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Sample records for chest radiographic findings

  1. Chest radiographic findings of leptospirosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. A study on chest radiographic findings of 54 cases with pneumonia like symptoms was performed. Of 54 cases, 8 cases were confirmed to be leptospirosis and 7 cases were leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever. 2. Of 8 cases of leptospirosis, 4 cases showed abnormal chest radiographic findings: acinar nodular type 2, massive confluent consolidation type 2. Of 7 cases of leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever: acinar nodular type 3, massive confluent consolidation type 1, and increased interstitial markings type 1 respectively. 3. It was considered to be difficult to diagnose the leptospirosis on chest radiographic findings alone, especially the case combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever.

  2. Chest radiographic findings of leptospirosis

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    Kim, Mee Hyun; Jung, Hee Tae; Lee, Young Joong; Yoon, Jong Sup [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-04-15

    1. A study on chest radiographic findings of 54 cases with pneumonia like symptoms was performed. Of 54 cases, 8 cases were confirmed to be leptospirosis and 7 cases were leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever. 2. Of 8 cases of leptospirosis, 4 cases showed abnormal chest radiographic findings: acinar nodular type 2, massive confluent consolidation type 2. Of 7 cases of leptospirosis combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever: acinar nodular type 3, massive confluent consolidation type 1, and increased interstitial markings type 1 respectively. 3. It was considered to be difficult to diagnose the leptospirosis on chest radiographic findings alone, especially the case combined with Korean hemorrhagic fever.

  3. Radiographic findings in the chest of patients following cardiac transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The postoperative chest radiographic findings in 38 patients undergoing orthotopic (37 patients) and heterotopic (1 patient) cardiac transplantation were evaluated. Findings were correlated with those of echocardiograms, sputum and blood cultures, and lung and heart biopsies. The radiographic manifestations in the chest of these patients are classified in the following three main categories: 1) newly formed cardiac silhouette findings due to the transplanted heart itself, i.e., changes in size and shape of the new heart and pericardial effusion resulting from the placement of a smaller heart in a larger pericardial sac. 2) infectious complications due to bacteria, fungal, and other opportunistic agents secondary to immunosuppressive therapy, and 3) usual postoperatice complications following thoracomoty and open-heart surgery. (orig.)

  4. Chest reporting by radiographers: Findings of an accredited postgraduate programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To analyse the objective structured examination (OSE) results of the first six cohorts of radiographers (n = 40) who successfully completed an accredited postgraduate programme in clinical reporting of adult chest radiographs. Methods: One hundred chest radiographs were used in the OSE which included a range of abnormal cases (prevalence of abnormal examinations approximated 50%) and included: cardiac, pulmonary, pleural, interstitial, inflammatory, neoplastic and traumatic appearances on patients referred from a range of referral sources. Normal variants and incidental findings were also included. True/false positive and negative fractions were used to mark the responses which were also scored for agreement with the previously agreed expected answers based on agreement between three consultant radiologists' reports. Results: Mean sensitivity and specificity rates, for all six cohorts (4000 reports), was 95.4% (95% CI 94.4%–96.3%) and 95.9% (95% CI 94.9%–96.7%), respectively. The mean agreement rate was 89% (95% CI 88.0%–89.0%) and the most common errors were related to heart size, hilar enlargement or pleural effusion (false positive); and skeletal appearances or pneumothoraces (false negative). Conclusions: These OSE results suggest therefore that in an academic setting, and following an accredited postgraduate education programme, this group of radiographers has the ability to correctly identify normal chest radiographs and are able to provide a report on the abnormal appearances to a high standard. Further work is required to confirm the clinical application of these findings

  5. Severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia in immunocompetent adults: chest radiographic and CT findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dingyu; Fu, Yangyang; Wang, Zhiwei; Cao, Jian; Walline, Joseph; Zhu, Huadong

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe adenovirus pneumonia and its associated imaging features are well-described in immunocompromised patients but are rare and poorly understood in immunocompetent adults. We sought to describe the radiographic and CT findings of severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in eight immunocompetent adults. Methods We reviewed systematically chest imaging manifestations of laboratory-confirmed severe adenovirus pneumonia in eight immunocompetent adults from April 2012 to April 2014. Results All patients showed abnormal results on initial chest radiograph and CT, with the exception of one normal initial chest radiograph. The abnormalities of the initial chest radiographs were unilateral (n=4) or bilateral (n=3), including consolidation (n=4), dense patchy opacity (n=3), ground glass opacity (GGO) (n=1), and pleural effusion (n=1). The initial CT findings consisted of unilateral (n=5) and bilateral (n=3) abnormalities, including consolidation (n=8), GGO (n=2), pleural effusion (n=3) and small nodules (n=1). Focal consolidation was the predominant finding in six patients whose initial CT scans were examined within one week after illness onset. Follow-up radiologic findings showed rapid development of bilateral consolidation within ten days after illness onset, usually accompanied by adjacent ground-glass opacity and pleural effusion. The parenchymal abnormalities began to absorb around two weeks after illness onset, with no appearances of fibrosis. Conclusions Severe adenovirus CAP in immunocompetent adults mainly appears as focal consolidation followed by rapid progression to bilateral consolidation, usually accompanied by adjacent GGO and pleural effusion, which may resemble bacterial pneumonia. Adenovirus should be considered in severe pneumonia cases with negative cultures and failure to respond to antibiotics.

  6. Chest Radiographic Findings in Primary Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Observations from High School Outbreaks

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    Koh, Won Jung; Kwon, O Jung; Lee, Kyung Soo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yeon Joo [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Jin; Lew, Woo Jin [Korean Institute of Tuberculosis, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, En Hi [4Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    To describe the radiographic findings of primary pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in previously healthy adolescent patients. The Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study, with a waiver of informed consent from the patients. TB outbreaks occurred in 15 senior high schools and chest radiographs from 58 students with identical strains of TB were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis by two independent observers. Lesions of nodule(s), consolidation, or cavitation in the upper lung zones were classified as typical TB. Mediastinal lymph node enlargement; lesions of nodule(s), consolidation, or cavitation in lower lung zones; or pleural effusion were classified as atypical TB. Inter-observer agreement for the presence of each radiographic finding was examined by kappa statistics. Of 58 patients, three (5%) had normal chest radiographs. Cavitary lesions were present in 25 (45%) of 55 students. Lesions with upper lung zone predominance were observed in 27 (49%) patients, whereas lower lung zone predominance was noted in 18 (33%) patients. The remaining 10 (18%) patients had lesions in both upper and lower lung zones. Pleural effusion was not observed in any patient, nor was the mediastinal lymph node enlargement. Hilar lymph node enlargement was seen in only one (2%) patient. Overall, 37 (67%) students had the typical form of TB, whereas 18 (33%) had TB lesions of the atypical form. The most common radiographic findings in primary pulmonary TB by recent infection in previously healthy adolescents are upper lung lesions, which were thought to be radiographic findings of reactivation pulmonary TB by remote infection

  7. Chest Radiographic Findings in Primary Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Observations from High School Outbreaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the radiographic findings of primary pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in previously healthy adolescent patients. The Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study, with a waiver of informed consent from the patients. TB outbreaks occurred in 15 senior high schools and chest radiographs from 58 students with identical strains of TB were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis by two independent observers. Lesions of nodule(s), consolidation, or cavitation in the upper lung zones were classified as typical TB. Mediastinal lymph node enlargement; lesions of nodule(s), consolidation, or cavitation in lower lung zones; or pleural effusion were classified as atypical TB. Inter-observer agreement for the presence of each radiographic finding was examined by kappa statistics. Of 58 patients, three (5%) had normal chest radiographs. Cavitary lesions were present in 25 (45%) of 55 students. Lesions with upper lung zone predominance were observed in 27 (49%) patients, whereas lower lung zone predominance was noted in 18 (33%) patients. The remaining 10 (18%) patients had lesions in both upper and lower lung zones. Pleural effusion was not observed in any patient, nor was the mediastinal lymph node enlargement. Hilar lymph node enlargement was seen in only one (2%) patient. Overall, 37 (67%) students had the typical form of TB, whereas 18 (33%) had TB lesions of the atypical form. The most common radiographic findings in primary pulmonary TB by recent infection in previously healthy adolescents are upper lung lesions, which were thought to be radiographic findings of reactivation pulmonary TB by remote infection

  8. Aspergillus infection of the respiratory tract after lung transplantation: chest radiographic and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of our study was to assess radiographic and CT findings in lung transplant patients with evidence of Aspergillus colonization or infection of the airways and correlate the findings with clinical, laboratory, bronchoalveolar lavage, biopsy and autopsy findings. The records of 189 patients who had undergone lung transplantation were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of Aspergillus colonization or infection of the airways. Aspergillus was demonstrated by culture or microscopy of sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or histologically from lung biopsies or postmortem studies in 44 patients (23 %). Notes and radiographs were available for analysis in 30 patients. In 12 of the 30 patients (40 %) chest radiographs remained normal. In 11 of 18 patients with abnormal radiographs pulmonary abnormalities were attributed to invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in the absence of other causes for pulmonary abnormalities (8 patients) or because of histological demonstration of IPA (3 patients). In these 11 patients initial radiographic abnormalities were focal areas of patchy consolidation (8 patients), ill-defined pulmonary nodules (2 patients) or a combination of both (1 patient). In some of the lesions cavitation was demonstrated subsequently. At CT a ''halo'' of decreased density was demonstrated in some of the nodules and lesion morphology and location were shown more precisely. Demonstration of Aspergillus from the respiratory tract after lung transplantation does not necessarily reflect IPA but may represent colonization of the airways or semi-invasive aspergillosis. The findings in patients with IPA did not differ from those described in the literature in other immunocompromised patients, suggesting that surgical disruption of lymphatic drainage and nervous supply or effects of preservation and transport of the transplant lung do not affect the radiographic appearances. (orig.)

  9. Chest Radiographic Findings of Novel Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children

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    Bae, So Young; Hong, Eun Sook; Paik, Sang Hyun; Park, Seong Jin; Cha, Jang Gyu; Lee, Hae Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Yun Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    To analyze chest radiographic findings in children infected with laboratory confirmed novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus. Three hundred seventy-two out of 2,014 children with laboratory confirmed H1N1 infection and who also underwent a chest radiograph from September to November 2009 were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into in-patients, out-patients, and patients with co-infections and further subdivided into with underlying disease and without underlying disease as well as age (<2 years old, 2-5 years, 5-10 years, 10-18 years old). The initial radiographs were evaluated for radiographic findings and the anatomic distribution of abnormalities. The initial radiographs were abnormal in 154 (41.39%) patients. The predominant radiographic findings were peribronchial wall opacity found in 85 (22.84%) patients and hyperinflation observed in 69 (18.54%) patients. Further, 75 (71.42%) patients exhibited central predominance and the right lower lung zone was also commonly involved. There were statistically significant differences in the radiological findings between in-patient and out-patient groups. However, there were no significant differences in the radiographic findings between in-patients and the co-infection group with respect the presence of underlying disease and age. Initial radiographs of children with laboratory confirmed H1N1 virus were abnormal in 41.39% of cases. The common radiographic findings included peribronchial opacities, hyperinflation, lower lung zonal distribution, and central predominance

  10. Chest Radiographic Findings of Novel Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze chest radiographic findings in children infected with laboratory confirmed novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus. Three hundred seventy-two out of 2,014 children with laboratory confirmed H1N1 infection and who also underwent a chest radiograph from September to November 2009 were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into in-patients, out-patients, and patients with co-infections and further subdivided into with underlying disease and without underlying disease as well as age (<2 years old, 2-5 years, 5-10 years, 10-18 years old). The initial radiographs were evaluated for radiographic findings and the anatomic distribution of abnormalities. The initial radiographs were abnormal in 154 (41.39%) patients. The predominant radiographic findings were peribronchial wall opacity found in 85 (22.84%) patients and hyperinflation observed in 69 (18.54%) patients. Further, 75 (71.42%) patients exhibited central predominance and the right lower lung zone was also commonly involved. There were statistically significant differences in the radiological findings between in-patient and out-patient groups. However, there were no significant differences in the radiographic findings between in-patients and the co-infection group with respect the presence of underlying disease and age. Initial radiographs of children with laboratory confirmed H1N1 virus were abnormal in 41.39% of cases. The common radiographic findings included peribronchial opacities, hyperinflation, lower lung zonal distribution, and central predominance

  11. HIV-positive patients in Pusan servitude : clinical and chest radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the clinical and chest radiolographic findings of HIV-positive in Pusan survitude. We reviewed the medical records of 74 admission cases of 41 HIV-positive patients (38 mem and 3 women), confirmed in NIH and admitted to our hospital between May 1990 and September 1997. We evaluated the clinical findings including the pulmonary disease diagnosed at each admission, and using the pattern approach assessed the radiographic findings in 63 cases available among 74 admission cases. For statistical analysis the Pearson Chi-Square test was used, and the chest CT findings available in 19 cases among 17 patients were also evaluated. In all cases the mode of transmission was sexual contact, and they were more frequently contacted with foreigners (73%) than koreans (27%). During the follow-up period, pulmonary diseases were diagnosed in 52 (70%) of 74 admission cases. The diagnoses were pneumocystis cabrini pneumonia (PCP, n=15), pneumonia(n=15), pulmonary tuberculosis(n=15), combined infection with PCP and pulmonary tuberculosis(n=5), and combined infection with PCP and bacterial pneumonia(n=1). The count of CD4+ lymphocyte in 33 of 55 available admissions cases was less than 50 cells/mm?. In 28 patients(68%) who died, the time between confirmation of HIV-positive status to death ranged from 2 to 81 (mean, 39) months. Chest radiographs of 46 available admission cases (73%) showed the followingabnormal findings: interstitial opacities(n=26), consolidation(n=17), single or multiple nodules (n=9), hilar or mediastinal lymph node enlargement(n=10), pleural effusion(n=8), cyst(n=2), mass(n=1), and pericardial effusion(n=1). Diffuse ground glass opacity was observed in eight (89%) of nine PCP cases (p<0.05), and in cases of pulmonary tubercolosis, hilar or mediastinal lymph node enlargement was frequent (p<0.05). Pulmonary diseases in HIV-positive patients in Pusan servitude were diagnosed during follow-up in 70% of cases. The majority of these diseases were infectious

  12. Chest radiographic staging in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: relationship with immunological findings.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kiely, J L

    2012-02-03

    The question of whether a chest radiographic severity staging system could be correlated with standard blood\\/serum diagnostic indices in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) was addressed in 41 patients. Asthma and positive Aspergillus fumigatus (AF) serology were considered essential diagnostic inclusion criteria. Eosinophil count, serum immunoglobulin (Ig)E and immediate skin hypersensitivity were also tested to grade patients as "definite" or "likely" ABPA. Definite cases had all five of these factors present, whereas likely cases had three or more. Chest radiographs were examined by experienced radiologists blinded to the clinical data. The six-stage radiographic score (0-5) was based on the severity and duration of changes seen: stage 0: normal; stage 1: transient hyperinflation; stage 2: transient minor changes; stage 3: transient major changes; stage 4: permanent minor changes; and stage 5: permanent major changes. Significant positive correlations (p<0.05) were observed between peak AF titres (expressed as an index), peak eosinophil count and radiographic severity stage. When considered as subgroups, these correlations approached, but did not reach, significance for the group with "likely" ABPA (n=28), but in the group with definite ABPA (n=13), there was a high correlation between radiographic score and peak AF index (r=0.59), as well as peak eosinophil count (r=0.62). This study suggests that the peak Aspergillus fumigatus index and eosinophil counts correlate best with the severity of radiographic stages in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. This chest radiographic staging system may be useful in the clinical assessment and management of patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, particularly in those patients with more severe radiographic stages.

  13. Incidental finding of unilateral isolated aplasia of serratus anterior muscle and winged scapula on chest radiograph: A case report

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    Choi, Joon Sung; Park, Hyun Jin; Ko, Jeong Min [Dept. of Radiology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The isolated aplasia of the serratus anterior muscle with winging of scapula is very rare, and only a few cases are reported. Here, we present a case of a 30-year-old Korean male who initially presented with a left flank pain. His physical exam did not show any significant finding in his right shoulder. However, his chest radiograph showed absence of right serratus anterior muscle and slightly elevated and medially rotated right scapula. Subsequent CT scan showed the right serratus anterior muscle aplasia and medial winging of the right scapula. This case is unique in two aspects. First, the combination of abnormalities is different from the typical congenital abnormalities involving shoulder girdle, such as Sprengel deformity or Poland syndrome. Secondly, this was incidentally diagnosed with chest radiograph, without clinical impression. Careful reading of chest radiograph can help the radiologists to detect such clinically silent abnormalities.

  14. Incidental finding of unilateral isolated aplasia of serratus anterior muscle and winged scapula on chest radiograph: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isolated aplasia of the serratus anterior muscle with winging of scapula is very rare, and only a few cases are reported. Here, we present a case of a 30-year-old Korean male who initially presented with a left flank pain. His physical exam did not show any significant finding in his right shoulder. However, his chest radiograph showed absence of right serratus anterior muscle and slightly elevated and medially rotated right scapula. Subsequent CT scan showed the right serratus anterior muscle aplasia and medial winging of the right scapula. This case is unique in two aspects. First, the combination of abnormalities is different from the typical congenital abnormalities involving shoulder girdle, such as Sprengel deformity or Poland syndrome. Secondly, this was incidentally diagnosed with chest radiograph, without clinical impression. Careful reading of chest radiograph can help the radiologists to detect such clinically silent abnormalities.

  15. Lung parenchymal change after the resolution of adenovirus pneumonia : chest radiographs and high-resolution CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate lung parenchymal change as seen on chest radiographs and high-resolution CT (HRCT) after the resolution of adenovirus pneumonia (a common cause of lower respiratory infection in infants and children),and the usefulness of HRCT during follow-up. Material and Methods : Four to 13(mean, 8) months after recovery, ten patients infected with adenovirus pneumonia underwent HRCT and chest radiographs. Eight were boys and two were girls, and their mean age was 26(range, 14-45) months. Adenovirus pneumonia had been confirmed by viral isolation in culture or serologic test. CT scanning was performed during quiet breathing ; collimation was 2 mm and the interval from apex to diaphragm was 5-10 mm. Lung settings were 1600 HU (window width) and -700 HU(level). CT findings were assessed and compared with chest radiographs by two chest radiologists, who reached a consensus. The patients were clinically followed up for one year. Result : On chest radiographs, hyperlucent lung was seen in 8 of 10 patients (80%) ; in one other there was partial collapse, and in one, findings were normal. The most common HRCT finding was a mosaic pattern of lung attenuation with decreased pulmonary vascularity in the area of lower attenuation ; this was seen in 8 of 10 patients (80%). Other findings were partial collapse, bronchiectasis, and bronchial wall thickening, each seen in two patients, and reticulonodular density, seen in one. In two patients HRCT findings were normal ; in one of these, chest findings were normal but a mosaic pattern of lung attenuation was found in all lobes. During follow-up, three patients wheezed continuously. Conclusion : In cases of adenovirus pneumonia, HRCT demonstrated more specific parenchymal change than did chest radiographs ; a mosaic pattern of lung attenuation was seen, with decreased pulmonary vascularity in areas of lower attenuation ; bronchiectasis,bronchial wall thickening, and reticulo-odular density were also noted. These findings were

  16. A study on findings from simple chest radiographs without any clinical symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the analysis on findings from simple chest radiography (CXR) test with total 1,669 subjects without any special clinical symptom came to the following conclusions: In terms of the general characteristics of subjects hereof, male and female group accounted for 55.2% and 44.8% respectively out of all 1,669 people. Pulmonary disease cases amounted to 249 persons (14.9%) out of all subjects. In the analysis on prevalence rate by age distribution, it was noted that the older age led to the more number of diseases, which was demonstrated by age 34 or younger (6.1%), age 35 ∼ 39 (9.7%), age 40 ∼ 49 (13.3%), and age 50 or older (30.8%). In regard of pulmonary disease alone, the region of onset was represented primarily by right upper lobe, which was followed by both upper lobe and left upper lobe, respectively. In terms of disease types, it was found that most cases were represented by pulmonary nodule (55.0%), which was followed by cardiomegaly (24.5%), CP angle blunting (4.8%), scoliosis (4.6%) tortuous aorta (2.8%), bronchial luminal dilatation(2.4%), and pleural thickening (2.0%). However, dextrocardia, cystic dilation of bronchus, cavitary lesion, and lung collapse accounted for relatively low rate (0.4% respectively). In terms of disease types by sex, it was found that male group accounted for higher percentage of having cardiomegaly, tortuous aorta and scoliosis than the former. In terms of disease types by age distribution, it was noted that age 34 or younger group accounted for higher percentage of scoliosis than any other age groups, while age 40 ∼ 49 group, age 35 ∼ 39 group, and age 50 or older group represented the case of CP angle blunting, pulmonary nodule, and cardiomegaly/tortuous aorta, respectively

  17. Radiographic findings in immunodeficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the chest radiographs and high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans in patients with immunodeficiency disorders and define the role of HRCT. Thirty-three cases were retrospectively graded according to the consensus of two radiologists. Patients with HIV seropositivity and asthma were excluded. HRCT was performed in 12 cases with standard techniques. Diagnoses included common variable hypogammaglobulinemia (n = 19), X-linked agammaglobulinemia (n = 4), chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (n = 4), and selective immunoglobulin g deficiencies (n = 2). Chest radiographs showed bronchiectasis in 11 of 33 cases with a predominant lower lobe distribution (82%). Nodules were present in six cases and mucus plugs in four cases. HRCT showed bronchiectasis in nine of 12 cases; in five of these nine cases, bronchiectasis was not apparent on chest radiographs. Other HRCT findings included segmental air trapping (four of 12), mucus plugs (three of 12), hazy consolidation (four of 12), nodules (five of 12), and bronchiolectasis (two of 12). Therapy was altered in seven of 12 cases in which HRCT was performed. Most pertinent to clinical management were the presence of a thymoma (n = 1) and severe focal of diffuse bronchiectasis

  18. Chest radiograph interpretation by medical students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To assess the ability of final year medical students to interpret conventional chest radiographs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten conventional chest radiographs were selected from a teaching hospital radiology department library that were good radiological examples of common conditions. All were conditions that a medical student should be expected to recognize by the end of their training. One normal radiograph was included. The radiographs were shown to 52 final year medical students who were asked to describe their findings. RESULTS: The median score achieved was 12.5 out of 20 (range 6-18). There was no difference between the median scores of male and female students (12.5 and 12.3, respectively, p=0.82) but male students were more likely to be certain of their answers than female students (median certainty scores 23.0 and 14.0, respectively). The overall degree of certainty was low. On no radiograph were more than 25% of students definite about their answer. Students had received little formal radiology teaching (2-42 h, median 21) and few expressed an interest in radiology as a career. Only two (3.8%) students thought they were good at interpreting chest radiographs, 17 (32.7%) thought they were bad or awful. CONCLUSION: Medical students reaching the end of their training do not perform well at interpreting simple chest radiographs. They lack confidence and have received little formal radiological tuition. Perhaps as a result, few are interested in radiology as a career, which is a matter for concern in view of the current shortage of radiologists in the UK

  19. CT saber-sheath trachea. Correlation with clinical, chest radiographic and functional findings

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    Trigaux, J.P. (Services de Radiologie, de Pneumologie, Cliniques Universitaires UCL Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium)); Hermes, G. (Services de Radiologie, de Pneumologie, Cliniques Universitaires UCL Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium)); Dubois, P. (Services de Radiologie, de Pneumologie, Cliniques Universitaires UCL Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium)); Beers, B. van (Services de Radiologie, de Pneumologie, Cliniques Universitaires UCL Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium)); Delaunois, L. (Services de Radiologie, de Pneumologie, Cliniques Universitaires UCL Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium)); Jamart, J. (Services de Radiologie, de Pneumologie, Cliniques Universitaires UCL Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium))

    1994-05-01

    The diagnosis of saber-sheath trachea is easy at CT due to its cross-sectional imaging, but the significance of this CT sign has not been evaluated in the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Various signs of COPD were compared between a series of 20 patients with a saber-sheath trachea at CT (tracheal index [<=]66%) and a group of 20 pneumologic control patients without saber-sheath trachea (tracheal index [>=]70%). These signs include clinical and standard radiographic indices of COPD, sternum-spine distance and 3 functional tests of COPD: forced expiratory volume in one second, carbon monoxide diffusing lung capacity, and funtional residual capacity (FRC). A significant difference was found between the 2 groups, concerning the values of FRC and of sternum-spine distance (p<10[sup -2]). The tracheal index was significantly correlated with the FRC values and with the sternum-spine distance. No other significant difference was observed. It is concluded that saber-sheath trachea is basically a sign of hyperinflation. (orig./MG).

  20. Gastric tumors on chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastric neoplasms of three patients protruded into their gas-containing fornices and were first visualized on plain chest radiographs. Endoscopy and/or surgery confirmed these to be a polyp, a leiomyoma, and an adenocarcinoma. The polyp, 1.3 cm in diameter, was the smallest of these three, but smaller lesions may be detectable under suitable conditions. Adequate technique and positioning, sufficiently large lesions in the upper portion of the stomach, a central beam tangential to the tumor, sufficient gas in the stomach, and careful scrutiny by the observer are required. Lesions may be more readily visualized during chest radiography when oral sodium bicarbonate is used to distend the stomach. In chest radiography, exposure limited to the lung fields has been advocated for economy and dose reduction. However, too small an exposure field may result in loss of information potentially beneficial to the patient. Using the smaller of two popular film sizes (35 x 43 cm and 35 x 35 cm), the saving in surface and bone marrow doses is negligible, and the saving in gonad dose may be nil over that when shielding is used. The interest of the observer may be absorbed by a concomitant cardiac or pulmonary lesion. Careful scrutiny of the entire radiograph is therefore essential. (author)

  1. Communication of Unexpected and Significant Findings on Chest Radiographs With an Automated PACS Alert System.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, Sara A

    2014-08-01

    An integral part of realizing the enormous potential of imaging in patient care is close communication between radiologists and referring physicians. One key element of this process is the communication of unexpected significant findings. The authors examined the performance of a PACS-based alert system in the appropriate communication of reports containing unexpected significant findings to referring physicians.

  2. Chest radiograph usefulness in the diagnosis of acute aortic dissection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nancy Welch; Chat Dang; Carlton Allen; Robert Cook

    2005-01-01

    Objective To assess the diagnostic value of chest radiographs in patients presenting to a busy inner-city Emergency Department with subsequently proven acute aortic dissection. Methods A retrospective review of initial chest radiographs and charts of patients with the confirmed diagnosis of acute aortic dissection was done for a period of 5 years from 1998 to 2003. A comparison was made between the initial readings of chest radiographs prior to confirmation of the aortic dissection, and a retrospective review of the same radiographs by two board-certified radiologists with special attention to the classic findings of acute aortic dissection identifiable on plain films. Results The charts of nine patients (four men, five women) with proven acute aortic dissection were reviewed. All nine patients were suspected of having acute aortic dissection based on presenting history and symptoms of chest pain (66% ), migratory pain (89% ), back pain (89% ), and the abruptness of onset of pain (89% ). Initial plain portable chest X-rays were obtained in the Emergency Department in all nine patients. Six of nine (67%) radiographs were read as normal, while three (33%) demonstrated a widened mediastinum (> 8.0cm), two (22%) showed an abnormal aortic contour, with one ( 11% ) displaying an apical cap. Confirmation of the diagnosis was obtained with either a spiral CT angiogram or transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). All nine plain radiographs were retrospectively reviewed by two board-certified radiologists aware of the diagnosis of acute dissection without a change in the readings. Conclusions Plain portable chest radiographs are of limited usefulness for the screening of acute aortic dissection. Further radiologic evaluation should be dictated by the clinical presentation and an awareness of the low sensitivity of portable chest X- rays.

  3. Chest radiographic and computed tomographic manifestations in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

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    Ritesh Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the chest radiographic and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT chest manifestations in glucocorticoid-naïve allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA patients. METHODS: This is a prospective observational study and includes 60 consecutive glucocorticoid-naïve patients with ABPA who underwent chest radiography and HRCT of the chest (1.25 mm every 10 mm in the routine diagnostic workup for ABPA. RESULTS: Chest radiographs were normal in 50% of cases. Of the remainder, most patients demonstrated permanent findings in the form of parallel line and ring shadows suggesting bronchiectasis. Consolidation was detected in 17 cases but in the majority, the corresponding HRCT chest scan showed mucus-filled bronchiectatic cavities. Chest HRCT was normal in 22 patients, while central bronchiectasis (CB was demonstrated in the remaining 38 patients. Bronchiectasis extended to the periphery in 33%-43% depending on the criteria used for defining CB. The other findings observed on HRCT were mucoid impaction, centrilobular nodules and high-attenuation mucus in decreasing order of frequency. CONCLUSION: Patients with ABPA can present with normal HRCT chest scans. Central bronchiectasis cannot be considered a characteristic feature of ABPA as peripheral bronchiectasis is commonly observed. Consolidation is an uncommon finding in ABPA.

  4. Chest radiographic findings and complications of the temporary implantation of the Jarvik-7 artificial heart while patients await orthotopic heart transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the University of Pittsburgh, the authors have had 15 patients in whom Jarvik-7 hearts were implanted as a temporary measure while the patients awaited suitable donors for cardiac transplantation. The paper presents a brief description of the Jarvik-7 artificial heart, factors affecting patient selection, and the radiographic appearance of a normally functioning Jarvik-7 heart, and reviews the chest radiographic complications seen in this patient group, along with eventual patient outcome

  5. Chest Radiography Findings in Primary Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Milković, Đurđica; Richter, Darko; Zoričić-Letoja, Ivka; Raos, Miljenko; Koncul, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    Plain chest radiography plays a major role in the diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary tuberculosis in childhood. The aim of our study was to investigate the distribution of characteristic chest radiographic findings at diagnosis in children with pulmonary tuberculosis. The age of the patients and the type and localization of radiographic changes at admission were retrospectively analyzed. We reviewed chest radiographs in 204 children admitted from January 1, 1991 until June 30, 1994 for newl...

  6. Chest radiographic data acquisition and quality assurance in multicenter studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Multicenter studies rely on data derived from different institutions. Forms can be designed to standardize the reporting process allowing reliable comparison of data. Objective. The purpose of the report is to provide a standardized method, developed as a part of a multicenter study of vertically transmitted HIV, for assessing chest radiographic results. Materials and methods. Eight hundred and five infants and children were studied at five centers; 3057 chest radiographs were scored. Data were entered using a forced-choice, graded response for 12 findings. Quality assurance measures and inter-rater agreement statistics are reported. Results. The form used for reporting chest radiographic results is presented. Inter-rater agreement was moderate to high for most findings, with the best correlation reported for the presence of bronchovascular markings and/or reticular densities addressed as a composite question (kappa = 0.71). The presence of nodular densities (kappa 0.56) and parenchymal consolidation (kappa = 0.57) had moderate agreement. Agreement for lung volume was low. Conclusion. The current tool, developed for use in the pediatric population, is applicable to any study involving the assessment of pediatric chest radiographs for a large population, whether at one or many centers. (orig.)

  7. Segmentation of ribs in digital chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Lin; Guo, Wei; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Ribs and clavicles in posterior-anterior (PA) digital chest radiographs often overlap with lung abnormalities such as nodules, and cause missing of these abnormalities, it is therefore necessary to remove or reduce the ribs in chest radiographs. The purpose of this study was to develop a fully automated algorithm to segment ribs within lung area in digital radiography (DR) for removal of the ribs. The rib segmentation algorithm consists of three steps. Firstly, a radiograph was pre-processed for contrast adjustment and noise removal; second, generalized Hough transform was employed to localize the lower boundary of the ribs. In the third step, a novel bilateral dynamic programming algorithm was used to accurately segment the upper and lower boundaries of ribs simultaneously. The width of the ribs and the smoothness of the rib boundaries were incorporated in the cost function of the bilateral dynamic programming for obtaining consistent results for the upper and lower boundaries. Our database consisted of 93 DR images, including, respectively, 23 and 70 images acquired with a DR system from Shanghai United-Imaging Healthcare Co. and from GE Healthcare Co. The rib localization algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 98.2% with 0.1 false positives per image. The accuracy of the detected ribs was further evaluated subjectively in 3 levels: "1", good; "2", acceptable; "3", poor. The percentages of good, acceptable, and poor segmentation results were 91.1%, 7.2%, and 1.7%, respectively. Our algorithm can obtain good segmentation results for ribs in chest radiography and would be useful for rib reduction in our future study.

  8. Lung involvement quantification in chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is an infectious disease which remains a global health problem. The chest radiography is the commonly method employed to assess the TB's evolution. The methods for quantification of abnormalities of chest are usually performed on CT scans (CT). This quantification is important to assess the TB evolution and treatment and comparing different treatments. However, precise quantification is not feasible for the amount of CT scans required. The purpose of this work is to develop a methodology for quantification of lung damage caused by TB through chest radiographs. It was developed an algorithm for computational processing of exams in Matlab, which creates a lungs' 3D representation, with compromised dilated regions inside. The quantification of lung lesions was also made for the same patients through CT scans. The measurements from the two methods were compared and resulting in strong correlation. Applying statistical Bland and Altman, all samples were within the limits of agreement, with a confidence interval of 95%. The results showed an average variation of around 13% between the two quantification methods. The results suggest the effectiveness and applicability of the method developed, providing better risk-benefit to the patient and cost-benefit ratio for the institution. (author)

  9. Chest radiographic findings and complications of the temporary implantation of the Jarvik-7 artificial heart while awaiting orthotopic heart transplantation: Experience with five cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Jarvik-7 artificial heart was originally introduced as a therapeutic alternative to cardiac transplantation in patients with endstage refractory cardiac disease. Its use has been expanded to those patients awaiting cardiac transplantation in whom death is impending and for whom a suitable donor match is unavailable. At Presbyterian-University Hospital of Pittsburgh five patients have had Jarvik-7 hearts implanted as a temporary measure while awaiting compatible donors for cardiac transplantation. The authors believe this is the largest patient group to undergo this procedure at a single institution. They present a brief description of the Jarvik-7 heart, the clinical factors affecting patient selection, and the radiographic appearance of a normally functioning Jarvik-7 heart, and review the chest radiographic complications seen in the patient group, along with eventual patient outcome

  10. Chest radiographic diagnosis of trisomy-21 in newborn infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Common chest radiographic findings in trisomy-21 include multiple manubrial ossification centers (MMC), 11 rib pairs (11R), and a notably bell-shaped chest (BSC). These findings were compared in a sequential series of 881 newborns (first 48 hours of life) without chromosomal abnormalities and 30 newborns with trisomy-21. Logistic regression analysis indicates that the probability of trisomy-21 is 0.05% when none of these findings is present, 1.6% with MMC alone, 0.2% with 11R alone, 0.7% with BSC alone, 8.8% with MMC and 11R, 19.4% with MMC and BSC, 3.9% with 11R and BSC, and 58.4% if all three findings are present

  11. Herpes simplex virus 1 pneumonia: conventional chest radiograph pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to describe the findings on plain chest radiographs in patients with herpes simplex virus pneumonia (HSVP). The study was based on 17 patients who at a retrospective search have been found to have a monoinfection with herpes simplex virus. The diagnosis was established by isolation of the virus from material obtained during fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) which also included broncho-alveolar lavage and tissue sampling. Fourteen patients had a chest radiograph performed within 24 h of the date of the FOB. Two radiographs showed no abnormalities of the lung parenchyma. The radiographs of the other 12 patients showed lung opacification, predominantly lobar or more extensive and always bilateral. Most patients presented with a mixed airspace and interstitial pattern of opacities, but 11 of 14 showed at least an airspace consolidation. Lobar, segmental, or subsegmental atelectasis was present in 7 patients, and unilateral or bilateral pleural effusion in 8 patients, but only in 1 patient was it a large amount. In contradiction to the literature which reports a high correlation between HSVP and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), 11 of 14 patients did not meet the pathophysiological criteria for ARDS. The radiologist may suggest the diagnosis of HSVP when bilateral airspace consolidation or mixed opacities appear in a susceptible group of patients who are not thought to have ARDS or pulmonary edema. The definite diagnosis of HSV pneumonia can be established only on the basis of culture of material obtained by broncho-alveolar lavage. (orig.)

  12. Can the Physicians or Surgions Do without Chest Radiograph?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Bakhshayeshkaram

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available   "nThe question is how much information is there in chest radiographs ? "nWe can consider the approximate heart size. Rough quantification of heart failure, very basic anatomy of the heart. The chest radiograph is widely available, cheap and very low long term risk of radiation. Chest radiographs are required in the initial consultation of heart or lung diseases. Follow-up radiographs are only required in certain situations. Chest radiographs contain significant information. But nowadays we look less critically, because it is easy to order echo, CT or MRI. Examples of frequently encountered abnormalities seen in our daily practice: "n-Change in hilar size or adenopathy "n-Alteration in hilar contour "n-Bronchial wall thickening "n-Obscuration of normal hilar structures "n   

  13. Computer Analysis Of ILO Standard Chest Radiographs Of Pneumoconiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C. C.; Shu, David B. C.; Tai, H. T.; Hou, W.; Kunkle, G. A.; Wang, Y.; Hoy, R. J.

    1982-11-01

    This paper presents study of computer analysis of the 1980 ILO standard chest radiographs of pneumoconiosis. Algorithms developed for detection of individual small rounded and irregular opacities have been experimented and evaluated on these standard radiographs. The density, shape, and size distribution of the detected objects in the lung field, in spite of false positives, can be used as indicators for the beginning of pneumoconiosis. This approach is potentially useful in computer-assisted screening and early detection process where the annual chest radiograph of each worker is compared with his (her) own normal radiograph obtained previously.

  14. Horizontal fissure on neonatal plain chest radiographs: clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regardless of etiology, pleural fluid, even in small amounts, can be visualized on the neonatal chest x-ray picture within pulmonary fissures. It remains unclear whether a marked horizontal fissure unaccompanied by any other radiological symptoms is of diagnostic value or not. Ninety-one consecutive neonatal chest radiographs with marked horizontal fissure were retrospectively analyzed. The images were made between 1999 and 2005 on 69 newborns admitted to the Neonatology Department, Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Gdansk. Analysis of the radiographs was conducted independently by three radiologists based on the following criteria: fissure thickness (marked or thickened), bronchovascular markings (increased or normal), size and shape of the heart (normal or abnormal), presence or absence of pulmonary infiltration, atelectasis, and changes related to wet lung syndrome. Due to divergent interpretations, the ultimate interpretation was established by consensus in 25 cases. The radiological findings were compared with clinical data. The compatibility of the three independent interpreters was statistically significant (p<0.0001). Marked transverse fissure was the only radiological finding on 66 x-rays. In 63 cases (69.2%) the children were asymptomatic as well. In 3 cases (3.3%) clinical symptoms of respiratory tract infection occurred. On the other 25 images, horizontal fissure was accompanied by other radiological symptoms. Chest x-ray results corresponded with clinical symptoms in 24 cases (26.4%). One child (1.1%) with radiological evidence of wet lung syndrome did not present any typical clinical symptoms of it. Horizontal fissure noted on a neonatal chest x-ray seems to be of minor diagnostic value if not accompanied by any other radiological symptoms. (author)

  15. Extracardiac chest sonography in children: Radiographic and clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-nine infants and children underwent high-resolution chest US for chest masses, opaque hemithorax identified on chest radiographs, and for documentation and localization of pleural fluid. Masses included cystic hygromas, thymic cysts, diaphragmatic eventration, round pneumonia, lung abscesses, and pleural pseudotumors. Complete chest opacification was due to pneumonia, pleural fluid, pulmonary hypoplasia, pleural metastasis, and bronchial foreign bodies. Sonographic examination of pleural disease allowed differentiation of pleural thickening from free fluid and guided aspiration of pockets of loculated fluid. Therapeutic decisions were changed in 29 of 39 patients based on the results of the chest US examinations

  16. Determining symptoms for chest radiographs in patients with swine flu (H1N1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question arises about the chest X-ray findings and clinical symptoms in swine flu and about the most important clinical finding when correlated with the chest radiograph. Should physicians order a chest X-ray in each patient suspected of having swine flu? There were 179 patients with a high suspicion of swine flu. All 179 patients had an initial chest radiograph. As many as 65 males (representing 56% of the projected study population) had a normal chest radiograph, while 35 males (representing 55.6% of the study population) had an abnormal chest X-ray. As many as 51 females (representing 44% of the population) had a normal chest X-ray, while 20 females (representing 44% of the study population) had abnormal chest X-rays. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was not a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal chest X-ray (CXR). Rapid antigen test was not a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal CXR. Fever was not a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal CXR. Cough appears to be a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal CXR. Sore throat appears to be a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal CXR. Chest pain was not a determining factor for normal vs. abnormal CXR. Presence of cough with PCR was statistically significant. In my opinion, chest radiographs in patients with suspected H1N1 should only be obtained if there is a cough or sore throat. Other symptoms associated with H1N1 do not warrant a chest radiograph unless absolutely necessary

  17. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Omar, Hesham R.; Mangar, Devanand; Khetarpal, Suneel; Shapiro, David H; Kolla, Jaya; Rashad, Rania; Helal, Engy; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP) chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a true occult ...

  18. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): chest radiographic features in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We abstracted data (n=62) on the radiologic appearance and course of SARS in pediatric patients with suspect (n=25) or probable (n=37) SARS, diagnosed in five hospital sites located in three cities: Toronto, Singapore, and Hong Kong. Available chest radiographs and thoracic CTs were reviewed for the presence of the following radiographic findings: airspace disease, air bronchograms, airways inflammation and peribronchial thickening, interstitial disease, pleural effusion, and hilar adenopathy. A total of 62 patients (suspect=25, probable=37) were evaluated for SARS. Patient ages ranged from 5.5 months to 17 years and 11.5 months (average, 6 years and 10 months) with a female-to-male ratio of 32:30. Forty-one patients (66.1%) were in close contact with other probable, suspect, or quarantined cases; 10 patients (16.1%) had recently traveled to WHO-designated affected areas within 10 days; and 7 patients (11.2%) were transferred from other hospitals that had SARS patients. Three patients, who did not have close/hospital contact or travel history to affected areas, were classified as SARS cases based on their clinical signs and symptoms and on the fact that they were living in an endemic area. The most prominent clinical presentations were fever, with a temperature over 38 C (100%), cough (62.9%), rhinorrhea (22.6%), myalgia (17.7%), chills (14.5%), and headache (11.3%). Other findings included sore throat (9.7%), gastrointestinal symptoms (9.7%), rigor (8.1%), and lethargy (6.5%). In general, fever and cough were the most common clinical presentations amongst younger pediatric SARS cases (age<10 years), whereas, in addition to these symptoms, headache, myalgia, sore throat, chills, and/or rigor were common in older patients (age≥10 years). The chest radiographs of 35.5% of patients were normal. The most prominent radiological findings that were observed in the remaining patients were areas of consolidation (45.2%), often peripheral with multifocal lesions in 22

  19. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): chest radiographic features in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babyn, Paul S.; Gahunia, Harpal K.; Manson, David [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chu, Winnie C.W.; Metreweli, Constantine [Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin (China); Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Chinese University of Hong Kong (China); Tsou, Ian Y.Y.; Wansaicheong, Gervais K.L.; Chee, Thomas S.G.; Kaw, Gregory J.L. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng (Singapore); Allen, Upton; Bitnun, Ari; Read, Stanley [Division of Infectious Diseases, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cheng, Frankie W.T.; Fok, Tai-Fai; Hon, Ellis K.L.; Li, Albert M.; Ng, Pak-Cheung [Department of Paediatrics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, 30-32 Ngan Shing Street, Shatin, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Chiu, Man-Chun; Leung, Chi-Wai [Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital, Lai King Hill Road, Lai Chi Kok, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Khong, Pek L. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, 102 Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Stringer, David A.

    2004-01-01

    We abstracted data (n=62) on the radiologic appearance and course of SARS in pediatric patients with suspect (n=25) or probable (n=37) SARS, diagnosed in five hospital sites located in three cities: Toronto, Singapore, and Hong Kong. Available chest radiographs and thoracic CTs were reviewed for the presence of the following radiographic findings: airspace disease, air bronchograms, airways inflammation and peribronchial thickening, interstitial disease, pleural effusion, and hilar adenopathy. A total of 62 patients (suspect=25, probable=37) were evaluated for SARS. Patient ages ranged from 5.5 months to 17 years and 11.5 months (average, 6 years and 10 months) with a female-to-male ratio of 32:30. Forty-one patients (66.1%) were in close contact with other probable, suspect, or quarantined cases; 10 patients (16.1%) had recently traveled to WHO-designated affected areas within 10 days; and 7 patients (11.2%) were transferred from other hospitals that had SARS patients. Three patients, who did not have close/hospital contact or travel history to affected areas, were classified as SARS cases based on their clinical signs and symptoms and on the fact that they were living in an endemic area. The most prominent clinical presentations were fever, with a temperature over 38 C (100%), cough (62.9%), rhinorrhea (22.6%), myalgia (17.7%), chills (14.5%), and headache (11.3%). Other findings included sore throat (9.7%), gastrointestinal symptoms (9.7%), rigor (8.1%), and lethargy (6.5%). In general, fever and cough were the most common clinical presentations amongst younger pediatric SARS cases (age<10 years), whereas, in addition to these symptoms, headache, myalgia, sore throat, chills, and/or rigor were common in older patients (age{>=}10 years). The chest radiographs of 35.5% of patients were normal. The most prominent radiological findings that were observed in the remaining patients were areas of consolidation (45.2%), often peripheral with multifocal lesions in 22

  20. Usefulness of chest radiographs in first asthma attacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the value of routine chest radiography during acute first attacks of asthma, we studied 371 consecutive children over one year of age who presented with an initial episode of wheezing. Three hundred fifty children (94.3%) had radiographic findings that were compatible with uncomplicated asthma and were considered negative. Twenty-one (5.7%) had positive findings: atelectasis and pneumonia were noted in seven, segmental atelectasis in six, pneumonia in five, multiple areas of subsegmental atelectasis in two, and pneumomediastinum in one. The patients with positive films were more likely to have a respiratory rate above 60 or a pulse rate above 160 (P < 0.001), localized rales or localized decreased breath sounds before treatment (P < 0.01), and localized rales (P < 0.005) and localized wheezing (P < 0.02) after treatment; also, these patients were admitted to the hospital more often (P < 0.001). Ninety-five percent (20 of 21) of the children with positive films could be identified before treatment on the basis of a combination of tachypnea, tachycardia, fever, and localized rales or localized decreased breath sounds. Most first-time wheezers will not have positive radiographs; careful clinical evaluation should reveal which patients will have abnormal radiographs and will therefore benefit from the procedure. 20 references, 3 tables

  1. Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children: Chest Radiographic and CT Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chest radiographic and CT findings of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in children, the population that is more vulnerable to respiratory infection than adults. The study population comprised 410 children who were diagnosed with an H1N1 infection from August 24, 2009 to November 11, 2009 and underwent chest radiography at Dankook University Hospital in Korea. Six of these patients also underwent chest CT. The initial chest radiographs were classified as normal or abnormal. The abnormal chest radiographs and high resolution CT scans were assessed for the pattern and distribution of parenchymal lesions, and the presence of complications such as atelectasis, pleural effusion, and pneumomediastinum. The initial chest radiograph was normal in 384 of 410 (94%) patients and abnormal in 26 of 410 (6%) patients. Parenchymal abnormalities seen on the initial chest radiographs included prominent peribronchial marking (25 of 26, 96%), consolidation (22 of 26, 85%), and ground-glass opacities without consolidation (2 of 26, 8%). The involvement was usually bilateral (19 of 26, 73%) with the lower lung zone predominance (22 of 26, 85%). Atelectasis was observed in 12 (46%) and pleural effusion in 11 (42%) patients. CT (n = 6) scans showed peribronchovascular interstitial thickening (n = 6), ground-glass opacities (n = 5), centrilobular nodules (n = 4), consolidation (n = 3), mediastinal lymph node enlargement (n = 5), pleural effusion (n = 3), and pneumomediastinum (n = 3). Abnormal chest radiographs were uncommon in children with a swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection. In children, H1N1 virus infection can be included in the differential diagnosis, when chest radiographs and CT scans show prominent peribronchial markings and ill-defined patchy consolidation with mediastinal lymph node enlargement, pleural effusion and pneumomediastinum

  2. Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children: Chest Radiographic and CT Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Min Jeong; Lee, Young Seok; Lee, Jee Young; Lee, Kun Song [Dankook University College of Medicine, Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chest radiographic and CT findings of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in children, the population that is more vulnerable to respiratory infection than adults. The study population comprised 410 children who were diagnosed with an H1N1 infection from August 24, 2009 to November 11, 2009 and underwent chest radiography at Dankook University Hospital in Korea. Six of these patients also underwent chest CT. The initial chest radiographs were classified as normal or abnormal. The abnormal chest radiographs and high resolution CT scans were assessed for the pattern and distribution of parenchymal lesions, and the presence of complications such as atelectasis, pleural effusion, and pneumomediastinum. The initial chest radiograph was normal in 384 of 410 (94%) patients and abnormal in 26 of 410 (6%) patients. Parenchymal abnormalities seen on the initial chest radiographs included prominent peribronchial marking (25 of 26, 96%), consolidation (22 of 26, 85%), and ground-glass opacities without consolidation (2 of 26, 8%). The involvement was usually bilateral (19 of 26, 73%) with the lower lung zone predominance (22 of 26, 85%). Atelectasis was observed in 12 (46%) and pleural effusion in 11 (42%) patients. CT (n = 6) scans showed peribronchovascular interstitial thickening (n = 6), ground-glass opacities (n = 5), centrilobular nodules (n = 4), consolidation (n = 3), mediastinal lymph node enlargement (n = 5), pleural effusion (n = 3), and pneumomediastinum (n = 3). Abnormal chest radiographs were uncommon in children with a swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection. In children, H1N1 virus infection can be included in the differential diagnosis, when chest radiographs and CT scans show prominent peribronchial markings and ill-defined patchy consolidation with mediastinal lymph node enlargement, pleural effusion and pneumomediastinum

  3. Sonographic Findings of Variable Chest Wall Disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Mi Suk; Kim, Ji Young; Cho, Woo Ho; Kim, Joung Sook; Jeong, Myeong Ja; Kim, Soung Hee; Kim, Jae Hyung; Kim, Soo Hyun; Jun, Woo Sun [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    Variable chest wall disorders include hemorrhage, inflammation and a tumor on the chest wall. Especially in females, abnormal anterior chest wall findings can appear as breast lesions due to the anatomic relationship between the chest wall and the breast. Sonography is the first diagnostic tool to utilize for chest wall disorders and has an important role for the differential diagnosis. In this study, we introduce sonographic findings of the various chest wall disorders that are discovered incidentally during an examination for a palpable mass or pain in the breast. We also describe sonographic findings that additionally performed of sonography-guided core needle biopsy

  4. Adult chest radiograph reporting by radiographers: Preliminary data from an in-house audit programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To examine the adult chest radiograph (CXR) reporting performance of a reporting radiographer in clinical practice using different audit systems; single radiologist and two radiologists, with clinical review of discordant cases. Materials and methods: 100 chest radiographs (CXRs) were drawn randomly from a consecutive series of 4800 CXRs which had been reported during a nine month period at a district general hospital by a radiographer after two years of training. Diagnostic outcomes were normal or abnormal, and agreement with the reporting radiographer or not. There was 50% duplication of CXRs reported between three radiologists. Concordance rates were determined for the radiographer-radiologist and inter-radiologist interpretations. Independent clinical review of discordant cases was performed to establish the final diagnosis. Results: Ninety-nine cases were reviewed, with 40 cases deemed abnormal by at least one radiologist. Consensus was found with the radiographers report in 59 normal and 33 abnormal CXRs reviewed by two radiologists (96.7% and 86.8% respectively). Seven CXR reports were discrepant with clinical review: mediastinal lymphadenopathy was missed by both radiologist and radiographer; linear atelectasis was reported by two radiologists but not the radiographer. Three cases were over-interpreted and on two occasions at least one radiologist agreed with the radiographer. There was very high concordance between the radiographer and each radiologist, 96%, 96% and 92% respectively. Conclusions: This study suggested that regular audit, which incorporates case note review and discrepant reporting within a multidisciplinary setting, should contribute to safe practice

  5. What can we learn from chest radiographs in hypoxemic asthmatics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Chest radiographs (X-rays) are frequently obtained on children with asthma exacerbations who remain hypoxemic after therapy eventhough their utility has not been evaluated. Objective: To compare X-rays in hypoxemic and non-hypoxemic asthmatic children. Methods: Over 21 months, X-rays were obtained on all persistently hypoxemic asthmatics (1-17 years, oxygen saturation <93% in room air), and some non-hypoxemic asthmatics. A pediatric radiologist blinded to the patients' symptoms evaluated each X-ray for lung size, extravascular lung fluid, and atelectasis. Clinical outcomes including duration of hypoxemia, length of hospital stay, and admission to the PICU were assessed through chart audit after hospital discharge. Results: A total of 445 patients were enrolled and stratified into four groups based on initial and post-treatment pulse oximetry measurements. Hypoxemic groups I and II were more likely to have large or small lungs (P<0.05), severe interstitial fluid (P<0.01), and atelectasis (P<0.01) compared to non-hypoxemic group IV. Group I was more likely to have fluid in the alveolar space compared to all other groups (P<0.01). Within hypoxemic group I, there was no association between any radiographic findings and our clinical outcomes. (orig.)

  6. Chest Radiographs for Pediatric TB Diagnosis: Interrater Agreement and Utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kaguthi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The chest radiograph (CXR is considered a key diagnostic tool for pediatric tuberculosis (TB in clinical management and endpoint determination in TB vaccine trials. We set out to compare interrater agreement for TB diagnosis in western Kenya. A pediatric pulmonologist and radiologist (experts, a medical officer (M.O, and four clinical officers (C.Os with basic training in pediatric CXR reading blindly assessed CXRs of infants who were TB suspects in a cohort study. C.Os had access to clinical findings for patient management. Weighted kappa scores summarized interrater agreement on lymphadenopathy and abnormalities consistent with TB. Sensitivity and specificity of raters were determined using microbiologically confirmed TB as the gold standard (n=8. A total of 691 radiographs were reviewed. Agreement on abnormalities consistent with TB was poor; k=0.14 (95% CI: 0.10–0.18 and on lymphadenopathy moderate k=0.26 (95% CI: 0.18–0.36. M.O [75% (95% CI: 34.9%–96.8%] and C.Os [63% (95% CI: 24.5%–91.5%] had high sensitivity for culture confirmed TB. TB vaccine trials utilizing expert agreement on CXR as a nonmicrobiologically confirmed endpoint will have reduced specificity and will underestimate vaccine efficacy. C.Os detected many of the bacteriologically confirmed cases; however, this must be interpreted cautiously as they were unblinded to clinical features.

  7. Eliminating rib shadows in chest radiographic images providing diagnostic assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oğul, Hasan; Oğul, B Buket; Ağıldere, A Muhteşem; Bayrak, Tuncay; Sümer, Emre

    2016-04-01

    A major difficulty with chest radiographic analysis is the invisibility of abnormalities caused by the superimposition of normal anatomical structures, such as ribs, over the main tissue to be examined. Suppressing the ribs with no information loss about the original tissue would therefore be helpful during manual identification or computer-aided detection of nodules on a chest radiographic image. In this study, we introduce a two-step algorithm for eliminating rib shadows in chest radiographic images. The algorithm first delineates the ribs using a novel hybrid self-template approach and then suppresses these delineated ribs using an unsupervised regression model that takes into account the change in proximal thickness (depth) of bone in the vertical axis. The performance of the system is evaluated using a benchmark set of real chest radiographic images. The experimental results determine that proposed method for rib delineation can provide higher accuracy than existing methods. The knowledge of rib delineation can remarkably improve the nodule detection performance of a current computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system. It is also shown that the rib suppression algorithm can increase the nodule visibility by eliminating rib shadows while mostly preserving the nodule intensity. PMID:26775736

  8. H1N1 influenza infection in children: Frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To describe the frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Materials and methods: Three hundred and fourteen paediatric patients with confirmed H1N1 influenza infection who underwent chest radiography at presentation at a single institution during the outbreak in 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Abnormal chest radiographic findings related to acute infection were analysed in terms of frequency, pattern, and distribution. Medical records and follow-up radiographs were also reviewed to assess clinical features and outcomes. Results: Chest lesions suggesting acute infection were identified in 49 (16%) patients (mean age 8.2 years, range approximately 1.8-18.5 years). The most common finding was prominent peribronchial marking (71%), followed by air-space opacity (51%) with or without volume decrease, generalized hyperinflation (24%), and pleural effusion (20%). Other minor findings included pneumomediastinum (n = 2) and a nodule (n = 1). Distributions were bilateral (55%) or unilateral (45%) with frequent involvement of lower (78%), and middle (59%) lung zones. Thirty-nine patients (80%) were hospitalized and six (12%) required mechanical ventilation, followed by recovery. Thirty-one out of the 33 patients that underwent follow-up radiography showed marked resolution of all radiographic abnormalities. Conclusion: The frequency of a chest radiographic abnormality was found to be low in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Although typical radiographic findings of a viral lower respiratory infection were more common, unilateral involvement and air-space opacity were common, often with pleural effusion. Furthermore, pulmonary lesions showed near complete resolution on follow-up radiographs in the majority of patients.

