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Sample records for chest-compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation

  1. Willingness to Perform Chest Compression Only in Witnessed Cardiac Arrest Victims versus Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesreen Yaghmour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Performing immediate bystander Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR is the most important factor that determines survival from cardiac arrest. Recommended mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver during CPR has led to lower rate of CPR performance in the population. Objectives: The present survey aimed to evaluate the willingness of nurses at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences for performing CPR versus chest-compression-only CPR. Patients and Methods: During a CPR course, we performed a survey on 25 nurses from Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. This survey included age and gender of the participants. In the first question, they were asked about their willingness to perform CPR with mouth to mouth breathing for witnessed cardiac arrest victims. In the second question, they were asked about their willingness to perform chest compression only for cardiac arrest victims. Results: Among the participating nurses, 96% were female with a mean age of 31 years. Only 40% were willing to perform CPR that requires mouth to mouth ventilation. On the other hand, 92% were willing to perform chest compression only without mouth to mouth ventilation. The mean age of the nurses who would do CPR was lower compared to those who would not. Conclusions: In this survey, we demonstrated that eliminating mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver could lead to markedly higher willingness to perform CPR for witnessed cardiac arrest victims in CPR trained nursing personnel. Our study is in agreement with other studies advocating that chest-compression-only CPR could lead to higher bystander resuscitation efforts.

  2. Are Canadians more willing to provide chest-compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)?-a nation-wide public survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheskes, Lindsay; Morrison, Laurie J; Beaton, Dorcas; Parsons, Janet; Dainty, Katie N

    2016-07-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves the likelihood of survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), yet it is performed in only 30% of cases. The 2010 guidelines promote chest-compression-only bystander CPR-a change intended to increase willingness to provide CPR. 1) To determine whether the Canadian general public is more willing to perform chest-compression-only CPR compared to traditional CPR; 2) to characterize public knowledge of OHCA; and 3) to identify barriers and facilitators to bystander CPR. A 32-item survey assessing resuscitation knowledge, and willingness to provide CPR were disseminated in five Canadian regions. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize response distribution. Logistic regression analysis was applied to assess shifts in intention to provide CPR. A total of 428 completed surveys were analysed. When presented with a scenario of being a bystander in an OHCA, a greater proportion of respondents were willing to provide chest-compression-only CPR compared to traditional CPR for all victims (61.5% v. 39.7%, pCPR, but this was mediated by victim characteristics, skill confidence, and recognition of a cardiac arrest.

  3. 2017 American Heart Association Focused Update on Pediatric Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality: An Update to the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Dianne L; de Caen, Allan R; Berger, Stuart; Samson, Ricardo A; Schexnayder, Stephen M; Joyner, Benny L; Bigham, Blair L; Niles, Dana E; Duff, Jonathan P; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Meaney, Peter A

    2018-01-02

    This focused update to the American Heart Association guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care follows the Pediatric Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation evidence review. It aligns with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation's continuous evidence review process, and updates are published when the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation completes a literature review based on new science. This update provides the evidence review and treatment recommendation for chest compression-only CPR versus CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths for children American Heart Association Guidelines Update for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care." Two demonstrated worse 30-day outcomes with chest compression-only CPR for children 1 through 18 years of age, whereas 2 studies documented no difference between chest compression-only CPR and CPR using chest compressions with rescue breaths. When the results were analyzed for infants American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Comparison of CPR quality and rescuer fatigue between standard 30:2 CPR and chest compression-only CPR: a randomized crossover manikin trial

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Jonghwan; Hwang, Seong Youn; Lee, Hui Jai; Park, Chang Je; Kim, Yong Joon; Son, Yeong Ju; Seo, Ji Seon; Kim, Jin Joo; Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, In Mo; Koh, Bong Yeun; Hong, Sung Gi

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to compare rescuer fatigue and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality between standard 30:2 CPR (ST-CPR) and chest compression only CPR (CO-CPR) performed for 8 minutes on a realistic manikin by following the 2010 CPR guidelines. Methods All 36 volunteers (laypersons; 18 men and 18 women) were randomized to ST-CPR or CO-CPR at first, and then each CPR technique was performed for 8 minutes with a 3-hour rest interval. We measured the mean blood pressure (MBP) of the vol...

  5. Chest compression-only CPR Is it the better choice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    The literature related to the rationale of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) including chest compressions combined with ventilations or compression-only CPR without ventilations is reviewed. The conclusion is that the evidence in favor of compression-only CPR is of limited level of evidence and

  6. CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    practice otv CPR. problems encountered and doctors" perception ol' each other's knowledge of resuscitation. The returned terms were analysed. ... tirst. respiration or heartbeat. (respiration). Normal heart rate (6090/ min). Normal respiratory rate (1220/ min). lHow do you recognise a patient needing CPR? 2'; to methods of ...

  7. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR): First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR): First aid Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR): First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a lifesaving technique useful in many emergencies, including heart attack or near ...

  8. Pitfalls with the "chest compression-only" approach: the challenge of an unusual cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid Bjørn

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chest compression-only (CC-only is now incorporated in the Norwegian protocol for dispatch guided CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation in cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac aetiology. We present a case that is unique and instructive as well as unusual. It reminds us of the challenges that face bystanders, dispatch centres and ambulance services when faced with possible cardiac arrest. This case report describes a 50 year old man in a rural community. He had suffered a heart attack 8 months previously, and was found unconscious with respiratory arrest in his garden one morning. Due to the proximity to the ambulance station, the paramedics were on the scene within three minutes. A chain-saw was lying beside him, but no external injuries were seen. The patient had no radial pulse, central cyanosis and respiratory gasps approximately every 30 seconds. Ventilation with bag and mask was given, and soon a femoral pulse could be palpated. Blood sugar was elevated and ECG (electrocardiogram was normal. GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale was 3. Upon arrival of the physician staffed air ambulance, further examination revealed bilateral miosis of the pupils and continuing bradypnoea. Naloxone was given with an immediate effect and the patient woke up. The patient denied intake of narcotics, but additional information from the dispatch centre revealed that he was hepatitis C positive. After a few hours, the patient admitted to have obtained a fentanyl transdermal patch from an acquaintance, having chewed it before falling unconscious. This case report shows the importance as well as the challenges of identifying a non-cardiac cause of possible cardiac arrest, and the value of providing causal therapy.

  9. Compression-only life support (COLS for cardiopulmonary resuscitation by layperson outside the hospital

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    Syed Moied Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR guidelines of compression-only life support (COLS for management of the victim with cardiopulmonary arrest in adults provide a stepwise algorithmic approach for optimal outcome of the victim outside the hospital by untrained laypersons. These guidelines have been developed to recommend practical, uniform and acceptable resuscitation algorithms across India. As resuscitation data of the Indian population are inadequate, these guidelines have been based on international literature. The guidelines have been recommended after discussion among Indian experts and the recommendations modified to ensure its practical applicability across the country. The COLS emphasises on early recognition of cardiac arrest and activation, early chest compression and early transfer to medical facility. The guidelines emphasise avoidance of any interruption of chest compression, and thus relies primarily on chest compression-only CPR by laypersons.

  10. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Advances

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    William Andrés Vargas-Garzón

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reanimation’s guidelines dictated by the AHA (American Heart Association are the strategies to follow in the envi­ronment of any situation related to cardiac arrest. They are acquired after the analysis of the evidence available in reani­mation from higher to less quality, with the best neurological results. After years of observation, was achieved to establish that survival behind cardiac arrest is, in general, low (6%, except that any witness starts immediately cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR maneuvers; therefore, medical personal must know and practice these maneuvers. With these con­siderations, it’s necessary to emphasize in the theoretical training of CPR of all health professional and laity, which guarantee everybody be prepared to emergency system ac­tivation, brain’s preservation and defibrillate to recuperate heart and life. The actual approach that combines compres­sions and defibrillation to closed chest, rescue ventilation and cardio tonic drugs. The guidelines AHA 2010, focus on increase frequency and quality of CPR. The objective of this article is to recognize various changes in these guidelines in cardiopulmonary reanimation and promote the continued education’s importance in reanimation.

  11. History of the evolution of cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    George Karlis; Marianna Korre

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is as old as humankind. The evolution of CPR represents a combination of human errors and discoveries. Aim: The present study reviews the most important moments in the history of resuscitation, from the first attempts of CPR until now. Methods: The methodology followed included bibliography research from review literature, through databases PubMed, Medline, Scopus, with the use of keywords, such as cardiopulmonary arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, hist...

  12. Ethical issues in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, S; Jørgensen, E O

    2001-08-01

    If patients are to benefit from resuscitation, they must regain consciousness and their full faculties. In recent years, we have acquired important information about the natural history of neurological recovery from circulatory arrest. There are clinical tests that predict the outcome, both during ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and in the period after restoration of spontaneous circulation. The ability to predict neurological outcome at this stage offers a basis for certain ethical considerations, which are not exclusively centered on "do-not-attempt-resuscitation" (DNAR)- orders. Instead of being forced to make the decision that "I do not want CPR", the patient should be able to decide that "I want resuscitation to be discontinued, if you predict that I will not recover to a level of neurological function that is acceptable to me". Ideally, no competent patient should be given a DNAR-status without his or her consent. No CPR-attempt should be stopped, and no treatment decision for a patient recovering after CPR should be taken without knowing and assessing the available information. Good ethical decision-making requires reliable facts, which we now know are available.

  13. Are We Successful in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    OpenAIRE

    Nalan Kozaci; Mehmet Oguzhan Ay; Ferhat Icme; Abdulkadir Akturk; Salim Satar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we aimed to determine the success rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation performed in the patients with diagnosis of cardiac arrest, and demographic characteristics of these patients. Material and Methods: The patients admitted to Adana Numune Education and Research Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine between 01.01.2011 and 31.12.2012, and who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation were included to this study planned as retrospectively. The age, gender, status o...

  14. Amitriptyline Intoxication Responded to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

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    Güldem Turan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The most severe effects in amitriptiline intoxications are related with central nervous system and cardiovascular system. Amitriptiline intoxication especially with high doses has severe cardiac effects and can result in cardiac arrest. Most favorable responses can be achieved with efficient and prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We wanted to present a case ingested high dose of amitriptiline for attempt to suicide and responded to prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  15. Are We Successful in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalan Kozaci

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this study, we aimed to determine the success rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation performed in the patients with diagnosis of cardiac arrest, and demographic characteristics of these patients. Material and Methods: The patients admitted to Adana Numune Education and Research Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine between 01.01.2011 and 31.12.2012, and who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation were included to this study planned as retrospectively. The age, gender, status of judicial cases, causes and time of cardiac arrest, first observed arrest rhythm, the diseases prior to the arrest, means of arrival to emergency department, duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the name of the hospitalised clinic, the existence of the operation, and outcome of the patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation in accordance with current advanced life support protocols were recorded in standard data entry form. Results: A total of 290 patients with completely accessible data were included to the study. Most of these patients were men (65.2%. The mean ages were 61 ± 19 years for men, 67 ± 14 years for women (p = 0.018. The most common diagnosis were ischemic heart disease and heart failure according to the analysis of the patient's medical history. 92 patients (31.7% were brought to the emergency department after death, and all of these patients were unsuccessful following to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 198 patients (68.3% had cardiac arrest in the emergency department, and we determined that cardiopulmonary resuscitation application of 102 patients were successful. The most common causes of cardiac arrest were myocardial infarction and heart failure. Mostly first observed rhythm in the monitor was asystole. The response rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia was higher. Most patients were hospitalised to the

  16. Conflicting perspectives compromising discussions on cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Groarke, J

    2010-09-01

    Healthcare professionals, patients and their relatives are expected to discuss resuscitation together. This study aims to identify the differences in the knowledge base and understanding of these parties. Questionnaires examining knowledge and opinion on resuscitation matters were completed during interviews of randomly selected doctors, nurses and the general public. 70% doctors, 24% nurses and 0% of a public group correctly estimated survival to discharge following in-hospital resuscitation attempts. Deficiencies were identified in doctor and nurse knowledge of ethics governing resuscitation decisions. Public opinion often conflicts with ethical guidelines. Public understanding of the nature of cardiopulmonary arrests and resuscitation attempts; and of the implications of a \\'Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR)\\' order is poor. Television medical dramas are the primary source of resuscitation knowledge. Deficiencies in healthcare professionals\\' knowledge of resuscitation ethics and outcomes may compromise resuscitation decisions. Educational initiatives to address deficiencies are necessary. Parties involved in discussion on resuscitation do not share the same knowledge base reducing the likelihood of meaningful discussion. Public misapprehensions surrounding resuscitation must be identified and corrected during discussion.

  17. Quality of survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, R.; de Haes, H. C.; Koster, R. W.; de Haan, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can be poor, in terms of life expectancy and quality of life. OBJECTIVES: To determine the impact of patient characteristics before, during, and after CPR on these outcomes, and to compare results of the quality-of-life assessment with

  18. Knowledge and practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), first described in 1960, is observed to be poorly applied in quality and quantum, hence, the need to ascertain its correct knowledge and practice among Nigerian doctors. Methods: Questionnaires were distributed randomly to doctors in a Nigerian University Teaching ...

  19. Acute posthypoxic myoclonus after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwes, Aline; van Poppelen, Daniel; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Kuiper, Michael A.; Zandstra, Durk F.; Weinstein, Henry C.; Tromp, Selma C.; Zandbergen, Eveline G. J.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Horn, Janneke

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acute posthypoxic myoclonus (PHM) can occur in patients admitted after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and is considered to have a poor prognosis. The origin can be cortical and/or subcortical and this might be an important determinant for treatment options and prognosis. The aim of

  20. Anaesthetists' knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation | Ogboli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) is an integral part of an anaesthetist's knowledge and practice. In Nigeria, these skills are taught mainly during medical school and postgraduate training. Objectives: The study sought to assess the knowledge of anaesthetists about CPR. Methodology: A structured ...

  1. Mitigating hyperventilation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolla, Dhimitri; Lewandowski, Tyler; Carlson, Jestin

    2016-03-01

    Although multiple airway management and ventilation strategies have been proposed during cardiac arrest, the ideal strategy is unknown. Current strategies call for advanced airways, such as endotracheal intubation and supraglottic airways. These may facilitate hyperventilation which is known to adversely affect cardiopulmonary physiology. We provide a summary of conceptual models linking hyperventilation to patient outcomes and identify methods for mitigating hyperventilation during cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Survival after in-hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    M Adib Hajbaghery; Akbari, H.; GA Mousavi

    2005-01-01

    Background: During recent years, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in hospital has received much attention. However, the survival rate of CPR in Iran’s hospitals is unknown. This study was designed to evaluate outcome of in-hospital CPR in Kashan. Methods: A longitudinal case registry study was conducted on all cases of in-hospital CPR during 6 months at 2002. Necessary data including; age, sex, underlying disease, working shift, time from cardiac arrest until initiating of CPR and unt...

  3. Survival after in-hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

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    M Adib Hajbaghery

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: During recent years, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in hospital has received much attention. However, the survival rate of CPR in Iran’s hospitals is unknown. This study was designed to evaluate outcome of in-hospital CPR in Kashan. Methods: A longitudinal case registry study was conducted on all cases of in-hospital CPR during 6 months at 2002. Necessary data including; age, sex, underlying disease, working shift, time from cardiac arrest until initiating of CPR and until defibrillation, duration and result of CPR, frequency of tracheal intubations and time served for it were collected in a checklist. Results: In six months study, 206 cases of cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempted. The survival rate was similar for both sexes. Short-term survival observed in19.9% of cases and only 5.3% survived to discharge. Conclusions: Duration of CPR, time of the first defibrillation, response time and the location of cardiac arrest are the key predictors of survival to hospital discharge and in-hospital CPR strategies require improvement. This study promotes a national study on post CPR survival for accurate data on our performance in attention to chain of survival. KeyWords: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR, Survival rate, Iran

  4. Liver laceration related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation

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    Halil Beydilli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is recognized as a medical procedure performed to maintain vital functions of a person whose cardiac and respiratory functions have stopped. Chest compression is the most essential component of CPR and it is performed on the lower half of the sternum. During CPR, many complications may occur because of chest compressions, especially chest injuries including sternum and rib fractures. Rarely tracheal injury, rupture of the stomach, or liver or spleen injury may also occur as complications.In this study, we present two cases of liver injury caused by resuscitation. With this article, we want to emphasize the importance of making correct chest compressions. Keywords: Resuscitation complications, Emergency service, Liver laceration, Autopsy

  5. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: how far have we come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, John J; Blackman, Virginia Schmied

    2007-01-01

    In the 43 years since it was first described, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has grown from an obscure medical theory to a basic first aid skill taught to adults and is now the near-universal technique used in CPR instruction. This article provides insight into the history of CPR. We explore the phenomenon of sudden cardiac arrest, the historical roots of CPR, current practice data and recommendations, and the society's role in the development of this life-saving technique. We conclude with a review of CPR's economic impact on the healthcare system and the ethical and policy issues surrounding CPR.

  6. Some Medicolegal Aspects of the Russian Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Kuksinsky

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to analyze the Russian legislation to identify the medicolegal aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which are most significant for an intensive care anesthesiologist. Statutory acts concerning human health care, including those pertinent to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and those providing for the responsibility of medical workers in some cases were analyzed. A number of discrepancies in various legal acts concerning human death verification and resuscitative measures were identified. The analysis has revealed the aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which are, from the point of view of legislation, most important for the physician.

  7. Advancements in cardiopulmonary resuscitation: increasing circulation and improving survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Philip T; Maxwell, Robert A

    2009-05-01

    Clinicians, as well as lay people, have realized the importance of resuscitative maneuvers throughout recorded history. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation has evolved from a relatively primitive technique to one now dictated by data from evidence based medicine. Recent advancements include changes in life support guidelines, the development of an impedance threshold device, and the initiation of therapeutic hypothermia. We can only expect continued advancements in cardiopulmonary resuscitation through new technology with resultant improved outcomes.

  8. Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Ojaghi Haghighi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is a lifesaving technique useful in the prevention of death or delaying it in a person with cardiac arrest. In this regard, demographic information about patients who need CPR is vital. Methods: In this cross-sectional study patients with cardiopulmonary arrest or arrhythmias admitted to Imam Reza and Sina educational hospitals of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences from 22 December 2013 to 21 December 2014 entered the study. Demographic information such as age, sex, cardiopulmonary resuscitation time, the place of cardiopulmonary arrest (outside or inside the hospital, the duration of resuscitation process, success or failure of the resuscitation process and the mechanism of cardiopulmonary arrest were obtained. Results: From a total of 354 cases of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 281 cases (79% were unsuccessful and 73 cases (21% were successful. The average age of patients was 59 ± 22 years. The average time of the resuscitation process was 31 ± 12 minutes. There was a significant difference between the mean of age and resuscitation time in patients who had experienced successful or unsuccessful resuscitation (P = 0.0001. There was a significant relationship between sex and the success rate of resuscitation (P = 0.0001. In addition, a significant relationship between the success of the resuscitation operation and the ward of resuscitation was observed (P = 0.0001. Conclusion: The most common mechanism leading to cardiopulmonary arrest among patients was asystole. In this regard, no significant difference was observed between successful and unsuccessful resuscitation processes. It was also observed that the success of resuscitation from 8 am to 4 pm was more than any other time period.

  9. Optimal oxygenation during and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumar, Robert W

    2011-06-01

    Reversal of tissue hypoxia, particularly in the heart and brain, is a fundamental goal of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that hyperoxia, especially after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), may worsen outcomes. The purpose of this review is to describe the current evidence supporting the concept of controlled oxygenation during and after cardiac arrest. Animal studies over the last two decades have built a compelling case that arterial hyperoxemia during the first hour after ROSC causes increased oxidative damage, increased neuronal death, and worse neurologic function. However, human data are limited. The only prospective randomized clinical trial comparing different inspired oxygen concentrations in post-cardiac arrest patients was underpowered to detect a difference in survival or neurologic outcome. More recently a retrospective analysis of data from a multicenter registry found that initial arterial hyperoxemia (paO2 ≥ 300 mmHg) was associated with increased mortality and worse functional outcome in patients admitted to the ICU after cardiac arrest. The existing evidence, though limited, has contributed to new guidelines for oxygen therapy in patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest. The benefit of supplemental oxygen during cardiopulmonary resuscitation remains uncertain. However, in patients who achieve ROSC after cardiac arrest, available evidence supports adjusting inspired oxygen content to avoid arterial hyperoxemia while providing adequate arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation. This strategy is likely to be most effective when initiated as soon as possible after ROSC and appears to be most important during the first hour. Definitive clinical trials are needed to determine the ultimate impact on outcome.

  10. Immediate defibrillation or defibrillation after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Soichi; Tanabe, Seizan; Ogawa, Toshio; Akahane, Manabu; Yasunaga, Hideo; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Matsumoto, Shinya; Imamura, Tomoaki

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether short cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by emergency medical services before defibrillation (CPR first) has a better outcome than immediate defibrillation followed by CPR (shock first) in patients with ventricular fibrillation/pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VF/pulseless VT) out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We analyzed a national database between 2006 and 2008, and included patients aged 18 years or more who had witnessed cardiac arrests and whose first recorded rhythm was VF/pulseless VT. Those study subjects were divided into five groups in accordance with the CPR/defibrillation intervention sequence. Each group was subdivided into call-to-response intervals of attempted defibrillation did not present a better outcome compared with shock first as measured by either one-month survival or neurologically favorable one-month survival, after adjusting for potential confounders. Further studies are required to determine whether CPR first has an advantage over shock first.

  11. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation-from the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, S; Chang, Z Y; Lau, Y H; Wong, Yky; Ong, Cym

    2017-05-01

    With increasing emphasis on patient autonomy, patients are encouraged to be more involved in end-of-life issues, including the use of extraordinary efforts to prolong their lives. Being able to make anticipatory decisions is seen to promote autonomy, empower patients and optimise patient care. To facilitate shared decision-making, patients need to have a clear and accurate understanding of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This study aims to understand the knowledge and perspectives of the local community regarding resuscitation options and end-of-life decision-making and to explore ways to improve the quality of end-of-life discussions. An interviewer-administered survey was conducted with a prospectively recruited group of surgical patients admitted postoperatively to the day surgery ward of a single tertiary institution in Singapore from April to May 2015. The survey, modelled after two validated questionnaires, measured patients' knowledge, attitudes and preferences regarding CPR in a series of 18 questions. Fifty-one out of 67 (76.1%) patients completed the survey. Results indicated that 80.4% (n=41) of participants correctly understood the purpose of CPR, but 64.7% (n=33) did not know of any possible complications of CPR. Less than half (n=21, 41.2%) of participants had thought about life support measures they wanted for themselves. Most of the participants agreed that they should personally be involved in making end-of-life decisions (n=44, 86.3%). Many patients had a poor knowledge of CPR and other resuscitation measures and the majority overestimated the success rate of CPR. However, a majority were receptive to improving their knowledge and keen to discuss end-of-life issues with physicians.

  12. In-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: prearrest morbidity and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, R.; Koster, R. W.; de Haan, R. J.; Oosting, H.; van der Wouw, P. A.; Lampe-Schoenmaeckers, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Considerations about the application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) should include the expected probability of survival. The survival probability after CPR may be more accurately estimated by the occurrence in time of the prearrest morbidity of patients. OBJECTIVE: To identify

  13. The Level Of Knowlege Guidelines Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation For Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Lukešová, Ludmila

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to determine the level of theoretical knowledge of the procedures of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of selected non-medical staff members in VFN in Prague. The work is subdivided into a theoretical and a practical part. In the first part I comment on the history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the basic and widespread vital support to adults and children and the didactics of CPR. In the second- practical part I compare the theoretical knowledge of CPR of selected n...

  14. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: from the beginning to the present day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristagno, Giuseppe; Tang, Wanchun; Weil, Max Harry

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac arrest represents a dramatic event that can occur suddenly and often without premonitory signs, characterized by sudden loss of consciousness and breathing after cardiac output ceases and both coronary and cerebral blood flows stop. Restarting of the blood flow by cardiopulmonary resuscitation potentially re-establishes some cardiac output and organ blood flows. This article summarizes the major events that encompass the history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, beginning with ancient history and evolving into the current American Heart Association's commitment to save hearts.

  15. [CPR--guidelines 2000. New international guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, H W

    2001-03-01

    The "Guidelines 2000 for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. An International Consensus an Science" are the first true international CPR guidelines in the history of resuscitation medicine. Experts from major international resuscitation organizations (International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, ILCOR) achieved a consensus of recommendations which had to pass a rigorous review procedure applying the tools of evidence-based medicine: all proposed guidelines or guideline changes had to be based on critically appraised pieces of evidence which had to be integrated into a final class of recommendations. The most important changes compared to previous recommendations from either the European Resuscitation Council or the American Heart Association are presented and commented upon.

  16. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: state of the art in 2011

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... The science of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is dynamic and ever changing as new evidence continuously comes to light. Modern CPR dates back to 1966, when the first consensus statement was released. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation. (ILCOR) was founded in 1992.

  17. Complications of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in non-traumatic cases and factors affecting complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit Kaldırım

    2016-09-01

    It has been shown that during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, severe injuries can occur due to thoracic compression. Only a positive correlation with the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was found in our study.

  18. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: biomedical and biophysical analysis (Chapter XXX)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noordergraaf, G.J; Ottesen, Johnny T.; Scheffer, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of the human in caring for others is reflected in the development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Superstition, divine intervention and finally science have contributed to the development of a technique which may allow any person to save another’s life. Fully 50% of the firs...

  19. Knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of clinicians at a South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to assess clinicians' knowledge about evaluating possible cardiac arrest patients and recognising cardiac arrest, to assess clinicians' knowledge about appropriate decisions and actions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and to determine which advanced life support ...

  20. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Araujo G. Ferreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify literature evidences related to actions to promote family's presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children hospitalized in pediatric and neonatal critical care units. Data sources : Integrative literature review in PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases, from 2002 to 2012, with the following inclusion criteria: research article in Medicine, or Nursing, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, using the keywords "family", "invasive procedures", "cardiopulmonary resuscitation", "health staff", and "Pediatrics". Articles that did not refer to the presence of the family in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures were excluded. Therefore, 15 articles were analyzed. Data synthesis : Most articles were published in the United States (80%, in Medicine and Nursing (46%, and were surveys (72% with healthcare team members (67% as participants. From the critical analysis, four themes related to the actions to promote family's presence in invasive procedures and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were obtained: a to develop a sensitizing program for healthcare team; b to educate the healthcare team to include the family in these circumstances; c to develop a written institutional policy; d to ensure the attendance of family's needs. Conclusions: Researches on these issues must be encouraged in order to help healthcare team to modify their practice, implementing the principles of the Patient and Family Centered Care model, especially during critical episodes.

  1. Retention of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills in Nigerian Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective: For effective bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), retention of CPR skills after the training is central. The objective of this study was to find out how much of the CPR skills a group of Nigerian secondary school students would retain six weeks after their first exposure to the conventional CPR training. Materials…

  2. A National Survey of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training for the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kenneth H.; Tomasetti, James A.

    1983-01-01

    Responses to a national survey by regional directors of the American Heart Association, American National Red Cross, and continuing education programs for the deaf indicated that little is done to train the deaf in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and that communication barriers and inadequate training resources are major reasons. (Author)

  3. Teamwork and Leadership in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hunziker, Sabina; Johansson, Anna C; Tschan, Franziska; Semmer, Norbert K; Rock, Laura; Howell, Michael D; Marsch, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    .... Resuscitation teams often deviate from algorithms of CPR. Emerging evidence suggests that in addition to technical skills of individual rescuers, human factors such as teamwork and leadership affect adherence to algorithms and hence the outcome of CPR...

  4. Assessment of Knowledge of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obstetricians are usually well prepared for and knowledgeable about the challenges of the birthing process. Cardiac arrest during pregnancy is uncommon, and many never encounter it throughout their practice. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of maternal cardiopulmonary ...

  5. Outcome of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the demographic characteristics of patients Who suffered cardiac arrest in our ICUs and to identify thOse factors influencing outcome after resuscitation following cardiac arrest. We reviewed the records of all patients who underwent CPR in the two ICUs at the ...

  6. Basic cardiopulmonary life support (BCLS for cardiopulmonary resuscitation by trained paramedics and medics outside the hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiopulmonary resuscitation guideline of Basic Cardiopulmonary Life Support (BCLS for management of adult victims with cardiopulmonary arrest outside the hospital provides an algorithmic stepwise approach for optimal outcome of the victims by trained medics and paramedics. This guideline has been developed considering the need to have a universally acceptable practice guideline for India and keeping in mind the infrastructural limitations of some areas of the country. This guideline is based on evidence elicited in the international and national literature. In the absence of data from Indian population, the excerpts have been taken from international data, discussed with Indian experts and thereafter modified to make them practically applicable across India. The optimal outcome for a victim with cardiopulmonary arrest would depend on core links of early recognition and activation; early high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, early defibrillation and early transfer to medical facility. These links are elaborated in a stepwise manner in the BCLS algorithm. The BCLS also emphasise on quality check for various steps of resuscitation.

  7. Interhospital Transport of Children Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Practical and Ethical Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noje, Corina; Fishe, Jennifer N; Costabile, Philomena M; Klein, Bruce L; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Pronovost, Peter J

    2017-10-01

    To discuss risks and benefits of interhospital transport of children in cardiac arrest undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Narrative review. Not applicable. Transporting children in cardiac arrest with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation between hospitals is potentially lifesaving if it enables access to resources such as extracorporeal support, but may risk transport personnel safety. Research is needed to optimize outcomes of patients transported with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and reduce risks to the staff caring for them.

  8. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures: practices of critical care and emergency nurses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MacLean, Susan L; Guzzetta, Cathie E; White, Cheri; Fontaine, Dorrie; Eichhorn, Dezra J; Meyers, Theresa A; Désy, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Increasingly, patients' families are remaining with them during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures, but this practice remains controversial and little is known about the practices...

  9. Reversible myocardial dysfunction after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; Aguayo de Hoyos, Eduardo; Ruiz-Navarro, Silvia; Díaz-Castellanos, Miguel Angel; Rucabado-Aguilar, Luis; Gómez-Jiménez, Francisco Javier; Martínez-Escobar, Sergio; Moreno, Rafael Melgares; Fierro-Rosón, Javier

    2005-08-01

    Myocardial stunning frequently has been described in patients with an acute coronary syndrome. Recently, it has also been described in critically ill patients without ischaemic heart disease. It is possible that the most severe form of any syndrome, leading to cardio-respiratory arrest, may cause myocardial stunning. Myocardial stunning appears to have been demonstrated in experimental studies, though this phenomenon has not been sufficiently studied in human models. The aim of the present work has been to study and describe the possible development of myocardial dysfunction in patients resuscitated after cardio-respiratory arrest, in the absence of acute or previous coronary artery disease. Descriptive study of a case series. The intensive care unit (ICU) of a provincial hospital. The study period was from April 1999 to June 2001. All patients admitted to the ICU with critical, non-coronary artery pathology, with no past history of cardiac disease, and those who were resuscitated after cardio-respiratory arrest, were included in the study. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography was used to assess left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and disturbances of segmental contractility. This study was carried out within the first 24h after admission, during the first week, during the second or third week, after 1 month, and between 3 and 6 months. Twenty-nine patients with a median age of 65 years (range 24--76) were included in the study. Twelve patients died. Twenty patients developed myocardial dysfunction; the initial LVEF in these patients was 0.28 (0.12--0.51), showing improvement over time in the patients who survived. All of these patients presented disturbances of segmental contractility which also became normal over time. After successful CPR, reversible myocardial dysfunction, consisting of systolic myocardial dysfunction and disturbances of segmental contractility, may occur.

  10. [Need of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in the sport of soccer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Martín, María Dolores; Martínez-Montilla, José Manuel; Amador-Marín, Bárbara

    2016-01-01

    In Spain there are around 25,000 cardiac arrests, many of them in the presence of non-medical personnel. In less than 25% of the cardio-respiratory arrests witnessed, witnesses began cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Soccer is a contact sport with multiple physical characteristics and requirements which pushes your body to the limit, thus leading to a higher chance of developing multiple lesions, including cardio-respiratory arrest. Therefore, our goal was to know the actual situation on training in basic life support in soccer. A literature review was performed on different databases both national (IME, CUIDEN, ENCUENTR@, ENFERMERÍA AL DÍA, ISOC) and international (PUBMED, SCOPUS, CINAHL), with different MESH descriptors related to the topic. A total of 395 references were identified. 17 studies were selected; 8 of them had like main theme cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the remaining 9 spoke on the use of semi-automatic defibrillators. There is a lack of research on this topic in soccer. This strikes our attention because in this area there could be situations requiring immediate rescue action. Therefore, we emphasize the importance of early cardio-respiratory resuscitation because training in basic life support and semi-automatic defibrillators in soccer are fundamental. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Does Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Cause Rib Fractures in Children? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Sabine; Mann, Mala; John, Nia; Ellaway, Bev; Sibert, Jo R.; Kemp, Alison M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: There is a diagnostic dilemma when a child presents with rib fractures after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) where child abuse is suspected as the cause of collapse. We have performed a systematic review to establish the evidence base for the following questions: (i) Does cardiopulmonary resuscitation cause rib fractures in…

  12. Retrospective investigation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcome in 146 exotic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuma, Mamoru; Kondo, Hirotaka; Ono, Sadaharu; Murakami, Akiyoshi; Harada, Tomoko; Sano, Tadashi

    2017-09-29

    The outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) were retrospectively evaluated in 146 exotic animals including 20 pet birds, 47 rabbits, 34 hamsters, 18 ferrets, 7 turtles and 20 other small mammals in cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) at presentation or during hospitalization at an animal clinic. The rates of return of spontaneous circulation, survival after CPR and discharge were 9.3, 2.3 and 1.2%, respectively. The mean success rate of CPR in animals included in this study was lower than those previously reported in dogs and cats. This might have been because of the challenges in effective chest compression, airway management and monitoring as well as establishment of intravenous catheterization route in exotic animals.

  13. Bystander initiated actions in out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: results from the Amsterdam Resuscitation Study (ARRESUST)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalewijn, R. A.; Tijssen, J. G.; Koster, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the functioning of the first two links of the chain of survival: 'access' and 'basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)'. In a prospective study, all bystander witnessed circulatory arrests resuscitated by emergency medical service (EMS) personnel, were

  14. Can a flowchart improve the quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, B; Ziegler, M; Hüpfl, M; Fleischhackl, R; Krychtiuk, K A; Schebesta, K

    2013-07-01

    Since the introduction of basic life support in the 1950s, on-going efforts have been made to improve the quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Even though bystander-CPR can increase the chance of survival almost fourfold, the rates of bystander initiated CPR have remained low and rarely exceed 20%. Lack of confidence and fear of committing mistakes are reasons why helpers refrain from initiating CPR. The authors tested the hypothesis that quality and confidence of bystander-CPR can be increased by supplying lay helpers with a basic life support flowchart when commencing CPR, in a simulated resuscitation model. After giving written informed consent, 83 medically untrained laypersons were randomised to perform basic life support for 300s with or without a supportive flowchart. The primary outcome parameter was hands-off time (HOT). Furthermore, the participants' confidence in their actions on a 10-point Likert-like scale and time-to-chest compressions were assessed. Overall HOT was 147±30 s (flowchart) vs. 169±55 s (non-flowchart), p=0.024. Time to chest compressions was significantly longer in the flowchart group (60±24 s vs. 23±18 s, p<0.0001). Participants in the flowchart group were significantly more confident when performing BLS than the non-flowchart counterparts (7±2 vs. 5±2, p=0.0009). A chart provided at the beginning of resuscitation attempts improves quality of CPR significantly by decreasing HOT and increasing the participants' confidence when performing CPR. As reducing HOT is associated with improved outcome and positively impacting the helpers' confidence is one of the main obstacles to initiate CPR for lay helpers, charts could be utilised as simple measure to improve outcome in cardiopulmonary arrest. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation knowledge and attitude among general dentists in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkandari, Sarah A; Alyahya, Lolwa; Abdulwahab, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Dentists as health care providers should maintain a competence in resuscitation. This cannot be overemphasized by the fact that the population in our country is living longer with an increasing proportion of medically compromised persons in the general population. This preliminary study aimed to assess the knowledge and attitude of general dentists towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). A cross-sectional study was carried out among 250 licensed general dental practitioners working in ministry of health. Data were obtained through electronic self-administered questionnaire consisting of demographic data of general dentists, and their experience, attitude and knowledge about CPR based on the 2010 American Heart Association guidelines update for CPR. Totally 208 general dentists took part in the present study giving a response rate of 83.2%. Only 36% of the participants demonstrated high knowledge on CPR, while 64% demonstrated low knowledge. Participants' age, gender, nationality, years of experience, career hierarchy, and formal CPR training were associated significantly with CPR knowledge. Almost all the participants (99%) felt that dentists needed to be competent in basic resuscitation skills and showed a positive attitude towards attending continuing dental educational programs on CPR. This study showed that majority of general dental practitioners in Kuwait had inadequate knowledge on CPR. It was also found that CPR training significantly influenced the CPR knowledge of the participants. Therefore, training courses on CPR should be regularly provided to general dentists in the country.

  16. Factors Influencing the Success Rate of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisyah Amanda Hanif

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is a series of actions performed on cardiac arrest patients. Not all patients receiving CPR can survive. The outcome of CPR is influenced by several factors. This study was conducted to determine the success rate of CPR and the factors influencing it in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital in 2013. Methods: This study was conducted by using 168 patient medical records who underwent CPR and met the inclusion criteria in the Resuscitation Room of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital from January to December 2013. The collected data consisted of age, gender, pre-arrest diagnosis, initial rhythm, response time and clinical outcome of CPR. The results were expressed in frequencies and percentage. The data were analyzed using the chi-square test. Results: The Success rate of CPR was 15.5%. The success rate was higher in patients with cardiac prearrest diagnoses (8.33%, p=0.024. The most common initial rhythm was unshockable rhythms (83.92%, yet patients with shockable heart rhythms had higher success rates (40.74%, p<0.001. All of the surviving patients had response time within the first minute from cardiac arrest. Conclusions: Success rate of CPR in the resuscitation room of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital during 2013 is still low. The factors influencing the survival rate are the pre-arrest diagnosis and initial heart rhythm.

  17. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibition improves macrocirculation and microcirculation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junyuan; Li, Chunsheng; Yuan, Wei

    2016-02-01

    This study is to clarify whether sildenafil, which is a selective inhibitor of the isoform 5 of the enzyme phosphodiesterase, improves macrocirculation or/and microcirculation during ventricular fibrillation (VF) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) so as to improve outcomes of resuscitation. Sixteen female pigs were used. After anesthesia, the abdominal cavity was opened to observe the mesenteric microcirculation. Following the guidelines, we determined microvascular flow index, perfused vessel density and proportion of perfused vessels both for large(diameter >20 μm)and small (diameter defibrillation was attempted. Compared with saline, sildenafil reduced the shocks and duration of CPR (all P .05). Microvascular flow index in both large and small microvessels were closely correlated to each other (r = 0.91, P < .01), and to CPP during CPR ([r = .88, P < .01] and [r = .70, P < .05], respectively). Sildenafil increases the success of resuscitation through improving macrocirculation and microcirculation during VF and CPR. There is a close relationship between microvascular flow and CPP during CPR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comprehensive cardiopulmonary life support (CCLS for cardiopulmonary resuscitation by trained paramedics and medics inside the hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR guideline of comprehensive cardiopulmonary life support (CCLS for management of the patient with cardiopulmonary arrest in adults provides an algorithmic step-wise approach for optimal outcome of the patient inside the hospital by trained medics and paramedics. This guideline has been developed considering the infrastructure of healthcare delivery system in India. This is based on evidence in the international and national literature. In the absence of data from the Indian population, the extrapolation has been made from international data, discussed with Indian experts and modified accordingly to ensure their applicability in India. The CCLS guideline emphasise the need to recognise patients at risk for cardiac arrest and their timely management before a cardiac arrest occurs. The basic components of CPR include chest compressions for blood circulation; airway maintenance to ensure airway patency; lung ventilation to enable oxygenation and defibrillation to convert a pathologic 'shockable' cardiac rhythm to one capable to maintaining effective blood circulation. CCLS emphasises incorporation of airway management, drugs, and identification of the cause of arrest and its correction, while chest compression and ventilation are ongoing. It also emphasises the value of organised team approach and optimal post-resuscitation care.

  19. An institutionwide approach to redesigning management of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lighthall, Geoffrey K; Mayette, Michael; Harrison, T Kyle

    2013-04-01

    Despite widespread training in basic life support (BLS) and advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) among hospital personnel, the likelihood of survival from in-hospital cardiac arrests remains low. In 2006 a university-affiliated tertiary medical center initiated a cardiopulmonary (CPR) resuscitation redesign project. REDESIGNING THE HOSPITAL'S RESUSCITATION SYSTEM: The CPR Committee developed the interventions on the basis of a large-scale view of the process of delivering BLS and ACLS, identification of key decision nodes and actions, and compartmentalization of specific functions. It was proposed that arrest management follow a steady progression in a two-layer scheme from BLS to ACLS. Handouts describing team structure and specific roles were given to all code team providers and house staff at the start of their month-long rotations. To further increase role clarity and team organization, daily morning and evening meetings of the arrest team were instituted. Site-specific BLS training, on-site ACLS refresher training, and defibrillator training were initiated. Project elements also included use of unannounced mock codes to provide system oversight; preparation and distribution of cognitive aids (printed algorithms, dosing guides, and other checklists to ensure compliance with ACLS protocols), identification of patients who may be unstable or a source of concern, event review and analysis of arrests and other critical events, and a CPR website. A mature hospital-based resuscitation system should include definition of arrest trends and resuscitation needs, development of local methods for approaching the arresting patient, an emphasis on prevention, establishment of training programs tailored to meet specific hospital needs, system examination and oversight, and administrative processes that maximize interaction between all components.

  20. Subcapsular liver haematoma after cardiopulmonary resuscitation by untrained personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsuez, Jean-Jacques; Charniot, Jean-Christophe; Veilhan, Luc Antoine; Mougué, Ferdinand; Bellin, Marie-France; Boissonnas, Alain

    2007-05-01

    Although early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is associated with increased survival of sudden cardiac arrest victims, it may also result in miscellaneous injuries. A 25-year-old inebriated man rescued from drowning in a swimming pool was apnoeic and pulseless after being pulled out of the water. Successful CPR was provided by untrained bystanders, including abdominal thrusts thought to remove water from the airways and chest compressions to provide haemodynamic support. As the patient progressively improved during his subsequent hospital stay, he complained of right upper abdominal and thoracic pain. A computed tomographic scan showed a 11 cm subcapsular haematoma contiguous to the right hepatic lobe. A favourable outcome was obtained after conservative, non-operative treatment. Subcapsular haematoma of the liver is a potentially life threatening complication that warrants consideration in survivors of cardiac arrest who have received closed chest compression and/or abdominal thrusts.

  1. Model based optimization of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Ali; Berg, Robert A; Nadkarni, Vinay; Nataraj, C

    2012-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the optimization of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) procedure, which plays a critical rule in saving the life of patients suffering from cardiac arrest. In this paper, we define the performance index for optimization using the oxygen delivery. A model developed earlier is used to calculate the oxygen delivery through CPR. The free parameters of this model which depend on the rescuer performance are ventilation time, compression speed, tidal volume, and fraction of oxygen in the inspired air. Two different optimization problems are carried out. First, a global optimization is implemented to discover the best values of the free parameters which maximize the oxygen delivery. In addition to this, a sequential optimization scheme is explored which uses a two step optimization in each CPR sequence to maximize the oxygen delivery. Results show that the sequential optimization procedure will enhance the performance of the CPR significantly.

  2. Implementing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training Programs in High Schools: Iowa's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyme, Derek B; Atkins, Dianne L

    2017-02-01

    To understand perceived barriers to providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) education, implementation processes, and practices in high schools. Iowa has required CPR as a graduation requirement since 2011 as an unfunded mandate. A cross-sectional study was performed through multiple choice surveys sent to Iowa high schools to collect data about school demographics, details of CPR programs, cost, logistics, and barriers to implementation, as well as automated external defibrillator training and availability. Eighty-four schools responded (26%), with the most frequently reported school size of 100-500 students and faculty size of 25-50. When the law took effect, 51% of schools had training programs already in place; at the time of the study, 96% had successfully implemented CPR training. Perceived barriers to implementation were staffing, time commitment, equipment availability, and cost. The average estimated startup cost was CPR training programs can be implemented with reasonable resource and time allocations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Certified Basic Life Support Instructors Assess Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills Poorly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla; Rasmussen, Stinne E; Kristensen, Mette Amalie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves survival from cardiac arrest. During basic life support (BLS) training, instructors assess CPR skills to enhance learning outcome. Emergency department staff and senior residents have been shown to assess chest compression...... out of 3 CPR cycles with 30±2 chest compressions at a depth of 50-60mm and rate of 100-120 min-1. Correct rescue breathing was defined as ≥50% efficient breaths in 3 CPR cycles with visible, but not excessive, manikin’s chest raise (for instructors) or a volume of 500-600 mL (manikin data).Results: We...... of CPR skills may be beneficial to ensure high-quality learning outcome.Author Disclosures: C. Hansen: None. S.E. Rasmussen: None. M.A. Nebsbjerg: None. M. Stærk: None. B. Løfgren: None....

  4. Manual versus mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation. An experimental study in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wohlfart Björn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimal manual closed chest compressions are difficult to give. A mechanical compression/decompression device, named LUCAS, is programmed to give compression according to the latest international guidelines (2005 for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. The aim of the present study was to compare manual CPR with LUCAS-CPR. Methods 30 kg pigs were anesthetized and intubated. After a base-line period and five minutes of ventricular fibrillation, manual CPR (n = 8 or LUCAS-CPR (n = 8 was started and run for 20 minutes. Professional paramedics gave manual chest compression's alternating in 2-minute periods. Ventilation, one breath for each 10 compressions, was given to all animals. Defibrillation and, if needed, adrenaline were given to obtain a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Results The mean coronary perfusion pressure was significantly (p Conclusions LUCAS-CPR gave significantly higher coronary perfusion pressure and significantly fewer rib fractures than manual CPR in this porcine model.

  5. A video to improve patient and surrogate understanding of cardiopulmonary resuscitation choices in the ICU: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael E; Krupa, Artur; Hinds, Richard F; Litell, John M; Swetz, Keith M; Akhoundi, Abbasali; Kashyap, Rahul; Gajic, Ognjen; Kashani, Kianoush

    2015-03-01

    To determine if a video depicting cardiopulmonary resuscitation and resuscitation preference options would improve knowledge and decision making among patients and surrogates in the ICU. Randomized, unblinded trial. Single medical ICU. Patients and surrogate decision makers in the ICU. The usual care group received a standard pamphlet about cardiopulmonary resuscitation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation preference options plus routine code status discussions with clinicians. The video group received usual care plus an 8-minute video that depicted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, showed a simulated hospital code, and explained resuscitation preference options. One hundred three patients and surrogates were randomized to usual care. One hundred five patients and surrogates were randomized to video plus usual care. Median total knowledge scores (0-15 points possible for correct answers) in the video group were 13 compared with 10 in the usual care group, p value of less than 0.0001. Video group participants had higher rates of understanding the purpose of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and resuscitation options and terminology and could correctly name components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. No statistically significant differences in documented resuscitation preferences following the interventions were found between the two groups, although the trial was underpowered to detect such differences. A majority of participants felt that the video was helpful in cardiopulmonary resuscitation decision making (98%) and would recommend the video to others (99%). A video depicting cardiopulmonary resuscitation and explaining resuscitation preference options was associated with improved knowledge of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation options and cardiopulmonary resuscitation terminology among patients and surrogate decision makers in the ICU, compared with receiving a pamphlet on cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Patients and surrogates found the video helpful in decision

  6. Do Radiologists Want/Need Training in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schellhammer, F. [St. Katharinen Hospital, Frechen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2003-03-01

    Purpose: Prompt and effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) decreases morbidity and mortality following cardiopulmonary arrest. Radiologists are frequently confronted with severely ill patients, who may deteriorate at any time. Furthermore, they have to be aware of life-threatening reactions towards contrast media. This study was designed to assess experience and self-estimation of German-speaking radiologists in CPR and cardiac defibrillation (CD). Material and Methods: 650 German-speaking radiologists were audited by a specially designed questionnaire, which was sent via e-mail. The answers were expected to be re-mailed within a 2-month period. Results: The response rate was 12.6%. 72.8% of the responders had performed at least 1 CPR (range 9.5 {+-} 13.1) and 37% at least 1 CD. 67.9% had had opportunities to attend training courses, which had been utilized by 41.8% of them. The last training of the responders was more than 2 years ago in 69.2% and more than 5 years ago in 37%. Of all responders 75.6% expressed the need for further education. Conclusion: The small response rate indicates the small importance of CPR in the subpopulation surveyed. The vast majority of the responders, however, showed interest in basic and advanced life support and advocated regular updates. It seems reasonable that radiological Dept. themselves should organize courses in order to cope with their specific situations.

  7. Withdrawing Versus not Offering Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Is There a Difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon JW Oczkowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conflict between substitute decision makers (SDMs and health care providers in the intensive care unit is commonly related to goals of treatment at the end of life. Based on recent court decisions, even medical consensus that ongoing treatment is not clinically indicated cannot justify withdrawal of mechanical ventilation without consent from the SDM. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, similar to mechanical ventilation, is a life-sustaining therapy that can result in disagreement between SDMs and clinicians. In contrast to mechanical ventilation, in cases for which CPR is judged by the medical team to not be clinically indicated, there is no explicit or case law in Canada that dictates that withholding/not offering of CPR requires the consent of SDMs. In such cases, physicians can ethically and legally not offer CPR, even against SDM or patient wishes. To ensure that nonclinically indicated CPR is not inappropriately performed, hospitals should consider developing ‘scope of treatment’ forms that make it clear that even if CPR is desired, the individual components of resuscitation to be offered, if any, will be dictated by the medical team’s clinical assessment.

  8. Rib fractures in infants due to cardiopulmonary resuscitation efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinak, David

    2007-06-01

    Although it is widely known that adults may sustain fractures of the anterior and/or lateral aspects of the ribs due to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) efforts, relatively little is written about the generation of CPR-related rib fractures in the infant age range. In a series of 70 consecutive autopsies in infants ranging in age from 2 weeks to 8 months, with no history or indications of injury, the parietal pleura of the thoracic cage was stripped and the ribs carefully examined for fracture. Subtle fractures of the anterolateral aspects of the ribs were discovered in 8 (11%) of the 70 cases. In 7 of the 8 cases, multiple ribs were fractured (ranging up to 10 rib fractures), and in 5 of these cases, the rib fractures were bilateral. All of the rib fractures were subtle, had little if any associated blood extravasation, and would have been easily missed had the parietal pleura not been stripped. These anterolateral rib fractures in infants are the likely correlate of anterolateral rib fractures that are not uncommonly seen in the adult population, resulting from resuscitation efforts. The rib fractures are subtle and may not be identified unless the parietal pleura is stripped.

  9. Return of consciousness during ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaussen, Alexander; Shepherd, Matthew; Nehme, Ziad; Smith, Karen; Bernard, Stephen; Mitra, Biswadev

    2015-01-01

    Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may generate sufficient cerebral perfusion pressure to make the patient conscious. The incidence and management of this phenomenon are not well described. This systematic review aims to identifying cases where CPR-induced consciousness is mentioned in the literature and explore its management options. The databases Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, Cinahl and the Cochrane Library were searched from their commencement to the 8th July 2014. We also searched Google (scholar) for grey literature. We combined MeSH terms and text words for consciousness and CPR, and included studies of all types. The search yielded 1997 unique records, of which 50 abstracts were reviewed. Nine reports, describing 10 patients, were relevant. Six of the patients had CPR performed by mechanical devices, three of these patients were sedated. Four patients arrested in the out-of-hospital setting and six arrested in hospital. There were four survivors. Varying levels of consciousness were described in all reports, including purposeful arm movements, verbal communication, and resuscitation interference. Management strategies directed at consciousness were offered to six patients and included both physical and chemical restraints. CPR-induced consciousness was infrequently reported in the medical literature, and varied in management. Given the increasing use of mechanical CPR, guidelines to identify and manage consciousness during CPR are required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The impact of television fiction on public expectations of survival following inhospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation by medical professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bulck, Jan J M

    2002-12-01

    Research has shown that the public overestimates the survival chances of patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Other studies have suggested that demonstrably exaggerated survival rates in medical television fiction might affect these estimates. Such studies were mostly conducted in the United States, dealt with cardiopulmonary resuscitation in general, and asked respondents to indicate their source of medical information, an unreliable survey technique. To examine whether public perceptions of survival after inhospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation by physicians and nurses is related to the consumption of medical drama, without relying on respondents' self-reports of what influences them. To examine whether training in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques mediates this relationship. A random sample of 820 third and fifth year secondary school students completed a questionnaire in which they indicated their consumption of medical television fiction, their practical knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques, and their estimates of the survival rate after inhospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A relationship was found between the consumption of medical television drama and higher estimates of cardiopulmonary resuscitation survival. Practical knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation also resulted in increased estimated survival rates. An interaction effect of drama and practical knowledge was found. Respondents with practical knowledge were less affected by television. The consumption of medical television drama is related to overestimating survival chances after inhospital resuscitation by physicians and nurses following cardiopulmonary arrest. A practical knowledge of basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques moderates but does not eliminate the television effect.

  11. Knowledge and preferences regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation : A survey among older patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Trudy J.; Leenman-Dekker, Sonja J.; Oldenhuis, Hilbrand K. E.; Bosveld, Henk E. P.; Berendsen, Annette J.

    Objective: Survival rates following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are low for older people, and are associated with a high risk of neurological damage. This study investigated the relationship between the preferences, knowledge of survival chances, and characteristics among older people

  12. Changing attitudes to cardiopulmonary resuscitation in older people: a 15-year follow-up study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cotter, P E

    2009-03-01

    while it is well established that individual patient preferences regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may change with time, the stability of population preferences, especially during periods of social and economic change, has received little attention.

  13. As seen on TV: observational study of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in British television medical dramas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, P N; Williamson, S; Lawler, P G

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and accuracy with which cardiopulmonary resuscitation is portrayed in British television medical dramas. Design: Observational study. Subjects: 64 episodes of three major British television medical dramas: Casualty, Cardiac Arrest, and Medics. Main outcome measures: Frequency of cardiopulmonary resuscitation shown on television; age, sex, and diagnosis of the patients undergoing resuscitation; rate of survival through resuscitation. Results: Overall 52 patients had a cardiorespiratory arrest on screen and 3 had a respiratory arrest alone, all the arrests occurring in 40 of the 64 episodes. Of the 52 patients having cardiorespiratory arrest, 32 (62%) underwent an attempt at cardiopulmonary resuscitation; 8 attempts were successful. All 3 of the patients having respiratory arrests alone received ventilatory support and survived. On 48% of occasions, victims of cardiac arrest seemed to be less than 35 years old. Conclusions: Cardiorespiratory resuscitation is often depicted in British television medical dramas. Patients portrayed receiving resuscitation are likely to be in a younger age group than in real life. Though the reasons for resuscitation are more varied and more often associated with trauma than in reality, the overall success rate is nevertheless realistic. Widespread overoptimism of patients for survival after resuscitation cannot necessarily be blamed on British television medical dramas. Key messagesA quarter of patients in British television medical dramas who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation on screen seemed to surviveThis figure is comparable to initial survival rates in a series of patients in real lifePatients on television are more likely to suffer cardiac arrest as a result of trauma than in real life, and patients undergoing resuscitation are likely to be younger than patients in real lifeThe overall survival rate of patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in British television medical drama seems

  14. 24 Hour Survival Rate and its Determinants in Patients with Successful Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Ghaem Hospital of Mashhad

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Movahedi; Ali Kavosi; Hamidreza Behnam Vashani; Gholamreza Mohammadi; Hasan Mehrad Majd; Javad Malekzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Aims The main cause of death in the adult population in the industrialized world is sudden cardiac arrest. The first purpose of cardiopulmonary resuscitation is return of spontaneous circulation. Post cardiopulmonary resuscitation cares are fifth stage of American Heart Association cardiopulmonary resuscitation that less take into consideration. Therefore, the present study was conducted with the aim of “24 Hour Survival Rate and it’s determinants in patients w...

  15. Trainers’ Attitudes towards Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, Current Care Guidelines, and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mäkinen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Studies have shown that healthcare personnel hesitate to perform defibrillation due to individual or organisational attitudes. We aimed to assess trainers’ attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation (CPR-D, Current Care Guidelines, and associated training. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to CPR trainers attending seminars in Finland (N=185 focusing on the updated national Current Care Guidelines 2011. The questions were answered using Likert scale (1 = totally disagree, 7 = totally agree. Factor loading of the questionnaire was made using maximum likelihood analysis and varimax rotation. Seven scales were constructed (Hesitation, Nurse’s Role, Nontechnical Skill, Usefulness, Restrictions, Personal, and Organisation. Cronbach’s alphas were 0.92–0.51. Statistics were Student’s t-test, ANOVA, stepwise regression analysis, and Pearson Correlation. Results. The questionnaire was returned by 124/185, 67% CPR trainers, of whom two-thirds felt that their undergraduate training in CPR-D had not been adequate. Satisfaction with undergraduate defibrillation training correlated with the Nontechnical Skills scale (p<0.01. Participants scoring high on Hesitation scale (p<0.01 were less confident about their Nurse’s Role (p<0.01 and Nontechnical Skills (p<0.01. Conclusion. Quality of undergraduate education affects the work of CPR trainers and some feel uncertain of defibrillation. The train-the-trainers courses and undergraduate medical education should focus more on practical scenarios with defibrillators and nontechnical skills.

  16. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation knowledge and skills of registered nurses in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Rajeswaran

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Botswana nurses provide most health care in the primary, secondary and tertiary level clinics and hospitals. Trauma and medical emergencies are on the increase, and nurses should have cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR knowledge and skills in order to be able to implement effective interventions in cardiac arrest situations.Objective: The objective of this descriptive study was to assess registered nurses’ CPR knowledge and skills.Method: A pre-test, intervention and re-test time-series research design was adopted, and data were collected from 102 nurses from the 2 referral hospitals in Botswana. A multiple choice questionnaire and checklist were used to collect data.Results: All nurses failed the pre-test. Their knowledge and skills improved after training, but deteriorated over the three months until the post-test was conducted.Conclusion: The significantly low levels of registered nurses’ CPR skills in Botswana should be addressed by instituting country-wide CPR training and regular refresher courses.

  17. Capnography during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Current evidence and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavani Shankar Kodali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Capnography continues to be an important tool in measuring expired carbon dioxide (CO 2 . Most recent Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS guidelines now recommend using capnography to ascertain the effectiveness of chest compressions and duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Based on an extensive review of available published literature, we selected all available peer-reviewed research investigations and case reports. Available evidence suggests that there is significant correlation between partial pressure of end-tidal CO 2 (PETCO 2 and cardiac output that can indicate the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Additional evidence favoring the use of capnography during CPR includes definitive proof of correct placement of the endotracheal tube and possible prediction of patient survival following cardiac arrest, although the latter will require further investigations. There is emerging evidence that PETCO 2 values can guide the initiation of extracorporeal life support (ECLS in refractory cardiac arrest (RCA. There is also increasing recognition of the value of capnography in intensive care settings in intubated patients. Future directions include determining the outcomes based on capnography waveforms PETCO 2 values and determining a reasonable duration of CPR. In the future, given increasing use of capnography during CPR large databases can be analyzed to predict outcomes.

  18. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: cardiac health care professionals' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosowan, Sarah; Jensen, Louise

    2011-01-01

    Family presence (FP) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is becoming an increasing practice. Within current literature, the attitudes and beliefs towards FP of cardiac health care professionals in Canada are limited. The purpose of this project was to examine the perceptions of cardiac health care professionals (n=368) concerning FP during CPR. A survey was conducted to explore the attitudes and beliefs of cardiac health care professionals towards family presence during CPR within five Edmonton and surrounding area hospitals. The response rate was 46%, with the greatest response from nurses and physicians. Of the respondents, 44.3% believed that family should have the option to be present, and 40.9% believed that family should be allowed at the bedside during CPR. Less than half of the respondents had experience with FP during CPR. The barriers identified towards FP were lack of support for families, the experience would be too traumatic for families, families would not understand the procedures, fear of families physically interfering with procedures, FP would increase stress levels among staff, and tradition and politics excludes FP. Despite less than half the respondents supporting FP the majority endorsed development of policy and procedures to overcome barriers to FP during CPR.

  19. Capnography during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Current evidence and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodali, Bhavani Shankar; Urman, Richard D

    2014-10-01

    Capnography continues to be an important tool in measuring expired carbon dioxide (CO2). Most recent Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) guidelines now recommend using capnography to ascertain the effectiveness of chest compressions and duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Based on an extensive review of available published literature, we selected all available peer-reviewed research investigations and case reports. Available evidence suggests that there is significant correlation between partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2) and cardiac output that can indicate the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Additional evidence favoring the use of capnography during CPR includes definitive proof of correct placement of the endotracheal tube and possible prediction of patient survival following cardiac arrest, although the latter will require further investigations. There is emerging evidence that PETCO2 values can guide the initiation of extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in refractory cardiac arrest (RCA). There is also increasing recognition of the value of capnography in intensive care settings in intubated patients. Future directions include determining the outcomes based on capnography waveforms PETCO2 values and determining a reasonable duration of CPR. In the future, given increasing use of capnography during CPR large databases can be analyzed to predict outcomes.

  20. A Reliable Method for Rhythm Analysis during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Ayala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interruptions in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR compromise defibrillation success. However, CPR must be interrupted to analyze the rhythm because although current methods for rhythm analysis during CPR have high sensitivity for shockable rhythms, the specificity for nonshockable rhythms is still too low. This paper introduces a new approach to rhythm analysis during CPR that combines two strategies: a state-of-the-art CPR artifact suppression filter and a shock advice algorithm (SAA designed to optimally classify the filtered signal. Emphasis is on designing an algorithm with high specificity. The SAA includes a detector for low electrical activity rhythms to increase the specificity, and a shock/no-shock decision algorithm based on a support vector machine classifier using slope and frequency features. For this study, 1185 shockable and 6482 nonshockable 9-s segments corrupted by CPR artifacts were obtained from 247 patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The segments were split into a training and a test set. For the test set, the sensitivity and specificity for rhythm analysis during CPR were 91.0% and 96.6%, respectively. This new approach shows an important increase in specificity without compromising the sensitivity when compared to previous studies.

  1. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation of adults with in-hospital cardiac arrest using the Utstein style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rose Mary Ferreira Lisboa da; Silva, Bruna Adriene Gomes de Lima E; Silva, Fábio Junior Modesto E; Amaral, Carlos Faria Santos

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical profile of patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest using the Utstein style. This study is an observational, prospective, longitudinal study of patients with cardiac arrest treated in intensive care units over a period of 1 year. The study included 89 patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers. The cohort was 51.6% male with a mean age 59.0 years. The episodes occurred during the daytime in 64.6% of cases. Asystole/bradyarrhythmia was the most frequent initial rhythm (42.7%). Most patients who exhibited a spontaneous return of circulation experienced recurrent cardiac arrest, especially within the first 24 hours (61.4%). The mean time elapsed between hospital admission and the occurrence of cardiac arrest was 10.3 days, the mean time between cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 0.68 min, the mean time between cardiac arrest and defibrillation was 7.1 min, and the mean duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 16.3 min. Associations between gender and the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (19.2 min in women versus 13.5 min in men, p = 0.02), the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the return of spontaneous circulation (10.8 min versus 30.7 min, p cardiac arrest, until hospital discharge and 6 months after discharge were 71%, 9% and 6%, respectively. The main initial rhythm detected was asystole/bradyarrhythmia; the interval between cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was short, but defibrillation was delayed. Women received cardiopulmonary resuscitation for longer periods than men. The in-hospital survival rate was low.

  2. The continuous quality improvement project for telephone-assisted instruction of cardiopulmonary resuscitation increased the incidence of bystander CPR and improved the outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Junro; Wato, Yukihiro; Yoshida, Yutaka; Inaba, Hideo

    2012-10-01

    In 2007, the Ishikawa Medical Control Council initiated the continuous quality improvement (CQI) project for telephone-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (telephone-CPR), which included instruction on chest-compression-only CPR, education on how to recognise out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) with agonal breathing, emesis and convulsion, recommendations for on-line or redialling instructions and feedback from emergency physicians. This study aimed to investigate the effect of this project on the incidence of bystander CPR and the outcomes of OHCAs. The baseline data were prospectively collected on 4995 resuscitation-attempted OHCAs, which were recognised or witnessed by citizens rather than emergency medical technicians during the period of February 2004 to March 2010. The incidence of telephone-CPR and bystander CPR, as well as the outcomes of the OHCAs, was compared before and after the project. The incidence of telephone-CPR and bystander CPR significantly increased after the project (from 42% to 62% and from 41% to 56%, respectively). The incidence of failed telephone-CPR due to human factors significantly decreased from 30% to 16%. The outcomes of OHCAs significantly improved after the projects. A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the CQI project is one of the independent factors associated with one-year (1-Y) survival with favourable neurological outcomes (odds ratio=1.81, 95% confidence interval=1.20-2.76). The CQI project for telephone-CPR increased the incidence of bystander CPR and improved the outcome of OHCAs. A CQI project appeared to be essential to augment the effects of telephone-CPR. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Do-not-resuscitate order: The experiences of iranian cardiopulmonary resuscitation team members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolghader Assarroudi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One dilemma in the end-of-life care is making decisions for conducting cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. This dilemma is perceived in different ways due to the influence of culture and religion. This study aimed to understand the experiences of CPR team members about the do-not-resuscitate order. Methods: CPR team members were interviewed, and data were analyzed using a conventional content analysis method. Results: Three categories and six subcategories emerged: “The dilemma between revival and suffering” with the subcategories of “revival likelihood” and “death as a cause for comfort;” “conflicting situation” with the subcategories of “latent decision” and “ambivalent order;” and “low-quality CPR” with the subcategories of “team member demotivation” and “disrupting CPR performance.” Conclusion: There is a need for the development of a contextual guideline, which is required for respecting the rights of patients and their families and providing legal support to health-care professionals during CPR.

