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Sample records for chest wall resection

  1. Massive chest wall resection and reconstruction for malignant disease

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    Foroulis CN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Christophoros N Foroulis,1 Athanassios D Kleontas,1 George Tagarakis,1 Chryssoula Nana,1 Ioannis Alexiou,1 Vasilis Grosomanidis,1 Paschalis Tossios,1 Elena Papadaki,2 Ioannis Kioumis,2 Sofia Baka,3 Paul Zarogoulidis,2 Kyriakos Anastasiadis11Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Aristotle University School of Medicine, AHEPA University Hospital, 2Pulmonary Department-Oncology Unit, “G. Papanikolaou” General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 3Oncology Department, European Interbalkan Medical Center, Thessaloniki, GreeceObjective: Malignant chest wall tumors are rare neoplasms. Resection with wide-free margins is an important prognostic factor, and massive chest wall resection and reconstruction are often necessary. A recent case series of 20 consecutive patients is reported in order to find any possible correlation between tumor histology, extent of resection, type of reconstruction, and adjuvant treatment with short- and long-term outcomes.Methods: Twenty patients were submitted to chest wall resection and reconstruction for malignant chest wall neoplasms between 2006 and 2014. The mean age (ten males was 59±4 years. The size and histology of the tumor, the technique of reconstruction, and the short- and long-term follow-up records were noted.Results: The median maximum diameter of tumors was 10 cm (5.4–32 cm. Subtotal sternal resection was performed in nine cases, and the resection of multiple ribs was performed in eleven cases. The median area of chest wall defect was 108 cm2 (60–340 cm2. Histology revealed soft tissue, bone, and cartilage sarcomas in 16 cases (80%, most of them chondrosarcomas. The rest of the tumors was metastatic tumors in two cases and localized malignant pleural mesothelioma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in one case. The chest wall defect was reconstructed by using the “sandwich technique” (propylene mesh/methyl methacrylate/propylene mesh in nine cases of large anterior defects or by using a 2

  2. Pneumocephalus Following Thoracic Surgery with Posterior Chest Wall Resection.

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    Müller, Ina; Tönnies, Mario; Pfannschmidt, Joachim; Kaiser, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Pneumocephalus can be seen after head injury with fracture of the skull-base or in cerebral neoplasm, infection, or after intracranial or spinal surgery. We report on a 69-year-old male patient with pneumocephalus after right-sided lobectomy and en bloc resection of the chest wall for non-small-cell lung cancer. Postoperatively, the patient showed a reduced vigilance level with no response to pain stimuli and anisocoria. The CCT scan revealed an extensive pneumocephalus; following which, the patient underwent neurosurgery with laminectomy and ligature of the transected nerve roots. After operation the patient returned to his baseline mental status. PMID:26693117

  3. Chest Wall Resection and Reconstruction as a Substitute to Treat Malignant Tumours in Chinese Patients

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    Y Yu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Chest wall cancers are a mixed group of lesions that offer an exciting diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for surgeons. The present study is an attempt to evaluate the pathology, treatment methodologies, role of surgical resection and reconstruction, and consequences of patients with these tumours. Methods: All the patients with malignant primary chest wall cancers treated at our institution between February 2007 and July 2013, were included in this study. Fifteen cases were identified with tumours. Seven of them were malignant small round cell tumour (MSRCT, six were rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS and the remaining two were other tumours. Five patients underwent initial biopsy, followed by chemotherapy (n = 4 and radiotherapy (n = 1. Results: Three of these five survived to undertake late chest wall resections. Six of the nine resected patients required en bloc resection of neighbouring muscles or organs; three required complex chest wall reconstruction. At the end of the study, we found that eight out of 15 patients (53% have survived (six years of follow-up, all with no evidence of disease; the other seven patients died of progressive disease. Two patients with tumour categories other than MSRCT or RMS, metastatic or not, at diagnosis, are alive with no indication of disease. There were no local recurrences. Conclusions: Surgical resection, with en bloc removal of involved structures and chest wall reconstruction, provides outstanding survival improvement in malignant chest wall tumours.

  4. Reconstruction with a patient-specific titanium implant after a wide anterior chest wall resection

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    Turna, Akif; Kavakli, Kuthan; Sapmaz, Ersin; Arslan, Hakan; Caylak, Hasan; Gokce, Hasan Suat; Demirkaya, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects is a challenging problem for thoracic surgeons, particularly after a wide resection of the chest wall that includes the sternum. The location and the size of the defect play a major role when selecting the method of reconstruction, while acceptable cosmetic and functional results remain the primary goal. Improvements in preoperative imaging techniques and reconstruction materials have an important role when planning and performing a wide chest wall resection with a low morbidity rate. In this report, we describe the reconstruction of a wide anterior chest wall defect with a patient-specific custom-made titanium implant. An infected mammary tumour recurrence in a 62-year old female, located at the anterior chest wall including the sternum, was resected, followed by a large custom-made titanium implant. Latissimus dorsi flap and split-thickness graft were also used for covering the implant successfully. A titanium custom-made chest wall implant could be a viable alternative for patients who had large chest wall tumours. PMID:24227881

  5. Reconstruction with a patient-specific titanium implant after a wide anterior chest wall resection

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    Turna, Akif; KAVAKLI, Kuthan; SAPMAZ, Ersin; Arslan, Hakan; Caylak, Hasan; Gokce, Hasan Suat; Demirkaya, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    The reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects is a challenging problem for thoracic surgeons, particularly after a wide resection of the chest wall that includes the sternum. The location and the size of the defect play a major role when selecting the method of reconstruction, while acceptable cosmetic and functional results remain the primary goal. Improvements in preoperative imaging techniques and reconstruction materials have an important role when planning and performing a wide...

  6. Urgent resection of bleeding congenital mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma in an infant

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    Bieda, Jan-Christoph

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case with prenatally diagnosed large cystic-solid mesenchymal chest wall hamartoma. An attempt of conservative management was made however repeated intralesional hemorrhage led to enlargement and severe anemia which required urgent resection at the age of 8 weeks. The infant had an unimpaired development over a follow-up of 4 years.

  7. Extended Resection of Chest Wall Tumors with Reconstruction Using Poly Methyl Methacrylate-Mesh Prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This prospective study evaluates the early result of patients with massive chest wall tumors treated by extended resection and reconstruction using Prolene or Marlex mesh-enforced with Poly Methyl Methacrylate Bone Cement (PMMC) prosthesis. Material and Methods: This surgery was performed on 40 patients with a mean age of 45±18 (12-62) at the Department of Surgery, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University between 1998-2001. Primary chest wall tumors were the indications of surgery in 42.5%, while secondary involvement extending from other sites principally breast cancer were the indications for 57.5%. In 85% of patients more than 3 ribs were involved by tumors and lesions were more than 10 cm in the greatest dimension in 50% of cases. Resection involved sternum in 15 (37.5%) cases and in 45% of cases complete extensive rib resections extended between costovertebral junctions and the costochondral junctions were performed. Additional resections of nearby organs were needed in 20 (50%) of cases including partial lung resection in 14 cases, partial vertebral resection in 3 cases and diaphragm resection for 3 cases. Immediate bony reconstruction by inserting Prolene or Marlex mesh-enforced with Poly Methyl Methacrylate Bone Cement (PMMC) prosthesis to the resulting chest wall defect was performed in 36 cases, whereas, 4 cases had delayed reconstruction. Primary simple soft tissue closure was sufficient for 37.5% of patients; whereas 35% were covered by local rotational flap and 27.5% needed myocutaneous flaps. No patient with this immediate reconstruction needed ventilatory support or tracheostomy and flail chest was not noticed ICU stay was markedly reduced; whereas 85% required less than 7 days. Immediate post operative (40 days) complications were found in 14 patients (35%) and cases with additional lung resection had more complication rate than others (64% vs 19%). Infection occurred in 3 patients and conservative treatment for 3-4 weeks using frequent

  8. Reconstruction after Anterior Chest Wall Keloid Resection Using Internal Mammary Artery Perforator Propeller Flaps

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    Ogawa, Rei; Ono, Shimpei; Akaishi, Satoshi; Dohi, Teruyuki; Iimura, Takeshi; Nakao, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is difficult to completely resect huge anterior chest wall keloids and then close the wound directly. We report here our retrospective analysis of our case series of patients with such keloids who underwent reconstruction with internal mammary artery perforator (IMAP) pedicled propeller flaps and then received postoperative high-dose-rate superficial brachytherapy. Methods: All consecutive patients with large/severe keloids on the anterior chest wall who underwent keloid resection followed by reconstruction with IMAP-pedicled propeller flaps and then high-dose-rate superficial brachytherapy in our academic hospital were identified. All cases were followed for >18 months. Donor site position, perforator pedicle, flap size, angle of flap rotation, complications, and recurrence were documented. Results: There were nine men and one woman. The average age was 37.9 years. The average follow-up duration was 28.7 months. The largest flap was 16 × 4 cm. The dominant perforators of the internal mammary artery were located in the sixth (n = 2), seventh (n = 5), eighth (n = 1), and ninth (n = 2) intercostal spaces. Twelve months after surgery, patients reported marked relief from keloid-associated pain and itching, except in two patients who underwent partial keloid resection; their remaining keloids were still troublesome but after conservative therapies, including steroid ointments/plasters, the keloids gradually ameliorated. Eighteen months after surgery, there was no keloid recurrence or new development of keloids on the donor site. Conclusions: IMAP-pedicled propeller flaps transfer skin tension from the anterior chest wall to the abdomen. Our series suggests that this approach combined with radiation therapy can control keloid recurrence.

  9. Chest wall resection and reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with Marlex mesh for metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma: a case report

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    Suganuma Nobuyasu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The distant metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinomas are often untreatable. In particular, bone metastasis is significantly related to poor prognosis since radioactive iodine therapy is generally less effective. Therefore, surgical resection is considered one of the treatments for patients with bone metastases. We report chest wall resection and reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with polypropylene mesh (Marlex mesh for metastatic rib bones as a result of follicular thyroid carcinoma. Case presentation A 51-year-old man was referred to our institution with a painful chest wall tumor. He presented with a 15 × 10 cm bony swelling on the left chest wall and multiple small lung nodules from follicular thyroid carcinoma. Completion total thyroidectomy, chest wall resection and reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with Marlex mesh were performed. There were no critical complications associated with surgical treatments and tumor pain disappeared during the postoperative period. Then, he received radioactive iodine therapy and the uptake of radioactive iodine was well observed in bilateral lung fields. Conclusion Reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with Marlex mesh is possible for repairing the wide chest wall resection required for thyroid carcinoma metastasis. This technique would help to enhance treatment efficacy in the combination therapy of radioactive iodine and surgery in patients with large thyroid carcinoma metastasis in the chest wall.

  10. Results of chest wall resection for recurrent or locally advanced breast malignancies.

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    Veronesi, Giulia; Scanagatta, Paolo; Goldhirsch, Aron; Rietjens, Mario; Colleoni, Marco; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Spaggiari, Lorenzo

    2007-06-01

    Between 1998 and 2003 we observed 15 women who underwent full thickness chest wall resection (FTCWR) followed by plastic reconstruction for locally recurrent or primary breast cancer. Preoperative symptoms were: pain (5 patients), malodorous ulceration (3 patients), presence of tumour mass (4 patients) and thoracic deformity (2 patients). One patient was asymptomatic. Surgery was partial sternectomy with rib resection in 9 patients, rib resection alone in 5, and total sternectomy in one. No perioperative mortality or major morbidity occurred; minor complications occurred in 3 patients (20%). Five of the six surviving patients reported a positive overall outcome in a telephonic interview. Median overall and disease-free survival were 23.4 and 17.5 months, respectively. In conclusion, FTCWR is a safe procedure with low morbidity and mortality that can provide good symptoms palliation in patients with locally advanced breast malignancies, so it should be considered more often by interdisciplinary care providers in those patients who fail to respond to classic multimodality treatment.

  11. Chest wall resection and reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with Marlex mesh for metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma: a case report

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    Suganuma Nobuyasu; Wada Nobuyuki; Arai Hiromasa; Nakayama Hirotaka; Fujii Keita; Masudo Katsuhiko; Yukawa Norio; Rino Yasushi; Masuda Munetaka; Imada Toshio

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The distant metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinomas are often untreatable. In particular, bone metastasis is significantly related to poor prognosis since radioactive iodine therapy is generally less effective. Therefore, surgical resection is considered one of the treatments for patients with bone metastases. We report chest wall resection and reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with polypropylene mesh (Marlex mesh) for metastatic rib bones as a re...

  12. Dynamic 3D printed titanium copy prosthesis: a novel design for large chest wall resection and reconstruction.

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    Aragón, Javier; Pérez Méndez, Itzell

    2016-06-01

    Due to high rates of complications, chest wall resection and reconstruction is a high risk procedure when large size of resection is required. Many different prosthetic materials have been used with similar results. Recently, thanks to the new advances in technology, personalized reconstruction have been possible with specific custom-made prosthesis. Nevertheless, they all generate certain amount of stiffness in thoracic motion because of his rigidity. In this report, we present a forward step in prosthesis design based on tridimensional titanium-printed technology. An exact copy of the resected chest wall was made, even endowing simulated sternochondral articulations, to achieve the most exact adaptation and best functional results, with a view to minimize postoperative complications. This novel design, may constitute an important step towards the improvement of the functional postoperative outcomes compared to the other prosthesis, on the hope, to reduce postoperative complications. PMID:27293863

  13. Lymphomas presenting as chest wall tumors

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    Witte, Biruta; Hürtgen, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Four cases of thoracic lymphoma mimicking chest wall tumors are presented. As resection is not the treatment of first choice in lymphomas, pretherapeutical evaluation of chest wall tumors should include a thoroughly staging and a biopsy for histopathological diagnosis. Chest wall destruction due to an anterior mediastinal mass, or a chest wall tumor associated with mediastinal lymph node enlargement, could be suspicious of thoracic lymphoma. Lymphoma with chest wall involvement mostly turns o...

  14. Chest Wall tumor: combined management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is relatively rare disease among children and adolescents. The incidence of solid tumors other than CNS is less than 2/100,000. Tumors of the chest wall can arise either from the somatic tissue or ribs. These are rare, so either institutional reviews or multi institutional studies should determine optimal therapeutic management. Of the bony chest wall, Ewing's sarcoma or the family of tumor (peripheral neuro epithelioma, Askin tumor), are the most common. These lesions are lytic and have associated large extra pleural component. This large extra pleural component often necessitates major chest wall resection (3 or more ribs), and when lower ribs are involved, this entails resection of portion of diaphragm. Despite this resection, survival in the early 1970 was 10-20%. Since 1970 multi agent chemotherapy has increased survival rates. of importance, however, is these regimens have caused significant reduction of these extra pleural components so that major chest wall resections have become a rarity. With improved survival and decreased morbidity preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery is now the accepted modality of treatment. Another major advantage of this regimen is that potential radiation therapy may be obviated. The most common chest wall lesion is rhabdomyosarcoma. In the IRS study of 1620 RMS patients, in 141 (9%) the primary lesion was in the chest wall. these are primarily alveolar histology. when lesions were superficial, wide local excision with supplemental radiation therapy was associated with low morbidity and good overall survival. however, a majority have significant intra- thoracic components. in these circumstances the resectability rate is less than 30% and the survival poor. Other lesions include non rhabdomyosarcomas, eosinophilic granuloma, chondrosarcoma, and osteomyelitis. The management of these lesions varies according to extent, histology, and patient characteristics

  15. Exploration on the reliable reconstruction methods after massive resection of chest wall%胸壁大块切除与重建方法的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒骏; 薛洋; 丛伟; 陈凡; 甘崇志; 谢家勇; 曾富春

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨胸壁大块切除及胸壁缺损修补重建的方法和效果.方法 回顾性分析11例原发性胸壁肿瘤和其他病变累及胸壁需行胸壁大决切除,术中应用多种方法进行重建.骨性胸廓重建采用戈尔补片及网状钛合金板等人工材料进行修复,皮下软组织修复主要应用分层直接缝合或转移肌皮瓣.结果 切除胸壁最大面积(15 ×20)cm2,原发性胸壁肿瘤5例(良性1例,恶性4例),胸壁结核2例,周围型肺癌3例,乳癌术后复发1例.所有患者均行胸壁大块切除及重建手术.全组无手术死亡,术后呼吸功能良好,无反常呼吸运动.结论 依据胸壁缺损的位置和大小,选用不同的修复材料,结合自体肌瓣覆盖是修补重建胸壁的可靠方法.%Objective To investigate the methods and efficacy of massive resection and reconstruction of chest wall. Methods 11 cases including primary chest wall tumors and other lesions involving massive resection of chest wall were analyzed retrospectively. Various reconstruction methods were used intraoperative. We used bony thorax with artificial material such as gore patches and mesh titanium alloy plate in reconstruction of chest wall. And the reparation of subcutaneous soft tissue layers were with direct layer suture or muscle flap transfer. Results The maximum recession area of chest wall was 15cm × 20cm. Five patients were diagnosed with primary chest wall tumor (one case of benign and the other four were malignant) , two with chest wall tuberculosis, three with peripheral lung cancer, one with breast cancer recurrence. They all underwent massive resection and reconstruction of chest wall. There was no operative mortality. The postoperative respiratory function of all patients was well, without abnormal respiratory movement. Conclusion It would be a reliable reconstruction method that combining autologous muscle flap coverage and various repair materials based on the location and size of the defect of

  16. Resección tumoral en bloque y reconstrucción de pared torácica In-bloc tumor resection and chest wall reconstruction

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    D. Palafox

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available La resección de una neoplasia pulmonar o mediastínica que afecta simultáneamente a la pared torácica y la reconstrucción del defecto originado por la misma, son procedimientos quirúrgicos que se pueden realizar en un mismo tiempo operatorio. Con la reconstrucción primaria se busca preservar la función respiratoria y la integridad de la caja torácica, permitiendo al paciente una buena mecánica respiratoria, a la vez que un resultado estético satisfactorio y evitando la necesidad de una nueva intervención quirúrgica. Existen diversas técnicas y disponemos de diferentes materiales protésicos para su realización. Presentamos a continuación el caso de un paciente al que se le realizó satisfactoriamente una resección tumoral en bloque y reconstrucción de la pared torácica.Resection of a pulmonary or mediastinic neoplasm which simultaneously affects chest wall and reconstruction of the defect, are surgical proceedings that can be performed in the same surgical time. The objectives of reconstructing primarily the chest wall are to preserve the respiratory function and the thoracic wall integrity, therefore offering the patient appropriate respiratory mechanics, satisfactory aesthetic result and avoiding the needding for a second surgical intervention. There are several techniques and materials available for the surgery performance. We present the case of a patient who underwent successfully tumoral resection in-bloc and chest wall reconstruction.

  17. Surgical treatment with sternal and rib resection for patients with post-irradiation ulcer of the chest wall; Case report

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    Sugiura, Hayato; Suenaga, Masahiro; Okada, Yoshikatsu; Kokuba, Yoshikazu; Uehara, Shinichi; Mori, Kikuro (Nagoya Memorial Hospital (Japan)); Torii, Shuhei; Kamei, Yuzuru

    1991-12-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy is widely performed in the treatment of patients with lymph node metastases from carcinoma of the breast, however, depending on the dose, cases are seen in which radiation ulcers develop and require surgical management. In the present paper we report a patient in whom postoperative radiotherapy was performed because parasternal lymph node metastasis was discovered at the time of surgery and who 15 months later experienced thoracic wall recurrence. Since metastasis to the contralateral lung was observed at that time, reoperation was not attempted, and when radiotherapy was again administered, an extensive radiation ulcer developed in association with sternal and costal necrosis. The skin and subcutaneous tissue together with the sternum and ribs were widely resected followed by the thoracoplasty using a latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap. Since there was no postoperative infection, the skin flap was accepted well, and the outcome was satisfactory from the standpoint of quality of life, we have reported the case. (author).

  18. Solitary Plasmacytoma of the Chest Wall

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    Servet Kayhan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A previously healthy 55-year-old man with right sided lateral chest pain admitted to clinic. It was found a solid and painful mass at the right 4th rib in physical examination. Chest X-ray and thoracic computarized tomography showed an opacity measured 60x33 mm within the right chest wall destructing the 4th rib. Needle aspiration was performed from tumor and cytologic examination showed atypic plasma cell infiltration. The patient was scheduled for a chest wall resection and reconstructive surgery. Examination of a permanent section showed that the chest wall tumor was solitary plasmacytoma. There was no evidence of multiple myeloma recurrence after two years from the operation.

  19. Radiation induced osteosarcoma of the chest wall

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    Sugimoto, Tsutomu; Yuki, Yoshihiro; Oizumi, Hiroyuki; Iijima, Yoshiyuki; Fujishima, Tsukasa; Shimazaki, Yasuhisa [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    We report a successful resection of an osteosarcoma in the chest wall developed 25 years after irradiation. A 74-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for her swelling in the left chest wall at August 24, 1995. At 49-year-old, she had undergone an operation and postoperative irradiation for left breast cancer. A computed tomography demonstrated a mass in the left chest wall that destructed the first rib, extending into the pleural space and invaded into the left common carotid and subclavian arteries. We planned a radical resection of the mass after repeated CT scannings, since it was histopathologically diagnosed as a chondrosarcoma and showed a rapid growth. The tumor was completely removed with radical transmediastinal forequarter amputation of the partial chest wall and total left upper extremity. The left common carotid artery was partially replaced with 6 mm EPTFE vascular prosthesis. The chest wall was reconstructed with Marlex-mesh prosthesis and a myocutaneous flap. She was discharged uneventfully and has not shown any evidence of recurrence. (author)

  20. [Dedifferentiated Chondrosarcoma of the Chest Wall].

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    Saitoh, Genkichi; Yoneshima, Yasuto; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kitagawa, Dai; Kinjo, Nao; Ohgaki, Kippei; Maehara, Shinichiro; Teramoto, Seiichi; Adachi, Eisuke; Ikeda, Yoichi; Mine, Mari

    2016-08-01

    A 79-year-old man complaining of an anterior chest mass with pain had an abnormal shadow on chest X-ray. A mass, 7 cm in size, with destruction of the right 4th rib was found on chest computed tomography. A F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) corresponding to the lesion showed an abnormal accumulation of FDG with the standardized uptake value(SUV) max=16.19. A malignant tumor of the chest wall origin was suspected and the tumor was resected with the 3th, 4th, and 5th ribs. Histologically, the tumor was diagnosed as dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma. He died of local recurrence about 5 months after the operation. PMID:27476566

  1. Actinomycosis - Left Post Chest Wall

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    Kafil Akhtar, M. Naim, S. Shamshad Ahmad, Nazoora Khan, Uroos Abedi, A.H. Khan*

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A forty year old female of weak body built presented with recurring small hard lumps in let posteriorchest wall for 3 years and discharging ulcers for 3 months duration. Clinically, the provisional diagnosiswas malignancy with secondary infection. FNAC showed features suggestive of dysplasia buthistopathology confirmed the diagnosis as actinomycosis. The present case is reported due to rare incidenceof actinomycosis at post chest wall with muscle involvement.

  2. Actinomycosis involving the chest wall: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of pulmonary actinomycosis with extension to involve the chest wall that were evaluated using computerized tomography are reported. In both cases, the relation of pulmonary and chest wall disease was best shown using CT

  3. APPLICATION OF TITANIUM PLATE AND Teflon PATCH IN CHEST WALL RECONSTRUCTION AFTER STERNAL TUMOR RESECTION%钛板联合Teflon补片重建胸骨肿瘤切除后胸廓

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴显宁; 陈名久; 喻风雷

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the reconstruction method and effectiveness of titanium plate and Teflon patch for the chest wall after resection of sternal tumors. Methods Between October 2006 and November 2009, 4 patients with sternal tumors were treated and the thoracic cages were reconstructed. There were 2 males and 2 females, aged 30-55 years. The patients were admitted because of chest lump or pain. The sizes of palpable lump ranged from 4 cm×3 cm to 10 cm×8 cm. CT examination showed bone destruction. After sternal tumor resection, defect size ranged from 10 cm x 8 cm to 18 cm×4 cm, and titanium plate and Teflon patch were used to repair and reconstruct the chest wall defect. Results The operations of the tumor resection and reconstruction of chest wall defect were successfully performed in 4 cases. Incisions healed by first intention with no abnormal breath, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumothorax, and infection. One case failed to be followed up after 6 months; 1 case died of intracranial hemorrhage; and 2 cases were followed up 1 and 4 years respectively without tumor recurrence. The chest wall had good remodeling. No loosening and exposure of titanium plate, difficulty in breathing, chest distress, and chest pain were observed during follow-up. Conclusion Surgical resection of sternal tumors will cause large chest wall defect which can be repaired by titanium plate and Teflon patch because it had the advantages of easy operation, satisfactory remodeling, and less complication.%目的 探讨胸骨肿瘤切除术后采用钛板联合Teflon补片重建胸廓的方法及疗效.方法 2006年10月-2009年11月,收治4例胸骨肿瘤患者.男2例,女2例;年龄30~55岁.以胸部肿块、疼痛1~6个月后入院.检查见胸前区范围为4cm×3em~10cm×8cm的肿块,质硬.CT检查见骨质破坏.采用胸骨肿瘤扩大切除术,切除范围为10cm×8cm~18em×14cm,采用钛板联合Teflon补片重建胸廓.结果 患者手术均顺利完成.术后切口Ⅰ期

  4. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

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    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the “activity” of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  5. Chest wall, lung, and pleural space trauma.

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    Miller, Lisa A

    2006-03-01

    Chest radiographs frequently underestimate the severity and extent of chest trauma and, in some cases, fail to detect the presence of injury. CT is more sensitive than chest radiography in the detection of pulmonary, pleural, and osseous abnormalities in the patient who has chest trauma. With the advent of multidetector CT (MDCT), high-quality multiplanar reformations are obtained easily and add to the diagnostic capabilities of MDCT. This article reviews the radiographic and CT findings of chest wall, pleural, and pulmonary injuries that are seen in the patient who has experienced blunt thoracic trauma.

  6. Plastic surgery in chest wall reconstruction: relevant aspects - case series

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    Diogo Franco

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to discuss the participation of Plastic Surgery in the reconstruction of the chest wall, highlighting relevant aspects of interdisciplinaryness. Methods: we analyzed charts from 20 patients who underwent extensive resection of the thoracic integument, between 2000 and 2014, recording the indication of resection, the extent and depth of the raw areas, types of reconstructions performed and complications. Results: among the 20 patients, averaging 55 years old, five were males and 15 females. They resections were: one squamous cell carcinoma, two basal cell carcinomas, five chondrosarcomas and 12 breast tumors. The extent of the bloody areas ranged from 4x9 cm to 25x40 cm. In 12 patients the resection included the muscular plane. In the remaining eight, the tumor removal achieved a total wall thickness. For reconstruction we used: one muscular flap associated with skin grafting, nine flaps and ten regional fasciocutaneous flaps. Two patients undergoing reconstruction with fasciocutaneous flaps had partially suffering of the flap, solved with employment of a myocutaneous flap. The other patients displayed no complications with the techniques used, requiring only one surgery. Conclusion: the proper assessment of local tissues and flaps available for reconstruction, in addition to the successful integration of Plastic Surgery with the specialties involved in the treatment, enable extensive resections of the chest wall and reconstructions that provide patient recovery.

  7. Classification of chest wall diseases.

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    Pozzi, E; Gulotta, C

    1993-01-01

    Several disorders of the thoracic cage are known to cause respiratory failure, by means of relatively simple mechanisms, such as the increased work of breathing, which results in alveolar hypoventilation. A variety of pathogenic mechanisms may be considered, as functions of the types of thoracic disorders present. As causes of these additional potential mechanisms, we considered the following: 1) ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) inhomogeneity; 2) inability to cough; 3) malformation or acquired defect of the respiratory centres; and 4) excess blood volume and fluid retention, which aggravate work of breathing and V/Q inhomogeneity. All of these disorders can be grouped into two major categories (which nevertheless have some of the pathophysiology in common): the mechanical syndrome and the neuromuscular or paralytic syndrome. In this paper we discuss chest wall diseases falling into the first category; namely, kyphoscoliosis, fibrothorax, thoracoplasty, ankylosing spondylitis and obesity-hypoventilation. Congenital deformities of the thoracic cage, which do not have important effects on ventilatory apparatus (e.g. pectus excavatum and pectus carinatum), were also considered. PMID:8472068

  8. Thoracoscopic pulmonary wedge resection without post-operative chest drain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Bo Laksáfoss; Hansen, Henrik Jessen; Kehlet, Henrik;

    2016-01-01

    effusion and coagulopathy. Chest X-rays were done twice on the day of surgery. 30-day complications were compiled from patient records. RESULTS: 49 patients underwent 51 unilateral VATS wedge resections without using a post-operative chest drain. No patient required reinsertion of a chest drain. 30 (59...... %) patients had a pneumothorax of mean size 12 ± 12 mm on supine 8-h post-operative X-ray for which the majority resolved spontaneously within 2-week control. There were no complications on 30-day follow-up. Median length of stay was 1 day. CONCLUSIONS: The results support that VATS wedge resection...... for pulmonary nodules without a post-operative chest drain may be safe in a selected group of patients....

  9. A case of radiation ulcer of chest wall with osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of anterior chest skin ulcer with rib and sternum osteomyelitis following radiation therapy for post operative mammary carcinoma. Operation was performed six times including debridement with sternum and rib resection reconstruction and skin grafting. It took about one and a half years after first operation to heal the ulcer with osteomyelitis. Principle of treatment for radiation ulcer accompanied by osteomyelitis is complete resection of the damaged lesion. However, it is difficult to evaluate the exact area of the damaged lesion. Therefore it is not rare to repeat its recurrence and have trouble with its treatment. In this case, it was considered that the resected area was insufficient on the initial operation. In order to treat for radiation ulcers accompanied by osteomyelitis, enough resection of the damaged lesion in the initial operation is necessary. Ultimately, in our case, the resection of all sternum, part of the right second to fifth rib and part of left second to seventh rib was necessary. It is generally said that reconstructing bone structure is required in the case of wide defect of chest wall. Though, we did not perform reconstruction of the bone structures, there is no problem in the condition of respiratory system. The surrounding soft tissues changed to hard enough to avoid paradoxical breathing. (author)

  10. Chest wall tuberculosis; CT findings in 14 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To present CT findings of chest wall tuberculosis. CT scans were obtained in 14 patients with proven chest wall tuberculosis. Diagnosis was confirmed by means of right open thoracostomy with abscess evacuation (n=1), excision and curettage (n=11) or excision and curettage along with resection of the involved lung (n=2). The images were assessed with emphasis for the extrapleural, pleural, and pulmonary lesions. All patients showed juxtacostal soft tissue mass with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. The lesions were located in the left hemithorax in eight patients and in the right in six. Multiple lesions were found in three patients (two in one and three in two). Rib destruction was observed in four patients. Intercostal muscle involvement of thickening and enhancement were shown in all patients. Thirteen patients (93%) had evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis: active pulmonary tuberculosis in nine and stable tuberculosis in four. Pleural lesions, including empyema necessitatis in six, were observed in eleven (79%). On CT scan, chest wall tuberculosis is characterized by juxtacostal soft tissue lesion with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. Rib destruction may be associated. Additionally, enhancing intercostal muscle suggest direct inflammatory process of tuberculosis and spread channel to the chest wall involvement of pleuropulmonary tuberculosis

  11. Imaging of Chest Wall Lesions in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hekmatnia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest wall lesions in childhood include a wide range of pathologies; Benign lesions include lipoma, neurofibroma, lymphangioma, hemangioma, and mesenchymal hamartoma."nMalignant lesions include Neuroblastoma, Rhabdo-myosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and Askin tumor."nSystemic diseases such as leukemia, lymphoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and also infections such as tuberculosis, and actinomycosis may also cause chest wall lesions."nThe imaging characteristics of these lesions are re-viewed, but only a minority of the lesions shows diagnostic imaging features, and most of lesions re-quire biopsy and histopathological examination for "ndefinitive diagnosis."nThe role of different modalities is discussed with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging for demonstrating lesion morphology and local spread. Computed tomography and neuclear medicine being used mainly to assess remote disease."nIn this lecture, we discuss about imaging of chest wall lesions in children.

  12. Algorithm of chest wall keloid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xiao; Zhang, Mingzi; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Ru; Wang, Youbin; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-08-01

    Keloids are common in the Asian population. Multiple or huge keloids can appear on the chest wall because of its tendency to develop acne, sebaceous cyst, etc. It is difficult to find an ideal treatment for keloids in this area due to the limit of local soft tissues and higher recurrence rate. This study aims at establishing an individualized protocol that could be easily applied according to the size and number of chest wall keloids.A total of 445 patients received various methods (4 protocols) of treatment in our department from September 2006 to September 2012 according to the size and number of their chest wall keloids. All of the patients received adjuvant radiotherapy in our hospital. Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was used to assess the treatment effect by both doctors and patients. With mean follow-up time of 13 months (range: 6-18 months), 362 patients participated in the assessment of POSAS with doctors.Both the doctors and the patients themselves used POSAS to evaluate the treatment effect. The recurrence rate was 0.83%. There was an obvious significant difference (P keloids. This algorithm could play a guiding role for surgeons when dealing with chest wall keloid treatment. PMID:27583896

  13. Free Tensor Fascia Lata Flap and Synthetic Mesh Reconstruction for Full-Thickness Chest Wall Defect

    OpenAIRE

    Jumpei Ono; Akira Takeda; Minekatsu Akimoto; Akira Iyoda; Yoshio Matsui; Yukitoshi Satoh; Eiju Uchinuma

    2013-01-01

    A large full-thickness chest wall defect over 10 cm in diameter requires skeletal reconstruction and soft tissue coverage. Use of various flaps for soft tissue coverage was previously reported, but en bloc resection in each case affects these flap pedicles and sizes. We present a case of a 74-year-old man with a soft tissue tumor involving the left lateral chest wall. We performed an en block resection and skeletal reconstruction using a mesh, free tensor fascia lata (TFL) flap for soft tissu...

  14. Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall

    OpenAIRE

    Tonziello, Gilda; Valentinotti, Romina; Arbore, Enrico; Cassetti, Paolo; Luzzati, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall Symptoms: — Medication: Ciprofloxacin Clinical Procedure:— Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Non-typhoid Salmonella extra-intestinal infections usually develop in infants and in adult patients with pre-existing predisposing conditions. Blood stream infections and urinary tract infections are the most common clinical presentations, but other sites of infection may be ...

  15. Primary Burkitt Lymphoma of the Chest Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Rommel Lu

    2012-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) originating in the skin and soft tissue at any site is exceedingly rare. This paper is about a case of primary sporadic BL that presented as an isolated, rapidly enlarging chest wall mass arising from skin and/or soft tissue in an adult. As with other BL presentations, this patient was treated with aggressive chemotherapy with central nervous system (CNS) chemoprophylaxis, but he later died because of sepsis.

  16. Primary Burkitt Lymphoma of the Chest Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommel Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkitt lymphoma (BL originating in the skin and soft tissue at any site is exceedingly rare. This paper is about a case of primary sporadic BL that presented as an isolated, rapidly enlarging chest wall mass arising from skin and/or soft tissue in an adult. As with other BL presentations, this patient was treated with aggressive chemotherapy with central nervous system (CNS chemoprophylaxis, but he later died because of sepsis.

  17. Reconstruction of chest, abdominal walls and perineum

    OpenAIRE

    Vijaykumar D; Vijayaraghavan Sundeep

    2007-01-01

    The structural integrity of the chest and abdominal walls and perineum is frequently altered by cancer extirpation. Advances in reconstructive surgery and the availability of innovative techniques have helped the cancer surgeon to proceed with radical excisions with minimum morbidity. The ability to harvest flaps from distant sites and the availability of good prosthetic materials have now become part of the routine armamentarium of the plastic surgeon engaged in reconstructive surgery of the...

  18. Using "Rebar" to Stabilize Rigid Chest Wall Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lary A; Grubbs, Deanna M

    2016-04-01

    After major chest wall resection, reconstruction of the bony defect with a rigid prosthesis is mandatory to protect the underlying thoracic organs, and to prevent flail chest physiology. Although many methods have been described for chest wall reconstruction, a commonly used technique employs a composite Marlex (polypropylene) mesh with methyl-methacrylate cement sandwiched between two layers of mesh (MMS), which is tailored to the defect size and shape. In building construction, steel "rebar" is used to strengthen and reinforce masonry structures. To avoid the initial residual motion of the rigid prosthesis used to reconstruct very large defects, particularly the sternum, we devised a simple technique of adding one or more Steinmann steel pins as "rebar" to strengthen and immediately stabilize the prosthesis to the surrounding ribs and sternum. For the very large defects, particularly over the heart and great vessels, titanium mesh may also be readily added into the sandwich construction for increased strength and to prevent late prosthetic fractures. Short- and long-term results of this inexpensive modification of the MMS reconstruction technique are excellent. This modified MMS tailor-made prosthesis is only one-third the cost of the recently popular prosthetic titanium systems, takes much less operative time to create and implant, and avoids the well-described complications of late titanium bar fracture and erosion/infection as well as loosening of screws and/or titanium bars.

  19. Musculoskeletal problems of the chest wall in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Peter L; Biswas, Anita C; Batt, Mark E

    2002-01-01

    Chest pain in the athlete has a wide differential diagnosis. Pain may originate from structures within the thorax, such as the heart, lungs or oesophagus. However, musculoskeletal causes of chest pain must be considered. The aim of this review is to help the clinician to diagnose chest wall pain in athletes by identifying the possible causes, as reported in the literature. Musculoskeletal problems of the chest wall can occur in the ribs, sternum, articulations or myofascial structures. The cause is usually evident in the case of direct trauma. Additionally, athletes' bodies may be subjected to sudden large indirect forces or overuse, and stress fractures of the ribs caused by sporting activity have been extensively reported. These have been associated with golf, rowing and baseball pitching in particular. Stress fractures of the sternum reported in wrestlers cause pain and tenderness of the sternum, as expected. Diagnosis is by bone scan and limitation of activity usually allows healing to occur. The slipping rib syndrome causes intermittent costal margin pain related to posture or movement, and may be diagnosed by the 'hooking manoeuvre', which reproduces pain and sometimes a click. If reassurance and postural advice fail, good results are possible with resection of the mobile rib. The painful xiphoid syndrome is a rare condition that causes pain and tenderness of the xiphoid and is self-limiting. Costochondritis is a self-limiting condition of unknown aetiology that typically presents with pain around the second to fifth costochondral joints. It can be differentiated from Tietze's syndrome in which there is swelling and pain of the articulation. Both conditions eventually settle spontaneously although a corticosteroid injection may be useful in particularly troublesome cases. The intercostal muscles may be injured causing tenderness between the ribs. Other conditions that should be considered include epidemic myalgia, precordial catch syndrome and referred pain

  20. Spectral characteristics of chest wall breath sounds in normal subjects.

    OpenAIRE

    Gavriely, N; Nissan, M.; Rubin, A. H.; Cugell, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--This study was carried out to establish a reliable bank of information on the spectral characteristics of chest wall breath sounds from healthy men and women, both non-smokers and smokers. METHODS--Chest wall breath sounds from 272 men and 81 women were measured using contact acoustic sensors, amplifiers, and fast Fourier transform (FFT) based spectral analysis software. Inspiratory and expiratory sounds were picked up at three standard locations on the chest wall during breathing...

  1. Reverse Abdominoplasty Flap in Reconstruction of Post-Bilateral Mastectomies Anterior Chest Wall Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William HC Tiong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse abdominoplasty was originally described for epigastric lift. Since the work by Baroudi and Huger in the 1970s, it has become clear that reverse abdominoplasty application can be extended beyond just aesthetic procedure. Through the knowledge of anterior abdominal wall vascularity, its application had included reconstructive prospect in the coverage of various chest wall defects. To date, reverse abdominoplasty flap has been used to reconstruct unilateral anterior chest wall defect or for larger defect but only in combination with other reconstructive techniques. Here, we presented a case where it is used as a standalone flap to reconstruct bilateral anterior chest wall soft tissue defect post-bilateral mastectomies in oncological resection. In conclusion, reverse abdominoplasty flap provided us with a simple, faster, and satisfactory reconstructive outcome.

  2. The role of imaging for the surgeon in primary malignant bone tumors of the chest wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary malignant chest wall tumors are rare. The most frequent primary malignant tumor of the chest wall is chondrosarcoma, less common are primary bone tumors belonging to the Ewing Family Bone Tumors (EFBT), or even rarer are osteosarcomas. They represent a challenging clinical entities for surgeons as the treatment of choice for these neoplasms is surgical resection, excluding EFBT which are normally treated by a multidisciplinary approach. Positive margins after surgical procedure are the principal risk factor of local recurrence, therefore to perform adequate surgery a correct preoperative staging is mandatory. Imaging techniques are used for diagnosis, to determine anatomic site and extension, to perform a guided biopsy, for local and general staging, to evaluate chemotherapy response, to detect the presence of a recurrence. This article will focus on the role of imaging in guiding this often difficult surgery and the different technical possibilities adopted in our department to restore the mechanics of the thoracic cage after wide resections

  3. Measurement of chest wall displacement based on terahertz wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Lv, Hao; Jiao, Teng; Lu, Guohua; Li, Sheng; Li, Zhao; Liu, Miao; Jing, Xijing; Wang, Jianqi

    2015-02-01

    Measurement of chest wall displacement is an important approach for measuring mechanics of chest wall, which has considerable significance for assessing respiratory system and diagnosing pulmonary diseases. However, existing optical methods for measuring chest wall displacement are inconvenient for some specific patients such as the female patients and the patients with bandaged chest. In this letter, we proposed a method for measuring chest wall displacement based on terahertz wave and established corresponding mathematic model and set up a terahertz measurement system. The main advantages of this method are that it can measure the chest wall displacement of the subjects without taking off clothes or arranging any markers. To validate this method and assess the performance of the terahertz system, in vitro, the displacement of a water module driven by a linear guide rail was measured by the terahertz system and compared with the actual displacement of the water module. The results showed that the waveforms measured with two methods have a good agreement, and the relative error is less than 5% and sufficiently good for measurement demands. In vivo, the synchronous experiment was performed on five human volunteers with the terahertz system and a respiratory belt transducer. The results demonstrate that this method has good performance and promising prospects for measuring chest wall displacement.

  4. Surgical treatment of T3 lung cancer invading the chest wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrami, V; Bezzi, M; Illuminati, G; Forte, A; Angelici, A; Bertagni, A; Ciulli, A; Gallinaro, L; Lorenzotti, A; Montesano, G; Palumbo, P G; Prece, V

    1999-01-01

    Lung tumors invading the chest wall are classed as belonging to the T3 group and are considered potentially resectable. Their management, however, is controversial, and extrapleural resection, when possible, is preferred to en bloc resection which is regarded as a far more invasive and dangerous operation. Five year survival rates for completely resected cases range in the literature from 25 to 35%, but survival rates are much worse if lymph node metastases are present. These poor outcomes have prompted the development of combined surgical approaches: preoperative radiation therapy, with or without chemotherapy, has been used with an improvement in resectability rates, but only modest results in terms of median survival; in a number of case series, increased operative morbidity and mortality have been reported with this approach. The present report relates to 122 patients treated by en bloc (20 cases) or extrapleural (102 cases) resection, 31 of whom also received neoadjuvant treatment. The operative mortality was 4.6%. Median survival was 17 months after en bloc resection and 19 months after extrapleural resection. Though no statistically significant difference was found, extrapleural resection would appear to yield better results than the en bloc procedure. PMID:10742890

  5. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tao; Platel, Bram; Mann, Ritse M; Huisman, Henkjan; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method to segment the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images. Determining the location of the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images is necessary in computer-aided detection systems to remove automatically detected cancer candidates beyond the chest wall and it can be of great help for inter- and intra-modal image registration. We show that the visible part of the chest wall in an automated 3D breast ultrasound image can be accurately modeled by a cylinder. We fit the surface of our cylinder model to a set of automatically detected rib-surface points. The detection of the rib-surface points is done by a classifier using features representing local image intensity patterns and presence of rib shadows. Due to attenuation of the ultrasound signal, a clear shadow is visible behind the ribs. Evaluation of our segmentation method is done by computing the distance of manually annotated rib points to the surface of the automatically detected chest wall. We examined the performance on images obtained with the two most common 3D breast ultrasound devices in the market. In a dataset of 142 images, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall was 5.59 ± 3.08 mm. PMID:23273891

  6. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tao; Platel, Bram; Mann, Ritse M; Huisman, Henkjan; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method to segment the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images. Determining the location of the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images is necessary in computer-aided detection systems to remove automatically detected cancer candidates beyond the chest wall and it can be of great help for inter- and intra-modal image registration. We show that the visible part of the chest wall in an automated 3D breast ultrasound image can be accurately modeled by a cylinder. We fit the surface of our cylinder model to a set of automatically detected rib-surface points. The detection of the rib-surface points is done by a classifier using features representing local image intensity patterns and presence of rib shadows. Due to attenuation of the ultrasound signal, a clear shadow is visible behind the ribs. Evaluation of our segmentation method is done by computing the distance of manually annotated rib points to the surface of the automatically detected chest wall. We examined the performance on images obtained with the two most common 3D breast ultrasound devices in the market. In a dataset of 142 images, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall was 5.59 ± 3.08 mm.

  7. Chemo-thermotherapy for radiation-induced squamous cell carcinoma in anterior chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodama, Ken; Doi, Osamu; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Yokouchi, Hideki; Noguchi, Shinzaburo; Koyama, Hiroki (Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan))

    1992-09-01

    A 62 years-old woman had visited our hospital with the large and deep ulcer formation on the left anterior chest wall. A biopsy of the ulcerous lesion established the diagnosis of a squamous cell carcinoma which might be induced by the irradiation after mastectomy. Although a wide resection of the chest wall including left arm was performed, it was impossible to resect completely. After then, she had operations for local recurrence three times in three years. However, cure was not obtained, and residual lesions gradually enlarged and all layers of the anterior chest wall were replaced with tumor tissues. Conventional chemotherapy using futraful and mytomycin C was not effective. Therefore, we tried combined therapy with intravenous administration of cisplatin (CDDP) and vindesine (VDS), and local hyperthermia using radiofrequency (RF) wave. A total number of 11 courses of this treatment modality was carried out at once a week intervals. The tumor-temperature was maintained at the range of 40-43degC for 40 min in each treatment session. Chemotherapeutic agents were administered simultaneously with hyperthermia. After these treatment, the recurrent tumor was markedly reduced, and epithelization of the ulcer was recognized from the surrounding normal skin. The residual tumor was then resected completely. The operative wound was successfully closed by surrounding normal tissue mobilization. She is in good postoperative condition. We concluded that the chemo-thermotherapy is safe and promising therapeutic modality for such invasive squamous cell carcinoma, and the normal tissues are not affected. Furthermore, this approach will expand the scope of radical resection for such an uncontrollable tumor. (author).

  8. [Chemo-thermotherapy of radiation-induced squamous cell carcinoma in anterior chest wall].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, K; Doi, O; Higashiyama, M; Yokouchi, H; Noguchi, S; Koyama, H

    1992-09-01

    A 62-year-old woman had visited our hospital with the large and deep ulcer formation on the left anterior chest wall. A biopsy of the ulcerous lesion established the diagnosis of a squamous cell carcinoma which might be induced by the irradiation after mastectomy. Although a wide resection of the chest wall including left arm was performed, it was impossible to resect completely. After then, she had operations for local recurrence for three times in three years. However, cure was not obtained, and residual lesions gradually enlarged and all layers of the anterior chest wall was replaced with tumor tissues. Conventional chemotherapy using ftorafur and mitomycin C was not effective. Therefore, we tried combined therapy with intravenous administration of cisplatin (CDDP) and vindesine (VDS), and local hyperthermia using radiofrequency (RF) wave. A total number of 11 courses of this treatment modality was carried out at once a week intervals. The tumor-temperature was maintained at the range of 40-43 degrees C for 40 min in each treatment session. Chemotherapeutic agents were administered simultaneously with hyperthermia. After these treatments, the recurrent tumor was markedly reduced, and epithelization of the ulcer was recognized from the surrounding normal skin. The residual tumor was then resected completely. The operative wound was successfully closed by surrounding normal tissue mobilization. She is in good postoperative condition. We concluded that the chemo-thermotherapy is safe and promising therapeutic modality for such invasive squamous cell carcinoma, and the normal tissues are not affected. Furthermore, this approach will expand the scope of radical resection for such an uncontrollable tumor.

  9. RECURRENT SALMONELLA TYPHI CHEST WALL ABSCESSES IN A DIABETIC LADY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasri Helen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available : Salmonella enterica serovar typhi causing typhoid fever is common in many parts of the world particularly in developing countries. Extra intestinal manifestations are uncommon and occur in immunocompromised individuals such as patients with diabetes, HIV infection, chronic steroid use, chemotherapy and malignancy. We report a case of Salmonella typhi causing recurrent chest wall abscesses in a lady with uncontrolled diabetes. She was admitted with high grade fever, left sided chest wall abscess and a previous history of two similar chest wall abscesses. After hospitalization prompt incision and drainage was done and aerobic culture of pus grew moderate growth of Salmonella typhi resistant to ciprofloxacin and sensitive to cephalosporins. Based on culture report our patient was treated with oral azithromycin for ten days and parenteral ceftriaxone for six weeks. There was rapid and full recovery and six months follow up revealed no recurrence.

  10. Melioidosis:a rare cause of anterior chest wall abscess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rashidi Ahmad; Azhar Amir Hamzah; Ahmad Kasfi Abdul Rahman; Phee Kheng Cheah

    2010-01-01

    Melioidosis is an unusual tropical infectious disease caused by the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, which was formerly known asPseudomonas pseudomallei. Melioidosis is characterized by abscess formation and it may manifest in any part of the human body, however, musculoskeletel melioidosis is uncommon and chest wall melioidosis is very rare. To determine the exact organism based solely on clinical presentation poses a great challenge to the physician. Yet, delay administration of antibiotic may be harmful. We describe a diabetic patient who had anterior chest wall melioidosis that mimicsStaphylococcus aureus infection. A description of his presentation and management, along with a review of literature is presented.

  11. CYSTIC HYGROMA OF CHEST WALL- 2 Reported Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapan Shah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hygromas arise in the sites of primitive lymphatic lakes, on the floor of the mouth, under the jaw, in the neck and in the axillae, but they can occur virtually anywhere in the body. Their occurrence on the chest wall is very rare and they progressively grow with age infiltrating into the local tissues, insinuating lymphatic pseudopods and form cysts in and around muscle fibers and nerves, making them difficult and hazardous to remove. Here, we have reported 2 cases of cystic hygroma of chest wall in children

  12. Endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall:a report of 28 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯重伟; 郑成竹; 陈丹磊; 胡明根; 李际辉; 印慨

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate the feasibility and clinical value of endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall. Methods: From December 2002 to May 2003, 28 patients with an average of age of 28 years old(rangeing from 20 to 45) were performed endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall. The subcutaneous space in the anterior chest wall and the subplatysmal space in the neck were bluntly dissected through a 10-mm incision between the nipples, and CO2 was insufllated at 6 - 8 mmHg to create the operative space. Three trocars were inserted in the mammary regions; and dissection of the thyroid, division of the thyroid vessels and parenchyma were performed endoscopically using an ultrasonically activated scalpel. The recurrent laryngeal nerve, the superior laryngeal nerve, and the parathyroid glands were preserved properly. Results: There were 3 mass resections, 17 subtotal lobectomies, 2 total lobectomies, 6 subtotal lobectomies plus contralateral mass resections. The mean operative time was (87.1 ± 26.0) min; the mean blood loss during operation was (47.9 ± 19.6) ml; and the mean postoperative hospital stay was (3.4 ± 0.7) d. The drainage tubes were pulled out at 36 - 60 h postoperatively. There were no conversions to open surgery or complications. No scars can be found in the neck, and the patients were satisfied with the postoperative appearance. Conclusion: Endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall combined with low-pressure subcutaneous CO2 insufflation is a feasible and safe procedure. It can bring satisfactory cosmetic results. It is believed that endoscopic thyroidectomy by such approach will find a role in the future.

  13. CT and MR findings of chest wall masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Woo; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Eun Suk; Kwon, Sun Young; Ko, Eun Ju [Eul Ji General Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Young [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hye Jeong [Eul Ji General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-15

    To evaluate the characteristic radiological findings of various diseases forming chest wall masses by CT and MR. We retrospectively reviewed CT and MR findings of the chest wall masses in 31 patients. Morphology, density, features of contrast enhancement, and location of the mass within the bony thorax or soft tissue were analyzed. Benign lesions of bony thorax were osteochondritis (n = 2), tuberculosis (n = 1), and osteochon droma (n = 1). Malignant lesions of bony thorax were Ewing's sarcoma (n = 1) and metastasis (n = 3). Benign lesions of soft tissue were abscess (n = 1), tuberculosis (n = 7), lipoma (n = 1), cavernous hemangioma (n = 2), cavernous lymphangioma (n = 1), and neurofibroma (n = 1). Malignant lesions of soft tissue were lymphoma (n = 1), spindle cell sarcoma (n = 1), metastasis (n = 8). Tuberculosis of the chest wall (n = 8) were ill-defined hypodense (n = 7) or isodense (n = 1) mass than surrounding muscle on pre-enhanced CT scan. All massess showed peripheral rim enhancement after contrast enhancement. Five cases were associated with pulmonary or pleural tuberculosis. All malignant lesions of bony thorax showed bone destruction, but inflammatory processes also showed bone destruction. MR showed characteristic signal intensity in the case of lipoma (n = 1) and hemangioma (n = 1). We conclude that CT and MR are helpful for differential diagnosis of chest wall masses.

  14. CNE article: pain after lung transplant: high-frequency chest wall oscillation vs chest physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esguerra-Gonzalez, Angeli; Ilagan-Honorio, Monina; Fraschilla, Stephanie; Kehoe, Priscilla; Lee, Ai Jin; Marcarian, Taline; Mayol-Ngo, Kristina; Miller, Pamela S; Onga, Jay; Rodman, Betty; Ross, David; Sommer, Susan; Takayanagi, Sumiko; Toyama, Joy; Villamor, Filma; Weigt, S Samuel; Gawlinski, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Background Chest physiotherapy and high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) are routinely used after lung transplant to facilitate removal of secretions. To date, no studies have been done to investigate which therapy is more comfortable and preferred by lung transplant recipients. Patients who have less pain may mobilize secretions, heal, and recover faster. Objectives To compare effects of HFCWO versus chest physiotherapy on pain and preference in lung transplant recipients. Methods In a 2-group experimental, repeated-measures design, 45 lung transplant recipients (27 single lung, 18 bilateral) were randomized to chest physiotherapy (10 AM, 2 PM) followed by HFCWO (6 PM, 10 PM; group 1, n=22) or vice versa (group 2, n=23) on postoperative day 3. A verbal numeric rating scale was used to measure pain before and after treatment. At the end of the treatment sequence, a 4-item patient survey was administered to assess treatment preference, pain, and effectiveness. Data were analyzed with χ(2) and t tests and repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results A significant interaction was found between mean difference in pain scores from before to after treatment and treatment method; pain scores decreased more when HFCWO was done at 10 AM and 6 PM (P =.04). Bilateral transplant recipients showed a significant preference for HFCWO over chest physiotherapy (11 [85%] vs 2 [15%], P=.01). However, single lung recipients showed no significant difference in preference between the 2 treatments (11 [42%] vs 14 [54%]). Conclusions HFCWO seems to provide greater decreases in pain scores than does chest physiotherapy. Bilateral lung transplant recipients preferred HFCWO to chest physiotherapy. HFCWO may be an effective, feasible alternative to chest physiotherapy. (American Journal of Critical Care. 2013;22:115-125).

  15. CYSTIC HYGROMA OF CHEST WALL- 2 Reported Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Tapan Shah; Dipen Patel; Yash Vaidhya; Jigar Jadeja; Sharad Patel; Asit Patel

    2012-01-01

    Hygromas arise in the sites of primitive lymphatic lakes, on the floor of the mouth, under the jaw, in the neck and in the axillae, but they can occur virtually anywhere in the body. Their occurrence on the chest wall is very rare and they progressively grow with age infiltrating into the local tissues, insinuating lymphatic pseudopods and form cysts in and around muscle fibers and nerves, making them difficult and hazardous to remove. Here, we have reported 2 cases of cystic hygroma of chest...

  16. Diagnostic imaging of primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the chest wall (Askin tumour)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallustio, G.; Pirronti, T.; Natale, L.; Bray, A.; Marano, P. [Rome Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Lasorella, A. [Rome Univ. (Italy). Paediatric Inst.

    1998-09-01

    Objectives. To describe the radiological features of primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) of the chest wall (Askin tumour) at diagnosis and to analyse the radiological changes occurring as a consequence of treatment and during follow-up. Results. CT demostrated a solid heterogeneous chest wall mass in all children at diagnosis and six had a rib lesion. Small nodular densities in the extra-pleural fat were identified in three patients, excluded tumour infiltration of the lunge or diaphragm, which had been suspected on CT. On MR, the lesions showed high signal intensity in T1-weighted/proton-denisty images and intermediate/high signal intensity in T2-weighted images compared with muscle. Minimal chest wall involvement was demonstrated in one case by MRI. Extensive necrosis of tumour mass with pseudo-cystic appearance was documented in the five patients who underwent chemotherapy. Macroscopical complete resection was performed in five patients but there was early local recurrence after surgery in two, identified by CT in one and by MR in the other.

  17. Clinical Implications High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO)

    OpenAIRE

    Mantellini E.; Perrero L.; Petrozzino S.; Gatta A.; Bona S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: patients with neuromuscular diseases presents an high incidence of respiratory infections favoured by stagnation of deep bronchial secretions and deficit of cough. The aim of the study is to evaluate the correct treatment of this condition and the role of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO) in helping the removal of bronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections in patients with neuromuscular disease.Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to resp...

  18. Clinical Implications High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantellini E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: patients with neuromuscular diseases presents an high incidence of respiratory infections favoured by stagnation of deep bronchial secretions and deficit of cough. The aim of the study is to evaluate the correct treatment of this condition and the role of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO in helping the removal of bronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections in patients with neuromuscular disease.Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to respiratory infections and neuromuscular disease. PCEF (Peak Cough Expiratory Flow is used as a standardized indicator of efficiency of cough.Results: the High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO is useful, in cases of increased production of mucus and impairment of muco-ciliary clearance, to remove the tracheobronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections.Conclusions: the correct approach to patients with neuromuscular disease and frequent respiratory infections is focused on treatment of cough ineffective and management of bronchial secretions. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO (VEST has a central role in treatment of cough ineffective and management of bronchial secretions reducing respiratory infections.

  19. Ultrasonic measurements of chest wall thickness and realistic chest phantom for calibration of Pu lung counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are four important problems for the measurements of chest wall thickness using ultrasonic device: (1) selection of optimum position of transducer and the number of measured points on the chest covered with detector, (2) estimation of adipose-to-muscle ratio in the chest wall, especially for dispersed adipose like 'marbled beef', (3) determination of regression equations for the prediction of chest wall thickness, derived from groups of different body shape, i.e. corpulent and lean, and (4) estimation of effective chest wall thickness involved self-absorption layer of lung tissue, which changes with distribution of activity in the lungs. This quantity can not be measured with ultrasonic device. Realistic chest phantom was developed. The phantom contains removable model organs (lungs, liver, kidneys and heart), model trachea and artificial rib cage, and also includes chest plates that can be placed over the chest to simulate wide range adipose-to-muscle ratio in the chest wall. Various soft tissue substitutes were made of polyurethane with different concentrations of additive, and the rib cage were made of epoxy resin with calcium carbonate. The experimental data have shown that the phantom can be used as a standard phantom for the calibration. (author)

  20. Primary Chest Wall Abscess Mimicking a Breast Tumor That Occurred after Blunt Chest Trauma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Yamaoka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary chest wall abscess occurring after blunt chest trauma is rare. We present the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with a swelling in her left breast. The patient had experienced blunt chest trauma 2 months back. Needle aspiration revealed pus formation in the patient’s chest. Computed tomography revealed a mass in the lower region of the left mammary gland, with thickening of the parietal pleura and skin and fracture of the fifth rib under the abscess. Following antibiotic administration and irrigation of the affected region, surgical debridement was performed. During surgery, we found that the pectoralis major muscle at the level of the fifth rib was markedly damaged, although the necrotic tissue did not contact the mammary gland. We diagnosed the lesion as a chest wall abscess that occurred in response to blunt chest trauma. Her postoperative course was uneventful. There has been no recurrence for six months after surgery.