  9. H1N1 influenza infection in children: Frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, S.-Y. [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.H., E-mail: jhkate@skku.ed [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eo, H.; Jeon, T.Y.; Shin, K.E.; Shin, W.S.; Jung, H.N. [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.-J. [Department of Pediatrics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Aim: To describe the frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Materials and methods: Three hundred and fourteen paediatric patients with confirmed H1N1 influenza infection who underwent chest radiography at presentation at a single institution during the outbreak in 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Abnormal chest radiographic findings related to acute infection were analysed in terms of frequency, pattern, and distribution. Medical records and follow-up radiographs were also reviewed to assess clinical features and outcomes. Results: Chest lesions suggesting acute infection were identified in 49 (16%) patients (mean age 8.2 years, range approximately 1.8-18.5 years). The most common finding was prominent peribronchial marking (71%), followed by air-space opacity (51%) with or without volume decrease, generalized hyperinflation (24%), and pleural effusion (20%). Other minor findings included pneumomediastinum (n = 2) and a nodule (n = 1). Distributions were bilateral (55%) or unilateral (45%) with frequent involvement of lower (78%), and middle (59%) lung zones. Thirty-nine patients (80%) were hospitalized and six (12%) required mechanical ventilation, followed by recovery. Thirty-one out of the 33 patients that underwent follow-up radiography showed marked resolution of all radiographic abnormalities. Conclusion: The frequency of a chest radiographic abnormality was found to be low in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Although typical radiographic findings of a viral lower respiratory infection were more common, unilateral involvement and air-space opacity were common, often with pleural effusion. Furthermore, pulmonary lesions showed near complete resolution on follow-up radiographs in the majority of patients.

  10. Adult Hirschprung disease: radiographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindelzun, R E; Hicks, S M

    1986-09-01

    Hirschprung disease is usually diagnosed in infancy. Occasionally patients reach adulthood without diagnosis or treatment. Four cases of adult Hirschprung disease are described. The principal radiographic findings are a markedly dilated, feces-filled colon above the zone of transition; a narrowed rectum; a cone- or funnel-shaped zone of transition; and a mosaic colonic pattern caused by collapsed redundant mucosa after colonic cleansing. In an adult, identification on a barium enema examination of an abrupt, smooth transition zone in the rectum with proximal colonic dilatation, in conjunction with an appropriate clinical history, should suggest the diagnosis of adult Hirschprung disease. PMID:3737900

  11. Are chest radiographs justified in pre-employment examinations. Presentation of legal position and medical evidence based on 1760 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The legal and medical basis for chest radiographs as part of pre-employment examinations (PEE) at a University Hospital is evaluated. The radiographs are primarily performed to exclude infectious lung disease. A total of 1760 consecutive chest radiographs performed as a routine part of PEEs were reviewed retrospectively. Pathologic findings were categorized as ''nonrelevant'' or ''relevant.'' No positive finding with respect to tuberculosis or any other infectious disease was found; 94.8% of the chest radiographs were completely normal. Only five findings were regarded as ''relevant'' for the individual. No employment-relevant diagnosis occurred. The performance of chest radiography as part of a PEE is most often not justified. The practice is expensive, can violate national and European law, and lacks medical justification. (orig.)

  12. Automatic brightness and contrast adjustments for digital chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital chest radiographs are often too bright and/or lack contrast (especially those of intensive care unit patients) when viewed on a video display. Automatically adjusting the brightness and contrast reduces viewer interaction and improves displayed image quality. This paper reports on an algorithm developed that analyzes the gray-level histogram of a chest radiograph and determines the breakpoints that separate patient background, soft tissues, and dense tissues. From the breakpoint values, a piece-wise linear look-up table (LUT) is generated that reduces background contrast (this darkens the image), maintains soft- tissue contrast, and increases dense-tissue contrast (for example, in the mediastinum and subdiaphragm). The resulting UT is applied to the original image via video display

  13. A Computer-Aided Detection System for Digital Chest Radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-de-Gea, Juan Manuel; García-Mateos, Ginés; Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Hernández-Hernández, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Computer-aided detection systems aim at the automatic detection of diseases using different medical imaging modalities. In this paper, a novel approach to detecting normality/pathology in digital chest radiographs is proposed. The problem tackled is complicated since it is not focused on particular diseases but anything that differs from what is considered as normality. First, the areas of interest of the chest are found using template matching on the images. Then, a texture descriptor called local binary patterns (LBP) is computed for those areas. After that, LBP histograms are applied in a classifier algorithm, which produces the final normality/pathology decision. Our experimental results show the feasibility of the proposal, with success rates above 87% in the best cases. Moreover, our technique is able to locate the possible areas of pathology in nonnormal radiographs. Strengths and limitations of the proposed approach are described in the Conclusions. PMID:27372536

  14. Value of the lateral chest radiograph in tuberculosis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value of the lateral chest radiograph, often considered a useful adjunct in the detection of hilar adenopathy, was evaluated in a prospective study of 449 children assessed for tuberculosis. Of these children 298 presented to the hospital with signs and symptoms suggestive of tuberculosis, while 151 were investigated in a regional clinic solely because they were in close contact with an adult household member on treatment for tuberculosis. Tuberculosis was confirmed by culture in 176 of the 449 children (39%). In 40 of these (23%) hilar adenopathy was visible on frontal and lateral view, in 19 of the 176 confirmed cases (11%) only on a frontal view and in 22 (13%) on a lateral view only. Probable tuberculosis was diagnosed in a further 140 of the 449 children (31%), and hilar adenopathy was visible on frontal and lateral views in 39 of these children (28%), on the frontal view only in 8 (6%) and on the lateral view only in 27 (19%). In the symptomatic children investigated in the hospital, and the asymptomatic children investigated in the clinic, hilar adenopathy was detected on the lateral chest radiograph only in 36 (12%) and 14 (9%) cases respectively. Lateral chest radiographs will considerably improve the accuracy of the diagnosis of childhood tuberculosis. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of pneumonia in children: comparison of MRI with fast imaging sequences at 1.5T with chest radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yikilmaz, Ali; Koc, Ali; Coskun, Abdulhakim (Dept. of Radiology, Erciyes Medical School, Kayseri (Turkey)); Ozturk, Mustafa K (Dept. of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Erciyes Medical School, Kayseri (Turkey)); Mulkern, Robert V; Lee, Edward Y (Dept. of Radiology and Dept. of Medicine, Pulmonary Div., Children' s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States)), email: Edward.lee@childrens.harvard.edu

    2011-10-15

    Background Although there has been a study aimed at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of pneumonia in children at a low magnetic field (0.2T), there is no study which assessed the efficacy of MRI, particularly with fast imaging sequences at 1.5T, for evaluating pneumonia in children. Purpose To investigate the efficacy of chest MRI with fast imaging sequences at 1.5T for evaluating pneumonia in children by comparing MRI findings with those of chest radiographs. Material and Methods This was an Institutional Review Board-approved, HIPPA-compliant prospective study of 40 consecutive pediatric patients (24 boys, 16 girls; mean age 7.3 years +- 6.6 years) with pneumonia, who underwent PA and lateral chest radiographs followed by MRI within 24 h. All MRI studies were obtained in axial and coronal planes with two different fast imaging sequences: T1-weighted FFE (Fast Field Echo) (TR/TE: 83/4.6) and T2-weighted B-FFE M2D (Balanced Fast Field Echo Multiple 2D Dimensional) (TR/TE: 3.2/1.6). Two experienced pediatric radiologists reviewed each chest radiograph and MRI for the presence of consolidation, necrosis/abscess, bronchiectasis, and pleural effusion. Chest radiograph and MRI findings were compared with Kappa statistics. Results All consolidation, lung necrosis/abscess, bronchiectasis, and pleural effusion detected with chest radiographs were also detected with MRI. There was statistically substantial agreement between chest radiographs and MRI in detecting consolidation (k = 0.78) and bronchiectasis (k = 0.72) in children with pneumonia. The agreement between chest radiographs and MRI was moderate for detecting necrosis/abscess (k = 0.49) and fair for detecting pleural effusion (k = 0.30). Conclusion MRI with fast imaging sequences is comparable to chest radiographs for evaluating underlying pulmonary consolidation, bronchiectasis, necrosis/abscess, and pleural effusion often associated with pneumonia in children

  16. Evaluation of pneumonia in children: comparison of MRI with fast imaging sequences at 1.5T with chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background Although there has been a study aimed at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of pneumonia in children at a low magnetic field (0.2T), there is no study which assessed the efficacy of MRI, particularly with fast imaging sequences at 1.5T, for evaluating pneumonia in children. Purpose To investigate the efficacy of chest MRI with fast imaging sequences at 1.5T for evaluating pneumonia in children by comparing MRI findings with those of chest radiographs. Material and Methods This was an Institutional Review Board-approved, HIPPA-compliant prospective study of 40 consecutive pediatric patients (24 boys, 16 girls; mean age 7.3 years ± 6.6 years) with pneumonia, who underwent PA and lateral chest radiographs followed by MRI within 24 h. All MRI studies were obtained in axial and coronal planes with two different fast imaging sequences: T1-weighted FFE (Fast Field Echo) (TR/TE: 83/4.6) and T2-weighted B-FFE M2D (Balanced Fast Field Echo Multiple 2D Dimensional) (TR/TE: 3.2/1.6). Two experienced pediatric radiologists reviewed each chest radiograph and MRI for the presence of consolidation, necrosis/abscess, bronchiectasis, and pleural effusion. Chest radiograph and MRI findings were compared with Kappa statistics. Results All consolidation, lung necrosis/abscess, bronchiectasis, and pleural effusion detected with chest radiographs were also detected with MRI. There was statistically substantial agreement between chest radiographs and MRI in detecting consolidation (k = 0.78) and bronchiectasis (k = 0.72) in children with pneumonia. The agreement between chest radiographs and MRI was moderate for detecting necrosis/abscess (k = 0.49) and fair for detecting pleural effusion (k = 0.30). Conclusion MRI with fast imaging sequences is comparable to chest radiographs for evaluating underlying pulmonary consolidation, bronchiectasis, necrosis/abscess, and pleural effusion often associated with pneumonia in children

  17. Radiographic findings in Marfan's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spontaneous pneumothorax and apical bulla are included in minor criteria of the diagnosis of Marfan's syndrome. We evaluated the frequency of radiological abnormal findings of the lung in Marfan's syndrome. Lungs could be assessed with CT in 38 cases that were selected from 50 cases in Marfan's syndrome with a cardiovascular disease or the valvular disease. Eleven cases (22%) in 50 cases had the past history of spontaneous pneumothorax. Chest CT scan in 38 cases showed emphysematous bullae in 12 cases, apical scar in eight cases, centrilobular emphysema in three cases, and bronchiectasis in one case. CT manifestations of the lung in Marfan's syndrome were mainly spontaneous pneumothorax and apical bullae as were previously reported. (author)

  18. Reading chest radiographs in the critically ill (Part II): Radiography of lung pathologies common in the ICU patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is part 2 of two series review of reading chest radiographs in the critically ill. Conventional chest radiography remains the cornerstone of day to day management of the critically ill occasionally supplemented by computed tomography or ultrasound for specific indications. In this second review we discuss radiographic findings of cardiopulmonary disorders common in the intensive care patient and suggest guidelines for interpretation based not only on imaging but also on the pathophysiology and clinical grounds. (author)

  19. Chest X-ray findings in children with influenza A (H1N1) virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the chest X-ray radiographic findings in children with influenza A (H1N1) virus infection. Methods: The chest X-ray radiographs in 67 children with influenza A (H1N1) virus infection were reviewed in this study. The chest radiographs were obtained 3-8 days after the onset of symptoms and for the follow-up. Results: The abnormalities were bilateral in 53 patients and unilateral in 7 patients. The predominant radiographic findings were bilateral patchy consolidation (n=42) with rapid confluence in 10 patients, lobular consolidation (n=7) with interstitial hyperplasia in 1 patient 3 month later, diffuse consolidation (n=11) with interstitial hyperplasia in all patients after 3 month. Conclusion: The predominant chest X-ray radiographic findings are bilateral patchy consolidation and diffuse consolidation with interstitial hyperplasia afterward. (authors)

  20. Computerized detection of pneumothorax on digital chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on neumothoraces that are clinically important abnormalities that usually appear as a subtle, fine line pattern on chest radiographs. We are developing a computer vision system for automated detection of pneumothorax to aid radiologists diagnosis. Chest images were digitized with a 0.175-mm pixel size, yielding a 2,000 x 2,430 matrix size, and 10 bits of gray scale. After indentification of the lung regions, an edge detection filter was employed in the apical areas to enhance a pneumothorax pattern. Ribs were detected with a technique based on statistical analysis of edge gradients and their orientations. Points located on a curved line suggestive of a pneumothorax in this enhanced image were detected with a Hough transform

  1. Radiographic finding in broncholitis obliterans after lung transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the radiographic findings of bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) after lung transplantation. Among the 55 single- and double-lung transplantations performed at the Toronto General Hospital, 41 have survived longer than 3 months and 7 have developed clinical BO. The chest radiographs, CT scans (where available) and medical records of these 7 patients were reviewed retrospectively, with the use of appropriate controls, and results were correlated with pathologic findings. Pathologic specimens demonstrated widespread BO in 3 patients (open lung biopsy), mild acute rejection with possible BO in 1 (transbronchial biopsy [TBBx]), undefined abnormality with some BO in 1 (TBBx), and acute rejection in 2 (TBBx)

  2. Prediction of chronic lung disease from the chest radiograph appearance at seven days of age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess if the chest radiograph appearance at seven days of age could be used to predict chronic lung disease. 60 preterm infants who were ventilated and/or had supplementary oxygen at seven days of age and had a chest radiograph performed at that postnatal age, were prospectively recruited. These chest radiographs were scored according to lung volume, presence of opacification, haziness, interstitial changes and cystic elements. 28 infants subsequently developed chronic lung disease; their median chest radiograph score was 5.5 which was significantly higher than that of the non-chronic lung disease infants. A chest radiograph score of 4 had a 71% sensitivity and 88% specificity in predicting chronic lung disease. It is concluded that chest radiograph appearance at seven days of age is a sensitive and specific predictor of chronic lung disease and thus could be used to indicate the need for preventive therapy. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  3. Radiographic, CT and MRI spectrum of hydatid disease of the chest: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty patients with thoracic hydatidosis (Echinococcus granulosus) were studied. The hydatid cysts were located in the lung parenchyma (70%), mediastinum (6.7%), inside the heart (10%), the pleurae (10%) and the chest wall (3.3%). Complications of thoracic hydatid cysts, such as rupture, infection, pleural involvement, spread and calcifications are presented. Computed tomography (CT) without and/or with contrast enhancement was performed in all patients (30). Findings from conventional chest radiographs were compared with CT and confirmed by pathology (30). In 10 cases (33.3%), magnetic resonance imaging was also performed. The diagnostic spectrum of hydatid cysts, including variations and developmental stages, is presented in this pictorial essay. (orig.)

  4. Lung cancer screening: Computed tomography or chest radiographs?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edwin; JR; van; Beek; Saeed; Mirsadraee; John; T; Murchison

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, lung cancer is the leading cause of mortalitydue to malignancy. The vast majority of cases of lung cancer are smoking related and the most effective way of reducing lung cancer incidence and mortality is by smoking cessation. In the Western world, smoking cessation policies have met with limited success. The other major means of reducing lung cancer deaths is to diagnose cases at an earlier more treatable stage employing screening programmes using chest radiographs or low dose computed tomography. In many countries smoking is still on the increase, and the sheer scale of the problem limits the affordability of such screening programmes. This short review article will evaluate the current evidence and potential areas of research which may benefit policy making across the world.

  5. Assessment of congestive heart failure in chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of observer variations and film-screen quality on the diagnosis of congestive heart failure based on chest radiographs was studied in 27 patients. For each patient, two films were exposed, one with the Kodak Lanex Medium system and one with the Agfa MR 400 system. The films were presented to three observers who assessed the presence of congestive heart failure on a three-graded scale. The results showed no significant difference between the two systems but large systematic differences between the observers. There were also differences between the two ratings by the same observer that could not be explained by the film-screen factor. It is concluded that the choice between these two systems is of little importance in view of the interobserver and intraobserver variability that can exist within the same department. (orig.)

  6. A STUDY OF CHEST RADIOGRAPHIC ABNORMALITIES AND MANTOUX TEST IN PEDIATRIC NEUROTUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis in children is a major health problem especially in developing countries. Neuro-tuberculosis is generally associated with higher mortality and morbidity, has variable presentation and is difficult to diagnose. OBJECTIVE: To determine the chest radiographic findings and Mantoux positivity in children with neuro-tuberculosis. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive study. SETTING: Pediatric wards of teaching hospitals affiliated to J. J. M Medical College, Davanagere. METHODS: A total of 45 patients fulfilling pre-defined criteria of neuro-tuberculosis were included. Chest radiographic abnormalities (CXR and its pattern along with the Mantoux test result were evaluated in these patients. RESULTS: Of the 45 patients with neurotuberculosis, radiographic abnormalities were seen in only 8.88% patients with the patterns being consolidation (50%, right middle lobe collapse (25%, and mediastinal lymphnode enlargement (25%. Mantoux test was positive in 13.33% patients. CONCLUSION: The chest X-Ray may be normal in majority of cases of pediatric neuro-tuberculosis and Mantoux may be non-reactive for a various reasons.

  7. Specificity and sensitivity of chest radiographs in the diagnosis of paediatric pulmonary tuberculosis and the value of additional high-kilovolt radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the most common notifiable infectious disease in South Africa. The diagnosis of pulmonary TB in children is often very difficult because of the non-specific radiological signs and inter-observer variation in the interpretation of radiographs. The frontal high-kilovolt (kV) radiograph has been used to assess the effect of TB adenopathy on the tracheobronchial tree and to detect endobronchial lesions. The aims of the present study were to assess the specificity and sensitivity of chest radiographs in the diagnosis of pulmonary TB and to assess whether the addition of the high-kV radiograph affects these parameters. The study group consisted of paediatric patients suspected of having pulmonary TB over a 6-year period. These patients had clinical, bacteriological and radiographic examinations. Radiographs were examined by one experienced radiologist in two sittings separated by a 6-week interval. On the first sitting, only standard radiographs were examined and, on the second sitting, these were supplemented with high-kV radiographs. Differences in the detection of each recognized radiological feature of pulmonary TB before and after the addition of the high-kV film were analysed for statistical significance. The frequency of radiographic findings in our study compared favourably with other reports. No statistically significant differences for the detection of radiographic features consistent with pulmonary TB, or for the diagnosis of pulmonary TB, were demonstrated between the two sittings. Specificity increased from 74.4% to 86.6% with the addition of the high-kV view and sensitivity remained constant at 38.8%. The present study does not support the routine use of the frontal high-kV radiograph for the diagnosis of pulmonary TB. This paper also confirms the findings of others, that standard chest radiographs are a poor indicator of pulmonary TB in children Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  8. Relationship between the chest radiograph, regional lung function studies, exercise tolerance, and clinical condition in cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Coates, A L; Boyce, P; Shaw, D. G.; Godfrey, S; Mearns, M

    1981-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of the interpretation of the chest film in delineating localised abnormalities of ventilation and perfusion, as well as the overall severity of airways obstruction, exercise tolerance, and clinical condition in children with cystic fibrosis. Radiographic findings in various regions of the chest film were compared with the functional values obtained with regional lung function tests which evaluated the arrival and disappearance of boluses of radioactive nitrog...

  9. Chest radiographic appearances in adult inpatients admitted with swine flu infection: local experience in Melbourne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influenza A virus (H1N1) pandemic began in Mexico in March 2009. As of July 2009, there were 5298 reported cases in Australia including 10 deaths. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the local chest radiographic findings in adult inpatients with proven H1N1, to assess the radiological disease progression and resolution, and to evaluate whether the severity of chest X-rays findings had a bearing on the length of admission and need for intensive care admission. Eleven H1N1 patients (5 males and 6 females, mean age of 36), presenting with cough (64%), fever (55%) and shortness of breath (55%), were admitted to our hospital between 13 August and 1 November 2010. Details of radiographic features, risk factors, clinical course including length of stay, doubling time of consolidation and time for 50% resolution of consolidation were recorded and analysed. Seventy-three per cent of our patients presented with bilateral mid and/or lower zone alveolar consolidation. One patient with underlying cystic fibrosis had only bilateral upper zone consolidation. No pleural effusion, lymphadenopathy or cardiomegaly was noted on any of the plain chest radiographs. The mean doubling time of consolidation was 1.5 days. The mean time for 50% resolution of consolidation after antiviral treatment was 10.5 days. The average length of stay in hospital was 22 days. Ninety-one per cent of our patients required intensive-care unit admission with 50% of those requiring intubation. Rapid progression of bilateral mid and lower zone air-space opacities in relatively young unwell patients, with lack of pleural effusion, pericardial effusion or lymphadenopathy on plain radiographs, should raise the clinical suspicion of H1N1 infection. Patients requiring hospital admission usually show slow clinical and radiological improvement, and require prolonged hospital stays.

  10. System for pathology categorization and retrieval in chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, Uri; Greenspan, Hayit; Konen, Eli; Sharon, Michal; Goldberger, Jacob

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we present an overview of a system we have been developing for the past several years for efficient image categorization and retrieval in large radiograph archives. The methodology is based on local patch representation of the image content, using a bag of visual words approach and similarity-based categorization with a kernel based SVM classifier. We show an application to pathology-level categorization of chest x-ray data, the most popular examination in radiology. Our study deals with pathology detection and identification of individual pathologies including right and left pleural effusion, enlarged heart and cases of enlarged mediastinum. The input from a radiologist provided a global label for the entire image (healthy/pathology), and the categorization was conducted on the entire image, with no need for segmentation algorithms or any geometrical rules. An automatic diagnostic-level categorization, even on such an elementary level as healthy vs pathological, provides a useful tool for radiologists on this popular and important examination. This is a first step towards similarity-based categorization, which has a major clinical implications for computer-assisted diagnostics.

  11. Analysis of optimization parameters in chest radiographs procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risks associated with ionizing radiation became evident soon after the discovery of the X radiation. Therefore, any medical practices that make use of any type of ionizing radiation should be subjected to the basic principles of radiological protection: justification, optimization of protection and application of dose limits. In diagnostic radiology, it means to seek the lowest dose reasonably practicable, without compromising the image quality. The purpose of this project was to evaluate optimization parameters, specifically image quality, exposure levels and radiographs rejection rates, in radiological chest examinations. The image quality evaluation was performed using two forms, one for adults and other for children, based on European standards. By the results, we can conclude that the evaluated sector is not in agreement to the principle of optimization and this reality is not different from most health institutions. The entrance surface air kerma (Ka,e) results were below the national diagnostic reference levels. However, the several image quality parameters showed insufficient ratings and the film rejection rates were high. The lack of optimization generates poor quality images, causing inaccurate diagnostic reports, and increasing operating costs. Therefore, the research warns of the urgency of implementing Quality Control Assurance Program in all radiology services in the country. (author)

  12. Chest Radiographic Patterns and the Transmission of Tuberculosis: Implications for Automated Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Angela; Barrie, James; Winter, Christopher; Elamy, Abdel-Halim; Tyrrell, Gregory; Long, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Computer-aided detection to identify and diagnose pulmonary tuberculosis is being explored. While both cavitation on chest radiograph and smear-positivity on microscopy are independent risk factors for the infectiousness of pulmonary tuberculosis it is unknown which radiographic pattern, were it detectable, would provide the greatest public health benefit; i.e. reduced transmission. Herein we provide that evidence. Objectives 1) to determine whether pulmonary tuberculosis in a high income, low incidence country is more likely to present with “typical” adult-type pulmonary tuberculosis radiographic features and 2) to determine whether those with “typical” radiographic features are more likely than those without such features to transmit the organism and/or cause secondary cases. Methods Over a three-year period beginning January 1, 2006 consecutive adults with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in the Province of Alberta, Canada, were identified and their pre-treatment radiographs scored by three independent readers as “typical” (having an upper lung zone predominant infiltrate, with or without cavitation but no discernable adenopathy) or “atypical” (all others). Each patient’s pre-treatment bacillary burden was carefully documented and, during a 30-month transmission window, each patient’s transmission events were recorded. Mycobacteriology, radiology and transmission were compared in those with “typical” versus “atypical” radiographs. Findings A total of 97 smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases were identified, 69 (71.1%) with and 28 (28.9%) without “typical” chest radiographs. “Typical” cases were more likely to have high bacillary burdens and cavitation (Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals: 2.75 [1.04–7.31] and 9.10 [2.51–32.94], respectively). Typical cases were also responsible for most transmission events—78% of tuberculin skin test conversions (p<0.002) and 95% of secondary cases in reported

  13. Progression of pleural and parenchymal disease on chest radiographs of workers exposed to amosite asbestos.

    OpenAIRE

    J.R. Shepherd; Hillerdal, G; McLarty, J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine predictors of progression of pleural and parenchymal disease on the chest radiographs of workers exposed to a short term, intense exposure of amosite asbestos. METHODS: The first and last of a series of chest radiographs of 887 workers exposed to amosite was interpreted and coded according to International Labour Organisation (ILO) standards by two physicians. Significant predictors of disease progression were found by a linear stepwise regression analysis from among ...

  14. Computerized analysis of abnormal asymmetry in digital chest radiographs: Evaluation of potential utility

    OpenAIRE

    Armato, Samuel G; Giger, Maryellen L.; MacMahon, Heber

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test a computerized method for the fully automated analysis of abnormal asymmetry in digital posteroanterior (PA) chest radiographs. An automated lung segmentation method was used to identify the aerated lung regions in 600 chest radiographs. Minimal apriori lung morphology information was required for this gray-level thresholding-based segmentation. Consequently, segmentation was applicable to grossly abnormal cases. The relative areas of segmente...

  15. Paratracheal lymphadenopathy: radiographic findings and correlation with CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, N L; Webb, W R; Gamsu, G

    1985-09-01

    Possible signs of paratracheal lymphadenopathy on the posteroanterior (PA) chest radiograph were assessed in 98 patients and correlated with computed tomography (CT). The nodes were normal in size in 62 patients and enlarged (greater than 15 mm) in 36. Among the latter group, widening of the right paratracheal stripe was seen in 11 (31%) and enlargement of the azygos node in 15 (42%). While the lateral contour of the superior vena cava (SVC) was convex in 46 patients (47%), 81 (83%) had an increased density in the region of the SVC. When all four parameters were combined, lymphadenopathy could be detected on the PA view in 87 patients (89%). CT demonstrated that the enlarged nodes were anterolateral rather than directly lateral to the trachea and also immediately posterior to the SVC, explaining the findings on the PA radiograph. PMID:4023240

  16. Robust and Reproducible Quantification of the Extent of Chest Radiographic Abnormalities (And It’s Free!)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena-Méndez, Ana; Aldasoro, Edelweiss; Muñoz, Jose; Moore, David A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Objective, reproducible quantification of the extent of abnormalities seen on a chest radiograph would improve the user-friendliness of a previously proposed severity scoring system for pulmonary tuberculosis and could be helpful in monitoring response to therapy, including in clinical trials. Methods In this study we report the development and evaluation of a simple tool using free image editing software (GIMP) to accurately and reproducibly quantify the area of affected lung on the chest radiograph of tuberculosis patients. As part of a pharmacokinetic study in Lima, Peru, a chest radiograph was performed on patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and this was subsequently photographed using a digital camera. The GIMP software was used by two independent and trained readers to estimate the extent of affected lung (expressed as a percentage of total lung area) in each radiograph and the resulting radiographic SCORE. Results 56 chest radiographs were included in the reading analysis. The Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) between the 2 observers was 0.977 (p<0.001) for the area of lung affected and was 0.955 (p<0.001) for the final score; and the kappa coefficient of Interobserver agreement for both the area of lung affected and the score were 0.9 (p<0.001) and 0.86 (p<0.001) respectively. Conclusions This high level of between-observer agreement suggests that this freely available software could constitute a simple and useful tool for robust evaluation of individual and serial chest radiographs. PMID:25996917

  17. Robust and Reproducible Quantification of the Extent of Chest Radiographic Abnormalities (And It's Free!.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Requena-Méndez

    Full Text Available Objective, reproducible quantification of the extent of abnormalities seen on a chest radiograph would improve the user-friendliness of a previously proposed severity scoring system for pulmonary tuberculosis and could be helpful in monitoring response to therapy, including in clinical trials.In this study we report the development and evaluation of a simple tool using free image editing software (GIMP to accurately and reproducibly quantify the area of affected lung on the chest radiograph of tuberculosis patients. As part of a pharmacokinetic study in Lima, Peru, a chest radiograph was performed on patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and this was subsequently photographed using a digital camera. The GIMP software was used by two independent and trained readers to estimate the extent of affected lung (expressed as a percentage of total lung area in each radiograph and the resulting radiographic SCORE.56 chest radiographs were included in the reading analysis. The Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC between the 2 observers was 0.977 (p<0.001 for the area of lung affected and was 0.955 (p<0.001 for the final score; and the kappa coefficient of Interobserver agreement for both the area of lung affected and the score were 0.9 (p<0.001 and 0.86 (p<0.001 respectively.This high level of between-observer agreement suggests that this freely available software could constitute a simple and useful tool for robust evaluation of individual and serial chest radiographs.

  18. Actinomycosis involving the chest wall: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of pulmonary actinomycosis with extension to involve the chest wall that were evaluated using computerized tomography are reported. In both cases, the relation of pulmonary and chest wall disease was best shown using CT

  19. The diagnosis of pneumonia requires a chest radiograph (x-ray – yes, no or sometimes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Gower Wootton

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP remains a common condition associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Outcome is improved by early recognition and rapid institution of empirical antibiotic therapy. A number of international guidelines recommend a chest radiograph (x-ray is obtained when pneumonia is suspected; the argument forwarded is that chest radiographs are relatively inexpensive and enable pneumonia (lung consolidation to be confirmed or excluded. But, radiographs are not available in the community setting and introduce a delay in diagnosis and treatment. For these reasons, in mild CAP treated by primary care, guidelines suggest criteria for clinical diagnosis. However, there is debate as to whether clinical features alone are sufficiently reliable to support a diagnosis of CAP with some suggesting diagnostic precision is improved by chest radiographs. Conversely, several studies have demonstrated a lack of agreement in the interpretation of chest radiographs bringing their role as the ultimate arbiter of diagnosis into question. Below we debate the diagnostic role of the humble chest radiograph in the context of suspected CAP.

  20. Paediatric Northern Score centile charts for the chest radiograph in cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To create the first national centile charts for the chest radiograph Northern Score using the UK Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Database (UKCFD). Materials and methods: All active patients for 2002 from the UKCFD were analysed in 1-year cohorts from 0 to 18 years. Northern Score results from the annual review forms were used to construct centile lines for the 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 95th centiles. Results: There were 1806 patients with recorded Northern Score data for 2002 (927 male patients, male:female ratio 1.05). The centile chart demonstrates a quasi-linear rise throughout childhood. A Northern Score in excess of age in years equates to >95th centile in school-aged CF patients. Conclusion: This centile chart provides a disease-specific reference range for monitoring individual patients or for evaluating therapeutic change using the dominant chest radiograph scoring system in the UK. Patients, parents and clinicians may find these useful during the annual review process

  1. Studies on computer-aided diagnosis systems for chest radiographs and mammograms (in Japanese)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems for chest radiographs and mammograms. Preprocessing and imaging processing methods for each CAD system include dynamic range compression and region segmentation technique. A new pattern recognition technique combines genetic algorithms with template matching methods to detect lung nodules. A genetic algorithm was employed to select the optimal shape of simulated nodular shadows to be compared with real lesions on digitized chest images. Detection performance was evaluated using 332 chest radiographs from the database of the Japanese Society of Radiological Technology. Our average true-positive rate was 72.8% with an average of 11 false-positive findings per image. A new detection method using high resolution digital images with 0.05 mm sampling is also proposed for the mammogram CAD system to detect very small microcalcifications. An automated classification method uses feature extraction based on fractal dimension analysis of masses. Using over 200 cases to evaluate the detection of mammographic masses and calcifications, the detection rate of masses and microcalcifications were 87% and 96% with 1.5 and 1.8 false-positive findings, respectively. The classification performance on benign vs malignant lesions, the Az values that were defined by the areas under the ROC curves derived from classification schemes of masses and microcalcifications were 0.84 and 0.89. To demonstrate the practicality of these CAD systems in a computer-network environment, we propose to use the mammogram CAD system via the Internet and WWW. A common gateway interface and server-client approach for the CAD system via the Internet will permit display of the CAD results on ordinary computers

  2. Scintigraphic and radiographic findings in Caroli's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, noninvasive evaluation of Caroli's disease has been demonstrated by computed tomography, ultrasonography, and nuclear scintigraphy. Confirmation of Caroli's disease requires invasive procedures such as percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography or endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. All of the techniques give valuable information making it easier to diagnose Caroli's disease and to determine its extent. In addition, associated abnormalities in organs outside of the biliary system may be revealed. Two cases are presented to illustrate the radiographic and scintigraphic findings of Caroli's disease

  3. Chest radiographs in acquired antibody deficiency syndrome with chronic granulomatous inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten cases of acquired antibody deficiency syndrome with chronic granulomatous infection were diagnosed in our hospital during the past 10 years. We were able to perform a retrospective analysis of the initial and follow-up chest radiographs in 8 of these patients. The following pathological findings could be demonstrated: 1. increased bronchovascular markings in the basal lung fields, 2. reticular densities in the middle and basal lung fields, 3. confluent nodular densities of varying size in the periphery of the basal and middle fields, 4. pulmonary infiltrates in the middle and lower lobes, 5. hilar node enlargement of moderate extent. Findings 2, 3 and 5 completely disappeared under steroid therapy whereas 1 showed only partial recovery. If both the radiologic and serologic findings are considered, it is possible to differentiate this disease from sarcoidosis. (orig.)

  4. Pulmonary radiographic findings and mortality in hospitalized patients with lower respiratory tract infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) remain a widespread problem and have a significant impact on primary healthcare resources. Previous studies have reported conflicting results on whether pulmonary radiographic findings at presentation predict lethality for patients with LRTIs. The aim of this study was to determine if the pulmonary radiographic findings at the third day of hospitalisation were independently associated with lethality in patients with LRTIs. A total of 616 patients with LRTIs, admitted to our hospital, were evaluated with regard to radiographic data. The prognostic analysis included an univariate approach of the following radiographic findings: focal alveolar infiltrates in one or more segments, focal alveolar infiltrates in one or more lobes, cavitations, diffuse infiltrates, solitary or multiple nodules, pleural effusion and fibrosis. Of the 616 patients, 560 patients (90.0%) had at least one pulmonary radiographic finding confirmed by a panel of radiologists. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows. Eleven independent radiographic variables were examined for association with lethality. Overall lethality was 10.2% (553 survivors, 63 non-survivors). The only parameter found to be significantly different between survivors and non-survivors was cavitations on chest radiograph (p-value: 0.047). In conclusion, the presence of cavitations on chest radiograph at third day of hospitalisation can help physicians' assessment of prognosis in patients with LRTIs, as it is an independent predictor of lethality

  5. Pulmonary radiographic findings and mortality in hospitalized patients with lower respiratory tract infections

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    Trakada, G. [Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Patras Medical School, Patras 26500 (Greece)]. E-mail: gtrakada@hotmail.com; Pouli, A. [Agios Savas Hospital, Athens (Greece); Goumas, P. [Department of ORL, University Hospital of Patras Medical School, Patras (Greece)

    2006-02-15

    Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) remain a widespread problem and have a significant impact on primary healthcare resources. Previous studies have reported conflicting results on whether pulmonary radiographic findings at presentation predict lethality for patients with LRTIs. The aim of this study was to determine if the pulmonary radiographic findings at the third day of hospitalisation were independently associated with lethality in patients with LRTIs. A total of 616 patients with LRTIs, admitted to our hospital, were evaluated with regard to radiographic data. The prognostic analysis included an univariate approach of the following radiographic findings: focal alveolar infiltrates in one or more segments, focal alveolar infiltrates in one or more lobes, cavitations, diffuse infiltrates, solitary or multiple nodules, pleural effusion and fibrosis. Of the 616 patients, 560 patients (90.0%) had at least one pulmonary radiographic finding confirmed by a panel of radiologists. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows. Eleven independent radiographic variables were examined for association with lethality. Overall lethality was 10.2% (553 survivors, 63 non-survivors). The only parameter found to be significantly different between survivors and non-survivors was cavitations on chest radiograph (p-value: 0.047). In conclusion, the presence of cavitations on chest radiograph at third day of hospitalisation can help physicians' assessment of prognosis in patients with LRTIs, as it is an independent predictor of lethality.

  6. Mucopolysaccharidosis: abnormal findings on abdomen and chest excluding musculoskeletal system

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    KimHan, Bo Kyung; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Cho, Jae Min [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Jeung Hee; Yoon, Dae Young; Seo, Young Lan; Han, Dae Hee; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon; Yoon, Young Cheol; Park, Sang Joon [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) is a lysosomal storage disease that causes tissue distortion and dysfunction due to the infiltration of mucopolysaccharide in connective tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristic findings of abdominal CT and plain chest radiography in patients with MPS. Sixty-two children with MPS diagnosed by urine analysis were involved in this study; 24 of these underwent abdominal CT and the findings were reviewed by two radiologists, who reached a consensus. Organomegaly was classified as severe, moderate or mild. On chest PA radiographs of 42 of the children, the transverse diameter of the trachea was measured and compared with that of 42 normal controls. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. At abdominal CT, hepatomegaly was observed in 22 patients (92%; 2 severe, 15 moderate and 5 mild); and splenomegaly was present in 18 (75%; 2 severe, 4 moderate and 12 mild). Among eight patients (33%) with pancreatic enlargement, one had a severly enlarged pancreas, while in the remaining seven, enlargement was mild. Also present were inguinal hernia (n=15), umbilical hernia (n=12), undulation with thickening of the diaphragmatic crura (n=10). abnormalities related to the male genitalia (n=5) and vascular anomaly (n=3). In MPS patients, the mid-point diameter of the trachea (range, 5.6-9 mm; mean, 6.9 mm) was significantly less than in normal controls (range, 8-14 mm; mean, 10.8 mm)(p<0.001). An awareness of the characteristic abnormalities observed at abdominal CT and chest PA radiography can lead to a better understanding of MPS in children.

  7. Mucopolysaccharidosis: abnormal findings on abdomen and chest excluding musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) is a lysosomal storage disease that causes tissue distortion and dysfunction due to the infiltration of mucopolysaccharide in connective tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristic findings of abdominal CT and plain chest radiography in patients with MPS. Sixty-two children with MPS diagnosed by urine analysis were involved in this study; 24 of these underwent abdominal CT and the findings were reviewed by two radiologists, who reached a consensus. Organomegaly was classified as severe, moderate or mild. On chest PA radiographs of 42 of the children, the transverse diameter of the trachea was measured and compared with that of 42 normal controls. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. At abdominal CT, hepatomegaly was observed in 22 patients (92%; 2 severe, 15 moderate and 5 mild); and splenomegaly was present in 18 (75%; 2 severe, 4 moderate and 12 mild). Among eight patients (33%) with pancreatic enlargement, one had a severly enlarged pancreas, while in the remaining seven, enlargement was mild. Also present were inguinal hernia (n=15), umbilical hernia (n=12), undulation with thickening of the diaphragmatic crura (n=10). abnormalities related to the male genitalia (n=5) and vascular anomaly (n=3). In MPS patients, the mid-point diameter of the trachea (range, 5.6-9 mm; mean, 6.9 mm) was significantly less than in normal controls (range, 8-14 mm; mean, 10.8 mm)(p<0.001). An awareness of the characteristic abnormalities observed at abdominal CT and chest PA radiography can lead to a better understanding of MPS in children

  8. Mucopolysaccharidosis: abnormal findings on abdomen and chest excluding musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) is a lysosomal storage disease that causes tissue distortion and dysfunction due to the infiltration of mucopolysaccharide in connective tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristic findings of abdominal CT and plain chest radiography in patients with MPS. Sixty-two children with MPS diagnosed by urine analysis were involved in this study; 24 of these underwent abdominal CT and the findings were reviewed by two radiologists, who reached a consensus. Organomegaly was classified as severe, moderate or mild. On chest PA radiographs of 42 of the children, the transverse diameter of the trachea was measured and compared with that of 42 normal controls. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. At abdominal CT, hepatomegaly was observed in 22 patients (92%; 2 severe, 15 moderate and 5 mild); and splenomegaly was present in 18 (75%; 2 severe, 4 moderate and 12 mild). Among eight patients(33%) with pancreatic enlargement, one had a severly enlarged pancreas, while in the remaining seven, enlargement was mild. Also present were inguinal hernia (n=15), umbilical hernia (n=12), undulation with thickening of the diaphragmatic crura (n=10), abnormalities related to the male genitalia (n=5) and vascular anomaly (n=3). In MPS patients, the mid-point diameter of the trachea (range, 5.6-9 mm; mean, 6.9 mm) was significantly less than in normal controls (range, 8-14 mm; mean, 10.8 mm) (p<0.001). An awareness of the characteristic abnormalities observed at abdominal CT and chest PA radiography can lead to a better understanding of MPS in children

  9. Mucopolysaccharidosis: abnormal findings on abdomen and chest excluding musculoskeletal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Jeung Hee; Yoon, Dae Young; Seo, Young Lan; Han, Dae Hee; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon; Yoon, Young Cheol; Park, Sang Joon [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim Han, Bok Yung; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Cho, Jae Min [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) is a lysosomal storage disease that causes tissue distortion and dysfunction due to the infiltration of mucopolysaccharide in connective tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristic findings of abdominal CT and plain chest radiography in patients with MPS. Sixty-two children with MPS diagnosed by urine analysis were involved in this study; 24 of these underwent abdominal CT and the findings were reviewed by two radiologists, who reached a consensus. Organomegaly was classified as severe, moderate or mild. On chest PA radiographs of 42 of the children, the transverse diameter of the trachea was measured and compared with that of 42 normal controls. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. At abdominal CT, hepatomegaly was observed in 22 patients (92%; 2 severe, 15 moderate and 5 mild); and splenomegaly was present in 18 (75%; 2 severe, 4 moderate and 12 mild). Among eight patients(33%) with pancreatic enlargement, one had a severly enlarged pancreas, while in the remaining seven, enlargement was mild. Also present were inguinal hernia (n=15), umbilical hernia (n=12), undulation with thickening of the diaphragmatic crura (n=10), abnormalities related to the male genitalia (n=5) and vascular anomaly (n=3). In MPS patients, the mid-point diameter of the trachea (range, 5.6-9 mm; mean, 6.9 mm) was significantly less than in normal controls (range, 8-14 mm; mean, 10.8 mm) (p<0.001). An awareness of the characteristic abnormalities observed at abdominal CT and chest PA radiography can lead to a better understanding of MPS in children.

  10. Optimization of pediatric chest radiographic images using optical densities ratio

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    Souza, Rafael T.F.; Miranda, Jose R.A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias de Botucatu; Pina, Diana R. [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem; Duarte, Sergio B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF/MCT), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study is the optimization of radiographic images for the pediatric patients in the age range between 0 and 1 years old, through Optical Density Ratio (ODR), considering that pediatric patients are overexposed to radiation in the repeated attempts to obtain radiographic images considered of good quality. The optimization of radiographic techniques was carried out with the RAP-PEPP (Realistic Analytical Phantom coupled to homogeneous Phantom Equivalent to Pediatric Patient) phantom in two incubators and one cradle. The data show that the clinical routine radiographic techniques generate low-quality images at up to 18.8% when evaluated by the ODRs, and increases in doses up to 60% when compared to the optimized techniques doses. (author)

  11. Predictive value of radiographic findings in gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a retrospective review of biphasic upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract examinations in 300 consecutive patients with abdominal pain, blood loss, nausea and vomiting, weight loss or dysphagia, the author evaluated the frequency of radiographic findings suggestive of gastritis. Forty-eight patients had undergone endoscopy within 1 week of upper GI tract examination. ''Best findings'' were defined by receiver operating characteristic wave analysis of individual findings, including aphthous lesions, serrated or nodular folds, marginal spiculation, and luminal constriction. Most false negative studies were in the fundus or proximal body; most false positive studies were in the antrum. They present a pictorial dictionary of findings and data for use of ''best findings'' to improve sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of gastritis

  12. Radiographic and HRCT findings of pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the radiographic and HRCT findings of Pneumocystic carinii pneumonia. We reviewed the medical records and retrospectively analysed the chest radiographs(n=31) and HRCT scans(n=17) of 31 patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia who had been followed up at our institute between, 1993 and March 1998. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia was confirmed by cytologic evaluation of sputum stained with methenamine silver(n=25) or on the basis of clinical history(n=6). The study group included 17 men and 14 women aged 28-78(average, 53.6) years. Twenty-eight patients had underlying conditions such as hematologic diseases(n=13), AIDS(n=8), malignancy(n=2), DM(n=2) and malnutrition(n=1), and three were free from underlying diseases. Twenty patients had pure Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and 11 had combined lung diseases, namely pulmonary tuberculosis(n=4), pulmonary metastasis(n=2), bacterial pneumonia(n=2), atypical mycobacterial infection(n=1), pulmonary edema(n=1), and Kaposi' s sarcoma(n=1). Chest radiographic findings of 20 cases of pure Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia included consolidation(n=12), linear-reticular opacity(n=8), ill defined haziness(n=7), and nodules(n=6), with bilaterality in is cases and zonal predominance in ten [central(n=5), lower(n=5)]. Ancillary findings included pleural effusion(n=10), cysts(n=5), lymphadenopathy(n=4) and pneumothorax(n=1). In two patients, findings were entirely normal. HRCT findings in ten cases of pure Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia included ground-glass opacity(n=6), consolidation(n=6), linear-reticular opacity(n=8), and nodules(n=5), with bilaterallity in seven cases and zonal predominance in five [central(n=5), lower(n=2)]. Ancillary findings among these cases included pleural effusion(n=4), lymphadenopathy(n=2), cysts(n=1), and pneumothorax(n=1). HRCT findings in seven cases of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia combined with other lung diseases included nodules(n=6), ground-glass opacity(n=5), linear-reticular opacity

  13. Radioisotope lung scanning and the chest radiograph in pulmonary disease. Chapter 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between the chest radiograph and images of regional ventilation and perfusion is considered. Procedures using radioactive tracers for regional pulmonary blood flow and ventilation studies are reviewed. The normal perfusion scan used injected particles labelled with sup(99m)Tc. Ventilation scans use inhaled 133Xe or sup(81m)Kr. Chest radiographs are compared with perfusion and ventilation scans in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolic disease, chronic obstructive lung disease, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, asthma, carcinoma of the bronchus, pneumonia, collapse and acute bronchitis. It is concluded that the regional physiology as complementary information to the chest radiograph would greatly enhance the diagnostic skill of the radiologist and should therefore be more readily available to him. (author)

  14. Radiographic findings of mycoplasma pneumonia in adult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mycoplasma pneumonia has known to be a not uncommon disease. However, the differential diagnosis of mycoplasm pneumonia with other viral pneumonia is difficult because of its variable clinical symptoms and atypical radiologic findings. A retrospective review was made of plain chest radiologic findings and clinical manifestations of 33 patients, who were admitted at Yonsei University Hospital from January, 1985 to February, 1990. The most prevalent age was 4th decade (33%) and main symptoms were cough (24/33), fever (2/33) and sputum (20/22). The most frequent season was winter (50%). The radiologic patterns were predominently interstitial (15/33), combined (13/33) and predominently alveolar (5/33) lesion. In alveolar infiltration cases (n 18), unilateral single lobe involvement was the most common (17/18) and left lower lobe (8/18) was predominently involved. Associated radiologic findings were hilar lymphadenopathy (4/33), pleural effusion (4/33) and cardiomegaly (7/33)

  15. Necrotizing fasciitis : plain radiographic and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the plain radiographic and CT findings of the necrotizing fasciitis. We retrospectively reviewed the radiologic findings of 4 cases with necrotizing fasciitis. Three cases were proven pathologically. We evaluated pattern and extent of the gas shadows in plain films. CT findings were analysed, with emphasis on : (a) gas pattern, (b) extent, (c) location and involved site, (d) associated focal abscess, and (e) swelling of the adjacent muscles. On plain radiographs, four cases showed streaky or mottled gas densities in the pelvis, three cases in the perineum, one case in the abdomen, and two cases in the thigh. On CT images, gas pattern was mottled and streaky appearance with swelling of the adjacent muscles. Gas shadows located in the extraperitoneal space in four cases, fascial layer in four cases, and subcutaneous layer in four cases. There were gas shadows in pelvic wall, perineum, abdominal wall, buttock, thigh, and scrotum. Focal low density lesion suggestive of focal abscess was not visualized. Plain radiography is useful for early diagnosis of the necrotizing fasciitis and CT is very useful for detection of precise location and extent of the disease. CT is also useful for differentiation of necrotizing fasciitis from focal abscess and cellulitis

  16. Necrotizing fasciitis : plain radiographic and CT findings

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    Lee, Chang Dae; Park, Jeong Hee; Jeon, Hae Jeong; Lim, Jong Nam; Heo, Tae Haeng; Park, Dong Rib [Konkuk Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-11-01

    To evaluate the plain radiographic and CT findings of the necrotizing fasciitis. We retrospectively reviewed the radiologic findings of 4 cases with necrotizing fasciitis. Three cases were proven pathologically. We evaluated pattern and extent of the gas shadows in plain films. CT findings were analysed, with emphasis on : (a) gas pattern, (b) extent, (c) location and involved site, (d) associated focal abscess, and (e) swelling of the adjacent muscles. On plain radiographs, four cases showed streaky or mottled gas densities in the pelvis, three cases in the perineum, one case in the abdomen, and two cases in the thigh. On CT images, gas pattern was mottled and streaky appearance with swelling of the adjacent muscles. Gas shadows located in the extraperitoneal space in four cases, fascial layer in four cases, and subcutaneous layer in four cases. There were gas shadows in pelvic wall, perineum, abdominal wall, buttock, thigh, and scrotum. Focal low density lesion suggestive of focal abscess was not visualized. Plain radiography is useful for early diagnosis of the necrotizing fasciitis and CT is very useful for detection of precise location and extent of the disease. CT is also useful for differentiation of necrotizing fasciitis from focal abscess and cellulitis.

  17. Chest radiographs obtained with shaped filters: evaluation by observer performance tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectiveness of a shaped filter in improving nodule and infiltrate detection was measured by observer performance testing. Seven observers read 152 test radiographs of the chest obtained from human volunteers. Half the test radiographs had target image observer performance in detecting nodule or infiltrate images was compared with the shaped-filter system and with a conventional chest imaging system. The results were analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) techniques and indicate that the filter technique was not significantly different from the conventional technique in infiltrate depiction. Observer performance in detecting nodules was slightly worse on images obtained with the shaped-filter system

  18. Using the ADDIE Model of Instructional Design to Teach Chest Radiograph Interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Cheung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interpreting basic chest radiographs is an important skill for internal medicine residents to help them adequately diagnose and manage respiratory diseases. Educators need tools to ensure that they take a systematic approach when creating a curriculum to teach this, as well as other skills, knowledge, or attitudes. Using an instructional design model helps educators accomplish this task by giving them a guide they can follow to ensure that the curriculum meets the needs of the learners. Using the creation of a curriculum to teach chest radiograph interpretation as an example, this paper illustrates how educators can use the ADDIE model of instructional design to help develop their own curricula.

  19. Acute chest syndrome of sickle cell disease: radiographic and clinical analysis of 70 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a pulmonary illness with fever, chest pain, leukocytosis and new pulmonary opacity in a patient with sickle cell disease. It is a common reason for hospitalization in sickle cell patients, and a significant cause of mortality. The etiology of ACS is unclear. Lung or bone infarction and infection, among other possible causes, have been proposed. Objective. We reviewed the chest radiographs and medical records of 41 patients with 70 episodes of ACS and correlated the clinical and radiographic courses in an attempt to better characterize and understand the syndrome. Results. In 87 % of episodes, no identifiable etiology of ACS was found. This group of patients had a median age of 14 years and showed dramatic clinical and radiographic improvement within 24 h of therapy. In the remainder of episodes (13 %), an identifiable etiology was found, usually bacterial pneumonia. These patients were younger than the group without an identifiable etiology (median age 2 years) and had a prolonged radiographic course of illness. Conclusion. The chest radiographs of children with ACS without an identifiable etiology have an extremely typical appearance and evolution. Only in cases which do not have this typical pattern should infection be suspected as the underlying cause. (orig.). With 3 figs

  20. Bone suppressed images improve radiologists’ detection performance for pulmonary nodules in chest radiographs

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    Schalekamp, Steven, E-mail: steven.schalekamp@gmail.com [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 10, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Ginneken, Bram van, E-mail: b.vanginneken@rad.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 10, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meiss, Louis, E-mail: L.Meiss@meandermc.nl [Meander Medical Centre, Utrechtseweg 160, 3800 BM Amersfoort (Netherlands); Peters-Bax, Liesbeth, E-mail: l.petersbax@rad.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 10, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Quekel, Lorentz G.B.A., E-mail: Lgba.quekel@meandermc.nl [Meander Medical Centre, Utrechtseweg 160, 3800 BM Amersfoort (Netherlands); Snoeren, Miranda M., E-mail: m.snoeren@rad.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 10, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Tiehuis, Audrey M., E-mail: am.tiehuis@meandermc.nl [Meander Medical Centre, Utrechtseweg 160, 3800 BM Amersfoort (Netherlands); Wittenberg, Rianne, E-mail: rianne_wittenberg@hotmail.com [Meander Medical Centre, Utrechtseweg 160, 3800 BM Amersfoort (Netherlands); Karssemeijer, Nico, E-mail: n.karssemeijer@rad.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 10, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M., E-mail: cornelia.schaeferprokop@gmail.com [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 10, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meander Medical Centre, Utrechtseweg 160, 3800 BM Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    Objectives: To assess the effect of bone suppression imaging on observer performance in detecting lung nodules in chest radiographs. Materials and methods: Posteroanterior (PA) and lateral digital chest radiographs of 111 (average age 65) patients with a CT proven solitary nodule (median diameter 15 mm), and 189 (average age 63) controls were read by 5 radiologists and 3 residents. Conspicuity of nodules on the radiographs was classified in obvious (n = 32), moderate (n = 32), subtle (n = 29) and very subtle (n = 18). Observers read the PA and lateral chest radiographs without and with an additional PA bone suppressed image (BSI) (ClearRead Bone Suppression 2.4, Riverain Technologies, Ohio) within one reading session. Multi reader multi case (MRMC) receiver operating characteristics (ROC) were used for statistical analysis. Results: ROC analysis showed improved detection with use of BSI compared to chest radiographs alone (AUC = 0.883 versus 0.855; p = 0.004). Performance also increased at high specificities exceeding 80% (pAUC = 0.136 versus 0.124; p = 0.0007). Operating at a specificity of 90%, sensitivity increased with BSI from 66% to 71% (p = 0.0004). Increase of detection performance was highest for nodules with moderate and subtle conspicuity (p = 0.02; p = 0.03). Conclusion: Bone suppressed images improve radiologists’ detection performance for pulmonary nodules, especially for those of moderate and subtle conspicuity.

  1. Acute chest syndrome of sickle cell disease: radiographic and clinical analysis of 70 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, L. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Buonomo, C. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Background. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a pulmonary illness with fever, chest pain, leukocytosis and new pulmonary opacity in a patient with sickle cell disease. It is a common reason for hospitalization in sickle cell patients, and a significant cause of mortality. The etiology of ACS is unclear. Lung or bone infarction and infection, among other possible causes, have been proposed. Objective. We reviewed the chest radiographs and medical records of 41 patients with 70 episodes of ACS and correlated the clinical and radiographic courses in an attempt to better characterize and understand the syndrome. Results. In 87 % of episodes, no identifiable etiology of ACS was found. This group of patients had a median age of 14 years and showed dramatic clinical and radiographic improvement within 24 h of therapy. In the remainder of episodes (13 %), an identifiable etiology was found, usually bacterial pneumonia. These patients were younger than the group without an identifiable etiology (median age 2 years) and had a prolonged radiographic course of illness. Conclusion. The chest radiographs of children with ACS without an identifiable etiology have an extremely typical appearance and evolution. Only in cases which do not have this typical pattern should infection be suspected as the underlying cause. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  2. Effectiveness of embolization for management of hemoptysis pulmonary tuberculosis: comparison of chest radiographic study and angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the effectiveness of embolization of the bronchial artery embolization for the management of hemoptysis in pulmonary tuberculosis cases with the severity of lung parenchymal injury and pleural infiltration, as seen on plain chest radiographs, and with the findings of angiography of the branchial artery. Among 265 patients with hemoptysis due to pulmonary tuberculosis, the findings of plain chest radiography and angiography of the bronchial artery were comparatively analyzed in the 206 for whom the results of follow up were available. The chest radiographin findings were classified as follows: Type I refers to simple pulmonary tuberculosis; Type II includes cases in which pulmonary tuberculosis is complicated by bronchiectasis, aspergillosis, or cavitation; Type III si either Types I or II acompainted by pleural in filtrates limited to the lung apex, and Type IV includes cases in which pleural infiltrates have extended beyond the apex in the whole the lung. Bronchial angiographic findings were divided into four groups: Group I consists of cases which show abnormalities of only the bronchial artery; Group II includes those in which abnormalities are seen in the bronchial artery and either the internal mammary or an intercostal artery; Group III comprises cases which belong to Group I or II and which a bronch of the subclavian artery is abnormal, and Group IV includes those in which abnormalities occur in at least two branches of the subclavian artery, or there is direct visualization of hypervascularity of this vessel. The initial post-embolic hemostatic effect and the results of follow up were studied over a six-month period. As compared with simple pulmonary tuberculosis (Type I), we found that as the severity of pleural infiltration and complications revealed by plain chest radiographs increased (Type II, III, IV), so did the severity of the manifestation of systemic collateral arteries other than the bronchial artery, as depicted by increased on

  3. Does PACS improve diagnostic accuracy in chest radiograph interpretations in clinical practice?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To assess the impact of a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) on the diagnostic accuracy of the interpretation of chest radiology examinations in a “real life” radiology setting. Materials and methods: During a period before PACS was introduced to radiologists, when images were still interpreted on film and reported on paper, images and reports were also digitally stored in an image database. The same database was used after the PACS introduction. This provided a unique opportunity to conduct a blinded retrospective study, comparing sensitivity (the main outcome parameter) in the pre and post-PACS periods. We selected 56 digitally stored chest radiograph examinations that were originally read and reported on film, and 66 examinations that were read and reported on screen 2 years after the PACS introduction. Each examination was assigned a random number, and both reports and images were scored independently for pathological findings. The blinded retrospective score for the original reports were then compared with the score for the images (the gold standard). Results: Sensitivity was improved after the PACS introduction. When both certain and uncertain findings were included, this improvement was statistically significant. There were no other statistically significant changes. Conclusion: The result is consistent with prospective studies concluding that diagnostic accuracy is at least not reduced after PACS introduction. The sensitivity may even be improved.