  4. Managing cardiac arrest with refractory ventricular fibrillation in the emergency department: Conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation versus extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siao, Fu-Yuan; Chiu, Chun-Chieh; Chiu, Chun-Wen; Chen, Ying-Chen; Chen, Yao-Li; Hsieh, Yung-Kun; Lee, Chien-Hui; Wu, Chang-Te; Chou, Chu-Chung; Yen, Hsu-Heng

    2015-07-01

    Refractory ventricular fibrillation, resistant to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), is a life threatening rhythm encountered in the emergency department. Although previous reports suggest the use of extracorporeal CPR can improve the clinical outcomes in patients with prolonged cardiac arrest, the effectiveness of this novel strategy for refractory ventricular fibrillation is not known. We aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of patients with refractory ventricular fibrillation managed with conventional CPR or extracorporeal CPR in our institution. This is a retrospective chart review study from an emergency department in a tertiary referral medical center. We identified 209 patients presenting with cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation between September 2011 and September 2013. Of these, 60 patients were enrolled with ventricular fibrillation refractory to resuscitation for more than 10 min. The clinical outcome of patients with ventricular fibrillation received either conventional CPR, including defibrillation, chest compression, and resuscitative medication (C-CPR, n = 40) or CPR plus extracorporeal CPR (E-CPR, n = 20) were compared. The overall survival rate was 35%, and 18.3% of patients were discharged with good neurological function. The mean duration of CPR was longer in the E-CPR group than in the C-CPR group (69.90 ± 49.6 min vs 34.3 ± 17.7 min, p = 0.0001). Patients receiving E-CPR had significantly higher rates of sustained return of spontaneous circulation (95.0% vs 47.5%, p = 0.0009), and good neurological function at discharge (40.0% vs 7.5%, p = 0.0067). The survival rate in the E-CPR group was higher (50% vs 27.5%, p = 0.1512) at discharge and (50% vs 20%, p = 0. 0998) at 1 year after discharge. The management of refractory ventricular fibrillation in the emergency department remains challenging, as evidenced by an overall survival rate of 35% in this study. Patients with refractory ventricular fibrillation receiving E

  5. Survivors' quality of life after cardiopulmonary resuscitation: an integrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, Gunilla; van der Riet, Pamela; Maguire, Jane

    2017-03-01

    The incidence of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation continues to increase worldwide largely due to greater awareness of the symptoms of cardiac events and increased attention to cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in the community. Globally, predicted survival rates after cardiopulmonary resuscitation have remained at 10% for decades and although patient outcome remains unpredictable, there is a positive trend in life expectancy. For a resuscitation attempt to be classed as successful, not only survival but also quality of life has to be evaluated. The aim of this review was to examine literature that explores the quality of life (QOL) for survivors' after CPR and the influence cognitive impairment, anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has had on their QOL. This review follows Whittemore and Knafl's framework for an integrative literature review. Electronic databases EBSCO, Ovid, PubMed and EMBASE were searched. After application of the inclusion and exclusion criteria, thirty-six papers published from January 2000 to June 2015 were included in this review. These papers represent a broad spectrum of research evaluating quality of life for survivors of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The heterogeneous research methods and vast number of different research tools make it challenging to compare the findings. The majority of papers concluded that quality of life for survivors of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was generally acceptable. However, studies also described survivors' experience of anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress and cognitive dysfunction. A majority of papers reported an acceptable quality of life if the patient survived to hospital discharge. The heterogeneity in quantitative papers was noticeable and indicates a marked variance in patient outcomes. This review highlights the absence of specialized tools used to investigate survivors' experience of the event. Further exploration of the

  6. Delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, M. R.; Billica, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    The microgravity environment presents several challenges for delivering effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Chest compressions must be driven by muscular force rather than by the weight of the rescuer's upper torso. Airway stabilization is influenced by the neutral body posture. Rescuers will consist of crew members of varying sizes and degrees of physical deconditioning from space flight. Several methods of CPR designed to accommodate these factors were tested in the one G environment, in parabolic flight, and on a recent shuttle flight. Methods: Utilizing study participants of varying sizes, different techniques of CPR delivery were evaluated using a recording CPR manikin to assess adequacy of compressive force and frequency. Under conditions of parabolic flight, methods tested included conventional positioning of rescuer and victim, free floating 'Heimlich type' compressions, straddling the patient with active and passive restraints, and utilizing a mechanical cardiac compression assist device (CCAD). Multiple restrain systems and ventilation methods were also assessed. Results: Delivery of effective CPR was possible in all configurations tested. Reliance on muscular force alone was quickly fatiguing to the rescuer. Effectiveness of CPR was dependent on technique, adequate restraint of the rescuer and patient, and rescuer size and preference. Free floating CPR was adequate but rapidly fatiguing. The CCAD was able to provide adequate compressive force but positioning was problematic. Conclusions: Delivery of effective CPR in microgravity will be dependent on adequate resuer and patient restraint, technique, and rescuer size and preference. Free floating CPR may be employed as a stop gap method until patient restraint is available. Development of an adequate CCAD would be desirable to compensate for the effects of deconditioning.

  7. Outcome after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Puyvelde, Tim; Ameloot, Koen; Roggen, Mieke; Troost, Els; Gewillig, Marc; Budts, Werner; Van De Bruaene, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Outcome after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in patients with underlying congenital heart disease is uncertain. This study aimed at evaluating outcome after CPR in patients with underlying congenital heart disease, factors related to worse outcome after CPR and whether survivors of sudden cardiac death (SCD) have a worse outcome when compared to an age, gender and disease-matched control population. Between 1984 and 2015, all patients with congenital heart disease who received in or out-of-hospital CPR were identified from the database of congenital heart disease from the University Hospitals Leuven. Postoperative and neonatal (heart defect were included in the study. Thirty-eight patients (66% men; median age 25 years (interquartile range 9-40); 68% out-of-hospital) were identified, of which 27 (66%) survived the event. The main cause of SCD was ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation ( n=21). Heart defect complexity (odds ratio (OR) 5.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-21.9; P=0.027), pulmonary hypertension (OR 13.8; 95% CI 2.1-89.5; P=0.006) and time to return of spontaneous circulation (OR 1.1; 95% CI 1.0-1.1; P=0.046) were related to worse outcome. Survivors of SCD had a worse prognosis when compared to an age, gender and disease-matched control group (5-year survival 76% vs. 98%; P=0.002). The complexity of underlying heart defect, pulmonary hypertension and time to return of spontaneous circulation are related to worse outcome in the case of CPR. Survivors of SCD have a worse outcome when compared to matched controls, indicating the need for adequate implantable cardioverter defibrillator indication assessment and for stringent follow-up of patients with worsening haemodynamics.

  8. Interposed abdominal compression-cardiopulmonary resuscitation after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji-ke; Wang, Jun; Li, Tian-fa

    2014-12-01

    The management of cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery differs from the management of cardiac arrest under other circumstances. In other studies, interposed abdominal compression-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (IAC-CPR) resulted in a better outcome compared with conventional CPR. The aim of the present study was to determine the feasibility, safety and efficacy of IAC-CPR compared with conventional CPR in patients with cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery. Data on all cardiac surgical patients who suffered a sudden cardiac arrest during the first 24 h after surgery were collected prospectively. Cardiac arrest was defined as the cessation of cardiac mechanical activity with the absence of a palpable central pulse, apnoea and unresponsiveness, including ventricular fibrillation, asystole and pulseless electrical activity. Forty patients were randomized to either conventional CPR (n = 21) or IAC-CPR (n = 19). IAC-CPR was initially performed by compressing the abdomen midway between the xiphoid and the umbilicus during the relaxation phase of chest compression. If spontaneous circulation was not restored after 10-15 min, the surgical team would immediately proceed to resternotomy. The endpoints of the study were safety, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) >5 min, survival to hospital discharge and survival for 6 months. With IAC-CPR, there were more patients in terms of ROSC, survival to hospital discharge, survival for 6 months and fewer CPR-related injuries compared with patients who underwent conventional CPR. IAC-CPR is feasible and safe and may be advantageous in cases of cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Survival and neurocognitive outcomes in pediatric extracorporeal-cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Guerra, Gonzalo; Zorzela, Liliane; Robertson, Charlene M T; Alton, Gwen Y; Joffe, Ari R; Moez, Elham Khodayari; Dinu, Irina A; Ross, David B; Rebeyka, Ivan M; Lequier, Laurance

    2015-11-01

    Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (E-CPR) is the initiation of extracorporeal life support during active chest compressions. There are no studies describing detailed neurocognitive outcomes of this population. We aim to describe the survival and neurocognitive outcomes of children who received E-CPR. Prospective cohort study. Children who received E-CPR at the Stollery Children's Hospital between 2000 and 2010 were included. Neurocognitive follow-up, including Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scales of Intelligence, was completed at the age of 4.5 years, and at a minimum of 6 months after the E-CPR admission. Fifty-five patients received E-CPR between 2000 and 2010. Children with cardiac disease had a 49% survival to hospital discharge and 43% survival at age 5-years, with no survivors (n=4) in those with non-cardiac disease. Pediatric E-CPR survivors had a mean (SD) Full Scale Intelligence quotient (FSIQ) score of 76.5 (15.9); with 4 children (24%) having intellectual disability (defined as FSIQ over 2 standard deviations below the population mean; i.e., CPR, open chest CPR, longer duration of CPR, low pH and more red blood cells given on the first day of ECMO, and longer time for lactate to normalize on ECMO were associated with higher mortality at age 5-years. Pediatric patients with cardiac disease who required E-CPR had 43% survival at age 5 years. Of concern, the intelligence quotient in E-CPR survivors was significantly lower than the population mean, with 24% having intellectual disability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Updates in the American Heart Association guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and potential applications to veterinary patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maton, Barbara L; Smarick, Sean D

    2012-04-01

    To review the updates in the American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and identify potential applications to veterinary patients. Cardiopulmonary arrest is common in veterinary emergency and critical care, and consensus guidelines are lacking. Human resuscitation guidelines are continually evolving as new clinical and experimental studies support updated recommendations. Synthesis of human, experimental animal model, and veterinary literature support the potential for updates and advancement in veterinary CPR practices. This review serves to highlight updates in the AHA guidelines for CPR and evaluate their application to small animal veterinary patients. Interventions identified will be evaluated for trans-species potential, raise questions regarding best resuscitation recommendations, and offer opportunities for further research to continue to advance veterinary CPR. The prognosis for any patient undergoing cardiopulmonary arrest remains guarded. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2012.

  11. 2017 American Heart Association Focused Update on Adult Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality: An Update to the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Monica E; Goldberger, Zachary D; Rea, Thomas; Swor, Robert A; Bobrow, Bentley J; Brennan, Erin E; Terry, Mark; Hemphill, Robin; Gazmuri, Raúl J; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Travers, Andrew H

    2018-01-02

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a lifesaving technique for victims of sudden cardiac arrest. Despite advances in resuscitation science, basic life support remains a critical factor in determining outcomes. The American Heart Association recommendations for adult basic life support incorporate the most recently published evidence and serve as the basis for education and training for laypeople and healthcare providers who perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Public cardiopulmonary resuscitation training rates and awareness of hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a cross-sectional survey of Victorians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Janet E; Smith, Karen; Case, Rosalind; Cartledge, Susie; Straney, Lahn; Finn, Judith

    2017-04-01

    To provide contemporary Australian data on the public's training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and awareness of hands-only CPR. A cross-sectional telephone survey in April 2016 of adult residents of the Australian state of Victoria was conducted. Primary outcomes were rates of CPR training and awareness of hands-only CPR. Of the 404 adults surveyed (mean age 55 ± 17 years, 59% female, 73% metropolitan residents), 274 (68%) had undergone CPR training. Only 50% (n = 201) had heard of hands-only CPR, with most citing first-aid courses (41%) and media (36%) as sources of information. Of those who had undergone training, the majority had received training more than 5 years previously (52%) and only 28% had received training or refreshed training in the past 12 months. Most received training in a formal first-aid class (43%), and received training as a requirement for work (67%). The most common reasons for not having training were: they had never thought about it (59%), did not have time (25%) and did not know where to learn (15%). Compared to standard CPR, a greater proportion of respondents were willing to provide hands-only CPR for strangers (67% vs 86%, P CPR training rates and awareness of hands-only CPR. Further promotion of hands-only CPR and self-instruction (e.g. DVD kits or online) may see further improvements in CPR training and bystander CPR rates. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  13. A review of simulation-enhanced, team-based cardiopulmonary resuscitation training for undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onan, Arif; Simsek, Nurettin; Elcin, Melih; Turan, Sevgi; Erbil, Bülent; Deniz, Kaan Zülfikar

    2017-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training is an essential element of clinical skill development for healthcare providers. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation has described issues related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiovascular care education. Educational interventions have been initiated to try to address these issues using a team-based approach and simulation technologies that offer a controlled, safe learning environment. The aim of the study is to review and synthesize published studies that address the primary question "What are the features and effectiveness of educational interventions related to simulation-enhanced, team-based cardiopulmonary resuscitation training?" We conducted a systematic review focused on educational interventions pertaining to cardiac arrest and emergencies that addressed this main question. The findings are presented together with a discussion of the effectiveness of various educational interventions. In conclusion, student attitudes toward interprofessional learning and simulation experiences were more positive. Research reports emphasized the importance of adherence to established guidelines, adopting a holistic approach to training, and that preliminary training, briefing, deliberate practices, and debriefing should help to overcome deficiencies in cardiopulmonary resuscitation training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia with cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55, 212-2 after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shijie; Tang, Wanchun; Song, Fengqing; Chung, Sung Phil; Weng, Yinlun; Yu, Tao; Weil, Max Harry

    2010-12-01

    To investigate whether hypothermia could be induced pharmacologically after resuscitation with the cannabinoid CB1/CB2 receptor agonist in a rat model and its effects on outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled experimental study. University-affiliated animal research laboratory. Ten healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats. Ventricular fibrillation was induced and untreated for 6 mins. Defibrillation was attempted after 8 mins of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Thirty minutes after resuscitation, animals were randomized to receive either WIN55, 212-2 (1.0 mg/kg/hr) or vehicle placebo (1.4 mL/kg/hr) for 6 hrs. Before infusion, the temperature was maintained at 37°C in all the animals with the help of a heating lamp. The same temperature environment was maintained for both groups after infusion. Hemodynamic measurements and cardiac output, ejection fraction, and myocardial performance index were measured at baseline and hourly for 6 hrs after resuscitation. Survival time up to 72 hrs was observed. Blood temperature decreased progressively after infusion of WIN55, 212-2 from 37°C to 34°C 4 hrs after resuscitation. There was no significant change in blood temperature after 6 hrs of placebo infusion of the same volume and same infusate temperature. Significantly better postresuscitation myocardial function and longer durations of survival were observed in WIN55, 212-2-treated animals. The selective cannabinoid agonist, WIN55, 212-2, produced a significant reduction in blood temperature and improved postresuscitation myocardial functions and survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The study results may provide a further option for early and effective induction of therapeutic hypothermia in settings of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  15. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation : the history and evidence behind modern management

    OpenAIRE

    Tua, Carl;

    2014-01-01

    Resuscitation following cardiac arrest involves a life-saving set of skills which are practised by healthcare workers and trained laypersons throughout the world. Various associations and groups, such as the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) and the American Heart Association have training programmes on resuscitation techniques using standardized algorithms. There are different protocols for different situations, using various pieces of equipment and with a range of...

  16. Novel electronic refreshers for cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magura Stephen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently the American Red Cross requires that individuals renew their cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR certification annually; this often requires a 4- to 8-hour refresher course. Those trained in CPR often show a decrease in essential knowledge and skills within just a few months after training. New electronic means of communication have expanded the possibilities for delivering CPR refreshers to members of the general public who receive CPR training. The study’s purpose was to determine the efficacy of three novel CPR refreshers - online website, e-mail and text messaging – for improving three outcomes of CPR training - skill retention, confidence for using CPR and intention to use CPR. These three refreshers may be considered “novel” in that they are not typically used to refresh CPR knowledge and skills. Methods The study conducted two randomized clinical trials of the novel CPR refreshers. A mailed brochure was a traditional, passive refresher format and served as the control condition. In Trial 1, the refreshers were delivered in a single episode at 6 months after initial CPR training. In Trial 2, the refreshers were delivered twice, at 6 and 9 months after initial CPR training, to test the effect of a repeated delivery. Outcomes for the three novel refreshers vs. the mailed brochure were determined at 12 months after initial CPR training. Results Assignment to any of three novel refreshers did not improve outcomes of CPR training one year later in comparison with receiving a mailed brochure. Comparing outcomes for subjects who actually reviewed some of the novel refreshers vs. those who did not indicated a significant positive effect for one outcome, confidence for performing CPR. The website refresher was associated with increased behavioral intent to perform CPR. Stated satisfaction with the refreshers was relatively high. The number of episodes of refreshers (one vs. two did not have a significant effect

  17. Outcomes of In–Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Patients with CKD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, Malik M.; Kaleem, Umar M.; Zafar, Taqi T.; Khan, Abdus Salam; Holley, Jean L.; Nally, Joseph V.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Advance care planning, including code/resuscitation status discussion, is an essential part of the medical care of patients with CKD. There is little information on the outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in these patients. We aimed to measure cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcomes in these patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Our study is observational in nature. We compared the following cardiopulmonary resuscitation–related outcomes in patients with CKD with those in the general population by using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2005–2011): (1) survival to hospital discharge, (2) discharge destination, and (3) length of hospital stay. All of the patients were 18 years old or older. Results During the study period, 71,961 patients with CKD underwent in–hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation compared with 323,620 patients from the general population. Unadjusted in–hospital mortality rates were higher in patients with CKD (75% versus 72%; P<0.001) on univariate analysis. After adjusting for age, sex, and potential confounders, patients with CKD had higher odds of mortality (odds ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 1.34; P≤0.001) and length of stay (odds ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.15; P=0.001). Hospitalization charges were also greater in patients with CKD. There was no overall difference in postcardiopulmonary resuscitation nursing home placement between the two groups. In a separate subanalysis of patients ≥75 years old with CKD, higher odds of in-hospital mortality were also seen in the patients with CKD (odds ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.17; P=0.01). Conclusions In conclusion, we observed slightly higher in-hospital mortality in patients with CKD undergoing in–hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation. PMID:27445163

  18. The Level of Awareness of Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resuscitation is one of the most evolving areas of modern medicine. For the past forty years newer techniques are developed in order to improve the outcome of resuscitation. The study is aimed at finding the level of knowledge amongst radiographers practising in Nigeria because radiographers use materials that ...

  19. extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patients with out-of-hospital refractory cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obling, Laust; Wiberg, Sebastian; Møller, Jacob Eifer

    2017-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Treatment options remain few in refractory cases, but extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) is increasingly applied to improve the outcome. This article summarizes the use, experience and outcome of e...

  20. A Curriculum-Based Health Service Program in Hypertension, Diabetes, Venereal Diseases and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Samuel T.; Janer, Ann L.

    1978-01-01

    Special screening and education courses in hypertension, diabetes, venereal disease, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were added as electives at the Auburn University School of Pharmacy. Applied learning experiences for students and services to the community are achieved. Course goals and content and behavioral objectives in each area are…

  1. Effects of Age, Gender, School Class on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills of Nigerian Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin; Onyeaso, Chukwudi Ochi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The need for training of schoolchildren on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as potential bystander CPR providers is growing globally but Nigeria is still behind and lacks basic necessary data. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of age, gender and school class on CPR skills of Nigerian secondary school…

  2. Quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation during real-life out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyllenborg, Tore; Granfeldt, Asger; Lippert, Freddy

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can increase survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, little is known about bystander CPR quality in real-life OHCA. AIM: To describe bystander CPR quality based on automated external defibrillator (AED) CPR process data during OHCA...

  3. Detection of a spontaneous pulse in photoplethysmograms during automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijshoff, R.W.; Sar, T. van der; Peeters, W.H.; Bezemer, R.; Aelen, P.; Paulussen, I.W.; Ordelman, S.C.; Venema, A.; Berkom, P.F. van; Aarts, R.M.; Woerlee, P.H.; Scheffer, G.J.; Noordergraaf, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reliable, non-invasive detection of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) with minimal interruptions to chest compressions would be valuable for high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We investigated the potential of photoplethysmography (PPG) to detect the presence of a

  4. Apps4CPR: A review study of mobile applications for cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Kalz, M. (2013, 23 September). Apps4CPR: A review study of mobile applications for cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and support. Presentation given during the 6th World Congress on Social Media, Mobile Apps and Internet/Web 2.0 in Medicine, Health, and Biomedical Research, London, UK.

  5. Perceived self-efficacy in performing and willingness to learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation in an elderly population in a suburban community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swor, Robert; Compton, Scott; Farr, Lynn; Kokko, Sue; Vining, Fern; Pascual, Rebecca; Jackson, Raymond E

    2003-01-01

    Older persons are the group most likely to respond to cardiac arrests in private residences. To characterize the knowledge about, attitudes toward, and perceived self-efficacy of older persons in learning and providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A total of 2743 surveys were mailed to adults 55 years and older who resided in a single Michigan suburb. Data were collected on demographics, medical history, training in and willingness to provide cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and concerns about providing this intervention. The 631 persons (24.6%) who responded were elderly (mean age, 73.5 years) and had a mean of 1.7 occupants per household. More than one third lived alone. Of all respondents, 275 (43.6%) had received training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 370 (58.6%) indicated a willingness to learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and 412 (65.3%) thought that they had the ability to perform this intervention. Respondents 80 years or younger were significantly more likely than respondents more than 80 years old to be willing to learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation (65.7% vs 19.0%, P cardiopulmonary resuscitation did not vary with the medical history of the respondent or the respondent's spouse. Adults 56 to 80 years old perceive themselves as able to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation and are interested in receiving training.

  6. Minimal interruption of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for a single shock as mandated by automated external defibrillations does not compromise outcomes in a porcine model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristagno, Giuseppe; Tang, Wanchun; Russell, James K; Jorgenson, Dawn; Wang, Hao; Sun, Shijie; Weil, Max Harry

    2008-11-01

    Current automated external defibrillations require interruptions in chest compressions to avoid artifacts during electrocardiographic analyses and to minimize the risk of accidental delivery of an electric shock to the rescuer. The earlier three-shock algorithm, with prolonged interruptions of chest compressions, compromised outcomes and increased severity of postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction. In the present study, we investigated the effect of timing of minimal automated external defibrillation-mandated interruptions of chest compressions on cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcomes, using a single-shock algorithm. We hypothesized that an 8-sec interruption of chest compressions for a single shock, as mandated by automated external defibrillations, would not impair initial resuscitation and outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Randomized prospective animal study. University affiliated research laboratory. Domestic pigs. In 24 domestic male pigs weighing 41 +/- 2 kg, ventricular fibrillation was induced by left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion and untreated for 7 min. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, including chest compressions and ventilation with oxygen, was then performed for an interval of 2 min before attempted defibrillation. Animals were randomized into three groups: A) interruption immediately before defibrillation; B) interruption after 1 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation; or C) no interruption. Chest compressions were delivered with the aid of a mechanical chest compressor at a rate of 100 compressions/min and compression/ventilation ratio of 30:2. Defibrillation was attempted with a single biphasic 150-J shock. Each animal was successfully resuscitated and survived for >72 hr. No differences in the number of shocks before return of spontaneous circulation, frequency of recurrent ventricular fibrillation, duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and severity of postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction were observed. In this

  7. Resuscitation on television: realistic or ridiculous? A quantitative observational analysis of the portrayal of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in television medical drama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Dylan; Willoughby, Hannah

    2009-11-01

    Patients' preferences for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) relate to their perception about the likelihood of success of the procedure. There is evidence that the lay public largely base their perceptions about CPR on their experience of the portrayal of CPR in the media. The medical profession has generally been critical of the portrayal of CPR on medical drama programmes although there is no recent evidence to support such views. To compare the patient characteristics, cause and success rates of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on medical television drama with published resuscitation statistics. Observational study. 88 episodes of television medical drama were reviewed (26 episodes of Casualty, Casualty, 25 episodes of Holby City, 23 episodes of Grey's Anatomy and 14 episodes of ER) screened between July 2008 and April 2009. The patient's age and sex, medical history, presumed cause of arrest, use of CPR and immediate and long term survival rate were recorded. Immediate survival and survival to discharge following CPR. There were a total of 76 cardio-respiratory arrests and 70 resuscitation attempts in the episodes reviewed. The immediate success rate (46%) did not differ significantly from published real life figures (p=0.48). The resuscitation process appeared to follow current guidelines. Survival (or not) to discharge was rarely shown. The average age of patients was 36 years and contrary to reality there was not an age related difference in likely success of CPR in patients less than 65 compared with those 65 and over (p=0.72). The most common cause of cardiac arrest was trauma with only a minor proportion of arrests due to cardio-respiratory causes such as myocardial infarction. Whilst the immediate success rate of CPR in medical television drama does not significantly differ from reality the lack of depiction of poorer medium to long term outcomes may give a falsely high expectation to the lay public. Equally the lay public may perceive that the

  8. Survival after extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in infants and children with heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Titus; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Frank, Deborah; Bratton, Susan L

    2008-10-01

    We investigated survival and predictors of mortality for infants and children with heart disease treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as an aid to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Children (cardiopulmonary resuscitation and were reported to the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization database were evaluated. Patients were classified into one of 3 groups based on underlying cardiac physiology: single ventricle, 2 ventricles, and cardiac muscle disease. Patients with eligible procedure codes were assigned a Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery-1 classification. Four hundred ninety-two patients were eligible for analysis, and 279 (57%) were assigned a Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery-1 category. Overall survival was 42%. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, significant pre-extracorporeal predictors for mortality included single-ventricle physiology (odds ratio, 1.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-2.4), a history of a stage 1-type procedure (odds ratio, 2.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-6.2), and extreme acidosis (arterial blood gas pH cardiopulmonary resuscitation resulted in hospital survival in 42% of infants and children with heart disease. Underlying cardiac physiology and associated cardiac surgical procedures influenced mortality, as did pre-extracorporeal resuscitation status and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation-associated complications.

  9. Factors affecting team leadership skills and their relationship with quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Joyce H Y; Ong, G J; Davies, Robin P; Gao, Fang; Perkins, Gavin D

    2012-09-01

    This study aims to explore the relationship between team-leadership skills and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in an adult cardiac-arrest simulation. Factors affecting team-leadership skills were also assessed. Forty advanced life-support providers leading a cardiac arrest team in a standardized cardiac-arrest simulation were videotaped. Background data were collected, including age (in yrs), sex, whether they had received any leadership training in the past, whether they were part of a professional group, the most recent advanced life-support course (in months) they had undergone, advanced life-support instructor/provider status, and whether they had led in any cardiac arrest situation in the preceding 6 months. Participants were scored using the Cardiac Arrest Simulation test score and Leadership Behavior Description Questionnaire for leadership skills. Process-focused quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation data were collected directly from manikin and video recordings. Primary outcomes were complex technical skills (measured as Cardiac Arrest Simulation test score, preshock pause, and hands-off ratio). Secondary outcomes were simple technical skills (chest-compression rate, depth, and ventilation rate). Univariate linear regressions were performed to examine how leadership skills affect quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and bivariate correlations elicited factors affecting team-leadership skills.Teams led by leaders with the best leadership skills performed higher quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation with better technical performance (R = 0.75, p Leadership skills were not significantly associated with more simple technical skills such as chest-compression rate, depth, and ventilation rate. Prior training in team leader skills was independently associated with better leadership behavior. There is an association between team leadership skills and cardiac arrest simulation test score, preshock pause, and hands off ratio. Developing leadership

  10. Lay bystanders' perspectives on what facilitates cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of automated external defibrillators in real cardiac arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Rosenkranz, Simone Mørk; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest will fail to receive bystander intervention (cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR] or defibrillation) despite widespread CPR training and the dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). We sought to investigate wh...

  11. Utstein-style guidelines on uniform reporting of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation in dogs and cats. A RECOVER statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boller, Manuel; Fletcher, Dan J; Brainard, Benjamin M; Haskins, Steve; Hopper, Kate; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Morley, Peter T; McMichael, Maureen; Nishimura, Ryohei; Robben, Joris H; Rozanski, Elizabeth; Rudloff, Elke; Rush, John; Shih, Andre; Smarick, Sean; Tello, Luis H

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide recommendations for reviewing and reporting clinical in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) events in dogs and cats and to establish nonambiguous operational definitions for CPR terminology. DESIGN: Consensus guidelines. SETTING: International, academia, referral

  12. Utilization of donors who have suffered cardiopulmonary arrest and resuscitation in intestinal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Cal S; Kaufman, Stuart S; Girlanda, Raffaele; Little, Cheryl M; Rekhtman, Yuliya; Raofi, Vandad; Laurin, Jaqueline M; Shetty, Kirti; Fennelly, Erin M; Johnson, Lynt B; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2008-10-15

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of a person destined to become an organ donor has been associated with overall poor donor quality, especially for the intestinal donor, as splanchnic vasoconstriction that is intended to preserve coronary and cerebral blood flow may result in clinically relevant intestinal ischemia. Outcomes of recipients who receive intestine grafts that have suffered CPR are unknown. We sought to analyze our clinical experience in using intestinal grafts from donors who suffered cardiopulmonary arrest and resuscitation and to evaluate the outcome of recipients of organs coming from resuscitated donors when compared with recipients of nonresuscitated donors. We retrospectively analyzed the donor and recipient charts of all of our intestinal transplants with regard to the performance of donor CPR. Sixty-seven intestinal transplants were performed in 65 patients from November 2003 to December 2007. Twelve donors (18%) were identified as having suffered cardiac arrest and subsequent CPR. Mean duration of CPR was 19.3+/-12.7 min. Terminal laboratory profiles of CPR donors and non-CPR donors were similar. Of the 12 resuscitated grafts, two were used for multivisceral, one for a modified multivisceral, seven for liver-intestine, and two for isolated intestinal transplant. There were no significant differences in outcome parameters such as operative time, blood use, ventilation days, length of stay, time to enteral independence, rejection, enteric bacteremia, and survival between the 12 resuscitated grafts and the 55 nonresuscitated grafts. A donor history of cardiac arrest should not automatically exclude the use of the intestine graft for transplantation.

  13. Forensic aspect of cause of subendocardial hemorrhage in cardiopulmonary resuscitation cases: chest compression or adrenaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charaschaisri, Werasak; Jongprasartsuk, Kesanee; Rungruanghiranya, Suthat; Kaufman, Larry

    2011-03-01

    Subendocardial hemorrhage (SEH) is a striking feature seen in many forensic autopsy cases. It was believed earlier to represent an agonal phenomenon without any particular reference to the cause of death. However, the latest study showed that even minor SEH might have an influence on cardiac function and might be involved in the mechanism of death. To rule out the possible cause of SEH from defibrillation, autopsies were performed in 240 adults admitted to Department of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Srinakarinwirot University and Department of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University between July 2006 and June 2008. All the subjects were subdivided into 2 groups: one group receiving resuscitation and the other group receiving no resuscitation. In the former group, 76 patients had attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation with adrenaline and 44 patients without adrenaline. While in the latter group, 120 patients received no resuscitation attempt. Approximately, 43.4% of resuscitation with adrenaline cases (33/76) demonstrated SEH in contrast to 4 cases of resuscitation without adrenaline (9.1%, P < 0.05). This demonstrates an increasing trend of SEH in cases with prolonged resuscitation and higher level of adrenaline utilizations.

  14. Voice advisory manikin versus instructor facilitated training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isbye, Dan L; Høiby, Pernilla; Rasmussen, Maria B

    2008-01-01

    for Resuscitation 2005) was assessed in a 2 min test before randomisation to either IF training in groups of 8 or individual VAM training. Immediately after training and after 3 months, CPR performance was assessed in identical 2 min tests. Laerdal PC Skill Reporting System 2.0 was used to collect data. To quantify...

  15. Outcome of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Intensive Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the demographic characteristics of patients who suffered cardiac arrest in our ICUs and to identify those factors influencing outcome after resuscitation following cardiac arrest. We reviewed the records of all patients who underwent CPR in the two ICUs at the Georg-August University ...

  16. Innovations in basic life support education for healthcare providers: improving competence in cardiopulmonary resuscitation through self-directed learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Carolyn L; Kardong-Edgren, Suzan; Cazzell, Mary; Behan, Deborah; Mancini, Mary Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation is an essential competency for nurses. Nurse educators involved in staff development and continuing education spend numerous hours offering basic life support courses and conducting performance improvement activities such as mock codes. This study provides evidence that cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance skills using self-directed learning methods are as good as or, on a number of parameters, better than those achieved with a more resource- and time-intensive traditional approach.

  17. Critical incidents during prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: what are the problems nobody wants to talk about?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenstein, Christian; Rupp, Peter; Fleischmann, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    We wanted to identify incidents that led or could have led to patient harm during prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A nationwide anonymous and Internet-based critical incident reporting system gave the data. During a 4-year period we received 548 reports of which 74 occurred during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Human error was responsible for 85% of the incidents, whereas equipment failure contributed to 15% of the reports. Equipment failure was considered to be preventable in 61% of all the cases, whereas incidents because of human error could have been prevented in almost all the cases. In most cases, prevention can be accomplished by simple strategies with the Poka-Yoke technique. Insufficient training of emergency medical service physicians in Germany requires special attention. The critical incident reports raise concerns regarding the level of expertize provided by emergency medical service doctors.

  18. Ruptured subcapsular liver haematoma following mechanically-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, John R; Freundlich, Robert Edward; Abir, Mahshid

    2016-02-02

    A 64-year-old man with a history of ascending aortic surgery and pulmonary embolus presented with shortness of breath. He rapidly decompensated, prompting intubation, after which he lost pulses. Manual resuscitation was initiated immediately, with subsequent use of a LUCAS-2 mechanical compression device. The patient was given bolus thrombolytic therapy and regained pulses after 7 min of CPR. Compressions were reinitiated with the LUCAS-2 twice more during resuscitation over the subsequent hour for brief episodes of PEA. After confirmation of massive pulmonary embolism on CT, the patient underwent interventional radiology-guided ultrasonic catheter placement with local thrombolytic therapy and experienced immediate improvement in oxygenation. He later developed abdominal compartment syndrome, despite cessation of thrombolytic and anticoagulation therapy. Bedside exploratory abdominal laparotomy revealed a ruptured subcapsular haematoma of the liver. The patient's haemodynamics improved following surgery and he was extubated 11 days postarrest with intact neurological function. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  19. Estimation of cerebral blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S F; Stadeager, Carsten Preben; Siemkowicz, E

    1990-01-01

    /kg/min). The cortical CBF was found between 14 and 211 ml 100 g-1.min-1 with mean 42 ml 100 g-1.min-1 and mean white matter CBF equal to 27 ml 100 g-1.min-1. It is suggested that the external cardiac massage in humans may be of poor efficacy in terms of brain revival. Cortical CBF after long-lasting cardiopulmonary...

  20. Effects of flashlight guidance on chest compression performance in cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a noisy environment

    OpenAIRE

    You, Je Sung; Chung, Sung Phil; Chang, Chul Ho; Park, Incheol; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, SeungHo; Lee, Hahn Shick

    2012-01-01

    Background In real cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), noise can arise from instructional voices and environmental sounds in places such as a battlefield and industrial and high-traffic areas. A feedback device using a flashing light was designed to overcome noise-induced stimulus saturation during CPR. This study was conducted to determine whether ?flashlight? guidance influences CPR performance in a simulated noisy setting. Materials and methods We recruited 30 senior medical students with...

  1. Diagnosis and management after life threatening events in infants and young children who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    OpenAIRE

    Samuels, M P; Poets, C F; Noyes, J P; Hartmann, H.; Hewertson, J; Southall, D P

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the mechanisms and thereby appropriate management for apparent life threatening events treated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation in infants and young children. DESIGN--Prospective clinical and physiological study. SETTING--Royal Brompton Hospital or in patients' homes, or both. SUBJECTS--157 Patients referred at median age 2.8 months (range 1 week to 96 months), 111 (71%) had recurrent events, 44 were born preterm, 19 were siblings of infants who had died suddenly and...

  2. Can tablets be used as a simulator for automated external defibrillation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation courses?

    OpenAIRE

    Kovic, Ivor

    2016-01-01

    Background. A novel, tablet-based automated external defibrillator (AED) simulator has been developed to facilitate AED training. Objective. To evaluate if the tablet AED simulator (an AED simulator based on mobile technology (M-AED)) can be successfully used during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) courses. To test medical and dental students’ CPR attitudes, knowledge and skills, and evaluate the impact of a one day CPR course. Methods. One hundred and twenty-four medical and denta...

  3. Families’ Stressors and Needs at Time of Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation: A Jordanian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masa’Deh, Rami; Saifan, Ahmad; Timmons, Stephen; Nairn, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Background: During cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, family members, in some hospitals, are usually pushed to stay out of the resuscitation room. However, growing literature implies that family presence during resuscitation could be beneficial. Previous literature shows controversial belief whether or not a family member should be present during resuscitation of their relative. Some worldwide association such as the American Heart Association supports family-witnessed resuscitation and urge hospitals to develop policies to ease this process. The opinions on family-witnessed resuscitation vary widely among various cultures, and some hospitals are not applying such polices yet. This study explores family members’ needs during resuscitation in adult critical care settings. Methods: This is a part of larger study. The study was conducted in six hospitals in two major Jordanian cities. A purposive sample of seven family members, who had experience of having a resuscitated relative, was recruited over a period of six months. Semi-structured interview was utilised as the main data collection method in the study. Findings: The study findings revealed three main categories: families’ need for reassurance; families’ need for proximity; and families’ need for support. The need for information about patient’s condition was the most important need. Updating family members about patient’s condition would reduce their tension and improve their acceptance for the end result of resuscitation. All interviewed family members wanted the option to stay beside their loved one at end stage of their life. Distinctively, most of family members want this option for some religious and cultural reasons such as praying and supplicating to support their loved one. Conclusions: This study emphasizes the importance of considering the cultural and religious dimensions in any family-witnessed resuscitation programs. The study recommends that family members of resuscitated patients should

  4. Families' stressors and needs at time of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation: a Jordanian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masa'Deh, Rami; Saifan, Ahmad; Timmons, Stephen; Nairn, Stuart

    2013-12-01

    During cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, family members, in some hospitals, are usually pushed to stay out of the resuscitation room. However, growing literature implies that family presence during resuscitation could be beneficial. Previous literature shows controversial belief whether or not a family member should be present during resuscitation of their relative. Some worldwide association such as the American Heart Association supports family-witnessed resuscitation and urge hospitals to develop policies to ease this process. The opinions on family-witnessed resuscitation vary widely among various cultures, and some hospitals are not applying such policies yet. This study explores family members' needs during resuscitation in adult critical care settings. This is a part of larger study. The study was conducted in six hospitals in two major Jordanian cities. A purposive sample of seven family members, who had experience of having a resuscitated relative, was recruited over a period of six months. Semi-structured interview was utilised as the main data collection method in the study. The study findings revealed three main categories: families' need for reassurance; families' need for proximity; and families' need for support. The need for information about patient's condition was the most important need. Updating family members about patient's condition would reduce their tension and improve their acceptance for the end result of resuscitation. All interviewed family members wanted the option to stay beside their loved one at end stage of their life. Distinctively, most of family members want this option for some religious and cultural reasons such as praying and supplicating to support their loved one. This study emphasizes the importance of considering the cultural and religious dimensions in any family-witnessed resuscitation programs. The study recommends that family members of resuscitated patients should be treated properly by professional communication and

  5. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a historical perspective leading up to the end of the 19th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmektzoglou, Konstantinos A; Johnson, Elizabeth O; Syros, Periklis; Chalkias, Athanasios; Kalambalikis, Lazaros; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2012-01-01

    Social laws and religious beliefs throughout history underscore the leaps and bounds that the science of resuscitation has achieved from ancient times until today. The effort to resuscitate victims goes back to ancient history, where death was considered a special form of sleep or an act of God. Biblical accounts of resuscitation attempts are numerous. Resuscitation in the Middle Ages was forbidden, but later during Renaissance, any prohibition against performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was challenged, which finally led to the Enlightenment, where scholars attempted to scientifically solve the problem of sudden death. It was then that the various components of CPR (ventilation, circulation, electricity, and organization of emergency medical services) began to take shape. The 19th century gave way to hallmarks both in the ventilatory support (intubation innovations and the artificial respirator) and the open-and closed chest circulatory support. Meanwhile, novel defibrillation techniques had been employed and ventricular fibrillation described. The groundbreaking discoveries of the 20th century finally led to the scientific framework of CPR. In 1960, mouth-to-mouth resuscitation was eventually combined with chest compression and defibrillation to become CPR as we now know it. This review presents the scientific milestones behind one of medicine's most widely used fields.

  6. Disseminating cardiopulmonary resuscitation training by distributing 35,000 personal manikins among school children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isbye, Dan L; Rasmussen, Lars S; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because most cardiac arrests occur at home, widespread training is needed to increase the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by lay persons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mass distribution of CPR instructional materials among schoolchildren. METHODS...... AND RESULTS: We distributed 35,002 resuscitation manikins to pupils (12 to 14 years of age) at 806 primary schools. Using the enclosed 24-minute instructional DVD, they trained in CPR and subsequently used the kit to train family and friends (second tier). They completed a questionnaire on who had trained...... the project did not increase significantly compared with the previous year (25.0% versus 27.9%; P=0.16). CONCLUSIONS: CPR training can be disseminated in a population by distributing personal resuscitation manikins among children in primary schools. The teachers felt able to easily facilitate CPR training...

  7. [Nurses' cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance during the first 5 minutes in in-situ simulated cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Jung; Lee, Kyeong Ryong; Lee, Myung Hyun; Kim, Jiyoung

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills and teamwork of nurses in simulated cardiac arrests in the hospital. A descriptive study was conducted with 35 teams of 3 to 4 registered nurses each in a university hospital located in Seoul. A mannequin simulator was used to enact simulated cardiac arrest. Assessment included critical actions, time elapsed to initiation of critical actions, quality of cardiac compression, and teamwork which comprised leadership behavior and communication among team members. Among the 35 teams, 54% recognized apnea, 43% determined pulselessness. Eighty percent of the teams compressed at an average elapsed time of 108±75 seconds with 35%, 36%, and 67% mean rates of correct compression depth, rate, and placement, respectively. Thirty-seven percent of the teams defibrillated at 224±67 seconds. Leadership behavior and communication among team members were absent in 63% and 69% of the teams, respectively. The skills of the nurses in this study cannot be considered adequate in terms of appropriate and timely actions required for resuscitation. Future resuscitation education should focus on improving the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation including team performance targeting the first responders of cardiac arrest.

  8. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and do-not-resuscitate orders: a guide for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loertscher, Laura; Reed, Darcy A; Bannon, Michael P; Mueller, Paul S

    2010-01-01

    The do-not-resuscitate order, introduced nearly a half century ago, continues to raise questions and controversy among health care providers and patients. In today's society, the expectation and availability of medical interventions, including at the end of life, have rendered the do-not-resuscitate order particularly relevant. The do-not-resuscitate order is the only order that requires patient consent to prevent a medical procedure from being performed; therefore, informed code status discussions between physicians and patients are especially important. Epidemiologic studies have informed our understanding of resuscitation outcomes; however, patient, provider, and institutional characteristics account for great variability in the prevalence of do-not-resuscitate orders. Specific strategies can improve the quality of code status conversations and enhance end-of-life care planning. In this article, we review the history, epidemiology, and determinants of do-not-resuscitate orders, as well as frequently encountered questions and recommended strategies for discussing this important topic with patients. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. An innovative design for cardiopulmonary resuscitation manikins based on a human-like thorax and embedded flow sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielen, Mark; Joshi, Rohan; Delbressine, Frank; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto; Feijs, Loe

    2017-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation manikins are used for training personnel in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation. State-of-the-art cardiopulmonary resuscitation manikins are still anatomically and physiologically low-fidelity designs. The aim of this research was to design a manikin that offers high anatomical and physiological fidelity and has a cardiac and respiratory system along with integrated flow sensors to monitor cardiac output and air displacement in response to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. This manikin was designed in accordance with anatomical dimensions using a polyoxymethylene rib cage connected to a vertebral column from an anatomical female model. The respiratory system was composed of silicon-coated memory foam mimicking lungs, a polyvinylchloride bronchus and a latex trachea. The cardiovascular system was composed of two sets of latex tubing representing the pulmonary and aortic arteries which were connected to latex balloons mimicking the ventricles and lumped abdominal volumes, respectively. These balloons were filled with Life/form simulation blood and placed inside polyether foam. The respiratory and cardiovascular systems were equipped with flow sensors to gather data in response to chest compressions. Three non-medical professionals performed chest compressions on this manikin yielding data corresponding to force-displacement while the flow sensors provided feedback. The force-displacement tests on this manikin show a desirable nonlinear behaviour mimicking chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in humans. In addition, the flow sensors provide valuable data on the internal effects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In conclusion, scientifically designed and anatomically high-fidelity designs of cardiopulmonary resuscitation manikins that embed flow sensors can improve physiological fidelity and provide useful feedback data.

  10. ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE & ATTITUDE OF THE PEDIATRIC RESIDENT ABOUT NEONATAL & PEDIATRIC CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M KADIAVAR

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A high leve of skill & knowledge is required in circumstances of cardiopulmonary resucitation which represents the most urgent clinical situations. The difficulties for pediatric residents who are fronted with the most cases of pediatric & neonatal resucitation are due to different causes of cardiorespiratory arrest in camparison to adults. This study aimed to assess the knowledge & their personal attitude toward the neonatal & pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitatin. Methods: By cross - sectional multicenter study between the pediatric residents who were studied in the teaching hospitals in Tehran (1378-90. Data were gathered among 140 residents by self-completed questionnaires which were included three parts as. demographic information assessment of their attitude by summation of score via ranking list questions and total score from assessment to their knowledge by different scenarios which were formatted in the multiple choice questions. Results: 35.7% of the residents studied in the first year of residency 35.0% in the second year and the remainder (29/3% in the third year More than 90% of them considered their knowledge about neonatal and pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation low & less than average. Net only 80% of the residents self - assessed their actual ability about this issue low but also declaired the insufficient education during the medical training. The total score of knowledge assessment was 14.7 + 1_0.54 from 30 without any significant relations among the residents in different hospitals or various levels of pediatric residency. (P value= 0.1 , 0.7 There was not significant correlation between the total score from their attitude & their knowledge. Conclusion: Pediatric residents as the key personnel in the management of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of the neonates and children should have enough knowledge and skills about this topic. This survey demonstrates a low level of the pediatric & neonatal

  11. Influenece of the CPRmeter on angular position of elbows and generated forces during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Kopacz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: It is commonly known that ergonomics in emergency medical services (EMS is very important. Emergency medical services workers are exposed to different conditions and they should perform a variety of tasks. Material and Methods: The aim of the work has been to analyze the angular position of elbows and forces generated by the upper limbs during cardiopulmonary resuscitation with and without the CPRmeter based on feedback technology. Ten male paramedics and 10 male non-paramedics, in a kneeling position, performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR on an Ambu Megacode manikin placed on the ground. Measurements were taken after 1 min and 4 min following the beginning of the trial. The angular position of the elbows was evaluated with a BTS Smart DX 7000 motion capture system. Kistler platforms 9286BA were used for measuring forces. Results: In the paramedic group, one statistically significant difference was observed in the mean difference between maximal and minimal right elbow angle in the 1st min without the device vs. the mean difference in the 4th min without the device. In the paramedic group, a 25% force decrease was observed after 4 min of resuscitation in trials without the CPRmeter in comparison to the 1st min. In trials with the CPRmeter, the force parameters were similar in the 1st and 4th min and more stable. No statistically significant differences were noticed in the control group. Conclusions: The CPRmeter has influence on the magnitude of the forces applied by the upper limbs and on the optimization of the rescuer effort during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The CPRmeter had no influence on the position of the upper part of the kinematic chain. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(6:909–916

  12. Descriptive Analysis of Medication Administration During Inpatient Cardiopulmonary Arrest Resuscitation (from the Mayo Registry for Telemetry Efficacy in Arrest Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipelisky, David; Ray, Jordan; Matcha, Gautam; Roy, Archana; Dumitrascu, Adrian; Harris, Dana; Bosworth, Veronica; Clark, Brooke; Thomas, Colleen S; Heckman, Michael G; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler; Kusumoto, Fred; Burton, M Caroline

    2016-05-15

    Advanced cardiovascular life support guidelines exist, yet there are variations in clinical practice. Our study aims to describe the utilization of medications during resuscitation from in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. A retrospective review of patients who suffered a cardiopulmonary arrest from May 2008 to June 2014 was performed. Clinical and resuscitation data, including timing and dose of medications used, were extracted from the electronic medical record and comparisons made. A total of 94 patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into different groups based on the medication combination used during resuscitation: (1) epinephrine; (2) epinephrine and bicarbonate; (3) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and calcium; (4) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and epinephrine drip; and (5) epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, and epinephrine drip. No difference in baseline demographics or clinical data was present, apart from history of dementia and the use of calcium channel blockers. The number of medications given was correlated with resuscitation duration (Spearman's rank correlation = 0.50, p resuscitation durations compared to that of the other groups (p resuscitation efforts for in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests. Increased duration and mortality rates were found in those resuscitations compared with epinephrine alone, likely due to the longer resuscitation duration in the former groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Thrombolysis during extended cardiopulmonary resuscitation for autoimmune-related pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian-Ping; Ying, Ke-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism (MPE) and acute myocardial infarction are the two most common causes of cardiac arrest (CA). At present, lethal hemorrhage makes thrombolytic therapy underused during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, despite the potential benefits for these underlying conditions. Hypercoagulability of the blood in autoimmune disorders (such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia) carries a risk of MPE. It is critical to find out the etiology of CA for timely thrombolytic intervention. A 23-year-old woman with a 10-year medical history of autoimmune hemolytic anemia suffered from CA in our emergency intensive care unit. ECG and echocardiogram indicated the possibility of MPE, so fibrinolytic therapy (alteplase) was successful during prolonged resuscitation. Neurological recovery of the patient was generally good, and no fatal bleeding developed. MPE was documented by CT pulmonary angiography. A medical history of autoimmune disease poses a risk of PE, and the causes of CA (such as this) should be investigated etiologically. A therapy with alteplase may be used early during cardiopulmonary resuscitation once there is presumptive evidence of PE. Clinical trials are needed in this setting to study patients with hypercoagulable states.

  14. Measuring and improving cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality inside the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Christopher; Bobrow, Bentley J; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler F; Dameff, Christian; Stolz, Uwe; Silver, Annemarie; Roosa, Jason; Page, Rianne; LoVecchio, Frank; Spaite, Daniel W

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate CPR quality during cardiac resuscitation attempts in an urban emergency department (ED) and determine the influence of the combination of scenario-based training, real-time audiovisual feedback (RTAVF), and post-event debriefing on CPR quality. CPR quality was recorded using an R Series monitor-defibrillator (ZOLL Medical) during the treatment of adult cardiac arrest patients. Phase 1 (P1; 11/01/2010-11/15/2012) was an observation period of CPR quality. Phase 2 (P2; 11/15/2012-11/08/2013) was after a 60-min psychomotor skills CPR training and included RTAVF and post-event debriefing. A total of 52 cardiac arrest patients were treated in P1 (median age 56 yrs, 63.5% male) and 49 in P2 (age 60 yrs, 83.7% male). Chest compression (CC) depth increased from 46.7 ± 3.8mm in P1 to 61.6 ± 2.8mm in P2 (p CPR feedback, and post-event debriefing was associated with improved CPR quality and compliance with CPR guidelines in this urban teaching emergency department. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Medical history of hypercholesterolaemia adversely affects the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation; the 'Shahal' experience in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, A; Golovner, M; Gavish, D; Shapira, I; Malov, N; Sender, J; Alroy, I; Kaplinski, E; Laniado, S

    2000-05-01

    To evaluate the impact selected risk factors for cardiac death may have on the success rate in a large cohort of subscribers to 'SHAHAL' who were resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. In this medical facility currently serving 50 000 subscribers, data were prospectively gathered from between 1987-1998. The information retrieved from the patients' medical records included a medical history of hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia (>220.mg. dl(-1)) smoking, angina, previous myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. A total of 998 patients aged 74+/-12 years (mean+/-1 SD) were included. Death was announced at the scene for 659 (66%) victims, while 339 (34%) patients were taken to hospital. Of these 140 (14% of the total cohort) survived and were discharged from the hospital. A comparison of various selected parameters between survivors and non-survivors of resuscitation revealed that survivors were younger, had a higher rate of pulseless ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation, more were among the arrests witnessed by the 'SHAHAL' team, and that more had a shorter time lag to initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation than non-survivors. None of the studied risk factors predicted the outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, with the exception of hypercholesterolaemia, which carried a significantly worse prognosis for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (P=0.009). A medical history of hypercholesterolaemia appears to be an important risk factor which adversely affects the outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Copyright 2000 The European Society of Cardiology.

  16. [Public access defibrillation: successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation due to automatic external defibrillator at traffic accident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanke, S; Reuter, H; Pfister, R; Michels, G

    2014-03-01

    A 65-year-old man collapsed after he stepped out of his car after a traffic accident. Fortunately, two police officers on a routine patrol in the area were quickly on the scene and started cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A passerby noticed that the patient was in distress and that an automatic defibrillator was nearby. He attached the electrodes of the defibrillator to the chest of the patient in accordance with instructions on the defibrillator and terminated the ventricular fibrillation (200 joule, biphasic). Emergency cardiac catheterization revealed a subtotal stenosis proximally in the right coronary artery, which was successfully treated with a stent. Based on the ideal basic life support, the immediate care by emergency mobile system and coronary angioplasty with successful revascularisation the patient could be released without any neurological deficit. This case illustrates that laypersons can use automatic external defibrillator in case of cardiac resuscitation sufficiently and quickly. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Nurses' reactions to participation in cardiopulmonary resuscitation on the nursing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pups, G M; Weyker, J D; Rodgers, B L

    1997-02-01

    A wide range of emotions are associated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attempts. Articles documenting nurses' reactions to CPR situations are scarce in the nursing literature. This study contains nurses' own descriptions of feelings experienced during and after CPR attempts and the nurses' suggestions for what could make the experience easier, what makes it more difficult, and what interventions the nurses use to reconcile their emotions. The participants were 29 registered nurses employed at an urban Midwestern hospital who completed an open-ended questionnaire that elicited descriptions of CPR events. The data were analyzed using a process of thematic analysis.

  18. Training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation: impact on the theoretical knowledge of nurses.

    OpenAIRE

    Morlin Bertoglio, Vanderléia; Azzolin,Karina; Nogueira De Souza, Emiliane; Rejane Rabelo, Eneida

    2008-01-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed at evaluating the knowledge of nurses on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as a function of the time elapsed since training was concluded. The study was performed in a general hospital in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, during July and August, 2005. Nurses were assigned to groups 1 (33 nurses, in units equipped with a heart monitor and a cardiac defibrillator) and 2 (23 nurses, in units without this equipment). Nurses in group 1 showed better knowledge on t...

  19. Study of Survival Rate After Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) in Hospitals of Kermanshah in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Afshin; Jalali, Amir; Almasi, Afshin; Naderipour, Arsalan; Kalhori, Reza Pourmirza; Khodadadi, Amineh

    2015-01-01

    Background: After CPR, the follow-up of survival rate and caused complications are the most important practices of the medical group. This study was performed aimed at determining the follow-up results after CPR in patients of university hospitals in Kermanshah in 2014. Methods: In this prospective study, 320 samples were examined. A purposive sampling method was used, and data was collected using a researcher-made information form with content and face validity and reliability of r= 0.79. Data was analyzed with STATA9 software and statistical tests, including calculation of the success rate, relative risk (RR), chi-square and Fisher at significance level of P < 0.05. Results: The initial success rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was equal to 15.3%, while the ultimate success rate (discharged alive from the hospital) was as 10.6%. The six-month success rate after resuscitation was 8.78% than those who were discharged alive. There were no significant statistical differences between different age groups regarding the initial success rate of resuscitation (P = 0.14), and the initial resuscitation success rate was higher in patients in morning shift (P = 0.02). Conclusion: By the results of study, it is recommended to increase the medical - nursing knowledge and techniques for personnel in the evening and night shifts. Also, an appropriate dissemination of health care staff in working shifts should be done to increase the success rate of CPR procedure. PMID:25560341

  20. A tourniquet assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation augments myocardial perfusion in a porcine model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengfei; Tang, David; Wu, Xiaobo; Hu, Xianwen; Xu, Jiefeng; Qian, Jie; Yang, Min; Tang, Wanchun

    2015-01-01

    During cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), myocardial blood flow generated by chest compression rarely exceeds 35% of its normal level. Cardiac output generated by chest compression decreases gradually with the prolongation of cardiac arrest and resuscitation. Early studies have demonstrated that myocardial blood flow during CPR is largely dependent on peripheral vascular resistance. In this study, we investigated the effects of chest compression in combination with physical control of peripheral vascular resistance assisted by tourniquets on myocardial blood flow during CPR. Ventricular fibrillation was induced and untreated for 7 min in ten male domestic pigs weighing between 33 and 37 kg. The animals were then randomized to receive CPR alone or a tourniquet assisted CPR (T-CPR). In the CPR alone group, chest compression was performed by a miniaturized mechanical chest compressor. In the T-CPR group, coincident with the start of resuscitation, the thin elastic tourniquets were wrapped around the four limbs from the distal end to the proximal part. After 2 min of CPR, epinephrine (20 μg/kg) was administered via the femoral vein. After 5 min of CPR, defibrillation was attempted by a single 150 J shock. If resuscitation was not successful, CPR was resumed for 2 min before the next defibrillation. The protocol was continued until successful resuscitation or for a total of 15 min. Five minutes after resuscitation, the elastic tourniquets were removed. The resuscitated animals were observed for 2h. T-CPR generated significantly greater coronary perfusion pressure, end-tidal carbon dioxide and carotid blood flow. There was no difference in both intrathoracic positive and negative pressures between the two groups. All animals were successfully resuscitated with a single shock in both groups. There were no significant changes in hemodynamics observed in the animals treated in the T-CPR group before-and-after the release of tourniquets at post-resuscitation 5 min. T

  1. Survival and neurological outcomes after nasopharyngeal cooling or peripheral vein cold saline infusion initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Barbut, Denise; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Cho, Jun Hwi; Sun, Shijie; Li, Yongqin; Weil, Max Harry; Tang, Wanchun

    2010-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that nasopharyngeal cooling initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves the success of resuscitation. In this study, we compared the effects of nasopharyngeal cooling with cold saline infusion initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation on resuscitation outcome in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest. We hypothesized that nasopharyngeal cooling initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation would yield better resuscitation outcome when compared with cold saline infusion. Randomized, prospective animal study. University-affiliated research laboratory. Yorkshire-X domestic pigs (Sus scrofa). Ventricular fibrillation was induced in 14 pigs weighing 38 +/- 2 kg. After 15 mins of untreated ventricular fibrillation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed for 5 mins before defibrillation. Coincident with the start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, animals were randomly assigned to receive nasopharyngeal cooling with the aid of the RhinoChill Device (BeneChill, San Diego, CA) or cold saline infusion with 30 mL/kg 4 degrees C saline. One hour after restoration of spontaneous circulation, surface cooling was begun with the aid of a water blanket in both groups and maintained for 4 hrs. Jugular vein temperature significantly decreased in animals subjected to nasopharyngeal cooling in comparison with those receiving cold saline infusion (p cold saline infusion (p cold saline infusion group (p = .02). In this model, nasopharyngeal cooling initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation improved the success of resuscitation compared to cooling with cold saline infusion.

  2. Recognising out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency calls increases bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Initiation of early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) depends on bystanders' or medical dispatchers' recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The primary aim of our study was to investigate if OHCA recognition during the emergency call was associated with byst......BACKGROUND: Initiation of early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) depends on bystanders' or medical dispatchers' recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The primary aim of our study was to investigate if OHCA recognition during the emergency call was associated...... with bystander CPR, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and 30-day survival. Our secondary aim was to identify patient-, setting-, and dispatcher-related predictors of OHCA recognition. METHODS: We performed an observational study of all OHCA patients' emergency calls in the Capital Region of Denmark from...... the association between OHCA recognition and bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival. Univariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify predictors of OHCA recognition. RESULTS: We included 779 emergency calls in the analyses. During the emergency calls, 70.1% (n=534) of OHCAs were recognised...

  3. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training for Medical Students in Anesthesiology Rotation in Ardabil Medical University (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh Isazadehfar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR training for undergraduate medical students has been noted to be poor in the past. Attempts have been made The aim of this study is to determine effect of CPR training in the anesthetic ward to improve knowledge and practice undergraduate medical student of CPR.Methods: A 12 month Educational experimental study with self control was done on all undergraduate medical student (n=30 at the medical university of Ardabil in 2006-2007. During I month of program allthis students have undergone CPR training including basic life support (BLS , advanced cardiac life support (ACLS and practical skills. Data were collected via questionnaire, demographic, pre/post knowledge and practice.Results: After training the acceptable score (good and very good about knowledge of BLS, ACLS and practical skill significantly increased %6.7 to %50 (p=0.0001 , %13.3 to %53.4 (p=0.001 and %3.3 to %100 (p=0.001 respectively. A significant relationship between knowledge of ACLS and practical skills was shown (p=0.005.Conclusion: The CPR training course in anesthetic ward leads to a significant increased in skills and knowledge. Adding this course to undergraduate curriculum of medical students especially in operaticallywards (e.g. Anesthetic ward is essential.Keywords: CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION; TRAINING; BASIC LIFE SUPPORT; ADVANCED CARDIAC LIFE SUPPORT

  4. Opportunities and barriers to cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in English secondary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockey, Andrew S; Barton, Katherine; Yoxall, Heather

    2016-10-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation rates and survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are poor in the UK compared with areas abroad that deliver mandatory training to all school children. We sought to identify barriers to training and develop a strategy to enable delivery of this training. Qualitative analysis, comprising semistructured interviews and group discussions, covering 14 schools in the metropolitan borough of Calderdale in West Yorkshire. Only three schools out of 14 were delivering training to entire year groups. Barriers include lack of resources, lack of training for teachers and difficulty in initiating a programme. Strategies were developed to overcome these barriers with the result that four additional schools are now teaching a whole year group. There is no single solution and bespoke plans may be needed for each school. The establishment of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in secondary schools in the UK is achievable. The commonly perceived barriers to establishment of training are all surmountable, but solving them does not necessarily ensure universal coverage. Support from healthcare professionals, in particular public health, is essential to ensure that the training is as widespread as possible. Mandatory inclusion of this training on the school curriculum, as seen in other countries, would result in significantly improved survival rates from out-of-hospital cardiorespiratory arrest. Solutions to improve training have been proposed, which could be used in other parts of Europe where such training is not a mandatory requirement.

  5. The effect of strength training on quality of prolonged basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelairas-Gómez, Cristian; Barcala-Furelos, Roberto; Szarpak, Łukasz; García-García, Óscar; Paz-Domínguez, Álvaro; López-García, Sergio; Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Providing high-quality chest compressions and rescue breaths are key elements in the effectiveness of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. To investigate the effects of a strength training programme on the quality of prolonged basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a manikin. This was a quasi-experimental trial. Thirty-nine participants with prior basic life support knowledge were randomised to an experimental or control group. They then performed a test of 10 min of chest compressions and mouth-to-mouth ventilation on manikins equipped with a skill reporter tool (baseline or test 1). The experimental group participated in a four-week strength training programme focused on the muscles involved in chest compressions. Both groups were subsequently tested again (test 2). After training, the experimental group significantly increased the mean depth of compression (53.7 ± 2.3 mm vs. 49.9 ± 5.9 mm; p = 0.003) and the correct compression fraction (68.2 ± 21.0% vs. 46.4 ± 29.1%; p = 0.004). Trained subjects maintained chest compression quality over time better than the control group. The mean tidal volume delivered was higher in the experimental than in the control group (701.5 ± 187.0 mL vs. 584.8 ± 113.6 mL; p = 0.040) and above the current resuscitation guidelines. In test 2, the percentage of rescue breaths with excessive volume was higher in the experi-mental group than in the controls (31.5 ± 19.6% vs. 15.6 ± 13.0%; p = 0.007). A simple strength training programme has a significant impact on the quality of chest compressions and its maintenance over time. Additional training is needed to avoid over-ventilation of potential patients.

  6. Survival after In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Major Referral Center during 2001-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Rafati

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite efforts to save more people suffering from in-hospital cardiac arrest, rates of survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR are no better today than they were more than a decade ago. This study was undertaken to assess the demographics, clinical parameters and outcomes of patients undergoing CPR by the code blue team at our center during 2001 to 2008. Data were collected retrospectively from adult patients (n=2262 who underwent CPR. Clinical outcomes of interest were survival at the end of CPR and survival at discharge from the hospital. Factors associated with survival were evaluated using binomial and Chi Square tests. Of the patients included (n=2262, 741 patients (32.8% had successful CPR. The number of male patients requiring CPR was more than females in need of the procedure. The majority of patients requiring CPR were older than 60 years (56.4±17.9. The number of successful CPR cases in long-day shift (7:00 to 19:00 was more than that in the night shift (19:00 to 7:00. Furthermore, 413 (18.4% cases were resuscitated on holidays and 1849 (81.7% on the working days. The duration of CPR was 10 min or less in 710 (31.4% cases. Cardiopulmonary resuscitations which lasted less than 10 minutes were associated with better outcomes. The findings of the present study indicate that some manageable factors including the duration of CPR, working shift, working day (holiday or non-holiday could affect the CPR outcomes. The findings might also be taken as evidence to suggest that the allocation of more personnel in each shift especially in night shifts and holidays, planning to increase the personnel's CPR skills, and decreasing the waste time would result in the improvement of CPR outcome.