  1. Palpation for muscular tenderness in the anterior chest wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Vach, Werner; Manniche, Claus;

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To asses the interobserver and intraobserver reliability (in terms of day-to-day and hour-to-hour reliability) of palpation for muscular tenderness in the anterior chest wall. DESIGN: A repeated measures designs was used. SETTING: Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense University...... Hospital, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Two experienced chiropractors examined 29 patients and 27 subjects in the interobserver part, and 1 of the 2 chiropractors examined 14 patients and 15 subjects in the intraobserver studies. INTERVENTION: Palpation for muscular tenderness was done in 14 predetermined areas...

  2. Anterior chest wall tuberculous abscess: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papavramidis Theodossis S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The granulomatous inflammation of tuberculosis usually involves the lungs and the hilar lymph nodes. Musculoskeletal tuberculosis (TB occurs in 1–3% of patients with TB, while TB of the chest wall constitutes 1% to 5% of all cases of musculoskeletal TB. Furthermore, nowadays it is rarer to find extrapulmonary TB in immunocompetent rather that non-immunocompetent patients. The present case reports a fifty-six-year-old immunocompetent man with an anterior chest wall tuberculous abscess. The rarity of the present case relates both to the localization of the tuberculous abscess, and to the fact that the patient was immunocompetent. The diagnosis of musculoskeletal tuberculous infection remains a challenge for clinicians and requires a high index of suspicion. The combination of indolent onset of symptoms, positive tuberculin skin test, and compatible radiographic findings, strongly suggests the diagnosis. TB, however, must be confirmed by positive culture or histologic proof. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are important to prevent serious bone and joint destruction.

  3. Measurements of the human anterior chest wall by ultrasound and estimates of chest wall thickness for use in determination of transuranic nuclides in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low energy photons on which the in vivo detection of plutonium isotopes and americium 241 is based are severely attenuated in body tissues. To assess the activity of these radionuclides in the lungs by external measurement it is necessary to estimate or measure the thickness of tissues overlying the lungs. It is also desirable to distinguish between muscle and adipose tissues in the chest wall because of the difference in their attenuation properties. Diagnostic ultrasound machines developed for medical use are suitable for this purpose. Experience gained since 1978 in ultrasonic measurements of chest wall thickness and the current measurement procedure are described. The concept of ''equivalent muscle chest wall thickness'' is introduced and a method for calculating the parameter is given. Both chest wall thickness and equivalent muscle chest wall thickness have been found to correlate well with Quetelets Index (weight divided by height squared). Residual correlations with other parameters have been examined. Empirical formulae are given that can be used to predict the chest wall thickness and equivalent muscle chest wall thickness of a subject of given weight, height and age. (author)

  4. Elastofibroma dorsi – differential diagnosis in chest wall tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinau Hans-Ulrich

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elastofibromas are benign soft tissue tumours mostly of the infrascapular region between the thoracic wall, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscle with a prevalence of up to 24% in the elderly. The pathogenesis of the lesion is still unclear, but repetitive microtrauma by friction between the scapula and the thoracic wall may cause the reactive hyperproliferation of fibroelastic tissue. Methods We present a series of seven cases with elastofibroma dorsi with reference to clinical findings, further clinical course and functional results after resection, as well as recurrence. Data were obtained retrospectively by clinical examination, phone calls to the patients' general practitioners and charts review. Follow-up time ranged from four months to nine years and averaged 53 months. Results The patients presented with swelling of the infrascapular region or snapping scapula. In three cases, the lesion was painful. The ratio men/women was 2/5 with a mean age of 64 years. The tumor sizes ranged from 3 to 13 cm. The typical macroscopic aspect was characterized as poorly defined fibroelastic soft tissue lesion with a white and yellow cut surface caused by intermingled remnants of fatty tissue. Microscopically, the lesions consisted of broad collagenous strands and densely packed enlarged and fragmented elastic fibres with mostly round shapes. In all patients but one, postoperative seroma (which had to be punctuated occurred after resection; however, at follow-up time, no patient reported any decrease of function or sensation at the shoulder or the arm of the operated side. None of the patients experienced a relapse. Conclusion In differential diagnosis of soft tissue tumors located at this specific site, elastofibroma should be considered as likely diagnosis. Due to its benign behaviour, the tumor should be resected only in symptomatic patients.

  5. Predicting Chest Wall Pain From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Different Fractionation Schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Recent studies with two fractionation schemes predicted that the volume of chest wall receiving >30 Gy (V30) correlated with chest wall pain after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the lung. This study developed a predictive model of chest wall pain incorporating radiobiologic effects, using clinical data from four distinct SBRT fractionation schemes. Methods and Materials: 102 SBRT patients were treated with four different fractionations: 60 Gy in three fractions, 50 Gy in five fractions, 48 Gy in four fractions, and 50 Gy in 10 fractions. To account for radiobiologic effects, a modified equivalent uniform dose (mEUD) model calculated the dose to the chest wall with volume weighting. For comparison, V30 and maximum point dose were also reported. Using univariable logistic regression, the association of radiation dose and clinical variables with chest wall pain was assessed by uncertainty coefficient (U) and C statistic (C) of receiver operator curve. The significant associations from the univariable model were verified with a multivariable model. Results: 106 lesions in 102 patients with a mean age of 72 were included, with a mean of 25.5 (range, 12–55) months of follow-up. Twenty patients reported chest wall pain at a mean time of 8.1 (95% confidence interval, 6.3–9.8) months after treatment. The mEUD models, V30, and maximum point dose were significant predictors of chest wall pain (p < 0.0005). mEUD improved prediction of chest wall pain compared with V30 (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.11). The mEUD with moderate weighting (a = 5) better predicted chest wall pain than did mEUD without weighting (a = 1) (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.14). Body mass index (BMI) was significantly associated with chest wall pain (p = 0.008). On multivariable analysis, mEUD and BMI remained significant predictors of chest wall pain (p = 0.0003 and 0.03, respectively). Conclusion: mEUD with moderate weighting better predicted chest wall pain

  6. A triceps musculocutaneous flap for chest-wall defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartrampf, C.R. Jr.; Elliott, L.F.; Feldman, S. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    A posterior upper arm flap based on the profunda brachii vessels has been described to cover soft-tissue defects in the upper anterolateral chest. In our series, the posterior upper arm skin is elevated with the long head of the triceps muscle to cover seven chest-wall defects resulting from indolent postradiation open wounds following partial TRAM flap failure (n = 2), soft-tissue deficiencies following partial TRAM flap loss (n = 3), and primarily as an ancillary flap in TRAM flap breast reconstruction (n = 2). This flap also may be used to supply well-vascularized tissue in the regions of the shoulder, axilla, and posterolateral back. A prerequisite for this operation is redundant tissue of the upper arm often present in middle-aged women and in patients with lymphedema following mastectomy. In our series of seven patients, all donor sites were closed primarily, and there was no subjective functional deficit following transfer of the long head of the triceps muscle.

  7. Photodynamic therapy for chest wall recurrence from breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, R R; Sibata, C; Mang, T S; Bagnato, V S; Downie, G H; Hu, X H; Cuenca, R

    2004-09-01

    Breast cancer is common with over 230,000 new cases diagnosed each year in North America alone. While great strides have been made to achieve excellent cancer control and survival, a significant minority of patients fail locally. While initial salvage to regain disease control is of the utmost importance, it is not universally successful. This leads to a therapeutic quagmire. Additional surgery, radiation and chemo-hormonal therapy are possible, but they are usually highly morbid with low success rates. Photodynamic therapy appears to be an underutilized salvage modality for this unfortunate patient population. This report analyzes and reviews the role of photodynamic therapy for patients with chest wall re-recurrence from breast cancer.

  8. Clinical image: Hydatid disease of the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R.J.; Berlin, J.W.; Ghahremani, G.G. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Hydatid disease is rarely encountered among the population of the United States, but it affects several million people in sheep-raising regions of the world. Human infestation with Echinococcus granulosus begins following ingestion of its ova, which are excreted into the contaminated water during the usual dog-sheep cycle. Hydatid cysts will then develop most frequently in the liver (75% of cases) and lungs (15%) of the human host. Skeletal involvement has been reported to occur in only 0.5-4.0% of patients in the endemic areas. Because of the rarity and perplexing imaging features of hydatid disease involving the chest wall, we wish herein to present a case evaluated recently at our institution. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Chest Wall Motion during Speech Production in Patients with Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliakosta, Georgia; Mandros, Charalampos; Tzelepis, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production. Method: The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45 plus or minus 8 years, Schober test 1.45 plus or…

  10. Effects of high-frequency chest wall oscillation on pleural pressure and oscillated flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Tal; Skjodt, Neil M; Jones, Richard L

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HF-CWO) is directly related to the level of oscillated flow (osc) in the airways. We used the Vest system to investigate the effects of HFCWO on chest wall and pleural pressures and we correlated these pressures to the resultant osc. We also compared the latest HFCWO device with it predecessor. Different combinations of vest inflation pressure (background pressure) and oscillation frequency were randomly applied to 10 healthy volunteers. Chest wall pressure was determined using an air-filled bag under the vest and pleural pressure was estimated using an esophageal balloon. Reverse plethysmography was used to measure osc at the mouth and a spirometer was used to measure changes in end-expired lung volume. We found a significant correlation between chest wall and pleural pressure with approximately one-third of the chest wall pressure transmitted into the pleural space. Mean esophageal pressure remained negative at all background pressure/frequency combinations. There was a significant correlation (pHFCWO and since osc is dependent on esophageal pulse pressure, which in turn is dependent on chest wall pulse pressure, it follows that the effectiveness of HFCWO is influenced by the ability to generate an effective chest wall pulse pressure.

  11. Aspergillosis of bilateral breast and chest wall in an immunocompetent male masquerading as breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra G Nasit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal species are not frequently encountered in an immunocompetent host. Invasive aspergillosis typically occurs in severely immunocompromised patient. Aspergillus infection of breast and chest wall are rarely encountered in an immunocompetent as well as in immunocompromised host. Till date only 13 cases of fungal infection of breast and chest wall have been reported in the literature. This report presents a case of aspergillosis of bilateral breast and chest wall in an immunocompetent male, clinically mimicking breast cancer. Diagnosis was achieved by fine-needle aspiration cytology and subsequently Aspergillus flavus was identified on fungal culture. The patient was successfully treated with voriconazole. Prompt diagnosis by cytology and appropriate treatment is necessary to prevent adverse outcome. Here, we present this rare case of fungal infection of breast and chest wall with relevant review of the literature.

  12. Obesity Increases the Risk of Chest Wall Pain From Thoracic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly being used to treat thoracic tumors. We attempted here to identify dose-volume parameters that predict chest wall toxicity (pain and skin reactions) in patients receiving thoracic SBRT. Patients and Methods: We screened a database of patients treated with SBRT between August 2004 and August 2008 to find patients with pulmonary tumors within 2.5 cm of the chest wall. All patients received a total dose of 50 Gy in four daily 12.5-Gy fractions. Toxicity was scored according to the NCI-CTCAE V3.0. Results: Of 360 patients in the database, 265 (268 tumors) had tumors within 30, or volume of the chest wall receiving 30 Gy. Body mass index (BMI) was also strongly associated with the development of chest pain: patients with BMI ≥29 had almost twice the risk of chronic pain (p = 0.03). Among patients with BMI >29, diabetes mellitus was a significant contributing factor to the development of chest pain. Conclusion: Safe use of SBRT with 50 Gy in four fractions for lesions close to the chest wall requires consideration of the chest wall volume receiving 30 Gy and the patient's BMI and diabetic state.

  13. Prediction of Chest Wall Toxicity From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephans, Kevin L., E-mail: stephak@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Djemil, Toufik; Tendulkar, Rahul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Robinson, Cliff G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States); Reddy, Chandana A.; Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine patient, tumor, and treatment factors related to the development of late chest wall toxicity after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: We reviewed a registry of 134 patients treated with lung SBRT to 60 Gy in 3 fractions who had greater than 1 year of clinical follow-up and no history of multiple treatments to the same lobe (n = 48). Patients were treated as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0236 without specific chest wall avoidance criteria. The chest wall was retrospectively contoured. Thirty-two lesions measured less than 3 cm, and sixteen measured 3 to 5 cm. The median planning target volume was 29 cm{sup 3}. Results: With a median follow-up of 18.8 months, 10 patients had late symptomatic chest wall toxicity (4 Grade 1 and 6 Grade 2) at a median of 8.8 months after SBRT. No patient characteristics (age, diabetes, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, or body mass index) were predictive for toxicity, whereas there was a trend for continued smoking (p = 0.066; odds ratio [OR], 4.4). Greatest single tumor dimension (p = 0.047; OR, 2.63) and planning target volume (p = 0.040; OR, 1.04) were correlated with toxicity, whereas distance from tumor edge to chest wall and gross tumor volume did not reach statistical significance. Volumes of chest wall receiving 30 Gy (V30) through 70 Gy (V70) were all highly significant, although this correlation weakened for V65 and V70 and maximum chest wall point dose only trended to significance (p = 0.06). On multivariate analysis, tumor volume was no longer correlated with toxicity and only V30 through V60 remained statistically significant. Conclusions: Tumor size and chest wall dosimetry are correlated to late chest wall toxicity. Only chest wall V30 through V60 remained significant on multivariate analysis. Restricting V30 to 30 cm{sup 3} or less and V60 to 3 cm{sup 3} or less should result in a 10% to 15% risk of late chest wall toxicity or lower.

  14. Sternoclavicular joint septic arthritis with chest wall abscess in a healthy adult: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Kato, Hisaaki; SHIRAI, Kunihiro; NAKAJIMA, Yasuhiro; YAMADA, Noriaki; Okada, Hideshi; Yoshida, Takahiro; Toyoda, Izumi; Ogura, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic arthritis of the sternoclavicular joint is rare. It can be associated with serious complications such as osteomyelitis, chest wall abscess, and mediastinitis. In this report, we describe a case of an otherwise healthy adult with septic arthritis of the sternoclavicular joint with chest wall abscess. Case presentation A 68-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital complaining of pain and erythema near the right sternoclavicular joint. Despite 1 week of oral antibiotics,...

  15. Chest wall reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™) and a TRAM flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunbjerg, Mette Eline; Juhl, Alexander Andersen; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg

    2014-01-01

    Mette Eline Brunbjerg, Alexander Andersen Juhl, Tine E. Damsgaard. "Chest wall reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™) and a TRAM flap.” Acta Oncol. 2013 Jun;52(5):1052-4. Epub 2012 Oct 24. PMID: 23095144......Mette Eline Brunbjerg, Alexander Andersen Juhl, Tine E. Damsgaard. "Chest wall reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™) and a TRAM flap.” Acta Oncol. 2013 Jun;52(5):1052-4. Epub 2012 Oct 24. PMID: 23095144...

  16. Estimating adipose tissue in the chest wall using ultrasonic and alternate 40K and biometric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The percentage of adipose (fat) tissue in the chest wall must be known to accurately measure Pu in the human lung. Correction factors of 100% or more in x-ray detection efficiency are common. Methods using simple 40K and biometric measurement techniques were investigated to determine the adipose content in the human chest wall. These methods predict adipose content to within 15% of the absolute ultrasonic value. These new methods are discussed and compared with conventional ultrasonic measurement techniques

  17. Normalized mean shapes and reference index values for computerized quantitative assessment indices of chest wall deformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Chul; Park, Man Sik; Lee, Seong Keon; Nam, Ki Chang; Park, Hyung Joo; Kim, Min Gi; Song, Jae-Jun; Choi, Hyuk

    2015-11-01

    We previously proposed a computerized index (eccentricity index [EI]) for chest-wall deformity measurements, such as pectus excavatum. We sought to define mean shapes based on normal chest walls and to propose for computerized index reference values of that are used in the quantitative analysis of the severity of chest-wall deformities. A total of 584 patients were classified into 18 groups, and a database of their chest-wall computed tomography (CT) scan images was constructed. The boundaries of the chest wall were extracted by using a segmentation algorithm, and the mean shapes were subsequently developed. The reference index values were calculated from the developed mean shapes. Reference index values for the EI were compared with a conventional index, the Haller index (HI). A close association has been shown between the two indices in multiple subjects (r = 0.974, P < 0.001). The newly developed mean shapes and reference index values supply both reliability and objectivity to the diagnosis, analysis, and treatment of chest-wall deformities. They promise to be highly useful in clinical settings.

  18. Reduce chest pain using modified silicone fluted drain tube for chest drainage after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lung resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Hu, Bin; Miao, Jinbai

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, efficacy and safety of a modified silicone fluted drain tube after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lung resection. Methods The prospective randomized study included 50 patients who underwent VATS lung resection between March 2015 and June 2015. Eligible patients were randomized into two groups: experimental group (using the silicone fluted drain tubes for chest drainage) and control group (using standard drain tubes for chest drainage). The volume and characteristics of drainage, postoperative (PO) pain scores and hospital stay were recorded. All patients received standard care during hospital admission. Results In accordance with the exit criteria, three patients were excluded from study. The remaining 47 patients included in the final analysis were divided into two groups: experiment group (N=24) and control group (N=23). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, sex, height, weight, clinical diagnosis and type of surgical procedure. There was a trend toward less PO pain in experimental group on postoperative day (POD) 1, with a statistically significant difference. Patients in experimental group had a reduced occurrence of fever [temperature (T) >37.4 °C] compared to the control group. Conclusions The silicone fluted drain tube is feasible and safe and may relieve patient PO pain and reduce occurrence of fever without the added risk of PO complications. PMID:26941976

  19. Evaluation of the safety of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) therapy in blunt thoracic trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Becker Brian; Ney Arthur L; Palmer Cassandra A; Anderson Casandra A; Schaffel Steven D; Quickel Robert R

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Airway clearance is frequently needed by patients suffering from blunt chest wall trauma. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO) has been shown to be effective in helping to clear secretions from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, asthma, primary ciliary dyskinesia, emphysema, COPD, and many others. Chest wall trauma patients are at increased risk for development of pulmonary complications related to airway clearance. These patients frequent...

  20. Predicting outcomes after blunt chest wall trauma: development and external validation of a new prognostic model

    OpenAIRE

    Battle, Ceri Elisabeth; Hutchings, Hayley; Lovett, Simon; Bouamra, Omar; Jones, Sally; Sen, Aruni; Gagg, James; Robinson, David; Hartford-Beynon, Jake; Williams, Jeremy; Evans, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Blunt chest wall trauma accounts for over 15% of all trauma admissions to Emergency Departments worldwide. Reported mortality rates vary between 4 and 60%. Management of this patient group is challenging as a result of the delayed on-set of complications. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a prognostic model that can be used to assist in the management of blunt chest wall trauma. Methods There were two distinct phases to the overall study; the development and the v...

  1. Determination of the chest wall thickness as calibration parameter for dosimetric partial-body counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe actual partial body measurements with Phoswich detectors in the in-vivo laboratory of the Institute for Technology in Karlsruhe. The chest wall thickness is estimated from the radio of body weight to body length. This formula includes several uncertainties. The aim of the project was the reduction of the uncertainties of the empirical formula using ultrasonography. This method allows an accuracy of plus or minus 1.1 mm for the determined chest wall thickness. Besides the experimental study several voxel models were used to determine the efficiency of modeled measuring systems. The voxel models reach the same accuracy as the ultrasound method.

  2. Heart failure due to severe myocardial calcification; A rare complication after irradiation on the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Shouichi; Maida, Kiyoshi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Shigeo (Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital (Japan))

    1993-11-01

    A 28-year-old female who had had irradiation on the chest wall at the age of 5 as a remedy for keloid granulation after burn, recently developed congestive heart failure. Severe tricuspid regurgitation was demonstrated by echocardiography with a certain calcification in the cardiac shadow on chest radiogram. Calcified right ventricle and ventricular septum were noticed operatively, which disturbed ventricular motion and also caused tricuspid valve deformity. These calcified myocardium apparently corresponded with the irradiation field. After tricuspid valve replacement, she regained physical activity satisfactorily without congestive heart failure. Because she had no other known causes of cardiac calcification such as hypercalcemia, myocarditis, myocardial infarction or renal diseases, irradiation on the chest wall could be responsible for the severe myocardial calcification. (author).

  3. Salivary gland choristoma (heterotopic salivary gland tissue) on the anterior chest wall of a newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aby, Janelle L; Patel, Mayha; Sundram, Uma; Benjamin, Latanya T

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland choristoma (heterotopic salivary gland tissue) is a rare condition typically seen in the newborn period. This developmental heterotopia is generally nonprogressive, with little risk of malignant transformation. We present the second known reported case of a salivary gland choristoma located on the anterior chest wall. Knowledge of this rare entity will allow for accurate diagnosis and management of this benign anatomic variant.

  4. Morganella morganii causing abscess over the anterior chest wall- a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D, Vijaya; Jv, Sathish; Mk, Yashaswini; S, Sulaiman

    2014-09-01

    A 17-year-old female college student presented with recurrent abscess over the anterior chest wall since one and half year. Morganella morganii was isolated from the aspirated pus. Patient was started on oral ciprofloxacin and the lesion resolved in two weeks.

  5. Properties of novel composite meshes in chest wall reconstruction: A comparative animal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Zardo

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: We consider composite grafts a suitable alternative for chest wall reconstruction. They are characterized by good overall biointegration and limited perigraft-fibrosis, thus potentially facilitating redo-procedures, even though a hydrophilic coating per se does not appear to prevent intrathoracic adhesion formation.

  6. Chest Wall Thickness Measurements and the Dosimetric Implications for Male Radiation Workers at the KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using ultrasound techniques, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has measured chest wall thicknesses of a group of male workers at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. A site-specific biometric equation has been developed for these workers. Chest wall thickness is an important modifier on lung counting efficiency. These data have been put into the perspective of the ICRP recommended dose limits for occupationally exposed workers:100 mSv in a 5-year period with a maximum of 50 mSv in any one year. For measured chest wall thicknesses of 1.9 cm to 4.1 cm and a 30 min counting time, the achievable MDAs for natural uranium in the KAERI lung counter vary from 5.75 mg to 11.28 mg. These values are close to, or even exceed, the predicted amounts of natural uranium that will remain in the lung (absorption type M and S) after an intake equal to the Annual Limit on Intake corresponding to a committed dose of 20 mSv. This paper shows that the KAERI lung counter probably cannot detect an intake of Type S natural uranium in a worker with a chest wall thickness equal to the average value (2.7 cm) under routine counting conditions

  7. Respiratory kinematics by optoelectronic analysis of chest-wall motion and ultrasonic imaging of the diaphragm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliverti, Andrea; Pedotti, Antonio; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Macklem, P. T.

    1998-07-01

    Although from a respiratory point of view, compartmental volume change or lack of it is the most crucial variable, it has not been possible to measure the volume of chest wall compartments directly. Recently we developed a new method based on a optoelectronic motion analyzer that can give the three-dimensional location of many markers with the temporal and spatial accuracy required for respiratory measurements. Marker's configuration has been designed specifically to measure the volume of three chest wall compartments, the pulmonary and abdominal rib cage compartments and the abdomen, directly. However, it can not track the exact border between the two rib cage compartments (pulmonary and abdominal) which is determined by the cephalic extremity of the area of apposition of the diaphragm to the inner surface of the rib cage, and which can change systematically as a result of disease processes. The diaphragm displacement can be detected by ultrasonography. In the present study, we propose an integrated system able to investigate the relationships between external (chest wall) and internal (diaphragm) movements of the different respiratory structures by simultaneous external imaging with the optoelectronic system combined with internal kinematic imaging using ultrasounds. 2D digitized points belonging to the lower lung margin, taken from ultrasonographic views, are mapped into the 3D space, where chest wall markers are acquired. Results are shown in terms of accuracy of 3D probe location, relative movement between the probe and the body landmarks, dynamic relationships between chest wall volume and position of the diaphragm during quiet breathing, slow inspirations, relaxations and exercise.

  8. Evaluation of anterior chest wall implanted port: technical aspects, results, and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Young Hwan; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Yoon, Yup; Kim, Si Young [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate the technical aspects, results and complications of patients with implanted anterior chest wall port. Between April 1997 and June 1999, a total of 63 implanted ports were placed at the anterior chest wall of 63 consecutive patients by interventional radiologists. The indications were chemotherapy in 61 patients and total parenteral nutrition in two. The peripheral portion of the subclavian vein was punctured under fluoroscopic guidance via ipsilateral peripheral vein during venography. A central venous catheter was placed in the superior vena cava, and using the subcutaneous tunneling method, a connected infusion port was implanted at the anterior chest wall. Results and complications were reviewed, and by means of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the expected patency of the port was determined. The technical success rate for implanted port at the anterior chest wall was 100% (63/63 patients). In two patients, hematoma and oozing were treated by compression. The duration of port implantation ranged from 12 to 855 (mean, 187) days, and the port patency rate was 305.7{+-}47.6 days. In seven patients (completed chemotherapy (n=3D3), central venous thrombosis (n=3D3) catheter-related infection (n=3D1)), the port was removed. Catheter obstruction occurred in two patients, and in one, the use of urokinase led to successful recanalization. Sixteen patients died of an underlying malignancy, but no catheter-related death was noted. Implantation of an anterior chest wall port is a safe and useful procedure, with long patency, for patients requiring chemotherapy and long-term venous access. (author)

  9. Identification of sex-different specimens of costicartilage pairs 2 - 6: post mortem study by radiograms of the anterior chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markert, K.; Reinwarth, E.M.; Wirth, I.; Brautzsch, G. (Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (German Democratic Republic). Inst. fuer Gerichtliche Medizin)

    1983-01-01

    On the basis of widely laterally resected anterior chest walls, ossification specimens of female (n=95) and male (n=112) individuals of different age have been examined. An unexpected high significance of the already described sex dimorphism could be secured between the 20th and 50th year of age. The estimated epiphenomenological changes impress as a female calcification type with centrally in the costal cartilage situated ossifications and as a male calcification type with sheath-like calcifications situated at the cranial and caudal edges of the costicartilage.

  10. Gastric Duplication: A Rare Cause of Massive Lower Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage, Chest Wall Mass, and Enterocutaneous Fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeka B. Kesieme

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric duplications are uncommon developmental abnormality reported to present with different clinical scenarios. We present a 2-1/2-year-old Nigerian female who started having intermittent massive lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage at 5 months of age. She subsequently developed a lower chest wall mass and enterocutaneous fistula. She was found to have gastric duplication with fistulous communication with the descending colon, spleen, and lower chest wall. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper on gastric duplication resulting in intermittent massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding mainly from splenic capsular erosion and fistula and enterocutaneous fistula resulting from erosion of anterior abdominal wall. Gastric duplication is hence an important rare cause of intermittent massive lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage and spontaneous enterocutaneous fistula in the paediatric population.

  11. Short TI inversion-recovery MR imaging of chest wall malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short-T1 inversion-recovery (STIR) sequences have greater constant, less motion sensitivity, and require shorter imaging times than conventional T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) sequences and are therefore particularly useful for staging chest wall malignancies. MR studies of 49 patients with possible chest wall malignancies were reviewed. Images were produced at 0.15 T with a variety of SE sequences. Forty-five also had STIR (repetition time, 1,400 - 2,100; echo time, 36 or 40; inversion time, 100 or 125). MR studies indicated chest wall involvement in 39 of 49 patients; 12 had obvious rib encasement, the most definitive finding. IN 13, lesions detected on STIR were either not visible or seen only in retrospect on T1 SE images. In five of five, STIR was clearly superior to T2 SE for delineation of tumor margins. The authors have discontinued using T2 SE sequences for chest neoplasms in favor of the higher contrast and sensitivity of STIR

  12. Unusual chest wall pain caused by thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kinshi; Yabuki, Shoji; Otani, Koji; Nikaido, Takuya; Otoshi, Ken-Ichi; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Shin-Ichi; Konno, Shin-Ichi

    2016-06-01

    Symptomatic thoracic disc herniation is clinically rare. There are few cases of disc herniation of the thoracic spine in top athletes described in the literature. We herein present a rare case of chest wall pain due to thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher. A 30-year-old, left-handed pitcher complained of left-sided chest wall pain in the region of his lower ribs during a game. Neurological examination revealed hypoesthesia of the left side of the chest at the level of the lower thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracic spine showed a left-sided paramedian disc herniation at the T9-T10 level. The player was initially prescribed rest, administration of pregabalin (150 mg twice a day), and subsequent physical rehabilitation. He was able to resume full training and pitching without medication 6 months after the onset. A follow-up MRI of the thoracic spine showed a reduction in the size of the herniated disc compared to the initial findings. Though relatively rare, thoracic disc herniation should be considered in cases of chest wall pain in athletes. PMID:26983590

  13. Unilateral chest wall anomaly in a patient with Gardner' s syndrome: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Eun Hee; Lee, So Yeon; Park, Hee Jin; Kwon, Heon Ju; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Hae Won; Kwang, Hyon Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji General Hospital, Eulji University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Gardner syndrome is a familial disease consisting of colonic polyposis, osteomas, and soft tissue tumors. We describe unilateral chest wall anomaly in a 32-year-old man with Gardner syndrome. A chest radiograph showed asymmetric hypertrophy of the right seventh to tenth ribs. CT images showed increased size of the medullary portions of these lesions, but relatively normal thickness of the cortex. Intercostal muscles along the right seventh to tenth ribs were hypertrophied as compared with the contralateral ribs. Both lungs were clear but the volume of right lung showed slightly smaller than left one.

  14. Malignant Mesothelioma Presenting as a Giant Chest, Abdominal and Pelvic Wall Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Zhi Hong; Gao, Xiao Long; Yi, Xiang Hua; Wang, Pei Jun [Tongji Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai (China)

    2011-11-15

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a relatively rare carcinoma of the mesothelial cells, and it is usually located in the pleural or peritoneal cavity. Here we report on a unique case of MM that developed in the chest, abdominal and pelvic walls in a 77-year-old female patient. CT and MRI revealed mesothelioma that manifested as a giant mass in the right flank and bilateral pelvic walls. The diagnosis was confirmed by the pathology and immunohistochemistry. Though rare, accurate investigation of the radiological features of a body wall MM may help make an exact diagnosis.

  15. Automated quantification of bronchiectasis, airway wall thickening and lumen tapering in chest CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez-Rovira, Adria; Kuo, Wieying; Petersen, Jens;

    were obtained using a fully automatic, in-house developed, segmentation method. Subsequently, for each detected airway branch, the Airway-Artery Ratio (AAR, ratio between airway outer wall and accompanying artery radius, a bronchiectasis measurement), Wall-Artery Ratio (WAR, ratio between airway wall...... measurement for each subject. Results: Spirometer-guided inspiratory chest CTs of 12 CF patients (median age 10.6 years, 5 females) and 12 age and gender matched controls - lungs evaluated as normal on CT - (median age 12.4 years, 5 females) were retrospectively selected in the Sophia Children’s Hospital.......632, pdetect and quantify CF-related structural changes of the airways....

  16. Chest wall thickness measurements and the dosimetric implications for male workers in the uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Human Monitoring Laboratory has measured the chest wall thickness and adipose mass fraction of a group of workers at three Canadian uranium refinery, conversion plant, and fuel fabrication sites using ultrasound. A site specific biometric equation has been developed for these workers, who seem to be somewhat larger than other workers reported in the literature. The average chest wall thickness of the seated persons measured at the uranium conversion plant and refinery was about 3.8 cm, and at the fuel fabrication facility was 3.4 cm. These values are not statistically different. Persons measured in a seated geometry had a thinner chest wall thickness than persons measured in a supine geometry - the decrease was in the range of 0.3 cm to 0.5 cm. It follows that a seated geometry will give a lower MDA (or decision level) than a supine geometry. Chest wall thickness is a very important modifier for lung counting efficiency and this data has been put into the perspective of the impending Canadian dose limits that will reduce the limit of occupationally exposed workers to essentially 20 mSv per year. Natural uranium must be measured based on the 235U emissions at these type of facilities. The refining and conversion process removes 234Th and the equilibrium is disturbed. This is unfortunate as the MDA values for this nuclide are approximately a factor of three lower than the values quoted below. The sensitivity of the germanium and phoswich based lung counting system has been compared. Achievable MDA's (30 minute counting time) with a four-phoswich-detector array lie in the range of 4.7 mg to 13.5 mg of natural uranium based on the 235U emissions over a range of chest wall thicknesses of 1.6 cm to 6.0 cm. The average achievable MDA is about 8.5 mg which can be reduced to about 6.2 mg by doubling the counting time. Similarly, MDA's (30 minute counting time) obtainable with a germanium lung counting system will lie in the range of 3 mg to 28 mg of natural uranium

  17. Interpretation of posterior wall of bronchus intermedius and subcarinal region in lateral chest radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Dong Wook; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Yoon, Yup [Kyunghee Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-01

    a lateral chest radiograph is frequently useful and sometimes decisive in detecting chest pathology. Certain parts, such as the posterior wall of the branchus intermedius (PWBI) and subcarinal regions, can be evaluated only on lateral chest radiograph. The authors present and emphasize the findings of PWBI and subcarinal abnormalities. Abnormal PWBI, more than 3 mm thick, is seen in cases of minor degree of oblique position, pulmonary edema, inflammation, neoplasm and enlarged lymph nodes. It can also be seen in patients with subcarinal mass. The findings of subcarinal mass on lateral view are ill-defined increased opacity, fullness of the inferior hilar region, doughnut sign, extra-density and thickening of the PWBI. Detection of changes in the PWBI and subcarinal region may be the only diagnostic evidence of hilar and subcarinal disease and helps in its early detection prior to computed tomography.

  18. Reconstrução da parede torácica nos defeitos adquiridos Chest wall reconstruction in acquired defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius H. de Carvalho

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Acquired chest wall defects present a challenging problem for thoracic surgeons. Many of such defects can be repaired with the use of local and regional musculocutaneous flaps, but larger defects compromising skeletal structure require increasingly sophisticated reconstructive techniques. The following discussion will review the options for repair acquired chest wall defects based in literature. The authors searched the Pubmed (www.pubmed.com and found citations from January 1996 to February 2008. By reading the titles and the abstracts most of the citations were discharged because they focused in congenital chest wall defects or were cases report. However, many papers were found describing the outcome of large series of patients with acquired chest wall deformities. A review of recent literature shows that the repair of chest wall defects with soft tissues, if possible, remains the treatment of choice. Large chest wall defects require skeletal reconstruction to prevent paradoxical respiration. The selection of the most appropriate flap is primary dictated by the location and the size of the defect. It is important to transfer tissue with good vitality, so understanding the vascular supply is imperative. Autogenous grafts have been used in the past for skeletal reconstruction but a combination of synthetic materials with musculocutaneous flaps has been used lately. Based in the literature, the use of prosthetic material in chest wall reconstruction does not significantly increases the risk of wound infection.

  19. Multidisciplinary approach to treatment of radiation-induced chest wall sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, H Volkan; Gandolfi, Brad M; Williams, Judson B; D'Amico, Thomas A; Zenn, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    Radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS) is a rare complication following therapeutic external irradiation for lung cancer patients. Patients with RIS may develop recurrence or metastasis of the previous disease and also at high risk for early chest wall complications following operation, which requires close follow-up and multidisciplinary approach. We present a challenging case of RIS with a multidisciplinary teamwork in the decision-making and successful management. PMID:25663293

  20. Severe neonatal hypercalcemia in 4-month-old, presented with respiratory distress and chest wall deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Aljahdali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT is a rare disease affecting calcium metabolism and results in severe life-treating hypocalcemia of the neonates. Diagnosis can be challenging due to variable and nonspecific symptomatology. We are reporting on a 4-month-old female infant presenting with respiratory distress and chest wall deformity. We are trying to highlight different surgical options for this rare disease and importance of close collaboration with the pediatric endocrinologist in the treatment plan for those patients.

  1. Individualized chest wall compensating bolus for electron irradiation following mastectomy: an ultrasound approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A-mode ultrasound is used in a procedure to construct individualized tissue compensating bolus for electron beam irradiation of the chest wall, where the thickness of tissues over the lung may vary by as much as 3 cm. Electron energies corresponding to the thickest tissues in the field would normally cause lung tissues beneath the thinner regions to receive the full tumor dose. The problem is made more serious by the fact that electron ranges in lung are 2-3 times greater than in muscle. We feel that some form of individualized compensation is necessary for patients with large variations in chest wall thickness within a given electron treatment field. The A-Scan procedure is particularly suited to deliniation of the pleura-lung interface because of the strong identifiable reflection from this discontinuity. In the first approach, a moldable gelatanous bolus material, mixed to transmit ultrasound at 5 MHz with a velocity equal to the speed of sound in muscle, is placed on the chest wall covering the entire field. The thickness of the compensating material is then reduced at each point in the field so that the total thickness (muscle plus compensator) indicated by the A-scan is everywhere the same as the chosen maximum treatment depth. Because the compensator has nearly the same electron stopping power as muscle, the compensated chest wall is now uniform in thickness over the entire field. In the second approach, we sacrifice the one-step advantages of using sonically transparent compensator material in order to obtain a more rugged and rapid setting compensator. Four patients have been treated with no evidence of pneumonitis. The more elegant combination of these two approaches awaits the development of rugged materials which are both quick setting and sonically transparent

  2. Resection and repair of large abdominal wall lesions in gynecologic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhu-feng; WANG Jin-hui; CUI Bing-qian; FAN Qing-bo; WANG Xiao-jun; ZHAO Ru; SONG Ke-xin

    2013-01-01

    Background The techniques of resection and repair of large lesions in the abdominal wall are very challenging in the area of gynecology.We explored the techniques of resection and plastic surgical repair of large abdominal wall lesions in gynecologic patients.Methods Twenty-six patients with large lesions in the abdominal wall underwent resection by the gynecologists and repair through abdominal plasty and V-Y plasty with or without fascia patch grafting by the gynecologists or plastic surgeons from March 2003 to October 2010.Results All patients had a history of cesarean section.One patient had an infected sinus tract after cesarean section,one patient had an inflammatory nodule,and the others had lesions of endometriosis,including one cancer.The average largest lesion diameter was (4.79 ± 4.18) cm according to the ultrasonography results.The lesions of all patients were completely resected with pretty abdominal contour.A polypropylene biological mesh was added to the fascia in 20 patients.One patient underwent groin flap repair,and one underwent V-Y advanced skin flap repair on the left of the incision to relieve the suture tension.Conclusions Multi-department cooperation involving the gynecology and plastic surgery departments,and even the general surgery department,is essential for patients with large lesions in the abdominal wall.This cooperative effort enabled surgeons to completely resect large lesions.Abdominal wall plastic surgical repair can ameliorate large wounds of the abdominal wall.

  3. Instant Abdominal Wall Reconstruction with Biologic Mesh following Resection of Locally Advanced Colonic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Oskay Kaya; Engin Olcucuoglu; Gaye Seker; Hakan Kulacoglu

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of immediate abdominal wall reconstruction with biologic mesh following the resection of locally advanced colonic cancer. The tumor in the right colon did not respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Surgical enbloc excision, including excision of the invasion in the abdominal wall, was achieved, and the defect was reconstructed with porcine dermal collagen mesh. The patient was discharged with no complication, and adaptation of the mesh was excellent at the six-month followup.

  4. Effects of Changes in Lung Volume on Oscillatory Flow Rate During High-Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J Butcher

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO in mucolysis and mucous clearance is thought to be dependant on oscillatory flow rate (Fosc. Therefore, increasing Fosc during HFCWO may have a clinical benefit.

  5. An unusual case of isolated, serial metastases of gallbladder carcinoma involving the chest wall, axilla, breast and lung parenchyma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Iott

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the English literature, only 9 cases of adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with cutaneous metastasis have been reported so far. One case of multiple cutaneous metastases along with deposits in the breast tissue has been reported. We present a case of incidental metastatic gallbladder carcinoma with no intra-abdominal disease presenting as a series of four isolated cutaneous right chest wall, axillary nodal, breast and pulmonary metastases following resection and adjuvant chemoradiation for her primary tumor. In spite of the metastatic disease coupled with the aggressive nature of the cancer, this patient reported that her energy level had returned to baseline with a good appetite and a stable weight indicating a good performance status and now is alive at 25 months since diagnosis. Her serially-presented, oligometastatic diseases were well-controlled by concurrent chemoradiation and stereotactic radiation therapy. We report this case study because of its rarity and for the purpose of complementing current literature with an additional example of cutaneous metastasis from adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder.

  6. What Is Chest MRI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Chest MRI? Chest MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe, noninvasive test. "Noninvasive" means that ... your chest wall, heart, and blood vessels. Chest MRI uses radio waves, magnets, and a computer to ...

  7. Pectoralis Muscle Flap Repair Reduces Paradoxical Motion of the Chest Wall in Complex Sternal Wound Dehiscence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitani, Jacob; Russo, Marco; Pompeo, Eugenio; Sergiacomi, Gian Luigi; Chiariello, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that in patients with chronic complex sternum dehiscence, the use of muscle flap repair minimizes the occurrence of paradoxical motion of the chest wall (CWPM) when compared to sternal rewiring, eventually leading to better respiratory function and clinical outcomes during follow-up. Methods In a propensity score matching analysis, out of 94 patients who underwent sternal reconstruction, 20 patients were selected: 10 patients underwent sternal reconstruction with bilateral pectoralis muscle flaps (group 1) and 10 underwent sternal rewiring (group 2). Eligibility criteria included the presence of hemisternum diastases associated with multiple (≥3) bone fractures and radiologic evidence of synchronous chest wall motion (CWSM). We compared radiologically assessed (volumetric computed tomography) ventilatory mechanic indices such as single lung and global vital capacity (VC), diaphragm excursion, synchronous and paradoxical chest wall motion. Results Follow-up was 100% complete (mean 85±24 months). CWPM was inversely correlated with single lung VC (Spearman R=−0.72, p=0.0003), global VC (R=−0.51, p=0.02) and diaphragm excursion (R=−0.80, p=0.0003), whereas it proved directly correlated with dyspnea grade (Spearman R=0.51, p=0.02) and pain (R=0.59, p=0.005). Mean CWPM and single lung VC were both better in group 1, whereas there was no difference in CWSM, diaphragm excursion and global VC. Conclusion Our study suggests that in patients with complex chronic sternal dehiscence, pectoralis muscle flap reconstruction guarantees lower CWPM and greater single-lung VC when compared with sternal rewiring and it is associated with better clinical outcomes with less pain and dyspnea. PMID:27733997

  8. Superficial microwave-induced hyperthermia in the treatment of chest wall recurrences in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, J B; Hay, M; Bordure, G

    1990-09-01

    Our study concerns 42 patients with chest wall recurrences from breast cancer: 17 Stage 1 (less than 4 cm in diameter), 11 Stage 2 (more than 4 cm), seven Stage 3 (skin ulceration whatever tumor size), and seven Stage 4 (neoplastic lymphangitis and/or skin nodules covering chest wall beyond midline). All the patients were treated with 2450 MHz microwaves by means of a generator with 4 magnetrons (250 to 300 W) and arterial applicators delivering 5 to 10 W/cm2. Each applicator is coupled with an infrared thermometer allowing an atraumatic temperature control processed by a PC-compatible computer using a Turbo Pascal program. A temperature of 41.5 degrees C to 42.5 degrees C was maintained for 45 minutes from the skin surface to a 2.5-cm depth within tissues. Hyperthermia alone was done in four patients; hyperthermia was combined with chemotherapy in four patients, and with electrontherapy (2 X 450 cGy or 3 X 350 cGy/week) in 34 patients: tumor dose under 3000 cGy in seven patients and over 3000 cGy in 27 patients. We observed a complete response in 22 patients (52.3%), a partial response (greater than 50%) in 11 patients (26.1%), and no response in nine patients (21.4%). No complete response was observed in patients treated with hyperthermia alone or in conjunction with chemotherapy. The local control was demonstrated to be improved only in patients treated with hyperthermia and radiotherapy. The results were correlated with tumor stage: ten complete responses out of 12 Stage 1, and one complete response out of four Stage 4. We noted nine side effects completely reversible within a month with no late skin reaction. Our results show that hyperthermia can give improved local control without any morbidity in treating chest wall recurrences of breast cancer.

  9. Necrotizing fasciitis involving the chest and abdominal wall caused by Raoultella planticola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Si-Hyun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Raoultella planticola was originally considered to be a member of environmental Klebsiella. The clinical significance of R. planticola is still not well known. Case presentation We describe the first case of necrotizing fasciitis involving the chest and abdominal wall caused by R. planticola. The identity of the organism was confirmed using 16S rRNA sequencing. The patient was successfully treated with the appropriate antibiotics combined with operative drainage and debridement. Conclusions R. planticola had been described as environmental species, but should be suspected in extensive necrotizing fasciitis after minor trauma in mild to moderate immunocompromised patients.

  10. Dosimetric evaluation of integrated IMRT treatment of the chest wall and supraclavicular region for breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bo; Wei, Xian-ding; Zhao, Yu-tian [Department of Radiation Oncology, the Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University, Wuxi (China); Ma, Chang-Ming, E-mail: charlie.ma@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of irradiation of the chest wall and supraclavicular region as an integrated volume with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after modified radical mastectomy. This study included 246 patients who received modified radical mastectomy. The patients were scanned with computed tomography, and the chest wall (with or without the internal mammary lymph nodes) and supraclavicular region were delineated. For 143 patients, the chest wall and supraclavicular region were combined as an integrated planning volume and treated with IMRT. For 103 patients, conventional treatments were employed with 2 tangential fields for the chest wall, abutting a mixed field of 6-MV x-rays (16 Gy) and 9-MeV electrons (34 Gy) for the upper supraclavicular region. The common prescription dose was 50 Gy/25 Fx/5 W to 90% of the target volume. The dosimetric characteristics of the chest wall, the supraclavicular region, and normal organs were compared. For the chest wall target, compared with conventional treatments, the integrated IMRT plans lowered the maximum dose, increased the minimum dose, and resulted in better conformity and uniformity of the target volume. There was an increase in minimum, average, and 95% prescription dose for the integrated IMRT plans in the supraclavicular region, and conformity and uniformity were improved. The V{sub 30} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and mean dose of the heart on the integrated IMRT plans were lower than those of the conventional plans. The V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 5} of the heart were higher on the integrated IMRT plans (p < 0.05) than on conventional plans. Without an increase in the radiation dose to organs at risk, the integrated IMRT treatment plans improved the dose distribution of the supraclavicular region and showed better dose conformity and uniformity of the integrated target volume of the chest wall and supraclavicular region.

  11. Solitary metastatic adenocarcinoma of the sternum treated by total sternectomy and chest wall reconstruction using a Gore-Tex patch and myocutaneous flap: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korfer Reiner

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The consequences of bone metastasis are often devastating. Although the exact incidence of bone metastasis is unknown, it is estimated that 350,000 people die of bone metastasis annually in the United States. The incidence of local recurrences after mastectomy and breast-conserving therapy varies between 5% and 40% depending on the risk factors and primary therapy utilized. So far, a standard therapy of local recurrence has not been defined, while indications of resection and reconstruction considerations have been infrequently described. This case report reviews the use of sternectomy for breast cancer recurrence, highlights the need for thorough clinical and radiologic evaluation to ensure the absence of other systemic diseases, and suggests the use of serratus anterior muscle flap as a pedicle graft to cover full-thickness defects of the anterior chest wall. Case presentation We report the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian woman who was referred to our hospital for the management of a retrosternal mediastinal mass. She had undergone radical mastectomy in 1999. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 74.23 × 37.7 × 133.6-mm mass in the anterior mediastinum adjacent to the main pulmonary artery, the right ventricle and the ascending aorta. We performed total sternectomy at all layers encompassing the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the right pectoralis major muscle, all the costal cartilages, and the anterior part of the pericardium. The defect was immediately closed using a 0.6 mm Gore-Tex cardiovascular patch combined with a serratus anterior muscle flap. Our patient had remained asymptomatic during her follow-up examination after 18 months. Conclusion Chest wall resection has become a critical component of the thoracic surgeon's armamentarium. It may be performed to treat either benign conditions (osteoradionecrosis, osteomyelitis or malignant diseases. There are, however, very few reports on the

  12. Low-grade extraskeletal osteosarcoma of the chest wall: case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetaille Bruno

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-grade extraskeletal osteosarcomas (ESOS are extremely rare. Case presentation We present the first case of low-grade ESOS of the chest wall, which occurred in a 30-year-old man. Because of initial misdiagnosis and patient's refusal of surgery, the diagnosis was done after a 4-year history of a slowly growing mass in soft tissues, leading to a huge (30-cm diameter calcified mass locally extended over the left chest wall. Final diagnosis was helped by molecular analysis of MDM2 and CDK4 oncogenes. Unfortunately, at this time, no surgical treatment was possible due to loco-regional extension, and despite chemotherapy, the patient died one year after diagnosis, five years after the first symptoms. Conclusion We describe the clinical, radiological and bio-pathological features of this unique case, and review the literature concerning low-grade ESOS. Our case highlights the diagnostic difficulties for such very rare tumours and the interest of molecular analysis in ambiguous cases.

  13. Radiation induced skin cancer the chest wall 30 years later from breast cancer operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Kouji; Togawa, Tamotsu; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Matsunami, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Tsuneko [Matsunami General Hospital, Kasamatsu, Gifu (Japan); Matsuo, Youichi

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes the skin cancer on the frontal chest wall induced by postoperative irradiation 30 years later from mastectomy. The patients was a 62-year-old woman, who received mastectomy of the right breast cancer (invasive ductal carcinoma, comedo type) at 31 years old, and received the postoperative radiotherapy of total 11,628 rad over 38 times. On the first medical examination in author`s hospital, the patient had an ulcer of about 10 cm diameter and was diagnosed the radiation induced skin cancer (well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma) in the biopsy. Because of the general condition of the patient was extremely bad and the skin cancer had highly developed, the excision was thought to be impossible. The radiotherapy (16 Gy) and combined local chemotherapy by OK 432 and Bleomycin were performed. In spite of the short term treatment, these therapies were effective on the reduction of the tumor size and the hemostasis, and brought the patient the improvement of QOL. The general condition of the patient improved to be stable and she recovered enough to go out from the hospital for 6 months. After 10 months, she showed anorexia and dyspnea and died after about 1 year from the admission. The present case is extremely rare, and it is required the radical therapy like the excision of chest wall at early stage. (K.H.)

  14. Passive mechanics of lung and chest wall in patients who failed or succeeded in trials of weaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubran, A; Tobin, M J

    1997-03-01

    In an accompanying article (Jubran, et al., Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 155:906-915), we report that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who failed a trial of weaning from mechanical ventilation developed worsening of pulmonary mechanics compared with patients who tolerated the trial and were extubated. We wondered whether the greater derangements in pulmonary mechanics in the weaning failure patients are evident ever before undertaking the weaning trial. We measured mechanics of the respiratory system, lung, and chest wall during passive ventilation at usual ventilator settings in 12 patients who went on to fail a weaning trial and in 12 patients who were successfully weaned. No differences in the resistances of the respiratory system, lung, and chest wall were observed between the two groups or when the resistances were separated into the components derived from ohmic resistance and viscoelastic behavior/time-constant inhomogeneities. Likewise, the groups did not differ in terms of static elastance and dynamic intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEPi) of the respiratory system and the respective lung and chest wall components or in terms of dynamic elastances of the respiratory system and chest wall. The failure group had a higher dynamic elastance of the lung than the success group (p chest wall components during passive ventilation did not satisfactorily discriminate between patients who failed a weaning trial and those successfully weaned, and, thus, are unlikely to be useful in signaling a patient's ability to tolerate the discontinuation of mechanical ventilation.

  15. Reconstruction of full thickness abdominal wall defect following tumor resection: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Predrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reconstruction of a full thickness abdominal wall defect is a demanding procedure for general and also for plastic surgeons, requiring vigorous planning and reconstruction of three layers. Case Outline. We present a case of a 70-year-old patient with a huge abdominal wall tumor with 40 years evolution. Surgery was performed under general anesthesia. Full thickness abdominal defect appeared after the tumor resection. Reconstruction followed in the same act. The defect was reconstructed using a combination of techniques, including omental flap, fascia lata graft, local skin flaps and skin grafts. After surgery no major complications were noted, only a partial skin flap loss, which was repaired using partial thickness skin grafts. The final result was described by the patient as very good, without hernia formation. Conclusion. Omenthoplasty, abdominal wall reconstruction in combination with free fascia lata graft and skin grafts can be one of good options for the reconstruction of full thickness abdominal wall defects.

  16. Evaluation of the safety of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO therapy in blunt thoracic trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Brian

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway clearance is frequently needed by patients suffering from blunt chest wall trauma. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO has been shown to be effective in helping to clear secretions from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, asthma, primary ciliary dyskinesia, emphysema, COPD, and many others. Chest wall trauma patients are at increased risk for development of pulmonary complications related to airway clearance. These patients frequently have chest tubes, drains, catheters, etc. which could become dislodged during HFCWO. This prospective observational study was conducted to determine if HFCWO treatment, as provided by The Vest™ Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Saint Paul, MN, was safe and well tolerated by these patients. Methods Twenty-five blunt thoracic trauma patients were entered into the study. These patients were consented. Each patient was prescribed 2, 15 minute HFCWO treatments per day using The Vest® Airway Clearance System (Hill-Rom, Inc., St Paul, MN. The Vest® system was set to a frequency of 10–12 Hz and a pressure of 2–3 (arbitrary unit. Physiological parameters were measured before, during, and after treatment. Patients were free to refuse or terminate a treatment early for any reason. Results No chest tubes, lines, drains or catheters were dislodged as a result of treatment. One patient with flail chest had a chest tube placed after one treatment due to increasing serous effusion. No treatments were missed and continued without further incident. Post treatment survey showed 76% experienced mild or no pain and more productive cough. Thirty days after discharge there were no deaths or hospital re-admissions. Conclusion This study suggests that HFCWO treatment is safe for trauma patients with lung and chest wall injuries. These findings support further work to demonstrate the airway clearance benefits of HFCWO treatment.

  17. Laparoscopic resection of submucosal tumor on posterior wall of gastric fundus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Wei Ke; Cheng-Zhu Zheng; Ming-Gen Hu; Dan-Lei Chen

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Laparoscopic resection of tumors on the posterior wall of gastric fundus, especially when they are next to the esophagocardiac junction (ECJ), is both difficult and timeconsuming. Furthermore, it can lead to inadvertent esophagus stenosis and injury to the spleen. In order to overcome these difficulties, laparoscopically extraluminal resection of gastric fundus was designed to manage submucosal tumors located on the posterior wall of gastric fundus and next to ECJ.METHODS: From January 2001 to September 2003,laparoscopically extraluminal resection of gastric fundus was successfully carried out on 15 patients. There were11 males and 4 females with an average age of 58 years(range, 38 to 78 years). The mean diameter of the tumors was 4.8 cm. The distance of the tumor border from ECJ was about 1.5-2.5 cm. The four-portal operation procedures were as follows: localization of the tumor, dissection of the omentum, mobilization of the gastric fundus and the upper polar of spleen, exposure of ECJ, and resection of the gastric fundus with Endo GIA.RESULTS: The laparoscopic operation time averaged(66.2±10.4) min, the average amount of bleeding was(89.4±21.7) mL. The mean post-operative hospital stay was (5.3±1.1) d. Within 36 h post-operation, 73.3% of all the patients recovered their gastrointestinal function and began to eat something and to walk. In all the operations,no apparent tumor focus was left and no complication or conversion to open surgery occurred.CONCLUSION: Our newly designed procedure,laparoscopically extraluminal resection of the gastric fundus, can avoid contamination of the abdominal cavity,injury to the spleen and esophageal stenosis. The procedure seems to be both safe and effective.

  18. Nodular Fasciitis of the Chest Wall as seen on Breast Sonography: This Clinically Simulated Palpable Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woo Jeong; Lee, Jin Hwa; Kang, Eun Ju; Kim, Dae Cheol; Cho, Se Heon; Nam, Kyung Jin [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Nodular fasciitis is a rapidly growing benign soft tissue tumor that is related to the fascia and this tumor is generally seen in young and middle aged adults. It is often seen as a subcutaneous solitary nodule in an upper extremity. Clinically, it is often mistaken for a malignancy. We present here a rare case of nodular fasciitis of the chest wall and that was observed on breast sonography (US) and this lesion clinically simulated palpable breast cancer. US may be helpful for evaluating a chest wall lesion that is misunderstood to be a breast lump. So, if the lesion's location is vague, US can reveal the exact location and characteristics of the mass. Although the incidence of nodular fasciitis is rare, nodular fasciitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis when a lesion is located in the chest wall

  19. Low incidence of chest wall pain with a risk-adapted lung stereotactic body radiation therapy approach using three or five fractions based on chest wall dosimetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaud P Coroller

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To examine the frequency and potential of dose-volume predictors for chest wall (CW toxicity (pain and/or rib fracture for patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT using treatment planning methods to minimize CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation scheme. METHODS: We reviewed data from 72 treatment plans, from 69 lung SBRT patients with at least one year of follow-up or CW toxicity, who were treated at our center between 2010 and 2013. Treatment plans were optimized to reduce CW dose and patients received a risk-adapted fractionation of 18 Gy×3 fractions (54 Gy total if the CW V30 was less than 30 mL or 10-12 Gy×5 fractions (50-60 Gy total otherwise. The association between CW toxicity and patient characteristics, treatment parameters and dose metrics, including biologically equivalent dose, were analyzed using logistic regression. RESULTS: With a median follow-up of 20 months, 6 (8.3% patients developed CW pain including three (4.2% grade 1, two (2.8% grade 2 and one (1.4% grade 3. Five (6.9% patients developed rib fractures, one of which was symptomatic. No significant associations between CW toxicity and patient and dosimetric variables were identified on univariate nor multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Optimization of treatment plans to reduce CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation strategy of three or five fractions based on the CW V30 resulted in a low incidence of CW toxicity. Under these conditions, none of the patient characteristics or dose metrics we examined appeared to be predictive of CW pain.

  20. Plasma Cell Leukemia Presenting as a Chest Wall Mass: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed; Paul, Yonette; Nwabudike, Stanley Madu; Ogbonna, Onyekachi; Grantham, Mica; Taddesse-Heath, Lekidelu

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is an uncommon neoplasm of plasma cells, with an aggressive clinical course and poor outcome, even with current standard of care. It can occur either de novo (primary PCL) or as a progression of multiple myeloma (MM). This disease has unique diagnostic criteria but certain genetic markers and clinical features may overlap with MM. Due to the low prevalence of PCL, guidelines on its management are extrapolated from the management of MM and based on small retrospective studies and cases reports/series. We present an interesting case of PCL in a middle-aged African-American male, who was diagnosed incidentally after chest wall imaging for an unrelated complaint. The diagnostic approach, management and outcomes of PCL are discussed. PMID:27462235

  1. Complex regional pain syndrome with associated chest wall dystonia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartzman Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS often suffer from an array of associated movement disorders, including dystonia of an affected limb. We present a case of a patient with long standing CRPS after a brachial plexus injury, who after displaying several features of the movement disorder previously, developed painful dystonia of chest wall musculature. Detailed neurologic examination found palpable sustained contractions of the pectoral and intercostal muscles in addition to surface allodynia. Needle electromyography of the intercostal and paraspinal muscles supported the diagnosis of dystonia. In addition, pulmonary function testing showed both restrictive and obstructive features in the absence of a clear cardiopulmonary etiology. Treatment was initiated with intrathecal baclofen and the patient had symptomatic relief and improvement of dystonia. This case illustrates a novel form of the movement disorder associated with CRPS with response to intrathecal baclofen treatment.

  2. Plasma Cell Leukemia Presenting as a Chest Wall Mass: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell leukemia (PCL is an uncommon neoplasm of plasma cells, with an aggressive clinical course and poor outcome, even with current standard of care. It can occur either de novo (primary PCL or as a progression of multiple myeloma (MM. This disease has unique diagnostic criteria but certain genetic markers and clinical features may overlap with MM. Due to the low prevalence of PCL, guidelines on its management are extrapolated from the management of MM and based on small retrospective studies and cases reports/series. We present an interesting case of PCL in a middle-aged African-American male, who was diagnosed incidentally after chest wall imaging for an unrelated complaint. The diagnostic approach, management and outcomes of PCL are discussed.