  4. Scientific use of the chest radiograph in intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper it is shown that, when properly standardized, the chest x-ray can be used to derive other important clinical information concerning the patient's status of hydration, the early detection of pulmonary edema in cardiacs, the assessment of ARDS severity and the differentiation of hydrostatic from injury lung edema. (author). 20 refs

  5. Histiocytic disorders of the chest: imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Jitesh; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Meyer, Cristopher A; Pipavath, Sudhakar N J; Schmidt, Rodney A; Swanson, Jonathan O; Godwin, J David

    2015-01-01

    Histiocytic disorders of the chest comprise a broad spectrum of diseases. The lungs may be involved in isolation or as part of systemic disease. Some of these disorders are primary and have unknown etiology, and others result from a histiocytic response to a known cause. Among primary histiocytic disorders, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is the most common; others include Erdheim-Chester disease and Rosai-Dorfman disease. Adult PLCH occurs almost exclusively in adults aged 20-40 years who smoke. Pediatric PLCH is extremely rare and typically occurs as part of multisystemic disease. Erdheim-Chester disease affects middle-aged and older adults; thoracic involvement usually occurs as part of systemic disease. Rosai-Dorfman disease affects children and young adults and manifests as painless cervical lymphadenopathy. Examples of secondary histiocytic disorders are storage diseases such as Gaucher disease, Niemann-Pick disease, and Fabry disease; pneumoconiosis such as silicosis and coal workers' pneumoconiosis; and infections such as Whipple disease and malakoplakia. These disorders are characterized at histopathologic examination on the basis of infiltration of alveoli or the pulmonary interstitium by histiocytes, which are a group of cells that includes macrophages and dendritic cells. Dendritic cells are a heterogeneous group of nonphagocytic antigen-presenting immune cells. Immunohistochemical markers help to distinguish among various primary histiocytic disorders. Characteristic radiologic findings in the appropriate clinical context may obviate biopsy to establish a correct diagnosis. However, in the absence of these findings, integration of clinical, pathologic, and radiologic features is required to establish a diagnosis. PMID:25763722

  6. Small airway disease after mycoplasma pneumonia in children: HRCT findings and correlation with radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings of small airway abnormalities after mycoplasma pneumonia and correlate them with the findings of chest radiography performed during the acute and follow-up phases of the condition. We retrospectively evaluated HRCT and chest radiographic findings of 18 patients with clinical diagnosis of small airway disease after mycoplasma pneumonia (M:F=8:10, mean age: 8.3 years, mean time interval after the initial infection; 26 menths). We evaluated the lung parenchymal and bronchial abnormalities on HRCT (n=18). In addition, presence of air-trapping was assessed on expiratory scans (n=13). The findings of HRCT were correlated with those of chest radiography performed during the acute phase of initial infection (n=15) and at the time of CT examination (n=18), respectively. HRCT revealed lung parenchymal abnormalities in 13 patients (72%). A mosaic pattern of lung attenuation was noted in ten patients (10/18, 56%) and air-trapping on expiratory scans was observed in nine (9/13), 69%). In nine of 14 (64%) with negative findings at follow-up chest radiography, one or both of the above parenchymal abnormalities was observed at HRCT. In four patients (27%), parenchymal abnormalities were seen at HRCT in areas considered normal at acute-phase chest radiography. Bronchiectasis or ateclectasis was observed in eight (44%) and four (22%) patients, respectively, at HRCT. The CT features of Swyer-James syndrome such as a unilateral hyperlucent lung with reduced lung volume and attenuated vessels were noted in two patients(11%). HRCT can clearly demonstrate lung parenchymal and bronchial abnormalities of small airway disease after mycoplasma pneumonia in children

  7. Enhancement of chest radiographs obtained in the intensive care unit through bone suppression and consistent processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Zhong, Sikai; Yao, Liping; Shang, Yanfeng; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Portable chest radiographs (CXRs) are commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU) to detect subtle pathological changes. However, exposure settings or patient and apparatus positioning deteriorate image quality in the ICU. Chest x-rays of patients in the ICU are often hazy and show low contrast and increased noise. To aid clinicians in detecting subtle pathological changes, we proposed a consistent processing and bone structure suppression method to decrease variations in image appearance and improve the diagnostic quality of images. We applied a region of interest-based look-up table to process original ICU CXRs such that they appeared consistent with each other and the standard CXRs. Then, an artificial neural network was trained by standard CXRs and the corresponding dual-energy bone images for the generation of a bone image. Once the neural network was trained, the real dual-energy image was no longer necessary, and the trained neural network was applied to the consistent processed ICU CXR to output the bone image. Finally, a gray level-based morphological method was applied to enhance the bone image by smoothing other structures on this image. This enhanced image was subtracted from the consistent, processed ICU CXR to produce a soft tissue image. This method was tested for 20 patients with a total of 87 CXRs. The findings indicated that our method suppressed bone structures on ICU CXRs and standard CXRs, simultaneously maintaining subtle pathological changes.

  8. Robust and Reproducible Quantification of the Extent of Chest Radiographic Abnormalities (And It’s Free!)

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Requena-Méndez; Edelweiss Aldasoro; Jose Muñoz; Moore, David A. J.

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: Objective, reproducible quantification of the extent of abnormalities seen on a chest radiograph would improve the user-friendliness of a previously proposed severity scoring system for pulmonary tuberculosis and could be helpful in monitoring response to therapy, including in clinical trials. METHODS: In this study we report the development and evaluation of a simple t...

  9. Chest trauma in childhood. Radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt thoracic trauma is frequently associated with further injuries (head and/or blunt abdominal trauma). The prognosis also depends on the concurrent injuries. The initial evaluation of an injured child is based on the chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound examination. Additional information can be obtained by a CT scan in mediastinal injuries. (orig./MG)

  10. Automatic screening for tuberculosis in chest radiographs: a survey

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeger, Stefan; Karargyris, Alexandros; Candemir, Sema; Siegelman, Jenifer; Folio, Les; Antani, Sameer; Thoma, George

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health threat. An estimated one-third of the world’s population has a history of TB infection, and millions of new infections are occurring every year. The advent of new powerful hardware and software techniques has triggered attempts to develop computer-aided diagnostic systems for TB detection in support of inexpensive mass screening in developing countries. In this paper, we describe the medical background of TB detection in chest X-rays and present a su...

  11. Computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs based on morphometric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li, Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Straus, Christopher; Vokes, Tamara; MacMahon, Heber; Doi, Kunio

    2007-03-01

    Vertebral fractures are the most common osteoporosis-related fractures. It is important to detect vertebral fractures, because they are associated with increased risk of subsequent fractures, and because pharmacologic therapy can reduce the risk of subsequent fractures. Although vertebral fractures are often not clinically recognized, they can be visualized on lateral chest radiographs taken for other purposes. However, only 15-60% of vertebral fractures found on lateral chest radiographs are mentioned in radiology reports. The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs in order to assist radiologists' image interpretation. Our computerized method is based on the automated identification of upper and lower vertebral edges. In order to develop the scheme, radiologists provided morphometric data for each identifiable vertebra, which consisted of six points for each vertebra, for 25 normals and 20 cases with severe fractures. Anatomical information was obtained from morphometric data of normal cases in terms of vertebral heights, heights of vertebral disk spaces, and vertebral centerline. Computerized detection of vertebral fractures was based on the reduction in the heights of fractured vertebrae compared to adjacent vertebrae and normal reference data. Vertebral heights from morphometric data on normal cases were used as reference. On 138 chest radiographs (20 with fractures) the sensitivity of our method for detection of fracture cases was 95% (19/20) with 0.93 (110/118) false-positives per image. In conclusion, the computerized method would be useful for detection of potentially overlooked vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs.

  12. Development of a world wide web-based interactive education program to improve detectability of pulmonary nodules on chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To design and develop a World Wide Web-based education program that will allow trainees to interactively learn and improve the diagnostic capability of detecting pulmonary nodules on chest radiographs. Chest radiographs with known diagnosis were retrieved and selected from our institutional clinical archives. A database was constructed by sorting radiographs into three groups: normal, nodule, and false positive (i.e., nodule-like focal opacity). Each nodule was assigned with the degree of detectability: easy, intermediate, difficult, and likely missed. Nodules were characterized by their morphology (well-defined, ill-defined, irregular, faint) and by other associated pathologies or potentially obscuring structures. The Web site was organized into four sections: study, test, record and information. The Web site allowed a user interactively to undergo the training section appropriate to the user's diagnostic capability. The training was enhanced by means of clinical and other pertinent radiological findings included in the database. The outcome of the training was tested with clinical test radiographs that presented nodules or false positives with varying diagnostic difficulties. A World Wide Web-based education program is a promising technique that would allow trainees to interactively learn and improve the diagnostic capability of detecting and characterizing pulmonary nodules

  13. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: correlation of radiographic and clinical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breysem, L. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, K. U. Leuven, Herestraat 49, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Smet, M.H. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, K. U. Leuven, Herestraat 49, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Lierde, S. van [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospitals of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Devlieger, H. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospitals of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Boeck, K. de [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospitals of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Marchal, G. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, K. U. Leuven, Herestraat 49, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    1997-08-01

    Background and purpose. Abnormalities of the chest wall have been described in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Clinical, radiographic and pulmonary function variables were evaluated in 1-year-old children ventilated because of neonatal lung disease in order to quantify these thoracic changes and to evaluate the lung disease. Methods. The pulmonary status of 51 infants with neonatal lung disease requiring artificial ventilation was reevaluated clinically and radiographically at the age of 1 year. Twenty-two of these infants had developed BPD. Thoracic depth and width were measured clinically and on chest X-ray. The Toce score evaluated the presence of cardiomegaly, hyperinflation, emphysema and interstitial lung disease. Lung function was measured after sedation using previously reported methods. In BPD patients, Toce score and lung function were determined and compared at 1 month and at 1 year of age. Results. In BPD patients, chest depth was significantly smaller when measured clinically as well as on chest radiograph (P < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test). There was a statistically significant correlation between chest depth measured clinically and on chest X-ray. Toce score was significantly higher in BPD patients (P < 0.05). In BPD patients intersitial abnormalities and decreased lung compliance were more frequent at the age of 1 month than at the age of 1 year. At the age of 1 year, hyperinflation was more frequent and at that time increased airway resistance was still noted. Thus the type of X-ray abnormality reflects the type of lung function disturbance. Conclusion. The flatness of the chest is most likely a consequence of the long-standing lung function abnormalities. (orig.). With 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. /sup 81m/Kr ventilation and /sup 99m/Tc perfusion scans in chest disease: comparison with standard radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 75 patients with various pulmonary disorders, ventilation and perfusion scans were obtained in multiple views with the /sup 81m/Kr//sup 99m/Tc technique and compared with an evaluation of regional ventilation and perfusion derived from the standard chest radiograph. In emphysema, the chest film correlated poorly with ventilation-perfusion scans, showing a trend to underestimate the functional impairment. In chronic bronchitis and asthma, large segmental defects observed on both ventilation and perfusion scans were associated with a normal chest radiograph. Typical findings in pulmonary embolism were segmental defects on perfusion scan with normal ventilation scan and clear lung fields on the chest film. In chronic left heart disease, plain films were inaccurate in predicting alternation of the base-to-apex perfusion gradient observed on the scan

  15. Development of computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li, Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Nie, Yongkang; Doi, Kunio

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the major public health concerns in the world. Several clinical trials indicated clearly that pharmacologic therapy for osteoporosis is effective for persons with vertebral fractures for preventing subsequent fractures. It is, therefore, important to diagnose vertebral fractures early. Although most vertebral fractures are asymptomatic, they can often be detected on lateral chest radiographs which may be obtained for other purposes. However, investigators have reported that vertebral fractures which were visible on lateral chest radiographs were underdiagnosed or underreported. Therefore, our purpose in this study was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs and to assist radiologists' image interpretation. Our computerized scheme is based on the detection of upper and lower edges of vertebrae on lateral chest images. A curved rectangular area which included a number of visible vertebrae was identified. This area was then straightened such that the upper and lower edges of the vertebrae were oriented horizontally. For detection of vertebral edges, line components were enhanced, and a multiple thresholding technique followed by image feature analysis was applied to the line enhanced image. Finally, vertebral heights determined from the detected vertebral edges were used for characterizing the shape of the vertebrae and for distinguishing fractured from normal vertebrae. Our preliminary results indicated that all of the severely fractured vertebrae in a small database were detected correctly by our computerized method.

  16. Improved detection of pulmonary nodules on energy-subtracted chest radiographs with a commercial computer-aided diagnosis software: comparison with human observers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To retrospectively analyze the performance of a commercial computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) software in the detection of pulmonary nodules in original and energy-subtracted (ES) chest radiographs. Original and ES chest radiographs of 58 patients with 105 pulmonary nodules measuring 5-30 mm and images of 25 control subjects with no nodules were randomized. Five blinded readers evaluated firstly the original postero-anterior images alone and then together with the subtracted radiographs. In a second phase, original and ES images were analyzed by a commercial CAD program. CT was used as reference standard. CAD results were compared to the readers' findings. True-positive (TP) and false-positive (FP) findings with CAD on subtracted and non-subtracted images were compared. Depending on the reader's experience, CAD detected between 11 and 21 nodules missed by readers. Human observers found three to 16 lesions missed by the CAD software. CAD used with ES images produced significantly fewer FPs than with non-subtracted images: 1.75 and 2.14 FPs per image, respectively (p=0.029). The difference for the TP nodules was not significant (40 nodules on ES images and 34 lesions in non-subtracted radiographs, p = 0.142). CAD can improve lesion detection both on energy subtracted and non-subtracted chest images, especially for less experienced readers. The CAD program marked less FPs on energy-subtracted images than on original chest radiographs. (orig.)

  17. Validation of the plain chest radiograph for epidemiologic studies of airflow obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chest radiographs of 125 industrial workers from rural New South Wales were examined for overinflated lungs, with and without attenuated midzonal vessels. Although the mean values of a comprehensive range of pulmonary function tests in the whole group were within normal limits, the nine subjects whose radiographs showed overinflated lungs and attenuated vessels had significantly impaired pulmonary function in comparison with 85 subjects with normal radiographs. The mean values for these nine subjects, expressed as a percentage of the mean value for subjects with normal radiographs, were: forced expiratory volume in 1 second, 75%; total lung capacity, 107%; residual volume, 143%; transpulmonary pressure at maximum inspiration, 60%; static deflation compliance, 158%; lung volume at transpulmonary pressure 10 cm H2O, 132%; transfer factor, 79%; and transfer factor/alveolar volume, 77%. Similar results were obtained by a second observer. Those subjects with overinflation but no vascular attenuation had significantly larger mean values for vital capacity and alveolar volume but no significant difference in total lung capacity or other tests of the mechanical properties of the lungs. Agreement on the presence of a positive sign between the two observers expressed as a percentage of those considered positive by either was 81% for overinflation and 62% for attenuated midzonal vessels. The results indicate that in groups of subjects with normal-average values of pulmonary function, the plain chest radiograph may provide information concerning pulmonary structure that is reflected in tests of function

  18. Interpretation of mobile chest radiographs from a high-resolution CRT display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a study to determine diagnostic accuracy of cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor with spatial resolution comparable to film-based digital radiographic images. In a pilot study, 50 preselected chest radiographs, chosen to provide a wide range of abnormalities, were performed with mobile apparatus using the Philips computed radiography (PCR) 901 storage phosphor system. A locally developed interface has been designed to transfer the original digital data comprising the 2,140 x 1,740 x 10-bit PCR images to a Megascan 2500 x 2048 pixel RT display system

  19. Hierarchical Markov random-field modeling for texture classification in chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Voracek, Rene; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.; Nolte, Loren W.; McAdams, Page

    1996-04-01

    A hierarchical Markov random field (MRF) modeling approach is presented for the classification of textures in selected regions of interest (ROIs) of chest radiographs. The procedure integrates possible texture classes and their spatial definition with other components present in an image such as noise and background trend. Classification is performed as a maximum a-posteriori (MAP) estimation of texture class and involves an iterative Gibbs- sampling technique. Two cases are studied: classification of lung parenchyma versus bone and classification of normal lung parenchyma versus miliary tuberculosis (MTB). Accurate classification was obtained for all examined cases showing the potential of the proposed modeling approach for texture analysis of radiographic images.

  20. Acute, non traumatic patterns in chest radiography of children. Recognition and understanding of radiographic appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of acute, non-traumatic diseases of the lower respiratory tract requires exact knowledge of the specific anatomy, physiology and pathology of the pediatric chest. The absolutely and relatively smaller airways, as compared with those of adults, and the undeveloped collateral ventilation result in radiological appearances that are unique in children. Viral pneumonia is predominant only in small children up to an age of 2 years. With increasing age, there is a higher incidence of bacterial pneumonia. The differentiation of viral and bacterial etiology of a pneumonia is not possible on the basis of chest radiographs. In acute pediatric imaging, possible aspiration of foreign bodies has to be considered. Since most foreign bodies cannot be detected radiographically, indirect features such as hyperinflation or mediastinal shifts have to be evaluated. Primary lung tumors are rare in children. More common are metastases with known primary tumors. Neuroblastoma or lymphomas may mimic intrapulmonary pathologies. (orig.)

  1. Where Does It Lead? Imaging Features of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices on Chest Radiograph and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzman, Rotem S.; Blondin, Dirk; Furst, Gunter; Scherer, Axel; R Miese, Falk; Kroepil, Patric [University of Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Winter, Joachim [University Hospital Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Abbara, Suhny [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (US)

    2011-10-15

    Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are being increasingly employed in patients suffering from cardiac rhythm disturbances. The principal objective of this article is to familiarize radiologists with pacemakers and ICDs on chest radiographs and CT scans. Therefore, the preferred lead positions according to pacemaker types and anatomic variants are introduced in this study. Additionally, the imaging features of incorrect lead positions and defects, as well as complications subsequent to pacemaker implantation are demonstrated herein.

  2. A chest radiograph scoring system in patients with severe acute respiratory infection: a validation study

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Emma; Haven, Kathryn; Reed, Peter; Bissielo, Ange; Harvey, Dave; McArthur, Colin; Bringans, Cameron; Freundlich, Simone; Ingram, R. Joan H.; Perry, David; Wilson, Francessa; Milne, David; Modahl, Lucy; Huang, Q. Sue; Gross, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Background The term severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) encompasses a heterogeneous group of respiratory illnesses. Grading the severity of SARI is currently reliant on indirect disease severity measures such as respiratory and heart rate, and the need for oxygen or intensive care. With the lungs being the primary organ system involved in SARI, chest radiographs (CXRs) are potentially useful for describing disease severity. Our objective was to develop and validate a SARI CXR severity s...

  3. Where Does It Lead? Imaging Features of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices on Chest Radiograph and CT

    OpenAIRE

    Lanzman, Rotem S.; Winter, Joachim; Blondin, Dirk; Fürst, Günter; Scherer, Axel; Miese, Falk R; Abbara, Suhny; Kröpil, Patric

    2011-01-01

    Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are being increasingly employed in patients suffering from cardiac rhythm disturbances. The principal objective of this article is to familiarize radiologists with pacemakers and ICDs on chest radiographs and CT scans. Therefore, the preferred lead positions according to pacemaker types and anatomic variants are introduced in this study. Additionally, the imaging features of incorrect lead positions and defects, as well as complica...

  4. Radiographic findings in tuberculosis of the calvarium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patankar, T.; Varma, R.; Krishnan, A.; Prasad, S. [Dept. of Radiology, King Edward Memorial Hospital, Parel, Bombay (India); Desai, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, King Edward Memorial Hospital, Bombay (India); Castillo, M. [Dept. of Radiology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2000-07-01

    We reviewed the pattern of involvement of the calvarium by tuberculosis (TB) in five patients and the role of imaging in its management. Four patients presented with localised scalp swelling and one with generalized seizures. Radiographs revealed lucent lesions with minimal surrounding sclerosis in the frontal (2), parietal (2) and occipital (1) bones. CT showed lesions involving the entire thickness of the calvarium and accompanying contrast-enhancing soft tissue. The patient presenting with seizures had a ring-enhancing lesion in the parietal lobe in addition to the extra-axial lesions. Although radiographs in all cases demonstrated calvarial TB, CT showed the extent of the defect, involvement of adjacent soft tissues, and in one case an intra-axial lesion. Radiographs suffice for follow-up of these patients. (orig.)

  5. Accuracy of the interpretation of chest radiographs for the diagnosis of paediatric pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A Elemraid

    Full Text Available World Health Organization (WHO radiological classification remains an important entry criterion in epidemiological studies of pneumonia in children. We report inter-observer variability in the interpretation of 169 chest radiographs in children suspected of having pneumonia.An 18-month prospective aetiological study of pneumonia was undertaken in Northern England. Chest radiographs were performed on eligible children aged ≤16 years with clinical features of pneumonia. The initial radiology report was compared with a subsequent assessment by a consultant cardiothoracic radiologist. Chest radiographic changes were categorised according to the WHO classification.There was significant disagreement (22% between the first and second reports (kappa = 0.70, P<0.001, notably in those aged <5 years (26%, kappa = 0.66, P<0.001. The most frequent sources of disagreement were the reporting of patchy and perihilar changes.This substantial inter-observer variability highlights the need for experts from different countries to create a consensus to review the radiological definition of pneumonia in children.

  6. Complications related to osteopenia in the thoracic spine on admission chest radiographs of substance abuse detoxification patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    . Conclusion. Osteopenia-related anterior wedging and fish vertebrae in the thoracic spine are common findings on chest radiographs of patients hospitalized for substance abuse detoxification. Serum inorganic phosphorus and calcium levels did not correlate with the presence of anterior wedging or fish vertebrae. (orig.)

  7. Survey of image quality and radiographic technique of pediatric chest examinations performed in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents the results of a survey of entrance surface air kerma values (Ke), image quality and radiographic exposure parameters used in pediatric chest examinations performed in Latin America. This study is part of the activities of the IAEA Regional Project RLA/9/057 whose objective is to optimize the radiological protection of patients in diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. The survey was performed in nine hospitals in Argentina (1), Brazil (4), Chile (1), Costa Rica (1), Peru (1) and Ecuador (1). The study group consisted of 462 pediatric patients (Group I- from two days to one year, Group II- from four to six years of age) undergoing chest PA/AP examinations. At the time of the examination the exposure parameters (kVp, mAs, focal-spot-to-film distance, etc.) and patient information (gender, height, weight and age) were recorded. The radiographic image quality was evaluated by the local radiologist based on the European Guidelines on Quality Criteria for Diagnostic Radiographic Images in Pediatrics. The results showed that the exposure parameters used on newborn patients were in the majority outside the 60-65kV range recommended by the European Guidelines for a good radiographic practice. In the case of examinations of patients with age between 4 to 6 years, 80% were performed with a peak tube voltage within the 60-80 kV range, as recommended by the European Guidelines. It was found that none of countries fully comply with the European Guidelines on Quality Criteria and those criteria No. 2 and No. 3 (reproduction of the chest without rotation) received the lowest scores. Probably this occurs because there are no proper patient immobilization devices. The Ke values, for both patient groups, showed a wide dispersion, ranged from 10 μGy to 160μGy for the newborn patients and from 20μGy to 240μGy for infant patients. It is possible to conclude that, in the participating Latin American countries on this project

  8. Tracheal luminal diameter on chest radiographs : demographic data in 690 normals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the normal range of transverse and AP diameter of the trachea on simple chest radiographs and to determine whether or not there is any correlation between tracheal diameter and age, sex, height, or body weight. Six hundred and ninety patients with no lesion on chest radiographs and no clinical evidence of respiratory disease were involved in this study. To obtein transverse and lateral diameters, the internal diameter of the tracheal air column was measured at a level 2cm above the top of the aortic arch on both posteroanterior and lateral radiographs. The normal ranges of AP and transverse diameters of the trachea were 16 to 25mm, and 14 to 22 mm in men, respectively and 12 to 20mm and 12 to 18mm in women. Statistically significant differences were observed between AP and transverse diameter in both in men and women, the former being consistently larger than the latter in both sexes. In men, significant correlations were observed between transverse diameter and patients' height, and between AP diameter and age as well as height. In women, significant differences were observed between AP diameter and patients' height, and transverse diameter and height as well as body weight of patients. Normal tracheal diameter was larger in men than in women. and AP diameter was larger than transverse diameter. Patients' height showed persistent correlation with luminal diameter

  9. Effective dose conversion coefficients for X-ray radiographs of the chest and the abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recently developed MAX (Male Adult voXel) and the FAXht (Female Adult voXel) head and trunk phantoms have been used to calculate organ and tissue equivalent dose conversion coefficients for X-ray radiographs of the chest and the abdomen as a function of source and field parameters, like voltage, filtration, field size, focus-to-skin distance, etc. Based on the equivalent doses to twenty three organs and tissues at risk, the effective dose has been determined and compared with corresponding data for others phantoms. The influence of different radiation transport codes, different tissue compositions and different human anatomies have been investigated separately. (Author)

  10. Effective dose conversion coefficients for X-ray radiographs of the chest and the abdomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, F.R.A. [Centro regional de Ciencias Nucleares, CRCN/CNEN, Rua Conego Barata, 999, Tamarineira, Recife, PE (Brazil); Kramer, R.; Vieira, J.W.; Khoury, H.J. [Departamento de Energia Nuclear, DEN/UFPE, Cidade Universitaria, Recife, PE (Brazil)]. E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br

    2004-07-01

    The recently developed MAX (Male Adult voXel) and the FAXht (Female Adult voXel) head and trunk phantoms have been used to calculate organ and tissue equivalent dose conversion coefficients for X-ray radiographs of the chest and the abdomen as a function of source and field parameters, like voltage, filtration, field size, focus-to-skin distance, etc. Based on the equivalent doses to twenty three organs and tissues at risk, the effective dose has been determined and compared with corresponding data for others phantoms. The influence of different radiation transport codes, different tissue compositions and different human anatomies have been investigated separately. (Author)

  11. Digital luminescence radiography (DLR) for lateral chest radiographs in intensive care units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DLR technique is being used increasingly for clinical diagnosis, particularly in intensive care. Since the installation of a DLR unit, we have carried out more than 20 000 examinations of the chest on patients in intensive care. 12.1% of these were lateral radiographs. In this way, the diagnosis can be made of the extent of a pleural effusion, the presence of a ventral pneumothorax or of atelectasis. Using DLR, these examinations can be carried out at the bedside and have improved the radiological investigation of patients in intensive care. (orig.)

  12. Analysis of biological tissues in infant chest for the development of an equivalent radiographic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pina, D. R.; Souza, Rafael T. F.; Duarte, Sergio B.; Alvarez, Matheus; Miranda, Jose R. A. [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Departamento de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem, Universidade Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Distrito de Rubiao Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Instituto de Biociencias de Botucatu, Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica, Universidade Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Distrito de Rubiao Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCT, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Instituto de Biociencias de Botucatu, Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica, Universidade Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Distrito de Rubiao Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Instituto de Biociencias de Botucatu, Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica, Universidade Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Distrito de Rubiao Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of the present study was to determine the amounts of different tissues in the chest of the newborn patient (age {<=}1 year), with the aim of developing a homogeneous phantom chest equivalent. This type of phantom is indispensable in the development of optimization procedures for radiographic techniques, including dosimetric control, which is a crucial aspect of pediatric radiology. The authors present a systematic set of procedures, including a computational algorithm, to estimate the amounts of tissues and thicknesses of the corresponding simulator material plates used to construct the phantom. Methods: The Gaussian fit of computed tomographic (CT) analysis was applied to classify and quantify different biological tissues. The methodology is summarized with a computational algorithm, which was used to quantify tissues through automated CT analysis. The thicknesses of the equivalent homogeneous simulator material plates were determined to construct the phantom. Results: A total of 180 retrospective CT examinations with anterior-posterior diameter values ranging 8.5-13.0 cm were examined. The amounts of different tissues were evaluated. The results provided elements to construct a phantom to simulate the infant chest in the posterior-anterior or anterior-posterior (PA/AP) view. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this report represents the first demonstration of an infant chest phantom dedicated to the radiology of children younger than one year. This phantom is a key element in the development of clinical charts for optimizing radiographic technique in pediatric patients. Optimization procedures for nonstandard patients were reported previously [Pina et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 49, N215-N226 (2004) and Pina et al., Appl. Radiat. Isot. 67, 61-69 (2009)]. The constructed phantom represents a starting point to obtain radiologic protocols for the infant patient.

  13. Analysis of biological tissues in infant chest for the development of an equivalent radiographic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The main purpose of the present study was to determine the amounts of different tissues in the chest of the newborn patient (age ≤1 year), with the aim of developing a homogeneous phantom chest equivalent. This type of phantom is indispensable in the development of optimization procedures for radiographic techniques, including dosimetric control, which is a crucial aspect of pediatric radiology. The authors present a systematic set of procedures, including a computational algorithm, to estimate the amounts of tissues and thicknesses of the corresponding simulator material plates used to construct the phantom. Methods: The Gaussian fit of computed tomographic (CT) analysis was applied to classify and quantify different biological tissues. The methodology is summarized with a computational algorithm, which was used to quantify tissues through automated CT analysis. The thicknesses of the equivalent homogeneous simulator material plates were determined to construct the phantom. Results: A total of 180 retrospective CT examinations with anterior-posterior diameter values ranging 8.5-13.0 cm were examined. The amounts of different tissues were evaluated. The results provided elements to construct a phantom to simulate the infant chest in the posterior-anterior or anterior-posterior (PA/AP) view. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this report represents the first demonstration of an infant chest phantom dedicated to the radiology of children younger than one year. This phantom is a key element in the development of clinical charts for optimizing radiographic technique in pediatric patients. Optimization procedures for nonstandard patients were reported previously [Pina et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 49, N215-N226 (2004) and Pina et al., Appl. Radiat. Isot. 67, 61-69 (2009)]. The constructed phantom represents a starting point to obtain radiologic protocols for the infant patient.

  14. Clinical and Laboratory Findings in Patients With Acute Respiratory Symptoms That Suggest the Necessity of Chest X-ray for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pneumonia is a common illness in all parts of the world and is considered as a major cause of death among all age groups. Nevertheless, only about 5% of patients referring to their primary care physicians with acute respiratory symptoms will develop pneumonia. This study was performed to derive practical criteria for performing chest radiographs for the evaluation of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A total of 420 patients with acute respiratory symptoms and positive findings on chest radiograph were evaluated from December 2008 to December 2009. The subjects were referred to outpatient clinics or emergency departments of Birjand's medical university hospitals, Iran, and were enrolled as positive cases. A checklist was completed for each patient including their demographic information, clinical signs and symptoms (cough, sputum production, dyspnea, chest pain, fever, tachycardia, and tachypnea), abnormal findings in pulmonary auscultation and laboratory findings (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein levels, and white blood cell count). An equal number of age-matched individuals with acute respiratory symptoms, but insignificant findings on chest radiography, were included as the control group. Finally, the diagnostic values of different findings were compared. The data showed that vital signs and physical examination findings are useful screening parameters for predicting chest radiograph findings in outpatient settings. Therefore, by implementing a prediction rule, we would be able to determine which patients would benefit from a chest X-Ray (sensitivity, 94% and specificity, 57%). This study's findings suggest that requesting chest radiographs might not be necessary in patients with acute respiratory symptoms unless the vital signs and/or physical examination findings are abnormal. Considering the 94% sensitivity of this rule for predicting CAP, a chest radiograph is required for patients with unreliable follow-ups or moderate to high

  15. Pneumothorax detection in chest radiographs using local and global texture signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geva, Ofer; Zimmerman-Moreno, Gali; Lieberman, Sivan; Konen, Eli; Greenspan, Hayit

    2015-03-01

    A novel framework for automatic detection of pneumothorax abnormality in chest radiographs is presented. The suggested method is based on a texture analysis approach combined with supervised learning techniques. The proposed framework consists of two main steps: at first, a texture analysis process is performed for detection of local abnormalities. Labeled image patches are extracted in the texture analysis procedure following which local analysis values are incorporated into a novel global image representation. The global representation is used for training and detection of the abnormality at the image level. The presented global representation is designed based on the distinctive shape of the lung, taking into account the characteristics of typical pneumothorax abnormalities. A supervised learning process was performed on both the local and global data, leading to trained detection system. The system was tested on a dataset of 108 upright chest radiographs. Several state of the art texture feature sets were experimented with (Local Binary Patterns, Maximum Response filters). The optimal configuration yielded sensitivity of 81% with specificity of 87%. The results of the evaluation are promising, establishing the current framework as a basis for additional improvements and extensions.

  16. Computer-aided detection (CAD) of lung nodules and small tumours on chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detection of focal pulmonary lesions is limited by quantum and anatomic noise and highly influenced by variable perception capacity of the reader. Multiple studies have proven that lesions - missed at time of primary interpretation - were visible on the chest radiographs in retrospect. Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) schemes do not alter the anatomic noise but aim at decreasing the intrinsic limitations and variations of human perception by alerting the reader to suspicious areas in a chest radiograph when used as a 'second reader'. Multiple studies have shown that the detection performance can be improved using CAD especially for less experienced readers at a variable amount of decreased specificity. There seem to be a substantial learning process for both, experienced and inexperienced readers, to be able to optimally differentiate between false positive and true positive lesions and to build up sufficient trust in the capabilities of these systems to be able to use them at their full advantage. Studies so far focussed on stand-alone performance of the CAD schemes to reveal the magnitude of potential impact or on retrospective evaluation of CAD as a second reader for selected study groups. Further research is needed to assess the performance of these systems in clinical routine and to determine the trade-off between performance increase in terms of increased sensitivity and decreased inter-reader variability and loss of specificity and secondary indicated follow-up examinations for further diagnostic workup.

  17. Lung involvement quantification in chest radiographs; Quantificacao de comprometimento pulmonar em radiografias de torax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giacomini, Guilherme; Alvarez, Matheus; Oliveira, Marcela de; Miranda, Jose Ricardo A. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Biociencias. Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica; Pina, Diana R.; Pereira, Paulo C.M.; Ribeiro, Sergio M., E-mail: giacomini@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2014-12-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is an infectious disease which remains a global health problem. The chest radiography is the commonly method employed to assess the TB's evolution. The methods for quantification of abnormalities of chest are usually performed on CT scans (CT). This quantification is important to assess the TB evolution and treatment and comparing different treatments. However, precise quantification is not feasible for the amount of CT scans required. The purpose of this work is to develop a methodology for quantification of lung damage caused by TB through chest radiographs. It was developed an algorithm for computational processing of exams in Matlab, which creates a lungs' 3D representation, with compromised dilated regions inside. The quantification of lung lesions was also made for the same patients through CT scans. The measurements from the two methods were compared and resulting in strong correlation. Applying statistical Bland and Altman, all samples were within the limits of agreement, with a confidence interval of 95%. The results showed an average variation of around 13% between the two quantification methods. The results suggest the effectiveness and applicability of the method developed, providing better risk-benefit to the patient and cost-benefit ratio for the institution. (author)

  18. Bone suppression increases the visibility of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in chest radiographs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Schalekamp

    Full Text Available Chest radiographs (CXR are an important diagnostic tool for the detection of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA in critically ill patients, but their diagnostic value is limited by a poor sensitivity. By using advanced image processing, the aim of this study was to increase the value of chest radiographs in the diagnostic work up of neutropenic patients who are suspected of IPA.The frontal CXRs of 105 suspected cases of IPA were collected from four institutions. Radiographs could contain single or multiple sites of infection. CT was used as reference standard. Five radiologists and two residents participated in an observer study for the detection of IPA on CXRs with and without bone suppressed images (ClearRead BSI 3.2; Riverain Technologies. The evaluation was performed separately for the right and left lung, resulting in 78 diseased cases (or lungs and 132 normal cases (or lungs. For each image, observers scored the likelihood of focal infectious lesions being present on a continuous scale (0-100. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC served as the performance measure. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by considering only the lungs with a suspiciousness score of greater than 50 to be positive.The average AUC for only CXRs was 0.815. Performance significantly increased, to 0.853, when evaluation was aided with BSI (p = 0.01. Sensitivity increased from 49% to 66% with BSI, while specificity decreased from 95% to 90%.The detection of IPA in CXRs can be improved when their evaluation is aided by bone suppressed images. BSI improved the sensitivity of the CXR examination, outweighing a small loss in specificity.

  19. Interpretation of chest radiographs in both cancer and other critical care patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Yilmaz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a clinical, pathophysiological and radiographic pattern that has signs of pulmonary edema occur without elevated pulmonary venous pressures. Clinical presentation and progression of acute respiratory distress syndrome are followed by frequently ordered portable chest X-ray in critically ill patients. We evaluated chest radiographs of ten cancer and other six critical care pediatric patients. The parenchymal imaging of lung in patients with cancer was reported the same as that of other critically ill children despite underlying pathophysiological variations in our investigation. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 270-273

  20. Gradual progression of intrapulmonary lymph nodes associated with usual interstitial pneumonia in progressive systemic sclerosis on chest radiographs and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 40 year old female visited the clinic for evaluation of Raynaud's phenomenon for a period of four years. The initial chest radiograph showed a fine reticular density and ground glass opacity with lower lobe predominance. These findings are consistent interstitial fibrosis. Additionally, high resolution CT showed multiple, small, coexisting nodular opacities, ranging from 3 to 7 mm in size in both lungs. These nodules grew up to 1.5 cm and showed moderate enhancement. Because of the rareness of intrapulmonary lymph node in patient of progressive systemic sclerosis, we couldn't exclude the possibility of malignancy. These nodules are turned out to be intrapulmonary lymph nodes on video assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy

  1. Gradual progression of intrapulmonary lymph nodes associated with usual interstitial pneumonia in progressive systemic sclerosis on chest radiographs and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Joon Young; Chung, Myung Hee; Kim, Seon Mun [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Hyun [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    A 40 year old female visited the clinic for evaluation of Raynaud's phenomenon for a period of four years. The initial chest radiograph showed a fine reticular density and ground glass opacity with lower lobe predominance. These findings are consistent interstitial fibrosis. Additionally, high resolution CT showed multiple, small, coexisting nodular opacities, ranging from 3 to 7 mm in size in both lungs. These nodules grew up to 1.5 cm and showed moderate enhancement. Because of the rareness of intrapulmonary lymph node in patient of progressive systemic sclerosis, we couldn't exclude the possibility of malignancy. These nodules are turned out to be intrapulmonary lymph nodes on video assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy.

  2. Chest wall tuberculosis; CT findings in 14 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To present CT findings of chest wall tuberculosis. CT scans were obtained in 14 patients with proven chest wall tuberculosis. Diagnosis was confirmed by means of right open thoracostomy with abscess evacuation (n=1), excision and curettage (n=11) or excision and curettage along with resection of the involved lung (n=2). The images were assessed with emphasis for the extrapleural, pleural, and pulmonary lesions. All patients showed juxtacostal soft tissue mass with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. The lesions were located in the left hemithorax in eight patients and in the right in six. Multiple lesions were found in three patients (two in one and three in two). Rib destruction was observed in four patients. Intercostal muscle involvement of thickening and enhancement were shown in all patients. Thirteen patients (93%) had evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis: active pulmonary tuberculosis in nine and stable tuberculosis in four. Pleural lesions, including empyema necessitatis in six, were observed in eleven (79%). On CT scan, chest wall tuberculosis is characterized by juxtacostal soft tissue lesion with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. Rib destruction may be associated. Additionally, enhancing intercostal muscle suggest direct inflammatory process of tuberculosis and spread channel to the chest wall involvement of pleuropulmonary tuberculosis

  3. H1N1 influenza in an Irish population: patterns of chest radiograph abnormality in patients testing positive.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, K

    2012-02-29

    The winter of 2010\\/2011 saw a second peak in the number of H1N1 cases detected in Ireland. The purpose of this study was to investigate the radiological characteristics of patients diagnosed during this period. A retrospective analysis of these cases was performed. Chest radiographs were classified as normal or abnormal. A total of 37 patients were included. Of these, 22 (59%) of chest radiographs were abnormal and 15 (41%) were normal. In the 7 paediatric patients, 4 (57%) had a perihilar distribution of disease, 2 (28%) had peripherally based disease with 1 (14%) having a mixed distribution. A series of radiographs was available for 9 patients, 6 of these showed a radiographic deterioration from the initial study. The majority of chest radiographs of patients with confirmed H1N1 infection will be abnormal. In children, disease is more likely to be perihilar in distribution. Chest radiography is an important initial investigation in patients with H1N1 infection and is useful to track progression of disease in the subset of patients requiring hospitalization for severe disease.

  4. Respiratory distress syndrome: comparison between radiographic finding after surfactant replacement therapy and prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hoon Sik; Kim, Kun Il; Park, Jae Hong [College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Sung Sook; Kwon, Jeong Mi [Il Sin Christian Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-05-01

    To evaluate the relationship between radiographic findings after surfactant replacement therapy and prognosis in newborns with respiratory distress syndrome (RDs). The chest radiographs and medical records of 78 infants (body weight 840-3600g, mean 1682g, gestational age 20-38 (mean, 31) weeks) who had been treated with surfactant were retrospectively analysed. Surfactant was applied 1-12 (mean, 5) hours after birth. By comparing pre-and post-surfactant radiographs, radiographic changes were graded as either uniform bilateral improvement (grade 1), asymmetrical unilateral improvement (grade 2), or no improvement (grade 3). complications such as barotrauma, bilateral diffuse consolidation, or intracranial hemorrhage were tabulated. We correlated the prognosis with (a) the radiographic improvement pattern, (b) the time of surfactant application, and (c) the incidence of pulmonary complications, respectively. Forty-six (59%) of 78 infants survived, and 32 (41%) died. The survivors comprised 38 infants in group 1 (67%, n=3D57), six in group 1 (46%, n=3D13), and two in group 3 (25%, n=3D8) (p less than 0.05). The survival rate did not correlate with the time of surfactant application (p greater than 0.05). Infants with barotrauma had a lower survival rate (42%, 10/24) than those not suffering from this condition (67%, 36/54) (p less than 0.05). The condition occurred in 12 (21%) of 57 infants in group 1, six (46%) of 13 in group 2, and six (75%) of eight in group 3 (p less than 0.05). Eleven (92%) of 12 infants with pulmonary hemorrhage, seven (100%) of seven with intracranial hemorrhage above grade 3, and seven (41%) of 17 with sepsis died. The radiographic changes occurring after surfactant replacement therapy correlated closely with the incidence of barotrauma and the prognosis of newborns with respiratory distress syndrome. Close observation of follow-up radiographic findings plays an important role in therapy and prognosis. (author)

  5. Respiratory distress syndrome: comparison between radiographic finding after surfactant replacement therapy and prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the relationship between radiographic findings after surfactant replacement therapy and prognosis in newborns with respiratory distress syndrome (RDs). The chest radiographs and medical records of 78 infants (body weight 840-3600g, mean 1682g, gestational age 20-38 (mean, 31) weeks) who had been treated with surfactant were retrospectively analysed. Surfactant was applied 1-12 (mean, 5) hours after birth. By comparing pre-and post-surfactant radiographs, radiographic changes were graded as either uniform bilateral improvement (grade 1), asymmetrical unilateral improvement (grade 2), or no improvement (grade 3). complications such as barotrauma, bilateral diffuse consolidation, or intracranial hemorrhage were tabulated. We correlated the prognosis with (a) the radiographic improvement pattern, (b) the time of surfactant application, and (c) the incidence of pulmonary complications, respectively. Forty-six (59%) of 78 infants survived, and 32 (41%) died. The survivors comprised 38 infants in group 1 (67%, n=3D57), six in group 1 (46%, n=3D13), and two in group 3 (25%, n=3D8) (p less than 0.05). The survival rate did not correlate with the time of surfactant application (p greater than 0.05). Infants with barotrauma had a lower survival rate (42%, 10/24) than those not suffering from this condition (67%, 36/54) (p less than 0.05). The condition occurred in 12 (21%) of 57 infants in group 1, six (46%) of 13 in group 2, and six (75%) of eight in group 3 (p less than 0.05). Eleven (92%) of 12 infants with pulmonary hemorrhage, seven (100%) of seven with intracranial hemorrhage above grade 3, and seven (41%) of 17 with sepsis died. The radiographic changes occurring after surfactant replacement therapy correlated closely with the incidence of barotrauma and the prognosis of newborns with respiratory distress syndrome. Close observation of follow-up radiographic findings plays an important role in therapy and prognosis. (author)

  6. The transverse diameter of the chest on routine radiographs reliably estimates gestational age and weight in premature infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to digital radiography it was possible for a radiologist to easily estimate the size of a patient on an analog film. Because variable magnification may be applied at the time of processing an image, it is now more difficult to visually estimate an infant's size on the monitor. Since gestational age and weight significantly impact the differential diagnosis of neonatal diseases and determine the expected size of kidneys or appearance of the brain by MRI or US, this information is useful to a pediatric radiologist. Although this information may be present in the electronic medical record, it is frequently not readily available to the pediatric radiologist at the time of image interpretation. To determine if there was a correlation between gestational age and weight of a premature infant with their transverse chest diameter (rib to rib) on admission chest radiographs. This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, which waived informed consent. The maximum transverse chest diameter outer rib to outer rib was measured on admission portable chest radiographs of 464 patients admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) during the 2010 calendar year. Regression analysis was used to investigate the association between chest diameter and gestational age/birth weight. Quadratic term of chest diameter was used in the regression model. Chest diameter was statistically significantly associated with both gestational age (P < 0.0001) and birth weight (P < 0.0001). An infant's gestational age and birth weight can be reliably estimated by comparing a simple measurement of the transverse chest diameter on digital chest radiograph with the tables and graphs in our study. (orig.)

  7. The transverse diameter of the chest on routine radiographs reliably estimates gestational age and weight in premature infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, Kelly R. [University of Minnesota, Department of Radiology, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Zhang, Lei [University of Minnesota, Biostatistical Design and Analysis Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Seidel, Frank G. [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Prior to digital radiography it was possible for a radiologist to easily estimate the size of a patient on an analog film. Because variable magnification may be applied at the time of processing an image, it is now more difficult to visually estimate an infant's size on the monitor. Since gestational age and weight significantly impact the differential diagnosis of neonatal diseases and determine the expected size of kidneys or appearance of the brain by MRI or US, this information is useful to a pediatric radiologist. Although this information may be present in the electronic medical record, it is frequently not readily available to the pediatric radiologist at the time of image interpretation. To determine if there was a correlation between gestational age and weight of a premature infant with their transverse chest diameter (rib to rib) on admission chest radiographs. This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, which waived informed consent. The maximum transverse chest diameter outer rib to outer rib was measured on admission portable chest radiographs of 464 patients admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) during the 2010 calendar year. Regression analysis was used to investigate the association between chest diameter and gestational age/birth weight. Quadratic term of chest diameter was used in the regression model. Chest diameter was statistically significantly associated with both gestational age (P < 0.0001) and birth weight (P < 0.0001). An infant's gestational age and birth weight can be reliably estimated by comparing a simple measurement of the transverse chest diameter on digital chest radiograph with the tables and graphs in our study. (orig.)

  8. Laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis: findings on computed tomography scans of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To present the findings of computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest in patients with laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed CT scans of eight patients, five males and three females, ranging from 5 to 18 years of age with a mean age of 10.5 years. Images were independently reviewed by two radiologists. In discrepant cases, a consensus was reached. Results: The most common CT findings were intratracheal polypoid lesions and pulmonary nodules, many of which were cavitated. Conclusions: In patients with laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis, the most common tomographic finding was the combination of intratracheal polypoid lesions and multiple pulmonary nodules, many of which were cavitated. (author)

  9. Laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis: findings on computed tomography scans of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Araujo Neto, Cesar de [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Meirelles, Gustavo Souza Portes [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), SP (Brazil); Irion, Klaus Loureiro [The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Zanetti, Glaucia [Faculdade de Medicina de Petropolis (FMP), RJ (Brazil); Missrie, Israel [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem; Sato, Juliana [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia de Cabeca e Pescoco

    2008-12-15

    Objectives: To present the findings of computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest in patients with laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed CT scans of eight patients, five males and three females, ranging from 5 to 18 years of age with a mean age of 10.5 years. Images were independently reviewed by two radiologists. In discrepant cases, a consensus was reached. Results: The most common CT findings were intratracheal polypoid lesions and pulmonary nodules, many of which were cavitated. Conclusions: In patients with laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis, the most common tomographic finding was the combination of intratracheal polypoid lesions and multiple pulmonary nodules, many of which were cavitated. (author)

  10. CT findings of the chest in adults with aspirated foreign bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zissin, R.; Shapiro-Feinberg, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba (Israel); Rozenman, J.; Apter, S.; Hertz, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Tel Aviv (Israel); Smorjik, J. [Dept. of Pulmonary Medicine, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba (Israel)

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the imaging findings in adult patients with tracheobronchial foreign body aspiration. Nineteen patients (11 men and 8 women; age range 26-89 years) with foreign-body aspiration were retrospectively reviewed. Nine patients were outpatients with non-specific symptoms and ten were hospitalized with nonresolving pneumonia (n=6), after detection of a dental fragment on a chest radiograph following intubation (n=3), and there was one mentally retarded patient with empyema. An aspirated dental fragment was seen on a chest radiograph in 3 patients and an endobronchial foreign body on CT in 16, appearing as a dense structure within the bronchial lumen. The foreign body was right sided in 14 cases and left sided in 5. Three cases were missed at first interpretation. Associated findings on CT were volume loss, hyperlucency with air trapping and bronchiectasis in the affected lobe. Thirteen patients were managed with bronchoscopy, whereas 2 needed thoracotomy. In 1 patient bronchoscopy failed to detect a foreign body, indicating a false-positive CT diagnosis. One patient expelled an aspirated tablet and two refused invasive procedure. The foreign bodies found mainly were bones and dental fragments. A high clinical suspicion is necessary to diagnose a foreign body. Since CT is often used to evaluate various respiratory problems in adults, it may be the first imaging modality to discover an unsuspected aspirated foreign body in the bronchial tree. (orig.) (orig.)

  11. A typical adenomatous hyperplasia of the lung: correlation of radiographic and pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study radiographic features of atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) of lung and correlate them with their pathologic findings, so as to improve the imaging diagnose. Methods: The imaging features of 8 patients with pathology- proved AAH were reviewed. All patients were women with age ranging from 35 to 74 years. All cases had chest radiography and HRCT. The radiographic findings were studied retrospectively and correlated with those of pat hology. Results: On chest X-ray, the foci in five patients presented as nodule-like area of a bit high attenuation, while the chest radiograph in the other three patients were negative. On HRCT, all 8 patients presented as non-solid nodules. All lesions were round or oval shaped with well-defined margin (n=4) or poor-defined margin (n=3). The greatest dimension of the lesions ranged from 5.0 mm to 20.0 mm. Their CT value ranged from -362.7 HU to -485.6 HU, the mean CT value was (-423.0 ± 47.0) HU. Air bronchograms and/or bubbles were seen in 5 lesions. Coarse spiculation and pleural tag was not seen in any lesion. Before operation, all the nodules did not change in size over a follow-up period from one month to six months. Pathologic findings showed atypical epithelial cell proliferation along thickened alveolar septa without alveolar collapse. Conclusion: AAH should be considered in cases with the following features: (1) nodules ate found in lung cancer screening or incidentally detected; (2) the diameter of the nodule is usually less than 10 mm; (3) the lesion presented as non-solid nodule on HRCT, air bronchogram and/or bubble sign can be seen; (4) no coarse spiculation and plural tag was seen. (authors)

  12. Evaluation of the usefulness of modified biological fingerprints in chest radiographs for patient recognition and identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yoichiro; Matsunobu, Yusuke; Morishita, Junji

    2016-07-01

    We have been developing an image-searching method to identify misfiled images in a PACS server. Developing new biological fingerprints (BFs) that would reduce the influence of differences in positioning and breathing phases to improve the performance of recognition is desirable. In our previous studies, the whole lung field (WLF) that included the shadows of the body and lungs was affected by differences in positioning and/or breathing phases. In this study, we showed the usefulness of a circumscribed lung with a rectangular region of interest and the upper half of a chest radiograph as modified BFs. We used 200 images as hypothetically misfiled images. The cross-correlation identifies the resemblance between the BFs in the misfiled images and the corresponding BFs in the database images. The modified BFs indicated better results than did WLF in a receiver operating characteristic analysis; therefore, they could be used as identifiers for patient recognition and identification. PMID:27132238

  13. The value of supine chest radiographs using digital luminescence radiography (DLR) in relation to observer experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate supine chest radiographs obtained by DLR for the diagnosis of pleural and parenchymatous changes and to compare the accuracy of observers in relation to their experience. 50 examinations, which had been checked by CT, were chosen. The images were examined by 7 doctors (2 non-radiologists, 5 radiologists). Our experience indicates that DLR has high specificity but low sensitivity for the diagnosis of a pneumothorax but relatively high sensitivity and low specificity for other changes (pleural effusions, atelectases and other intrapulmonary opacities). The area under the ROC-curve averaged over the 7 rater was similar for these 4 entities. There were marked differences between the observers; the radiologists were considerably better than the non-radiologists. Altogether, the diagnostic value of single DLR examinations was relatively low. In indeterminate cases, additional diagnostic methods should, therefore, be used. (orig.)