  7. Are YouTube videos accurate and reliable on basic life support and cardiopulmonary resuscitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaylaci, Serpil; Serinken, Mustafa; Eken, Cenker; Karcioglu, Ozgur; Yilmaz, Atakan; Elicabuk, Hayri; Dal, Onur

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate reliability and accuracy of the information on YouTube videos related to CPR and BLS in accord with 2010 CPR guidelines. YouTube was queried using four search terms 'CPR', 'cardiopulmonary resuscitation', 'BLS' and 'basic life support' between 2011 and 2013. Sources that uploaded the videos, the record time, the number of viewers in the study period, inclusion of human or manikins were recorded. The videos were rated if they displayed the correct order of resuscitative efforts in full accord with 2010 CPR guidelines or not. Two hundred and nine videos meeting the inclusion criteria after the search in YouTube with four search terms ('CPR', 'cardiopulmonary resuscitation', 'BLS' and 'basic life support') comprised the study sample subjected to the analysis. Median score of the videos is 5 (IQR: 3.5-6). Only 11.5% (n = 24) of the videos were found to be compatible with 2010 CPR guidelines with regard to sequence of interventions. Videos uploaded by 'Guideline bodies' had significantly higher rates of download when compared with the videos uploaded by other sources. Sources of the videos and date of upload (year) were not shown to have any significant effect on the scores received (P = 0.615 and 0.513, respectively). The videos' number of downloads did not differ according to the videos compatible with the guidelines (P = 0.832). The videos downloaded more than 10,000 times had a higher score than the others (P = 0.001). The majority of You-Tube video clips purporting to be about CPR are not relevant educational material. Of those that are focused on teaching CPR, only a small minority optimally meet the 2010 Resucitation Guidelines. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  8. Hypothermia and postconditioning after cardiopulmonary resuscitation reduce cardiac dysfunction by modulating inflammation, apoptosis and remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Meybohm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mild therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest is neuroprotective, but its effect on myocardial dysfunction that is a critical issue following resuscitation is not clear. This study sought to examine whether hypothermia and the combination of hypothermia and pharmacological postconditioning are cardioprotective in a model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation following acute myocardial ischemia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty pigs (28-34 kg were subjected to cardiac arrest following left anterior descending coronary artery ischemia. After 7 minutes of ventricular fibrillation and 2 minutes of basic life support, advanced cardiac life support was started according to the current AHA guidelines. After successful return of spontaneous circulation (n = 21, coronary perfusion was reestablished after 60 minutes of occlusion, and animals were randomized to either normothermia at 38 degrees C, hypothermia at 33 degrees C or hypothermia at 33 degrees C combined with sevoflurane (each group n = 7 for 24 hours. The effects on cardiac damage especially on inflammation, apoptosis, and remodeling were studied using cellular and molecular approaches. Five animals were sham operated. Animals treated with hypothermia had lower troponin T levels (p<0.01, reduced infarct size (34+/-7 versus 57+/-12%; p<0.05 and improved left ventricular function compared to normothermia (p<0.05. Hypothermia was associated with a reduction in: (i immune cell infiltration, (ii apoptosis, (iii IL-1beta and IL-6 mRNA up-regulation, and (iv IL-1beta protein expression (p<0.05. Moreover, decreased matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity was detected in the ischemic myocardium after treatment with mild hypothermia. Sevoflurane conferred additional protective effects although statistic significance was not reached. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Hypothermia reduced myocardial damage and dysfunction after cardiopulmonary resuscitation possible via a reduced rate of apoptosis

  9. Attitude and skill levels of graduate health professionals in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebreegziabher Gebremedhn, Endale; Berhe Gebregergs, Gebremedhn; Anderson, Bernard Bradley; Nagaratnam, Vidhya

    2017-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an emergency procedure used to treat victims following cardiopulmonary arrest. Graduate health professionals at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital manage many trauma and critically ill patients. The chance of survival after cardiopulmonary arrest may be increased with sufficient attitude and skill levels. The study aimed to assess the attitude and skill levels of graduate health professionals in performing CPR. A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted from May 1 to 30, 2013, at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital. The mean attitude and skill scores were compared for sex, original residence, and department of the participants using Student's t-test and analysis of variance (Scheffe's test). P-values skill scores were 2.34 (SD =1.95), 3.77 (SD =1.58), 1.18 (SD =1.52), 2.16 (SD =1.93), 3.88 (SD =1.36), and 1.21 (SD =1.77), respectively. Attitude and skill level of graduate health professionals with regard to CPR were insufficient. Training on CPR for graduate health professionals needs to be given emphasis.

  10. Stress and Coping of Critical Care Nurses After Unsuccessful Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMeekin, Dawn E; Hickman, Ronald L; Douglas, Sara L; Kelley, Carol G

    2017-03-01

    Participation by a critical care nurse in an unsuccessful resuscitation can create a unique heightened level of psychological stress referred to as postcode stress, activation of coping behaviors, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). To explore the relationships among postcode stress, coping behaviors, and PTSD symptom severity in critical care nurses after experiencing unsuccessful cardiopulmonary resuscitations and to see whether institutional support attenuates these repeated psychological traumas. A national sample of 490 critical care nurses was recruited from the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses' eNewsline and social media. Participants completed the Post-Code Stress Scale, the Brief COPE (abbreviated), and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, which were administered through an online survey. Postcode stress and PTSD symptom severity were weakly associated (r = 0.20, P = .01). No significant associations between coping behaviors and postcode stress were found. Four coping behaviors (denial, self-distraction, self-blame, and behavioral disengagement) were significant predictors of PTSD symptom severity. Severity of postcode stress and PTSD symptoms varied with the availability of institutional support. Critical care nurses show moderate levels of postcode stress and PTSD symptoms when asked to recall an unsuccessful resuscitation and the coping behaviors used. Identifying the critical care nurses most at risk for PTSD will inform the development of interventional research to promote critical care nurses' psychological well-being and reduce their attrition from the profession. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  11. Near-infrared spectroscopy during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and after restoration of spontaneous circulation: a valid technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wik, Lars

    2016-06-01

    This article explores the status of using near-infrared spectroscopy and reporting cerebral oximetry (rSO2) for cardiac arrest patients. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) patients have significantly higher rSO2 compared with no bystander CPR patients. It is unclear how quickly rSO2 changes with hemodynamic instability. rSO2 during mechanical CPR varies between 44 and 55% and manual CPR varies between 20 and 40%, representing a significant relative rSO2 increase. Studies have found a relationship between rSO2 and restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and rSO2 increase can be used as a sign of ROSC. rSO2 evaluation is effective for monitoring quality of resuscitation and neurological prognostication. It seems that cardiac arrest patients with good neurologic outcome have significantly higher rSO2 levels (CPC 1-2 median rSO2 68%, CPC 3-5 median rSO2 58%, P infrared spectroscopy and rSO2 have been used as a monitor during CPR, detection of ROSC, after ROSC, and during post-resuscitation care. Prospective, controlled, randomized clinical studies are needed to document their wide use.

  12. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation decisions in the emergency department: An ethnography of tacit knowledge in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummell, Stephen P; Seymour, Jane; Higginbottom, Gina

    2016-05-01

    Despite media images to the contrary, cardiopulmonary resuscitation in emergency departments is often unsuccessful. The purpose of this ethnographic study was to explore how health care professionals working in two emergency departments in the UK, make decisions to commence, continue or stop resuscitation. Data collection involved participant observation of resuscitation attempts and in-depth interviews with nurses, medical staff and paramedics who had taken part in the attempts. Detailed case examples were constructed for comparative analysis. Findings show that emergency department staff use experience and acquired tacit knowledge to construct a typology of cardiac arrest categories that help them navigate decision making. Categorisation is based on 'less is more' heuristics which combine explicit and tacit knowledge to facilitate rapid decisions. Staff then work as a team to rapidly assimilate and interpret information drawn from observations of the patient's body and from technical, biomedical monitoring data. The meaning of technical data is negotiated during staff interaction. This analysis was informed by a theory of 'bodily' and 'technical' trajectory alignment that was first developed from an ethnography of death and dying in intensive care units. The categorisation of cardiac arrest situations and trajectory alignment are the means by which staff achieve consensus decisions and determine the point at which an attempt should be withdrawn. This enables them to construct an acceptable death in highly challenging circumstances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Duration of ventilations during cardiopulmonary resuscitation by lay rescuers and first responders: relationship between delivering chest compressions and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beesems, Stefanie G.; Wijmans, Lizzy; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2013-01-01

    The 2010 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation allow 5 seconds to give 2 breaths to deliver sufficient chest compressions and to keep perfusion pressure high. This study aims to determine whether the recommended short interruption for ventilations by trained lay rescuers and first responders

  14. Positive end-expiratory pressure improves survival in a rodent model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation using high-dose epinephrine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCaul, Conán

    2009-10-01

    Multiple interventions have been tested in models of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to optimize drug use, chest compressions, and ventilation. None has studied the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on outcome. We hypothesized that because PEEP can reverse pulmonary atelectasis, lower pulmonary vascular resistance, and potentially improve cardiac output, its use during CPR would increase survival.

  15. Interruption of cardiopulmonary resuscitation with the use of the automated external defibrillator in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alem, Anouk P.; Sanou, Björn T.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2003-01-01

    Study objective: The protocol for the use of the automated external defibrillator calls for a period of "hands-off" time, during which no cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can be performed. We assessed the actual interruption time of CPR during the use of the automated external defibrillator in

  16. The effectiveness of ultrabrief and brief educational videos for training lay responders in hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation: implications for the future of citizen cardiopulmonary resuscitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrow, Bentley J; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler F; Spaite, Daniel W; Potts, Jerald; Denninghoff, Kurt; Chikani, Vatsal; Brazil, Paula R; Ramsey, Bob; Abella, Benjamin S

    2011-03-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) but often is not performed. We hypothesized that subjects viewing very short Hands-Only CPR videos will (1) be more likely to attempt CPR in a simulated OHCA scenario and (2) demonstrate better CPR skills than untrained individuals. This study is a prospective trial of 336 adults without recent CPR training randomized into 4 groups: (1) control (no training) (n=51); (2) 60-second video training (n=95); (3) 5-minute video training (n=99); and (4) 8-minute video training, including manikin practice (n=91). All subjects were tested for their ability to perform CPR during an adult OHCA scenario using a CPR-sensing manikin and Laerdal PC SkillReporting software. One half of the trained subjects were randomly assigned to testing immediately and the other half after a 2-month delay. Twelve (23.5%) controls did not even attempt CPR, which was true of only 2 subjects (0.7%; P=0.01) from any of the experimental groups. All experimental groups had significantly higher average compression rates (closer to the recommended 100/min) than the control group (P38 mm) than the control group (Pvideos are more likely to attempt CPR and show superior CPR skills than untrained laypersons. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01191736.

  17. Prognostic factors of the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a cardiology hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Timerman

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the early and late results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a cardiology hospital and to try to detect prognostic determinants of both short- and long-term survival. METHODS: A series of 557 patients who suffered cardiorespiratory arrest (CRA at the Dante Pazzanese Cardiology Institute over a period of 5 years was analyzed to examine factors predicting successful resuscitation and long-term survival. RESULTS: Ressuscitation maneuvers were tried in 536 patients; 281 patients (52.4% died immediately, and 164 patients (30.6% survived for than 24 hours. The 87 patients who survived for more than 1 month after CRA were compared with nonsurvivors. Coronary disease, cardiomyopathy, and valvular disease had a better prognosis. Primary arrhythmia occurred in 73.5% of the >1-month survivor group and heart failure occurred in 12.6% of this group. In those patients in whom the initial mechanism of CRA was ventricular fibrillation, 33.3% survived for more than 1 month, but of those with ventricular asystole only 4.3% survived. None of the 10 patients with electromechanical dissociation survived. There was worse prognosis in patients included in the extreme age groups (zero to 10 years and 70 years or more. The best results occurred when the cardiac arrest took place in the catheterization laboratories. The worst results occurred in the intensive care unit and the hemodialysis room. CONCLUSION: The results in our series may serve as a helpful guide to physicians with the difficult task of deciding when not to resuscitate or when to stop resuscitation efforts.

  18. Use of donors who have suffered cardiopulmonary arrest and resuscitation in lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarczyk, Kevin; Osswald, Brigitte R; Pizanis, Nikolaus; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Massoudy, Parwis; Heckmann, Jens; Jakob, Heinz G; Kamler, Markus

    2011-03-01

    Shortage of donors is one of the major limitations in lung transplantation (LuTX) and an aggressive expansion of criteria for donor selection has been proposed. This study evaluates the outcome of recipients of pulmonary grafts coming from resuscitated donors when compared with recipients of non-resuscitated donors. We retrospectively analyzed the donor and recipient charts of all double LuTX performed at our institution between 2000 and 2008 with regard to the performance of donor-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Out of 186 eligible transplants, 22 patients (11.8%) received lungs from donors who have suffered cardiac arrest (CA) and subsequent CPR. Mean duration of CPR was 15.2 ± 11.3 min. Terminal laboratory profiles of CPR donors and non-CPR donors were similar as were ventilation time and paO(2)/FiO(2) ratio before organ harvesting or chest X-ray. CPR-donor status did not affect the following indices of graft function: length of postoperative ventilation, paO(2)/FiO(2) ratio up to 48 h and lung function up to 60 months. Length of intensive care and hospital stay, need for inotropic support and 30-day mortality were not significantly different for the transplantation of CPR or no-CPR donor lungs. One- and 3-year survival rates were comparable as well with 84.4% and 66.3% for CPR donors versus 88.5% and 69.8% no-CPR donors. This study indicates that transplantation of lungs from resuscitated donors may not affect outcome after LuTX. Therefore, donor history of CA should not automatically preclude LuTX. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Attitude and skill levels of graduate health professionals in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebreegziabher Gebremedhn E

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Endale Gebreegziabher Gebremedhn,1 Gebremedhn Berhe Gebregergs,2 Bernard Bradley Anderson,3,† Vidhya Nagaratnam1 1Department of Anaesthesia, School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, 2Department of Public Health, Bahir Dar College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar, 3Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia †Dr Bernard Bradley Anderson passed away on January 2, 2014 Background: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is an emergency procedure used to treat victims following cardiopulmonary arrest. Graduate health professionals at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital manage many trauma and critically ill patients. The chance of survival after cardiopulmonary arrest may be increased with sufficient attitude and skill levels. The study aimed to assess the attitude and skill levels of graduate health professionals in performing CPR.Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted from May 1 to 30, 2013, at the University of Gondar Teaching Hospital. The mean attitude and skill scores were compared for sex, original residence, and department of the participants using Student’s t-test and analysis of variance (Scheffe’s test. P-values <0.05 were considered to be statistically significant.Results: Of the 506 graduates, 461 were included in this study with a response rate of 91.1%. The mean attitude scores of nurse, interns, health officer, midwifery, anesthesia, and psychiatric nursing graduates were 1.15 (standard deviation [SD] =1.67, 8.21 (SD =1.24, 7.2 (SD =1.49, 6.69 (SD =1.83, 8.19 (SD =1.77, and 7.29 (SD =2.01, respectively, and the mean skill scores were 2.34 (SD =1.95, 3.77 (SD =1.58, 1.18 (SD =1.52, 2.16 (SD =1.93, 3.88 (SD =1.36, and 1.21 (SD =1.77, respectively.Conclusion and recommendations: Attitude and skill level of graduate health professionals with regard

  20. A Review of the Performance of Artifact Filtering Algorithms for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushun Gong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Various filtering strategies have been adopted and investigated to suppress the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR artifact. In this article, two types of artifact removal methods are reviewed: one is the method that removes CPR artifact using only ECG signals, and the other is the method with additional reference signals, such as acceleration, compression depth and transthoracic impedance. After filtering, the signal-to-noise ratio is improved from 0 dB to greater than 2.8 dB, the sensitivity is increased to > 90% as recommended by the American Heart Association, whereas the specificity was far from the recommended 95%, which is considered to be the major drawback of the available artifact removal methods. The overall performance of the adaptive filtering methods with additional reference signal outperforms the methods using only ECG signals. Further research should focus on the refinement of artifact filtering methods and the improvement of shock advice algorithms with the presence of CPR.

  1. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training in Schools Following 8 Years of Mandating Legislation in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Zinckernagel, Line; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: School cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training has become mandatory in many countries, but whether legislation has translated into implementation of CPR training is largely unknown. We assessed CPR training of students following 8 years of legislative mandates in Denmark. METHODS...... to identify factors associated with completed CPR training. Information from 63.1% of eligible schools was collected: 49.3% (n=611) of leadership and 48.2% (n=665) of teachers responded. According to teachers, 28.4% (95% CI 25.0% to 32.0%) and 10.3% (95% CI 8.1% to 12.8%) of eligible classes had completed CPR...... and automated external defibrillator training, respectively. Among leadership, 60.2% (95% CI 56.2% to 64.1%) reported CPR training had occurred during the 3 years prior to the survey. Factors associated with completed CPR training included believing other schools were conducting training (odds ratio [OR] 9...

  2. Association of cardiopulmonary resuscitation psychomotor skills with knowledge and self-efficacy in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Sook; Issenberg, S Barry

    2014-12-01

    Effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills are essential for better patient survival, but whether these skills are associated with knowledge of and self-efficacy in CPR is not well known. The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of CPR skills and identify the association of the psychomotor skills with knowledge and self-efficacy at the time of CPR skills training. A convenience sample of 124 nursing students participated in a one-group posttest-only study. The quality of CPR psychomotor skills, as assessed by structured observation using a manikin, was suboptimal. Nursing students who performed correct chest compression skills reported higher self-efficacy, but there was no association between CPR psychomotor skills and total knowledge. Rigorous skills training sessions with more objective feedback on performance and individual coaching are warranted to enable mastery learning and self-efficacy. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation with semi-automated external defibrillator: assessment of the teaching-learning process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyadahira, Ana Maria Kazue; Quilici, Ana Paula; Martins, Carmem da Costa; de Araújo, Giane Leandro; Pelliciotti, Josikélem da Silva Sodré

    2008-09-01

    Studies demonstrate that, for every minute delayed on defibrillating a heart arrest patient, survival chances decrease by 10%, and that the same chances of survival are 98% effective when it is employed within 30 seconds. While attending a heart arrest patient, it is crucial that the use of external semi-automated defibrillator (AED) is included in the training. The purpose of the present study is to compare Psychomotor Ability and the Theoretical Knowledge of lay people on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) using AED, before and after training. This sample was composed of 40 administrative workers of a public institution that were trained on CPR technique using EAD, as an experiment. The significantly higher scores in the assessment instrument items of Psychomotor Ability and Theoretical Knowledge, after training, indicates that the participants have presented improvements in their performances.

  4. [Research on optimization of lower limb parameters of cardiopulmonary resuscitation simulation model based on genetic algorithm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin

    2014-10-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest is one of the critical clinical syndromes in emergency situations. A cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a necessary curing means for those patients with sudden cardiac arrest. In order to simulate effectively the hemodynamic effects of human under AEI-CPR, which is active compression-decompression CPR coupled with enhanced external counter-pulsation and inspiratory impedance threshold valve, and research physiological parameters of each part of lower limbs in more detail, a CPR simulation model established by Babbs was refined. The part of lower limbs was divided into iliac, thigh and calf, which had 15 physiological parameters. Then, these 15 physiological parameters based on genetic algorithm were optimized, and ideal simulation results were obtained finally.

  5. [Training program on cardiopulmonary resuscitation with the use of automated external defibrillator in a university].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Ana Paula; Miyadahira, Ana Maria Kazue

    2012-03-01

    Early defibrillation in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) receives increasing emphasis on its priority and rapidity. This is an experience report about the implementation of a training program in CPR using a defibrillator in a private university. The training program in basic CPR maneuvers was based on global guidelines, including a theorical course with practical demonstration of CPR maneuvers with the defibrillator, individual practical training and theoretical and practical assessments. About the performance of students in the practical assessment the mean scores obtained by students in the first stage of the course was 26.4 points, while in the second stage the mean was 252.8 points, in the theoretical assessment the mean in the first stage was 3.06 points and in the second 9.0 points. The implementation of programs like this contribute to the effective acquisition of knowledge (theory) and skill (pratice) for the care of CPR victims.

  6. Neural injury after use of vasopressin and adrenaline during porcine cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Peter; Sharma, Hari Shanker; Basu, Samar

    2015-01-01

    Background Our aim was to investigate cerebral and cardiac tissue injury subsequent to use of vasopressin and adrenaline in combination compared with vasopressin alone during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Methods In a randomized, prospective, laboratory animal study 28 anesthetized piglets were subject to a 12-min untreated cardiac arrest and subsequent CPR. After 1 min of CPR, 10 of the piglets received 0.4 U/kg of arg8-vasopressin (V group), and 10 piglets received 0.4 U/kg of arg8-vasopressin, 1 min later followed by 20 µg/kg body weight of adrenaline, and another 1 min later continuous administration (10 µg/kg/min) of adrenaline (VA group). After 8 min of CPR, the piglets were defibrillated and monitored for another 3 h. Then they were killed and the brain immediately removed pending histological analysis. Results During CPR, the VA group had higher mean blood pressure and cerebral cortical blood flow (CCBF) but similar coronary perfusion pressure. After restoration of spontaneous circulation there was no difference in the pressure variables, but CCBF tended to be (36% ± 16%) higher in the V group. Neuronal injury and signs of a disrupted blood–brain barrier (BBB) were greater, 20% ± 4% and 21% ± 4%, respectively, in the VA group. In a background study of repeated single doses of adrenaline every third minute after 5 min arrest but otherwise the same protocol, histological measurements showed even worse neural injury and disruption of the BBB. Conclusion Combined use of vasopressin and adrenaline caused greater signs of cerebral and cardiac injury than use of vasopressin alone during experimental cardiopulmonary resuscitation. PMID:25645317

  7. Exploring How Lay Rescuers Overcome Barriers to Provide Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiesen, Wenche Torunn; Bjørshol, Conrad Arnfinn; Høyland, Sindre; Braut, Geir Sverre; Søreide, Eldar

    2017-02-01

    Survival rates after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) vary considerably among regions. The chance of survival is increased significantly by lay rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) before Emergency Medical Services (EMS) arrival. It is well known that for bystanders, reasons for not providing CPR when witnessing an OHCA incident may be fear and the feeling of being exposed to risk. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of why barriers to providing CPR are overcome. Using a semi-structured interview guide, 10 lay rescuers were interviewed after participating in eight OHCA incidents. Qualitative content analysis was used. The lay rescuers were questioned about their CPR-knowledge, expectations, and reactions to the EMS and from others involved in the OHCA incident. They also were questioned about attitudes towards providing CPR in an OHCA incident in different contexts. The lay rescuers reported that they were prepared to provide CPR to anybody, anywhere. Comprehending the severity in the OHCA incident, both trained and untrained lay rescuers provided CPR. They considered CPR provision to be the expected behavior of any community citizen and the EMS to act professionally and urgently. However, when asked to imagine an OHCA in an unclear setting, they revealed hesitation about providing CPR because of risk to their own safety. Mutual trust between community citizens and towards social institutions may be reasons for overcoming barriers in providing CPR by lay rescuers. A normative obligation to act, regardless of CPR training and, importantly, without facing any adverse legal reactions, also seems to be an important factor behind CPR provision. Mathiesen WT , Bjørshol CA , Høyland S , Braut GS , Søreide E . Exploring how lay rescuers overcome barriers to provide cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a qualitative study. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(1):27-32.

  8. Neural injury after use of vasopressin and adrenaline during porcine cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Peter; Sharma, Hari Shanker; Basu, Samar; Wiklund, Lars

    2015-03-01

    Our aim was to investigate cerebral and cardiac tissue injury subsequent to use of vasopressin and adrenaline in combination compared with vasopressin alone during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In a randomized, prospective, laboratory animal study 28 anesthetized piglets were subject to a 12-min untreated cardiac arrest and subsequent CPR. After 1 min of CPR, 10 of the piglets received 0.4 U/kg of arg(8)-vasopressin (V group), and 10 piglets received 0.4 U/kg of arg(8)-vasopressin, 1 min later followed by 20 µg/kg body weight of adrenaline, and another 1 min later continuous administration (10 µg/kg/min) of adrenaline (VA group). After 8 min of CPR, the piglets were defibrillated and monitored for another 3 h. Then they were killed and the brain immediately removed pending histological analysis. During CPR, the VA group had higher mean blood pressure and cerebral cortical blood flow (CCBF) but similar coronary perfusion pressure. After restoration of spontaneous circulation there was no difference in the pressure variables, but CCBF tended to be (36% ± 16%) higher in the V group. Neuronal injury and signs of a disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB) were greater, 20% ± 4% and 21% ± 4%, respectively, in the VA group. In a background study of repeated single doses of adrenaline every third minute after 5 min arrest but otherwise the same protocol, histological measurements showed even worse neural injury and disruption of the BBB. Combined use of vasopressin and adrenaline caused greater signs of cerebral and cardiac injury than use of vasopressin alone during experimental cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  9. A randomized cross-over study of the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation among females performing 30:2 and hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrickson W Clive

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hands-Only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is recommended for use on adult victims of witnessed out-of-hospital (OOH sudden cardiac arrest or in instances where rescuers cannot perform ventilations while maintaining minimally interrupted quality compressions. Promotion of Hands-Only CPR should improve the incidence of bystander CPR and, subsequently, survival from OOH cardiac arrest; but, little is known about a rescuer's ability to deliver continuous chest compressions of adequate rate and depth for periods typical of emergency services response time. This study evaluated chest compression rate and depth as subjects performed Hands-Only CPR for 10 minutes. For comparison purposes, each also performed chest compressions with ventilations (30:2 CPR. It also evaluated fatigue and changes in body biomechanics associated with each type of CPR. Methods Twenty healthy female volunteers certified in basic life support performed Hands-Only CPR and 30:2 CPR on a manikin. A mixed model repeated measures cross-over design evaluated chest compression rate and depth, changes in fatigue (chest compression force, perceived exertion, and blood lactate level, and changes in electromyography and joint kinetics and kinematics. Results All subjects completed 10 minutes of 30:2 CPR; but, only 17 completed 10 minutes of Hands-Only CPR. Rate, average depth, percentage at least 38 millimeters deep, and force of compressions were significantly lower in Hands-Only CPR than in 30:2 CPR. Rates were maintained; but, compression depth and force declined significantly from beginning to end CPR with most decrement occurring in the first two minutes. Perceived effort and joint torque changes were significantly greater in Hands-Only CPR. Performance was not influenced by age. Conclusion Hands-Only CPR required greater effort and was harder to sustain than 30:2 CPR. It is not known whether the observed greater decrement in chest compression depth associated

  10. A randomized cross-over study of the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation among females performing 30:2 and hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, Cynthia; Parekh, Jesal N; Ricard, Mark D; Potts, Jerald; Patrickson, W Clive; Cason, Carolyn L

    2009-07-07

    Hands-Only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is recommended for use on adult victims of witnessed out-of-hospital (OOH) sudden cardiac arrest or in instances where rescuers cannot perform ventilations while maintaining minimally interrupted quality compressions. Promotion of Hands-Only CPR should improve the incidence of bystander CPR and, subsequently, survival from OOH cardiac arrest; but, little is known about a rescuer's ability to deliver continuous chest compressions of adequate rate and depth for periods typical of emergency services response time. This study evaluated chest compression rate and depth as subjects performed Hands-Only CPR for 10 minutes. For comparison purposes, each also performed chest compressions with ventilations (30:2) CPR. It also evaluated fatigue and changes in body biomechanics associated with each type of CPR. Twenty healthy female volunteers certified in basic life support performed Hands-Only CPR and 30:2 CPR on a manikin. A mixed model repeated measures cross-over design evaluated chest compression rate and depth, changes in fatigue (chest compression force, perceived exertion, and blood lactate level), and changes in electromyography and joint kinetics and kinematics. All subjects completed 10 minutes of 30:2 CPR; but, only 17 completed 10 minutes of Hands-Only CPR. Rate, average depth, percentage at least 38 millimeters deep, and force of compressions were significantly lower in Hands-Only CPR than in 30:2 CPR. Rates were maintained; but, compression depth and force declined significantly from beginning to end CPR with most decrement occurring in the first two minutes. Perceived effort and joint torque changes were significantly greater in Hands-Only CPR. Performance was not influenced by age. Hands-Only CPR required greater effort and was harder to sustain than 30:2 CPR. It is not known whether the observed greater decrement in chest compression depth associated with Hands-Only CPR would offset the potential physiological

  11. Effect of Prior Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Knowledge on Compression Performance by Hospital Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Joshua N.; Glick, Joshua E.; Terndrup, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to determine cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) knowledge of hospital providers and whether knowledge affects performance of effective compressions during a simulated cardiac arrest. Methods This cross-sectional study evaluated the CPR knowledge and performance of medical students and ED personnel with current CPR certification. We collected data regarding compression rate, hand placement, depth, and recoil via a questionnaire to determine knowledge, and then we assessed performance using 60 seconds of compressions on a simulation mannequin. Results Data from 200 enrollments were analyzed by evaluators blinded to subject knowledge. Regarding knowledge, 94% of participants correctly identified parameters for rate, 58% for hand placement, 74% for depth, and 94% for recoil. Participants identifying an effective rate of ≥100 performed compressions at a significantly higher rate than participants identifying <100 (μ=117 vs. 94, p<0.001). Participants identifying correct hand placement performed significantly more compressions adherent to guidelines than those identifying incorrect placement (μ=86% vs. 72%, p<0.01). No significant differences were found in depth or recoil performance based on knowledge of guidelines. Conclusion Knowledge of guidelines was variable; however, CPR knowledge significantly impacted certain aspects of performance, namely rate and hand placement, whereas depth and recoil were not affected. Depth of compressions was poor regardless of prior knowledge, and knowledge did not correlate with recoil performance. Overall performance was suboptimal and additional training may be needed to ensure consistent, effective performance and therefore better outcomes after cardiopulmonary arrest. PMID:25035744

  12. Effect of Prior Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Knowledge on Compression Performance by Hospital Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua N. Burkhardt

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR knowledge of hospital providers and whether knowledge affects performance of effective compressions during a simulated cardiac arrest. Methods: This cross-sectional study evaluated the CPR knowledge and performance of medical students and ED personnel with current CPR certification. We collected data regarding compression rate, hand placement, depth, and recoil via a questionnaire to determine knowledge, and then we assessed performance using 60 seconds of compressions on a simulation mannequin. Results: Data from 200 enrollments were analyzed by evaluators blinded to subject knowledge. Regarding knowledge, 94% of participants correctly identified parameters for rate, 58% for hand placement, 74% for depth, and 94% for recoil. Participants identifying an effective rate of ≥100 performed compressions at a significantly higher rate than participants identifying <100 (µ=117 vs. 94, p<0.001. Participants identifying correct hand placement performed significantly more compressions adherent to guidelines than those identifying incorrect placement (µ=86% vs. 72%, p<0.01. No significant differences were found in depth or recoil performance based on knowledge of guidelines. Conclusion: Knowledge of guidelines was variable; however, CPR knowledge significantly impacted certain aspects of performance, namely rate and hand placement, whereas depth and recoil were not affected. Depth of compressions was poor regardless of prior knowledge, and knowledge did not correlate with recoil performance. Overall performance was suboptimal and additional training may be needed to ensure consistent, effective performance and therefore better outcomes after cardiopulmonary arrest.

  13. Factors affecting the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in inpatient units: perception of nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clairton Marcos Citolino Filho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify, in the perception of nurses, the factors that affect the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in adult inpatient units, and investigate the influence of both work shifts and professional experience length of time in the perception of these factors. METHOD A descriptive, exploratory study conducted at a hospital specialized in cardiology and pneumology with the application of a questionnaire to 49 nurses working in inpatient units. RESULTS The majority of nurses reported that the high number of professionals in the scenario (75.5%, the lack of harmony (77.6% or stress of any member of staff (67.3%, lack of material and/or equipment failure (57.1%, lack of familiarity with the emergency trolleys (98.0% and presence of family members at the beginning of the cardiopulmonary arrest assistance (57.1% are factors that adversely affect the quality of care provided during CPR. Professional experience length of time and the shift of nurses did not influence the perception of these factors. CONCLUSION The identification of factors that affect the quality of CPR in the perception of nurses serves as parameter to implement improvements and training of the staff working in inpatient units.

  14. 30 : 2: A Game Designed to Promote the Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imma Boada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is a first-aid key survival technique used to stimulate breathing and keep blood flowing to the heart. Its effective administration can significantly increase the survival chances of cardiac arrest victims. We propose 30 : 2, a videogame designed to introduce the main steps of the CPR protocol. It is not intended for certification and training purpose. Driven by the 2010 European Resuscitation Council guidelines we have designed a game composed of eight mini games corresponding to the main steps of the protocol. The player acts as a helper and has to solve a different challenge. We present a detailed description of the game creation process presenting the requirements, the design decisions, and the implementation details. In addition, we present some first impressions of our testing users (25 children, five of each age from 8 to 12 years old and 12 males and 13 females. We evaluated clarity of instructions and three settings of the game: the aesthetics of scenarios, the playability, and the enjoyability of each mini game. All games were well punctuated, and there are no significantly differences between their sex. The proposed game can be a suitable tool to disseminate and promote CPR knowledge.

  15. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation on Flemish television: challenges to the television effects hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bulck, J; Damiaans, K

    2004-09-01

    People who watch a lot of medical fiction overestimate the success rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). It has been suggested that this is because CPR is usually shown to be successful on television. This study analysed a popular Flemish medical drama series. Previous research showed that heavy viewing of this series was related to overestimation of CPR success. Content analysis of 70 episodes of "Spoed" in the period between 2001 and the first three months of 2003. Causes and treatment of cardiac arrest and outcome of CPR were recorded in the same way as previous studies. CPR was performed 31 times in the 70 episodes. Only 19% of the patients survived the resuscitation attempt. Most patients were middle aged or older. Causes of arrest were different from those in British or American television series. The low survival rate challenges the idea that heavy viewers adopt the overestimation shown by television. Psychological research shows that people ignore base rate information in the shape of statistics, in favour of vivid, dramatic examples. Showing some impressive examples of success might therefore be more important than the overall success rate. It is suggested that the message of television fiction is that doctors are not powerless and that treatment does not stop once the heart stops beating. This helps to create what has been called an "illusion of efficacy".

  16. Two decades of British newspaper coverage regarding do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation decisions: Lessons for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beed, Martin; de Beer, Thearina; Brindley, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    To review UK newspaper reports relating to Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) decisions in order to identify common themes and encourage dialogue. An online media database (LexisNexis(®)) was searched for UK Newspaper articles between 1993 and 2013 that referenced DNACPR decisions. Legal cases, concerning resuscitation decisions, were identified using two case law databases (Lexis Law(®) and Westlaw(®)), and referenced back to newspaper publications. All articles were fully reviewed. Three hundred and thirty one articles were identified, resulting from 77 identifiable incidents. The periods 2000-01 and 2011-13 encompassed the majority of articles. There were 16 high-profile legal cases, nine of which resulted in newspaper articles. Approximately 35 percent of newspaper reports referred to DNACPR decisions apparently made without adequate patient and/or family consultation. "Ageism" was referred to in 9 percent of articles (mostly printed 2000-02); and "discrimination against the disabled" in 8 percent (mostly from 2010-12). Only five newspaper articles (2 percent) discussed patients receiving CPR against their wishes. Eighteen newspaper reports (5 percent) associated DNACPR decisions with active euthanasia. Regarding DNACPR decision-making, the predominant theme was perceived lack of patient involvement, and, more recently, lack of surrogate involvement. Negative language was common, especially when decisions were presumed unilateral. Increased dialogue, and shared decision-making, is recommended. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Outcomes of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Among Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Waleed; Ghafoor, Irum; Jamshed, Arif; Gul, Sabika; Hafeez, Haroon

    2017-04-01

    To review all episodes where an emergency code was called in a cancer-specialized hospital in Pakistan and to assess survival to discharge among patients who received a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We reviewed demographic and clinical data related to all "code blue" calls over 3 years. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test the association of clinical characteristics with the primary outcome of survival to discharge. A total of 646 code blue calls were included in the analysis. The CPR was performed in 388 (60%) of these calls. For every 20 episodes of CPR among patients with cancer of all ages, only 1 resulted in a patient's survival to discharge, even though in 52.2% episodes there was a return of spontaneous circulation. No association was found between the type of rhythm at initiation of CPR and likelihood of survival to discharge. The proportion of patients with advanced cancer surviving to discharge after in-hospital CPR in a low-income country was in line with the reported international experience. Most patients with cancer who received in-hospital CPR did not survive to discharge and did not appear to benefit from resuscitation. Advance directives by patients with cancer limiting aggressive interventions at end of life and proper documentation of these directives will help in provision of care that is humane and consonant with patients' wishes for a dignified death. Patients' early appreciation of the limited benefits of CPR in advanced cancer is likely to help them formulate such advance directives.

  18. Experience with a hospital policy on not offering cardiopulmonary resuscitation when believed more harmful than beneficial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtwright, Andrew M; Brackett, Sharon; Cadge, Wendy; Krakauer, Eric L; Robinson, Ellen M

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the impact of age, race, and functional status on decisions not to offer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) despite patient or surrogate requests that CPR be performed. This was a retrospective cohort study of all ethics committee consultations between 2007 and 2013 at a large academic hospital with a not offering CPR policy. There were 134 cases of disagreement over whether to provide CPR. In 45 cases (33.6%), the patient or surrogate agreed to a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order after initial ethics consultation. In 67 (75.3%) of the remaining 89 cases, the ethics committee recommended not offering CPR. In the other 22 (24.7%) cases, the ethics committee recommended offering CPR. There was no significant relationship between age, race, or functional status and the recommendation not to offer CPR. Patients who were not offered CPR were more likely to be critically ill (61.2% vs 18.2%, P CPR was 90.2%. There was no association between age, race, or functional status and the decision not to offer CPR made in consultation with an ethics committee. Orders to withhold CPR were more common among critically ill patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. How effectively can young people perform dispatcher-instructed cardiopulmonary resuscitation without training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Matthew; Swain, Andrew; Dunning, Andrew; Baine, Julie; Burrowes, Corey

    2015-05-01

    Survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is increased by bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Bystander performance can be improved when CPR instructions are delivered by a calltaker at the Emergency Communications Centre. Little is known about a young person's ability to understand these instructions and perform CPR correctly. We assessed the ability of a group of untrained young people to effectively apply these directions to an adult resuscitation manikin. 87 youngsters aged 7-15 years with no previous training in CPR were separately equipped with a mobile phone and an adult assessment manikin. They phoned the emergency number (111) and were automatically diverted to a senior emergency medical dispatcher (EMD). The EMD delivered resuscitation instructions which complied fully with Medical Priority Dispatch System (version 12.1). Performance was monitored using a Laerdal Computerised Skill Reporting System. Average compression depth increased with age from 10.3 mm to 30 mm for 8 and 15 year olds respectively. 100 compressions per minute was achieved in youngsters aged 10 years and older but the rate fatigued over time and improved after interruption for two ventilations. Those aged 11 years and older consistently compressed the chest from 31 mm to 50mm. Only one participant could successfully ventilate the manikin by mouth-to-mouth. This study demonstrates that untrained youngsters should perform compression-only CPR. From 11 years of age, they can effectively perform dispatcher-directed CPR by compressing the chest at an appropriate rate and depth. However, their technique benefits from formal training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Manual Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Versus CPR Including a Mechanical Chest Compression Device in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Comprehensive Meta-analysis From Randomized and Observational Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnes, J.L.; Brouwer, M.A.; Navarese, E.P.; Verhaert, D.V.; Verheugt, F.W.; Smeets, J.L.; Boer, M.J. de

    2016-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: Mechanical chest compression devices have been developed to facilitate continuous delivery of high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Despite promising hemodynamic data, evidence on clinical outcomes remains inconclusive. With the completion of 3 randomized controlled

  1. If a patient arrests after cardiac surgery is it acceptable to delay cardiopulmonary resuscitation until you have attempted either defibrillation or pacing?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lockowandt, Ulf; Levine, Adrian; Strang, Tim; Dunning, Joel

    2008-01-01

    .... The question addressed was whether it is acceptable to delay cardiopulmonary resuscitation if a patient arrests after cardiac surgery in order to attempt defibrillation or pacing, prior to performing...

  2. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the elderly: analysis of the events in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Tricerri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing number of old people in all western countries and increasing life expectancy at birth, many seniors spend the last period of their life with various afflictions that may lead to cardiac arrest. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR increases survival rates. Octogenarians are the fastest growing segment of the population and despite empirical evidence that CPR is of questionable effectiveness in seniors with comorbidities, it is still the only treatment among life-sustaining ones. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is frequently unsuccessful, but if survival is achieved, a fairly good quality of life can be expected. Various papers analyzed the effect of CPR in hospitalized patients or in cardiac arrest occurring at home or in public places, while less is known about events occurring in the emergency room (ER. We performed a retrospective analysis of cardiac arrest events occurred in ER within 54 months: we analyzed 415,001 records of ER visits (from 01/01/1999 to 30/06/2003 in San Giovanni Addolorata Hospital. Data were analyzed in terms of age and outcome. We identified 475 records with the outcome of death in ER or death on arrival. Out of them, we selected 290 medical records which had sufficient data to be analyzed. Of the 290 patients evaluated, 225 died in ER, 18 were deemed to die on arrival, and 47 survived the cardiac arrest and were admitted to intensive care unit (ICU. The overall mortality was 0.11%, while the incidence of the selected events was 0.072%. The mean age of the analyzed population was 71.3 years. The only possible diagnosis was often cardiac arrest, though most of the times we could specify and group the diagnosis even better. The analysis of the procedures showed that cardiac arrest treated by direct current (DC shock was similarly distributed in different age groups, and no difference was detectable between the two groups. The mean age of the patients who underwent tracheal intubation (TI was

  3. Delayed recovery of spontaneous circulation following cessation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in an older patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yili; Kim, Sijun; Dharia, Amishi; Shalshin, Aleksander; Dauer, Jan

    2013-03-12

    This report describes the apparent 'resurrection' of a patient in an emergency department setting. Befittingly named the 'Lazarus phenomenon', the recovery of spontaneous circulation after cessation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation is an extremely rare occurrence that was first described in 1982 and has been mentioned only 38 times in the medical literature. Our patient's case is remarkable in that it helps illustrate many of the mechanisms of this rare phenomenon. It also serves as a reminder of our limitations in determining when to terminate cardiopulmonary resuscitation and suggests that cessation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation should be approached with more care. An 89-year-old Caucasian woman with a medical history of hypertension, atrial fibrillation, hypothyroidism, aortic insufficiency, lymphedema and hypoxia secondary to partial lung resection presented to our hospital after a witnessed fall unassociated with head trauma or loss of consciousness. On examination, our patient was saturating at 85 percent and exhibited a decreased range of motion of the upper extremities and left hip. Radiographic images revealed a left femoral neck and left distal radius fracture. Our patient was stabilized on 100 percent fraction of inspired oxygen and was awaiting transfer to an in-patient unit when, at 3:30 a.m., she went into cardiac arrest. An advanced cardiac life support protocol was initiated, at which time our patient was intubated and administered epinephrine, vasopressin and sodium bicarbonate. Our patient remained unresponsive and asystolic so cardiopulmonary resuscitation was abandoned at 3:48 a.m. After five minutes a ventricular contraction was noted at 3:51 a.m. This progressed to sinus rhythm with a pulse at 3:53 a.m. Our patient was stabilized on norepinephrine and moved to our Intensive Care Unit. At 10:55 a.m., however, our patient again arrested and, despite resuscitative efforts, was pronounced dead at 11:03 a.m. Our patient's case clearly

  4. Regions With Low Rates of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Have Lower Rates of CPR Training in Victoria, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Bray, Janet E.; Straney, Lahn; Smith, Karen; Cartledge, Susie; Case, Rosalind; Bernard, Stephen; Finn, Judith

    2017-01-01

    Background Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) more than doubles the chance of surviving an out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest. Recent data have shown considerable regional variation in bystander CPR rates across the Australian state of Victoria. This study aims to determine whether there is associated regional variation in rates of CPR training and willingness to perform CPR in these communities. Methods and Results We categorized each Victorian postcode as either a low or high bystand...

  5. Relationship between non-technical skills and technical performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: does stress have an influence?

    OpenAIRE

    Krage, R.; Zwaan, L.; Tjon Soei Len, L.; Kolenbrander, M.; Groeningen, D. van; Loer, S.A.; Wagner, C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Non-technical skills, such as task management, leadership, situational awareness, communication and decision-making refer to cognitive, behavioural and social skills that contribute to safe and efficient team performance. The importance of these skills during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is increasingly emphasised. Nonetheless, the relationship between non-technical skills and technical performance is poorly understood. We hypothesise that non-technical skills become increa...

  6. [Knowledge and attitudes of citizens in the Basque Country (Spain) towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automatic external defibrillators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Peña, S; Fernández-Aedo, I; Pérez-Urdiales, I; García-Azpiazu, Z; Unanue-Arza, S

    2016-03-01

    To explore the training, ability and attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the use of automatic defibrillators among the population of the Basque Country (Spain). A face-to-face survey. Capital cities of the Basque Country. A total of 605 people between 15-64 years of age were randomly selected. Information about the knowledge, perceptions and self-perceived ability to identify and assist cardiopulmonary arrest was requested. A total of 56.4% of the responders were women, 61.8% were occupationally active, and 48.3% had higher education. Thirty-seven percent of the responders claimed to be trained in resuscitation techniques, but only 20.2% considered themselves able to apply such techniques. Public servants were almost 4 times more likely of being trained in defibrillation compared to the rest of workers (OR 3.7; Pdefibrillator. Citizens of the Basque Country consider the early identification and treatment of cardiorespiratory arrest victims to be important, though their knowledge in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation is limited. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  7. [Study of knowledge in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillation in sports instructors of public sport centers in Asturias (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Cuervo, Coral; Cuartas Álvarez, Tatiana; Castro Delgado, Rafael; Arcos González, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the level of knowledge about cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillation (AED) in sport instructors working in public sport centers in Asturias. A cross-sectional study was conducted on sports instructors in May 2014, by completing a self-administered questionnaire on cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of AED, with 25 items and four possible answers, only one valid, divided into five categories (emergency medical system in Asturias, initial assessment, circulation,airway and use of AED). Age, gender, work experience as sports instructor, previous training courses, education and training and employment contract were studied as epidemiological variables. A total 26 questionnaires (52%) were collected in public sports centers, and 84% of total responses were correct. It should be emphasized that among the wrong answers, 42.30% did not know what was the first action in a cardiac arrest, and 36.62% did not know how to perform a complete cardiopulmonary resuscitation if the person affected had a perioral injury, with 46.15% not knowing how to respond to a cardiac arrest due to drowning. It is recommended to include the management of cardiac arrest in their workplace in the training plans and the continuing education of sports instructors, at least every two years, according to national laws and laws from Asturias, including also training on the use and management of AED. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training in High School Using Avatars in Virtual Worlds: An International Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Leif; Heinrichs, LeRoy; Youngblood, Patricia; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2013-01-01

    Background Approximately 300,000 people suffer sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) annually in the United States. Less than 30% of out-of-hospital victims receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) despite the American Heart Association training over 12 million laypersons annually to conduct CPR. New engaging learning methods are needed for CPR education, especially in schools. Massively multiplayer virtual worlds (MMVW) offer platforms for serious games that are promising learning methods that take advantage of the computer capabilities of today’s youth (ie, the digital native generation). Objective Our main aim was to assess the feasibility of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in high school students by using avatars in MMVM. We also analyzed experiences, self-efficacy, and concentration in response to training. Methods In this prospective international collaborative study, an e-learning method was used with high school students in Sweden and the United States. A software game platform was modified for use as a serious game to train in emergency medical situations. Using MMVW technology, participants in teams of 3 were engaged in virtual-world scenarios to learn how to treat victims suffering cardiac arrest. Short debriefings were carried out after each scenario. A total of 36 high school students (Sweden, n=12; United States, n=24) participated. Their self-efficacy and concentration (task motivation) were assessed. An exit questionnaire was used to solicit experiences and attitudes toward this type of training. Among the Swedish students, a follow-up was carried out after 6 months. Depending on the distributions, t tests or Mann-Whitney tests were used. Correlation between variables was assessed by using Spearman rank correlation. Regression analyses were used for time-dependent variables. Results The participants enjoyed the training and reported a self-perceived benefit as a consequence of training. The mean rating for self-efficacy increased from 5.8/7 (SD 0

  9. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in high school using avatars in virtual worlds: an international feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzfeldt, Johan; Hedman, Leif; Heinrichs, LeRoy; Youngblood, Patricia; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2013-01-14

    Approximately 300,000 people suffer sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) annually in the United States. Less than 30% of out-of-hospital victims receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) despite the American Heart Association training over 12 million laypersons annually to conduct CPR. New engaging learning methods are needed for CPR education, especially in schools. Massively multiplayer virtual worlds (MMVW) offer platforms for serious games that are promising learning methods that take advantage of the computer capabilities of today's youth (ie, the digital native generation). Our main aim was to assess the feasibility of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in high school students by using avatars in MMVM. We also analyzed experiences, self-efficacy, and concentration in response to training. In this prospective international collaborative study, an e-learning method was used with high school students in Sweden and the United States. A software game platform was modified for use as a serious game to train in emergency medical situations. Using MMVW technology, participants in teams of 3 were engaged in virtual-world scenarios to learn how to treat victims suffering cardiac arrest. Short debriefings were carried out after each scenario. A total of 36 high school students (Sweden, n=12; United States, n=24) participated. Their self-efficacy and concentration (task motivation) were assessed. An exit questionnaire was used to solicit experiences and attitudes toward this type of training. Among the Swedish students, a follow-up was carried out after 6 months. Depending on the distributions, t tests or Mann-Whitney tests were used. Correlation between variables was assessed by using Spearman rank correlation. Regression analyses were used for time-dependent variables. The participants enjoyed the training and reported a self-perceived benefit as a consequence of training. The mean rating for self-efficacy increased from 5.8/7 (SD 0.72) to 6.5/7 (SD 0.57, Phighly immersed

  10. Quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation during real-life out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllenborg, Tore; Granfeldt, Asger; Lippert, Freddy; Riddervold, Ingunn Skogstad; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can increase survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, little is known about bystander CPR quality in real-life OHCA. To describe bystander CPR quality based on automated external defibrillator (AED) CPR process data during OHCA and compare it with the European Resuscitation Council 2010 and 2015 Guidelines. We included OHCA cases from the Capital Region, Denmark, (2012-2016) where a Zoll AED was used before ambulance arrival. For cases with at least one minute of continuous data, the initial 10min of CPR data were analysed for compression rate, depth, fraction and compressions delivered for each minute of CPR. Data are presented as median [25th;75th percentile]. We included 136 cases. Bystander median compression rate was 101min(-1) [94;113], compression depth was 4.8cm [3.9;5.8] and compressions per minute were 62 [48;73]. Of all cases, the median compression rate was 100-120min(-1) in 42%, compression depth was 5-6cm in 26%, compression fraction≥60% in 51% and compressions delivered per minute exceeded 60 in 54%. In a minute-to-minute analysis, we found no evidence of deterioration in CPR quality over time. The median peri-shock pause was 27s [23;31] and the pre-shock pause was 19s [17;22]. The median CPR performed by bystanders using AEDs with audio-feedback in OHCA was within guideline recommendations without deterioration over time. Compression depth had poorer quality compared with other parameters. To improve bystander CPR quality, focus should be on proper compression depth and minimizing pauses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. "Please. Don't. Die.": A Grounded Theory Study of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mausz, Justin; Snobelen, Paul; Tavares, Walter

    2018-02-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an important determinant of survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), yet rates of bystander CPR are highly variable. In an effort to promote bystander CPR, the procedure has been streamlined, and ultrashort teaching modalities have been introduced. CPR has been increasingly reconceptualized as simple, safe, and easy to perform; however, current methods of CPR instruction may not adequately prepare lay rescuers for the various logistical, conceptual, and emotional challenges of resuscitating a victim of cardiac arrest. We adopted a constructivist grounded theory methodology to qualitatively explore bystander CPR and invited lay rescuers who had recently (ie, within 1 week) intervened in an OHCA to participate in semistructured interviews and focus groups. We used constant comparative analysis until theoretical saturation to derive a midrange explanatory theory of bystander CPR. We constructed a 3-stage theoretical model describing a common experiential process for lay rescuer intervention in OHCA: Being called to act is disturbing, causing panic, shock, and disbelief that must ultimately be overcome. Taking action to save the victim is complicated by several misconceptions about cardiac arrest, where victims are mistakenly believed to be choking, and agonal respirations are misinterpreted to mean the victim is alive. Making sense of the experience is challenging, at least in the short term, where lay rescuers have to contend with self-doubt, unanswered questions, and uncomfortable emotional reactions to a traumatic event. Our study suggests that current CPR training programs may not adequately prepare lay rescuers for the reality of an OHCA and identifies several key knowledge gaps that should be addressed. The long-term psychological consequences of bystander intervention in OHCA remain poorly understood and warrant further study. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Rescuer fatigue under the 2010 ERC guidelines, and its effect on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Catherine H; Heggie, James; Jones, Christopher M; Thorne, Christopher J; Hulme, Jonathan

    2013-08-01

    Updated life-support guidelines were published by the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) in 2010, increasing the required depth and rate of chest compression delivery. This study sought to determine the impact of these guidelines on rescuer fatigue and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performance. 62 Health science students performed 5 min of conventional CPR in accordance with the 2010 ERC guidelines. A SkillReporter manikin was used to objectively assess temporal change in determinants of CPR quality. Participants subjectively reported their end-fatigue levels, using a visual analogue scale, and the point at which they believed fatigue was affecting CPR delivery. 49 (79%) participants reported that fatigue affected their CPR performance, at an average of 167 s. End fatigue averaged 49.5/100 (range 0-95). The proportion of chest compressions delivered correctly decreased from 52% in min 1 to 39% in min 5, approaching significance (p=0.071). A significant decline in chest compressions reaching the recommended depth occurred between the first (53%) and fifth (38%) min (p=0.012). Almost half this decline (6%) was between the first and second minutes of CPR. Neither chest compression rate, nor rescue breath volume, were affected by rescuer fatigue. Fatigue affects chest compression delivery within the second minute of CPR under the 2010 ERC guidelines, and is poorly judged by rescuers. Rescuers should, therefore, be encouraged to interchange after 2 min of CPR delivery. Team leaders should be advised to not rely on rescuers to self-report fatigue, and should, instead, monitor for its effects.

  13. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration and survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnet, Frederic; Triba, Mohamed N; Borron, Stephen W; Lapostolle, Frederic; Hubert, Hervé; Gueugniaud, Pierre-Yves; Escutnaire, Josephine; Guenin, Aurelien; Hoogvorst, Astrid; Marbeuf-Gueye, Carol; Reuter, Paul-Georges; Javaud, Nicolas; Vicaut, Eric; Chevret, Sylvie

    2017-02-01

    Relationship between cardiopulmonary arrest and resuscitation (CPR) durations and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remain unclear. Our primary aim was to determine the association between survival without neurologic sequelae and cardiac arrest intervals in the setting of witnessed OHCA. We analyzed 27,301 non-traumatic, witnessed OHCA patients in France included in the national registry from June 1, 2011 through December 1, 2015. We analyzed cardiac arrest intervals, designated as no-flow (NF; from collapse to start of CPR) and low-flow (LF; from start of CPR to cessation of resuscitation) in relation to 30-day survival without sequelae. We determined the influence of recognized prognostic factors (age, gender, initial rhythm, location of cardiac arrest) on this relation. For the entire cohort, the area delimited by a value of NF greater than 12min (95% confidence interval: 11-13min) and LF greater than 33min (95% confidence interval: 29-45min), yielded a probability of 30-day survival of less than 1%. These sets of values were greatly influenced by initial cardiac arrest rhythm, age, sex and location of cardiac arrest. Extended CPR duration (greater than 40min) in the setting of initial shockable cardiac rhythm is associated with greater than 1% survival with NF less than 18min. The NF interval was highly influential on the LF interval regardless of outcome, whether return of spontaneous circulation (pCPR duration in OHCA patients. The knowledge of (NF, LF) curves as function of age, initial rhythm, location of cardiac arrest or gender may aid in decision-making vis-à-vis the termination of CPR or employment of advanced techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of early amiodarone administration during and immediately after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlis, G; Iacovidou, N; Lelovas, P; Niforopoulou, P; Zacharioudaki, A; Papalois, A; Sunde, K; Steen, P A; Xanthos, T

    2014-01-01

    Aim of this experimental study was to compare haemodynamic effects and outcome with early administration of amiodarone and adrenaline vs. adrenaline alone in pigs with prolonged ventricular fibrillation (VF). After 8 min of untreated VF arrest, bolus doses were administered of adrenaline (0.02 mg/kg) and either amiodarone (5 mg/kg) or saline (n = 8 per group) after randomisation. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was commenced immediately after drug administration, and defibrillation was attempted 2 min later. CPR was resumed for another 2 min after each defibrillation attempt, and the same dose of adrenaline was given every 4th minute during CPR. Haemodynamic monitoring and mechanical ventilation continued for 6 h after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and the pigs were euthanised at 48 h. Researchers were blinded for drug groups throughout the study. There was no difference in rates of ROSC and 48-h survival with amiodarone vs. saline (5/8 vs. 7/8 and 0/8 vs. 3/8, respectively). Diastolic aortic pressure and coronary perfusion pressure were significantly lower with amiodarone during CPR and 1 min after ROSC (P < 0.05). The number of electric shocks required for terminating VF, time to ROSC and adrenaline dose were significantly higher with amiodarone (P < 0.01). The incidence of post-resuscitation tachyarrhythmias tended to be higher in the saline group (P = 0.081). Early administration of amiodarone did not improve ROSC or 48-h survival rates, and was associated with worse haemodynamics in this swine model of cardiac arrest. © 2013 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. [A report of 463 in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation based on the "Utstein Style"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Mo, De-Fan; Lan, Bao-Qiong; Gao, Yun-Suo

    2008-12-01

    Assessment of outcomes and outcome-related factors of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) based on the "Utstein Style". The study was designed as a prospective, single-institution, registry investigation of 463 patients (included adult and pediatric patients) for whom a CPR was attempted. The study population consisted of 320 (69.1%) male patients and 143 (30.9%) female patients. The age range of 45-54, 55-64, 65-74 were ranked the first, the second and third highest. In the past medical history, cardiovascular disease and cerebrovascular disorder were two main disorders, accounting for 36.3% (168/463) and 9.9% (46/463), respectively. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was the initial electrocardiographic (ECG) change in 74 patients (16.0%). Two hundred and seventy-three patients received the in-hospital CPR, and 190 patients received the pre-hospital CPR. Spontaneous circulation returned in 34.6% (160/273) of the in-hospital patients after CPR, and 16.6% (77/273) survived for 24 hours and 10.4% (48/273) survived up to the time of discharge. The rates of restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survival of the in-hospital CPR were higher than those of the pre-hospital CPR [47.6% (130/273) vs. 15.8% (30/190), 13.9% (38/273) vs. 5.3% (10/190), both Pcardiopulmonary arrest, but the rate of survival for in-hospital resuscitation still seems to be too low. The further improvement of CPR outcome is necessary.

  16. Elevated Serum Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) is Associated with Poor Functional Outcome After Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helwig, Kirsten; Seeger, Florian; Hölschermann, Hans; Lischke, Volker; Gerriets, Tibo; Niessner, Marion; Foerch, Christian

    2017-08-01

    The neurological prognosis of patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is difficult to assess. GFAP is an astrocytic intermediate filament protein released into bloodstream in case of cell death. We performed a prospective study aiming to compare the predictive potential of GFAP after resuscitation to the more widely used biomarker neuron-specific enolase (NSE). One hundred patients were included at 48 h (tolerance interval ±12 h) after cardiac arrest. A serum sample was collected immediately after study inclusion. We determined serum levels of GFAP and NSE by means of immunoassays. Primary outcome was the modified Glasgow outcome scale at 4 weeks. Values below four were considered as a poor functional outcome. Median GFAP levels in poor outcome (n = 61) and good outcome (n = 39) patients were 0.03 μg/L (interquartile range 0.01-0.07 μg/L) and 0.02 μg/L (0.01-0.03 μg/L; p = 0.014), respectively. GFAP revealed a sensitivity of 60.7% and a specificity of 66.7% to predict a poor functional outcome. All patients having a GFAP level >0.08 µg/L had a poor functional outcome. For NSE, sensitivity was 44.3% and specificity was 100.0% for predicting a poor outcome. Multivariate regression analysis revealed GFAP, NSE, and the Karnofsky index to be independent predictors of outcome. The release patterns of GFAP and NSE after CPR show differences. GFAP levels above 0.08 µg/L were associated with a poor outcome in all cases, and patients with strongly elevated values (>3 µg/L) consistently had severe brain damage on brain imaging. Both biomarkers independently contribute to outcome prediction after CPR.

  17. The Value of Serum NR2 Antibody in Prediction of Post-Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidari, Ali; Vaziri, Samira; Moazen Zadeh, Ehsan; Farahmand, Sahar; Talachian, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits antibody (NR2-ab) is a sensitive marker of ischemic brain damage in clinical circumstances, such as cerebrovascular accidents. We aimed to assess the value of serum NR2-ab in predicting the post-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) survival. Methods: In this cohort study, we examined serum NR2-ab levels 1 hour after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in 49 successfully resuscitated patients. Patients with traumatic or asphyxic arrests, prior neurological insults, or major medical illnesses were excluded. Participants were followed until death or hospital discharge. Demographic data, coronary artery disease risk factors, time before initiation of CPR, and CPR duration were documented. In addition, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), blood pressure, and survival status of patients were recorded at 1, 6, 24, and 72 hour(s) after ROSC. Descriptive analyses were performed, and the Cox proportional hazard model was applied to assess if NR2-ab level is an independent predictive factor of survival. Results: 49 successfully resuscitated patients were evaluated; 27 (55%) survived to hospital discharge, 4 (8.1%) were in vegetative state, 10 (20.4%) were physically disabled, and 13 (26.5%) were physically functional. Within 72 hours of ROSC all of the 12 NR2-ab positive patients died. In contrast, 31 (84%) of the NR2-ab negative patients survived. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios of NR2-ab in prediction of survival were 54.5% (95%CI=32.7%-74.9%), 100% (95%CI=84.5%-100%), infinite, and 45.5% (95%CI=28.8%-71.8%), respectively. Subsequent analysis showed that both NR2-ab status and GCS were independent risk factors of death. Conclusions: A positive NR2-ab serum test 1 hour after ROSC correlated with lower 72-hour survival. Further studies are required to validate this finding and demonstrate the value of a quantitative NR2-ab assay and its optimal time of measurement. PMID:26495391

  18. The Value of Serum NR2 Antibody in Prediction of Post-Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bidari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits antibody (NR2-ab is a sensitive marker of ischemic brain damage in clinical circumstances, such as cerebrovascular accidents. We aimed to assess the value of serum NR2-ab in predicting the post-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR survival. Methods: In this cohort study, we examined serum NR2-ab levels 1 hour after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC in 49 successfully resuscitated patients. Patients with traumatic or asphyxic arrests, prior neurological insults, or major medical illnesses were excluded. Participants were followed until death or hospital discharge. Demographic data, coronary artery disease risk factors, time before initiation of CPR, and CPR duration were documented.  In addition, Glasgow coma scale (GCS, blood pressure, and survival status of patients were recorded at 1, 6, 24, and 72 hour(s after ROSC. Descriptive analyses were performed, and the Cox proportional hazard model was applied to assess if NR2-ab level is an independent predictive factor of survival. Results: 49 successfully resuscitated patients were evaluated; 27 (55% survived to hospital discharge, 4 (8.1% were in vegetative state, 10 (20.4% were physically disabled, and 13 (26.5% were physically functional. Within 72 hours of ROSC all of the 12 NR2-ab positive patients died. In contrast, 31 (84% of the NR2-ab negative patients survived. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios of NR2-ab in prediction of survival were 54.5% (95%CI=32.7%-74.9%, 100% (95%CI=84.5%-100%, infinite, and 45.5% (95%CI=28.8%-71.8%, respectively. Subsequent analysis showed that both NR2-ab status and GCS were independent risk factors of death. Conclusions: A positive NR2-ab serum test 1 hour after ROSC correlated with lower 72-hour survival. Further studies are required to validate this finding and demonstrate the value of a quantitative NR2-ab assay and its optimal time of measurement.

  19. Feasibility of Biosignal-guided Chest Compression During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundermann, Matthew L; Salcido, David D; Koller, Allison C; Menegazzi, James J

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is one of the leading causes of death in the United States and is treated by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). CPR involves both chest compressions and positive pressure ventilations when given by medical providers. Mechanical chest compression devices automate chest compressions and are beginning to be adopted by emergency medical services with the intent of providing high-quality, consistent chest compressions that are not limited by human providers who can become fatigued. Biosignals acquired from cardiac arrest patients have been characterized in their ability to track the effect of CPR on the patient. The authors investigated the feasibility and appropriate response of a biosignal-guided mechanical chest compression device in a swine model of cardiac arrest. After a custom signal-guided chest compression device was engineered, its ability to respond to biosignal changes in a swine model of cardiac arrest was tested. In a preliminary series of six swine, two biosignals were used: mean arterial pressure (MAP) and a mathematical derivative of the electrocardiogram waveform, median slope (MS). How these biosignals changed was observed when chest compression rate and depth were adjusted by the signal-guided chest compression device, independent of the user. Chest compression rate and depth were adjusted by the signal-guided chest compression device according to a preset threshold algorithm until either of the biosignals improved to satisfy a set "threshold" or until the chest compression rate and depth achieved maximum values. Defibrillation was attempted at the end of each resuscitation in an effort to achieve return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The signal-guided chest compression device responded appropriately to biosignals by changing its rate and depth. All animals exhibited positive improvements in their biosignals. During the course of the resuscitation, three of the six animals improved their MS biosignal to reach the MS threshold

  20. Cerebral Oximetry as a Real-Time Monitoring Tool to Assess Quality of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Post Cardiac Arrest Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Akram W; Trammell, Antoine R; Austin, Harland; Barbour, Kenya; Onuorah, Emeka; House, Dorothy; Miller, Heather L; Tutt, Chandila; Combs, Deborah; Phillips, Roger; Dickert, Neal W; Zafari, A Maziar

    2015-08-25

    Regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2) as assessed by near infrared frontal cerebral spectroscopy decreases in circulatory arrest and increases with high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We hypothesized that higher rSO2 during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) would predict survival to discharge and neurological recovery. This prospective case series included patients experiencing in-hospital cardiac arrest. Cerebral oximetry was recorded continuously from initiation of resuscitation until ROSC and up to 48 hours post-arrest. Relationships between oximetry data during these time periods and outcomes of resuscitation survival and survival to discharge were analyzed. The cohort included 27 patients. Nineteen (70.3%) achieved ROSC, and 8 (29.6%) survived to discharge. Median arrest duration was 20.8 minutes (range=8 to 74). There was a significant difference in rSO2 between resuscitation survivors and resuscitation nonsurvivors at initiation of the resuscitative efforts (35% versus 17.5%, P=0.03) and during resuscitation (36% versus 15%, P=0.0008). No significant association was observed between rSO2 at ROSC or during the post-arrest period and survival to discharge. Among patients who survived to discharge, there was no association between cerebral performance category and rSO2 at ROSC, during resuscitation, or post-arrest. Higher rSO2 levels at initiation of resuscitation and during resuscitation are associated with resuscitation survival and may reflect high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, in this small series, rSO2 was not predictive of good neurological outcome. Larger studies are needed to determine whether this monitoring modality can be used to improve clinical outcomes. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  1. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation challenges in selected Botswana hospitals: Nurse managers’ views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Rajeswaran

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic accident victims, as well as persons experiencing cardiac and other medical emergencies, might lose their lives due to the non-availability of trained personnel to provide effective cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR with functional equipment and adequate resources.The objectives of the study were to identify unit managers’ perceptions about challenges encountered when performing CPR interventions in the two referral public hospitals in Botswana. These results could be used to recommend more effective CPR strategies for Botswana’s hospitals. Interviews, comprising two quantitative sections with closed ended questions and one qualitative section with semi-structured questions, were conducted with 22 unit managers. The quantitative data indicated that all unit managers had at least eight years’ nursing experience, and could identify CPR shortcomings in their hospitals. Only one interviewee had never performed CPR. The qualitative data analysis revealed that the hospital units sometimes had too few staff members and did not have fully equipped emergency trolleys and/or equipment. No CPR teams and no CPR policies and guidelines existed. Nurses and doctors reportedly lacked CPR knowledge and skills. No debriefing services were provided after CPR encounters. The participating hospitals should address the following challenges that might affect CPR outcomes: shortages of staff, overpopulation of hospital units, shortcomings of the emergency trolleys and CPR equipment, absence of CPR policies and guidelines, absence of CPR teams, limited CPR competencies of doctors and nurses and the lack of debriefing sessions after CPR attempts.