  3. Plasma Cell Leukemia Presenting as a Chest Wall Mass: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed; Paul, Yonette; Nwabudike, Stanley Madu; Ogbonna, Onyekachi; Grantham, Mica; Taddesse-Heath, Lekidelu

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is an uncommon neoplasm of plasma cells, with an aggressive clinical course and poor outcome, even with current standard of care. It can occur either de novo (primary PCL) or as a progression of multiple myeloma (MM). This disease has unique diagnostic criteria but certain genetic markers and clinical features may overlap with MM. Due to the low prevalence of PCL, guidelines on its management are extrapolated from the management of MM and based on small retrospective studies and cases reports/series. We present an interesting case of PCL in a middle-aged African-American male, who was diagnosed incidentally after chest wall imaging for an unrelated complaint. The diagnostic approach, management and outcomes of PCL are discussed. PMID:27462235

  4. Biometric estimation of chest wall thickness in female nonradiation workers of a monazite processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest wall thickness (CWT) was estimated in fifty four female nonradiation workers of a monazite processing plant by biometric measurements. The CWT ranged from 4.12 cm to 6.94 cm giving an average of 5.19 ± 0.76 cm. CWT was found to have very good correlation with percent Body Fat and abdominal circumference but poor correlation with Body Mass Index, Body Build Index, Slenderness, age etc. CWT increases with age especially in the upper middle-aged group (> 35 years). A single measurement of abdominal circumference can be used to estimate CWT with 94 % accuracy. A factor of 0.0587 was derived to estimate CWT from abdominal circumference. The study also showed that about 11 % of the subjects were obese. The results obtained will be very useful for the accurate measurement of Low Energy Photons like 239Pu and 241Am deposited in the lung. (author)

  5. VAC® for external fixation of flail chest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, Rikke; Berg, Jais O; Albret, Rikke;

    2012-01-01

    A large aterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore-Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure...

  6. Volume-Targeted Versus Pressure-Targeted Noninvasive Ventilation in Patients With Chest-Wall Deformity : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struik, Fransien M.; Duiverman, Marieke L.; Meijer, Petra M.; Nieuwenhuis, Jellie A.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Wijkstra, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is an effective treatment for patients with chronic respiratory failure due to chest-wall deformity, but it is unknown if the time required for the patient to adjust to long-term NIV depends on whether the NIV is volume-targeted or pressure-targete

  7. Chest Wall Thickness Measurements and the Dosimetric Implications for Male Workers in the South Korean Uranium Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using ultrasound techniques, the Human Monitoring Laboratory has measured chest wall thicknesses of a group of male workers at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. A site-specific biometric equation has been developed for these workers, who are somewhat smaller than other workers reported in the literature. Chest wall thickness is an important modifier on lung counting efficiency. These data have been put into the perspective of the ICRP recommended dose limits for occupationally exposed workers: 100 mSv in a 5-year period with a maximum of 50 mSv in any one year. For measured chest wall thicknesses of 1.9 cm to 4.1 cm and a 30 min counting time, the achievable MDAs for natural uranium in the KAERI lung counter vary from 6.6 mg to 13.2 mg. These values are close to, or even exceed, the predicted amounts of natural uranium that will remain in the lung (absorption type M and S) after an intake equal to the Annual Limit on Intake corresponding to a committed dose of 20 mSv. This paper shows that the KAERI lung counter probably cannot detect an intake of Type S natural uranium in a worker with a chest wall thickness equal to the average value (2.7 cm) under routine counting conditions. (author)

  8. Biometric estimation of chest wall thickness of female radiation workers as an aid in in-vivo detection of the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An equation was derived to estimate female chest wall thickness from a series of biometric measurements. This technique will result in improved performance for actinide detection in females by accounting for variations in chest wall thickness in derivation of calibration factors

  9. Lung pressures and gas transport during high-frequency airway and chest wall oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, M C; Ye, T H; Tran, N H

    1989-09-01

    The major goal of this study was to compare gas exchange, tidal volume (VT), and dynamic lung pressures resulting from high-frequency airway oscillation (HFAO) with the corresponding effects in high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO). Eight anesthetized paralyzed dogs were maintained eucapnic with HFAO and HFCWO at frequencies ranging from 1 to 16 Hz in the former and 0.5 to 8 Hz in the latter. Tracheal (delta Ptr) and esophageal (delta Pes) pressure swings, VT, and arterial blood gases were measured in addition to respiratory impedance and static pressure-volume curves. Mean positive pressure (25-30 cmH2O) in the chest cuff associated with HFCWO generation decreased lung volume by approximately 200 ml and increased pulmonary impedance significantly. Aside from this decrease in functional residual capacity (FRC), no change in lung volume occurred as a result of dynamic factors during the course of HFCWO application. With HFAO, a small degree of hyperinflation occurred only at 16 Hz. Arterial PO2 decreased by 5 Torr on average during HFCWO. VT decreased with increasing frequency in both cases, but VT during HFCWO was smaller over the range of frequencies compared with HFAO. delta Pes and delta Ptr between 1 and 8 Hz were lower than the corresponding pressure swings obtained with conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) applied at 0.25 Hz. delta Pes was minimized at 1 Hz during HFCWO; however, delta Ptr decreased continuously with decreasing frequency and, below 2 Hz, became progressively smaller than the corresponding values obtained with HFAO and CMV.

  10. Cine magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and ultrasonography in the evaluation of chest wall invasion of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the usefulness of cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) in the evaluation of chest wall invasion, we compared the results of cine-MRI with those of computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US). Eleven patients were examined who had no pain and who were difficult to diagnose by routine examinations. MRI was performed with a Magnetom SP/4000, 1.5T unit (Siemens, Germany). For cine imaging, continuous turbo-FLUSH (ultra fast low angle shot) images were obtained at an orthogonal section to the chest wall during slow deep breathing. A CT scan was performed using a TCT 900S or Super Helix (Toshiba, Japan) at 1 cm intervals, with section thicknesses of 1 cm throughout the entire chest. US was performed with a model SSA-270A (Toshiba, Japan) with 7.5-MHz linear array scanners (PLF-705S; Toshiba, Japan). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 67%, 75% and 73% for cine MRI, 67%, 63% and 64% for CT, 33%, 75% and 64% for US, respectively. These results indicate that cine MRI is potentially useful for the diagnosis of chest wall invasion of lung cancer. (author)

  11. Actinomicose pulmonar com envolvimento da parede torácica Lung actinomycosis with chest wall involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cunha Fatureto

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A Actinomicose é uma infecção rara, crônica, supurativa e granulomatosa que pode envolver diversos órgãos. A infecção pulmonar geralmente está relacionada à imunodepressão e à saúde bucal precária. O envolvimento torácico é incomum (10 - 20%, a parede torácica é acometida em apenas 12% destes casos. No presente trabalho, é descrito o caso de um paciente de 26 anos, não HIV e sem co-morbidades, assintomático respiratório, com massa infra-escapular, de crescimento progressivo, muito dolorosa, com sinais locais flogísticos, sem trauma local, apresentando febre persistente, com três meses de evolução. O diagnóstico inicial foi de neoplasia de partes moles de parede torácica. À biopsia incisional da referida massa, houve saída de secreção gelatinosa vinhosa com grânulos amarelados, sugestivos de actinomicose, sendo confirmado por exame anatomopatológico. Empiricamente foi instituída ciprofloxacina devido alergia à cefalosporina. Houve excelente resposta clínica à drenagem externa e à medicação prescrita. Não houve recaída da doença em 18 meses de seguimento.Actinomycosis is an uncommon suppurative granulomatous chronic infection that may involve several organs. Lung infection is usually related to immunodepression and poor oral hygiene. Cases of thoracic involvement are rare (10 - 20% and only 12% of such cases affect the chest wall. This report describes the case of a 26-year-old HIV-negative patient without comorbidities or respiratory complaints who presented a very painful, progressively growing infrascapular mass, with local phlogistic signs and no local trauma, and persistent fever. It had been progressing for three months. The initial diagnosis was neoplasia of chest wall soft tissue. However, incision biopsy in this mass produced a red wine-colored gelatinous secretion containing yellowish granules suggestive of actinomycosis, which was later confirmed by anatomopathological examination

  12. Effects of chest wall compression on expiratory flow rates in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Nozoe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Manual chest wall compression (CWC during expiration is a technique for removing airway secretions in patients with respiratory disorders. However, there have been no reports about the physiological effects of CWC in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Objective: To compare the effects of CWC on expiratory flow rates in patients with COPD and asymptomatic controls. Method: Fourteen subjects were recruited from among patients with COPD who were receiving pulmonary rehabilitation at the University Hospital (COPD group. Fourteen age-matched healthy subjects were also consecutively recruited from the local community (Healthy control group. Airflow and lung volume changes were measured continuously with the subjects lying in supine position during 1 minute of quiet breathing (QB and during 1 minute of CWC by a physical therapist. Results: During CWC, both the COPD group and the healthy control group showed significantly higher peak expiratory flow rates (PEFRs than during QB (mean difference for COPD group 0.14 L/sec, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.04 to 0.24, p<0.01, mean difference for healthy control group 0.39 L/sec, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.57, p<0.01. In the between-group comparisons, PEFR was significantly higher in the healthy control group than in the COPD group (-0.25 L/sec, 95% CI -0.43 to -0.07, p<0.01. However, the expiratory flow rates at the lung volume at the PEFR during QB and at 50% and 25% of tidal volume during QB increased in the healthy control group (mean difference for healthy control group 0.31 L/sec, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.47, p<0.01: 0.31 L/sec, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.47, p<0.01: 0.27 L/sec, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.41, p<0.01, respectively but not in the COPD group (0.05 L/sec, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.12: -0.01 L/sec, 95% CI -0.11 to 0.08: 0.02 L/sec, 95% CI -0.05 to 0.90 with the application of CWC. Conclusion: The effects of chest wall compression on expiratory flow rates was different between COPD patients and

  13. High-frequency chest wall oscillation. Assistance to ventilation in spontaneously breathing subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calverley, P M; Chang, H K; Vartian, V; Zidulka, A

    1986-02-01

    In five supine normal subjects breathing spontaneously, we studied the effects of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO), which was achieved by oscillating the pressure in an air-filled cuff wrapped around the lower thorax. Oscillations of 3.5 and 8 Hz (in randomized order) were applied for 15 minutes each at both maximal (mean of 90 to 102 cm H2O) and half-maximal peak tolerable cuff pressures. Fifteen minutes of control spontaneous ventilation preceded each HFCWO maneuver. The HFCWO resulted in a significant decrease in spontaneous minute ventilation (VES) at maximal and half-maximal pressures by 35 and 40 percent, respectively, at 3 Hz and by 26 and 35 percent, respectively, at 5 Hz, with little change in VES at 8 Hz. This occurred despite an unchanging arterial carbon dioxide tension at all frequencies. Arterial oxygen pressure increased at 3 Hz at maximal pressure but remained statistically unchanged at 3 Hz at half-maximal pressure and at 5 Hz and 8 Hz both at maximal and half-maximal pressures. We conclude that HFCWO may potentially assist ventilation in spontaneously breathing man without requiring an endotracheal tube.

  14. Chest-wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound images using thoracic volume classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Zhang, Wei; Mann, Ritse M.; Platel, Bram; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) systems are expected to improve effectiveness and efficiency of radiologists in reading automated 3D breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. One challenging task on developing CAD is to reduce a large number of false positives. A large amount of false positives originate from acoustic shadowing caused by ribs. Therefore determining the location of the chestwall in ABUS is necessary in CAD systems to remove these false positives. Additionally it can be used as an anatomical landmark for inter- and intra-modal image registration. In this work, we extended our previous developed chestwall segmentation method that fits a cylinder to automated detected rib-surface points and we fit the cylinder model by minimizing a cost function which adopted a term of region cost computed from a thoracic volume classifier to improve segmentation accuracy. We examined the performance on a dataset of 52 images where our previous developed method fails. Using region-based cost, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall decreased from 7.57±2.76 mm to 6.22±2.86 mm.art.

  15. Modulated electron radiotherapy treatment planning using a photon multileaf collimator for post-mastectomized chest walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using a photon MLC (xMLC) for modulated electron radiotherapy treatment (MERT) as an alternative to conventional post-mastectomy chest wall (CW) irradiation. A Monte Carlo (MC) based planning system was developed to overcome the inaccuracy of the 'pencil beam' algorithm. MC techniques are known to accurately calculate the dose distributions of electron beams, allowing the explicit simulation of electron interactions within the MLC. Materials and methods: Four real clinical CW cases were planned using MERT which were compared with the conventional electron treatments based on blocks and by a straightforward approach using the MLC, and not the blocks (as an intermediate step to MERT) to shape the same segments with SSD between 60 and 70 cm depending on PTV size. MC calculations were verified with an array of ionization chambers and radiochromic films in a solid water phantom. Results: Tests based on gamma analysis between MC dose distributions and radiochromic film measurements showed an excellent agreement. Differences in the absolute dose measured with a plane-parallel chamber at a reference point were below 3% for all cases. MERT solution showed a better PTV coverage and a significant reduction of the doses to the organs at risk (OARs). Conclusion: MERT can effectively improve the current electron treatments by obtaining a better PTV coverage and sparing healthy tissues. More directly, block-shaped treatments could be replaced by MLC-shaped non-modulated segments providing similar results.

  16. Small bowel resection - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... incision is red, warm, swollen, or more painful Short of breath or chest pain Swollen legs or pain in your calves Alternative Names Small intestine surgery - discharge; Bowel resection - small intestine - discharge; Resection of ...

  17. [Reconstruction of the anterior chest wall by a sandwich-type combination of a synthetic support and a muscle flap from the latissimus dorsi. Apropos of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfrey, E; Grolleau, J L; Glock, Y; Chavoin, J P; Costagliola, M

    1996-04-01

    Reconstruction of the chest wall after balistic or other trauma requires good and muscle cover and creation of a new, stable and airtight wall. The authors present a case of balistic trauma of the right anterolateral chest wall which was urgently debrided and subsequently reconstructed by sandwich combination of a latissimus dorsi muscle flap and synthetic material composed of a sheet of PTFE and creation of two methylmethylacrylate ribs. The advantage of this technique is that it avoids the use of autologous tissue from an already weakened chest wall and confers a new chest stability in several sites corresponding to the wall defect with easily available and easy-to-use materials. PMID:8761064

  18. Extrinsic tracheal compression caused by scoliosis of the thoracic spine and chest wall degormity: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Kyong min Sarah; Lee, Bae Young; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Song, Kyung Sup; Kang, Hyeon Hul; Lee, Sang Haak; Moon, Hwa Sik [St. Paul' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity is not commonly observed. Although this condition can be diagnosed more easily with the help of multidetector CT, the standard treatment method has not yet been definitely established. We report a case of an eighteen-year-old male who suffered from severe extrinsic tracheal compression due to scoliosis and straightening of the thoracic spine, confirmed on CT and bronchoscopy. The patient underwent successful placement of tracheal stent but later died of bleeding from the tracheostomy site probably due to tracheo-brachiocephalic artery fistula. We describe the CT and bronchoscopic findings of extrinsic airway compression due to chest wall deformity as well as the optimal treatment method, and discuss the possible explanation for bleeding in the patient along with review of the literature.

  19. Effects of changes in lung volume on oscillatory flow rate during high-frequency chest wall oscillation

    OpenAIRE

    Scott J Butcher; Pasiorowski, Michal P; Jones, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) in mucolysis and mucous clearance is thought to be dependant on oscillatory flow rate (Fosc). Therefore, increasing Fosc during HFCWO may have a clinical benefit.OBJECTIVES: To examine effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on Fosc at two oscillation frequencies in healthy subjects and patients with airway obstruction.METHODS: Five healthy subjects and six patients with airway obstruction underwent 1...

  20. High frequency chest wall oscillation for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: a randomized sham-controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis Stephanie; Badlani Sameer; Dalapathi Vijay; Harris Vanessa; Ridge Alana; Bilderback Andrew; Hatipoğlu Umur; Diette Gregory B; Mahajan Amit K; Charbeneau Jeff T; Naureckas Edward T; Krishnan Jerry A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background High frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) is used for airway mucus clearance. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of HFCWO early in the treatment of adults hospitalized for acute asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods Randomized, multi-center, double-masked phase II clinical trial of active or sham treatment initiated within 24 hours of hospital admission for acute asthma or COPD at four academic medical centers. Patients receiv...

  1. Bone scan findings of chest wall pain syndrome after stereotactic body radiation therapy: implications for the pathophysiology of the syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Shane; Decker, Roy H.; Evans, Suzanne B.

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 72-year-old woman treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for peripherally located stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). After treatment she developed ipsilateral grade II chest wall pain. A bone scan showed nonspecific and heterogeneous increased radiotracer uptake in the volume of ribs receiving 30% of the prescription dose of radiation (V30). We present a color wash image demonstrating excellent concordance between the V30 and the area of scinti...

  2. A study of the first heart sound spectra in normal anesthetized cats: possible origins and chest wall influences.

    OpenAIRE

    Fazzalari, N L; Mazumdar, J; Ghista, D. N.; Allen, D G; de Bruin, H

    1984-01-01

    Heart sound recordings were taken from cats. The heart sounds were recorded directly from the chest wall and through an esophageal tube. The phono transducer and the esophageal tube were both placed over the base of the heart. Ultrasound M-mode, or motion-mode, recordings were taken to study the mitral valve dynamics. After analogue to digital conversion, electrocardiogram gated first heart sounds of each phono record were analyzed by the fast Fourier transform to obtain a frequency spectrum....

  3. Rib cage deformities alter respiratory muscle action and chest wall function in patients with severe osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella LoMauro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is an inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by bone fragility, multiple fractures and significant chest wall deformities. Cardiopulmonary insufficiency is the leading cause of death in these patients. METHODS: Seven patients with severe OI type III, 15 with moderate OI type IV and 26 healthy subjects were studied. In addition to standard spirometry, rib cage geometry, breathing pattern and regional chest wall volume changes at rest in seated and supine position were assessed by opto-electronic plethysmography to investigate if structural modifications of the rib cage in OI have consequences on ventilatory pattern. One-way or two-way analysis of variance was performed to compare the results between the three groups and the two postures. RESULTS: Both OI type III and IV patients showed reduced FVC and FEV(1 compared to predicted values, on condition that updated reference equations are considered. In both positions, ventilation was lower in OI patients than control because of lower tidal volume (p<0.01. In contrast to OI type IV patients, whose chest wall geometry and function was normal, OI type III patients were characterized by reduced (p<0.01 angle at the sternum (pectus carinatum, paradoxical inspiratory inward motion of the pulmonary rib cage, significant thoraco-abdominal asynchronies and rib cage distortions in supine position (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, the restrictive respiratory pattern of Osteogenesis Imperfecta is closely related to the severity of the disease and to the sternal deformities. Pectus carinatum characterizes OI type III patients and alters respiratory muscles coordination, leading to chest wall and rib cage distortions and an inefficient ventilator pattern. OI type IV is characterized by lower alterations in the respiratory function. These findings suggest that functional assessment and treatment of OI should be differentiated in these two forms of the

  4. Hyperthermia combined with radiation therapy for superficial breast cancer and chest wall recurrence: A review of the randomised data

    OpenAIRE

    Zagar, Timothy M.; OLESON, JAMES R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Craciunescu, Oana I; BLACKWELL, KIMBERLY L.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Jones, Ellen L.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperthermia has long been used in combination with radiation for the treatment of superficial malignancies, in part due to its radiosensitising capabilities. Patients who suffer superficial recurrences of breast cancer, be it in their chest wall following mastectomy, or in their breast after breast conservation, typically have poor clinical outcomes. They often develop distant metastatic disease, but one must not overlook the problems associated with an uncontrolled local failure. Morbidity ...

  5. Chest-wall thickness and percent thoracic fat estimation by B-mode ultrasound: system and procedure review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate measurement of chest wall thickness is necessary for estimation of lung burden of transuranic elements in humans. To achieve tis capability, the ORNL Whole Body Counter has acquired a B-mode ultrasonic imaging system for defining the structure within the thorax of the body. This report contains a review of the ultrasound system in use at the ORNL Whole Body Counter, including its theory of operation, and te procedure for use of the system. Future developmental plans are also presented

  6. Postmastectomy radiotherapy of the chest wall. Comparison of electron-rotation technique and common tangential photon fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hehr, T.; Classen, J.; Huth, M.; Durst, I.; Bamberg, M.; Budach, W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Christ, G. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Univ. of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2004-10-01

    Background and purpose: different radiotherapy techniques are being used for postmastectomy irradiation. A retrospective analysis of patterns of locoregional failure (LRF) after modified radical mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection followed by locoregional radiotherapy with or without systemic treatment was performed. Main emphasis was focused on the comparison of two postmastectomy radiotherapy techniques. Patients and methods: 287 evaluable patients with locally advanced disease and/or adverse pathologic features (pT3 17% of patients, pT4 35%, multicentricity 25%, pN more than three positive nodes and/or pN1biii 70%, ''close margins'' 29%, infiltration of pectoral fascia 20%) with or without adjuvant chemo-hormonal treatment were included between 1989 and 2000. Median age was 61 years (range 24-88 years). All patients had modified radical mastectomy and axillary lymphonodectomy level I-II(III) for primary breast cancer. Median total dose of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy to the chest wall was 50 Gy (range 46-56 Gy). A local boost to the tumor bed of 10 Gy was applied in 72 patients. 80% of the patients received supraclavicular and 60% ipsilateral internal mammary lymph node irradiation of 50 Gy. 19% of the patients received adjuvant chemo-hormonal therapy, 38% hormonal therapy, and 27% chemotherapy. The median follow-up of patients at risk was 43 months (average 54 months). Results: the 5-year locoregional tumor control (LRC), LRC first event, disease-free, and overall survival were 85%, 91%, 61%, and 70% (Kaplan-Meier analysis), respectively. Cox regression analysis showed that stage III (relative risk [RR] 1.7), more than three involved axillary lymph nodes (RR 5.1), and infiltration of the pectoral fascia (RR 3.2) increased the risk of locoregional failure, while positive estrogen receptor status (RR 0.3) was associated with a reduced risk. No statistically significant differences in LRC were observed for patients treated

  7. Implementation of the three-field electron wraparound technique for extensive recurrent chest wall carcinoma: dosimetric and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, M

    1991-09-01

    Treatment of extensive recurrent chest wall carcinoma is a challenge for the radiation oncologist as well as the physics team responsible for setup, computer planning, and daily reproducibility. While electron arc therapy is desirable, unfortunately, most sites do not have this capability. The alternative method of treatment discussed here involves the use of a three-field electron wraparound technique for the chest wall when electron arc therapy is not available. This technique yields an excellent alternative treatment modality with flexibility to accommodate multiple electron energies to compensate for varying chest wall thickness. An additional anterior photon beam is used when skin lesions extend superiorly to the clavicle and along the proximal aspect of the arm. Computerized tomography (CT) interfaced radiotherapy computer planning is used to precisely calculate the sequential gantry angles, skin gaps for adjacent electron fields, and the appropriate junction moves to create a feathering effect of all overlap areas. Treatment aids include extensive shaping of electron and photon fields and the application of bolus material on all four fields. A Smithers Medical Products' Alpha Cradle is used to make this intricate setup possible, providing patient comfort and daily reproducibility for a more efficient treatment. PMID:1910473

  8. Nitrogen washout during tidal breathing with superimposed high-frequency chest wall oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harf, A; Zidulka, A; Chang, H K

    1985-08-01

    In order to assess the efficacy of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) superimposed on tidal ventilation, multiple-breath nitrogen washout curves were obtained in 7 normal seated subjects. To maintain a regular breathing pattern throughout the study, the subjects breathed synchronously with a Harvard ventilator set at a constant tidal volume and frequency for each subject during a trial period. Washout curves were obtained during 3 different maneuvers performed in random order. Series A was the control condition with no superimposed HFCWO. In Series B and C, HFCWO at 5 Hz was superimposed on the regulated tidal breathing; the magnitude of the oscillatory tidal volume measured at the airway opening was 20 ml for Series B and 40 ml for Series C. The nitrogen washout was clearly faster in Series C than in Series A for each subject. In Series B, there was an interindividual variability, with a washout rate either equal to that in Maneuver A or in Maneuver C, or intermediate between the two. When these washout curves were analyzed in terms of a simple monocompartment model, the time constant of the washout was found to decrease by 16 +/- 11% in Series B, and 25 +/- 7% in Series C compared with that in Series A. In this group of normal subjects, the correction of any inhomogeneity in the distribution of the ventilation is unlikely to explain these results because of the close fit of all washout curves to a monoexponential model. It is postulated that during inspiration HFCWO enhances gas mixing in the lung periphery and that during expiration it improves gas mixing in the airways.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Effects of high-frequency chest wall oscillation on respiratory control in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, M C; Gelmont, D; Howell, S; Johnson, R; Yang, F; Chang, H K

    1989-05-01

    We studied the spontaneous breathing patterns of 10 normal adult volunteers during high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO), accomplished by inflating and deflating a vest worn around each subject's thorax at 2.5 Hz. Tidal volumes generated by HFCWO averaged 100 ml. Mean vest pressure was maintained at approximately 35 cm H2O throughout each experiment, even when HFCWO was not applied. During HFCWO, subjects were instructed occasionally to exhale deeply to obtain end-tidal samples representative of PACO2. HFCWO increased the breath-to-breath variability of spontaneous respiration in all subjects, prolonging expiratory pauses and producing short apneas in some cases. PACO2 decreased significantly (p less than 0.05). The effects on minute ventilation, tidal volume, and inspiratory and expiratory durations remained variable across subjects, even when differences in PACO2 between control and HFCWO states were reduced through inhalation of a low CO2 mixture. None of the changes were statistically significant, although average expiratory duration increased by 29%. Ventilatory responses to CO2 with and without HFCWO were also measured. Normocapnic (PACO2 = 40 mm Hg) ventilatory drive increased significantly (p less than 0.05) in six subjects (Type 1 response) and decreased substantially in the others (Type 2 response); with hypercapnia, the changes in drive were attenuated in both groups. Consequently, CO2 sensitivity decreased in Type 1 subjects and increased in Type 2 subjects. A simple analysis based on this result shows that with HFCWO, Type 2 subjects breathing air will tend to have a lower spontaneous minute ventilation and become hypercapnic. Type 1 subjects will become hypocapnic, but minute ventilation may be higher or lower than control.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. High frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with chronic air-flow obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquet, J; Brochard, L; Isabey, D; de Cremoux, H; Chang, H K; Bignon, J; Harf, A

    1987-12-01

    In order to assess high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) as a way to assist spontaneous breathing in obstructive lung disease, we studied 12 patients with severe and stable COPD. HFCWO at 5 Hz were applied by means of an inflatable vest. In order to avoid any discomfort, oscillations were applied only during the expiratory phase of the spontaneous breathing cycle. We compared gas exchange and pattern of breathing during control and HFCWO periods, each lasting 15 min. Minute ventilation did not change, but the pattern of breathing was markedly altered during HFCWO: breathing frequency decreased (p less than 0.001) from 18 +/- 6/min during control to 14 +/- 5/min, whereas tidal volume increased (p less than 0.01) from 600 +/- 200 ml during control to 860 +/- 400 ml. Secondary to this change in the pattern of breathing, arterial PO2 increased slightly (p less than 0.01) from 54 +/- 7 mm Hg during control to 57 +/- 8 mm Hg during HFCWO, and arterial PCO2 significantly (p less than 0.01) decreased from 46 +/- 6 mm Hg during control to 43 +/- 7 mm Hg during HFCWO. In addition, duty cycle (Ti/Ttot) decreased (p less than 0.001) from 0.37 +/- 0.03 s during control to 0.29 +/- 0.05 s during HFCWO. Such a decrease in duty cycle suggest that inspiratory muscle work was facilitated under HFCWO. In 8 patients, we obtained the tension-time index (TTdi), or the product of duty cycle and Pdi/Pdimax, and found that this index significantly decreased (p less than 0.05) from 0.06 +/- 0.03 during control to 0.04 +/- 0.02 during HFCWO.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Tangential beam IMRT versus tangential beam 3D-CRT of the chest wall in postmastectomy breast cancer patients: A dosimetric comparison

    OpenAIRE

    AI-Yahya Khaled; Mohamed Adel; Aziz Alaradi Abdul; Rudat Volker; Altuwaijri Saleh

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background This study evaluates the dose distribution of reversed planned tangential beam intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared to standard wedged tangential beam three-dimensionally planned conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) of the chest wall in unselected postmastectomy breast cancer patients Methods For 20 unselected subsequent postmastectomy breast cancer patients tangential beam IMRT and tangential beam 3D-CRT plans were generated for the radiotherapy of the chest wall. ...

  12. Chest wall desmoid tumours treated with definitive radiotherapy: a plan comparison of 3D conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jia; Ng, Diana; Lee, James; Stalley, Paul; Hong, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Definitive radiotherapy is often used for chest wall desmoid tumours due to size or anatomical location. The delivery of radiotherapy is challenging due to the large size and constraints of normal surrounding structures. We compared the dosimetry of 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) to evaluate the best treatment option. Methods and materials Ten consecutive patients with inoperable chest wall de...

  13. A study of the first heart sound spectra in normal anesthetized cats: possible origins and chest wall influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzalari, N L; Mazumdar, J; Ghista, D N; Allen, D G; de Bruin, H

    1984-01-01

    Heart sound recordings were taken from cats. The heart sounds were recorded directly from the chest wall and through an esophageal tube. The phono transducer and the esophageal tube were both placed over the base of the heart. Ultrasound M-mode, or motion-mode, recordings were taken to study the mitral valve dynamics. After analogue to digital conversion, electrocardiogram gated first heart sounds of each phono record were analyzed by the fast Fourier transform to obtain a frequency spectrum. Relative energies in 15 Hz bandwidths up to 150 Hz were correlated with the mitral valve closing velocity of the anterior mitral leaflet, obtained from the M-mode echocardiograms. The closing velocity correlated best with the energy in the 30-45 Hz bandwidth and 60-75 Hz bandwidth for the externally and internally monitored phonocardiogram respectively. The chest wall acted as a low pass filter, that is, the wall favoured the transmission of low frequencies and the energy transmitted decreased as wall thickness increased. PMID:6713253

  14. Dystrophic calcinosis with both a huge calcified mass in the cervical spine and calcification in the chest wall in a patient with rheumatoid overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tadashi; Hirakawa, Kei; Takaoka, Hirokazu; Iyama, Ken-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Dystrophic calcinosis in soft tissue occurs in damaged or devitalized tissues in the presence of normal calcium and phosphorous metabolism. It is often noted in subcutaneous tissues in patients with collagen vascular diseases and may involve a relatively localized area or be widespread. A 74-year-old Japanese woman with an overlap of rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic sclerosis developed a huge tumor-like mass at the atlanto-axial vertebral joint region that caused severe cervical pain and difficulty in activities of daily living. She also had subcutaneous dystrophic calcification in the soft tissue of the chest wall. Calcinosis associated with systemic sclerosis is a well-recognized phenomenon, but a destructive paraspinal tumor in the cervical spine associated with overlap syndrome is extremely unique. Because calcinosis in spinal locations can be complicated by neurological involvement, patients with progressive symptoms may require surgical intervention. Surgical resection and biological therapy improved this patient's life and activities of daily living. Calcinosis is common in the conditions reviewed here, and different agents have been used for treatment. However, calcinosis management is poorly organized and lacks an accepted classification, systematic studies, and clinical therapeutic trials. The association of calcinosis and collagen vascular diseases is clinically and etiologically important. Although a combination of calcinosis and rheumatoid overlap syndrome is rare, various collagen vascular diseases may occur simultaneously. A perceptive diagnostic approach toward these diseases is critical, and early diagnosis and treatment are needed to prevent dystrophic calcinosis.

  15. Dystrophic calcinosis with both a huge calcified mass in the cervical spine and calcification in the chest wall in a patient with rheumatoid overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tadashi; Hirakawa, Kei; Takaoka, Hirokazu; Iyama, Ken-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Dystrophic calcinosis in soft tissue occurs in damaged or devitalized tissues in the presence of normal calcium and phosphorous metabolism. It is often noted in subcutaneous tissues in patients with collagen vascular diseases and may involve a relatively localized area or be widespread. A 74-year-old Japanese woman with an overlap of rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic sclerosis developed a huge tumor-like mass at the atlanto-axial vertebral joint region that caused severe cervical pain and difficulty in activities of daily living. She also had subcutaneous dystrophic calcification in the soft tissue of the chest wall. Calcinosis associated with systemic sclerosis is a well-recognized phenomenon, but a destructive paraspinal tumor in the cervical spine associated with overlap syndrome is extremely unique. Because calcinosis in spinal locations can be complicated by neurological involvement, patients with progressive symptoms may require surgical intervention. Surgical resection and biological therapy improved this patient's life and activities of daily living. Calcinosis is common in the conditions reviewed here, and different agents have been used for treatment. However, calcinosis management is poorly organized and lacks an accepted classification, systematic studies, and clinical therapeutic trials. The association of calcinosis and collagen vascular diseases is clinically and etiologically important. Although a combination of calcinosis and rheumatoid overlap syndrome is rare, various collagen vascular diseases may occur simultaneously. A perceptive diagnostic approach toward these diseases is critical, and early diagnosis and treatment are needed to prevent dystrophic calcinosis. PMID:24894107

  16. Near-infrared optical monitoring of cardiac oxygen sufficiency through thoracic wall without open-chest surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakihana, Yasuyuki; Tamura, Mamoru

    1991-05-01

    The cardiac function is exquisitely sensitive to oxygen, because its energy production mainly depends on the oxidative phosphorylation at mitochondria. Thus, oxygenation state of the tissue is critical. Cytochrome a,a3, hemoglobin and myoglobin, which play indispensable role in the oxygen metabolism, have the broad absorption band in near infrared (NIR) region and the light in this region easily penetrates biological tissues. Using NIR spectrophotometry, we attempted to measure the redox state of the copper in cytochrome a,a3 in rat heart through thoracic wall without open chest. The result is given in this paper.

  17. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used ... diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A ...

  18. Chest wall secondary chondrosarcoma arising from enchondroma in a young Asian female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih Chiang Nieh

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Secondary chondrosarcoma in a young Asian female arising from a benign solitary enchondroma in the absence of multiple enchondromatosis, such as Ollier disease or Maffucci syndrome, is extremely rare. Regular follow up including physical assessment and radiological imaging can result in earlier detection of malignant transformation obviating the need for aggressive surgical treatment involving multiple rib resections.

  19. Acute effects of different inspiratory efforts on ventilatory pattern and chest wall compartmental distribution in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz de Souza, Helga; Rocha, Taciano; Campos, Shirley Lima; Brandão, Daniella Cunha; Fink, James B; Aliverti, Andrea; de Andrade, Armele Dornelas

    2016-06-15

    It is not completely described how aging affect ventilatory kinematics and what are the mechanisms adopted by the elderly population to overcome these structural modifications. Given this, the aim was to evaluate the acute effects of different inspiratory efforts on ventilatory pattern and chest wall compartmental distribution in elderly women. Variables assessed included: tidal volume (Vt), total chest wall volume (Vcw), pulmonary rib cage (Vrcp%), abdominal rib cage (Vrca%) and abdominal compartment (Vab%) relative contributions to tidal volume. These variables were assessed during quiet breathing, maximal inspiratory pressure maneuver (MIP), and moderate inspiratory resistance (MIR; i.e., 40% of MIP). 22 young women (age: 23.9±2.5 years) and 22 elderly women (age: 68.2±5.0 years) participated to this study. It was possible to show that during quiet breathing, Vab% was predominant in elderly (p<0.001), in young, however, Vab% was similar to Vrcp% (p=0.095). During MIR, Vrcp% was predominant in young (p<0.001) and comparable to Vab% in elderly (p=0.249). When MIP was imposed, both groups presented a predominance of Vrcp%. In conclusion, there are differences in abdominal kinematics between young and elderly women during different inspiratory efforts. In elderly, during moderate inspiratory resistance, the pattern is beneficial, deep, and slow. Although, during maximal inspiratory resistance, the ventilatory pattern seems to predict imminent muscle fatigue. PMID:26900004

  20. Uncertainty induced by chest wall thickness assessment methods on lung activity estimation for plutonium and americium: a large population-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo lung counting aims at assessing the retained activity in the lungs. The calibration factor relating the measured counts to the worker’s specific retained lung activity can be obtained by several means and strongly depends on the chest wall thickness. Here we compare, for 374 male nuclear workers, the activity assessed with a reference protocol, where the material equivalent chest wall thickness is known from ultrasound measurements, with two other protocols. The counting system is an array of four germanium detectors. It is found that non site-specific equations for the assessment of the chest wall thickness induce large biases in the assessment of activity. For plutonium isotopes or 241Am the proportion of workers for whom the retained activity is within ± 10% of the reference one is smaller than 10%. The use of site-specific equations raises this proportion to 20% and 58% for plutonium and 241Am, respectively. Finally, for the studied population, when site-specific equations are used for the chest wall thickness, the standard uncertainties for the lung activity are 42% and 12.5%, for plutonium and 241Am, respectively. Due to the relatively large size of the studied population, these values are a relatively robust estimate of the uncertainties due to the assessment of the chest wall thickness for the current practice at this site. (paper)

  1. Abdominal wall metastasis in scar after open resection of an adrenocortical carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Gupta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old man patient presented with progressively increasing, occasionally painful lump in the left upper and central abdomen. Investigations revealed well-defined capsulated left adrenocortical carcinoma. Tumor was resected successfully along with left kidney. Tumor recurred in the abdominal surgical scar 1.5 years after surgery. We are reporting this case because of rarity of metastatic recurrence of an adrenocortical carcinoma in the abdominal surgical scar 1.5 years after resection of primary tumor.

  2. Spontaneous massive hemothorax secondary to chest wall chondrosarcoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Mohammad Ghasemi; Mahmodlou, Rahim; Mohammadi, Afshin; Mladkova, Nikol; Noorozinia, Farahnaz

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a 30-year-old man with no past history of disease or recent trauma, who was seen in the emergency room after developing sharp pain in the left hemithorax. Chest roentgenogram showed costopherenic angle blunting and an oval mass in the left mediastinum. A computed tomographic scan showed extrapleural mass with coarse calcifications and pleural effusion, confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. The tumor was biopsied and removed during thoracotomy. The pathology reported revealed chondrosarcoma, which is a rare cause for a spontaneous massive hemothorax. Invasion of the intercostals vessels by the tumor was the probable cause of hemothorax in this patient. PMID:21740393

  3. Quantitative evaluation of correlation of dose and FDG-PET uptake value with clinical chest wall complications in patients with lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algan, O; Confer, M; Algan, S; Matthiesen, C; Herman, T; Ahmad, S; Ali, I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate quantitatively the dosimetric factors that increase the risk of clinical complications of rib fractures or chest wall pain after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the lung. The correlations of clinical complications with standard-uptake values (SUV) and FDG-PET activity distributions from post-treatment PET-imaging were studied. Mean and maximum doses from treatment plans, FDG-PET activity values on post-SBRT PET scans and the presence of clinical complications were determined in fifteen patients undergoing 16 SBRT treatments for lung cancer. SBRT treatments were delivered in 3 to 5 fractions using 5 to 7 fields to prescription doses in the range from 39.0 to 60.0 Gy. The dose and FDG-PET activity values were extracted from regions of interest in the chest wall that matched anatomically. Quantitative evaluation of the correlation between dose deposition and FDG-PET activity was performed by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficient using pixel-by-pixel analysis of dose and FDG-PET activity maps in selected regions of interest associated with clinical complications. Overall, three of fifteen patients developed rib fractures with chest wall pain, and two patients developed pain symptoms without fracture. The mean dose to the rib cage in patients with fractures was 37.53 Gy compared to 33.35 Gy in patients without fractures. Increased chest wall activity as determined by FDG-uptake was noted in patients who developed rib fractures. Enhanced activity from PET-images correlated strongly with high doses deposited to the chest wall which could be predicted by a linear relationship. The local enhanced activity was associated with the development of clinical complications such as chest wall inflammation and rib fracture. This study demonstrates that rib fractures and chest wall pain can occur after SBRT treatments to the lung and is associated with increased activity on subsequent PET scans. The FDG-PET activity

  4. The Effect of Pre-Injury Anti-Platelet Therapy on the Development of Complications in Isolated Blunt Chest Wall Trauma: A Retrospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Battle, Ceri; Hutchings, Hayley; Bouamra, Omar; Phillip A Evans

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The difficulties in the management of the blunt chest wall trauma patient in the Emergency Department due to the development of late complications are well recognised in the literature. Pre-injury anti-platelet therapy has been previously investigated as a risk factor for poor outcomes following traumatic head injury, but not in the blunt chest wall trauma patient cohort. The aim of this study was to investigate pre-injury anti-platelet therapy as a risk factor for the developmen...

  5. Determination of the chest wall thickness as calibration parameter for dosimetric partial-body counting; Bestimmung der Brustwandstaerke als Kalibrierparameter fuer dosimetrische Teilkoerpermessungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guen, H. [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz; Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenforschung; Hegenbart, L. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenforschung; Breckow, J. [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2010-05-15

    The authors describe actual partial body measurements with Phoswich detectors in the in-vivo laboratory of the Institute for Technology in Karlsruhe. The chest wall thickness is estimated from the radio of body weight to body length. This formula includes several uncertainties. The aim of the project was the reduction of the uncertainties of the empirical formula using ultrasonography. This method allows an accuracy of plus or minus 1.1 mm for the determined chest wall thickness. Besides the experimental study several voxel models were used to determine the efficiency of modeled measuring systems. The voxel models reach the same accuracy as the ultrasound method.

  6. High-frequency chest-wall oscillation in a noninvasive-ventilation-dependent patient with type 1 spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Joanna M; Collins, Nicola; Bush, Andrew; Chatwin, Michelle

    2011-11-01

    With the recent increased use of noninvasive ventilation, the prognoses of children with neuromuscular disease has improved significantly. However, children with muscle weakness remain at risk for recurrent respiratory infection and atelectasis. We report the case of a young girl with type 1 spinal muscular atrophy who was dependent on noninvasive ventilation, and in whom conventional secretion-clearance physiotherapy became insufficient to clear secretions. We initiated high-frequency chest-wall oscillation (HFCWO) as a rescue therapy, and she had improved self-ventilation time. This is the first case report of HFCWO for secretion clearance in a severely weak child with type 1 spinal muscular atrophy. In a patient with neuromuscular disease and severe respiratory infection and compromise, HFCWO can be used safely in combination with conventional secretion-clearance physiotherapy.

  7. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T.M.; Barbosa, P.; Rodrigues, M.K.; Oliveira, M.F.; Nery, L.E. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neder, J.A. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V{sub CW}) = rib cage (V{sub RC}) + abdomen (V{sub AB})] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) V{sub CW} increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V{sub CW} regulation as EEV{sub CW} increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEV{sub AB} decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) V{sub CW} (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEV{sub CW} in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEV{sub RC} with marked reductions in EEV{sub AB}. These patients showed lower EIV{sub CW} and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV{sub CW} regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  8. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Takara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V CW = rib cage (V RC + abdomen (V AB] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE V CW increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V CW regulation as EEV CW increased non-linearly in 17/30 "hyperinflators" and decreased in 13/30 "non-hyperinflators" (P < 0.05. EEV AB decreased slightly in 8 of the "hyperinflators", thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI V CW (P < 0.05. In contrast, decreases in EEV CW in the "non-hyperinflators" were due to the combination of stable EEV RC with marked reductions in EEV AB. These patients showed lower EIV CW and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05. Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV CW regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001. However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  9. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(VCW) = rib cage (VRC) + abdomen (VAB)] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) VCW increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of VCW regulation as EEVCW increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEVAB decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) VCW (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEVCW in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEVRC with marked reductions in EEVAB. These patients showed lower EIVCW and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIVCW regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment

  10. A case of parachordoma on the chest wall and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parachordoma is an extremely uncommon soft-tissue tumor, which mainly occurs in the deep soft-tissue of the distal parts of the limbs, such as deep fascia, muscle tendon, synovial or soft-tissue closed to the bone. Nevertheless, the literature reports about parachordoma on the thoracic wall were scarce. The clinical and imaging manifestation has a non-specific appearance. In this article, we reported one case of parachordoma of the thoracic wall that we met in clinical works and reviewed the literature.

  11. Radiotherapy to the chest wall following mastectomy for node-negative breast cancer: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Although nodal status is the major determinant of risk of locoregional relapse (LRR), other factors also contribute, and these assume a greater significance for those with node-negative breast cancer. Previous reviews of post-mastectomy radiotherapy have included studies using radiotherapy techniques or doses no longer considered clinically appropriate. Objectives. To determine the effectiveness of post-mastectomy radiotherapy in women with node-negative breast cancer with particular reference to those patient and tumour factors which contribute to an increased risk of LRR. Methods. A systematic literature review was conducted. Trials using inadequate or orthovoltage radiotherapy were excluded. Data linking potential risk factors, either individually or in combination, to the occurrence of LRR were handled qualitatively. Data from randomised trials of post-mastectomy radiotherapy were included in a meta-analysis. Results. Baseline risk of LRR is increased in the presence of lymphovascular invasion, a grade 3 tumour, tumours greater than 2 cm or a close resection margin and in patients who are pre-menopausal or aged less than 50. Those with no risk factors have a baseline risk of LRR of approximately 5% or less rising to a risk of 15% or more for those with two or more risk factors. In the meta-analysis of three randomised trials of mastectomy and axillary clearance (667 patients), the addition of radiotherapy resulted in an 83% reduction in the risk of LRR (P < 0.00001) and in a 14% improvement in survival (P = 0.16). Conclusion. The use of post-mastectomy radiotherapy for women with node-negative breast cancer requires re-evaluation. Radiotherapy should be considered for those with two or more risk factors.

  12. Reproducibility of The Abdominal and Chest Wall Position by Voluntary Breath-Hold Technique Using a Laser-Based Monitoring and Visual Feedback System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The voluntary breath-hold (BH) technique is a simple method to control the respiration-related motion of a tumor during irradiation. However, the abdominal and chest wall position may not be accurately reproduced using the BH technique. The purpose of this study was to examine whether visual feedback can reduce the fluctuation in wall motion during BH using a new respiratory monitoring device. Methods and Materials: We developed a laser-based BH monitoring and visual feedback system. For this study, five healthy volunteers were enrolled. The volunteers, practicing abdominal breathing, performed shallow end-expiration BH (SEBH), shallow end-inspiration BH (SIBH), and deep end-inspiration BH (DIBH) with or without visual feedback. The abdominal and chest wall positions were measured at 80-ms intervals during BHs. Results: The fluctuation in the chest wall position was smaller than that of the abdominal wall position. The reproducibility of the wall position was improved by visual feedback. With a monitoring device, visual feedback reduced the mean deviation of the abdominal wall from 2.1 ± 1.3 mm to 1.5 ± 0.5 mm, 2.5 ± 1.9 mm to 1.1 ± 0.4 mm, and 6.6 ± 2.4 mm to 2.6 ± 1.4 mm in SEBH, SIBH, and DIBH, respectively. Conclusions: Volunteers can perform the BH maneuver in a highly reproducible fashion when informed about the position of the wall, although in the case of DIBH, the deviation in the wall position remained substantial

  13. Characteristics Of Congenital Chest Wall Deformities In Referred Patients To Tehran Imam Khomeini And Kashan Shahid Beheshti Hospital During 1991-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoodabadi A

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infants and children present with a wide range of congenital chest wall deformities which have both physiologic psychologic consequences and are often associated with other abnormalities. Surgical intervention offers excellent cosmetic results with minimal morbidity and mortality. In order to investigation of chest wall deformities, and surgical results, this study was performed. Materials and Methods: A descriptive study on existing data on 60 consecutive patients with chest wall deformity during 10 years carried out. Patient's characteristics such as age, gender, signs and symptoms type of operation, associated disorder, syndrome, and surgical complications were considered. Results: Pectus excavatum 60% and pectus carinatum 30% Poland syn 6.7% 9 sternal cleft 3.2. Inpectus, M/F: Was 3/1 and others were 1:1. Age of admission 4 to 27 years 13.4±6.82 and association syndromes were, turner, Morgue and marfan, most patients were operated in delayed time (75 and hence, scoliosis was common than others. Conclusion: Pectus excavatum was the most common deformity and if scoliosis was prominent and most operation was done in old age but surgical result was excellent no anyone expired and complication was a little. So we recommended that all of the chest deformities must be operated in anytime.

  14. Sternal Cleft and Pectus Excavatum: A Combined Approach for the Correction of a Complex Anterior Chest Wall Malformation in a Teenager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocchioni, Francesca; Ghionzoli, Marco; Lo Piccolo, Roberto; Deaconu, Diana E; Facchini, Flavio; Milanez De Campos, Jose R; Messineo, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Congenital sternal cleft is a rare chest wall malformation. Because of the flexibility of the chest in infants, surgical repair should be performed by primary closure in the neonatal period. In adolescents and adults, different techniques have been suggested to overcome the lack of sternal bone tissue. We describe a very rare case of an 18-year-old woman with a complete bifid sternum associated with pectus excavatum for whom a satisfactory cosmetic and functional result was obtained by adequate surgical planning, which entailed a combination of two standardized surgical techniques. PMID:26046903

  15. Impact of Fractionation and Dose in a Multivariate Model for Radiation-Induced Chest Wall Pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Din, Shaun U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Williams, Eric L.; Jackson, Andrew [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Rosenzweig, Kenneth E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Wu, Abraham J.; Foster, Amanda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yorke, Ellen D. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Rimner, Andreas, E-mail: rimnera@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of patient/tumor characteristics, radiation dose, and fractionation using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model to predict stereotactic body radiation therapy–induced grade ≥2 chest wall pain (CWP2) in a larger series and develop clinically useful constraints for patients treated with different fraction numbers. Methods and Materials: A total of 316 lung tumors in 295 patients were treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy in 3 to 5 fractions to 39 to 60 Gy. Absolute dose–absolute volume chest wall (CW) histograms were acquired. The raw dose-volume histograms (α/β = ∞ Gy) were converted via the LQ model to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (normalized total dose, NTD) with α/β from 0 to 25 Gy in 0.1-Gy steps. The Cox proportional hazards (CPH) model was used in univariate and multivariate models to identify and assess CWP2 exposed to a given physical and NTD. Results: The median follow-up was 15.4 months, and the median time to development of CWP2 was 7.4 months. On a univariate CPH model, prescription dose, prescription dose per fraction, number of fractions, D83cc, distance of tumor to CW, and body mass index were all statistically significant for the development of CWP2. Linear-quadratic correction improved the CPH model significance over the physical dose. The best-fit α/β was 2.1 Gy, and the physical dose (α/β = ∞ Gy) was outside the upper 95% confidence limit. With α/β = 2.1 Gy, V{sub NTD99Gy} was most significant, with median V{sub NTD99Gy} = 31.5 cm{sup 3} (hazard ratio 3.87, P<.001). Conclusion: There were several predictive factors for the development of CWP2. The LQ-adjusted doses using the best-fit α/β = 2.1 Gy is a better predictor of CWP2 than the physical dose. To aid dosimetrists, we have calculated the physical dose equivalent corresponding to V{sub NTD99Gy} = 31.5 cm{sup 3} for the 3- to 5-fraction groups.

  16. Occurrence of Breast Cancer After Chest Wall Irradiation for Pediatric Cancer, as Detected by a Multimodal Screening Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terenziani, Monica [Pediatric Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Casalini, Patrizia [Molecular Biology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Scaperrotta, Gianfranco; Gandola, Lorenza; Trecate, Giovanna [Radiology and Radiotherapy Departments, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Catania, Serena; Cefalo, Graziella [Pediatric Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Conti, Alberto [Breast Surgery Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Massimino, Maura; Meazza, Cristina; Podda, Marta; Spreafico, Filippo [Pediatric Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Suman, Laura [Radiology and Radiotherapy Departments, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Gennaro, Massimiliano, E-mail: gennaromassimiliano@istitutotumori.mi.it [Breast Surgery Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the occurrence of breast cancer (BC) after exposure to ionizing radiation for pediatric cancer, by means of a multimodal screening program. Patients and Methods: We identified 86 patients who had received chest wall radiation therapy for pediatric cancer. Clinical breast examination (CBE), ultrasound (US), and mammography (MX) were performed yearly. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was added as of October 2007. We calculated the risk of developing BC by radiation therapy dose, patient age, and menarche before or after primary treatment. Results: Eleven women developed a BC from July 2002-February 2010. The sensitivity of the screening methods was 36% for CBE, 73% for MX, 55% for US, and 100% for MRI; the specificity was 91%, 99%, 95%, and 80% for CBE, MX, US, and MRI, respectively. The annual BC detection rate was 2.9%. The median age at BC diagnosis was 33 years. Although age had no influence, menarche before as opposed to after radiation therapy correlated significantly with BC (P=.027): the annual BC detection rate in the former subgroup was 5.3%. Conclusions: Mammography proved more sensitive and specific in our cohort of young women than CBE or US. Magnetic resonance imaging proved 100% sensitive (but this preliminary finding needs to be confirmed). Our cohort of patients carries a 10-fold BC risk at an age more than 20 years younger than in the general population.

  17. Occurrence of Breast Cancer After Chest Wall Irradiation for Pediatric Cancer, as Detected by a Multimodal Screening Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the occurrence of breast cancer (BC) after exposure to ionizing radiation for pediatric cancer, by means of a multimodal screening program. Patients and Methods: We identified 86 patients who had received chest wall radiation therapy for pediatric cancer. Clinical breast examination (CBE), ultrasound (US), and mammography (MX) were performed yearly. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was added as of October 2007. We calculated the risk of developing BC by radiation therapy dose, patient age, and menarche before or after primary treatment. Results: Eleven women developed a BC from July 2002-February 2010. The sensitivity of the screening methods was 36% for CBE, 73% for MX, 55% for US, and 100% for MRI; the specificity was 91%, 99%, 95%, and 80% for CBE, MX, US, and MRI, respectively. The annual BC detection rate was 2.9%. The median age at BC diagnosis was 33 years. Although age had no influence, menarche before as opposed to after radiation therapy correlated significantly with BC (P=.027): the annual BC detection rate in the former subgroup was 5.3%. Conclusions: Mammography proved more sensitive and specific in our cohort of young women than CBE or US. Magnetic resonance imaging proved 100% sensitive (but this preliminary finding needs to be confirmed). Our cohort of patients carries a 10-fold BC risk at an age more than 20 years younger than in the general population.

  18. Treatment techniques for 3D conformal radiation to breast and chest wall including the internal mammary chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnik, Deborah; Selvaraj, Raj N; Faul, Clare; Gerszten, Kristina; Heron, Dwight E; King, Gwendolyn C

    2007-01-01

    Breast, chest wall, and regional nodal irradiation have been associated with an improved outcome in high-risk breast cancer patients. Complex treatment planning is often utilized to ensure complete coverage of the target volume while minimizing the dose to surrounding normal tissues. The 2 techniques evaluated in this report are the partially wide tangent fields (PWTFs) and the 4-field photon/electron combination (the modified "Kuske Technique"). These 2 techniques were evaluated in 10 consecutive breast cancer patients. All patients had computerized tomographic (CT) scans for 3D planning supine on a breast board. The breast was defined clinically by the physician and confirmed radiographically with radiopaque bebes. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of normal and target tissues were then compared. The deep tangent field with blocks resulted in optimal coverage of the target and the upper internal mammary chain (IMC) while sparing of critical and nontarget tissues. The wide tangent technique required less treatment planning and delivery time. We compared the 2 techniques and their resultant DVHs and feasibility in a busy clinic.

  19. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic resection of ectopic pancreas in the posterior wall of gastric high body: Case report and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Der Hsu; Hurng-Sheng Wu; Chien-Long Kuo; Yueh-Tsung Lee

    2005-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has revolutionized the treatment of gastrointestinal tumors. Submucosal tumors of the stomach can be resected using laparoscopic techniques. We report here a case of ectopic pancreas tissue in the gastric wall that was removed using robotic-assisted laparoscopic resection. The patient was a 15-year-old female who presented with abdominal discomfort and tarry stools. Laboratory analysis showed iron deficiency anemia. Preoperative endoscopy revealed a submucosal lesion in the posterior wall of the gastric high body. Intraoperative upper endoscopy clearly located the lesion. A robotic-assisted laparoscopic wedge resection of the putative gastric submucosal tumor was performed. The pathology results showed an ectopic pancreas. The patient had an uneventful recovery and we believe that this is a valid treatment option for this benign condition.

  20. Short-term comparative study of high frequency chest wall oscillation and European airway clearance techniques in patients with cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Osman, Leyla P; Roughton, Michael; Hodson, Margaret E; Pryor, Jennifer A

    2009-01-01

    Background High frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) is standard treatment for airway clearance in the USA and has recently been introduced in the UK and Europe. There is little published research comparing HFCWO with airway clearance techniques (ACTs) frequently used in the UK and Europe. The aim of this study was to compare the short-term effects of HFCWO with usual ACTs in patients with cystic fibrosis hospitalised with an infective pulmonary exacerbation. Methods A 4-day randomised cr...

  1. A pilot study of the impact of high-frequency chest wall oscillation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with mucus hypersecretion

    OpenAIRE

    Chakravorty I; Chahal K; Austin G

    2011-01-01

    Indranil Chakravorty1, Kamaljit Chahal2, Gillian Austin21St George's Hospital, London, 2East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust, Lister Hospital and Primary Care Trust, Stevenage, Hertfordshire, UKIntroduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with mucus hypersecretion tend to demonstrate increased frequency of infective exacerbations and a steeper slope of decline in lung function. Enhanced mucociliary clearance with high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) d...

  2. Low-dose Photofrin-induced PDT offers excellent clinical response with minimal morbidity in chest wall recurrence of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Ron; Mang, Thomas S.

    2000-03-01

    Limited therapeutic options exist when chest wall recurrence form breast cancer progresses despite standard salvage treatment. As photodynamic therapy offers excellent response for cutaneous lesions this may be a possible indication for PDT. A total of 102 treatment fields were illuminated on 9 women with biopsy proven chest wall recurrence of breast cancer which was progressing despite salvage surgery, radiation, and chemi-hormonal therapy. PDT consisted of outpatient IV infusion of Photofrin at 0.8 mg/kg followed 48 hours laser by illumination at 140-170 J/cm2 via a KTP Yag laser coupled to a dye unit. No patient was lost to follow up. At 6 months post PDT; complete response, defined as total lesion elimination was 89 percent, partial response 8 percent, and no response 3 percent. No photosensitivity was seen and no patient developed scarring, fibrosis, or healing difficulties. Low dose Photofrin induced PDT is very active against chest wall lesions. Despite fragile and heavily pre-treated tissues, excellent clinical and cosmetic outcome was obtained. PDT is an underutilized modality for this indication.

  3. HIGH-INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND FOR TREATMENT OF UNRESECTABLE TUMORS LOCATED IN THE WALLS OF CHEST AND ABDOMEN IN 10 PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑国强; 郭峰; 霍苓; 李正

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To present our results of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment in 10 patients with unresectable tumors involved in the walls of chest and abdomen. Methods: Tumors located in the walls of the chest and abdomen in 10 patients were treated by HIFU, including local recurrence of fibrosarcoma in 1 case and local invasion or metastases in 9 cases. All of the 10 patients had received anti-cancer treatments before HIFU, 3 patients were complicated with intercostal neuralgia. Results: Partial responses were obtained in 2 patients, minor response in 1 patient, stable disease in 4, progressive disease in 2 after HIFU treatments. All the intercostal neuralgia in 3 patients was disappeared after HIFU. Bone scan showed that site of rib metastasis before HIFU became normal after HIFU in one patient. Conclusion: Our preliminary results showed that HIFU could get good results for patients with malignant tumors located in the walls of chest and abdomen if they are focal tumors, even if they are complicated with rib metastasis.

  4. Surgical resection of cerebellar hemangioblastoma with enhanced wall thickness: A report of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Zhenxing; Yuan, Dan; SUN, YAXING; YAN, PENGXIANG; Zuo, Huancong

    2015-01-01

    Hemangioblastomas are tumors of the central nervous system, and the cerebellum is the most common site of occurrence. Cerebellar hemangioblastoma with enhanced wall thickness is rare and often misdiagnosed preoperatively. At present, no unified radiological classification system based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings exists for cerebellar hemangioblastoma, and this tumor type can be solid or cystic mass, according to the MRI findings. The most common presentation of cerebellar hem...