  14. Cavity contour segmentation in chest radiographs using supervised learning and dynamic programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maduskar, Pragnya, E-mail: pragnya.maduskar@radboudumc.nl; Hogeweg, Laurens; Sánchez, Clara I.; Ginneken, Bram van [Diagnostic Image Analysis Group, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, 6525 GA (Netherlands); Jong, Pim A. de [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX (Netherlands); Peters-Bax, Liesbeth [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, 6525 GA (Netherlands); Dawson, Rodney [University of Cape Town Lung Institute, Cape Town 7700 (South Africa); Ayles, Helen [Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Efficacy of tuberculosis (TB) treatment is often monitored using chest radiography. Monitoring size of cavities in pulmonary tuberculosis is important as the size predicts severity of the disease and its persistence under therapy predicts relapse. The authors present a method for automatic cavity segmentation in chest radiographs. Methods: A two stage method is proposed to segment the cavity borders, given a user defined seed point close to the center of the cavity. First, a supervised learning approach is employed to train a pixel classifier using texture and radial features to identify the border pixels of the cavity. A likelihood value of belonging to the cavity border is assigned to each pixel by the classifier. The authors experimented with four different classifiers:k-nearest neighbor (kNN), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), GentleBoost (GB), and random forest (RF). Next, the constructed likelihood map was used as an input cost image in the polar transformed image space for dynamic programming to trace the optimal maximum cost path. This constructed path corresponds to the segmented cavity contour in image space. Results: The method was evaluated on 100 chest radiographs (CXRs) containing 126 cavities. The reference segmentation was manually delineated by an experienced chest radiologist. An independent observer (a chest radiologist) also delineated all cavities to estimate interobserver variability. Jaccard overlap measure Ω was computed between the reference segmentation and the automatic segmentation; and between the reference segmentation and the independent observer's segmentation for all cavities. A median overlap Ω of 0.81 (0.76 ± 0.16), and 0.85 (0.82 ± 0.11) was achieved between the reference segmentation and the automatic segmentation, and between the segmentations by the two radiologists, respectively. The best reported mean contour distance and Hausdorff distance between the reference and the automatic segmentation were

  15. Cavity contour segmentation in chest radiographs using supervised learning and dynamic programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Efficacy of tuberculosis (TB) treatment is often monitored using chest radiography. Monitoring size of cavities in pulmonary tuberculosis is important as the size predicts severity of the disease and its persistence under therapy predicts relapse. The authors present a method for automatic cavity segmentation in chest radiographs. Methods: A two stage method is proposed to segment the cavity borders, given a user defined seed point close to the center of the cavity. First, a supervised learning approach is employed to train a pixel classifier using texture and radial features to identify the border pixels of the cavity. A likelihood value of belonging to the cavity border is assigned to each pixel by the classifier. The authors experimented with four different classifiers:k-nearest neighbor (kNN), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), GentleBoost (GB), and random forest (RF). Next, the constructed likelihood map was used as an input cost image in the polar transformed image space for dynamic programming to trace the optimal maximum cost path. This constructed path corresponds to the segmented cavity contour in image space. Results: The method was evaluated on 100 chest radiographs (CXRs) containing 126 cavities. The reference segmentation was manually delineated by an experienced chest radiologist. An independent observer (a chest radiologist) also delineated all cavities to estimate interobserver variability. Jaccard overlap measure Ω was computed between the reference segmentation and the automatic segmentation; and between the reference segmentation and the independent observer's segmentation for all cavities. A median overlap Ω of 0.81 (0.76 ± 0.16), and 0.85 (0.82 ± 0.11) was achieved between the reference segmentation and the automatic segmentation, and between the segmentations by the two radiologists, respectively. The best reported mean contour distance and Hausdorff distance between the reference and the automatic segmentation were

  16. Radiation safety education reduces the incidence of adult fingers on neonatal chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A previous audit revealed a high frequency of adult fingers visualised on neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) chest radiographs—representing an example of inappropriate occupational radiation exposure. Radiation safety education was provided to staff and we hypothesised that the education would reduce the frequency of adult fingers visualised on NICU chest radiographs. Two cross-sectional samples taken before and after the administration of the education were compared. We examined fingers visualised directly in the beam, fingers in the direct beam but eliminated by technologists editing the image, and fingers under the cones of the portable x-ray machine. There was a 46.2% reduction in fingers directly in the beam, 50.0% reduction in fingers directly in the beam but cropped out, and 68.4% reduction in fingers in the coned area. There was a 57.1% overall reduction in adult fingers visualised, which was statistically significant (Z value − 7.48, P < 0.0001). This study supports radiation safety education in minimising inappropriate occupational radiation exposure. (paper)

  17. The chest radiographic appearances of non-tuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary infection in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the chest radiographic appearances of the non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) pulmonary infection in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Methods: Ten patients with AIDS and NTM underwent chest X-ray radiography and 7 patients performed high-resolution CT (HRCT) scan. Chest radiographic features of' NTM in patients with AIDS were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The chest radiograph showed bilateral pulmonary involvement in 6 cases and single lung involvement in 4 cases (3 cases in the right, 1 case in the left). Patchy air space consolidation (6 cases), large consolidation (5 cases), cavitation (5 cases), small nodules (3 cases), military nodules (2 cases), linear opacity (1 cases) were demonstrated on radiography. On HRCT, air space consolidation (7 cases), small nodules (6 cases), large consolidation (5 cases) with cavitation and cylindric bronchiectasis after the absorption of consolidation, enlarged hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes (4 cases), ground-glass opacities (3 cases), military nodules and 'tree-in-bud' sign (2 case), pleural effusion (1 case), pericardial effusion (1 case) and fibrotic band (1 case) were found. Conclusion: The most common radiographic appearances of NTM in patients with AIDS are bilateral small nodules, large consolidation with cavitation and cylindric bronchiectasis, enlarged hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes. (authors)

  18. Automated characterization of perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs: Validation and calibration to observer preference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The authors previously proposed an image-based technique [Y. Lin et al. Med. Phys. 39, 7019–7031 (2012)] to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs. In this study, an observer study was designed and conducted to validate the output of the program against rankings by expert radiologists and to establish the ranges of the output values that reflect the acceptable image appearance so the program output can be used for image quality optimization and tracking. Methods: Using an IRB-approved protocol, 2500 clinical chest radiographs (PA/AP) were collected from our clinical operation. The images were processed through our perceptual quality assessment program to measure their appearance in terms of ten metrics of perceptual image quality: lung gray level, lung detail, lung noise, rib–lung contrast, rib sharpness, mediastinum detail, mediastinum noise, mediastinum alignment, subdiaphragm–lung contrast, and subdiaphragm area. From the results, for each targeted appearance attribute/metric, 18 images were selected such that the images presented a relatively constant appearance with respect to all metrics except the targeted one. The images were then incorporated into a graphical user interface, which displayed them into three panels of six in a random order. Using a DICOM calibrated diagnostic display workstation and under low ambient lighting conditions, each of five participating attending chest radiologists was tasked to spatially order the images based only on the targeted appearance attribute regardless of the other qualities. Once ordered, the observer also indicated the range of image appearances that he/she considered clinically acceptable. The observer data were analyzed in terms of the correlations between the observer and algorithmic rankings and interobserver variability. An observer-averaged acceptable image appearance was also statistically derived for each quality attribute based on the collected individual acceptable ranges

  19. Automated characterization of perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs: Validation and calibration to observer preference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samei, Ehsan, E-mail: samei@duke.edu [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Departments of Radiology, Physics, Biomedical Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Lin, Yuan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Departments of Radiology and Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Choudhury, Kingshuk R. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology and Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Page McAdams, H. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The authors previously proposed an image-based technique [Y. Lin et al. Med. Phys. 39, 7019–7031 (2012)] to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs. In this study, an observer study was designed and conducted to validate the output of the program against rankings by expert radiologists and to establish the ranges of the output values that reflect the acceptable image appearance so the program output can be used for image quality optimization and tracking. Methods: Using an IRB-approved protocol, 2500 clinical chest radiographs (PA/AP) were collected from our clinical operation. The images were processed through our perceptual quality assessment program to measure their appearance in terms of ten metrics of perceptual image quality: lung gray level, lung detail, lung noise, rib–lung contrast, rib sharpness, mediastinum detail, mediastinum noise, mediastinum alignment, subdiaphragm–lung contrast, and subdiaphragm area. From the results, for each targeted appearance attribute/metric, 18 images were selected such that the images presented a relatively constant appearance with respect to all metrics except the targeted one. The images were then incorporated into a graphical user interface, which displayed them into three panels of six in a random order. Using a DICOM calibrated diagnostic display workstation and under low ambient lighting conditions, each of five participating attending chest radiologists was tasked to spatially order the images based only on the targeted appearance attribute regardless of the other qualities. Once ordered, the observer also indicated the range of image appearances that he/she considered clinically acceptable. The observer data were analyzed in terms of the correlations between the observer and algorithmic rankings and interobserver variability. An observer-averaged acceptable image appearance was also statistically derived for each quality attribute based on the collected individual acceptable ranges

  20. Morphometric Comparison of Clavicle Outlines from 3D Bone Scans and 2D Chest Radiographs: A Short-listing Tool to Assist Radiographic Identification of Human Skeletons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan, Carl N.; Amidan, Brett G.; Trease, Harold E.; Guyomarch, Pierre; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Byrd, John E.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a computerized clavicle identification system, primarily designed to resolve the identities of unaccounted for US soldiers who fought in the Korean War. Elliptical Fourier analysis is used to quantify the clavicle outline shape from skeletons and postero-anterior antemortem chest radiographs to rank individuals in terms of metric distance. Similar to leading fingerprint identification systems, shortlists of the top matching candidates are extracted for subsequent human visual assessment. Two independent tests of the computerized system using 17 field-recovered skeletons and 409 chest radiographs demonstrate that true positive matches are captured within the top 5% of the sample 75% of the time. These results are outstanding given the eroded state of some field-recovered skeletons and the faintness of the 1950’s photoflurographs. These methods enhance the capability to resolve several hundred cold cases for which little circumstantial information exists and current DNA and dental record technologies cannot be applied.

  1. Acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot: Plain radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the plain film findings of acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot. Acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot was considered when fragmentation of the articular ends of bone and subluxation of the affected joint developed within eight weeks after clinical onset of diabetic gangrene. Eight toes of six diabetics were satisfactory to our criteria. We analyzed plain radiographic findings of the affected joint and soft tissue, interval changes in followed-up radiographs, and deformities after healing. The time interval between clinical onset of gangrene and bone destruction ranges from 2 weeks to 4 weeks(mean 2.6 weeks). Plane radiographs showed fragmentation of the articular ends, subluxation, and soft tissue swelling of the metatarsophalangeal joint or interphalangeal joint. The significant feature of these patients was rapid progression of the lesions. Clinically, all patients had diabetic gangrene in affected toes, however, there was no evidence of osteomyelitis in our series. Amputation was done in 2 cases, and lesions in 3 of the remaining 4 cases were repaired spontaneously with regression of gangrene, leaving radiological residua such as pointed-end, tapered-end, and ball and socket deformity. Rapid disorganisation of the joint with associated evidence of soft tissue gangrene in plain radiograph is believed to be valuable for the diagnosis of diabetic osteoarthropathy

  2. Do preliminary chest X-ray findings define the optimum role of pulmonary scintigraphy in suspected pulmonary embolism?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To investigate if preliminary chest radiograph (CXR) findings can define the optimum role of lung scintigraphy in subjects investigated for pulmonary embolism (PE). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The CXR and scintigraphy findings from 613 consecutive subjects investigated for suspected PE were retrieved from a radiological database. Of 393 patients with abnormal CXRs, a subgroup of 238 was examined and individual radiographic abnormalities were characterized. CXR findings were related to the scintigraphy result. RESULTS: Scintigraphy was normal in 286 subjects (47%), non-diagnostic in 207 (34%) and high probability for PE in 120 (20%). In 393 subjects (64%) the preliminary CXR was abnormal and 188 (48%) of scintigrams in this group were non-diagnostic. Individual radiographic abnormalities were not associated with significantly different scintigraphic outcomes. If the preliminary CXR was normal (36%), the proportion of non-diagnostic scintigrams decreased to 9% (19 of 220 subjects) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: In subjects investigated for PE, an abnormal CXR increases the prevalence of non-diagnostic scintigrams. A normal pre-test CXR is more often associated with a definitive (normal or high probability) scintigram result. The chest radiograph may be useful in deciding the optimum sequence of investigations. Forbes, K.P.N., Reid, J.H., Murchison, J.T. (2001)

  3. Usefulness of computerized method for lung nodule detection on digital chest radiographs using similar subtraction images from different patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of a novel computerized method to select automatically the similar chest radiograph for image subtraction in the patients who have no previous chest radiographs and to assist the radiologists’ interpretation by presenting the “similar subtraction image” from different patients. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained, and the requirement for informed patient consent was waived. A large database of approximately 15,000 normal chest radiographs was used for searching similar images of different patients. One hundred images of candidates were selected according to two clinical parameters and similarity of the lung field in the target image. We used the correlation value of chest region in the 100 images for searching the most similar image. The similar subtraction images were obtained by subtracting the similar image selected from the target image. Thirty cases with lung nodules and 30 cases without lung nodules were used for an observer performance test. Four attending radiologists and four radiology residents participated in this observer performance test. Results: The AUC for all radiologists increased significantly from 0.925 to 0.974 with the CAD (P = .004). When the computer output images were available, the average AUC for the residents was more improved (0.960 vs. 0.890) than for the attending radiologists (0.987 vs. 0.960). Conclusion: The novel computerized method for lung nodule detection using similar subtraction images from different patients would be useful to detect lung nodules on digital chest radiographs, especially for less experienced readers.

  4. The bipartite tarsal navicular bone: radiographic and computed tomography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shawdon, A. [Alphington Sports Medicine Clinic, Northcote, VIC (Australia); Kiss, Z.S. [Mercy Private Hospital, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Dept. of Radiology; Fuller, P. [Sports Medicine Centrs of Victoria, Ashwood. VIC (Australia)

    1995-05-01

    Two cases of bipartite tarsal navicular bone are presented. The radiographic and computed tomography (CT) findings of this anatomical variant are described. Correct recognition of this entity is important, both because it may be the cause of symptoms per se, and because it may be misdiagnosed as a fracture. When plain films are not diagnostic, CT scanning is helpful in distinguishing between a fracture and this variant. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  5. The bipartite tarsal navicular bone: radiographic and computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of bipartite tarsal navicular bone are presented. The radiographic and computed tomography (CT) findings of this anatomical variant are described. Correct recognition of this entity is important, both because it may be the cause of symptoms per se, and because it may be misdiagnosed as a fracture. When plain films are not diagnostic, CT scanning is helpful in distinguishing between a fracture and this variant. 6 refs., 4 figs

  6. Chest radiological findings in pakistani cement mill workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest radiological findings in Pakistani cement mill workers Even in the 21st century, in developing countries millions of people work daily in dusty environments. They are exposed to different types of health hazards namely, fumes, gases and dust, which are risk factors for developing occupational diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform chest radiology to determine the occupational hazards of cement dust on the lungs of cement mill workers. This study was carried out in the Department of Physiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Hamdard University Karachi, Pakistan, during the period June to August 2000. In this study 50, apparently healthy volunteer male cement mill workers were randomly selected with an average of 13 years exposure with age ranging from 20-60 years. They were matched with 50, healthy male control subjects in terms of age, height, weight and socioeconomic status. Both groups met with exclusion criteria as per standard. Radiology was performed by Trophy radiology. Results: The present study demonstrated 12% of cases with interstitial lung disease and 2% of cases with pleural thickening and chronic bronchitis in cement mill workers. Conclusion: Exposure to cement dust causes interstitial lung disease, pleural thickening and chronic bronchitis in cement mill workers. (author)

  7. Application of Phase Congruency for Discriminating Some Lung Diseases Using Chest Radiograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Mohd Rijal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel procedure using phase congruency is proposed for discriminating some lung disease using chest radiograph. Phase congruency provides information about transitions between adjacent pixels. Abrupt changes of phase congruency values between pixels may suggest a possible boundary or another feature that may be used for discrimination. This property of phase congruency may have potential for deciding between disease present and disease absent where the regions of infection on the images have no obvious shape, size, or configuration. Five texture measures calculated from phase congruency and Gabor were shown to be normally distributed. This gave good indicators of discrimination errors in the form of the probability of Type I Error (δ and the probability of Type II Error (β. However, since 1 −  δ is the true positive fraction (TPF and β is the false positive fraction (FPF, an ROC analysis was used to decide on the choice of texture measures. Given that features are normally distributed, for the discrimination between disease present and disease absent, energy, contrast, and homogeneity from phase congruency gave better results compared to those using Gabor. Similarly, for the more difficult problem of discriminating lobar pneumonia and lung cancer, entropy and homogeneity from phase congruency gave better results relative to Gabor.

  8. MRI reporting by radiographers: Findings of an accredited postgraduate programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, Keith [Allied Heath Professions Department, Canterbury Christ Church University, North Holmes Road, Canterbury, Kent CT1 1QU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: keith.piper@canterbury.ac.uk; Buscall, Kaie [Allied Heath Professions Department, Canterbury Christ Church University, North Holmes Road, Canterbury, Kent CT1 1QU (United Kingdom); Thomas, Nigel [X-Ray Department, Trafford General Hospital, Manchester M41 5SL (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    Aim: To analyse the objective structured examination (OSE) results of the first three cohorts of radiographers (n = 39) who completed an accredited postgraduate certificate (PgC) programme in reporting of general magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigations and to compare the agreement rates with those demonstrated for a small group of consultant radiologists. Method: Forty MRI investigations were used in the OSE which included the following anatomical areas and abnormal appearances: knee; meniscal/ligament injuries, bone bruises, effusions and osteochondral defects; lumbar spine: intervertebral disc morphology, vertebral collapse, tumours (bone and soft tissue), spinal stenosis and/or nerve root involvement; internal auditory meati (IAM): acoustic neuroma. Incidental findings included maxillary polyp, arachnoid cyst, renal cyst, hydroureter, pleural effusion and metastases (adrenal, lung, perirenal and/or thoracic spine). Sensitivity, specificity and total percentage agreement rates were calculated for all radiographers (n = 39) using all reports (n = 1560). A small representative subgroup of reports (n = 27) was compared to the three consultant radiologists' reports which were produced when constructing the OSE. Kappa values were estimated to measure agreement in four groups: consultant radiologists only; radiographers and each of the consultant radiologists independently. Results: The sensitivity, specificity and agreement rates for the three cohorts (combined) of radiographers were 99.0%, 99.0% and 89.2%, respectively. For the majority (5/9) of anatomical areas and/or pathological categories no significant differences (p < 0.05) were found between the mean Kappa scores (K = 0.47-0.76) for different groups of observers, whether radiographers were included in the group analysis or not. Where differences were apparent, this was in cases (4/9) where the variation was either not greater than found between radiologists and/or of no clinical significance

  9. MRI reporting by radiographers: Findings of an accredited postgraduate programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To analyse the objective structured examination (OSE) results of the first three cohorts of radiographers (n = 39) who completed an accredited postgraduate certificate (PgC) programme in reporting of general magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigations and to compare the agreement rates with those demonstrated for a small group of consultant radiologists. Method: Forty MRI investigations were used in the OSE which included the following anatomical areas and abnormal appearances: knee; meniscal/ligament injuries, bone bruises, effusions and osteochondral defects; lumbar spine: intervertebral disc morphology, vertebral collapse, tumours (bone and soft tissue), spinal stenosis and/or nerve root involvement; internal auditory meati (IAM): acoustic neuroma. Incidental findings included maxillary polyp, arachnoid cyst, renal cyst, hydroureter, pleural effusion and metastases (adrenal, lung, perirenal and/or thoracic spine). Sensitivity, specificity and total percentage agreement rates were calculated for all radiographers (n = 39) using all reports (n = 1560). A small representative subgroup of reports (n = 27) was compared to the three consultant radiologists' reports which were produced when constructing the OSE. Kappa values were estimated to measure agreement in four groups: consultant radiologists only; radiographers and each of the consultant radiologists independently. Results: The sensitivity, specificity and agreement rates for the three cohorts (combined) of radiographers were 99.0%, 99.0% and 89.2%, respectively. For the majority (5/9) of anatomical areas and/or pathological categories no significant differences (p < 0.05) were found between the mean Kappa scores (K = 0.47-0.76) for different groups of observers, whether radiographers were included in the group analysis or not. Where differences were apparent, this was in cases (4/9) where the variation was either not greater than found between radiologists and/or of no clinical significance. These

  10. A study on computer-aided diagnosis based on temporal subtraction of sequential chest radiographs (in Japanese)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automated digital image subtraction technique for use with pairs of temporally sequential chest radiographs has been developed to aid radiologists in the detection of interval changes. Automated image registration based on nonlinear geometric warping is performed prior to subtraction in order to deal with complicated radiographic misregistration. Processing includes global matching, to achieve rough registration between the entire lung fields in the two images, and local matching, based on a cross-correlation method, to determine local shift values for a number of small regions. A proper warping of x,y-coordinates is determined by fitting two-dimensional polynomials to the distributions of the shift values. One image is warped and then subtracted from the other. The resultant subtraction images were able to enhance the conspicuity of various types of interval changes. Improved global matching based on a weighted template matching method achieved robust registration even with photofluorographs taken in chest mass screening programs, which had previously presented us with a relatively large number of poor-registration images. The new method was applied to 129 pairs of chest mass screening images, and offered registration accuracy as good as manual global matching. An observer test using 114 cases including 57 lung cancer cases presented better sensitivity and specificity on average compared to conventional comparison readings. In addition, newly developed image processing that eliminates the rib edge artifacts in subtraction images was applied to 26 images having pathological interval changes; results showed the potential for application to automated schemes for the detection of interval change patterns. With its capacity to improve the diagnostic accuracy of chest radiographs, the chest temporal subtraction technique promises to become an important element of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems

  11. Evaluation of dental panoramic radiographic findings in edentulous jaws: A retrospective study of 743 patients "Radiographic features in edentulous jaws"

    OpenAIRE

    Kose, Taha Emre; DEMIRTAS, Nihat; Cakir Karabas, Hulya; Ozcan, Ilknur

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of significant panoramic radiographic findings and eventual treatment requirements before conventional or implant supported prosthetic treatment in asymptomatic edentulous patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 743 asymptomatic edentulous patients were retrospectively evaluated using a digital panoramic system. We analyzed the radiographic findings, including impacted teeth, retained root fragments, foreign bodies, severe atroph...

  12. Radiographic findings of miliary tuberculosis: difference in patients with and those without associated acute respiratory failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the differences in the radiography findings of miliary tuberculosis between patients with and without associated acute respiratory failure (ARF). We retrospectively 32 patients in whom miliary tuberculosis had been diagnosed, and assigned them to one of two groups: with ARF (n=10), and without ARF (n=22). Chest radiographic findings such as presence of miliary modules, consolidation, ground-glass opacity (GGO), pleural effusion, small calcified nodules and linear opacities were assessed, the size and profusion of nodules in each of four zones were analyzed and scored using the standard radiographs of the international labor organization, and the extent of consolidation and GGO were scored according to the percentage on involved lung. We compared the radiologic findings between the two groups. Ground-glass opacity, consolidation, and pleural effusion were seen more frequently in miliary tuberculosis patinets with ARF than in those without ARF. Although the size and profusion of nodules were similar in both groups (p>0.05), consolidation and ground-glass opacity in cases of miliary tuberculosis with ARF were significantly more extensive than in those without ARF (p<0.005). GGO and consolidation were more extensive in miliary tuberculosis patients with ARF. A finding of ground-glass opacity in miliary tuberculosis patients might be an early indication of developing ARF

  13. Development of CAD based on ANN analysis of power spectra for pneumoconiosis in chest radiographs: effect of three new enhancement methods

    OpenAIRE

    Okumura, Eiichiro; Kawashita, Ikuo; Ishida, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    We have been developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme for pneumoconiosis based on a rule-based plus artificial neural network (ANN) analysis of power spectra. In this study, we have developed three enhancement methods for the abnormal patterns to reduce false-positive and false-negative values. The image database consisted of 2 normal and 15 abnormal chest radiographs. The International Labour Organization standard chest radiographs with pneumoconiosis were categorized as subcategor...

  14. Scintigraphic and radiographic findings in Caroli's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, A.J.; Parker, A.L.; Spicer, M.J.; Brown, T.J.

    1984-04-01

    In recent years, noninvasive evaluation of Caroli's disease has been demonstrated by computed tomography, ultrasonography, and nuclear scintigraphy. Confirmation of Caroli's disease requires invasive procedures such as percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography or endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. All of the techniques give valuable information making it easier to diagnose Caroli's disease and to determine its extent. In addition, associated abnormalities in organs outside of the biliary system may be revealed. Two cases are presented to illustrate the radiographic and scintigraphic findings of Caroli's disease.

  15. Computerized detection of vertebral compression fractures on lateral chest radiographs: Preliminary results with a tool for early detection of osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertebral fracture (or vertebral deformity) is a very common outcome of osteoporosis, which is one of the major public health concerns in the world. Early detection of vertebral fractures is important because timely pharmacologic intervention can reduce the risk of subsequent additional fractures. Chest radiographs are used routinely for detection of lung and heart diseases, and vertebral fractures can be visible on lateral chest radiographs. However, investigators noted that about 50% of vertebral fractures visible on lateral chest radiographs were underdiagnosed or under-reported, even when the fractures were severe. Therefore, our goal was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs in order to assist radiologists' image interpretation and thus allow the early diagnosis of osteoporosis. The cases used in this study were 20 patients with severe vertebral fractures and 118 patients without fractures, as confirmed by the consensus of two radiologists. Radiologists identified the locations of fractured vertebrae, and they provided morphometric data on the vertebral shape for evaluation of the accuracy of detecting vertebral end plates by computer. In our computerized method, a curved search area, which included a number of vertebral end plates, was first extracted automatically, and was straightened so that vertebral end plates became oriented horizontally. Edge candidates were enhanced by use of a horizontal line-enhancement filter in the straightened image, and a multiple thresholding technique, followed by feature analysis, was used for identification of the vertebral end plates. The height of each vertebra was determined from locations of identified vertebral end plates, and fractured vertebrae were detected by comparison of the measured vertebral height with the expected height. The sensitivity of our computerized method for detection of fracture cases was 95% (19/20), with 1.03 (139/135) false

  16. Bone and joint changes following electrical burn: plain radiographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Uk Jung; Lee, Eil Seong; Shim, Ya Seong; Kim, Seon Bok; Lee, Shin Ho; Jung, Hae Kyoung; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Kang, Ik Won [Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    To evaluate the plain radiographic findings of bone and joint changes following electrical burn. This study involved 19 patients with 27 bone and joints regions which had suffered electrical injury. The most common input and output sites were, respectively, the hand(7/14) and foot (6/10). Three other sites were involved. Four cases involved osteomyelitis, and in four, amputation was performed. We observed bone and joint changes, changes following osteomyelitis and changes in the amputation stump. We analyzed the difference between input and output changes, and when this was interesting, the average time of onset was assessed. In bone and joint changes following electrical burn, the most frequent radiographic finding was joint contracture(n=3D16). Other findings included osteolysis(n=3D8), articular abnormalites (n=3D6), periostitis(n=3D5), fracture(n=3D5), acro-osteolysis(n=3D2), and heterotopic bone formation(n=3D2). In cases involving osteomyelitis(n=3D4), aggravation of underlying bone changes was noted. In electrical burn, various changes were noted in bone and joints, and input injury was more severe than that of output.=20.

  17. Bone and joint changes following electrical burn: plain radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the plain radiographic findings of bone and joint changes following electrical burn. This study involved 19 patients with 27 bone and joints regions which had suffered electrical injury. The most common input and output sites were, respectively, the hand(7/14) and foot (6/10). Three other sites were involved. Four cases involved osteomyelitis, and in four, amputation was performed. We observed bone and joint changes, changes following osteomyelitis and changes in the amputation stump. We analyzed the difference between input and output changes, and when this was interesting, the average time of onset was assessed. In bone and joint changes following electrical burn, the most frequent radiographic finding was joint contracture(n=3D16). Other findings included osteolysis(n=3D8), articular abnormalites (n=3D6), periostitis(n=3D5), fracture(n=3D5), acro-osteolysis(n=3D2), and heterotopic bone formation(n=3D2). In cases involving osteomyelitis(n=3D4), aggravation of underlying bone changes was noted. In electrical burn, various changes were noted in bone and joints, and input injury was more severe than that of output.=20

  18. Rib suppression in chest radiographs to improve classification of textural abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogeweg, Laurens E.; Mol, Christian; de Jong, Pim A.; van Ginneken, Bram

    2010-03-01

    The computer aided diagnosis (CAD) of abnormalities on chest radiographs is difficult due to the presence of overlapping normal anatomy. Suppression of the normal anatomy is expected to improve performance of a CAD system, but such a method has not yet been applied to the computer detection of interstitial abnormalities such as occur in tuberculosis (TB). The aim of this research is to evaluate the effect of rib suppression on a CAD system for TB. Profiles of pixel intensities sampled perpendicular to segmented ribs were used to create a local PCA-based shape model of the rib. The model was normalized to the local background intensity and corrected for gradients perpendicular to the rib. Subsequently rib suppressed images were created by subtracting the models for each rib from the original image. The effect of rib suppression was evaluated using a CAD system for TB detection. Small square image patches were sampled randomly from 15 normal and 35 TB-affected images containing textural abnormalities. Abnormalities were outlined by a radiologist and were given a subtlety rating from 1 to 5. Features based on moments of intensity distributions of Gaussian derivative filtered images were extracted. A supervised learning approach was used to discriminate between normal and diseased image patches. The use of rib suppressed images increased the overall performance of the system, as measured by the area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve, from 0.75 to 0.78. For the more subtly rated patches (rated 1-3) the performance increased from 0.62 to 0.70.

  19. Chest x-ray findings of opportunistic infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chest x-ray findings of 20 cases of pulmonary opportunistic infection were analyzed according to causative agents. The results were as follows: 1. Final diagnoses of 20 cases of opportunistic infections were tuberculosis in 6 cases, pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in 5 cases, bacterial infection in 7 cases, and fungal infection in 2 cases. 2. The underlying diseases were leukemia in 6 cases, kidney transplantation in 6 cases, lymphoma in 3 cases, nephrotic syndrome in 1 case, nasopharyngeal cancer in 1 case, multiple myeloma in 1 case, agranulocytosis in 1 case, and hypogammaglobulinemia in 1 case. 3. In tuberculosis, all the 6 cases showed severe manifestations such as military tuberculosis, tuberculous pneumonia, moderately advanced tuberculosis and tuberculous pericarditis. 4. In pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, the most frequent findings were bilateral alveolar densities and peripheral field of the lung was saved in most cases. 5. In 2 cases of fungal infections bilateral multiple cavity nodules were noted. 6. In cases of bacterial infection there was more cases of gram negative infection than gram positive and 2 cases of pseudomonas revealed bilateral multiple cavitary nodules

  20. Chest x-ray findings of opportunistic infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yul; Jeon, Suk Chul; Lim, Jeong Ki; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-06-15

    The chest x-ray findings of 20 cases of pulmonary opportunistic infection were analyzed according to causative agents. The results were as follows: 1. Final diagnoses of 20 cases of opportunistic infections were tuberculosis in 6 cases, pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in 5 cases, bacterial infection in 7 cases, and fungal infection in 2 cases. 2. The underlying diseases were leukemia in 6 cases, kidney transplantation in 6 cases, lymphoma in 3 cases, nephrotic syndrome in 1 case, nasopharyngeal cancer in 1 case, multiple myeloma in 1 case, agranulocytosis in 1 case, and hypogammaglobulinemia in 1 case. 3. In tuberculosis, all the 6 cases showed severe manifestations such as military tuberculosis, tuberculous pneumonia, moderately advanced tuberculosis and tuberculous pericarditis. 4. In pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, the most frequent findings were bilateral alveolar densities and peripheral field of the lung was saved in most cases. 5. In 2 cases of fungal infections bilateral multiple cavity nodules were noted. 6. In cases of bacterial infection there was more cases of gram negative infection than gram positive and 2 cases of pseudomonas revealed bilateral multiple cavitary nodules.

  1. Radiographic Findings of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Tehran in Comparison with Other Institutional Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jamzad

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Tuberculosis (TB is one of the most common worldwide infections, especially in developing countries. Early diagnosis is very important for prevention of the chronic form of the disease and sequel formation. Chest x-ray (CXR is an easy, feasible, non-expensive and quick tool for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. "nPatients and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 200 chest x-rays of secondary pulmonary TB cases in university-affiliated hospitals. These cases were all proved by a positive sputum smear or culture for mycobacterium tuberculosis. "nResults: In this study, we correlated CXR findings of 100 male and 100 female patients. The peak age of involvement in both groups was 61-80 years. None of the chest x-rays were normal. The main radiographic findings were consolidation-infiltration, fibrosis, pleural effusion, cavitation, pleural thickening and bronchiectasis. Mediastinal lymphadenopathy was detected in 9% of the cases. Pulmonary infiltration with consolidation was the most common finding (55%. Miliary shadowing, atelectasis and pneumomediastinum were the least common presentations. Lymphadenopathy was more common in 40 to 60-year-old women. Right lung involvement was more common than the left side and the upper zones were involved in most cases. The most common underlying diseases were hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Infiltration in diabetic patients and fibrotic appearances in hypertensive patients were common findings. "nConclusion: There was no significant difference between our data and the other studies carried out in Iran. The patients were younger in the studies from other countries. However, cavitary lesions were more common in other studies than this study, which seems to be due to the higher prevalence of underlying diseases such as HIV or diabetes.

  2. Interpretation of digital chest radiographs: Comparison of light emitting diode versus cold cathode fluorescent lamp backlit monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the diagnostic performance of light emitting diode (LED) backlight monitors and cold cathode fluorescent lamp (CCFL) monitors for the interpretation of digital chest radiographs. We selected 130 chest radiographs from health screening patients. The soft copy image data were randomly sorted and displayed on a 3.5 M LED (2560 x 1440 pixels) monitor and a 3 M CCFL (2048 x 1536 pixels) monitor. Eight radiologists rated their confidence in detecting nodules and abnormal interstitial lung markings (ILD). Low dose chest CT images were used as a reference standard. The performance of the monitor systems was assessed by analyzing 2080 observations and comparing them by multi-reader, multi-case receiver operating characteristic analysis. The observers reported visual fatigue and a sense of heat. Radiant heat and brightness of the monitors were measured. Measured brightness was 291 cd/m2 for the LED and 354 cd/m2 for the CCFL monitor. Area under curves for nodule detection were 0.721 ± 0.072 and 0.764 ± 0.098 for LED and CCFL (p = 0.173), whereas those for ILD were 0.871 ± 0.073 and 0.844 ± 0.068 (p = 0.145), respectively. There were no significant differences in interpretation time (p = 0.446) or fatigue score (p = 0.102) between the two monitors. Sense of heat was lower for the LED monitor (p = 0.024). The temperature elevation was 6.7 degree C for LED and 12.4 degree C for the CCFL monitor. Although the LED monitor had lower maximum brightness compared with the CCFL monitor, soft copy reading of the digital chest radiographs on LED and CCFL showed no difference in terms of diagnostic performance. In addition, LED emitted less heat.

  3. Pulmonary complications of induction therapy for acute myeloid leukemia in adults. Findings of chest X-rays and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To exclude pulmonary complications, 359 chest radiographs and 50 computed tomographs of the lung were performed in 95 patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia. The radiological findings were registered, described and correlated with clinical findings in the present study on 2395 days of observation. Results: In summary, 52 patients showed alterations of the lung. Pulmonary hyperhydration was seen in 21 cases, bacterial pneumonia was found in 18 cases, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis was documented in 14 cases, and 5 cases of severe haemorrhage were seen. An unexplained pulmonary edema in 13 patients with interstitial and alveolar infiltrates is considered to be a complication of treatment with cytosine-arabinoside. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that chest X-ray and computed tomography have a high impact in detection and treatment of pulmonary complications following intensive chemotherapy. We may expect the development of diffuse opacity following administration of cytosine-arabinoside in medium-sized doses. (orig.)

  4. Feline alimentary lymphosarcoma: radiographic, ultrasonographic, histologic, and viral findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixty cats with clinical symptoms indicative of gastroin-testinal lymphosarcoma were examined radiographically and ultrasonographically. Clinical signs included lethargy, anorexia, weight loss, anemia, vomiting, diarrhea, and a palpable mid-abdominal mass. Radiographic findings with alimentary lymphosarcoma (LSA) showed diffuse decreased serosal detail, a mid-abdominal soft-tissue mass, cavernous lesions, and gas-filled bowel loops. Ultrasonographic features included marked stomach or intestinal wall thickening, loss of wall layering, decreased echogenicity, and a hyperechoic central reflection. Hypoechonic infiltration of mesenterial lymph nodes and other abdominal organs were visualized ultrasonographically. Alimentary LSA was diagnosed in thirty-six of the sixty cats. Ultrasonography was helpful in determining the cause of disease in the remaining twenty-four cats. Differential diagnosis included intussusception, foreign bodies, chronic gastroenteritis, granuloma (feline infectious peritonitis - FIP), and other gastrointestinal neoplasms. In ten of the thirty-six cats with alimentary lymphosarcoma, diagnosis was confirmed by ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsies. Blood and/or saliva ELISA-tests determined feline leukemia virus or antigen in only eleven of the thirty-six cats. Histopathology revealed lymphoid infiltration of the stomach or intestinal wall in twenty-nine of the thirty-six cases. Additionally, the medical records of seventy-one cats with proven alimentary LSA were reviewed. Ultrasonographic findings showed intestinal LSA in sixty-two cats and LSA of the stomach in nine cats. Both studies indicate that ultrasonography is a valuable diagnostic tool for feline alimentary LSA. (author)

  5. Inter-observer variation in the interpretation of chest radiographs for pneumonia in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To assess inter-observer variation in the interpretation of chest radiographs of individuals with pneumonia versus those without pneumonia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Chest radiographs of out-patients with a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) were assessed for the presence of infiltrates by radiologists from three local hospitals and were reassessed by one university hospital radiologist. Various measures of inter-observer agreement were calculated. RESULTS: The observed proportional agreement was 218 in 243 patients (89.7%). Kappa was 0.53 (moderate agreement) with a 95% confidence interval of 0.37 to 0.69. The observed positive agreement (59%) was much lower than for negative agreement (94%). Kappa was considerably lower, if chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was present (κ=0.20) or Streptococcus pneumoniae (κ=-0.29) was the infective agent. CONCLUSION: The overall inter-observer agreement adjusted for chance was moderate. Inter-observer agreement in cases with pneumonia was much worse than the agreement in negative (i.e. non-pneumonia) cases. A general practitioner's selection of patients with a higher chance of having pneumonia for chest radiography would thus not improve the observer agreement

  6. Optimization of standard patient radiographic images for chest, skull and pelvis exams in conventional x-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimized radiographic techniques for clinical images of chest, skull and pelvis using conventional single-phase, three-phase and high-frequency x-ray units for a standard patient have been developed. Optimization of image contrast and optical density was obtained by using a homogeneous phantom (PEP) and an Anderson Rando anthropomorphic phantom. Image quality was evaluated by nine radiologists in independent analyses, leading to the choice of the optimized technique. A course of action to implement and validate these techniques in other radiographic systems has also been introduced. A realistic-analytic phantom (RAP) was constructed to certify the validation process. The optimized radiographic technique was implemented in the routine of our home hospital radiodiagnostic routine, enabling a reduction in patient doses around 25, 14 and 72%, respectively, for chest, skull and pelvis exams when compared with the previously used techniques. In addition, a corresponding reduction in the x-ray tube load of 68, 14 and 62% for the respective mentioned exams has been observed. In conclusion, implemented optimal techniques can lead to a reduction in the rate of film rejection, thus contributing to a better risk-benefit relationship for the patient and cost-benefit for the radiodiagnostic facility. (note)

  7. Comparison of Chest X-Ray Findings of Smear Positive and Smear Negative Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuberculosis is a chronic pulmonary infectious disease that has affected one-third of the people in the world. It causes nine million new cases and two million deaths per year. Chest radiography associated with Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast staining procedure significantly helps the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Chest radiography can help the diagnosis of tuberculosis in patients with a negative smear sample result that is mainly diagnosed with delay. In this study, chest X-ray findings of PTB were compared in two groups of smear positive and smear negative patients. In this retrospective descriptive-analytical study, 376 patients who had been confirmed with PTB were referred to Birjand Health Care Center from 2001 to 2006. Out of the 376 patients, 100 patients with a positive smear based on WHO criteria were selected. In addition, among negative smear patients, 100 were selected in whom similar demographic characteristics with positive smear patients were seen. All of them had undergone chest radiographies that were then interpreted by two expert radiologists independently. Moreover, all patients’ sputa were examined by an expert laboratory technician at the reference laboratory of the health center. The obtained data were analyzed by means of frequency distribution table and descriptive statistics using SPSS (version 15) and Chi-square statistical test. Except reticulo-nodular infiltration, the relative frequency of other radiographic findings in positive smear patients were more than negative smear patients; and only differences in calcification variables, mediastinal widening, patchy infiltration and hilar adenopathy were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Based on the results of this study, although radiographic findings are not diagnostic in PTB, they are helpful if the assessment associates with the view of clinical manifestations and sputum smears

  8. Radiographic findings in late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernia: helpful imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzzafar, Sofia; Swischuk, Leonard E.; Jadhav, Siddharth P. [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Galveston, TX (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Imaging findings in delayed presentation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia can be confusing and misleading, resulting in a delay in diagnosis. To evaluate the often puzzling plain film findings of late-presenting CDH in an effort to determine whether any of the findings could be helpful in arriving at an early diagnosis. We reviewed and documented the plain film findings and clinical data in eight patients seen during the last 20 years with late-presenting CDH. IRB exempt status was obtained in this study. There were five boys and three girls. The age range was 4 months to 12 years with a mean of 2.4 years. Five children presented with acute respiratory problems while three presented with acute abdominal pain. Two children presented with both respiratory and abdominal findings and one also presented with hematemesis. Two children had radiographic findings that were not difficult to analyze while the remaining six had findings that posed initial diagnostic problems. Although not common, late-presenting CDH can result in confusing plain film radiographic findings and a delay in diagnosis. We found that the most important finding in analyzing these radiographs is in evaluating the location and position of the gastric bubble with the more common left-side hernias. (orig.)

  9. Validation of an image-based technique to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs with an observer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Choudhury, Kingshuk R.; McAdams, H. Page; Foos, David H.; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-03-01

    We previously proposed a novel image-based quality assessment technique1 to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs. In this paper, an observer study was designed and conducted to systematically validate this technique. Ten metrics were involved in the observer study, i.e., lung grey level, lung detail, lung noise, riblung contrast, rib sharpness, mediastinum detail, mediastinum noise, mediastinum alignment, subdiaphragm-lung contrast, and subdiaphragm area. For each metric, three tasks were successively presented to the observers. In each task, six ROI images were randomly presented in a row and observers were asked to rank the images only based on a designated quality and disregard the other qualities. A range slider on the top of the images was used for observers to indicate the acceptable range based on the corresponding perceptual attribute. Five boardcertificated radiologists from Duke participated in this observer study on a DICOM calibrated diagnostic display workstation and under low ambient lighting conditions. The observer data were analyzed in terms of the correlations between the observer ranking orders and the algorithmic ranking orders. Based on the collected acceptable ranges, quality consistency ranges were statistically derived. The observer study showed that, for each metric, the averaged ranking orders of the participated observers were strongly correlated with the algorithmic orders. For the lung grey level, the observer ranking orders completely accorded with the algorithmic ranking orders. The quality consistency ranges derived from this observer study were close to these derived from our previous study. The observer study indicates that the proposed image-based quality assessment technique provides a robust reflection of the perceptual image quality of the clinical chest radiographs. The derived quality consistency ranges can be used to automatically predict the acceptability of a clinical chest radiograph.

  10. Cardiothoracic ratio on chest radiograph in pediatric heart disease: How does it correlate with heart volumes at magnetic resonance imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cardiothoracic ratio by chest radiograph is widely used as a marker of cardiac size. The purpose of this study is to correlate cardiothoracic ratio and cardiac volumes as measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (MR) in common structural and myopathic heart disease with increased cardiac size due to volume overload or hypertrophy. A retrospective single center study was performed in all patients between 2007 and 2013 with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), aortic regurgitation, isolated left-to-right shunt and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) who underwent cardiovascular MR and chest radiograph within 6 months of each other. Cardiothoracic ratios by chest radiograph (frontal and lateral) were compared to cardiac volumes (indexed for body surface area) by cardiovascular MR. One hundred twenty-seven patients (mean age: 11.2 ± 5.5 years) were included in this study (76 with TOF, 23 with isolated left-to-right shunt, 16 with aortic regurgitation and 12 with HCM). Frontal cardiothoracic ratio of all groups correlated with indexed right ventricular (RV) end-diastolic volume (EDVI) (r = 0.40, P < 0.01) and indexed total heart volume (THVI) (r = 0.27, P < 0.01). In TOF patients, frontal cardiothoracic ratio correlated with RVEDVI (r = 0.34, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 27.6%), indexed RV end-systolic volume (ESVI) (r = 0.44, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 33.3%) and THVI (r = 0.35, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 19.6%), although RV volumes and THVI showed widespread variation given the high coefficients of variation. In patients with aortic regurgitation, frontal cardiothoracic ratio correlated with left ventricular (LV) EDVI (r = 0.50, P = 0.047), but not with THVI and aortic regurgitant fraction, and widespread variation for LV EDVI (coefficient of variation = 19.2%), LV ESVI (coefficient of variation = 32.5%) and THVI (coefficient of variation = 13.6%) was also observed. Frontal cardiothoracic ratio was not correlated with cardiac volumes

  11. Cardiothoracic ratio on chest radiograph in pediatric heart disease: How does it correlate with heart volumes at magnetic resonance imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotenhuis, Heynric B. [The University of Toronto, Division of Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics, The Labatt Family Heart Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Zhou, Cheng; Isaac, Kathryn V. [The University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Tomlinson, George [University of Toronto, Department of Medicine, Toronto General Hospital and Mt. Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Seed, Mike; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars; Yoo, Shi-Joon [The University of Toronto, Division of Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics, The Labatt Family Heart Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); The University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    The cardiothoracic ratio by chest radiograph is widely used as a marker of cardiac size. The purpose of this study is to correlate cardiothoracic ratio and cardiac volumes as measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (MR) in common structural and myopathic heart disease with increased cardiac size due to volume overload or hypertrophy. A retrospective single center study was performed in all patients between 2007 and 2013 with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), aortic regurgitation, isolated left-to-right shunt and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) who underwent cardiovascular MR and chest radiograph within 6 months of each other. Cardiothoracic ratios by chest radiograph (frontal and lateral) were compared to cardiac volumes (indexed for body surface area) by cardiovascular MR. One hundred twenty-seven patients (mean age: 11.2 ± 5.5 years) were included in this study (76 with TOF, 23 with isolated left-to-right shunt, 16 with aortic regurgitation and 12 with HCM). Frontal cardiothoracic ratio of all groups correlated with indexed right ventricular (RV) end-diastolic volume (EDVI) (r = 0.40, P < 0.01) and indexed total heart volume (THVI) (r = 0.27, P < 0.01). In TOF patients, frontal cardiothoracic ratio correlated with RVEDVI (r = 0.34, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 27.6%), indexed RV end-systolic volume (ESVI) (r = 0.44, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 33.3%) and THVI (r = 0.35, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 19.6%), although RV volumes and THVI showed widespread variation given the high coefficients of variation. In patients with aortic regurgitation, frontal cardiothoracic ratio correlated with left ventricular (LV) EDVI (r = 0.50, P = 0.047), but not with THVI and aortic regurgitant fraction, and widespread variation for LV EDVI (coefficient of variation = 19.2%), LV ESVI (coefficient of variation = 32.5%) and THVI (coefficient of variation = 13.6%) was also observed. Frontal cardiothoracic ratio was not correlated with cardiac volumes

  12. Development and image quality assessment of a contrast-enhancement algorithm for display of digital chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation presents a contrast-enhancement algorithm Artifact-Suppressed Adaptive Histogram Equalization (ASAHE). This algorithm was developed as part of a larger effort to replace the film radiographs currently used in radiology departments with digital images. Among the expected benefits of digital radiology are improved image management and greater diagnostic accuracy. Film radiographs record X-ray transmission data at high spatial resolution, and a wide dynamic range of signal. Current digital radiography systems record an image at reduced spatial resolution and with coarse sampling of the available dynamic range. These reductions have a negative impact on diagnostic accuracy. The contrast-enhancement algorithm presented in this dissertation is designed to boost diagnostic accuracy of radiologists using digital images. The ASAHE algorithm is an extension of an earlier technique called Adaptive Histogram Equalization (AHE). The AHE algorithm is unsuitable for chest radiographs because it over-enhances noise, and introduces boundary artifacts. The modifications incorporated in ASAHE suppress the artifacts and allow processing of chest radiographs. This dissertation describes the psychophysical methods used to evaluate the effects of processing algorithms on human observer performance. An experiment conducted with anthropomorphic phantoms and simulated nodules showed the ASAHE algorithm to be superior for human detection of nodules when compared to a computed radiography system's algorithm that is in current use. An experiment conducted using clinical images demonstrating pneumothoraces (partial lung collapse) indicated no difference in human observer accuracy when ASAHE images were compared to computed radiography images, but greater ease of diagnosis when ASAHE images were used. These results provide evidence to suggest that Artifact-Suppressed Adaptive Histogram Equalization can be effective in increasing diagnostic accuracy and efficiency

  13. Establishing the cardiothoracic ratio using chest radiographs in an indigenous Ghanaian population: a simple tool for cardiomegaly screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiothoracic ratio is a simple and cheap tool in the estimation of heart size. It is a useful index of cardiac size evaluation, and a value of 50% is generally considered to indicate the upper limit of normal. This study is to ascertain the normal mean value in cardiothoracic ratio of Ghanaians using chest radiography to serve as baseline for screening for cardiomegaly. Standard postero-anterior radiographs of the -clients/patients were used in the study. The cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) was obtained by dividing the transverse cardiac diameter [sum of the horizontal distances from the right and left lateral-most margins of the heart to the midline (spinous processes of the vertebral bodies)] by the maximum internal thoracic diameter. Systematic sampling with appropriate inclusion and exclusion criteria were used to obtain a sample size of 1989. The mean transverse cardiac diameter and cardiothoracic ratio increased with age. The transverse thoracic diameter increased with age until the sixth decade when it reduced with age. The mean CTR increased gradually with age with females having greater values than males. The mean CTR of the study population were 0.459, 0.467 and 0.452 for the general population, females and males respectively. This study has been able to establish 0.459 as the mean CTR values for Ghanaians. It has also shown the relationship between age and clients /patient’s cardiothoracic ratio which compares favourably with findings of a similar study in Nigeria, a neighbouring country in the West African sub region with similar ethnic and social structure. (au)

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of computer-aided detection of pulmonary tuberculosis in chest radiographs: a validation study from sub-Saharan Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Breuninger

    Full Text Available Chest radiography to diagnose and screen for pulmonary tuberculosis has limitations, especially due to inter-reader variability. Automating the interpretation has the potential to overcome this drawback and to deliver objective and reproducible results. The CAD4TB software is a computer-aided detection system that has shown promising preliminary findings. Evaluation studies in different settings are needed to assess diagnostic accuracy and practicability of use.CAD4TB was evaluated on chest radiographs of patients with symptoms suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis enrolled in two cohort studies in Tanzania. All patients were characterized by sputum smear microscopy and culture including subsequent antigen or molecular confirmation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb to determine the reference standard. Chest radiographs were read by the software and two human readers, one expert reader and one clinical officer. The sensitivity and specificity of CAD4TB was depicted using receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves, the area under the curve calculated and the performance of the software compared to the results of human readers.Of 861 study participants, 194 (23% were culture-positive for M.tb. The area under the ROC curve of CAD4TB for the detection of culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis was 0.84 (95% CI 0.80-0.88. CAD4TB was significantly more accurate for the discrimination of smear-positive cases against non TB patients than for smear-negative cases (p-value<0.01. It differentiated better between TB cases and non TB patients among HIV-negative compared to HIV-positive individuals (p<0.01. CAD4TB significantly outperformed the clinical officer, but did not reach the accuracy of the expert reader (p = 0.02, for a tuberculosis specific reading threshold.CAD4TB accurately distinguished between the chest radiographs of culture-positive TB cases and controls. Further studies on cost-effectiveness, operational and ethical aspects should

  15. The interest of radiographical investigations of bone diseases in the selection of stallions [orthopedic lesions, abnormal radiographic findings, multivariate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breeding of sport horses requires products with qualities for performance traits. The objectives of this study were to investigate the relation between radiographical examination and descendant of sires. Foots, fetlocks of both thoracic and pelvic limbs, carpus, tarsus and stifles were examined radiographically in 225 3-year old horses descent from 25 stallions. Data were analysed by multivariate analysis. Results indicate that descendant of a stallion presents the same abnormal radiographic findings. It is concluded that bone diseases are of great importance in breeding sport horses and that these abnormalities could have a genetic component

  16. Integration of temporal subtraction and nodule detection system for digital chest radiographs into picture archiving and communication system (PACS): four-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Shuji; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Matsuo, Yoshio; Okafuji, Takashi; Kamitani, Takeshi; Honda, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Keiji; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Sugiyama, Naoki; Doi, Kunio

    2008-03-01

    Since May 2002, temporal subtraction and nodule detection systems for digital chest radiographs have been integrated into our hospital's picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). Image data of digital chest radiographs were stored in PACS with the digital image and communication in medicine (DICOM) protocol. Temporal subtraction and nodule detection images were produced automatically in an exclusive server and delivered with current and previous images to the work stations. The problems that we faced and the solutions that we arrived at were analyzed. We encountered four major problems. The first problem, as a result of the storage of the original images' data with the upside-down, reverse, or lying-down positioning on portable chest radiographs, was solved by postponing the original data storage for 30 min. The second problem, the variable matrix sizes of chest radiographs obtained with flat-panel detectors (FPDs), was solved by improving the computer algorithm to produce consistent temporal subtraction images. The third problem, the production of temporal subtraction images of low quality, could not be solved fundamentally when the original images were obtained with different modalities. The fourth problem, an excessive false-positive rate on the nodule detection system, was solved by adjusting this system to chest radiographs obtained in our hospital. Integration of the temporal subtraction and nodule detection system into our hospital's PACS was customized successfully; this experience may be helpful to other hospitals. PMID:17333415

  17. Comparison of gated radionuclide scans and chest radiographs. Assessment of left ventricular impairment in patients with coronary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, J A; Reinke, D B; Makey, D G; Shafer, R B

    1980-03-01

    Diagnostic efficacy of gated cardiac blood pool imaging was studied in 41 consecutive patients with LV ejection fractions (LVEF) less than or equal to 0.50. Eighty percent of patients were receiving therapy for LV failure at the time of the study. All patients had documented coronary-artery disease (CAD). Chest x-ray films were interpreted blindly by a senior radiologist. Cardiothoracic ratio of less than or equal to 0.50 was recorded as normal. Radionuclide assessment of LV function contributes importantly to the diagnostic and screening value of chest x-ray films. Patients with coronary disease and clinical evidence of heart failure should have radioisotopic studies even if chest x-ray film findings are normal. In patients with coronary artery disease and enlarged LV on chest films, radionuclide study of left ventricular performance aids in defining LV impairment, and in the prognostication of subsequent clinical course. PMID:6444573

  18. Retropharyngeal Tendinitis: Radiographic and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelineck, J.; Salomonsen, M.; Hviid, C. [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-10-15

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in retropharyngeal tendinitis. Material and methods: Within 1 year, four patients presenting with symptoms of retropharyngeal tendinitis were examined by radiography and MRI. Results: On MRI and radiographs, all patients had characteristic soft-tissue swellings and calcifications related to the tendon of the longus colli muscle situated inferior to the anterior arc of C1. MRI showed well-defined edema, with high signal in the retropharyngeal tissue anterior to C1-C5 on short T1 inversion recovery (STIR) sequences, low signal on T1-weighted sequences, and low signal in the calcification on both sequences. In addition, three patients had high signal intensity changes on STIR sequences in the atlantoaxial joint situated posterior to the anterior arc of C1. Conclusion: MRI is a sensitive and accurate method in the diagnosis of retropharyngeal tendinitis. A new finding in this condition is an effusion or synovitis in the anterior atlantoaxial joint. MRI is a valuable tool in differentiating retropharyngeal tendinitis from other diagnoses such as retropharyngeal abscess, pyogenic spondylitis, and spondyloarthropathy.

  19. Retropharyngeal Tendinitis: Radiographic and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in retropharyngeal tendinitis. Material and methods: Within 1 year, four patients presenting with symptoms of retropharyngeal tendinitis were examined by radiography and MRI. Results: On MRI and radiographs, all patients had characteristic soft-tissue swellings and calcifications related to the tendon of the longus colli muscle situated inferior to the anterior arc of C1. MRI showed well-defined edema, with high signal in the retropharyngeal tissue anterior to C1-C5 on short T1 inversion recovery (STIR) sequences, low signal on T1-weighted sequences, and low signal in the calcification on both sequences. In addition, three patients had high signal intensity changes on STIR sequences in the atlantoaxial joint situated posterior to the anterior arc of C1. Conclusion: MRI is a sensitive and accurate method in the diagnosis of retropharyngeal tendinitis. A new finding in this condition is an effusion or synovitis in the anterior atlantoaxial joint. MRI is a valuable tool in differentiating retropharyngeal tendinitis from other diagnoses such as retropharyngeal abscess, pyogenic spondylitis, and spondyloarthropathy

  20. Chest roentgenographic findings of thymic size and shape in respiratory distress syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thymic size can be affected by both exogenous and endogenous glucocorticoids. Development of the respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is influenced by adrenal cortical function. Thus, thymic size in RDS is considered to be enlarged due to decreased adrenal cortical function. To find whether the presence of RDS correlates with the thymus, the size and shape of the thymus were evaluated in the radiographs of premature infants with RDS, without RDS (control prematurity) and normal infants. The subjects were consisted of chest films of Korean premature infants, 120 with RDS, 60 without RDS, and 60 of normal infants taken at the Department of Radiology, Our Lady of Mercy Hospital during the period of 62 months since January 1978. Relative size of the thymus was determine by cardiothymic/thoracic ratio (CT /T ratio). Grading and location of the thymic prominence as well as incidence of the shape were examined. And all the relations among the radiographs of RDS, control prematurity and normal infants were analyzed. The results were as follows: 1. The CT/T ratio of premature infants with RDS was significantly greater than that of control prematurity and normal infants (P< 0.01). 2. The incidence of bilateral thymic prominence was more frequent in premature infant with RDS than in control prematurity and normal infants (P<0.05). 3. The frequency of thymic prominence was greater in the right than left side in all the three groups (P<0.05). 4. As in the shape of the thymus, a rounded type was most frequent, and a triangular type was least frequent in all three groups. 5. Incident of RDS was very low (9.8%) when the CT/T ratio is below 0.3 and it was very high (90.9%) when the CT/T ratio is above 0.49.

  1. Chest radiographic features of lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis in HIV-infected children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitcher, R.D., E-mail: pitcher@iafrica.co [Division of Paediatric Radiology, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Cape Town (South Africa); Beningfield, S.J. [Division of Radiology, New Groote Schuur Hospital and University of Cape Town (South Africa); Zar, H.J. [Department of Paediatric Pulmonology, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, School of Child and Adolescent Health, University of Cape Town (South Africa)

    2010-02-15

    Aim: To review the radiological features of biopsy-proven lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis (LIP) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and establish whether these are based on systematic radiological analysis, and to investigate whether more specific radiological diagnostic criteria can be developed. Materials and methods: A Medline search of English-language articles on the radiological features of biopsy-proven LIP in HIV-infected children was conducted for the period 1982 to 2007 inclusive. Radiological findings were compared with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria for a presumptive diagnosis of LIP. Results: Pulmonary pathology was recorded as 'diffuse' and 'bilateral' in 125 (97.6%) of 128 reported cases of LIP. Twenty-five different terms were used to describe the pulmonary parenchyma. In 96 (75%), the terminology was consistent with CDC diagnostic criteria. Radiological evolution was documented in 43 (33.5%). Persistent focal opacification superimposed on diffuse pulmonary nodularity was demonstrated in 10 (7.8%). The method of radiological evaluation was described in six (4.6%). In no instance was the terminology defined. Conclusion: The radiological features of LIP have not been systematically analysed. However, CDC criteria remain reliable, allowing diagnosis of at least 75% of cases. The sensitivity of these criteria may be increased by including cases with persistent focal pulmonary opacification superimposed on diffuse nodularity. Longitudinal studies utilizing standardized radiographic analysis are needed to elucidate the natural history of LIP.