  2. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Pattern Evaluation Based on Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition Filter via Nonlinear Approaches

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    Muammar Sadrawi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Good quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is the mainstay of treatment for managing patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. Assessment of the quality of the CPR delivered is now possible through the electrocardiography (ECG signal that can be collected by an automated external defibrillator (AED. This study evaluates a nonlinear approximation of the CPR given to the asystole patients. The raw ECG signal is filtered using ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD, and the CPR-related intrinsic mode functions (IMF are chosen to be evaluated. In addition, sample entropy (SE, complexity index (CI, and detrended fluctuation algorithm (DFA are collated and statistical analysis is performed using ANOVA. The primary outcome measure assessed is the patient survival rate after two hours. CPR pattern of 951 asystole patients was analyzed for quality of CPR delivered. There was no significant difference observed in the CPR-related IMFs peak-to-peak interval analysis for patients who are younger or older than 60 years of age, similarly to the amplitude difference evaluation for SE and DFA. However, there is a difference noted for the CI (p<0.05. The results show that patients group younger than 60 years have higher survival rate with high complexity of the CPR-IMFs amplitude differences.

  3. A New Method for Feedback on the Quality of Chest Compressions during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

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    Digna M. González-Otero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR improves through the use of CPR feedback devices. Most feedback devices integrate the acceleration twice to estimate compression depth. However, they use additional sensors or processing techniques to compensate for large displacement drifts caused by integration. This study introduces an accelerometer-based method that avoids integration by using spectral techniques on short duration acceleration intervals. We used a manikin placed on a hard surface, a sternal triaxial accelerometer, and a photoelectric distance sensor (gold standard. Twenty volunteers provided 60 s of continuous compressions to test various rates (80–140 min−1, depths (3–5 cm, and accelerometer misalignment conditions. A total of 320 records with 35312 compressions were analysed. The global root-mean-square errors in rate and depth were below 1.5 min−1 and 2 mm for analysis intervals between 2 and 5 s. For 3 s analysis intervals the 95% levels of agreement between the method and the gold standard were within −1.64–1.67 min−1 and −1.69–1.72 mm, respectively. Accurate feedback on chest compression rate and depth is feasible applying spectral techniques to the acceleration. The method avoids additional techniques to compensate for the integration displacement drift, improving accuracy, and simplifying current accelerometer-based devices.

  4. A New Method for Feedback on the Quality of Chest Compressions during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Otero, Digna M.; Ruiz, Jesus; Ruiz de Gauna, Sofía; Irusta, Unai; Ayala, Unai

    2014-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves through the use of CPR feedback devices. Most feedback devices integrate the acceleration twice to estimate compression depth. However, they use additional sensors or processing techniques to compensate for large displacement drifts caused by integration. This study introduces an accelerometer-based method that avoids integration by using spectral techniques on short duration acceleration intervals. We used a manikin placed on a hard surface, a sternal triaxial accelerometer, and a photoelectric distance sensor (gold standard). Twenty volunteers provided 60 s of continuous compressions to test various rates (80–140 min−1), depths (3–5 cm), and accelerometer misalignment conditions. A total of 320 records with 35312 compressions were analysed. The global root-mean-square errors in rate and depth were below 1.5 min−1 and 2 mm for analysis intervals between 2 and 5 s. For 3 s analysis intervals the 95% levels of agreement between the method and the gold standard were within −1.64–1.67 min−1 and −1.69–1.72 mm, respectively. Accurate feedback on chest compression rate and depth is feasible applying spectral techniques to the acceleration. The method avoids additional techniques to compensate for the integration displacement drift, improving accuracy, and simplifying current accelerometer-based devices. PMID:25243189

  5. Impaired Cerebral Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation Function in a Rat Model of Ventricular Fibrillation and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Postcardiac arrest brain injury significantly contributes to mortality and morbidity in patients suffering from cardiac arrest (CA. Evidence that shows that mitochondrial dysfunction appears to be a key factor in tissue damage after ischemia/reperfusion is accumulating. However, limited data are available regarding the cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction during CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and its relationship to the alterations of high-energy phosphate. Here, we sought to identify alterations of mitochondrial morphology and oxidative phosphorylation function as well as high-energy phosphates during CA and CPR in a rat model of ventricular fibrillation (VF. We found that impairment of mitochondrial respiration and partial depletion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr developed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus following a prolonged cardiac arrest. Optimal CPR might ameliorate the deranged phosphorus metabolism and preserve mitochondrial function. No obvious ultrastructural abnormalities of mitochondria have been found during CA. We conclude that CA causes cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction along with decay of high-energy phosphates, which would be mitigated with CPR. This study may broaden our understanding of the pathogenic processes underlying global cerebral ischemic injury and provide a potential therapeutic strategy that aimed at preserving cerebral mitochondrial function during CA.

  6. Knowledge and psychomotor skills of nursing students in North Cyprus in the area of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal, Umran; Sarpkaya, Dilek

    2013-07-01

    Objective : The aim of the study was to determine the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) knowledge and skill levels of nursing students in North Cyprus. Methods : The study design was quasi-experimental and longitudinal. A questionnaire was applied to the students before the CPR lecture. Then the students were informed about adult CPR by the researchers and all of the students practiced CPR on a Resusci-Anne manikin. One and six months after this training the same questionnaire and skills checklist of CPR were applied. Results : Eighty three third year students of nursing participated in the study. While the average CPR knowledge score of these students was 9.3 ± 2.9 out of 23 before the lecture, this average increased to 17.0 ± 1.8 one month after the CPR lecture and decreased by two points back to 14.9 ± 3.8 after six months. Skill score of the students one month after the CPR skills training was 18.4 out of 21, and that this average decreased to 13.8 after six months (p<0.05). Nursing students tend to forget theoretical and applied CPR training after couple of months. Hence there is a need for continuous CPR training and education and repeating the skills at regular intervals even after they have graduated to ensure sustainability in the CPR skills.

  7. Assessment of the success of cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempts performed in a Turkish university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pembeci, Kamil; Yildirim, Ayse; Turan, Eser; Buget, Mehmet; Camci, Emre; Senturk, Mert; Tugrul, Mehmet; Akpir, Kutay

    2006-02-01

    The success rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may differ from institution to institution, even within different sites in the same institution. A variety of factors may influence the outcome. In this study, we assessed the adequacy of CPR attempts guided by the current standards and aimed to define the factors influencing the outcome following in-hospital cardiac arrest. One hundred and thirty-four patients who required CPR were studied prospectively. Different variables for the CPR performance were recorded using forms designed for this study in the light of the guidelines. In these CPR forms various data including the demographics, history, monitoring, number, composition and experience of the anaesthesiologists, the site of CPR, time of day, the delay before onset of CPR, tracheal intubation, duration of arrest, initial rhythm in ECG monitored patients, management of CPR, drug administration and reversible causes of cardiac arrest were recorded. Our rates of immediate survival, survival at 24 h and survival to discharge 49.3%, 28.5% and 13.4%, respectively. The extent of monitoring prior to arrest, the attendance of one or more experienced anesthesiologists in the CPR team, CPR during office hours, CPR in ICU or operating room, early initiation of CPR and tracheal intubation prior to arrest were found as the factors increasing discharge survival. We conclude that early initiation of CPR with an experienced team in a well-equipped hospital sites increases the discharge survival rate following cardiac arrest.

  8. Analysis of the YouTube videos on basic life support and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourinho, Francis Solange Vieira; de Medeiros, Kleyton Santos; Salvador, Pétala Tuani Candido De Oliveira; Castro, Grayce Loyse Tinoco; Santos, Viviane Euzébia Pereira

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the videos on the YouTube video sharing site, noting which points addressed in the videos related to CPR and BLS, based on the 2010 Guidelines for the American Heart Association (AHA). This was an exploratory, quantitative and qualitative research performed in the YouTube sharing site, using as keywords the expressions in Portuguese equivalent to the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) "Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation" and "Basic Life Support" for videos that focused on the basic life support. The research totaled 260 videos over the two searches. Following the exclusion criteria, 61 videos remained. These mostly are posted by individuals and belong to the category Education. Moreover, most of the videos, despite being added to the site after the publication of the 2010 AHA Guidelines, were under the older 2005 guidelines. Although the video-sharing site YouTube is widely used today, it lacks videos about CPR and BLS that comply to the most recent AHA recommendations, which may negatively influence the population that uses it.

  9. [Assessment of the teaching-learning process in students of the health area: cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakame, Patrícia Moita Garcia; Miyadahira, Ana Maria Kazue

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the skills and knowledge of undergraduate students in the health area on cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers with the use of an automatic external defibrillator. The evaluation was performed in three different stages of the teaching-learning process. A theoretical and practical course was taught and the theoretical classes included demonstration. The evaluation was performed in three different stages of the teaching-learning process. Two instruments were applied to evaluate the skills (30-items checklist) and knowledge (40-questions written test). The sample comprised 84 students. After the theoretical and practical course, an increase was observed in the number of correct answers in the 30-items checklist and 40-questions written test. After the theoretical class (including demonstration), only one of the 30-items checklist for skills achieved an index ≥ 90% of correct answers. On the other hand, an index of correct answers greater than 90% was achieved in 26 (86.7%) of the 30 items after a practical training simulation, evidencing the importance of this training in the defibrillation procedure.

  10. Evaluation of Smartphone Applications for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiwon Ahn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. There are many smartphone-based applications (apps for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR training. We investigated the conformity and the learnability/usability of these apps for CPR training and real-life supports. Methods. We conducted a mixed-method, sequential explanatory study to assess CPR training apps downloaded on two apps stores in South Korea. Apps were collected with inclusion criteria as follows, Korean-language instruction, training features, and emergency supports for real-life incidents, and analyzed with two tests; 15 medical experts evaluated the apps’ contents according to current Basic Life Support guidelines in conformity test, and 15 nonmedical individuals examined the apps using System Usability Scale (SUS in the learnability/usability test. Results. Out of 79 selected apps, five apps were included and analyzed. For conformity (ICC, 0.95, p<0.001, means of all apps were greater than 12 of 20 points, indicating that they were well designed according to current guidelines. Three of the five apps yielded acceptable level (greater than 68 of 100 points for learnability/usability. Conclusion. All the included apps followed current BLS guidelines and a majority offered acceptable learnability/usability for layperson. Current and developmental smartphone-based CPR training apps should include accurate CPR information and be easy to use for laypersons that are potential rescuers in real-life incidents. For Clinical Trials. This is a clinical trial, registered at the Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS, cris.nih.go.kr, number KCT0001840.

  11. Results achieved by emergency physicians in teaching basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation to secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Fábrega, Xavier; Escalada-Roig, Xavier; Sánchez, Miquel; Culla, Alexandre; Díaz, Núria; Gómez, Xavier; Villena, Olga; Rodríguez, Esther; Gaspar, Alberto; Molina, José Emilio; Salvador, Jordi; Miró, Oscar

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the results obtained with a basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (b-CPR) program (PROCES) specifically designed for secondary school students (14-16 years old) and taught by emergency physicians. We used a multiple-choice test with 20 questions (10 on theory and 10 on skills) answered before and immediately after and 1 year after receiving the b-CPR course. Satisfactory learning was considered when at least 8 out of 10 skill questions were correctly answered. We investigated student variables associated with better immediate and deferred (1 year after) PROCES performance. We compared the results with those obtained using a more standardized program to teach b-CPR to police cadets. We enrolled 600 high school students. PROCES achieved significant improvement in overall, theory and skill marks immediately after the course (PPROCES and by 37% when assessed 1 year later. Students without pending study subjects (P=0.001) and those from private schools (PPROCES and only female students achieved greater performance 1 year after the course (PPROCES, and this specific program achieves a reasonable amount of satisfactory learning.

  12. [Basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation program for high school students (PROCES). Results from the pilot program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, Oscar; Jiménez-Fábrega, Xavier; Díaz, Núria; Coll-Vinent, Blanca; Bragulat, Ernest; Jiménez, Sònia; Espinosa, Gerard; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; García-Alfranca, Fernando; Alvarez, M Teresa; Salvador, Jordi; Millá, José; Sánchez, Miquel

    2005-01-15

    The PROCES (Programa de Reanimació Cardiopulmonar Orientat a Centres d'Ensenyament Secundari) program is aimed at teaching basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (b-CPR) to teenagers within high school. Our aim was to analyze the results obtained from the pilot program. PROCES was splitted in 7 sessions: 5 of them (5 hours) were taught by teachers at high school and 2 of them (4 hours, including how to perform b-CPR) were taught by emergency physicians. To assess the degree of students' learning, they were administered a 20-question test before and after the program. Epidemiological characteristics and students' opinions (all them were requested to rate the program from 0 to 10) were also collected. Students were 14 years-old in 38%, 15 in 38% and 16 or more in 24%. Before PROCES, the mean mark (over 20 points) was 8.5 (2.4). After PROCES, marks improved up to 13.5 (3.2) (p PROCES completion. Students rated the theoretical part as 7.9 (1.1), the skill part as 8.2 (1.2), and the emergency physicians classes as 8.4 (1.1). PROCES is an useful tool for teaching and improving teenagers' knowledge and skills in b-CPR, with no exceptions associated with teenagers' characteristics.

  13. Effects of team coordination during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Castelao, Ezequiel; Russo, Sebastian G; Riethmüller, Martin; Boos, Margarete

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and evaluate to what extent the literature on team coordination during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) empirically confirms its positive effect on clinically relevant medical outcome. A systematic literature search in PubMed, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and CENTRAL databases was performed for articles published in the last 30 years. A total of 63 articles were included in the review. Planning, leadership, and communication as the three main interlinked coordination mechanisms were found to have effect on several CPR performance markers. A psychological theory-based integrative model was expanded upon to explain linkages between the three coordination mechanisms. Planning is an essential element of leadership behavior and is primarily accomplished by a designated team leader. Communication affects medical performance, serving as the vehicle for the transmission of information and directions between team members. Our findings also suggest teams providing CPR must continuously verbalize their coordination plan in order to effectively structure allocation of subtasks and optimize success. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Practices and Perspectives in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Attempts and the Use of Do Not Attempt Resuscitation Orders: A Cross-sectional Survey in Sri Lanka.

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    Beane, Abi; Ambepitiyawaduge, Pubudu De Silva; Thilakasiri, Kaushila; Stephens, Tim; Padeniya, Anuruddha; Athapattu, Priyantha; Mahipala, Palitha G; Sigera, Ponsuge Chathurani; Dondorp, Arjen M; Haniffa, Rashan

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the characteristics of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attempts, the perspectives of junior doctors involved in those attempts and the use of do not attempt resuscitation (DNAR) orders. A cross-sectional telephone survey aimed at intern doctors working in all medical/surgical wards in government hospitals. Interns were interviewed based on the above objective. A total of 42 CPR attempts from 82 hospitals (338 wards) were reported, 3 of which were excluded as the participating doctor was unavailable for interview. 16 (4.7%) wards had at least 1 patient with an informal DNAR order. 42 deaths were reported. 8 deaths occurred without a known resuscitation attempt, of which 6 occurred on wards with an informal DNAR order in place. 39 resuscitations were attempted. Survival at 24 h was 2 (5.1%). In 5 (13%) attempts, CPR was the only intervention reported. On 25 (64%) occasions, doctors were "not at all" or "only a little bit surprised" by the arrest. CPR attempts before death in hospitals across Sri Lanka is prevalent. DNAR use remains uncommon.

  15. Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcome reports: update and simplification of the Utstein templates for resuscitation registries: a statement for healthcare professionals from a task force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian Resuscitation Council, New Zealand Resuscitation Council, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Councils of Southern Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ian; Nadkarni, Vinay; Bahr, Jan; Berg, Robert A; Billi, John E; Bossaert, Leo; Cassan, Pascal; Coovadia, Ashraf; D'Este, Kate; Finn, Judith; Halperin, Henry; Handley, Anthony; Herlitz, Johan; Hickey, Robert; Idris, Ahamed; Kloeck, Walter; Larkin, Gregory Luke; Mancini, Mary Elizabeth; Mason, Pip; Mears, Gregory; Monsieurs, Koenraad; Montgomery, William; Morley, Peter; Nichol, Graham; Nolan, Jerry; Okada, Kazuo; Perlman, Jeffrey; Shuster, Michael; Steen, Petter Andreas; Sterz, Fritz; Tibballs, James; Timerman, Sergio; Truitt, Tanya; Zideman, David

    2004-11-23

    Outcome after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation is dependent on critical interventions, particularly early defibrillation, effective chest compressions, and advanced life support. Utstein-style definitions and reporting templates have been used extensively in published studies of cardiac arrest, which has led to greater understanding of the elements of resuscitation practice and progress toward international consensus on science and resuscitation guidelines. Despite the development of Utstein templates to standardize research reports of cardiac arrest, international registries have yet to be developed. In April 2002, a task force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) met in Melbourne, Australia, to review worldwide experience with the Utstein definitions and reporting templates. The task force revised the core reporting template and definitions by consensus. Care was taken to build on previous definitions, changing data elements and operational definitions only on the basis of published data and experience derived from those registries that have used Utstein-style reporting. Attention was focused on decreasing the complexity of the existing templates and addressing logistical difficulties in collecting specific core and supplementary (ie, essential and desirable) data elements recommended by previous Utstein consensus conferences. Inconsistencies in terminology between in-hospital and out-of-hospital Utstein templates were also addressed. The task force produced a reporting tool for essential data that can be used for both quality improvement (registries) and research reports and that should be applicable to both adults and children. The revised and simplified template includes practical and succinct operational definitions. It is anticipated that the revised template will enable better and more accurate completion of all reports of cardiac arrest and resuscitation attempts. Problems with data definition, collection, linkage

  16. Proficiency in cardiopulmonary resuscitation of medical students at graduation: a simulator-based comparison with general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüscher, Fabian; Hunziker, Sabina; Gaillard, Vincent; Tschan, Franzisks; Semmer, Norbert K; Hunziker, Patrick R; Marsch, Stephan

    2010-01-23

    There are no data on the preparedness of medical students at the time of their graduation to handle a cardiac arrest. The aim of the present study was to compare the performance in cardiopulmonary resuscitation of medical students at the time of their graduation with that of experienced general practitioners. 24 teams consisting of three medical students and 24 teams consisting of three general practitioners were confronted with a scenario of a simulated witnessed cardiac arrest. Analysis was performed post-hoc using video recordings obtained during the simulation. Medical students diagnosed the cardiac arrest as quickly as general practitioners. Medical students were less likely to call for help in the initial phase of the cardiac arrest (14/24 vs 21/24; P = 0.002); had less hands-on time during the first 180 seconds of the arrest (52 +/- 33 sec vs 105 +/- 39 sec; P leadership (4/24 vs 14/24 teams, P <0.007). The technical quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation provided by medical students was partly better, but for no parameter worse, than that provided by general practitioners. When confronted with a cardiac arrest, medical students at the time of their graduation substantially delayed evidence-based life-saving measures like defibrillation and provided only half of the resuscitation support provided by experienced general practitioners. Future research should focus on how to best prepare medical students to handle medical emergencies.

  17. Survival after in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a major referral center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saghafinia Masoud

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was undertaken to assess the demographics, clinical parameters and outcomes of patients undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, by the code blue team at our center to compare with other centers. Materials and Methods: Data were collected retrospectively from all adult patients who underwent CPR at our hospital from 2007 to 2008. CPR was performed on 290 patients and it was given 313 times. Clinical outcomes of interest were survival at the end of CPR and survival at discharge from the hospital. Factors associated with survival were evaluated via binomial and chi square-tests. Results: Of the 290 patients included, 95 patients (30.4% had successful CPR. However, only 35 patients (12% were alive at discharge. The majority requiring CPR were above 60 years of age (61.7%. Males required CPR more than females. There were 125 women (43.1% and 165 males (56.9% aged 3 to 78 (average 59.6 years. Majority (179 of the cases (61.7% were above 60 years of age. Regarding the various wards, 54 cases (17.3% were in the internal medicine ward, 63 cases (20.1% in the surgery ward, 1 case (0.3% in the clinic, 11 cases (3.5% in the paraclinic, 116 cases (37.1% in the emergency (ER, 55 cases (17.5% in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU and Coronary Care Unit (CCU, and 13 cases (4.2% were in other wards. Cardiac massage was done in 133 cases (42.5%, defibrillation only via electroshock 3 cases (1%, and both were used in177 cases (56.5%. The ER had the most cases of CPR. Both cardiac massage and electroshock defibrillation were needed in most cases. Conclusion: In-hospital CPR for cardiopulmonary arrest was associated with 30.4% success at our center at the end of CPR but only 12% were alive at discharge. Duration of CPR> 10 minutes was predictive of significantly decreased survival to discharge.

  18. Effect of automatic external defibrillator audio prompts on cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, L J; Larsen, P D; Tzeng, Y C; Galletly, D C

    2005-02-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) audio prompts in an automatic external defibrillator in 24 lay subjects, before and after CPR training. Untrained subjects were asked to perform CPR on a manikin with and without the assistance of audio prompts. All subjects were then trained in CPR, and retested them eight weeks later. Untrained subjects who performed CPR first without audio prompts performed poorly, with only (mean (SD)) 24.5% (32%) of compressions at the correct site and depth, a mean compression rate of 52 (31) per minute, and with 15% (32%) of ventilatory attempts adequate. Repeat performance by this group with audio prompts resulted in significant improvements in compression rate (91(12), p = 0.0002, paired t test), and percentage of correct ventilations (47% (40%), p = 0.01 paired t test), but not in the percentage correct compressions (23% (29%)). Those who performed CPR first with audio prompts performed significantly better in compression rate (87 (19), p = 003, unpaired t test), and the percentage of correct ventilations (51 (34), p = 0.003 unpaired t test), but not in the percentage of correct compressions (18 (27)) than those without audio prompts. After training, CPR performance was significantly better than before training, but there was no difference in performance with or without audio prompts, although 73% of subjects commented that they felt more comfortable performing CPR with audio prompts. For untrained subjects, the quality of CPR may be improved by using this device, while for trained subjects the willingness to perform CPR may be increased.

  19. Clinical observation of ulinastatin combined with CRRT in the treatment of early cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qinghong; Peng, Jinliang; Zhou, Yuming; Zeng, Weilan; Xiao, Shihui; Cheng, Hui; Zhong, Zhenzhou; Liao, Xiangming; Xiao, Xiaoliu; Luo, Liang; Liu, Xianghong

    2017-12-01

    The clinical efficacy of ulinastatin (UTI) combined with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in the treatment after early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was evaluated. A total of 70 patients who were successfully treated with CPR in Ganzhou People's Hospital from October 2016 to March 2017 were selected as the subjects. The patients were randomly divided into control group (35 cases, conventional treatment) and UTI combined with CRRT group (35 cases, UTI + CRRT). The whole blood of patients was collected at 0, 3, 6 and 12 h after CPR. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay was used to detect the changes of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) gene in mRNA levels between the two groups, i-STAT system 300 was used to analyze pH level, SO2, HCO3- and lactic acid (LAC) concentration; Abbott AXSYM system was used to detect the expression of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in serum; the concentration of plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) was examined by a special kit; interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in patients was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The effect of UTI combined with CRRT in the early stage of CPR was analyzed. The levels of TLR4, cTnI, TNF-α, IL-6 and MDA in the plasma of patients in both groups were significantly increased (PCRRT group was lower than that in control group (PCRRT group at 3 h, while the pH and SO2 did not change significantly. UTI + CRRT could significantly shorten the average recovery time of consciousness and the average recovery time of consciousness and spontaneous respiration in patients treated with CPR (PCRRT treatment can significantly improve the patient's condition after early CPR.

  20. Could post-mortem computed tomography angiography inform cardiopulmonary resuscitation research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutty, Guy N; Robinson, Claire; Amoroso, Jasmin; Coats, Tim; Morgan, Bruno

    2017-09-23

    Firstly, to develop an optimised chest compression post mortem computed tomography angiography protocol in the adult human during closed chest compression to investigate cardiopulmonary resuscitation blood flow, and secondly to provide preliminary observations of post-mortem anatomical cardiac chamber movement using a novel radiolucent static chest compression device. Variable volumes of radiological contrast agent were injected intravenously into a series of consented human cadavers. Each cadaver had chest compressions delivered with a LUCAS™2 mechanical chest compressor. Following each cycle of chest compressions, each cadaver was imaged with a Toshiba Aquilion CXL 128 slice computed tomography (CT) scanner to investigate the extent of contrast distribution. A chest compression simulator was then designed and built to allow static CT imaging of 1cm incremental cadaver chest compressions to a depth of 5cm. Mechanical compressions: Ten cases were recruited for the CT angiography component of the study. Two were subsequently excluded from the study at the time of the initial, non-contrast PMCT scan. A further case was recruited in Emergency Department (ED). CT demonstrable antegrade arterial contrast distribution was achieved in 2 cases. The other 7 cases, including that undertaken in ED shortly after death, showed venous retrograde flow. Incremental compressions: Five new cases underwent incremental chest compression imaging. All cases demonstrated compression of the sternum, ribs, atria and great vessels. The right and left ventricles were not compressed, but moved laterally and inferiorly, further into the left chest cavity. The left hemi-diaphragm, stomach and liver moved inferiorly. The sternum, ventricles, hemi-diaphragm, stomach and liver all moved back to their original position on incremental release. The study suggests that with further protocol modification and access to human cadavers as near to death as possible, chest compression post mortem computed

  1. Effects of flashlight guidance on chest compression performance in cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a noisy environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Je Sung; Chung, Sung Phil; Chang, Chul Ho; Park, Incheol; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, SeungHo; Lee, Hahn Shick

    2013-08-01

    In real cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), noise can arise from instructional voices and environmental sounds in places such as a battlefield and industrial and high-traffic areas. A feedback device using a flashing light was designed to overcome noise-induced stimulus saturation during CPR. This study was conducted to determine whether 'flashlight' guidance influences CPR performance in a simulated noisy setting. We recruited 30 senior medical students with no previous experience of using flashlight-guided CPR to participate in this prospective, simulation-based, crossover study. The experiment was conducted in a simulated noisy situation using a cardiac arrest model without ventilation. Noise such as patrol car and fire engine sirens was artificially generated. The flashlight guidance device emitted light pulses at the rate of 100 flashes/min. Participants also received instructions to achieve the desired rate of 100 compressions/min. CPR performances were recorded with a Resusci Anne mannequin with a computer skill-reporting system. There were significant differences between the control and flashlight groups in mean compression rate (MCR), MCR/min and visual analogue scale. However, there were no significant differences in correct compression depth, mean compression depth, correct hand position, and correctly released compression. The flashlight group constantly maintained the pace at the desired 100 compressions/min. Furthermore, the flashlight group had a tendency to keep the MCR constant, whereas the control group had a tendency to decrease it after 60 s. Flashlight-guided CPR is particularly advantageous for maintaining a desired MCR during hands-only CPR in noisy environments, where metronome pacing might not be clearly heard.

  2. Reliability and accuracy of the thoracic impedance signal for measuring cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Erik; Ruiz, Jesús; Aramendi, Elisabete; González-Otero, Digna; Ruiz de Gauna, Sofía; Ayala, Unai; Russell, James K; Daya, Mohamud

    2015-03-01

    To determine the accuracy and reliability of the thoracic impedance (TI) signal to assess cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality metrics. A dataset of 63 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest episodes containing the compression depth (CD), capnography and TI signals was used. We developed a chest compression (CC) and ventilation detector based on the TI signal. TI shows fluctuations due to CCs and ventilations. A decision algorithm classified the local maxima as CCs or ventilations. Seven CPR quality metrics were computed: mean CC-rate, fraction of minutes with inadequate CC-rate, chest compression fraction, mean ventilation rate, fraction of minutes with hyperventilation, instantaneous CC-rate and instantaneous ventilation rate. The CD and capnography signals were accepted as the gold standard for CC and ventilation detection respectively. The accuracy of the detector was evaluated in terms of sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV). Distributions for each metric computed from the TI and from the gold standard were calculated and tested for normality using one sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. For normal and not normal distributions, two sample t-test and Mann-Whitney U test respectively were applied to test for equal means and medians respectively. Bland-Altman plots were represented for each metric to analyze the level of agreement between values obtained from the TI and gold standard. The CC/ventilation detector had a median sensitivity/PPV of 97.2%/97.7% for CCs and 92.2%/81.0% for ventilations respectively. Distributions for all the metrics showed equal means or medians, and agreements >95% between metrics and gold standard was achieved for most of the episodes in the test set, except for the instantaneous ventilation rate. With our data, the TI can be reliably used to measure all the CPR quality metrics proposed in this study, except for the instantaneous ventilation rate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A hemodynamic-directed approach to pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (HD-CPR) improves survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Ryan W; Kilbaugh, Todd J; Shoap, Wesley; Bratinov, George; Lin, Yuxi; Hsieh, Ting-Chang; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Berg, Robert A; Sutton, Robert M

    2017-02-01

    Most pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrests (IHCAs) occur in ICUs where invasive hemodynamic monitoring is frequently available. Titrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to the hemodynamic response of the individual improves survival in preclinical models of adult cardiac arrest. The objective of this study was to determine if titrating CPR to systolic blood pressure (SBP) and coronary perfusion pressure (CoPP) in a pediatric porcine model of asphyxia-associated ventricular fibrillation (VF) IHCA would improve survival as compared to traditional CPR. After 7min of asphyxia followed by VF, 4-week-old piglets received either hemodynamic-directed CPR (HD-CPR; compression depth titrated to SBP of 90mmHg and vasopressor administration to maintain CoPP ≥20mmHg); or Standard Care (compression depth 1/3 of the anterior-posterior chest diameter and epinephrine every 4min). All animals received CPR for 10min prior to the first defibrillation attempt. CPR was continued for a maximum of 20min. Protocolized intensive care was provided to all surviving animals for 4h. The primary outcome was 4-h survival. Survival rate was greater with HD-CPR (12/12) than Standard Care (6/10; p=0.03). CoPP during HD-CPR was higher compared to Standard Care (point estimate +8.1mmHg, CI95: 0.5-15.8mmHg; p=0.04). Chest compression depth was lower with HD-CPR than Standard Care (point estimate -14.0mm, CI95: -9.6 to -18.4mm; pCPR vs. Standard Care (median 5 vs. 2; pCPR improves short-term survival compared to standard depth-targeted CPR in a porcine model of pediatric asphyxia-associated VF IHCA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Computational simulation of passive leg-raising effects on hemodynamics during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Ah; Park, Jiheum; Lee, Jung Chan; Shin, Sang Do; Kim, Hee Chan

    2017-03-01

    The passive leg-raising (PLR) maneuver has been used for patients with circulatory failure to improve hemodynamic responsiveness by increasing cardiac output, which should also be beneficial and may exert synergetic effects during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, the impact of the PLR maneuver on CPR remains unclear due to difficulties in monitoring cardiac output in real-time during CPR and a lack of clinical evidence. We developed a computational model that couples hemodynamic behavior during standard CPR and the PLR maneuver, and simulated the model by applying different angles of leg raising from 0° to 90° and compression rates from 80/min to 160/min. The simulation results showed that the PLR maneuver during CPR significantly improves cardiac output (CO), systemic perfusion pressure (SPP) and coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) by ∼40-65% particularly under the recommended range of compression rates between 100/min and 120/min with 45° of leg raise, compared to standard CPR. However, such effects start to wane with further leg lifts, indicating the existence of an optimal angle of leg raise for each person to achieve the best hemodynamic responses. We developed a CPR-PLR model and demonstrated the effects of PLR on hemodynamics by investigating changes in CO, SPP, and CPP under different compression rates and angles of leg raising. Our computational model will facilitate study of PLR effects during CPR and the development of an advanced model combined with circulatory disorders, which will be a valuable asset for further studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A standardized template for measuring and reporting telephone pre-arrival cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dameff, Christian; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler; Tully, Jeffrey; Panczyk, Micah; Dunham, Aaron; Murphy, Ryan; Stolz, Uwe; Chikani, Vatsal; Spaite, Daniel; Bobrow, Bentley

    2014-07-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival. Telephone CPR (TCPR) comprises CPR instruction given by emergency dispatchers to bystanders responding to OHCA and the CPR performed as a result. TCPR instructions improve bystander CPR rates, but the quality of the instructions varies widely. No standardized system exists to critically evaluate the TCPR intervention. Investigators analyzed audio recordings of suspected OHCA calls from a large regional 9-1-1 dispatch center and applied descriptive terms, a data collection tool and a six metric reporting template to describe TCPR. Data were obtained from October 2010 to November 2011. Dispatcher recognition of CPR need, delivery of TCPR instructions, and bystander CPR performance were documented. A total of 590 calls were analyzed. Call evaluators achieved "near perfect agreement" with 5/6 reporting metrics and "strong agreement" on the 6th metric: percentage of calls where need for CPR was recognized by dispatch. CPR was indicated in 317 calls and already in progress in 94. Dispatchers recognized the need for TCPR in 176 of the 223 (79%) remaining calls. CPR instructions were started in 65/223 (29%) and bystander CPR resulting from TCPR instructions was started in 31/223 (14%). We developed and demonstrated successful implementation of a simple data collection and reporting system for critical evaluation of the TCPR intervention. A standardized methodology for measuring TCPR is necessary to perform on-going quality improvement, to establish performance standards, and for future research on how to optimize bystander CPR rates and OHCA survival. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. What are the barriers to implementation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in secondary schools? A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Rod, Morten Hulvej; Folke, Fredrik; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training in schools is recommended to increase bystander CPR and thereby survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but despite mandating legislation, low rates of implementation have been observed in several countries, including Denmark. The purpose of the study was to explore barriers to implementation of CPR training in Danish secondary schools. Design A qualitative study based on individual interviews and focus groups with school leadership and teachers. Thematic analysis was used to identify regular patterns of meaning both within and across the interviews. Setting 8 secondary schools in Denmark. Schools were selected using strategic sampling to reach maximum variation, including schools with/without recent experience in CPR training of students, public/private schools and schools near to and far from hospitals. Participants The study population comprised 25 participants, 9 school leadership members and 16 teachers. Results School leadership and teachers considered it important for implementation and sustainability of CPR training that teachers conduct CPR training of students. However, they preferred external instructors to train students, unless teachers acquired the CPR skills which they considered were needed. They considered CPR training to differ substantially from other teaching subjects because it is a matter of life and death, and they therefore believed extraordinary skills were required for conducting the training. This was mainly rooted in their insecurity about their own CPR skills. CPR training kits seemed to lower expectations of skill requirements to conduct CPR training, but only among those who were familiar with such kits. Conclusions To facilitate implementation of CPR training in schools, it is necessary to have clear guidelines regarding the required proficiency level to train students in CPR, to provide teachers with these skills, and to underscore that extensive skills are not required to

  7. Outcome of surgical embolectomy in patients with massive pulmonary embolism with and without cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Samad; Habibzadeh, Afshin; Safaei, Naser; Mohammadi, Kamran; Ranjbar, Abdolmohammad; Ghodratizadeh, Sahar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary embolism is a challenging critical cardiovascular disease with high morbidity and mortality. Surgical embolectomy has favorable results in patients with massive pulmonary embolism. Aim To study the outcome of embolectomy in patients with massive pulmonary embolism. Material and methods In this single-center, retrospective study, 36 patients including 14 male and 22 female patients with a mean age of 50.80 ±18.89 years with acute pulmonary embolism who underwent surgical pulmonary embolectomy from January 2011 to January 2016 were included. The medical records of all patients were reviewed for demographic and preoperative data and postoperative outcomes. Results Common risk factors for acute PE were major surgery within 3 months and deep vein thrombosis. The most common presenting symptoms of patients were dyspnea, followed by chest pain and syncope. Mean duration of hospitalization was 14.76 ±8.69 days and mean operation duration was 4.47 ±1.54 h. Mean time from admission to embolectomy was 6.58 ±1.13 h. Ten (27.8%) patients died during the operation including 3 cases with cardiopulmonary resuscitation prior to surgery and 2 cases with severe cardiogenic shock. Patients who survived were followed for 6 months. The mortality rate during follow-up was 15.4%; all 4 patients died during follow-up period due to metastatic cancer. No pulmonary embolism recurrance were seen. Conclusions Although surgical embolectomy mostly was done for high risk patients, it had good in-hospital and excellent mid-term outcomes. PMID:29354176

  8. Death before disco: the effectiveness of a musical metronome in layperson cardiopulmonary resuscitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, John W; Jou, Andrew C; Wang, Huaping; Bleess, Brandon B; Tham, Stephanie K

    2015-01-01

    A novel musical memory aid has been proposed for aiding laypersons in complying with the American Heart Association (AHA) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines of 100 compressions per minute (cpm). This study tested usefulness of such a memory aid to improve layperson long-term compliance with CPR compression rate guidelines. A prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted using CPR-untrained laypersons. Subjects received either a standard CPR educational experience (AHA Heartsaver® CPR class) or an experimental CPR educational experience (AHA Heartsaver® CPR class augmented with a musical metronome). Experimental group subjects were taught to perform compressions to the cadence of a pop music song (The Bee Gees "Stayin' Alive"; Saturday Night Fever, The Original Movie Soundtrack; Polygram International Music, 1977) with a tempo of 100 beats/min. Compression rates, depth of compressions, and correct compressions were measured initially and upon retesting ≥6 weeks post-training. Control subjects had a higher mean compression rate both immediately (121 [standard deviation {SD} = 21] vs. 109 [SD = 15] cpm; 95% confidence interval [CI] of mean difference 4-19; p = 0.002) and at follow-up (120 [SD = 20] vs. 111 [SD = 13] cpm; 95% CI of mean difference 2-16; p = 0.014). Compression rates stratified to 100-120 cpm demonstrated no difference between groups initially (39% vs. 48%; p = 0.382), but more experimental subjects maintained these rates at follow-up (43% vs. 74%; p = 0.003). Subjects trained to use a musical metronome more often maintained a compression rate of 100-120 cpm at ≥6-week follow-up, suggesting the memory aid may improve long-term guideline adherence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Comparison of Chest Compression Quality Delivered During On-Scene and Ground Transport Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

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    Christopher S. Russi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: American Heart Association (AHA guidelines recommend cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR chest compressions 1.5 to 2 inches (3.75-5 cm deep at 100 to 120 per minute. Recent studies demonstrated that manual CPR by emergency medical services (EMS personnel is substandard. We hypothesized that transport CPR quality is significantly worse than on-scene CPR quality. Methods: We analyzed adult patients receiving on-scene and transport chest compressions from nine EMS sites across Minnesota and Wisconsin from May 2008 to July 2010. Two periods were analyzed: before and after visual feedback. CPR data were collected and exported with the Zoll M series monitor and a sternally placed accelerometer measuring chest compression rate and depth. We compared compression data with 2010 AHA guidelines and Zoll RescueNet Code Review software. CPR depth and rate were “above (deep,” “in,” or “below (shallow” the target range according to AHA guidelines. We paired on-scene and transport data for each patient; paired proportions were compared with the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: In the pre-feedback period, we analyzed 105 of 140 paired cases (75.0%; in the post-feedback period, 35 of 140 paired cases (25.0% were analyzed. The proportion of correct depths during on-scene compressions (median, 41.9%; interquartile range [IQR], 16.1-73.1 was higher compared to the paired transport proportion (median, 8.7%; IQR, 2.7-48.9. Proportions of on-scene median correct rates and transport median correct depths did not improve in the post-feedback period. Conclusion: Transport chest compressions are significantly worse than on-scene compressions. Implementation of visual real-time feedback did not affect performance.

  10. Delay and performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in surf lifeguards after simulated cardiac arrest due to drowning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claesson, Andreas; Karlsson, Tomas; Thorén, Ann-Britt; Herlitz, Johan

    2011-11-01

    To describe time delay during surf rescue and compare the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) before and after exertion in surf lifeguards. A total of 40 surf lifeguards at the Tylösand Surf Lifesaving Club in Sweden (65% men; age, 19-43 years) performed single-rescuer CPR for 10 minutes on a Laerdal SkillmeteÔ Resusci Anne manikin. The test was repeated with an initial simulated surf rescue on an unconscious 80-kg victim 100 m from the shore. The time to victim, to first ventilation, and to the start of CPR was documented. The mean time in seconds to the start of ventilations in the water was 155 ± 31 (mean ± SD) and to the start of CPR, 258 ± 44. Men were significantly faster during rescue (mean difference, 43 seconds) than women (P = .002). The mean compression depth (millimeters) at rest decreased significantly from 0-2 minutes (42.6 ± 7.8) to 8-10 minutes (40.8 ± 9.3; P = .02). The mean compression depth after exertion decreased significantly (44.2 ± 8.7 at 0-2 minutes to 41.5 ± 9.1 at 8-10 minutes; P = .0008). The compression rate per minute decreased after rescue from 117.2 ±14.3 at 0 to 2 minutes to 114.1 ± 16.1 after 8 to 10 minutes (P = .002). The percentage of correct compressions at 8 to 10 minutes was identical before and after rescue (62%). In a simulated drowning, 100 m from shore, it took twice as long to bring the patient back to shore as to reach him; and men were significantly faster. Half the participants delivered continuous chest compressions of more than 38 mm during 10 minutes of single-rescuer CPR. The quality was identical before and after surf rescue. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Incorporating cardiopulmonary resuscitation training into a cardiac rehabilitation programme: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartledge, Susie; Finn, Judith; Bray, Janet E; Case, Rosalind; Barker, Lauren; Missen, Diane; Shaw, James; Stub, Dion

    2018-02-01

    Patients with a cardiac history are at future risk of cardiac events, including out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Targeting cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training to family members of cardiac patients has long been advocated, but is an area in need of contemporary research evidence. An environment yet to be investigated for targeted training is cardiac rehabilitation. To evaluate the feasibility of providing CPR training in a cardiac rehabilitation programme among patients, their family members and staff. A prospective before and after study design was used. CPR training was delivered using video self-instruction CPR training kits, facilitated by a cardiac nurse. Data was collected pre-training, post-training and at one month. Cardiac patient participation rates in CPR classes were high ( n = 56, 72.7% of eligible patients) with a further 27 family members attending training. Patients were predominantly male (60.2%), family members were predominantly female (81.5%), both with a mean age of 65 years. Confidence to perform CPR and willingness to use skills significantly increased post-training (both p<0.001). Post training participants demonstrated a mean compression rate of 112 beats/min and a mean depth of 48 mm. Training reach was doubled as participants shared the video self-instruction kit with a further 87 people. Patients, family members and cardiac rehabilitation staff had positive feedback about the training. We demonstrated that cardiac rehabilitation is an effective and feasible environment to provide CPR training. Using video self-instruction CPR training kits enabled further training reach to the target population.

  12. Outcomes of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Maintenance Dialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Fahad; Adil, Malik M; Malik, Ahmed A; Schold, Jesse D; Holley, Jean L

    2015-12-01

    Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in hospitalized patients with ESRD requiring maintenance dialysis are unknown. Outcomes of in-hospital CPR in these patients were compared with outcomes in the general population using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS; 2005-2011). The study population included all adults (≥ 18 years old) from the general population and those with a history of ESRD. Baseline characteristics, in-hospital complications, and discharge outcomes were compared between the two groups. The effects of in-hospital CPR on mortality, length of stay, hospitalization charges, and discharge destination were analyzed. Yearly national trends in survival, discharge to home, and length of stay were also examined using the Cochran-Armitage trend test. During the study period, 56,069 patients with ESRD underwent in-hospital CPR compared with 323,620 patients from the general population. Unadjusted in-hospital mortality rates were higher in patients with ESRD (73.9% versus 71.8%, P<0.001) on univariate analysis. After adjusting for age, gender, and potential confounders, patients with ESRD had higher odds of mortality (odds ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 1.3; P<0.001). Survival after CPR improved in the year 2011 compared with 2005 (31% versus 21%, P<0.001). Multivariate analysis also revealed that a greater proportion of patients with ESRD who survived were discharged to skilled nursing facilities. In conclusion, outcomes after in-hospital CPR are improving in patients with ESRD but remain worse than outcomes in the general population. Patients with ESRD who survive are more likely to be discharged to nursing homes. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  13. Barriers to the success of cardiopulmonary resuscitation teams from the perspective of nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Despite the long history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, there are still major concerns about poor CPR team performance in hospitals. While only 10-15 percent of those undergoing CPR leave the hospitals alive, the statistics vary in different countries. Since addressing the barriers to successful CPR may help prevent the potential risks to future patients, the present study aimed to identify such barriers from the perspective of nurses.Methods: In a descriptive-analytic study in 2011, 200 nurses, including 68 men (34 percent and 132 women (66 percent, employed at four teaching hospitals affiliated to Golestan University of Medical Sciences (Iran were randomly selected. Data were collected through a researcher-made questionnaire. Descriptive (frequency, mean, and standard deviation and inferential statistics were applied for data analysis. All analyses were performed with SPSS version 16 .Results: The majority of nurses (83 percent had an experience of working with a CPR team. The participating nurses suggested absence of timely clinical CPR (98 percent, lack of regular standard in-service training (98 percent, lack of CPR equipment and supplies in the wards (92 percent, lack of efficient communication among team members (90 percent, and underlying diseases of the patients (88 percent as the most important barriers to successful CPR. Conclusion: Considering the poor performance of CPR teams in hospitals, management of this challenge requires more attention of planners and hospital authorities. Holding standard retraining programs to update the staff’s knowledge and improve their skills would be essential to forming a competent and cohesive CPR team.

  14. Anxiety after cardiac arrest/cardiopulmonary resuscitation: exacerbated by stress and prevented by minocycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neigh, Gretchen N; Karelina, Kate; Glasper, Erica R; Bowers, Stephanie L K; Zhang, Ning; Popovich, Phillip G; DeVries, A Courtney

    2009-11-01

    Stress is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease; however, most of the research on this topic has focused on incidence rather than outcome. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of prior exposure to chronic stress on ischemia-induced neuronal death, microglial activation, and anxiety-like behavior. In Experiment 1, mice were exposed to 3 weeks of daily restraint (3 hours) and then subjected to either 8 minutes of cardiac arrest/cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR) or sham surgery. Anxiety-like behavior, microglial activation, and neuronal damage were assessed on postischemic Day 4. In Experiment 2, mice were infused intracerebroventricularly with minocycline (10 microg/day) to determine the effect of inhibiting post-CA/CPR microglial activation on the development of anxiety-like behavior and neuronal death. CA/CPR precipitated anxiety-like behavior and increased microglial activation and neuronal damage within the hippocampus relative to sham surgery. Prior exposure to stress exacerbated these measures among CA/CPR mice, but had no significant effect on sham-operated mice. Treatment with minocycline reduced both neuronal damage and anxiety-like behavior among CA/CPR animals. Anxiety-like behavior was significantly correlated with measures of microglial activation but not neuronal damage. A history of stress exposure increases the pathophysiological response to ischemia and anxiety-like behavior, whereas inhibiting microglial activation reduces neuronal damage and mitigates the development of anxiety-like behavior after CA/CPR. Thus, modulating inflammatory signaling after cerebral ischemia may be beneficial in protecting the brain and preventing the development of affective disorders.

  15. Haemodynamic effects of adrenaline (epinephrine) depend on chest compression quality during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytte, Morten; Kramer-Johansen, Jo; Eilevstjønn, Joar; Eriksen, Morten; Strømme, Taevje A; Godang, Kristin; Wik, Lars; Steen, Petter Andreas; Sunde, Kjetil

    2006-12-01

    Adrenaline (epinephrine) is used during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) based on animal experiments without supportive clinical data. Clinically CPR was reported recently to have much poorer quality than expected from international guidelines and what is generally done in laboratory experiments. We have studied the haemodynamic effects of adrenaline during CPR with good laboratory quality and with quality simulating clinical findings and the feasibility of monitoring these effects through VF waveform analysis. After 4 min of cardiac arrest, followed by 4 min of basic life support, 14 pigs were randomised to ClinicalCPR (intermittent manual chest compressions, compression-to-ventilation ratio 15:2, compression depth 30-38 mm) or LabCPR (continuous mechanical chest compressions, 12 ventilations/min, compression depth 45 mm). Adrenaline 0.02 mg/kg was administered 30 s thereafter. Plasma adrenaline concentration peaked earlier with LabCPR than with ClinicalCPR, median (range), 90 (30, 150) versus 150 (90, 270) s (p = 0.007), respectively. Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) and cortical cerebral blood flow (CCBF) increased and femoral blood flow (FBF) decreased after adrenaline during LabCPR (mean differences (95% CI) CPP 17 (6, 29) mmHg (p = 0.01), FBF -5.0 (-8.8, -1.2) ml min(-1) (p = 0.02) and median difference CCBF 12% of baseline (p = 0.04)). There were no significant effects during ClinicalCPR (mean differences (95% CI) CPP 4.7 (-3.2, 13) mmHg (p = 0.2), FBF -0.2 (-4.6, 4.2) ml min(-1)(p = 0.9) and CCBF 3.6 (-1.8, 9.0)% of baseline (p = 0.15)). Slope VF waveform analysis reflected changes in CPP. Adrenaline improved haemodynamics during laboratory quality CPR in pigs, but not with quality simulating clinically reported CPR performance.

  16. The effects of flipped learning for bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation on undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Taizo; Goto, Tadahiro; Kobuchi, Taketsune; Kimura, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2017-12-22

    To compare bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills retention between conventional learning and flipped learning for first-year medical students. A post-test only control group design. A total of 108 participants were randomly assigned to either the conventional learning or flipped learning. The primary outcome measures of time to the first chest compression and the number of total chest compressions during a 2-minute test period 6 month after the training were assessed with the Mann-Whitney U test. Fifty participants (92.6%) in the conventional learning group and 45 participants (83.3%) in the flipped learning group completed the study. There were no statistically significant differences 6 months after the training in the time to the first chest compression of 33.0 seconds (interquartile range, 24.0-42.0) for the conventional learning group and 31.0 seconds (interquartile range, 25.0-41.0) for the flipped learning group (U=1171.0, p=0.73) or in the number of total chest compressions of 101.5 (interquartile range, 90.8-124.0) for the conventional learning group and 104.0 (interquartile range, 91.0-121.0) for the flipped learning group (U=1083.0, p=0.75). The 95% confidence interval of the difference between means of the number of total chest compressions 6 months after the training did not exceed a clinically important difference defined a priori. There were no significant differences between the conventional learning group and the flipped learning group in our main outcomes. Flipped learning might be comparable to conventional learning, and seems a promising approach which requires fewer resources and enables student-centered learning without compromising the acquisition of CPR skills.

  17. Use of the Trendelenburg Position in the Porcine Model Improves Carotid Flow During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

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    Lenker, Jay

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is now widely used as a treatment for ventricular fibrillation, though numerous studies have shown the outcome of standard CPR to be dismal. Alternative methods of CPR, including interposed abdominal compression, constant aortic occlusion, and the use of intrathoracic pressure regulator, have been shown to increase cardiac output and affect the mortality rate of CPR.OBJECTIVES: Here we suggest the Trendelenburg position as yet another method of increasing cardiac output and therefore improving the effectiveness of chest compressions. We hypothesized that the use of the Trendelenburg position during CPR would increase cardiac output as measured by carotid blood flow.METHODS: We anaesthetized six pigs and measured their pre-arrest carotid flow rate for two minutes. We then induced ventricular fibrillation in those pigs and performed open-chest CPR on them. Post-arrest carotid blood flow was measured for two minutes each at 0 (supine position, 10, 20, and 30 degrees of head-down tilt in each pig. The mean carotid flow for each degree of tilt was compared to mean carotid flow at 0 degrees of tilt using a paired student t-test.RESULTS: We found an increase of up to 1.4-fold in carotid blood flow during CPR in the Trendelenburg position, though only 20 and 30 degrees of Trendelenburg showed a statistically significant increase from the 0 degrees of tilt in pigs.CONCLUSION: The Trendelenburg position can lead to increased blood flow through the carotid arteries during CPR in this pig model. Future studies should investigate whether this increased blood flow through the carotid arteries leads to improved brain perfusion and better neurologic outcomes.

  18. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation before defibrillation in the out-of-hospital setting: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winship, Christian; Williams, Brett; Boyle, Malcolm J

    2012-10-01

    Many studies over the past decade have investigated delaying initial defibrillation to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), as it has been associated with increased rates of restoration of spontaneous circulation and/or survival. Since 2006, a number of studies have investigated these procedures. The objective of this study was to undertake a literature review examining the commencement of CPR before defibrillation in the out-of-hospital setting. A literature review was undertaken using the electronic medical databases Ovid Medline, EMBASE, CINHAL Plus, Cochrane Systematic Review and Meditext, from their commencement to the end of June 2011. Keywords used in the search included: CPR, defibrillation, ventricular fibrillation, VF, EMS, EMT, paramedic, emergency medical service, emergency medical technician, prehospital, out-of-hospital and ambulance. References of relevant articles were also reviewed. Of the 3079 articles located, 10 met the inclusion criteria. The results of these studies showed conflicting results. All retrospective studies (n=6) indicated a benefit in performing pre-shock CPR on patients with ventricular fibrillation for durations between 90 and 180 s. Conversely, all randomised controlled trials demonstrated no benefit from providing CPR before defibrillation compared with immediate defibrillation for return of spontaneous circulation, neurological outcome and/or survival to hospital discharge. However, none of the studies reported evidence that CPR before defibrillation is harmful. Conflicting evidence remains regarding the benefit of CPR before defibrillation. The establishment of a consistent timeframe of chest compressions before defibrillation in the out-of-hospital setting will provide uniformity in standards in clinical practice and education and training.

  19. Are Chinese Students Willing to Learn and Perform Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiao; Hu, Cuihuan; Mao, Jing

    2016-12-01

    Immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can improve survival rate from cardiac arrest and students are potentially important bystander CPR providers. Our aim was to investigate the willingness among Chinese students to learn and perform bystander CPR. Questionnaires were distributed to 1407 students. The survey investigated the willingness to learn and perform bystander CPR and the barriers to performing CPR on family members and strangers, assuming that students had mastered CPR. Only 14.6% of respondents reported having ever attended CPR training classes, however, 88.3% expressed their willingness to learn. The main characteristics of the students who were willing to learn were the following: they considered the development of the local emergency system excellent (odds ratio [OR] = 3.15); cardiovascular diseases were present within their family (OR = 2.74); and they had previously heard about CPR (OR = 2.43). Almost all respondents (94.6%) reported that they would conduct bystander CPR on family members, while only 59.7% of respondents would do it for strangers. A lack of confidence was the principal barrier to doing CPR for family members (78.4%) and the leading barrier to stranger CPR was the fear of legal liability if their lifesaving attempts failed (90.8%). The complicated process of performing CPR was also a major barrier in both scenarios. When there is a great desire to learn CPR, the rate and effect of training can be significantly improved by providing students with regular CPR training, especially compression-only CPR training. Training classes should focus on enhancing the participants' confidence. In addition, legislation by the government is needed to protect the rescuers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Stop-Only-While-Shocking algorithm reduces hands-off time by 17% during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Koch; Mohammed, Anna; Pedersen, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reducing hands-off time during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is believed to increase survival after cardiac arrests because of the sustaining of organ perfusion. The aim of our study was to investigate whether charging the defibrillator before rhythm analyses and shock delivery...... significantly reduced hands-off time compared with the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) 2010 CPR guideline algorithm in full-scale cardiac arrest scenarios. METHODS: The study was designed as a full-scale cardiac arrest simulation study including administration of drugs. Participants were randomized...... into using the Stop-Only-While-Shocking (SOWS) algorithm or the ERC2010 algorithm. In SOWS, chest compressions were only interrupted for a post-charging rhythm analysis and immediate shock delivery. A Resusci Anne HLR-D manikin and a LIFEPACK 20 defibrillator were used. The manikin recorded time and chest...

  1. Hypothermia after cardiac arrest as a novel approach to increase survival in cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Rahmani, Farzad; Safari, Saeid; Golzari, Samad Ej

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this review study was to evaluate therapeutic mild hypothermia, its complications and various methods for induced mild hypothermia in patients following resuscitation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Studies conducted on post-cardiac arrest cares, history of induced hypothermia, and therapeutic hypothermia for patients with cardiac arrest were included in this study. We used the valid databases (PubMed and Cochrane library) to collect relevant articles. According to the studies reviewed, induction of mild hypothermia in patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation would lead to increased survival and better neurological outcome; however, studies on the complications of hypothermia or different methods of inducing hypothermia were limited and needed to be studied further. This study provides strategic issues concerning the induction of mild hypothermia, its complications, and different ways of performing it on patients; using this method helps to increase patients' neurological survival rate.

  2. [Motor capacities involved in the psychomotor skills of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation technique: recommendations for the teaching-learning process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyadahira, A M

    2001-12-01

    It is a bibliographic study about the identification of the motor capacities involved in the psychomotor skills of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) which aims to obtain subsidies to the planning of the teaching-learning process of this skill. It was found that: the motor capacities involved in the psychomotor skill of the CPR technique are predominantly cognitive and motor, involving 9 perceptive-motor capacities and 8 physical proficiency capacities. The CPR technique is a psychomotor skill classified as open, done in series and categorized as a thin and global skill and the teaching-learning process of the CPR technique has an elevated degree of complexity.

  3. Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcome reports: update and simplification of the Utstein templates for resuscitation registries. A statement for healthcare professionals from a task force of the international liaison committee on resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian Resuscitation Council, New Zealand Resuscitation Council, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council of Southern Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ian; Nadkarni, Vinay; Bahr, Jan; Berg, Robert A; Billi, John E; Bossaert, Leo; Cassan, Pascal; Coovadia, Ashraf; D'Este, Kate; Finn, Judith; Halperin, Henry; Handley, Anthony; Herlitz, Johan; Hickey, Robert; Idris, Ahamed; Kloeck, Walter; Larkin, Gregory Luke; Mancini, Mary Elizabeth; Mason, Pip; Mears, Gregory; Monsieurs, Koenraad; Montgomery, William; Morley, Peter; Nichol, Graham; Nolan, Jerry; Okada, Kazuo; Perlman, Jeffrey; Shuster, Michael; Steen, Petter Andreas; Sterz, Fritz; Tibballs, James; Timerman, Sergio; Truitt, Tanya; Zideman, David

    2004-12-01

    Outcome following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation is dependent on critical interventions, particularly early defibrillation, effective chest compressions, and advanced life support. Utstein-style definitions and reporting templates have been used extensively in published studies of cardiac arrest, which has led to greater understanding of the elements of resuscitation practice and progress toward international consensus on science and resuscitation guidelines. Despite the development of Utstein templates to standardize research reports of cardiac arrest, international registries have yet to be developed. In April 2002 a task force of ILCOR met in Melbourne, Australia, to review worldwide experience with the Utstein definitions and reporting templates. The task force revised the core reporting template and definitions by consensus. Care was taken to build on previous definitions, changing data elements and operational definitions only on the basis of published data and experience derived from those registries that have used Utstein-style reporting. Attention was focused on decreasing the complexity of the existing templates and addressing logistical difficulties in collecting specific core and supplementary (i.e., essential and desirable) data elements recommended by previous Utstein consensus conference. Inconsistencies in terminology between in-hospital and out-of-hospital Utstein templates were also addressed. The task force produced a reporting tool for essential data that can be used for both quality improvement (registries) and research reports and that should be applicable to both adults and children. The revised and simplified template includes practical and succinct operational definitions. It is anticipated that the revised template will enable better and more accurate completion of all reports of cardiac arrest and resuscitation attempts. Problems with data definition, collection, linkage, confidentiality, management, and registry

  4. Outcomes and Cost Analysis of Patients With Successful In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lun Liu

    2011-12-01

    Conclusions: Given the fact that less than one quarter of the successfully resuscitated patients have a favorable outcome, two-thirds of the mortality cases died within 24 hours, which is a high cost for successful resuscitation, and one-third of the survivors had to stay on chronic respiratory care center. A better prognostic tool to predict outcomes should be developed to avoid futile resuscitation.

  5. Effects of kneeling posture on chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Michael Sh; Chow, Daniel Hk

    2017-10-05

    To study the effects of kneeling posture on chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in males. Efficiency of chest compression during CPR affected millions of victims over the world. There are still no clear guidelines on kneeling posture that a rescuer should adopt in performing CPR. A self-controlled repeated-measures design was applied in this study. The efficiency of chest compression on a mannequin when three kneeling postures were adopted (farthest, self-adjusted and nearest) was analysed. Eighteen participants with qualified first-aid certificate were recruited. Each participant had to perform three sessions of CPR, using one of the three different kneeling postures (i.e., farthest, self-adjusted and nearest) in each. They were performed in a random order chosen by drawing lots. Each session consisted of five cycles of CPR in each kneeling posture. Each cycle consisted of 30 strokes of chest compression performed within 18 s with a 4-s pause between consecutive cycles. Each session lasted for 2 min. The participants were allowed to rest for 10 min on a chair between sessions. Efficiency of chest compression was quantified by compression force, joint angle, heart rate and energy expenditure. After each session of CPR, the participants were surveyed about their rate of perceived exertion. Efficiency of chest compression in self-adjusted and nearest kneeling postures was significantly better than that of the farthest one. While the self-adjusted and nearest postures had the similar effect, most of the participants preferred self-adjusted kneeling posture because of lower rate of perceived exertion. The use of the self-adjusted and nearest kneeling postures during CPR in males resulted in more effective chest compression with lower perceived exertion, compared with the farthest kneeling posture. Both these positions can be objectively recommended to enhance the efficiency of chest compression and thereby increase the cardiac arrest

  6. Brief compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation training video and simulation with homemade mannequin improves CPR skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Gregory K; Osborne, Arayel; Greene, Charlotte H

    2016-11-29

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training has traditionally involved classroom-based courses or, more recently, home-based video self-instruction. These methods typically require preparation and purchase fee; which can dissuade many potential bystanders from receiving training. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of teaching compression-only CPR to previously untrained individuals using our 6-min online CPR training video and skills practice on a homemade mannequin, reproduced by viewers with commonly available items (towel, toilet paper roll, t-shirt). Participants viewed the training video and practiced with the homemade mannequin. This was a parallel-design study with pre and post training evaluations of CPR skills (compression rate, depth, hand position, release), and hands-off time (time without compressions). CPR skills were evaluated using a sensor-equipped mannequin and two blinded CPR experts observed testing of participants. Twenty-four participants were included: 12 never-trained and 12 currently certified in CPR. Comparing pre and post training, the never-trained group had improvements in average compression rate per minute (64.3 to 103.9, p = 0.006), compressions with correct hand position in 1 min (8.3 to 54.3, p = 0.002), and correct compression release in 1 min (21.2 to 76.3, p CPR-certified group had adequate pre and post-test compression rates (>100/min), but an improved number of compressions with correct release (53.5 to 94.7, p 50 mm) remained problematic in both groups. Comparisons made between groups indicated significant improvements in compression depth, hand position, and hands-off time in never-trained compared to CPR-certified participants. Inter-rater agreement values were also calculated between the CPR experts and sensor-equipped mannequin. A brief internet-based video coupled with skill practice on a homemade mannequin improved compression-only CPR skills, especially in the previously untrained

  7. Trends in in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults receiving maintenance dialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Susan P. Y.; Kreuter, William; Curtis, J. Randall; Hall, Yoshio N.; O’Hare, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Understanding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) practices and outcomes can help to support advance care planning in patients receiving maintenance dialysis. Objective To characterize patterns and outcomes of in-hospital CPR in US adults receiving maintenance dialysis. Design A national retrospective cohort study. Setting A comprehensive national registry for end-stage renal disease. Participants 663,734 Medicare beneficiaries aged 18 years who initiated maintenance dialysis between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2010. Exposure Receipt of in-hospital CPR from 91 days after dialysis initiation through the time of death, first kidney transplant or end of follow-up on December 31, 2011. Main outcomes and measures Incidence of CPR and survival after the first episode of CPR recorded in Medicare claims during follow-up. Results The annual incidence of CPR for the overall cohort was 1.4 events/1,000 in-hospital days (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–1.4). Approximately one in five (21.9%, 95% CI 21.4–22.3) CPR recipients survived to hospital discharge, with a median post-discharge survival of 5.0 months (interquartile range 0.7–16.8). Among patients who died in the hospital, 14.9% (95% CI 14.8–15.1) received CPR during their terminal admission. From 2000–2011, there was an increase in the incidence of CPR (1.0 events/1,000 in-hospital days [95% CI 0.9–1.1] to 1.6 events/1,000 in-hospital days [95% CI 1.6–1.7]; trend pCPR recipients who survived to discharge (15.2% [95% CI 11.1–20.5] to 28% [95% CI 26.7–29.4]; trend pCPR (9.5% [95% CI 8.4–10.8] to 19.8% [95% CI 19.2–20.4]; trend pCPR was higher and long-term survival worse than reported for other populations. PMID:25915762

  8. Exploring virtual worlds for scenario-based repeated team training of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzfeldt, Johan; Hedman, Leif; Medin, Christopher; Heinrichs, Wm LeRoy; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2010-09-03

    Contemporary learning technologies, such as massively multiplayer virtual worlds (MMVW), create new means for teaching and training. However, knowledge about the effectiveness of such training is incomplete, and there are no data regarding how students experience it. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a field within medicine in high demand for new and effective training modalities. In addition to finding a feasible way to implement CPR training, our aim was to investigate how a serious game setting in a virtual world using avatars would influence medical students' subjective experiences as well as their retention of knowledge. An MMVW was refined and used in a study to train 12 medical students in CPR in 3-person teams in a repeated fashion 6 months apart. An exit questionnaire solicited reflections over their experiences. As the subjects trained in 4 CPR scenarios, measurements of self-efficacy, concentration, and mental strain were made in addition to measuring knowledge. Engagement modes and coping strategies were also studied. Parametric and nonparametric statistical analyses were carried out according to distribution of the data. The majority of the subjects reported that they had enjoyed the training, had found it to be suitable, and had learned something new, although several asked for more difficult and complex scenarios as well as a richer virtual environment. The mean values for knowledge dropped during the 6 months from 8.0/10 to 6.25/10 (P = .002). Self-efficacy increased from before to after each of the two training sessions, from 5.9/7 to 6.5/7 (P = .01) after the first and from 6.0/7 to 6.7/7 (P = .03) after the second. The mean perceived concentration value increased from 54.2/100 to 66.6/100 (P = .006), and in general the mental strain was found to be low to moderate (mean = 2.6/10). Using scenario-based virtual world team training with avatars to train medical students in multi-person CPR was feasible and showed promising results. Although we

  9. An assessment of resuscitation quality in the television drama Emergency Room: guideline non-compliance and low-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation lead to a favorable outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkelbein, Jochen; Spelten, Oliver; Marks, Jörg; Hellmich, Martin; Böttiger, Bernd W; Wetsch, Wolfgang A

    2014-08-01

    Two earlier studies found that outcome after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the television medical drama Emergency Room (ER) is not realistic. No study has yet evaluated CPR quality in ER. Retrospective analysis of CPR quality in episodes of ER. Three independent board-certified emergency physicians trained in CPR and the American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines reviewed ER episodes in two 5-year time-frames (2001-2005 and 2005-2009). Congruency with the corresponding 2000 and 2005 AHA guidelines was determined for each CPR scene. None. None. To evaluate whether CPR is in agreement with the specific algorithms of the AHA guidelines. Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney-U-test were used to evaluate statistical significance (PCPR scene was in agreement with the published AHA guidelines. However, low-quality CPR and non-compliance with the guidelines resulted in favorable outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation with defibrillation (ACPRD-C) among female hospital nurses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsing-Long; Lin, Mei-Hsiang; Ho, Chao-Chung; Fu, Chin-Hua; Koo, Malcolm

    2017-07-01

    Nurses are often the first responders to in-hospital cardiac emergencies. A positive attitude towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation with defibrillation may contribute to early cardiopulmonary resuscitation and rapid defibrillation, which are associated with enhanced long-term survival. The aim of this study was to translate and adapt the 31-item attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation with defibrillation and the national resuscitation guidelines (ACPRD) instrument into Chinese and to evaluate its psychometric properties in a sample of Taiwanese hospital nurses. The ACPRD instrument was translated into Chinese using professional translation services. Content validity index based on five experts to refine the translated instrument. The final instrument was applied to a sample of 290 female nurses, recruited from a regional hospital in southern Taiwan, to assess its internal consistency, factor structure, and discriminative validity. The Chinese ACPRD instrument showed good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.87). Seven factors emerged from the factor analysis. The instrument showed good discriminative validity and were able to differentiate the attitudes of nurses with more experience of defibrillation or cardiopulmonary resuscitation from those with less experience. Nurses working in emergency ward or intensive care unit also showed significantly higher overall scores compared to those working in other units. The Chinese ACPRD demonstrated adequate content validity, internal consistency, sensible factor structure, and good discriminative validity. Among Chinese-speaking nurses, it may be used as a tool for assessing the effectiveness of educational programs that aim to improve their confidence in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation with defibrillation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Basic life support skills of high school students before and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation training: a longitudinal investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meissner Theresa M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immediate bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR significantly improves survival after a sudden cardiopulmonary collapse. This study assessed the basic life support (BLS knowledge and performance of high school students before and after CPR training. Methods This study included 132 teenagers (mean age 14.6 ± 1.4 years. Students completed a two-hour training course that provided theoretical background on sudden cardiac death (SCD and a hands-on CPR tutorial. They were asked to perform BLS on a manikin to simulate an SCD scenario before the training. Afterwards, participants encountered the same scenario and completed a questionnaire for self-assessment of their pre- and post-training confidence. Four months later, we assessed the knowledge retention rate of the participants with a BLS performance score. Results Before the training, 29.5% of students performed chest compressions as compared to 99.2% post-training (P P Conclusions BLS training in high school seems highly effective considering the minimal amount of previous knowledge the students possess. We observed significant improvement and a good retention rate four months after training. Increasing the number of trained students may minimize the reluctance to conduct bystander CPR and increase the number of positive outcomes after sudden cardiopulmonary collapse.