  5. High frequency chest wall oscillation for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: a randomized sham-controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis Stephanie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO is used for airway mucus clearance. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of HFCWO early in the treatment of adults hospitalized for acute asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Methods Randomized, multi-center, double-masked phase II clinical trial of active or sham treatment initiated within 24 hours of hospital admission for acute asthma or COPD at four academic medical centers. Patients received active or sham treatment for 15 minutes three times a day for four treatments. Medical management was standardized across groups. The primary outcomes were patient adherence to therapy after four treatments (minutes used/60 minutes prescribed and satisfaction. Secondary outcomes included change in Borg dyspnea score (≥ 1 unit indicates a clinically significant change, spontaneously expectorated sputum volume, and forced expired volume in 1 second. Results Fifty-two participants were randomized to active (n = 25 or sham (n = 27 treatment. Patient adherence was similarly high in both groups (91% vs. 93%; p = 0.70. Patient satisfaction was also similarly high in both groups. After four treatments, a higher proportion of patients in the active treatment group had a clinically significant improvement in dyspnea (70.8% vs. 42.3%, p = 0.04. There were no significant differences in other secondary outcomes. Conclusions HFCWO is well tolerated in adults hospitalized for acute asthma or COPD and significantly improves dyspnea. The high levels of patient satisfaction in both treatment groups justify the need for sham controls when evaluating the use of HFCWO on patient-reported outcomes. Additional studies are needed to more fully evaluate the role of HFCWO in improving in-hospital and post-discharge outcomes in this population. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00181285

  6. A clinical pilot study: high frequency chest wall oscillation airway clearance in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisson, Kathleen Marya; Walsh, Susan; Simmons, Zachary; Vender, Robert L

    2006-06-01

    Respiratory complications are common in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with respiratory failure representing the most common cause of death. Ineffective airway clearance resultant from deficient cough frequently contributes to these abnormalities. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) administered through the Vest Airway Clearance System when added to standard care in preventing pulmonary complications and prolonging the time to death in patients with ALS. This is a single center study performed at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center (HMC). Nine patients with a diagnosis of ALS and concurrently receiving non-invasive ventilatory support with bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) were recruited from the outpatient clinic at HMC. Four patients were randomized to receive standard care and five patients to receive standard care plus the addition of HFCWO administered twice-daily for 15 min duration. Longitudinal assessments of oxyhemoglobin saturation, forced vital capacity (FVC), and adverse events were obtained until time of death. Pulmonary complications of atelectasis, pneumonia, hospitalization for a respiratory-related abnormality, and tracheostomy with mechanical ventilation were monitored throughout the study duration. No differences were observed between treatment groups in relation to the rate of decline in FVC. The addition of HFCWO airway clearance failed to improve time to death compared to standard treatment alone (340 days +/- 247 vs. 470 days +/- 241; p = 0.26). The random allocation of HFCWO airway clearance to patients with ALS concomitantly receiving BiPAP failed to attain any significant clinical benefits in relation to either loss of lung function or mortality. This study does not exclude the potential benefit of HFCWO in select patients with ALS who have coexistent pulmonary diseases, pre-existent mucus-related pulmonary complications, or less severe levels of

  7. Chest wall stabilization and reconstruction: short and long-term results 5 years after the introduction of a new titanium plates system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollitto, Francesco; Loizzi, Domenico; Di Gennaro, Francesco; Scarascia, Daniele; Carlucci, Annalisa; Giudice, Giuseppe; Armenio, Andrea; Ludovico, Rossana; Loizzi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Background We report short and long-term results with the dedicated Synthes® titanium plates system, introduced 5 years ago, for chest wall stabilization and reconstruction. Methods We retrospectively analyzed (January 2010 to December 2014) 27 consecutive patients (22 males, 5 females; range 16–83 years, median age 60 years), treated with this system: primary [3] and secondary [8] chest wall tumor; flail chest [5]; multiple ribs fractures [5]; sternal dehiscence-diastasis [3]; sternal fracture [1]; sternoclavicular joint dislocation [1]; Poland syndrome [1]. Short-term results were evaluated as: operating time, post-operative morbidity, mortality, hospital stay; long-term results as: survival, plates-related morbidity, spirometric values, chest pain [measured with Verbal Rating Scale (VRS) and SF12 standard V1 questionnaire]. Results Each patient received from 1 to 10 (median 2) titanium plates/splints; median operating time was 150 min (range: 115–430 min). Post-operative course: 15 patients (55.6%) uneventful, 10 (37%) minor complications, 2 (7.4%) major complications; no post-operative mortality. Median post-operative hospital stay was 13 days (range: 5–129 days). At a median follow-up of 20 months (range: 1–59 months), 21 patients (78%) were alive, 6 (22%) died. Three patients presented long-term plates-related morbidity: plates rupture [2], pin plate dislodgment [1]; two required a second surgical look. One-year from surgery median spirometric values were: FVC 3.31 L (90%), FEV1 2.46 L (78%), DLCO 20.9 mL/mmHg/min (76%). On 21 alive patients, 7 (33.3%) reported no pain (VRS score 0), 10 (47.6%) mild (score 2), 4 (19.1%) moderate (score 4), no-one severe (score >4); 15 (71.5%) reported none or mild, 6 (28.5%) moderate pain influencing quality of life. Conclusions An optimal chest wall stabilization and reconstruction was achieved with the Synthes® titanium plates system, with minimal morbidity, no post-operative mortality, acceptable operating time

  8. Doxifluridine, medroxyprogesterone acetate and cyclophosphamide (DMpC) combination therapy found effective for case of chest wall recurrent breast cancer with bone and pleural metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 67-year-old woman in poor general condition consulted my clinic with complaints of dyspnea and right chest wall pain. There was a huge and moist ulcer, caused by recurrence and post-radiation, on her right anterior to posterior chest wall. A chest X-ray demonstrated massive pleural effusion. Bone scinti gram showed multiple metastases in the spine, femur and pelvis. Her general condition was so poor that standard chemotherapy was unsuitable. Therefore, the patient was orally administered DMpC (doxifluridine, medroxyprogesterone acetate and cyclophosphamide) combination therapy. The pleural effusion had completely disappeared after 11 weeks, and the elevated serum CA15-3 and CEA value returned to a normal range 13 weeks later. No side effects were observed from this therapy. The patient clinically achieved good quality of life (QOL) in 6 months form this therapy with zoredronic acid administration. DMpC therapy appears to have few side effects and might be an effective treatment option for recurrent breast cancer patients with a poor general health condition. (author)

  9. VAC® for external fixation of flail chest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Winge

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A large anterior chest wall defect following tumor resection was reconstructed with a Gore- Tex® membrane and a combined musculocutaneous rectus femoris and tensor fasciae latae free flap. Subsequent paradoxical respiration impeded weaning from the ventilator. Appliance of Vacuum Assisted Closure® (VAC® resulted in immediate chest wall stability and a decrease in the patient’s need for respiratory support. Shortly thereafter, the VAC® was discontinued and the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU. This case report is the first to describe the successful use of VAC® as an adjuvant to a one-stage procedure for large thoracic wall reconstruction, allowing sufficient temporary external fixation to eliminate paradoxical respiration and plausibly shorten the stay in the ICU. No adverse effects on flap healing or haemodynamics were recorded. It is likely that external VAC® can improve thoracic stability and pulmonary function in a patient with flail chest and decrease the need for mechanical ventilation.

  10. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for refractory bilateral breast cancer in a patient with extensive cutaneous metastasis in the chest and abdominal walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu YF

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yueh-Feng Lu,1 Yu-Chin Lin,2 Kuo-Hsin Chen,3,4 Pei-Wei Shueng,1 Hsin-Pei Yeh,1 Chen-Hsi Hsieh1,5,6 1Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, 2Division of Oncology and Hematology, Department of Medicine, 3Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, 4Department of Electrical Engineering, Yuan-Ze University, Taoyuan, 5Department of Medicine, 6Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: Treatment for bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and abdominal skin invasion normally involves conventional radiotherapy (RT; however, conventional RT provides inadequate target volume coverage and excessive treatment of large volumes of normal tissue. Helical tomotherapy (HT has the ability to deliver continuous craniocaudal irradiation that suppresses junction problems and provides good conformity of dose distribution. A 47-year-old female with stage IV bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and pectoralis major muscle invasion, lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion, and multiple bone metastases received chemotherapy and target therapy beginning in January 2014; 4 months after the initiation of chemotherapy, computed tomography revealed progression of chest and abdominal wall invasion. A total dose of 70.2 Gy was delivered to both breasts, the chest wall, the abdominal wall, and the bilateral supraclavicular nodal areas in 39 fractions via HT. The total planning target volume was 4,533.29 cm3. The percent of lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V20 was 28%, 22%, and 25% for the right lung, left lung, and whole lung, respectively. The mean dose to the heart was 8.6 Gy. Follow-up computed tomography revealed complete response after the RT course. Grade 1 dysphagia, weight loss, grade 2 neutropenia, and grade 3 dermatitis were noted during the RT course. Pain score decreased from 6 to 1. No cardiac, pulmonary, liver, or intestinal toxicity

  11. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  12. Chest wall deformity and respiratory distress in a 17-year-old patient with achondroplasia: CT and MRI evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A marked thoracic deformity associated with intrathoracic tracheal narrowing was seen in a 17-year old with achondroplasia and dyspnea. The role of chest deformity and its evaluation by CT and MRI in achondroplastic patients with respiratory symptoms are considered. (orig.)

  13. Imaging of osteo-articular disorders of the anterior chest wall; Imagerie des affections osteo-articulaires de la paroi thoracique anterieure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grignon, B.; Prost-Rio, D.; Walter, F.; Rubini, B.; Roland, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 54 - Nancy (France); Jan, C.; Gaucher, A.; Regent, D. [Hopital de Brabois-Vandoeuvre, 54 - Nancy (France); Bresson, A. [Centre Hospitalier Regional, 54 - Briey (France)

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a pictorial display of osseous and articular lesions of the anterior chest wall. The role of CT and MR imaging in such disorders is emphasized. Imaging of the anterior thoracic wall by plain films is particularly difficult. However numerous disorders may be encountered. They include inflammatory hyperostosis and sclerosis of the clavicle and the sternum, condensing osteitis and post-traumatic osteolysis of the clavicle, radiation osteitis of the sternum and the ribs, septic arthritis of the sterno-clavicular joint, primary and secondary tumors of the sternum and the ribs. We illustrate a spectrum of such lesions in which CT and MR imaging provides acute evaluation of both soft tissue and bone details. (authors). 31 refs.

  14. Tangential beam IMRT versus tangential beam 3D-CRT of the chest wall in postmastectomy breast cancer patients: A dosimetric comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AI-Yahya Khaled

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluates the dose distribution of reversed planned tangential beam intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT compared to standard wedged tangential beam three-dimensionally planned conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT of the chest wall in unselected postmastectomy breast cancer patients Methods For 20 unselected subsequent postmastectomy breast cancer patients tangential beam IMRT and tangential beam 3D-CRT plans were generated for the radiotherapy of the chest wall. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-volume histograms were evaluated for the PTV and organs at risk. Parameters of the dose distribution were compared using the Wilcoxon matched pairs test. Results Tangential beam IMRT statistically significantly reduced the ipsilateral mean lung dose by an average of 21% (1129 cGy versus 1437 cGy. In all patients treated on the left side, the heart volume encompassed by the 70% isodose line (V70%; 35 Gy was reduced by an average of 43% (5.7% versus 10.6%, and the mean heart dose by an average of 20% (704 cGy versus 877 cGy. The PTV showed a significantly better conformity index with IMRT; the homogeneity index was not significantly different. Conclusions Tangential beam IMRT significantly reduced the dose-volume of the ipsilateral lung and heart in unselected postmastectomy breast cancer patients.

  15. Computed Radiography and Computed Tomography of Chest Wall Diseases%胸壁病变的计算机X线摄影和CT检查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪庆坚; 李惠民; 肖湘生; 王晨光; 胡爱妹

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze computed radiography (CR) and computed tomography (CT) findings of diseases of chest wall and to investigate the value of CR and CT in diagnosis of these diseases. Materials and Methods: The findings and diagnoses of 39 cases with proved (by fina needle biopsy, or surgory and/or pathology, of clinical follow up) chest wall disease were analysed retrospectively. Resulte: In 12 infective lesions, including purulent infection (4 cases) and tuberculosis (8 cases), the correct dignosis was made in 4cases by CR and in 11 cases by CT. In 16 soft tissue tumors, including lipoma (7 cases), fibrosarcoma (4 cases), hemangioma (1 case), neurofibroma (1 case), malignant fibrous histocytoma (1case), aggressive fibromatosis (1 case) and liposarcoma (1 case), the correct diagnosis was made in 3cases by CR and in 14 cases by CT. In 11 bone lesions, including fibrous dysplasia (7 cases), chondroma (2 cases), myeloma (lcase) and cosinophilic granuloma (1 case), the correct diagnosis was made in 8cases by CR and in 10 cases by CT. Conclusion: CR is useful in the dignosis of chest wall bone diseases. CT is obviously superior to CR for demonstration of all chest wall diseases espacially for soft tissue lesions. CT has definite value for the differentiation of malignant from benign tumore of chest wall, but still has certain limit.%目的:探讨胸壁病变的计算机X线摄影(CR)和CT表现及其诊断价值,提高对胸壁病变的认识。材料和方法:回顾分析经手术病理、穿刺细胞学检查或临床随访资料证实的39例CR和CT资料。结果:感染组12例中(包括化脓性感染4例,胸壁结核8例),CR准确诊断4例,CT诊断11例;软组织肿瘤组16例中(包括脂肪瘤7例,纤维肉瘤4例,血管瘤、神经纤维瘤、恶性纤维组织细胞瘤、侵袭性纤维瘤病和脂肪肉瘤各l例),CR准确诊断3例,CT诊断14例;骨肿瘤和肿瘤样病变组11例中(包括骨纤维异常增殖症7例,软骨瘤2

  16. Giant hepatic hemangioma resection via chest and abdomen joint incision%经胸腹部联合切口的巨大肝血管瘤切除术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢欣; 徐意瑶; 毛一雷; 桑新亭

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic hemangioma is a common benign tumor of liver,while hepatic hemangioma with a diameter > 3 cm is rarely seen in clinical practice.A female patient with a giant hepatic hemangioma (diameter =48 cm) received tumor resection via chest and abdomen joint incision at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital on April 10,2012.The patient received exploratory laparotomy for hepatic tumor via chest and abdomen joint incision 22 years ago,while the operation was failed due to intraoperative bleeding.The success of the operation benefited from comprehensive application of computed tomography angiography reconstruction technique,three-dimensional liver reserve function assessment,intraoperative controlled low central venous pressure,total hepatic vascular exclusion and precise hepatectomy technique.%北京协和医院肝脏外科于2012年4月10日成功完成1例巨大肝血管瘤切除手术,手术历时11h,肿瘤最长径为48 cm.该患者22年前曾因肝脏肿瘤行经胸、腹联合切口探查,但因术中出血较多未能切除肿瘤.该手术的成功受益于精准肝切除,包括CT血管重建技术、三维立体肝脏储备功能评估、术中控制性低中心静脉压以及精细肝切除操作技术的综合应用.

  17. Pulmonary hyperinflation and respiratory distress following solvent aspiration in a patient with asthma: expectoration of bronchial casts and clinical improvement with high-frequency chest wall oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Toshihiko; Kawazu, Taketoshi; Iwashita, Kazuo; Yahata, Ritsuko

    2004-11-01

    An 18-year-old student with a history of asthma accidentally inhaled organic solvent during a class, with immediate cough and dyspnea that worsened over several hours. He presented in severe respiratory distress, with hypoxemia and marked pulmonary hyperinflation. Administration of inhaled bronchodilator was ineffective because of agitation, and the patient could not be positioned for chest physiotherapy to treat presumed widespread mucus plugging. High-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) in the sitting position initially caused increased distress but was subsequently tolerated when noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) via nasal mask was initiated. Almost immediately, the patient began expectorating bronchial mucus casts, with concomitant clinical improvement. Endotracheal intubation was avoided, and with aggressive pharmacologic treatment for acute severe asthma and continuation of intermittent HFCWO-NPPV, the patient made a full recovery over the next several days. This case suggests that the combination of HFCWO and NPPV may be helpful in the presence of mucus plugging as a complication of acute inhalation injury or acute severe asthma.

  18. Malign Recurrence of Primary Chest Wall Hemangiopericytoma in the Lung after Four Years: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulay Akman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiopericytoma (HPC may develop in every site where the endothelial tissue exits and primarily develops in the skeletal-muscular system or the skin. Adult cases of HPC generally exhibit a benign course. 20–30% of the cases may show a malign course. The tumors that show more than four mitoses, a focal area of necrosis, and increased cellularity on a magnification ×10 are considered as malign. In our paper, we presented our case who showed a lung metastasis at the end of 4 years and who developed a pathological fracture of the right humerus at the end of approximately 2 years, because hemangiopericytoma is rarely seen in the chest wall as a primary tumor.

  19. Radio-guided occult lesion localisation using iodine 125 Seeds “ROLLIS” to guide surgical removal of an impalpable posterior chest wall melanoma metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dissanayake, Shashini [Western Hospital, Footscray, Victoria (Australia); Dissanayake, Deepthi [Royal Perth Hospital Perth, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Taylor, Donna B [Royal Perth Hospital Perth, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia (Australia); Western Hospital, Footscray, Victoria (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    Cancer screening and surveillance programmes and the use of sophisticated imaging tools such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) have increased the detection of impalpable lesions requiring imaging guidance for excision. A new technique involves intra-lesional insertion of a low-activity iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) seed and detection of the radioactive signal in theatre using a hand-held gamma probe to guide surgery. Whilst several studies describe using this method to guide the removal of impalpable breast lesions, only a handful of publications report its use to guide excision of lesions outside the breast. We describe a case in which radio-guided occult lesion localisation using an iodine 125 seed was used to guide excision of an impalpable posterior chest wall metastasis detected on PET-CT.

  20. Radio-guided occult lesion localisation using iodine 125 Seeds “ROLLIS” to guide surgical removal of an impalpable posterior chest wall melanoma metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer screening and surveillance programmes and the use of sophisticated imaging tools such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) have increased the detection of impalpable lesions requiring imaging guidance for excision. A new technique involves intra-lesional insertion of a low-activity iodine-125 (125I) seed and detection of the radioactive signal in theatre using a hand-held gamma probe to guide surgery. Whilst several studies describe using this method to guide the removal of impalpable breast lesions, only a handful of publications report its use to guide excision of lesions outside the breast. We describe a case in which radio-guided occult lesion localisation using an iodine 125 seed was used to guide excision of an impalpable posterior chest wall metastasis detected on PET-CT

  1. Description of GTV and CTV for radiation therapy of breast carcinomas: breast and chest wall; La radiotherapie du sein et de la paroi thoracique: les volumes a traiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilhuydy, J.M. [Institut Bergonie, Service de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Bussieres, E. [Insitut Bergonie, Service de Chirurgie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Romestaing, P. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Service de Radiotherapie, 69 - Pierre Benite (France)

    2001-10-01

    The radiotherapy of the breast or the chest wall is a complex technique. The definition of the gross tumour volume and the clinical target volume depends on clinical, anatomical and histological criteria. The volumes are located by physical examination, mammography, echography and tomodensitometry. The implantation of surgical clips in the lumpectomy cavity is useful for the boost field. The planning target volume takes into consideration movements of tissues during respiration and variations in beam geometry characteristics. The organs at risk (heart, lung) must be considered systematically. Technical contrivances are necessary to modify and homogenize dose distribution. Conformational irradiation allows an individually design treatment planning. Intensity modulated radiotherapy technique is a future advantageous technique still under evaluation. (authors)

  2. 聚对二氧环己酮网制备及重建犬胸壁缺损的研究%Preparation of a polydioxanone mesh as chest wall prosthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚志云; 徐志飞; 秦雄; 段亮; 赵学维; 王文祖

    2008-01-01

    目的 通过生物材料的选择和制备,研制新型可降解人工胸壁修复材料,并通过动物实验探讨其用于胸壁重建的可行性.方法 采用聚对二氧环己酮(PDO)纤维编织成网状结构人工胸壁,应用于犬胸壁缺损重建动物模型,8、16、24周处死实验犬,观察人工材料降解变化、材料与组织结合界面、胸壁再生情况.结果 PDO网可以重建胸壁稳定性,并在24周内逐步降解吸收,由机体再生组织完全取代.结论 PDO网具备适宜的可降解特性,作为胸壁重建材料,可获得有效胸壁稳定,具有良好临床应用前景.%Objective To investigate the feasibility of a novel biodegradable surgical mesh as chest wall prosthesis.Methods Biodegradable chest wall prosthesis made of polydioxanone monofilament was explored in a canine model.The degradation process of prothesis,interface between tissue and bioma terial and chest wall regeneration were observed.Results The polydioxanone mesh was reabsorbed and replaced by autogeneous tissue within 24 weeks and achieved perfect chest wall stabilization.Conclusion The polydioxanone mesh investigated here shows favorable biodegradation properties and provide good chest wall stabilization.

  3. Diaphragm pacing failure secondary to deteriorated chest wall mechanics: When a good diaphragm does not suffice to take a good breath in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila Layachi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diaphragm pacing allows certain quadriplegic patients to be weaned from mechanical ventilation. Pacing failure can result from device dysfunction, neurotransmission failure, or degraded lung mechanics (such as atelectasis. We report two cases where progressive pacing failure was attributed to deteriorated chest wall mechanics. The first patient suffered from cervical spinal cord injury at age 45, was implanted with a phrenic stimulator (intrathoracic, successfully weaned from ventilation, and permanently paced for 7 years. Pacing effectiveness then slowly declined, finally attributed to rib cage stiffening due to ankylosing spondylitis. The second patient became quadriplegic after meningitis at age 15, was implanted with a phrenic stimulator (intradiaphragmatic and weaned. After a year hypoventilation developed without obvious cause. In relationship with complex endocrine disorders, the patient had gained 31 kg. Pacing failure was attributed to excessive mechanical inspiratory load. Rib cage mechanics abnormalities should be listed among causes of diaphragm pacing failure and it should be kept in mind that a “good diaphragm” is not sufficient to produce a “good inspiration”.

  4. Diaphragm pacing failure secondary to deteriorated chest wall mechanics: When a good diaphragm does not suffice to take a good breath in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layachi, Lila; Georges, Marjolaine; Gonzalez-Bermejo, Jésus; Brun, Anne-Laure; Similowski, Thomas; Morélot-Panzini, Capucine

    2015-01-01

    Diaphragm pacing allows certain quadriplegic patients to be weaned from mechanical ventilation. Pacing failure can result from device dysfunction, neurotransmission failure, or degraded lung mechanics (such as atelectasis). We report two cases where progressive pacing failure was attributed to deteriorated chest wall mechanics. The first patient suffered from cervical spinal cord injury at age 45, was implanted with a phrenic stimulator (intrathoracic), successfully weaned from ventilation, and permanently paced for 7 years. Pacing effectiveness then slowly declined, finally attributed to rib cage stiffening due to ankylosing spondylitis. The second patient became quadriplegic after meningitis at age 15, was implanted with a phrenic stimulator (intradiaphragmatic) and weaned. After a year hypoventilation developed without obvious cause. In relationship with complex endocrine disorders, the patient had gained 31 kg. Pacing failure was attributed to excessive mechanical inspiratory load. Rib cage mechanics abnormalities should be listed among causes of diaphragm pacing failure and it should be kept in mind that a "good diaphragm" is not sufficient to produce a "good inspiration". PMID:26236593

  5. Chest drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Chris

    2014-07-15

    As an intensive care nurse with experience of caring for critically ill patients in the UK and on deployed operations overseas, I found the CPD article useful in reviewing the pathophysiology of a pneumothorax, use of intrapleural chest drains, observations that should be recorded, and nursing care and management of a patient with an intrapleural chest drain. Reflecting on the time out activities in the CPD article was valuable. PMID:25005418

  6. Dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy on the left-sided chest wall and internal mammary nodes irradiation in treating post-mastectomy breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xiao Li; Hu, Wei Gang; Chen, Jia Yi; Wang, Jia Zhou; Ye, Jin Song; Guo, Xiao Mao

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of applying volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) on the post-mastectomy left-sided breast cancer patients, with the involvement of internal mammary nodes (IMN). Patients and methods The prescription dose was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions, and the clinical target volume included the left chest wall (CW) and IMN. VMAT plans were created and compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans on Pinnacle treatmen...

  7. Reversibility of stress-echo induced ST-segment depression by long-term oral n-3 PUFA supplementation in subjects with chest pain syndrome, normal wall motion at stress-echo and normal coronary angiogram

    OpenAIRE

    Ziacchi Vigilio; Gaibazzi Nicola

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Normal coronary arteries may coexist with abnormal coronary and systemic endothelial function in patients with chest pain. Recent work by the renowned Pisa echo-group elegantly suggests that isolated ST-segment depression during stress-echo (SE) can be used as a marker of coronary endothelial dysfunction, in the absence of stress-inducible wall motion abnormalities and in the absence of angiographically-significant coronary artery disease (CAD). The long chain n-3 polyunsa...

  8. SU-E-T-583: Operated Left Breast and Chest Wall Radiotherapy: A Dosimetric Comparison Between 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, B [AMRI Cancer Centre and GLA university, Mathura, Kolkata, West bengal (India); Roy, S [AMRI Cancer Centre, Kolkata, Kolkata, West bengal (India); Munshi, A [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgon, haryana (India); Pradhan, A [GLA University, Mathura, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the comparative dosimetric efficacy between field and field 3DCRT(FnF), multiple field Intensity modulated radiotherapy (SnS IMRT) and, partial arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in case of post operative left side breast and chest wall irradiation. Methods: CT study set of fifteen post-operative left breast and chest wall patient was tested for a treatment plan of 50Gy in 25 fraction using partial arc VMAT, SnSIMRT and tangential beam 3DCRT . 3DCRT FnF gantry angle was ranging for left medial tangential 290±17{sup 0} and Lt lateral tangential l14°±12{sup 0}. For IMRT four fixed beam at gantry angle G130{sup 0} G110{sup 0} G300{sup 0} and G330{sup 0} was used, in case of insufficient dose another beam G150{sup 0} was added. In case of partial arc VMAT, lateral tangential arc G130{sup 0}-G100{sup 0} and medial tangential arc G280{sup 0}-G310{sup 0}. Inverse optimization was opted to cover at least 95%PTV by 95% prescription dose (RxD) and a strong weightage on reduction of heart and lung dose. PTV coverage was evaluated for it’s clinically acceptability depending on the tumor spatial location and its quadrant. Out of the three plans, any one was used for the actual patient treatment. Results: Dosimetric analysis done for breast PTV, left lung, heart and the opposite breast. PTV mean dose and maximum dose was 5129.8±214.8cGy, 4749.0±329.7cGy, 5024.6±73.4cGy and 5855.2±510.7cGy, 5340.7±146.1cGy, 5347.2±196.8cGy for FnF, VMAT and IMRT respectively. Ipsilateral lung volume receiving 20Gy and 5Gy was 23.6±9.5cGy and 32.7±10.3cGy for FnF, 18.6±8.7cGy and 38.8±15.2cGy for VMAT and 25.7±9.6cGy and 50.7±8.4cGy for IMRT respectively. Heart mean and 2cc dose was 867.9±456.7cGy and 5038.5±184.3cGy for FnF, 532.6±263cGy and 3632.1±990.6 for VMAT, 711±229.9cGy and 4421±463.7cGy for IMRT respectively. VMAT shows minimum contralateral breast dose 168±113.8cGy. Conclusion: VMAT shows a better tumor conformity, minimum heart

  9. Comparison of high-frequency chest wall oscillation and oscillating positive expiratory pressure in the home management of cystic fibrosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, C M; Sockrider, M M; Giles, D; Sontag, M K; Accurso, F J; Castile, R G

    2001-11-01

    Enhanced airway clearance is thought to result in better-maintained pulmonary function in cystic fibrosis (CF). Postural drainage, percussion, and vibration (PDPV) have been the primary airway clearance technique (ACT) employed in CF for over 40 years. Two new airway clearance modalities are high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) and oscillating positive expiratory pressure (OPEP). This pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of these techniques during home use, assess patient satisfaction with them as compared to PDPV, and assess the feasibility of performing a definitive comparative trial. The prospective, randomized, multicenter crossover trial was conducted at three urban academic CF Care Centers. Twenty-nine CF patients, 9-39 years of age, participated. Subjects performed 4 weeks each of HFCWO and OPEP following 2-week lead-in/washout periods. Spirometry, lung volumes, National Institutes of Health and Petty Scores, and a satisfaction survey were performed at baseline and after each treatment period. An ACT preference survey was completed at the conclusion of the study. Twenty-four subjects completed both therapies. There were no statistically significant differences between therapies for spirometry, lung volumes, or clinical scores. No significant safety issues arose during the study period. Compliance between therapies was similar. Significant differences among therapies existed in patient satisfaction. Given a choice of therapy, 50% of subjects chose HFCWO, 37% OPEP, and 13% PDPV. This study suggests that HFCWO and OPEP are safe and as effective as patients' routine therapies when used for airway clearance in a home setting. Patient satisfaction and preference differ among ACTs and should be considered when prescribing home therapy. A definitive, multi-center, comparative study evaluating long-term efficacy of these techniques is feasible.

  10. Experiencia con la reconstrucción quirúrgica de las deformidades de la pared torácica Surgical Experience with Reconstruction of Chest Wall Deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A Mainieri-Hidalgo

    2010-12-01

    de tórax por neumotórax trans- operatorio. No se documentaron otras complicaciones. Conclusiones: Las deformidades del Pectus Excavatum y Pectus Carinatum que presentan síntomas restrictivos o afección sicológica por la deformidad estética, se pueden reparar con baja morbilidad y salvo los casos que desarrollan cicatriz queloide, resultados estéticos muy aceptables. La técnica de utilizar una malla en lugar de la barra de metal, funciona igual con el beneficio de que se evitan las potenciales complicaciones por el desplazamiento del metal y no requiere la reintervención para retirarla.Aim: To analyze the clinical data, the indications and results for the surgical reconstruction of the chest wall deformities. Methods: With the purpose of assessing the information, clinical data of 45 patients treated with surgical procedures for Pectus Excavatum (PE and Pectus Carinatutm (PC in the Thoracic Surgery Department of the Hospital Calderón Guardia during the period of January 1998 to January 2010, was analyzed. Results: During this period 29 patients were surgically treated for PE and 16 for Pectus Carinatum, 37 male and 8 female. Ages started from 13 to 24 with a median of 16 years. In 28 patients the surgical indication was the emotional stress caused by the deformity, 17 had in addition to that, symptoms like dyspnea during exercise, chest pain or palpitations. In 26 of the 29 patients operated for PE a metal bar was utilized to hold the sternum in position and removed 6 months later and in the last 3 patients a polypropylene mesh was used with the same function with no need of reintervention to remove it. The results were subjectively evaluated according to the patient’s satisfaction and the medical notes. In one patient with PE the deformity recurred but not the symptoms. In forty four patients the symptoms disappeared and there was a cosmetic satisfaction but 3 developed hypertrophic scars. One patient, five months after the surgery, had a dislodged

  11. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Omar, Hesham R.; Mangar, Devanand; Khetarpal, Suneel; Shapiro, David H; Kolla, Jaya; Rashad, Rania; Helal, Engy; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP) chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a true occult ...

  12. A pilot study of the impact of high-frequency chest wall oscillation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with mucus hypersecretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravorty I

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Indranil Chakravorty1, Kamaljit Chahal2, Gillian Austin21St George's Hospital, London, 2East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust, Lister Hospital and Primary Care Trust, Stevenage, Hertfordshire, UKIntroduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients with mucus hypersecretion tend to demonstrate increased frequency of infective exacerbations and a steeper slope of decline in lung function. Enhanced mucociliary clearance with high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO devices previously used in cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis patients may offer the opportunity for community-based, self-managed therapy to improve quality of life and lung function.Study design and methods: A randomized controlled crossover pilot study of HFCWO compared with conventional treatment was conducted in 22 patients with moderate to severe COPD and mucus hypersecretion. Patients spent 4 weeks using an HFCWO (SmartVest® device and 4 weeks in a conventional phase with a 2-week washout. Eleven patients started with HFCWO and changed to conventional treatment, whereas the other eleven patients started conventional treatment and crossed over to HFCWO.Results: The patients were elderly with a mean age of 71 (standard deviation [SD] 10 years and were at the upper end of the normal range of body mass index (25 [SD 4.2] kg/m2. The majority of patients had moderate to severe COPD with a mean percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 41 (SD 15.6 and percentage predicted forced vital capacity of 73 (SD 17.7. Baseline sputum production was negatively correlated to lung function and positively to St George's Respiratory Questionnaire. Symptom scores and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire symptom dimension improved significantly (-8, P < 0.05. Sputum production showed a declining trend in the HFCWO phase, although not reaching statistical significance. The HFCWO device was well tolerated with good reported compliance.Conclusion: This pilot study

  13. Evaluation of bolus electron conformal therapy compared with conventional techniques for the treatment of left chest wall postmastectomy in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opp, Dan, E-mail: Daniel.Opp@moffitt.org; Forster, Kenneth; Li, Weiqi; Zhang, Geoffrey; Harris, Eleanor E.

    2013-01-01

    Postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) lowers local-regional recurrence risk and improves survival in selected patients with breast cancer. The chest wall and lower axilla are technically challenging areas to treat with homogenous doses and normal tissue sparing. This study compares several techniques for PMRT to provide data to guide selection of optimal treatment techniques. Twenty-five consecutive left-sided patients treated postmastectomy were contoured using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas guidelines then planned using 4 different PMRT techniques: opposed tangents with wedges (3-dimensional [3D] wedges), opposed tangents with field-in-field (FiF) modulation, 8-field intensity modulation radiotherapy (IMRT), and custom bolus electron conformal therapy (BolusECT, .decimal, Inc., Sanford, FL). Required planning target volume (PTV) coverage was held constant, and then dose homogeneity and normal tissue dose parameters were compared among the 4 techniques. BolusECT achieved clincally acceptable PTV coverage for 22 out of 25 cases. Compared with either tangential technique, IMRT and BolusECT provided the lowest heart V{sub 25} doses (3.3% ± 0.9% and 6.6% ± 3.2%, respectively with p < 0.0001). FiF had the lowest mean total lung dose (7.3 ± 1.1 Gy, with p = 0.0013), IMRT had the lowest total lung V{sub 20} (10.3% ± 1.6%, p < 0.0001), and BolusECT had the lowest mean heart dose (7.3 ± 2.0 Gy, p = 0.0002). IMRT provided the optimal dose homogeneity and normal tissue sparing compared with all other techniques for the cases in which BolusECT could not achieve acceptable PTV coverage. IMRT generally exposes contralateral breast and lung to slightly higher doses. Optimal PMRT technique depends upon patient anatomy. Patients whose maximal target volume depth is about 5.7 cm or less can be treated with BolusECT-assisted 12 or 15 MeV electron beams. At these energies, BolusECT has comparable dose-volume statistics as IMRT and lower heart V{sub 25} than opposed

  14. 经胸骨前径路三孔法内镜甲状腺切除术的体会%Three-port endoscopic thyroidectomy via anterior chest wall approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张勇; 吴永红

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨经胸骨前径路三孔法内镜甲状腺切除术的临床疗效及应用价值.方法:回顾分析为17例患者经胸骨前径路行三孔法内镜甲状腺切除术的临床资料.结果:17例手术均获成功,无一例中转开放手术,未损伤喉上神经、喉返神经及甲状旁腺.手术时间100~ 150 min,平均134 min;术中出血量30 ~50ml,平均42ml.患者对术后美容效果均非常满意.结论:选择合适的手术病例,经胸骨前径路行三孔法内镜甲状腺切除术是安全可行的,疗效确切,具有很好的美容效果.%Objective; To discuss the clinical efficacy and application value of three-port endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall. Methods;The clinical data of 17 patients who underwent three-port endoscopic thyroidectoroy through anterior chest wall were analyzed retrospectively. Results;Seventeen operations were all successful,without conversions to open procedures. No injuries of the superior laryngeal nerve, recurrent laryngeal nerve, or parathyroid occurred. The average operating time was 134 min(100-150 min) .average blood loss was 42 ml(30-50 ml). All the patients were very satisfied with the cosmetic results. Conclusions;Three-port endoscopic thyroidectomy through anterior chest wall is safe and feasible for selected appropriate cases, with the advantages of excellent cosmetic results and definite therapeutic effect.

  15. Chest pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... back. A tear in the wall of the aorta, the large blood vessel that takes blood from ... You have high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or diabetes You already have heart disease Call your doctor ...

  16. Dosimetric Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy, Static Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, and 3D Conformal Planning for the Treatment of a Right-Sided Reconstructed Chest Wall and Regional Nodal Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishruta A. Dumane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared 3D conformal planning, static field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT to investigate the suitable treatment plan and delivery method for a right-sided reconstructed chest wall and nodal case. The dose prescribed for the reconstructed chest wall and regional nodes was 50.4 Gy. Plans were compared for target coverage and doses of the lungs, heart, contralateral breast, and healthy tissue. All plans achieved acceptable coverage of the target and IMNs. The best right lung sparing achieved with 3D was a V20 Gy of 31.09%. Compared to it, VMAT reduced the same by 10.85% and improved the CI and HI over 3D by 18.75% and 2%, respectively. The ipsilateral lung V5 Gy to V20 Gy decreased with VMAT over IMRT by as high as 17.1%. The contralateral lung V5 Gy was also lowered with VMAT compared to IMRT by 16.22%. The MU and treatment beams were lowered with VMAT over IMRT by 30% and 10, respectively, decreasing the treatment time by >50%. VMAT was the treatment plan and delivery method of choice for this case due to a combination of improved lung sparing and reduced treatment time without compromising target coverage.

  17. Potential of ultrasound in the pediatric chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinavarat, Panruethai, E-mail: pantrinavarat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Rama IV Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Riccabona, Michael, E-mail: michael.riccabona@klinikum-graz.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Graz (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Ultrasound (US) of chest, even with inherent limitations of the US beam and air, has been useful in many pediatric chest conditions. It has extended its role and is now widely used by many subspecialists in medicine. This review article will cover techniques, indications, and applications of chest US in neonates, infants and children, including also different common as well as some rare and modern aspects and applications, such as pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pulmonary lesions, mediastinum, diaphragm, and chest wall. Other related imaging modalities are also briefly discussed.

  18. Endoscopic resection of subepithelial tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arthur; Schmidt; Markus; Bauder; Bettina; Riecken; Karel; Caca

    2014-01-01

    Management of subepithelial tumors(SETs) remains challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound(EUS) has improved differential diagnosis of these tumors but a definitive diagnosis on EUS findings alone can be achieved in the minority of cases. Complete endoscopic resection may provide a reasonable approach for tissue acquisition and may also be therapeutic in case of malignant lesions. Small SET restricted to the submucosa can be removed with established basic resection techniques. However, resection of SET arising from deeper layers of the gastrointestinal wall requires advanced endoscopic methods and harbours the risk of perforation. Innovative techniques such as submucosal tunneling and full thickness resection have expanded the frontiers of endoscopic therapy in the past years. This review will give an overview about endoscopic resection techniques of SET with a focus on novel methods.

  19. Sarcoma fibromixóide de baixo grau da parede torácica: relato de caso Low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma of the chest wall: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson L. Gasparetto

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Este relato descreve um caso de sarcoma fibromixóide de baixo grau na parede torácica em uma paciente feminina de 23 anos de idade. A radiografia de tórax e a tomografia computadorizada demonstraram massa heterogênea na região inferior do hemitórax direito, com necrose e focos de calcificação. O exame histológico foi sugestivo de leiomioma, mas a imuno-histoquímica definiu o diagnóstico de sarcoma fibromixóide de baixo grau. A evolução clínica do caso foi boa, apesar dos aspectos de malignidade demonstrados na tomografia computadorizada.We report the case of a 23-year-old female patient with a low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma involving the chest wall. The chest radiography and computed tomography scan showed a heterogeneous mass in the lower right hemithorax, with necrosis and calcification foci. Histological examination was suggestive of a leiomyoma but the immunohistochemical study proved to be a low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma. The clinical outcome of this patient was good, although the computed tomography scan showed signs of malignancy.

  20. The chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic interpretation of chest films of newborns in respiratory distress remains one of the most difficult aspects of pediatric radiology. Complex pulmonary and cardiac adjustments to extrauterine life are rapidly taking place. The small, fluid-filled fetal lung must rid itself of fluid and fill with air. The high vascular resistance of the fetal pulmonary bed and the open ductus arteriosus allow shunting of blood in both directions. Films taken in this period of time may show lungs that resemble those seen in congestive heart failure or fluid overload. When these findings are observed in infants who may appear dusky or even cyanotic, the result may be the diagnosis of disease in normal infants passing through a stormy transition period. To make things worse, the films are taken as portable surpine films, usually in an isolette in the intensive care unit (ICU). The phase of respiration is difficult, if not impossible, to control, and lateral films are usually not obtained. Many of the infants are on assisted ventilation either by tube or nasal prongs-nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-and lungs can appear over-inflated or whited out, depending on the pressures used and the phase of the respiratory cycle. Prolonged crying itself can make lungs appear semiopaque; the next breath may show such a dramatic reinflation that it is hard to believe the two films are of the same infant, made only seconds apart. Is the heart large? Or is it the thymus? Are the lungs ''wet''? Is there infection? Is there pulmonary vascular engorgement? Why are these films so hard to interpret? They have no easy answers. The radiologist must realize that the neonatal intensive care personnel, armed though they may be with blood gas values, are no better at interpreting films. If anything, they read into them what they wish to see

  1. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  2. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicky, S.; Wintermark, M.; Schnyder, P.; Capasso, P.; Denys, A. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology

    2000-10-01

    In western European countries most blunt chest traumas are associated with motor vehicle and sport-related accidents. In Switzerland, 39 of 10,000 inhabitants were involved and severely injured in road accidents in 1998. Fifty two percent of them suffered from blunt chest trauma. According to the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics, traumas represented in men the fourth major cause of death (4 %) after cardiovascular disease (38 %), cancer (28 %), and respiratory disease (7 %) in 1998. The outcome of chest trauma patients is determined mainly by the severity of the lesions, the prompt appropriate treatment delivered on the scene of the accident, the time needed to transport the patient to a trauma center, and the immediate recognition of the lesions by a trained emergency team. Other determining factors include age as well as coexisting cardiac, pulmonary, and renal diseases. Our purpose was to review the wide spectrum of pathologies related to blunt chest trauma involving the chest wall, pleura, lungs, trachea and bronchi, aorta, aortic arch vessels, and diaphragm. A particular focus on the diagnostic impact of CT is demonstrated. (orig.)

  3. Conditioned pain modulation and situational pain catastrophizing as preoperative predictors of pain following chest wall surgery: a prospective observational cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Grosen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Variability in patients' postoperative pain experience and response to treatment challenges effective pain management. Variability in pain reflects individual differences in inhibitory pain modulation and psychological sensitivity, which in turn may be clinically relevant for the disposition to acquire pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of conditioned pain modulation and situational pain catastrophizing on postoperative pain and pain persistency. METHODS: Preoperatively, 42 healthy males undergoing funnel chest surgery completed the Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck's Depression Inventory before undergoing a sequential conditioned pain modulation paradigm. Subsequently, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale was introduced and patients were instructed to reference the conditioning pain while answering. Ratings of movement-evoked pain and consumption of morphine equivalents were obtained during postoperative days 2-5. Pain was reevaluated at six months postoperatively. RESULTS: Patients reporting persistent pain at six months follow-up (n = 15 were not significantly different from pain-free patients (n = 16 concerning preoperative conditioned pain modulation response (Z = 1.0, P = 0.3 or level of catastrophizing (Z = 0.4, P = 1.0. In the acute postoperative phase, situational pain catastrophizing predicted movement-evoked pain, independently of anxiety and depression (β = 1.0, P = 0.007 whereas conditioned pain modulation predicted morphine consumption (β = -0.005, P = 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative conditioned pain modulation and situational pain catastrophizing were not associated with the development of persistent postoperative pain following funnel chest repair. Secondary outcome analyses indicated that conditioned pain modulation predicted morphine consumption and situational pain catastrophizing predicted movement-evoked pain intensity in the acute

  4. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  5. 腹壁下动脉穿支皮瓣在乳房再造和胸壁溃疡修复中的应用%Deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps in breast reconstruction and chest wall ulcer repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐军; 穆兰花; 刘元波; 朱晓峰; 李森恺

    2001-01-01

    目的 在解剖学研究基础上,对以腹壁下动静脉为蒂的横行腹直肌(TRAM)肌皮瓣的切取进行完善和改进,将其精确为腹壁下动脉穿支(DIEP)皮瓣,从而提供一种更为理想的乳腺癌术后乳房再造和胸壁创面修复的皮瓣。 方法切取DIEP皮瓣,移植至胸壁受区,腹壁下动静脉分别与胸廓内动静脉相吻合,用于乳腺癌术后乳房再造和胸壁放射性溃疡的修复。 结果 解剖学研究和临床观察发现自腹壁下动脉有粗大的肌皮穿支或皮支自血管主干发出,穿过腹直肌纤维直接进入皮瓣,因此,术中只剪开腹直肌前鞘,钝性分离腹壁下动静脉及其穿支周围的腹直肌纤维,无须离断腹直肌纤维,临床应用DIEP皮瓣再造乳房4例,修复胸壁缺损2例,皮瓣面积(10cm×12cm)~(12cm×35cm),全部成活,效果满意。 结论 DIEP皮瓣是对传统的TRAM皮瓣的一种技术改良,既保留了TRAM皮瓣血运丰富、组织量大、易于塑形的优点,尚可保持腹直肌的完整性,同期进行腹壁整形。%Objectives To modifiy the techniques of harvesting the freeinferior epigastric artery transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap as deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap based on the anatomic study and to provide ideal methods for breast reconstruction after operation of mastocarcinoma and repair of chest wall ulcer after radiotherapy. Methods DIEP flaps were elevated and transferred to recipient sites in the chest walls. The inferior epigastric artery and vein were anastomosed to the internal thoracic artery and vein. Results During flap dissection, large perforators were found to enter the flap across the fibers of the rectus muscle. So DIEP flaps were elevated with preservation of the continuity of the rectus muscle′s fibers. Four DIEP flaps were used for breast reconstruction and two for repair of chest wall ulcer. The size of the flaps ranged from (10

  6. Quantitative Imaging Assessment of an Alternative Approach to Surgical Mitral Valve Leaflet Resection: An Acute Porcine Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronyak, Steven M; Fredi, Joseph L; Young, Michael N; Dumont, Douglas M; Williams, Phillip E; Byram, Brett C; Merryman, W David

    2016-07-01

    This study reports the initial in vivo use of a combined radiofrequency ablation and cryo-anchoring (RFC) catheter as an alternative to surgical mitral valve (MV) leaflet resection. Radiofrequency ablation thermally shrinks enlarged collagenous tissues, providing an alternative to leaflet resection, and cryo-anchoring provides reversible attachment of a catheter to freely mobile MV leaflets. Excised porcine MVs (n = 9) were tested in a left heart flow simulator to establish treatment efficacy criteria. Resected leaflet area was quantified by tracking markers on the leaflet surface, and leaflet length reductions were directly measured on echocardiography. Leaflet area decreased by 38 ± 2.7%, and leaflet length decreased by 9.2 ± 1.8% following RFC catheter treatment. The RFC catheter was then tested acutely in healthy pigs (n = 5) under epicardial echocardiographic guidance, open-chest without cardiopulmonary bypass, using mid-ventricular free wall access. Leaflet length was quantified using echocardiography. Quantitative assessment of MV leaflet length revealed that leaflet resection was successful in 4 of 5 pigs, with a leaflet length reduction of 13.3 ± 4.6%. Histological, mechanical, and gross pathological findings also confirmed that RFC catheter treatment was efficacious. The RFC catheter significantly reduces MV leaflet size in an acute animal model, providing a possible percutaneous alternative to surgical leaflet resection. PMID:26508331

  7. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret;

    2013-01-01

    are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before chest CT can...

  8. Chest x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  9. Characterisation of manual chest physiotherapy and respiratory response in mechanically ventilated children

    OpenAIRE

    Gregson, Rachael Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Chest physiotherapy is integral to the management of mechanically ventilated children and previous research has confirmed that chest wall vibrations are the manual techniques used most frequently by physiotherapists in this population. Chest wall vibrations involve the application of a compressive force to the chest during expiration, with the aim of removing accumulated secretions and improving lung aeration. However, these techniques are largely unquantified and may vary grea...

  10. Severe Pulmonary Valve Regurgitation 40 Years After Blunt Chest Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglsang, Simon; Heiberg, Johan; Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    Severe pulmonary valve regurgitation caused by a pulmonary valve tear is a rare complication to a blunt chest trauma. In this case report, we present a patient with pulmonary regurgitation originating from a chest trauma 40 years ago. Possible mechanisms are osseous pinch of the pulmonary valve between the anterior chest wall and the vertebral column, and retrograde blowout from severe compression of the lungs. PMID:26434447

  11. CT of blunt chest trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While trauma is still the leading cause of death in the pediatric age range, it is surprising how little the CT appearances of pediatric chest injury have been investigated in the literature. We have reviewed the CT findings of blunt chest trauma in 44 children for whom chest CT examinations were requested to investigate the extent of intrathoracic injury. We noted a propensity for pulmonary contusions to be located posteriorly or posteromedially, and for them to be anatomically nonsegmental and crescentic in shape. This is possibly attributable to the relatively compliant anterior chest wall in children. The CT appearances of other major thoracic injuries are described, including pulmonary lacerations, pneumothoraces, malpositioned chest tubes, mediastinal hematomas, aortic injury, tracheobronchial injury, hemopericardium, and spinal injuries with paraspinal fluid collections. Children demonstrating findings incidental to the actual injury yet important to the subsequent therapy are also presented. We conclude that, in the event of clinically significant blunt chest trauma, the single supine chest examination in the trauma room is insufficient to adequately identify the extent of intrathoracic injury. With the exception of concern for aortic injury for which aortography is indicated, a dynamically enhanced CT scan of the thorax should be performed as clinically significant findings may result in altered therapy. (orig.)

  12. Electronic versus traditional chest tube drainage following lobectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lijkendijk, Marike; Licht, Peter B; Neckelmann, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Electronic drainage systems have shown superiority compared with traditional (water seal) drainage systems following lung resections, but the number of studies is limited. As part of a medico-technical evaluation, before change of practice to electronic drainage systems for routine...... thoracic surgery, we conducted a randomized controlled trial (RCT) investigating chest tube duration and length of hospitalization. METHODS: Patients undergoing lobectomy were included in a prospective open label RCT. A strict algorithm was designed for early chest tube removal, and this decision...... time for chest tube removal, as well as length of hospitalization. RESULTS: A total of 105 patients were randomized. We found no significant difference between the electronic group and traditional group in optimal chest tube duration (HR = 0.83; 95% CI: 0.55-1.25; P = 0.367), actual chest tube duration...

  13. Successful Resection of Giant Mediastinal Lipofibroadenoma of the Thymus by Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdisi, George; Roden, Anja C; Shen, K Robert

    2015-08-01

    We report the case of a 20-year-old man who presented with a large heterogeneous mass incidentally found on a chest roentgenogram performed in the context of acute onset of fever and cough. A chest computed tomography scan showed a large heterogenous mass in the anterior mediastinum. The patient underwent surgical resection by a right video-assisted thoracoscopic approach. The resected mass was completely encapsulated and was histologically determined to be a lipofibroadenoma. Complete resection is curative. This is the sixth reported case of lipofibroadenoma of the thymus in the English literature and the first reported case of video-assisted thoracoscopic resection of a lipofibroadenoma. PMID:26234840

  14. Reverse airflow in certain chest drains may be misinterpreted as prolonged air leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stouby, Anna; Neckelmann, Kirsten; Licht, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Prolonged air leakage is common after lung resection. We observed that during deep inspiration some patients were able to empty the water-seal of commercial chest drainage systems and retract air back into the chest tube, which subsequently escaped during the following expiration, mimicking "true...

  15. 体表膈肌肌电对睡眠呼吸暂停事件的鉴别作用%Distinguishing central from obstructive sleep apnea with chest wall surface electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱慧儿; 王玮; 罗远明

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether or not diaphragm electromyography recorded from chest wall surface electrodes (EMGsur) can be used to distinguish central from obstructive sleep apnea.Methods Ten patients ( age (44±10) years,body mass index (25.9±1.8) kg/m2 ) with suspected obstructive sleep apnea referred from Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Disease were studied between January and September 2009. EMGsur and diaphragm electromyography from esophageal electrode (EMGeso) were recorded during conventional overnight full polysomnography. And chest-abdominal movement was measured with chest and abdominal bands.Results High-quality EMGsur and EMGeso were recorded in all subjects except for one who could not tolerate a multipair esophageal electrode.Excellent correlation was found between EMGsur and EMGeso during sleep including apnea events ( r=0.81±0.06,P<0.05 ).The central sleep apnea events diagnosed by EMGeso were exactly the same as those diagnosed by EMGsur.However,the central sleep apnea events diagnosed by EMGsur were less than those diagnosed by conventional thoracic-abdominal bands ( 7±11 vs 28±31,P<0.05 ).Conclusion EMGsur may be used to distinguish central from obstructive sleep apnea events.%目的 探讨体表电极记录膈肌肌电是否有助于准确区分阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停(OSA)与中枢性睡眠呼吸暂停(CSA)事件.方法 选择2009年1-9月广州呼吸疾病研究所就诊并疑有睡眠呼吸暂停综合征的10例患者,其中男8例,女2例;年龄(44±10)岁,体质指数(25.9±1.8) kg/m2.对患者进行整夜常规多导睡眠监测的同时记录体表膈肌肌电信号、食管膈肌肌电信号,分析体表膈肌肌电与食管膈肌肌电的相关性,并比较胸腹带、体表膈肌肌电和食管膈肌肌电在判断CSA事件方面的差异.结果 除1例患者外,其他9例患者均能耐受多导食管电极检查,并可记录到高质量的食管膈肌肌电信号和体表膈肌肌电信号.食管膈肌肌电和

  16. Pediatric chest imaging. Chest imaging in infants and children. 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging of the pediatric chest continues to evolve rapidly. All chapters in this 2nd edition of Pediatric Chest Imaging have been extensively updated, with additional disease-specific information and numerous new illustrations. The book thus presents the state of the art in the diagnosis of pediatric chest disorders, highlighting the role played by advanced technology. As the conventional features of most of these disorders are extremely well known, special attention is devoted to the technical aspects of the modern imaging modalities, their indications, and the diagnostic information that they supply. Individual chapters focus on chest ultrasound, nuclear medicine imaging, high-resolution chest CT, helical CT, and pediatric cardiac CT and pediatric cardiacMRI. Others are directed towards specific disorders, including congenital malformations of the chest, chest tumors, pulmonary infection, trauma, the lung in systemic diseases, the pediatric airway, foreign bodies, the thymus, and the chest wall. Without exception, the authors of this book are internationally known specialists with great expertise in the field. This book will serve as a handy, superbly illustrated reference for all who routinely image children, as well as for those who need access to information on how best to image them. (orig.)

  17. Criptococoma pulmonar con invasión torácica en un varón inmunocompetente Pulmonary cryptococcoma with involvement of the chest wall in an immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana A. Pisarevsky

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available La criptococosis pulmonar en pacientes inmunocompetentes es una entidad poco habitual y su presentación como masas de gran tamaño, con compromiso de la pared torácica y de los tejidos blandos vecinos, no la encontramos descriptas en nuestra revisión bibliográfica. La variedad gattii (serotipoB/C está acotada geográficamente a regiones tropicales y subtropicales y parece afectar preferentemente a individuos inmunocompetentes. Presentamos el caso de un hombre de 51 años proveniente del noreste de la Argentina, fumador de 10 atados/año que consulta por aumento del volumen del hombro izquierdo e impotencia funcional por intenso dolor de seis meses de evolución. Mediante una biopsia percutánea de la masa, se diagnostica Cryptococcus neoformans, variedad gattii. El paciente recibe terapéutica antifúngica, mostrando una evolución favorable con disminución progresiva de la masa.The pulmonary cryptococcosis in immunocompetent patients is unusual, and its presentation as large masses with involvement of the chest wall and the neighboring soft tissues has not been found in our bibliographic research. The variety gattii (serotype B/C is limited geographically to tropical and subtropical regions and appears to affect particularly immunocompetent individuals. We describe the case of a 51-year-old man from the Northeast of Argentina, with a history of smoking 10 pack/year. He presented an increased volume of the left shoulder and reported that for the last six months he had been unable to move it due to the pain. A percutaneous biopsy of the mass provided a diagnosis of Cryptococcus neoformans, variety gattii. The patient was treated with antifungal therapy showing a favourable outcome with a progressive decrease of the mass.

  18. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Palas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  19. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  20. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript ... time! Spotlight Recently posted: Pediatric MRI Intravascular Ultrasound Video: Chest CT Video:Thyroid Ultrasound Video: Head CT ...

  1. Application of high-frequency chest wall oscillation in elderly patients after cardiac surgery%高频胸壁振荡在高龄患者心脏外科手术后的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢波; 薛松; 黄日太; 王旭冬; 郑微艳

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨高频胸壁振荡(HFCWO)在高龄患者心脏外科手术后应用的耐受性、安全性和临床效果.方法 201例接受心脏外科手术的高龄患者(>70岁)于拔除气管插管6~8h后行HFCWO联合人工胸部物理治疗(HFCWO组),应用Likert量表对每次治疗的耐受性进行评估,并观察患者初次HFCWO治疗前10 min、治疗中和治疗结束后10 min的循环和呼吸指标(心率、收缩压、中心静脉压、肺动脉平均压、呼吸频率和脉搏血氧饱和度)的变化.以仅行人工胸部物理治疗的165例心脏外科手术高龄患者(>70岁)作为对照组,比较两组患者的临床资料(术后肺部感染发生率、胸腔积液发生率、肺不张发生率、二次气管插管率、ICU滞留时间、抗生素使用时间和住院时间).结果 HFCWO组共行984次HFCWO治疗,其中813次(82.62%)能够被患者较好耐受,66次(6.71%)不能耐受;未发生与HFCWO相关的不良事件;患者初次HFCWO治疗前10 min、治疗中和治疗结束后10 min的心率、收缩压、中心静脉压、肺动脉平均压、呼吸频率和脉搏血氧饱和度均无显著变化(P>0.05).HFCWO组术后肺部感染发生率和胸腔积液发生率均显著低于对照组(3.98% vs 9.09%,P<0.05;6.47% vs 12.72%,P<0.05),术后抗生素使用时间和住院时间也显著短于对照组[(5.07±2.23)d vs (6.98±2.41)d,P<0.05;(9.58±4.10)d vs (11.79±5.06)d,P<0.05],而两组术后肺不张发生率、二次气管插管率和ICU滞留时间差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 HFCWO在高龄患者心脏外科手术后拔除气管插管后早期应用安全,且能被大多数患者很好耐受.HFCWO联合人工胸部物理治疗对减少术后肺部感染、胸腔积液和抗生素的使用有一定作用.%Objective To evaluate the tolerability, safety and efficacy of high-frequency chest wall oscillation ( HFCWO) in elderly patients after cardiac surgery. Methods Two hundred and one

  2. Effectiveness of chest physiotherapy in the management of bronchiectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronchiectasis is a chronic disease in which clearance of sputum is disturbed because bronchi dilated permanently. So for the clearance of sputum we have to use physiotherapy techniques such as postural drainage percussion and vibration (PDPY), active cycle of breathing technique (ACBT), autogenic drainage, positive expiratory pressure, high frequency chest wall oscillation. Objective: To determine the role of Chest Physical therapy intervention in the management of Bronchi ectasis. To compare the prognosis of bronchiectasis with and without chest physiotherapy. Methodology: Data was collected from Gulab Devi Chest Hospital, Lahore. A Randomized Control Trial (RCT) study method was used and 60 patients are studied. In this study, they were divided into 03 groups 1- Antibiotics Therapy 2-Chest Physical therapy 3-Antibiotics and Chest Physical therapy. Each group consistant. (author)

  3. SKIN GRAFT COMBINED WITH THORAX WIRE FASTENING FOR REPAIRING POSTOPERATIVE COLOBOMA AFTER RESECTION OF CHEST BACK GIANT NEVUS%胸科钢丝内固定联合皮片移植修复胸背部巨痣切除术后缺损

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵为民; 代涛; 袁德品; 张功宝

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨胸科钢丝内固定联合皮片移植修复胸背部巨痣切除术后缺损的临床疗效.方法 2007年6月- 2010年10月,收治17例胸背部巨痣患儿.男7例,女10例;年龄3岁6个月~l5岁,平均8岁.巨痣范围为20cm×12cm~60cm×50cm.2例曾行激光治疗,余15例均未治疗.巨痣表面皮肤破溃及渗出2例,坚硬3例,毛发生长7例,5例皮肤质地与周围正常皮肤一致;5例皮肤瘙痒明显.手术切除巨痣后,于创缘以胸科钢丝内固定缩小创面,再取大腿中厚皮片移植修复创面.术后综合抗瘢痕治疗.结果 巨痣切除后创面面积为(2 110.74±725.69)cm2,胸科钢丝缩创后面积为(1 624.94±560.57)cm2,缩创前后创面面积比较差异有统计学意义(t=9.006,P=0.001).术后植皮均顺利成活,切口及供皮区创面均Ⅰ期愈合.患者术后均获随访,随访时间为6个月~2年,平均13个月.植皮区、供皮区无明显瘢痕增生或挛缩,皮肤色泽及弹性与创周正常皮肤相似,乳头、肚脐等局部器官与术前比较无牵拉移位.结论 胸背部巨痣切除后,胸科钢丝内固定联合皮片移植修复继发创面,可减少取皮量,术后瘢痕轻微,外观满意.%Objective To observe the effectiveness of skin graft combined with thorax wire fastening for repairing postoperative coloboma after resection of chest back giant nevus. Methods Between June 2007 and October 2010, 17 cases of chest back giant nevus were treated. There were 7 males and 10 females, aged from 3 years and 6 months to 15 years (mean, 8 years). The size of giant nevus was 20 cm x 12 cm to 60 cm x 50 cm. Two cases of them were ever treated by laser, while the others were never treated. The check before operation showed ulcer of the skin and effusion in 2 cases, hard skin in 3 cases, hair growth in 7 cases, and normal in 5 cases. Five cases had serious itch. After giant nevus was cut off, thorax wire was fastened to reduce the wound area, and then the intermediate split

  4. Efeitos de duas técnicas de incentivo respiratório na mobilidade toracoabdominal após cirurgia abdominal alta Effects of two respiratory incentive techniques on chest wall mobility after upper abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elaine Trevisan

    2010-12-01

    with the Voldyne device, and group 2 (n=6, submitted to a split-inspiration pattern training. Chest wall expansion was rated by measuring thorax circumferences before surgery and on the 1st, 3rd, and 5th post-operative (PO days. In both groups a significant decrease was found in circumference values on the 1st PO day, which gradually recovered, until on the 5th PO day no significant differences were found as compared to pre-operative measures. Group 1 showed significantly better thoracic-abdominal expansion rates than group 2's, as well as higher recovery time rates all through. Though both breathing techniques used were effective, inspiratory incentive using the Voldyne device showed better results in recovering chest mobility after upper abdominal surgery.