  2. Retrospective assessment of thoracic radiographic findings in metastatic canine hemangiosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-one dogs with histopathologically confirmed hemangiosarcoma were evaluated by thoracic radiography for metastatic disease. All dogs had histopathologic examinations of the lungs within two weeks of thoracic radiography. Fourteen dogs had histopathologic evidence of pulmonary hemangiosarcoma; metastatic disease was detected radiographically in eleven of these dogs. The most common radiographic pattern was that of poorly defined small coalescing nodules (8 dogs); other radiographic patterns included well-circumscribed nodules (3 dogs) and alveolar infiltrates secondary to hemorrhage (2 dogs). Differential diagnoses for diffuse, poorly defined, coalescing pulmonary opacities should include hemangiosarcoma in addition to edema, lymphoma, systemic mycoses, fibrosis, allergy, toxicosis, and carcinomas

  3. Clinical study for findings of pneumothoraces on the plain chest film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two hundred and fifty cases of pneumothoraces in intensive care unit in the last seven and half years were reviewed. In intensive care unit, plain chest films are likely to be obtained on supine position that make difficult to diagnose pneumothorax, because of unusual distribution of air in the pleural cavity. In our institution, they were obtained in supine position in 75 %. In our series of 207 supine chest cases, anteromedial and subpulmonic recesses were involved in 11.6 % and 25.6 % respectively. Twenty five cases (12 %) showed unusual location of air. Several radiographic signs have been previously described to recognize this condition. Basilar hyperlucency was most reliable sign (100 %) of detecting subpulmonary pneumothorax. Double diaphragm sign (60 %) and distinct cardiac apex (46.6 %) were also reliable signs. Almost all cases of unusual pneumothoraces were recognized on supine radiographs. However, CT was useful to detect unusual pneumothorax in patient with pneumomediastinum or pulmonary contusion. Unusual pneumothoraces were seen only in traumatized patients. The importance of careful observation of plain chest films to detecte unusual pneumothorax in patients with blunt chest trauma was stressed. (author)

  4. In search of optimum chest radiography techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nation-wide study of chest radiography in Sweden previously revealed a large variation in the physical and technical factors involved, in particular radiation dose. In this study image quality could not be assessed unambiguously. The aim was to try to establish correlation between visual grading of radiographs and physical and technical factors in order to find the optimum chest X-ray system. The physical and technical performance of 24 chest units was evaluated. Radiographs were taken of an anthropomorphic chest phantom supplied with test structures simulating various pathologies. Image quality was assessed by visual grading analysis of the radiographs. The physical and technical parameters of the units rated best were used to exemplify good radiographic practice. Results were in agreement with the recommendations issued by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC). It was also shown that low radiation dose is compatible with high-quality radiographic imaging of the chest. (Author)

  5. Lung cancer screening program using annual chest radiographs with computed radiography (FCR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takashima, Tsutomu; Itoh, Hiroshi; Ikegaki, Shigeru; Chika, Koyata; Nitta, Haruo; Seno, Takashi; Miyashita, Yukichi; Kobayashi, Tadashi

    1987-08-01

    In the Wajima lung cancer screening program conducted under the auspices of Kanazawa University Hospital, Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) was utilized in a new chest radiography trial. The results of the screening program are that the necessity of repeat examinations due to poor image quality are less common and the method enables detection of small pulmonary nodular shadows which are possibly candidates for surgery. Oblique chest X-ray with FCR is remarkably effective for the detection and the identification of small lesions. However, the disadvantage of slow processing and high cost must be fully satisfied if FCR is to become a new imaging modality for mass screening.

  6. A comparison of the Shwachman, Chrispin-Norman and Brasfield methods for scoring of chest radiographs of patients with cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three systems are described for chest radiograph scoring in cystic fibrosis patients: the Shwachman-Kulczycki, the Chrispin-Norman and the Brasfield method. Sixty chest radiographs of 39 patients of different ages have been independently scored by two radiologists according to the three methods. No statistical differences between the methods could be demonstrated. The Chrispin-Norman method is recommended as the best choice because differences in scoring appeared better interpretable. A significant increase in precision could be achieved by combining the scores of the three methods. (orig.)

  7. Extraction of the Two-Dimensional Cardiothoracic Ratio from Digital PA Chest Radiographs: Correlation with Cardiac Function and the Traditional Cardiothoracic Ratio

    OpenAIRE

    Browne, Ronan F. J.; O’Reilly, Geraldine; McInerney, David

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to extract the two-dimensional (2D) cardiothoracic ratio from digital chest radiographs using image analysis software on a Magic View 300 system. We also wanted to investigate its correlation with cardiac function, as defined by left ventricular ejection fraction from MUGA scanning, and with the traditional one-dimensional cardiothoracic ratio. One hundred patients undergoing radionuclide ventriculography and concurrent digital PA chest radiography using a commerc...

  8. Radiographic findings in wrists and hands of patients with leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leprosy, like other neuropathic disorders, can involve the skeleton, affecting both bone and joints, especially those segments that have to withstand weight. To asses the osteoarticular involvement of the wrist and hand in 58 patients with leprosy. The radiographic images of wrist and hand of 58 patients with Hansen's disease were reviewed. The entire spectrum of specific and nonspecific bone lesions described in the literature is presented. Despite the fact that the upper limbs do not have to withstand the weight that the feet and ankles do, radiographic images show that gripping and other common motions can also produce lesions compatible with those of neuropathic arthropathy. (Author) 20 refs

  9. Predictive value of specific radiographic findings of disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to determine whether and to what extend radiographic erosion, joint space narrowing, and malalignment are predictive of clinical disability in patients with rheumatoid arthristis (RA). Radiographs of the hands and wrists of 224 patients with RA were scored for these radiographic parameters. To determine which of these findings best explained variation in clinical measures of disability, a series of regression analyses was performed. Malalignment scores were the best predictor of joint deformity and limitation of motion. Erosion scores were most predictive of variation in functional tests. The author concludes that specific radiographic findings of malalignment and erosion are significantly predictive of disability in patients with RA

  10. Quality assurance: using the exposure index and the deviation index to monitor radiation exposure for portable chest radiographs in neonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many methods are used to track patient exposure during acquisition of plain film radiographs. A uniform international standard would aid this process. To evaluate and describe a new, simple quality-assurance method for monitoring patient exposure. This method uses the ''exposure index'' and the ''deviation index,'' recently developed by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The deviation index measures variation from an ideal target exposure index value. Our objective was to determine whether the exposure index and the deviation index can be used to monitor and control exposure drift over time. Our Agfa workstation automatically keeps a record of the exposure index for every patient. The exposure index and deviation index were calculated on 1,884 consecutive neonatal chest images. Exposure of a neonatal chest phantom was performed as a control. Acquisition of the exposure index and calculation of the deviation index was easily achieved. The weekly mean exposure index of the phantom and the patients was stable and showed <10% change during the study, indicating no exposure drift during the study period. The exposure index is an excellent tool to monitor the consistency of patient exposures. It does not indicate the exposure value used, but is an index to track compliance with a pre-determined target exposure. (orig.)

  11. Quality assurance: using the exposure index and the deviation index to monitor radiation exposure for portable chest radiographs in neonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Mervyn D. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Riley Children' s Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Riley Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Cooper, Matt L.; Piersall, Kelly [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Riley Children' s Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Apgar, Bruce K. [Agfa HealthCare Corporation, Greenville, SC (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Many methods are used to track patient exposure during acquisition of plain film radiographs. A uniform international standard would aid this process. To evaluate and describe a new, simple quality-assurance method for monitoring patient exposure. This method uses the ''exposure index'' and the ''deviation index,'' recently developed by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The deviation index measures variation from an ideal target exposure index value. Our objective was to determine whether the exposure index and the deviation index can be used to monitor and control exposure drift over time. Our Agfa workstation automatically keeps a record of the exposure index for every patient. The exposure index and deviation index were calculated on 1,884 consecutive neonatal chest images. Exposure of a neonatal chest phantom was performed as a control. Acquisition of the exposure index and calculation of the deviation index was easily achieved. The weekly mean exposure index of the phantom and the patients was stable and showed <10% change during the study, indicating no exposure drift during the study period. The exposure index is an excellent tool to monitor the consistency of patient exposures. It does not indicate the exposure value used, but is an index to track compliance with a pre-determined target exposure. (orig.)

  12. Computed radiography versus mobile direct radiography for bedside chest radiographs: Impact of dose on image quality and reader agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To asses the image quality and potential for dose reduction of mobile direct detector (DR) chest radiography as compared with computed radiography (CR) for intensive care unit (ICU) chest radiographs (CXR). Methods and materials: Three groups of age-, weight- and disease-matched ICU patients (n = 114 patients; 50 CXR per acquisition technique) underwent clinically indicated bedside CXR obtained with either CR (single read-out powder plates) or mobile DR (GOS-TFT detectors) at identical or 50% reduced dose (DR50%). Delineation of anatomic structures and devices used for patient monitoring, overall image quality and disease were scored by four readers. In 12 patients pairs of follow-up CR and DR images were available, and in 15 patients pairs of CR and DR50% images were available. In these pairs the overall image quality was also compared side-by-side. Results: Delineation of anatomy in the mediastinum was scored better with DR or DR50% than with CR. Devices used for patient monitoring were seen best with DR, with DR50% being superior to CR. In the side-by-side comparison, the overall image quality of DR and DR50% was rated better than CR in 96% (46/48) and 87% (52/60), respectively. Inter-observer agreement for the assessment of pathology was fair for CR and DR50% (κ = 0.33 and κ = 0.39, respectively) and moderate for DR (κ = 0.48). Conclusion: Mobile DR units offer better image quality than CR for bedside chest radiography and allow for 50% dose reduction. Inter-observer agreement increases with image quality and is superior with DR, while DR50% and CR are comparable.

  13. Detection of radiographic findings in lung fibrosis using storage phosphor plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to examine the influence of the filter kernel size on the detectability of differing radiological findings in interstitial lung disease. In 97 patients with confirmed pulmonary fibrosis chest radiographs were obtained with a film-screen system of speed class 200 and with correspondingly exposed storage phosphorous plates. The size of the filter kernel used for the image postprocessing varied between sigma 5 and sigma 70. The detectability of interstitial lung changes was evaluated independently by eight readers on the basis of a defined rating system. The results were analysed using multifactorial analysis of variance with Scheffe test at a significance level of p=0.05. Small kernel size (S 5, S 10) combined with high edge enhancement were only of benefit in the imaging of septal lines, but reduced the detectability of nodular and reticular structures. Good detail detectability of both micronodules and septal lines was obtained with a medium kernel size of sigma 40. Storage phosphor radiography utilizing the appropriate choice of postprocessing parameters provides equivalent image quality for evaluating interstitial lung changes compared with a modern film-screen technique. (orig.)

  14. Radiographic findings in the nail-patella syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    West, James A.; Louis, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Nail-patella syndrome is a rare disorder characterized classically by the tetrad of nail hypoplasia or aplasia, aplastic or hypoplastic patellae, elbow dysplasia, and the presence of iliac horns. Iliac horns are considered pathognomonic, and the presence of hypoplastic or aplastic patellae in conjunction with nail abnormalities is a cardinal feature of diagnosis. Elbow dysplasia is present in most cases and can exhibit features typical of the syndrome. Herein we present the radiographic findi...

  15. Thoracic radiographic findings in dogs infected with Rickettsia rickettsii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixteen beagle dogs were injected intradermally with Rickettsia rickettsii. The dogs were divided into four groups (n = 4): 1) infected, non-treated control; 2) infected, treated with doxycycline; 3) infected, treated with doxycycline and an anti-inflammatory dose of corticosteroid; and 4) infected, treated with doxycycline and an immunosuppressive dose of corticosteroid. Thoracic radiographs were made and ocular fluorescein angiography was performed on days 6, 10, 17 post-inoculation. A mild interstitial lung opacity was noted in 4/16 dogs on day 6, 5/16 on day 10 and 3/16 on day 17 post-inoculation. Increased retinal vascular permeability was noted in 8/16 dogs on day 6, 3/16 on day 10 and 1/16 on day 17 post-inoculation. Correlation between the presence of radiographic and retinal lesions was not significant (p = 0.08). Eleven, naturally infected, dogs with thoracic radiographs and a final diagnosis of RMSF were also evaluated. Four of the 11 dogs had an unstructured interstitial pattern. Dogs with acute, experimentally-infected or naturally-occurring RMSF may have subtle pulmonary changes characterized by an unstructured interstitial pattern

  16. Cardiac findings on non-gated chest computed tomography: A clinical and pictorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanza, Rene Epunza; Allard, Christian; Berube, Michel

    2016-02-01

    The use of chest computed tomography (CT) as an imaging test for the evaluation of thoracic pathology has significantly increased during the last four decades. Although cardiopulmonary diseases often overlap in their clinical manifestation, radiologists tend to overlook the heart while interpreting routine chest CT. Recent advances in CT technology have led to significant reduction of heart motion artefacts and now allow for the identification of several cardiac findings on chest CT even without electrocardiogram (ECG) gating. These observations range from simple curiosity to both benign and malignant discoveries, to life-threatening discoveries. We here present a clinical and radiologic review of common and less common cardiac findings discovered on non-gated chest CT in order to draw the attention of radiologists and referring physicians to these possibilities. PMID:26781150

  17. Absorbed doses received by patients submitted to chest radiographs in hospitals of the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical irradiation contributes with a significant amount to the dose received by the population. Here, this contribution was evaluated in a survey of absorbed doses received by patients submitted to chest radiological examinations (postero-anterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) projections) in hospitals of the city of Sao Paulo. Due to the variety of equipment and procedures used in radiological examinations, a selection of hospitals was made (12, totalizing 27 X-ray facilities), taking into account their representativeness as medical institutions in the city, in terms of characteristics and number of radiographs carried out. An anthropomorphic phantom, provided with thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD-1 00), was irradiated simulating the patient, and the radiographic image quality was evaluated. Absorbed doses were determined to the thoracic region (entrance and exit skin and lung doses), and to some important organs from the radiation protection point of view (lens of the eye, thyroid and gonads). The great variation on the exposure parameters (kV, mA.s, beam size) leads to a large interval of entrance skin doses-ESD (coefficients of variation, CV, of 60% and 76%, for PA and LAT projections, respectively, were found) and of organ doses (CV of 60% and 46%. for thyroid and lung respectively). Mean values of ESD for LAT and PA projections were 0.22 and 0.98 mGy, respectively. The average absorbed doses per exam (PA and LAT) to thyroid and lung, 0.15 and 0.24 mGy respectively,showed that the thyroid was irradiated by the primary beam in many cases. Values of lens of the eye and gonad absorbed doses were below 30 μGy. Comparison of the lung doses obtained in this study with values in the literature, calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, showed good agreement. On the other hand, the comparison shows significant differences in the dose values to organs outside the chest region (thyroid, lens of eye and gonads). The effective dose calculated for a chest examination, PA and LAT

  18. Computer-aided diagnosis of pneumoconiosis abnormalities extracted from chest radiographs scanned with a CCD scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a computer-aided diagnosis for pneumoconiosis radiographs obtained with a common charge-coupled devices (CCD) scanner. Since the current computer-aided diagnosis systems of pneumoconiosis are not practical for medical doctors due to high costs of usage for a special scanner, we propose a novel system which measures abnormalities of pneumoconiosis from lung images obtained with a common CCD scanner. Experimental results of discriminations between normal and abnormal cases for 56 right-lung images including 6 standard pneumoconiosis images have shown that the proposed abnormalities are well extracted according to the standards of pneumoconiosis categories. (author)

  19. Correlation between thoracic radiographs and postmortem findings in dogs with hemangiosarcoma: 77 cases (1984-1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoracic radiographic and postmortem findings were compared in dogs with histologically confirmed hemangiosarcoma (HSA). On the basis of results of radiography, a false-negative diagnosis was made for pulmonary HSA in 10 (21.7%) of 46 dogs, and in 26 (53.1%) of 49 dogs for cardiac HSA. The incidence of false-negative radiographic diagnosis for pulmonary HSA was lower in dogs when left and right lateral views were obtained. The radiographic sensitivity was 78%, and the negative-predictive value was 74% for pulmonary HSA. The radiographic sensitivity was 47%, and the negative-predictive value was 43% for cardiac HSA

  20. Pulmonary Aspergillus chest wall involvement in chronic granulomatous disease: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary Aspergillus infection in patients with chronic granulomatous disease tends to involve the chest wall and consequently carries a high mortality rate. We report the findings of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in three such cases. We suggest that CT and MRI have a complementary role in evaluating chest wall invasion by pulmonary Aspergillus infection in chronic granulomatous disease. (orig./GDG)

  1. Construction of pediatric homogeneous phantoms for optimization of chest and skull radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We developed two pediatric patient-equivalent phantoms. • Our phantoms were used in the optimization process of computed radiography systems. • We evaluated physical quantities such as effective detective quantum efficiency and contrast-to-noise ratio. • We determined optimized techniques for pediatric protocols. - Abstract: Objectives: To develop two pediatric patient-equivalent phantoms, the Pediatric Chest Equivalent Patient (PCEP) and the Pediatric Skull Equivalent Patient (PSEP) for children aged 1 to 5 years. We also used both phantoms for image quality evaluations in computed radiography systems to determine Gold Standard (GS) techniques for pediatric patients. Methods: To determine the simulator materials thickness (Lucite and aluminum), we quantified biological tissues (lung, soft, and bone) using an automatic computational algorithm. To objectively establish image quality levels, two physical quantities were used: effective detective quantum efficiency and contrast-to-noise ratio. These quantities were associated to values obtained for standard patients from previous studies. Results: For chest radiographies, the GS technique applied was 81 kVp, associated to 2.0 mAs and 83.6 μGy of entrance skin dose (ESD), while for skull radiographies, the GS technique was 70 kVp, associated to 5 mAs and 339 μGy of ESD. Conclusion: This procedure allowed us to choose optimized techniques for pediatric protocols, thus improving quality of diagnosis for pediatric population and reducing diagnostic costs to our institution. These results could also be easily applied to other services with different equipment technologies

  2. Construction of pediatric homogeneous phantoms for optimization of chest and skull radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Allan Felipe Fattori, E-mail: allan@ibb.unesp.br [Instituto de Biociências de Botucatu, P.O. BOX 510, Departamento de Física e Biofísica, UNESP—Universidade Estadual Paulista, Distrito de Rubião Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Miranda, José Ricardo de Arruda, E-mail: jmiranda@ibb.unesp.br [Instituto de Biociências de Botucatu, Departamento de Física e Biofísica, UNESP—Universidade Estadual Paulista, Distrito de Rubião Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Bacchim Neto, Fernando Antonio, E-mail: fernando.bacchim@gmail.com [Instituto de Biociências de Botucatu, Departamento de Física e Biofísica, UNESP—Universidade Estadual Paulista, Distrito de Rubião Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Duarte, Sérgio Barbosa, E-mail: sbd@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Laboratório de Altas Energias, Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, Rio de Janeiro, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Pina, Diana Rodrigues de, E-mail: drpina@fmb.unesp.br [Departamento de Doenças Tropicais e Diagnóstico por Imagem, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, UNESP—Universidade Estadual Paulista, Distrito de Rubião Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We developed two pediatric patient-equivalent phantoms. • Our phantoms were used in the optimization process of computed radiography systems. • We evaluated physical quantities such as effective detective quantum efficiency and contrast-to-noise ratio. • We determined optimized techniques for pediatric protocols. - Abstract: Objectives: To develop two pediatric patient-equivalent phantoms, the Pediatric Chest Equivalent Patient (PCEP) and the Pediatric Skull Equivalent Patient (PSEP) for children aged 1 to 5 years. We also used both phantoms for image quality evaluations in computed radiography systems to determine Gold Standard (GS) techniques for pediatric patients. Methods: To determine the simulator materials thickness (Lucite and aluminum), we quantified biological tissues (lung, soft, and bone) using an automatic computational algorithm. To objectively establish image quality levels, two physical quantities were used: effective detective quantum efficiency and contrast-to-noise ratio. These quantities were associated to values obtained for standard patients from previous studies. Results: For chest radiographies, the GS technique applied was 81 kVp, associated to 2.0 mAs and 83.6 μGy of entrance skin dose (ESD), while for skull radiographies, the GS technique was 70 kVp, associated to 5 mAs and 339 μGy of ESD. Conclusion: This procedure allowed us to choose optimized techniques for pediatric protocols, thus improving quality of diagnosis for pediatric population and reducing diagnostic costs to our institution. These results could also be easily applied to other services with different equipment technologies.

  3. Clinical Findings in Patients with Splenic Injuries: Are Injuries to the Left Lower Chest Important?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneir, Aaron

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical findings in patients with splenic injury and to determine if isolated left lower chest injury may be the single clinical indicator of splenic injury. The medical records of all adult blunt trauma patients with splenic injury over a 14 month period were reviewed. Significant left lower chest injury was considered present if the patient had left sided pleuritic chest pain with tenderness to ribs 7-12 or if these ribs were visualized as fractured on any imaging study. Patients were considered to have clinical findings suggestive of splenic injury if they had pre-hospital or emergency department hypotension, abdominal pain or tenderness, a Glasgow coma scale < 15, or gross hematuria. Ninety patients had splenic injury. Thirty-nine (43%. 95% CI 33, 54% patients had significant left lower chest injury. In five (6%. 95% CI 2, 12% patients, injury to this portion of the chest was the single indicator of splenic injury. Nearly half the patients with splenic injury will have significant injury to the left lower chest and this finding may be the only indicator of splenic injury.

  4. Can radiographers be trained to triage CT colonography for extracolonic findings?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographers have been shown to be capable CT colonography observers. We evaluated whether radiographers can be trained to triage screening CT colonography for extracolonic findings. Eight radiographers participated in a structured training program. They subsequently evaluated extracolonic findings in 280 low-dose CT colonograms (cases). This dataset contained 66 cases with possibly important findings (E3) and 27 cases with probably important findings (E4) [classification based on the highest classified finding (C-RADS)]. The first 40 and last 40 CT colonograms were identical test cases. Immediate feedback was given after each reading, except for test cases. Radiographers triaged cases based on C-RADS classification and indicated the need for a radiologist read. We constructed learning curves for correct case triaging by calculating moving averages. In the final test series, 84/120 (70 %) cases with E3 or E4 findings and 139/200 (70 %) without E3 or E4 findings were correctly triaged. Correct identification of cases with E3 findings improved with training from 46/88 (52 %) to 62/88 (70 %) (P < 0.0001) but not for E4 findings [both 22/32 (69 %) P = 1.00]. Radiographers improve after training in correctly triaging extracolonic findings at CT colonography but do not reach a high enough accuracy to consider their structural involvement in screening. circle Radiographers were trained to triage CT colonography for extracolonic findings. (orig.)

  5. Shoulder arthroplasty. Part 2: Normal and abnormal radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frequently, the decision made by general practitioners or musculoskeletal triage assessment services to refer patients for specialist review is initiated by a radiological report. Following shoulder arthroplasty it is important to ensure that any patient with asymptomatic evidence of a failing prosthesis is referred for review so that revision surgery can be contemplated and planned before the situation becomes unsalvageable. The first paper in this series described the various types of shoulder arthroplasty and indications for each. This follow-up paper will concentrate on their modes of failure and the associated radiographic features, and is aimed at radiology trainees and non-musculoskeletal specialist radiologists.

  6. Shoulder arthroplasty. Part 2: Normal and abnormal radiographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheridan, B.D., E-mail: bdsheridan@hotmail.com [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Ahearn, N.; Tasker, A.; Wakeley, C.; Sarangi, P. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Frequently, the decision made by general practitioners or musculoskeletal triage assessment services to refer patients for specialist review is initiated by a radiological report. Following shoulder arthroplasty it is important to ensure that any patient with asymptomatic evidence of a failing prosthesis is referred for review so that revision surgery can be contemplated and planned before the situation becomes unsalvageable. The first paper in this series described the various types of shoulder arthroplasty and indications for each. This follow-up paper will concentrate on their modes of failure and the associated radiographic features, and is aimed at radiology trainees and non-musculoskeletal specialist radiologists.

  7. Computer-assisted instruction and diagnosis of radiographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, D; Butler, C; Hodder, R; Allman, R; Woods, J; Riordan, D

    1984-04-01

    Recent advances in computer technology, including high bit-density storage, digital imaging, and the ability to interface microprocessors with videodisk, create enormous opportunities in the field of medical education. This program, utilizing a personal computer, videodisk, BASIC language, a linked textfile system, and a triangulation approach to the interpretation of radiographs developed by Dr. W. L. Thompson, can enable the user to engage in a user-friendly, dynamic teaching program in radiology, applicable to various levels of expertise. Advantages include a relatively more compact and inexpensive system with rapid access and ease of revision which requires little instruction to the user. PMID:6376675

  8. Evaluation of digitization range in laser-digitized adult portable chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the evaluation of digital radiography and digitized film radiography, much attention has been directed at the problem of adequate spatial resolution. While investigators have demonstrated the ranges of pixel matrix size necessary for diagnosis, less information is available on the range of bit depth and the resulting gray scale required. This paper presents the results of our study of the effects of varying the gray-scale dynamic range between 4 and 12 bits on observer detection of catheter tips and evaluation of pulmonary vascular congestion on digitized adult portable chest films. Films were digitized at 1,684 x 2,048 pixels and displayed at the same resolution (Pixar/Megascan) with the number of bits and pixles altered by removal of succsuccessive low-order bits

  9. Characterization of interstitial lung disease in chest radiographs using SOM artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an automated approach to apply a self-organizing map (SOM) artificial neural network (ANN) as a tool for feature extraction and dimensionality reduction to recognize and characterize radiologic patterns of interstitial lung diseases in chest radiography. After feature extraction and dimensionality reduction a multilayer perceptron (MLP) ANN is applied for radiologic patterns classification in normal, linear, nodular or mixed. A leave-one-out methodology was applied for training and test over a database containing 17 samples of linear pattern, 9 samples of nodular pattern, 9 samples of mixed pattern and 18 samples of normal pattern. The MLP network provided an average result of 88.7% of right classification, with 100% of right classification for linear pattern, 55.5% for nodular pattern, 77.7% for mixed pattern and 100% for normal pattern. (orig.)

  10. A comparative study for chest radiograph image retrieval using binary texture and deep learning classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anavi, Yaron; Kogan, Ilya; Gelbart, Elad; Geva, Ofer; Greenspan, Hayit

    2015-08-01

    In this work various approaches are investigated for X-ray image retrieval and specifically chest pathology retrieval. Given a query image taken from a data set of 443 images, the objective is to rank images according to similarity. Different features, including binary features, texture features, and deep learning (CNN) features are examined. In addition, two approaches are investigated for the retrieval task. One approach is based on the distance of image descriptors using the above features (hereon termed the "descriptor"-based approach); the second approach ("classification"-based approach) is based on a probability descriptor, generated by a pair-wise classification of each two classes (pathologies) and their decision values using an SVM classifier. Best results are achieved using deep learning features in a classification scheme. PMID:26736908

  11. Symptomatic pulmonary lipiodol embolism after transarterial chemoembolization for hepatic malignant tumor: clinical presentation and chest imaging findings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Haifeng; Yang Renjie; Wang Xiaodong; Zhu Xu; Chen Hui

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary lipiodol embolism after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) was rare and life-threatening,occasionally reported in previous literatures.We aimed to review the records of 11 patients with pulmonary oily embolism and analyze their characteristics of radiographic findings and risk factors.Methods Records of 478 consecutive patients who underwent 1 026 percutaneous TACE procedures were retrospectively analyzed.Eleven cases with respiratory symptoms were identified as having symptomatic pulmonary lipiodol embolism after TACE.Data of these patients,including clinical presentation,techniques of TACE,imaging features of tumor and chest imaging findings,were assessed.Results Eleven (2.3%) of 478 consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous TACE procedures had a pulmonary oily embolism after procedures.The mean size of target tumors embolized was (13.6±2.0) cm.All were hyper-vascular.The mean volume of lipiodol was (21.8±8.2) ml.Pulmonary oily embolisms were revealed within 12-48 hours after TACE.The most severe respiratory symptoms and imaging abnormalities of the eight patients who survived presented between 2 and 5 days after TACE,becoming normal between 12 and 35 days after TACE.Three patients died.Chest CT revealed retention of radiopaque lipiodol in lungs.Conclusions Pulmonary lipiodol embolism occurs easily in patients who have large hyper-vascular hepatic malignant tumor.The high-density lipiodol deposition in the lung field can be used as diagnostic feature.

  12. Radiographic findings of aberrant right subclavian artery initially depicted on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiographic findings of aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSCA) initially depicted on CT. Twenty-five cases incidentally diagnosed during CT between June 1993 and May 2001, were examined. They included 13 men and 12 women aged from 29 to 84 years old (mean, 63 years). Three findings were evaluated on posteroanterior radiographs: oblique edge, vessel through the trachea, and mass effect. On lateral radiographs, the following findings were evaluated: posterior tracheal imprint, retrotracheal opacity, and aortic arch obscuration. On the posteroanterior radiographs, oblique edge, vessel through the trachea, and mass effect were observed in 32% (8/25), 44% (11/25), and 20% (5/25) of cases, respectively. On the lateral radiographs, posterior tracheal imprint, retrotracheal opacity, and aortic arch obscuration were observed in 95% (18/19), 58% (11/19), and 37% (7/19), respectively. On posteroanterior radiographs, normal cases were most frequent (40%). In contrast, lateral radiographs demonstrated at least one abnormality in all cases. As a variation of posterior tracheal imprint, the long-segment type of compression was observed in 32%. We consider detailed interpretation of the posterior tracheal edge on lateral radiographs to be important in diagnosing cases of mild ARSCA. (author)

  13. Chest radiographs assist in judging prognosis of patients with severe pulmonary complications of AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographs of 17 patients, who required assisted ventilation in the intensive care unit for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with probable respiratory distress syndrome, were studied retrospectively. Five of the six survivors manifested central lucencies forming rosettes typical of alveolar air filling, usually with central air bronchograms of normal caliber. Nine of the 11 fatalities lacked these features and instead had abnormal peripheral lucencies suggesting interstitial air. This was confirmed in seven autopsies that all revealed marked distortion of pulmonary architecture similar to that seen in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Thus, aeration typical of normal alveoli and airways suggests an increased likelihood of survival and response to respiratory therapy, while peripheral aeration suggesting interstitial air or BPD is prognostically ominous

  14. Preliminary validation of a new methodology for estimating dose reduction protocols in neonatal chest computed radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don, Steven; Whiting, Bruce R.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Sehnert, W. James; Ellinwood, Jacquelyn S.; Töpfer, Karin; Masoumzadeh, Parinaz; Kraus, Richard A.; Kronemer, Keith A.; Herman, Thomas; McAlister, William H.

    2006-03-01

    The risk of radiation exposure is greatest for pediatric patients and, thus, there is a great incentive to reduce the radiation dose used in diagnostic procedures for children to "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA). Testing of low-dose protocols presents a dilemma, as it is unethical to repeatedly expose patients to ionizing radiation in order to determine optimum protocols. To overcome this problem, we have developed a computed-radiography (CR) dose-reduction simulation tool that takes existing images and adds synthetic noise to create realistic images that correspond to images generated with lower doses. The objective of our study was to determine the extent to which simulated, low-dose images corresponded with original (non-simulated) low-dose images. To make this determination, we created pneumothoraces of known volumes in five neonate cadavers and obtained images of the neonates at 10 mR, 1 mR and 0.1 mR (as measured at the cassette plate). The 10-mR exposures were considered "relatively-noise-free" images. We used these 10 mR-images and our simulation tool to create simulated 0.1- and 1-mR images. For the simulated and original images, we identified regions of interest (ROI) of the entire chest, free-in-air region, and liver. We compared the means and standard deviations of the ROI grey-scale values of the simulated and original images with paired t tests. We also had observers rate simulated and original images for image quality and for the presence or absence of pneumothoraces. There was no statistically significant difference in grey-scale-value means nor standard deviations between simulated and original entire chest ROI regions. The observer performance suggests that an exposure >=0.2 mR is required to detect the presence or absence of pneumothoraces. These preliminary results indicate that the use of the simulation tool is promising for achieving ALARA exposures in children.

  15. Exploratory analyses of the association of MRI with clinical, laboratory and radiographic findings in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emery, Paul; van der Heijde, Désirée; Østergaard, Mikkel;

    2011-01-01

    Evaluate relationships between MRI and clinical/laboratory/radiographic findings in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......Evaluate relationships between MRI and clinical/laboratory/radiographic findings in rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  16. Lung segmentation in chest radiographs using anatomical atlases with nonrigid registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candemir, Sema; Jaeger, Stefan; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Musco, Jonathan P; Singh, Rahul K; Zhiyun Xue; Karargyris, Alexandros; Antani, Sameer; Thoma, George; McDonald, Clement J

    2014-02-01

    The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is developing a digital chest X-ray (CXR) screening system for deployment in resource constrained communities and developing countries worldwide with a focus on early detection of tuberculosis. A critical component in the computer-aided diagnosis of digital CXRs is the automatic detection of the lung regions. In this paper, we present a nonrigid registration-driven robust lung segmentation method using image retrieval-based patient specific adaptive lung models that detects lung boundaries, surpassing state-of-the-art performance. The method consists of three main stages: 1) a content-based image retrieval approach for identifying training images (with masks) most similar to the patient CXR using a partial Radon transform and Bhattacharyya shape similarity measure, 2) creating the initial patient-specific anatomical model of lung shape using SIFT-flow for deformable registration of training masks to the patient CXR, and 3) extracting refined lung boundaries using a graph cuts optimization approach with a customized energy function. Our average accuracy of 95.4% on the public JSRT database is the highest among published results. A similar degree of accuracy of 94.1% and 91.7% on two new CXR datasets from Montgomery County, MD, USA, and India, respectively, demonstrates the robustness of our lung segmentation approach. PMID:24239990

  17. Clinical and radiographic findings, treatment, and outcome in cattle with osteochondrosis: 29 cases (1986-1996)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective-To summarize the radiographic and clinical findings, treatment, and outcome in cattle with osteochondrosis diagnosed radiographically. Design-Retrospective case series. Sample Population-29 cattle with radiographic evidence of osteochondrosis. Procedures-Medical records were reviewed, and owners or referring veterinarians were contacted for outcome assessment. Data were analyzed for potential interactions between osteochondrosis classification (osteochondritis dessicans vs subchondral cyst-like lesions), clinical and radiographic findings, treatment, and outcome, using Fisher's exact test and descriptive statistics. Results-Osteochondrosis was associated with young, male, purebred cattle, clinical evidence of lameness, and radiographic evidence of concurrent degenerative joint disease. Osteochondritis dissecans and subchondral cyst-like lesions had similar clinical findings and outcomes but varied significantly in their radiographic distribution among joints. Osteochondrosis often manifests clinically as a unilateral condition, but bilateral lesions were often found (88%) when limbs were radiographically examined. Cattle managed conservatively tended to be culled (within 6 months of diagnosis because of lameness) more often than those managed surgically, despite the lack of treatment bias. ClinicalImplications-Osteochondrosis in cattle is often associated with lameness or degenerative joint disease. Conservative management does not result in a favorable clinical prognosis for long-term, lameness-free survival, and more studies need to be completed to evaluate the efficacy of surgical treatment of osteochondrosis in cattle

  18. Prevalence of Radiologic Findings in Patients with Blunt Chest Trauma in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haghighi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Chest trauma due to its vital organs can be very dangerous and lethal. Our country has the first grade of accidents in the word, so rapid diagnosis and treatment in patients with chest trauma is necessary. One cost benefit and available imaging modality in each Region of our country is X-ray."nCXR interpretation needs to knowledge about prevalence of abnormal Radiologic findings and their accuracy. Therefore, it is necessary to perform a study about the rate of CXR abnormal findings in patients with blunt chest trauma."nPatients and Methods: In this descriptive and prospective study, CXR of patients with blunt chest trauma that admitted in Alzahra and Kashani hospitals studied and percent of vital radiologic findings prevalence determined."nResults: The final results were as below:"n1- Rib FX (18.5% (143, 2- Hemothorax (13.6% (105, 3- Pneumothorax (11.8% (91, 4- Sub cutaneous emphysema (10.2% (79, 5- Lung laceration (8.1% (63, 6- Mediastinal winding (6.4% (50, 7- Clavicular and sternal FX (5.8% (44, 8- Pneumo mediastinum (4.1% (32, 9- spinal FX (3.5% (27, 10- Great vessels injury signs (1.4% (11."nConclusion: According to above results, accurate investigation of CXR, helps physician and radiologist to find any threatened finding, so determination of next step as clinical follow up or spiral CT, angiography or surgery; accordingly.

  19. The effect of 10 : 1 compression and soft copy interpretation on the chest radiographs of premature neonates with reference to their possible application in teleradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to assess the potential application of teleradiology in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) by ascertaining whether any decrease in conspicuity of anatomic detail or interventional devices in the chest radiographs of premature infants is caused by picture archiving and communication system (PACS)-based soft copy interpretation of 10 : 1 compressed images. One hundred digital chest radiographs of low-birthweight infants were obtained in the NICU using a storage phosphor system. Laser-printed images were interpreted and the data set for each radiograph was then irreversibly compressed by a 10 : 1 ratio. Four radiologists with extensive PACS experience used a five-point grading system to score laser-printed hard copy images for the visibility of six parameters of anatomic landmarks and interventional devices in the chest. Compressed soft copy images displayed on 2K PACS workstation were subsequently scored using the same approach. Statistical manipulation demonstrated no loss of anatomic detail in five of the six parameters scored, with minimal difference in one landmark, the retrocardiac lung assessment. While further study is required to assess the clinical impact of the variance noted when evaluating lung parameters, the preservation or improvement of information in the remaining parameters following irreversible compression and soft copy interpretation is promising for the potential use of teleradiology in this population. (orig.)

  20. Radiographic findings after pubic symphysiotomy: mean time to follow-up of 41.6 years.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Galbraith, John G

    2014-01-01

    Pubic symphysiotomy is a rarely performed procedure in which the pubic symphysis is divided to facilitate vaginal delivery in cases of obstructed labor. Recently, many obstetricians have shown renewed interest in this procedure. The purpose of this paper is to report the long-term radiographic findings for patients who had undergone pubic symphysiotomy compared with the radiographic appearance of a group of age-matched and parity-matched controls.

  1. Prevalence and clinical significance of incidental cardiac findings in non-ECG-gated chest CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of incidental cardiac findings in non-ECG-gated chest CT. Non-ECG-gated chest CT examinations of 300 patients were retrospectively analyzed for incidental cardiac findings. Subsequently, these findings were evaluated for their clinical relevance by a cardiologist. A total of 107 out of 300 examined patients had 174 incidental cardiac findings including coronary calcification (90), aortic/mitral valve calcification (42), iatrogenic changes (23), pericardial effusion (6), dilatation of the heart (4), myocardial changes (3), thrombus in the left ventricle (2), constrictive pericarditis (2) and atrial myxoma (1). Of the cardiac findings 51% were described in the written report and in 53 out of the 107 patients the cardiac findings were unknown. Newly detected incidental findings from 8 patients were rated as clinically significant: pericardial effusion (4), constrictive pericarditis (1), thrombus in the left ventricle (1), atrial myxoma (1) and dilatation of the heart (1). Incidental cardiac findings are frequent in non-ECG-gated chest CT and may have a high clinical relevance. (orig.)

  2. Chest HRCT findings in acute transformation of adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with acute transformation of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL). We retrospectively identified 72 consecutive patients at our institution with ATLL between October 2000 and March 2014. The cases included acute type (n = 20), lymphoma type (n = 21), smouldering type (n = 24) and chronic type (n = 7). Sixteen (7 men, 9 women; aged 36-85 years, mean 63.3 years) of 31 patients (24 with smouldering and seven with chronic type; 51.6 %) developed acute transformation of ATLL, and had undergone chest HRCT examinations. Parenchymal abnormalities, enlarged lymph nodes, pericardial effusion, pleural effusion and skin lesions were evaluated on HRCT. Chest HRCT of 15 of the 16 patients showed abnormal findings, including ground-glass opacity (GGO) (n = 8), consolidation (n = 5), interlobular septal thickening (n = 5) and nodules (n = 5). Pleural effusion was found in five patients, lymph node enlargement in 10 patients and multiple skin thickening in two patients. Almost all patients with acute transformation of ATLL had abnormal findings on chest HRCT, which consisted mainly of lymph node enlargement, GGO, interlobular septal thickening, nodules and bilateral pleural effusions. (orig.)

  3. Chest HRCT findings in acute transformation of adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Fumito; Sato, Haruka; Omeri, Ahmad Khalid; Ono, Asami; Tokuyama, Kouhei; Ando, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Akira; Mori, Hiromu [Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yufu, Oita (Japan); Ogata, Masao; Kohno, Kazuhiro; Takano, Kuniko [Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Yufu, Oita (Japan)

    2015-06-01

    To assess chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with acute transformation of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL). We retrospectively identified 72 consecutive patients at our institution with ATLL between October 2000 and March 2014. The cases included acute type (n = 20), lymphoma type (n = 21), smouldering type (n = 24) and chronic type (n = 7). Sixteen (7 men, 9 women; aged 36-85 years, mean 63.3 years) of 31 patients (24 with smouldering and seven with chronic type; 51.6 %) developed acute transformation of ATLL, and had undergone chest HRCT examinations. Parenchymal abnormalities, enlarged lymph nodes, pericardial effusion, pleural effusion and skin lesions were evaluated on HRCT. Chest HRCT of 15 of the 16 patients showed abnormal findings, including ground-glass opacity (GGO) (n = 8), consolidation (n = 5), interlobular septal thickening (n = 5) and nodules (n = 5). Pleural effusion was found in five patients, lymph node enlargement in 10 patients and multiple skin thickening in two patients. Almost all patients with acute transformation of ATLL had abnormal findings on chest HRCT, which consisted mainly of lymph node enlargement, GGO, interlobular septal thickening, nodules and bilateral pleural effusions. (orig.)

  4. The accuracy of chest radiographs in the detection of congenital heart disease and in the diagnosis of specific congenital cardiac lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients. Traditional teaching holds that specific types of CHD can be diagnosed on the chest radiograph (CXR) through pattern recognition. To determine the accuracy of radiologists in detecting CHD on the CXR. This study was a blinded retrospective review of chest radiographs from 281 patients (<12 years) by five pediatric radiologists from three institutions. Thirteen groups were evaluated that included 12 categories of CHD and a control group of patients without heart disease. Radiographs were assessed for heart size, heart and mediastinal shape and vascularity. Clinical information, angiography, echocardiograms and surgery were used as the gold standard for definitive diagnosis. The average accuracy of the five readers in distinguishing normal from CHD patients was 78% (range of 72% to 82%). The overall measure of accuracy in distinguishing specific congenital cardiac lesions among 13 groups of patients was 71% (range of 63% to 79%). CXR alone is not diagnostic of specific cardiac lesions, with a low accuracy of only 71%. We believe that less emphasis should be placed on the use of radiographs alone in diagnosing specific congenital cardiac lesions. (orig.)

  5. Pneumonia induced by swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) infection. Chest computed tomography findings in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the features of chest computed tomography (CT) in children with swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV). The study population consisted of 16 children with laboratory-confirmed S-OIV infection (12 boys, 4 girls), with an age range of 5-10 years (mean 6.3 years). Pneumonia was suspected in these patients based on clinical features or confirmed by radiography. All subjects underwent CT for close evaluation of pneumonia, including characteristics, distribution, extent, and other findings such as pleural effusion, pneumothorax, and pneumomediastinum. The predominant CT finding was consolidation plus ground-grass opacity (GGO) (11/16, 69%). The consolidation-dominant pattern was found in 10 of 16 (66%) patients, and 1 (6%) was GGO-dominant. One (6%) had only GGO. In all, 7 of the 16 patients had segmental or lobar consolidation. Abnormal opacities were primarily distributed in the central lung zone (8/16, 50%) and were multifocal (15/16, 94%). Four showed atelectasis (4/16, 25%). Pneumomediastinum was observed in 4 of 16 (25%). One patient had negative radiographic findings but was positive on CT. Multifocal consolidation with central distribution is a common CT finding in children with S-OIV, but there are few GGO-dominant cases. Widespread consolidation (segmental or lobar) is also common. (author)

  6. Comparative analysis of chest radiological findings between avian human influenza and SARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the chest radiological findings of a mortal avian human influenza case. Methods: One patient in our hospital was proved to be infected avian human influenza in Guangdong province on March 1, 2006. The Clinical appearances and chest radiological findings of this case were retrospectively analyzed and compared with that of 3 mortal SARS cases out of 16 cases in 2003. Results: Large consolidated areas in left lower lobe was showed in pulmonary radiological findings of this patient and soon developed into ARDS (adult respiratory distress syndrome). However, the pulmonary radiological findings had no characteristic. Characteristics of soaring size and number during short term appeared in SARS instead of avian human influenza. Final diagnosis was up to the etiology and serology examination. Conclusion: Bronchial dissemination was not observed in this avian human influenza case. Pay attention to the avian human influenza in spite of no history of contract with sick or dead poultry in large city. (authors)

  7. Radiographic structural findings in the mandibular condyles of young individuals receiving orthodontic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic findings in mandibular condyles were studied from the pre- and post-treatment panoramic radiographs of 625 orthodontic patients. The subjects' mean age was 11 years at the start and 14 years at the end of active orthodontic treatment. Radiographic condylar findings were seen in 14 subjects before treatment and in 54 subjects after treatment. In age-related controls condylar findings were seen in 3%. The condylar findings was ''flattening only'' in half of the patients and in one-third of the controls with condylar findings. Activator treatment was associated with condylar findings. Condylar findings increased with age in the orthodontically treated subjects, but not in the unselected population controls. This may mean that condyles become more sensitive with age in children. Increase with age may be partly due to the radiographic interpretation, since minor condylar findings are difficult to observe in young children, and partly due to differences in treatment modalities and the duration of treatment. 44 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  8. Quantification of pneumothorax volume on chest radiographs: comparison between the collins' and the axel's methods with three-dimensional CT as the standard of reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was twofold. In a preliminary study, we evaluated the accuracy of 3-D (three-dimensional) CT for the estimation of pneumothorax volume and for providing the optimal postprocessing method for clinical study. In the clinical study, we determined which of the two methods, Collins' and Axel's, was more accurate for the estimation of pneumothorax volume, as seen on chest radiographs, using 3-D CT as the standard of reference. In the preliminary study, 3-D CT was applied to phantoms and to four patients with pneumothorax using two different postprocessing methods, manual contour delineation and thresholding. In the clinical study, 3-D CT was performed in 13 patients with pneumothorax. For the purpose of evaluating conventional radiographs, a localizer scan was used for comparing the accuracy of Collins' method with that of Axel's method, with 3-D CT as the standard of reference. The preliminary study revealed that 3-D CT estimated pneumothorax volume with great accuracy and that manual contour delineation and thresholding measured volume equally well. Because of the shorter postprocessing time required with thresholding than with manual contour delineation (5 min versus 30 min), the former was used during clinical study. The results of this indicated close correlation between the measurements obtained using Collins' method on chest radiographs and those obtained by 3-D CT(r=0.95, p0.05). 3-D CT can estimate pneumothorax volume with great accuracy. Collins' method is superior to Axel's method for the quantification of pneumothorax volume as seen on chest radiographs

  9. Radiographic, high detail radiographic, microangiographic and histological findings of the distal portion of the tarsus in weanling young and adult horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical radiographic (LM and D35L-P1MO reviews), high detail radiographic, microangiographic and histological findings of distal portion of the tarsus of 16 horses (five weanling, four young and six adult), without known clinical histories, were evaluated to determine the sensitivity of clinical radiographs for the detection of abnormalities in the distal tarsus and the prevalence of abnormalities in this population. Clinical radiographic and high detail radiographic abnormalities were observed in at least 30 per cent of the tarsi examined. Statistical agreement between observations from clinical radiographs and corresponding post mortem high detail radiographs was not good for subchondral bone plate irregularities and joint margin changes. Three patterns of sclerosis of the medullary spongiosa were visualized on high detail radiographs; thickening of the subchondral bone plate was seen commonly in the weaning group,, whereas arching and bridging patterns were more prevalent in the young and adult groups. Bone production on the dorsal cortex of the central and third tarsal bones did not increase with age. Abnormalities in vascular perfusion and articular cartilage histology were observed in association with subchondral bone plate irregularities and focal regions of osteopenia observed on high detail radiographs

  10. Detectability of simulated pulmonary nodules on chest radiographs: Comparison between irradiation side sampling indirect flat-panel detector and computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the detectability of simulated pulmonary nodules on chest radiographs between an irradiation side sampling indirect flat-panel detector (ISS-FPD) and computed radiography (CR). Materials and methods: This study was an observer performance study. Simulated pulmonary nodules of 8 mm in diameter were superimposed on an anthropomorphic chest phantom. Chest radiographs were acquired under 2 exposure levels (4 and 3.2 mAs) with the ISS-FPD and the CR. Six thoracic radiologists evaluated all 40 images (10 patterns × 2 different exposure doses × 2 different systems) for the presence or absence of a lesion over each of 12 defined areas on a 3-megapixel monochrome liquid-crystal display. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were obtained for observation in predefined 480 areas. A jackknife method was used for statistical analysis. Differences with a P value of <0.05 were considered significant. Results: The analysis of the observer detection of simulated pulmonary nodules showed larger areas under the ROC curve (AUC) by the ISS-FPD than by the CR. There was a statistically significant difference between the two systems at 3.2 mAs (P = 0.0330). Conclusion: The ISS-FPD was superior to the CR for the detection of simulated pulmonary nodules at 3.2 mAs

  11. Elimination of daily routine chest radiographs in a mixed medical–surgical intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graat, Marleen E.; Kröner, Anke; Spronk, Peter E.; Korevaar, Johanna C.; Stoker, Jaap; Vroom, Margreeth B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of elimination of daily routine chest radiographs (CXRs) in a mixed medical–surgical intensive care unit (ICU) on utility of on demand CXRs, length of stay (LOS) in ICU, readmission rate, and mortality rate. Design and setting Prospective, nonrandomized, controlled study in a 28-bed ICU. Analysis included data of all admitted ICU patients during 5 months before and after elimination of daily routine CXRs. Results Before elimination, 2457 daily routine CXRs and 1437 on demand CXRs were obtained from 754 patients. After elimination, 1267 CXRs were obtained from 622 patients. The ratio of CXRs/patient day decreased from 1.1 ± 0.3 to 0.6 ± 0.4 (p < 0.05). Elimination did not result in a change in utility and timing of on demand CXRs. The absolute diagnostic and therapeutic value of on demand CXRs increased with elimination of daily routine CXRs: before intervention, 147 unexpected predefined abnormalities were found (10.2% of all on demand CXRs in 15.9% of all patients), of which 57 (3.9%) in 6.4% of all patients led to a change in therapy. After intervention, 156 unexpected predefined abnormalities were found (11.6%; p < 0.05), of which 61 (4.8%) in 9.5% of all patients (p < 0.05) led to a change in therapy. The LOS in ICU, readmission rate and ICU, and hospital mortality rate were not influenced by the change in strategy. Conclusions Elimination of daily routine CXRs reduced the number of CXRs in a mixed medical–surgical ICU, while not affecting readmission rate and ICU and hospital mortality rates. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00134-007-0542-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users PMID:17333118

  12. CT staging of colorectal cancer: What do you find in the chest?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQueen, A.S., E-mail: andrewmcqueen7@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Scott, J. [Department of Radiology, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-15

    Aim: To clarify the chest computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with a new diagnosis of colorectal adenocarcinoma. Materials and methods: Patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC) over a 3-year period were retrospectively studied. All CT examinations were performed within a single NHS Trust using the same CT system and protocol. Two primary outcomes were assessed: the presence of pulmonary metastases and the identification of a significant, unexpected chest abnormality. Results: Five hundred and fourteen out of 568 (90.5%) CRC patients underwent complete CT staging. Thirty-one patients (6%) had lung metastases, of which four (0.8%) were isolated. Three hundred and fifty-three (68.7%) had no evidence of pulmonary metastases, but 130 (25.3%) had indeterminate lung nodules (ILNs). The ILNs of 12 patients were subsequently confirmed as metastases on follow-up. A major non-metastatic finding (pulmonary embolism or synchronous primary malignancy) was found in 15/514 patients (3%). Conclusions: Thoracic CT altered the initial TNM stage in fewer than 1% of CRC patients, but the detection of significant incidental chest disease and the establishment of an imaging baseline are useful outcomes of this imaging strategy. One-quarter of all staging examinations demonstrated ILNs.

  13. The Development of Expertise in Radiology: In Chest Radiograph Interpretation, "Expert" Search Pattern May Predate "Expert" Levels of Diagnostic Accuracy for Pneumothorax Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brendan S; Rainford, Louise A; Darcy, Sarah P; Kavanagh, Eoin C; Toomey, Rachel J

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To investigate the development of chest radiograph interpretation skill through medical training by measuring both diagnostic accuracy and eye movements during visual search. Materials and Methods An institutional exemption from full ethical review was granted for the study. Five consultant radiologists were deemed the reference expert group, and four radiology registrars, five senior house officers (SHOs), and six interns formed four clinician groups. Participants were shown 30 chest radiographs, 14 of which had a pneumothorax, and were asked to give their level of confidence as to whether a pneumothorax was present. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was carried out on diagnostic decisions. Eye movements were recorded with a Tobii TX300 (Tobii Technology, Stockholm, Sweden) eye tracker. Four eye-tracking metrics were analyzed. Variables were compared to identify any differences between groups. All data were compared by using the Friedman nonparametric method. Results The average area under the ROC curve for the groups increased with experience (0.947 for consultants, 0.792 for registrars, 0.693 for SHOs, and 0.659 for interns; P = .009). A significant difference in diagnostic accuracy was found between consultants and registrars (P = .046). All four eye-tracking metrics decreased with experience, and there were significant differences between registrars and SHOs. Total reading time decreased with experience; it was significantly lower for registrars compared with SHOs (P = .046) and for SHOs compared with interns (P = .025). Conclusion Chest radiograph interpretation skill increased with experience, both in terms of diagnostic accuracy and visual search. The observed level of experience at which there was a significant difference was higher for diagnostic accuracy than for eye-tracking metrics. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:27322975

  14. Management approach for recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax in consecutive pregnancies based on clinical and radiographic findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixson George R

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To describe management and clinical features observed in a patient's seven spontaneous pneumothoraces that developed during two consecutive pregnancies involving both hemithoraces. Materials and methods A 21 year old former smoker developed three spontaneous left pneumothoraces in the index pregnancy, having already experienced four right pneumothorax events in a prior pregnancy at age 19. Results Chest tubes were required in several (but not all hospitalizations during these two pregnancies. Following her fourth right pneumothorax, thoracoscopic excision of right apical lung blebs and mechanical pleurodesis was performed. The series of left pneumothoraces culminated in mini-thoracotomy and thoracoscopically directed mechanical pleurodesis. For both pregnancies unassisted vaginal delivery was performed with no adverse perinatal sequelae. With the exception of multiple pneumothoraces, there were no additional pregnancy complications. Conclusion Spontaneous pneumothorax in pregnancy is believed to be a rare phenomenon, yet the exact incidence is unknown. Here we present the first known case of multiple spontaneous pneumothoraces in two consecutive pregnancies involving both hemithoraces. Clinical management coordinated with obstetrics and surgical teams facilitated a satisfactory outcome for both pregnancies. The diagnosis of pneumothorax should be contemplated in any pregnant patient with dyspnea and chest pain, followed by radiographic confirmation.