  12. DHA-supplemented diet increases the survival of rats following asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhwan; Yin, Tai; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Lampe, Joshua W; Becker, Lance B

    2016-11-04

    Accumulating evidence illustrates the beneficial effects of dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on cardiovascular diseases. However, its effects on cardiac arrest (CA) remain controversial in epidemiological studies and have not been reported in controlled animal studies. Here, we examined whether dietary DHA can improve survival, the most important endpoint in CA. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups and received either a control diet or a DHA-supplemented diet for 7-8 weeks. Rats were then subjected to 20 min asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest followed by 30 min cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation. Rat survival was monitored for additional 3.5 h following resuscitation. In the control group, 1 of 9 rats survived for 4 h, whereas 6 of 9 rats survived in the DHA-treated group. Surviving rats in the DHA-treated group displayed moderately improved hemodynamics compared to rats in the control group 1 h after the start of resuscitation. Rats in the control group showed no sign of brain function whereas rats in the DHA-treated group had recurrent seizures and spontaneous respiration, suggesting dietary DHA also protects the brain. Overall, our study shows that dietary DHA significantly improves rat survival following 20 min of severe CA.

  13. Prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Folke, Fredrik; Kragholm, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    AIM: It is unclear whether prolonged resuscitation can result in successful outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA). We assessed associations between duration of pre-hospital resuscitation on survival and functional outcome following OHCA in patients achieving pre-hospital return...

  14. Innovative cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator programs in schools: Results from the Student Program for Olympic Resuscitation Training in Schools (SPORTS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Victoria L; Haley, Danielle M; Dugan, Noreen P; Iyer, V Ramesh; Shults, Justine

    2016-07-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rates are low. Our study objective was to encourage Philadelphia high school students to develop CPR/AED (automated external defibrillator) training programs and to assess their efficacy. The focus was on developing innovative ways to learn the skills of CPR/AED use, increasing willingness to respond in an emergency, and retention of effective psychomotor resuscitation skills. Health education classes in 15 Philadelphia School District high schools were selected, with one Control and one Study Class per school. Both completed CPR/AED pre- and post-tests to assess cognitive knowledge and psychomotor skills. After pre-tests, both were taught CPR skills and AED use by their health teacher. Study Classes developed innovative programs to learn, teach, and retain CPR/AED skills. The study culminated with Study Classes competing in multiple CPR/AED skills events at the CPR/AED Olympic event. Outcomes included post-tests, Mock Code, and presentation scores. All students' cognitive and psychomotor skills improved with standard classroom education (pschools at the CPR/AED Olympics and the development of their own student-directed education programs resulted in remarkable retention of psychomotor skill scores in the Study Class (88%) vs the Control Class (79%) (pschools ≥94%. Students who developed creative and novel methods of teaching and learning resuscitation skills showed outstanding application of these skills in a Mock Code with remarkable psychomotor skill retention, potentially empowering a new generation of effectively trained CPR bystanders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Early cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of Automated External Defibrillators by laypersons in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest using an SMS alert service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Annemieke C.; van Manen, Jeanette Gabrielle; van der Worp, Wim E.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate an SMS service (SMS = short message service = text message) with which laypersons are alerted to go to patients with suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and perform early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and use an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). This study is the

  16. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions-A nationwide prospective feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2010-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...

  17. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions--a nationwide prospective feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2011-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...

  18. Therapeutic hypothermia activates the endothelin and nitric oxide systems after cardiac arrest in a pig model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Zoerner

    Full Text Available Post-cardiac arrest myocardial dysfunction is a major cause of mortality in patients receiving successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH is the recommended treatment after resuscitation from cardiac arrest (CA and is known to exert neuroprotective effects and improve short-term survival. Yet its cytoprotective mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, our aim was to determine the possible effect of MTH on vasoactive mediators belonging to the endothelin/nitric oxide axis in our porcine model of CA and CPR. Pigs underwent either untreated CA or CA with subsequent CPR. After state-of-the-art resuscitation, the animals were either left untreated, cooled between 32-34 °C after ROSC or treated with a bolus injection of S-PBN (sodium 4-[(tert-butylimino methyl]benzene-3-sulfonate N-oxide until 180 min after ROSC, respectively. The expression of endothelin 1 (ET-1, endothelin converting enzyme 1 (ECE-1, and endothelin A and B receptors (ETAR and ETBR transcripts were measured using quantitative real-time PCR while protein levels for the ETAR, ETBR and nitric oxide synthases (NOS were assessed using immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. Our results indicated that the endothelin system was not upregulated at 30, 60 and 180 min after ROSC in untreated postcardiac arrest syndrome. Post-resuscitative 3 hour-long treatments either with MTH or S-PBN stimulated ET-1, ECE-1, ETAR and ETBR as well as neuronal NOS and endothelial NOS in left ventricular cardiomyocytes. Our data suggests that the endothelin and nitric oxide pathways are activated by MTH in the heart.

  19. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation interruptions with use of a load-distributing band device during emergency department cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Annathurai, Annitha; Shahidah, Ahmad; Leong, Benjamin Sieu-Hon; Ong, Victor Yeok Kein; Tiah, Ling; Ang, Shiang Hu; Yong, Kok Leong; Sultana, Papia

    2010-09-01

    Our primary aim is to measure no-flow time and no-flow ratio before and after an emergency department (ED) switched from manual to a load-distributing band mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) device. This was a phased, before-after cohort evaluation at an urban tertiary hospital ED. We collected continuous video and chest compression data with the Physiocontrol CodeStat Suite 7.0 for resuscitations during the period just before and after adoption of load-distributing band CPR. All out-of-hospital, nontraumatic cardiac arrest, adult patients were eligible. From February 2007 to July 2008, there were 26 manual and 41 load-distributing band cases. Patients in both phases were comparable in terms of demographics, medical history, witnessed arrest, arrest location, bystander CPR rates, out-of-hospital defibrillation, initial rhythm, and ED defibrillation. The median no-flow time, defined as the sum of all pauses between compressions longer than 1.5 seconds, during the first 5 minutes of resuscitation, was manual CPR 85 seconds (interquartile range [IQR] 45 to 112 seconds) versus load-distributing band 104 seconds (IQR 69 to 151 seconds). The mean no-flow ratio, defined as no-flow time divided by segment length, was manual 0.28 versus load-distributing band 0.40 (difference=-0.12; 95% confidence interval -0.22 to -0.02). However, from 5 to 10 minutes into the resuscitation, median no-flow time was manual 85 seconds (IQR 59 to 151 seconds) versus load-distributing band 52 seconds (IQR 34 to 82 seconds) and mean no-flow ratio manual 0.34 versus load-distributing band 0.21 (difference=0.13; 95% confidence interval 0.02 to 0.24). The average time to apply load-distributing band CPR during this period was 152 seconds. Application of a load-distributing band in the ED is associated with a higher no-flow ratio than manual CPR in the first 5 minutes of resuscitation. We suggest that attention to team training, rapid application of the device to minimize interruption

  20. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation challenges in selected Botswana hospitals: Nurse managers’ views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Rajeswaran

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic accident victims, as well as persons experiencing cardiac and other medical emergencies, might lose their lives due to the non-availability of trained personnel to provide effective cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR with functional equipment and adequate resources. The objectives of the study were to identify unit managers’ perceptions about challenges encountered when performing CPR interventions in the two referral public hospitals in Botswana. These results could be used to recommend more effective CPR strategies for Botswana’s hospitals. Interviews, comprising two quantitative sections with closed ended questions and one qualitative section with semi-structured questions, were conducted with 22 unit managers. The quantitative data indicated that all unit managers had at least eight years’ nursing experience, and could identify CPR shortcomings in their hospitals. Only one interviewee had never performed CPR. The qualitative data analysis revealed that the hospital units sometimes had too few staff members and did not have fully equipped emergency trolleys and/or equipment. No CPR teams and no CPR policies and guidelines existed. Nurses and doctors reportedly lacked CPR knowledge and skills. No debriefing services were provided after CPR encounters. The participating hospitals should address the following challenges that might affect CPR outcomes: shortages of staff, overpopulation of hospital units, shortcomings of the emergency trolleys and CPR equipment, absence of CPR policies and guidelines, absence of CPR teams, limited CPR competencies of doctors and nurses and the lack of debriefing sessions after CPR attempts. Die slagoffers van padongelukke, asook persone wat hart- en ander mediese noodtoestande ervaar, kan hulle lewens verloor omdat daar nie opgeleide personeel met funksionele toerusting en voldoende hulpbronne beskikbaar is om effektiewe kardiopulmonale resussitasie (KPR te doen nie. Die studie het ten doel

  1. Estrogen-mediated renoprotection following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation is robust to GPR30 gene deletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Hutchens

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury is a serious,sexually dimorphic perioperative complication, primarily attributed to hypoperfusion. We previously found that estradiol is renoprotective after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in ovariectomized female mice. Additionally, we found that neither estrogen receptor alpha nor beta mediated this effect. We hypothesized that the G protein estrogen receptor (GPR30 mediates the renoprotective effect of estrogen.Ovariectomized female and gonadally intact male wild-type and GPR30 gene-deleted mice were treated with either vehicle or 17β-estradiol for 7 days, then subjected to cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Twenty four hours later, serum creatinine and urea nitrogen were measured, and histologic renal injury was evaluated by unbiased stereology.In both males and females, GPR30 gene deletion was associated with reduced serum creatinine regardless of treatment. Estrogen treatment of GPR30 gene-deleted males and females was associated with increased preprocedural weight. In ovariectomized female mice, estrogen treatment did not alter resuscitation, but was renoprotective regardless of GPR30 gene deletion. In males, estrogen reduced the time-to-resuscitate and epinephrine required. In wild-type male mice, serum creatinine was reduced, but neither serum urea nitrogen nor histologic outcomes were affected by estrogen treatment. In GPR30 gene-deleted males, estrogen did not alter renal outcomes. Similarly, renal injury was not affected by G1 therapy of ovariectomized female wild-type mice.Treatment with 17β-estradiol is renoprotective after whole-body ischemia-reperfusion in ovariectomized female mice irrespective of GPR30 gene deletion. Treatment with the GPR30 agonist G1 did not alter renal outcome in females. We conclude GPR30 does not mediate the renoprotective effect of estrogen in ovariectomized female mice. In males, estrogen therapy was not renoprotective. Estrogen treatment of GPR30

  2. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) plus delayed defibrillation versus immediate defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; He, Qing; Yang, Li J; Liu, Guan J; Jones, Alexander

    2014-09-12

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a common health problem associated with high levels of mortality. Cardiac arrest is caused by three groups of dysrhythmias: ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT), pulseless electric activity (PEA) and asystole. The most common dysrhythmia found in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is VF. During VF or VT, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) provides perfusion and oxygenation to the tissues, whilst defibrillation restores a viable cardiac rhythm. Early successful defibrillation is known to improve outcomes in VF/VT. However, it has been hypothesized that a period of CPR before defibrillation creates a more conducive physiological environment, increasing the likelihood of successful defibrillation. The order of priority of CPR versus defibrillation therefore remains in contention. As previous studies have remained inconclusive, we conducted a systematic review of available evidence in an attempt to draw conclusions on whether CPR plus delayed defibrillation or immediate defibrillation resulted in better outcomes in OHCA. To examine whether an initial one and one-half to three minutes of CPR administered by paramedics before defibrillation versus immediate defibrillation on arrival influenced survival rates, neurological outcomes or rates of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in OHCA. We searched the following databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials (CENTRAL) (2013, Issue 6); MEDLINE (Ovid) (1948 to May 2013); EMBASE (1980 to May 2013); the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science (1980 to May 2013) and the China Academic Journal Network Publishing Database (China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), 1980 to May 2013). We included studies published in all languages. We also searched the Current Controlled Trials and Clinical Trials databases for ongoing trials. We screened the references lists of studies included in our review against the reference

  3. Association of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival according to ambulance response-times after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) increases patient survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but it is unknown to what degree bystander CPR remains positively associated with survival with increasing time to potential defibrillation. The main objective...... was to examine the association of bystander CPR with survival as time to advanced treatment increases. Methods: We studied 7623 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients between 2005 and 2011, identified through the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used...... out-of-hospital cardiac arrest statistics, an additional 233 patients could potentially be saved annually if response time was reduced from 10 to 5 minutes and 119 patients if response time was reduced from 7 (the median response time in this study) to 5 minutes. Conclusions: The absolute survival...

  4. Lay Bystanders' Perspectives on What Facilitates Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Use of Automated External Defibrillators in Real Cardiac Arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Rosenkranz, Simone Mørk; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest will fail to receive bystander intervention (cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR] or defibrillation) despite widespread CPR training and the dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). We sought to investigate what...... factors encourage lay bystanders to initiate CPR and AED use in a cohort of bystanders previously trained in CPR techniques who were present at an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS AND RESULTS: One-hundred and twenty-eight semistructured qualitative interviews with CPR-trained lay bystanders......, until data saturation. We used cross-sectional indexing (using software), and inductive in-depth thematic analyses, to identify those factors that facilitated CPR and AED use. In addition to prior hands-on CPR training, the following were described as facilitators: prior knowledge that intervention...

  5. The effect of formal training of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR skills on medical students perceived self-sufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaghaghi A

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Experience of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in real clinical setting is not easily possible for all medical students. Purpose: To assess medical student perceived self-sufficiency on three procedural skill on internship courses after they had taken a training course in clerkship period. Methods: Forty three medical students who had attended a workshop on CPR, tracheal intubations and venopuncture answered the questionnaires on their perceived self-sufficiency in performing these procedures after serving a few months as interns. Results: The mean score for perceived self-sufficiency (PSS was 75.84 (±18.63.Thre were a high correlation between the score given for the applicability of training in real life situation and the stress reduction scores on first time performing the procedure. Conclusion: The high degree of correlation between PSS scores and applicability scores, may warrant the consideration of new methods in procedural skills. Keywords: SKILL TRAINING, CPR TRAINING, PERCEIVED SELF-SUFFICIENCY

  6. Pre-arrest predictors of failure to survive after in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebell, Mark H; Afonso, Anna M

    2011-10-01

    Our objective was to perform a systematic review of pre-arrest predictors of the outcome of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in adults. We searched PubMed for studies published since 1985 and bibliographies of previous meta-analyses. We included studies with predominantly adult patients, limited to in-hospital arrest, using an explicit definition of cardiopulmonary arrest and CPR and reporting survival to discharge by at least one pre-arrest variable. A total of 35 studies were included in the final analysis. Inclusion criteria, design elements and results were abstracted in parallel by both investigators. Discrepancies were resolved by consensus. The rate of survival to discharge was 17.5%; we found a trend towards increasing survival in more recent studies. Metastatic malignancy [odds ratio (OR) 3.9] or haematologic malignancy (OR 3.9), age over 70, 75 or 80 years (OR 1.5, 2.8 and 2.7, respectively), black race (OR 2.1), altered mental status (OR 2.2), dependency for activities of daily living (range OR 3.2-7.0 depending on specific activity), impaired renal function (OR 1.9), hypotension on admission (OR 1.8) and admission for pneumonia (OR 1.7), trauma (OR 1.7) or medical non-cardiac diagnosis (OR 2.2) were significantly associated with failure to survive to discharge; cardiovascular diagnoses and co-morbidities were associated with improved survival (range OR 0.23-0.53). Elevated CPR risk scores predicted failure to survive but have not been validated consistently in different populations. We identified several pre-arrest variables associated with failure to survive to discharge. This information should be shared with patients as part of a shared decision-making process regarding the use of do not resuscitate orders.

  7. Serum Cortisol Levels as a Predictor of Neurologic Survival inSuccessfully Resuscitated Victims of Cardiopulmonary Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Tavakoli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA is the most stressful lifetime event for the victims and an important issue for the emergency physicians. The status of the hypothalamic pituitary- adrenal axis (HPA function in successfully resuscitated victims of cardiopulmonary arrest has been recently of an interest for the researchers. Methods: In a prospective cohort study, 50 successfully resuscitated OHCA victims’ serum cortisol levels were measured 5 minutes and 1 hour after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. The data were analyzed comparing the one-week neurologic survival. Results: Fifty blood samples were obtained for serum cortisol levels after 5 minutes of ROSC. Fourteen patients (28% pronounced death during one hour after CPR. Blood sample from living 36 patients after one hour post-CPR were obtained for second cortisol assay. Eleven patients (22% were neurologically survived after one week. Seven patients (14% were discharged finally from hospital with good neurologic recovery. The serum cortisol levels in both the neurologically surviving and the non-surviving after 5 minutes of ROSC patients were 63.4 ±13.6 and 43.2±25.5(microg/ml, (mean±S.D., respectively and after 1 hour of ROSC patients’ serum cortisol levels were 64.9±13.1 and 47.3±27.1(microg/ml, (mean±S.D., respectively. The difference was significantly higher in neurologically survived group in both 5 minutes and 1 hour after ROSC (P= 0.015 and 0.013 respectively. Conclusion: serum cortisol levels after 5 minutes and one hour of ROSC in victims of cardiopulmonary arrest are significantly higher in neurologically survived than non-survived patients.

  8. Google Glass Video Capture of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Events: A Pilot Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassutto, Stacey M; Kayser, Joshua B; Kerlin, Meeta P; Upton, Mark; Lipschik, Gregg; Epstein, Andrew J; Dine, C Jessica; Schweickert, William

    2017-12-01

    Video recording of resuscitation from fixed camera locations has been used to assess adherence to guidelines and provide feedback on performance. However, inpatient cardiac arrests often happen in unpredictable locations and crowded rooms, making video recording of these events problematic. We sought to understand the feasibility of Google Glass (GG) as a method for recording inpatient cardiac arrests and capturing salient resuscitation factors for post-event review. This observational study involved recording simulated cardiac arrest events on inpatient medical wards. Each simulation was reviewed by 3 methods: in-room physician direct observation, stationary video camera (SVC), and GG. Nurse and physician specialists analyzed the videos for global visibility and audibility, as well as recording quality of predefined resuscitation events and behaviors. Resident code leaders were surveyed regarding attitudes toward GG use in the clinical emergency setting. Of 11 simulated cardiac arrest events, 9 were successfully recorded by all observation methods (1 GG failure, 1 SVC failure). GG was judged slightly better than SVC recording for average global visualization (3.95 versus 3.15, P = .0003) and average global audibility (4.77 versus 4.42, P = .002). Of the GG videos, 19% had limitations in overall interpretability compared with 35% of SVC recordings (P = .039). All 10 survey respondents agreed that GG was easy to use; however, 2 found it distracting and 3 were uncomfortable with future use during actual resuscitations. GG is a feasible and acceptable method for capturing simulated resuscitation events in the inpatient setting.

  9. Adherence to AHA Guidelines When Adapted for Augmented Reality Glasses for Assisted Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Johan N; Ehrler, Frederic; Gervaix, Alain; Haddad, Kevin; Lacroix, Laurence; Schrurs, Philippe; Sahin, Ayhan; Lovis, Christian; Manzano, Sergio

    2017-05-29

    The American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are nowadays recognized as the world's most authoritative resuscitation guidelines. Adherence to these guidelines optimizes the management of critically ill patients and increases their chances of survival after cardiac arrest. Despite their availability, suboptimal quality of CPR is still common. Currently, the median hospital survival rate after pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest is 36%, whereas it falls below 10% for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Among emerging information technologies and devices able to support caregivers during resuscitation and increase adherence to AHA guidelines, augmented reality (AR) glasses have not yet been assessed. In order to assess their potential, we adapted AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) guidelines for AR glasses. The study aimed to determine whether adapting AHA guidelines for AR glasses increased adherence by reducing deviation and time to initiation of critical life-saving maneuvers during pediatric CPR when compared with the use of PALS pocket reference cards. We conducted a randomized controlled trial with two parallel groups of voluntary pediatric residents, comparing AR glasses to PALS pocket reference cards during a simulation-based pediatric cardiac arrest scenario-pulseless ventricular tachycardia (pVT). The primary outcome was the elapsed time in seconds in each allocation group, from onset of pVT to the first defibrillation attempt. Secondary outcomes were time elapsed to (1) initiation of chest compression, (2) subsequent defibrillation attempts, and (3) administration of drugs, as well as the time intervals between defibrillation attempts and drug doses, shock doses, and number of shocks. All these outcomes were assessed for deviation from AHA guidelines. Twenty residents were randomized into 2 groups. Time to first defibrillation attempt (mean: 146 s) and adherence to AHA guidelines in terms of time to other

  10. Review of active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ACD-CPR). Analysis of iatrogenic complications and their biomechanical explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabl, W; Baubin, M; Haid, C; Pfeiffer, K P; Scheithauer, R

    1997-10-06

    Our review takes a critical look at the active compression-decompression technique (ACD) for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). ACD-CPR was developed following a report of successful resuscitation performed by a medical amateur using a household plunger. The efficacy of the principle of active decompression has been demonstrated by animal and human studies. Potential iatrogenic complications from the CardioPump were evaluated only when large clinical trials were already underway. Our prospective analysis of autopsy patients and systematic randomised studies in corpses prove that ACD-CPR using the CardioPump considerably increases the rate of iatrogenic complications and especially of sternum fractures. The experimental use of the CardioPump in corpses and the analysis of a variety of different parameters, especially of the rubber cushion pads mounted in the silicone cup to prevent skin abrasions, revealed a statistically significant correlation between sternum fractures and female sex (P Sex differences in the shape of the sternum and especially the thickness may account for the significant correlation between sternum fractures and female sex.

  11. Conditions and procedures for in-hospital extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swol, Justyna; Belohlávek, Jan; Haft, Jonathan W; Ichiba, Shingo; Lorusso, Roberto; Peek, Giles J

    2016-04-01

    The use of extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR; ECPR) has been repeatedly published as non-randomized studies, mainly case series and case reports. The aim of this article is to support physicians, perfusionists, nurses and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) specialists who regularly perform ECPR or are willing to start an ECPR program by establishing standards for safe and efficient ECPR procedures. This article represents the experience and recommendations of physicians who provide ECPR routinely. Based on its survival and outcome rates, ECPR can be considered when determining the optimal treatment of patients who require CPR. The successful performance of ECLS cannulation during CPR is a life-saving measure and has been associated with improved outcome (including neurological outcome) after CPR. We summarize the general structure of an ECLS team and describe the cannulation procedure and the approaches for post-resuscitation care. The differences in hospital organizations and their regulations may result in variations of this model. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. A Novel Nonlinear Mathematical Model of Thoracic Wall Mechanics During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Based on a Porcine Model of Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Ali; Simpao, Allan F; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Berg, Robert A; Nataraj, C

    2017-02-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is used widely to rescue cardiac arrest patients, yet some physiological aspects of the procedure remain poorly understood. We conducted this study to characterize the dynamic mechanical properties of the thorax during CPR in a swine model. This is an important step toward determining optimal CPR chest compression mechanics with the goals of improving the fidelity of CPR simulation manikins and ideally chest compression delivery in real-life resuscitations. This paper presents a novel nonlinear model of the thorax that captures the complex behavior of the chest during CPR. The proposed model consists of nonlinear elasticity and damping properties along with frequency dependent hysteresis. An optimization technique was used to estimate the model coefficients for force-compression using data collected from experiments conducted on swine. To track clinically relevant, time-dependent changes of the chest's properties, the data was divided into two time periods, from 1 to 10 min (early) and greater than 10 min (late) after starting CPR. The results showed excellent agreement between the actual and the estimated forces, and energy dissipation due to viscous damping in the late stages of CPR was higher when compared to the earlier stages. These findings provide insight into improving chest compression mechanics during CPR, and may provide the basis for developing CPR simulation manikins that more accurately represent the complex real world changes that occur in the chest during CPR.

  13. Assessment of Iranian Nurses and Emergency Medical Personnel in Terms of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Knowledge Based on the 2010 Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhori, Reza Pourmirza; Jalali, Amir; Naderipour, Arsalan; Almasi, Afshin; Khavasi, Mohammad; Rezaei, Masoud; Abbasi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) knowledge of hospital nurses and emergency medical personnel in Kermanshah, Iran. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 330 hospital nurses and 159 emergency medical personnel working in educational hospitals and emergency medical centers in Kermanshah. Data were collected using a validated and reliable (r = 0.74) researcher-made questionnaire consisting of a demographic characteristics questionnaire and the 2010 CPR knowledge questionnaire. Based on the most recent CPR guidelines, the knowledge of 19.5%, 78.6%, and 1.9% of the emergency medical staff was excellent, good, and moderate, respectively. None of the participants had poor knowledge. In addition, the knowledge of 20.2%, 65.4%, 14%, and 0.4% of the nurses in this study was excellent, good, moderate, and poor, respectively. There was no significant difference in CPR knowledge between hospital nurses and emergency medical staff. Moreover, no significant association was found between CPR knowledge and gender, age, work experience, field of study, previous occupation, and advanced resuscitation courses. However, CPR knowledge of individuals with training in basic CPR courses was higher than participants without training in these courses (P nurses and emergency medical personnel was in an acceptable range. Nevertheless, it is strongly recommended that nurses and emergency staff receive training according to the most recent CPR guidelines.

  14. Systematic review of interventions to improve appropriate use and outcomes associated with do-not-attempt-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Richard A; Fritz, Zoë; Baker, Annalie; Grove, Amy; Perkins, Gavin D

    2014-11-01

    The treatment for a cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), may be lifesaving following an acute, potentially reversible illness. Yet this treatment is unlikely to be effective if cardiac arrest occurs as part of the dying process towards the end of a person's natural life. Do not attempt CPR (DNACPR) decisions allow resuscitation to be withheld when it has little chance of success, or where the patient, or those close to the patient, indicate the burdens of CPR outweigh the benefits. This review sought to identify evidence for systems that improve the appropriate use of DNACPR decisions. Electronic databases were searched (Medline, CINAHL and Embase) for English language articles from 2001 to 2014. 4090 citations were identified of which 37 studies were relevant. The overall quality of evidence was moderate to poor. Thematic synthesis identified key interventions which may improve DNACPR decision making. The most promising interventions involved structured discussion at the time of acute admission to hospital and review by specialist teams at the point of an acute deterioration. Linking DNACPR decisions to discussions about overall treatment plans provided greater clarity about goals of care, aided communication between clinicians and reduced harms. Standardised documentation proved helpful for improving the frequency and quality of recording DNACPR decisions. Patient and clinician education in isolation were associated with limited or no effects. Relatively simple process changes may enhance the appropriate use of and outcomes associated with DNACPR decisions. Systematic review registration number: PROSPERO2012:CRD42012002669. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automatic external defibrillator training in schools: "is anyone learning how to save a life?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Devin; Flores-Medrano, Oscar; Brooks, Steve; Buick, Jason E; Morrison, Laurie J

    2013-09-01

    Bystander resuscitation efforts, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and use of an automatic external defibrillator (AED), save lives in cardiac arrest cases. School training in CPR and AED use may increase the currently low community rates of bystander resuscitation. The study objective was to determine the rates of CPR and AED training in Toronto secondary schools and to identify barriers to training and training techniques. This prospective study consisted of telephone interviews conducted with key school staff knowledgeable about CPR and AED teaching. An encrypted Web-based tool with prespecified variables and built-in logic was employed to standardize data collection. Of 268 schools contacted, 93% were available for interview and 83% consented to participate. Students and staff were trained in CPR in 51% and 80% of schools, respectively. Private schools had the lowest training rate (39%). Six percent of schools provided AED training to students and 47% provided AED training to staff. Forty-eight percent of schools had at least one AED installed, but 25% were unaware if their AED was registered with emergency services dispatch. Cost (17%), perceived need (11%), and school population size (10%) were common barriers to student training. Frequently employed training techniques were interactive (32%), didactic instruction (30%) and printed material (16%). CPR training rates for staff and students were moderate overall and lowest in private schools, whereas training rates in AED use were poor in all schools. Identified barriers to training include cost and student population size (perceived to be too small to be cost-effective or too large to be implemented). Future studies should assess the application of convenient and cost-effective teaching alternatives not presently in use.

  16. Can surf-lifeguards perform a quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation sailing on a lifeboat? A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcala-Furelos, Roberto; Abelairas-Gomez, Cristian; Palacios-Aguilar, Jose; Rey, Ezequiel; Costas-Veiga, Javier; Lopez-Garcia, Sergio; Rodriguez-Nunez, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    Drowning is a high-priority public health problem around the world. The European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2015 put special emphasis on special environments like open waters. Stopping the drowning process as soon as possible and starting an early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improve survival. Inflatable rescue boats (IRBs) are used around the world in the water rescue of drowning victims. Our objective was to test the quality of CPR performed by surf-lifeguards while sailing on an IRB. A quasi-experimental simulation trial was conducted in Tenerife (Canary Islands-Spain) on September 2015. Ten surf-lifeguards were asked to perform a 2 min CPR on manikins in four different scenarios: (1) onshore, (2) on adrift boat, (3) on a boat sailing at 5 knots and (4) on a boat sailing at 10 knots. CPR was performed individually and was measured by means of CPRmeter (Laerdal, Norway) located on the standard manikin. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used in order to analyse the differences between scenarios. The composite of all CPR variables was over 84% in all conditions, but it was lower when CPR was performed on board: onshore (96.49±3.58%) versus adrift (91.80±3.56, p=0.04), sailing at 5 knots (88.65±5.54, p=0.03) and sailing at 10 knots (84.74±5.56, p=0.001). Surf-lifeguards are able to deliver good-quality CPR even on a moving IRB, but their performance is lower than onshore. This fact should be considered in real cases to balance the risk and benefits of CPR on board. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. The use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency room of a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Renata Maria de Oliveira; Campanharo, Cássia Regina Vancini; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira de; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-11-21

    to compare the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and death after cardiac arrest, with and without the use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). case-control study nested in a cohort study including 285 adults who experienced cardiac arrest and received CPR in an emergency service. Data were collected using In-hospital Utstein Style. The control group (n=60) was selected by matching patients considering their neurological condition before cardiac arrest, the immediate cause, initial arrest rhythm, whether epinephrine was used, and the duration of CPR. The case group (n=51) received conventional CPR guided by a metronome set at 110 beats/min. Chi-square and likelihood ratio were used to compare ROSC rates considering p≤0.05. ROSC occurred in 57.7% of the cases, though 92.8% of these patients died in the following 24 hours. No statistically significant difference was found between groups in regard to ROSC (p=0.2017) or the occurrence of death (p=0.8112). the outcomes of patients after cardiac arrest with and without the use of a metronome during CPR were similar and no differences were found between groups in regard to survival rates and ROSC. comparar a taxa de retorno da circulação espontânea e óbito após parada cardiorrespiratória, com e sem a utilização do metrônomo durante ressuscitação cardiopulmonar. estudo caso-controle aninhado a estudo de coorte, com 285 adultos atendidos em parada cardíaca em um serviço de emergência e submetidos à ressuscitação cardiopulmonar. Os dados foram coletados por meio do In-hospital Utstein Style. O grupo controle (n=60) foi selecionado pelo pareamento dos pacientes considerando-se o estado neurológico pré-parada cardiorrespiratória, causa imediata e ritmo inicial da parada, utilização de epinefrina e duração da ressuscitação. O grupo caso (n=51) foi submetido à ressuscitação cardiopulmonar convencional com a utilização do metrônomo a 110sons/min. Para comparar

  18. Implementation of a High-Performance Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol at a Collegiate Emergency Medical Services Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefos, Kathryn A.; Nable, Jose V.

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a significant public health issue. Although OHCA occurs relatively infrequently in the collegiate environment, educational institutions with on-campus emergency medical services (EMS) agencies are uniquely positioned to provide high-quality resuscitation care in an expedient fashion. Georgetown University's…

  19. Smartphone Apps for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training and Real Incident Support: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Lenssen, Niklas; Felzen, Marco; Rossaint, Rolf; Tabuenca, Bernardo; Specht, Marcus; Skorning, Max

    2014-01-01

    Background: No systematic evaluation of smartphone/mobile apps for resuscitation training and real incident support is available to date. To provide medical, usability, and additional quality criteria for the development of apps, we conducted a mixed-methods sequential evaluation combining the

  20. Mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in in-hospital cardiac arrest : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lameijer, Heleen; Immink, Rosa S.; Broekema, Josien J.; Ter Maaten, Jan C.

    2015-01-01

    With increasing rates of in-hospital cardiac arrest, improving resuscitation outcomes is essential. Mechanical chest compressors seem to be related to improved outcome in out-of hospital cardiac arrest; however, the literature on its use in in-hospital cardiac arrest is scarce. We used the Medline

  1. 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) of pediatric and neonatal patients: pediatric basic life support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    This publication presents the 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) of the pediatric patient and the 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics/AHA guidelines for CPR and ECC of the neonate. The guidelines are based on the evidence evaluation from the 2005 International Consensus Conference on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations, hosted by the American Heart Association in Dallas, Texas, January 23-30, 2005. The "2005 AHA Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care" contain recommendations designed to improve survival from sudden cardiac arrest and acute life-threatening cardiopulmonary problems. The evidence evaluation process that was the basis for these guidelines was accomplished in collaboration with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). The ILCOR process is described in more detail in the "International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations." The recommendations in the "2005 AHA Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care" confirm the safety and effectiveness of many approaches, acknowledge that other approaches may not be optimal, and recommend new treatments that have undergone evidence evaluation. These new recommendations do not imply that care involving the use of earlier guidelines is unsafe. In addition, it is important to note that these guidelines will not apply to all rescuers and all victims in all situations. The leader of a resuscitation attempt may need to adapt application of the guidelines to unique circumstances. The following are the major pediatric advanced life support changes in the 2005 guidelines: There is further caution about the use of endotracheal tubes. Laryngeal mask airways are acceptable when used by experienced

  2. Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (E-CPR) During Pediatric In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest Is Associated With Improved Survival to Discharge: A Report from the American Heart Association's Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation (GWTG-R) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, Javier J; Rogers, Rachel S; Localio, Russell; Shults, Justine; Raymond, Tia; Gaies, Michael; Thiagarajan, Ravi; Laussen, Peter C; Kilbaugh, Todd; Berg, Robert A; Nadkarni, Vinay; Topjian, Alexis

    2016-01-12

    Although extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (E-CPR) can result in survival after failed conventional CPR (C-CPR), no large, systematic comparison of pediatric E-CPR and continued C-CPR has been reported. Consecutive patients CPR events ≥10 minutes in duration reported to the Get With the Guidelines-Resuscitation registry between January 2000 and December 2011 were identified. Hospitals were grouped by teaching status and location. Primary outcome was survival to discharge. Regression modeling was performed, conditioning on hospital groups. A secondary analysis was performed with the use of propensity score matching. Of 3756 evaluable patients, 591 (16%) received E-CPR and 3165 (84%) received C-CPR only. Survival to hospital discharge and survival with favorable neurological outcome (Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category score of 1-3 or unchanged from admission) were greater for E-CPR (40% [237 of 591] and 27% [133 of 496]) versus C-CPR patients (27% [862 of 3165] and 18% [512 of 2840]). Odds ratios (ORs) for survival to hospital discharge and survival with favorable neurological outcome were greater for E-CPR versus C-CPR. After adjustment for covariates, patients receiving E-CPR had higher odds of survival to discharge (OR, 2.80; 95% confidence interval, 2.13-3.69; PCPR. This association persisted when analyzed by propensity score-matched cohorts (OR, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.33-2.18; PCPR of ≥10 minutes duration, E-CPR was associated with improved survival to hospital discharge and survival with favorable neurological outcome compared with C-CPR. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Ethical aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in premature neonates: where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Reempts, P J; Van Acker, K J

    2001-12-01

    Advances in diagnosis, techniques, therapeutic interventions, organisation of perinatal care, and socio-economic factors have all contributed to the survival after resuscitation and intensive care of neonates with extremely low birth weight and gestational age. While morbidity during the first years of life in those infants does not increase, at school age multiple dysfunctions may become apparent. What are the limits of intensive care for the newborn? Is it right to use extreme technical and economic measures for neonates with a borderline chance of survival? What is justifiable for the neonate, the family, the society and how does legislation interfere in a decision process which involves starting, stopping or continuing intensive care? A short historical overview for the care of the newborn is given, followed by the outcome after resuscitation and treatment of the very low birth weight infant. Published management strategies and recommendations are discussed.

  4. The quality of chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation overrides importance of timing of defibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristagno, Giuseppe; Tang, Wanchun; Chang, Yun-Te; Jorgenson, Dawn B; Russell, James K; Huang, Lei; Wang, Tong; Sun, Shijie; Weil, Max Harry

    2007-07-01

    We address the quality of chest compressions and the impact on initial defibrillation or initial chest compressions after sudden death. Ventricular fibrillation was induced by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery in 24 domestic pigs with a mean (+/- SD) weight of 40 +/- 2 kg. Cardiac arrest was left untreated for 5 min. Animals were then randomized to receive chest compressions-first or defibrillation-first and were further randomized to "optimal" or "conventional" chest compressions. A total of four groups of animals were investigated using a factorial design. For optimal chest compressions, the anterior posterior diameter of the chest was reduced by 25%, representing approximately 6 cm. Only 70% of this depth, or approximately 4.2 cm, represented conventional chest compressions. Chest compressions were delivered with a mechanical chest compressor. Defibrillation was attempted with a single biphasic 150-J shock. Postresuscitation myocardial function was echocardiographically assessed. Coronary perfusion pressures and end-tidal Pco(2) were significantly lower with conventional chest compressions. With optimal chest compressions, either as an initial intervention or after defibrillation, each animal was successfully resuscitated. Fewer shocks were required prior to the return of spontaneous circulation after initial optimal chest compressions. No animals were resuscitated when conventional chest compressions preceded the defibrillation attempt. When defibrillation was attempted as the initial intervention followed by conventional chest compressions, two of six animals were resuscitated. In this animal model of cardiac arrest, it was the quality of the chest compressions, rather then the priority of either initial defibrillation or initial chest compressions, that was the predominant determinant of successful resuscitation.

  5. Performance review of regional emergency medical service pre‐arrival cardiopulmonary resuscitation with or without dispatcher instruction: a population‐based observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Fukushima, Hidetada; Kawai, Yasuyuki; Asai, Hideki; Seki, Tadahiko; Norimoto, Kazunobu; Urisono, Yasuyuki; Okuchi, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Background To investigate variations in emergency medical service (EMS) pre‐arrival cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), including both bystander CPR without dispatch assistance and dispatch‐assisted CPR (DACPR). Methods We carried out an observational study by implementing EMS pre‐arrival CPR reports in three fire agencies. We included adult, non‐traumatic, and non‐EMS witnessed out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrests. This reporting system comprised the dispatch instruction process and bystander CP...

  6. Improving cardiopulmonary resuscitation with a CPR feedback device and refresher simulations (CPR CARES Study): a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Adam; Brown, Linda L; Duff, Jonathan P; Davidson, Jennifer; Overly, Frank; Tofil, Nancy M; Peterson, Dawn T; White, Marjorie L; Bhanji, Farhan; Bank, Ilana; Gottesman, Ronald; Adler, Mark; Zhong, John; Grant, Vincent; Grant, David J; Sudikoff, Stephanie N; Marohn, Kimberly; Charnovich, Alex; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Kessler, David O; Wong, Hubert; Robertson, Nicola; Lin, Yiqun; Doan, Quynh; Duval-Arnould, Jordan M; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2015-02-01

    The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) affects hemodynamics, survival, and neurological outcomes following pediatric cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA). Most health care professionals fail to perform CPR within established American Heart Association guidelines. To determine whether "just-in-time" (JIT) CPR training with visual feedback (VisF) before CPA or real-time VisF during CPA improves the quality of chest compressions (CCs) during simulated CPA. Prospective, randomized, 2 × 2 factorial-design trial with explicit methods (July 1, 2012, to April 15, 2014) at 10 International Network for Simulation-Based Pediatric Innovation, Research, & Education (INSPIRE) institutions running a standardized simulated CPA scenario, including 324 CPR-certified health care professionals assigned to 3-person resuscitation teams (108 teams). Each team was randomized to 1 of 4 permutations, including JIT training vs no JIT training before CPA and real-time VisF vs no real-time VisF during simulated CPA. The proportion of CCs with depth exceeding 50 mm, the proportion of CPR time with a CC rate of 100 to 120 per minute, and CC fraction (percentage CPR time) during simulated CPA. The quality of CPR was poor in the control group, with 12.7% (95% CI, 5.2%-20.1%) mean depth compliance and 27.1% (95% CI, 14.2%-40.1%) mean rate compliance. JIT training compared with no JIT training improved depth compliance by 19.9% (95% CI, 11.1%-28.7%; P 89.0%) in all groups. Combining both interventions showed the highest compliance with American Heart Association guidelines but was not significantly better than either intervention in isolation. The quality of CPR provided by health care professionals is poor. Using novel and practical technology, JIT training before CPA or real-time VisF during CPA, alone or in combination, improves compliance with American Heart Association guidelines for CPR that are associated with better outcomes. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02075450.

  7. Variation in local trust Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) policies: a review of 48 English healthcare trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Karoline; Field, Richard A; Perkins, Gavin D

    2015-01-13

    To explore Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) policies from English acute, community and ambulance service Trusts for evidence of consistency and variation in implementation of national guidelines between healthcare organisations. Acute, community or ambulance National Health Service (NHS) Trusts in England. 48 NHS Trusts. Freedom of information requests for adult DNACPR policies were sent to a random sample of Trusts. DNACPR policies were assessed on aspects identified from national guidelines including documentation, ethical and legal issues, decision-makers and involvement of others in DNACPR decisions as well as practical considerations such as validity, review and portability of decisions. Policies from 26 acute, 12 community and 10 ambulance service Trusts were reviewed. There was variation in terminology used (85% described documents as policies, 6% procedures and 8% guidelines). Only one quarter of Trusts used the recommended Resuscitation Council (UK) record form (or a modification of the form). There was variation in the terminology used which included DNAR, DNACPR, Not for CPR and AND (allow natural death). Accountability for DNACPR decisions rested with consultants at all acute Trusts and the most senior clinician at community Trusts. Most Trusts (74%) recommended discussion of decisions with a multidisciplinary team. Compliance with guidance requiring clinical staff to assess the patient for capacity and when to consult a lasting power of attorney or independent mental capacity advocate occurred less commonly. There was wide variation in the duration of time over which a DNACPR decision was considered valid as well as in the Trusts' approach to reviewing DNACPR decisions. The level of portability of DNACPR decisions between healthcare organisations was one of the greatest sources of variation. There is significant variation in the translation of the national DNACPR guidelines into English healthcare Trusts' DNACPR policies. Published

  8. Effect of Mild Hypothermia on the Coagulation-Fibrinolysis System and Physiological Anticoagulants after Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Porcine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ping; Zhang, Ming-Yue; Zhao, Hong; Tang, Zi-Ren; Hua, Rong; Mei, Xue; Cui, Juan; Li, Chun-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mild hypothermia on the coagulation-fibrinolysis system and physiological anticoagulants after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). A total of 20 male Wuzhishan miniature pigs underwent 8 min of untreated ventricular fibrillation and CPR. Of these, 16 were successfully resuscitated and were randomized into the mild hypothermia group (MH, n = 8) or the control normothermia group (CN, n = 8). Mild hypothermia (33°C) was induced intravascularly, and this temperature was maintained for 12 h before pigs were actively rewarmed. The CN group received normothermic post-cardiac arrest (CA) care for 72 h. Four animals were in the sham operation group (SO). Blood samples were taken at baseline, and 0.5, 6, 12, 24, and 72 h after ROSC. Whole-body mild hypothermia impaired blood coagulation during cooling, but attenuated blood coagulation impairment at 72 h after ROSC. Mild hypothermia also increased serum levels of physiological anticoagulants, such as PRO C and AT-III during cooling and after rewarming, decreased EPCR and TFPI levels during cooling but not after rewarming, and inhibited fibrinolysis and platelet activation during cooling and after rewarming. Finally, mild hypothermia did not affect coagulation-fibrinolysis, physiological anticoagulants, or platelet activation during rewarming. Thus, our findings indicate that mild hypothermia exerted an anticoagulant effect during cooling, which may have inhibitory effects on microthrombus formation. Furthermore, mild hypothermia inhibited fibrinolysis and platelet activation during cooling and attenuated blood coagulation impairment after rewarming. Slow rewarming had no obvious adverse effects on blood coagulation. PMID:23818980

  9. Aortic intimal separation resulting from manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation-completing the spectrum of blunt thoracic aortic injury complicating CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew S; Castonguay, Mathieu; Murray, Shawn K

    2016-11-01

    Blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI) resulting from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is rarely reported and most reports are of aortic rupture. Clinical reports have also documented aortic dissection and intramural hematomas with sequential imaging showing the development of these aortic injuries after the administration of CPR, suggesting that non-transmural aortic injury may also result from CPR. We report partial separation of an aortic intimal atheromatous plaque as a component injury in a case with multiple complications of manual CPR. A 74-year-old male presented to the emergency room (ER) with a 2-day history of chest pain. While in the ER, he suffered witnessed cardiac arrest and resuscitative attempts were pursued for 60 min prior to declaring death. At autopsy, there were numerous injuries attributable to CPR, including bilateral rib fractures, sternal fracture, retrosternal and mediastinal hemorrhage, epicardial ecchymoses, and ruptured pericardium. There was a perforated inferior wall myocardial infarct with a large left hemothorax. There was partial separation/laceration of an intimal atheromatous plaque on the anterior wall of the ascending aorta proximal to the origin of the brachiocephalic artery, forming a triangular flap, without associated intramedial dissection or hematoma. There was no thrombus formation, effectively excluding existence of the laceration prior to circulatory arrest. This aortic injury provides pathologic confirmation of non-transmural BTAI definitively sustained during manual CPR. Pathologists and clinicians alike should be cognizant of the possibility of BTAI resulting from CPR, which may manifest the full range of severity from intimal tear through aortic rupture.

  10. Comparison of shock-first strategy and cardiopulmonary resuscitation-first strategy in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi-Jun; Li, Chun-Sheng; Yin, Wen-Peng; Hou, Xiao-Min; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Da

    2013-02-01

    The choice of a shock-first or a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)-first strategy in the treatment of prolonged cardiac arrest (CA) is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of these strategies on oxygen metabolism and resuscitation outcomes in a porcine model of 8min CA. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was electrically induced. After 8min of untreated VF, 24 male inbred Wu-Zhi-Shan miniature pigs were randomized to receive either defibrillation first (ID group) or chest compression first (IC group). In the ID group, a shock was delivered immediately. If the defibrillation attempt failed to attain restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), manual chest compressions were rapidly initiated at a rate of 100compressionsmin(-1), and the compression-to-ventilation ratio was 30:2. If VF persisted after five cycles of CPR, a second defibrillation attempt was made. In the IC group, chest compressions were delivered first, followed by a shock. Hemodynamic variables, the VF waveform and blood gas analysis outcomes were recorded. Oxygen metabolism parameters and the amplitude spectrum area (AMSA) of the VF waveform were computed. There were no significant differences in the rate of ROSC and 24h survival between two groups. The ID group had lower lactic acid levels, higher cardiac output, better oxygen consumption and better oxygen extraction ratio at 4 and 6h after ROSC than the IC group. In a porcine model of prolonged CA, the choice of a shock-first or CPR-first strategy did not affect the rate of ROSC and 24h survival, but the shock-first strategy might result in better hemodynamic status and better oxygen metabolism than the CPR-first strategy at the first 6h after ROSC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment Of Nurses Performance During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation In Intensive Care Unit And Cardiac Care Unit At The Alexandria Main University Hospital.

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    Dr. Nagla Hamdi Kamal Khalil El- Meanawi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation one of the most emergency management the nurse has a pivotal role and should be highly qualified in performing these procedures. The aim of the study is to assess performance of nurses during Cardio pulmonary resuscitation for patient with cardiac arrest In Intensive Care Unit and Cardiac Care Unit at the Alexandria main university hospital. To answer the question what are the most common area of satisfactory and area of neglection in nurses performance during Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation. The sample consists of 53 staff nurses working in Intensive care unit amp cardiac care unit at Alexandria main university hospital. The tools of data collection were structured of questionnaire sheet and observational cheek list. The results showed that unsatisfactory performance between nurses in both units. The study concluded that all nurses need to improve their performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patient with cardiac arrest it is crucial for nursing staff to participate in CPR courses in order to refresh and update their theoretical knowledge and performance skills and consequently to improve the safety and effectiveness of care. The study recommended that continuous evaluation of nurses knowledge and performance is essential the optimal frequency with which CPR training should be implemented at least every 6 months in order to avoid deterioration in nurses CPR knowledge and skills.

  12. Factors associated with delayed defibrillation in cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A prospective simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Castan

    Full Text Available Early defibrillation is an important factor of survival in cardiac arrest. However, novice resuscitators often struggle with cardiac arrest patients. We investigated factors leading to delayed defibrillation performed by final-year medical students within a simulated bystander cardiac arrest situation.Final-year medical students received a refresher lecture and basic life support training before being confronted with a simulated cardiac arrest situation in a simulation ambulance. The scenario was analyzed for factors leading to delayed defibrillation. We compared the time intervals the participants needed for various measures with a benchmark set by experienced resuscitators. After training, the participants were interviewed regarding challenges and thoughts during the scenario.The median time needed for defibrillation was 158 s (n = 49, interquartile range: 107-270 s, more than six-fold of the benchmark time. The major part of total defibrillation time (49%; median, n = 49 was between onset of ventricular fibrillation and beginning to prepare the defibrillator, more specifically the time between end of preparation of the defibrillator and actual delivery of the shock, with a mean proportion of 26% (n = 49, SD = 17% of the overall time needed for defibrillation (maximum 67%. Self-reported reasons for this delay included uncertainty about the next step to take, as reported by 73% of the participants. A total of 35% were unsure about which algorithm to follow. Diagnosing the patient was subjectively difficult for 35% of the participants. Overall, 53% of the participants felt generally confused.Our study shows that novice resuscitators rarely achieve guideline-recommended defibrillation times. The most relative delays were observed when participants had to choose what to do next or which algorithm to follow, and thus i.e. performed extensive airway management before a life-saving defibrillation. Our data provides a first insight in the process of

  13. Different Techniques of Respiratory Support Do Not Significantly Affect Gas Exchange during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Newborn Piglet Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendler, Marc R; Maurer, Miriam; Hassan, Mohammad A; Huang, Li; Waitz, Markus; Mayer, Benjamin; Hummler, Helmut D

    2015-01-01

    There are no evidence-based recommendations on the use of different techniques of respiratory support and chest compressions (CC) during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We studied the short-term effects of different ventilatory support strategies along with CC representing clinical practice on gas exchange [arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2)], hemodynamics and cerebral oxygenation. We hypothesized that in newborn piglets with cardiac arrest, use of a T-piece resuscitator (TPR) providing positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) improves gas exchange as measured by SaO2 during CPR as compared to using a self-inflating bag (SIB) without PEEP. Furthermore, we explored the effects of a mechanical ventilator without synchrony to CC. Thirty newborn piglets with asystole were randomized into three groups and resuscitated for 20 min [fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) = 0.21 for 10 min and 1.0 thereafter]. Group 1 received ventilation using a TPR [peak inspiratory pressure (PIP)/PEEP of 20/5 cm H2O, rate 30/min] with inflations interposed between CC (3:1 ratio). Group 2 received ventilation using a SIB (PIP of 20 cm H2O without PEEP, rate 30/min) with inflations interposed between CC (3:1 ratio). Group 3 received ventilation using a mechanical ventilator (PIP/PEEP of 20/5 cm H2O, rate 30/min). CC were applied with a rate of 120/min without synchrony to inflations. We found no significant differences in SaO2 between the three groups. However, there was a trend toward a higher SaO2 [TPR: 28.0% (22.3-40.0); SIB: 23.7% (13.4-52.3); ventilator: 44.1% (39.2-54.3); median (interquartile range)] and a lower PaCO2 [TPR: 95.6 mm Hg (82.1-113.6); SIB: 100.8 mm Hg (83.0-108.0); ventilator: 74.1 mm Hg (68.5-83.1); median (interquartile range)] in the mechanical ventilator group. We found no significant effect on gas exchange using different respiratory support strategies

  14. Prolonged Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Process and Lower Frequency of Medical Staff Visit Predicts Independently In-hospital Resuscitation Success in the Elderly Population

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    Jui-Chen Tsai

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: Although the initial resuscitation success rate was not affected by age, a longer time interval between the last medical staffs’ visit and the onset of resuscitation did result in a worse success rate in elderly patients. Our data suggest that more frequent staff visits to the elderly population during hospitalization could alter initial resuscitation results.

  15. Simultaneous measurement of cerebral and muscle tissue parameters during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Reyhaneh; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Woldemichael, Ermias; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Toronov, Vladislav

    2015-03-01

    In this series of animal experiments on resuscitation after cardiac arrest we had a unique opportunity to measure hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy (hNIRS) parameters directly on the brain dura, or on the brain through the intact pig skull, and simultaneously the muscle hNIRS parameters. Simultaneously the arterial blood pressure and carotid and femoral blood flow were recorded in real time using invasive sensors. We used a novel hyperspectral signalprocessing algorithm to extract time-dependent concentrations of water, hemoglobin, and redox state of cytochrome c oxidase during cardiac arrest and resuscitation. In addition in order to assess the validity of the non-invasive brain measurements the obtained results from the open brain was compared to the results acquired through the skull. The comparison of hNIRS data acquired on brain surface and through the adult pig skull shows that in both cases the hemoglobin and the redox state cytochrome c oxidase changed in similar ways in similar situations and in agreement with blood pressure and flow changes. The comparison of simultaneously measured brain and muscle changes showed expected differences. Overall the results show feasibility of transcranial hNIRS measurements cerebral parameters including the redox state of cytochrome oxidase in human cardiac arrest patients.

  16. [Prognostic assessment as the basis for limiting therapy in unconscious patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntz, H-R; Mochmann, H-C

    2015-10-01

    The prognosis of patients who have been resuscitated after cardiac arrest is still unfavourable and long-term results have only slightly improved. As a consequence, intensivists are frequently confronted with the question of limiting active therapeutic efforts for patients in prolonged coma. The history of the patient and circumstances of the resuscitation are of limited value with regard to reliable decisions. Clinical and electrophysiological neurologic techniques as well as biomarkers and diagnostic imaging are, therefore, the basis for prognostication and potential consecutive therapeutic decisions. Sedation, relaxation and particularly therapeutic hypothermia have great influence on the test results. These influences have to be excluded before results can be validated. With regard to therapeutic hypothermia a reliable neurologic evaluation as a basis for limiting treatment is only possible after rewarming. Moreover results of multiple tests should be in agreement before a decision to limit treatment can be made. Finally it must be kept in mind that the absence of unfavourable test results is not proof of a good prognosis. The decision to limit treatment can not be made on the basis of a single adverse prognostic sign, but requires a comprehensive clinical diagnostic assessment.

  17. Influence of chest compression artefact on capnogram-based ventilation detection during out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leturiondo, Mikel; de Gauna, Sofía Ruiz; Ruiz, Jesus M; Julio Gutiérrez, J; Leturiondo, Luis A; González-Otero, Digna M; Russell, James K; Zive, Dana; Daya, Mohamud

    2017-12-12

    Capnography has been proposed as a method for monitoring the ventilation rate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). A high incidence (above 70%) of capnograms distorted by chest compression induced oscillations has been previously reported in out-of-hospital (OOH) CPR. The aim of the study was to better characterize the chest compression artefact and to evaluate its influence on the performance of a capnogram-based ventilation detector during OOH CPR. Data from the MRx monitor-defibrillator were extracted from OOH cardiac arrest episodes. For each episode, presence of chest compression artefact was annotated in the capnogram. Concurrent compression depth and transthoracic impedance signals were used to identify chest compressions and to annotate ventilations, respectively. We designed a capnogram-based ventilation detection algorithm and tested its performance with clean and distorted episodes. Data were collected from 232 episodes comprising 52654 ventilations, with a mean (±SD) of 227 (±118) per episode. Overall, 42% of the capnograms were distorted. Presence of chest compression artefact degraded algorithm performance in terms of ventilation detection, estimation of ventilation rate, and the ability to detect hyperventilation. Capnogram-based ventilation detection during CPR using our algorithm was compromised by the presence of chest compression artefact. In particular, artefact spanning from the plateau to the baseline strongly degraded ventilation detection, and caused a high number of false hyperventilation alarms. Further research is needed to reduce the impact of chest compression artefact on capnographic ventilation monitoring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Extensive colonic necrosis following cardiac arrest and successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation: report of a case and literature review

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    Katsoulis Iraklis E

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Non-occlusive colonic ischaemia is a recognized albeit rare entity related to low blood flow within the visceral circulation and in most reported cases the right colon was affected. This is the second case report in the literature of extensive colonic necrosis following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. A 83-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our hospital due to a low energy hip fracture. On her way to the radiology department she sustained a cardiac arrest. CPR started immediately and was successful. A few hours later, the patient developed increasing abdominal distension and severe metabolic acidocis. An abdominal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT scan was suggestive of intestinal ischaemia. At laparotomy, the terminal ileum was ischaemic and extensive colonic necrosis was found, sparing only the proximal third of the transverse colon. The rectum was also spared. The terminal ileum and the entire colon were resected and an end ileostomy was fashioned. Although the patient exhibited a transient improvement during the immediate postoperative period, she eventually died 24h later from multiple organ failure. Histology showed transmural colonic necrosis with no evidence of a thromboembolic process or vasculitis. Therefore, this entity was attributed to a low flow state within the intestinal circulation secondary to the cardiac arrest.

  19. Afraid of being "witchy with a 'b'": a qualitative study of how gender influences residents' experiences leading cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolehmainen, Christine; Brennan, Meghan; Filut, Amarette; Isaac, Carol; Carnes, Molly

    2014-09-01

    Ineffective leadership during cardiopulmonary resuscitation ("code") can negatively affect a patient's likelihood of survival. In most teaching hospitals, internal medicine residents lead codes. In this study, the authors explored internal medicine residents' experiences leading codes, with a particular focus on how gender influences the code leadership experience. The authors conducted individual, semistructured telephone or in-person interviews with 25 residents (May 2012 to February 2013) from 9 U.S. internal medicine residency programs. They audio recorded and transcribed the interviews and then thematically analyzed the transcribed text. Participants viewed a successful code as one with effective leadership. They agreed that the ideal code leader was an authoritative presence; spoke with a deep, loud voice; used clear, direct communication; and appeared calm. Although equally able to lead codes as their male colleagues, female participants described feeling stress from having to violate gender behavioral norms in the role of code leader. In response, some female participants adopted rituals to signal the suspension of gender norms while leading a code. Others apologized afterwards for their counternormative behavior. Ideal code leadership embodies highly agentic, stereotypical male behaviors. Female residents employed strategies to better integrate the competing identities of code leader and female gender. In the future, residency training should acknowledge how female gender stereotypes may conflict with the behaviors required to enact code leadership and offer some strategies, such as those used by the female residents in this study, to help women integrate these dual identities.

  20. A national survey of prevalence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and knowledge of the emergency number in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jennings, S

    2009-07-06

    AIM: The aim of this survey was to establish prevalence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training within the last 5 years and reasons preventing training and initiation of CPR in Ireland as well as awareness of the emergency numbers. METHODS: An in-home omnibus survey was undertaken in 2008 with quota sampling reflecting the age, gender, social class and geography of Ireland. RESULTS: Of the 974 respondents, 23.5% had undergone CPR training in the previous 5 years with lower social class and age 65 years and older significantly less likely to be trained. The workplace was both a major source of awareness as well as training for those trained. In the untrained group lack of awareness of the need for CPR training was the most significant reason for non-training. Cost was not cited as a barrier. 88.9% of people gave a correct emergency number with geographical variation. Notably, the European emergency number 112 was not well known. CONCLUSION: Previous Irish and American population targets for CPR training have been surpassed in Ireland in 2008. New internationally agreed targets are now required. Meanwhile older people and those in lower socio-economic groups should be targeted for training. Awareness of at least one emergency number is very high in Ireland. Some geographical variation was found and this should be studied further.

  1. A clinical observational study analysing the factors associated with hyperventilation during actual cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang O; Shin, Dong Hyuk; Baek, Kwang Je; Hong, Dae Young; Kim, Eun Jung; Kim, Sang Chul; Lee, Kyeong Ryong

    2013-03-01

    This is the first study to identify the factors associated with hyperventilation during actual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the emergency department (ED). All CPR events in the ED were recorded by video from April 2011 to December 2011. The following variables were analysed using review of the recorded CPR data: ventilation rate (VR) during each minute and its associated factors including provider factors (experience, advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) certification), clinical factors (auscultation to confirm successful intubation, suctioning, and comments by the team leader) and time factors (time or day of CPR). Fifty-five adult CPR cases including a total of 673 min sectors were analysed. The higher rates of hyperventilation (VR>10/min) were delivered by inexperienced (53.3% versus 14.2%) or uncertified ACLS provider (52.2% versus 10.8%), during night time (61.0 versus 34.5%) or weekend CPR (53.1% versus 35.6%) and when auscultation to confirm successful intubation was performed (93.5% versus 52.8%) than not (all pHyperventilation during CPR was associated with inexperienced or uncertified ACLS provider, auscultation to confirm intubation, and night time or weekend CPR. And to deliver proper ventilation, comments by the team leader should be given regardless of providers' expert level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Donor Heart Utilization following Cardiopulmonary Arrest and Resuscitation: Influence of Donor Characteristics and Wait Times in Transplant Regions

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    Mohammed Quader

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Procurement of hearts from cardiopulmonary arrest and resuscitated (CPR donors for transplantation is suboptimal. We studied the influences of donor factors and regional wait times on CPR donor heart utilization. Methods. From UNOS database (1998 to 2012, we identified 44,744 heart donors, of which 4,964 (11% received CPR. Based on procurement of heart for transplantation, CPR donors were divided into hearts procured (HP and hearts not procured (HNP groups. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of heart procurement. Results. Of the 4,964 CPR donors, 1,427 (28.8% were in the HP group. Donor characteristics that favored heart procurement include younger age (25.5 ± 15 yrs versus 39 ± 18 yrs, P≤0.0001, male gender (34% versus 23%, P≤0.0001, shorter CPR duration (30 min, P≤0.0001, and head trauma (60% versus 15%. Among the 11 UNOS regions, the highest procurement was in Region 1 (37% and the lowest in Region 3 (24%. Regional transplant volumes and median waiting times did not influence heart procurement rates. Conclusions. Only 28.8% of CPR donor hearts were procured for transplantation. Factors favoring heart procurement include younger age, male gender, short CPR duration, and traumatic head injury. Heart procurement varied by region but not by transplant volumes or wait times.