  5. Learning chest imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrozo Pupo, John C. (ed.) [Magdalena Univ., Santa Maria (Colombia). Respire - Inst. for Respiratory Care

    2013-03-01

    Useful learning tool for practitioners and students. Overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology. Aid to the correct interpretation of chest X-ray images. Radiology of the thorax forms an indispensable element of the basic diagnostic process for many conditions and is of key importance in a variety of medical disciplines. This user-friendly book provides an overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology and presents numerous instructive case-based images with accompanying explanatory text. A wide range of clinical conditions and circumstances are covered with the aim of enabling the reader to confidently interpret chest images by correctly identifying structures of interest and the causes of abnormalities. This book, which will be an invaluable learning tool, forms part of the Learning Imaging series for medical students, residents, less experienced radiologists, and other medical staff. Learning Imaging is a unique case-based series for those in professional education in general and for physicians in prarticular.

  6. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. ...

  7. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Thomsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chest radiography is one of the most common examinations in radiology departments. In 2013 approximately 80,000 chest x-rays were performed on women in the fertile age. Even low dose for the examinationCorrect collimation Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing...... on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years...... of age are included in the study. The clinical research is performed between September and November 2014 where 3rd year Radiography students collect data on four Danish x-ray departments using identical procedures under guidance of clinical supervisors. Optimal collimation is determined by European...

  8. Management of chest keloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim June Kyu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Keloid formation is one of the most challenging clinical problems in wound healing. With increasing frequency of open heart surgery, chest keloid formations are not infrequent in the clinical practice. The numerous treatment methods including surgical excision, intralesional steroid injection, radiation therapy, laser therapy, silicone gel sheeting, and pressure therapy underscore how little is understood about keloids. Keloids have a tendency to recur after surgical excision as a single treatment. Stretching tension is clearly associated with keloid generation, as keloids tend to occur on high tension sites such as chest region. The authors treated 58 chest keloid patients with surgical excision followed by intraoperative and postoperative intralesional steroid injection. Even with minor complications and recurrences, our protocol results in excellent outcomes in cases of chest keloids.

  9. Influence of floating thoracic wall on dogs pulmonary function and curative effect of pressure dressing on chest%浮动胸壁对犬呼吸功能的影响及加压包扎治疗效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周志明; 陈拥; 王泽学; 孙颢洁; 梁磊

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the inlfuence of lfoating thoracic wall on dogs pulmonary function and the curative effect of pressure dressing on chest.Methods Floating thoracic wall models of large areas(20 cm2/kg ) and small areas(10 cm2/kg ) were established in 18 hybrid dogs. the intrpleural pressure(iPP), partial pressure of oxygen in artery(Pao2), partial pressure of carbon dioxide in artery(Paco2) and arterial oxygen saturation(sao2) were measured with blood gas analysis and intrathoracic cannula. and the curative effect of pressure dressing on chest on pulmonary function was studied, too.Results Pao2 and sao2 decreased(P <0.05), but Paco2 increased (P <0.05) in large areas group. Pao2 and sao2 decreased(P <0.05) in small areas group. Compared with the lfoating thoracic wall models, after treatment of pressure dressing on chest, pulmonary function data had no statistical signiifcance in large areas group. PaO2 and SaO2 increased (P <0.05), Paco2 decreased(P <0.05) in small areas group after treatment of pressure dressing on chest.Conclusion The lfail chest of large areas group had a great effect on pulmonary function, but the pressure dressing on chest did not show the therapeutic efifcacy. The pressure dressing on chest was an effective way for improvement of pulmonary function in lfail chest of small areas.%目的:观察浮动胸壁对犬呼吸功能的影响以及胸壁加压包扎的疗效。方法实验用杂交犬18只建立大面积(20cm2/kg)和小面积(10cm2/kg)两组胸壁浮动动物模型,用胸腔置管和血气分析等观察胸膜腔内压(iPP)、动脉血氧分压(Pao2)、动脉血二氧化碳分压(Paco2)及动脉血氧饱和度(sao2)变化和加压包扎治疗的效果。结果大面积组Pao2和sao2下降(P<0.05),Paco2升高(P<0.05);小面积组Pao2和sao2下降(P<0.05)。同模型制作后比较,加压包扎治疗后,大面积组呼吸功能指标差异无显著性意义;小面积

  10. Routinely obtained chest X-rays after elective video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery can be omitted in most patients; a retrospective, observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Lars S; Jensen, Katrine; Petersen, René Horsleben;

    2015-01-01

    divided into three groups according to the degree of pulmonary resection. The chest X-rays (obtained anterior-posterior in one plane with the patient in the supine position) were categorized as abnormal if showing pneumothorax >5 cm, possible intra-thoracic bleeding and/or a displaced chest tube. Medical....... Proportions of abnormal chest X-rays were unequally distributed between groups (p pneumothorax >5 cm and one showed a kinked chest...

  11. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian; Thomsen, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    of clinical supervisors. Optimal collimation is determined by European and Regional Danish guidelines. The areal between current and optimal collimation is calculated. The experimental research is performed in September - October 2014 Siemens Axiom Aristos digital radiography system DR using 150 kV, 1,25 -3......Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials:A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from...

  12. A novel technique for the reconstruction of resected sternoclavicular joints: A case report with a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waseem M Hajjar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sternal metastasis in thyroid cancer is an uncommon occurrence with only a handful of cases of chest wall resections being done. Sternal reconstruction for both primary and secondary tumors has been performed using various techniques and materials such as the mesh, methyl acrylate resin, and steel plates; however, this is a case of papillary thyroid cancer involving the sternum in a 50-year-old woman who had resection of the sternum with reconstruction using titanium bars and clips (STRATOS system fixed to the clavicles with an underlying Proceed mesh. STRATOS system showed good recovery postoperatively. The functional results were excellent with the patient being able to perform all daily activities unassisted after 1 month and almost complete range of motion with acceptable limitations in power of the shoulder muscles after 2 months. We have reviewed all the English language publications of the subject by doing Medline search for the last 25 years and we present here the surgical management of this pathology with our novel approach by using the titanium steel bars to stabilize both medial aspects of the resected clavicles as a promising therapy for manubrial reconstruction and clavicular fixation.

  13. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ultrasound Video: Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is ... radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  14. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript ... Recently posted: Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids Dementia Video: General Ultrasound Video: Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Radiology and ...

  15. Chest injury in victims of Bam earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyed Mohammad Ghodsi; Moosa Zargar; Ali Khaji; Mojgan Karbakhsh

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the data of trauma patients with thoracic injury in the earthquake of Bam admitted to hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Science (TUMS)for better understanding the type and consequence of thoracic injuries in a major earthquake.Methods: After Bam earthquake registering 6.5 on the Richter scale, 526 trauma patients were admitted to hospitals of TUMS. Among them, 53 patients sustained thoracic injury.Results: This group was composed of 21 females (39.6%) and 32 males (60.4%). Fifteen patients (28.3%) had isolated chest injuries. Rib fracture (36.4%) was the most common injury in our patients and haemo/pneumothorax (25.5%) followed. Superficial injury was the most common accompanying injury. Multipletrauma patients with chest injury had higher injury severity score (ISS) versus patients with isolated chest injury (P =0.003).Conclusions: Chest wall injuries and haemo/pneumothorax comprise a considerable number of injuries in survival victims of earthquakes. Consequently, the majority of these patients can be treated with observation or tube thoracostomy. We should train and equip the health workers and members of rescue teams to treat and manage these patients in the field.

  16. Sandstorm in the chest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talluri MR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A 32 year old female presented with dry cough and progressive breathlessness of one year duration. There was no history suggestive of collagen vascular disease, lung parenchymal infection or allergic airway disease. Clinical evaluation showed basal fine inspiratory crepitations. Radiographic examination of the chest revealed a black pleura line and lung parenchymal calcification. CT scan of the chest demonstrated nodular calcification of lung parenchyma with a “crazy pavement” pattern, which is suggestive of alveolar calcification. Pulmonary function test showed a severe restrictive defect. On transbronchial lung biopsy calcific spherules suggestive of the alveolar microlithiasis were seen. Diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis was made and symptomatic treatment was given, as there is no specific therapy available. The case illustrates an unusual cause of shortness of breath in a young female with striking radiographic features.

  17. CHEST PHYSIOTHERAPY FOR INFANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Preeti S. Christian (M.P.T Cardiopulmonary Conditions)

    2014-01-01

    In the normal lung, secretions are removed by Mucociliary activity, normal breathing cycles, and cough. In disease, increased secretion viscosity and volume, dyskinesia of the cilia, and ineffective cough combine to reduce the ability to clear secretions, and may increase exacerbations and infections. Many chest physiotherapy techniques like postural drainage, percussion and vibration are used since many years. These techniques are derived from adult studies but these techniques are quite str...

  18. 高频胸壁振荡排痰仪在心脏外科手术后的应用效果研究%Application of high-frequency chest wall oscillation system expectoration after cardiac surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余萌; 魏艳艳; 丰文波; 王琪; 董静; 吴荣; 石丽

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the tolerability,safety and efficacy of High-frequency Chest Wall Oscillation System Expectoration( HFCWO)after cardiac surgery. Methods Patients in August to October 2013 undergoing cardiac surgery were randomly divided into HFCWO group and percussion on back group. The tolerability,comfort and pain were assessed,and the changes of circulatory and respiratory parameters such as heart rate,blood pressure,central venous pressure,breathing rate and pulse oxygen saturation were measured 10 min before,during and 10 min after HFCWO and percussion on back therapy. Moreover,the efficacy of sputum excretion and related clinical outcome were compared between two groups. Results Ten minutes before, during and 10 minutes after treatment,each circulatory parameters had no statistical significance(P > 0. 05). At the first and second treatment,the tolerility and comfort of HFCWO group had a statistical difference with percussion on back group(P 0. 05). Conclusions HFCWO is a safe and well-tolerated equipment in patients after extubation following cardiac surgery,and is better than percussion on back group in sputum expectoration.%目的:探讨高频胸壁振荡排痰仪在心脏外科术后应用的耐受性、安全性和临床效果。方法将2013年8—10月接受心脏外科手术的患者,随机分为高频振荡排痰(HFCWO)组和人工叩背组。对每次治疗的耐受性、舒适度和疼痛进行评估,并观察患者初次 HFCWO 治疗前10 min、治疗中和治疗结束后10 min 的循环和呼吸指标(心率、血压、中心静脉压、呼吸频率和氧饱和度)的变化。比较两组患者的排痰效果和临床结局。结果患者两次治疗前10 min、治疗中和治疗后10 min 的各项循环指标,两组差异无统计学意义(P >0.05)。第1次和第2次治疗时 HFCWO 组在耐受性和舒适感评估与人工叩背组有差异(P <0.05);而两组在疼痛程度评估和是否中断治疗

  19. Early chest tube removal after video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy with serous fluid production up to 500 ml/day

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Lars S; Jensen, Katrine; Petersen, Rene Horsleben;

    2014-01-01

    In fast-track pulmonary resections, we removed chest tubes after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy with serous fluid production up to 500 ml/day. Subsequently, we evaluated the frequency of recurrent pleural effusions requiring reintervention.......In fast-track pulmonary resections, we removed chest tubes after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy with serous fluid production up to 500 ml/day. Subsequently, we evaluated the frequency of recurrent pleural effusions requiring reintervention....

  20. Large bowel resection - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100089.htm Large bowel resection - Series To use the sharing features ... 6 out of 6 Normal anatomy Overview The large bowel [large intestine or the colon] is part ...

  1. Large bowel resection - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000151.htm Large bowel resection - discharge To use the sharing features ... surgery to remove all or part of your large intestine (large bowel). You may also have had ...

  2. Laparoscopic Colon Resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inches to complete the procedure. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Colon Resection? Results may vary depending ... type of procedure and patient’s overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain May shorten hospital stay ...

  3. Liver resection for cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RW Parks; OJ Garden

    2001-01-01

    STORY OF HEPATIC RESECTION The earliest hepatic surgery was almost exclusively performed for trauma with records from as for tumor were those of Langenbuch in 1888 [3] , Tiffany in 1890 [4],and Lucke in 1891[5].By1899,76 cases of liver resection had been reported with a mortality rate of 14.9% [6], a remarkably low figure for operations of this magnitude,all performed at the end of the 19th century.

  4. The neonatal chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, Luisa [Servico de Imagiologia Geral do Hospital de Santa Maria, Av. Prof. Egas Moniz, 1649-035 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: mluisalobo@gmail.com

    2006-11-15

    Lung diseases represent one of the most life threatening conditions in the newborn. Important progresses in modern perinatal care has resulted in a significantly improved survival and decreased morbidity, in both term and preterm infants. Most of these improvements are directly related to the better management of neonatal lung conditions, and infants of very low gestational ages are now surviving. This article reviews the common spectrum of diseases of the neonatal lung, including medical and surgical conditions, with emphasis to the radiological contribution in the evaluation and management of these infants. Imaging evaluation of the neonatal chest, including the assessment of catheters, lines and tubes are presented.

  5. The neonatal chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung diseases represent one of the most life threatening conditions in the newborn. Important progresses in modern perinatal care has resulted in a significantly improved survival and decreased morbidity, in both term and preterm infants. Most of these improvements are directly related to the better management of neonatal lung conditions, and infants of very low gestational ages are now surviving. This article reviews the common spectrum of diseases of the neonatal lung, including medical and surgical conditions, with emphasis to the radiological contribution in the evaluation and management of these infants. Imaging evaluation of the neonatal chest, including the assessment of catheters, lines and tubes are presented

  6. Sleeve resection for delayed presentation of traumatic bronchial transection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohamed, H Y

    2010-02-01

    Tracheobronchial disruption is uncommon in blunt chest trauma. Many of these patients die before reaching the hospital. In the majority of survivors diagnosis is occasionally delayed resulting in complications like airway stenosis and lung collapse. Thus it is important to have radiological follow up after severe thoracic trauma. Sleeve resection can be an excellent option to conserve lung tissue in delayed presentation of bronchial transection.

  7. Picture quiz: a case of sudden severe chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabia, Mustafa Abu; Sullivan, P; Stivaros, Stavros M

    2007-01-01

    An 18-year-old male with no previous medical history presented to hospital with sudden onset of acute epigastric pain radiating to the anterior chest wall and both shoulders. There was no history of recent trauma and he had not been vomiting. PMID:21611610

  8. American College of Chest Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American College of Chest Physicians and Sunovion announce strategic initiative focused on the importance of drug delivery in the management of COPD Sunovion Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Sunovion) and the ...

  9. 乳腺癌术后胸壁和锁骨上区整体调强剂量学探讨%Irradiation of the chest wall and regional nodes as an integrated volume with IMRT for breast cancer after mastectomy:from dosimetry to clinical observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹勤舟; 魏贤顶; 赵于天; 张福正; 杨波

    2012-01-01

    Objective To discuss dosimetric characteristics of integrated volume for chest wall target and supraclavicular target with IMRT for breast cancer after mastectomy, and observe a-cute side - effects following irradiation. Methods It was plan for breast cancer after mastectomy of 146cases, the plan for integrated volume with IMRT for breast cancer in 43 cases choice3 fields for chest wall target area and 2 fields for supraclavicular target area and 1 field for the total target area, the general plan in 103 cases was 3D - CRT for chest wall target joining plan of mixed irradiation by 6 MV X — ray and 9 MeV electronic line for supraclavicular target. prescription dose was 50 Gy/25 times, to meet the requirements of 90 % prescription dose for target area; and dosimetry characteristics on the chest wall target and supraclavicular target area and normal organ are compared. Results The plan of integrated volume with IMRT for breast cancer for the chest wall target area compared with general plan reduces the maximum dose and enhance the minimum dose and a better target conformal and uniformity. The plan of integrated volume with IMRT for breast cancer for Supraclavicular target area compared with general plan, the minimum dose and the average dose of prescription dose and 95% contains the target volume, and conformal and uniformity for the target region was increased obviously. The plan of integrated volume with IMRT for breast cancer for the normal organ compared with general plan, the V30 and V10 and V30 and Dmean of the ipsilateral lung and heart were lowed, while the V5 and V10 of the ipsilateral lung and heart were increased, it were no statistical difference of V20 of the ipsilateral lung and Dmean of the contralateral lung and Dmean of the contralateral breast, ≥grade 2 radiational dermatitis was identified in 38% patients, no patient developed radiation pneumonitis. Conclusion The plan for integrated volume with IMRT for breast cancer can improve the dose of

  10. Pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer on radiological findings: Evaluation of chest CT findings in pathologically proven 76 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Daun; Shin, Sang Soo; Kim, Yun Hyeon [Chonnam National Univ. Hospital, Gwangju, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Ook; Seon, Hyun Ju; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National Univ. Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To evaluate chest CT features of pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung malignancy. We retrospectively reviewed chest CT findings for 76 consecutive patients (21-84 years, average: 63 years; M : F = 30 : 46) who underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure under the suspicion of lung cancer and were pathologically diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis by bronchoscopic biopsy (n = 49), transthoracic needle biopsy (n = 17), and surgical resection (n = 10). We categorized the chest CT patterns of those lesions as follows: bronchial narrowing or obstruction without a central mass like lesion (pattern 1), central mass-like lesion with distal atelectasis or obstructive pneumonia (pattern 2), peripheral nodule or mass including mass-like consolidation (pattern 3), and cavitary lesion (pattern 4). CT findings were reviewed with respect to the patterns and the locations of the lesions, parenchymal abnormalities adjacent to the lesions, the size, the border and pattern of enhancement for the peripheral nodule or mass and the thickness of the cavitary wall in the cavitary lesion. We also evaluated the abnormalities regarding the lymph node and pleura. Pattern 1 was the most common finding (n = 34), followed by pattern 3 (n = 23), pattern 2 (n = 11) and finally, pattern 4 (n = 8). The most frequently involving site in pattern 1 and 2 was the right middle lobe (n = 14/45). However, in pattern 3 and 4, the superior segment of right lower lobe (n = 5/31) was most frequently involved. Ill-defined small nodules and/or larger confluent nodules were found in the adjacent lung and at the other segment of the lung in 31 patients (40.8%). Enlarged lymph nodes were most commonly detected in the right paratracheal area (n = 9/18). Pleural effusion was demonstrated in 10 patients. On the CT, pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer most commonly presented with bronchial narrowing or obstruction without a central mass-like lesion, which resulted in distal atelectasis and obstructive

  11. Pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer on radiological findings: Evaluation of chest CT findings in pathologically proven 76 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate chest CT features of pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung malignancy. We retrospectively reviewed chest CT findings for 76 consecutive patients (21-84 years, average: 63 years; M : F = 30 : 46) who underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure under the suspicion of lung cancer and were pathologically diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis by bronchoscopic biopsy (n = 49), transthoracic needle biopsy (n = 17), and surgical resection (n = 10). We categorized the chest CT patterns of those lesions as follows: bronchial narrowing or obstruction without a central mass like lesion (pattern 1), central mass-like lesion with distal atelectasis or obstructive pneumonia (pattern 2), peripheral nodule or mass including mass-like consolidation (pattern 3), and cavitary lesion (pattern 4). CT findings were reviewed with respect to the patterns and the locations of the lesions, parenchymal abnormalities adjacent to the lesions, the size, the border and pattern of enhancement for the peripheral nodule or mass and the thickness of the cavitary wall in the cavitary lesion. We also evaluated the abnormalities regarding the lymph node and pleura. Pattern 1 was the most common finding (n = 34), followed by pattern 3 (n = 23), pattern 2 (n = 11) and finally, pattern 4 (n = 8). The most frequently involving site in pattern 1 and 2 was the right middle lobe (n = 14/45). However, in pattern 3 and 4, the superior segment of right lower lobe (n = 5/31) was most frequently involved. Ill-defined small nodules and/or larger confluent nodules were found in the adjacent lung and at the other segment of the lung in 31 patients (40.8%). Enlarged lymph nodes were most commonly detected in the right paratracheal area (n = 9/18). Pleural effusion was demonstrated in 10 patients. On the CT, pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer most commonly presented with bronchial narrowing or obstruction without a central mass-like lesion, which resulted in distal atelectasis and obstructive

  12. Ultrasonographic ifndings at the resected area after hepatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Qiang Mo; Xue-Ming Liu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since hepatectomy has been widely performed, different operative manner, operating areas, and material in the residual cavity may be found ultrasonographi-cally near the resected area after the operation. In this study, we investigated the changes of focal ultrasonography at the resected area post hepatectomy and recognized the characteristic ultrasonographic images. METHODS:176 patients whose ultrasonographic ifndings were studied in the residual area during the early and later periods after hepatectomy were retrospectively analyzed in terms of operative manner, operative area, and material in the residual cavity. RESULTS: There were absence of partial hepatic lobe or hepatic segment, focal anechoic area with thin wall or mixed mass at the resected area, and conformation of irregular high-echoic conglomeration at the resected area, cystic non-anechoic area, and mixed mass with irregularly thickened wall at the resected area, inconsistent internal echoes, and color Doppler twinking artifacts around the material and the residual cavity after curettage and aspiration. CONCLUSIONS: Focal ultrasonographic ifndings at the resected area after hepatectomy vary with different operative procedures, operative area, resection size, absence or existence of material, and kinds of material in the residual cavity.

  13. A new specifically designed forceps for chest drain insertion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Andrews, Emmet

    2012-02-03

    Insertion of a chest drain can be associated with serious complications. It is recommended that the drain is inserted with blunt dissection through the chest wall but there is no specific instrument to aid this task. We describe a new reusable forceps that has been designed specifically to facilitate the insertion of chest drains.A feasibility study of its use in patients who required a chest drain as part of elective cardiothoracic operations was undertaken. The primary end-point was successful and accurate placement of the drain. The operators also completed a questionnaire rating defined aspects of the procedure. The new instrument was used to insert the chest drain in 30 patients (19 male, 11 female; median age 61.5 years (range 16-81 years)). The drain was inserted successfully without the trocar in all cases and there were no complications. Use of the instrument rated as significantly easier relative to experience of previous techniques in all specified aspects. The new device can be used to insert intercostal chest drains safely and efficiently without using the trocar or any other instrument.

  14. Radiology illustrated. Chest radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Soo [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology; Han, Joungho [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Pathology; Chung, Man Pyo [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Medicine; Jeong, Yeon Joo [Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Pattern approach to the diagnosis of lung diseases based on CT scan appearances. Guide to quick and reliable differential diagnosis. CT-pathology correlation. Emphasis on state-of-the-art MDCT. The purpose of this atlas is to illustrate how to achieve reliable diagnoses when confronted by the different abnormalities, or ''disease patterns'', that may be visualized on CT scans of the chest. The task of pattern recognition has been greatly facilitated by the advent of multidetector CT (MDCT), and the focus of the book is very much on the role of state-of-the-art MDCT. A wide range of disease patterns and distributions are covered, with emphasis on the typical imaging characteristics of the various focal and diffuse lung diseases. In addition, clinical information relevant to differential diagnosis is provided and the underlying gross and microscopic pathology is depicted, permitting CT-pathology correlation. The entire information relevant to each disease pattern is also tabulated for ease of reference. This book will be an invaluable handy tool that will enable the reader to quickly and easily reach a diagnosis appropriate to the pattern of lung abnormality identified on CT scans.

  15. Chest radiographic findings of leptospirosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mee Hyun; Jung, Hee Tae; Lee, Young Joong; Yoon, Jong Sup [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-04-15

    1. A study on chest radiographic findings of 54 cases with pneumonia like symptoms was performed. Of 54 cases, 8 cases were confirmed to be leptospirosis and 7 cases were leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever. 2. Of 8 cases of leptospirosis, 4 cases showed abnormal chest radiographic findings: acinar nodular type 2, massive confluent consolidation type 2. Of 7 cases of leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever: acinar nodular type 3, massive confluent consolidation type 1, and increased interstitial markings type 1 respectively. 3. It was considered to be difficult to diagnose the leptospirosis on chest radiographic findings alone, especially the case combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever.

  16. 乳腺癌术后胸壁大体积复发二野和六野调强放疗剂量学比较%A dosimetric comparison of the tangential beams IMRT with multifield beams IMRT of the chest wall in postmastectomy breast cancer recurrent patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永武; 孙晓南; 王奇; 刘海; 施国治

    2013-01-01

    目的 比较乳腺癌术后胸壁大体积复发2野和6野调强放疗的计划差异.方法 对8例乳腺切除术后胸壁大体积复发病例,Pinnacle计划系统上分别对PTV进行2野调强和6野调强放疗计划设计,PTV处方剂量为50 Gy/25次(GTV后续计划补量至66~70 Gy),比较2种计划95%处方剂量PTV适形指数(CI)、均匀性指数(HI)及心脏、同侧肺剂量.结果 6野IMRT计划的CI和HI均优于2野IMRT计划,6野和2野的CI分别为(0.66±0.08)和(0.53±0.10)(t=7.99,P<0.05),HI分别为(1.36±0.08)和(2.19±0.78)(t=9.04,P<0.05).2个计划中肺V5、V10、V20、V35和心脏Dmax、V35、Dmean值比较差异无统计学意义.结论 乳腺癌切除术后胸壁大体积复发患者行放疗,6野静态逆向调强放疗计划靶区覆盖优于2野,而心肺受量方面无明显差异.%Objective To compare the dose distribution of reserved planned tangential beam IMRT(2-field IMRT) with multifields beams IMRT(6-field IMRT) of the bulk-recurrent chest wall in postmastectomy breast cancer patients.Methods For 8 patients with chest wall in postmastectomy breast cancer bulk-recurrence,2-field IMRT and 6-field IMRT plans were generated on PTV in Pinnacle Planning System.The prescribed dose of PTV was 50 Gy in 25 fractions and GTV was 66-70 Gy which irradiated incrementally by subsequent plan in 8-10 fractions.The conformal index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) of 95% of prescribed dose over PTV were compared,while the dose distribution on ipsilateral lung and heart were evaluated.Results The CI of PTV by 6-field IMRT (0.66 ± 0.08) was higher than that of the2-field IMRT (0.53±0.10)(t=7.99,P<0.05).The HI ofPTV by6-field IMRT (1.36±0.08)waslower than that of 2-field IMRT (2.19 ±0.78) (t =9.04,P <0.05).There was no statistical difference in V5,V10,V20 and V35 for ipsilateral lung and in D V35 and D for heart between two plans.Conclusions Compared with 2-field IMRT,6-field IMRT might have a better dose distribution on

  17. The effects of ultrashortwave irradiation and chest-wall vibration therapy on serum eosinophil cationic protein and the percentage of eosinophil in the sputum of children with asthma%超短波和胸壁振动辅助治疗对轻、中度儿童哮喘诱导痰EOS及血清ECP的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵飞; 乔艳红; 刘丰; 王一彪

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of ultrashortwave irradiation and chest-wall vibration therapy on serum eosinophil cationic protein(ECP)and percentage of eosinophil(EOS%)in the sputum of children with mild to moderate asthma. Methods A total of 68 children with asthma were divided into a control group and a treatment group.The control group WaS treated with conventional treatment only,while the treatment group was given ultrashortwave irradiation and chest-wall vibration therapy in addition to the conventional treatment.The serum ECP,EOS% in induced sputum,FEV1.0%,and PEF% were measured before and after treatment.The relationships among ECP,EOS%,FEV1.0% and PEF% were analyzed.Results FEV1.0% and PEF% were negatively correlated with serum ECP and EOS% in children with asthma.Compared with the control group,ECP and EOS% were significantly reduced after treatment,while FEV1.0% and PEF% were significantly elevated. Conclusion Uhrashortwave irradiation and chest-wall vibration therapy can improve ventilation by ameliorating airway inflammation and obstruction.%目的 探讨超短波和胸壁振动辅助治疗儿童哮喘对诱导痰嗜酸粒细胞百分数(EOS%)、血清嗜酸粒细胞阳离子蛋白(ECP)及肺通气功能的影响.方法 68例哮喘儿童随机分为对照组和治疗组,对照组采用常规治疗,治疗组除常规治疗外,先后行超短波和胸壁振动辅助治疗,并分别于治疗前、后采血测ECP,行肺通气功能检查及诱导痰EOS%分类.结果 哮喘儿童诱导痰EOS%、血清ECP与肺通气功能指标第1秒最大呼气量占预计值的百分数(FEV1.0%)及呼气峰流速占预计值的百分数(PEF%)均呈显著负相关(P<0.01);与对照组比较,治疗后治疗组血清ECP、诱导痰EOS%均显著降低,FEV1.0%、PEF%显著升高(P<0.05或0.01).结论 超短波和胸壁振动辅助治疗儿童哮喘具有减轻气道炎症和气道受阻、提高肺通气功能的作用.

  18. Interpretation of neonatal chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Plain radiographs for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are obtained using the portable X-ray equipment in order to evaluate the neonatal lungs and also to check the position of the tubes and catheters used for monitoring critically-ill neonates. Neonatal respiratory distress is caused by a variety of medical or surgical disease conditions. Clinical information about the gestational week, respiratory symptoms, and any events during delivery is essential for interpretation of the neonatal chest radiographs. Awareness of common chest abnormality in the prematurely born or term babies is also very important for chest evaluation in the newborn. Furthermore, knowledge about complications such as air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia following treatment are required to accurately inform the clinicians. The purpose of this article was to briefly review radiographic findings of chest diseases in newborns that are relatively common in daily practice.

  19. Chest Pain (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... number of problems related to the stomach and intestines can cause pain that spreads to or even begins in the chest, including ulcers, gallbladder disease, pancreatitis, and irritable bowel syndrome. (See "Patient information: Peptic ulcer disease (Beyond the ...

  20. [Statistical study of mandibular resections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidibe, C A; Dichamp, J; Razouk, O; Bertrand, J C; Guilbert, G

    1994-01-01

    A retrospective study of mandibular resections performed from 1980 to 1984 was conducted to evaluate age, sex, aetiology, etc. The number of mandibular resections appears to have declined at the Institute of Stomatology and Maxillofacial Surgery of the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital. Different factors are involved included early diagnosis, improved surgical techniques and better patient follow-up. Partial mandibular resections are increasingly performed (52% of the cases) compared with total resections. Finally, a better understanding of the pathologies involved, especially tumours, has led to an adaptation of the resection techniques to avoid extensive mutilations.

  1. [Complete Resection of Non-seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor with Plastron Approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Jun; Oizumi, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hirohisa; Endoh, Makoto; Watarai, Hikaru; Hamada, Akira; Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Nakahashi, Kenta; Sasage, Takayuki; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2016-07-01

    A 17-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for the abnormal chest shadow. Chest computed tomography(CT) demonstrated mediastinal tumor, measuring 13 cm in diameter with high serum level of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). The lesions were diagnosed as mixed germ cell tumors including a non-seminomatous malignant component by CT guided needle biopsy. After 5 courses of chemotherapy, the serum AFP and hCG were decreased almost normal level but the tumor size was not changed. Because it seemed to be difficult to get sufficient operating field with standard median sternotomy and patient wanted to treat funnel chest, we selected tumor resection with plastron approach. The tumor was completely resected with a good operation field by this procedure. PMID:27365059

  2. Effects of modified chest-up Trendelenburg position on cerebral oxygen metabolism and early postoperative cognitive function in elderly patients undergoing laparoscopic radical resection of the colorectal carcinoma%改良抬胸Trendelenburg位对腹腔镜结直肠癌根治术老年患者脑氧代谢和早期术后认知功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施锋; 李金宝; 邓小明; 许波

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of modified chest-up Trendelenburg position on cerebral oxygen metabolism and early postoperative cognitive function in elderly patients undergoing laparoscopic radical resection of colorectal carcinoma.Methods Eighty ASA Ⅰ or Ⅱ patients,60-82 years old,weighing 44-69 kg,scheduled for elective laparoscopic radical resection of colorectal carcinoma,were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=40):group M,patients in chest-up position using custom-made posture cushions,group T,patients in conventional Trendelenburg position.Blood samples were simultaneously taken from radial artery and jugular bulb at 5 min after regular general anesthesia induction in supine position (T1),immediately after pneumoperitoneum in modified Trendelenburg position or Trendelenburg position(T2),at 30 min (T3),60 min(T4),90 min(T5) after pneumoperitoneum,and at 15 min after deflation in horizon position (T6).The values of blood gas,blood glucose,lactate,and MAP were recorded.he differences of arteriovenous O2 content (Ca-jvDO2) and glucose content (Da-jvglu) were calculated.Cognitive function was assessed by mini-mental state examination at 24 h before anesthesia and at 6,24,48 h and 72 h after anesthesia.Results Compared with T1,arterial partial pressure carbon dioxide(PaCO2) at T3-6,jugular venous partial pressure oxygen(PjvO2) at T3-5 and jugular venous oxygen saturation(SjvO2) at T4-5 were significantly increased in both groups,MAP at T2 were significantly decreased in both groups,MAP at T4-6 were significantly increased in group M,MAP at T3-6,SjvO2 [(75±9)%] at T6 and jugular venous lactate (Lacjv)[(2.0±0.5) mmol/L] at T5 were significantly increased and Ca-jvDO2[(5.2±1.5)%] at T5 were significantly decreased in group T(P<0.05).Compared with group T,CajvDO2[(5.9±1.6)%] at T5 was not significantly decreased,MAP at T4-6,SjvO2[(75±9)%] and Lacjv[(1.5±0.5) mmol/L] at T5 were not significantly increased,Da-jvglu before and after pneumoperitoneum

  3. An unusual cause for recurrent chest infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lobo, Ronstan

    2012-10-01

    We present a case of an elderly non-smoking gentleman who, since 2005, had been admitted multiple times for recurrent episodes of shortness of breath, wheeze, cough and sputum. The patient was treated as exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and\\/or lower respiratory tract infections. Bronchoscopy was done which revealed multiple hard nodules in the trachea and bronchi with posterior tracheal wall sparing. Biopsies confirmed this as tracheopathia osteochondroplastica (TO). He had increasing frequency of admission due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and pseudomonas infections, which failed to clear despite intravenous, prolonged oral and nebulised antibiotics. The patient developed increasing respiratory distress and respiratory failure. The patient died peacefully in 2012. This case report highlights the typical pathological and radiological findings of TO and the pitfalls of misdiagnosing patients with recurrent chest infections as COPD.

  4. 舒尼替尼单药治疗晚期三阴乳癌胸壁转移的初步疗效观察(附1例报告并文献复习)%SUNITINIB MONOTHERAPY FOR TRIPLE-NEGATIVE BREAST CANCER WITH CHEST WALL METASTASIS: REPORT OF ONE CASE AND REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红军; 张立建; 刘杰

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of sunitinib monotherapy for triple-negative breast cancer (TN-BC) patient with chest wall metastasis. Methods One TNBC advanced patient who failed to response previous anthracycline, docetaxel and pemetrexed therapy was treated with oral sunitinib. Results Monotherapy with sunitinib for this case was effective, with mild side effects and the patient was well tolerated. This case indicated that sunitinib was well tolerated and efficiency. Conclusion Sunitinib monotherapy may be an effective choice for advanced-stage TNBC patients with a poor physical status.%目的 观察舒尼替尼单药治疗胸壁转移的晚期三阴乳癌的有效性和安全性.方法 应用舒尼替尼单药治疗蒽环类、紫杉类及培美曲塞治疗无效的三阴乳癌晚期病人1例.结果 舒尼替尼单药治疗晚期三阴乳癌胸壁转移有效,毒副作用轻,病人耐受良好.结论 舒尼替尼单药可能是体质差的晚期三阴乳癌病人治疗的一种有效的选择.

  5. Preoperative therapies for resectable and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Varadhachary, Gauri R.

    2011-01-01

    In the era of multidetector high quality CT imaging, it is feasible and critical to use objective criteria to define resectable pancreatic cancer. This allows accurate pretreatment staging and the development of stage-specific therapy. Tumors of borderline resectability have emerged as a distinct subset and the definition has been expanded in the last few years. Borderline resectable tumors are defined as those with tumor abutment of

  6. Endoscopic resection of subepithelial tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Arthur; Bauder, Markus; Riecken, Bettina; Caca, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Management of subepithelial tumors (SETs) remains challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has improved differential diagnosis of these tumors but a definitive diagnosis on EUS findings alone can be achieved in the minority of cases. Complete endoscopic resection may provide a reasonable approach for tissue acquisition and may also be therapeutic in case of malignant lesions. Small SET restricted to the submucosa can be removed with established basic resection techniques. However, resection o...

  7. Robotic Lung Resection for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benjamin; Eldaif, Shady M; Cerfolio, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Robotic-assisted pulmonary lobectomy can be considered for patients able to tolerate conventional lobectomy. Contraindications to resection via thoracotomy apply to patients undergoing robotic lobectomy. Team training, familiarity with equipment, troubleshooting, and preparation are critical for successful robotic lobectomy. Robotic lobectomy is associated with decreased rates of blood loss, blood transfusion, air leak, chest tube duration, length of stay, and mortality compared with thoracotomy. Robotic lobectomy offers many of the same benefits in perioperative morbidity and mortality, and additional advantages in optics, dexterity, and surgeon ergonomics as video-assisted thoracic lobectomy. Long-term oncologic efficacy and cost implications remain areas of study. PMID:27261913

  8. Contemporary management of flail chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vana, P Geoff; Neubauer, Daniel C; Luchette, Fred A

    2014-06-01

    Thoracic injury is currently the second leading cause of trauma-related death and rib fractures are the most common of these injuries. Flail chest, as defined by fracture of three or more ribs in two or more places, continues to be a clinically challenging problem. The underlying pulmonary contusion with subsequent inflammatory reaction and right-to-left shunting leading to hypoxia continues to result in high mortality for these patients. Surgical stabilization of the fractured ribs remains controversial. We review the history of management for flail chest alone and when combined with pulmonary contusion. Finally, we propose an algorithm for nonoperative and surgical management. PMID:24887787

  9. Contemporary management of flail chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vana, P Geoff; Neubauer, Daniel C; Luchette, Fred A

    2014-06-01

    Thoracic injury is currently the second leading cause of trauma-related death and rib fractures are the most common of these injuries. Flail chest, as defined by fracture of three or more ribs in two or more places, continues to be a clinically challenging problem. The underlying pulmonary contusion with subsequent inflammatory reaction and right-to-left shunting leading to hypoxia continues to result in high mortality for these patients. Surgical stabilization of the fractured ribs remains controversial. We review the history of management for flail chest alone and when combined with pulmonary contusion. Finally, we propose an algorithm for nonoperative and surgical management.

  10. Gunshot wounds to the chest

    OpenAIRE

    Holmen, Lillian Beate

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This is a review of gunshot wounds to the chest. Although uncommon in Norway, they represent a big health problem in other parts of the world and in war situations. Method: A systematic literature search using PubMed and McMaster+. Results: Gunshot wounds to the chest can be highly lethal. Depending on the injured organ, a large percentage of the patients die before reaching the hospital. There is a big difference between low-velocity and high-velocity weapons. Low velocity inju...

  11. Accuracy of chest radiography versus chest computed tomography in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mojtaba Chardoli; Toktam Hasan-Ghaliaee; Hesam Akbari; Vafa Rahimi-Movaghar

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Thoracic injuries are responsible for 25% of deaths of blunt traumas.Chest X-ray (CXR) is the first diagnostic method in patients with blunt trauma.The aim of this study was to detect the accuracy of CXR versus chest computed tomograpgy (CT) in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma.Methods:Study was conducted at the emergency department of S ina Hospital from March 2011 to March 2012.Hemodynamically stable patients with at least 16 years of age who had blunt chest trauma were included.All patients underwent the same diagnostic protocol which consisted of physical examination,CXR and CT scan respectively.Results:Two hundreds patients (84% male and 16% female) were included with a mean age of(37.9±13.7) years.Rib fracture was the most common finding of CXR (12.5%) and CT scan (25.5%).The sensitivity of CXR for hemothorax,thoracolumbar vertebra fractures and rib fractures were 20%,49% and 49%,respectively.Pneumothorax,foreign body,emphysema,pulmonary contusion,liver hematoma and sternum fracture were not diagnosed with CXR alone.Conclusion:Applying CT scan as the first-line diagnostic modality in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma can detect pathologies which may change management and outcome.

  12. Inflation and deflation pressure-volume loops in anesthetized pinnipeds confirms compliant chest and lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Fahlman, Andreas; Loring, Stephen H.; Johnson, Shawn P.; Haulena, Martin; Trites, Andrew W.; Fravel, Vanessa A.; Van Bonn, William G.

    2014-01-01

    We examined structural properties of the marine mammal respiratory system, and tested Scholander's hypothesis that the chest is highly compliant by measuring the mechanical properties of the respiratory system in five species of pinniped under anesthesia (Pacific harbor seal, Phoca vitulina; northern elephant seal, Mirounga angustirostris; northern fur seal Callorhinus ursinus; California sea lion, Zalophus californianus; and Steller sea lion, Eumetopias jubatus). We found that the chest wall...

  13. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Chest in a Neonate in Southern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwafemi Olasupo Awe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the successful saving of a male neonate with necrotizing fasciitis of the chest following a hot fomentation of the umbilicus with exposure of the ribs and the pleural space on the right side. He recovered 5 weeks after admission. We stressed the need to recognize necrotizing fasciitis extending from the upper anterior abdominal wall to the chest following hot fomentation of the umbilicus. The need for multidisciplinary cooperation for excellent outcome is very important, that is, neonatologist, medical microbiologist, and plastic and chest surgeons.

  14. A systematic analysis of neonatal mouse heart regeneration after apical resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Donald Marion; O'Meara, Caitlin Claire; Ho, Nhi Ngoc; Gannon, Joseph; Cai, Lei; Lee, Richard Theodore

    2015-02-01

    The finding that neonatal mice are able to regenerate myocardium after apical resection has recently been questioned. We determined if heart regeneration is influenced by the size of cardiac resection and whether surgical retraction of the ventricular apex results in an increase in cardiomyocyte cell cycle activity. We performed moderate or large apical ventricular resections on neonatal mice and quantified scar infiltration into the left ventricular wall at 21 days post-surgery. Moderately resected hearts had 15±2% of the wall infiltrated by a collagen scar; significantly greater scar infiltration (23±4%) was observed in hearts with large resections. Resected hearts had higher levels of cardiomyocyte cell cycle activity relative to sham hearts. Surgically retracting the ventricle often resulted in fibrosis and induced cardiomyocyte cell cycle activity that were comparable to that of resected hearts. We conclude that apical resection in neonatal mice induces cardiomyocyte cell cycle activity and neomyogenesis, although scarring can occur. Surgical technique and definition of approach to assessing the extent of regeneration are both critical when using the neonatal mouse apical resection model.

  15. Totally endoscopic robotic resection of left atrial myxoma with persistent left superior vena cava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarui, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Norihiko; Ohtake, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Go

    2016-07-01

    A 68-year old man with a cardiac tumour was admitted for robotic tumour resection using the da Vinci S Surgical System. While undergoing preoperative examination, he was found to have a persistent left superior vena cava. After general anaesthesia and single-lung ventilation, cardiopulmonary bypass was established, with venous drainage through bilateral internal jugular and right femoral veins and arterial return through the right femoral artery. Robotic tumour resection was performed by four ports in the right chest. There were no difficulties during the operation, and successful tumour resection was achieved with satisfactory margins. He was discharged without complications. Persistent left superior vena cava is very rare, but if diagnosed preoperatively and an appropriate operative plan is made, robotic cardiac surgery can be performed safely. With robotic surgery, cardiac tumour resection can be feasibly performed, with cosmetic benefits. PMID:26989070

  16. Combined endoscopic and laparoscopic approach for palliative resection of metastatic melanoma of the stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritchard SA

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastatic tumours of the stomach present a clinical dilemma for the surgeon. Palliative surgical resection can alleviate symptoms and prolong survival in selected patients. However, previous studies have used open methods of surgical resection with potentially high morbidity and mortality. We describe the use of laparoscopic wedge resection of the stomach for palliative resection of metastatic melanoma to highlight the benefits of this technique. Case presentation A 58 year old male was investigated for iron deficiency anaemia while under treatment for pulmonary metastatic malignant melanoma. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a 5 cm diameter ulcer on the anterior wall of the stomach, biopsies from the ulcer confirmed metastatic melanoma. Laparoscopic wedge resection of the stomach lesion was performed without complication. Conclusion Laparoscopic approach has many benefits and is useful for the palliative resection of rare tumours of the stomach in order to preserve the quality of life. Its use should be considered in selected patients.

  17. [Postoperative local thermo-chemotherapy in control of residual pleural diseases after resection of primary lung carcinoma--regulation of dissemination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, K; Doi, O; Tatsuta, M; Kurokawa, E; Terasawa, T

    1987-12-01

    Pleural dissemination was proved by intraoperative histodiagnosis in 11 of 121 patients who underwent pulmonary resection for non-small cell carcinoma of the lung between April, 1985 and December, 1986. To control such intrathoracic residual diseases, we devised a means of local thermo-chemotherapy. Ten of 11 patients were treated with intrapleurally administrated cisplatin (50-100mg, bolus) combined with simultaneous radiofrequency hyperthermia (13.56 MHz) for 2 to 3 weeks after surgery. Courses were repeated at 5-to 7-day intervals. Eight patients had N2-disease, one N1 and the other NX. Eight were adenocarcinomas. Thermal burn of the chest wall with hyperkalemia was observed in only one patient who received thermotherapy at the over a magnetrode power of 450 watts for 50 minutes. In the other 9, side effects were minimal under the thermotherapy to obtain a peripleural temperature beyond 42 degrees C. Of the 10 patients, three lived more than 12 months after treatment. Although distant metastases were recognized in 6 cases, none had local recurrence for the median follow-up period of 6 months. One patient had metastasis to the contralateral supraclavicular lymph nodes. Because there was no evidence of intrathoracic recurrences in this patient, radical neck dissection were performed 15 months after the initial operation. This experience warrants further investigation of thermo-chemotherapy as a treatment for controlling pleural dissemination after resection of primary tumor.

  18. New developments in ultrasonic imaging of the chest and other body organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accurate measurement of transuranic elements deposited in the lung is a complex task. One of the problems is measuring uranium-L x-rays associated with plutonium passing through the chest of an accidentally exposed subject. Because the normal human chest-wall thickness varies from about 1 to 4.5 cm, it is important that an accurate determination be made for every person counted for plutonium or for other heavy elements with similar emissions. An ultrasonic B-scanning system (brightness modulated time-base) was developed for defining the structure within the body. Computer programs were written to determine the distance between the lung and chest-wall interface and the outer surface of the chest wall at several points on each scan. These points are exponentially averaged to obtain an average chest-wall thickness that is used, with other information, to derive a calibration factor for plutonium in the subject. It is also combined with the counting data to obtain the plutonium lung burden. Since photon transmission characteristics differ in fat and soft tissue, assessing the fat content is important and can provide a correction factor for counter sensitivity when viewing various organs. The main advantage of the B-scanning and three-dimensional systems are discussed

  19. 高频胸壁振荡排痰仪在心脏术后患者中的应用研究与进展%Research on Application and Development of the High-Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation System in Post-Cardiac Surgery Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺红霞; 石丽

    2015-01-01

    振荡排痰仪是一种针对心脏术后患者有效的医疗护理辅助仪器,在国外已有大量的高频胸壁振荡方面的研究与应用,但在国内仅有少数医疗单位进行过初步探索,与国际落差较大。阜外心血管病医院跟踪国际医疗技术前沿,大胆地对背心式高频胸壁振荡排痰仪进行了研究与实践,取得了较好的治疗效果。本文拟对高频振荡排痰仪的概念、国内外研究状况及我科的研究与实践情况进行初步总结,以期对提高心脏术后患者的治疗效果有所裨益。%As an effective method for the treatment of post-cardiac patients, the high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) system has been reported in a large number of researches and got wider popularization in foreign countries. In view of this, there has been a big gap between the foreign countries and China because only a few medical institutes in China carry on related preliminary researches. Fuwai Hospital was exempliifed in this paper for its research and successful practice of the vest-type HFCWO system to achieve better therapeutic effects. This paper summarized the concept of the HFCWO system, the research status at home and abroad as well as the research and practice in the hospital so as to promote the therapeutic effect for post-cardiac patients.

  20. Differential points of mediastinal cystic lesion in chest computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jin; Baek, Jang Mi; Song, Jang Hyeon; Seon, Hyun Ju [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Hyeon [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    To find differential diagnostic imaging findings of mediastinal cystic lesions in chest computed tomography. We retrospectively reviewed imaging findings of 70 patients with histopathologically proven mediastinal cystic lesions. They were 33 male and 37 female patients. Among 70 cases, 49 cases were in the anterior mediastinum, 12 cases were in the middle mediastinum, and 9 cases were in the posterior mediastinum. 19 patients had symptoms. Chest discomfort was the most common symptom. When the cystic lesion was located in the anterior mediastinum, and unilocular, the possibility of thymic cyst was the most likely (p < 0.0027). When the cystic lesion was located in the anterior mediastinum and was multilocular with a relatively thick wall, the possibility of a mature cystic teratoma was the most likely (p < 0.001). When the lesion was a high attenuation cystic lesion located around the air-way, the possibility of a bronchogenic cyst was the most likely (p < 0.001). Chest CT gives information about the location, loculation, wall thickness and internal attenuation of mediastinal cystic lesions. And certain details seen on CT imaging can help with the correct diagnosis, especially in the cases of thymic cyst, mature cystic teratoma and bronchogenic cyst.

  1. Nuclear imaging of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Y.W. [Samsung Cheil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology; Kim, E.E. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Cancer Center; Isawa, T. [Yokohama Higashi National Hospital (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    This book provides up-to-the minute information on the diagnostic nuclear imaging of chest disorders. The authors have endeavored to integrate and consolidate the many different subspecialities in order to enable a holistic understanding of chest diseases from the nuclear medicine standpoint. Highlights of the book include in addition to the cardiac scan the description of aerosol lung imaging in COPD and other important pulmonary diseases and the updates on breast and lung cancer imaging, as well as imaging of the bony thorax and esophagus. It is required reading not only for nuclear medicine practitioners and researchers but also for all interested radiologists, traumatologists, pulmonologists, oncologists and cardiologists. (orig.) 217 figs., 25 tabs.

  2. Monitor unit calculations for breast or chest wall treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, P C; Ames, T; Howard-Ames, T; Kohut, H; Heleba, V; Krishnamoorthy, J

    1989-01-01

    Tangential breast fields always "flash" beyond the surface of the patient. Since the portion of the beam that is in air does not contribute scatter, external beam treatment planning computers that utilize stored beam data can lead to dose errors of up to 10%. These errors can be reduced by using an irregular field calculation program to adjust the monitor units to account for the loss of scatter.

  3. Chest shape in preterm newborn infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suggestion that thoracic shape of anteroposterior radiographs reflects lung compliance was examined in 62 preterm newborn infants (none with pulmonary hypoplasia) by measuring ratios of upper to lower chest widths. Chest shape did not vary significantly with the presence of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) or with gender, Apgar score, endotracheal intubation, radiographic severity of RDS, or age at radiography. However, decreased maturity was associated with a relatively wide upper chest and narrow lower chest. Developmental factors may be more important than lung compliance (and the other factors noted) in determining the radiographic configuration of the infantile chest

  4. O5.105-ALA FLUORESCENCE GUIDED RESECTION OF HEMANGIOBLASTOMAS - IS IT USEFUL WITH CONVENTIONAL SURGICAL TOOLS?

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, J M; Sainz, L.; Presti, A. Lo; Ramirez, M.; Aguirre, D.; Ordoñez, C.; Daoud, L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) for fluorescent guided malignant glioma surgery has proved to be useful to ensure a complete resection and thus, a best survival result. One report has described its usefulness for the detection of hemangioblastoma fragments at the cyst wall after apparently complete tumor resection. Von Hippel-Lindau disease patients suffer from many CNS hemangioblastomas, requiring multiple surgical procedures for resection of tumors, many times obscured ...

  5. Gastric tumors on chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastric neoplasms of three patients protruded into their gas-containing fornices and were first visualized on plain chest radiographs. Endoscopy and/or surgery confirmed these to be a polyp, a leiomyoma, and an adenocarcinoma. The polyp, 1.3 cm in diameter, was the smallest of these three, but smaller lesions may be detectable under suitable conditions. Adequate technique and positioning, sufficiently large lesions in the upper portion of the stomach, a central beam tangential to the tumor, sufficient gas in the stomach, and careful scrutiny by the observer are required. Lesions may be more readily visualized during chest radiography when oral sodium bicarbonate is used to distend the stomach. In chest radiography, exposure limited to the lung fields has been advocated for economy and dose reduction. However, too small an exposure field may result in loss of information potentially beneficial to the patient. Using the smaller of two popular film sizes (35 x 43 cm and 35 x 35 cm), the saving in surface and bone marrow doses is negligible, and the saving in gonad dose may be nil over that when shielding is used. The interest of the observer may be absorbed by a concomitant cardiac or pulmonary lesion. Careful scrutiny of the entire radiograph is therefore essential. (author)

  6. Multi-institutional analysis of T3 subtypes and adjuvant radiotherapy effects in resected T3N0 non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Seon; Lee, Ik Jae; Cho, Jae Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    We evaluated the prognostic significance of T3 subtypes and the role of adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with resected the American Joint Committee on Cancer stage IIB T3N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). T3N0 NSCLC patients who underwent resection from January 1990 to October 2009 (n = 102) were enrolled and categorized into 6 subgroups according to the extent of invasion: parietal pleura chest wall invasion, mediastinal pleural invasion, diaphragm invasion, separated tumor nodules in the same lobe, endobronchial tumor <2 cm distal to the carina, and tumor-associated collapse. The median overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 55.3 months and 51.2 months, respectively. In postoperative T3N0M0 patients, the tumor size was a significant prognostic factor for survival (OS, p = 0.035 and DFS, p = 0.035, respectively). Patients with endobronchial tumors within 2 cm of the carina also showed better OS and DFS than those in the other T3 subtypes (p = 0.018 and p = 0.016, respectively). However, adjuvant radiotherapy did not cause any improvement in survival (OS, p = 0.518 and DFS, p = 0.463, respectively). Only patients with mediastinal pleural invasion (n = 25) demonstrated improved OS and DFS after adjuvant radiotherapy (n = 18) (p = 0.012 and p = 0.040, respectively). The T3N0 NSCLC subtype that showed the most favorable prognosis is the one with endobronchial tumors within 2 cm of the carina. Adjuvant radiotherapy is not effective in improving survival outcome in resected T3N0 NSCLC.

  7. Preoperative evaluation for lung cancer resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyratos, Dionysios; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Angelis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Pataka, Athanasia; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andreas; Arikas, Stamatis; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Tsiouda, Theodora; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Siminelakis, Stavros; Argyriou, Michael; Kotsakou, Maria; Kessis, George; Kolettas, Alexander; Beleveslis, Thomas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades lung cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide for both sexes. Even though cigarette smoking has been proved to be the main causative factor, many other agents (e.g., occupational exposure to asbestos or heavy metals, indoor exposure to radon gas radiation, particulate air pollution) have been associated with its development. Recently screening programs proved to reduce mortality among heavy-smokers although establishment of such strategies in everyday clinical practice is much more difficult and unknown if it is cost effective compared to other neoplasms (e.g., breast or prostate cancer). Adding severe comorbidities (coronary heart disease, COPD) to the above reasons as cigarette smoking is a common causative factor, we could explain the low surgical resection rates (approximately 20-30%) for lung cancer patients. Three clinical guidelines reports of different associations have been published (American College of Chest Physisians, British Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society/European Society of Thoracic Surgery) providing detailed algorithms for preoperative assessment. In the current mini review, we will comment on the preoperative evaluation of lung cancer patients. PMID:24672690

  8. 腹壁子宫内膜异位症再次手术5例原因分析%Clinical analysis of the cause of repeated resection for patients with abdominal wall endometriosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成宁海; 吴鸣; 朱兰; 郎景和; 刘珠凤; 孙大为; 冷金花; 沈铿; 黄惠芳; 潘凌亚

    2006-01-01

    目的探讨腹壁子宫内膜异位症(abdominal wall endometriosis,AWE)再次手术病例的临床特点.方法回顾性总结分析1992~2005年间我院收治的101例AWE患者的临床资料,分为再次手术组5例,未再次手术组96例.分析比较2组临床特点.结果再次手术组1例为反复发作的AWE,逐步演变为不典型子宫内膜异位症;1例患者再次手术切除的AWE位于初次手术的另一侧,此部位有经期疼痛症状,应属于遗漏;其余3例患者首次手术均距病灶边缘0.5cm切除.再次手术组术前扪诊和B超检查AWE病灶均显著大于未再次手术组(P<0.05),而2组手术切除病灶大小差异无显著意义(P>0.05),可能与再次手术组的病例切除病灶外的组织较少有关.结论手术切除AWE病灶时,应根据术前患者的症状,对可疑部位进行仔细探查,避免较小病灶的遗漏.切除病灶尽可能距病灶边缘1cm以上.对于病程长、反复发作的AWE,要警惕其恶变.