  15. Coal worker's pneumoconiosis: CT assessment in exposed workers and correlation with radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the signs of coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) at computed tomography (CT), the authors obtained thoracic CT scans in 170 coal-dust-exposed workers who were concomitantly evaluated with conventional posteroanterior and lateral radiography. The profusion and extent of disease was assessed by means of CT in two groups of miners: group 1 (n = 86), miners with worker's compensation and radiographic evidence of CWP, and group 2(n = 84), miners who had applied for compensation without radiographic evidence of CWP. The CT signs of CWP consisted of micronodules, nodules, and progressive massive fibrosis. The comparative analysis demonstrates the superiority of an optimal CT technique over chest radiography in the evaluation of simple silicosis, with improved sensitivity in the detection of small parenchymal opacities. CT provides additional information on the stage of the disease but also clarifies some ambiguities of the ILO classification of small opacities. CT was equivalent to radiography for complicated silicosis, except in the identification of necrosis. CT evaluations are complementary to plain radiography in the assessment of CWP, and the addition of high-resolution CT is useful in achieving a more accurate evaluation of the small parenchymal opacities

  16. Pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer on radiological findings: Evaluation of chest CT findings in pathologically proven 76 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate chest CT features of pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung malignancy. We retrospectively reviewed chest CT findings for 76 consecutive patients (21-84 years, average: 63 years; M : F = 30 : 46) who underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure under the suspicion of lung cancer and were pathologically diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis by bronchoscopic biopsy (n = 49), transthoracic needle biopsy (n = 17), and surgical resection (n = 10). We categorized the chest CT patterns of those lesions as follows: bronchial narrowing or obstruction without a central mass like lesion (pattern 1), central mass-like lesion with distal atelectasis or obstructive pneumonia (pattern 2), peripheral nodule or mass including mass-like consolidation (pattern 3), and cavitary lesion (pattern 4). CT findings were reviewed with respect to the patterns and the locations of the lesions, parenchymal abnormalities adjacent to the lesions, the size, the border and pattern of enhancement for the peripheral nodule or mass and the thickness of the cavitary wall in the cavitary lesion. We also evaluated the abnormalities regarding the lymph node and pleura. Pattern 1 was the most common finding (n = 34), followed by pattern 3 (n = 23), pattern 2 (n = 11) and finally, pattern 4 (n = 8). The most frequently involving site in pattern 1 and 2 was the right middle lobe (n = 14/45). However, in pattern 3 and 4, the superior segment of right lower lobe (n = 5/31) was most frequently involved. Ill-defined small nodules and/or larger confluent nodules were found in the adjacent lung and at the other segment of the lung in 31 patients (40.8%). Enlarged lymph nodes were most commonly detected in the right paratracheal area (n = 9/18). Pleural effusion was demonstrated in 10 patients. On the CT, pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer most commonly presented with bronchial narrowing or obstruction without a central mass-like lesion, which resulted in distal atelectasis and obstructive

  17. Radiographic and high resolution CT findings of non-specific interstitial pneumonia/fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the radiographic and high resolution CT findings in fifteen patients with biopsy proven nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. The most common radiographic findings in NSIP were bilateral infiltrates involving alveolar pattern, interstitial pattern, and mixed alveolar-interstitial pattern, which distributed mainly in the middle and lower lung zones. Loss of lung volumes were common. The predominant findings of linear and reticular opacities on HRCT were peribronchovascular interstitial thickening, parenchymal bands, intralobular interstitial thickening, and traction bronchiectasis. Honeycombing was not noted in any patient on initial CT scans. The predominant findings of increased lung opacity were mixed pattern of ground glass opacity and consolidation. Because these findings mimic those of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia, distinction between NSIP and IPF/UIP seems to be difficult by radiographic and HRCT findings. The response to corticosteroid therapy was good. At follow up HRCT, the pulmonary abnormalities observed on initial scans had disappeared or were diminished in most cases. Intralobular interstitial thickening and traction bronchiectasis, that have been considered to be an indicator of irreversible fibrosis, occasionally disappeared after corticosteroid therapy. (author)

  18. Radiographic and high resolution CT findings of non-specific interstitial pneumonia/fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Satoshi [Tosei General Hospital, Seto, Aichi (Japan); Yokoi, Toyoharu; Suzuki, Ryujiro; Noda, Yasunobu; Kato, Toshiyuki; Kaneko, Michie

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the radiographic and high resolution CT findings in fifteen patients with biopsy proven nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. The most common radiographic findings in NSIP were bilateral infiltrates involving alveolar pattern, interstitial pattern, and mixed alveolar-interstitial pattern, which distributed mainly in the middle and lower lung zones. Loss of lung volumes were common. The predominant findings of linear and reticular opacities on HRCT were peribronchovascular interstitial thickening, parenchymal bands, intralobular interstitial thickening, and traction bronchiectasis. Honeycombing was not noted in any patient on initial CT scans. The predominant findings of increased lung opacity were mixed pattern of ground glass opacity and consolidation. Because these findings mimic those of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia, distinction between NSIP and IPF/UIP seems to be difficult by radiographic and HRCT findings. The response to corticosteroid therapy was good. At follow up HRCT, the pulmonary abnormalities observed on initial scans had disappeared or were diminished in most cases. Intralobular interstitial thickening and traction bronchiectasis, that have been considered to be an indicator of irreversible fibrosis, occasionally disappeared after corticosteroid therapy. (author)

  19. Chest Radiographic Features of Acquired Immunological Deficiency Syndrome(AIDS) After Renal Transplantation%肾移植后获得性免疫缺陷综合征 的胸部X线表现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄淑贞; 陈光辉; 吴振沏

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate radiographic features of pneumocystis carinii pneumonia(PCP)or Kaposi sarcoma(KS),which were the most common complications of AIDS after renal transplantation.Methods Radiographic diagnosis and differential diagnosis of 2 cases with PCP and KS comfirmed by pathology were discussed by analysing the chest X-ray findings combined with revieuw of reference literature.Results The two cases with anti-HIV antibody all had mediasinal lymphopathy.In the case of KS,the omental tuber or tubercle shadows and pleural effusion were found on both pulmonary fields.Conclusion No characteristic chest radiographic meanifestations in AIDS,the definitive diagnosis depends on clinical laboratory examination and pathological examination.%目的探讨肾移植术后获得性免疫缺陷综合性(AIDS)最常见并发症卡氏囊虫肺炎(PCP)和Kaposi氏肉瘤(KS)的影像学表现。方法 2例病理证实的PCP和KS均伴有抗HIV抗体阳性,KS伴皮肤红斑。结果 PCP和KS均有肺门纵隔淋巴结肿大,PCP两肺间质性网结斑片及弧立肿块阴影。KS两肺网结,结节状阴影,停用免疫抑制药物症状及肺部阴影很快改善及吸收。结论 AIDS没有特异性肺部影像学表现,确诊有赖临床化验及病理检查。

  20. Comparison of observer performance on soft-copy reading of digital chest radiographs: High resolution liquid-crystal display monitors versus cathode-ray tube monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to compare observer performance for detection of abnormalities on chest radiographs with 5-megapixel resolution liquid-crystal displays (LCD) and 5-megapixel resolution cathode-ray tube (CRT) monitors under bright and subdued ambient light conditions. Six radiologists reviewed a total of 254 digital chest radiographs under four different conditions with a combination of two types of monitors (a 5-megapixel resolution LCD and a 5-megapixel resolution CRT monitor) and with two types of ambient light (460 and 50 lux). The abnormalities analyzed were nodules, pneumothorax and interstitial lung disease. For each reader, the detection performance using 5-megapixel LCD and 5-megapixel CRT monitors under bright and subdued ambient light conditions were compared using multi-case and multi-modality ROC analysis. For each type of ambient light, the average detection performance with the two types of monitors was also compared. For each reader, the observer performance of 5-megapixel LCD and 5-megapixel CRT monitors, under both bright and subdued ambient light conditions, showed no significant statistical differences for detecting nodules, pneumothorax and interstitial lung disease. In addition, there was no significant statistical difference in the average performance when the two monitor displays, under both bright and subdued ambient light conditions, were compared

  1. The utility of digital subtraction chest radiographs as the detector for the early radiation pneumonitis in breast cancer patients treated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of radiation pneumonitis was reported 1-5% in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy. Early breast cancer has a better prognosis than other cancers, so the patients are expected to have a long disease-free survival. Radiation oncologists should have sensitive detectability for the early and asymptomatic radiation pneumonitis. I investigated prospectively the utility of digital subtraction chest radiography as a detector for radiation pneumonitis. Sixteen women with breast cancer treated by radiotherapy developed radiation pneumonitis between 1994 and 1998 at our university hospital. I analyzed the risk factors for radiation pneumonitis in these patients and compared them with the control group consisting of 50 cases of breast cancer not having radiation pneumonitis. These patients were classified 5 grades in term of the late toxic and radiological signs. The first grade indicated undetectable faint shadow on chest radiographs and the 5th grade demonstrated severe radiation pneumonitis indicated for medication. I performed subtraction of pre-radiotherapy images from radiographs demonstrating radiation pneumonitis. With the digital subtraction technique, I could detect the shadow as faint as the second grade. I concluded that the subtraction technique would be a feasible modality for examination of patients receiving radiotherapy for breast cancer. (author)

  2. Extrapleural hematoma as an unexpected finding on a follow-up chest X-ray after coronary surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present two cases of an extrapleural hematoma, on a follow-up chest X-ray after coronary artery bypass surgery using an internal mammary artery (IMA). In both cases, the finding was disclosed on a routine chest film obtained 1 month post-operatively, in a patient who was either asymptomatic or had nonspecific symptoms. Follow-up chest films showed spontaneous resolution in both patients. We emphasize the recognition and significance of such a self-limited post-operative radiological finding

  3. HRCT findings of disseminated small nodular shadow in plain chest x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) was done in 22 cases of disseminated small nodular shadow from plain chest X-ray, which was included in metastatic lesion, Miliary tuberculosis, pneumoconiosis etc. and following results were obtained. Most of metastatic nodule (n=8) showed more than 1.5mm in diameter and the margin of nodule was discrete (n=8) and many cases (n=8) were associated with thickened bronchovascular sheath or interlobular septum and hilar and mediastinal lymphnode enlargement (n=6). One case turned out to be not true nodule in HRCT but revealed thickened interlobular septum and bronchovascular bundles. All cases of miliary tuberculosis (n=8) showed even sized, well marginate and less than 3mm in diameter of nodule without evidence of thickening of bronchovascular bundle or interlobular septum. Ease cases of pneumoconiosis, histiocytosis X, diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) showed ill defined nodule and associate finding of DPB was peripheral bronchioloectasis. HRCT is useful method to exact evaluation of nodular lesion and find out associate findings for differential diagnosis of disseminate small nodular shadow in plain chest X-rays

  4. Sonographic and radiographic imaging features of the neonate with necrotizing enterocolitis: correlating findings with outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdominal radiography is the reference standard in imaging neonates with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC); however, ultrasound of the abdomen including bowel may be of value in this setting. To correlate sonographic and radiographic findings with patient outcomes in NEC. We reviewed sonographic and radiographic exams, as well as clinical, pathological and laboratory records. Ultrasound images were reviewed for free intraperitoneal gas, peritoneal fluid, pneumatosis intestinalis, portal gas, bowel vascularity, bowel wall thickness and echogenicity, peristalsis and the presence of dilated bowel with anechoic contents. Contemporaneously acquired radiographs were reviewed for intraperitoneal gas, pneumatosis intestinalis, portal gas, the sentinel loop sign and gas pattern. Patients were categorized into two groups based on clinical outcome. Forty-four neonates receiving 55 sonograms were included. Focal fluid collections, echogenic free fluid, increased bowel wall echogenicity and increased bowel wall thickness were statistically significant in predicting an unfavorable outcome. Other features approached significance in predicting poor outcomes: free peritoneal gas, pneumatosis intestinalis, aperistalsis, bowel wall thinning and absent bowel perfusion. Anechoic free peritoneal fluid predicted a good outcome. The sentinel loop sign on radiographs predicted an unfavorable outcome. Abdominal sonography and radiography in patients with NEC can help prognosticate the outcome. (orig.)

  5. Sonographic and radiographic imaging features of the neonate with necrotizing enterocolitis: correlating findings with outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchantef, Karl [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); McGill University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Montreal Children' s Hospital, Montreal (Canada); Epelman, Monica [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Orlando, FL (United States); Darge, Kassa; Anupindi, Sudha A. [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kirpalani, Haresh [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Division of Neonatology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Laje, Pablo [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Surgery, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Abdominal radiography is the reference standard in imaging neonates with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC); however, ultrasound of the abdomen including bowel may be of value in this setting. To correlate sonographic and radiographic findings with patient outcomes in NEC. We reviewed sonographic and radiographic exams, as well as clinical, pathological and laboratory records. Ultrasound images were reviewed for free intraperitoneal gas, peritoneal fluid, pneumatosis intestinalis, portal gas, bowel vascularity, bowel wall thickness and echogenicity, peristalsis and the presence of dilated bowel with anechoic contents. Contemporaneously acquired radiographs were reviewed for intraperitoneal gas, pneumatosis intestinalis, portal gas, the sentinel loop sign and gas pattern. Patients were categorized into two groups based on clinical outcome. Forty-four neonates receiving 55 sonograms were included. Focal fluid collections, echogenic free fluid, increased bowel wall echogenicity and increased bowel wall thickness were statistically significant in predicting an unfavorable outcome. Other features approached significance in predicting poor outcomes: free peritoneal gas, pneumatosis intestinalis, aperistalsis, bowel wall thinning and absent bowel perfusion. Anechoic free peritoneal fluid predicted a good outcome. The sentinel loop sign on radiographs predicted an unfavorable outcome. Abdominal sonography and radiography in patients with NEC can help prognosticate the outcome. (orig.)

  6. Radiographic findings of systemic lupus erythematosus enteritis (a report of 4 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the radiographic findings and diagnosis in lupus enteritis. Methods: 4 cases of lupus enteritis (male 1, female 3) were studied. Abdominal pain was the chief complaint in all these cases. Before and after steroid therapy, small bowel contrast study was performed. Results: In one patient abdominal plain film revealed slight dilatation of jejunum with air-fluid levels. Small bowel contrast study showed effacement and (or) nodules of the mucosal folds, thumb printing, spasm and some degree of rigidity and narrowing of the lumen. Clinical symptoms and radiographic findings became normal after steroid therapy. Conclusions: If a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus presents abdominal symptoms, small bowel contrast study should be done. It is important and helpful to assist the diagnosis, to decide therapeutic plan and to follow up the effect of treatment

  7. Radiographic findings of degeneration in cervical spines of middle-aged soccer players

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twelve amateur veteran soccer players (average age 40.1 ± 5.4 years), who began playing in their teens and who were admitted with symptoms most likely to be related to cervical spondylosis, were examined by cervical radiography. Abnormal radiographic findings included: calcification of anterior longitudinal ligament (25%), anterior (75%) and posterior vertebral spurs (75%), ossicle between spinous processes (75%), calcification of nuchal ligament (Barsony) (58%), ossicle on spinous process (25%), and bony spur of Luschka's joints (83%). It was shown in the stress distribution by finite element method analysis that the stress in heading the ball was applied mainly to the lower parts of the cervical spine. The results of this analysis also corresponded well with some of the radiographic findings. (orig.)

  8. Genetic correlations between performance traits and radiographic findings in the limbs of German Warmblood riding horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, K F; Distl, O

    2007-01-01

    Results of mare performance tests in the field (MPT-F) of 10,949 mares, mare performance tests at station (MPT-S) of 1,712 mares, and inspections of horses intended for sale at riding horse auctions (AU) of 4,772 horses were used to investigate genetic correlations between corresponding performance traits. Mare performance tests were held in 1995 to 2004 and auction inspections in 1999 to 2004. Scores on a scale from 0 to 10 were given for gaits under rider (walk, trot, canter), rideability (evaluated by judging commission and test rider), free-jumping (ability, style, total), and character. Radiography results of 5,102 Hanoverian Warmblood horses were used to investigate genetic correlations between performance traits and particular radiographic findings. The radiographic findings included osseous fragments in fetlock and hock joints, deforming arthropathy in hock joints, and distinct radiographic findings in the navicular bones, which were analyzed as binary traits, and radiographic appearance of the navicular bones, which was analyzed as a quasi-linear trait. Genetic parameters were estimated multivariately in linear animal models with REML using information on the horses radiographed and their contemporaries (n = 18,609). Heritability of performance traits ranged between 0.14 and 0.61, and heritability of radiographic findings between 0.14 and 0.33. Additive genetic correlations between corresponding performance traits were close to unity for MPT-F and MPT-S, ranged from 0.81 to 0.90 for MPT-F and AU, and were 0.75 to 0.92 for MPT-S and AU. Genetic correlations between performance and radiography results were mostly close to zero. Indications of negative additive genetic correlations were observed for deforming arthropathy in hock joints and canter, rideability evaluated by test rider, jumping traits and character, and osseous fragments in hock joints and character. Selection of horses for radiological health of their limbs will assist further genetic

  9. Pneumothorax in the Supine Patient: Subtle Radiographic Signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rierson, Davis; Bueno, Juliana

    2016-07-01

    Routine posteroanterior chest radiographs and computed tomography scans are more sensitive for detecting pneumothoraces than anteroposterior chest radiographs. However, supine chest radiographs are commonly performed as part of the initial and routine assessment of trauma and critically ill patients. Rates of occult pneumothorax can be as high as 50% and have a significant impact in the mortality of these patients; thus, a prompt diagnosis of this entity is important. This pictorial essay will illustrate the pleural anatomy, explain the distribution of air within the pleural space in the supine position, and review the radiologic findings that characterize this entity. PMID:27105051

  10. Genetic correlations between conformation traits and radiographic findings in the limbs of German Warmblood riding horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Distl Ottmar

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Studbook inspection (SBI data of 20 768 German Warmblood mares and radiography results (RR data of 5102 Hanoverian Warmblood horses were used for genetic correlation analyses. The scores on a scale from 0 to 10 were given for conformation and basic quality of gaits, resulting in 14 SBI traits which were used for the correlation analyses. The radiographic findings considered included osseous fragments in fetlock (OFF and hock joints (OFH, deforming arthropathy in hock joints (DAH and distinct radiographic findings in the navicular bones (DNB which were analyzed as binary traits, and radiographic appearance of the navicular bones (RNB which was analyzed as a quasi-linear trait. Genetic parameters were estimated multivariately in linear animal models with REML using information on 24 448 horses with SBI and/or RR records. The ranges of heritability estimates were h2 = 0.14–0.34 for the RR traits and h2 = 0.09–0.50 for the SBI traits. Negative additive genetic correlations of rg = -0.19 to -0.56 were estimated between OFF and conformation of front and hind limbs and walk at hand, and between DNB and hind limb conformation. There were indications of negative additive genetic correlations between DAH and all SBI traits, but because of low prevalence and low heritability of DAH, these results require further scrutiny. Positive additive genetic correlations of rg = 0.37–0.52 were estimated between OFF and withers height and between OFH and withers height, indicating that selection for taller horses will increase disposition to develop OFF and OFH. Selection of broodmares with regards to functional conformation will assist, but cannot replace possible selection against radiographic findings in the limbs of young Warmblood riding horses, particularly with regards to OFF.

  11. Genetic correlations between conformation traits and radiographic findings in the limbs of German Warmblood riding horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Kathrin Friederike; Distl, Ottmar

    2006-01-01

    Studbook inspection (SBI) data of 20 768 German Warmblood mares and radiography results (RR) data of 5102 Hanoverian Warmblood horses were used for genetic correlation analyses. The scores on a scale from 0 to 10 were given for conformation and basic quality of gaits, resulting in 14 SBI traits which were used for the correlation analyses. The radiographic findings considered included osseous fragments in fetlock (OFF) and hock joints (OFH), deforming arthropathy in hock joints (DAH) and distinct radiographic findings in the navicular bones (DNB) which were analyzed as binary traits, and radiographic appearance of the navicular bones (RNB) which was analyzed as a quasi-linear trait. Genetic parameters were estimated multivariately in linear animal models with REML using information on 24 448 horses with SBI and/or RR records. The ranges of heritability estimates were h2 = 0.14-0.34 for the RR traits and h2 = 0.09-0.50 for the SBI traits. Negative additive genetic correlations of r(g) = -0.19 to -0.56 were estimated between OFF and conformation of front and hind limbs and walk at hand, and between DNB and hind limb conformation. There were indications of negative additive genetic correlations between DAH and all SBI traits, but because of low prevalence and low heritability of DAH, these results require further scrutiny. Positive additive genetic correlations of r(g) = 0.37-0.52 were estimated between OFF and withers height and between OFH and withers height, indicating that selection for taller horses will increase disposition to develop OFF and OFH. Selection of broodmares with regards to functional conformation will assist, but cannot replace possible selection against radiographic findings in the limbs of young Warmblood riding horses, particularly with regards to OFF. PMID:17129565

  12. Chest CT findings in patients with non-cardiovascular causes of chest pain: Focusing on pulmonary tuberculosis in a tuberculosis endemic country

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Won; Shim, Sung Shine; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Ryu, Yon Ju [Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To review the common causes of non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) according to the location and lesion type as seen on chest CT, and to evaluate CT findings in tuberculosis (TB) as a cause of NCCP. In the period 2009 to 2012, patients having NCCP without definitive evidence of acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary thromboembolism, and aortic dissection, were included. In total, 162 patients (60.5% male; 39.5% female), with a mean age of 51 years, were enrolled. CT images were evaluated by location and lesion type, for causes of NCCP. Chest CT revealed that the most common location for the cause of NCCP was the pleura (45.1%), followed by the subpleural lung parenchyma (30.2%). The most common lesion causing NCCP was TB (33.3%), followed by pneumonia (19.1%). Of the 54 TB cases, 40 (74.1%) were stable TB and 14 (25.9%) were active TB; among these 54 patients, NCCP was most commonly the result of fibrotic pleural thickening (55.6%), followed by subpleural stable pulmonary TB (14.8%). Results of chest CT revealed that TB was a major cause of NCCP in a TB endemic area. Among the TB patients, fibrotic pleural thickening in patients with stable TB was the most common cause of NCCP.

  13. Chest CT findings in patients with non-cardiovascular causes of chest pain: Focusing on pulmonary tuberculosis in a tuberculosis endemic country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To review the common causes of non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) according to the location and lesion type as seen on chest CT, and to evaluate CT findings in tuberculosis (TB) as a cause of NCCP. In the period 2009 to 2012, patients having NCCP without definitive evidence of acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary thromboembolism, and aortic dissection, were included. In total, 162 patients (60.5% male; 39.5% female), with a mean age of 51 years, were enrolled. CT images were evaluated by location and lesion type, for causes of NCCP. Chest CT revealed that the most common location for the cause of NCCP was the pleura (45.1%), followed by the subpleural lung parenchyma (30.2%). The most common lesion causing NCCP was TB (33.3%), followed by pneumonia (19.1%). Of the 54 TB cases, 40 (74.1%) were stable TB and 14 (25.9%) were active TB; among these 54 patients, NCCP was most commonly the result of fibrotic pleural thickening (55.6%), followed by subpleural stable pulmonary TB (14.8%). Results of chest CT revealed that TB was a major cause of NCCP in a TB endemic area. Among the TB patients, fibrotic pleural thickening in patients with stable TB was the most common cause of NCCP

  14. Terminal phalangeal accessory ossification center of the thumb: an additional radiographic finding in Larsen syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen syndrome is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by multiple joint dislocations, vertebral anomalies and dysmorphic facies. Both autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive forms of the disorder have been proposed. Individuals with autosomal-dominant Larsen syndrome have characteristic ''cylindrical-shape'' thumbs caused by broad, shortened phalanges. Autosomal-dominant Larsen syndrome results from heterozygosity for mutations in filamin B, a cytoskeletal protein involved in multicellular processes. We report here a patient with a duplicated or accessory distal thumb phalanx and multiple large joint dislocations who was shown to be heterozygous for a filamin B mutation predicting the amino acid substitution G1691S. This adds a new radiographic finding, duplicated or accessory distal phalanx, to the radiographic abnormalities seen in this rare dominant disorder. (orig.)

  15. Chest X-ray findings in the acute phase of Kawasaki disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reviewed the chest X-ray (CXR) findings and clinical courses of 129 patients with Kawasaki disease and found abnormal CXR findings in 14.7% of the patients. Reticulogranular pattern was the most frequent abnormality (89.5%), while peribronchial cuffing (21.1%), pleural effusion (15.8%), atelectasis (10.5%) and air trapping (5.3%) were also seen. In each of these patients, CXR abnormalities appeared within 10 days after the onset of illness. In the group with abnormal CXR findings, a statistically significant increase was noted in duration of fever, incidence of adventitious sounds, serum CPR levels and incidence of coronary arterial lesions and pericardial effusion, as compared with the group having normal CXR findings. The pathological basis of these CXR changes is not clear, since no biopsy or autopsy specimen was obtained from these patients. Since none of these patients showed definite heart failure, it is difficult to consider that abnormal CXR findings were due to heart failure. On the other hand, physical signs and previous pathological reports suggested that the causes of abnormal CXR findings were lower respiratory tract inflammation and/or pulmonary arteritis. (orig.)

  16. Clear cell chondrosarcoma: radiographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance findings in 34 patients with pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Mark S.; Koyama, Takashi; Swee, Ronald G.; Inwards, Carrie Y. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, MN 55905, Rochester (United States)

    2003-12-01

    To describe the radiographic features of clear cell chondrosarcoma (CCCS), including the computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) findings, and to correlate them with the histopathologic findings. A retrospective review was carried out of 72 patients with histopathologically confirmed CCCS. Imaging studies were available for 34 patients: conventional radiographs (n=28), CT scans (n=14), and MR images (n=15). Radiographic studies were reviewed by three radiologists who rendered a consensus opinion; the studies were correlated with the histopathologic findings. Of the 34 patients with imaging studies, 30 were male and 4 were female (mean age 38.6 years; range 11-74 years). Twenty-two lesions were in long bones (15, proximal femur; 1, distal femur; 1, proximal tibia; 5, proximal humerus) and 11 were in flat bones (5, vertebra; 4, rib; 1, scapula; 1, innominate). One lesion occurred in the tarsal navicular bone. Typically, long bone lesions were located in the epimetaphysis (19/22) and were lucent with a well-defined sclerotic margin and no cortical destruction or periosteal new bone formation. More than one-third of the long bone lesions contained matrix mineralization with a characteristic chondroid appearance. Pathologic fractures were present in six long bone lesions (4, humerus; 2, femur). Lesions in the proximal humerus were more likely to have indistinct margins (4/5) and extend into the diaphysis. Flat bone lesions were typically lytic and expansile and occasionally demonstrated areas of cortical disruption. Typically, matrix mineralization, when present, was amorphous. MR imaging, when available, was superior to conventional radiographs for demonstrating the intramedullary extent of a lesion as well as soft tissue extension. CT images better delineated the presence of cortical destruction and the character of matrix mineralization patterns. CCCS lesions were typically low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and moderately or significantly

  17. Clear cell chondrosarcoma: radiographic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance findings in 34 patients with pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the radiographic features of clear cell chondrosarcoma (CCCS), including the computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) findings, and to correlate them with the histopathologic findings. A retrospective review was carried out of 72 patients with histopathologically confirmed CCCS. Imaging studies were available for 34 patients: conventional radiographs (n=28), CT scans (n=14), and MR images (n=15). Radiographic studies were reviewed by three radiologists who rendered a consensus opinion; the studies were correlated with the histopathologic findings. Of the 34 patients with imaging studies, 30 were male and 4 were female (mean age 38.6 years; range 11-74 years). Twenty-two lesions were in long bones (15, proximal femur; 1, distal femur; 1, proximal tibia; 5, proximal humerus) and 11 were in flat bones (5, vertebra; 4, rib; 1, scapula; 1, innominate). One lesion occurred in the tarsal navicular bone. Typically, long bone lesions were located in the epimetaphysis (19/22) and were lucent with a well-defined sclerotic margin and no cortical destruction or periosteal new bone formation. More than one-third of the long bone lesions contained matrix mineralization with a characteristic chondroid appearance. Pathologic fractures were present in six long bone lesions (4, humerus; 2, femur). Lesions in the proximal humerus were more likely to have indistinct margins (4/5) and extend into the diaphysis. Flat bone lesions were typically lytic and expansile and occasionally demonstrated areas of cortical disruption. Typically, matrix mineralization, when present, was amorphous. MR imaging, when available, was superior to conventional radiographs for demonstrating the intramedullary extent of a lesion as well as soft tissue extension. CT images better delineated the presence of cortical destruction and the character of matrix mineralization patterns. CCCS lesions were typically low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and moderately or significantly

  18. The paediatric wrist revisited - findings of bony depressions in healthy children on radiographs compared to MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avenarius, Derk M.F.; Eldevik, Petter [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Owens, Catherine M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); University College London, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Rosendahl, Karen [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    The presence of erosions is used for diagnosis and monitoring of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Assessment of carpal bone erosions in children is challenging due to lack of normal references. To define normal appearances of bony depressions in the wrist on radiographs and MRI. MRI and radiography of the wrist were performed in 88 healthy children, 5-15 years of age. We assessed the number of bony depressions within the carpals/proximal metacarpals on both modalities, separately and combined. A total of 75 carpal depressions were identified on radiography compared to 715 on MRI. The number of bony depressions identified radiographically showed no statistically significant difference across age-groups. Within the metacarpals, there was no significant difference between bony depressions identified by MRI or radiography, except at the bases of the second metacarpal. Bony depressions that resemble erosions are normal findings in the wrist in children. MRI identifies more depressions than radiographs in the carpus. Some bony depressions occur at typical locations and should be accounted for when assessing the wrist in JIA to avoid overstaging. (orig.)

  19. The paediatric wrist revisited - findings of bony depressions in healthy children on radiographs compared to MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of erosions is used for diagnosis and monitoring of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Assessment of carpal bone erosions in children is challenging due to lack of normal references. To define normal appearances of bony depressions in the wrist on radiographs and MRI. MRI and radiography of the wrist were performed in 88 healthy children, 5-15 years of age. We assessed the number of bony depressions within the carpals/proximal metacarpals on both modalities, separately and combined. A total of 75 carpal depressions were identified on radiography compared to 715 on MRI. The number of bony depressions identified radiographically showed no statistically significant difference across age-groups. Within the metacarpals, there was no significant difference between bony depressions identified by MRI or radiography, except at the bases of the second metacarpal. Bony depressions that resemble erosions are normal findings in the wrist in children. MRI identifies more depressions than radiographs in the carpus. Some bony depressions occur at typical locations and should be accounted for when assessing the wrist in JIA to avoid overstaging. (orig.)

  20. Radiographic findings in cats with intranasal neoplasia or chronic rhinitis: 29 cases (1982-1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare radiographic findings and determine useful criteria to differentiate between intranasal neoplasia and chronic rhinitis in cats. Design: Retrospective study. Animals: Cats with chronic nasal disease caused by neoplasia (n = 18) or by chronic rhinitis (n = 11). Procedure: Radiographs were reviewed by 3 radiologists, followed by group review. Diagnosis was determined by intranasal biopsy or necropsy, and specimens were reviewed by a pathologist to confirm cause and histologic diagnosis. Results: Lymphosarcoma was the most common (n = 5) of the 6 histopathologic types in the neoplasia group. Cats in the neoplasia and chronic rhinitis groups had a high prevalence of aggressive radiographic lesions. Prevalence of a facial mass in cats with neoplasia (8/18) versus in those with chronic rhinitis (4/11) and of deviation (9/18 vs 6/11, respectively) or lysis (12/18 vs 7/11) of the nasal septum was similar. However, significantly (P = 0.02) more cats with neoplasia than with chronic rhinitis (13/16 vs 3/7, respectively) had unilateral turbinate destruction/lysis. Additionally, unilateral lateral bone erosion and loss of teeth associated with adjacent intranasal disease were more prevalent in cats with neoplasia (7/8 and 5/18, respectively) than in cats with chronic rhinitis (1/3 and 0/11, respectively). Clinical Implications: Features that may assist in radiographic diagnosis of neoplasia include the appearance of unilateral aggressive lesions, such as lysis of lateral bones, nasal turbinate destruction, and loss of teeth. Bilaterally symmetric lesions are more suggestive of chronic rhinitis than of neoplasia

  1. Pulmonary tuberculosis in five young infants with nursery exposure: clinical, radiographic and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical, radiographic (n = 5) and CT findings (n = 4) of five Korean infants ranging in age from 2 to 3 months with confirmed tuberculosis were retrospectively analysed. All of the patients were symptomatic, anergic to tuberculin, and had a positive culture of Myobacterium tuberculosis in gastric aspirates. The probable source of infection was the hospital in which they were born. CT scans demonstrated hilar and mediastinal lymph node enlargement with central low attenuation and peripheral enhancement in all cases. CT may be useful in diagnosis by demonstrating characteristic adenopathy and disseminated disease in young infants. (orig.)

  2. Chest Imaging Findings in Hospitalized Children with H1N1 Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgi Pekcan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim was to review the radiological findings and to find new prognostic factors that determine the need for pediatric intensive care unit (PICU in children with swine-origin influenza (H1N1 virus infection. Methods: Chest X-ray (CXR and computed tomography (CT findings of 18 children with laboratory-confirmed H1N1 infection (9 boys, 9 girls with a median age of 34 (1–216 months were retrospectively evaluated. Results: CXRs were performed in 15 (83.3% and thorax CT in 7 (38.8% children. Abnormal findings were detected in 60% of the patients who underwent CXR and 85.7% of the patients who underwent thorax CT. Radiological findings were mostly diffuse, bilateral, and asymmetric. Ground-glass opacity (GGO (66.6% was the leading abnormality and was followed by reticulation (38.8%, nodules (27.7%, consolidation only (16.6%, tree-in-bud pattern (11.1%, consolidation with GGO (5.5%, and septal lines (5.5%. Lymphadenopathy (22.2%, air trapping (5.5%, and parenchymal band (5.5% were other recorded findings. CXR was found to be insufficient to detect subpleural nodules, lymphadenopathies, and sometimes GGO. Only existence of nodules (p=0.04 affected the need for PICU admission. Conclusion: The most common radiological findings in children with H1N1 infection were bilateral, asymmetric GGO with or without associated multifocal areas of consolidation. CXR was insufficient to detect subpleural nodules, lymphadenopathies, and sometimes GGO. The existence of nodules is a bad prognostic factor in determining the need for PICU admission.

  3. Pulmonary diseases of the infants weighing under 1500 grams at birth: clinical and radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the introduction of the intensive perinatal care, the survival rate of the infants weighing less than 1500 gm at birth has improved substantially. However, pulmonary diseases remain to be the major causes of the high mortality of these low birthweight infants. In order to systematically assess an epidemiologic distribution of the pulmonary diseases in these very low weight prematures, we have analyzed the chest x-rays of 102 infants weighing less than 1500 gm. These consisted of 30 with extreme low birth weight (ELBW) weighing less than 1000 gm and 72 with very low birth weight (VLBW) weighing 1001 - 1500 gm. The survival rate of ELBW and VLBW was 10% and 49%, respectively. Seventy of 102 infants had abnormal findings in the chest x-ray. Forty-eight had idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome (IRDS), 8 immature lung, 6 Wilson-Mikity syndrome, 4 pneumonia, 2 pulmonary hemorrhage, 1 congenital heart disease, and 1 suspicious Pierre-Robin syndrome. Seven out of 48 infants with IRDS had persistent ductus arteriosus, and in only 2(30%) of 7 cases were alive. Endotracheal intubation and assisted ventilation application for the treatment of IRDS resulted in pulmonary interstitial emphysema in 4 infants and pneumothorax and / or pneumomediastinum in 4 infants. Displacement of endotracheal intubation showed lobar and / or unilateral lung atelectasis in 8 infants and a case of accidental dislodgement of intubation tube into the esophagus resulted in air esophagogram and worsened lung aeration. In spite of the development of many sophisticated methods of diagnostic radiology, the chest x-ray was still the most valuable yet simple way of evaluating the pulmonary problems in these extreme and very low birth weight prematures

  4. Chest pain related to crack cocaine smoking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chest radiographs of 80 patients coming to emergency room because of chest pain and/or shortness of breath following the smoking of highly potent crack cocaine were retrospectively reviewed. Four showed intrathoracic free air (pneumomediastinum in two, hemopneumothorax in one, and pneumothorax in one). Four other patients showed subsegmental atelectasis or parenchymal infiltrate. Radiographic detection of these abnormalities was of importance in the clinical management of the patients. This spectrum of findings is presented with a discussion of the pathophysiologic mechanisms and other potential complications of this form of drug abuse

  5. Clinical, radiographic and MRI findings of the temporomandibular joint in patients with different rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenius, L M J; Tervahartiala, P; Helenius, I; Al-Sukhun, J; Kivisaari, L; Suuronen, R; Kautiainen, H; Hallikainen, D; Lindqvist, C; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the condition of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with different rheumatic diseases, and report correlations between the clinical, radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. The 67 patients were divided into four groups: 16 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 15 with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), 18 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and 18 with spondyloarthropathy (SPA). They were clinically examined, and panoramic tomography, lateral panoramic radiography and MRI of the TMJ were performed. MRI showed reduced articular cartilage in 25% (4/16) of RA, 0% (0/15) of MCTD, 17% (3/18) of AS and 17% (3/18) of SPA patients. Condylar changes included erosion, osteophytes and abnormal shape. Disc alterations included perforation, abnormal anterior position and decreased movement. These abnormalities were most frequent in RA patients, and least frequent in MCTD and SPA patients. Crepitation and reduced maximum opening of the mouth correlated with abnormalities of the disc and articular cartilage as shown by MRI. Severe condylar erosion in panoramic tomograms significantly correlated with MRI findings of condylar erosion (Pjaw often indicated structural damage to the TMJ. Panoramic radiographs provide an alternative method to MRI but, to obtain a more detailed anatomic picture, MRI is recommended for patients with acute unexplained pain or as part of preoperative work up. A panoramic recording is not indicated when MRI is planned. PMID:17052893

  6. Radiographic appearance of the feet of mammoth donkeys and the finding of subclinical laminitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All feet of 10 clinically sound mammoth donkeys (Group I) were radiographed to determine the appearance of the distal phalanx. The distal phalanges had blunted to concave-shaped dorsal solar margins which varied in appearance from slight to pronounced. The distal phalanges of the forefeet were wider than those of the hindfeet, and also were positioned a greater distance from the dorsal aspect of the hoof wall. The greater distance between the dorsal aspect of the hoof wall and the distal phalanges seemed related to the presence of a periosteal-like bony proliferation on the dorsum of the distal phalanx. This bony proliferation occurred in those distal phalanges which also had radiographic findings consistent with pedal osteitis. Next, all feet of 5 additional mammoth donkeys (Group II) that were to be necropsied for various reasons, were examined similarly to Group I, necropsied and found to have laminitis. Only 2 of these 5 donkeys had been lame; only one had rotation of the distal phalanges (in the forefeet). Radiographic data from the 4 donkeys without rotation seemed most similar to that found in those Group I donkeys which had periosteal reactions on their distal phalanges. Conclusions from this study were that: 1) feet of mammoth donkeys have some anatomic differences from those of domestic horses, 2) subclinical laminitis and pedal osteitis can occur in mammoth donkeys, 3) rotation of the distal phalanx occurs in some, but not all laminitic donkeys, 4) laminitic changes may be more pronounced in their fore than in their hindfeet, and 5) additional studies of donkeys need to be done, examining both proven normal and confirmed laminitic feet

  7. Paired maximum inspiratory and expiratory plain chest radiographs for assessment of airflow limitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Takashi, E-mail: tkino@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Kawayama, Tomotaka, E-mail: kawayama_tomotaka@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Imamura, Youhei, E-mail: mamura_youhei@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Sakazaki, Yuki, E-mail: sakazaki@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Hirai, Ryo, E-mail: hirai_ryou@kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Ishii, Hidenobu, E-mail: shii_hidenobu@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Suetomo, Masashi, E-mail: jin_t_f_c@yahoo.co.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Matsunaga, Kazuko, E-mail: kmatsunaga@kouhoukai.or.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Azuma, Koichi, E-mail: azuma@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Fujimoto, Kiminori, E-mail: kimichan@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Hoshino, Tomoaki, E-mail: hoshino@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •It is often to use computed tomography (CT) scan for diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. •CT scan is more expensive and higher. •A plane chest radiography more simple and cheap. Moreover, it is useful as detection of pulmonary emphysema, but not airflow limitation. •Our study demonstrated that the maximum inspiratory and expiratory plane chest radiography technique could detect severe airflow limitations. •We believe that the technique is helpful to diagnose the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. -- Abstract: Background: The usefulness of paired maximum inspiratory and expiratory (I/E) plain chest radiography (pCR) for diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is still unclear. Objectives: We examined whether measurement of the I/E ratio using paired I/E pCR could be used for detection of airflow limitation in patients with COPD. Methods: Eighty patients with COPD (GOLD stage I = 23, stage II = 32, stage III = 15, stage IV = 10) and 34 control subjects were enrolled. The I/E ratios of frontal and lateral lung areas, and lung distance between the apex and base on pCR views were analyzed quantitatively. Pulmonary function parameters were measured at the same time. Results: The I/E ratios for the frontal lung area (1.25 ± 0.01), the lateral lung area (1.29 ± 0.01), and the lung distance (1.18 ± 0.01) were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in COPD patients compared with controls (1.31 ± 0.02 and 1.38 ± 0.02, and 1.22 ± 0.01, respectively). The I/E ratios in frontal and lateral areas, and lung distance were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in severe (GOLD stage III) and very severe (GOLD stage IV) COPD as compared to control subjects, although the I/E ratios did not differ significantly between severe and very severe COPD. Moreover, the I/E ratios were significantly correlated with pulmonary function parameters. Conclusions: Measurement of I/E ratios on paired I/E pCR is simple and

  8. Paired maximum inspiratory and expiratory plain chest radiographs for assessment of airflow limitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •It is often to use computed tomography (CT) scan for diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. •CT scan is more expensive and higher. •A plane chest radiography more simple and cheap. Moreover, it is useful as detection of pulmonary emphysema, but not airflow limitation. •Our study demonstrated that the maximum inspiratory and expiratory plane chest radiography technique could detect severe airflow limitations. •We believe that the technique is helpful to diagnose the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. -- Abstract: Background: The usefulness of paired maximum inspiratory and expiratory (I/E) plain chest radiography (pCR) for diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is still unclear. Objectives: We examined whether measurement of the I/E ratio using paired I/E pCR could be used for detection of airflow limitation in patients with COPD. Methods: Eighty patients with COPD (GOLD stage I = 23, stage II = 32, stage III = 15, stage IV = 10) and 34 control subjects were enrolled. The I/E ratios of frontal and lateral lung areas, and lung distance between the apex and base on pCR views were analyzed quantitatively. Pulmonary function parameters were measured at the same time. Results: The I/E ratios for the frontal lung area (1.25 ± 0.01), the lateral lung area (1.29 ± 0.01), and the lung distance (1.18 ± 0.01) were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in COPD patients compared with controls (1.31 ± 0.02 and 1.38 ± 0.02, and 1.22 ± 0.01, respectively). The I/E ratios in frontal and lateral areas, and lung distance were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in severe (GOLD stage III) and very severe (GOLD stage IV) COPD as compared to control subjects, although the I/E ratios did not differ significantly between severe and very severe COPD. Moreover, the I/E ratios were significantly correlated with pulmonary function parameters. Conclusions: Measurement of I/E ratios on paired I/E pCR is simple and

  9. Diagnostic Accuracy of Computer-Aided Detection of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Chest Radiographs: A Validation Study from Sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Breuninger, M.; van Ginneken, B.; R. H. H. M. Philipsen; Mhimbira, F.; Hella, J.J.; Lwilla, F.; Hombergh, J. van den; Ross, A.; Jugheli, L.; Wagner, D; Reither, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chest radiography to diagnose and screen for pulmonary tuberculosis has limitations, especially due to inter-reader variability. Automating the interpretation has the potential to overcome this drawback and to deliver objective and reproducible results. The CAD4TB software is a computer-aided detection system that has shown promising preliminary findings. Evaluation studies in different settings are needed to assess diagnostic accuracy and practicability of use. Methods CAD4TB was ...

  10. Swine-origin influenza A viral (H1N1) infection in children. Chest computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to review the chest computed tomography (CT) findings in children with swine-origin influenza (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection. The radiologists retrospectively reviewed chest CT findings in 12 children with S-OIV infection and recorded the following findings: ground-glass opacities (GGO), consolidation, nodules, reticular opacities, peribronchial cuffing, and air trapping; distribution; affected lobes. The presence of pleural effusions, pneumomediastinum, pulmonary interstitial emphysema (PIE), and lymphadenopathy was also recorded. Chest CT revealed GGO (67%), consolidation (67%), nodules (25%), peribronchial cuffing (42%), and air trapping (33%). The distribution of the lesions was random (75%), peribronchial (17%), or subpleural (8%). The lobes affected were the lower (92%), upper (58%), and middle (17%) lobes. There were associated pleural effusions (42%), PIE (42%), pneumomediastinum (33%), and lymphadenopathy (75%). Among five patients with air-leak complications, three had a history of allergies and three required the intensive care unit. Chest CT findings in children with S-OIV infection were peribronchial thickening and a mixture of airspace consolidation and GGO with random distribution and lower lobe predominance. Pleural effusion, lymphadenopathy, PIE, and pneumomediastinum may be associated findings. (author)

  11. Computed chest tomography in an animal model for decompression sickness: radiologic, physiologic, and pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to investigate the early pulmonary effects of acute decompression in an animal model for human decompression sickness by CT and light microscopy. Ten test pigs were exposed to severe decompression stress in a chamber dive. Three pigs were kept at ambient pressure to serve as controls. Decompression stress was monitored by measurement of pulmonary artery pressure and arterial and venous Doppler recording of bubbles of inert gas. Chest CT was performed pre- and postdive and in addition the inflated lungs were examined after resection. Each lung was investigated by light microscopy. Hemodynamic data and bubble recordings reflected severe decompression stress in the ten test pigs. Computed tomography revealed large quantities of ectopic gas, predominantly intravascular, in three of ten pigs. These findings corresponded to maximum bubble counts in the Doppler study. The remaining test pigs showed lower bubble grades and no ectopic gas by CT. Sporadic interstitial edema was demonstrated in all animals - both test and control pigs - by CT of resected lungs and on histologic examination. A severe compression-decompression schedule can liberate large volumes of inert gas which are detectable by CT. Despite this severe decompression stress, which led to venous microembolism, CT and light microscopy did not demonstrate changes in lung structure related to the experimental dive. Increased extravascular lung water found in all animals may be due to infusion therapy. (orig.)

  12. Computed chest tomography in an animal model for decompression sickness: radiologic, physiologic, and pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuter, M.; Struck, N.; Heller, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Christian Albrechts Univ., Kiel (Germany); Tetzlaff, K. [Dept. of Medicine, Christian Albrechts Univ., Kiel (Germany); Brasch, F.; Mueller, K.M. [Inst. of Pathology, Hospital Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany); Gerriets, T. [Dept. of Neurology, Medical Univ. at Luebeck (Germany); Weiher, M.; Hansen, J. [Dept. of Anaesthesiology and Hyperbaric Centre Northern Germany, Friedrich Ebert Hospital, Neumuenster (Germany); Hirt, S. [Dept. of Medicine, Cardiac and Vascular Surgery, Christian Albrechts University, Kiel (Germany)

    2000-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the early pulmonary effects of acute decompression in an animal model for human decompression sickness by CT and light microscopy. Ten test pigs were exposed to severe decompression stress in a chamber dive. Three pigs were kept at ambient pressure to serve as controls. Decompression stress was monitored by measurement of pulmonary artery pressure and arterial and venous Doppler recording of bubbles of inert gas. Chest CT was performed pre- and postdive and in addition the inflated lungs were examined after resection. Each lung was investigated by light microscopy. Hemodynamic data and bubble recordings reflected severe decompression stress in the ten test pigs. Computed tomography revealed large quantities of ectopic gas, predominantly intravascular, in three of ten pigs. These findings corresponded to maximum bubble counts in the Doppler study. The remaining test pigs showed lower bubble grades and no ectopic gas by CT. Sporadic interstitial edema was demonstrated in all animals - both test and control pigs - by CT of resected lungs and on histologic examination. A severe compression-decompression schedule can liberate large volumes of inert gas which are detectable by CT. Despite this severe decompression stress, which led to venous microembolism, CT and light microscopy did not demonstrate changes in lung structure related to the experimental dive. Increased extravascular lung water found in all animals may be due to infusion therapy. (orig.)

  13. Chest trauma in children: current imaging guidelines and techniques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    Given the heterogeneous nature of pediatric chest trauma, the optimal imaging approach is tailored to the specific patient. Chest radiography remains the most important imaging modality for initial triage. The decision to perform a chest computed tomography scan should be based on the nature of the trauma, the child\\'s clinical condition, and the initial radiographic findings, taking the age-related pretest probabilities of serious injury into account. The principles of as low as reasonably achievable and Image Gently should be followed. The epidemiology and pathophysiology, imaging techniques, characteristic findings, and evidence-based algorithms for pediatric chest trauma are discussed.

  14. Primary flexor enthesopathy of the canine elbow: imaging and arthroscopic findings in 8 dogs with discrete radiographic changes

    OpenAIRE

    Van Ryssen, Bernadette; de Bakker, Evelien; Baumlin, Yseult; Samoy, Yves; Van Vynckt, Delphine; Gielen, Ingrid; Ducatelle, Richard; van Bree, Henri

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe the radiographic, ultrasonographic, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and arthroscopic findings in eight dogs with elbow lameness caused by primary flexor enthesopathy. Study design: Clinical study. Animals: Eight client-owned dogs. Methods: In all dogs, lameness was localized to the elbow by clinical examination. Radiographic examination, ultrasound, CT and MRI were performed prior to arthroscopy. In seven dogs, surgical treatment ...

  15. Computer-aided diagnostic scheme for the detection of lung nodules on chest radiographs: Localized search method based on anatomical classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed an advanced computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme for the detection of various types of lung nodules on chest radiographs intended for implementation in clinical situations. We used 924 digitized chest images (992 noncalcified nodules) which had a 500x500 matrix size with a 1024 gray scale. The images were divided randomly into two sets which were used for training and testing of the computerized scheme. In this scheme, the lung field was first segmented by use of a ribcage detection technique, and then a large search area (448x448 matrix size) within the chest image was automatically determined by taking into account the locations of a midline and a top edge of the segmented ribcage. In order to detect lung nodule candidates based on a localized search method, we divided the entire search area into 7x7 regions of interest (ROIs: 64x64 matrix size). In the next step, each ROI was classified anatomically into apical, peripheral, hilar, and diaphragm/heart regions by use of its image features. Identification of lung nodule candidates and extraction of image features were applied for each localized region (128x128 matrix size), each having its central part (64x64 matrix size) located at a position corresponding to a ROI that was classified anatomically in the previous step. Initial candidates were identified by use of the nodule-enhanced image obtained with the average radial-gradient filtering technique, in which the filter size was varied adaptively depending on the location and the anatomical classification of the ROI. We extracted 57 image features from the original and nodule-enhanced images based on geometric, gray-level, background structure, and edge-gradient features. In addition, 14 image features were obtained from the corresponding locations in the contralateral subtraction image. A total of 71 image features were employed for three sequential artificial neural networks (ANNs) in order to reduce the number of false-positive candidates. All

  16. Thin-section chest CT findings of primary Sjoegren's syndrome: correlation with pulmonary function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to describe thin-section CT findings of lung involvement in patients with primary Sjoegren's syndrome (PSS), and to correlate them with pulmonary function tests (PFT). The chest thin-section CT examinations of 35 patients with proven diagnosis of PSS and respiratory symptoms were retrospectively assessed by two observers, in a first step independently with interobserver evaluation, and in a second step in consensus. The extent of the most frequent CT findings was scored. Correlation was made with PFT in 31 of these patients. Three main CT patterns were identified with good interobserver agreement (kappa coefficient 0.71): 19 of 35 (54%) large and/or small airways disease; 7 of 35 (20%) interstitial lung fibrosis (ILF); and 5 of 35 (14%) suggestive of lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP). The CT scans were normal in 2 patients (6%) and showed only dilatation of pulmonary vessels due to pulmonary arterial hypertension in two others (6%). Airway disease patients had predominantly obstructive profiles (mean FEV1/FVC ratio 69.7±12.7%, mean MEF25 50.1±22.9%), whereas patients with ILF and LIP had predominantly restrictive profiles and/or a decreased diffusing lung capacity (mean TLC 87.0±26.0 and 64.6±18.6%, mean DLCO 57.4±21.2 and 52.0±8.0%). Significant correlation (pCO (r=-0.70) and between the score of air trapping and FEV1 (r=-1.0). In patients with PSS and respiratory symptoms, thin-section CT may provide characterization of lung involvement which correlates with pulmonary function. (orig.)

  17. Chest radiography and thoracic computed tomography findings in children who have family members with active pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The chest radiography and TCT findings in children who had contacted with adult family members with active pulmonary tuberculosis were compared. The contributions of thoracic computed tomography to the diagnosis of tuberculosis were investigated. Methods and material: The children who were 0-16 years old (n=173) and children of families with an adult member which was diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis were evaluated. The children were considered in two groups based on the absence (n=125) or presence (n=48) of complaints and/or ambiguous symptoms such as lack of appetite, mild cough, sweating, history of lung infection, low body weight and those with suspicious chest radiography findings (12 cases) were included in this study. Asymptomatic patients (n=125) did not undergo TCT. Patients who had positive PPD skin tests only received isoniazid. If the TCT demonstrated enlarged lymph nodes or parenchymal lesions, minimally active pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed and antituberculous treatment was given. Results and discussions: TCT revealed lymph node enlargement or parenchymal lesions in 39 children (81.2%). Of the 12 children whose CXRs revealed suspicious lymph node enlargement and/or infiltration, five had normal findings in TCT whereas the initial findings were confirmed in the remaining seven. These data suggest that there is a correlation between the presence of ambiguous symptoms in exposed children and TCT findings; chest radiography and TCT findings do not yield parallel findings. All the patients who received anti-TB treatment were resolved in the control examinations. Conclusion: In this study there is a correlation between presence of ambiguous symptoms and TCT findings, but the chest radiography and TCT findings do not yield harmony in exposed children with ambiguous symptoms (suspicious tuberculosis cases). These observations should be considered in children with symptoms similar to those of exposed children, but with no definite history of

  18. Effect of Picture Archiving and Communication System Image Manipulation on the Agreement of Chest Radiograph Interpretation in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Denise A.; Naqvi, Asad Ahmed; Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth; Flavin, Michael P.; Manson, David; Soboleski, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Variability in image interpretation has been attributed to differences in the interpreters’ knowledge base, experience level, and access to the clinical scenario. Picture archiving and communication system (PACS) has allowed the user to manipulate the images while developing their impression of the radiograph. The aim of this study was to determine the agreement of chest radiograph (CXR) impressions among radiologists and neonatologists and help determine the effect of image manipulation with PACS on report impression. Materials and Methods: Prospective cohort study included 60 patients from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit undergoing CXRs. Three radiologists and three neonatologists reviewed two consecutive frontal CXRs of each patient. Each physician was allowed manipulation of images as needed to provide a decision of “improved,” “unchanged,” or “disease progression” lung disease for each patient. Each physician repeated the process once more; this time, they were not allowed to individually manipulate the images, but an independent radiologist presets the image brightness and contrast to best optimize the CXR appearance. Percent agreement and opposing reporting views were calculated between all six physicians for each of the two methods (allowing and not allowing image manipulation). Results: One hundred percent agreement in image impression between all six observers was only seen in 5% of cases when allowing image manipulation; 100% agreement was seen in 13% of the cases when there was no manipulation of the images. Conclusion: Agreement in CXR interpretation is poor; the ability to manipulate the images on PACS results in a decrease in agreement in the interpretation of these studies. New methods to standardize image appearance and allow improved comparison with previous studies should be sought to improve clinician agreement in interpretation consistency and advance patient care.

  19. Endobronchial Tuberculosis and Chest Radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Sasani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Endobronchial tuberculosis and chest radiography I read, with interest, the article entitled “Clinical and Para-clinical Presentations of Endobronchial Tuberculosis” by Ahmadi Hoseini H. S. et al. (1 published in this journal. I would like to focus on some details about the chest X-ray of patients as elaborated by the authors in the results section. Accordingly, the findings of chest radiography in the available patients were as follows: pulmonary consolidation (75%, reduced pulmonary volume (20%, and hilar adenopathy (10%. This is an incomplete statement because the authors did not explain whether there was any normal chest radiography in the study population. In addition, it is not clear whether the X-ray examinations of the patients were normal, how many abnormal plain films yielded the presented data. On the other hand, the fact that the studied patients had no normal chest radiography is  controversial since in the literature, 10-20% of the patients with endobronchial tuberculosis are reported to have normal chest X-ray (2, 3. In fact, this is one of the problems in the diagnosis of the disease, as well as a potential cause of delayed diagnosis and treatment of the patients. Therefore, the absence of normal chest radiographs is in contrast to the available literature, and if not an error, it could be a subject of further investigation.