  3. Efficacy of acute care health care providers in cardiopulmonary resuscitation compressions in normal and obese adult simulation manikins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Huanying; Erwin, Kristin; Houston, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Annually, over 350,000 persons require cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), either in or outside of the hospital. With obesity a rising health issue in the United States, concerns exist regarding the efficacy of quality compressions for CPR in obese patients. The aims of this study were to determine if the compressions for three adult simulation manikins (normal, obese, and morbidly obese) met quality guidelines; to examine any differences in quality of chest compressions performed by health care providers between the three manikins; and to examine the effect of participant characteristics on the quality of chest compressions in obese and morbidly obese manikins. A randomized controlled design was used. Sixty-one health care providers performed chest compressions on the three simulation manikins. Results showed that performance on the normal-sized manikin was significantly better than that on both obese and morbidly obese manikins. Participant characteristics were significantly associated with quality of chest compressions. The effectiveness of compressions in obese and morbidly obese CPR recipients has yet to be determined. PMID:28966448

  4. Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcome reports: update of the Utstein Resuscitation Registry Templates for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: a statement for healthcare professionals from a task force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian and New Zealand Council on Resuscitation, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council of Southern Africa, Resuscitation Council of Asia); and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Gavin D; Jacobs, Ian G; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Berg, Robert A; Bhanji, Farhan; Biarent, Dominique; Bossaert, Leo L; Brett, Stephen J; Chamberlain, Douglas; de Caen, Allan R; Deakin, Charles D; Finn, Judith C; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Iwami, Taku; Koster, Rudolph W; Lim, Swee Han; Huei-Ming Ma, Matthew; McNally, Bryan F; Morley, Peter T; Morrison, Laurie J; Monsieurs, Koenraad G; Montgomery, William; Nichol, Graham; Okada, Kazuo; Eng Hock Ong, Marcus; Travers, Andrew H; Nolan, Jerry P

    2015-09-29

    Utstein-style guidelines contribute to improved public health internationally by providing a structured framework with which to compare emergency medical services systems. Advances in resuscitation science, new insights into important predictors of outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and lessons learned from methodological research prompted this review and update of the 2004 Utstein guidelines. Representatives of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation developed an updated Utstein reporting framework iteratively by meeting face to face, by teleconference, and by Web survey during 2012 through 2014. Herein are recommendations for reporting out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Data elements were grouped by system factors, dispatch/recognition, patient variables, resuscitation/postresuscitation processes, and outcomes. Elements were classified as core or supplemental using a modified Delphi process primarily based on respondents' assessment of the evidence-based importance of capturing those elements, tempered by the challenges to collect them. New or modified elements reflected consensus on the need to account for emergency medical services system factors, increasing availability of automated external defibrillators, data collection processes, epidemiology trends, increasing use of dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, emerging field treatments, postresuscitation care, prognostication tools, and trends in organ recovery. A standard reporting template is recommended to promote standardized reporting. This template facilitates reporting of the bystander-witnessed, shockable rhythm as a measure of emergency medical services system efficacy and all emergency medical services system-treated arrests as a measure of system effectiveness. Several additional important subgroups are identified that enable an estimate of the specific contribution of rhythm and bystander actions that are key determinants of outcome. © 2014 by the American Heart

  5. New guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation Nuevas directrices para la resucitación cardiopulmonar Novas diretrizes da ressuscitação cardiopulmonar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Celia Barcellos Dalri

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA poses a severe threat to life; cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR represents a challenge for research and assessment by nurses and their team. This study presents the most recent international recommendations for care in case of cardiopulmonary heart arrest, based on the 2005 Guidelines by the American Heart Association (AHA. These CPR guidelines are based on a large-scale review process, organized by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR. High-quality basic and advanced CPR maneuvers can save lives.La parada cardiorrespiratoria (PCR es una ocurrencia que presenta una grave amenaza a la vida; la resucitación cardiopulmonar (RCP representa un desafío para la investigación y la evaluación por parte del enfermero y su equipo. Este estudio presenta las más recientes recomendaciones internacionales sobre la atención a la parada cardiorrespiratoria, basada en las Directrices de 2005 de la American Heart Asociation (AHA. Esas directrices sobre RCP se fundamentan en un proceso de revisión extenso, organizado por el International Liasion Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR. Las maniobras básicas y avanzadas de RCP ofrecidas con calidad pueden salvar vidas.A parada cardiorrespiratória (PCR é intercorrência de grave ameaça à vida; a ressuscitação cardiopulmonar (RCP representa desafio para a investigação e a avaliação por parte do enfermeiro e sua equipe. Esse estudo apresenta as mais recentes recomendações internacionais sobre atendimento da parada cardiorrespiratória, baseado nas Diretrizes de 2005 da American Heart Association (AHA. Essas diretrizes sobre RCP fundamentam-se num processo de revisão extenso, organizado pelo International Liasion Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR. As manobras básicas e avançadas de RCP com qualidade podem salvar vidas.

  6. Ischaemia-modified albumin predicts the outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthos, Theodoros; Iacovidou, Nicoletta; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis; Vlachos, Ioannis; Bassiakou, Eleni; Stroumpoulis, Konstantinos; Kouskouni, Evagelia; Karabinis, Andreas; Papadimitriou, Lila

    2010-05-01

    Ischaemia-modified albumin (IMA) has recently been shown to be an early and sensitive marker of ischaemia. It is generally accepted that cardiac arrest causes the most severe form of global ischaemia. The aim of the present study was to identify whether IMA is an independent predictor of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in a swine model of cardiac arrest. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was induced in 30 piglets, which were left untreated for 8 min before attempting resuscitation with precordial compression, mechanical ventilation and electrical defibrillation. Electrical defibrillation was attempted after 10 min of VF. Blood samples for IMA determination were drawn at baseline, after 8 min of VF and before delivery of each shock. A binary logistic regression model was implemented for the prediction of animals achieving ROSC from data available before the first defibrillation attempt. Backward stepwise selection was used to extract the final model. Inclusion and exclusion significance levels were 0.1 and 0.05, respectively. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the parameters and to obtain the appropriate cut-off points. IMA exhibited 100% sensitivity and 93.8% specificity in defining the subgroup of animals that will achieve ROSC. This high-accuracy prediction had a very early onset (from eighth VF minute) and remained at the same level until the end of the experiment. When combining IMA and coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) measurements from the first CPR cycle in the form of the simple ratio IMA/CPP, a cut-off point of 7 could provide 100% sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing the animals that will achieve ROSC in the upcoming defibrillation attempts. Until today, CPP has been found to be the only key determinant of successful resuscitation. Our study suggests that IMA can be a predictive index of ROSC even before the initiation of CPR. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland

  7. Effects of the administration of 2,3-butanedione monoxime during conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation on ischaemic contracture and resuscitability in a pig model of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Kook; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Choi, Sung Soo; Park, Sang Wook; Yun, Seong Woo; Lee, Sung Min; Kim, Nan Yeol; Heo, Tag; Min, Yong Il

    2015-02-01

    Ischaemic contracture compromises the haemodynamic effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and resuscitability. 2,3-Butanedione monoxime (BDM) reduced ischaemic contracture by inhibiting actin-myosin crossbridge formation in an isolated heart model. We investigated the effects of BDM on ischaemic contracture and resuscitation outcomes in a pig model of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). After 15min of untreated ventricular fibrillation, followed by 8min of basic life support, 16 pigs were randomised to receive either 2mlkg(-1) of BDM solution (25gl(-1)) or 2mlkg(-1) of saline during advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). During the ACLS, the control group showed an increase in left ventricular (LV) wall thickness from 10.0mm (10.0-10.8) to 13.0mm (13.0-13.0) and a decrease in LV chamber area from 8.13cm(2) (7.59-9.29) to 7.47cm(2) (5.84-8.43). In contrast, the BDM group showed a decrease in the LV wall thickness from 10mm (9.0-10.8) to 8.5mm (7.0-9.8) and an increase in the LV chamber area from 9.86cm(2) (7.22-12.39) to 12.15 cm(2) (8.02-14.40). Mixed model analyses of the LV wall thickness and LV chamber area revealed significant group effects and group-time interactions. Spontaneous circulation was restored in four (50%) animals in the control group and in eight (100%) animals in the BDM group (p=0.077). All the resuscitated animals survived during an intensive care period of 4h. BDM administered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation reversed ischaemic contracture in a pig model of OHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Rosuvastatin improves myocardial and neurological outcomes after asphyxial cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yun; Wu, Yichen; Meng, Min; Luo, Man; Zhao, Hongmei; Sun, Hong; Gao, Sumin

    2017-03-01

    Rosuvastatin, a potent HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, is cholesterol-lowering drugs and reduce the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. This study is to explore whether rosuvastatin improves outcomes after cardiac arrest in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 8min of cardiac arrest (CA) by asphyxia and randomly assigned to three experimental groups immediately following successful resuscitation: Sham; Control; and Rosuvastatin. The survival, hemodynamics, myocardial function, neurological outcomes and apoptosis were assessed. The 7-d survival rate was greater in the rosuvastatin treated group compared to the Control group (P=0.019 by log-rank test). Myocardial function, as measured by cardiac output and ejection fraction, was significantly impaired after CA and notably improved in the animals treated with rosuvastatin beginning at 60min after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) (Pcardiac troponin T and neuron-specific enolase and the caspase-3 activity were significantly decreased in the Rosuvastatin group when compared with the Control group (P<0.05). In conclusion, rosuvastatin treatment substantially improves the 7-d survival rate as well as myocardial function and neurological outcomes after ROSC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects and limitations of an AED with audiovisual feedback for cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomized manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Henrik; Gruber, Julia; Neuhold, Stephanie; Frantal, Sophie; Hochbrugger, Eva; Herkner, Harald; Schöchl, Herbert; Steinlechner, Barbara; Greif, Robert

    2011-07-01

    Correctly performed basic life support (BLS) and early defibrillation are the most effective measures to treat sudden cardiac arrest. Audiovisual feedback improves BLS. Automated external defibrillators (AED) with feedback technology may play an important role in improving CPR quality. The aim of this simulation study was to investigate if an AED with audiovisual feedback improves CPR parameters during standard BLS performed by trained laypersons. With ethics committee approval and informed consent, 68 teams (2 flight attendants each) performed 12 min of standard CPR with the AED's audiovisual feedback mechanism enabled or disabled. We recorded CPR quality parameters during resuscitation on a manikin in this open, prospective, randomized controlled trial. Between the feedback and control-group we measured differences in compression depth and rate as main outcome parameters and effective compressions, correct hand position, and incomplete decompression as secondary outcome parameters. An effective compression was defined as a compression with correct depth, hand position, and decompression. The feedback-group delivered compression rates closest to the recommended guidelines (101 ± 9 vs. 109 ± 15/min, p=0.009), more effective compressions (20 ± 18 vs. 5 ± 6%, pAED's audiovisual feedback system improved some CPR-quality parameters, thus confirming findings of earlier studies with the notable exception of decreased compression depth, which is a key parameter that might be linked to reduced cardiac output. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A comparative study of defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance during simulated cardiac arrest in nursing student teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eikeland Husebø Sissel I

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although nurses must be able to respond quickly and effectively to cardiac arrest, numerous studies have demonstrated poor performance. Simulation is a promising learning tool for resuscitation team training but there are few studies that examine simulation for training defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (D-CPR in teams from the nursing education perspective. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which nursing student teams follow the D-CPR-algorithm in a simulated cardiac arrest, and if observing a simulated cardiac arrest scenario and participating in the post simulation debriefing would improve team performance. Methods We studied video-recorded simulations of D-CPR performance in 28 nursing student teams. Besides describing the overall performance of D-CPR, we compared D-CPR performance in two groups. Group A (n = 14 performed D-CPR in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario, while Group B (n = 14 performed D-CPR after first observing performance of Group A and participating in the debriefing. We developed a D-CPR checklist to assess team performance. Results Overall there were large variations in how accurately the nursing student teams performed the specific parts of the D-CPR algorithm. While few teams performed opening the airways and examination of breathing correctly, all teams used a 30:2 compression: ventilation ratio. We found no difference between Group A and Group B in D-CPR performance, either in regard to total points on the check list or to time variables. Conclusion We found that none of the nursing student teams achieved top scores on the D-CPR-checklist. Observing the training of other teams did not increase subsequent performance. We think all this indicates that more time must be assigned for repetitive practice and reflection. Moreover, the most important aspects of D-CPR, such as early defibrillation and hands-off time in relation to shock, must be highlighted in team

  11. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training by Avatars: A Qualitative Study of Medical Students' Experiences Using a Multiplayer Virtual World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzfeldt, Johan; Hedman, Leif; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2016-12-16

    Emergency medical practices are often team efforts. Training for various tasks and collaborations may be carried out in virtual environments. Although promising results exist from studies of serious games, little is known about the subjective reactions of learners when using multiplayer virtual world (MVW) training in medicine. The objective of this study was to reach a better understanding of the learners' reactions and experiences when using an MVW for team training of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Twelve Swedish medical students participated in semistructured focus group discussions after CPR training in an MVW with partially preset options. The students' perceptions and feelings related to use of this educational tool were investigated. Using qualitative methodology, discussions were analyzed by a phenomenological data-driven approach. Quality measures included negotiations, back-and-forth reading, triangulation, and validation with the informants. Four categories characterizing the students' experiences could be defined: (1) Focused Mental Training, (2) Interface Diverting Focus From Training, (3) Benefits of Practicing in a Group, and (4) Easy Loss of Focus When Passive. We interpreted the results, compared them to findings of others, and propose advantages and risks of using virtual worlds for learning. Beneficial aspects of learning CPR in a virtual world were confirmed. To achieve high participant engagement and create good conditions for training, well-established procedures should be practiced. Furthermore, students should be kept in an active mode and frequent feedback should be utilized. It cannot be completely ruled out that the use of virtual training may contribute to erroneous self-beliefs that can affect later clinical performance.

  12. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training by Avatars: A Qualitative Study of Medical Students’ Experiences Using a Multiplayer Virtual World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Leif; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background Emergency medical practices are often team efforts. Training for various tasks and collaborations may be carried out in virtual environments. Although promising results exist from studies of serious games, little is known about the subjective reactions of learners when using multiplayer virtual world (MVW) training in medicine. Objective The objective of this study was to reach a better understanding of the learners’ reactions and experiences when using an MVW for team training of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Methods Twelve Swedish medical students participated in semistructured focus group discussions after CPR training in an MVW with partially preset options. The students’ perceptions and feelings related to use of this educational tool were investigated. Using qualitative methodology, discussions were analyzed by a phenomenological data-driven approach. Quality measures included negotiations, back-and-forth reading, triangulation, and validation with the informants. Results Four categories characterizing the students’ experiences could be defined: (1) Focused Mental Training, (2) Interface Diverting Focus From Training, (3) Benefits of Practicing in a Group, and (4) Easy Loss of Focus When Passive. We interpreted the results, compared them to findings of others, and propose advantages and risks of using virtual worlds for learning. Conclusions Beneficial aspects of learning CPR in a virtual world were confirmed. To achieve high participant engagement and create good conditions for training, well-established procedures should be practiced. Furthermore, students should be kept in an active mode and frequent feedback should be utilized. It cannot be completely ruled out that the use of virtual training may contribute to erroneous self-beliefs that can affect later clinical performance. PMID:27986645

  13. Shock advisory system for heart rhythm analysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation using a single ECG input of automated external defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasteva, Vessela; Jekova, Irena; Dotsinsky, Ivan; Didon, Jean-Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Minimum "hands-off" intervals during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are required to improve the success rate of defibrillation. In support of such life-saving practice, a shock advisory system (SAS) for automatic analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG) contaminated by chest compression (CC) artefacts is presented. Ease of use for the automated external defibrillators (AEDs) is aimed and therefore only processing of ECG from usual defibrillation pads is required. The proposed SAS relies on assessment of outstanding components of ECG rhythms and CC artefacts in the time and frequency domain. For this purpose, three criteria are introduced to derive quantitative measures of band-pass filtered CC-contaminated ECGs, combined with three more criteria for frequency-band evaluation of reconstructed ECGs (rECG). The rECGs are derived by specific techniques for CC waves similarity assessment and are reproducing to some extent the underlying ECG rhythms. The rhythm classifier embedded in SAS takes a probabilistic decision designed by statistics on the training dataset. Both training and testing are fully performed on real CC-contaminated strips of 10 s extracted from human ECGs of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest interventions. The testing is done on 172 shockable strips (ventricular fibrillations VF), 371 non-shockable strips (NR) and 330 asystoles (ASYS). The achieved sensitivity of 90.1% meets the AHA performance goal for noise-free VF (>90%). The specificity of 88.5% for NR and 83.3% for ASYS are comparable or even better than accuracy reported in literature. It is important to note that, the aim of this SAS is not to recommend shock delivery but to advice the rescuers to "Continue CPR" or to "Stop CPR and Prepare for Shock" thus minimizing "hands-off" intervals.

  14. Relationship between non-technical skills and technical performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: does stress have an influence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krage, Ralf; Zwaan, Laura; Tjon Soei Len, Lian; Kolenbrander, Mark W; van Groeningen, Dick; Loer, Stephan A; Wagner, Cordula; Schober, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    Non-technical skills, such as task management, leadership, situational awareness, communication and decision-making refer to cognitive, behavioural and social skills that contribute to safe and efficient team performance. The importance of these skills during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is increasingly emphasised. Nonetheless, the relationship between non-technical skills and technical performance is poorly understood. We hypothesise that non-technical skills become increasingly important under stressful conditions when individuals are distracted from their tasks, and investigated the relationship between non-technical and technical skills under control conditions and when external stressors are present. In this simulator-based randomised cross-over study, 30 anaesthesiologists and anaesthesia residents from the VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, participated in two different CPR scenarios in random order. In one scenario, external stressors (radio noise and a distractive scripted family member) were added, while the other scenario without stressors served as control condition. Non-technical performance of the team leader and technical performance of the team were measured using the 'Anaesthetists' Non-technical Skill' score and a recently developed technical skills score. Analysis of variance and Pearson correlation coefficients were used for statistical analyses. Non-technical performance declined when external stressors were present (adjusted mean difference 3.9 points, 95% CI 2.4 to 5.5 points). A significant correlation between non-technical and technical performance scores was observed when external stressors were present (r=0.67, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.83, ptechnical performance score (task management, team working, situation awareness, decision-making). During CPR with external stressors, the team's technical performance is related to the non-technical skills of the team leader. This may have important implications for training of

  15. Results of rapid-response extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children with refractory cardiac arrest following cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsoufi, Bahaaldin; Awan, Abid; Manlhiot, Cedric; Guechef, Alexander; Al-Halees, Zohair; Al-Ahmadi, Mamdouh; McCrindle, Brian W; Kalloghlian, Avedis

    2014-02-01

    Survival of children having cardiac arrest refractory to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is very poor. We sought to examine current era outcomes of extracorporeal CPR (ECPR) support for refractory arrest following surgical correction of congenital heart disease. Demographic, anatomical, clinical, surgical and support details of children requiring postoperative ECPR (2007-12) were included in multivariable logistic regression models to determine the factors associated with survival. Thirty-nine children, median age 44 days (4 days-10 years), required postoperative ECPR at a median interval of 1 day (up to 15 days) after surgery. Thirteen (33%) children had single-ventricle pathology; Risk Adjustment in Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS)-1 categories were 2, 3, 4 and 6 in 6, 15, 13 and 5 patients, respectively. Median CPR duration was 34 (8-125) min, while median support duration was 4 (1-17) days. Seven (18%) patients underwent cardiac re-operation, 28 (72%) survived >24 h after support discontinuation and 16 (41%) survived. Survival rates in neonates, infants and older children were 53, 39 and 17% (P=0.13). Survival rates for single- vs two-ventricle pathology patients were 54 and 35%, (P=0.25) and 50, 47, 23 and 60% in RACHS-1 2, 3, 4 and 6 patients, respectively (P=0.37). Survivors had shorter CPR duration (25 vs 34 min, P=0.05), lower pre-arrest lactate (2.6 vs 4.6 mmol/l, P=0.05) and postextracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) peak lactate (15.4 vs 20.0 mmol/l, Pcardiac arrest. Survival is unrelated to cardiac physiology or surgical complexity. Timely support prior to the emergence of end-organ injury and surgical correction of residual cardiac lesions might enhance survival.

  16. Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with pulmonary embolism in surgical patients - a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swol, J; Buchwald, D; Strauch, J; Schildhauer, T A

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) devices maintain the circulation and oxygenation of organs during acute right ventricular failure and cardiogenic shock, bypassing the lungs. A pulmonary embolism can cause this life-threatening condition. ECLS is a considerably less invasive treatment than surgical embolectomy. Whether to bridge embolectomy or for a therapeutic purpose, ECLS is used almost exclusively following failure of all other therapeutic options. From January 1, 2008 to June 30, 2014, five patients in cardiac arrest and with diagnosed pulmonary embolism (PE) were cannulated with the ECLS system. PE was diagnosed using computer tomography scanning or echocardiography. Cardiac arrest was witnessed in the hospital in all cases and CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) was initiated immediately. Cannulation of the femoral vein and femoral artery was always performed under CPR conditions. Right heart failure regressed during the ECLS therapy, usually under a blood flow of 4-5 L/min after 48 hours. Three patients were weaned from ECLS and one patient became an organ donor. Finally, two of the five PE patients treated with ECLS were discharged from inpatient treatment without neurological dysfunction. The duration of ECLS therapy depends on the patient's condition. Irreversible damage to the organs after hypoxemia limits ECLS treatment and leads to futile multiorgan failure. Hemorrhages after thrombolysis and cerebral dysfunction were further complications. Veno-arterial cannulation for ECLS can be feasibly achieved and should be established during active CPR for cardiac arrest. In the case of PE, the immediate diagnosis and rapid implantation of the system are decisive for therapeutic success. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. CPR PRO® device reduces rescuer fatigue during continuous chest compression cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomized crossover trial using a manikin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovic, Ivor; Lulic, Dinka; Lulic, Ileana

    2013-10-01

    The performance of high-quality chest compressions with minimal interruptions is one of the most important elements of the "Chain of Survival." To evaluate the impact of a novel CPR PRO(®) (CPRO) device for manual chest compression on rescuer fatigue, pain, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality. Randomized crossover trial of 24 health care professionals performing continuous chest compression CPR for 10 min with a CPRO device and conventional manual CPR (MCPR). Data about chest compressions were recorded using a manikin. Rescuers' physiologic signs were recorded before and after each session, and heart rate (HR) data were tracked continuously. Fatigue was assessed with ratings of perceived exertion, and pain questionnaire. All subjects completed 10 min of CPR with both methods. Significantly more rest breaks were taken during MCPR sessions (1.7 ± 2 vs. 0.21 ± 0.72). Subjects' perceived exertion was higher after MCPR, as well as the average (120.7 ± 16.8 vs. 110.8 ± 17.6) and maximal HR (134.3 ± 18.5 vs. 123.42 ± 16.5) during testing. Subjects reported more pain in the hands, especially the wrist, after performing MCPR. Average depth of compressions was higher with the CPRO device (4.6 ± 7.0 vs. 4.3 ± 7.9) and declined more slowly over time. Other CPR quality parameters, such as the correct position and complete release of pressure, were also better for CPRO CPR. CPRO device reduces rescuer fatigue and pain during continuous chest compression CPR, which results in a higher quality of CPR in a simulation setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)-related posterior rib fractures in neonates and infants following recommended changes in CPR techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, I; Pingen, A; Schiffmann, H; Vogel, M; Vlajnic, D; Ganschow, R; Born, M

    2014-07-01

    Posterior rib fractures are highly indicative of non-accidental trauma (NAT) in infants. Since 2000, the "two-thumbs" technique for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of newborns and infants has been recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA). This technique is similar to the grip on an infant's thorax while shaking. Is it possible that posterior rib fractures in newborns and infants could be caused by the "two-thumbs" technique? Using computerized databases from three German children's hospitals, we identified all infants less than 12 months old who underwent professional CPR within a 10-year period. We included all infants with anterior-posterior chest radiographs taken after CPR. Exclusion criteria were sternotomy, osteopenia, various other bone diseases and NAT. The radiographs were independently reviewed by the Chief of Pediatric Radiology (MB) and a Senior Pediatrician, Head of the local Child Protection Team (IF). Eighty infants with 546 chest radiographs were identified, and 50 of those infants underwent CPR immediately after birth. Data concerning the length of CPR was available for 41 infants. The mean length of CPR was 11min (range: 1-180min, median: 3min). On average, there were seven radiographs per infant. A total of 39 infants had a follow-up radiograph after at least 10 days. No rib fracture was visible on any chest X-ray. The results of this study suggest rib fracture after the use of the "two-thumbs" CPR technique is uncommon. Thus, there should be careful consideration of abuse when these fractures are identified, regardless of whether CPR was performed and what technique used. The discovery of rib fractures in an infant who has undergone CPR without underlying bone disease or major trauma warrants a full child protection investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Regions With Low Rates of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Have Lower Rates of CPR Training in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Janet E; Straney, Lahn; Smith, Karen; Cartledge, Susie; Case, Rosalind; Bernard, Stephen; Finn, Judith

    2017-06-05

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) more than doubles the chance of surviving an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Recent data have shown considerable regional variation in bystander CPR rates across the Australian state of Victoria. This study aims to determine whether there is associated regional variation in rates of CPR training and willingness to perform CPR in these communities. We categorized each Victorian postcode as either a low or high bystander CPR region using data on adult, bystander-witnessed, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of presumed cardiac etiology (n=7175) from the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry. We then surveyed adult Victorians (n=404) and compared CPR training data of the respondents from low and high bystander CPR regions. Of the 404 adults surveyed, 223 (55%) resided in regions with low bystander CPR. Compared with respondents from high bystander CPR regions, respondents residing in regions with low bystander CPR had lower rates of CPR training (62% versus 75%, P=0.009) and lower self-ratings for their overall knowledge of CPR (76% versus 84%, P=0.04). There were no differences between the regions in their reasons for not having undergone CPR training or in their willingness to perform CPR. Rates of survival for bystander-witnessed, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests were significantly lower in low bystander CPR regions (15.7% versus 17.0%, PCPR training and lower survival in regions with lower rates of bystander CPR in Victoria, Australia. Targeting these regions with CPR training programs may improve bystander CPR rates and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest outcomes. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  20. An evaluation of three methods of in-hospital cardiac arrest educational debriefing: The cardiopulmonary resuscitation debriefing study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Keith; Kimani, Peter K; Davies, Robin P; Baker, Annalie; Davies, Michelle; Husselbee, Natalie; Melody, Teresa; Griffiths, Frances; Perkins, Gavin D

    2016-08-01

    The use of cardiac arrest educational debriefing has been associated with improvements in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality and patient outcome. The practical challenges associated with delivering some debriefing approaches may not be generalisable to the UK health setting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the deliverability and effectiveness of three cardiac arrest debriefing approaches that were tailored to UK working practice. We undertook a before/after study at three hospital sites. During the post-intervention period of the study, three cardiac arrest educational debriefing models were implemented at study hospitals (one model per hospital). To evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions, CPR quality and patient outcome data were collected from consecutive adult cardiac arrest events attended by the hospital cardiac arrest team. The primary outcome was chest compression depth. Between November 2011 and July 2014, 1198 cardiac arrest events were eligible for study inclusion (782 pre-intervention; 416 post-intervention). The quality of CPR was high at baseline. During the post-intervention period, cardiac arrest debriefing interventions were delivered to 191 clinicians on 344 occasions. Debriefing interventions were deliverable in practice, but were not associated with a clinically important improvement in CPR quality. The interventions had no effect on patient outcome. The delivery of these cardiac arrest educational debriefing strategies was feasible, but did not have a large effect on CPR quality. This may be attributable to the high-quality of CPR being delivered in study hospitals at baseline. ISRCTN39758339. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of an anatomically-detailed finite element thorax model to investigate pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques on hard bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Binhui; Mao, Haojie; Cao, Libo; Yang, King H

    2014-09-01

    Improved Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) approaches will largely benefit the children in need. The constant peak displacement and constant peak force loading methods were analyzed on hard bed for pediatric CPR by an anatomically-detailed 10 year-old (YO) child thorax finite element (FE) model. The chest compression and rib injury risk were studied for children with various levels of thorax stiffness. We created three thorax models with different chest stiffness. Simulated CPR׳s in the above two conditions were performed. Three different compression rates were considered under the constant peak displacement condition. The model-calculated deflections and forces were analyzed. The rib maximum principle strains (MPS׳s) were used to predict the potential risk of rib injury. Under the constant peak force condition, the chest deflection ranged from 34.2 to 42.2mm. The highest rib MPS was 0.75%, predicted by the compliant thorax model. Under the normal constant peak displacement condition, the highest rib MPS was 0.52%, predicted by the compliant thorax model. The compression rate did not affect the highest rib MPS. Results revealed that the thoracic stiffness had great effects on the quality of CPR. To maintain CPR quality for various children, the constant peak displacement technique is recommended when the CPR is performed on the hard bed. Furthermore, the outcome of CPR in terms of rib strains and total work are not sensitive to the compression rate. The FE model-predicted high strains were in the ribs, which have been found to be vulnerable to CPR in the literature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation during prolonged basic life support in military medical university students: A manikin study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Zhuo, Chao-nan; Zhang, Lei; Gong, Yu-shun; Yin, Chang-lin; Li, Yong-qin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The quality of chest compressions can be significantly improved after training of rescuers according to the latest national guidelines of China. However, rescuers may be unable to maintain adequate compression or ventilation throughout a response of average emergency medical services because of increased rescuer fatigue. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in training of military medical university students during a prolonged basic life support (BLS). METHODS: A 3-hour BLS training was given to 120 military medical university students. Six months after the training, 115 students performed single rescuer BLS on a manikin for 8 minutes. The qualities of chest compressions as well as ventilations were assessed. RESULTS: The average compression depth and rate were 53.7±5.3 mm and 135.1±15.7 compressions per minute respectively. The proportion of chest compressions with appropriate depth was 71.7%±28.4%. The average ventilation volume was 847.2±260.4 mL and the proportion of students with adequate ventilation was 63.5%. Compared with male students, significantly lower compression depth (46.7±4.8 vs. 54.6±4.8 mm, P<0.001) and adequate compression rate (35.5%±26.5% vs. 76.1%±25.1%, P<0.001) were observed in female students. CONCLUSIONS: CPR was found to be related to gender, body weight, and body mass index of students in this study. The quality of chest compressions was well maintained in male students during 8 minutes of conventional CPR but declined rapidly in female students after 2 minutes according to the latest national guidelines. Physical fitness and rescuer fatigue did not affect the quality of ventilation. PMID:26401177

  3. Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and predictors of survival in patients undergoing coronary angiography including percutaneous coronary interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprung, Juraj; Ritter, Matthew J; Rihal, Charanjit S; Warner, Mary E; Wilson, Gregory A; Williams, Brent A; Stevens, Susanna R; Schroeder, Darrell R; Bourke, Denis L; Warner, David O

    2006-01-01

    We studied the outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in patients undergoing coronary angiography (CA) and/or percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Of 51,985 CA and PCI patients treated between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 2000, 114 required CPR. Records were reviewed for relationships between patient characteristics and various procedures and short-term survival. Long-term survival was compared with that of a matched cohort of patients who did not have an arrest during catheterization and a matched cohort from the general Minnesota population. Over the 11-year period, the overall incidence of CPR was 21.9 per 10,000 procedures. This rate decreased from 33.9 per 10,000 before 1995 to 13.1 per 10,000 after 1995. Overall survival to hospital discharge after CPR was 56.1%. Survival to discharge was less frequent with a history of congestive heart failure, previous coronary artery bypass graft surgery, hemodynamic instability during the procedure, and with prolonged or emergent catheterizations. Pulseless electrical activity (versus asystole or ventricular fibrillation) indicated very poor short-term survival. Interestingly, short-term survival was not related to the extent of coronary artery disease. Long-term survival of patients who survived cardiac arrest was comparable to that of those who did not have arrest during catheterization. In conclusion, the incidence of periprocedural CPR during diagnostic or interventional coronary procedures decreased after 1995. Patients who received CPR in the cardiac catheterization lab have a remarkably frequent survival to hospital discharge rate. Long-term survival of these patients is only minimally reduced.

  4. ROSC rates and live discharge rates after cardiopulmonary resuscitation by different CPR teams - a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tak Kyu; Park, Young Mi; Do, Sang-Hwan; Hwang, Jung-Won; Song, In-Ae

    2017-12-04

    Previous studies have reported that the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is closely associated with patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to compare patient CPR outcomes across resident, emergency medicine, and rapid response teams. The records of patients who underwent CPR at the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2016 were analyzed retrospectively. Return of spontaneous circulation, 10- and 30-day survival, and live discharge after return of spontaneous circulation were compared across patients treated by the three CPR teams. Of the 1145 CPR cases, 444 (39%) were conducted by the resident team, 431 (38%) by the rapid response team, and 270 (23%) by the emergency medicine team. The adjusted odds ratios for the return of spontaneous circulation and subsequent 10-day survival among patients who received CPR from the resident team compared to the rapid response team were 0.59 (P = 0.001) and 0.71 (P = 0.037), respectively. There were no significant differences in the 30-day survival and rate of live discharge between patients who received CPR from the rapid response and resident teams; likewise, no significant differences were observed between patients who received CPR from the emergency medicine and rapid response teams. Patients receiving CPR from the rapid response team may have higher 10-day survival and return of spontaneous circulation rates than those who receive CPR from the resident team. However, our results are limited by the differences in approach, time of CPR, and room settings between teams.

  5. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Video in Advance Care Planning for Progressive Pancreas and Hepatobiliary Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volandes, Angelo E.; Chen, Ling Y.; Gary, Kristen A.; Li, Yuelin; Agre, Patricia; Levin, Tomer T.; Reidy, Diane L.; Meng, Raymond D.; Segal, Neil H.; Yu, Kenneth H.; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K.; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Kelsen, David P.; O'Reilly, Eileen M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an important advance directive (AD) topic in patients with progressive cancer; however such discussions are challenging. Objective This study investigates whether video educational information about CPR engenders broader advance care planning (ACP) discourse. Methods Patients with progressive pancreas or hepatobiliary cancer were randomized to an educational CPR video or a similar CPR narrative. The primary end-point was the difference in ACP documentation one month posttest between arms. Secondary end-points included study impressions; pre- and post-intervention knowledge of and preferences for CPR and mechanical ventilation; and longitudinal patient outcomes. Results Fifty-six subjects were consented and analyzed. Rates of ACP documentation (either formal ADs or documented discussions) were 40% in the video arm (12/30) compared to 15% in the narrative arm (4/26), OR=3.6 [95% CI: 0.9–18.0], p=0.07. Post-intervention knowledge was higher in both arms. Posttest, preferences for CPR had changed in the video arm but not in the narrative arm. Preferences regarding mechanical ventilation did not change in either arm. The majority of subjects in both arms reported the information as helpful and comfortable to discuss, and they recommended it to others. More deaths occurred in the video arm compared to the narrative arm, and more subjects died in hospice settings in the video arm. Conclusions This pilot randomized trial addressing downstream ACP effects of video versus narrative decision tools demonstrated a trend towards more ACP documentation in video subjects. This trend, as well as other video effects, is the subject of ongoing study. PMID:23725233

  6. 'We have to discuss it': cancer patients' advance care planning impressions following educational information about cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, A S; Shuk, E; O'Reilly, E M; Gary, K A; Volandes, A E

    2015-12-01

    Most cancer patients desire information about care options at the end of life, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Communicating such care options can be challenging and is part of advance care planning (ACP). Our prior studies with video educational media produced data on patients' categoric preferences (yes/no/unsure) for CPR; however, the thematic underpinnings of these educated preferences in patients treated for advanced cancer aren't well known. Qualitative thematic content analysis of participants' responses in a randomized trial of an educational video (V) or narrative (N) about CPR in patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancers. Responses were independently coded and categorized for thematic content by two reviewers. Of 54 study participants, 26 total (41% of V arm, 56% of N arm) articulated questions, comments, or both. Reviewer analyses demonstrated thematic consensus and resulted in seven distinct themes listed in decreasing order of prevalence: (a) ACP should be started early; (b) educational information about CPR affirmed participants' existing beliefs/knowledge/values about advanced illness; (c) participants were apprehensive about ACP but wanted to discuss it; (d) gaps in knowledge about ACP emerged; (e) CPR information was helpful/acceptable; (f) physicians should be involved in ACP; and (g) medical questions about critical illness arose. Findings identified that while sometimes difficult to discuss, advance care planning is desired, deemed helpful, and ideally begun early by clinicians, and that video education is an appropriate and affirming initiator of discussions. These themes are incorporated into our ongoing research on cancer patient-specific values and education about care options. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Development of a video-based education and process change intervention to improve advance cardiopulmonary resuscitation decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Nicholas; Johnson, Claire E; Saul, Peter; Waldron, Heidi; Chong, Jeffrey C; Hill, Anne-Marie; Hayes, Barbara

    2016-10-06

    Advance cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) decision-making and escalation of care discussions are variable in routine clinical practice. We aimed to explore physician barriers to advance CPR decision-making in an inpatient hospital setting and develop a pragmatic intervention to support clinicians to undertake and document routine advance care planning discussions. Two focus groups, which involved eight consultants and ten junior doctors, were conducted following a review of the current literature. A subsequent iterative consensus process developed two intervention elements: (i) an updated 'Goals of Patient Care' (GOPC) form and process; (ii) an education video and resources for teaching advance CPR decision-making and communication. A multidisciplinary group of health professionals and policy-makers with experience in systems development, education and research provided critical feedback. Three key themes emerged from the focus groups and the literature, which identified a structure for the intervention: (i) knowing what to say; (ii) knowing how to say it; (iii) wanting to say it. The themes informed the development of a video to provide education about advance CPR decision-making framework, improving communication and contextualising relevant clinical issues. Critical feedback assisted in refining the video and further guided development and evolution of a medical GOPC approach to discussing and recording medical treatment and advance care plans. Through an iterative process of consultation and review, video-based education and an expanded GOPC form and approach were developed to address physician and systemic barriers to advance CPR decision-making and documentation. Implementation and evaluation across hospital settings is required to examine utility and determine effect on quality of care.

  8. Improved outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in rats with myocardial infarction treated with allogenic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong; Tang, Wanchun; Sun, Shijie; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Xu, Tingyan; Weil, Max Harry

    2009-03-01

    We hypothesized that rats in which myocardial infarction had been treated with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) would have better outcomes following the global myocardial ischemia of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) compared with rats in which myocardial infarction had been treated with phosphate buffer solution (PBS). Prospective, randomized controlled study. University-affiliated research institute. Male Sprague-Dawley rats. Myocardial infarction was induced in 18 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Four weeks later, animals were randomized to receive 5 x 10 MSCs labeled with red fluorescent dye gel (PKH26) in PBS or a PBS-alone injection into right femoral vein. Echocardiographically measured myocardial function, including ejection fraction, left ventricular end-diastolic volume, and left ventricular end-systolic volume, was quantitated 2 and 4 weeks after administering MSCs or PBS. Four weeks after MSCs or PBS injection, 6 minutes of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and 6 minutes of CPR were performed before defibrillation. Myocardial function, including cardiac index, left ventricular, dP/dt max (dP/dt max), left ventricular negative dP/dt min (-dP/dt min), and left ventricular diastolic pressure, was measured before inducing VF and hourly following return of spontaneous circulation. Labeled MSCs were observed in 5-mum cryostat sections from each harvested heart. Significant improvements in ejection fraction, left ventricular end-diastolic volume, left ventricular end-systolic volume, cardiac index, dP/dt max, -dP/dt min, and left ventricular diastolic pressure followed injection of MSCs before inducing VF. Following return of spontaneous circulation, myocardial function was significantly better in animals pretreated with MSCs; this was associated with significantly increased duration of postresuscitation survival. Myocardial function before and after CPR and duration of survival after CPR were significantly improved in animals in which myocardial

  9. Pericardial tear as a consequence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) involving chest compression: a report of two postmortem cases of acute type A aortic dissection with hemopericardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Takahisa; Takanari, Hiroki; Shiotani, Seiji; Hayakawa, Hideyuki; Ohno, Youkichi; Fowler, David R

    2015-05-01

    We present two cases of a pericardial tear as a consequence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation involving chest compressions in fatal acute type A aortic dissection (AoD) with hemopericardium. For each case, postmortem computed tomography revealed a hematoma in the false lumen of the ascending aorta with a slight hemopericardium and a large left hemothorax, as well as focal pericardial dimpling and discontinuity around the left ventricle. At autopsy, we confirmed a convex lens-shape gaping pericardial tear at the left posterolateral site of the pericardium and a massive volume of bloody fluid in the left thoracic cavity. It has been hypothesized that the pericardium ruptured due to chest compressions during resuscitation in these cases of acute type A AoD with hemopericardium and that intrapericardial blood leakage through the pericardial tear resulted in a hemothorax. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of continuous compression with regular ventilations versus 30:2 compressions-ventilations strategy during mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengfei; Liu, Qingyu; Zheng, Guanghui; Liu, Zhifeng; Jiang, Longyuan; Lin, Qing; Chen, Rui; Tang, Wanchun

    2017-09-01

    A compression-ventilation (C:V) ratio of 30:2 is recommended for adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by the current American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines. However, continuous chest compression (CCC) is an alternative strategy for CPR that minimizes interruption especially when an advanced airway exists. In this study, we investigated the effects of 30:2 mechanical CPR when compared with CCC in combination with regular ventilation in a porcine model. Sixteen male domestic pigs weighing 39±2 kg were utilized. Ventricular fibrillation was induced and untreated for 7 min. The animals were then randomly assigned to receive CCC combined with regular ventilation (CCC group) or 30:2 CPR (VC group). Mechanical chest compression was implemented with a miniaturized mechanical chest compressor. At the same time of beginning of precordial compression, the animals were mechanically ventilated at a rate of 10 breaths-per-minute in the CCC group or with a 30:2 C:V ratio in the VC group. Defibrillation was delivered by a single 150 J shock after 5 min of CPR. If failed to resuscitation, CPR was resumed for 2 min before the next shock. The protocol was stopped if successful resuscitation or at a total of 15 min. The resuscitated animals were observed for 72 h. Coronary perfusion pressure, end-tidal carbon dioxide and carotid blood flow in the VC group were similar to those achieved in the CCC group during CPR. No significant differences were observed in arterial blood gas parameters between two groups at baseline, VF 6 min, CPR 4 min and 30, 120 and 360 min post-resuscitation. Although extravascular lung water index of both groups significantly increased after resuscitation, no distinct difference was found between CCC and VC groups. All animals were successfully resuscitated and survived for 72 h with favorable neurologic outcomes in both groups. However, obviously more numbers of rib fracture were observed in CCC animals in comparison with VC animals. There was no

  11. EVOLUTION OF KNOWLEDGE DEVELOPMENT IN HUMAN RESUSCITATION

    OpenAIRE

    O. Zabolotina

    2010-01-01

    Study of human resuscitation development history is the first step in understanding modern approaches to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A significant increase in survival parameters is driven by accumulation of knowledge, expertise, improvement in resuscitation technologies. Development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation structure, development of recommendations approved for study and practical use, addressing these issues at the state level are accompanied with a significant reduction in morta...

  12. Phospholipid alterations in the brain and heart in a rat model of asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhwan; Lampe, Joshua W; Yin, Tai; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Becker, Lance B

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) induces whole-body ischemia, causing damage to multiple organs. Ischemic damage to the brain is mainly responsible for patient mortality. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for brain damage is not understood. Prior studies have provided evidence that degradation of membrane phospholipids plays key roles in ischemia/reperfusion injury. The aim of this study is to correlate organ damage to phospholipid alterations following 30 min asphyxia-induced CA or CA followed by cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) resuscitation using a rat model. Following 30 min CA and CPB resuscitation, rats showed no brain function, moderately compromised heart function, and died within a few hours; typical outcomes of severe CA. However, we did not find any significant change in the content or composition of phospholipids in either tissue following 30 min CA or CA followed by CPB resuscitation. We found a substantial increase in lysophosphatidylinositol in both tissues, and a small increase in lysophosphatidylethanolamine and lysophosphatidylcholine only in brain tissue following CA. CPB resuscitation significantly decreased lysophosphatidylinositol but did not alter the other lyso species. These results indicate that a decrease in phospholipids is not a cause of brain damage in CA or a characteristic of brain ischemia. However, a significant increase in lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylethanolamine found only in the brain with more damage suggests that impaired phospholipid metabolism may be correlated with the severity of ischemia in CA. In addition, the unique response of lysophosphatidylinositol suggests that phosphatidylinositol metabolism is highly sensitive to cellular conditions altered by ischemia and resuscitation.

  13. Effects of Blended Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Defibrillation E-learning on Nursing Students' Self-efficacy, Problem Solving, and Psychomotor Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ju Young; Woo, Chung Hee; Yoo, Jae Yong

    2016-06-01

    This study was conducted to identify the educational effects of a blended e-learning program for graduating nursing students on self-efficacy, problem solving, and psychomotor skills for core basic nursing skills. A one-group pretest/posttest quasi-experimental design was used with 79 nursing students in Korea. The subjects took a conventional 2-week lecture-based practical course, together with spending an average of 60 minutes at least twice a week during 2 weeks on the self-guided e-learning content for basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation using Mosby's Nursing Skills database. Self- and examiner-reported data were collected between September and November 2014 and analyzed using descriptive statistics, paired t test, and Pearson correlation. The results showed that subjects who received blended e-learning education had improved problem-solving abilities (t = 2.654) and self-efficacy for nursing practice related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation (t = 3.426). There was also an 80% to 90% rate of excellent postintervention performance for the majority of psychomotor skills, but the location of chest compressions, compression rate per minute, artificial respiration, and verification of patient outcome still showed low levels of performance. In conclusion, blended E-learning, which allows self-directed repetitive learning, may be more effective in enhancing nursing competencies than conventional practice education.

  14. Comparison of three instructional methods for teaching cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of an automatic external defibrillator to high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reder, S; Cummings, P; Quan, L

    2006-06-01

    To evaluate new instructional methods for teaching high school students cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillator (AED) knowledge, actions and skills. We conducted a cluster-controlled trial of 3 instructional interventions among Seattle area high school students, with random allocation based on classrooms, during 2003-04. We examined two new instructional methods: interactive-computer training and interactive-computer training plus instructor-led (hands-on) practice, and compared them with traditional classroom instruction that included video, teacher demonstration and instructor-led (hands-on) practice, and with a control group. We assessed CPR and AED knowledge, performance of key AED and CPR actions, and essential CPR ventilation and compressions skills 2 days and 2 months after training. All outcomes were transformed to a scale of 0-100%. For all outcome measures mean scores were higher in the instructional groups than in the control group. Two days after training all instructional groups had mean CPR and AED knowledge scores above 75%, with use of the computer program scores were above 80%. Mean scores for key AED actions were above 80% for all groups with training, with hands-on practice enhancing students' positive outcomes for AED pad placement. Students who received hands-on practice more successfully performed CPR actions than those in the computer program only group. In the 2 hands-on practice groups the scores for 3 of the outcomes ranged from 57 to 74%; they were 32 to 54% in the computer only group. For the outcome of continuing CPR until the AED was available scores were high, 89 to 100% in all 3 training groups. Mean CPR skill scores were low in all groups. The highest mean score for successful ventilations was 15% and for compressions, 29%. The pattern of results was similar after 2 months. We found evidence that interactive computer based self instruction alone was sufficient to teach CPR and AED knowledge and AED

  15. Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Is Clustered and Associated With Neighborhood Socioeconomic Characteristics: A Geospatial Analysis of Kent County, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uber, Amy; Sadler, Richard C; Chassee, Todd; Reynolds, Joshua C

    2017-08-01

    Geographic clustering of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is associated with demographic and socioeconomic features of the community where out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) occurred, although this association remains largely untested in rural areas. With a significant rural component and relative racial homogeneity, Kent County, Michigan, provides a unique setting to externally validate or identify new community features associated with bystander CPR. Using a large, countywide data set, we tested for geographic clustering of bystander CPR and its associations with community socioeconomic features. Secondary analysis of adult OHCA subjects (2010-2015) in the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) data set for Kent County, Michigan. After linking geocoded OHCA cases to U.S. census data, we used Moran's I-test to assess for spatial autocorrelation of population-weighted cardiac arrest rate by census block group. Getis-Ord Gi statistic assessed for spatial clustering of bystander CPR and mixed-effects hierarchical logistic regression estimated adjusted associations between community features and bystander CPR. Of 1,592 subjects, 1,465 met inclusion criteria. Geospatial analysis revealed significant clustering of OHCA in more populated/urban areas. Conversely, bystander CPR was less likely in these areas (99% confidence) and more likely in suburban and rural areas (99% confidence). Adjusting for clinical, demographic, and socioeconomic covariates, bystander CPR was associated with public location (odds ratio [OR] = 1.19; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03-1.39), initially shockable rhythms (OR = 1.48; 95% CI = 1.12-1.96), and those in urban neighborhoods (OR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.38-0.77). Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and bystander CPR are geographically clustered in Kent County, Michigan, but bystander CPR is inversely associated with urban designation. These results offer new insight into bystander CPR patterns in mixed urban and rural

  16. Passive continuous positive airway pressure ventilation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomized cross-over manikin simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Bernd E; Muellenbach, Ralf M; Wurmb, Thomas; Struck, Manuel F; Roewer, Norbert; Kranke, Peter

    2017-02-01

    While controlled ventilation is most frequently used during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), the application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and passive ventilation of the lung synchronously with chest compressions and decompressions might represent a promising alternative approach. One benefit of CPAP during CPR is the reduction of peak airway pressures and therefore a potential enhancement in haemodynamics. We therefore evaluated the tidal volumes and airway pressures achieved during CPAP-CPR. During CPR with the LUCAS™ 2 compression device, a manikin model was passively ventilated at CPAP levels of 5, 10, 20 and 30 hPa with the Boussignac tracheal tube and the ventilators Evita® V500, Medumat® Transport, Oxylator® EMX, Oxylog® 2000, Oxylog® 3000, Primus® and Servo®-i as well as the Wenoll® diver rescue system. Tidal volumes and airway pressures during CPAP-CPR were recorded and analyzed. Tidal volumes during CPAP-CPR were higher than during compression-only CPR without positive airway pressure. The passively generated tidal volumes increased with increasing CPAP levels and were significantly influenced by the ventilators used. During ventilation at 20 hPa CPAP via a tracheal tube, the mean tidal volumes ranged from 125 ml (Medumat®) to 309 ml (Wenoll®) and the peak airway pressures from 23 hPa (Primus®) to 49 hPa (Oxylog® 3000). Transport ventilators generated lower tidal volumes than intensive care ventilators or closed-circuit systems. Peak airway pressures during CPAP-CPR were lower than those during controlled ventilation CPR reported in literature. High peak airway pressures are known to limit the applicability of ventilation via facemask or via supraglottic airway devices and may adversely affect haemodynamics. Hence, the application of ventilators generating high tidal volumes with low peak airway pressures appears desirable during CPAP-CPR. The limited CPAP-CPR capabilities of transport ventilators in our study might

  17. If a patient arrests after cardiac surgery is it acceptable to delay cardiopulmonary resuscitation until you have attempted either defibrillation or pacing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockowandt, Ulf; Levine, Adrian; Strang, Tim; Dunning, Joel

    2008-10-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether it is acceptable to delay cardiopulmonary resuscitation if a patient arrests after cardiac surgery in order to attempt defibrillation or pacing, prior to performing external cardiac massage. Altogether 550 papers were found in Medline and 990 in Embase using the reported search, of which 22 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that current resuscitation guidelines state that there is no evidence to support or refute external cardiac massage prior to defibrillation in-hospital, although a benefit has been shown for patients out-of-hospital if the response time is over 4-5 min. In addition, four large studies including the AHA National Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, who reported the findings of 6789 in-hospital arrests, emphasise the importance of early defibrillation within 1-2 min. More concerning in patients post-cardiac surgery are four case reports after cardiothoracic surgery and five in the non-surgical literature where significant harm has been caused from external cardiac massage, although equally we found cohort studies of cardiac surgical patients who had external cardiac massage followed by re-sternotomy and found no trauma due to external cardiac massage. We recommend that guidelines for immediate external massage should be adhered to currently as the evidence that these guidelines may do harm is not yet strong enough to recommend a change in practice. However, we acknowledge that there are no in-hospital data to support very short periods of external massage prior to defibrillation and there have been examples of damage to the myocardium due to external massage. This should be borne in mind when external massage is being performed on

  18. Impedance Threshold Device Combined With High-Quality Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Improves Survival With Favorable Neurological Function After Witnessed Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Atsushi; Duval, Sue; Nakamura, Yuji; Yoshihara, Katsunori; Yannopoulos, Demetris

    2016-09-23

    The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been recently shown to affect clinical outcome. The Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) Prehospital Resuscitation Impedance Valve and Early Versus Delayed Analysis (PRIMED) trial showed no differences in outcomes with an active vs. sham impedance threshold device (ITD), a CPR adjunct that enhances circulation. It was hypothesized the active ITD would improve survival with favorable neurological outcomes in witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients when used with high-quality CPR. Using the publicly accessible ROC PRIMED database, a post-hoc analysis was performed on all witnessed subjects with both compression rate and depth data (n=1,808) who received CPR within the study protocol definition of adequate CPR quality (compression rate 80-120/min and depth 4-6 cm; n=929). Demographics were similar between sham and active ITD groups. In witnessed subjects who received quality CPR, survival with favorable neurological function was 11.9% for the active ITD subjects (56/470) vs. 7.4% for the sham (34/459) (odds ratio 1.69 [95% confidence interval 1.08, 2.64]). There were no statistically significant differences for this primary outcome when CPR was performed outside the boundaries of the definition of adequate CPR quality. Multivariable models did not change these associations. An active ITD combined with adequate-quality conventional CPR has the potential to significantly improve survival after witnessed cardiac arrest. (Circ J 2016; 80: 2124-2132).

  19. A qualitative study about experiences and emotions of emergency medical technicians and out-of-hospital emergency nurses after performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation resulting in death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Aedo, I; Pérez-Urdiales, I; Unanue-Arza, S; García-Azpiazu, Z; Ballesteros-Peña, S

    To explore the experiences, emotions and coping skills among emergency medical technicians and emergency nurses after performing out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation manoeuvres resulting in death. An exploratory qualitative research was performed. Seven emergency medical technicians and six emergency nurses were selected by non-probability sampling among emergency medical system workers. The meetings took place up to information saturation, achieved after six individual interviews and a focal group. The meetings were then transcribed and a manual and inductive analysis of the contents performed. After a failed resuscitation several short and long-term reactions appear. They can be negatives, such as sadness or uncertainty, or positives, such as the feeling of having done everything possible to save the patient's life. Emotional stress increases when ambulance staff have to talk with the deceased's family or when the patient is a child. The workers don't know of a coping strategy other than talking about their emotions with their colleagues. Death after a failed resuscitation can be viewed as a traumatic experience for rescuers. Being in contact with the suffering of others is an emotional, stress-generating factor with direct repercussions on the working and personal lives of emergency staff. Nevertheless, structured coping techniques are not common among those professionals. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of cardiopulmonary resuscitation practices in emergency departments for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims in Lebanon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Noureddine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The survival rate of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA victims in Lebanon is low. A national policy on resuscitation practice is lacking. This survey explored the practices of emergency physicians related to the resuscitation of OHCA victims in Lebanon. Methods: A sample of 705 physicians working in emergency departments (EDs was recruited and surveyed using the LimeSurvey software (Carsten Schmitz, Germany. Seventy-five participants responded, yielding 10.64% response rate. Results: The most important factors in the participants' decision to initiate or continue resuscitation were presence of pulse on arrival (93.2%, underlying cardiac rhythm (93.1%, the physician's ethical duty to resuscitate (93.2%, transport time to the ED (89%, and down time (84.9%. The participants were optimistic regarding the survival of OHCA victims (58.1% reporting > 10% survival and reported frequent resuscitation attempts in medically futile situations. The most frequently reported challenges during resuscitation decisions were related to pressure or presence of victim's family (38.8% and lack of policy (30%. Conclusion: In our setting, physicians often rely on well-established criteria for initiating/continuing resuscitation; however, their decisions are also influenced by cultural factors such as victim's family wishes. The findings support the need for a national policy on resuscitation of OHCA victims.

  1. Cardiopulmonary-cerebral resuscitation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    breathing. These are the only diagnostic signs of cardiac arrest. Absent central pulses (e.g. carotid, femoral) can confirm the diagnosis. During anaesthesia, it ..... The exception to this rule is when cardiac arrest has taken place due to hypoxia. Ventilation will then have first priority. This is particularly important in children.

  2. Relationship between non-technical skills and technical performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: does stress have an influence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krage, R.; Zwaan, L.; Tjon Soei Len, L.; Kolenbrander, M.; Groeningen, D. van; Loer, S.A.; Wagner, C.; Schober, P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Non-technical skills, such as task management, leadership, situational awareness, communication and decision-making refer to cognitive, behavioural and social skills that contribute to safe and efficient team performance. The importance of these skills during cardiopulmonary

  3. Microcirculatory blood flow during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation does not correlate with global hemodynamics: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupičková, Petra; Mlček, Mikuláš; Huptych, Michal; Mormanová, Zuzana; Bouček, Tomáš; Belza, Tomáš; Lacko, Stanislav; Černý, Miloš; Neužil, Petr; Kittnar, Otomar; Linhart, Aleš; Bělohlávek, Jan

    2016-06-08

    Current research highlights the role of microcirculatory disorders in post-cardiac arrest patients. Affected microcirculation shows not only dissociation from systemic hemodynamics but also strong connection to outcome of these patients. However, only few studies evaluated microcirculation directly during cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The aim of our experimental study in a porcine model was to describe sublingual microcirculatory changes during CA and CPR using recent videomicroscopic technology and provide a comparison to parameters of global hemodynamics. Cardiac arrest was induced in 18 female pigs (50 ± 3 kg). After 3 min without treatment, 5 min of mechanical CPR followed. Continuous hemodynamic monitoring including systemic blood pressure and carotid blood flow was performed and blood lactate was measured at the end of baseline and CPR. Sublingual microcirculation was assessed by the Sidestream Dark Field (SDF) technology during baseline, CA and CPR. Following microcirculatory parameters were assessed off-line separately for capillaries (≤20 µm) and other vessels: total and perfused vessel density (TVD, PVD), proportion of perfused vessels (PPV), microvascular flow index (MFI) and heterogeneity index (HI). In comparison to baseline the CA small vessel microcirculation was only partially preserved: TVD 15.64 (13.59-18.48) significantly decreased to 12.51 (10.57-13.98) mm/mm(2), PVD 15.57 (13.56-17.80) to 5.53 (4.17-6.60) mm/mm(2), PPV 99.64 (98.05-100.00) to 38.97 (27.60-46.29) %, MFI 3.00 (3.00-3.08) to 1.29 (1.08-1.58) and HI increased from 0.08 (0.00-0.23) to 1.5 (0.71-2.00), p = 0.0003 for TVD and <0.0001 for others, respectively. Microcirculation during ongoing CPR in small vessels reached 59-85 % of the baseline values: TVD 13.33 (12.11-15.11) mm/mm(2), PVD 9.34 (7.34-11.52) mm/mm(2), PPV 72.34 (54.31-87.87) %, MFI 2.04 (1.58-2.42), HI 0.65 (0.41-1.07). The correlation between microcirculation and global

  4. Delaying defibrillation to give basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation to patients with out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wik, Lars; Hansen, Trond Boye; Fylling, Frode; Steen, Thorbjørn; Vaagenes, Per; Auestad, Bjørn H; Steen, Petter Andreas

    2003-03-19

    Defibrillation as soon as possible is standard treatment for patients with ventricular fibrillation. A nonrandomized study indicates that after a few minutes of ventricular fibrillation, delaying defibrillation to give cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) first might improve the outcome. To determine the effects of CPR before defibrillation on outcome in patients with ventricular fibrillation and with response times either up to or longer than 5 minutes. Randomized trial of 200 patients with out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation in Oslo, Norway, between June 1998 and May 2001. Patients received either standard care with immediate defibrillation (n = 96) or CPR first with 3 minutes of basic CPR by ambulance personnel prior to defibrillation (n = 104). If initial defibrillation was unsuccessful, the standard group received 1 minute of CPR before additional defibrillation attempts compared with 3 minutes in the CPR first group. Primary end point was survival to hospital discharge. Secondary end points were hospital admission with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), 1-year survival, and neurological outcome. A prespecified analysis examined subgroups with response times either up to or longer than 5 minutes. In the standard group, 14 (15%) of 96 patients survived to hospital discharge vs 23 (22%) of 104 in the CPR first group (P =.17). There were no differences in ROSC rates between the standard group (56% [58/104]) and the CPR first group (46% [44/96]; P =.16); or in 1-year survival (20% [21/104] and 15% [14/96], respectively; P =.30). In subgroup analysis for patients with ambulance response times of either up to 5 minutes or shorter, there were no differences in any outcome variables between the CPR first group (n = 40) and the standard group (n = 41). For patients with response intervals of longer than 5 minutes, more patients achieved ROSC in the CPR first group (58% [37/64]) compared with the standard group (38% [21/55]; odds ratio [OR], 2.22; 95

  5. [Lay-rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)--controversies in emergency medicine: lay-rescuer CPR with or without mouth-to-mouth ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolcke, Benno

    2013-09-01

    An analysis of literature results reveals differences concerning the need for rescue breathing in lay-rescuer cardiopulmonary-resuscitation (CPR). Observational studies on large registries have shown improved survival rates with standard CPR (chest compressions and rescue breathing) compared to continuous chest compressions (CCC). This applies especially for cardiac arrests of non-cardiac origin or prolonged EMS-arrival times. In contrast a public program for lay-rescuers focusing on CCC lead to improved success rates of bystander-CPR, followed by improved survival rates. The 2010 ERC guidelines have resolved this controversy by integrating both aspects. CCC is recommended for everyone. Trained bystanders should use standard-CPR as method of choice. For dispatcher-assisted CPR the results are clear. Giving instructions for mouth-to-mouth ventilation is too complicated and time consuming, thus impairing survival rates. Therefore CCC is recommended for dispatcher-assisted CPR. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Ultrasound-guided intracardiac xenotransfusion of canine packed red blood cells and epinephrine to the left ventricle of a severely anemic cat during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oron, Liron; Bruchim, Yaron; Klainbart, Sigal; Kelmer, Efrat

    2017-03-01

    To describe the use of an ultrasound-guided intracardiac xenotransfusion of canine packed red blood cells (pRBC) to the left ventricle of a severely anemic cat during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). An 8-year-old previously healthy neutered female cat was presented with severe weakness after she had disappeared for 1 month. On presentation, the cat was in hypovolemic shock, laterally recumbent, and severely anemic with massive flea infestation. Within minutes of admission, the cat became agonal and suffered cardiopulmonary arrest. CPR was immediately initiated; however, attempts to gain IV access during CPR were unsuccessful. As the cat's blood type was yet unknown, 10 mL of canine pRBC was transfused directly into the left ventricular chamber using ultrasound guidance, as well as 0.02 mg/kg of epinephrine using a similar technique. The cat regained cardiac activity and once the jugular vein was cannulated it received 20 additional mL of canine pRBC intravenously. The packed cell volume and total plasma protein following the intracardiac transfusion were 0.09 L/L [9%] and 30 g/L [3.0 g/dL], respectively. Subsequent blood typing revealed the cat had type B blood. The cat was discharged 3 days post-CPR and was alive and doing well 3 months following discharge. This is the first reported case of ultrasound-guided intracardiac canine-to-feline xenotransfusion during CPR. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  7. Quantitative assessment of brain tissue oxygenation in porcine models of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation using hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfabadi, Shahin S.; Toronov, Vladislav; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Hare, Gregory M. T.

    2014-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-invasive tool to measure real-time tissue oxygenation in the brain. In an invasive animal experiment we were able to directly compare non-invasive NIRS measurements on the skull with invasive measurements directly on the brain dura matter. We used a broad-band, continuous-wave hyper-spectral approach to measure tissue oxygenation in the brain of pigs under the conditions of cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and defibrillation. An additional purpose of this research was to find a correlation between mortality due to cardiac arrest and inadequacy of the tissue perfusion during attempts at resuscitation. Using this technique we measured the changes in concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin [HbO2] and deoxy-hemoglobin [HHb] to quantify the tissue oxygenation in the brain. We also extracted cytochrome c oxidase changes Δ[Cyt-Ox] under the same conditions to determine increase or decrease in cerebral oxygen delivery. In this paper we proved that applying CPR, [HbO2] concentration and tissue oxygenation in the brain increase while [HHb] concentration decreases which was not possible using other measurement techniques. We also discovered a similar trend in changes of both [Cyt-Ox] concentration and tissue oxygen saturation (StO2). Both invasive and non-invasive measurements showed similar results.