  9. Bronchiolitis obliterans following exposure to sulfur mustard: chest high resolution computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanei, Mostafa E-mail: m.ghanei@bmsu.ac.ir; Mokhtari, Majid; Mohammad, Mehdi Mir; Aslani, Jafar

    2004-11-01

    Background: Pulmonary complications are known to occur in over half of the patients exposed to sulfur mustard (SM). Chemical weapons of mass destruction (WMD) including SM were used by Iraq during Iran-Iraq war between 1983 and 1989. We undertook this study to evaluate the chest high resolution computerized tomography (HRCT) as a diagnostic tool in patients with documented exposure to SM and chronic respiratory symptoms. Method: The medical records of 155 patients exposed to SM during Iran-Iraq war and suffered respiratory complications were reviewed. Chest HRCTs of these patients were examined. Ten healthy controls with no history of exposure to HD were matched for age, gender, and chest HRCT protocol applied. Results: Fifty chest HRCTs of these patients were randomly selected for this study. The most frequent findings were; air trapping 38 (76%), bronchiectasis 37 (74%), mosaic parenchymal attenuation (MPA) 36 (72%), irregular and dilated major airways 33 (66%) bronchial wall thickening (BWT) 45 (90%), and interlobular septal wall thickening (SWT) 13 (26%), respectively. Air trapping in one patient (10%) was the only positive finding in the control group. Conclusions: Chest HRCT findings of bronchiectasis, air trapping, MPA, SWT, and BWT were seen in our patients 15 years after exposure to HD. These findings suggest the diagnosis of bronchiolitis obliterans (BO). We did not encounter chest HRCT features consistent with pulmonary fibrosis.

  10. Active breathing control (ABC): Determination and reduction of breathing-induced organ motion in the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Extensive radiotherapy volumes for tumors of the chest are partly caused by interfractional organ motion. We evaluated the feasibility of respiratory observation tools using the active breathing control (ABC) system and the effect on breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with unresectable tumors of the chest were selected for evaluation of the ABC system. Computed tomography scans were performed at various respiratory phases starting at the same couch position without patient movement. Threshold levels were set at minimum and maximum volume during normal breathing cycles and at a volume defined as shallow breathing, reflecting the subjective maximal tolerable reduction of breath volume. To evaluate the extent of organ movement, 13 landmarks were considering using commercial software for image coregistration. In 4 patients, second examinations were performed during therapy. Results: Investigating the differences in a normal breathing cycle versus shallow breathing, a statistically significant reduction of respiratory motion in the upper, middle, and lower regions of the chest could be detected, representing potential movement reduction achieved through reduced breath volume. Evaluating interfraction reproducibility, the mean displacement ranged between 0.24 mm (chest wall/tracheal bifurcation) to 3.5 mm (diaphragm) for expiration and shallow breathing and 0.24 mm (chest wall) to 5.25 mm (diaphragm) for normal inspiration. Conclusions: By modifying regularity of the respiratory cycle through reduction of breath volume, a significant and reproducible reduction of chest and diaphragm motion is possible, enabling reduction of treatment planning margins

  11. LAPAROSCOPIC RESECTION IN COLORECTAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reinhard Bittner

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction The feasibility of colon resection using the laparoscope was demonstrated as early as 1991[1~3]. It was shown one year later that it is also possible to use the laparoscope in abdominoperineal resection of the rectum for rectal carcinoma[4, 5]. One year after this, the first study was reported in which the results of anterior resection with the laparoscope were compared with the conventional operation in a small number of patients with carcinoma of the rectum[6]. The first reports on the feasibility of total excision of the mesorectum in patients with carcinoma of the middle or lower third of the rectum were first published at the start of this century[7~9]. It can be stated in summary that resection of the colon or rectum using the laparoscope is not of disadvantage to the patient, given that the surgeon has appropriate experience and the patient has been properly selected.

  12. [Laparoscopic rectal resection technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthuber, M; Kriening, B; Schrempf, M; Geißler, B; Märkl, B; Rüth, S

    2016-07-01

    The quality of radical oncological operations for patients with rectal cancer determines the rate of local recurrence and long-term survival. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced tumors, a standardized surgical procedure for rectal tumors less than 12 cm from the anus with total mesorectal excision (TME) and preservation of the autonomous nerve system for sexual and bladder function have significantly improved the oncological results and quality of life of patients. The TME procedure for rectal resection has been performed laparoscopically in Germany for almost 20 years; however, no reliable data are available on the frequency of laparoscopic procedures in rectal cancer patients in Germany. The rate of minimally invasive procedures is estimated to be less than 20 %. A prerequisite for using the laparoscopic approach is implicit adherence to the described standards of open surgery. Available data from prospective randomized trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses indicate that in the early postoperative phase the generally well-known positive effects of the minimally invasive approach to the benefit of patients can be realized without any long-term negative impact on the oncological results; however, the results of many of these studies are difficult to interpret because it could not be confirmed whether the hospitals and surgeons involved had successfully completed the learning curve. In this article we would like to present our technique, which we have developed over the past 17 years in more than 1000 patients. Based on our experiences the laparoscopic approach can be highly recommended as a suitable alternative to the open procedure. PMID:27277556

  13. New developments in ultrasonic imaging of the chest and other body organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultrasonic imaging system described herein was developed to measure chest-wall thickness and the percentage of fat in the chest and around other body organs. The system uses pulse-echo techniques to transmit and detect sound waves reflected from the interfaces of body organs and adjacent tissue. A computer draws these interfaces on color scans, and a code is used to exponentially average data from several points on each scan to find the average thicknesses of the chest wall and fat layers. These average thicknesses are then used to adjust x-ray calibration factors for plutonium lung counters. The correction factor for three subjects measured for fat content ranging from 12.6 to 22.2% was 18 to 41%. The ultrasonic system also defines the shape and position of the kidneys and liver so we are able to more accurately place detectors on the body during in-vivo radiation measurements. We have also developed a technique for displaying the interfaces from a series of ultrasonic chest scans to produce a topographical map that enables us to better understand the shape and contour of the lung and chest-wall interface

  14. Clinical spectrum of pulmonary hamartoma diagnosed by surgical resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We retrospectively reviewed our institutional experience of pulmonary hamartomas. We analyzed the records of 23 patients with pulmonary hamartomas which were diagnosed by surgical resection. There were 12 males and 11 females. Their mean age was 53.5 years old (range: 28 to 71 years). Twenty patients were asymptomatic, 2 had chest pain and 1 had a cough. Twenty-two patients had solitary and only 1 patient had multiple lesions. The tumor sizes ranged from 0.5 to 3.0 cm (mean: 1.5 cm). Graphically, 6 patients had calcification which was not popcorn-like. We could not diagnose nodules by bronchoscopic biopsy, which was preoperatively performed in 17 patients. Surgery was performed because we could not rule out malignancy in all patients. Surgical procedures consisted of 6 enucleation, 16 wedge resection and 1 lobectomy. Video-assisted thoracic surgery was performed in 17 patients. To diagnose pulmonary nodule, whose malignancy is difficult to determine, surgical resection should be considered. (author)

  15. Novel computed tomographic chest metrics to detect pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chin-Shang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH can potentially improve survival and quality of life. Detecting PH using echocardiography is often insensitive in subjects with lung fibrosis or hyperinflation. Right heart catheterization (RHC for the diagnosis of PH adds risk and expense due to its invasive nature. Pre-defined measurements utilizing computed tomography (CT of the chest may be an alternative non-invasive method of detecting PH. Methods This study retrospectively reviewed 101 acutely hospitalized inpatients with heterogeneous diagnoses, who consecutively underwent CT chest and RHC during the same admission. Two separate teams, each consisting of a radiologist and pulmonologist, blinded to clinical and RHC data, individually reviewed the chest CT's. Results Multiple regression analyses controlling for age, sex, ascending aortic diameter, body surface area, thoracic diameter and pulmonary wedge pressure showed that a main pulmonary artery (PA diameter ≥29 mm (odds ratio (OR = 4.8, right descending PA diameter ≥19 mm (OR = 7.0, true right descending PA diameter ≥ 16 mm (OR = 4.1, true left descending PA diameter ≥ 21 mm (OR = 15.5, right ventricular (RV free wall ≥ 6 mm (OR = 30.5, RV wall/left ventricular (LV wall ratio ≥0.32 (OR = 8.8, RV/LV lumen ratio ≥1.28 (OR = 28.8, main PA/ascending aorta ratio ≥0.84 (OR = 6.0 and main PA/descending aorta ratio ≥ 1.29 (OR = 5.7 were significant predictors of PH in this population of hospitalized patients. Conclusion This combination of easily measured CT-based metrics may, upon confirmatory studies, aid in the non-invasive detection of PH and hence in the determination of RHC candidacy in acutely hospitalized patients.

  16. Novel computed tomographic chest metrics to detect pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) can potentially improve survival and quality of life. Detecting PH using echocardiography is often insensitive in subjects with lung fibrosis or hyperinflation. Right heart catheterization (RHC) for the diagnosis of PH adds risk and expense due to its invasive nature. Pre-defined measurements utilizing computed tomography (CT) of the chest may be an alternative non-invasive method of detecting PH. This study retrospectively reviewed 101 acutely hospitalized inpatients with heterogeneous diagnoses, who consecutively underwent CT chest and RHC during the same admission. Two separate teams, each consisting of a radiologist and pulmonologist, blinded to clinical and RHC data, individually reviewed the chest CT's. Multiple regression analyses controlling for age, sex, ascending aortic diameter, body surface area, thoracic diameter and pulmonary wedge pressure showed that a main pulmonary artery (PA) diameter ≥29 mm (odds ratio (OR) = 4.8), right descending PA diameter ≥19 mm (OR = 7.0), true right descending PA diameter ≥ 16 mm (OR = 4.1), true left descending PA diameter ≥ 21 mm (OR = 15.5), right ventricular (RV) free wall ≥ 6 mm (OR = 30.5), RV wall/left ventricular (LV) wall ratio ≥0.32 (OR = 8.8), RV/LV lumen ratio ≥1.28 (OR = 28.8), main PA/ascending aorta ratio ≥0.84 (OR = 6.0) and main PA/descending aorta ratio ≥ 1.29 (OR = 5.7) were significant predictors of PH in this population of hospitalized patients. This combination of easily measured CT-based metrics may, upon confirmatory studies, aid in the non-invasive detection of PH and hence in the determination of RHC candidacy in acutely hospitalized patients

  17. Imaging of fetal chest masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Richard A. [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Prenatal imaging with high-resolution US and rapid acquisition MRI plays a key role in the accurate diagnosis of congenital chest masses. Imaging has enhanced our understanding of the natural history of fetal lung masses, allowing for accurate prediction of outcome, parental counseling, and planning of pregnancy and newborn management. This paper will focus on congenital bronchopulmonary malformations, which account for the vast majority of primary lung masses in the fetus. In addition, anomalies that mimic masses and less common causes of lung masses will be discussed. (orig.)

  18. Chest neoplasms with infectious etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Carlos S; Chen, Melissa M; Martinez-Jimenez, Santiago; Carrillo, Jorge; Restrepo, Catalina

    2011-12-28

    A wide spectrum of thoracic tumors have known or suspected viral etiologies. Oncogenic viruses can be classified by the type of genomic material they contain. Neoplastic conditions found to have viral etiologies include post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoid granulomatosis, Kaposi's sarcoma, Castleman's disease, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, lung cancer, malignant mesothelioma, leukemia and lymphomas. Viruses involved in these conditions include Epstein-Barr virus, human herpes virus 8, human papillomavirus, Simian virus 40, human immunodeficiency virus, and Human T-lymphotropic virus. Imaging findings, epidemiology and mechanism of transmission for these diseases are reviewed in detail to gain a more thorough appreciation of disease pathophysiology for the chest radiologist.

  19. Chest dynamics asymmetry facilitates earlier detection of pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisman, D; Landesberg, A; Kohn, S; Faingersh, A; Klotzman, I C; Gover, A; Kessel, I; Rotschild, A

    2016-02-01

    Pneumothorax is usually diagnosed when signs of life-threatening tension pneumothorax develop. The case report describes novel data derived from miniature superficial sensors that continuously monitored the amplitude and symmetry of the chest wall tidal displacement (TDi) in a premature infant that suffered from pneumothorax. Off-line analysis of the TDi revealed slowly progressing asymmetric ventilation that could be detected 38 min before the diagnosis was made. The TDi provides novel and valuable information that can assist in early detection and decision making. PMID:26814803

  20. The application of capnography to differentiate peri-chest tube air leak from parenchymal leak following pulmonary surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Oparka, Jonathan D.; Walker, William S

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged air leak is a common complication of pulmonary resection. However, while a bubbling chest drain is commonly related to parenchymal air leakage, it may also be caused by air entering the pleural cavity via an incomplete seal of the tissues at the chest tube insertion site. Examination alone is not sufficient to guide the surgeon as to which of the above complications is responsible for drain bubbling. We describe a simple method, whereby a CO2 monitoring device is attached to the che...

  1. [Treatment outcome of surgical thoracic wall stabilization of the unstable thorax with and without lung contusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voggenreiter, G; Neudeck, F; Aufmkolk, M; Obertacke, U; Schmit-Neuerburg, K P

    1996-06-01

    Between 1988 and 1994, 295 patients with blunt chest trauma were treated. Forty-two patients had flail chest, requiring mechanical ventilation. Open reduction and osteosynthesis (ASIF reconstruction plates or isoelastic rip clamps) of the chest wall were performed in 20 patients. For the purpose of analysis we separated the patients into five groups: group I (n = 10) had chest wall stabilization in flail chest without pulmonary contusion (average ISS 31.0, AIS-thorax 4.1); group II (n = 10) had chest wall stabilization in flail chest with pulmonary contusion (average ISS 37.0, AIS-thorax 4.3); group III (n = 18) had fail chest without pulmonary contusion (average ISS 36.3, AIS-thorax 4.2); group IV (n = 4) had flail chest with pulmonary contusion (average ISS 37.8, AIS-thorax 4.0); group V (n = 29) had pulmonary contusion without flail chest (average ISS 34.5. AIS-thorax 4.1). With open reduction and internal fixation of unstable chest wall segments, the duration of ventilatory support, mortality and pneumonia were significantly reduced to 6.5 (1-25) days in group I (mortality rate 0%, incidence of pneumonia 10%) compared to group III (duration of ventilatory support 26.7 days, mortality rate 39%, incidence of pneumonia 16%). Eighty percent of the patients in group I were extubated within 5 days postoperatively. In group II 4 patients underwent emergency thoracotomy for intrathoracic injuries (3 of them died between 4 h and 31 days) and 2 patients for laceration of the lung. In all these cases the chest wall was stabilized after thoracotomy. One patient was stabilized for a deformation of the chest wall and two for paradoxical movement of the chest wall during weaning from the respirator. The mean duration of ventilation in group II was 30.8 (10-112) days (mortality rate 30%, incidence of pneumonia 30%). No complications related to the osteosynthesis arose during the follow-up. In conclusion, the best indication for early operative chest wall stabilization is flail

  2. 应用4DCT研究乳腺癌根治术后胸壁IMRT的放射物理学优势%The radiation physics advantages of 4DCT on intensity-modulated radiotherapy of chest wall after radical mastectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文岩; 肖志清; 王艳强; 张玉峰; 郭晗; 薛晓英

    2014-01-01

    Objective To invesigate the influence of breathing motion on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of chest wall after radical mastectomy,and explore clinical value of accurately determined target volume.Methods A total of 17 radical mastectomy patients underwent 3DCT simulation scans sequentially followed by 4DCT simulation scans during free breathing.The targets and normal organs was determined based on CT images respectively.Three sets of radiotherapy plan were designed for each patient:plan 3D,plan 4D and plan 3D-A.The Plan 3D and plan 4D was designed based on 3D and 4D targets respectively.Plan 3D was copied to 4D target with the same isocenter coordinates.The dose distribution was calculated separately to evaluate the dose-volume histograms parameters for PTV,ipsilateral lung and heart,respectively.Two planning parameters was compared with paired t-test or Wilcoxon sign-rank test.Results The average volume of PTV4D was (10.35 ± 4.80) % larger than PTV3D (P =0.000).Compared with plan 3D,the V100,V95,V90,D95,D90,Dmin of plan 3D-A were reduced,that were (0.78 -18.0)% (P=0.000),(0.01-3.90)% (P=0.000),(0-2.12)% (P=0.000),(13-222) cGy (P=0.000),(1-118) cGy (P=0.000),(6-1 910) cGy (P=0.000).However,the V20,V10,V5,Dmean of the ipsilateral lung and V30 of heart were same between 3D plan and 4D plan (P =0.288,0.407,0.435,0.758,0.575).Conclusions The respiratory motion may reduce the target dose and its coverage in chest wall treatments,so 4DCT plan could accurately define target volume without increasing the exposure dose of normal tissues.%目的 探讨根治术后乳腺癌胸壁IMRT时为克服呼吸运动影响应用4DCT确定靶区的临床价值.方法 对入组的17例乳腺癌根治术后患者序贯进行常规CT和4DCT扫描并采集图像,分别勾画靶区和正常组织.根据每位患者的3D、4D靶区分别制定3D计划和4D计划,并将3D计划按等中心坐标直接复制到4D靶区上比较差异及OAR剂量学变化,并行配对t

  3. 微创改良胸肋抬举术治疗漏斗胸%Minimally invasive surgical treatment of improved costa sternales lifts in treatment of congenital funnel chest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜佳辉; 赵松; 侯智亮; 薛颢雨; 贾敬周

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the safety and effect of minimally invasive surgical treatment of improved costa ster-nales lifts in treatment the children with congenital funnel chest. Methods Fifty patients were retrospectively evaluated with congenital funnel chest including the males (n =35) and females(n = 15). There were eleven patients with asymmetric funnel chest and eight patients combined with costal margin holds the deformity. All the patients were enforced the minimally invasive costa sternales lifts technique. The improvement was a small longitudinal incision on the chest wall about 3 ~5cm. Intersecting sternum with the V - type keeped continuous complete and continuous periosteum after resection of cartilage. We exalted the fixed sternum after keepping the continuous rib periosteum and shortting the periosteum complete ribs. Results The sternum raised about an average of 3. 1 (1. 5 - 5.0) cm and the average spinula between sternum and spine was about 6. 2 (4.0 ~ 9. 7) cm. Follow - up 3 - 24months, funnel chest of all the patients were corrected and eight patients combined with costal margin were corrected satisfactorily. Only one patient left chest wall a-symmetry and flat chest. Serious complication was not observed. Conclusions The minimally invasive surgical treatment of improved costa sternales lifts in treatment of the children with congenital funnel chest may be a safe and effective method with small trauma and few complications and may be worthy to be popularized.%目的 探讨微创改良胸肋抬举术治疗儿童先天性漏斗胸的安全性和疗效.方法 回顾性分析先天性漏斗胸患儿50例,男35例,女15例.其中不对称漏斗胸11例,合并肋缘外翻畸形8例.均行微创改良胸肋抬举术,即胸壁纵行小切口,长3~5cm,V型横断胸骨保留其后骨膜连续完整,间断切除肋软骨,保留骨膜连续完整,折叠、缩短缝合肋骨骨膜,抬举并固定胸骨,从而矫治漏斗胸.结果 术后胸骨平均抬高3

  4. Parenteral Nutrition in Liver Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Chiarla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Albeit a very large number of experiments have assessed the impact of various substrates on liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy, a limited number of clinical studies have evaluated artificial nutrition in liver resection patients. This is a peculiar topic because many patients do not need artificial nutrition, while several patients need it because of malnutrition and/or prolonged inability to feeding caused by complications. The optimal nutritional regimen to support liver regeneration, within other postoperative problems or complications, is not yet exactly defined. This short review addresses relevant aspects and potential developments in the issue of postoperative parenteral nutrition after liver resection.

  5. Remote interpretation of chest roentgenograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrus, W S; Hunter, C H; Bird, K T

    1975-04-01

    A series of 98 chest films was interpreted by two physicians on the basis of monitor display of the transmitted television signal representing the roentgenographic image. The transmission path was 14 miles long, and included one active repeater station. Receiver operating characteristic curves were drawn to compare interpretations rendered on television view of the image with classic, direct view interpretations of the same films. Performance in these two viewing modes was found to be quite similar. When films containing only hazy densities lacking internal structure or sharp margins, were removed from the sample, interpretation of the remaining films was essentially identical via the two modes. Since hazy densities are visible on retrospective examination, interpretation of roentgenograms at a distance via television appears to be a feasible route for delivery of radiologic services.

  6. Chest pain in focal musculoskeletal disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2010-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system is a recognized source of chest pain. However, despite the apparently benign origin, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain remain under-diagnosed, untreated, and potentially continuously disabled in terms of anxiety, depression, and activities of daily living. Several...

  7. Chest pain and exacerbations of bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King PT

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Paul T King,1,2 Stephen R Holdsworth,2 Michael Farmer,1 Nicholas J Freezer,1 Peter W Holmes11Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, 2Monash University Department of Medicine, Monash Medical Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: Bronchiectasis is a common disease and a major cause of respiratory morbidity. Chest pain has been described as occurring in the context of bronchiectasis but has not been well characterized. This study was performed to describe the characteristics of chest pain in adult bronchiectasis and to define the relationship of this pain to exacerbations.Subjects and methods: We performed a prospective study of 178 patients who were followed-up for 8 years. Subjects were reviewed on a yearly basis and assessed for the presence of chest pain. Subjects who had chest pain at the time of clinical review by the investigators were included in this study. Forty-four patients (25% described respiratory chest pain at the time of assessment; in the majority of cases 39/44 (89%, this occurred with an exacerbation and two distinct types of chest pain could be described: pleuritic (n = 4 and non-pleuritic (n = 37, with two subjects describing both forms. The non-pleuritic chest pain occurred most commonly over both lower lobes and was mild to moderate in severity. The pain subsided as patients recovered. Conclusion: Non-pleuritic chest pain occurs in subjects with bronchiectasis generally in association with exacerbations.Keywords: sputum, collapse, bronchitis, airway obstruction

  8. Post-traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst with hemopneumothorax following blunt chest trauma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fagkrezos Dimitris

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Post-traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst is an uncommon cavitary lesion of the lung and develops after blunt chest trauma and even more rarely following penetrating injuries. It is generally seen in young adults presenting with cough, chest pain, hemoptysis, and dyspnea. Post-traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst should be included in the differential diagnosis of cavitary pulmonary lesions. We describe the case of a 60-year-old Caucasian Greek woman who sustained traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst with hemopneumothorax due to a blunt chest trauma after a traffic accident. Case presentation After a traffic accident, a 60-year-old Caucasian Greek woman sustained a hemopneumothorax due to a blunt chest trauma. There was evidence of an extensive contusion in the posterior and lateral segments of the right lower lobe, a finding that was attributed to an early sign of a cavitation, and the presence of a thin-walled air cavity was detected on the anterior segment of the right lower lobe in the control computed tomography taken 24 hours after admission. Our patient was treated by catheter aspiration, and the findings of computed tomography evaluation about one month later showed complete resolution of one of the two air-filled cavitary lesions. The second pseudocyst also disappeared completely, as shown by the control computed tomography scan performed six months later. Conclusions Traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst is a rare complication of blunt chest trauma, and computed tomography is a more valuable imaging technique than chest radiograph for early diagnosis.

  9. Estimation of cartilaginous region in noncontrast CT of the chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Safdar, Nabile; Yu, Glenna; Myers, Emmarie; Sandler, Anthony; Linguraru, Marius George

    2014-03-01

    Pectus excavatum is a posterior depression of the sternum and adjacent costal cartilages and is the most common congenital deformity of the anterior chest wall. Its surgical repair can be performed via minimally invasive procedures that involve sternum and cartilage relocation and benefit from adequate surgical planning. In this study, we propose a method to estimate the cartilage regions in thoracic CT scans, which is the first step of statistical modeling of the osseous and cartilaginous structures for the rib cage. The ribs and sternum are first segmented by using interactive region growing and removing the vertebral column with morphological operations. The entire chest wall is also segmented to estimate the skin surface. After the segmentation, surface meshes are generated from the volumetric data and the skeleton of the ribs is extracted using surface contraction method. Then the cartilage surface is approximated via contracting the skin surface to the osseous structure. The ribs' skeleton is projected to the cartilage surface and the cartilages are estimated using cubic interpolation given the joints with the sternum. The final cartilage regions are formed by the cartilage surface inside the convex hull of the estimated cartilages. The method was validated with the CT scans of two pectus excavatum patients and three healthy subjects. The average distance between the estimated cartilage surface and the ground truth is 2.89 mm. The promising results indicate the effectiveness of cartilage surface estimation using the skin surface.

  10. Radical resection of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander Koliopanos; C Avgerinos; Athanasios Farfaras; C Manes; Christos Dervenis

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PCa) is a disease with dismal prognosis, and the only possibility of cure, albeit small, is based on the combination of complete resection with negative histopathological margins (R0 resection) with adjuvant treatment. Therefore, a lot of effort has been made during the last decade to assess the role of extensive surgery in both local recurrence and survival of patients with PCa. DATA SOURCES:Medline search and manual cross-referencing were utilized to identify published evidence-based data for PCa surgery between 1973 and 2006, with emphasis to feasibility, efifcacy, long-term survival, disease free survival, recurrence rates, pain relief and quality of life. RESULTS: Extended surgery is safe and feasible in high volume surgical centers with comparable short-term results. Organ preserving surgery is a main goal because of quality of life reasons and is performed whenever possible from the tumor extent. Concerning long-term survival major vein resection does not adversely affect outcome. To date, there are no changes in long-term survival attributed to the extended lymph node dissection. However, there is a beneift in locoregional control with fewer local recurrences and extended lymphadenectomy allows better staging for the disease. CONCLUSIONS:Extended PCa surgery is safe and feasible despite the inconclusive results in patient's survival beneift. In the future, appropriately powered randomized trials of standard vs. extended resections may show improved outcomes for PCa patients.

  11. Awake craniotomy for tumor resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadali Attari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment of brain tumors, especially those located in the eloquent areas such as anterior temporal, frontal lobes, language, memory areas, and near the motor cortex causes high risk of eloquent impairment. Awake craniotomy displays major rule for maximum resection of the tumor with minimum functional impairment of the Central Nervous System. These case reports discuss the use of awake craniotomy during the brain surgery in Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. A 56-year-old woman with left-sided body hypoesthesia since last 3 months and a 25-year-old with severe headache of 1 month duration were operated under craniotomy for brain tumors resection. An awake craniotomy was planned to allow maximum tumor intraoperative testing for resection and neurologic morbidity avoidance. The method of anesthesia should offer sufficient analgesia, hemodynamic stability, sedation, respiratory function, and also awake and cooperative patient for different neurological test. Airway management is the most important part of anesthesia during awake craniotomy. Tumor surgery with awake craniotomy is a safe technique that allows maximal resection of lesions in close relationship to eloquent cortex and has a low risk of neurological deficit.

  12. 一种新颖的内镜缝合设备在内镜全层切除术后修补消化道缺损的初步应用(含视频)%Endoscopic suturing closure of gastrointestinal wall defect after endoscopic full-thickness resection (with video)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱俊宇; 王萍; 蔡明琰; 周平红; 姚礼庆; 徐美东; 陈世耀; 陈巍峰; 胡健卫; 秦文政

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨利用一种新颖的内镜缝合设备(OverStitchTM )修补内镜全层切除术(EFTR)后消化道缺损的临床疗效。方法回顾性分析应用 OverStitchTM设备缝合经 EFTR 治疗消化道黏膜下肿瘤后消化道缺损患者的临床资料,评价其有效性、可行性及安全性。结果共计5例患者,4例病灶位于胃部,1例病灶位于十二指肠降部,病灶大小20~50 cm,平均32 cm;患者均顺利完整切除病灶,完全修补缺损,修补时间110~220 min,平均166 min;住院时间4~6 d,平均5 d。2例患者术后第1天出现上腹部隐痛,体温升高症状,1例患者术后 CT 提示左侧胸腔少量积液,均予以半卧位休息,抗感染、制酸、胃肠减压治疗,3~4 d 后好转出院。结论 OverStitchTM作为一种新颖的内镜缝合技术,对于修补 EFTR 治疗后消化道缺损具有一定的可行性、有效性和安全性。%Objective To evaluate the efficacy of a new endoscopic suturing device(OverStitchTM, Apollo Endosurgery, USA)for gastrointestinal wall defect after endoscopic full⁃thickness resection (EFTR). Methods Clinical data of the patients with submucosal tumors who underwent endoscopic suturing closure of gastrointestinal wall defect at the Endoscopy Center of Zhongshan Hospital from April 2015 to June 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Results Five patients were included in this research with 4 lesions located in stom⁃ach and 1 lesion located in descendent duodenum. The mean diameter of lesions was 3 2 cm (ranging 2 0⁃5 0 cm). All patients underwent complete closure and none of them was converted to laparoscopic surgery or laparotomy. The mean repairing time was 16 6 min (ranging 11 0⁃22 0 min). The mean postoperative hospi⁃talization time was 5 days ( ranging 4⁃6 d). Two patients complained about slight abdominal pain and elevated body temperature. CT showed minor pleural effusion in one case. These patients received

  13. [Mediastinal Mature Teratoma Necessitating Resection of Superior Vena Cava].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragaki, Masato; Iimura, Yasuaki; Hasegawa, Naoto; Kaga, Kichizo

    2015-09-01

    A 43-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for an abnormal shadow on chest X-ray. Computed tomography revealed a tumor with calcification of 9.8 cm in size at the anterior mediastinum. The infiltration into the left brachiocephalic vein and superior vena cava by tumor was suspected. Surgery was performed under a diagnosis of mature teratoma. The tumor was found to adhere firmly to superior vena cava (SVC), left brachiocephalic vein, right phrenic nerve, and the arch of the azygos vein. To ensure the blood flow, an artificial blood vessel was placed between left brachiocephalic vein and right atrium. Then SVC was clamped and the tumor was resected with the part of SVC. PMID:26329629

  14. Radiographic, CT and MRI spectrum of hydatid disease of the chest: a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinner, W.N. von [Dept. of Radiology MBC28, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1993-01-01

    Thirty patients with thoracic hydatidosis (Echinococcus granulosus) were studied. The hydatid cysts were located in the lung parenchyma (70%), mediastinum (6.7%), inside the heart (10%), the pleurae (10%) and the chest wall (3.3%). Complications of thoracic hydatid cysts, such as rupture, infection, pleural involvement, spread and calcifications are presented. Computed tomography (CT) without and/or with contrast enhancement was performed in all patients (30). Findings from conventional chest radiographs were compared with CT and confirmed by pathology (30). In 10 cases (33.3%), magnetic resonance imaging was also performed. The diagnostic spectrum of hydatid cysts, including variations and developmental stages, is presented in this pictorial essay. (orig.)

  15. Radiographic, CT and MRI spectrum of hydatid disease of the chest: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty patients with thoracic hydatidosis (Echinococcus granulosus) were studied. The hydatid cysts were located in the lung parenchyma (70%), mediastinum (6.7%), inside the heart (10%), the pleurae (10%) and the chest wall (3.3%). Complications of thoracic hydatid cysts, such as rupture, infection, pleural involvement, spread and calcifications are presented. Computed tomography (CT) without and/or with contrast enhancement was performed in all patients (30). Findings from conventional chest radiographs were compared with CT and confirmed by pathology (30). In 10 cases (33.3%), magnetic resonance imaging was also performed. The diagnostic spectrum of hydatid cysts, including variations and developmental stages, is presented in this pictorial essay. (orig.)

  16. Resection indications of radius head fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Domanic, Unsal; Taser, Omer; Akalin, Yilmaz; Cakmak, Mehmet

    2004-01-01

    Boundaries of resection indication of radius head and timing of resection problems in radius head fractures are discussed on our cases with literature on the subject. In Mason type II. And type III., the best treatment is resection of the head. But it must be performed as soon as possible.

  17. Learning endoscopic resection in the esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vilsteren, Frederike G. I.; Pouw, Roos E.; Herrero, Lorenza Alvarez; Bisschops, Raf; Houben, Martin; Peters, Frans T. M.; Schenk, B. E.; Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Schoon, Erik J.; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic resection is the cornerstone of endoscopic management of esophageal early neoplasia. However, endoscopic resection is a complex technique requiring knowledge and expertise. Our aims were to identify the most important learning points in performing endoscopic resection in a tra

  18. Congenital left ventricular diverticulum, a rare chest fluoroscopy finding: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-wei; WU Hong-bing; MAO Zhi-fu; HU Xiao-ping

    2011-01-01

    Congenital left ventricular diverticulum is a very rare cardiac abnormality and it is not completely understood about its etiology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. This article presents a case of large congenital diverticulum of the left ventricle. The clinical manifestation included paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. The diagnosis was made by chest fluoroscopy observation and confirmed by 64-slice CT-angiography. The arrhythmia alleviated instead of antiarrhythmic drugs but by radiofrequency catheter ablation. Due to the rapid growth of the diverticulum, the patient underwent surgical resection finally. Owing to the fatal risks, clinicians should improve the understanding of this disease by deeply studying more cases, in order to standardize the treatment.

  19. Single-stage bilateral pulmonary resections by video-assisted thoracic surgery for multiple small nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Feng; Yang, Haitang

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment is thought to be the most effective strategy for multiple small nodules. However, in general, one-stage bilateral resection is not recommended due to its highly invasive nature. Methods Clinical records of patients undergoing one-stage bilateral resections of multiple pulmonary nodules between January 2009 and September 2014 in a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Results Simultaneous bilateral pulmonary resection by conventional video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) was undertaken in 29 patients. Ground glass opacity (GGO) accounted for 71.9% (46/64) of total lesions, including 26 pure GGO and 20 mixed GGO lesions. One case underwent bilateral lobectomy that was complicated by postoperative dyspnea. Lobar-sublobar (L/SL) resection and bilateral sublobar resection (SL-SL) were conducted in 16 and 12 cases, respectively, and most of these cases had uneventful postoperative courses. There was no significant difference with regard to postoperative complications (P=0.703), duration of use of chest drains (P=0.485), between one- and two-stage groups. Mean postoperative follow-up in cases of primary lung cancer was 31.4 (range, 10–51) months. There was neither recurrence nor deaths at final follow-up. Conclusions Single-stage bilateral surgery in selected cases with synchronous bilateral multiple nodules (SBMNs) is feasible and associated with satisfactory outcomes. PMID:27076942

  20. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Krane, Elliot J. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Holmes, Tyson H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Robinson, Terry E. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Cystic Fibrosis Center for Excellence in Pulmonary Biology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  1. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  2. Impacts to the chest of PMHSs - Influence of impact location and load distribution on chest response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmqvist, Kristian; Svensson, Mats Y; Davidsson, Johan; Gutsche, Andreas; Tomasch, Ernst; Darok, Mario; Ravnik, Dean

    2016-02-01

    The chest response of the human body has been studied for several load conditions, but is not well known in the case of steering wheel rim-to-chest impact in heavy goods vehicle frontal collisions. The aim of this study was to determine the response of the human chest in a set of simulated steering wheel impacts. PMHS tests were carried out and analysed. The steering wheel load pattern was represented by a rigid pendulum with a straight bar-shaped front. A crash test dummy chest calibration pendulum was utilised for comparison. In this study, a set of rigid bar impacts were directed at various heights of the chest, spanning approximately 120mm around the fourth intercostal space. The impact energy was set below a level estimated to cause rib fracture. The analysed results consist of responses, evaluated with respect to differences in the impacting shape and impact heights on compression and viscous criteria chest injury responses. The results showed that the bar impacts consistently produced lesser scaled chest compressions than the hub; the Middle bar responses were around 90% of the hub responses. A superior bar impact provided lesser chest compression; the average response was 86% of the Middle bar response. For inferior bar impacts, the chest compression response was 116% of the chest compression in the middle. The damping properties of the chest caused the compression to decrease in the high speed bar impacts to 88% of that in low speed impacts. From the analysis it could be concluded that the bar impact shape provides lower chest criteria responses compared to the hub. Further, the bar responses are dependent on the impact location of the chest. Inertial and viscous effects of the upper body affect the responses. The results can be used to assess the responses of human substitutes such as anthropomorphic test devices and finite element human body models, which will benefit the development process of heavy goods vehicle safety systems. PMID:26687541

  3. Technique for chest radiography for pneumoconiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routine radiographic chest examinations have been performed using a variety of techniques. Although chest radiography is one of the most commonly performed radiographic examinations, it is often difficult to obtain consistently good quality roentgenograms. This publication provides a simple guide and relatively easy solution to the many problems that radiologic technologists might encounter. The language is purposely relatively simple and care has been taken to avoid difficult mathematical and physical explanations. The intent is to provide an easily referrable text for those who may encounter difficulties in producing acceptable chest radiographs

  4. Chest pain: a time for concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Joan E; Magdic, Kathy S

    2014-01-01

    When a patient complains of chest pain, the first priority is to establish whether the situation is life threatening. Life-threatening differential diagnoses that clinicians must consider include acute coronary syndrome, cardiac tamponade, pulmonary embolus, aortic dissection, and tension pneumothorax. Nonthreatening causes of chest pain that should be considered include spontaneous pneumothorax, pleural effusion, pneumonia, valvular diseases, gastric reflux, and costochondritis. The challenge for clinicians is not to be limited by "satisfaction of search" and fail to consider important differential diagnoses. The challenge, however, can be met by developing a systematic method to assess chest pain that will lead to the appropriate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan.

  5. Hemivaginal septum resection in a patient with a rare variant of Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Nigel; Anderson, Sharon H; Verrecchio, Elizabeth S; Brown, M Allyson; Glassner, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome is characterized by a triad of uterine didelphys, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. The syndrome should be suspected in any young woman with abdominal pain or cyclic dysmenorrhea, and radiologic evidence of müllerian duct and renal anomalies. Herein is presented the case of a 25-year-old woman with a rare variant of Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome, characterized by an anomalous connection between the 2 endocervical canals, who underwent hemivaginal septum resection to relieve progressively worsening dysmenorrhea. The right hemivaginal septum was resected medially from the left cervix and laterally off the right vaginal wall. Hydrodissection between the hemivaginal septum and right cervix facilitated surgical resection. After resection of the hemivaginal septum there was complete resolution of dysmenorrhea and no recurrence of hematometra or hematocolpos. PMID:24858986

  6. Liver resection over the last decade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wettergren, A.; Larsen, P.N.; Rasmussen, A.;

    2008-01-01

    of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma in our institution. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The patients who underwent their primary liver resection from 1.1.1995-31.12.2004 in our institution were included. The surgical outcome was reviewed retrospectively and the five-year survival...... after resection of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma was estimated. RESULTS: 141 patients (71M/70F), median age 58 years (1-78), underwent a liver resection in the ten-year period. The number of resections increased from two in 1995 to 32 in 2004. Median hospital......AIMS: The results after liver resection have improved over the last decade with an operative mortality rate of less than 5% in high-volume centres. The aim of the present study was to assess the perioperative outcome after hepatic resection and to assess the long-term survival after liver resection...

  7. Cell Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Albenne, Cécile; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2008-01-01

    This chapter covers our present knowledge of cell wall proteomics highlighting the distinctive features of cell walls and cell wall proteins in relation to problems encountered for protein extraction, separation and identification. It provides clues to design strategies for efficient cell wall proteomic studies. It gives an overview of the kinds of proteins that have yet been identified: the expected proteins vs the identified proteins. Finally, the new vision of the cell wall proteome, and t...

  8. Common Acupoints in Chest and Abdomen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science Editor; CUI Xue-jun

    2003-01-01

    @@ Tiantu (CV 21) Location: In the center of the suprasternal fossa(Fig. l ). Indications: Cough, dyspnea, chest pain, pharyngolaryngeal swelling and pains, sudden hoarseness of the voice, goiter, globus hystericus, and dysphagia.

  9. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  10. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  11. Angina - when you have chest pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or having sex. How to treat your chest pain Sit, stay calm, and rest. Your symptoms will often go away soon after you stop activity. If you are lying down, sit up in bed. Try deep breathing to ...

  12. Open-Chest Management after Heart Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Takayama, Hiroo; Leone, Richard J.; Aldea, Gabriel S.; Fishbein, Daniel P.; Verrier, Edward D.; Salerno, Christopher T.

    2006-01-01

    Postcardiotomy open-chest management has been widely used in cardiac surgery. Although this strategy can be applied to heart transplantation, the use of immunosuppressants in transplant recipients raises particular concerns about sternal wound infection and impaired healing.

  13. [A case of abdominal wall actinomycosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Jin Soo; Cho, Hyeong Jun; Choi, Seung Bong; Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jin Il; Lee, In Kyu

    2015-04-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative granulomatous infectious disease caused by actinomyces species that is characterized by formation of characteristic clumps called as sulfur granules. Abdominal actinomycosis is a rare disease and is often difficult to diagnose before operation. Abdominal actinomycosis infiltrating into the abdominal wall and adhering to the colon is even rarer. Most abdominal actinomycosis develops after operation, trauma or inflammatory bowel disease, and is also considered as an opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patient with underlying malignancy, diabetes mellitus, human immunodeficiency virus infection, etc. Actinomycosis is diagnosed based on histologic demonstration of sulfur granules in surgically resected specimen or pus, and treatment consists of long-term penicillin based antibiotics therapy with or without surgical resection. Herein, we report an unusual case of abdominal wall actinomycosis which developed in a patient after acupuncture and presented as abdominal wall mass that was first mistaken for abdominal wall invasion of diverticulum perforation. PMID:25896158

  14. 乳突尖部分切除加自体骨粉鼓室上壁重建在鼓室成形术中的应用%Mastoidale partial resection and superior tympanic wall reconstruction with autogenous bone meal in tympanoplasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈学华; 纪树芳; 李卡凡; 梅晓峰

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the value of mastoidale partial resection and superior tympanic wall reconstruction with autogenous bone meal in tympanoplasty. Methods A total of 42 patients with chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) were treated with open tympanoplasty. Among these patients,22 patients were treated with autologous bone hearing reconstruction (autologous bone group) and 20 patients were treated with titanium auricular bone reconstruction (titanium auricular bone group) . The dry ear rate,dry ear time,external auditory canal shape,hearing and complication were observed after operation in the two groups. Results The postauricular incisions of all patients in the two groups were primary healing,and there was no postoperative complications such as vertigo, facial nerve paralysis and tinnitus and tinnitus, etc. After operation, the mastoid cavity recovered with good epithelization, and without escharosis, otopiesis or adhesion. The dry ear rate in autologous bone group and titanium auricular bone group was 95.5% (21/22)and 95.0% (19/20) .respectively;there was no significant difference in dry ear rate between the two groups ( P > 0. 05 ). There was no significant difference in dry ear time between the two groups (P >0.05). Before treatment,there was no significant difference in air conduction auditory threshold and air-bone gap between the two groups (P >0. 05). The air conduction auditory threshold and air-bone gap after treatment were significantly lower than those before treatment in the two group(P <0. 05). After treatment, the air conduction auditory threshold and air-bone gap in titanium auricular bone group were significantly lower than those in autologous bone group (P < 0. 05). Conclusions Facial nerve monitoring can effectively identify the exposed facial nerve or thin bone canal facial nerve,and could avoid facial nerve injury during surgery. The mastoidale partial resection and superior tympanic wall reconstruction with autogenous bone meal

  15. Surface Chest Motion Decomposition for Cardiovascular Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Ghufran Shafiq; Kalyana C. Veluvolu

    2014-01-01

    Surface chest motion can be easily monitored with a wide variety of sensors such as pressure belts, fiber Bragg gratings and inertial sensors, etc. The current applications of these sensors are mainly restricted to respiratory motion monitoring/analysis due to the technical challenges involved in separation of the cardiac motion from the dominant respiratory motion. The contribution of heart to the surface chest motion is relatively very small as compared to the respiratory motion. Further, t...

  16. Misdiagnosed Chest Pain: Spontaneous Esophageal Rupture

    OpenAIRE

    Inci, Sinan; Gundogdu, Fuat; Gungor, Hasan; Arslan, Sakir; Turkyilmaz, Atila; Eroglu, Atila

    2013-01-01

    Chest pain is one of themost common complaints expressed by patients presenting to the emergency department, and any initial evaluation should always consider life-threatening causes. Esophageal rupture is a serious condition with a highmortality rate. If diagnosed, successful therapy depends on the size of the rupture and the time elapsed between rupture and diagnosis.We report on a 41-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department complaining of left-sided chest pain for two hours.

  17. Nuss procedure for surgical stabilization of flail chest with horizontal sternal body fracture and multiple bilateral rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Kwang; Kang, Do Kyun

    2016-06-01

    Flail chest is a life-threatening situation that paradoxical movement of the thoracic cage was caused by multiply fractured ribs in two different planes, or a sternal fracture, or a combination of the two. The methods to achieve stability of the chest wall are controversy between surgical fixation and mechanical ventilation. We report a case of a 33-year-old man who fell from a high place with fail chest due to multiple rib fractures bilaterally and horizontal sternal fracture. The conventional surgical stabilization using metal plates by access to the front of the sternum could not provide stability of the flail segment because the fracture surface was obliquely upward and there were multiple bilateral rib fractures adjacent the sternum. The Nuss procedure was performed for supporting the flail segment from the back. Flail chest was resolved immediately after the surgery. The patient was weaned from the mechanical ventilation on third postoperative day successfully and was ultimately discharged without any complications.

  18. Cardiac pathologies incidentally detected with non-gated chest CT; Inzidentelle Pathologien des Herzens im Thorax-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Axel; Kroepil, P.; Lanzman, R.S.; Moedder, U. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Duesseldorf, Heinrich-Heine-Univ. (Germany); Choy, G.; Abbara, S. [Cardiovascular Imaging Section, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Cardiac imaging using electrocardiogram-gated multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) permits noninvasive diagnosis of congenital and acquired cardiac pathologies and has thus become increasingly important in the last years. Several studies investigated the incidence and relevance of incidental extracardiac structures within the lungs, mediastinum, chest wall, and abdomen with gated coronary CT. This resulted in the general acceptance of the review of extracardiac structures as a routine component of coronary CT interpretation. On the other hand radiologists tend to neglect pericardial and cardiac pathologies in non-gated chest CT, which is primarily performed for the evaluation of the respiratory system or for tumor staging. Since the introduction of multi-detector spiral CT technology, the incidental detection of cardiac and pericardial findings has become possible using non-gated chest CT. This article reviews the imaging appearances and differential diagnostic considerations of incidental cardiac entities that may be encountered in non-gated chest CT. (orig.)

  19. Derivation and validation of two decision instruments for selective chest CT in blunt trauma: a multicenter prospective observational study (NEXUS Chest CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Rodriguez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Unnecessary diagnostic imaging leads to higher costs, longer emergency department stays, and increased patient exposure to ionizing radiation. We sought to prospectively derive and validate two decision instruments (DIs for selective chest computed tomography (CT in adult blunt trauma patients.From September 2011 to May 2014, we prospectively enrolled blunt trauma patients over 14 y of age presenting to eight US, urban level 1 trauma centers in this observational study. During the derivation phase, physicians recorded the presence or absence of 14 clinical criteria before viewing chest imaging results. We determined injury outcomes by CT radiology readings and categorized injuries as major or minor according to an expert-panel-derived clinical classification scheme. We then employed recursive partitioning to derive two DIs: Chest CT-All maximized sensitivity for all injuries, and Chest CT-Major maximized sensitivity for only major thoracic injuries (while increasing specificity. In the validation phase, we employed similar methodology to prospectively test the performance of both DIs. We enrolled 11,477 patients-6,002 patients in the derivation phase and 5,475 patients in the validation phase. The derived Chest CT-All DI consisted of (1 abnormal chest X-ray, (2 rapid deceleration mechanism, (3 distracting injury, (4 chest wall tenderness, (5 sternal tenderness, (6 thoracic spine tenderness, and (7 scapular tenderness. The Chest CT-Major DI had the same criteria without rapid deceleration mechanism. In the validation phase, Chest CT-All had a sensitivity of 99.2% (95% CI 95.4%-100%, a specificity of 20.8% (95% CI 19.2%-22.4%, and a negative predictive value (NPV of 99.8% (95% CI 98.9%-100% for major injury, and a sensitivity of 95.4% (95% CI 93.6%-96.9%, a specificity of 25.5% (95% CI 23.5%-27.5%, and a NPV of 93.9% (95% CI 91.5%-95.8% for either major or minor injury. Chest CT-Major had a sensitivity of 99.2% (95% CI 95.4%-100%, a specificity of

  20. Mechanisms and Clinical Management of Ventricular Arrhythmias following Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Wolbrom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonpenetrating, blunt chest trauma is a serious medical condition with varied clinical presentations and implications. This can be the result of a dense projectile during competitive and recreational sports but may also include other etiologies such as motor vehicle accidents or traumatic falls. In this setting, the manifestation of ventricular arrhythmias has been observed both acutely and chronically. This is based on two entirely separate mechanisms and etiologies requiring different treatments. Ventricular fibrillation can occur immediately after chest wall injury (commotio cordis and requires rapid defibrillation. Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia can develop in the chronic stage due to underlying structural heart disease long after blunt chest injury. The associated arrhythmogenic tissue may be complex and provides the necessary substrate to form a reentrant VT circuit. Ventricular tachycardia in the absence of overt structural heart disease appears to be focal in nature with rapid termination during ablation. Regardless of the VT mechanism, patients with recurrent episodes, despite antiarrhythmic medication in the chronic stage following blunt chest injury, are likely to require ablation to achieve VT control. This review article will describe the mechanisms, pathophysiology, and treatment of ventricular arrhythmias that occur in both the acute and chronic stages following blunt chest trauma.

  1. Clinical features and surgical treatment of chest aggressive fibromatosis%胸部侵袭性纤维瘤病的临床特征和外科治疗效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳娇; 高禹舜

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical features and surgical treatment of chest aggressive fibromatosis.Methods Twenty-five patients with aggressive fibromatosis treated from September 1998 to May 2014 in the Department of Thoracic Surgery of Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences were included in this study.Results The 25 patients, including 12 males and 13 famales, had an average age of 38 (range 15-76 years).The initial manifestations included chest pain (9 patients, 36.0%) and shortness of breath (1 patient).In 13 patients (52.0%) the tumor was found in a physical examination.Two patients ( 8.0%) were detected during an operation for lung disease.The tumor was located in the left chest wall in 15 patients, and located on the right side in 10 patients.Among them, the most common locations were the left front chest wall and the right front chest wall.The operation method affects the prognosis. Radiological imaging and needle biopsy did not make a correct diagnosis, and the diagnosis of aggressive fibromatosis was confirmed by pathology using immunohistechmistry after surgery.13 patients underwent tumor resection, 9 cases had expanded resection, 3 patients had palliative resection.Six cases received radiotherapy after surgery.The median follow-up time was 101.5 months.Currently , all of the 25 patients are still alive, but 5 cases had local recurrence after surgery, among them, 4 patients received tumor resection, and one patient underwent expanded resection.Conclusions Aggressive fibromatosis is a low-grade malignant tumor.The diagnosis of aggressive fibromatosis needs to be confirmed by pathology using immunohistechmical staining after surgery.Although this tumor is liable to relapse, its prognosis is favorable. Radical surgery is the most important treatment for patients to get a higher quality of life and long-term survival without recurrence.%目的:分析胸部侵袭性纤维瘤病的临床特点和外科治疗

  2. A study of the value of high frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease%高频胸壁震荡在慢性阻塞性肺疾病急性加重期有创通气患者治疗中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘婷婷; 康焰; 许照敏; 吕琅遐; 贾玲俐; 高蕴

    2014-01-01

    目的 探索高频胸壁震荡(HFCWO)对慢性阻塞性肺疾病(简称慢阻肺)急性加重患者行有创机械通气的安全性和有效性.方法 采用前瞻性随机对照研究,选取2012年2月至2013年2月四川大学华西医院重症医学科行有创机械通气的慢阻肺急性加重患者35例,利用SAS 9.1软件将患者完全随机分为对照组和高频胸壁震荡组(H组).对照组接受常规治疗,H组接受HFCWO+常规治疗.比较两组患者有创机械通气时间、无创通气时间、总机械通气时间、ICU留驻时间、住院时间及前7d的pH值和氧合指数,同时记录H组使用HFCWO前、中、后的心率、血压、呼吸、氧饱和度和气道峰压和呼吸机报警情况.结果 H组总机械通气时间为(10±6)d,低于对照组的(15±8)d(P<0.05),但两组有创机械通气时间、无创通气时间、ICU留驻时间、住院时间差异均无统计学意义(均P >0.05),前7d的pH值和氧合指数差异均无统计学意义(均P>0.05).H组患者使用HFCWO前、中、后的心率、呼吸、血压、氧饱和度、气道峰压等无明显改变(均P>0.05).3.67%(8/281)人次出现严重呼吸机报警(3级),且与机械通气时间和预后无明显相关性.结论 高频胸壁震荡在慢阻肺急性加重机械通气患者中应用具有较好的安全性和舒适性,可以减少总机械通气时间,但不能改善患者预后.%Objective To explore the safety and efficacy of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) in invasive mechanical ventilation patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD).Methods A prospective,randomized,controlled trial was conducted.Thirty-five AECOPD patients with invasive mechanical ventilation were included in the intensive care unit of West China Hospital of Sichuan University from February 2012 to February 2013.The patients were randomly allocated into a HFCWO (H) group and a control group using SAS 9.1 software.The control

  3. ABDOMINOPERINEAL RESECTION OF THE RECTUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tarcoveanu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The abdominoperineal resection is a procedure that combine a low anterior resection and the complete perineal excision of the anus and rectum. The paper discuss the surgical anatomy of the rectum, the history, the indications and complications of the procedure. It is also described the technique of the abdominoperineal resection: the abdominal approach is through a lower midline incision, and then, the small bowell is packed into the upper side of the abdomen. The sigmoid colon is mobilized by the incising the posterior and lateral peritoneum. The peritoneal dissection is continued distally parallel to the rectum. The inferior mesenteric artery is identified and ligated just distal to the take off of the left colic artery or higher. The next step is the total mesorectal excision, performed by entering in the retrorectal space, in the avascular space of areolar tissue, above the promontory of the sacrum and anteriorly the presacral nerves. This plane should be continued by sharp disection laterally and caudally till the pelvic floor. Anterior dissection of the rectum is achived by incision the recto-vesical reflection and dissection of the Denonvilliers fascia (in men and in women the mobilization of the rectum is finished by the incision and the dissection of the recto-vaginal reflection. The colon can be now divided proximally. The next step is the perineal resection: an eliptical incision is made to encompass the anus with an adequate margin of tissue. The skin edges are then grasped and the subcutaneous tissue is divided with cautery; the dissection is continued into the fat of the ischio-anal fossa and the inferior rectal vessels are divided. The levator ani is than divided. After the complete posterior dissection of the rectum, the specimen may be delivered into the perineal wound and then, the anteriorly final dissection can be achived. In men the dissection plane is between the rectum and the prostate / urethra, and in women between the

  4. Precision resection of intestine using ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Rainer J.; Gora, Wojciech S.; Jayne, David; Hand, Duncan P.; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopic resection of early colorectal neoplasms typically employs electrocautery tools, which lack precision and run the risk of full thickness thermal injury to the bowel wall with subsequent perforation. We present a means of endoluminal colonic ablation using picosecond laser pulses as a potential alternative to mitigate these limitations. High intensity ultrashort laser pulses enable nonlinear absorption processes, plasma generation, and as a consequence a predominantly non-thermal ablation regimen. Robust process parameters for the laser resection are demonstrated using fresh ex vivo pig intestine samples. Square cavities with comparable thickness to early colorectal neoplasms are removed for a wavelength of 1030 nm and 515 nm using a picosecond laser system. The corresponding histology sections exhibit in both cases only minimal collateral damage to the surrounding tissue. The ablation depth can be controlled precisely by means of the pulse energy. Overall, the application of ultrafast lasers for the resection of intestine enables significantly improved precision and reduced thermal damage to the surrounding tissue compared to conventional electrocautery.

  5. Hepatic Resection Using a Water Jet Dissector

    OpenAIRE

    H. U. Baer; Stain, S. C.; Guastella, T.; G. J. Maddern; Blumgart, L. H.

    1993-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity in major hepatic resection is often related to hemorrhage. A high pressure, high velocity water jet has been developed and has been utilized to assist in hepatic parenchymal transection. Sixty-seven major hepatic resections were performed for solid hepatic tumors. The tissue fracture technique was used in 51 patients (76%), and the water jet dissector was used predominantly in 16 patients (24%). The extent of hepatic resection using each technique was similar. The ...

  6. Liver Resections for Metastases from Intraabdominal Leiomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Nocchi Kalil; Bianca De Lourdes Pereira; Marcia Cristina Lima Brenner; Luiz Pereira-Lima

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses liver resection for intraabdominal leiomyosarcoma metastases as a therapy for carefully selected patients. Of the 83 hepatectomies performed from 1992 to 1996, five were resections for liver metastases due to intraabdominal leiomyosarcoma, in 3 patients. The surgical indication was single liver metastases, without any evidence of extrahepatic disease. No mortality occurred during surgery and the longest survival was 38 months. We concluded that liver resection for leiomyo...

  7. Radiological contribution to the diagnosis of early postoperative complications after lung resection for primary tumor: a revisional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priola, Adriano Massimiliano; Priola, Sandro Massimo; Boccuzzi, Francesco; Dervishi, Najada; Lisi, Elena; Veltri, Andrea; Ardissone, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In the post-operative course of the interventions of lung resection for primary tumor, complications of different nature and severity can arise, recognizing different pathogenetic mechanisms and differing according to the type of resection performed and to the time elapsed after surgery. The low diagnostic accuracy of chest radiography requires a thorough knowledge of the radiologist about all radiographic findings, both normal and pathological, which can be found in the immediate post-operative period (within 30 days after surgery). This article aims to describe the incidence, the clinical features and the radiological aspects of immediate complications following pulmonary resections, with specific reference to those in which the diagnostic imaging provides a fundamental contribution. PMID:27621893

  8. [LAPAROSCOPIC APPROACH AND SURGICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN RESECTION OF A LARGE EPIPHRENIC ESOPHAGEAL DIVERTICULUM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnicki, Yaron; Inbar, Roy; Barkay, Olga; Shpitz, Baruch; Ghinea, Ronen; Avital, Shmuel

    2015-08-01

    Epiphrenic diverticulum of the esophagus is an uncommon finding. Small diverticula are usually asymptomatic in nature. Large diverticula may present with dysphagia, chest or upper abdominal discomfort, vomiting, irritating cough or halitosis. There are a few different surgical approaches to epiphrenic diverticulum resection. It can be performed with an abdominal or a thoracic approach and in an open or a laparoscopic manner. In this case report we present a 70 years old male patient with a giant epiphrenic diverticulum and dysphagia. The patient was operated upon via a laparoscopic abdominal approach with intra-operative endoscopic assistance and underwent a diverticulum resection. We present a review of the different kinds of esophageal diverticula, the mechanism of their formation, and the surgical considerations associated with choosing the appropriate surgical approach. PMID:26480613

  9. Chest trauma in children: A local experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest trauma in childhood is relatively uncommon in clinical practice andhas been the subject of few reports in literature. This study was undertakento examine our experience in dealing with chest trauma in children. This wasa retrospective study of 74 children who sustained chest trauma and werereferred to King Fahd Hospital in Medina over a two-year period. The age,cause of injury, severity of injury, associated extrathoracic injuries,treatment and outcome were analyzed. The median age of patients was nineyears. Fifty-nine of them (80%) sustained blunt trauma in 62% of thechildren, gun shot wounds were seen in five and stab wounds in 10 children.Head injury was the most common injury associated with thoracic trauma andwas seen in 14 patients (19%) and associated intra-abdominal injuries wereseen in nine patients. Chest x-ray of the blunt trauma patients revealedfractured ribs in 24 children, pneumothorax in six, hemothorax in four,hemoneumothorax in three, and pulmonary contusions in 22 patients. Fifty onepercent of children were managed conservatively, 37% required tubethoracostomy, 8% were mechanically ventilated and 4% underwent thoractomy.The prevalence of chest trauma in children due to road traffic accidents ishigh in Saudi Arabia. Head injury is thought to be the most common associatedextrathoracic injuries, however, most of these patients can be managedconservatively. (author)

  10. Vaginoscopic resection of vaginal septum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassif, Joseph; Al Chami, Ali; Abu Musa, Antoine; Nassar, Anwar H; Kurdi, Ahmad; Ghulmiyyah, Labib

    2012-12-01

    We report the resection of a vaginal septum while preserving the virginity of a 12-year-old girl with Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich Syndrome (HWWS) having a didelphys uterus, obstructed hemivagina, and an ipsilateral renal agenesis with follow-up at 18 months. Successful resection of the vaginal septum with conservation of the hymenal ring and complete drainage of both the hematocolpos and the hematometra were achieved. Cyclic dysmenorrhea and pelvic pain were completely resolved on follow-up visits at 4, 6, and 18 months. Office hysteroscopy performed during the last follow-up visit revealed a patent vaginal vault without evidence of adenosis or recurrence of the vaginal septum. Vaginoscopy is a safe, convenient, and efficient diagnostic and therapeutic modality that can be used in the management of patients with an obstructed hemivagina. It maintains the patient's virginity and it is useful in patients with a restrictive vaginal opening or narrow vaginal canal. Furthermore, the hysteroscopic excision of the vaginal septum offers minimal risk of recurrence of the septal defect. PMID:23315718

  11. Pulmonary artery aneurysm with patent arterial duct: resection of aneurysm and ductal division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefera, Endale; Teodori, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Congenital or acquired aneurysm of the pulmonary artery (PA) is rare. Although aneurysms are described following surgical treatment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), occurrence of this lesion in association with PDA without previous surgery is extremely uncommon. An eight-year-old patient with PDA and aneurysm of the main PA is described in this report. Clinical diagnosis of PDA was made upon presentation. Diagnosis of PA aneurysm was suspected on chest x-ray and was confirmed on transthoracic echocardiography. Successful surgical resection of the aneurysm and division of the duct were performed under cardiopulmonary bypass. The patient did well on follow-up both from clinical and echocardiographic point of view.