  20. Cervical spine in patients with diastrophic dysplasia - radiographic findings in 122 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remes, Ville M.; Helenius, Ilkka J.; Peltonen, Jari I. [Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki University Central Hospital, P.O. Box 281, 00029 HUS (Finland); Marttinen, Eino J. [Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Poussa, Mikko S. [Orton Orthopaedic Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    2002-09-01

    Heading AbstractBackground. In previous studies, typical radiological findings in the cervical spine of patients with diastrophic dysplasia (DD) have been kyphosis, displacement of the vertebrae, spina bifida occulta (SBO), anterior hypoplasia of vertebrae C3-5, and hyperplasia and dysmorphism of the odontoid process.Objectives. To make a radiological analysis of the cervical spine in patients with DD.Materials and methods. The study comprised 122 patients (50 males, 72 females), with an average age of 19 years (range newborn-63 years). Follow-up was available on 62 patients (51%), for an average duration of 11 years. Cervical spine alignment was measured according to Cobb's method. The height (H) and depth (D) of the vertebral body and sagittal diameter (S) of the spinal canal were measured. H/D and S/D ratios were then calculated from the measurements. The shape of the vertebrae was assessed. Displacement and movement of cervical vertebrae in neutral and bending radiographs were measured.Results. The average lordosis in the last radiograph was 17 (range 4 -55 ). Five (4%) patients had a cervical kyphosis with an average of 92 (range 10-165 ) on their last radiograph. The H/D ratio increased slowly during growth and showed significant correlation with age. There was no growth spurt at puberty. The S/D ratio was fairly stable until 7-8 years of age, when it started to decline slowly. The percentage of vertebrae with a flat vertebral body and narrow spinal canal value tended to increase with age. Vertebral hypoplasia and displacement between vertebrae were most common in the mid-cervical region and resolved spontaneously with age. Degenerative changes seemed to increase with age and were already visible during the second decade of life. SBO was noted in 79% of patients.Conclusions. The most common alignment in the cervical spine is lordosis in adulthood. The vertebral bodies are flattened and the spinal canal is narrowed. Vertebral body hypoplasia and

  1. Cervical spine in patients with diastrophic dysplasia - radiographic findings in 122 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heading AbstractBackground. In previous studies, typical radiological findings in the cervical spine of patients with diastrophic dysplasia (DD) have been kyphosis, displacement of the vertebrae, spina bifida occulta (SBO), anterior hypoplasia of vertebrae C3-5, and hyperplasia and dysmorphism of the odontoid process.Objectives. To make a radiological analysis of the cervical spine in patients with DD.Materials and methods. The study comprised 122 patients (50 males, 72 females), with an average age of 19 years (range newborn-63 years). Follow-up was available on 62 patients (51%), for an average duration of 11 years. Cervical spine alignment was measured according to Cobb's method. The height (H) and depth (D) of the vertebral body and sagittal diameter (S) of the spinal canal were measured. H/D and S/D ratios were then calculated from the measurements. The shape of the vertebrae was assessed. Displacement and movement of cervical vertebrae in neutral and bending radiographs were measured.Results. The average lordosis in the last radiograph was 17 (range 4 -55 ). Five (4%) patients had a cervical kyphosis with an average of 92 (range 10-165 ) on their last radiograph. The H/D ratio increased slowly during growth and showed significant correlation with age. There was no growth spurt at puberty. The S/D ratio was fairly stable until 7-8 years of age, when it started to decline slowly. The percentage of vertebrae with a flat vertebral body and narrow spinal canal value tended to increase with age. Vertebral hypoplasia and displacement between vertebrae were most common in the mid-cervical region and resolved spontaneously with age. Degenerative changes seemed to increase with age and were already visible during the second decade of life. SBO was noted in 79% of patients.Conclusions. The most common alignment in the cervical spine is lordosis in adulthood. The vertebral bodies are flattened and the spinal canal is narrowed. Vertebral body hypoplasia and displacement

  2. Radiographic evaluation of foals and ponies with abdominal disorders. 2. Findings in 60 patients with acute abdominal discomfort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diagnostic approach based on clinical and radiographic examinations for evaluation of young foals and small ponies with acute abdominal discomfort is presented. Standing right to left lateral abdominal radiographs were taken of 54 foals and 6 ponies using a previously described technique. Interpretation of the radiographs was in conjuction with all clinical and laboratory findings and patient management. Using this approach, the site and cause of acute abdominal discomfort could be diagnosed accurately in 55 of 60 (91%) patients as confirmed by clinical, surgical or PM findings. Typical radiographs and photographs taken at surgery or at PM examination are presented. Typical radiographic findings, their interpretation and possible underlying gastrointestinal diseases are listed. It is concluded that the incorporation of standing lateral abdominal radiography in the clinical evaluation of foals and ponies with acute abdominal diseases gives findings of high diagnostic significance and should contribute to clinical decision-making, and that abdominal radiography can replace data from rectal palpation in foals and ponies

  3. Comparison of radiographic and necropsy findings of lung lesions in calves after challenge exposure with Pasteurella multocida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives-To test suitability of radiographic evaluation of lung lesions as a substitute for lung lesion scores derived by examination at necropsy in challenge-exposure models of bovine pneumonia. Animals-10 calves selected by body weight from 20 multiple-source male Holstein calves approximately 1 to 2 months old enrolled in a Pasteurella multocida challenge-exposure study. Procedure-Calves were paired on the basis of weight and randomly assigned within pairs to vaccine or control (saline solution) group. By use of deep tracheal cannulation, calves were challenge exposed with a culture of virulent P. multocida, observed for 10 days, euthanatized, and necropsied, and the lungs were scored for pneumonic lesions. Radiographic views of the lung fields of the calves were taken before challenge exposure and before necropsy and were evaluated for alveolar disease by a veterinary radiologist. Lung lesion scores were compared with radiographic evaluations. Results-There was a strong and significant correlation (R2 = 0.91, P < 0.001) between results of the evaluation of postchallenge-exposure radiographs and necropsy results. There also was also strong and significant correlation (R2 = 0.90, P < 0.001) between evaluation of the prechallenge-exposure radiographs-and necropsy results. Conclusions-Radiographic evaluation of lung lesions correlates well with lung lesions found at necropsy. The findings emphasize the need for caution in interpreting the results of challenge-exposure studies of bovine respiratory tract disease in which small numbers of calves are studied

  4. Determination and Comparison of Echocardiographic Findings According to Cardio Thoracic Ratio (CTR in Chest X–Ray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Bashardoost

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chest X–Ray is one of the most common method of imaging. Cardio Thoracic Ratio ( CTR is one of the parameters of Chest X–Ray that is used for determining cardiac enlargement. Echocardiography as compared to Chest X–Ray is expensive and all centers dont have it, but it can determine heart size, valvular diseases, Ejection Fraction, Left Ventricular Hypertrophy (LVH, Pericardial effusion and diastolic dysfunction very well. So, this research was done in order to compare CTR with Echocardiographic findings and precent expensive investigations in the future. Methods: In this cross-sectional analytical study from Sep 2006 to Sep2007, CTR of 172 patients referring to Shohadaye Kargar and Goodarz hospitals was determined from their Chest X–Rays and echocardiography was done later. Data was analyzed with SPSS software and statiscal tests such as Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used. Results: The results of this research wereas folows: 1- The mean age for the patients with increased CTR was higher than patients with normal CTR. 2- Left Ventricular Hypertrophy (LVH and increases of left and right ventricular diameters increased the CTR. 3- There was no statistical relation between sex, pericardial effusion, left and right atrium diameters and CTR. 4- Patients with increased CTR had more valvular heart diseases, systolic and diastolic dysfunction than patients with normal CTR. Conclusion: Increased CTR is one of the signs of cardiac pathologies and therefore echocardiography is advisable for more evaluation of patients with increased CTR.

  5. 尘肺普查高千伏X线胸片质量的相关影响因素%Influencing Factors of Quality of High KV Chest Radiograph in Pneumoconiosis Census

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李润根; 焦新强; 高鑫

    2011-01-01

    [Objective]To analyze the influencing factors of high kilovoltage (KV) chest radiographs quality, and raise the photography level.[Methods]Chest high KV radiographs of 500 dust exposed workers in pneumoconiosis census were identified as an investigation group, among which, 300 workers who had the chest digital radiographs ( DR) synchronization were selected as a control group. The evaluation team formed by 5 professionals who had the pneumoconiosis diagnosis qualifications evaluated each chest radiograph objectively, quality differences of 2 group were compared, evaluation results were analyzed, and the common factors influencing the high KV chest radiograph quality were enumerated.[Results]The superior film rate, the good film rate, the bad film rate and the wasted film rate of investigation group was 38. 00% , 59. 00% , 2. 40% and 0. 60% respectively, compared with control group, the differences were significant (P < 0.01). The technical aspects and the human factors were the primary causes of decline in the quality high KV radiograph.[Conclusion]The chest high KV radiograph are influenced by many factors, only the strengthening quality control can effectively improve the chest radiograph quality.%目的 分析高千伏X线胸片质量的影响因素,提高胸部高千伏摄影水平.方法 500例粉尘作业人员尘肺病普查的胸部高千伏X线片为调查组,其中300例摄有同期数字放射线照相术(DR)胸片作为对照组.由5名具有尘肺病诊断资格的专业人员组成评价小组,对每份胸片进行客观评价,比较2组胸片的质量差异,分析评价结果,列举影响高千伏胸部X线片环节质量的常见因素.结果 调查组优片率、良片率、差片率和废片率分别为38.00%、59.00%、2.40%对和0.60%,与对照组比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).技术环节及人为因素是造成高千伏X线胸片质量下降的主要原因.结论 胸部高千伏X线摄影的影响因素较多,只有加强环节质

  6. Correlation between clinical and radiographic findings on the occurrence of furcation involvement in patients with periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Santos Gusmão

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Taking into consideration the method employed and the results obtained, it may be concluded that the clinical and radiographic examinations performed are effective tools for diagnosing furcation involvement in teeth affected with periodontal disease.

  7. Non-accidental pediatric trauma: radiographic findings in the abused child

    OpenAIRE

    Deltoff, Marshall

    1994-01-01

    The common radiographic manifestations of abused children are discussed along with the mandated obligation of the doctor to recognize and report any reasonable suspicion of non-accidental trauma in his/her pediatric patients.

  8. Radiographic and MR Imaging Findings of the Spine after Bisphosphonate Treatment, in a Child with Idiopathic Juvenile Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olympia Papakonstantinou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates are employed with increasing frequency in various pediatric disorders, mainly associated with osteoporosis. After cessation of bisphosphonate treatment in children, skeletal radiologic changes have been documented including dense metaphyseal lines of the long bones and “bone in bone” appearance of the vertebrae. However, the evolution of these radiographic changes has not been fully explored. We describe the MR imaging appearance of the spine that, to our knowledge, has not been previously addressed in a child with idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis who had received bisphosphonates and emphasize the evolution of the radiographic findings of the spine and pelvis over a four-year period.

  9. Pulmonary edema: radiographic differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the feasibility of using chest radiography to differentiate between three different etiologies of pulmonary edema. Plain chest radiographs of 77 patients, who were clinically confirmed as having pulmonary edema, were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were classified into three groups : group 1 (cardiogenic edema : n = 35), group 2 (renal pulmonary edema : n = 16) and group 3 (permeability edema : n = 26). We analyzed the radiologic findings of air bronchogram, heart size, peribronchial cuffing, septal line, pleural effusion, vascular pedicle width, pulmonary blood flow distribution and distribution of pulmonary edema. In a search for radiologic findings which would help in the differentiation of these three etiologies, each finding was assessed. Cardiogenic and renal pulmonary edema showed overlapping radiologic findings, except for pulmonary blood flow distribution. In cardiogenic pulmonary edema (n=35), cardiomegaly (n=29), peribronchial cuffing (n=29), inverted pulmonary blood flow distribution (n=21) and basal distribution of edema (n=20) were common. In renal pulmonary edema (n=16), cardiomegaly (n=15), balanced blood flow distribution (n=12), and central (n=9) or basal distribution of edema (n=7) were common. Permeability edema (n=26) showed different findings. Air bronchogram (n=25), normal blood flow distribution (n=14) and peripheral distribution of edema (n=21) were frequent findings, while cardiomegaly (n=7), peribronchial cuffing (n=7) and septal line (n=5) were observed in only a few cases. On plain chest radiograph, permeability edema can be differentiated from cardiogenic or renal pulmonary edema. The radiographic findings which most reliably differentiated these two etiologies were air bronchogram, distribution of pulmonary edema, peribronchial cuffing and heart size. Only blood flow distribution was useful for radiographic differentiation of cardiogenic and renal edema

  10. Chest pain due to Pinch-off syndrome: radiological findings and endovascular rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviani, E; Giribono, A M; Ferrara, D; Santagata, A; Narese, D; Midiri, F; Albano, D; Porcellini, M

    2016-01-01

    Port-a-cath is widely used as a route for administration of drugs in hematology and oncology patients and, recently, has been adapted also for hemodialysis patients. Major complications include infection, thrombosis, arrhythmia, and embolization. The Pinch-off-syndrome (POS) means the clavicle and the first rib compress the long-term central venous catheter. The reported incidence rate ranges from 1.4% to 4.1%. This syndrome can be recognized on chest radiography by observing a thinning of the catheter lumen through the passage between the clavicle and the first rib. Catheter fracture is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication that must be recognized and treated promptly. Management of dislodged ports includes percutaneous transcatheter retrieval, open thoracotomy retrieval and oral anticoagulant therapy. Among these techniques, percutaneous transcatheter retrieval is an easy, safe and efficient method. We report the successful percutaneous endovascular retrieval of dislodged intracardiac catheter, separated from its port, in a 58 year-old male patient who presented with chest pain. PMID:26980633

  11. Clinical, radiographic, and histological findings of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Hee; Song, Byeong Chul; Kimn, Sun Ho; Park, Yang Soon [Seoul Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Cemento-osseous dysplasias are a group of disorders known to originate from periodontal ligament tissue and involve, essentially, the same pathological process. They are usually classified into three main groups: periapical, florid, and focal cemental dysplasias depending on their extent and radiographic appearances. Radiographically, florid cementoosseous dysplasia (FCOD) appears as dense, lobulated masses, often symmetrically located in various regions of the jaws. The best management for the asymptomatic FCOD patient consists of regular recall examinations with prophylaxis. The management of the symptomatic patient is more difficult. A case of FCOD occurring in a 52-year-old edentulous Korean female is reported which is rare with regard to race and sex.

  12. Clinical, radiographic, and histological findings of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cemento-osseous dysplasias are a group of disorders known to originate from periodontal ligament tissue and involve, essentially, the same pathological process. They are usually classified into three main groups: periapical, florid, and focal cemental dysplasias depending on their extent and radiographic appearances. Radiographically, florid cementoosseous dysplasia (FCOD) appears as dense, lobulated masses, often symmetrically located in various regions of the jaws. The best management for the asymptomatic FCOD patient consists of regular recall examinations with prophylaxis. The management of the symptomatic patient is more difficult. A case of FCOD occurring in a 52-year-old edentulous Korean female is reported which is rare with regard to race and sex.

  13. The chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic interpretation of chest films of newborns in respiratory distress remains one of the most difficult aspects of pediatric radiology. Complex pulmonary and cardiac adjustments to extrauterine life are rapidly taking place. The small, fluid-filled fetal lung must rid itself of fluid and fill with air. The high vascular resistance of the fetal pulmonary bed and the open ductus arteriosus allow shunting of blood in both directions. Films taken in this period of time may show lungs that resemble those seen in congestive heart failure or fluid overload. When these findings are observed in infants who may appear dusky or even cyanotic, the result may be the diagnosis of disease in normal infants passing through a stormy transition period. To make things worse, the films are taken as portable surpine films, usually in an isolette in the intensive care unit (ICU). The phase of respiration is difficult, if not impossible, to control, and lateral films are usually not obtained. Many of the infants are on assisted ventilation either by tube or nasal prongs-nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-and lungs can appear over-inflated or whited out, depending on the pressures used and the phase of the respiratory cycle. Prolonged crying itself can make lungs appear semiopaque; the next breath may show such a dramatic reinflation that it is hard to believe the two films are of the same infant, made only seconds apart. Is the heart large? Or is it the thymus? Are the lungs ''wet''? Is there infection? Is there pulmonary vascular engorgement? Why are these films so hard to interpret? They have no easy answers. The radiologist must realize that the neonatal intensive care personnel, armed though they may be with blood gas values, are no better at interpreting films. If anything, they read into them what they wish to see

  14. Double-sided psoas abscess in a young infant: Sonographic and radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psoas abscess is rare in children and is exceptional in the neonatal period. A sonographically and radiographically well-documented case of double-sided primary psoas abscess in a few-week-old infant is presented. To our knowledge this is the first description of a case of double-sided psoas abscess in a neonate. (orig.)

  15. Double-sided psoas abscess in a young infant: Sonographic and radiographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schut, J.M.; Meradji, M.; Oranje, A.P.; Bergmeijer, J.H.; Schuller, J.L.

    1988-02-01

    Psoas abscess is rare in children and is exceptional in the neonatal period. A sonographically and radiographically well-documented case of double-sided primary psoas abscess in a few-week-old infant is presented. To our knowledge this is the first description of a case of double-sided psoas abscess in a neonate.

  16. Correlation of radiographic, necropsy and histologic findings in 8 dogs with elbow dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbow dysplasia is osteoarthrosis/degenerative joint disease due to abnormal development of the elbow joint. The abnormal development is the result of specific inherited etiologies alone or in combination. This paper attempts to clarify the diagnosis of elbow dysplasia based on the presence of degenerative joint disease by correlating radiographic, necropsy, and histopathologic results using elbows from 8 German Shepherd dogs. All elbows had radiographic changes consistent with osteoarthrosis/degenerative joint disease which were identified best on the flexed medial-lateral projection. Radiographically, a specific diagnosis was made in seven elbows; ununited anconeal process (6) and osteochondrosis (1). At necropsy these lesions were confirmed plus 14 elbows were identified that had fragmented medial coronoid process (6), abnormally shaped medial coronoid processes or fissures in the articular cartilage of the medial coronoid process (8). Additionally, histopathologically there was proliferative synovitis at the radial notch of the ulna and degenerative changes on the proximal, nonarticular surface of the anconeal process at the site of insertion of the olecranon ligament and joint capsule. Therefore, for screening the elbow joint to identify elbow dysplasia, the recognition of osteoarthrosis/degenerative joint disease on an extreme flexed mediolateral radiograph appears to be sufficient

  17. Radiographic and 2-D echocardiographic findings in eighteen cats experimentally exposed to D. immitis via mosquito bites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eighteen cats were exposed to Dirofilaria immitis infected mosquitoes. Thoracic radiography was performed prior to exposure and at 5, 7, and 9 month intervals following exposure. Immunologic testing for adult heartworm antigen was performed on days 168, 195, 210, 224, 237, 254 and 271 post infection. Necropsies were performed on all cats. Adult heartworms were found in 61% of the exposed cats. Radiographic findings in heartworm positive cats included bronchointerstitial lung disease, lobar pulmonary arterial enlargement and pulmonary hyperinflation. In most heartworm positive cats, lobar arterial enlargement resolved as the disease progressed while pulmonary hyperinflation progressively became more common. Pulmonary patterns in heartworm positive cats remained abnormal throughout the study while abnormal pulmonary patterns resolved in over 50% of the heartworm negative cats. Cardiomegaly was seen in less than 50% of the cats with adult heartworms at necropsy. This study suggests that the radiographic appearance of heartworm disease is variable and radiographic changes are dependent on the time post infection at which cats are evaluated. Echocardiographic examinations were randomly performed on 16 of 18 cats. Heartworms were identified in 7 cats. No false positive identifications were made. Persistent pulmonary disease accompanied by resolving vascular disease in heartworm cats with pulmonary hyperinflation may be difficult to distinguish from cats with feline allergic lung. Echocardiograms may be helpful in identifying adult heartworms in cats in which the radiographic signs or immunodiagnostic data are insufficient to provide a diagnosis

  18. Injuries to the cranial cruciate ligament and associated structures: summary of clinical, radiographic, arthroscopic and pathological findings from 10 horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical, radiographic, arthroscopic and pathological findings of 10 horses with injury to the cranial cruciate ligament are presented. The most consistent clinical signs included moderate to severe distension of the femoropatellar joint and a Grade III to a Grade V out of V lameness. Craniocaudal instability could be elicited in five horses under general anaesthesia and in one conscious horse. Radiographic evaluation of the stifles revealed that avulsion fracture of the medial intercondylar eminence was the most common finding in six out of 10 horses. Arthroscopic examination of the affected femorotibial joints were performed in five horses. This confirmed the presumptive diagnosis of cranial cruciate ligament injury or rupture. Post mortem examinations were performed on two horses which documented partial tears of the cranial cruciate ligament

  19. Radiographic findings and Gs-alpha bioactivity studies and mutation screening in acrodysostosis indicate a different etiology from pseudohypoparathyroidism

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    Graham, J.M. Jr.; Krakow, D.; Smith, A.K.; Lachman, R.S. [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States). School of Medicine; Tolo, V.T. [Div. of Orthopedics, Children' s Hospital of Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Acrodysostosis is an uncommon skeletal dysplasia associated with nasal hypoplasia, midface deficiency, severe brachydactyly, and varying degrees of hearing loss and mental retardation. Previous publications have suggested that it may be difficult to distinguish acrodystostosis from pseudohypoparathyroidism on clinical grounds, but acrodysostosis does appear to have distinct clinical and radiologic findings. Spinal stenosis is an underappreciated risk in acrodysostosis, despite the reported loss of normal caudal widening of the lumbar interpediculate distance on AP spine radiographs in the original report of this disorder by Robinow et al., with confirmation of these radiographic findings by Butler et al. We report two sporadic cases of acrodysostosis, one of which required decompressive laminectomy for symptomatic spinal stenosis, and review 11 cases of acrodysostosis from 9 families that were submitted to the International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry. The objective of this report is to determine the frequency and severity of spinal stenosis in patients with acrodysostosis and to summarize the clinical and radiographic findings of acrodysostosis in an effort to distinguish acrodysostosis clearly from pseudohypoparathyroidism. The pattern of brachydactyly differs between these two conditions, and varying degrees of spinal stenosis are characteristic of acrodysostosis. Both our index patients with acrodysostosis had normal bioactivity of the alpha subunit of the Gs protein, therefore indicating that acrodysostosis has a different pathogenesis from pseudohypoparathyroidism. Furthermore, single-strand confirmational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis failed to demonstrate any confirmational alterations in the coding exons of the Gs alpha gene. These radiographic and laboratory findings substantiate that acrodysostosis is clinically different from pseudohypoparathyroidism and that it is necessary to follow patients with acrodysostosis for signs of spinal stenosis. (orig.)

  20. Radiographic findings and Gs-alpha bioactivity studies and mutation screening in acrodysostosis indicate a different etiology from pseudohypoparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acrodysostosis is an uncommon skeletal dysplasia associated with nasal hypoplasia, midface deficiency, severe brachydactyly, and varying degrees of hearing loss and mental retardation. Previous publications have suggested that it may be difficult to distinguish acrodystostosis from pseudohypoparathyroidism on clinical grounds, but acrodysostosis does appear to have distinct clinical and radiologic findings. Spinal stenosis is an underappreciated risk in acrodysostosis, despite the reported loss of normal caudal widening of the lumbar interpediculate distance on AP spine radiographs in the original report of this disorder by Robinow et al., with confirmation of these radiographic findings by Butler et al. We report two sporadic cases of acrodysostosis, one of which required decompressive laminectomy for symptomatic spinal stenosis, and review 11 cases of acrodysostosis from 9 families that were submitted to the International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry. The objective of this report is to determine the frequency and severity of spinal stenosis in patients with acrodysostosis and to summarize the clinical and radiographic findings of acrodysostosis in an effort to distinguish acrodysostosis clearly from pseudohypoparathyroidism. The pattern of brachydactyly differs between these two conditions, and varying degrees of spinal stenosis are characteristic of acrodysostosis. Both our index patients with acrodysostosis had normal bioactivity of the alpha subunit of the Gs protein, therefore indicating that acrodysostosis has a different pathogenesis from pseudohypoparathyroidism. Furthermore, single-strand confirmational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis failed to demonstrate any confirmational alterations in the coding exons of the Gs alpha gene. These radiographic and laboratory findings substantiate that acrodysostosis is clinically different from pseudohypoparathyroidism and that it is necessary to follow patients with acrodysostosis for signs of spinal stenosis. (orig.)

  1. Estimation of entrance dose on chest radiographs according to the exposure index on Computerized Radiology System: preliminary results; Estimativa de dose de entrada a partir do indice de exposicao em sistema CR: resultados preliminares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donomai, Luana Kaoru; Jornada, Tiago da Silva; Daros, Kellen Adriana Curci, E-mail: luana.donomai@gmail.com, E-mail: tiagosjornada@gmail.com, E-mail: daros.kellen@unifesp.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Digital radiology has improved image quality in radiographs in comparison to screen/film systems though the visual control of the quantity of radiation involved on these exams became more demanding due to the low perception of over and underexposed images. Therefore, this study aims to analyze the exposure index (EI) from chest examinations and relate them to the entrance skin dose. Indices from 29 patients and kerma entrance dose were correlated. A correlation coefficient equal to 0,6881 was calculated. EI and entrance dose are correlated positive and moderately, indicating the relevance to deepen the subject. (author)

  2. Chest shape in preterm newborn infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suggestion that thoracic shape of anteroposterior radiographs reflects lung compliance was examined in 62 preterm newborn infants (none with pulmonary hypoplasia) by measuring ratios of upper to lower chest widths. Chest shape did not vary significantly with the presence of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) or with gender, Apgar score, endotracheal intubation, radiographic severity of RDS, or age at radiography. However, decreased maturity was associated with a relatively wide upper chest and narrow lower chest. Developmental factors may be more important than lung compliance (and the other factors noted) in determining the radiographic configuration of the infantile chest

  3. Pediatric chest CT after trauma: impact on surgical and clinical management

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    Patel, Rina P. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Hilmes, Melissa A.; Kan, J.H. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Yu, Chang [Vanderbilt University, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States); Ray, Jackie [Vanderbilt University, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Chest CT after pediatric trauma is frequently performed but its clinical impact, particularly with respect to surgical intervention, has not been adequately evaluated. To assess the impact of chest CT compared with chest radiography on pediatric trauma management. Two hundred thirty-five consecutive pediatric trauma patients who had both chest CT and radiography were identified. Images were reviewed and findings were categorized and correlated with subsequent chest interventions, blinded to final outcome and management. Of the 235 children, 38.3% (90/235) had an abnormal chest radiograph and 63.8% (150/235) had an abnormal chest CT (P < 0.0001). Chest interventions followed in 4.7% (11/235); of these, the findings could be made 1 cm above the dome of the liver in 91% (10/11). Findings requiring chest intervention included pneumothorax (PTX) and vertebral fractures. PTX was found on 2.1% (5/235) of chest radiographs and 20.0% (47/235) of chest CTs (P < 0.0001); 1.7% (4/235) of the children received a chest tube for PTX, 0.85% (2/235) seen on chest CT only. Vertebral fractures were present in 3.8% of the children (9/235) and 66.7% (6/9) of those cases were treated with spinal fusion or brace. There were no instances of mediastinal vascular injury. Most intrathoracic findings requiring surgical management in our population were identified in the lower chest and would be included in routine abdominopelvic CT exams; this information needs to be taken into consideration in the diagnostic algorithm of pediatric trauma patients. (orig.)

  4. Pediatric chest CT after trauma: impact on surgical and clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest CT after pediatric trauma is frequently performed but its clinical impact, particularly with respect to surgical intervention, has not been adequately evaluated. To assess the impact of chest CT compared with chest radiography on pediatric trauma management. Two hundred thirty-five consecutive pediatric trauma patients who had both chest CT and radiography were identified. Images were reviewed and findings were categorized and correlated with subsequent chest interventions, blinded to final outcome and management. Of the 235 children, 38.3% (90/235) had an abnormal chest radiograph and 63.8% (150/235) had an abnormal chest CT (P < 0.0001). Chest interventions followed in 4.7% (11/235); of these, the findings could be made 1 cm above the dome of the liver in 91% (10/11). Findings requiring chest intervention included pneumothorax (PTX) and vertebral fractures. PTX was found on 2.1% (5/235) of chest radiographs and 20.0% (47/235) of chest CTs (P < 0.0001); 1.7% (4/235) of the children received a chest tube for PTX, 0.85% (2/235) seen on chest CT only. Vertebral fractures were present in 3.8% of the children (9/235) and 66.7% (6/9) of those cases were treated with spinal fusion or brace. There were no instances of mediastinal vascular injury. Most intrathoracic findings requiring surgical management in our population were identified in the lower chest and would be included in routine abdominopelvic CT exams; this information needs to be taken into consideration in the diagnostic algorithm of pediatric trauma patients. (orig.)

  5. NMR findings in patients after wrist trauma with a negative plain radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose was to assess the prevalence and location of the injuries of the carpal bones and soft tissue of the wrist on NMR in patients with negative radiographs. A total of 89 patients (9–81years) were consecutively examined after wrist trauma. Radiograms were performed in four projections: AP, PA, oblique and lateral. In 63 cases of negative radiographs and persistent clinical problem, simplified NMR (T1,T2, STIR; in coronal plane) was conducted with a 1.5 Tesla magnet. Results were evaluated by two independent observers. A positive X-ray result was stated when at least one observer suggested bone fracture. The MR images were viewed for detection of possible bone fracture, bone edema and soft tissue injuries. Cohen’s kappa coefficient was calculated to assess the quality of chosen criteria by means of agreement between both observers and both methods. As many as 26 X-ray studies were classified as positive. Substantial agreement between independent observers was found (kappa=0.63). In 17 cases out of 63 with two negative wrist radiogram, the NMR result was positive (19%). The most frequently fractured or injured bone was scaphoid (10 cases) and distal radius (5 cases). Fair agreement was found between X-ray and NMR studies (kappa=0.37) due to different diagnostic information received in both methods. Simplified NMR imaging of the wrist proved to be strongly efficient in the detection of pathological changes in injured wrists

  6. Association of bronchoalveolar lavage yield with chest computed tomography findings and symptoms in immunocompromised patients

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    Kyle R Brownback

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: CT findings of reticular and nodular infiltrates portend a worse diagnostic yield from BAL than those that are alveolar in nature. Symptomatic patients are more likely to have diagnostic FOB with BAL than asymptomatic patients.

  7. IRMER regulations: compliance rate of radiograph reporting by non-radiology clinicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To assess compliance with regulation 7(8) of Ionizing Radiation Medical Exposure Regulations (IRMER) 2000 legislation amongst non-radiologists reporting radiographs in a large district general hospital. Materials and methods: A prospective review of 100 consecutive radiography request cards from five different departments undertaking their specialty radiograph reporting were collected over 4 weeks. The requests were then traced to their respective case notes to assess documentation of radiographs. The five departments included chest, maxillo-facial, rheumatology, orthopaedics, and inpatients. Twenty-two case notes were gathered from chest clinics, 21 from maxillo-facial, 15 from rheumatology, 23 from orthopaedics fracture clinics, and 19 were taken from inpatients. Results: Only 53% of radiographs undertaken by non-radiologists had a documented report. The specialty most compliant with IRMER was orthopaedics 17/23 (74%) and the specialty least compliant was maxilla-facial 8/21 (38%). Of the documented radiographs, the consultant grade was the largest group of doctors [36% (19/53)] that undertook documentation, and for the undocumented radiographs, they were also the largest group of clinicians that did not document radiographs [77% (36/47)]. All radiographs that were documented in the notes also had documented interpretation of the radiograph. Conclusion: Only 53% of plain radiographs were documented and reported by non-radiology clinicians even though IRMER legislation applies to all clinicians undertaking radiograph interpretation. All clinicians undertaking interpretation of radiographs should be made aware of this legislation and the responsibility to document their findings.

  8. Crackle analysis for chest auscultation and comparison with high-resolution CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of our study was to clarify the correlation between respiratory sounds and the high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings of lung diseases. Respiratory sounds were recorded using a stethoscope in 41 patients with crackles. All had undergone inspiratory and expiratory CT. Subjects included 18 patients with interstitial pneumonia and 23 without interstitial pneumonia. Two parameters, two-cycle duration (2CD) and initial deflection width (IDW) of the ''crackle,'' were induced by time-expanded waveform analysis. Two radiologists independently assessed 11 HRCT findings. An evaluation was carried out to determine whether there was a significant difference in the two parameters between the presence and absence of each HRCT finding. The two parameters of crackles were significantly shorter in the interstitial pneumonia group than the non-interstitial pneumonia group. Ground-glass opacity, honeycombing, lung volume reduction, traction bronchiectasis, centrilobular nodules, emphysematous change, and attenuation and volume change between inspiratory and expiratory CT were correlated with one or two parameters in all patients, whereas the other three findings were not. Among the interstitial pneumonia group, traction bronchiectasis, emphysematous change, and attenuation and volume change between inspiratory and expiratory CT were significantly correlated with one or two parameters. Abnormal respiratory sounds were correlated with some HRCT findings. (author)

  9. Radiographic findings in 4 cows with traumatic reticuloperitonitis due to a non-magnetic foreign body composed of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to describe the findings in four cows with non-magnetic reticular foreign bodies composed of copper. The cows were referred to our clinic because of reduced appetite and a marked decrease in milk production. Based on the clinical findings, a tentative diagnosis of traumatic reticuloperitonitis was made in all cows. The reticulum of all cows was then examined ultrasonographically and radiographically. In all cows, radiographs of the reticulum showed wire-shaped foreign bodies, ranging from 3 to 7 cm in length, which appeared to have penetrated the reticular wall. Two cows (No. 3, 4) had a magnet in the reticulum close to the foreign body but there was no direct contact between the two. A magnet was administered to cows No. 1 and 2, and radiography of the reticulum was performed for a second time the following day. The magnets were observed in the reticulum however, they did not contact the foreign bodies. Because all the magnets were correctly placed in the reticulum yet, despite close proximity, did not contact the foreign bodies, the latter were thought to be non-magnetic. Cow No. 1 was slaughtered. Left flank laparoruminotomy was performed in the remaining three cows. In all cows, copper foreign bodies ranging in length from 3.0 to 7.0 cm, were found in the reticulum. They had penetrated the reticular wall and were not attached to magnets. The radiographic findings described in the present study are strongly indicative of a non-magnetic foreign body. Ruminotomy is the treatment of choice but slaughter may also be considered

  10. Characteristic plain radiographic and intravenous urographic findings of bladder calculi formed over a hair nidus: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the characteristic plain radiographic and intravenous urographic (IVU) findings of calculus formed over a hair. A 66-year-old man who had been quadriplegic for 40 years because of vertebral injury was admitted for further evaluation of frequent urinary tract infection. Plain radiography showed a linear, serpiginous calcification in the lower abdomen, and IVU revealed a round filling defect with linear radiopacity in the bladder, suggesting calculus. The gross appearance of the stone after extraction demonstrated that calcification had formed over a hair

  11. High resolution chest CT in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis: Characteristic findings before and after antituberculous therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The purpose of this study was (a) to describe HRCT findings for pulmonary tuberculosis before and after treatment, and (b) to evaluate the possible use of HRCT to assess disease activity. Patients and methods: We prospectively studied 52 patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis that was proven bacteriologically. HRCT scans were performed before and after treatment. Results: Micronodules, nodules, tree-in-bud appearance, consolidation, and cavities were the most common HRCT findings seen in active pulmonary tuberculosis. The disappearance of tree-in-bud appearance, pleural effusion and the presence of fibrotic change appear to be indications of the effectiveness of treatment. HRCT can differentiate old fibrotic lesions from newly active tuberculous lesions. Conclusions: HRCT may be helpful in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis and may be useful in the assessment of the efficacy of anti-tuberculous treatment

  12. Can chest high-resolution computed tomography findings diagnose pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: the present study was aimed at retrospectively reviewing high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis in order to evaluate the frequency of tomographic findings and their distribution in the lung parenchyma. Materials and methods: thirteen patients (9 females and 4 males; age, 9 to 59 years; mean age, 34.5 years) were included in the present study. The HRCT images were independently evaluated by two observers whose decisions were made by consensus. The inclusion criterion was the presence of abnormalities typical of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis at HRCT, which precludes lung biopsy. However, in 6 cases lung biopsy was performed. Results: ground-glass opacities and small parenchymal nodules were the predominant tomographic findings, present in 100% of cases, followed by small subpleural nodules (92.3%), subpleural cysts (84.6%), subpleural linear calcifications (69.2%), crazy-paving pattern (69.2%), fissure nodularity (53.8%), calcification along interlobular septa (46.2%) and dense consolidation (46.2%). Conclusion: as regards distribution of the lesions, there was preferential involvement of the lower third of the lungs. No predominance of distribution in axial and anteroposterior directions was observed. (author)

  13. Can chest high-resolution computed tomography findings diagnose pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis?

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    Francisco, Flavia Angelica Ferreira; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Zanetti, Glaucia [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Escuissato, Dante Luiz [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Medicina e Apoio Diagnostico; Silva, Claudio S. [Radiology Department, Facultad de Medicina Clinica Alemana, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago (Chile); Hochhegger, Bruno [Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-15

    Objective: the present study was aimed at retrospectively reviewing high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis in order to evaluate the frequency of tomographic findings and their distribution in the lung parenchyma. Materials and methods: thirteen patients (9 females and 4 males; age, 9 to 59 years; mean age, 34.5 years) were included in the present study. The HRCT images were independently evaluated by two observers whose decisions were made by consensus. The inclusion criterion was the presence of abnormalities typical of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis at HRCT, which precludes lung biopsy. However, in 6 cases lung biopsy was performed. Results: ground-glass opacities and small parenchymal nodules were the predominant tomographic findings, present in 100% of cases, followed by small subpleural nodules (92.3%), subpleural cysts (84.6%), subpleural linear calcifications (69.2%), crazy-paving pattern (69.2%), fissure nodularity (53.8%), calcification along interlobular septa (46.2%) and dense consolidation (46.2%). Conclusion: as regards distribution of the lesions, there was preferential involvement of the lower third of the lungs. No predominance of distribution in axial and anteroposterior directions was observed. (author)

  14. Chest CT findings in patients with inflammatory myopathy and Jo1 antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoracic high-resolution computed tomography scans (HRCT) of 17 patients with inflammatory muscle disorders (IMD) and positive Jo1 antibodies were retrospectively reviewed regarding presence, extension, and distribution of pathological findings. Abnormal findings were found in 14 (82.3%) patients. The predominant CT abnormality was ground glass attenuation, which was present in seven patients (41.1%), having a bilateral and diffuse distribution. In general, lesions tended to appear in the lower lobes and more specifically in the lung bases. Interlobular septal thickening was found in six patients (35.3%); it was seen in the upper and lower lobes with peripheral distribution and bilateral localization in five out of six patients. Bronchiectases, reticular opacities, and honeycombing were found in six patients (35.3%). Air space consolidation was seen in about 17% of the patients. Lung involvement is a frequent feature of IMD patients with positive Jo1 antibodies and its most common radiological pattern is that of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia

  15. Chest CT findings in patients with inflammatory myopathy and Jo1 antibodies

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    Karadimitrakis, Stylianos; Plastiras, Sotiris C. [University of Athens Medical School, Department of Pathophysiology, Laiko University Hospital, 75 M. Asias Street, 11527 Athens (Greece); Zormpala, Alexandra; Chatzikonstantinou, Konstantinos [Department of Radiology, Laiko University Hospital, Athens (Greece); Boki, Kyriaki A. [University of Athens Medical School, Department of Pathophysiology, Laiko University Hospital, 75 M. Asias Street, 11527 Athens (Greece); Tzelepis, George E. [University of Athens Medical School, Department of Pathophysiology, Laiko University Hospital, 75 M. Asias Street, 11527 Athens (Greece)], E-mail: gtzelep@med.uoa.gr; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M. [University of Athens Medical School, Department of Pathophysiology, Laiko University Hospital, 75 M. Asias Street, 11527 Athens (Greece)

    2008-04-15

    Thoracic high-resolution computed tomography scans (HRCT) of 17 patients with inflammatory muscle disorders (IMD) and positive Jo1 antibodies were retrospectively reviewed regarding presence, extension, and distribution of pathological findings. Abnormal findings were found in 14 (82.3%) patients. The predominant CT abnormality was ground glass attenuation, which was present in seven patients (41.1%), having a bilateral and diffuse distribution. In general, lesions tended to appear in the lower lobes and more specifically in the lung bases. Interlobular septal thickening was found in six patients (35.3%); it was seen in the upper and lower lobes with peripheral distribution and bilateral localization in five out of six patients. Bronchiectases, reticular opacities, and honeycombing were found in six patients (35.3%). Air space consolidation was seen in about 17% of the patients. Lung involvement is a frequent feature of IMD patients with positive Jo1 antibodies and its most common radiological pattern is that of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia.

  16. Novel influenza A (H1N1) infection: chest CT findings from 21 cases in Seoul, Korea

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    Shim, S.S., E-mail: sinisim@ewha.ac.k [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Y.J. [Division of Pulmonary and Critical care medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Aim: To retrospectively evaluate the computed tomography (CT) appearances of novel influenza A (H1N1) infection. Materials and methods: Chest CT images obtained at clinical presentation in 21 patients (eight men, 13 women; mean age, 37 years; age range, 6-82 years) with confirmed novel influenza A (H1N1) infection were assessed. The radiological appearances of pulmonary parenchymal abnormalities, distribution, and extent of involvement on initial chest CT images were documented. The study group was divided on the basis of age [group 1, patients <18 years old (n = 8); group 2, patients {>=}18 years old (n = 13)]. Medical records were reviewed for underlying medical conditions and laboratory findings. The occurrence of recognizable CT patterns was compared for each group using the images from the initial CT examination. Results: The most common CT pattern observed in all patients was ground-glass attenuated (GGA) lesions (20/21, 95%). Bronchial wall thickening (9/21, 43%) was the second most common CT finding. Other common CT findings were consolidation (6/21, 29%), pleural effusion (6/21, 29%), pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum (5/21, 24%), and atelectasis (5/21, 24%). Among these, atelectasis and pneumomediastinum (pneumothorax) were only observed in group 1. The GGA lesions showed predilections for diffuse multifocal (10/20, 50%) or lower zone (8/20, 40%) distribution. Involvement of central lung parenchyma (12/20, 60%) was more common than a mixed peripheral and central pattern (6/20, 30%) or a subpleural pattern (2/20, 10%) at the time of presentation. Patchy GGA lesions were more frequent (18/20, 90%) than diffuse GGA lesions, and 75% (15/20) of these lesions had a bronchovascular distribution. Bilateral disease was present in all patients with GGA lesions. Bronchial wall thickening was predominantly centrally located and the distribution of the consolidation was non-specific. Conclusion: The predominantly centrally located GGA lesions, with common multifocal

  17. Novel influenza A (H1N1) infection: chest CT findings from 21 cases in Seoul, Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To retrospectively evaluate the computed tomography (CT) appearances of novel influenza A (H1N1) infection. Materials and methods: Chest CT images obtained at clinical presentation in 21 patients (eight men, 13 women; mean age, 37 years; age range, 6-82 years) with confirmed novel influenza A (H1N1) infection were assessed. The radiological appearances of pulmonary parenchymal abnormalities, distribution, and extent of involvement on initial chest CT images were documented. The study group was divided on the basis of age [group 1, patients <18 years old (n = 8); group 2, patients ≥18 years old (n = 13)]. Medical records were reviewed for underlying medical conditions and laboratory findings. The occurrence of recognizable CT patterns was compared for each group using the images from the initial CT examination. Results: The most common CT pattern observed in all patients was ground-glass attenuated (GGA) lesions (20/21, 95%). Bronchial wall thickening (9/21, 43%) was the second most common CT finding. Other common CT findings were consolidation (6/21, 29%), pleural effusion (6/21, 29%), pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum (5/21, 24%), and atelectasis (5/21, 24%). Among these, atelectasis and pneumomediastinum (pneumothorax) were only observed in group 1. The GGA lesions showed predilections for diffuse multifocal (10/20, 50%) or lower zone (8/20, 40%) distribution. Involvement of central lung parenchyma (12/20, 60%) was more common than a mixed peripheral and central pattern (6/20, 30%) or a subpleural pattern (2/20, 10%) at the time of presentation. Patchy GGA lesions were more frequent (18/20, 90%) than diffuse GGA lesions, and 75% (15/20) of these lesions had a bronchovascular distribution. Bilateral disease was present in all patients with GGA lesions. Bronchial wall thickening was predominantly centrally located and the distribution of the consolidation was non-specific. Conclusion: The predominantly centrally located GGA lesions, with common multifocal or

  18. Chest CT findings in EBUS-TBNA-proven anthracosis in enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes

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    Kirchner, J. [Allgemeines Krankenhaus Hagen (Germany). Dept. of Interventional and Diagnostic Radiology; Mueller, P. [Allgemeines Krankenhaus Hagen (Germany). Dept. of Medicine; Broll, M.; Kirchner, E.M. [Sana Klinikum Duisburg (Germany). Dept. of Medicine; Pomjanski, N.; Biesterfeld, S. [University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Liermann, D. [Marien Hospital, Herne (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Kickuth, R. [University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate the multislice computed tomography (MSCT) findings of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA)-proven hilar and mediastinal lymph node enlargement with signs of anthracosis. 53 enlarged lymph nodes in 39 patients (28 male, 11 female) with EBUS-TBNA-confirmed anthracosis were analyzed retrospectively. The mean short axis diameter of the enlarged lymph nodes with signs of anthracosis was 13.7 mm. Lymph nodes most often showed an oval shape (84%) and were well defined in 66% of cases. Lymph node confluence was observed in 32% of cases. Calcifications were documented in 24.5% of cases. Contrast enhancement and fatty involution were seen seldom (3.8%). Lymph node necrosis was not seen. Lymph node anthracosis may be found most often in enlarged, well defined lymph nodes with an oval shape, frequently associated with confluence and calcifications.

  19. Chest CT findings in EBUS-TBNA-proven anthracosis in enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the multislice computed tomography (MSCT) findings of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA)-proven hilar and mediastinal lymph node enlargement with signs of anthracosis. 53 enlarged lymph nodes in 39 patients (28 male, 11 female) with EBUS-TBNA-confirmed anthracosis were analyzed retrospectively. The mean short axis diameter of the enlarged lymph nodes with signs of anthracosis was 13.7 mm. Lymph nodes most often showed an oval shape (84%) and were well defined in 66% of cases. Lymph node confluence was observed in 32% of cases. Calcifications were documented in 24.5% of cases. Contrast enhancement and fatty involution were seen seldom (3.8%). Lymph node necrosis was not seen. Lymph node anthracosis may be found most often in enlarged, well defined lymph nodes with an oval shape, frequently associated with confluence and calcifications.

  20. Differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodule : chest radiography vs CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracies of chest radiographs and chest CT in the diagnosis of a solitary pulmonary nodule(SPN), and to determine the role of CT and CT findings which aid in the differential diagnosis of nodules. A retrospective study was done on 54 patients in whom SPN was found on chest radiographs and chest CT was carried out. The study involved 25 benign and 29 malignant nodules, confirmed histopathologically and clinically. Chest radiographs and CT scans were reviewed separately in randomized order by two chest radiologists who for each film listed the three most likely diagnoses in descending order. The radiologists recorded the confidence value of the most probable diagnosis, and also the marginal and internal characteristics of nodules and their size, as nodules seen on chest CT scans. Diagnostic rates in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant nodules were 65.7% by radiography and 77.8% by CT. Correct first-choice diagnosis was by radiography in 30.6% of cases, and by CT in 41.7%. Using radiographs, and the correct diagnosis was among the top-three choices in 61.1% of cases;with CT, the corresponding figure was 76.8%. Overall, a confident diagnosis was reached more often with the CT(41.7%) than with the chest radiograph(21.4%); diagnostic accuracy was 60.0% and 52.2%, respectively. CT findings which imply a benign nodule include smooth margins and diffuse internal calcifications, whereas marginal lobulations, air-bronchograms, internal low density without cavitation, eccentric calcifications, and large size suggest malignancy. We found that CT findings such as well-defined margins, spiculations, pleural tail or internal homogeneity did not contribute in the differentiation between benign and malignant nodules. CT is superior to chest radiography in the differential diagnosis of the solitary pulmonary nodule. Using CT, diagnosis was accurate and made with a high level of confidence, especially with the

  1. Grading Scale of Radiographic Findings in the Pubic Bone and Symphysis in Athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiographic abnormalities in the pubic bone and symphysis are often seen in athletes with groin pain. The aim was to create a grading scale of such radiologic changes. Material and Methods: Plain radiography of the pelvic ring including the pubic bone and the symphysis was performed in 20 male athletes, age 19-35, with long-standing uni- or bilateral groin pain. We used two control groups: Control group 1: 20 healthy age-matched men who had undergone radiologic examination of the pelvis due to trauma. Control group 2: 120 adults (66 men and 54 women) in 9 age groups between 15 and 90 years of age. These examinations were also evaluated for interobserver variance. Results and Conclusion: The grading scale was based on the type and the amount of the different changes, which were classified as follows: No bone changes (grade 0), slight bone changes (grade 1), intermediate changes (grade 2), and advanced changes (grade 3). The grading scale is easy to interpret and an otherwise troublesome communication between the radiologist and the physician was avoided. There was a high interobserver agreement with a high kappa value (0.8707). Male athletes with long-standing groin pain had abnormal bone changes in the symphysis significantly more frequently and more severely (p>0.001) than their age-matched references. In asymptomatic individuals such abnormalities increased in frequency with age both in men and women

  2. Radiographic findings of the hand and foot in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detail examination of the hands and feet was performed in a group of 34 patients affected by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), using low-dose mammographic film and Rank Xerox selenium plate, according to current diagnostic techniques. All patients presented articular symptoms (pain and arthralgia). The high incidence (38.8%) of patients with no radiographic evidence of bone damage-even though articular symptoms are present-is emphasized. In such cases, it is very difficult to distinguish SLE from rheumatoid arthritis, especially as far as therapeutic management and prognosis are concerned. The lack of any pathognomonic radiological sign of the lupus arthritis, in the hands as well as in the feet, is then stressed. Nevertheless, artropathy in SLE is defined as a deforming unerosive arthritis, with a typical symmetric distribution, affecting most commonly (according to incidence) the proximal interphalangeal and metacarpophalangeal joints. In the hand, arthropathy is referred to as Jaccoud's type arthritis, because it is characterized by joint deformities which can be corrected. In the foot, the main abnormalities include hallux valgus, subluxation of the matatarsophalangeal joints and widening of the forefoot

  3. Serial chest CT findings in interstitial lung disease associated with polymyositis-dermatomyositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: A retrospective study was carried out in two institutions to determine serial changes in the pattern, distribution, and extent of interstitial lung disease (ILD) associated with polymyositis (PM)-dermatomyositis (DM) using HRCT. Subjects and methods: Twenty patients with PM-DM and clinical suspicion of ILD who underwent at least two serial HRCT examinations were retrospectively evaluated by two readers. Patients were classified according to the dominant CT pattern which was correlated with clinical evolution and underlying histology when available (n=6). Results: Patients were classified into four groups according to the dominant pattern: ground-glass attenuation and reticulation (group 1, n=9); honeycombing (group 2, n=4); airspace consolidation (group 3, n=4), and normal or almost normal lung (group 4, n=3). Under medical treatment, serial HRCT showed that the extent of areas of ground-glass opacities (group 1) decreased in five patients, stabilized in two, and increased in two. Pathologic findings demonstrated usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) in two cases and unspecified interstitial pneumonia in one. In group 2, extent of honeycombing increased in three cases and stabilized in one. In group 3, dramatic resolution of airspace consolidation occurred in three cases. Clinical deterioration with extensive consolidation at CT and diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) at histology occurred in one patient of each of the three previous groups. Lesions stayed invisible or progressed slightly in the fourth group. Conclusion: In ILD associated with PM-DM, clinical deterioration and DAD in the follow-up can be observed whatever the HRCT pattern. However, unfavorable evolution is constant when honeycombing is present at the initial CT

  4. Influenza A H1N1 pneumonia: radiograph and CT features of children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the imaging features on chest radiograph and CT in children with Influenza A H1N1 pneumonia. Methods: The imaging data of chest radiograph and CT in six children with Influenza A H1N1 pneumonia confirmed by real-time RT-PCR assay was retrospectively analysis. All patients had chest radiograph at first examination and 4 of them re-examed. One children took CT. Results: All cases showed thick lung markings with varied degrees of pulmonary infiltration and interstitial changes on chest radiograph. Among them, 3 cases showed bilateral pulmonary infiltration and 3 cases showed infiltration in left lung; enlarged hilar was observed in 3 cases. The imaging findings of the pneumonia changed quickly during the follow-up accompanied with the improvement of clinical symptoms. The only one chest CT examination showed bilateral infiltration, multiple ground-glass opacities, small subpleural nodulars, right pleural effusion and lymphadenopathy of lung hila and mediastinum. Conclusions: Chest radiograph and CT revealed certain typical imaging features in the children with influenza A H1N1 pneumonia. However, the final diagnosis of influenza A H1N1 pneumonia still should be made based on epidemiology and laboratory examination. (authors)

  5. Imaging findings of measles pneumonia in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To illustrate the chest radiography and MSCT findings of measles pneumonia in adults. Methods: One hundred and sixty three measles patients underwent chest radiography, MSCT was performed in 3 of them. Measles pneumonia was confirmed in 10 patients (6.13%). Results: Eight of 10 patients had abnormal appearances in initial chest radiography. The characteristic chest radiographic findings were ground-glass opacities (n=6) and bronchial wall thickening (n=2). MSCT showed bilateral multiple ground-glass opacities in 1 patient, unilateral patchy ground-glass opacities with lobular distribution in the right upper lung in 2 patients. Conclusions: Familiarizing with radiographic and MSCT appearances of measles pneumonia in adults is very important for the differential diagnosis and appropriate management of measles pneumonia. Normal initial chest radiography cannot exclude the involvement of the lungs. (authors)

  6. Diffusion-weighted imaging findings on MRI as the sole radiographic findings in a child with proven herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a case of herpes simplex encephalitis in an 8-year-old girl, in whom hyperintensity was detected on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) while conventional MRI sequences were normal 1 week after the onset of neurological symptoms. This case is rare in that a child beyond the neonatal period with focal herpes simplex encephalitis had an abnormal DWI sequence as the only MRI finding. (orig.)

  7. Comparison of chest radiography and high-resolution computed tomography findings in early and low-grade coal worker's pneumoconiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is more sensitive than chest X-ray (CXR) in the depiction of parenchymal abnormalities. We aimed to present and compare CXR and HRCT findings in coal workers with and without early and low-grade coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP). Materials and Methods: 71 coal workers were enrolled in this study. All workers were male. The CXR and HRCT of those workers were obtained and graded by two trained readers. HRCT's were graded according to Hosoda and Shida's Japanese classification. After grading, 67 workers with CXR profusion 0/0-2/2 were included in the study. Four patients with major opacity were excluded. Profusion 0/1 to 1/1 cases were accepted as early and profusion 1/2 and 2/2 cases as low-grade pneumoconiosis. Results: Discordance between CXR and HRCT was high. Discordance rate was found higher in the early pneumoconiosis cases with negative CXR than low-grade pneumoconiosis (60, 36 and 8%, respectively). When coal miners with normal CXR were evaluated by HRCT, six out of 10 cases were diagnosed as positive. In low-grade pneumoconiosis group, the number of patients with positive CXR but negative HRCT were low in comparison to patients with CXR negative and early pneumoconiosis findings. Most of the CXR category 0 patients (10/16) were diagnosed as category 1 by HRCT. Eleven cases diagnosed as CXR category 1 were diagnosed as category 0 (7/11) and category 2 (4/11) by HRCT. In CXR category 2 (eight cases), there were four cases diagnosed as category 1 by HRCT. Conclusions: Discordance between CXR and HRCT was high, especially for CXR negative and early pneumoconiosis cases. The role of CXR in screening coal workers to detect early pneumoconiosis findings should be questioned. We suggest using HRCT as a standard screening method instead of CXR to distinguish between normal and early pneumoconiosis

  8. Plain abdominal radiographs in patients with Crohn's disease: Radiological findings and diagnostic value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Regan, K.; O' Connor, O.J.; O' Neill, S.B.; Mc Laughlin, P.D. [Department of Radiology, Cork University Hospital and University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Desmond, A. [Department of Medicine (Gastroenterology), Cork University Hospital and University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); McWilliams, S.R. [Department of Radiology, Cork University Hospital and University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Quigley, E.M.M.; Shanahan, F. [Department of Medicine (Gastroenterology), Cork University Hospital and University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Maher, M.M., E-mail: M.Maher@ucc.ie [Department of Radiology, Cork University Hospital and University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2012-08-15

    Aim: To determine the diagnostic yield and clinical value of plain film of the abdomen (PFA) in Crohn's disease (CD) patients and to determine whether performance of PFA yields definitive diagnostic information or whether additional imaging examinations are required. Materials and methods: One hundred and seventy-seven CD patients underwent 643 PFAs during the period September 1992 to August 2008. Two radiologists blinded to the clinical details independently evaluated individual PFAs and/or their reports for abnormal findings using the following criteria: normal, small bowel (SB) findings; colonic findings, acute CD complications, extra-colonic findings; global assessment/impression. The results of additional imaging studies performed within 5 days of PFA were recorded and findings were analysed. Results: A mean of 3.6 (range 1-22) PFAs was performed per patient during the study period. Almost 70% of films were normal (n = 449). SB abnormalities were detected in 21.8% (n = 140) PFAs; most commonly dilated loops (18.8%, n = 121) and mucosal oedema (5%, n = 32). Colonic abnormalities were present in 11.4% (n = 73); most commonly mucosal oedema (7.5%, n = 48) and dilated loops (5%, n = 32). Four cases of pneumoperitoneum were detected. There was no case of toxic megacolon. There was one case in which intra-abdominal abscess/collection was suspected and two cases of obstruction/ileus. Extracolonic findings (renal calculi, sacro-iliitis, etc.) were identified in 7.5% (n = 48). PFAs were followed by additional abdominal imaging within 5 days of PFA in 273/643 (42.5%) of cases. Conclusion: Despite the high rates of utilization of PFA in CD patients, there is a low incidence of abnormal findings (32.5%). Many of the findings are non-specific and clinically irrelevant and PFA is frequently followed by additional abdominal imaging examinations.

  9. Acute, non traumatic patterns in chest radiography of children. Recognition and understanding of radiographic appearances; Akute, nicht traumabedingte Veraenderungen des unteren Respirationstraktes des Kindes im Thoraxroentgen. Erkennen und Verstehen radiologischer Veraenderungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, S.; Hoermann, M.; Schibany, N.; Ponhold, W. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Sandstroem, S. [Bild o Funktionsdiagnostisk Centrum, Universitetssjukhus, Lund (Sweden)

    2002-03-01

    The diagnosis of acute, non-traumatic diseases of the lower respiratory tract requires exact knowledge of the specific anatomy, physiology and pathology of the pediatric chest. The absolutely and relatively smaller airways, as compared with those of adults, and the undeveloped collateral ventilation result in radiological appearances that are unique in children. Viral pneumonia is predominant only in small children up to an age of 2 years. With increasing age, there is a higher incidence of bacterial pneumonia. The differentiation of viral and bacterial etiology of a pneumonia is not possible on the basis of chest radiographs. In acute pediatric imaging, possible aspiration of foreign bodies has to be considered. Since most foreign bodies cannot be detected radiographically, indirect features such as hyperinflation or mediastinal shifts have to be evaluated. Primary lung tumors are rare in children. More common are metastases with known primary tumors. Neuroblastoma or lymphomas may mimic intrapulmonary pathologies. (orig.) [German] Die Diagnostik akuter, nicht traumabedingter Erkrankungen des unteren Respirationstraktes erfordert genaue Kenntnisse der speziellen Anatomie, Physiologie und Pathologie der kindlichen Lunge. Die absolut und auch relativ kleineren Luftwege im Vergleich zum Erwachsenen, aber auch der noch nicht ausgebildete Kollateralkreislauf fuehren zu pulmonalen Veraenderungen, wie sie nur beim Kind vorkommen. Bei den Pneumonien sind Viren nur bei Kleinkindern bis zum 2. Lebensjahr praedominant. Mit zunehmendem Alter treten Bakterien immer mehr in den Vordergrund. Eine Unterscheidung zwischen viralem und bakteriellem Erreger ist im Thoraxroentgen nicht moeglich. Haeufig ist auch eine fragliche Fremdkoerperaspiration abzuklaeren. Da die meisten Fremdkoerper nicht roentgendicht sind, muss auf indirekte Zeichen wie Ueberblaehung und Mediastinalshift geachtet werden. Primaere pulmonale Tumoren zaehlen zu den Raritaeten. Haeufiger sind Sekundaerblastome

  10. Impact of positive chest X-ray findings and blood cultures on adverse outcomes following hospitalized pneumococcal lower respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Marlene; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Benfield, Thomas Lars Vibe;

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the clinical presentation and outcome of pneumococcal lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) without positive chest X-ray findings and blood cultures. We investigated the prognostic impact of a pulmonary infiltrate and bacteraemia on the clinical course of hospitalized...... patients with confirmed pneumococcal LRTI....