  8. Comparison of the Mapleson C system and adult and paediatric self-inflating bags for delivering guideline-consistent ventilation during simulated adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherren, P B; Lewinsohn, A; Jovaisa, T; Wijayatilake, D S

    2011-07-01

    There is a discrepancy between resuscitation teaching and witnessed clinical practice. Furthermore, deleterious outcomes are associated with hyperventilation. We therefore conducted a manikin-based study of a simulated cardiac arrest to evaluate the ability of three ventilating devices to provide guideline-consistent ventilation. Mean (SD) minute ventilation was reduced with the paediatric self-inflating bag (7.0 (3.2) l.min⁻¹) compared with the Mapleson C system (9.8 (3.5) l.min⁻¹) and adult self-inflating bag (9.7 (4.2) l.min⁻¹ ; p = 0.003). Tidal volume was also lower with the paediatric self-inflating bag (391 (52) ml) compared with the others (582 (87) ml and 625 (103) ml, respectively; p < 0.001), as was peak airway pressure (14.5 (5.2) cmH₂O vs 20.7 (9.0) cmH₂O and 30.3 (11.4) cmH₂O, respectively; p < 0.001). Participants hyperventilated patients' lungs in simulated cardiac arrest with all three devices. The paediatric self-inflating bag delivered the most guideline-consistent ventilation. Its use in adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation may ensure delivery of more guideline-consistent ventilation in patients with tracheal intubation. © 2011 The Authors. Anaesthesia © 2011 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  9. Autonomy and paternalism in geriatric medicine. The Jewish ethical approach to issues of feeding terminally ill patients, and to cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, A J; Sonnenblick, M

    1998-02-01

    Respecting and encouraging autonomy in the elderly is basic to the practice of geriatrics. In this paper, we examine the practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and "artificial" feeding in a geriatric unit in a general hospital subscribing to jewish orthodox religious principles, in which the sanctity of life is a fundamental ethical guideline. The literature on the administration of food and water in terminal stages of illness, including dementia, still shows division of opinion on the morality of withdrawing nutrition. We uphold the principle that as long as feeding by naso-gastric (N-G) or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) does not constitute undue danger or arouse serious opposition it should be given, without causing suffering to the patient. This is part of basic care, and the doctor has no mandate to withdraw this. The question of CPR still shows much discrepancy regarding elderly patients' wishes, and doctors' opinions about its worthwhileness, although up to 10 percent survive. Our geriatric patients rarely discuss the subject, but it is openly ventilated with families who ask about it, who are then involved in the decision-making, and the decision about CPR or "do-not-resuscitate" (DNR) is based on clinical and prognostic considerations.

  10. Automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation using a load-distributing band external cardiac support device for in-hospital cardiac arrest: a single centre experience of AutoPulse-CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, J R; White, S; Quinn, N; Gubran, C J; Ludman, P F; Townend, J N; Doshi, S N

    2015-02-01

    Poor quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) predicts adverse outcome. During invasive cardiac procedures automated-CPR (A-CPR) may help maintain effective resuscitation. The use of A-CPR following in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) remains poorly described. Firstly, we aimed to assess the efficiency of healthcare staff using A-CPR in a cardiac arrest scenario at baseline, following re-training and over time (Scenario-based training). Secondly, we studied our clinical experience of A-CPR at our institution over a 2-year period, with particular emphasis on the details of invasive cardiac procedures performed, problems encountered, resuscitation rates and in-hospital outcome (AutoPulse-CPR Registry). Scenario-based training: Forty healthcare professionals were assessed. At baseline, time-to-position device was slow (mean 59 (±24) s (range 15-96s)), with the majority (57%) unable to mode-switch. Following re-training time-to-position reduced (28 (±9) s, p<0.01 vs baseline) with 95% able to mode-switch. This improvement was maintained over time. AutoPulse-CPR Registry: 285 patients suffered IHCA, 25 received A-CPR. Survival to hospital discharge following conventional CPR was 28/260 (11%) and 7/25 (28%) following A-CPR. A-CPR supported invasive procedures in 9 patients, 2 of whom had A-CPR dependant circulation during transfer to the catheter lab. A-CPR may provide excellent haemodynamic support and facilitate simultaneous invasive cardiac procedures. A significant learning curve exists when integrating A-CPR into clinical practice. Further studies are required to better define the role and effectiveness of A-CPR following IHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Relationship between non-technical skills and technical performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Does stress have an influence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krage, R. (Ralf); L. Zwaan (Laura); Tjon Soei Len, L. (Lian); Kolenbrander, M.W. (Mark W); Van Groeningen, D. (DIck); S.A. Loer (Stephan A.); C. Wagner (Cordula); P. Schober (P.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground Non-technical skills, such as task management, leadership, situational awareness, communication and decision-making refer to cognitive, behavioural and social skills that contribute to safe and efficient team performance. The importance of these skills during cardiopulmonary

  12. Can mass education and a television campaign change the attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a rural community?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Møller; Isbye, Dan Lou; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is improved when bystanders provide Basic Life Support (BLS). However, bystander BLS does not occur frequently. The aim of this study was to assess the effects on attitudes regarding different aspects of resuscitation of a one-year targeted media...

  13. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Adults and Children With Mechanical Circulatory Support: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peberdy, Mary Ann; Gluck, Jason A; Ornato, Joseph P; Bermudez, Christian A; Griffin, Russell E; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Kerber, Richard E; Lewis, Eldrin F; Link, Mark S; Miller, Corinne; Teuteberg, Jeffrey J; Thiagarajan, Ravi; Weiss, Robert M; O'Neil, Brian

    2017-06-13

    Cardiac arrest in patients on mechanical support is a new phenomenon brought about by the increased use of this therapy in patients with end-stage heart failure. This American Heart Association scientific statement highlights the recognition and treatment of cardiovascular collapse or cardiopulmonary arrest in an adult or pediatric patient who has a ventricular assist device or total artificial heart. Specific, expert consensus recommendations are provided for the role of external chest compressions in such patients. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Resuscitation, prolonged cardiac arrest, and an automated chest compression device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Martin; Jørgensen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2010-01-01

    The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest.......The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest....

  15. Association between cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration and one-month neurological outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiura, Masahiro; Hamabe, Yuichi; Akashi, Akiko; Sakurai, Atsushi; Tahara, Yoshio; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nagao, Ken; Yaguchi, Arino; Morimura, Naoto

    2017-04-21

    The duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an important factor associated with the outcomes for an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, the appropriate CPR duration remains unclear considering pre- and in-hospital settings. The present study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the CPR duration (including both the pre- and in-hospital duration) and neurologically favorable outcomes 1-month after cardiac arrest. Data were utilized from a prospective multi-center cohort study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients transported to 67 emergency hospitals between January 2012 and March 2013 in the Kanto area of Japan. A total of 3,353 patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (age ≥18 years) who underwent CPR by emergency medical service personnel and achieved the return of spontaneous circulation in a pre- or in-hospital setting were analyzed. The primary outcome was a 1-month favorable neurological outcome. Logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the influence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration. The CPR duration that achieved a cumulative proportion >99% of cases with a 1-month neurologically favorable outcome was determined. Of the 3,353 eligible cases, pre-hospital return of spontaneous circulation was obtained in 1,692 cases (50.5%). A total of 279 (8.3%) cases had a 1-month neurologically favorable outcome. The CPR duration was significantly and inversely associated with 1-month neurologically favorable outcomes with adjustment for pre- and in-hospital confounders (adjusted odds ratio: 0.911, per minute, 95% CI: 0.892-0.929, p CPR, the probability of a 1-month neurologically favorable outcome decreased from 8.3 to 0.7%. At 45 min of CPR, the cumulative proportion for a 1-month neurologically favorable outcome reached >99%. The CPR duration was independently and inversely associated with 1-month neurologically favorable outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The CPR duration required to achieve return

  16. Introducing systematic dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (telephone-CPR) in a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System (AMPDS): implementation process and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dami, Fabrice; Fuchs, Vincent; Praz, Laurent; Vader, John-Paul

    2010-07-01

    In order to improve the quality of our Emergency Medical Services (EMS), to raise bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation rates and thereby meet what is becoming a universal standard in terms of quality of emergency services, we decided to implement systematic dispatcher-assisted or telephone-CPR (T-CPR) in our medical dispatch center, a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System. The aim of this article is to describe the implementation process, costs and results following the introduction of this new "quality" procedure. This was a prospective study. Over an 8-week period, our EMS dispatchers were given new procedures to provide T-CPR. We then collected data on all non-traumatic cardiac arrests within our state (Vaud, Switzerland) for the following 12 months. For each event, the dispatchers had to record in writing the reason they either ruled out cardiac arrest (CA) or did not propose T-CPR in the event they did suspect CA. All emergency call recordings were reviewed by the medical director of the EMS. The analysis of the recordings and the dispatchers' written explanations were then compared. During the 12-month study period, a total of 497 patients (both adults and children) were identified as having a non-traumatic cardiac arrest. Out of this total, 203 cases were excluded and 294 cases were eligible for T-CPR. Out of these eligible cases, dispatchers proposed T-CPR on 202 occasions (or 69% of eligible cases). They also erroneously proposed T-CPR on 17 occasions when a CA was wrongly identified (false positive). This represents 7.8% of all T-CPR. No costs were incurred to implement our study protocol and procedures. This study demonstrates it is possible, using a brief campaign of sensitization but without any specific training, to implement systematic dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System such as our EMS that had no prior experience with systematic T-CPR. The results in terms of T-CPR delivery

  17. The System-Wide Effect of Real-Time Audiovisual Feedback and Postevent Debriefing for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: The Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality Improvement Initiative*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Keith; Kimani, Peter K.; Abella, Benjamin S.; Chilwan, Mehboob; Cooke, Matthew W.; Davies, Robin P.; Field, Richard A.; Gao, Fang; Quinton, Sarah; Stallard, Nigel; Woolley, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of implementing real-time audiovisual feedback with and without postevent debriefing on survival and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality at in-hospital cardiac arrest. Design: A two-phase, multicentre prospective cohort study. Setting: Three UK hospitals, all part of one National Health Service Acute Trust. Patients: One thousand three hundred and ninety-five adult patients who sustained an in-hospital cardiac arrest at the study hospitals and were treated by hospital emergency teams between November 2009 and May 2013. Interventions: During phase 1, quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and patient outcomes were measured with no intervention implemented. During phase 2, staff at hospital 1 received real-time audiovisual feedback, whereas staff at hospital 2 received real-time audiovisual feedback supplemented by postevent debriefing. No intervention was implemented at hospital 3 during phase 2. Measurements and Main Results: The primary outcome was return of spontaneous circulation. Secondary endpoints included other patient-focused outcomes, such as survival to hospital discharge, and process-focused outcomes, such as chest compression depth. Random-effect logistic and linear regression models, adjusted for baseline patient characteristics, were used to analyze the effect of the interventions on study outcomes. In comparison with no intervention, neither real-time audiovisual feedback (adjusted odds ratio, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.31–1.22; p = 0.17) nor real-time audiovisual feedback supplemented by postevent debriefing (adjusted odds ratio, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.35–1.21; p = 0.17) was associated with a statistically significant improvement in return of spontaneous circulation or any process-focused outcome. Despite this, there was evidence of a system-wide improvement in phase 2, leading to improvements in return of spontaneous circulation (adjusted odds ratio, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.06–3.30; p = 0.03) and process

  18. The System-Wide Effect of Real-Time Audiovisual Feedback and Postevent Debriefing for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: The Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Keith; Kimani, Peter K; Abella, Benjamin S; Chilwan, Mehboob; Cooke, Matthew W; Davies, Robin P; Field, Richard A; Gao, Fang; Quinton, Sarah; Stallard, Nigel; Woolley, Sarah; Perkins, Gavin D

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of implementing real-time audiovisual feedback with and without postevent debriefing on survival and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality at in-hospital cardiac arrest. A two-phase, multicentre prospective cohort study. Three UK hospitals, all part of one National Health Service Acute Trust. One thousand three hundred and ninety-five adult patients who sustained an in-hospital cardiac arrest at the study hospitals and were treated by hospital emergency teams between November 2009 and May 2013. During phase 1, quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and patient outcomes were measured with no intervention implemented. During phase 2, staff at hospital 1 received real-time audiovisual feedback, whereas staff at hospital 2 received real-time audiovisual feedback supplemented by postevent debriefing. No intervention was implemented at hospital 3 during phase 2. The primary outcome was return of spontaneous circulation. Secondary endpoints included other patient-focused outcomes, such as survival to hospital discharge, and process-focused outcomes, such as chest compression depth. Random-effect logistic and linear regression models, adjusted for baseline patient characteristics, were used to analyze the effect of the interventions on study outcomes. In comparison with no intervention, neither real-time audiovisual feedback (adjusted odds ratio, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.31-1.22; p=0.17) nor real-time audiovisual feedback supplemented by postevent debriefing (adjusted odds ratio, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.35-1.21; p=0.17) was associated with a statistically significant improvement in return of spontaneous circulation or any process-focused outcome. Despite this, there was evidence of a system-wide improvement in phase 2, leading to improvements in return of spontaneous circulation (adjusted odds ratio, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.06-3.30; p=0.03) and process-focused outcomes. Implementation of real-time audiovisual feedback with or without postevent debriefing did not

  19. A prospective study to determine the circumstances, incidence and outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a referral hospital in India, in relation to various factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhar Joshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Cardiac arrest has multifactorial aetiology and the outcome depends on timely and correct interventions. We decided to investigate the circumstances, incidence and outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR at a tertiary hospital in India, in relation to various factors, including extensive basic life support and advanced cardiac life support training programme for all nurses and doctors. Methods: It has been over a decade and a half with periodical updates and implementation of newer guidelines prepared by various societies across the world about CPR for both in-hospital and out-of hospital cardiac arrests (IHCA and OHCA. We conducted a prospective study wherein all cardiac arrests reported in the hospital consecutively for 12 months were registered for the study and followed their survival up to 1-year. Statistical analysis was performed by using Chi-square test for significant differences in proportions applied to various parameters of the study. Results: The main outcome measures were; (following CPR return of spontaneous circulation, survival for 24 h, survival from 24 h to 6 weeks or discharge, alive at 1-year. For survivors, an assessment was made about their cerebral performance and overall performance and accordingly graded. All these data were tabulated. Totally 419 arrests were reported in the hospital, out of which 413 were in-hospital arrests. Out of this 260 patients were considered for resuscitation, we had about 27 survivors at the end of 1-year follow-up (10.38%. Conclusion: We conclude by saying there are many factors involved in good clinical outcomes following IHCAs and these variable factors need to be researched further.

  20. Effect of two additional interventions, test and reflection, added to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation training on seventh grade students' practical skills and willingness to act: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Anette; Hult, Håkan; Kreitz-Sandberg, Susanne; Herlitz, Johan; Svensson, Leif; Nilsson, Lennart

    2017-06-23

    The aim of this research is to investigate if two additional interventions, test and reflection, after standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training facilitate learning by comparing 13-year-old students' practical skills and willingness to act. Seventh grade students in council schools of two municipalities in south-east Sweden. School classes were randomised to CPR training only (O), CPR training with a practical test including feedback (T) or CPR training with reflection and a practical test including feedback (RT). Measures of practical skills and willingness to act in a potential life-threatening situation were studied directly after training and at 6 months using a digital reporting system and a survey. A modified Cardiff test was used to register the practical skills, where scores in each of 12 items resulted in a total score of 12-48 points. The study was conducted in accordance with current European Resuscitation Council guidelines during December 2013 to October 2014. 29 classes for a total of 587 seventh grade students were included in the study. The total score of the modified Cardiff test at 6 months was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were the total score directly after training, the 12 individual items of the modified Cardiff test and willingness to act. At 6 months, the T and O groups scored 32 (3.9) and 30 (4.0) points, respectively (pskills. Reflection did not increase further CPR skills. At 6-month follow-up, no intervention effect was found regarding willingness to make a life-saving effort. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Communication and protocol compliance and their relation to the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR): A mixed-methods study of simulated telephone-assisted CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord-Ljungquist, Helena; Brännström, Margareta; Bohm, Katarina

    2015-07-01

    In the event of a cardiac arrest, emergency medical dispatchers (EMDs) play a critical role by providing telephone-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (T-CPR) to laypersons. The aim of our investigation was to describe compliance with the T-CPR protocol, the performance of the laypersons in a simulated T-CPR situation, and the communication between laypersons and EMDs during these actions. We conducted a retrospective observational study by analysing 20 recorded video and audio files. In a simulation, EMDs provided laypersons with instructions following T-CPR protocols. These were then analysed using a mixed method with convergent parallel design. If the EMDs complied with the T-CPR protocol, the laypersons performed the correct procedures in 71% of the actions. The single most challenging instruction of the T-CPR protocol, for both EMDs and laypersons, was airway control. Mean values for compression depth and frequency did not reach established guideline goals for CPR. Proper application of T-CPR protocols by EMDs resulted in better performance by laypersons in CPR. The most problematic task for EMDs as well for laypersons was airway management. The study results did not establish that the quality of communication between EMDs and laypersons performing CPR in a cardiac arrest situation led to statistically different outcomes, as measured by the quality and effectiveness of the CPR delivered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in emergency departments after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with the outcome: A nationwide observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Won Chul; Lee, Eui Jung; Hwang, Seung-Sik

    2015-11-01

    The appropriate duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for patients who experience out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the duration of CPR in emergency departments (EDs) and to determine whether the institutions' median duration of CPR was associated with survival-to-discharge rate. A cohort of adult patients from a nationwide OHCA registry was retrospectively evaluated. The main variable was the median duration of CPR for each ED (institutional duration), and the main outcome was survival to discharge. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to adjust for individual and aggregated confounders. Among the 107,736 patients who experienced OHCA between 2006 and 2010, 30,716 (28.5%) were selected for analysis. The median age was 65 years, and 67.1% were men. The median duration of CPR for all EDs was 28 min, ranging from 11 to 45 min. EDs were categorized into 3 groups according to their institutional duration of CPR: groups A (CPR varied widely among hospitals. The institutional duration of CPR less than 20 min was significantly associated with lower survival-to-discharge rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. "You can also save a life!": children's drawings as a non-verbal assessment of the impact of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriş, Antoniu Octavian; Tatu-Chiţoiu, Gabriel; Cimpoeşu, Diana; Ionescu, Daniela Florentina; Pop, Călin; Oprea, Nadia; Ţînţ, Diana

    2017-04-01

    Drawings made by training children into cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during the special education week called "School otherwise" can be used as non-verbal means of expression and communication to assess the impact of such training. We analyzed the questionnaires and drawings completed by 327 schoolchildren in different stages of education. After a brief overview of the basic life support (BLS) steps and after watching a video presenting the dynamic performance of the BLS sequence, subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire and make a drawing to express main CPR messages. Questionnaires were filled completely in 97.6 % and drawings were done in 90.2 % cases. Half of the subjects had already witnessed a kind of medical emergency and 96.94 % knew the correct "112" emergency phone number. The drawings were single images (83.81 %) and less cartoon strips (16.18 %). Main themes of the slogans were "Save a life!", "Help!", "Call 112!", "Do not be indifferent/insensible/apathic!" through the use of drawings interpretation, CPR trainers can use art as a way to build a better relation with schoolchildren, to connect to their thoughts and feelings and obtain the highest quality education.

  4. Knowledge and skill retention of in-service versus preservice nursing professionals following an informal training program in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a repeated-measures quasiexperimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Jhuma; Vijayakanthi, Nandini; Sankar, M Jeeva; Dubey, Nandkishore

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to compare the impact of a training program in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on the knowledge and skills of in-service and preservice nurses at prespecified time points. This repeated-measures quasiexperimental study was conducted in the pediatric emergency and ICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital between January and March 2011. We assessed the baseline knowledge and skills of nursing staff (in-service nurses) and final year undergraduate nursing students (preservice nurses) using a validated questionnaire and a skill checklist, respectively. The participants were then trained on pediatric CPR using standard guidelines. The knowledge and skills were reassessed immediately after training and at 6 weeks after training. A total of 74 participants-28 in-service and 46 preservice professionals-were enrolled. At initial assessment, in-service nurses were found to have insignificant higher mean knowledge scores (6.6 versus 5.8, P = 0.08) while the preservice nurses had significantly higher skill scores (6.5 versus 3.2, P nurses performing better in knowledge test (10.5 versus 9.1, P = 0.01) and the preservice nurses performing better in skill test (9.8 versus 7.4, P nurses in pediatric CPR improved with training. In comparison to preservice nurses, the in-service nurses seemed to retain knowledge better with time than skills.

  5. EVOLUTION OF KNOWLEDGE DEVELOPMENT IN HUMAN RESUSCITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zabolotina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Study of human resuscitation development history is the first step in understanding modern approaches to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A significant increase in survival parameters is driven by accumulation of knowledge, expertise, improvement in resuscitation technologies. Development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation structure, development of recommendations approved for study and practical use, addressing these issues at the state level are accompanied with a significant reduction in mortality both at the hospital and pre-hospital levels. Key words: children, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, development stages, training of pediatricians. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:25-27

  6. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation for breath-holding spells followed by cardiac arrest due to left main coronary artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyilmaz, Isa; Altin, Husnu Fırat; Yildiz, Okan; Erek, Ersin; Ergul, Yakup; Guzeltas, Alper

    2015-06-01

    Non-syndromic congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) leads to ventricular hypertrophy and increased oxygen consumption, and when combined with other factors reduces coronary blood flow, potentially resulting in myocardial ischemia and sudden cardiac death. While the anatomic obstruction of coronary circulation is as common in non-syndromic SVAS as in Williams syndrome, it often remains unacknowledged. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is an elective procedure that can be used to support patients with cardiac arrest during diagnosis as a way to reduce cardiopulmonary load in preparation for surgery or further treatment. In this report, we describe the rare case of an infant with severe SVAS and mild valvular pulmonary and left main coronary artery stenosis, as well as breath-holding spells. After multiple cardiac arrests, the infant underwent diagnostic catheter angiography on ECMO and had the pathology surgically corrected. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  7. A Mobile Device App to Reduce Medication Errors and Time to Drug Delivery During Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Study Protocol of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Johan N; Ehrler, Frederic; Lovis, Christian; Combescure, Christophe; Haddad, Kevin; Gervaix, Alain; Manzano, Sergio

    2017-08-22

    During pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), vasoactive drug preparation for continuous infusions is complex and time-consuming. The need for individual specific weight-based drug dose calculation and preparation places children at higher risk than adults for medication errors. Following an evidence-based and ergonomic driven approach, we developed a mobile device app called Pediatric Accurate Medication in Emergency Situations (PedAMINES), intended to guide caregivers step-by-step from preparation to delivery of drugs requiring continuous infusion. In a prior single center randomized controlled trial, medication errors were reduced from 70% to 0% by using PedAMINES when compared with conventional preparation methods. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the use of PedAMINES in both university and smaller hospitals reduces medication dosage errors (primary outcome), time to drug preparation (TDP), and time to drug delivery (TDD) (secondary outcomes) during pediatric CPR when compared with conventional preparation methods. This is a multicenter, prospective, randomized controlled crossover trial with 2 parallel groups comparing PedAMINES with a conventional and internationally used drug infusion rate table in the preparation of continuous drug infusion. The evaluation setting uses a simulation-based pediatric CPR cardiac arrest scenario with a high-fidelity manikin. The study involving 120 certified nurses (sample size) will take place in the resuscitation rooms of 3 tertiary pediatric emergency departments and 3 smaller hospitals. After epinephrine-induced return of spontaneous circulation, nurses will be asked to prepare a continuous infusion of dopamine using either PedAMINES (intervention group) or the infusion table (control group) and then prepare a continuous infusion of norepinephrine by crossing the procedure. The primary outcome is the medication dosage error rate. The secondary outcome is the time in seconds elapsed since the oral

  8. The Validity of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills in the Emergency Department Using Video-Assisted Surveillance: An Iranian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Hossein-Nejad

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the quality of CPR procedures performed in Tehran’s Rasool-e-Akram Hospital-- the first Emergency Medicine academic center in Iran-using a videotaped real-life (actual CPR technique, with the aim of pointing out the defects and shortcomings in this regard. The performance of the CPR team in the emergency resuscitation room of Rasool-e-Akram Hospital was evaluated through videotaping. In an expert panel in the educational council of the emergency medicine group scored each item, which could be evaluated through videotaping, based on the existing guidelines. Fifty CPRs were videotaped between May to July 2008. From among the 33 CPRs which were recorded from the very first moment, 25 of them were started which the correct procedure, chest compression and ventilation, whereas procedures such as checking for pulse, getting an IV-line or intubation were performed as the first action in the remaining cases. While many believe CPR is performed properly in our center, the present study revealed that the performance is still distant from the desired ideal.

  9. The validity of cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills in the emergency department using video-assisted surveillance: an Iranian experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Hossein-Nejad

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the quality of CPR procedures performed in Tehran's Rasool-e-Akram Hospital-- the first Emergency Medicine academic center in Iran-using a videotaped real-life (actual CPR technique, with the aim of pointing out the defects and shortcomings in this regard. The performance of the CPR team in the emergency resuscitation room of Rasool-e-Akram Hospital was evaluated through videotaping. In an expert panel in the educational council of the emergency medicine group scored each item, which could be evaluated through videotaping, based on the existing guidelines. Fifty CPRs were videotaped between May to July 2008. From among the 33 CPRs which were recorded from the very first moment, 25 of them were started which the correct procedure, chest compression and ventilation, whereas procedures such as checking for pulse, getting an IV-line or intubation were performed as the first action in the remaining cases. While many believe CPR is performed properly in our center, the present study revealed that the performance is still distant from the desired ideal.

  10. Risk stratification of survival in injured patients with cardiopulmonary resuscitation within the first hour of arrival to trauma centre: retrospective analysis from the national trauma data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nasim; Greenberg, Patricia; Johnson, Victor M; Davis, John Mihran

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate overall survival and associated survival factors for patients with trauma who had cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) within 1 hour after arrival to a hospital. Retrospective patient data was retrieved from the 2007-2010 edition of the US National Trauma Data Bank. Inhospital survival was the primary outcome; only patients with a known outcome were included in the analysis. Summary statistics and univariate analyses were first reported. Eighty per cent of the patients were then randomly selected and used for multivariate logistic regression analysis. The identified risk factors were further assessed for discrimination and calibration with the remaining patients with trauma using area under the curve (AUC) analysis and a Hosmer-Lemeshow test. From 19 310 total cases that were reviewed, only 2640 patients required CPR within 1 hour of hospital arrival and met the additional inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 2309 (87.5%) died and 331 (12.5%) survived to discharge. There were statistical differences for race (p=0.003), initial systolic BP (p<0.001), initial pulse (p<0.001), cause of injury (p<0.001), presence of head injury (p=0.02), Injury Severity Score (ISS) (p<0.001), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) total score (p<0.001) and GCS motor score (p<0.001); though not all were clinically significant. The multiple logistic regression model (AUC=0.72) identified lower ISS, higher GCS motor score, Caucasian race, American College of Surgeons (ACS) level 2 trauma designation and higher initial SBP as the most predictive of survival to hospital discharge. Approximately 13% of patients who had CPR within an hour of arrival to a trauma centre survived their injury. Therefore, implementation of an aggressive first hour in-hospital resuscitation strategy may result in better survival outcomes for this patient population. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved

  11. Positive impact of crisis resource management training on no-flow time and team member verbalisations during simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Castelao, Ezequiel; Russo, Sebastian G; Cremer, Stephan; Strack, Micha; Kaminski, Lea; Eich, Christoph; Timmermann, Arnd; Boos, Margarete

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of video-based interactive crisis resource management (CRM) training on no-flow time (NFT) and on proportions of team member verbalisations (TMV) during simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Further, to investigate the link between team leader verbalisation accuracy and NFT. The randomised controlled study was embedded in the obligatory advanced life support (ALS) course for final-year medical students. Students (176; 25.35±1.03 years, 63% female) were alphabetically assigned to 44 four-person teams that were then randomly (computer-generated) assigned to either CRM intervention (n=26), receiving interactive video-based CRM-training, or to control intervention (n=18), receiving an additional ALS-training. Primary outcomes were NFT and proportions of TMV, which were subdivided into eight categories: four team leader verbalisations (TLV) with different accuracy levels and four follower verbalisation categories (FV). Measurements were made of all groups administering simulated adult CPR. NFT rates were significantly lower in the CRM-training group (31.4±6.1% vs. 36.3±6.6%, p=0.014). Proportions of all TLV categories were higher in the CRM-training group (p<0.001). Differences in FV were only found for one category (unsolicited information) (p=0.012). The highest correlation with NFT was found for high accuracy TLV (direct orders) (p=0.06). The inclusion of CRM training in undergraduate medical education reduces NFT in simulated CPR and improves TLV proportions during simulated CPR. Further research will test how these results translate into clinical performance and patient outcome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating the quality of prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation by reviewing automated external defibrillator records and survival for out-of-hospital witnessed arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Patrick Chow-In; Chen, Wen-Jone; Lin, Chih-Hao; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Lin, Fang-Yue

    2005-02-01

    Without an easy method to monitor the performance of prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), earlier studies have not been able to assess the quality of CPR. In this study, we have used a new approach to evaluate prehospital CPR performance and the impact on outcome using data retrieved from the automatic external defibrillators (AED). Electrocardiography (ECG) and voice records from AED data cards from 633 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) were reviewed. Fifty-two witnessed cardiac arrests in ventricular fibrillation (VF) requiring post-shock CPR underwent an independent, structured review by two physicians. The adequacy of prehospital CPR was defined on the basis of noticeable deflection of the ECG with chest compressions, the actual number of chest compressions delivered per minute, and the continuity of prehospital CPR at the scene and during transport. Outcome measures included return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survival to hospital admission and discharge. The quality of prehospital CPR was judged as adequate in 15 (29%, 95%; CI: 18-42%) and inadequate in 37 (71%, 95%; CI: 58-82%) of the consensus. Adequate CPR performance resulted in a higher rate of ROSC at the scene (53% versus 8%, 95% CI of the difference 14-76%), and survival to hospital discharge (53% versus 8%, 95% CI of the difference 14-76%). Two reviewers agreed on whether CPR was adequate in 92.3% of cases, with a kappa of 0.82. The quality of prehospital CPR is associated with a greater likelihood of survival in witnessed VF arrests in need of post-shock CPR. The potential of widely available electrocardiography and voice records in AEDs in providing a convenient and real-time evaluation of prehospital CPR should be explored further.

  13. A counterbalanced cross-over study of the effects of visual, auditory and no feedback on performance measures in a simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baxley Susan M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has demonstrated that trained rescuers have difficulties achieving and maintaining the correct depth and rate of chest compressions during both in and out of hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Feedback on rate and depth mitigate decline in performance quality but not completely with the residual performance decline attributed to rescuer fatigue. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of feedback (none, auditory only and visual only on the quality of CPR and rescuer fatigue. Methods Fifteen female volunteers performed 10 minutes of 30:2 CPR in each of three feedback conditions: none, auditory only, and visual only. Visual feedback was displayed continuously in graphic form. Auditory feedback was error correcting and provided by a voice assisted CPR manikin. CPR quality measures were collected using SkillReporter® software. Blood lactate (mmol/dl and perceived exertion served as indices of fatigue. One-way and two way repeated measures analyses of variance were used with alpha set a priori at 0.05. Results Visual feedback yielded a greater percentage of correct compressions (78.1 ± 8.2% than did auditory (65.4 ± 7.6% or no feedback (44.5 ± 8.1%. Compression rate with auditory feedback (87.9 ± 0.5 compressions per minute was less than it was with both visual and no feedback (p Conclusions In this study feedback mitigated the negative effects of fatigue on CPR performance and visual feedback yielded better CPR performance than did no feedback or auditory feedback. The perfect confounding of sensory modality and periodicity of feedback (visual feedback provided continuously and auditory feedback provided to correct error leaves unanswered the question of optimal form and timing of feedback.

  14. Duration of Prehospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Favorable Neurological Outcomes for Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests: A Nationwide, Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yoshikazu; Funada, Akira; Goto, Yumiko

    2016-12-20

    The appropriate duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) remains unclear and may differ based on initial rhythm. We aimed to determine the relationship between the duration of prehospital CPR by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel and post-OHCA outcomes. We analyzed the records of 12 877 pediatric patients who experienced OHCAs (Prehospital EMS-initiated CPR duration was defined as the time from CPR initiation by EMS personnel to prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or to hospital arrival when prehospital ROSC was not achieved during prehospital CPR efforts. The rates of 30-day survival and 30-day CPC 1 to 2 were 9.1% (n=1167) and 2.5% (n=325), respectively. Prehospital EMS-initiated CPR duration was significantly and inversely associated with 30-day outcomes (adjusted odds ratio for 1-minute increments: 0.94, 95% confidence interval: 0.93-0.95 for survival; adjusted odds ratio: 0.90, 95% confidence interval: 0.88-0.92 for CPC 1-2). The duration of prehospital EMS-initiated CPR, beyond which the chance for favorable outcomes diminished to prehospital EMS-initiated CPR durations beyond which the chance for 30-day survival with CPC 1 to 2 diminished to prehospital CPR duration, beyond which the chance for favorable outcome diminished to Prehospital EMS-initiated CPR duration for pediatric OHCAs was independently and inversely associated with 30-day favorable outcomes. The duration of prehospital EMS-initiated CPR, beyond which the chance for 30-day favorable outcomes diminished to <1%, was 42 minutes. However, the CPR duration to achieve this proportion of outcomes differed based on initial rhythm. Further research is required to elucidate appropriate CPR duration for pediatric OHCAs, including in-hospital CPR time. URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02432196. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Lay persons alerted by mobile application system initiate earlier cardio-pulmonary resuscitation: A comparison with SMS-based system notification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Maria Luce; Muschietti, Sandro; Burkart, Roman; Benvenuti, Claudio; Conte, Giulio; Regoli, François; Mauri, Romano; Klersy, Catherine; Moccetti, Tiziano; Auricchio, Angelo

    2017-05-01

    We compared the time to initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by lay responders and/or first responders alerted either via Short Message Service (SMS) or by using a mobile application-based alert system (APP). The Ticino Registry of Cardiac Arrest collects all data about out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) occurring in the Canton of Ticino. At the time of a bystander's call, the EMS dispatcher sends one ambulance and alerts the first-responders network made up of police officers or fire brigade equipped with an automatic external defibrillator, the so called "traditional" first responders, and - if the scene was considered safe - lay responders as well. We evaluated the time from call to arrival of traditional first responders and/or lay responders when alerted either via SMS or the new developed mobile APP. Over the study period 593 OHCAs have occurred. Notification to the first responders network was sent via SMS in 198 cases and via mobile APP in 134 cases. Median time to first responder/lay responder arrival on scene was significantly reduced by the APP-based system (3.5 [2.8-5.2]) compared to the SMS-based system (5.6 [4.2-8.5] min, p 0.0001). The proportion of lay responders arriving first on the scene significantly increased (70% vs. 15%, pmobile APP system is highly efficient in the recruitment of first responders, significantly reducing the time to the initiation of CPR thus increasing survival rates. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Rescuer-limited cardiopulmonary resuscitation as an alternative to 2-min switched CPR in the setting of inhospital cardiac arrest: a randomised cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Choong Hyun; Cho, Gyu Chong; Ahn, Jung Hwan; Park, Yoo Seok; Lee, Chang Hee

    2015-07-01

    The 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) recommend that chest compression be rotated every 2 min to prevent rescuer fatigue. However, the quality of chest compression using 2-min switched CPR tends to decrease rapidly due to rescuer fatigue. We aimed to compare the effectiveness of use of 2-min switched CPR and rescuer-limited CPR (the person performing compressions is allowed to switch with another rescuer prior to 2 min if feeling fatigued) in the setting of inhospital cardiac arrest. Using a randomised cross-over trial design, 90 medical students were grouped into pairs to perform four cycles of 2-min switched CPR and rescuer-limited CPR (495 s per technique). During each trial, the total number of compressions performed, mean depth of compression and proportion of effective compressions performed (compression depth >5 mm) were recorded for identification of significant differences and changes in pulse rate and RR were measured to determine the extent of exhaustion. Compared with 2-min switched CPR, the mean compression was deeper (51 vs 47 mm, pCPR. Subgroup analysis by 30-s unit showed more consistent compression quality during rescuer-limited CPR. No significant differences in change in pulse rate and RR were found between the two techniques. Rescuer-limited CPR yields a greater number of effective compressions and more consistent quality of CPR than 2-min switched CPR. Rescuer-limited CPR might be a suitable alternative for treating inhospital cardiac arrest. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Barriers and Facilitators to Learning and Performing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) in Neighborhoods with Low Bystander CPR Prevalence and High Rates of Cardiac Arrest in Columbus, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, Comilla; Haukoos, Jason S.; Bond, Cindy; Rabe, Marilyn; Colbert, Susan H.; King, Renee; Sayre, Michael; Heisler, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Background Residents who live in neighborhoods that are primarily African-American, Latino, or poor are more likely to have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), less likely to receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and less likely to survive. No prior studies have been conducted to understand the contributing factors that may decrease the likelihood of residents learning and performing CPR in these neighborhoods. The goal of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators to learning and performing CPR in three low-income, “high-risk” predominantly African American, neighborhoods in Columbus, Ohio. Methods and Results Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) approaches were used to develop and conduct six focus groups in conjunction with community partners in three target high-risk neighborhoods in Columbus, Ohio in January-February 2011. Snowball and purposeful sampling, done by community liaisons, was used to recruit participants. Three reviewers analyzed the data in an iterative process to identify recurrent and unifying themes. Three major barriers to learning CPR were identified and included financial, informational, and motivational factors. Four major barriers were identified for performing CPR and included fear of legal consequences, emotional issues, knowledge, and situational concerns. Participants suggested that family/self-preservation, emotional, and economic factors may serve as potential facilitators in increasing the provision of bystander CPR. Conclusion The financial cost of CPR training, lack of information, and the fear of risking one's own life must be addressed when designing a community-based CPR educational program. Using data from the community can facilitate improved design and implementation of CPR programs. PMID:24021699

  18. Early detection of brain death using the Bispectral Index (BIS) in patients treated by extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (E-CPR) for refractory cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouffroy, Romain; Lamhaut, Lionel; Guyard, Alexandra; Philippe, Pascal; An, Kim; Spaulding, Christian; Baud, Frédéric; Carli, Pierre; Vivien, Benoît

    2017-11-01

    Despite increasing use of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (E-CPR) for treatment of refractory cardiac arrest patients, prognosis remains dismal, often resulting in brain-death. However, clinical assessment of brain-death occurence is difficult in post-cardiac arrest patients, sedated, paralyzed, under mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH). Our objective was to assess the usefulness of Bispectral-Index (BIS) monitoring at bedside for an early detection of brain-death occurrence in refractory cardiac arrest patients treated by E-CPR. This prospective study was performed in an intensive care unit of an university hospital. Forty-six patients suffering from refractory cardiac arrest treated by E-CPR were included. BIS was continuously recorded during ICU hospitalization. Clinical brain-death was confirmed when appropriate by EEG and/or cerebral CT angiography. Twenty-nine patients evolved into brain-death and had average BIS values under MTH and after rewarming (temperature ≥35°C) of 4 (0-47) and 0 (0-82), respectively. Among these, 11 (38%) entered into a procedure of organs donation. Among the 17 non-brain-dead patients, the average BIS values at admission and after rewarming were 39 (0-65) and 59 (22-82), respectively. Two patients had on admission a BIS value equal to zero and evolved to a poor prognostic (CPC 4) and died after care limitations. BIS values were significantly different between patients who developed brain death and those who did not. In both groups, no differences were observed between the AUCs of ROC curves for BIS values under MTH and after rewarming (respectively 0.86 vs 0.83, NS). Initial values of BIS could be used as an assessment tool for early detection of brain-death in refractory cardiac arrest patients treated by mild therapeutic hypothermia and E-CPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration on neurologically favourable outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A population-based study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Tasuku; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Nishiyama, Chika; Nishiuchi, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Yasuyuki; Kawamura, Takashi; Ohta, Bon; Iwami, Taku

    2017-04-01

    The optimal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) duration for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains unclear. We aimed to assess the association between CPR duration and outcome after OHCA. This prospective, population-based observational study conducted in Osaka, Japan enrolled 6981 adult patients with non-traumatic witnessed OHCA who achieved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) from January 2005 through December 2012. CPR duration was defined as the time of CPR initiation by emergency medical service personnel to the ROSC in pre-hospital settings or after hospital admission. The primary outcome was one-month survival with neurologically favourable outcome (cerebral performance category scale 1 or 2). Overall, median CPR duration was 25min (interquartile range: 15-34) and the proportion of neurologically favourable outcome was 12.5% (875/6,981). The proportion of neurologically favourable outcome among the CPR duration ≥31min group was significantly lower compared with that among the 0-5min group (55.1% [320/581] versus 2.2% [54/2424], adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.04; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.03-0.05 in all patients, 78.4% [240/306] versus 11.4% [30/264], AOR 0.04; 95% CI 0.02-0.06 in the shockable group, 29.1% [80/275] versus 1.1% [24/2160], and AOR 0.03; 95% CI 0.02-0.05 in the non-shockable group). The cumulative proportion for neurologically favourable outcome reached 99% after 44, 41, and 43min of CPR in all patients, the shockable group, and the non-shockable group, respectively. The proportion of patients with neurologically favourable outcome declined with increasing CPR duration, but some OHCA patients could benefit from prolonged CPR duration >30min. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of Dispatcher‐Assisted Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on Neurological Outcomes in Children With Out‐of‐Hospital Cardiac Arrests: A Prospective, Nationwide, Population‐Based Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yoshikazu; Maeda, Tetsuo; Goto, Yumiko

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of dispatcher‐assisted bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on neurological outcomes in children is unclear. We investigated whether dispatcher‐assisted bystander CPR shows favorable neurological outcomes (Cerebral Performance Category scale 1 or 2) in children with out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Methods and Results Children (n=5009, ageCPR (n=2287); bystander CPR with dispatcher instruction (n=2019); and bystander CPR without dispatcher instruction (n=703) groups. The primary endpoint was favorable neurological outcome at 1 month post‐OHCA. Dispatcher CPR instruction was offered to 53.9% of patients, significantly increasing bystander CPR provision rate (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 7.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 6.60 to 8.57). Bystander CPR with and without dispatcher instruction were significantly associated with improved 1‐month favorable neurological outcomes (aOR, 1.81 and 1.68; 95% CI, 1.24 to 2.67 and 1.07 to 2.62, respectively), compared to no bystander CPR. Conventional CPR was associated with increased odds of 1‐month favorable neurological outcomes irrespective of etiology of cardiac arrest (aOR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.56 to 3.41). However, chest‐compression‐only CPR was not associated with 1‐month meaningful outcomes (aOR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.67 to 1.64). Conclusions In children with OHCA, dispatcher‐assisted bystander CPR increased bystander CPR provision rate and was associated with improved 1‐month favorable neurological outcomes, compared to no bystander CPR. Conventional bystander CPR was associated with greater likelihood of neurologically intact survival, compared to chest‐compression‐only CPR, irrespective of cardiac arrest etiology. PMID:24785780

  1. Practice guideline summary: Reducing brain injury following cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geocadin, Romergryko G; Wijdicks, Eelco; Armstrong, Melissa J; Damian, Maxwell; Mayer, Stephan A; Ornato, Joseph P; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Suarez, José I; Torbey, Michel T; Dubinsky, Richard M; Lazarou, Jason

    2017-05-30

    To assess the evidence and make evidence-based recommendations for acute interventions to reduce brain injury in adult patients who are comatose after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Published literature from 1966 to August 29, 2016, was reviewed with evidence-based classification of relevant articles. For patients who are comatose in whom the initial cardiac rhythm is either pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), therapeutic hypothermia (TH; 32-34°C for 24 hours) is highly likely to be effective in improving functional neurologic outcome and survival compared with non-TH and should be offered (Level A). For patients who are comatose in whom the initial cardiac rhythm is either VT/VF or asystole/pulseless electrical activity (PEA) after OHCA, targeted temperature management (36°C for 24 hours, followed by 8 hours of rewarming to 37°C, and temperature maintenance below 37.5°C until 72 hours) is likely as effective as TH and is an acceptable alternative (Level B). For patients who are comatose with an initial rhythm of PEA/asystole, TH possibly improves survival and functional neurologic outcome at discharge vs standard care and may be offered (Level C). Prehospital cooling as an adjunct to TH is highly likely to be ineffective in further improving neurologic outcome and survival and should not be offered (Level A). Other pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic strategies (applied with or without concomitant TH) are also reviewed. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. The design of instructional tools affects secondary school students' learning of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in reciprocal peer learning: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserbyt, Peter; Byra, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Research investigating design effects of instructional tools for learning Basic Life Support (BLS) is almost non-existent. To demonstrate the design of instructional tools matter. The effect of spatial contiguity, a design principle stating that people learn more deeply when words and corresponding pictures are placed close (i.e., integrated) rather than far from each other on a page was investigated on task cards for learning Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) during reciprocal peer learning. A randomized controlled trial. A total of 111 students (mean age: 13 years) constituting six intact classes learned BLS through reciprocal learning with task cards. Task cards combine a picture of the skill with written instructions about how to perform it. In each class, students were randomly assigned to the experimental group or the control. In the control, written instructions were placed under the picture on the task cards. In the experimental group, written instructions were placed close to the corresponding part of the picture on the task cards reflecting application of the spatial contiguity principle. One-way analysis of variance found significantly better performances in the experimental group for ventilation volumes (P=.03, ηp2=.10) and flow rates (P=.02, ηp2=.10). For chest compression depth, compression frequency, compressions with correct hand placement, and duty cycles no significant differences were found. This study shows that the design of instructional tools (i.e., task cards) affects student learning. Research-based design of learning tools can enhance BLS and CPR education. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison between exclusively school teacher-based and mixed school teacher and healthcare provider-based programme on basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation for secondary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Fábrega, X; Escalada-Roig, X; Miró, O; Sanclemente, G; Díaz, N; Gómez, X; Villena, O; Rodríguez, E; Gaspar, A; Molina, J E; Salvador, J; Sánchez, M

    2009-09-01

    To compare two teaching methodologies for PROCES (a basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (b-CPR) programme for secondary school students): one exclusively performed by school teachers (study group) and another by a mixed team of school teachers and healthcare providers (control group). According to their preferences, teachers chose either method and students were consequently assigned to the control or study group. All participants took a 10 multiple-choice question exam regarding b-CPR skills twice: immediately after PROCES and one year later. Eight or more correct answers was considered satisfactory learning. Results between groups were compared. Associations between satisfactory learning and some student characteristics were analysed. Immediately after PROCES, 442 students (219 in the study group and 223 in the control group) took the exam. The percentage of satisfactory learning was not different: 67.1% in the study group and 64.6% in the control group. Immediate satisfactory learning was related to the absence of pending subjects in the control (odds ratio (OR) 2.31, 95% CI 1.16 to 4.64) and study (OR 5.87, 95% CI 1.22 to 28.20) groups. One year later, a greater percentage of retention of b-CRP skills was detected in the study group (57.1% vs 40.6%; p = 0.01). The absence of any pending subject (OR 6.86, 95% CI 1.83 to 25.66) was independently associated with better retention in the study group, but not the control group. Secondary school teachers, previously trained in b-CPR, can teach these skills effectively to 14-16-year-old students using PROCES. The retention of b-CPR skills is greater with this methodology compared with a more standardised programme.

  4. Implementation of the ALERT algorithm, a new dispatcher-assisted telephone cardiopulmonary resuscitation protocol, in non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System (AMPDS) Emergency Medical Services centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipulante, Samuel; Tubes, Rebecca; El Fassi, Mehdi; Donneau, Anne-Francoise; Van Troyen, Barbara; Hartstein, Gary; D'Orio, Vincent; Ghuysen, Alexandre

    2014-02-01

    Early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a key factor in improving survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The ALERT (Algorithme Liégeois d'Encadrement à la Réanimation par Téléphone) algorithm has the potential to help bystanders initiate CPR. This study evaluates the effectiveness of the implementation of this protocol in a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System area. We designed a before and after study based on a 3-month retrospective assessment of victims of OHCA in 2009, before the implementation of the ALERT protocol in Liege emergency medical communication centre (EMCC), and the prospective evaluation of the same 3 months in 2011, immediately after the implementation. At the moment of the call, dispatchers were able to identify 233 OHCA in the first period and 235 in the second. Victims were predominantly male (59%, both periods), with mean ages of 64.1 and 63.9 years, respectively. In 2009, only 9.9% victims benefited from bystander CPR, this increased to 22.5% in 2011 (p<0.0002). The main reasons for protocol under-utilisation were: assistance not offered by the dispatcher (42.3%), caller physically remote from the victim (20.6%). Median time from call to first compression, defined here as no flow time, was 253s in 2009 and 168s in 2011 (NS). Ten victims were admitted to hospital after ROSC in 2009 and 13 in 2011 (p=0.09). From the beginning and despite its under-utilisation, the ALERT protocol significantly improved the number of patients in whom bystander CPR was attempted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Augmenting communication and decision making in the intensive care unit with a cardiopulmonary resuscitation video decision support tool: a temporal intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCannon, Jessica B; O'Donnell, Walter J; Thompson, B Taylor; El-Jawahri, Areej; Chang, Yuchiao; Ananian, Lillian; Bajwa, Ednan K; Currier, Paul F; Parikh, Mihir; Temel, Jennifer S; Cooper, Zara; Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Volandes, Angelo E

    2012-12-01

    Effective communication between intensive care unit (ICU) providers and families is crucial given the complexity of decisions made regarding goals of therapy. Using video images to supplement medical discussions is an innovative process to standardize and improve communication. In this six-month, quasi-experimental, pre-post intervention study we investigated the impact of a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) video decision support tool upon knowledge about CPR among surrogate decision makers for critically ill adults. We interviewed surrogate decision makers for patients aged 50 and over, using a structured questionnaire that included a four-question CPR knowledge assessment similar to those used in previous studies. Surrogates in the post-intervention arm viewed a three-minute video decision support tool about CPR before completing the knowledge assessment and completed questions about perceived value of the video. We recruited 23 surrogates during the first three months (pre-intervention arm) and 27 surrogates during the latter three months of the study (post-intervention arm). Surrogates viewing the video had more knowledge about CPR (p=0.008); average scores were 2.0 (SD 1.1) and 2.9 (SD 1.2) (out of a total of 4) in pre-intervention and post-intervention arms. Surrogates who viewed the video were comfortable with its content (81% very) and 81% would recommend the video. CPR preferences for patients at the time of ICU discharge/death were distributed as follows: pre-intervention: full code 78%, DNR 22%; post-intervention: full code 59%, DNR 41% (p=0.23).

  6. Hands-on defibrillation has the potential to improve the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and is safe for rescuers-a preclinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Tobias; Gruenewald, Matthias; Lauenstein, Christoph; Drews, Tobias; Iden, Timo; Meybohm, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that rescuers could safely provide a low, static downward force in direct contact with patients during elective cardioversion. The purpose of our experimental study was to investigate whether shock delivery during uninterrupted chest compressions may have an impact on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality and can be safely performed in a realistic animal model of CPR. Twenty anesthetized swine were subjected to 7 minutes of ventricular fibrillation followed by CPR according to the 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines. Pregelled self-adhesive defibrillation electrodes were attached onto the torso in the ventrodorsal direction and connected to a biphasic defibrillator. Animals were randomized either to (1) hands-on defibrillation, where rescuers wore 2 pairs of polyethylene gloves and shocks were delivered during ongoing chest compressions, or (2) hands-off defibrillation, where hands were taken off during defibrillation. CPR was successful in 9 out of 10 animals in the hands-on group (versus 8 out of 10 animals in the hands-off group; not significant). In the hands-on group, chest compressions were interrupted for 0.8% [0.6%; 1.4%] of the total CPR time (versus 8.2% [4.2%; 9.0%]; P=0.0003), and coronary perfusion pressure was earlier restored to its pre-interruption level (P=0.0205). Also, rescuers neither sensed any kind of electric stimulus nor did Holter ECG reveal any serious cardiac arrhythmia. Hands-on defibrillation may improve CPR quality and could be safely performed during uninterrupted chest compressions in our standardized porcine model.

  7. Hands-On Defibrillation Has the Potential to Improve the Quality of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Is Safe for Rescuers—A Preclinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Tobias; Gruenewald, Matthias; Lauenstein, Christoph; Drews, Tobias; Iden, Timo; Meybohm, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently, it has been demonstrated that rescuers could safely provide a low, static downward force in direct contact with patients during elective cardioversion. The purpose of our experimental study was to investigate whether shock delivery during uninterrupted chest compressions may have an impact on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality and can be safely performed in a realistic animal model of CPR. Methods and Results Twenty anesthetized swine were subjected to 7 minutes of ventricular fibrillation followed by CPR according to the 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines. Pregelled self-adhesive defibrillation electrodes were attached onto the torso in the ventrodorsal direction and connected to a biphasic defibrillator. Animals were randomized either to (1) hands-on defibrillation, where rescuers wore 2 pairs of polyethylene gloves and shocks were delivered during ongoing chest compressions, or (2) hands-off defibrillation, where hands were taken off during defibrillation. CPR was successful in 9 out of 10 animals in the hands-on group (versus 8 out of 10 animals in the hands-off group; not significant). In the hands-on group, chest compressions were interrupted for 0.8% [0.6%; 1.4%] of the total CPR time (versus 8.2% [4.2%; 9.0%]; P=0.0003), and coronary perfusion pressure was earlier restored to its pre-interruption level (P=0.0205). Also, rescuers neither sensed any kind of electric stimulus nor did Holter ECG reveal any serious cardiac arrhythmia. Conclusions Hands-on defibrillation may improve CPR quality and could be safely performed during uninterrupted chest compressions in our standardized porcine model. PMID:23316286

  8. Effect of methylene blue on the genomic response to reperfusion injury induced by cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in porcine brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiklund Lars

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury is a common secondary effect of cardiac arrest which is largely responsible for postresuscitative mortality. Therefore development of therapies which restore and protect the brain function after cardiac arrest is essential. Methylene blue (MB has been experimentally proven neuroprotective in a porcine model of global ischemia-reperfusion in experimental cardiac arrest. However, no comprehensive analyses have been conducted at gene expression level. Methods Pigs underwent either untreated cardiac arrest (CA or CA with subsequent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR accompanied with an infusion of saline or an infusion of saline with MB. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling using the Affymetrix porcine microarray was performed to 1 gain understanding of delayed neuronal death initiation in porcine brain during ischemia and after 30, 60 and 180 min following reperfusion, and 2 identify the mechanisms behind the neuroprotective effect of MB after ischemic injury (at 30, 60 and 180 min. Results Our results show that restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC induces major transcriptional changes related to stress response, inflammation, apoptosis and even cytoprotection. In contrast, the untreated ischemic and anoxic insult affected only few genes mainly involved in intra-/extracellular ionic balance. Furthermore, our data show that the neuroprotective role of MB is diverse and fulfilled by regulation of the expression of soluble guanylate cyclase and biological processes accountable for inhibition of apoptosis, modulation of stress response, neurogenesis and neuroprotection. Conclusions Our results support that MB could be a valuable intervention and should be investigated as a therapeutic agent against neural damage associated with I/R injury induced by cardiac arrest.

  9. The Universal Form of Treatment Options (UFTO as an alternative to Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR orders: a mixed methods evaluation of the effects on clinical practice and patient care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoë Fritz

    Full Text Available To determine whether the introduction of the Universal Form of Treatment Options (the UFTO, as an alternative approach to Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR orders, reduces harms in patients in whom a decision not to attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR was made, and to understand the mechanism for any observed change.A mixed-methods before-and-after study with contemporaneous case controls was conducted in an acute hospital. We examined DNACPR (103 patients with DNACPR orders in 530 admissions and UFTO (118 decisions not to attempt resuscitation in 560 admissions practice. The Global Trigger Tool was used to quantify harms. Qualitative interviews and observations were used to understand mechanisms and effects.RATE OF HARMS IN PATIENTS FOR WHOM THERE WAS A DOCUMENTED DECISION NOT TO ATTEMPT CPR WAS REDUCED: Rate difference per 1000 patient-days was 12.9 (95% CI: 2.6-23.2, p-value=0.01. There was a difference in the proportion of harms contributing to patient death in the two periods (23/71 in the DNACPR period to 4/44 in the UFTO period (95% CI 7.8-36.1, p-value=0.006. Significant differences were maintained after adjustment for known confounders. No significant change was seen on contemporaneous case control wards. Interviews with clinicians and observation of ward practice revealed the UFTO helped provide clarity of goals of care and reduced negative associations with resuscitation decisions.Introducing the UFTO was associated with a significant reduction in harmful events in patients in whom a decision not to attempt CPR had been made. Coupled with supportive qualitative evidence, this indicates the UFTO improved care for this vulnerable group.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN85474986 UK Comprehensive Research Network Portfolio 7932.

  10. The study of knowledge and attitude of new coming residents in cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 1377-78

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    Haj Zeinali AM

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is one of the most important skills that every body must know it in medical services. In educational hospitals, the (Newly-arrived residents are in first cell for management of victims, specially in emergency rooms and at nights. Their knowledge and ability for successful CPR have a direct relation with prevalence of total mortality and morbidity. This research has assessed the knowledge and attitude of the new residents about CPR, and for answering to this question: "Is the CPR workshops necessary for all of the new residents in the beginning of their courses". All of the 506 new residents were examined simultaneously in 2 separate years with a questionnaire consist of 50 questions about their CPR secence and skills and 8 questions about their attitude in CPR. These informations were analyzed by SPSS and EPI6 softwares. The mean correct answers were 55%±11.8. The best results were about arrythmias (68.6% and airway management (63.6% and the worst were about IV access (43.1% and pediatric CPR (31.5%. These findings were similar in 2 sequential years. Their knowledge had significant relation with sex (P=0.002, their original university (P=0.031, their residency course (P=0.024 and their residency reception scores (P<0.001. Males and knowledge more than females. The max scores were from Kerman (62% and Beheshti universities (60.5% and the min score were from Hamadan (48% and Kashan universities (37%. The orthopedic (62.5% and urologic residents (61.6% had the most knowledge and the gynecology residents (53.8% had the least. The knowledge had no relation with the time of graduation. About their attitude in CPR: Their knowledge was moderate (65.8%, their abilities was moderate (58% and their education about CPR in MD course had been low (51.5%. Their references for education had been individual studies (74.6%, CPR workshop had not been condected in the most universities (92.7%. knowledge about CPR is low (55

  11. Serious game versus online course for pretraining medical students before a simulation-based mastery learning course on cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, David; Delval, Paul; Abdenouri, Sonia; Truchot, Jennifer; Ceccaldi, Pierre-François; Plaisance, Patrick; Hadchouel, Alice; Tesnière, Antoine

    2017-12-01

    Although both recorded lectures and serious games have been used to pretrain health professionals before simulation training on cardiopulmonary resuscitation, they have never been compared. The aim of this study was to compare an online course and a serious game for pretraining medical students before simulation-based mastery learning on the management of sudden cardiac arrest. A randomised controlled trial. Participants were pretrained using the online course or the serious game on day 1 and day 7. On day 8, each participant was evaluated repeatedly on a scenario of cardiac arrest until reaching a minimum passing score. Department of Simulation in Healthcare in a French medical faculty. Eighty-two volunteer second-year medical students participated between June and October 2016 and 79 were assessed for primary outcome. The serious game used was Staying Alive, which involved a 3D realistic environment, and the online course involved a PowerPoint lecture. The median total training time needed for students to reach the minimum passing score on day 8. This same outcome was also assessed 4 months later. The median training time (interquartile range) necessary for students to reach the minimum passing score was similar between the two groups: 20.5 (15.8 to 30.3) minutes in the serious game group versus 23 (15 to 32) minutes in the online course group, P = 0.51. Achieving an appropriate degree of chest compression was the most difficult requirement to fulfil for students in both groups. Four months later, the median training time decreased significantly in both groups, but no correlation was found at an individual level with the training times observed on day 8. The serious game used in this study was not superior to an online course to pretrain medical students in the management of a cardiac arrest. The absence of any correlation between the performances of students evaluated during two training sessions separated by 4 months suggests that some elements in the

  12. A counterbalanced cross-over study of the effects of visual, auditory and no feedback on performance measures in a simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Carolyn L; Trowbridge, Cynthia; Baxley, Susan M; Ricard, Mark D

    2011-08-02

    Previous research has demonstrated that trained rescuers have difficulties achieving and maintaining the correct depth and rate of chest compressions during both in and out of hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Feedback on rate and depth mitigate decline in performance quality but not completely with the residual performance decline attributed to rescuer fatigue. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of feedback (none, auditory only and visual only) on the quality of CPR and rescuer fatigue. Fifteen female volunteers performed 10 minutes of 30:2 CPR in each of three feedback conditions: none, auditory only, and visual only. Visual feedback was displayed continuously in graphic form. Auditory feedback was error correcting and provided by a voice assisted CPR manikin. CPR quality measures were collected using SkillReporter® software. Blood lactate (mmol/dl) and perceived exertion served as indices of fatigue. One-way and two way repeated measures analyses of variance were used with alpha set a priori at 0.05. Visual feedback yielded a greater percentage of correct compressions (78.1 ± 8.2%) than did auditory (65.4 ± 7.6%) or no feedback (44.5 ± 8.1%). Compression rate with auditory feedback (87.9 ± 0.5 compressions per minute) was less than it was with both visual and no feedback (p < 0.05). CPR performed with no feedback (39.2 ± 0.5 mm) yielded a shallower average depth of compression and a lower percentage (55 ± 8.9%) of compressions within the accepted 38-50 mm range than did auditory or visual feedback (p < 0.05). The duty cycle for auditory feedback (39.4 ± 1.6%) was less than it was with no feedback (p < 0.05). Auditory feedback produced lower lactate concentrations than did visual feedback (p < 0.05) but there were no differences in perceived exertion. In this study feedback mitigated the negative effects of fatigue on CPR performance and visual feedback yielded better CPR performance than did no feedback or auditory feedback

  13. A survey of attitudes and factors associated with successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR knowledge transfer in an older population most likely to witness cardiac arrest: design and methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brehaut Jamie C

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overall survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest rarely exceed 5%. While bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR can increase survival for cardiac arrest victims by up to four times, bystander CPR rates remain low in Canada (15%. Most cardiac arrest victims are men in their sixties, they usually collapse in their own home (85% and the event is witnessed 50% of the time. These statistics would appear to support a strategy of targeted CPR training for an older population that is most likely to witness a cardiac arrest event. However, interest in CPR training appears to decrease with advancing age. Behaviour surrounding CPR training and performance has never been studied using well validated behavioural theories. Methods/Design The overall goal of this study is to conduct a survey to better understand the behavioural factors influencing CPR training and performance in men and women 55 years of age and older. The study will proceed in three phases. In phase one, semi-structured qualitative interviews will be conducted and recorded to identify common categories and themes regarding seeking CPR training and providing CPR to a cardiac arrest victim. The themes identified in the first phase will be used in phase two to develop, pilot-test, and refine a survey instrument based upon the Theory of Planned Behaviour. In the third phase of the project, the final survey will be administered to a sample of the study population over the telephone. Analyses will include measures of sampling bias, reliability of the measures, construct validity, as well as multiple regression analyses to identify constructs and beliefs most salient to seniors' decisions about whether to attend CPR classes or perform CPR on a cardiac arrest victim. Discussion The results of this survey will provide valuable insight into factors influencing the interest in CPR training and performance among a targeted group of individuals most susceptible to

  14. A Mobile Device App to Reduce Time to Drug Delivery and Medication Errors During Simulated Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Johan N; Ehrler, Frederic; Combescure, Christophe; Lacroix, Laurence; Haddad, Kevin; Sanchez, Oliver; Gervaix, Alain; Lovis, Christian; Manzano, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    During pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), vasoactive drug preparation for continuous infusion is both complex and time-consuming, placing children at higher risk than adults for medication errors. Following an evidence-based ergonomic-driven approach, we developed a mobile device app called Pediatric Accurate Medication in Emergency Situations (PedAMINES), intended to guide caregivers step-by-step from preparation to delivery of drugs requiring continuous infusion. The aim of our study was to determine whether the use of PedAMINES reduces drug preparation time (TDP) and time to delivery (TDD; primary outcome), as well as medication errors (secondary outcomes) when compared with conventional preparation methods. The study was a randomized controlled crossover trial with 2 parallel groups comparing PedAMINES with a conventional and internationally used drugs infusion rate table in the preparation of continuous drug infusion. We used a simulation-based pediatric CPR cardiac arrest scenario with a high-fidelity manikin in the shock room of a tertiary care pediatric emergency department. After epinephrine-induced return of spontaneous circulation, pediatric emergency nurses were first asked to prepare a continuous infusion of dopamine, using either PedAMINES (intervention group) or the infusion table (control group), and second, a continuous infusion of norepinephrine by crossing the procedure. The primary outcome was the elapsed time in seconds, in each allocation group, from the oral prescription by the physician to TDD by the nurse. TDD included TDP. The secondary outcome was the medication dosage error rate during the sequence from drug preparation to drug injection. A total of 20 nurses were randomized into 2 groups. During the first study period, mean TDP while using PedAMINES and conventional preparation methods was 128.1 s (95% CI 102-154) and 308.1 s (95% CI 216-400), respectively (180 s reduction, P=.002). Mean TDD was 214 s (95% CI 171-256) and

  15. Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcome Reports: Update of the Utstein Resuscitation Registry Templates for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From a Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian and New Zealand Council on Resuscitation, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council of Southern Africa, Resuscitation Council of Asia); and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perkins, Gavin D.; Jacobs, Ian G.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Berg, Robert A.; Bhanji, Farhan; Biarent, Dominique; Bossaert, Leo L.; Brett, Stephen J.; Chamberlain, Douglas; de Caen, Allan R.; Deakin, Charles D.; Finn, Judith C.; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Iwami, Taku; Koster, Rudolph W.; Lim, Swee Han; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; McNally, Bryan F.; Morley, Peter T.; Morrison, Laurie J.; Monsieurs, Koenraad G.; Montgomery, William; Nichol, Graham; Okada, Kazuo; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Travers, Andrew H.; Nolan, Jerry P.; Aikin, Richard P.; Böttiger, Bernd W.; Callaway, Clifton W.; Castren, Maaret K.; Eisenberg, Mickey S.; Kleinman, Monica E.; Kloeck, David A.; Kloeck, Walter G.; Mancini, Mary E.; Neumar, Robert W.; Ornato, Joseph P.; Paiva, Edison F.; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Soar, Jasmeet; Sierra, Alfredo F.; Stanton, David; Zideman, David A.; Rea, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Utstein-style guidelines contribute to improved public health internationally by providing a structured framework with which to compare emergency medical services systems. Advances in resuscitation science, new insights into important predictors of outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and

  16. Survival models for out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation from the perspectives of the bystander, the first responder, and the paramedic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalewijn, R. A.; de Vos, R.; Tijssen, J. G.; Koster, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    Survival from out-of-hospital resuscitation depends on the strength of each component of the chain of survival. We studied, on the scene, witnessed, nontraumatic resuscitations of patients older than 17 years. The influence of the chain of survival and potential predictors on survival was analyzed

  17. Cardiac arrest – cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within 10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care (with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care the rate of survival is higher.