  12. Awake operative videothoracoscopic pulmonary resections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompeo, Eugenio; Mineo, Tommaso C

    2008-08-01

    The authors' initial experience with awake videothoracoscopic lung resection suggests that these procedures can be easily and safely performed under sole thoracic epidural anesthesia with no mortality and negligible morbidity. One major concern was that operating on a ventilating lung would render surgical maneuvers more difficult because of the lung movements and lack of a sufficient operating space. Instead, the open pneumothorax created after trocar insertion produces a satisfactory lung collapse that does not hamper surgical maneuvers. These results contradict the accepted assumption that the main prerequisite for allowing successful thoracoscopic lung surgery is general anesthesia with one-lung ventilation. No particular training is necessary to accomplish an awake pulmonary resection for teams experienced in thoracoscopic surgery, and conversions to general anesthesia are mainly caused by the presence of extensive fibrous pleural adhesions or the development of intractable panic attacks. Overall, awake pulmonary resection is easily accepted and well tolerated by patients, as confirmed by the high anesthesia satisfaction score, which was better than in nonawake control patients. Nonetheless, thoracic epidural anesthesia has potential complications, including epidural hematoma, spinal cord injury, and phrenic nerve palsy caused by inadvertently high anesthetic level, but these never occurred in the authors' experience. Further concerns relate to patient participation in operating room conversations or risk for development of perioperative panic attacks. However, the authors have found that reassuring the patient during the procedure, explaining step-by-step what is being performed, and even showing the ongoing procedure on the operating video can greatly improve the perioperative wellness and expectations of patients, particularly if the procedure is performed for oncologic diseases. Panic attacks occurred in few patients and could be usually managed through

  13. Outcome following Resection of Biliary Cystadenoma: A Single Centre Experience and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pitchaimuthu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Biliary cystadenomas (BCAs are rare, benign, potentially malignant cystic lesions of the liver, accounting for less than 5% of cystic liver tumours. We report the outcome following resection of biliary cystadenoma from a single tertiary centre. Methods. Data of patients who had resection of BCA between January 1993 and July 2014 were obtained from liver surgical database. Patient demographics, clinicopathological characteristics, operative data, and postoperative outcome were analysed. Results. 29 patients had surgery for BCA. Male : female ratio was 1 : 28. Clinical presentation was abdominal pain (74%, jaundice (20%, abdominal mass (14%, and deranged liver function tests (3%. Cyst characteristics included septations (48%, wall thickening (31%, wall irregularity (38%, papillary projections (10%, and mural nodule (3%. Surgical procedures included atypical liver resection (52%, left hemihepatectomy (34%, right hemihepatectomy (10%, and left lateral segmentectomy (3%. Median length of stay was 7 (IQ 6.5–8.5 days. Two patients developed postoperative bile leak. No patients had malignancy on final histology. Median follow-up was 13 (IQ 6.5–15.7 years. One patient developed delayed biliary stricture and one died of cholangiocarcinoma 11 years later. Conclusion. Biliary cystadenomas can be resected safely with significantly low morbidity. Malignant transformation and recurrence are rare. Complete surgical resection provides a cure.

  14. Cardiogenic shock following blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-González Fayna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac contusion, usually caused by blunt chest trauma, has been recognized with increased frequency over the past decades. Traffic accidents are the most frequent cause of cardiac contusions resulting from a direct blow to the chest. Other causes of blunt cardiac injury are numerous and include violent fall impacts, interpersonal aggression, explosions, and various types of high-risk sports. Myocardial contusion is difficult to diagnose; clinical presentation varies greatly, ranging from lack of symptoms to cardiogenic shock and arrhythmia. Although death is rare, cardiac contusion can be fatal. We present a case of cardiac contusion due to blunt chest trauma secondary to a fall impact, which manifested as cardiogenic shock.

  15. Studies on regional ventilation observed from a lateral side of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three normal subjects ranging in age from 27 to 35 and three patients with unilateral pulmonary resection were studied. The subjects were seated. A scinticamera was placed for dorsal or lateral side of the chest. The subject was instructed to inhale 5 mCi of xenon-133 from functional residual capacity. During rebreathing in the spirometer circuit, carbon dioxide was removed by a soda-lime absorber and oxygen was added at a rate sufficient to maintain a constant volume. External counts were measured for determinating a half-time (Tsub(1/2)) of washout during normal breathing at rest after equilibrium was reached. The influence of xenon-133 entered in the chest on external counts was corrected. It was found that about 10 % of radioactive counts of xenon-133 in the right lung were detected from lateral view of the left side of the chest in the patients. The value of a half-time in the dorsal lower portion of the lung was the smallest, that is, the portion was somewhat better ventilated than the others. Horizontal uneveness as well as vertical uneveness of ventilation were observed. Horizontal uneveness was influenced by the movement of diaphragma and by a belly-band. (author)

  16. Misdiagnosed Chest Pain: Spontaneous Esophageal Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inci, Sinan; Gundogdu, Fuat; Gungor, Hasan; Arslan, Sakir; Turkyilmaz, Atila; Eroglu, Atila

    2013-01-01

    Chest pain is one of themost common complaints expressed by patients presenting to the emergency department, and any initial evaluation should always consider life-threatening causes. Esophageal rupture is a serious condition with a highmortality rate. If diagnosed, successful therapy depends on the size of the rupture and the time elapsed between rupture and diagnosis.We report on a 41-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department complaining of left-sided chest pain for two hours. PMID:27122690

  17. Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy: A Comparative Study of Resection And Electro-diathermy Ablation in the Treatment of Primary Palmar Hyperhidrosis, Taif Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al Saeed*, Majed Al Mourgi**, Mohamed Hatem

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim of the work: Palmar Hyperhidrosis is an excessive and unpleasant sweating and it is under control of the thoracic sympathetic chain. At present, endoscopic upper thoracic Sympathectomy (ETS offers a safe and durable solution of the condition. The operation includes excision, electro diathermy ablation or application of surgical clips on the thoracic sympathetic ganglia T2 and T3. The present study was done to compare the results achieved by excision and electro-diathermy ablation. Patients and methods: This prospective randomized study was conducted in King Abdul Aziz Specialist Hospital and Al-Hada Armed Forces Hospital, Taif- Saudi Arabia, from January 2007 to August 2010 and included sixteen patients with primary palmar hyperhidrosis. They were randomized into 2 groups; each of 8 patients. In one group; the sympathetic chains with T2 and T3 ganglia were excised on both sides and in the other group, the sympathetic chains and ganglia were ablated bilaterally using electro-coagulation diathermy hook.Results: There were 10 women and six men. The mean age of the ablation group was 23.6±7.6 years and in the resection group it was 22.5±8.4years. The mean operating time for bilateral Sympathectomy in the resection group was 74±18.6minutes; whilst in the thermal ablation group it was 32±7.8 minutes. The mean postoperative hospital stay in the excision group was 48±12 hours and in the ablation group, it was24±6 hours. No deaths occurred and all patients are discharged with dry hands. The mean follow up was 24±18 months. Intraoperative intercostal venous bleeding occurred in 18.75% of sympathectomies in the excision group but not in the ablation group. Neuralgic pain of the chest wall developed in 31.25% of sympathectomies of the excision group and 6.25% of the sympathectomies of the ablation group. Horner's syndrome developed in 6.25% per cent of the sympathectomies in both groups. Compensatory hyperhidrosis of trunk and

  18. Perioperative nursing for laparoscopic liver resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Li-jia; WEN Guo-fen

    2005-01-01

    Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital (SRRSH) has developed a form of laparoscopic hepatectomy, resecting by curettage and suction. Such resection has been carried out successfully in 6 patients who had liver tumors. The results are satisfactory. And after the operation, there is a very effective perioperative nursing ensuring the patient's recovery.

  19. Xanthogranulomatous Cystitis Treated by Transurethral Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachi Yamamoto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Xanthogranulomatous cystitis (XC is a rare benign chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. Curative treatment of XC requires surgical resection, and most of reported cases were treated by partial cystectomy. Here we describe a case with XC that was treated using transurethral resection.

  20. Liver resection in liver transplant recipients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriele Marangoni; Walid Faraj; Harsheet Sethi; Mohamed Rela; Paolo Muiesan; Nigel Heaton

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver resection after liver transplantation is a relatively uncommon procedure. Indications for liver resection include hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT), non-anastomotic biliary stricture (ischemic biliary lesions), liver abscess, liver trauma and recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Organ shortage and lower survival after re-transplantation have encouraged us to make attempts at graft salvage. METHODS: Eleven resections at a mean of 59 months after liver transplantation were made over 18 years. Indications for liver resection included HCC recurrence in 4 patients, ischemic cholangiopathy, segmental HAT, sepsis and infected hematoma in 2 each, and ischemic segmentⅣafter split liver transplantation in 1. RESULTS: There was no perioperative mortality. Morbidity included one re-laparotomy for small bowel perforation, one bile leak treated conservatively, one right subphrenic collection, one wound infection and 5 episodes of Gram-negative sepsis. One patient underwent re-transplantation 4 months after resection for chronic rejection. There were 3 deaths, two from HCC recurrence and one from post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. The overall mean follow-up after resection was 48 months. CONCLUSIONS: Liver resection in liver transplant recipients is safe, and has good outcome in selected patients and avoids re-transplantation in the majority of patients. Recipients with recurrent HCC in graft may beneift from resection, but cure is uncommon.

  1. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation with IMRT in resectable and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation is an alternative to the surgery-first approach for resectable pancreatic cancer (PDA) and represents the standard of care for borderline resectable (BLR). Materials and methods: All patients with resectable and BLR PDA treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation using IMRT between 1/2009 and 11/2011 were reviewed. Patients were treated to a customized CTV which included the primary mass and regional vessels. Results: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation was completed in 69 patients (39 BLR and 30 resectable). Induction chemotherapy was used in 32 (82%) of the 39 patients with BLR disease prior to chemoXRT. All resectable patients were treated with chemoXRT alone. Following neoadjuvant treatment, 48 (70%) of the 69 patients underwent successful pancreatic resection with 47 (98%) being margin negative (RO). In 30 of the BLR patients who had arterial abutment or SMV occlusion, 19 (63%) were surgically resected and all had RO resections. The cumulative incidence of local failure at 1 and 2 years was 2% (95% CI 0–6%) and 9% (95% CI 0.6–17%) respectively. The median overall survival for all patients, patients undergoing resection, and patients without resection were 20, 26 and 11 months respectively. Sixteen (23%) of the 69 patients are alive without disease with a median follow-up of 47 months (36–60). Conclusion: Neoadjuvant chemoXRT can facilitate a margin negative resection in patients with localized PCa

  2. Chest trauma in childhood. Radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt thoracic trauma is frequently associated with further injuries (head and/or blunt abdominal trauma). The prognosis also depends on the concurrent injuries. The initial evaluation of an injured child is based on the chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound examination. Additional information can be obtained by a CT scan in mediastinal injuries. (orig./MG)

  3. Cardiac injuries in blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobon-Gomez Catalina

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Blunt chest traumas are a clinical challenge, both for diagnosis and treatment. The use of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance can play a major role in this setting. We present two cases: a 12-year-old boy and 45-year-old man. Late gadolinium enhancement imaging enabled visualization of myocardial damage resulting from the trauma.

  4. Coccidioidomycosis - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chest x-ray shows the affects of a fungal infection, coccidioidomycosis. In the middle of the left lung (seen on the ... defined borders. Other diseases that may explain these x-ray findings include lung abscesses, chronic pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic ...

  5. Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chest x-ray shows adenocarcinoma of the lung. There is a rounded light spot in the right upper lung (left side ... density. Diseases that may cause this type of x-ray result would be tuberculous or fungal granuloma, and ...

  6. Chest Pain: Delays in seeking medical attention

    OpenAIRE

    Dickson, R.; Shuster, M; Brown, G B

    1992-01-01

    A multicenter prospective survey of 101 patients who presented to the emergency departments of five metropolitan medical centers complaining of non-traumatic chest pain showed that many delayed going to hospital. We call for more effective communication between physicians, patients, and the public and for improved public education on the signs and symptoms of myocardial infarction and the correct response.

  7. Treatment of 336 cases of chest trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing; CHU Xiang-yang; LIU Yi; WANG Yun-xi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the clinical features,diagnosis and treatment of chest trauma.Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted among 336 cases of chest trauma admitted to our hospital from January 2009 to May 2011.Results:Out of all cases,325 were cured,accounting for 96.7%; 11 died,accounting for 3.3%.Among the dead cases,one died of hemorrhagic shock,three of acute respiratory distress syndrome,three of multiple organ failure,and four of severe multiple traumas.Conclusions:(1) For patients with severe chest trauma,early emergency treatment is crucial to save life.(2) Open thoracic surgery is needed for acute cardiac tamponade,intrapulmonary vascular injuries,progressive intrathoracic bleeding,lung laceration,tracheal breakage,and diaphragmatic injury.In addition,operative timing and method should be well chosen.(3) Pulmonary contusion is one of common complications in chest trauma,for which the combination of strong anti-infection therapy and mechanical ventilation is an effective treatment strategy.

  8. The HEART score for chest pain patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backus, B.E.

    2012-01-01

    The HEART score was developed to improve risk stratification in chest pain patients in the emergency department (ED). This thesis describes series of validation studies of the HEART score and sub studies for individual elements of the score. The predictive value of the HEART score for the occurrence

  9. Cardiac injuries in blunt chest trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Tobon-Gomez Catalina; Huguet Marina; Bijnens Bart H; Frangi Alejandro F; Petit Marius

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Blunt chest traumas are a clinical challenge, both for diagnosis and treatment. The use of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance can play a major role in this setting. We present two cases: a 12-year-old boy and 45-year-old man. Late gadolinium enhancement imaging enabled visualization of myocardial damage resulting from the trauma.

  10. Surgical resection for pulmonary metastases of sweat gland carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Osaki, T; Kodate, M.; Nakanishi, R.; Mitsudomi, T.; Shirakusa, T.

    1994-01-01

    A case of axillary sweat gland carcinoma which metastasised to both lungs six years after resection of the primary lesion is described. The lesions were resected and three years later two further pulmonary metastases were resected.

  11. Clinicodemographic aspect of resectable pancreatic cancer and prognostic factors for resectable cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang Kun-Chun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PCA is one of the most lethal human malignancies, and radical surgery remains the cornerstone of treatment. After resection, the overall 5-year survival rate is only 10% to 29%. At the time of presentation, however, about 40% of patients generally have distant metastases and another 40% are usually diagnosed with locally advanced cancers. The remaining 20% of patients are indicated for surgery on the basis of the results of preoperative imaging studies; however, about half of these patients are found to be unsuitable for resection during surgical exploration. In the current study, we aimed to determine the clinicopathological characteristics that predict the resectability of PCA and to conduct a prognostic analysis of PCA after resection to identify favorable survival factors. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical files of 688 patients (422 men and 266 women who had undergone surgery for histopathologically proven PCA in the Department of Surgery at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital in Taiwan from 1981 to 2006. We compared the clinical characteristics of patients who underwent resection and patients who did not undergo resection in order to identify the predictive factors for successful resectability of PCA, and we conducted prognostic analysis for PCA after resection. Results A carbohydrate antigen 19–9 (CA 19–9 level of 37 U/ml or greater and a tumor size of 3 cm or more independently predicted resectability of PCA. In terms of survival after resection, PCA patients with better nutritional status (measured as having an albumin level greater than 3.5 g/dl, radical resection, early tumor stage and better-differentiated tumors were associated with favorable survival. Conclusions Besides traditional imaging studies, preoperative CA 19–9 levels and tumor size can also be used to determine the resectability of PCA. Better nutritional status, curative resection, early tumor stage and well

  12. An experience of corrective surgery of 37 cases of chest deformity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was carried out to ascertain the cosmetic outcome of corrective surgery for pectus deformity and to determine the morbidity associated with it. Study Design: Quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted in CMH Rawalpindi and CMH Quetta from 2007 to 2012. Methodology: Total number of cases operated for chest deformity was 37. Modified Welch procedure with sub perichondrial resection was done with a strut of prolene mesh in a majority of excavatum repairs and k wires in few. Pectoroplasty was subsequently carried out in all patients. Midline incision was made in a majority of patients. Submammary incision was made in some female patients with a lower deformity due to better cosmetic outcome. Inclusion criterion was patients with chest deformity without any cardiac and spinal deformity. Results: Age range was between 4 years to 12 years with mean age of 8 +- 2.3 years. Twenty four (65%) deformities were of excavatum and 9 (24%) were of carinatum type. Four (11%) cases were of unilateral asymmetrical deformity. Mean operating time was 95 +- 11 minutes. Transfusion was required in only 1 (3%) of the cases. There was no perioperative mortality. Four (11%) patients had formation of seroma and 3 (8%) developed pneumothorax which was aspirated without placement of chest tube. Two (5%) had surgical site infection. Fifteen (41%) patients were satisfied and 21 (57%) reported excellent results. Conclusion: Chest deformity correction is safe and effective procedure with acceptable cosmetic results. It is easy to perform and improves self image of the suffering individual. (author)

  13. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Bronchitis (Chest Cold)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Farm Get Smart About Antibiotics Week Bronchitis (Chest Cold) Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... types—acute bronchitis. Causes Acute bronchitis, or chest cold, often occurs after an upper respiratory infection like ...

  14. The vascular pedicle width seen on chest PA in normal Korean adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunwoo, Hee Jung; Ahn, Myeong Im; Baik, Jun Hyun; Jung, Youn Ju; Kim, Jee Young [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seog Hee [Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    We wanted to measure the vascular pedicle width (VPW) in normal Korean adults and correlate the VPW with the body physique and we also wanted to establish the index for normal VPWs, which could be utilized in reading chest PAs. We VPW was measured on the posteroanterior (PA) chest radiographs of 262 normal Korean adults (134 men and 128 women, age range: 22-88 years, mean age: 45.2 years), who visited the hospital for a general health examination. The relationship between the VPW and the height and the Body Mass Index (BMI) was evaluated. Correlations between height and the thoracic spine length (TSL) and between the BMI and the lateral chest wall thickness (CWT) were analyzed as well. The mean VPW was 47.4 ({+-} 6.4) mm. The VPW was positively correlated with the height ({rho} < 0.01) and the BMI ({rho} < 0.01) of the subject. The patient's height was well correlated with the TSL, and the BMI was correlated with the CWT (r = 0.75, r = 0.76). The table for the normal VPWs according to patient's TSL and CWT was established. By measuring the TSL and the CWT on chest PA, which reflect the height and BMI, respectively, and by utilizing the provided table for the normal VPW, we can determine the normality of a patient's VPW.

  15. Ultrasonido de tórax en ninos Ultrasound of the pediatric's chest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Fuentealba T

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available El Ultrasonido es un examen complementario en el estudio por imágenes del tórax. En los últimos tiempos se ha ampliado su utilización especialmente en el estudio del tórax pediátrico ya que es una alternativa de imagen que no usa radiación y por otra parte, es considerado por algunos autores como el examen de primera línea en la evaluación de algunas patologías específicas como: aumento de volumen superficial de la pared torácica, movimiento diafragmático, timo y derrame pleural. El objetivo de este artículo es revisar las principales indicaciones en el estudio del tórax pediátrico por ultrasonido en patología no cardiológica.Ultrasound is an alternative technique for the examination of the chest. Recently chest ultrasound has expanded its use mainly on the study of pediatric patients, since it does not use radiation and it is considered by some authors as the first line test in the evaluation of some specific conditions like: superficial lumps and bumps of the chest wall, diaphragm motility, thymus characterization and pleural effusions. The purpose of this paper is to review the main indications for pediatric chest ultrasound in non-cardiac diseases.

  16. Wonderful Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of "working" walls in children's programs. Children's programs need "working" walls (and ceilings and floors) which can be put to use for communication, display, storage, and activity space. The furnishings also work, or don't work, for the program in another sense: in aggregate, they serve as…

  17. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    of “ambiguous walls” as a more “critical” approach to design [1]. The concept of ambiguous walls refers to the diffuse status a lumious and possibly responsive wall will have. Instead of confining it can open up. Instead of having a static appearance, it becomes a context over time. Instead of being hard...

  18. Investigation of the Chest-Ear Radio Propagation Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Søren Helstrup; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2010-01-01

    The path gain (|S21|) between antennas on the chest and at the ear is presented as a function of the position of the antenna on the chest. A monopole antenna and a printed Inverted-F Antenna (IFA) are considered for placement on the chest. The path gain is found by HFSS simulations as well as...

  19. The comparison of three high-frequency chest compression devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong W; Lee, Jongwon; Warwick, Warren J

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency chest compression (HFCC) is shown to enhance clearance of pulmonary airway secretions. Several HFCC devices have been designed to provide this therapy. Standard equipment consists of an air pulse generator attached by lengths of tubing to an adjustable, inflatable vest/jacket (V/J) garment. In this study, the V/Js were fitted over a mannequin. The three device air pulse generators produced characteristic waveform patterns. The variations in the frequency and pressure setting of devices were consistent with specific device design features. These studies suggest that a better understanding of the effects of different waveform, frequency, and pressure combinations may improve HFCC therapeutic efficacy of three different HFCC machines. The V/J component of HFCC devices delivers the compressive pulses to the chest wall to produce both airflow through and oscillatory effects in the airways. The V/J pressures of three HFCC machines were measured and analyzed to characterize the frequency, pressure, and waveform patterns generated by each of three device models. The dimensions of all V/Js were adjusted to a circumference of approximately 110% of the chest circumference. The V/J pressures were measured, and maximum, minimum, and mean pressure, pulse pressure, and root mean square of three pulse generators were calculated. Jacket pressures ranged between 2 and 34 mmHg. The 103 and 104 models' pulse pressures increased with the increase in HFCC frequency at constant dial pressure. With the ICS the pulse pressure decreased when the frequency increased. The waveforms of models 103 and 104 were symmetric sine wave and asymmetric sine wave patterns, respectively. The ICS had a triangular waveform. At 20 Hz, both the 103 and 104 were symmetric sine waveform but the ICS remained triangular. Maximum crest factors emerged in low-frequency and high-pressure settings for the ICS and in the high-frequency and low-pressure settings for models 103 and 104. Recognizing the

  20. Chest Traumas due to Bicycle accident in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Cobanoglu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim:Childhood injuries are the leading cause of death in children and result in significant healthcare utilization. Trauma is the second most common cause of mortality in children aged 1-4 years and leading cause of death in children older than 4 years. Thoracic injury is the second most leading cause of death in traumatized children. Multisystemic injury is found in more than 50% of children with thoracic injuries most of which are secondary to blunt traumas. We planned this study to evaluate thorax trauma cases secondary to bicycle driving in childhood and to draw attention to the importance of the regulation of traffic rules, the education of bicycle drivers.Material and Methods:  A retrospective evaluation was performed in 17 pediatric patients admitted to the Department of Thoracic Surgery during 2006-2010 with a diagnosis of chest trauma due to bicycle driving. For every patient, a pediatric trauma score (PTS was calculated. Descriptive statistics were performed for PTS. Results; Eleven (64.70% cases were injured due to the tricycle accidents and six cases 6 (35.29% were injured due to the two-wheeled bicycle accidents. The most frequent thoracic pathologies included pulmonary contusion (41.2% and chest wall contusion (29.41%. Extrathoracic injuries were seen in 35.29%, the extremities (17.64% and abdomino pelvic (11.76% being the most commonly involved. Treatment consisted of symptomatic treatment in 12 patients (70.58%, tube thoracostomy in 2 patients (11.76%, and thoracotomy in 1 patient (5.9%. The morbidity was seen in 3 patients (17.64%. The mortality rate was 5.9% (n:1. The mean PTS of the cases who had additional system injuries were significantly worse than the cases who had isolated chest traumas Conclusions: The pediatric thorax has a greater cartilage content and incomplete ossification of the ribs. Due to the pliability of the pediatric rib cage and mediastinal mobility, significant intrathoracic injury may exist in the

  1. The utility of high-frequency chest wall oscillation therapy in the post-operative management of elderly surgical patients%高频胸壁振荡治疗在老年患者全麻术后管理中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓昭阳; 顾峥峥; 杨靖; 谢晓华

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the utility of HFCWO in the post-operative management of elderly surgical patients. Methods Twenty-five consecutive elderly patients who underwent operations received HFCWC treatment, along with routine postoperative care. HFCW0 was apphed at 12 Hz, for 10 min. Routine hemodynamic and pulse oximetry data were collected before, during, and after HFCWO. We also collected qualitative data on patient tolerance and preference for HFCW0 versus percussive chest physiotherapy. Results No major adverse events were encountered. Hemodynamic and pulse oximetry values remained stable before,during, and after HFCWC. Eighty-eight percent of the subjects reported little or no discomfort during therapy, and the subjects who expressed a preference preferred HFCW0 to conventional chest physiotherapy by more than two to one. Conclusion HFCWO is a safe, well-tolerated adjunct to the routine post-operative treatment of elderly surgical patients.%目的 评估高频胸壁振荡(HFCWO)在老年患者全麻术后管理中的应用意义.方法 25名老年外科术后患者接受HFCWO治疗以及术后护理常规.HFCWO设定为12Hz,10 min.记录HFCWO治疗前、中、后的常规血流动力学和脉搏血氧数据.收集并对比HFCWO与人工叩击物理治疗的耐受性和偏好选择的数据.结果 治疗中无重大不良事件发生,血流动力学及脉搏血氧在治疗前、中、后保持稳定.88%的患者未诉不适或有轻微不适,多数患者更愿意选择HFCWO治疗.结论 HFCWO是一种安全,耐受性良好的老年患者外科全麻术后常规辅助治疗.

  2. Hepatic metastasis from adrenocortical carcinoma fifteen years after primary resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mawardi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 73-year-old man who presented with an asymptomatic hepatic mass during investigation of mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by a plain chest radiograph, followed by ultrasonography, which revealed a solitary hepatic lesion measuring 7.1 cm × 6.5 cm × 5.8 cm in dimension. Fine- needle aspiration of the mass revealed malignant cells compatible with hepatocellular carcinoma. Interestingly, the patient had a left adrenalectomy and complete left nephrectomy in 1987, for a non-functioning left adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC. The ACC was diagnosed as stage two, with no evidence of local invasion or distant metastases. No adjuvant therapy was recommended postoperatively. After a five-year follow-up, there was no evidence of ACC recurrence and the patient was declared cured from his ACC. The patient underwent a complete segmental resection of the right lobe of the liver successfully. The final diagnosis of the mass was a well-differentiated metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma.

  3. Digital chest radiography: collimation and dose reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian;

    Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials:A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from...... one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years of age are included in the study. The clinical research is performed between September and November 2014 where 3rd year Radiography students collect data on four Danish x-ray departments using identical procedures under guidance...... of clinical supervisors. Optimal collimation is determined by European and Regional Danish guidelines. The areal between current and optimal collimation is calculated. The experimental research is performed in September - October 2014 Siemens Axiom Aristos digital radiography system DR using 150 kV, 1,25 -3...

  4. Optimizing Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this clinical trial, patients with resected pancreatic head cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either gemcitabine with or without erlotinib for 5 treatment cycles. Patients who do not experience disease progression or recurrence will then be r

  5. Localized gastric amyloidosis differentiated histologically from scirrhous gastric cancer using endoscopic mucosal resection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamata Tsugumasa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Amyloidosis most often manifests as a systemic involvement of multiple tissues and organs, and an amyloidal deposit confined to the stomach is extremely rare. It is sometimes difficult to provide a definitive diagnosis of localized gastric amyloidosis by biopsy specimen and diagnosis of amyloidosis in some cases has been finalized only after surgical resection of the stomach. Case presentation A 76-year-old Japanese woman with epigastric discomfort underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopy procedure. The esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed gastric wall thickening, suggesting scirrhous gastric carcinoma, at the greater curvature from the upper to the lower part of the gastric corpus. A biopsy specimen revealed amyloid deposits in the submucosal layer with no malignant findings. We resected a representative portion of the lesion by endoscopic mucosal resection using the strip biopsy method to obtain sufficient tissue specimens, and then conducted a detailed histological evaluation of the samples. The resected specimens revealed deposition of amyloidal materials in the gastric mucosa and submucosa without any malignant findings. Congo red staining results were positive for amyloidal protein and exhibited green birefringence under polarized light. Congo red staining with prior potassium permanganate incubation confirmed the light chain (AL amyloid protein type. Based on these results, gastric malignancy, systemic amyloidosis and amyloid deposits induced by inflammatory disease were excluded and this lesion was consequently diagnosed as localized gastric amyloidosis. Our patient was an older woman and there were no findings relative to an increase in gastrointestinal symptoms or anemia, so no further treatment was performed. She continued to be in good condition without any finding of disease progression six years after verification of our diagnosis. Conclusions We report an unusual case of primary amyloidosis of the stomach

  6. Effective dose from chest tomosynthesis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomosynthesis (digital tomography) is a recently introduced low-dose alternative to CT in the evaluation of the lungs in patients with cystic fibrosis and pulmonary nodules. Previous studies have reported an adult effective dose of 0.12-0.13 mSv for chest tomosynthesis. The aim of this study was to determine the paediatric effective dose from the dose-area-product. During a 3-y period, 38 children with cystic fibrosis and 36 paediatric oncology patients were examined with chest tomosynthesis, totally 169 posteroanterior and 17 anteroposterior examinations (40 boys and 34 girls, mean age 13.7 y, range 7-20 y). Using recently reported paediatric chest tomosynthesis conversion factors (0.23-1.09 mSv Gy cm-2) corrected for sex, age and energy, the mean posteroanterior effective dose calculated was 0.17 mSv; using the proposed simplified conversion factors of 0.6 (8-10 y), 0.4 (11-14 y) and 0.3 mSv Gy cm-2 (15-19 y), the mean posteroanterior effective dose calculated was 0.15 mSv. As the difference in the calculated effective dose was minor, it is recommendable to use the simplified conversion factors. Using the conversion factor for adult chest tomosynthesis (0.26 mSv Gy cm-2), the mean effective dose was 0.11 mSv. Anteroposterior exposures had considerably higher effective dose. By using conversion factors adapted for children, the calculated risks from radiologic procedures will be more accurate. (authors)

  7. Injuries of the chestFNx01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deodhar S

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty cases of chest injuries were admitted in the Department of Surgery, K.E.M. Hospital, Bombay. These injuries seem to be fairly common. Detailed examination at the time of admission is necessary to assess the clinical presentation and the presence of major complications. Institution of intra-peritoneal drainage, restoration of negative intra-pleural pressure and active respiratory physiotherapy constitute an important part of the treatment. The literature on this subject is briefly reviewed

  8. Role of quantitative CT in predicting postoperative FEV1 and chronic dyspnea in patients undergoing lung resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papageorgiou Chrysovalantis V

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lung resection is the mainstay of treatment in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer. However, lung cancer patients often suffer from comorbidities and the respiratory reserve should be carefully evaluated preoperatively in order to avoid postoperative complications. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 is considered to be an index that depicts the patient's respiratory efficacy and its prediction has a key role in the preoperative evaluation of lung cancer patients with impaired lung function. Prediction of postoperative FEV1 is currently possible with the use of perfusion radionuclide lung scanning. Quantitative CT is the analysis of data acquired during normal chest CT scan using the system's software. By applying a dual threshold of -500 to -910 Hounsfield Units, functional lung volumes are estimated and postoperative FEV1 can be predicted by reducing the preoperative measurement by the fraction of the part to be resected. Studies have shown that preoperative predictions correlate well with the actual postoperative measurements. Additionally, quantitative CT results are in good agreement with perfusion scintigraphy predictions. Newer radiological techniques such as perfusion MRI and co-registered SPECT/CT have also been used in the preoperative evaluation with similar results. In conclusion, chest CT which is obligatory for staging, can be used for quantitative analysis of the already available data. It is technically simple, providing an accurate prediction of postoperative FEV1. Thus, quantitative CT appears to be a useful tool in the preoperative evaluation of lung cancer patients undergoing lung resection.

  9. Normal Echosemiotics of Resected Parenchymatous Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rykhtik P.I.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to develop ultrasonic techniques of the resected liver, pancreas, and kidney, and study their normal echosemiotics after different types of resection. Materials and Methods. We examined 404 patients after various hepatectomies, 145 — after extended pancreaticoduodenal resections, and 123 — after different types of nephrectomy. Ultrasound was performed on scanners Voluson 730 PRO (GE, USA and Technos (Esaote, Italy in early postoperative period — on day 2–3 and on day 7–10, and in follow-up care — 3, 6 and 12 months after the operation. Results. We developed an ultrasound technique and established sonographic criteria to assess resected parenchymatous organs, represented normal ultrasound semiotics of the liver, pancreas and kidney after different types of resection. The number and location of hepatic veins in hepatic stump was found to be of primary importance in determining the hepatectomy type; and it was called the hepatic vein rule. An additional criterion was the portal vein branching character. The assessment criteria of pancreatic stump were its size in the body of pancreas and diameter of the major pancreatic duct, as well as spatial location of anastomosed loop of jejunum and gastric remnant. During the first postoperative month slight dilatation of Wirsung duct up to 3–4 mm with its following recovery is permissible. In late postoperative period, the duct dilatation over 3 mm is considered pathological. To determine the nephrectomy type it is necessary to assess the form of the organ and the resection area. Normal echogram can be misinterpreted after frontal nephrectomy due to different parenchymal thickness in its resected and remaining parts. Conclusion. The developed echosemiotics of resected parenchymatous organ in the majority of cases enables to take a correct view of the volume and character of the surgery, and determine postoperative state of the stump.

  10. Lung involvement quantification in chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is an infectious disease which remains a global health problem. The chest radiography is the commonly method employed to assess the TB's evolution. The methods for quantification of abnormalities of chest are usually performed on CT scans (CT). This quantification is important to assess the TB evolution and treatment and comparing different treatments. However, precise quantification is not feasible for the amount of CT scans required. The purpose of this work is to develop a methodology for quantification of lung damage caused by TB through chest radiographs. It was developed an algorithm for computational processing of exams in Matlab, which creates a lungs' 3D representation, with compromised dilated regions inside. The quantification of lung lesions was also made for the same patients through CT scans. The measurements from the two methods were compared and resulting in strong correlation. Applying statistical Bland and Altman, all samples were within the limits of agreement, with a confidence interval of 95%. The results showed an average variation of around 13% between the two quantification methods. The results suggest the effectiveness and applicability of the method developed, providing better risk-benefit to the patient and cost-benefit ratio for the institution. (author)

  11. Chest pain associated with moderator band pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goli, Anil K; Kaszala, Karoly; Osman, Mohammed N; Lucke, John; Carrillo, Roger

    2014-10-01

    A 65-year-old man was evaluated for chronic chest pain that had been present for 8 years after placement of a dual-chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillator to treat inducible ventricular tachycardia. Previous coronary angiography had revealed nonobstructive coronary artery disease and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.45 to 0.50, consistent with mild idiopathic nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Evaluation with chest radiography and transthoracic echocardiography showed the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead to be embedded within the right ventricle at the moderator band, which had mild calcification. Treatment included extraction of the dual-coil lead and placement of a new single-coil right ventricular lead at the mid septum. The patient had complete relief of symptoms after the procedure. This case shows that chest pain can be associated with the placement of a right ventricular implantable cardioverter-defibrillator lead in the moderator band and that symptomatic relief can occur after percutaneous lead extraction and the implantation of a new right ventricular lead to the mid septal region.

  12. Surface Chest Motion Decomposition for Cardiovascular Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Ghufran; Veluvolu, Kalyana C.

    2014-05-01

    Surface chest motion can be easily monitored with a wide variety of sensors such as pressure belts, fiber Bragg gratings and inertial sensors, etc. The current applications of these sensors are mainly restricted to respiratory motion monitoring/analysis due to the technical challenges involved in separation of the cardiac motion from the dominant respiratory motion. The contribution of heart to the surface chest motion is relatively very small as compared to the respiratory motion. Further, the heart motion spectrally overlaps with the respiratory harmonics and their separation becomes even more challenging. In this paper, we approach this source separation problem with independent component analysis (ICA) framework. ICA with reference (ICA-R) yields only desired component with improved separation, but the method is highly sensitive to the reference generation. Several reference generation approaches are developed to solve the problem. Experimental validation of these proposed approaches is performed with chest displacement data and ECG obtained from healthy subjects under normal breathing and post-exercise conditions. The extracted component morphologically matches well with the collected ECG. Results show that the proposed methods perform better than conventional band pass filtering.

  13. Adult case of an omphalomesenteric cyst resected by laparoscopic-assisted surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fumi Sawada; Masazumi Tsuneyoshi; Atushi Kondo; Naohiko Harada; Rie Yoshimura; Kenichi Ito; Kazuhiko Nakamura; Hajime Nawata; Kazuhiro Mizumoto; Shuji Shimizu; Takahiro Inoue; Takashi Yao

    2006-01-01

    This report describes an extremely rare adult case of an omphalomesenteric cyst resected by laparoscopicassisted surgery. A 29-years-old Japanese man was referred and admitted to Kyushu University Hospital because of an abdominal mass and an elevated serum CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) level (21.3 ng/mL) in August 2001. Abdominal CT and US demonstrated a cystic mass with septum and calcification. Laparoscopy showed a large mass to be attached to his abdominal wall, measuring 110 mm x 70 mm x 50 mm and filled with mucus. The mass was resected by laparoscopicassisted surgery. The histological findings of its wall showed fibromuscular tissue, adipose tissue, calcification,and an intestinal structure. It was finally diagnosed to be an omphalomesenteric cyst.

  14. Management of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amit; Mahipal; Jessica; Frakes; Sarah; Hoffe; Richard; Kim

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the United States. Surgery remains the only curative option; however only 20% of the patients have resectable disease at the time of initialpresentation. The definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is not uniform but generally denotes to regional vessel involvement that makes it unlikely to have negative surgical margins. The accurate staging of pancreatic cancer requires triple phase computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging of the pancreas. Management of patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer remains unclear. The data for treatment of these patients is primarily derived from retrospective single institution experience. The prospective trials have been plagued by small numbers and poor accrual. Neoadjuvant therapy is recommended and typically consists of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The chemotherapeutic regimens continue to evolve along with type and dose of radiation therapy. Gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil based chemotherapeutic combinations are administered. The type and dose of radiation vary among different institutions. With neoadjuvant treatment, approximately 50% of the patients are able to undergo surgical resections with negative margins obtained in greater than 80% of the patients. Newer trials are attempting to standardize the definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer and treatment regimens. In this review, we outline the definition, imaging requirements and management of patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

  15. Extrapleural Inner Thoracic Wall Lesions: Multidetector CT Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shik [Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The extrapleural space is external to the parietal pleura in the thorax. The structures within and adjacent to this region include the fat pad, endothoracic fascia, intercostal muscles, connective tissue, nerves, vessels, and ribs. Further, the space is divided into the inner and outer thoracic wall by the innermost intercostal muscle. Extrapleural lesions in the inner thoracic wall are classified as air-containing lesions, fat-containing lesions, and soft tissue-containing lesions according on their main component. Air-containing lesions include extrapleural air from direct chest trauma and extrapleural extension from pneumomediastinum. Prominent extrapleural fat is seen in decreased lung volume conditions, and can also be seen in normal individuals. Soft tissue-containing lesions include extrapleural extensions from a pleural or chest wall infection as well as tumors and extrapleural hematoma. We classify extrapleural lesions in the inner thoracic wall and illustrate their imaging findings

  16. Development of an irradiation method of intraoperative radiation therapy for curatively resected rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) has been performed to prevent local recurrence of rectal cancer only when positive margins are suspected. To further reduce local recurrence, we attempted to develop a new IORT irradiation method in which electron beam irradiation is administered as uniformly as possible to the intrapelvic dissection surfaces. Low anterior resection and abdominoperineal resection were performed in one male and one female cadaver. Electron beam irradiation was administered by four different methods, and absorbed doses were measured at 15 sites within the pelvis. We also attempted to measure absorbed doses at nine sites within the pelvis in 14 patients treated with IORT. The cadaver study revealed low absorbed doses in the lateral walls of the pelvis when a single irradiation was delivered from the anterior. When the lateral walls of the pelvis were irradiated twice, once each time on the right and left, the absorbed doses were low in the central pelvis and presacrum. Relatively high absorbed doses were achieved in all of these areas by a technique that combined these two methods. Adequate absorbed doses were not achieved by a single irradiation administered from the perineum. This study suggests that electron beam irradiation administered three times to the dissected surfaces in the pelvis after resection of rectal cancer (i.e., to the central pelvis and presacrum from the anterior, and to the left and right lateral walls of the pelvis) is the most suitable method for achieving adequate absorbed doses. (author)

  17. Development of an irradiation method of intraoperative radiation therapy for curatively resected rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadahiro, Sataro; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Ishikawa, Kenji [Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine] (and others)

    1999-08-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) has been performed to prevent local recurrence of rectal cancer only when positive margins are suspected. To further reduce local recurrence, we attempted to develop a new IORT irradiation method in which electron beam irradiation is administered as uniformly as possible to the intrapelvic dissection surfaces. Low anterior resection and abdominoperineal resection were performed in one male and one female cadaver. Electron beam irradiation was administered by four different methods, and absorbed doses were measured at 15 sites within the pelvis. We also attempted to measure absorbed doses at nine sites within the pelvis in 14 patients treated with IORT. The cadaver study revealed low absorbed doses in the lateral walls of the pelvis when a single irradiation was delivered from the anterior. When the lateral walls of the pelvis were irradiated twice, once each time on the right and left, the absorbed doses were low in the central pelvis and presacrum. Relatively high absorbed doses were achieved in all of these areas by a technique that combined these two methods. Adequate absorbed doses were not achieved by a single irradiation administered from the perineum. This study suggests that electron beam irradiation administered three times to the dissected surfaces in the pelvis after resection of rectal cancer (i.e., to the central pelvis and presacrum from the anterior, and to the left and right lateral walls of the pelvis) is the most suitable method for achieving adequate absorbed doses. (author)

  18. Stationary digital chest tomosynthesis for coronary artery calcium scoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gongting; Wang, Jiong; Potuzko, Marci; Harman, Allison; Pearce, Caleb; Shan, Jing; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    The coronary artery calcium score (CACS) measures the buildup of calcium on the coronary artery wall and has been shown to be an important predictor of the risk of coronary artery diseases (CAD). Currently CACS is measured using CT, though the relatively high cost and high radiation dose has limited its adoption as a routine screening procedure. Digital Chest Tomosynthesis (DCT), a low dose and low cost alternative to CT, and has been shown to achieve 90% of sensitivity of CT in lung disease screening. However commercial DCT requires long scanning time and cannot be adapted for high resolution gated cardiac imaging, necessary for CACS. The stationary DCT system (s- DCT), developed in our lab, has the potential to significantly shorten the scanning time and enables high resolution cardiac gated imaging. Here we report the preliminary results of using s-DCT to estimate the CACS. A phantom heart model was developed and scanned by the s-DCT system and a clinical CT in a phantom model with realistic coronary calcifications. The adapted fan-beam volume reconstruction (AFVR) method, developed specifically for stationary tomosynthesis systems, is used to obtain high resolution tomosynthesis images. A trained cardiologist segmented out the calcifications and the CACS was obtained. We observed a strong correlation between the tomosynthesis derived CACS and CT CACS (r2 = 0.88). Our results shows s-DCT imaging has the potential to estimate CACS, thus providing a possible low cost and low dose imaging protocol for screening and monitoring CAD.

  19. Segmentation of ribs in digital chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Lin; Guo, Wei; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Ribs and clavicles in posterior-anterior (PA) digital chest radiographs often overlap with lung abnormalities such as nodules, and cause missing of these abnormalities, it is therefore necessary to remove or reduce the ribs in chest radiographs. The purpose of this study was to develop a fully automated algorithm to segment ribs within lung area in digital radiography (DR) for removal of the ribs. The rib segmentation algorithm consists of three steps. Firstly, a radiograph was pre-processed for contrast adjustment and noise removal; second, generalized Hough transform was employed to localize the lower boundary of the ribs. In the third step, a novel bilateral dynamic programming algorithm was used to accurately segment the upper and lower boundaries of ribs simultaneously. The width of the ribs and the smoothness of the rib boundaries were incorporated in the cost function of the bilateral dynamic programming for obtaining consistent results for the upper and lower boundaries. Our database consisted of 93 DR images, including, respectively, 23 and 70 images acquired with a DR system from Shanghai United-Imaging Healthcare Co. and from GE Healthcare Co. The rib localization algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 98.2% with 0.1 false positives per image. The accuracy of the detected ribs was further evaluated subjectively in 3 levels: "1", good; "2", acceptable; "3", poor. The percentages of good, acceptable, and poor segmentation results were 91.1%, 7.2%, and 1.7%, respectively. Our algorithm can obtain good segmentation results for ribs in chest radiography and would be useful for rib reduction in our future study.

  20. Pitfalls and variants in pediatric chest imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Asensio, D; Fernández Martín, M

    2016-05-01

    Most pitfalls in the interpretation of pediatric chest imaging are closely related with the technique used and the characteristics of pediatric patients. To obtain a quality image that will enable the correct diagnosis, it is very important to use an appropriate technique. It is important to know how technical factors influence the image and to be aware of the possible artifacts that can result from poor patient cooperation. Moreover, radiologists need to be familiar with the normal anatomy in children, with the classic radiologic findings, and with the anatomic and developmental variants to avoid misinterpreting normal findings as pathological.

  1. Radiological diagnosis and therapy of chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The causes and localization of chest pain are numerous. They can derive from infections, traumas, or tumors. Possible sites of origin are: skeletal portions, vertebral column, ribs, and sternum, as well as mediastinum and pleura. In women, occurrence tends to be cyclic and affect the mamma region. Radiological diagnosis includes radiography, nuclear techniques as well as whole body computer-tomography. Radiation therapy is indicated in cases of mediastinal tumor formation. Radiation of painful osteolytic vertebral metastases and rib destructions proves to be an efficient palliative measure. (orig.)

  2. Combined Double Sleeve Lobectomy and Superior Vena Cava Resection for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daxing ZHU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old man with right central type of lung squamous carcinoma was admitted to our department. Bronchoscopy displayed complete obstruction of right upper lobe bronchus and infiltration of the bronchus intermedius with tumor. Chest contrast computed tomography revealed the tumor invaded right pulmonary artery, superior vena cava, and the persistant left superior vena cava flowed into the coronary sinus. The tumor was successfully removed by means of bronchial and pulmonary artery sleeve resection of the right upper and middle lobes combined with resection and reconstruction of superior vena cava (SVC utilizing ringed polytetrafluoroethylene graft. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first report of complete resection of locally advanced lung cancer involving superior vena cava, right pulmonary artery trunk and main bronchus with persistant left superior vena cava.

  3. Combined Double Sleeve Lobectomy and Superior Vena Cava Resection for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daxing ZHU; Xiaoming QIU; Qinghua ZHOU

    2015-01-01

    A 65-year-old man with right central type of lung squamous carcinoma was admitted to our department. Bronchoscopy displayed complete obstruction of right upper lobe bronchus and inifltration of the bronchus intermedius with tumor. Chest contrast computed tomography revealed the tumor invaded right pulmonary artery, superior vena cava, and the persistant letf superior vena cava lfowed into the coronary sinus. hTe tumor was successfully removed by means of bronchial and pulmonary artery sleeve resection of the right upper and middle lobes combined with resection and reconstruction of superior vena cava (SVC) utilizing ringed polytetralfuoroethylene gratf. To the best of our knowledge, this was the ifrst report of complete resection of locally advanced lung cancer involving superior vena cava, right pulmonary artery trunk and main bronchus with persistant letf superior vena cava.

  4. Bacteriological research for the contamination of equipment in chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Gu; Song, Woon Heung; Kweon, Dae Cheol [Shinhan University, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The purpose is to determine the degree of contamination of the equipment for infection control in chest radiography of the radiology department. We confirmed by chemical and bacterial identification of bacteria of the equipment and established a preventive maintenance plan. Chest X-ray radiography contact area on the instrument patients shoulder, hand, chin, chest lateral radiography patient contact areas with a 70% isopropyl alcohol cotton swab were compared to identify the bacteria before and after sterilization on the patient contact area in the chest radiography equipment of the department. The gram positive Staphylococcus was isolated from side shoots handle before disinfection in the chest radiography equipment. For the final identification of antibiotic tested that it was determined by performing the nobobiocin to the sensitive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Chest radiography equipment before disinfecting the handle side of Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria were detected using a disinfectant should be to prevent hospital infections.

  5. DNA End Resection:Facts and Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Liu; a Jun Huang; b

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which arise following exposure to a number of endogenous and exogenous agents, can be repaired by either the homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways in eukaryotic cells. A vital step in HR repair is DNA end resection, which generates a long 30 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) tail that can invade the homologous DNA strand. The generation of 30 ssDNA is not only essential for HR repair, but also promotes activation of the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR). Multiple fac-tors, including the MRN/X complex, C-terminal-binding protein interacting protein (CtIP)/Sae2, exonuclease 1 (EXO1), Bloom syndrome protein (BLM)/Sgs1, DNA2 nuclease/helicase, and several chromatin remodelers, cooperate to complete the process of end resection. Here we review the basic machinery involved in DNA end resection in eukaryotic cells.

  6. Evaluation of radiation doses delivered in different chest CT protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Gorycki, Tomasz; Lasek, Iwona; Kamiński, Kamil; Studniarek, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background There are differences in the reference diagnostic levels for the computed tomography (CT) of the chest as cited in different literature sources. The doses are expressed either in weighted CT dose index (CTDIVOL) used to express the dose per slice, dose-length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). The purpose of this study was to assess the radiation dose used in Low Dose Computer Tomography (LDCT) of the chest in comparison with routine chest CT examinations as well as to ...

  7. Chest Radiography Findings in Primary Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Milković, Đurđica; Richter, Darko; Zoričić-Letoja, Ivka; Raos, Miljenko; Koncul, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    Plain chest radiography plays a major role in the diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary tuberculosis in childhood. The aim of our study was to investigate the distribution of characteristic chest radiographic findings at diagnosis in children with pulmonary tuberculosis. The age of the patients and the type and localization of radiographic changes at admission were retrospectively analyzed. We reviewed chest radiographs in 204 children admitted from January 1, 1991 until June 30, 1994 for newl...

  8. Hepatic resection and regeneration. Past and present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatic surgery has been performed on condition that the liver regenerates after hepatic resection, and the development of liver anatomy due to Glisson, Rex, and Couinaud has thrown light on hepatic surgery Understanding of feeding and drainage vessels became feasible for systemic hepatic resection; however, it seems to have been the most important problem to control the bleeding during hepatic resection. New types of devices such as cavitron ultrasonic surgical aspirator (CUSA) and Microwave coagulation were exploited to control blood loss during hepatic surgery. Pringle maneuver for exclusion feeding vessels of the liver and the decrease of central venous pressure during anesthesia enabled further decrease of blood loss. Nowadays, 3D-CT imaging may depict feeding and drainage vessels in relation to liver mass, and surgeons can simulate hepatic surgery in virtual reality before surgery, allowing hepatectomy to be performed without blood transfusion. Thus, hepatic resection has been a safe procedure, but there's been a significant research on how much of the liver can be resected without hepatic failure. A prediction scoring system based on ICGR15, resection rates, and age is mostly reliable in some criteria. Even if hepatectomy is performed with a good prediction score, the massive bleeding and associated infection may induce postoperative hepatic failure, while the criteria of postoperative hepatic failure have not yet established. Hepatic failure is supposed to be induced by the apoptosis of mature hepatocytes and necrosis originated from microcirculation disturbance of the liver. Prostaglandin E1 for the improvement of microcirculation, steroid for the inhibition of cytokines inducing apoptosis, and blood purification to exclude cytokines have been tried separately or concomitantly. New therapeutic approaches, especially hepatic regeneration from the stem cell, are expected. (author)

  9. Effects of partial middle turbinectomy with varying resection volume and location on nasal functions and airflow characteristics by CFD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyun Bum; Jeon, Young Sun; Chung, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Sung Kyun

    2016-10-01

    The surgical term "turbinectomy" encompasses many variations in the location and extent of removal. As a systemic approach to consider the negative impact of middle turbinectomy(MT), such as the excessive removal of turbinate, airflows inside a pre-surgery model and a series of virtual surgery models were numerically analyzed and compared. These models simulate three variations of partial MT(three bilateral and three unilateral) with varying resection volume and location. Each middle turbinectomy results in alterations of flow and thermal parameters, such as nasal resistance (NR), velocity, temperature, wall shear stress(WSS) and wall heat transfer(WHT). WSS distributions were also considered in connection with mucosal secretion. The tendency of changes in nasal functions and airflow characteristics was identified with respect to resection volume and location. A counter-rotating vortical structure was seen in the region of widened middle airway for the case of total resection of middle turbinate. Maximum velocity and WSS near sphenopalatine ganglion, which was a possible explanation for headache after total resection of middle turbinate, was increased. Changes in NR and WHT for bi-lateral resection cases were greater than those for unilateral resection cases. While the physiological changes in four partial MT models were insignificant, changes in near total resection model was prominent. Although our surgical simulation was done for a single case, we postulate that the removal of the anterior inferior part of middle turbinate while preserving posterior margin will not alter airflow characteristics extensively. These findings will help designing surgical plans for partial MT. PMID:27598464

  10. Optical compensation device for chest film radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Robert G.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.; DeForest, Sherman E.; Schmidt, Gregory W.; Hier, Richard G.

    1990-07-01

    Although chest radiography is the most commonly performed radiographic examination and one of the most valuable and cost-effective studies in medicine it suffers from relatively high error rates in both missing pathology and false positive interpretations. Detectability of lung nodules and other structures in underpenetrated regions of the chest film can be improved by both exposure and optical compensation but current compensation systems require major capital cost or a significant change in normal clinical practice. A new optical compensation system called the " Intelligent X-Ray Illuminator" (IXI) automatically and virtually instantaneously generates a patient-specific optical unsharp mask that is projected directly on a radiograph. When a radiograph is placed on the IXI which looks much like a conventional viewbox it acquires a low-resolution electronic image of this film from which the film transmission is derived. The transmission information is inverted and blurred in an image processor to form an unsharp mask which is fed into a spatial light modulator (SLM) placed between a light source and the radiograph. The SLM tailors the viewbox luminance by decreasing illumination to underexposed (i. e. transmissive) areas of the radiograph presenting the observer with an optically unsharp-masked image. The IXI uses the original radiograph and will allow it to be viewed on demand with conventional (uniform illumination. Potentially the IXI could introduce the known beneficial aspects of optical unsharp masking into radiology at low capital

  11. Chest Traumas due to Fall in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Cobanoglu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Falls are the most common reason for childhood traumas. The aim of this study is to investigate the causes, types, monthly frequencies and results f injuries due to fall of children in our region and to recommend somep recautions for preventing these injuries. Material and Methods: A retrospective evaluation was performed in 47 pediatric patients admitted to the Department of Thoracic Surgery during 2006-2009 with a diagnosis of chest trauma due to fall. For every patient, a pediatric trauma score (PTS was calculated. Descriptive statistics were performed for PTS and the duration of hospital stay. Results: The mean PTS of the cases who had additional system injuries were significantly worse than the cases who had isolated chest traumas. Similarly, the length of hospital stay was also much longer in the cases with associated system injuries.Conclusions: Injuries occur mostly in summer season. It may be due to the fact that the children do not go to the school and usually spend their times outside in this period. The children and their parents should be educated about the prevention of these accidents. Additionally, the accident and injury rates may also be reduced by constructing safer games and sports grounds with robust infrastructure.

  12. Cross-chest liposuction in gynaecomastia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Murali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gynaecomastia is usually treated with liposuction or liposuction with excision of the glandular tissue. The type of surgery chosen depends on the grade of the condition. Objective: Because gynaecomastia is treated primarily as a cosmetic procedure, we aimed at reducing the invasiveness of the surgery. Materials and Methods: The technique complies with all recommended protocols for different grades of gynaecomastia. It uses liposuction, gland excision, or both, leaving only minimal post-operative scars. The use of cross-chest liposuction through incisions on the edge of the areola helps to get rid of all the fat under the areola without an additional scar as in the conventional method. Results: This is a short series of 20 patients, all with bilateral gynaecomastia (i.e., 40 breasts, belonging to Simon′s Stage 1 and 2, studied over a period of 2 years. The average period of follow-up was 15 months. Post-operative complications were reported in only two cases, with none showing long-term complications or issues specifically due to the procedure. Conclusions : Cross-chest liposuction for gynaecomastia is a simple yet effective surgical tool in bilateral gynaecomastia treatment to decrease the post-operative scars. The use of techniques like incision line drain placement and post-drain removal suturing of wounds aid in decreasing the scar.

  13. Acute chest pain emergencies - spouses' prehospital experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund, Kerstin; Quell, Robin; Sørlie, Venke

    2008-10-01

    The call to the Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre is often a person's first contact with the health-care system in cases of acute illness or injury and acute chest pain is a common reason for calling. The aim was to illuminate how spouses to persons with acute chest pain experienced the alarm situation, the emergency call and the prehospital emergency care. Interviews were conducted with nineteen spouses. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used for the analyses. The themes responsibility and uneasiness emerged as well as an overall theme of aloneness. Being a spouse to a person in need of acute medical and nursing assistance was interpreted as "Being responsible and trying to preserve life" and "Being able to manage the uneasiness and having trust in an uncertain situation." When their partners' life was at risk the spouses were in an escalating spiral of worry, uncertainty, stress, fear of loss, feeling of loneliness and desperation. They had to manage emotional distress and felt compelled to act to preserve life, a challenging situation. PMID:18929341

  14. A Phase 1/2 and Biomarker Study of Preoperative Short Course Chemoradiation With Proton Beam Therapy and Capecitabine Followed By Early Surgery for Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ryan, David P.; Borger, Darrell R.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Deshpande, Vikram; Shinagare, Shweta [Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wo, Jennifer Y.; Boucher, Yves [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wadlow, Raymond C.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Allen, Jill N.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Zhu, Andrew X. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ferrone, Cristina R. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mamon, Harvey J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith; Winrich, Barbara; Grillo, Tarin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety, efficacy and biomarkers of short-course proton beam radiation and capecitabine, followed by pancreaticoduodenectomy in a phase 1/2 study in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with radiographically resectable, biopsy-proven PDAC were treated with neoadjuvant short-course (2-week) proton-based radiation with capecitabine, followed by surgery and adjuvant gemcitabine. The primary objective was to demonstrate a rate of toxicity grade ≥3 of <20%. Exploratory biomarker studies were performed using surgical specimen tissues and peripheral blood. Results: The phase 2 dose was established at 5 daily doses of 5 GyE. Fifty patients were enrolled, of whom 35 patients were treated in the phase 2 portion. There were no grade 4 or 5 toxicities, and only 2 of 35 patients (4.1%) experienced a grade 3 toxicity event (chest wall pain grade 1, colitis grade 1). Of 48 patients eligible for analysis, 37 underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Thirty of 37 (81%) had positive nodes. Locoregional failure occurred in 6 of 37 resected patients (16.2%), and distant recurrence occurred in 35 of 48 patients (72.9%). With median follow-up of 38 months, the median progression-free survival for the entire group was 10 months, and overall survival was 17 months. Biomarker studies showed significant associations between worse survival outcomes and the KRAS point mutation change from glycine to aspartic acid at position 12, stromal CXCR7 expression, and circulating biomarkers CEA, CA19-9, and HGF (all, P<.05). Conclusions: This study met the primary endpoint by showing a rate of 4.1% grade 3 toxicity for neoadjuvant short-course proton-based chemoradiation. Treatment was associated with favorable local control. In exploratory analyses, KRAS{sup G12D} status and high CXCR7 expression and circulating CEA, CA19-9, and HGF levels were associated with poor survival.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis: a rare cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chest pain is a common presenting symptom with a broad differential. Life-threatening cardiac and pulmonary etiologies of chest pain should be evaluated first. However, it is critical to perform a thorough assessment for other sources of chest pain in order to limit morbidity and mortality from less common causes. We present a rare case of a previously healthy 45 year old man who presented with focal, substernal, reproducible chest pain and Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia who was later found to have primary Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis.