  18. resuscitation among Nigerian doctors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Background: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), first described in 1960, is observed to be poorly applied in quality and quantum, hence, the need to ascertain its correct knowledge and practice among Nigerian doctors. Methods: Questionnaires were distributed randomly to doctors in a Nigerian University.

  19. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation or uncontrolled donation after the circulatory determination of death following out-of-hospital refractory cardiac arrest-An ethical analysis of an unresolved clinical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Ave, Anne L; Shaw, David M; Gardiner, Dale

    2016-11-01

    The availability of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (E-CPR), for use in refractory out-of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), is increasing. In parallel, some countries have developed uncontrolled donation after circulatory determination of death (uDCDD) programs using ECMO to preserve organs for transplantation purposes. When facing a refractory OHCA, how does the medical team choose between initiating ECMO as part of an E-CPR protocol or ECMO as part of a uDCDD protocol? To answer these questions we conducted a literature review on E-CPR compared to uDCDD protocols using ECMO and analyzed the raised ethical issues. Our analysis reveals that the inclusion criteria in E-CPR and uDCDD protocols are similar. There may be a non-negligible risk of including patients in a uDCDD protocol, when the patient might have been saved by the use of E-CPR. In order to avoid the fatal error of letting a saveable patient die, safeguards are necessary. We recommend: (1) the development of internationally accepted termination of resuscitation guidelines that would have to be satisfied prior to inclusion of patients in any uDCDD protocol, (2) the choice regarding modalities of ongoing resuscitation during transfer should be focused on the primary priority of attempting to save the life of patients, (3) only centers of excellence in life-saving resuscitation should initiate or maintain uDCDD programs, (4) E-CPR should be clinically considered first before the initiation of any uDCDD protocol, and (5) there should be no discrimination in the availability of access to E-CPR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Self-confidence and level of knowledge after cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in 14 to 18-year-old schoolchildren: A randomised-interventional controlled prospective study in secondary schools in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingen, Sabine; Schroeder, Daniel C; Ecker, Hannes; Steinhauser, Susanne; Altin, Sibel; Stock, Stephanie; Lechleuthner, Alex; Hohn, Andreas; Böttiger, Bernd W

    2018-01-02

    Education of schoolchildren in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a strategic goal for improvement of bystander CPR in society. The primary objective was to analyse the impact of CPR training on the resuscitation knowledge and self-confidence of secondary schoolchildren. In addition, independent predictors of improved CPR knowledge and self-confidence were investigated. Prospective, randomised-interventional controlled study. Four secondary schools in Germany. Four hundred and twenty-four schoolchildren aged from 14 to 18 years were included into the study. Fifty-one percent were female, and 33% had an immigrant background. The intervention group received a 90-min CPR training session, whereas controls had no intervention. Levels of knowledge and self-confidence in initiating CPR were analysed by a study questionnaire before (t0), 90 min after (t1) and 6 months after training (t2). Based on the evaluation of study questionnaires, the primary endpoint was to determine the development of resuscitation knowledge and self-confidence in initiating cardiopulmonary resuscitation at survey time-points t0, t1 and t2. Schoolchildren in the intervention group (n=207) showed a significantly higher level of knowledge (P The long-term benefit in the level of knowledge and self-confidence were significantly higher in native compared with immigrant schoolchildren: (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.14 to 2.82; P = 0.011) and (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.07 to 2.60; P = 0.024), respectively. Guideline compliant (90 min) theoretical and practical CPR training improves the level of knowledge and self-confidence in 14 to 18-year-old schoolchildren. Older schoolchildren are more likely to have increased self-confidence with respect to initiating CPR. Schoolchildren with an immigrant background showed a significantly lower increase in their level of knowledge and self-confidence compared with native children. Adaptation and simplification of teaching materials and further research on

  1. Análise crítica das novas recomendações para reanimação cardiopulmonar The new guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a critical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Zorzela

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever as novas recomendações da American Heart Association (AHA, baseado em evidências científicas organizadas pelo Comitê Internacional de Reanimação, endossado e disseminado por entidades norte-americanas e européias. FONTES DOS DADOS: Os guias para suporte básico e avançado de vida em pediatria publicados nas revistas Circulation em novembro de 2005 foram revisados, bem como as subseqüentes publicações sobre o mesmo tópico usando as palavras-chave cardiac arrest, basic life support, advanced life support, cardiopulmonary resuscitation e pediatric resuscitation, através dos métodos de busca PubMed e MEDLINE. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: As maiores alterações foram na área de suporte básico de vida. O novo guia enfatiza a relação compressão torácica/ventilação para os profissionais da saúde treinados, que passa a ser 15:2 em todas as idades, exceto neonatos. É ressaltada a importância das compressões torácicas fortes e rápidas e a necessidade de se evitar a hiperventilação durante e após a parada cardiorrespiratória. O uso de megadoses de adrenalina foi retirado, bem como outras orientações. CONCLUSÃO: O guia mais recente de reanimação em pediatria da AHA tem como foco principal o atendimento básico pré-hospitalar. Está baseado na melhor evidência científica disponível, porém futuras pesquisas são necessárias para corroborar essas mudanças e trazer novas evidências para os futuros protocolos.OBJECTIVE: To describe the new American Heart Association (AHA guidelines for pediatric life support, based on the scientific evidence evaluated by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and endorsed and disseminated by North American resuscitation councils. SOURCES: The guidelines for basic and advanced life support published in Circulation in November 2005 were reviewed together with subsequent publications on the same topics, identified in PubMed and MEDLINE using the keywords

  2. The study protocol for the LINC (LUCAS in cardiac arrest) study: a study comparing conventional adult out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation with a concept with mechanical chest compressions and simultaneous defibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubertsson, Sten; Silfverstolpe, Johan; Rehn, Liselott; Nyman, Thomas; Lichtveld, Rob; Boomars, Rene; Bruins, Wendy; Ahlstedt, Björn; Puggioli, Helena; Lindgren, Erik; Smekal, David; Skoog, Gunnar; Kastberg, Robert; Lindblad, Anna; Halliwell, David; Box, Martyn; Arnwald, Fredrik; Hardig, Bjarne Madsen; Chamberlain, Douglas; Herlitz, Johan; Karlsten, Rolf

    2013-01-25

    The LUCAS™ device delivers mechanical chest compressions that have been shown in experimental studies to improve perfusion pressures to the brain and heart as well as augmenting cerebral blood flow and end tidal CO2, compared with results from standard manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Two randomised pilot studies in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients have not shown improved outcome when compared with manual CPR. There remains evidence from small case series that the device can be potentially beneficial compared with manual chest compressions in specific situations. This multicentre study is designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of mechanical chest compressions with the LUCAS™ device whilst allowing defibrillation during on-going CPR, and comparing the results with those of conventional resuscitation. This article describes the design and protocol of the LINC-study which is a randomised controlled multicentre study of 2500 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients. The study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00609778?term=LINC&rank=1). Primary endpoint is four-hour survival after successful restoration of spontaneous circulation. The safety aspect is being evaluated by post mortem examinations in 300 patients that may reflect injuries from CPR. This large multicentre study will contribute to the evaluation of mechanical chest compression in CPR and specifically to the efficacy and safety of the LUCAS™ device when used in association with defibrillation during on-going CPR.

  3. Fatores prognósticos de sobrevida pós-reanimação cardiorrespiratória cerebral em hospital geral In-hospital post-cardiopulmonary-cerebral resuscitation survival prognostic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Mansur de Carvalho Guanaes Gomes

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar as características clínicas e demográficas dos pacientes que receberam reanimação cardiorrespiratória e detectar fatores prognósticos de sobrevivência a curto e longo prazo. MÉTODOS: Analisamos, prospectivamente, 452 pacientes que receberam reanimação em hospitais gerais de Salvador. Utilizou-se análise uni, bivariada e estratificada nas associações entre as variáveis e a curva de sobrevida de Kaplan-Meier e a regressão de Cox para análise de nove anos de evolução. RESULTADOS: A idade variou de 14 a 93 anos, media de 54,11 anos; predominou o sexo masculino; metade dos pacientes tinha ao menos uma doença de base, enfermidade cardiovascular foi etiologia responsável em metade dos casos. Parada cardíaca foi testemunhada em 77% dos casos e em apenas 69% dos pacientes foi iniciada imediatamente a reanimação. O ritmo cardíaco inicial não foi diagnosticado em 59% dos pacientes. Assistolia foi o ritmo mais freqüente (42%, seguida de arritmia ventricular (35%. A sobrevida imediata foi de 24% e sobrevida à alta hospitalar de 5%. Foram identificados como fatores prognósticos em curto prazo: etiologia da parada; diagnóstico do ritmo cardíaco inicial; fibrilação ou taquicardia ventricular como mecanismo de parada; tempo estimado préreanimação menor ou igual a 5 minutos e, tempo de reanimação menor ou igual a 15 minutos. Os fatores prognósticos de sobrevivência em nove anos de evolução foram: não ter recebido epinefrina; ser reanimado em hospital privado e tempo de reanimação menor ou igual a 15 minutos. CONCLUSÃO: Os dados observados podem servir de subsídios para os profissionais de saúde decidir quando iniciar ou parar uma reanimação no ambiente hospitalar.OBJECTIVE: To assess clinical and demographic characteristics of patients who had cardiopulmonary resuscitation and identify short- and long-term survival prognostic factors. METHODS: Four hundred and fifty-two (452 resuscitated

  4. [The latest in paediatric resuscitation recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce, Jesús; Rodríguez, Antonio; Carrillo, Angel; de Lucas, Nieves; Calvo, Custodio; Civantos, Eva; Suárez, Eva; Pons, Sara; Manrique, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    Cardiac arrest has a high mortality in children. To improve the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, it is essential to disseminate the international recommendations and the training of health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article summarises the 2015 European Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, which are based on a review of the advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and consensus in the science and treatment by the International Council on Resuscitation. The Spanish Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, developed by the Spanish Group of Paediatric and Neonatal Resuscitation, are an adaptation of the European recommendations, and will be used for training health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article highlights the main changes from the previous 2010 recommendations on prevention of cardiac arrest, the diagnosis of cardiac arrest, basic life support, advanced life support and post-resuscitation care, as well as reviewing the algorithms of treatment of basic life support, obstruction of the airway and advanced life support. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  5. Time to start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the effect of target temperature management at 33°C and 36°C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dankiewicz, Josef; Friberg, Hans; Bělohlávek, Jan; Walden, Andrew; Hassager, Christian; Cronberg, Tobias; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Hovdenes, Jan; Horn, Janneke; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Thomas; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wise, Matthew; Åneman, Anders; Nielsen, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    The optimal temperature during targeted temperature management (TTM) for comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is unknown. It has been hypothesized that patients with long no-flow times, for example those without bystander CPR would have the most to gain from temperature

  6. Part 3: Adult Basic Life Support and Automated External Defibrillation: 2015 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Andrew H; Perkins, Gavin D; Berg, Robert A; Castren, Maaret; Considine, Julie; Escalante, Raffo; Gazmuri, Raul J; Koster, Rudolph W; Lim, Swee Han; Nation, Kevin J; Olasveengen, Theresa M; Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Sayre, Michael R; Sierra, Alfredo; Smyth, Michael A; Stanton, David; Vaillancourt, Christian

    2015-10-20

    This review comprises the most extensive literature search and evidence evaluation to date on the most important international BLS interventions, diagnostics, and prognostic factors for cardiac arrest victims. It reemphasizes that the critical lifesaving steps of BLS are (1) prevention, (2) immediate recognition and activation of the emergency response system, (3) early high-quality CPR, and (4) rapid defibrillation for shockable rhythms. Highlights in prevention indicate the rational and judicious deployment of search-and-rescue operations in drowning victims and the importance of education on opioid-associated emergencies. Other 2015 highlights in recognition and activation include the critical role of dispatcher recognition and dispatch-assisted chest compressions, which has been demonstrated in multiple international jurisdictions with consistent improvements in cardiac arrest survival. Similar to the 2010 ILCOR BLS treatment recommendations, the importance of high quality was reemphasized across all measures of CPR quality: rate, depth, recoil, and minimal chest compression pauses, with a universal understanding that we all should be providing chest compressions to all victims of cardiac arrest. This review continued to focus on the interface of BLS sequencing and ensuring high-quality CPR with other important BLS interventions, such as ventilation and defibrillation. In addition, this consensus statement highlights the importance of EMS systems, which employ bundles of care focusing on providing high-quality chest compressions while extricating the patient from the scene to the next level of care. Highlights in defibrillation indicate the global importance of increasing the number of sites with public-access defibrillation programs. Whereas the 2010 ILCOR Consensus on Science provided important direction for the “what” in resuscitation (ie, what to do), the 2015 consensus has begun with the GRADE methodology to provide direction for the quality of

  7. Decision to resuscitate or not in patients with chronic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saltbæk, Lena; Tvedegaard, Erling

    2012-01-01

    Do-not-resuscitate (DNR) decisions are frequently made without informing the patients. We attempt to determine whether patients and physicians wish to discuss the DNR decision, who they think, should be the final decision maker and whether they agree on the indication for cardiopulmonary resuscit...... resuscitation (CPR) in case of cardiac arrest....

  8. Resuscitation Guideline 2000: What is the level of Awareness and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was officially instituted in 1960. In 1992, the American Heart Association released the first set of resuscitation guidelines. Following a general consensus by experts drawn from various resuscitation councils worldwide, a new set of evidence based guidelines was released in ...

  9. Development of a decision aid for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit employing user-centered design and a wiki platform for rapid prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisance, Ariane; Witteman, Holly O; LeBlanc, Annie; Kryworuchko, Jennifer; Heyland, Daren Keith; Ebell, Mark H; Blair, Louisa; Tapp, Diane; Dupuis, Audrey; Lavoie-Bérard, Carole-Anne; McGinn, Carrie Anna; Légaré, France; Archambault, Patrick Michel

    2018-01-01

    Upon admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), all patients should discuss their goals of care and express their wishes concerning life-sustaining interventions (e.g., cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)). Without such discussions, interventions that prolong life at the cost of decreasing its quality may be used without appropriate guidance from patients. To adapt an existing decision aid about CPR to create a wiki-based decision aid individually adapted to each patient's risk factors; and to document the use of a wiki platform for this purpose. We conducted three weeks of ethnographic observation in our ICU to observe intensivists and patients discussing goals of care and to identify their needs regarding decision making. We interviewed intensivists individually. Then we conducted three rounds of rapid prototyping involving 15 patients and 11 health professionals. We recorded and analyzed all discussions, interviews and comments, and collected sociodemographic data. Using a wiki, a website that allows multiple users to contribute or edit content, we adapted the decision aid accordingly and added the Good Outcome Following Attempted Resuscitation (GO-FAR) prediction rule calculator. We added discussion of invasive mechanical ventilation. The final decision aid comprises values clarification, risks and benefits of CPR and invasive mechanical ventilation, statistics about CPR, and a synthesis section. We added the GO-FAR prediction calculator as an online adjunct to the decision aid. Although three rounds of rapid prototyping simplified the information in the decision aid, 60% (n = 3/5) of the patients involved in the last cycle still did not understand its purpose. Wikis and user-centered design can be used to adapt decision aids to users' needs and local contexts. Our wiki platform allows other centers to adapt our tools, reducing duplication and accelerating scale-up. Physicians need training in shared decision making skills about goals of care and in using the

  10. Tidal Volume Delivery and Endotracheal Tube Leak during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Intubated Newborn Piglets with Hypoxic Cardiac Arrest Exposed to Different Modes of Ventilatory Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendler, Marc R; Weber, Claudia; Hassan, Mohammad A; Huang, Li; Mayer, Benjamin; Hummler, Helmut D

    2017-01-01

    There are few data available on the interaction of inflations, chest compressions (CC), and delivery of tidal volumes in newborn infants undergoing resuscitation in the presence of endotracheal tube (ET) leaks. To determine the effects of different respiratory support strategies along with CC on changes in tidal volume and ET leaks in hypoxic newborn piglets with cardiac arrest. Asphyxiated newborn piglets, intubated with weight-adapted uncuffed ET, were randomized into three groups and resuscitated according to ILCOR 2010 guidelines: (1) T-piece resuscitator (TPR) group = peak inspiratory pressure (PIP)/positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) 25/5 cm H2O, rate 30/min, inflations interposed between CC (3:1 ratio); (2) self- inflating bag (SIB) group = PIP 25 cm H2O without PEEP, rate 30/min, inflations interposed between CC (3:1 ratio), and (3) ventilator group = PIP/PEEP of 25/5 cm H2O, rate 30/min. CC were applied with a rate of 120/min without synchrony to inflations. We observed a significant increase of leak (average increase 11.4%) when CC was added to respiratory support (p = 0.0001). Expired tidal volume was larger in the SIB group than in the two other modes which both applied PEEP. However, tidal volumes caused by CC only were larger in the two groups with PEEP than in the SIB group (without PEEP). There is interaction between lung inflations and CC affecting leak and delivery of tidal volume, which may be influenced by the mode/device used for respiratory support. Leak is larger in the presence of PEEP. However, CC cause additional tidal volume which is larger in the presence of PEEP. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Time to start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the effect of target temperature management at 33°C and 36°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dankiewicz, Josef; Friberg, Hans; Bělohlávek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    interaction between no flow-time and intervention group (p=0.11), which may imply that the non-superior effect of 33°C was consistent for all no-flow times. Bystander CPR was not independently associated with neurological function. CONCLUSIONS: TTM at 33°C compared to 36°C was not associated with an increased......INTRODUCTION: The optimal temperature during targeted temperature management (TTM) for comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is unknown. It has been hypothesized that patients with long no-flow times, for example those without bystander CPR would have the most to gain...

  12. In-hospital resuscitation evaluated by in situ simulation: a prospective simulation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondrup, Frederik; Brabrand, Mikkel; Folkestad, Lars

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: : Interruption in chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation can be characterized as no flow ratio (NFR) and the importance of minimizing these pauses in chest compression has been highlighted recently. Further, documentation of resuscitation performance has been...

  13. Effects of mild hypothermia on the ROS and expression of caspase-3 mRNA and LC3 of hippocampus nerve cells in rats after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian; Shen, Yi; Qian, Hui-Yin; Liu, Li-Jun; Zhou, Bao-Chun; Xiao, Yan; Mao, Jin-Ning; An, Guo-Yin; Rui, Ming-Zhong; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Chang-Lai

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) is a common and serious event in emergency medicine. Despite recent improvements in resuscitation techniques, the survival rate of patients with CA is unchanged. The present study was undertaken to observe the effect of mild hypothermia (MH) on the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the effect of neurological function and related mechanisms. Sixty-five healthy male Sprague Dawley (SD) adult rats were randomly (random number) divided into 2 groups: blank control group (n=5) and CPR group (n=60). CA was induced by asphyxia. The surviving rats were randomly (random number) divided into two groups: normothermia CPR group (NT) and hypothermia CPR group (HT). Normothermia of 37 °C was maintained in the NT group after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), hypothermal intervention of 32 °C was carried out in the HT group for 4 hours immediately after ROSC. Both the NT and HT groups were then randomly divided into 2 subgroups 12 hours and 24 hours after ROSC (NT-12, NT-24, HT-12, HT-24 subgroups). During observation, the neurological deficit scores (NDSs) was recorded, then the bilateral hippocampi were obtained from rats' head, and monoplast suspension of fresh hippocampus tissue was made immediately to determine the level of intracellular ROS by flow cytometry. Transmission electron microscope was used to observe the ultramicro changes of cellular nucleus and mitochondria. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine the expression of caspase-3 mRNA, and western-blotting (WB) was used to determine the level of LC3 in frozen hippocampus tissue. Measured data were analyzed with paired sample t test and One-Way ANOVA. Of 60 rats with CA, 44 (73%) were successfully resuscitated and 33 (55%) survived until the end of the experiment. The NDSs of rats in the NT and HT groups were more significantly reduced than those in the BC group (F=8.107, Pnerve cells in the NT and HT groups significantly increased compared to the BC

  14. [Resuscitation - Basic Life Support in adults and application of automatic external defibrillators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Andreas; Seewald, Stephan; Wnent, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Witnesses of a sudden cardiac arrest play a key-role in resuscitation. Lay-persons should therefore be trained to recognize that a collapsed person who is not breathing at all or breathing normally might suffer from cardiac arrest. Information of professional emergency medical staff by lay-persons and their initiation of cardio-pulmonary-resuscitation-measures are of great importance for cardiac-arrest victims. Ambulance-dispatchers have to support lay-rescuers via telephone. This support includes the localisation of the nearest Automatic External Defibrillator (AED). Presentation of agonal breathing or convulsions due to brain-hypoxia need to be recognized as potential early signs of cardiac arrest. In any case of cardiac arrest chest-compressions need to be started. There is insufficiant data to recommend "chest-compression-only"-CPR as being equally sufficient as cardio-pulmonary-resuscitation including ventilation. Rescuers trained in ventilation should therefore combine compressions and ventilations at a 30:2-ratio. Movement of the chest is being used as a sign of sufficient ventilation. High-quality chest-compressions of at least 5 cm of depth, not exceeding 6 cm, are recommended at a ratio of 100-120 chest conpressions/min. Interruption of chest-compression should be avoided. At busy public places AED should be available to enable lay-rescuers to apply early defibrillation. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Suspended animation for delayed resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safar, Peter J; Tisherman, Samuel A

    2002-04-01

    'Suspended animation for delayed resuscitation' is a new concept for attempting resuscitation from cardiac arrest of patients who currently (totally or temporarily) cannot be resuscitated, such as traumatic exsanguination cardiac arrest. Suspended animation means preservation of the viability of brain and organism during cardiac arrest, until restoration of stable spontaneous circulation or prolonged artificial circulation is possible. Suspended animation for exsanguination cardiac arrest of trauma victims would have to be induced within the critical first 5 min after the start of cardiac arrest no-flow, to buy time for transport and resuscitative surgery (hemostasis) performed during no-flow. Cardiac arrest is then reversed with all-out resuscitation, usually requiring cardiopulmonary bypass. Suspended animation has been explored and documented as effective in dogs in terms of long-term survival without brain damage after very prolonged cardiac arrest. In the 1990s, the Pittsburgh group achieved survival without brain damage in dogs after cardiac arrest of up to 90 min no-flow at brain (tympanic) temperature of 10 degrees C, with functionally and histologically normal brains. These studies used emergency cardiopulmonary bypass with heat exchanger or a single hypothermic saline flush into the aorta, which proved superior to pharmacologic strategies. For the large number of normovolemic sudden cardiac death victims, which currently cannot be resuscitated, more research in large animals is needed.

  16. [Effects of a voice metronome on compression rate and depth in telephone assisted, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation: an investigator-blinded, 3-armed, randomized, simulation trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tulder, Raphael; Roth, Dominik; Krammel, Mario; Laggner, Roberta; Schriefl, Christoph; Kienbacher, Calvin; Lorenzo Hartmann, Alexander; Novosad, Heinz; Constantin Chwojka, Christof; Havel, Christoph; Schreiber, Wolfgang; Herkner, Harald

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect on compression rate and depth of a conventional metronome and a voice metronome in simulated telephone-assisted, protocol-driven bystander Cardiopulmonary resucitation (CPR) compared to standard instruction. Thirty-six lay volunteers performed 10 minutes of compression-only CPR in a prospective, investigator-blinded, 3-arm study on a manikin. Participants were randomized either to standard instruction ("push down firmly, 5 cm"), a regular metronome pacing 110 beats per minute (bpm), or a voice metronome continuously prompting "deep-deepdeep- deeper" at 110 bpm. The primary outcome was deviation from the ideal chest compression target range (50 mm compression depth x 100 compressions per minute x 10 minutes = 50 m). Secondary outcomes were CPR quality measures (compression and leaning depth, rate, no-flow times) and participants' related physiological response (heart rate, blood pressure and nine hole peg test and borg scales score). We used a linear regression model to calculate effects. The mean (SD) deviation from the ideal target range (50 m) was -11 (9) m in the standard group, -20 (11) m in the conventional metronome group (adjusted difference [95%, CI], 9.0 [1.2-17.5 m], P=.03), and -18 (9) m in the voice metronome group (adjusted difference, 7.2 [-0.9-15.3] m, P=.08). Secondary outcomes (CPR quality measures and physiological response of participants to CPR performance) showed no significant differences. Compared to standard instruction, the conventional metronome showed a significant negative effect on the chest compression target range. The voice metronome showed a non-significant negative effect and therefore cannot be recommended for regular use in telephone-assisted CPR.

  17. Practice characteristics of Emergency Department extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) programs in the United States: The current state of the art of Emergency Department extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ED ECMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonna, Joseph E; Johnson, Nicholas J; Greenwood, John; Gaieski, David F; Shinar, Zachary; Bellezo, Joseph M; Becker, Lance; Shah, Atman P; Youngquist, Scott T; Mallin, Michael P; Fair, James Franklin; Gunnerson, Kyle J; Weng, Cindy; McKellar, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    To characterize the current scope and practices of centers performing extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) on the undifferentiated patient with cardiac arrest in the emergency department. We contacted all US centers in January 2016 that had submitted adult eCPR cases to the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) registry and surveyed them, querying for programs that had performed eCPR in the Emergency Department (ED ECMO). Our objective was to characterize the following domains of ED ECMO practice: program characteristics, patient selection, devices and techniques, and personnel. Among 99 centers queried, 70 responded. Among these, 36 centers performed ED ECMO. Nearly 93% of programs are based at academic/teaching hospitals. 65% of programs are less than 5 years old, and 60% of programs perform ≤3 cases per year. Most programs (90%) had inpatient eCPR or salvage ECMO programs prior to starting ED ECMO programs. The majority of programs do not have formal inclusion and exclusion criteria. Most programs preferentially obtain vascular access via the percutaneous route (70%) and many (40%) use mechanical CPR during cannulation. The most commonly used console is the Maquet Rotaflow(®). Cannulation is most often performed by cardiothoracic (CT) surgery, and nearly all programs (>85%) involve CT surgeons, perfusionists, and pharmacists. Over a third of centers that submitted adult eCPR cases to ELSO have performed ED ECMO. These programs are largely based at academic hospitals, new, and have low volumes. They do not have many formal inclusion or exclusion criteria, and devices and techniques are variable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Up-Down Hand Position Switch May Delay the Fatigue of Non-Dominant Hand Position Rescuers and Improve Chest Compression Quality during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Crossover Manikin Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bing; Wang, Huang-Lei; Xiong, Dan; Sheng, Li-Pin; Yang, Qi-Sheng; Jiang, Shan; Xu, Peng; Chen, Zhi-Qiao; Zhao, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown improved external chest compression (ECC) quality and delayed rescuer fatigue when the dominant hand (DH) was in contact with the sternum. However, many rescuers prefer placing the non-dominant hand (NH) in contact with the sternum during ECC. We aimed to investigate the effects of up-down hand position switch on the quality of ECC and the fatigue of rescuers during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). After completion of a review of the standard adult basic life support (BLS) course, every candidate performed 10 cycles of single adult CPR twice on an adult manikin with either a constant hand position (CH) or a switched hand position (SH) in random order at 7-day intervals. The rescuers’ general characteristics, hand positions, physiological signs, fatigue appearance and ECC qualities were recorded. Our results showed no significant differences in chest compression quality for the DH position rescuers between the CH and SH sessions (p>0.05, resp.). And also no significant differences were found for Borg score (p = 0.437) or cycle number (p = 0.127) of fatigue appearance after chest compressions between the two sessions. However, for NH position rescuers, the appearance of fatigue was delayed (p = 0.046), with a lower Borg score in the SH session (12.67 ± 2.03) compared to the CH session (13.33 ± 1.95) (p = 0.011). Moreover, the compression depth was significantly greater in the SH session (39.3 ± 7.2 mm) compared to the CH session (36.3 ± 8.1 mm) (p = 0.015). Our data suggest that the up-down hand position switch during CPR may delay the fatigue of non-dominant hand position rescuers and improve the quality of chest compressions. PMID:26267353

  19. Manual Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Versus CPR Including a Mechanical Chest Compression Device in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Comprehensive Meta-analysis From Randomized and Observational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnes, Judith L; Brouwer, Marc A; Navarese, Eliano P; Verhaert, Dominique V M; Verheugt, Freek W A; Smeets, Joep L R M; de Boer, Menko-Jan

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical chest compression devices have been developed to facilitate continuous delivery of high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Despite promising hemodynamic data, evidence on clinical outcomes remains inconclusive. With the completion of 3 randomized controlled trials, we conduct a meta-analysis on the effect of in-field mechanical versus manual CPR on clinical outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. With a systematic search (PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Libraries), we identified all eligible studies (randomized controlled trials and nonrandomized studies) that compared a CPR strategy including an automated mechanical chest compression device with a strategy of manual CPR only. Outcome variables were survival to hospital admission, survival to discharge, and favorable neurologic outcome. Twenty studies (n=21,363) were analyzed: 5 randomized controlled trials and 15 nonrandomized studies, pooled separately. For survival to admission, the pooled estimate of the randomized controlled trials did not indicate a difference (odds ratio 0.94; 95% confidence interval 0.84 to 1.05; P=.24) between mechanical and manual CPR. In contrast, meta-analysis of nonrandomized studies demonstrated a benefit in favor of mechanical CPR (odds ratio 1.42; 95% confidence interval 1.21 to 1.67; PCPR guidelines (2000 versus 2005) and the CPR strategy (P=.27). Survival to discharge and neurologic outcome did not differ between strategies. Although there are lower-quality, observational data that suggest that mechanical CPR used at the rescuer's discretion could improve survival to hospital admission, the cumulative high-quality randomized evidence does not support a routine strategy of mechanical CPR to improve survival or neurologic outcome. These findings are irrespective of the endorsed CPR guidelines during the study periods. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Resuscitation education: narrowing the gap between evidence-based resuscitation guidelines and performance using best educational practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Elizabeth A; Fiedor-Hamilton, Melinda; Eppich, Walter J

    2008-08-01

    Recent data from in- and out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests reveal that health care teams frequently deviate from American Heart Association guidelines during resuscitation efforts. These discrepancies between the current state of evidence-based resuscitation guidelines and the quality of basic and advanced life support actually delivered represent a missed opportunity and provide a significant target for optimizing patient outcomes through improved educational effectiveness. This article presents discussion of the quality of resuscitation delivered to patients, a brief history of the development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and attempts to translate the science of resuscitation to the bedside through effective educational strategies, a review of educational best practices that relate to resuscitation education, and discussion of the role of medical simulation in resuscitation training.

  1. Time matters--realism in resuscitation training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Kristian; Høyer, Christian; Ostergaard, Doris

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The advanced life support guidelines recommend 2min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and minimal hands-off time to ensure sufficient cardiac and cerebral perfusion. We have observed doctors who shorten the CPR intervals during resuscitation attempts. During simulation......-based resuscitation training, the recommended 2-min CPR cycles are often deliberately decreased in order to increase the number of scenarios. The aim of this study was to test if keeping 2-min CPR cycles during resuscitation training ensures better adherence to time during resuscitation in a simulated setting......s) or shortened CPR cycles (30-45s instead of 120s) in the scenarios. Adherence to time was measured using the European Resuscitation Council's Cardiac Arrest Simulation Test (CASTest) in retention tests conducted one and 12 weeks after the course. RESULTS: The real-time group adhered significantly...

  2. Development of a Decision Aid for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Involving Intensive Care Unit Patients' and Health Professionals' Participation Using User-Centered Design and a Wiki Platform for Rapid Prototyping: A Research Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisance, Ariane; Witteman, Holly O; Heyland, Daren Keith; Ebell, Mark H; Dupuis, Audrey; Lavoie-Bérard, Carole-Anne; Légaré, France; Archambault, Patrick Michel

    2016-02-11

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an intervention used in cases of cardiac arrest to revive patients whose heart has stopped. Because cardiac arrest can have potentially devastating outcomes such as severe neurological deficits even if CPR is performed, patients must be involved in determining in advance if they want CPR in the case of an unexpected arrest. Shared decision making (SDM) facilitates discussions about goals of care regarding CPR in intensive care units (ICUs). Patient decision aids (DAs) are proven to support the implementation of SDM. Many patient DAs about CPR exist, but they are not universally implemented in ICUs in part due to lack of context and cultural adaptation. Adaptation to local context is an important phase of implementing any type of knowledge tool such as patient DAs. User-centered design supported by a wiki platform to perform rapid prototyping has previously been successful in creating knowledge tools adapted to the needs of patients and health professionals (eg, asthma action plans). This project aims to explore how user-centered design and a wiki platform can support the adaptation of an existing DA for CPR to the local context. The primary objective is to use an existing DA about CPR to create a wiki-based DA that is adapted to the context of a single ICU and tailorable to individual patient's risk factors while employing user-centered design. The secondary objective is to document the use of a wiki platform for the adaptation of patient DAs. This study will be conducted in a mixed surgical and medical ICU at Hôtel-Dieu de Lévis, Quebec, Canada. We plan to involve all 5 intensivists and recruit at least 20 alert and oriented patients admitted to the ICU and their family members if available. In the first phase of this study, we will observe 3 weeks of daily interactions between patients, families, intensivists, and other allied health professionals. We will specifically observe 5 dyads of attending intensivists and alert

  3. Effect of an interactive cardiopulmonary resuscitation assist device with an automated external defibrillator synchronised with a ventilator on the CPR performance of emergency medical service staff: a randomised simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzschke, Rainer; Doehn, Christoph; Kersten, Jan F; Blanz, Julian; Kalwa, Tobias J; Scotti, Norman A; Kubitz, Jens C

    2017-04-04

    The present study evaluates whether the quality of advanced cardiac life support (ALS) is improved with an interactive prototype assist device. This device consists of an automated external defibrillator linked to a ventilator and provides synchronised visual and acoustic instructions for guidance through the ALS algorithm and assistance for face-mask ventilations. We compared the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality of emergency medical system (EMS) staff members using the study device or standard equipment in a mannequin simulation study with a prospective, controlled, randomised cross-over study design. Main outcome was the effect of the study device compared to the standard equipment and the effect of the number of prior ALS trainings of the EMS staff on the CPR quality. Data were analysed using analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) and binary logistic regression, accounting for the study design. In 106 simulations of 56 two-person rescuer teams, the mean hands-off time was 24.5% with study equipment and 23.5% with standard equipment (Difference 1.0% (95% CI: -0.4 to 2.5%); p = 0.156). With both types of equipment, the hands-off time decreased with an increasing cumulative number of previous CPR trainings (p = 0.042). The study equipment reduced the mean time until administration of adrenaline (epinephrine) by 23 s (p = 0.003) and that of amiodarone by 17 s (p = 0.016). It also increased the mean number of changes in the person doing chest compressions (0.6 per simulation; p CPR.com compared to the standard equipment (p = 0.004). With an increasing number of prior CPR trainings, the time intervals in the ALS algorithm until the defibrillations decreased with standard equipment but increased with the study device. EMS staff with limited training in CPR profit from guidance through the ALS algorithm by the study device. However, the study device somehow reduced the ALS quality of well-trained rescuers and thus can only be recommended for

  4. Chest Compression Fraction between Mechanical Compressions on a Reducible Stretcher and Manual Compressions on a Standard Stretcher during Transport in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests: The Ambulance Stretcher Innovation of Asian Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (ASIA-CPR) Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Han; Shin, Sang Do; Song, Kyoung Jun; Hong, Ki Jeong; Ro, Young Sun; Song, Sung Wook; Kim, Chu Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with the use of mechanical devices is recommended during ambulance transport. However, the CPR quality en route and while in transfer to the emergency department (ED) for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) remains uncertain. We developed a mechanical CPR device outfitted on a reducible stretcher (M-CPR) and compared with standard manual CPR on a standard stretcher (S-CPR) to evaluate CPR quality. Adult OHCAs transported by five ambulances in a metropolitan area with a population of 3.5 million (many of whom lived in high-rise buildings) from September to October (before-phase) and November to December (after-phase) in 2015 were collected. The reducible stretcher was developed for use in a small elevator during the transfer from scene to ambulance, and the AutoPulse® (ZOLL Medical, Chelmsford, MA, USA) was used for M-CPR. Chest compression fraction (CCF) was measured by transthoracic impedance data using an X-series® cardiac monitor (ZOLL Medical) during time from attachment to patient to arrival to the ED. A comparison of CCF using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test evaluated the difference between the before- and after-phases. Of the eligible 49 OHCAs, 31 (21 in the before-phase and 10 in the after-phase) were analyzed, excluding patients for whom CCF was not measured, for whom M-CPR was not used, who had a return of spontaneous circulation in the field before transport, or who collapsed during transport. There were no differences in demographic data. Median total CCF (median, q1-q3) was significantly higher in the after-phase M-CPR group (85.2, 83.4-86.3) than in the before-phase S-CPR group (80.1, 68.0-85.2) (p = 0.03). Mechanical CPR on the reducible stretcher during the transport of OHCAs to the ED showed a much higher chest compression fraction than standard manual CPR.

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Family-witnessed resuscitation in emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients in their 2000 and 2005 Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary. Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiac Care.12 The AHA encourages family presence at the resuscitation, and recommends this in all AHA adult and paediatric life support courses. Methods. We studied the attitudes of emergency doctors working in Gauteng.

  6. Impact of Training Frequency on Nurses' Pediatric Resuscitation Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurzynski, Susan M; Gottfried, Julie Albright; Pietraszewski, Julie; Zalewski, Melinda

    The ideal time frame for frequency of resuscitation skills training has yet to be determined. Results obtained from this performance improvement project using hands-on practice sessions suggest that 6 months may be an adequate time frame for retention of resuscitation skills. Professional development educators may want to consider 6-month retraining intervals for low-volume/high-risk skills such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation to optimize nurses' proficiency in these life-saving competencies.

  7. Drugs in resuscitation: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S W

    2011-08-01

    Drug therapy is recommended after effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation in cardiac arrest. Some drugs appear to have short-term benefits, such as improved survival to hospital, e.g. vasopressor and antiarrhythmics. Hence, they have been included in the cardiac life support algorithm. However, to date, no drug (or combination of drugs) has been shown to improve long-term survival in randomised trials. Hopefully, improvements in post-arrest intensive unit care can translate improved survival in hospitals into better long-term outcomes. This review is an update on drugs during resuscitation, including the choice of agents, dosing, sequence and route. Specific drugs may have benefits in correcting identified causes of collapse. Drug usage during resuscitation is an evolving science, with the use of medications improving as results of clinical studies become available.

  8. Old age and poor prognosis increase the likelihood of disagreement between cancer patients and their oncologists on the indication for resuscitation attempt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saltbaek, Lena; Michelsen, Hanne M; Nelausen, Knud M

    2013-01-01

    The do-not-resuscitate decision is a common ethical problem. However, the concordance between patients' preferences and physicians' assessments of the indication for cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempt (CPR) has only been modestly investigated.......The do-not-resuscitate decision is a common ethical problem. However, the concordance between patients' preferences and physicians' assessments of the indication for cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempt (CPR) has only been modestly investigated....

  9. Kinetics of carbon dioxide during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiklund, L; Söderberg, D; Henneberg, S

    1986-01-01

    CO2 kinetics during CPR was investigated in 15 anesthetized piglets. BP, blood gases, and acid-base balance were monitored through catheters in the carotid artery and a central vein, as well as in cerebrospinal fluid. Cardiac arrest was induced by a transthoracic direct current shock. CPR was begun...... immediately by artificial ventilation and simultaneous external chest compressions. Epinephrine was administered after 8 min of CPR. One group (n = 5) of animals received no buffer treatment while another (n = 5) received an infusion of 75 mmol sodium bicarbonate and a third group (n = 5) received...... an equivalent amount of tris-buffer mixture. The results of these experiments, as well as previously described circulatory variables during CPR, were analyzed using a computer model describing the CO2 kinetics of the pig. Our main finding was that PaCO2 was positively correlated to cardiac output during CPR...

  10. Kinetics of carbon dioxide during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiklund, L; Söderberg, D; Henneberg, S

    1986-01-01

    an equivalent amount of tris-buffer mixture. The results of these experiments, as well as previously described circulatory variables during CPR, were analyzed using a computer model describing the CO2 kinetics of the pig. Our main finding was that PaCO2 was positively correlated to cardiac output during CPR...

  11. Gastric rupture following cardiopulmonary resuscitation: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Lucas Teixeira; Mendes, Lucas Cronemberger Maia; Mello, Patrícia Machado Veiga de Carvalho; Santos, Lina Gomes; Vasconcelos, Jayro Tadeu Paiva de

    2006-01-01

    JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A ruptura gástrica é uma rara complicação das manobras de reanimação cardiopulmonar (RCP), com incidência de 0,1% dos casos. O desconhecimento dessa possível complicação durante essas manobras impede sua identificação e reduz a probabilidade de sobrevivência do paciente. O objetivo deste trabalho foi abordar um caso de abdômen agudo por ruptura gástrica após manobra de RCP, prontamente diagnosticada e tratada. RELATO DO CASO: Paciente do sexo feminino, de 76 anos, i...

  12. Knowledge and Practice of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the knowledge and practice of the 2000 CPR guidelines of doctors and nurses in Benin City, Nigeria was evaluated. This cross sectional study was conducted in six health facilities in Benin City. A structured self administered questionnaire was used to test the knowledge and practice of CPR of 145 doctors and ...

  13. Kinetics of carbon dioxide during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiklund, L; Söderberg, D; Henneberg, S

    1986-01-01

    CO2 kinetics during CPR was investigated in 15 anesthetized piglets. BP, blood gases, and acid-base balance were monitored through catheters in the carotid artery and a central vein, as well as in cerebrospinal fluid. Cardiac arrest was induced by a transthoracic direct current shock. CPR was begun...

  14. Cardiac arrest: resuscitation and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Kaustubha D; Halperin, Henry R; Becker, Lance B

    2015-06-05

    The modern treatment of cardiac arrest is an increasingly complex medical procedure with a rapidly changing array of therapeutic approaches designed to restore life to victims of sudden death. The 2 primary goals of providing artificial circulation and defibrillation to halt ventricular fibrillation remain of paramount importance for saving lives. They have undergone significant improvements in technology and dissemination into the community subsequent to their establishment 60 years ago. The evolution of artificial circulation includes efforts to optimize manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation, external mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation devices designed to augment circulation, and may soon advance further into the rapid deployment of specially designed internal emergency cardiopulmonary bypass devices. The development of defibrillation technologies has progressed from bulky internal defibrillators paddles applied directly to the heart, to manually controlled external defibrillators, to automatic external defibrillators that can now be obtained over-the-counter for widespread use in the community or home. But the modern treatment of cardiac arrest now involves more than merely providing circulation and defibrillation. As suggested by a 3-phase model of treatment, newer approaches targeting patients who have had a more prolonged cardiac arrest include treatment of the metabolic phase of cardiac arrest with therapeutic hypothermia, agents to treat or prevent reperfusion injury, new strategies specifically focused on pulseless electric activity, which is the presenting rhythm in at least one third of cardiac arrests, and aggressive post resuscitation care. There are discoveries at the cellular and molecular level about ischemia and reperfusion pathobiology that may be translated into future new therapies. On the near horizon is the combination of advanced cardiopulmonary bypass plus a cocktail of multiple agents targeted at restoration of normal metabolism and

  15. History of neonatal resuscitation. Tales of heroism and desperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, T N

    1999-09-01

    Although the history of neonatal resuscitation is as old as medicine itself, today's standards of practice evolved over the past 40 years. Most ancient physicians and midwives did know that stimulation and expansion of lungs was needed to revive the "apparently dead" newborn, but the means of providing these 'therapies' varied from brutal shaking, hitting, swinging, electrocuting, hanging upside-down to applying gentle pressures or squeezing of the chest. It would take centuries of development in physiological concepts and technology for the evolution of a rational approach in resuscitating the newborn infant. Even after great advances in medical science in the 19th century, cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques remained primitive until the mid-1950s. In this article the author has traced some elements of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques and developed an outline of the history of neonatal resuscitation.

  16. [Advanced resuscitation of adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, F.K.; Lauritsen, T.L.; Torp-Pedersen, C.

    2008-01-01

    International and European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines for Resuscitation 2005 implicate major changes in resuscitation, including new universal treatment algorithms. This brief summary of Guidelines 2005 for advanced resuscitation of adult cardiac arrest victims is based upon the ERC...

  17. Debriefing after resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Keith; Perkins, Gavin D

    2013-06-01

    Evidence of suboptimal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) delivery in practice has driven interest in strategies to improve CPR quality. Early data suggest that debriefing may be an effective strategy. In this review, we analyse types of debriefing and the evidence to support their usage. There is a general lack of standardization in terminology and methods used for debriefing that limits evaluation. Debriefing interventions generally take two different formats. Hot debriefing is one where individuals or teams are provided with debriefing immediately after the event. Although perhaps the most widely used and easiest to implement, research evidence for its effectiveness is scant. Cold debriefing, where individuals or teams are provided with feedback sometime after the event, is associated with improvements in process and patient outcomes. Such feedback usually involves the use of objective performance data, such as defibrillator downloads or videotape records. Before and after cohort studies have found that both verbal debriefing in groups and individual written feedback seem to be associated with an improvement in performance. Debriefing is a useful strategy to improve resuscitation performance, but the optimal delivery method remains unclear. Future high-quality research is required to identify the most effective form of debriefing.

  18. The effect on quality of chest compressions and exhaustion of a compression--ventilation ratio of 30:2 versus 15:2 during cardiopulmonary resuscitation--a randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deschilder, Koen; de Vos, Rien; Stockman, Willem

    2007-01-01

    Recent cardio pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines changed the compression:ventilation ratio in 30:2. To compare the quality of chest compressions and exhaustion using the ratio 30:2 versus 15:2. A prospective, randomised crossover design was used. Subjects were recruited from the H.-Hart

  19. Increased susceptibility to cardiovascular effects of dihydrocapcaicin in resuscitated rats. Cardiovascular effects of dihydrocapsaicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Keld; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Jayatissa, Magdalena Niepsuj

    2010-01-01

    Survivors of a cardiac arrest often have persistent cardiovascular derangements following cardiopulmonary resuscitation including decreased cardiac output, arrhythmias and morphological myocardial damage. These cardiovascular derangements may lead to an increased susceptibility towards the extern...... and internal environment of the cardiovascular system as compared to the healthy situation.......Survivors of a cardiac arrest often have persistent cardiovascular derangements following cardiopulmonary resuscitation including decreased cardiac output, arrhythmias and morphological myocardial damage. These cardiovascular derangements may lead to an increased susceptibility towards the external...

  20. Family Presence During Resuscitation: A Double-Edged Sword.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassankhani, Hadi; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Rahmani, Azad; Haririan, Hamidreza; Porter, Joanne E

    2017-03-01

    To illuminate the meaning of the lived experiences of resuscitation team members with the presence of the patient's family during resuscitation in the cultural context of Iran. An interpretative phenomenology was used to discover the lived experiences of the nurses and physicians of Tabriz hospitals, Iran, with family presence during resuscitation (FPDR). A total of 12 nurses and 9 physicians were interviewed over a 6-month period. The interviews were audio recorded and semistructured, and were transcribed verbatim. Van Manen's technique was used for data analysis. Two major themes and 10 subthemes emerged, including destructive presence (cessation of resuscitation, interference in resuscitation, disruption to the resuscitation team's focus, argument with the resuscitation team, and adverse mental image in the family) and supportive presence (trust in the resuscitation team, collaboration with the resuscitation team, alleviating the family's concern and settling their nerves, increasing the family's satisfaction, and reducing conflict with resuscitation team members). Participants stated that FPDR may work as a double-edged sword for the family and resuscitation team, hurting or preserving quality. It is thus recommended that guidelines be created to protect patients' and families' rights, while considering the positive aspects of the phenomenon for hospitals. A liaison support person would act to decrease family anxiety levels and would be able to de-escalate any potentially aggressive or confrontational events during resuscitation. Well-trained and expert cardiopulmonary resuscitation team members do not have any stress in the presence of family during resuscitation. Resuscitation events tend to be prolonged when family members are allowed to be present. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  1. [Which drugs are useful during resuscitation? Which are not?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkamp, Wilhelm

    2016-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation represents a therapeutic challenge. Evidence-based guidelines, which were updated in 2015, give detailed advice on how to treat the patient. Basic life support consists of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (30 chest compressions interrupted briefly to provide to 2 ventilations) and, if ventricular tachyarrhythmia is present, urgent cardiac defibrillation. Administration of drugs is one of the aspects of advanced life support. Vasopressors (adrenaline, vasopressin) aim to optimize coronary and cerebral perfusion. Antiarrhythmic drugs (amiodarone or lidocaine, when amiodarone is not available) are given during cardiac arrest to treat specific cardiac arrhythmias, mainly ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia. However, even in current guidelines, there is growing ambivalence towards drug treatment in the setting of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. This is mainly due to a paucity of robust clinical data. Most of the studies that have addressed the efficacy and safety of drugs during resuscitation are observational studies; however, a few small randomized controlled studies also exist. Recently, two large randomized controlled studies addressing the efficacy and safety of adrenaline versus placebo and amiodarone or lidocaine versus placebo have started. Both are currently recruiting patients. The hope is that the results of these studies will help to better define the role of drugs administered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  2. Defibrillator charging before rhythm analysis significantly reduces hands-off time during resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L. K.; Folkestad, L.; Brabrand, M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our objective was to reduce hands-off time during cardiopulmonary resuscitation as increased hands-off time leads to higher mortality. METHODS: The European Resuscitation Council (ERC) 2005 and ERC 2010 guidelines were compared with an alternative sequence (ALT). Pulseless ventricular...

  3. Definitive studies on pole-top resuscitation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, A.S.; Ridolpho, P.F.; Cole, J.E.

    1983-02-01

    This report summarizes the history of the application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation to the electric shock victim located at the top of a utility pole. This dramatic and urgent situation requires that rescue be attempted with procedures which are thoroughly understood and effective. Questions related to the use of resuscitation and precordial thump at the pole top were subjected to experimental testing, both in animals and in humans. Results of this study clearly demonstrate the advantages of postponing resuscitation until the victim has been lowered to the ground. The author concludes with seven recommendations for emergency treatment at the scene.

  4. Ethics and medico legal aspects of "Not for Resuscitation"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Sulakshan Salins

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Not for resuscitation in India still remains an abstract concept with no clear guidelines or legal frame work. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a complex medical intervention which is often used inappropriately in hospitalized patients and usually guided by medical decision making rather than patient-directed choices. Patient autonomy still remains a weak concept and relatives are expected to make this big decision in a short time and at a time of great emotional distress. This article outlines concepts around ethics and medico legal aspects of not for resuscitation, especially in Indian setting.

  5. The amplitude spectrum area correctly predicts improved resuscitation and facilitated defibrillation with head cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Min-Shan; Barbut, Denise; Guan, Jun; Bisera, Joe; Inderbitzen, Becky; Weil, Max Harry; Tang, Wanchun

    2008-11-01

    When systemic hypothermia was maintained before inducing cardiac arrest, the likelihood of successful defibrillation and meaningful survival was increased. When hypothermia is induced during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mortality is also improved. With the introduction of the amplitude spectrum area as a predictor of the success of electrical defibrillation, we investigated the effect of preferential head cooling initiated coincident with cardiopulmonary resuscitation on amplitude spectrum area as a predictor. We hypothesized that rapid head cooling initiated coincident with cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves amplitude spectrum area, and therefore is predictive of successful defibrillation. Prospective randomized controlled study. University-affiliated research institute. Domestic pigs. Sixteen pigs, weighing 40.6 +/- 1.4 kg, were randomized to the hypothermia (n = 8), or control (n = 8) group. Ventricular fibrillation was induced and untreated for 10 mins. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was then initiated for 5 mins followed by attempted defibrillation with a biphasic 150-J electric shock. Coincident with starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation, hypothermia was induced with evaporative intranasal cooling using a perfluorochemical. If spontaneous circulation was not restored after defibrillation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation was resumed for 1 min before the next defibrillation attempt until the animal was either successfully resuscitated or for a total of 15 mins. The target core temperature was 34 degrees C. Control animals were identically treated except for hypothermia. Five seconds of ventricular fibrillation waveform were recorded immediately preceding delivery of a shock. The ventricular fibrillation waveforms were analyzed using the amplitude spectrum area algorithm. A smaller epinephrine dose (60 +/- 32.1 vs. 30 +/- 0 mg/mL, p = .01) and shorter cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration (365 +/- 42 sec vs. 600 +/- 243 sec, p = .01) were required to

  6. Recommendations in dispatcher-assisted bystander resuscitation from emergency call center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García del Águila, J; López-Messa, J; Rosell-Ortiz, F; de Elías Hernández, R; Martínez del Valle, M; Sánchez-Santos, L; López-Herce, J; Cerdà-Vila, M; Roza-Alonso, C L; Bernardez-Otero, M

    2015-01-01

    Dispatch-assisted bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has been shown as an effective measure to improve the survival of this process. The development of a unified protocol for all dispatch centers of the different emergency medical services can be a first step towards this goal in our environment. The process of developing a recommendations document and the realization of posters of dispatch-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, agreed by different actors and promoted by the Spanish Resuscitation Council, is presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  7. Retention of knowledge of and skills in cardiopulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies indicate that early and effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves the chances of survival in cardiac arrest victims; however, the knowledge and skills of HCPs in basic life support vary. International recommendations on the BLS course were that HCPs repeat the course every two years. However, no studies ...

  8. Doctors' attitudes regarding not for resuscitation orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritharan, Gaya; Mills, Amber C; Levinson, Michele R; Gellie, Anthea L

    2017-12-01

    Objectives The aims of the present study were to investigate doctors' attitudes regarding the discussion and writing of not for resuscitation (NFR) orders and to identify potential barriers to the completion of these orders. Methods A questionnaire-based convenience study was undertaken at a tertiary hospital. Likert scales and open-ended questions were directed to issues surrounding the discussion, timing, understanding and writing of NFR orders, including legal and personal considerations. Results Doctors thought the presence of an NFR order both should and does alter care delivered by nursing staff, particularly delivery of pain relief, nursing observations and contacting the medical emergency team. Eighty-five per cent of doctors believed they needed somebody else's consent to write an NFR order (seeking of consent is not a requirement in most Australian jurisdictions). Conclusion There are complex barriers to the writing and implementation of NFR orders, including doctors' knowledge around the need for consent when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is likely to be futile or excessively burdensome. Doctors also believed that NFR orders result in changes to goals-of-care, suggesting a confounding of NFR orders with palliative care. Furthermore, doctors are willing to write NFR orders where there is clear medical indication and the patient is imminently dying, but are otherwise reliant on patients and family to initiate discussion. What is known about the topic? Hospitalised elderly patients, in the absence of an NFR order, are known to have poor survival and outcomes following resuscitation. Further, Australian data on the prevalence of NFR forms show that only a minority of older in-patients have a written NFR order in their history. In Australian hospitals, NFR orders are completed by doctors. What does this paper add? To our knowledge, the present study is the first in Australia to qualitatively analyse doctors' reasons to writing NFR orders. The open-text nature

  9. Cardiopulmonary bypass and hemostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsman, Leon

    1992-01-01

    In chapter 1, we recalled that intracardiac defects can only be corrected when cardiopulmonary circulation is maintained by extracorporeal criculation and ventilation. To prevent clot formation in this artificial circuit, the socalled cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), we completely depend on the

  10. Miniature oxygen resuscitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G.; Teegen, J. T.; Waddell, H.

    1969-01-01

    Miniature, portable resuscitation system is used during evacuation of patients to medical facilities. A carrying case contains a modified resuscitator head, cylinder of oxygen, two-stage oxygen regulator, low pressure tube, and a mask for mouth and nose.

  11. Temperature Management After Cardiac Arrest: An Advisory Statement by the Advanced Life Support Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnino, Michael W; Andersen, Lars W; Berg, Katherine M; Reynolds, Joshua C; Nolan, Jerry P; Morley, Peter T; Lang, Eddy; Cocchi, Michael N; Xanthos, Theodoros; Callaway, Clifton W; Soar, Jasmeet

    2016-01-01

    For more than a decade, mild induced hypothermia (32 °C-34 °C) has been standard of care for patients remaining comatose after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm, and this has been extrapolated to survivors of cardiac arrest with initially nonshockable rhythms and to patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest. Two randomized trials published in 2002 reported a survival and neurological benefit with mild induced hypothermia. One recent randomized trial reported similar outcomes in patients treated with targeted temperature management at either 33 °C or 36 °C. In response to these new data, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation Advanced Life Support Task Force performed a systematic review to evaluate 3 key questions: (1) Should mild induced hypothermia (or some form of targeted temperature management) be used in comatose post-cardiac arrest patients? (2) If used, what is the ideal timing of the intervention? (3) If used, what is the ideal duration of the intervention? The task force used Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology to assess and summarize the evidence and to provide a consensus on science statement and treatment recommendations. The task force recommends targeted temperature management for adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm at a constant temperature between 32 °C and 36 °C for at least 24 hours. Similar suggestions are made for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with a nonshockable rhythm and in-hospital cardiac arrest. The task force recommends against prehospital cooling with rapid infusion of large volumes of cold intravenous fluid. Additional and specific recommendations are provided in the document. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Trauma resuscitation time.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olden, G.D.J. van; Vugt, A.B. van; Biert, J.; Goris, R.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Documenting the timing and organisation of trauma resuscitation can be utilised to assess performance standards, and to ensure a high quality of trauma resuscitation procedures. Since there is no European literature available on trauma resuscitation time (TRT) in the emergency room, the aim of this

  13. An “Intention-Focused” paradigm for improving bystander CPR performance□

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Ashish R.; Fishman, Jessica; Camp-Rogers, Teresa; Starodub, Roksolana; Merchant, Raina M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite public education campaigns and a chest compression-only initiative, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is provided in approximately 30–40% of out of hospital cardiac arrests in the United States. Bystander CPR rates may not improve without addressing factors influencing bystanders’ probability of performing CPR. We propose an “intention-focused” model for the bystander CPR performance utilizing validated behavioral theory. This model describes a framework that may predict CPR performance, with intention as the key determinant of this behavior. This model may provide specific targets for strengthening the intention to perform CPR, which could lead to increased bystander rates. PMID:25534077

  14. Protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in prolonged resuscitation: A case report and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Mohseni, Masood; Ziaeifard, Mohsen; Abbasi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The severity of ischemia/reperfusion injury determines the neurologic outcome after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. CASE REPORT We present a case of prolonged open-chest resuscitation who survived without neurologic sequel. Multiple applied strategies to limit the deleterious effects of ischemia and reperfusion injury, that is, infusion of magnesium sulfate and mannitol, protective lung ventilation and optimal postoperative pain control prevented the end organ damage in t...

  15. Survey of "do not resuscitate" orders in a district general hospital.

    OpenAIRE

    Aarons, E J; Beeching, N J

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the local use of written "Do not resuscitate" orders to designate inpatients unsuitable for cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the event of cardiac arrest. DESIGN--Point prevalence questionnaire survey of inpatients' medical and nursing records. SETTING--10 acute medical and six acute surgical wards of a district general hospital. PARTICIPANTS--Questionnaires were filled in anonymously by nurses and doctors working on the wards surveyed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Responses t...

  16. Decisions not to resuscitate in a Swedish university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, H; Adolfsson, A; Lundberg, D

    1997-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has the potential to save many lives. Used indiscriminately though, it may be harmful and not in the best interest of the patient. An advance directive to refrain from resuscitation in selected patients is probably not uncommon in Sweden, but guidelines ruling this are still generally lacking. This study was performed to evaluate the use and documentation of do-not-resuscitate orders in a Swedish university hospital. Adult inpatients at 7 medical, 3 surgical and 2 neurological wards, a total of 220, were investigated on one specific day by interviewing the physicians and nurses responsible for their care. We found a discrepancy in doctors' and nurses' perception concerning the appropriateness of CPR in selected patients. CPR was judged by doctors to be inappropriate for 45 patients (20%). Out of these 45 patients, only 24 had a written do-not-resuscitate order in their medical record, in most cases noted as a code word or sign only. Rarely were the patient or his/her relatives involved in the decision-making process. We conclude that a decision to refrain from resuscitation is often not made, even when considered medically and ethically justifiable. Also, the use of coded information as a sole indicator for a patient not to be resuscitated is still common practice. The patient or his/her relatives are rarely involved in this decision.

  17. The AED in resuscitation: it's not just about the shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    The automated external defibrillator (AED), in combination with effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), is a critical part of the American Heart Association's "Chain of survival." Newer guidelines have simplified resuscitation and emphasized the importance of CPR in providing rapid and deep compressions with minimal interruptions; in fact, CPR should resume immediately after the shock given by the AED, without the delay entailed in checking for pulse or rhythm conversion. Our experience with the AED aboard aircraft, showing 40% long-term survival with the AED in ventricular fibrillation, demonstrated the safety and efficacy of the device. Despite this and other reports of successful AED deployment, AEDs are not yet available at all public locations. Prospective research, as undertaken by the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, will be the key to future refinements of the guidelines and enhanced survival with use of the AED in sudden cardiac arrest.

  18. Role of the family support person during resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottle, Elita-Mae; James, Jayne Elizabeth

    This article discusses family witnessed resuscitation and describes the need for a healthcare professional to be available to support the family before and during this experience. Careful explanation and emotional support are required during the event and if cardiopulmonary resuscitation is unsuccessful, further explanation and support will be required. A family support person is usually a nurse but could also be a hospital chaplain or social worker. The chaplain's background and ability to interpret medical information, combined with the emotional and spiritual support he or she can offer, make the chaplain suitable for this role. However, for some patients and families a chaplain's involvement might not be appropriate. The authors suggest that further research and evidence-based guidance should be developed to maximise the benefits of a family support person's presence during witnessed resuscitation.

  19. Emergency Medical Technicians Are Often Consulted on Termination of Resuscitation, and Will Terminate Resuscitation Based on Controversial Single Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind-Klausen, Troels; Glerup Lauridsen, Kasper; Bødtker, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Many out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attempts have to be terminated. Previous studies have investigated knowledge on abandoning resuscitation among physicians. In the prehospital setting emergency medical technicians (EMTs) may be involved in the decision...... on abandoning CPR but this is sparsely investigated. Aim: To investigate if EMTs are involved in termination of CPR, their self-assessed competence and knowledge of guidelines on termination of CPR according to European Resuscitation Council guidelines 2015. In addition, to evaluate single factors...... that according to an EMT should lead to termination of CPR. Methods: This was a pilot-study including EMTs from a Danish Emergency Medical Service. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire. All responses were collected anonymously. Results: In total, 50 EMTs (male: 88%, median age: 38, response rate...

  20. An unsuccessful resuscitation:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    resuscitation and the cause of death. They were not too concerned with possible mistakes made during the resuscitation, as long as they had the details. The doctors experienced many difficulties in breaking the bad news, due to the low level of education of the families, emotional and unpredictable responses, not being.

  1. Do resuscitation-related injuries kill infants and children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matshes, Evan W; Lew, Emma O

    2010-06-01

    Occasionally, individuals accused of inflicting fatal injuries on infants and young children will claim some variant of the "CPR defense," that is, they attribute the cause of injuries found at autopsy to their "untrained" resuscitative efforts. A 10-year (1994-2003) historical fixed cohort study of all pediatric forensic autopsies at the Miami-Dade County Medical Examiner Department was undertaken. To be eligible for inclusion in the study, children had to have died of atraumatic causes, with or without resuscitative efforts (N(atraumatic) = 546). Of these, 382 had a history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR; average age of 4.17 years); 248 had CPR provided by trained individuals only; 133 had CPR provided by both trained and untrained individuals; 1 had CPR provided by untrained individuals only. There was no overlap between these 3 distinct groups. Twenty-two findings potentially attributable to CPR were identified in 19:15 cases of orofacial injuries compatible with attempted endotracheal intubation; 4 cases with focal pulmonary parenchymal hemorrhage; 1 case with prominent anterior mediastinal emphysema; and 2 cases with anterior chest abrasions. There were no significant hollow or solid thoracoabdominal organ injuries. There were no rib fractures. The estimated relative risk of injury subsequent to resuscitation was not statistically different between the subset of decedents whose resuscitative attempts were made by trained individuals only, and the subset who received CPR from both trained and untrained individuals. In the single case of CPR application by an untrained individual only, no injuries resulted. The remaining 164 children dying from nontraumatic causes and who did not undergo resuscitative efforts served as a control group; no injuries were identified. This study indicates that in the pediatric population, injuries secondary to resuscitative efforts are infrequent or rare, pathophysiologically inconsequential, and predominantly orofacial in

  2. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation challenges in selected Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The participating hospitals should address the following challenges that might affect CPR outcomes: shortages of staff, overpopulation of hospital units, shortcomings of the emergency trolleys and CPR equipment, absence of CPR policies and guidelines, absence of CPR teams, limited CPR competencies of doctors and ...

  3. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation challenges in selected Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-05-07

    May 7, 2013 ... attempt of artificial breathing, supplying oxygen to the lungs, and external chest compressions to re-establish cardiac function, ... unknown number of adults and children encountering other medical, accident and/or ..... by stress and anxiety when they are confronted with the realities of grief, dying, death and ...

  4. MODERN RECOMMENDATIONS ON BASIC CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION FOR CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.F. Tepaev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The major causes of death in children and adolescents in Russia are the external reasons, such as traumas, poisonings, drowning and transport incidents. Many injuries are preventable. Popularization of up to date methods of basic life support is one of methods of declining of a mortality of victims of out-of-hospital arrest. This article highlights the American Heart Association Guidelines for Pediatric Basic Life Support. Key words: basic life support, children, adolescents. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(4:24-29

  5. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Prone Position: A Simplified Method for Outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng Wei

    2006-05-01

    Conclusion: Our study revealed that prone CPR provides good respiratory and circulatory support at the same time. It is easy to perform and it may be a good alternative way for bystanders to perform CPR in public surroundings. We recommend that more investigators do further studies on this topic.

  6. Evidence for Time-dependent Maximum Increase ofFree Radical Damage and Eicosanoid Formation in theBrain as Related to Duration of Cardiac Arrest andCardio-pulmonary Resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, Samar; Liu, Xiaoli; Nozari, Ala; Rubertsson, Sten; Miclescu, Adriana; Wiklund, Lars

    2003-01-01

    Recovery of neurological function in patients following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a complex event. Free radical induced oxidative stress is supposed to be involved in this process. We studied levels of 8-iso-PGF2alpha (indicating oxidative injury) and 15-keto-dihydro-PGF2alpha (indicating inflammatory response) in venous plasma obtained from the jugular bulb in a porcine model of experimental cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) where 2, 5, 8, 10 or 12 min of ve...

  7. Aortic intramural hematoma and hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm: unusual complication following resuscitation