  16. Chest trauma in children: current imaging guidelines and techniques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    Given the heterogeneous nature of pediatric chest trauma, the optimal imaging approach is tailored to the specific patient. Chest radiography remains the most important imaging modality for initial triage. The decision to perform a chest computed tomography scan should be based on the nature of the trauma, the child\\'s clinical condition, and the initial radiographic findings, taking the age-related pretest probabilities of serious injury into account. The principles of as low as reasonably achievable and Image Gently should be followed. The epidemiology and pathophysiology, imaging techniques, characteristic findings, and evidence-based algorithms for pediatric chest trauma are discussed.

  17. Survival benefit in patients after palliative resection vs non-resection colon cancer surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Beham; M Rentsch; K Püllmann; L Mantouvalou; H Spatz; HJ Schlitt; A Obed

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate survival in patients undergoing palliative resection versus non-resection surgery for primary colorectal cancer in a retrospective analysis.METHODS: Demographics, TNM status, operating details and survival were reviewed for 67 patients undergoing surgery for incurable colorectal cancer. Palliative resection of the primary tumor was performed in 46 cases in contrast to 21 patients with non-resection of the primary tumor and bypass surgery. Risk factors for postoperative mortality and poor survival were analyzed with univariate and multivariate analyses.RESULTS: The two groups were comparable in terms of age, gender, preoperative presence of ileus and tumor stage. Multivariate analysis showed that median survival was significantly higher in patients with palliative resection surgery (544 vs 233 d). Differentiation of the tumor and tumor size were additional independent factors that were associated with a significantly poorer survival rate.CONCLUSION: Palliative resection surgery for primary colorectal cancer is associated with a higher median survival rate. Also, the presence of liver metastasis and tumor size are associated with poor survival. Therefore,resection of the primary tumor should be considered in patients with non-curable colon cancer.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest: current and new applications, with an emphasis on pulmonology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Mauad, Fernando Marum, E-mail: marcelk46@yahoo.com.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC/FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Secao de Radiologia

    2011-03-15

    The objective of the present review study was to present the principal applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest, including the description of new techniques. Over the past decade, this method has evolved considerably because of the development of new equipment, including the simultaneous interconnection of phased-array multiple radiofrequency receiver coils and remote control of the table movement, in addition to faster techniques of image acquisition, such as parallel imaging and partial Fourier acquisitions, as well as the introduction of new contrast agents. All of these advances have allowed MRI to gain ground in the study of various pathologies of the chest, including lung diseases. Currently, MRI is considered the modality of choice for the evaluation of lesions in the mediastinum and in the chest wall, as well as of superior sulcus tumors. However, it can also facilitate the diagnosis of lung, pleural, and cardiac diseases, as well as of those related to the pulmonary vasculature. Pulmonary MRI angiography can be used in order to evaluate various pulmonary vascular diseases, and it has played an ever greater role in the study of thromboembolism. Because cardiac MRI allows morphological and functional assessment in the same test, it has also become part of the clinical routine in the evaluation of various cardiac diseases. Finally, the role of MRI has been extended to the identification and characterization of pulmonary nodules, the evaluation of airway diseases, and the characterization of pleural effusion. (author)

  19. Inflation and deflation pressure-volume loops in anesthetized pinnipeds confirms compliant chest and lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eFahlman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We examined structural properties of the marine mammal respiratory system, and tested Scholander’s hypothesis that the chest is highly compliant by measuring the mechanical properties of the respiratory system in five species of pinniped under anesthesia (Pacific harbor seal, Phoca vitulina; northern elephant seal, Mirounga angustirostris; northern fur seal Callorhinus ursinus; California sea lion, Zalophus californianus; and Steller sea lion, Eumetopias jubatus. We found that the chest wall compliance (CCW of all five species was greater than lung compliance (airways and alveoli, CL as predicted by Scholander, which suggests that the chest provides little protection against alveolar collapse or lung squeeze. We also found that specific respiratory compliance was significantly greater in wild animals than in animals raised under human care. While differences in ages between the two groups may affect this incidental finding, it is also possible that lung conditioning in free-living animals may increase pulmonary compliance and reduce the risk of lung squeeze during diving. Overall, our data indicate that compliance of excised pinniped lungs provide a good estimate of total respiratory compliance.

  20. Inflation and deflation pressure-volume loops in anesthetized pinnipeds confirms compliant chest and lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlman, Andreas; Loring, Stephen H; Johnson, Shawn P; Haulena, Martin; Trites, Andrew W; Fravel, Vanessa A; Van Bonn, William G

    2014-01-01

    We examined structural properties of the marine mammal respiratory system, and tested Scholander's hypothesis that the chest is highly compliant by measuring the mechanical properties of the respiratory system in five species of pinniped under anesthesia (Pacific harbor seal, Phoca vitulina; northern elephant seal, Mirounga angustirostris; northern fur seal Callorhinus ursinus; California sea lion, Zalophus californianus; and Steller sea lion, Eumetopias jubatus). We found that the chest wall compliance (CCW) of all five species was greater than lung compliance (airways and alveoli, CL) as predicted by Scholander, which suggests that the chest provides little protection against alveolar collapse or lung squeeze. We also found that specific respiratory compliance was significantly greater in wild animals than in animals raised in an aquatic facility. While differences in ages between the two groups may affect this incidental finding, it is also possible that lung conditioning in free-living animals may increase pulmonary compliance and reduce the risk of lung squeeze during diving. Overall, our data indicate that compliance of excised pinniped lungs provide a good estimate of total respiratory compliance. PMID:25426080

  1. Use of a sealant to prevent prolonged air leaks after lung resection: a prospective randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lequaglie Cosimo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary air leaks are common complications of lung resection and result in prolonged hospital stays and increased costs. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether, compared with standard care, the use of a synthetic polyethylene glycol matrix (CoSeal® could reduce air leaks detected by means of a digital chest drain system (DigiVent™, in patients undergoing lung resection (sutures and/or staples alone. Methods Patients who intraoperatively showed moderate or severe air leaks (evaluated by water submersion tests were intraoperatively randomized to receive just sutures/staples (control group or sutures/staples plus CoSeal® (sealant group. Differences among the groups in terms of air leaks, prolonged air leaks, time to chest tube removal, length of hospital stay and related costs were assessed. Results In total, 216 lung resection patients completed the study. Nineteen patients (18.1% in the control group and 12 (10.8% patients in the sealant group experienced postoperative air leaks, while a prolonged air leak was recorded in 11.4% (n = 12 of patients in the control group and 2.7% (n = 3 of patients in the sealant group. The difference in the incidence of air leaks and prolonged air leaks between the two groups was statistically significant (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0013. The mean length of hospital stay was significantly shorter in the sealant group (4 days than the control group (8 days (p = 0.0001. We also observed lower costs in the sealant group than the control group. Conclusion The use of CoSeal® may decrease the occurrence and severity of postoperative air leaks after lung resection and is associated with shorter hospital stay. Trial registration Not registered. The trial was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the IRCCS-CROB Basilicata Regional Cancer Institute, Rionero in Vulture, Italy.

  2. Comparison of chest compression quality between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method during CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Sub

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to grasp difference in quality of chest compression accuracy between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method. Participants were progressed 64 people except 6 absentees among 70 people who agreed to participation with completing the CPR curriculum. In the classification of group in participants, the modified chest compression method was called as smartphone group (33 people). The standardized chest compression method was called as traditional group (31 people). The common equipments in both groups were used Manikin for practice and Manikin for evaluation. In the meantime, the smartphone group for application was utilized Android and iOS Operating System (OS) of 2 smartphone products (G, i). The measurement period was conducted from September 25th to 26th, 2012. Data analysis was used SPSS WIN 12.0 program. As a result of research, the proper compression depth (mm) was shown the proper compression depth (p< 0.01) in traditional group (53.77 mm) compared to smartphone group (48.35 mm). Even the proper chest compression (%) was formed suitably (p< 0.05) in traditional group (73.96%) more than smartphone group (60.51%). As for the awareness of chest compression accuracy, the traditional group (3.83 points) had the higher awareness of chest compression accuracy (p< 0.001) than the smartphone group (2.32 points). In the questionnaire that was additionally carried out 1 question only in smartphone group, the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone had the high negative reason in rescuer for occurrence of hand back pain (48.5%) and unstable posture (21.2%). PMID:24704648

  3. Vascularised fibula osteocutaneous flap for cervical spinal and posterior pharyngeal wall reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thankappan Krishnakumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of vascularised fibula osteocutaneous flap used for composite cervical spinal and posterior pharyngeal wall reconstruction, in a patient with recurrent skull base chordoma, resected by an anterior approach via median labio-mandibular glossotomy approach. Bone stability and pharyngeal wall integrity were simultaneously restored

  4. [Large abdominal wall reconstruction by free flap after recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Fourn, B; Lejeune, F; Sartre, J Y; Loirat, Y; Pannier, M

    1996-12-01

    Based on a case of recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans of the abdominal wall, the authors discuss the need for initial wide resection of this type of skin tumour and the possibilities of repair of extensive full thickness defects of the abdominal wall by means of a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous free flap.

  5. [Large abdominal wall reconstruction by free flap after recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Fourn, B; Lejeune, F; Sartre, J Y; Loirat, Y; Pannier, M

    1996-12-01

    Based on a case of recurrence of a dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans of the abdominal wall, the authors discuss the need for initial wide resection of this type of skin tumour and the possibilities of repair of extensive full thickness defects of the abdominal wall by means of a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous free flap. PMID:9768175

  6. Cutting edge of endoscopic full-thickness resection for gastric tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tadateru; Maehata; Osamu; Goto; Hiroya; Takeuchi; Yuko; Kitagawa; Naohisa; Yahagi

    2015-01-01

    Recently,several studies have reported local full-thickness resection techniques using flexible endoscopy for gastric tumors,such as gastrointestinal stromal tumors,gastric carcinoid tumors,and early gastric cancer(EGC). These techniques have the advantage of allowing precise resection lines to be determined using intraluminal endoscopy. Thus,it is possible to minimize the resection area and subsequent deformity. Some of these methods include:(1) classical laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery(LECS);(2) inverted LECS;(3) combination of laparoscopic and endoscopic approaches to neoplasia with non-exposure technique; and(4) non-exposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery. Furthermore,a recent prospective multicenter trial of the sentinel node navigation surgery(SNNS) for EGC has shown acceptable results in terms of sentinel node detection rate and the accuracy of nodal metastasis. Endoscopic full-thickness resection with SNNS is expected to become a treatment option that bridges the gap between endoscopic submucosal dissection and standard surgery for EGC. In the future,the indications for these procedures for gastric tumors could be expanded.

  7. Submucosal tunnel endoscopy: Peroral endoscopicmyotomy and peroral endoscopic tumor resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is an innovative,minimally invasive, endoscopic treatment for esophagealachalasia and other esophageal motility disorders,emerged from the natural orifice transluminal endoscopicsurgery procedures, and since the first human caseperformed by Inoue in 2008, showed exciting results ininternational level, with more than 4000 cases globallyup to now. POEM showed superior characteristics thanthe standard 100-year-old surgical or laparoscopic Hellermyotomy (LHM), not only for all types of esophagealachalasia [classical (Ⅰ), vigorous (Ⅱ), spastic (Ⅲ),Chicago Classification], but also for advanced sigmoidtype achalasia (S1 and S2), failed LHM, or other esophagealmotility disorders (diffuse esophageal spasm,nutcracker esophagus or Jackhammer esophagus). POEMstarts with a mucosal incision, followed by submucosaltunnel creation crossing the esophagogastric junction(EGJ) and myotomy. Finally the mucosal entry is closedwith endoscopic clip placement. POEM permittedrelatively free choice of myotomy length and localization.Although it is technically demanding procedure, POEMcan be performed safely and achieves very goodcontrol of dysphagia and chest pain. Gastroesophagealreflux is the most common troublesome side effect,and is well controllable with proton pump inhibitors.Furthermore, POEM opened the era of submucosal tunnelendoscopy, with many other applications. Based onthe same principles with POEM, in combination withnew technological developments, such as endoscopicsuturing, peroral endoscopic tumor resection (POET), issafely and effectively applied for challenging submucosalesophageal, EGJ and gastric cardia tumors (submucosaltumors), emerged from muscularis propria. POET showedup to know promising results, however, it is restricted tospecialized centers. The present article reviews the recentdata of POEM and POET and discussed controversialissues that need further study and future perspectives.

  8. CLIMBING WALL

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE AND RESCUE Group of TIS Commission informs that the climbing wall in the yard of the Fire-fighters Station, is intended for the sole use of the members of that service, and recalls that access to this installation is forbidden for safety reasons to all persons not belonging to the Service.CERN accepts no liability for damage or injury suffered as a result of failure to comply with this interdiction.TIS/DI

  9. No benefit to surgical fixation of flail chest injuries compared with modern comprehensive management: results of a retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Jaclyn; Almahrabi, Yahya; Slobogean, Gerard; Slobogean, Bronwyn; Garraway, Naisan; Simons, Richard K.; Hameed, S. Morad

    2016-01-01

    Background Chest wall trauma is a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Recent technological advances and scientific publications have created a renewed interest in surgical fixation of flail chest. However, definitive data supporting surgical fixation are lacking, and its virtues have not been evaluated against modern, comprehensive management protocols. Methods Consecutive patients undergoing rib fracture fixation with rib-specific locking plates at 2 regional trauma centres between July 2010 and August 2012 were matched to historical controls with similar injury patterns and severity who were managed nonoperatively with modern, multidisciplinary protocols. We compared short- and long-term outcomes between these cohorts. Results Our patient cohorts were well matched for age, sex, injury severity scores and abbreviated injury scores. The nonoperatively managed group had significantly better outcomes than the surgical group in terms of ventilator days (3.1 v. 6.1, p = 0.012), length of stay in the intensive care unit (3.7 v. 7.4 d, p = 0.009), total hospital length of stay (16.0 v. 21.9 d, p = 0.044) and rates of pneumonia (22% v. 63%, p = 0.004). There were no significant differences in long-term outcomes, such as chest pain or dyspnea. Conclusion Although considerable enthusiasm surrounds surgical fixation of flail chest injuries, our analysis does not immediately validate its universal implementation, but rather encourages the use of modern, multidisciplinary, nonoperative strategies. The role of rib fracture fixation in the modern era of chest wall trauma management should ultimately be defined by prospective, randomized trials. PMID:27438051

  10. Resection planning for robotic acoustic neuroma surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBrayer, Kepra L.; Wanna, George B.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Balachandran, Ramya; Labadie, Robert F.; Noble, Jack H.

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic neuroma surgery is a procedure in which a benign mass is removed from the Internal Auditory Canal (IAC). Currently this surgical procedure requires manual drilling of the temporal bone followed by exposure and removal of the acoustic neuroma. This procedure is physically and mentally taxing to the surgeon. Our group is working to develop an Acoustic Neuroma Surgery Robot (ANSR) to perform the initial drilling procedure. Planning the ANSR's drilling region using pre-operative CT requires expertise and around 35 minutes' time. We propose an approach for automatically producing a resection plan for the ANSR that would avoid damage to sensitive ear structures and require minimal editing by the surgeon. We first compute an atlas-based segmentation of the mastoid section of the temporal bone, refine it based on the position of anatomical landmarks, and apply a safety margin to the result to produce the automatic resection plan. In experiments with CTs from 9 subjects, our automated process resulted in a resection plan that was verified to be safe in every case. Approximately 2 minutes were required in each case for the surgeon to verify and edit the plan to permit functional access to the IAC. We measured a mean Dice coefficient of 0.99 and surface error of 0.08 mm between the final and automatically proposed plans. These preliminary results indicate that our approach is a viable method for resection planning for the ANSR and drastically reduces the surgeon's planning effort.

  11. Proximal Gastrojejunal Reconstruction after Pancreaticoduodenal Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reconstruction by proximal gastrojejunostomy, and distal biliary and pancreatic anastomoses is infrequently used after resection of the head of the pancreas because of fear of fistulas and cholangitis. Pancreaticoduodenectomy is being performed more frequently for cystic malignant and premalignant lesions. Because of this there is a need for endoscopic visualization and biopsy of the residual pancreatic duct, since multi-centricity is characteristic of some of these malignancies. Since endoscopic access of the bile duct and pancreatic duct is difficult and unsuccessful in 50–70% after B II or Roux Y reconstruction, we prospectively studied the merit and complications (early and late of proximal gastrojejunal (PGJ reconstruction after pancreaticoduodenal resection. Material and Methods. Thirty nine consecutive, non-radomized patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy and PGJ reconstruction over 14 mos. There were 21 males and 18 females. Results. 7 patients with IPMN have undergone repeat CT scanning for surveillance, with 3 requiring repeat EUS and ERCP. There were no technical difficulties accessing the pancreas or the pancreatic duct, supporting the PGJ reconstruction. Conclusion. Proximal gastrojejunal reconstruction following pancreaticoduodenal resection may be safely done with similar morbidity to traditional pancreaticojejunal reconstructions. PGJ reconstruction may be of greater value when direct visual access to the bile duct or pancreatic duct is necessary, and should be considered when doing resection for mucinous cysts or IPMN of the head of the pancreas.

  12. Postoperative omental infarction following colonic resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, S.F., E-mail: skerr44@doctors.org.uk [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); Hyland, R.; Rowbotham, E.; Chalmers, A.G. [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Aim: To illustrate the computed tomography (CT) appearances and natural history of postoperative omental infarction following colonic resection and to highlight the important clinical implications of this radiological diagnosis. Materials and methods: Over a 3 year period, 15 patients with a history of colonic resection were identified as having a CT diagnosis of postoperative omental infarction. Relevant clinical and pathological data were retrospectively collected from the institution's electronic patient records system and all relevant imaging was reviewed, including serial CT images in 10 patients. Results: A diagnosis of postoperative omental infarction was made in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients who had undergone open or laparoscopic colonic resection for benign or malignant disease. CT appearances ranged from diffuse omental stranding to discrete masses, which typically appeared within weeks of surgery and could persist for years. In four (36%) of the patients with colorectal cancer, the CT appearances raised concern for recurrent malignancy, but percutaneous biopsy and/or serial CT allowed a confident diagnosis of omental infarction to be made. Although most cases were self-limiting, three (20%) cases were complicated by secondary infection and required radiological or surgical intervention. Conclusion: Postoperative omental infarction is an under-recognized complication of colonic resection. It has the potential to mimic recurrent malignancy and may require radiological or surgical intervention for secondary infection.

  13. Postoperative omental infarction following colonic resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To illustrate the computed tomography (CT) appearances and natural history of postoperative omental infarction following colonic resection and to highlight the important clinical implications of this radiological diagnosis. Materials and methods: Over a 3 year period, 15 patients with a history of colonic resection were identified as having a CT diagnosis of postoperative omental infarction. Relevant clinical and pathological data were retrospectively collected from the institution’s electronic patient records system and all relevant imaging was reviewed, including serial CT images in 10 patients. Results: A diagnosis of postoperative omental infarction was made in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients who had undergone open or laparoscopic colonic resection for benign or malignant disease. CT appearances ranged from diffuse omental stranding to discrete masses, which typically appeared within weeks of surgery and could persist for years. In four (36%) of the patients with colorectal cancer, the CT appearances raised concern for recurrent malignancy, but percutaneous biopsy and/or serial CT allowed a confident diagnosis of omental infarction to be made. Although most cases were self-limiting, three (20%) cases were complicated by secondary infection and required radiological or surgical intervention. Conclusion: Postoperative omental infarction is an under-recognized complication of colonic resection. It has the potential to mimic recurrent malignancy and may require radiological or surgical intervention for secondary infection.

  14. What Keeps Postpulmonary Resection Patients in Hospital?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Bardell

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prolonged air leak (longer than three days was hypothesized to be the primary cause of extended hospital stays following pulmonary resection. Its effect on length of stay (LOS was compared with that of suboptimal pain control, nausea and vomiting, and other causes. Predictors of prolonged LOS and of prolonged air leaks were investigated.

  15. Single incision laparoscopic colorectal resection: Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinnusamy Palanivelu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A prospective case series of single incision multiport laparoscopic colorectal resections for malignancy using conventional laparoscopic trocars and instruments is described. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients (seven men and four women with colonic or rectal pathology underwent single incision multiport laparoscopic colectomy/rectal resection from July till December 2010. Four trocars were placed in a single transumblical incision. The bowel was mobilized laparoscopically and vessels controlled intracorporeally with either intra or extracorporeal anastomosis. Results: Three patients had carcinoma in the caecum, one in the hepatic flexure, two in the rectosigmoid, one in the descending colon, two in the rectum and two had ulcerative pancolitis (one with high grade dysplasia and another with carcinoma rectum. There was no conversion to standard multiport laparoscopy or open surgery. The median age was 52 years (range 24-78 years. The average operating time was 130 min (range 90-210 min. The average incision length was 3.2 cm (2.5-4.0 cm. There were no postoperative complications. The average length of stay was 4.5 days (range 3-8 days. Histopathology showed adequate proximal and distal resection margins with an average lymph node yield of 25 nodes (range 16-30 nodes. Conclusion: Single incision multiport laparoscopic colorectal surgery for malignancy is feasible without extra cost or specialized ports/instrumentation. It does not compromise the oncological radicality of resection. Short-term results are encouraging. Long-term results are awaited.

  16. Parabolic resection for mitral valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Daniel H; Drake, Charles G; Recchia, Dino

    2010-02-01

    Parabolic resection, named for the shape of the cut edges of the excised tissue, expands on a common 'trick' used by experienced mitral surgeons to preserve tissue and increase the probability of successful repair. Our objective was to describe and clinically analyze this simple modification of conventional resection. Thirty-six patients with mitral regurgitation underwent valve repair using parabolic resection in combination with other techniques. Institution specific mitral data, Society of Thoracic Surgeons data and preoperative, post-cardiopulmonary bypass (PCPB) and postoperative echocardiography data were collected and analyzed. Preoperative echocardiography demonstrated mitral regurgitation ranging from moderate to severe. PCPB transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no regurgitation or mild regurgitation in all patients. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 2.8%. Serial echocardiograms demonstrated excellent repair stability. One patient (2.9%) with rheumatic disease progressed to moderate regurgitation 33 months following surgery. Echocardiography on all others demonstrated no or mild regurgitation at a mean follow-up of 22.8+/-12.8 months. No patient required mitral reintervention. Longitudinal analysis demonstrated 80% freedom from cardiac death, reintervention and greater than moderate regurgitation at four years following repair. Parabolic resection is a simple technique that can be very useful during complex mitral reconstruction. Early and intermediate echocardiographic studies demonstrate excellent results.

  17. Current role of bloodless liver resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Spiros G Delis; Juan Madariaga; A Bakoyiannis; Ch Dervenis

    2007-01-01

    Liver resections are demanding operations which can have life threatening complications although they are performed by experienced liver surgeons. Recently new technologies are applied in the field of liver surgery, having one goal: safer and easier liver operations. The aim of this article is to address the issue of bloodless liver resection using radiofrequency energy. Radionics, Cool-tipTM System and Tissue Link are some of the devices which are using radiofrequency energy. All information included in this article, refers to these devices in which we have personal experience in our unit of liver surgery. These devices take advantage of its unique combination of radiofrequency current and internal electrode cooling to perform sealing of the small vessels and biliary radicals. Dissection is also feasible with the cool-tip probe. For the purposes of this study patient sex, age, type of disease and type of surgical procedure in association with the duration of parenchymal transection, blood loss, length of hospital stay, morbidity and mortality were analyzed. Cool-tip RF device may provide a unique, simple and rather safe method of bloodless liver resections if used properly. It is indicated mostly in cirrhotic patients with challenging hepatectomies (segment W, central resections). The total operative time is eliminated and the average blood loss is significantly decreased. It is important to note that this technique should not be applied near the hilum or the vena cava to avoid damage of these structures.

  18. Multiorgan resection in patients with gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Dragan L.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Multiorgan resection for a malignancy is a very comlicated procedure, but there is always the question: does it work? In everyday clinical practice gastric cancer in phases III and IV is rather frequent. Unfortunately, our patients are under the age of 55 years. D2 lymphadenectomy is not as extensive as D2 %/ or D3, so one must ask himself if multiorgan resection is worth the risk. Material and methods We evaluated two groups of patients: group I consisted of 34 patients who underwent total or subtotal gastrectomy, systematic lymphadenectomy and resection of one or more organs; group II (control consisted of 167 patients who underwent total or subtotal gastrectomy and systematic lymphadenectomy. These two groups of patients were analzyed in regard to: Bormann's classification, histopathologic type, early mortality, early postoperative complications, lymph node dissection and long-term survival. Results According to Bormann's classification the most common type of carcinoma in both groups was ulcerovegetativ tumor (70.6% in I and 58% in II. In the first group of patients a great number of patients had poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas (47%, while in the second group the most common histologic type was well differentiated intestinal carcinoma (28%. Patients with multiorgan resections had higher rates of early postoperative mortality and morbiditiy (mortality - 14.7% and complications - 26.5% than patients in control group (mortality - 4.8% and complications - 11.4%. The most frequent causes of postopertive mortality and morbidity were anastomotic leakage and wound infections in both groups. Metastatic lymph node invelvement was higher in the first group (41%, than in the second (28%. Long-term survival was best in the control group (38.5 months. Patients with multiorgan resection had better survival (25.4 months than inoperable cases (only 5 months. Discussion Patients undergoing multiorgan resection usually have advanced gastric

  19. Relevance of an incidental chest finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Télles, Arturo; Mendoza, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Solitary pulmonary nodule represents 0.2% of incidental findings in routine chest X-ray images. One of the main diagnoses includes lung cancer in which small-cell subtype has a poor survival rate. Recently, a new classification has been proposed including the very limited disease stage (VLD stage) or T1-T2N0M0 with better survival rate, specifically in those patients who are treated with surgery. However, current recommendations postulate that surgery remains controversial as a first-line treatment in this stage. We present the case of a 46-year-old female referred to our hospital with a preoperative diagnosis of a solitary pulmonary nodule. On initial approach, a biopsy revealed a small cell lung cancer. She received multimodal therapy with surgery, chemotherapy, and prophylactic cranial irradiation and is currently alive without recurrence on a 2-year follow-up. PMID:22345914

  20. Pleural fluids associated with chest infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, Amal; Thomson, Anne H

    2002-12-01

    Pleural effusions are commonly associated with pneumonias and a small number of these progress to empyema. An understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of pleural fluid aids the clinician in the management of empyema. There remains much debate about the optimal treatment of empyema in children. Early recognition of the condition is important since delayed therapy may result in unnecessary morbidity. Conventional management with high dose parenteral antibiotics and chest tube drainage remains the mainstay of therapy. However, this treatment modality may fail if the pleural fluid becomes viscous and loculated and, therefore, a more aggressive approach is required. Intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy has been shown to decrease the length of hospital stay and may reduce the need for surgical intervention. The prognosis in children with parapneumonic empyema is excellent with the vast majority retaining normal lung function at long term follow-up.

  1. An Atypical Cause of Atypical Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zaheen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes a case involving a 57-year-old HIV-positive man who presented with acute retrosternal chest pain accompanied by 24 h of fever. Septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint was diagnosed based on magnetic resonance imaging findings in addition to Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. To the authors’ knowledge, the present case is only the 12th reported case of manubriosternal septic arthritis, and the first in an HIV-positive patient. Early diagnosis and treatment can circumvent the need for surgical intervention. Based on the present case report and review of the literature, the authors summarize the epidemiology, appropriate imaging and suggestions for antibiotic therapy for this rare presentation.

  2. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hochhegger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation.

  3. Strain Assessment in Surgically Resected Inflammatory and Neoplastic Bowel Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havre, R F; Leh, S; Gilja, O H;

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether ultrasound-based strain imaging can discriminate between colorectal adenocarcinomas and stenotic Crohn's lesions in newly resected surgical specimens.Materials and Methods: Resected surgical specimens from 27 patients electively operated for colorectal tumors or st...

  4. Prematurity reduces functional adaptation to intestinal resection in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aunsholt, Lise; Thymann, Thomas; Qvist, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    Background: Necrotizing enterocolitis and congenital gastrointestinal malformations in infants often require intestinal resection, with a subsequent risk of short bowel syndrome (SBS). We hypothesized that immediate intestinal adaptation following resection of the distal intestine with placement...

  5. Digital luminescence radiography of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a digital system in chest radiology compared to the conventional film-screen system. The first studies (1-3) were purely clinical, had two parts, one clinical and one using phantoms, and the 5:th used solely phantoms. Except for the first - pilot - study, the studies were performed as receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. From one exposure, two digital radiographs were obtained, one simulating the film-screen radiograph and one enhanced, using an unsharp mask. The conventional radiograph was compared to this double-image, but in addition to this, even to the simulated normal and enhanced separately (1-3). To evaluate the value of inverted (positive) radiographs, the original digital (negative) radiographs were inverted, and then compared to the originals (4). As digitzation means easy storing and transfer of data and possibility of electronic display, the diagnostic performance of an interactive workstation was assessed (5). In the clinical studies, a variety of chest affections were used: atelectasis, tumor, pneumothorax, fibrosis, mediastinal and bony changes, tuberculosis, incompensations and enlargement of the heart (1), pneumothorax (2), fibrosis (3), and tumor (4). In the phantom studies, test objects simulating tumors (4) and pneumothorax (5) were used. In no study was statistical significant difference seen between the digital and conventional system (p>0.05). Neither in the clinical nor the phantom study did inversion of the radiographs improve diagnostic performance. The workstation performed almost equally well as the radiographs even with a resolution of 1.25 1p/mm compared to the digital radiographs 2.5 and film-screen radiographs 5 1p/mm. (au) (50 refs.)

  6. Coping in Chest Pain Patients with and without Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaliano, Peter P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined relations between psychiatric disorder and coronary heart disease (CHD) in 77 patients with chest pain, and compared coping profiles of chest pain patients with and without psychiatric disorders and CHD. Psychiatric patients with no medical disease were also studied. Results are discussed in the context of illness behavior and…

  7. Low dose computed tomography of the chest : Applications and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietema, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    In areas with a high intrinsic contrast such as the chest, radiation dose can be reduced for specific indications. Low dose chest CT is feasible and cannot only be applied for lung cancer screening, but also in daily routine and for early detection of lung destruction. We showed in a small sample of

  8. Segmentation of anatomical structures in chest CT scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rikxoort, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, methods are described for the automatic segmentation of anatomical structures from chest CT scans. First, a method to segment the lungs from chest CT scans is presented. Standard lung segmentation algorithms rely on large attenuation differences between the lungs and the surrounding

  9. Chest physical therapy in acute viral bronchiolitis: an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postiaux, Guy; Zwaenepoel, Bruno; Louis, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    We describe the various therapies for infant acute viral bronchiolitis and the contradictory results obtained with chest physical therapy. The treatment target is bronchial obstruction, which is a multifactorial phenomenon that includes edema, bronchoconstriction, and increased mucus production, with a clinical grading defined as severe, moderate, or mild. Chest physical therapy is revisited in its various modalities, according to preliminary scoring of the disease.

  10. Effect of rib-cage structure on acoustic chest impedance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Niels Henrik; Møller, Henrik; Hansen, John;

    2011-01-01

    When a stethoscope is placed on the surface of the chest, the coupler picks up sound from heart and lungs transmitted through the tissues of the ribcage and from the surface of the skin. If the acoustic impedance of the chest surface is known, it is possible to optimize the coupler for picking up...

  11. Giant pericardial cyst mimicking dextrocardia on chest X-ray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Hamad M; Galrinho, Ana; Abreu, João; Valente, Bruno; Bakero, Luis; Ferreira, Rui C

    2013-01-01

    Pericardial cysts are rare benign congenital malformations, usually small, asymptomatic and detected incidentally on chest X-ray as a mass located in the right costophrenic angle. Giant pericardial cysts are very uncommon and produce symptoms by compressing adjacent structures. In this report, the authors present a case of a symptomatic giant pericardial cyst incorrectly diagnosed as dextrocardia on chest X-ray.

  12. Lung mass, right upper lung - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This picture is a chest x-ray of a person with a lung mass. This is a front view, where the lungs are the two dark areas and ... visible in the middle of the chest. The x-ray shows a mass in the right upper lung, ...

  13. Sexual, Physical, Verbal/Emotional Abuse and Unexplained Chest Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslick, Guy D.; Koloski, Natasha A.; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Approximately one third of patients with non cardiac chest pain (NCCP) report a history of abuse, however no data exists on the prevalence of abuse among people with unexplained chest pain in the general population. We aimed to determine if there is a relationship between childhood sexual, physical, emotional abuse and unexplained…

  14. Resuscitation, prolonged cardiac arrest, and an automated chest compression device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Martin; Jørgensen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Lars S;

    2010-01-01

    The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest.......The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest....

  15. Management of chest drainage tubes after lung surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Yukitoshi

    2016-06-01

    Since chest tubes have been routinely used to drain the pleural space, particularly after lung surgery, the management of chest tubes is considered to be essential for the thoracic surgeon. The pleural drainage system requires effective drainage, suction, and water-sealing. Another key point of chest tube management is that a water seal is considered to be superior to suction for most air leaks. Nowadays, the most common pleural drainage device attached to the chest tube is the three-bottle system. An electronic chest drainage system has been developed that is effective in standardizing the postoperative management of chest tubes. More liberal use of digital drainage devices in the postoperative management of the pleural space is warranted. The removal of chest tubes is a common procedure occurring almost daily in hospitals throughout the world. Extraction of the tube is usually done at the end of full inspiration or at the end of full expiration. The tube removal technique is not as important as how it is done and the preparation for the procedure. The management of chest tubes must be based on careful observation, the patient's characteristics, and the operative procedures that had been performed. PMID:27048219

  16. Measurement of characteristic leap interval between chest and falsetto registers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, DG; Svec, JG; Schutte, HK

    2002-01-01

    A markedly smaller time constant distinguishes a chest-falsetto leap from the more usual execution of a sung interval by muscular adjustments in the length and tension of the vocal folds. The features of such a chest-falsetto leap are examined in detail with respect to F-0, peak-to-peak amplitude of

  17. Good results after repeated resection for colorectal liver metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolff, Hans Christian; Calatayud, Dan; Larsen, Peter Nørgaard;

    2012-01-01

    Our study aim was to evaluate the perioperative events, postoperative events and survival after a second liver resection due to colorectal liver metastases (CLM), compared with a matched control group that had only undergone primary liver resection due to CLM.......Our study aim was to evaluate the perioperative events, postoperative events and survival after a second liver resection due to colorectal liver metastases (CLM), compared with a matched control group that had only undergone primary liver resection due to CLM....

  18. Cutaneous Metastasis of Medullary Carcinoma Thyroid Masquerading as Subcutaneous Nodules Anterior Chest and Mandibular Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Mannan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous metastasis of underlying primary malignancies can present to dermatologist with chief complaints of cutaneous lesions. The underlying malignancy is generally diagnosed much later after a complete assessment of the concerned case. Medullary carcinoma thyroid (MCT is a relatively uncommon primary neoplasia of the thyroid. Very few cases presenting as cutaneous metastases of MCT have been reported in the literature. Most of the cases which have been reported are of the papillary and the follicular types. We here report a case of a patient who presented in the dermatology clinic with the primary complaint of multiple subcutaneous nodules in anterior chest wall and left side of body of mandible. By systematic application of clinical and diagnostic skills these nodules were diagnosed as cutaneous metastasis of MCT bringing to the forefront a history of previously operated thyroid neoplasm. So clinically, the investigation of a flesh coloured subcutaneous nodule, presenting with a short duration, particularly in scalp, jaw, or anterior chest wall should include possibility of metastastic deposits. A dermatologist should keep a possibility of an internal organ malignancy in patients while investigating a case of flesh coloured subcutaneous nodules, presenting with short duration. A systematic application of clinical and diagnostic skills will eventually lead to such a diagnosis even when not suspected clinically at its primary presentation. A prompt and an emphatic diagnosis and treatment will have its bearing on the eventual outcome in all these patients.

  19. Radiofrequency ablation-assisted liver resection:a step toward bloodless liver resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Athanasios Petrou; Kyriakos Neofytou; Constantinos Mihas; Jessamy Bagenal; Michael Kontos; John Griniatsos; Evangelos Felekouras

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver resection is currently the most efficient curative approach for a wide variety of liver tumors. The ap-plication of modern techniques and new surgical devices has improved operative outcomes. Radiofrequency ablation is used more often for liver parenchymal transection. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of radiofrequency abla-tion-assisted liver resection. METHODS: A retrospective study of 145 consecutive patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation-assisted liver resec-tion was performed. Intraoperative blood loss, need for trans-fusion or intraoperative Pringle maneuver, the duration of liver parenchymal transection, perioperative complications, and postoperative morbidity and mortality were all evaluated. RESULTS: Fifty minor and ninety-five major liver resections were performed. The mean intraoperative blood loss was 251 mL, with a transfusion rate of 11.7%. The Pringle maneuver was necessary in 12 patients (8.3%). The mean duration for parenchymal transection was 51.75 minutes. There were 47 patients (32.4%) with postoperative complications. There is no mortality within 30 days after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Radiofrequency ablation-assisted liver re-section permits both major and minor liver resections with minimal blood loss and without occlusion of hepatic inflow. Furthermore it decreases the need for blood transfusion and reduces morbidity and mortality.

  20. Short-term outcomes following laparoscopic resection for colon cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Dara O

    2011-03-01

    Laparoscopic resection for colon cancer has been proven to have a similar oncological efficacy compared to open resection. Despite this, it is performed by a minority of colorectal surgeons. The aim of our study was to evaluate the short-term clinical, oncological and survival outcomes in all patients undergoing laparoscopic resection for colon cancer.

  1. Lung parenchymal change after the resolution of adenovirus pneumonia : chest radiographs and high-resolution CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate lung parenchymal change as seen on chest radiographs and high-resolution CT (HRCT) after the resolution of adenovirus pneumonia (a common cause of lower respiratory infection in infants and children),and the usefulness of HRCT during follow-up. Material and Methods : Four to 13(mean, 8) months after recovery, ten patients infected with adenovirus pneumonia underwent HRCT and chest radiographs. Eight were boys and two were girls, and their mean age was 26(range, 14-45) months. Adenovirus pneumonia had been confirmed by viral isolation in culture or serologic test. CT scanning was performed during quiet breathing ; collimation was 2 mm and the interval from apex to diaphragm was 5-10 mm. Lung settings were 1600 HU (window width) and -700 HU(level). CT findings were assessed and compared with chest radiographs by two chest radiologists, who reached a consensus. The patients were clinically followed up for one year. Result : On chest radiographs, hyperlucent lung was seen in 8 of 10 patients (80%) ; in one other there was partial collapse, and in one, findings were normal. The most common HRCT finding was a mosaic pattern of lung attenuation with decreased pulmonary vascularity in the area of lower attenuation ; this was seen in 8 of 10 patients (80%). Other findings were partial collapse, bronchiectasis, and bronchial wall thickening, each seen in two patients, and reticulonodular density, seen in one. In two patients HRCT findings were normal ; in one of these, chest findings were normal but a mosaic pattern of lung attenuation was found in all lobes. During follow-up, three patients wheezed continuously. Conclusion : In cases of adenovirus pneumonia, HRCT demonstrated more specific parenchymal change than did chest radiographs ; a mosaic pattern of lung attenuation was seen, with decreased pulmonary vascularity in areas of lower attenuation ; bronchiectasis,bronchial wall thickening, and reticulo-odular density were also noted. These findings were

  2. Lung parenchymal change after the resolution of adenovirus pneumonia : chest radiographs and high-resolution CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jung Hee; Kim, Joung Sook; Kim, Chang Kuen; Kang, Seung Pyung; Lee, Soo Hyun; Hur Gham [Inje Univ. Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-07-01

    To evaluate lung parenchymal change as seen on chest radiographs and high-resolution CT (HRCT) after the resolution of adenovirus pneumonia (a common cause of lower respiratory infection in infants and children),and the usefulness of HRCT during follow-up. Material and Methods : Four to 13(mean, 8) months after recovery, ten patients infected with adenovirus pneumonia underwent HRCT and chest radiographs. Eight were boys and two were girls, and their mean age was 26(range, 14-45) months. Adenovirus pneumonia had been confirmed by viral isolation in culture or serologic test. CT scanning was performed during quiet breathing ; collimation was 2 mm and the interval from apex to diaphragm was 5-10 mm. Lung settings were 1600 HU (window width) and -700 HU(level). CT findings were assessed and compared with chest radiographs by two chest radiologists, who reached a consensus. The patients were clinically followed up for one year. Result : On chest radiographs, hyperlucent lung was seen in 8 of 10 patients (80%) ; in one other there was partial collapse, and in one, findings were normal. The most common HRCT finding was a mosaic pattern of lung attenuation with decreased pulmonary vascularity in the area of lower attenuation ; this was seen in 8 of 10 patients (80%). Other findings were partial collapse, bronchiectasis, and bronchial wall thickening, each seen in two patients, and reticulonodular density, seen in one. In two patients HRCT findings were normal ; in one of these, chest findings were normal but a mosaic pattern of lung attenuation was found in all lobes. During follow-up, three patients wheezed continuously. Conclusion : In cases of adenovirus pneumonia, HRCT demonstrated more specific parenchymal change than did chest radiographs ; a mosaic pattern of lung attenuation was seen, with decreased pulmonary vascularity in areas of lower attenuation ; bronchiectasis,bronchial wall thickening, and reticulo-odular density were also noted. These findings were

  3. Endovascular resection of the native aortic valve before transcatheter aortic valve implantation: state of the art and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarra, Emiliano; Mosala Nezhad, Zahra; Bollen, Xavier; Gielen, Charles-Edouard; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; De Kerchove, Laurent; Raucent, Benoit; Astarci, Parla

    2016-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was introduced into clinical practice in 2002 as a rescue approach in patients presenting with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis but not eligible for conventional aortic valve replacement. This technique allows implantation of a balloon expandable bioprosthesis without resection of the native aortic valve. Several complications are described as a consequence of the residual highly calcified valve being squeezed against the aortic wall by the stent of the implant. This can result in deformation of the metal stent and paravalvular leakage, risk of occlusion of the coronary ostia, or central and peripheral embolization of valvular debris. To avoid these complications, many authors suggest the possibility to resect and remove the native aortic valve before transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In this field, different authors have described possible techniques and different sources of energy to resect the calcified valve. In this article, we review the development of these experimental techniques and discuss future prospects in this field. PMID:27032472

  4. Single port-assisted fully laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection (APR) with immediate V-RAM flap reconstruction of the perineal defect.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ali, Sayid

    2012-09-01

    Abdominoperineal resection (APR) of anorectal cancers after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy may incur significant perineal morbidity. While vertical rectus abdominis muscle (V-RAM) flaps can fill the pelvic resection space with health tissue, their use has previously been described predominantly in association with laparotomy. Here, we describe a means of combination laparoscopic APR with V-RAM flap reconstruction that allows structural preservation of the entire abdominal wall throughout the oncological resection and of the deep parietal layers after V-RAM donation. Furthermore, a single port access device used at the end colostomy site allows a second senior surgeon assist with an additional two working instruments for the purpose of improved pelvic tissue retraction, especially useful in obese patients.

  5. Sigmoid Resection with Primary Anastomosis for Uncomplicated Giant Colonic Diverticulum : a Report of two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, J; Mansvelt, B; Veys, E

    2014-01-01

    Giant colonic diverticulum (GCD) is a rare complication of colonic diverticulosis. A small number of cases has been reported in the literature. Patients with GCD have often few non-specific symptoms. Unfortunately, severe complications exist and may lead to surgical acute abdomen. Therefore, this complication of the diverticular disease must be known and properly treated. There is no gold standard diagnostic test, but an air-fluid or air-filled, rounded, pseudocystic image in relation with the colonic wall in a patient with colonic diverticula should suggest this diagnosis to the clinician. We report two cases of a 70-year-old male patient and a 44-year-old female patient having a giant sigmoid diverticulum. The treatment of choice of an uncomplicated GCD is an elective colonic resection, including the giant -diverticulum, with primary anastomosis ; while in case of complicated GCD (peritonitis, abscess or complex fistula), a two-stage resection should be considered.

  6. Clinical predictors of resectability of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid A Almadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Identifying patient-related factors as well as symptoms and signs that can predict pancreatic cancer at a resectable stage, which could be used in an attempt to identify patients at an early stage of pancreatic cancer that would be appropriate for surgical resection and those at an unresectable stage be sparred unnecessary surgery. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted at a major tertiary care, university hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The study population included individuals who underwent a computed tomography and a pancreatic mass was reported as well as the endoscopic reporting database of endoscopic procedures where the indication was a pancreatic mass, between April 1996 and April 2012. Any patient with a histologically confirmed diagnosis of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas was included in the analysis. We included patients′ demographic information (age, gender, height, weight, body mass index, historical data (smoking, comorbidities, symptoms (abdominal pain and its duration, anorexia and its duration, weight loss and its amount, and over what duration, vomiting, abdominal distention, itching and its duration, change in bowel movements, change in urine color, jaundice and its duration. Other variables were also collected including laboratory values, location of the mass, the investigation undertaken, and the stage of the tumor. Results: A total of 61 patients were included, the mean age was 61.2 ± 1.51 years, 25 (41% were females. The tumors were located in the head (83.6%, body (10.9%, tail (1.8%, and in multiple locations (3.6% of the pancreas. Half of the patients (50% had Stage IV, 16.7% stages IIB and III, and only 8.3% were stages IB and IIA. On univariable analysis a lower hemoglobin level predicted resectability odds ratio 0.65 (95% confidence interval, 0.42-0.98, whereas on multivariable regression none of the variables included in the model could predict resectability of

  7. Transthoracic resection versus non-transthoracic resection for gastroesophageal junction cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the impact of transthoracic resection on long-term survival of patients with GEJ cancer and to compare the postoperative morbidity and mortality of patients undergoing transthoracic resection with those of patients who were not undergoing transthoracic resection. METHOD: Searches of electronic databases identifying studies from Medline, Cochrane Library trials register, and WHO Trial Registration etc were performed. Outcome measures were survival, postoperative morbidity and mortality, and operation related events. RESULTS: Twelve studies (including 5 RCTs and 7 non-RCTs comprising 1105 patients were included in this meta-analysis, with 591 patients assigned treatment with transthoracic resection. Transthoracic resection did not increase the 5-y overall survival rate for RCTs and non-RCTs (HR = 1.01, 95% CI 0.80- 1.29 and HR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.70- 1.14, respectively. Stratified by the Siewert classification, our result showed no obvious differences were observed between the group with transthoracic resection and group without transthoracic resection (P>0.05. The postoperative morbidity (RR = 0.69, 95% CI 0.48- 1.00 and OR = 0.55, 95% CI 0.25- 1.22 and mortality (RD = -0.03, 95% CI -0.06- 0.00 and RD = 0.00, 95% CI -0.05- 0.05 of RCTs and non-RCTs did not suggest any significant differences between the two groups. Hospital stay was long with thransthoracic resection (WMD = -5.80, 95% CI -10.38- -1.23 but did not seem to differ in number of harvested lymph nodes, operation time, blood loss, numbers of patients needing transfusion, and reoperation rate. The results of sensitivity analyses were similar to the primary analyses. CONCLUSIONS: There were no significant differences of survival rate and postoperative morbidity and mortality between transthoracic resection group and non-transthoracic resection group. Both surgical approaches are acceptable, and that one offers no clear advantage over

  8. Detection of rib fractures in minor chest injuries: a comparison between ultrasonography and radiography performed on the same day

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    Cho, Yong Soo; Back, Chang Hee; Lee, Kyung Rae; Shin, Yun Hack; Whang, Yeong Seop; Jeong, Ku Young [Yeosu Baek Hospital, Yeosu (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Soo Hyun [NamWon Medical Center, NamWon (Korea, Republic of); Whang, Cheol Mog [Konyang University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    We wished to compare the ability of ultrasonography and radiography performed on the same day to detect rib fractures in minor chest injuries. Two hundred and fifteen patients with minor chest injuries were selected. Radiography and ultrasonography were performed on the same day with these patients. Chest wall pain was the only presenting symptom. Two radiologists performed ultrasonography. Fractures were identified by a disruption of the anterior margin of the rib and costal cartilage. The incidence and location of fractures and complications revealed by radiography and ultrasonography were compared. Radiographs revealed the presence of 70 rib fractures in 50 (23%) of 215 patients and ultrasonography revealed the presence of 203 rib fractures in 133 (62%) of 215 patients. Ultrasonography uniquely identified 133 rib fractures in 83 patients. Ultrasonography identified a 2.9 fold increase in the number of fractures in a 2.6 fold number of subjects as compared to radiography. Of the 203 sonographically detected fractures, 201 were located in the rib, one was located at the costochondral junction, and one in the costal cartilage. There were no complications seen by either radiography or ultrasonography. Ultrasonography reveals more fractures than those that may be overlooked on radiography for minor chest injuries.

  9. Surgical Planning by 3D Printing for Primary Cardiac Schwannoma Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kuk Hui; Kim, Kun-Woo; Ahn, Chi Bum; Choi, Chang Hu; Park, Kook Yang; Park, Chul Hyun; Lee, Jae-Ik; Jeon, Yang Bin

    2015-11-01

    We report herein a case of benign cardiac schwannoma in the interatrial septum. A 42-year-old woman was transferred from a clinic because of cardiomegaly as determined by chest X-ray. A transthoracic echocardiography and chest computed tomography examination revealed a huge mass in the pericardium compressing the right atrium, superior vena cava (SVC), left atrium, and superior pulmonary vein. To confirm that the tumor originated from either heart or mediastinum, cine magnetic resonance imaging was performed, but the result was not conclusive. To facilitate surgical planning, we used 3D printing. Using a printed heart model, we decided that tumor resection under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) through sternotomy would be technically feasible. At surgery, a huge tumor in the interatrial septum was confirmed. By incision on the atrial roof between the aorta and SVC, tumor enucleation was performed successfully under CPB. Pathology revealed benign schwannoma. The patient was discharged without complication. 3D printing of the heart and tumor was found to be helpful when deciding optimal surgical approach.

  10. Clinical study of simultaneous lung volume reduction surgery during resection of pulmonary or esophageal neoplasms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Yi-jun; WANG Chao-yang; WANG Cheng-de; DONG Yao-zhong

    2009-01-01

    Background If the emphysema lesions are not symmetrical, unilateral lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) can be carried out on the more severe side. The aim of this research was to evaluate the feasibility and effects of LVRS performed simultaneously with resection of pulmonary and esophageal neoplasms.Methods Forty-five patients with pulmonary neoplasm and 37 patients with esophageal neoplasm were randomly assigned to group A or group B. In group A, LVRS was performed simultaneously on the same side as thoracotomy. In group B, only tumor resection was performed. The nonfunctional lung area was determined by preoperative chest computed tomography and lung ventilation/perfusion scan. The lung volume removed was about 20% to 30% of the lobes on one side. Preoperative and postoperative indexes including pulmonary function testing variables, arterial blood gas analysis variables, dyspnea scale, 6-minute walk distance, etc., were compared between the groups.Results There were no surgical deaths in this study. The postoperative forced vital capacity in 1 second, PaO_2, PaCO_2,dyspnea scale, and 6-minute walk distance were improved significantly in group A, whereas these indexes did not change or decreased slightly in group B.Conclusions For tumor patients who have associated emphysema, simultaneous LVRS not only increases the chance of receiving surgical therapy, but also improves the postoperative quality of life of the patient. LVRS has expanded thesurgical indication for tumor patients.

  11. Hepatic Resection Using a Water Jet Dissector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. U. Baer

    1993-01-01

    high velocity water jet has been developed and has been utilized to assist in hepatic parenchymal transection. Sixty-seven major hepatic resections were performed for solid hepatic tumors. The tissue fracture technique was used in 51 patients (76%, and the water jet dissector was used predominantly in 16 patients (24%. The extent of hepatic resection using each technique was similar. The results showed no difference in operative duration (p = .499. The mean estimated blood loss using the water jet was 1386 ml, and tissue fracture technique 2450 ml (p = .217. Transfusion requirements were less in the water jet group (mean 2.0 units compared to the tissue fracture group (mean 5.2 units; (p = .023. Results obtained with the new water dissector are encouraging. The preliminary results suggest that blood loss may be diminished.

  12. Endoscopic Resection of the Bicipitoradial Bursa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing; Sit, Yan Kit; Pan, Xiao Hua

    2016-03-01

    The bicipitoradial bursa lies at the insertion of the biceps tendon on the radial tuberosity. It is an unusual site for chronic bursitis. It can be treated conservatively with aspiration and steroid injection. Surgical excision of the bursa is indicated in case of infection cause, failed conservative treatment with recurrence of the enlarged bursa and pain after aspiration, the presence of nerve compression with neurological impairment, mechanical limitation to flexion and extension of the elbow or biceps tendon degeneration, and/or functional impairment. Open resection through the anterior approach requires extensive dissection to expose the radial tuberosity and the radial neck, which increases the risk of neurovascular injury. Endoscopic resection is possible through distal biceps tendoscopy and endoscopy around the radial neck. It is technically demanding and should be reserved to the experienced elbow arthroscopist. PMID:26752772

  13. LEAKAGE OF COLONIC ANASTOMOSIS AFTER COLON RESECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kanellos I; Pramateftakis MG

    2004-01-01

    Objective To present the diagnosis and management of anastomotic leakage after colon resection. Methods Early diagnosis and urgent therapeutic intervention are required in order to avert life-threatening conditions that may be caused by anastomotic leakage. Results The diagnosis of anastomotic leakage is based on clinical features, peripheral blood investigations and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan. Major leaks are defined by symptoms of peritonitis and septicaemia due to leakage. Major leaks should be managed operatively. Minor leaks can be managed conservatively with successful outcomes. Conclusion Leakage of colonic anastomosis remains the most serious complication after colon resection. It is a major cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality. A high index of suspicion is required in order to detect early, nonspecific signs of a leakage and urgent surgical intervention is usually required to avert life-threatening events.

  14. Endoscopic resection of superficial gastrointestinal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovannini Marc; Cesar Vivian Lopes

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic endoscopy plays a major role in the management of gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasia.Its indications can be generalized into four broad categories; to remove or obliterate neoplastic lesion,to palliate malignant obstruction, or to treat bleeding.Only endoscopic resection allows complete histologicalstaging of the cancer, which is critical as it allowss tratification and refinement for further treatment.Although other endoscopic techniques, such asablation therapy, may also cure early GI cancer, they can not provide a definitive pathological specimen.Early stage lesions reveal low frequency of lymph node metastasis which allows for less invasive treatments and thereby improving the quality of life when compared to surgery. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are now accepted worldwide as treatment modalities for early cancers of the GI tract.

  15. Epidural anaesthesia and analgesia for liver resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzimas, P; Prout, J; Papadopoulos, G; Mallett, S V

    2013-06-01

    Although epidural analgesia is routinely used in many institutions for patients undergoing hepatic resection, there are unresolved issues regarding its safety and efficacy in this setting. We performed a review of papers published in the area of anaesthesia and analgesia for liver resection surgery and selected four areas of current controversy for the focus of this review: the safety of epidural catheters with respect to postoperative coagulopathy, a common feature of this type of surgery; analgesic efficacy; associated peri-operative fluid administration; and the role of epidural analgesia in enhanced recovery protocols. In all four areas, issues are raised that question whether epidural anaesthesia is always the best choice for these patients. Unfortunately, the evidence available is insufficient to provide definitive answers, and it is clear that there are a number of areas of controversy that would benefit from high-quality clinical trials.

  16. Laparoscopic Resection of an Adrenal Schwannoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinos, Toutouzas G.; Panagiotis, Kekis B.; Nikolaos, Michalopoulos V.; Ioannis, Flessas; Andreas, Manouras; Geogrios, Zografos

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Schwannomas are tumors originating from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath (neurilemma) of the neuroectoderm. Rarely, schwannomas can arise from the retroperitoneum and adrenal medulla. We describe a case of a 71-y-old woman who presented with an incidentally discovered adrenal tumor. Methods: Ultrasound and computed tomography scans revealed a lesion with solid and cystic areas originating from the left adrenal gland. The patient underwent complete laparoscopic resection of the tumor and the left adrenal gland. Results: Histopathological examination and immunohistochemical staining of the excised specimen revealed a benign schwannoma measuring 5.5×5×3.7 cm. To our knowledge, few other cases of laparoscopic resection of adrenal schwannomas have been reported. Conclusion: Because preoperative diagnosis of adrenal tumors is inconclusive, complete laparoscopic excision allows for definitive diagnosis with histological evaluation and represents the treatment of choice. PMID:23484583

  17. Laparoscopic resection of bleeding gastric polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, W T; Leong, H T; Li, M K

    1997-03-01

    Gastric polyps account for a small proportion of gastric neoplasms. Many of them presented with acute or chronic bleeding. Endoscopic polypectomy is the preferred treatment modality. However, endoscopic polypectomy is often incomplete and impossible for large polyps. Large and intramural polyps require laparotomy and excision. From June to October 1995, four patients with bleeding gastric polyps received laparoscopic resection in our unit. All were women, aged 40-78, with polyps 2-6 cm in diameter. One patient underwent emergency surgery for active bleeding. The others received elective operations. Operating time ranged from 90 to 120 min. There was no perioperative morbidity or mortality. Full diet was resumed by the 4th postoperative day. The average postoperative hospital stay was 5. 3 days (4-7). Laparoscopic resection of gastric polyp is a preferable treatment option when endoscopic treatment fails.

  18. Titanium internal fixation system used for sternum reconstruction after resection of chondrosarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zheng-cheng; ZHAO Heng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chondrosarcoma is the most common malignant primary ches t wall tumor, only 20% of these cases involve sternum.1 Current therapy for chondrosarcoma requires adequate surgical excision and radiation therapy,2chemotherapy have not been yet proved to be effective.However, reconstruction of the defect is difficult, the problems of providing soft tissue coverage additionally complicating the surgery and even potentially limit the ability to achieve clear margin. Titanium internal fixation system can provide proper chest stability, ensure wide surgical margin and reduce hurts.

  19. Painful Spastic Hip Dislocation: Proximal Femoral Resection

    OpenAIRE

    Albiñana, Javier; Gonzalez-Moran, Gaspar

    2002-01-01

    The dislocated hip in a non-ambulatory child with spastic paresis tends to be a painful interference to sleep, sitting upright, and perineal care. Proximal femoral resection-interposition arthroplasty is one method of treatment for this condition. We reviewed eight hips, two bilateral cases, with a mean follow-up of 30 months. Clinical improvement was observed in all except one case, with respect to pain relief and sitting tolerance. Some proximal migration was observed in three cases, despit...

  20. Age-related changes in chest geometry during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, J M; Koehler, R C; Schleien, C L; Michael, J R; Chantarojanasiri, T; Rogers, M C; Traystman, R J

    1987-06-01

    We studied alterations of chest geometry during conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in anesthetized immature swine. Pulsatile force was applied to the sternum in increments to determine the effects of increasing compression on chest geometry and intrathoracic vascular pressures. In 2-wk- and 1-mo-old piglets, permanent changes in chest shape developed due to incomplete recoil of the chest along the anteroposterior axis, and large intrathoracic vascular pressures were generated. In 3-mo-old animals, permanent chest deformity did not develop, and large intrathoracic vascular pressures were not produced. We propose a theoretical model of the chest as an elliptic cylinder. Pulsatile displacement along the minor axis of an ellipse produces a greater decrease in cross-sectional area than displacement of a circular cross section. As thoracic cross section became less circular due to deformity, greater changes in thoracic volume, and hence pressure, were produced. With extreme deformity at high force, pulsatile displacement became limited, diminishing pressure generation. We conclude that changes in chest geometry are important in producing intrathoracic intravascular pressure during conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in piglets. PMID:3610916