  11. The distinctly visible right upper lobe bronchus on the lateral chest: A clue to adolescent cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic differentiation between cystic fibrosis and asthma presenting in teenagers and young adults can be difficult. Many patients with a late presentation of cystic fibrosis display minimal changes on a chest radiograph. However, a large majority (90%) of cystic fibrosis patients with an essentially normal PA chest radiograph will have a distinctly outlined orifice of right upper lobe bronchus on a lateral chest film as opposed to a small number of asthmatics (25%) or normal patients (18%). This observation correlates well with the pathologic finding that the initial pulmonary involvement in cystic fibrosis is typically in the right upper lobe in adolescents. Teenager or young adult patients presenting with a history of repeated respiratory infections, asthma-like symptoms and a distinctly visible right upper lobe bronchus on a lateral chest film should be sweat-tested to exclude cystic fibrosis. (orig.)

  12. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  13. Thin-section chest CT findings of primary Sjoegren's syndrome: correlation with pulmonary function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taouli, Bachir; Mourey, Isabelle [Department of Radiology, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Brauner, Michel W.; Lemouchi, Djamel [Department of Radiology, Universite Paris XIII, Bobigny (France); Grenier, Philippe A. [Department of Radiology, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France)

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe thin-section CT findings of lung involvement in patients with primary Sjoegren's syndrome (PSS), and to correlate them with pulmonary function tests (PFT). The chest thin-section CT examinations of 35 patients with proven diagnosis of PSS and respiratory symptoms were retrospectively assessed by two observers, in a first step independently with interobserver evaluation, and in a second step in consensus. The extent of the most frequent CT findings was scored. Correlation was made with PFT in 31 of these patients. Three main CT patterns were identified with good interobserver agreement (kappa coefficient 0.71): 19 of 35 (54%) large and/or small airways disease; 7 of 35 (20%) interstitial lung fibrosis (ILF); and 5 of 35 (14%) suggestive of lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP). The CT scans were normal in 2 patients (6%) and showed only dilatation of pulmonary vessels due to pulmonary arterial hypertension in two others (6%). Airway disease patients had predominantly obstructive profiles (mean FEV{sub 1}/FVC ratio 69.7{+-}12.7%, mean MEF{sub 25} 50.1{+-}22.9%), whereas patients with ILF and LIP had predominantly restrictive profiles and/or a decreased diffusing lung capacity (mean TLC 87.0{+-}26.0 and 64.6{+-}18.6%, mean DL{sub CO} 57.4{+-}21.2 and 52.0{+-}8.0%). Significant correlation (p<0.01) was found between the scores of ground-glass attenuation and TLC (r=-0.84) and DL{sub CO} (r=-0.70) and between the score of air trapping and FEV1 (r=-1.0). In patients with PSS and respiratory symptoms, thin-section CT may provide characterization of lung involvement which correlates with pulmonary function. (orig.)

  14. Extracranial soft-tissue swelling: a normal postmortem radiographic finding or a sign of trauma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strouse, P.J. [Section of Pediatric Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor (United States); Caplan, M. [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Owings, C.L. [Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, C. S. Mott Children`s Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Objective. To determine if extracranial soft-tissue swelling is an expected postmortem finding or a sign of trauma. Materials and methods. Extracranial soft-tissue thickness was measured at 5 standardized locations on postmortem skull films obtained of 18 infants with no evidence of trauma on autopsy. The same measurements were performed on the skull films of 100 living children, all less than 3 years old and without clinical history of trauma. Results. Extracranial soft tissues measured only slightly greater in the postmortem group than on films of living children; however, the difference did achieve statistical significance. Conclusion. Minimal extracranial soft-tissue swelling is a normal finding on a postmortem skeletal survey. The presence of substantial or asymmetric extracranial soft-tissue swelling should be viewed with suspicion for trauma. (orig.) With 2 tabs., 5 refs.

  15. Radiographical investigations of organic lesions of the hypothalamus in patients suffering from neurogenic pulmonary edema due to serious intracranial diseases. Relationship between radiographical findings and outcome of patients suffering from neurogenic pulmonary edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographical investigations of the hypothalamus by computerized tomography (CT) have rarely been performed despite the fact that the damage to the hypothalamus owing to serious intracranial organic diseases may cause neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE). We presented 22 consecutive cases of patients suffering from NPE caused by serious intracranial organic diseases and investigated the relationship between NPE and abnormal radiographical findings of the hypothalamus. In 11 cases, organic lesions were noted in the hypothalami and 10 of these patients died of NPE (91.0%). In contrast, of the remaining 11 cases without significant radiographical findings of organic lesions in the hypothalami, only 2 patients were lost (18.2%). In general, various factors including systemic ones are considered to contribute to the prognosis of the patients suffering NPEs caused by serious intracranial diseases. It was concluded that hypothalamic damage was not always found by radiograph in patients with NPE due to critical intracranial diseases, but once abnormal findings in their hypothalamus of these patients were noted, their prognosis would become significantly poor (p<0.05). (author)

  16. Preoperative diagnosis and radiographic findings of a freely movable mucocele of the vermiform appendix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucocele of the vermiform appendix is rarely diagnosed before surgery, although radiologic and ultrasonographic (US) findings have been reported. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of 2 different radiologic images of the cyst in the same patient during the preoperative period. We present 2 different shapes and locations of a freely movable mucocele of the appendix as it appeared before surgery. (author)

  17. Experimental Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae challenge in swine: Comparison of computed tomographic and radiographic findings during disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brauer Carsten

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In pigs, diseases of the respiratory tract like pleuropneumonia due to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App infection have led to high economic losses for decades. Further research on disease pathogenesis, pathogen-host-interactions and new prophylactic and therapeutic approaches are needed. In most studies, a large number of experimental animals are required to assess lung alterations at different stages of the disease. In order to reduce the required number of animals but nevertheless gather information on the nature and extent of lung alterations in living pigs, a computed tomographic scoring system for quantifying gross pathological findings was developed. In this study, five healthy pigs served as control animals while 24 pigs were infected with App, the causative agent of pleuropneumonia in pigs, in an established model for respiratory tract disease. Results Computed tomographic (CT findings during the course of App challenge were verified by radiological imaging, clinical, serological, gross pathology and histological examinations. Findings from clinical examinations and both CT and radiological imaging, were recorded on day 7 and day 21 after challenge. Clinical signs after experimental App challenge were indicative of acute to chronic disease. Lung CT findings of infected pigs comprised ground-glass opacities and consolidation. On day 7 and 21 the clinical scores significantly correlated with the scores of both imaging techniques. At day 21, significant correlations were found between clinical scores, CT scores and lung lesion scores. In 19 out of 22 challenged pigs the determined disease grades (not affected, slightly affected, moderately affected, severely affected from CT and gross pathological examination were in accordance. Disease classification by radiography and gross pathology agreed in 11 out of 24 pigs. Conclusions High-resolution, high-contrast CT examination with no overlapping of organs is superior to

  18. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian; Thomsen, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials:A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from...... one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years of age are included in the study. The clinical research is performed between September and November 2014 where 3rd year Radiography students collect data on four Danish x-ray departments using identical procedures under guidance of...... conference. Conclusion: Collimation improvement in basic chest radiography can reduce the radiation to female patients at chest x-ray examinations....

  19. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Thomsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chest radiography is one of the most common examinations in radiology departments. In 2013 approximately 80,000 chest x-rays were performed on women in the fertile age. Even low dose for the examinationCorrect collimation Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing on...... collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years...... of age are included in the study. The clinical research is performed between September and November 2014 where 3rd year Radiography students collect data on four Danish x-ray departments using identical procedures under guidance of clinical supervisors. Optimal collimation is determined by European...

  20. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Consequently, all patients should be evaluated radiologically after blunt chest trauma to allow timely and appropriate treatment. Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are proven modalities with which to evaluate patients after blunt chest trauma. Over the last several years extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) has gained increasing importance for the initial assessment of seriously injured patients. In the acute phase of severely injured patients eFAST examinations are helpful to exclude pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemopericardium. Chest radiographs may also be used to diagnose a pneumothorax or hemothorax; however, the sensitivity is limited and CT is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate severely injured patients. (orig.)

  1. Absorbed doses received by patients submitted to chest radiographs in hospitals of the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil; Doses absorvidas pelos pacientes submetidos a radiografias toracicas em hospitais do municipio de Sao Paulo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Marcelo Baptista de

    2000-07-01

    Medical irradiation contributes with a significant amount to the dose received by the population. Here, this contribution was evaluated in a survey of absorbed doses received by patients submitted to chest radiological examinations (postero-anterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) projections) in hospitals of the city of Sao Paulo. Due to the variety of equipment and procedures used in radiological examinations, a selection of hospitals was made (12, totalizing 27 X-ray facilities), taking into account their representativeness as medical institutions in the city, in terms of characteristics and number of radiographs carried out. An anthropomorphic phantom, provided with thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD-1 00), was irradiated simulating the patient, and the radiographic image quality was evaluated. Absorbed doses were determined to the thoracic region (entrance and exit skin and lung doses), and to some important organs from the radiation protection point of view (lens of the eye, thyroid and gonads). The great variation on the exposure parameters (kV, mA.s, beam size) leads to a large interval of entrance skin doses-ESD (coefficients of variation, CV, of 60% and 76%, for PA and LAT projections, respectively, were found) and of organ doses (CV of 60% and 46%. for thyroid and lung respectively). Mean values of ESD for LAT and PA projections were 0.22 and 0.98 mGy, respectively. The average absorbed doses per exam (PA and LAT) to thyroid and lung, 0.15 and 0.24 mGy respectively,showed that the thyroid was irradiated by the primary beam in many cases. Values of lens of the eye and gonad absorbed doses were below 30 {mu}Gy. Comparison of the lung doses obtained in this study with values in the literature, calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, showed good agreement. On the other hand, the comparison shows significant differences in the dose values to organs outside the chest region (thyroid, lens of eye and gonads). The effective dose calculated for a chest examination, PA and

  2. Pure neuritic leprosy presenting as ulnar nerve neuropathy: a case report of electrodiagnostic, radiographic, and histopathological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Russell; Baccon, Jennifer; Dossett, John; Scollard, David; Byler, Debra; Patel, Akshal; Harbaugh, Kimberly

    2015-11-01

    Hansen's disease, or leprosy, is a chronic infectious disease with many manifestations. Though still a major health concern and leading cause of peripheral neuropathy in the developing world, it is rare in the United States, with only about 150 cases reported each year. Nevertheless, it is imperative that neurosurgeons consider it in the differential diagnosis of neuropathy. The causative organism is Mycobacterium leprae, which infects and damages Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, leading first to sensory and then to motor deficits. A rare presentation of Hansen's disease is pure neuritic leprosy. It is characterized by nerve involvement without the characteristic cutaneous stigmata. The authors of this report describe a case of pure neuritic leprosy presenting as ulnar nerve neuropathy with corresponding radiographic, electrodiagnostic, and histopathological data. This 11-year-old, otherwise healthy male presented with progressive right-hand weakness and numbness with no cutaneous abnormalities. Physical examination and electrodiagnostic testing revealed findings consistent with a severe ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse thickening and enhancement of the ulnar nerve and narrowing at the cubital tunnel. The patient underwent ulnar nerve decompression with biopsy. Pathology revealed acid-fast organisms within the nerve, which was pathognomonic for Hansen's disease. He was started on antibiotic therapy, and on follow-up he had improved strength and sensation in the ulnar nerve distribution. Pure neuritic leprosy, though rare in the United States, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of those presenting with peripheral neuropathy and a history of travel to leprosy-endemic areas. The long incubation period of M. leprae, the ability of leprosy to mimic other conditions, and the low sensitivity of serological tests make clinical, electrodiagnostic, and radiographic evaluation necessary for diagnosis

  3. Image processing in digital chest radiography: effect on diagnostic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, H; Partanen, K; Lehtovirta, J; Matsi, P; Soimakallio, S

    1992-01-01

    The usefulness of digital image processing of chest radiographs was evaluated in a clinical study. In 54 patients, chest radiographs in the posteroanterior projection were obtained by both 14 inch digital image intensifier equipment and the conventional screen-film technique. The digital radiographs (512 x 512 image format) viewed on a 625 line monitor were processed in three different ways: (1) standard display; (2) digital edge enhancement for the standard display; and (3) inverse intensity display. The radiographs were interpreted independently by three radiologists. The diagnoses were confirmed by CT, follow-up radiographs and clinical records. Chest abnormalities of the films analyzed included 21 primary lung tumors, 44 pulmonary nodules, 16 cases with mediastinal disease and 17 cases with pneumonia/atelectasis. Interstitial lung disease, pleural plaques, and pulmonary emphysema were found in 30, 18 and 19 cases, respectively. The sensitivity of conventional radiography when averaged overall findings was better than that of the digital techniques (P less than 0.001). The differences in diagnostic accuracy measured by sensitivity and specificity between the three digital display modes were small. Standard image display showed better sensitivity for pulmonary nodules (0.74 vs 0.66; P less than 0.05) but poorer specificity for pulmonary emphysema (0.85 vs. 0.93; P less than 0.05) compared with inverse intensity display. We conclude that when using 512 x 512 image format, the routine use of digital edge enhancement and tone reversal at digital chest radiographs is not warranted. PMID:1563421

  4. Use of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography Findings to Modify Statin and Aspirin Prescription in Patients With Acute Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursnani, Amit; Celeng, Csilla; Schlett, Christopher L; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Zakroysky, Pearl; Lee, Hang; Ferencik, Maros; Fleg, Jerome L; Bamberg, Fabian; Wiviott, Stephen D; Truong, Quynh A; Udelson, James E; Nagurney, John T; Hoffmann, Udo

    2016-02-01

    Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is used in patients with low-intermediate chest pain presenting to the emergency department for its reliability in excluding acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, its influence on medication modification in this setting is unclear. We sought to determine whether knowledge of CCTA-based coronary artery disease (CAD) was associated with change in statin and aspirin prescription. We used the CCTA arm of the Rule Out Myocardial Infarction using Computed Angiographic Tomography II multicenter, randomized control trial (R-II) and comparison cohort from the observational Rule Out Myocardial Infarction using Computed Angiographic Tomography I cohort (R-I). In R-II, subjects were randomly assigned to CCTA to guide decision making, whereas in R-I patients underwent CCTA with results blinded to caregivers and managed according to standard care. Our final cohort consisted of 277 subjects from R-I and 370 from R-II. ACS rate was similar (6.9% vs 6.2% respectively, p = 0.75). For subjects with CCTA-detected obstructive CAD without ACS, initiation of statin was significantly greater after disclosure of CCTA results (0% in R-I vs 20% in R-II, p = 0.009). Conversely, for subjects without CCTA-detected CAD, aspirin prescription was lower with disclosure of CCTA results (16% in R-I vs 4.8% in R-II, p = 0.001). However, only 68% of subjects in R-II with obstructive CAD were discharged on statin and 65% on aspirin. In conclusion, physician knowledge of CCTA results leads to improved alignment of aspirin and statin with the presence and severity of CAD although still many patients with CCTA-detected CAD are not discharged on aspirin or statin. Our findings suggest opportunity for practice improvement when CCTA is performed in the emergency department. PMID:26762723

  5. Evaluation of different imaging chains in clinical chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manninen, H.; Terho, E.O.; Wiljasalo, M.; Wiljasalo, S.; Soimakallio, S. (Kuopio Central Hospital (Finland))

    1984-11-01

    Six imaging techniques in clinical chest radiography have been evaluated: four film-screen combinations in the conventional grid technique and two combinations in the air gap technique. Five parameters characterising the quality of a chest radiograph were evaluated by three radiologists and one chest physician by using a nominal grading scale from -2 to +2 compared with the standard technique. The quality parameters judged were: the visibility of peripheral lung vessels, lung parenchyme, the pulmonary hilum, and lung structure behind the heart shadow, as well as the visibility of miscellaneous findings of clinical interest. The air gap technique was shown to be superior to the ordinary grid technique. The diagnostic quality of chest radiography does not necessarily deteriorate with the screen speed. However, statistically significant differences were noticed, even between techniques which had equal speed and physical resolution.

  6. Pulmonary complications of induction therapy for acute myeloid leukemia in adults. Findings of chest X-rays and computed tomography; Pulmonale Komplikationen der Induktionstherapie bei akuter myeloischer Leukaemie des Erwachsenen. Befunde in Thoraxuebersichtsaufnahme und Computertomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchner, J.; Huettmann, C.; Jacobi, V. [Univ. Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Boehme, A. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik 3

    1998-03-01

    To exclude pulmonary complications, 359 chest radiographs and 50 computed tomographs of the lung were performed in 95 patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia. The radiological findings were registered, described and correlated with clinical findings in the present study on 2395 days of observation. Results: In summary, 52 patients showed alterations of the lung. Pulmonary hyperhydration was seen in 21 cases, bacterial pneumonia was found in 18 cases, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis was documented in 14 cases, and 5 cases of severe haemorrhage were seen. An unexplained pulmonary edema in 13 patients with interstitial and alveolar infiltrates is considered to be a complication of treatment with cytosine-arabinoside. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that chest X-ray and computed tomography have a high impact in detection and treatment of pulmonary complications following intensive chemotherapy. We may expect the development of diffuse opacity following administration of cytosine-arabinoside in medium-sized doses. (orig.) [Deutsch] Zum Ausschluss pulmonaler Komplikationen durchgefuehrte Thoraxuebersichtsaufnahmen (n=359) und computertomographische Untersuchungen der Lunge (n=50) von 95 Patienten mit akuter myeloischer Leukaemie werden in der vorliegenden Arbeit systematisch erfasst, beschrieben und mit den klinischen Symptomen an insgesamt 2395 Beobachtungstagen korreliert. Ergebnisse: Hierbei wiesen 52 Patienten Lungenveraenderungen auf. Eine pulmonale Ueberwaesserung wurde in 21 Faellen beobachtet, bakterielle Pneumonien in 18 Faellen, eine invasive pulmonale Aspergillose in 14 Faellen. Es wurden 5 Lungenblutungen beobachtet. Ein bei 13 Patienten aufgetretenes unklares Lungenoedem mit diffuser interstitieller Zeichnungsvermehrung und auch alveolaerer Komponente wird von uns als Komplikation der Anwendung von Cytosin-Arabinosid angenommen. Schlussfolgerung: Thoraxuebersichtsaufnahme und Computertomographie besitzen einen hohen Stellenwert bei der Erkennung

  7. Comparison of chest-CT findings of Influenza virus-associated pneumonia in immunocompetent vs. immunocompromised patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by Influenza viruses do not significantly differ between immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients or between different types and subtypes of Influenza virus. • Patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by Influenza viruses seem to be interchangeable which might in part explain the great overlap in CT-imaging findings that has been reported in the past. • Interestingly, pattern transition from interstitial into airway-centric pattern seems to be frequent in immunocompromised patients receiving specific antiviral therapy, whereas the conversion of the airway-centric pattern into an interstitial pattern was observed more frequent in immunocompetent patients developing ARDS. - Abstract: Purpose: To retrospectively compare CT-patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by different Influenza virus types and subtypes in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients for possible discrimination. Materials and methods: Retrospective database search at our institution yielded 237 patients who were tested positive for Influenza virus type A or type B by bronchoalveolar lavage between January 2009 and April 2014. Fifty-six of these patients (female 26; male 30; median age 55.8 y, range 17–86 y; SD ± 14.4 y) underwent chest-HRCT due to a more severe clinical course of pulmonary infection. We registered all CT-findings compatible with pulmonary infection classifying them as airway predominant (tree-in-bud, centrilobular nodules, bronchial wall thickening ± peribronchial ground-glass opacity and consolidation) vs. interstitial-parenchymal predominant (bilateral, symmetrical GGO, consolidation, crazy paving and/or interlobular septal thickening). Twenty-six patients (46.4%) had follow-up CT-studies (0.78 mean, SD ± 5.8 scans). Results: Thirty-six patients were immunocompromised (group I) whereas 20 patients were immunocompetent (group II). An airway-centric pattern of infection was found in 15 patients (group

  8. Comparison of chest-CT findings of Influenza virus-associated pneumonia in immunocompetent vs. immunocompromised patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloth, C., E-mail: christopher.kloth@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Forler, S.; Gatidis, S. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Beck, R. [Institute of Medical Virology and Epidemiology of Viral Diseases, Eberhard-Karls-University, Elfriede-Aulhorn-Straße 6, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Spira, D.; Nikolaou, K.; Horger, M. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by Influenza viruses do not significantly differ between immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients or between different types and subtypes of Influenza virus. • Patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by Influenza viruses seem to be interchangeable which might in part explain the great overlap in CT-imaging findings that has been reported in the past. • Interestingly, pattern transition from interstitial into airway-centric pattern seems to be frequent in immunocompromised patients receiving specific antiviral therapy, whereas the conversion of the airway-centric pattern into an interstitial pattern was observed more frequent in immunocompetent patients developing ARDS. - Abstract: Purpose: To retrospectively compare CT-patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by different Influenza virus types and subtypes in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients for possible discrimination. Materials and methods: Retrospective database search at our institution yielded 237 patients who were tested positive for Influenza virus type A or type B by bronchoalveolar lavage between January 2009 and April 2014. Fifty-six of these patients (female 26; male 30; median age 55.8 y, range 17–86 y; SD ± 14.4 y) underwent chest-HRCT due to a more severe clinical course of pulmonary infection. We registered all CT-findings compatible with pulmonary infection classifying them as airway predominant (tree-in-bud, centrilobular nodules, bronchial wall thickening ± peribronchial ground-glass opacity and consolidation) vs. interstitial-parenchymal predominant (bilateral, symmetrical GGO, consolidation, crazy paving and/or interlobular septal thickening). Twenty-six patients (46.4%) had follow-up CT-studies (0.78 mean, SD ± 5.8 scans). Results: Thirty-six patients were immunocompromised (group I) whereas 20 patients were immunocompetent (group II). An airway-centric pattern of infection was found in 15 patients (group

  9. A Case Study into the Effect of Radiographic Factors on Image Quality and Dose for a Selenium Based Digital Chest Radiography System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoravision, the first commercially available digital radiography system utilising amorphous selenium, has been evaluated from both clinical and physical perspectives. The advent of digital radiography systems has made the optimisation of both image quality and dose an important problem. Initial studies, using the manufacturer's recommended factors, demonstrated that the image quality, measured both objectively and subjectively, was significantly superior to conventional screen-film images. However, some questions still remained regarding the system's performance. A second study using alternative factors showed that the Thoravision always produced acceptable diagnostic images, regardless of the factors, and there are advantages to using lower kVp, objective measurements of image quality confirm this. It is clear that no single set of radiographic factors and image processing algorithms will produce optimised images for every patient and further elucidation of the problem is required. The difference between acceptable and a good clinical image is also highlighted and the implications discussed. (author)

  10. Comparison of radiographic subchondral bone changes with arthroscopic findings in the equine femoropatellar and femorotibial joints: a retrospective study of 72 joints (50 horses)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographs of 72 femoropatellar and femorotibial joints from 50 horses were evaluated. Ninety four arthroscopically evaluated areas were graded according to a predetermined system. The radiographic grade was then compared to arthroscopic findings in the same location. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the association between the radiographic subchondral bone changes and arthroscopic findings. Radiographically normal areas in the femoropatellar joint were arthroscopically positive for cartilaginous changes in 40% of the femoropatellar joints. Areas of mild subchondral bone flattening (grade I) in the lateral trochlear ridge were arthroscopically positive for cartilage changes 78% of the time. Ninety six percent of moderate to severe subchondral bone changes (grades II-V) were arthroscopically positive for cartilage damage. This research demonstrates that (1) a significant number of radiographically normal joints will have cartilage changes, (2) areas of mild subchondral bone flattening have cartilage changes present in the majority of cases and (3) areas of moderate to severe subchondral bone changes have arthroscopically detectable cartilage changes present

  11. Lung tissue volume estimated by simultaneous radiographic and helium dilution methods.

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, J. D.; Gluck, E H; Crapo, R O; Jones, H A; Hughes, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The pulmonary total tissue volume (blood, extravascular water, and dry tissue volume) was measured by finding the difference between the radiographic displacement volume of the thorax (RDVT) and the lung gas volume. Simultaneous determinations of RDVT and gas volume were made in 10 healthy subjects sitting upright. RDVT was determined from posteroanterior and lateral chest radiographs, a computerised modification of the Barnhard method being used; and gas volume was measured by helium dilutio...

  12. Technique for chest radiography for pneumoconiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routine radiographic chest examinations have been performed using a variety of techniques. Although chest radiography is one of the most commonly performed radiographic examinations, it is often difficult to obtain consistently good quality roentgenograms. This publication provides a simple guide and relatively easy solution to the many problems that radiologic technologists might encounter. The language is purposely relatively simple and care has been taken to avoid difficult mathematical and physical explanations. The intent is to provide an easily referrable text for those who may encounter difficulties in producing acceptable chest radiographs

  13. Radiologic Findings of Influenza A (H1N1) Pneumonia: Report of Two Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel influenza A (H1N1) infection is a highly infectious disease, which has been rapidly spreading worldwide since it was first documented in March of 2009 in Mexico. We experienced and report two cases of Influenza A (H1N1) pneumonia, accompanied by chest radiographic and CT findings. The chest radiographs revealed diffuse haziness and extensive airspace consolidation, whereas the CT scans demonstrated multifocal areas of ground glass opacity and airspace consolidation with a CT halo sign

  14. Radiologic Findings of Influenza A (H1N1) Pneumonia: Report of Two Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jin Kyoung; Ahn, Myeong Im; Jung, Jung Im; Han, Dae Hee; Park, Seog Hee; Park, Chan Kwon; Kim, Young Kyoon [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Novel influenza A (H1N1) infection is a highly infectious disease, which has been rapidly spreading worldwide since it was first documented in March of 2009 in Mexico. We experienced and report two cases of Influenza A (H1N1) pneumonia, accompanied by chest radiographic and CT findings. The chest radiographs revealed diffuse haziness and extensive airspace consolidation, whereas the CT scans demonstrated multifocal areas of ground glass opacity and airspace consolidation with a CT halo sign.

  15. Exposição de pacientes e qualidade da imagem em radiografias de tórax: uma avaliação crítica Patients exposure and imaging quality in chest radiographs: a critical evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelaja Otolorin Osibote

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Foi realizada avaliação da dose de entrada na pele, da dose efetiva e da qualidade da imagem em radiografias de tórax de pacientes adultos. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: O estudo realizou-se em oito hospitais, sendo sete públicos (dois filantrópicos e um particular nos municípios de Angra dos Reis, Cabo Frio, Campos dos Goytacazes, Itaperuna, Niterói, Recife e Rio de Janeiro. Foram avaliadas a dose de entrada na pele e a dose efetiva de 735 radiografias de tórax nas incidências póstero-anterior/ântero-posterior e perfil. No que se refere aos critérios de imagem, foram avaliadas 44 radiografias. RESULTADOS: Constatou-se variação de até nove vezes nos valores da dose de entrada na pele e de até seis vezes na dose efetiva para um mesmo tipo de projeção. Os valores das técnicas radiográficas também apresentaram grandes discrepâncias. A qualidade das imagens também não é boa, pois foi obtido valor médio de presença dos critérios de apenas 55%. CONCLUSÃO: Há necessidade de melhoria/padronização de procedimentos em radiologia convencional, o que pode ser atingido se for implantado um programa de controle e garantia de qualidade no setor de radiologia, incluindo o treinamento dos técnicos, a aferição do desempenho dos equipamentos emissores de radiação e o controle sensitométrico do sistema de processamento radiográfico.OBJECTIVE: Entrance skin dose, effective dose, and imaging quality in chest radiographs of adult patients have been evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study has been developed in eight institutions - seven public hospitals (two of them philanthropic institutions and one private - in the cities of Agra dos Reis, Cabo Frio, Campos dos Goytacazes, Itaperuna, Niterói, Recife and Rio de Janeiro. Entrance skin dose and effective dose have been evaluated in 735 chest radiographs obtained in posteroanterior/anteroposterior and lateral projections. As regards imaging criteria, 44 radiographs have been

  16. Pediatric digital chest imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology

  17. Sandstorm in the chest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talluri MR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A 32 year old female presented with dry cough and progressive breathlessness of one year duration. There was no history suggestive of collagen vascular disease, lung parenchymal infection or allergic airway disease. Clinical evaluation showed basal fine inspiratory crepitations. Radiographic examination of the chest revealed a black pleura line and lung parenchymal calcification. CT scan of the chest demonstrated nodular calcification of lung parenchyma with a “crazy pavement” pattern, which is suggestive of alveolar calcification. Pulmonary function test showed a severe restrictive defect. On transbronchial lung biopsy calcific spherules suggestive of the alveolar microlithiasis were seen. Diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis was made and symptomatic treatment was given, as there is no specific therapy available. The case illustrates an unusual cause of shortness of breath in a young female with striking radiographic features.

  18. ‘On their side’: Focus group findings regarding the role of MRI radiographers and patient care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Radiographers have been described as caring and concerned healthcare professionals, who are attentive to the needs of their patients. However, this may not always be the case, and patient care may be overlooked at times. Methods: A qualitative descriptive study using a focus group was conducted with radiographers to determine their views on patient care. The focus group included 7 MRI radiographers of varying levels of experience. The data was analysed following a process of thematic analysis. Results: 7 themes emerged from analysis of the data. These were; a trade-off, a wide range of patients with a wide range of issues, from one extreme to the other, it's not that bad, getting the patient scanned, room for improvement, and on their side. Conclusion: The radiographers considered themselves on the patient's side, with the main objective to get the patient scanned, in some way, to aid in their diagnosis and treatment

  19. Bone scan findings of chest wall pain syndrome after stereotactic body radiation therapy: implications for the pathophysiology of the syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Shane; Decker, Roy H.; Evans, Suzanne B.

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 72-year-old woman treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for peripherally located stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). After treatment she developed ipsilateral grade II chest wall pain. A bone scan showed nonspecific and heterogeneous increased radiotracer uptake in the volume of ribs receiving 30% of the prescription dose of radiation (V30). We present a color wash image demonstrating excellent concordance between the V30 and the area of scinti...

  20. Boerhaave's syndrome - tension hydropneumothorax and rapidly developing hydropneumothorax: two radiographic clues in one case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Ho, Lam; Tran Van, Ngoc; Le, Thuong Vu

    2016-07-01

    Boerhaave's syndrome is a rare and severe condition with high mortality partly because of its atypical presentation resulting in delayed diagnosis and management. Diagnostic clues play an important role in the approach to this syndrome. Here, we report a 48 year-old male patient hospitalized with fever and left chest pain radiating into the interscapular area. Two chest radiographs undertaken 22 h apart showed a rapidly developing tension hydropneumothorax. The amylase level in the pleural fluid was high. The fluid in the chest tube turned bluish after the patient drank methylene blue. The diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome was suspected based on the aforementioned clinical clues and confirmed at the operation. The patient recovered completely with the use of antibiotics and surgical treatment. In this case, we describe key findings on chest radiographs that are useful in diagnosing Boerhaave's syndrome. PMID:27512563

  1. Cardiac MRI. Diagnostic gain of an additional axial SSFP chest sequence for the detection of potentially significant extracardiac findings in the cardiac MRI examination setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Cardiac MRI (CMRI) is an effective method for imaging of the heart. The aim of our study was to assess whether an axial chest sequence in addition to the standard CMR examination setting has advantages in the detection of potentially significant extracardiac findings (PSEF). Materials and Methods: 400 consecutive patients were imaged at 1.5 T for clinical reasons. In addition to the standard long and short-axis views, an axial SSFP sequence was obtained covering the thorax from the lung apex to the diaphragm. All sequences were separately evaluated for PSEF. Results: A total of 25 PSEF were diagnosed in 400 patients, including 16 pleural effusions, a pulmonary fibrosis, a spondylodiscitis, ascites, lymphadenopathies, relapse of a mamma carcinoma, growth of adrenal glands metastases and diaphragmatic elevation. All 25 PSEF were detected by reading survey sequences. 24 of the 25 PSEF were detected by the additional SSFP chest sequence as well as the CINE sequences. Conclusion: In our study the additional axial SSFP chest sequence didn't show a benefit in the detection of PSEF. With the survey sequences we were able to detect all PSEF. We conclude that survey images should be assessed for additional findings. (orig.)

  2. Cardiac MRI. Diagnostic gain of an additional axial SSFP chest sequence for the detection of potentially significant extracardiac findings in the cardiac MRI examination setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roller, F.C.; Schneider, C.; Krombach, G.A. [University Hospital Giessen (Germany). Dept. Radiology; Schuhbaeck, A. [University Hospital Giessen (Germany). Dept. Cardiology; Rolf, A. [Kerckhoff Hospital Bad Nauheim (Germany). Dept. Cardiology

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Cardiac MRI (CMRI) is an effective method for imaging of the heart. The aim of our study was to assess whether an axial chest sequence in addition to the standard CMR examination setting has advantages in the detection of potentially significant extracardiac findings (PSEF). Materials and Methods: 400 consecutive patients were imaged at 1.5 T for clinical reasons. In addition to the standard long and short-axis views, an axial SSFP sequence was obtained covering the thorax from the lung apex to the diaphragm. All sequences were separately evaluated for PSEF. Results: A total of 25 PSEF were diagnosed in 400 patients, including 16 pleural effusions, a pulmonary fibrosis, a spondylodiscitis, ascites, lymphadenopathies, relapse of a mamma carcinoma, growth of adrenal glands metastases and diaphragmatic elevation. All 25 PSEF were detected by reading survey sequences. 24 of the 25 PSEF were detected by the additional SSFP chest sequence as well as the CINE sequences. Conclusion: In our study the additional axial SSFP chest sequence didn't show a benefit in the detection of PSEF. With the survey sequences we were able to detect all PSEF. We conclude that survey images should be assessed for additional findings. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of time-related changes in lung detail findings after radiation therapy to the chest using multidetector-row CT. Usefulness of precision scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-related changes in lung detail findings after radiation therapy to the chest were evaluated using multidetector-row CT. The frequency of individual findings and time-related changes in percent incidence of findings were compared between ordinary scanning at 3 mm raw thickness and 8 mm recon thickness, and precision scanning set at 0.5 mm for both parameters. For both scanning methods, the most frequently detected finding was ground-glass opacity (GGO). For all findings other than GGO and consolidation, the frequency of detection was greater with precision scanning than with ordinary scanning. GGO was also the finding showing the greatest difference in frequency of detection between the two scanning methods; because ordinary scanning tended to overvalue GGO, a demonstrative experiment was conducted using a lung detail phantom. Regarding time-related changes in percent incidence of findings, precision scanning was equivalent or superior to ordinary scanning at all time points except after 3 months. These results, combined with the more accurate evaluation of various lung detail changes after radiation therapy to the chest, including GGO (reversible lesion), suggest the usefulness of precision scanning in combination with ordinary scanning. (author)

  4. Chest injuries associated with head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfred Chukwuemeka Mezue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there have been significant advances in the management of traumatic brain injury (TBI, associated severe injuries, in particular chest injuries, remain a major challenge. This paper analyses the contribution of chest injuries to the outcome of head injuries in the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH and the Memfys Hospital for Neurosurgery (MHN in Enugu, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective review of the medical records, operative notes, and radiological findings of all patients admitted for head injury who had associated significant chest injuries in the MHN from 2002 to 2009 and the UNTH between 2007 and 2010. Patients with only head injury and other extracranial injury not affecting the chest were excluded. Patients who were inadequately investigated were also excluded. Results: Nineteen patients from the MHN and 11 patients from the UNTH were analyzed. Ages ranged from 9 to 65 years and the male:female ratio was 3:1. Injuries were most common between 30 and 50 years and road traffic accident accounted for 60%. Barotrauma from ventilation was documented in 2 patients. The commonest types of intrathoracic injuries are pneumothorax and hemothorax. Chest wall injuries are more common but carry less morbidity and mortality. Only 20% of patients presented within 48 hours of injury. Management of the associated chest trauma commenced in the referring hospitals only in 26.4% of the patients. All patients with hemo-pneumothorax had tube thoracostomy as did 96% of patients with pneumothorax. 10% of patients with haemothorax needed thoracotomy. Mortality is 43%, which is higher than for patients with only TBI with comparable Glasgow coma scale. Outcome is influenced by the time to admission and the GCS on admission. Conclusion: Associated chest injuries result in higher mortality from head injuries. This association is more likely in the young and more productive. All patients presenting with head and

  5. Clinical, Radiographic, and Pathologic Findings in Patients Undergoing Reoperation Following Radiation Therapy and Temozolomide for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Susannah; Ye, Xiaobu; Grossman, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with glioblastoma (GBM) frequently deteriorate clinically and radiographically after chemoradiation and may require repeat surgical intervention. We attempted to correlate pathologic findings with preoperative clinical characteristics and survival in patients undergoing reoperation for GBM. Materials and Methods Patients eligible for this retrospective analysis had pathologically confirmed GBM diagnosed between 2005 and 2010, received standard radiation and temozolomide, and underwent repeat resection within 18 months of diagnosis. Results Thirty-eight patients were identified. Median age was 56 years (range, 30 to 80 y), 55% were male, and 66% had baseline performance status ≥90%. Median survival was 16.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.3–19.8) from initial surgery. At reoperation, 21% of patients had no pathologically evident tumor. Median time from initial diagnosis to second surgery was similar in patients with and without evident tumor (8.5 vs. 8.8 mo, respectively). Patients without evident tumor tended to have a worse performance status. Median overall survival from second surgery was 7 months (95% CI, 4.2–10.1) and 9.1 months (95% CI, 2.1–25.3) for patients with and without evident tumor, respectively. Multivariate proportional hazards analysis showed a hazard ratio for death of 0.61 (95% CI, 0.25–1.49) for patients without evident tumor after adjusting for Karnofsky performance status and second surgical procedure. Conclusions GBM patients with and without disease recurrence have similar clinical characteristics at the time of second surgical resection. Pathologic outcomes were not correlated with specific clinical or radiologic characteristics, including the time from diagnosis to reoperation. There was a trend toward improved overall survival among patients without evident tumor at reoperation. PMID:26491903

  6. Canine prostatic disease: comparison of radiographic appearance with morphologic and microbiologic findings: 30 cases (1981-1985)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective analysis was made of radiographs from 24 clinically normal young adult male Beagles used in previously reported base-line research on the distal male urinary tract. The ventrodorsal and craniocaudal prostate gland dimensions were measured, as visualized on the lateral radiographic view, and expressed as a ratio of the distance between the cranial aspect of the public bone and the sacral promontory. In 17 of these 24 dogs, there was sufficient image clarity to permit confident measurement of prostatic dimensions. From these data, the largest acceptable prostatic dimension, as visualized on the lateral radiographic view, was 70% of the public-promontory distance. A retrospective analysis was made of 30 cases of canine prostatic disease, with the objective of identifying the radiographic (survey and distention retrograde urethrocystogram) appearance most often associated with the various spontaneous prostatic diseases. Prostatomegaly was not specific for the cause of prostatic disease, except if the apparent parenchymal dimensions were greater than or equal to 90% of the public-promontory distance wherein neoplasia, abscess, and paraprostatic cysts (readily differentiated from diffuse intraparenchymal disease by ultrasonography) were the principle considerations. Multifocal, irregularly shaped, parenchymal mineral densities were observed only in dogs with prostatic carcinoma (4/7 cases) or prostatitis (1 case of chronic prostatitis). Narrowing of the prostatic portion of the urethra was observed only in association with abscess, neoplasm, or noninflammatory nonneoplastic disease (possibly benign hypertrophy/hyperplasia), whereas widening of this part of the urethra was not observed

  7. Chronic diffuse infiltrative lung disease: Chest radiography diagnostic accuracy of CT versus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors compared the accuracy of chest radiographic and CT findings in predicting diagnoses in 118 patients with chronic diffuse infiltrative lung disease, using three independent observers. First-choice diagnosis was correct with 57% of radiographs and 76% of CT scans (P<.001). CT was most accurate in silicosis (93%), UIP (89%), lymphangitic carcinomatosis (85%), and sarcoidosis (77%). The observers had a high degree of confidence in their first-choice diagnoses with 23% of radiographs and 49% of CT scans and were correct when confident in 77% and 93% of cases, respectively (P<.001). Observers correctly predicted whether a transbronchial or an open lung biopsy was indicated with 65% of radiographs and 87% of CT scans (P<.001). The authors conclude that CT is superior to the radiograph in evaluation of chronic infiltrative lung disease

  8. Computer-aided diagnosis in chest radiography: Beyond nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginneken, Bram van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)], E-mail: bram@isi.uu.nl; Hogeweg, Laurens; Prokop, Mathias [University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    Chest radiographs are the most common exam in radiology. They are essential for the management of various diseases associated with high mortality and morbidity and display a wide range of findings, many of them subtle. In this survey we identify a number of areas beyond pulmonary nodules that could benefit from computer-aided detection and diagnosis (CAD) in chest radiography. These include interstitial infiltrates, catheter tip detection, size measurements, detection of pneumothorax and detection and quantification of emphysema. Recent work in these areas is surveyed, but we conclude that the amount of research devoted to these topics is modest. Reasons for the slow pace of CAD development in chest radiography beyond nodules are discussed.

  9. Radiographic features of paediatric pneumocystis pneumonia - a historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To determine differences between the plain radiographic features of paediatric pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) recorded before the emergence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in 1982 and those documented in the HIV era. To establish differences in the radiographic features of PCP documented in HIV-infected children in developed and developing countries. Method: A Medline search of articles was conducted from 1950 to 2006, using the terms 'pneumocystis pneumonia in children' and 'chest radiographic features' or 'bilateral opacification' or 'lobar consolidation' or 'asymmetrical opacification' or 'pneumatocoeles' or 'cavities' or 'pneumothorax' or 'pneumomediastinum' or 'pleural effusion' or 'mediastinal adenopathy' or 'nodules' or 'normal chest radiography'. Appropriate articles were retrieved, radiological data extracted, reference lists examined and hand searches of referenced articles conducted. Results: Diffuse bilateral 'ground-glass' or alveolar pulmonary opacification, which may show some asymmetry, has been consistently documented as the commonest radiographic finding in childhood PCP throughout the period under review. The less common radiological features of PCP in children are similar to those in adults. In developed countries, PCP-related pulmonary air cysts have been reported at an earlier age in HIV-infected children, compared with uninfected children. PCP-related air cysts, pneumothorax, and pneumomediastinum have been reported in children in developed but not in developing countries. Conclusion: The radiological features of paediatric PCP documented before the HIV epidemic are similar to those recorded in the HIV era. Further study of the determinants of the uncommon radiographic features in children is warranted

  10. Radiography of the chest and upper airway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques of radiography of the chest in all pediatric-age groups differ only slightly from those used in adult radiography. The technologist's principal challenge, however, relates to optimum handling of the patient with respect to positioning and radiation protection. The hints provided in this chapter should permit the conscientious radiographer to obtain high quality radiographs on all pediatric patients

  11. Large mediastinal tumor mass as a prognostic factor in Hodgkin's lymphoma. Is the definition on the basis of a chest radiograph in the era of CT obsolete?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, J.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Mueller, R.P. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Mueller, H.; Engert, A. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Medical Oncology; Kuhnert, G.; Kobe, C. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The risk factor 'large mediastinal tumor mass' is an internationally accepted unfavorable prognostic factor in the staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The definition of this risk factor varies considerably between large cooperative study groups. The purpose of the present analysis was to determine to which degree data obtained from chest radiograph (CRX) give the same results as those from CT scans (CT). Methods: A total of 145 de novo HL patients in early unfavorable and advanced stages were included in this study. A total of 94 patients had a large mediastinal tumor mass according to the guidelines of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG), while 51 had mediastinal lymph node involvement only. The size of mediastinal involvement and the thoracic diameter were measured on CRX and CT. Agreement between CRX and CT was determined by sensitivity and specificity analysis as well as descriptive statistics and correlations. Results: The correlation of the diameters on CRX with those of CT was 0.95 for the tumor size and 0.77 for the thoracic diameter. The diagnostic decision - large mediastinal mass or not - correlated with 0.81 between CRX and CT and was identical in 90.3% of cases. The sensitivity was 0.87 and the specificity 0.96 for CRX, which is considered the current standard. Conclusion: The results show that there is a high agreement between the measurements of CRX and CT. Diagnosis of a large mediastinal mass disagreed in 10% of patients. Since the correct diagnosis of this risk factor is decisive for the adequate multimodal treatment choice, CRX should not be omitted. (orig.)

  12. Fatigue stress fractures of the pubic ramus in the army: imaging features with radiographic, scintigraphic and MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although fatigue fractures are not unusual in athletes and military personnel those of the pubic ramus are rare. We report three cases of fatigue fractures of the inferior pubic rami in two male recruits and one female military cadet. On the initial radiograph, most of the lesions were subtle and easy to overlook. However, bone scintigraphy provided more distinct images that allowed easy and early detection of lesion, and MR imaging presented more diagnostic information, which allowed a precise diagnosis

  13. Estimation of salivary amylase and total proteins in leukemia patients and its correlation with clinical feature and radiographic finding

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok L; Sujatha G; Hema G

    2010-01-01

    Background: Leukemia is a fatal disease. The oral manifestations of the leukemias occur early in the course of the disease and these oral features can at times act as a diagnostic indicator. Saliva has been used as a diagnostic aid in a number of systemic diseases. Materials and Methods: In our study, samples of unstimulated saliva of 30 leukemia patients who were not on chemotherapy were collected and analyzed for salivary amylase and total protein. The oral manifestations and radiographic...

  14. Chest radiological patterns predict the duration of mechanical ventilation in children with RSV infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RSV-infected children demonstrate various radiographic features, some of which are associated with worse clinical outcomes. To investigate whether specific chest radiological patterns in RSV-infected children with acute respiratory failure (ARF) in the peri-intubation period are associated with prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation. We included RSV-infected children 8 days, a backward stepwise regression arrived at a model that included age and right and left lung atelectasis. Using day 2 chest radiograph results, the best model included age and left lung atelectasis. A model combining the two days' findings yielded an area under the ROC curve of 0.92 with a satisfactory fit (P = 0.95). Chest radiological patterns around the time of intubation can identify children with RSV-associated ARF who would require prolonged mechanical ventilation. (orig.)

  15. Characteristics of pulmonary cysts in Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome: Thin-section CT findings of the chest in 12 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobino, Kazunori, E-mail: tobino@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Gunji, Yoko [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Kurihara, Masatoshi [Pneumothorax Center, Nissan Tamagawa Hospital, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); Kunogi, Makiko; Koike, Kengo [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Johkoh, Takeshi [Department of Radiology, Kinki Central Hospital of Mutual Aid Association of Public School Teachers, Kurumazuka 3-1, Itami, Hyogo 664-0872 (Japan); Kodama, Yuzo [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Iwakami, Shin-ichiro [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, Shizuoka Hospital, 1129 Nagaoka, Izunokuni, Shizuoka 410-2295 (Japan); Kikkawa, Mika [Biochemical Research Center, Division of Proteomics and Biomolecular Sciences, Juntendo University, Graduate School of Medicine, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo (Japan); Takahashi, Kazuhisa [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Seyama, Kuniaki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To describe in detail the characteristic chest computed tomography (CT) findings of Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome. Materials and methods: Thin-section chest CT scans of consecutive 12 patients with genetically diagnosed BHD syndrome were retrospectively evaluated by two observers, especially about the characteristics (distribution, number, size, shape and relation to pleura) of pulmonary cysts. Interobserver agreement in the identification of abnormalities on the CT images was achieved using the {kappa} statistic, and the degree of interobserver correlation for the characterization of pulmonary cysts was assessed using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results: Multiple pulmonary cysts were seen in all patients. The number of cysts in each patient was various (range, 29-407), and cysts of various sizes (from a few mm to 2 cm or more) were seen in all patient. 76.6% (mean) of cysts were irregular-shaped, and 40.5% (mean) of cysts were located along the pleura. The mean extent score of cysts was 13% of the whole lung, and the distribution of cysts was predominantly in the lower medial zone. Finally, cysts abutting or including the proximal portions of lower pulmonary arteries or veins were also seen in all patients. Conclusion: Multiple, irregular-shaped cysts of various sizes with lower medial lung zone predominance are characteristic CT findings of BHD syndrome. Cysts abutting or including the proximal portions of lower pulmonary arteries or veins may also exist in this syndrome in a high probability.

  16. Thin-section chest CT findings in systemic lupus erythematosus with antiphospholipid syndrome: A comparison with systemic lupus erythematosus without antiphospholipid syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess thin-section chest CT findings in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), in comparison with SLE without APS. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and thin-section CT findings of 17 consecutive patients with an established diagnosis of SLE with APS, comparing with 37 consecutive SLE patients without APS, between 2004 and 2008, and patients who had other autoimmune disease, such as Sjögren syndrome, were excluded. No significant differences were seen between the two groups in age, gender, smoking habits, or history of steroid pulse and biological therapy. CT images of 2 mm thickness obtained with a 16- or 64-detector row CT were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists in consensus on ultra high-resolution gray-scale monitors. Results: The frequency of thin-section CT abnormalities was higher in SLE with APS group (82%) than in SLE without APS group (43%). Ground-glass opacity (59%), architectural distortion (47%), reticulation (41%), enlarged peripheral pulmonary artery (29%), and mosaic attenuation (29%) were significantly more common in the SLE with APS group than in the SLE without APS group (Fisher's exact test, p < 0.01). Conclusion: SLE patients with APS have increased prevalence of thin-section chest CT abnormalities than those without APS.

  17. Comparison of upper gastrointestinal radiographic findings to histopathologic observations: a retrospective study of 41 dogs and cats with suspected small bowel infiltrative disease (1985 to 1990)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was the intent of this study to define which, if any, radiographic observations corresponded with specific causes of diffuse infiltrative small bowel disease and if radiographic findings could differentiate inflammatory disease from neoplastic disease and either of them from normal. Bowel spasticity, luminal narrowing, and thumb printing tend to indicate the presence of tumor more often than inflammatory disease. Increased bowel gas in cats and barium adhesion in dogs and cats suggest that a component of enteritis is present. Decreased bowel gas in dogs is more often associated with obstructive disease, but is not helpful in differentiating diffuse inflammatory disease from diffuse neoplastic disease. While several observations that can foster differentiation of neoplastic from inflammatory disease were found, this study also indicated that the UGI lacks a high degree of predictive value other than to indicate the presence of infiltrative small bowel disease

  18. Classification of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease based on chest radiography

    OpenAIRE

    Leilane Marcos; Gerson Linck Bichinho; Emmanuel Alvarenga Panizzi; Keidy Karla Goncalves Storino; Davi Carpintero Pinto

    2013-01-01

    Objective Quantitative analysis of chest radiographs of patients with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) determining if the data obtained from such radiographic images could classify such individuals according to the presence or absence of disease. Materials and Methods For such a purpose, three groups of chest radiographic images were utilized, namely: group 1, including 25 individuals with COPD; group 2, including 27 individuals without COPD; and group 3 (utilized fo...

  19. Thoracic radiology in patients in intensive care. Correlation of chest examinations with clinical and biochemical findings. Radiologische Verlaufskontrolle der Thoraxorgane beim Intensivpflegepatienten. Wertigkeit der Thoraxaufnahme in Korrelation mit klinischen und biochemischen Befunden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaltenborn, H.; Schild, H.; Hoehne, U.; Gast, U.; Lorenz, J.; Schinzel, H. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Klinische Strahlenkunde)

    1991-05-01

    Correlation between chest radiographs and clinical indicators was studied in 212 patients in intensive care. 1. There was good correlation between raised pulmonary artery pressure and radiological signs of left heart insufficiency, but not with the value of central venous pressure. 2. Fever and leukocytosis nearly always precede radiological evidence of pneumonia; their persistence does not necessarily indicate persistent pneumonia. 3. Pneumonias, effusions, atalectases and emboli are more common on the right. 4. More than 70% of central venous catheters were incorrectly placed; most commonly, the catheter was placed too low. Life-threatening complications occurred in 1.3%. (orig.).

  20. Estimation of salivary amylase and total proteins in leukemia patients and its correlation with clinical feature and radiographic finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leukemia is a fatal disease. The oral manifestations of the leukemias occur early in the course of the disease and these oral features can at times act as a diagnostic indicator. Saliva has been used as a diagnostic aid in a number of systemic diseases. Materials and Methods: In our study, samples of unstimulated saliva of 30 leukemia patients who were not on chemotherapy were collected and analyzed for salivary amylase and total protein. The oral manifestations and radiographic changes (OPG were recorded. The correlation between the oral manifestations and the salivary components (salivary amylase and total protein was assessed for prognostic significance. Results: In the present study when the mean values of salivary amylase (1280±754 U/ml and total protein (647.2±320.7 mg% were compared with that in control subjects. There was a statistically significant difference for amylase levels (P<.05. On intraoral examination the study subjects showed pallor, gingivitis, gingival enlargement, petechiae, and ecchymosis. On the OPG, the radiographic features included generalized rarefaction of bone (20%, thinning of lamina dura (3.4%, generalized alveolar crest bone resorption (30%, thinning of walls of alveolar crypts (6.7%, besides others, e.g., periapical abscess (10%. Conclusions: The saliva of leukemic patients demonstrated obvious changes in composition. A rise in salivary amylase and total protein levels was evident, with the increase in amylase levels being statistically significant.

  1. The Value and Prognostic Role of the CT Scan versus Chest Radiography in the Follow-up of Intubated Burn Patients with Possible Inhalation Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Spyropoulou, G.A.; Iconomou, T.; Tsagarakis, M.; Tsoutsos, D.

    2005-01-01

    The admission and follow-up chest radiographs as well as the follow-up CT scans of 13 burn patients admitted to our clinic requiring ventilatory support were analysed for signs of inhalation injury and pulmonary complications. The findings were compared with the results of the clinical examination, the blood gas tests, and bronchoscopy. Eleven out of the 13 patients underwent bronchoscopy revealing inhalation injury. The CT scan detected pleural effusion in two patients with a normal chest ra...

  2. Restorative treatment thresholds for interproximal primary caries based on radiographic images: findings from the Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordan, Valeria V; Garvan, Cynthia W; Heft, Marc W; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Qvist, Vibeke; Rindal, D Brad; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2009-01-01

    lesion, based on a series of radiographic images depicting interproximal caries at increasing lesion depths in a mandibular premolar; in addition, the dentists were questioned regarding two caries risk scenarios: one involving a patient with low caries risk and another involving a patient at higher risk....... Logistic regression was used to analyze associations between the decision to intervene restoratively and specific dentist, practice, and patient characteristics. Of the 901 DPBRN practitioner-investigators, 500 (56%) completed the survey. For a high caries risk patient, 66% of respondents indicated that...... they would restore a proximal enamel lesion, while 24% would do so once the lesion had reached into the outer third of the dentin. For a low caries risk patient, 39% of respondents reported that they would restore an enamel lesion, and 54% would do so once the lesion had reached into the outer third of...

  3. Clinical, radiographic, and scintigraphic findings associated with enthesitis of the lateral collateral ligaments of the tarsocrural joint in Standardbred racehorses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Injury of the lateral collateral ligaments of the tarsocrural joints was diagnosed in nine Standardbred pacers. The average age was 4.9 years. The severity of the lameness varied from severe to subtle and joint effusion was seen in eight of 10 tarsocrural joints. A positive hindlimb flexion test was seen in four of six cases in which results were recorded. The identification of the site of involvement was based on a focal intense 'hot spot' seen on scintigraphy, and new bone formation seen radiographically at the anatomical sites of insertion of the long lateral collateral ligament of the tarsocrural joint in nine limbs and the short lateral collateral ligament of one limb. The authors believe this injury to be enthesitis caused by the cyclic trauma of training and racing speed. The primary therapy was rest. Of six cases which returned to training, three raced as well or better than before injury

  4. Development and evaluation of a computer-aided diagnostic scheme for lung nodule detection in chest radiographs by means of two-stage nodule enhancement with support vector classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a computer-aided detection (CADe) scheme for nodules in chest radiographs (CXRs) with a high sensitivity and a low false-positive (FP) rate. Methods: The authors developed a CADe scheme consisting of five major steps, which were developed for improving the overall performance of CADe schemes. First, to segment the lung fields accurately, the authors developed a multisegment active shape model. Then, a two-stage nodule-enhancement technique was developed for improving the conspicuity of nodules. Initial nodule candidates were detected and segmented by using the clustering watershed algorithm. Thirty-one shape-, gray-level-, surface-, and gradient-based features were extracted from each segmented candidate for determining the feature space, including one of the new features based on the Canny edge detector to eliminate a major FP source caused by rib crossings. Finally, a nonlinear support vector machine (SVM) with a Gaussian kernel was employed for classification of the nodule candidates. Results: To evaluate and compare the scheme to other published CADe schemes, the authors used a publicly available database containing 140 nodules in 140 CXRs and 93 normal CXRs. The CADe scheme based on the SVM classifier achieved sensitivities of 78.6% (110/140) and 71.4% (100/140) with averages of 5.0 (1165/233) FPs/image and 2.0 (466/233) FPs/image, respectively, in a leave-one-out cross-validation test, whereas the CADe scheme based on a linear discriminant analysis classifier had a sensitivity of 60.7% (85/140) at an FP rate of 5.0 FPs/image. For nodules classified as ''very subtle'' and ''extremely subtle,'' a sensitivity of 57.1% (24/42) was achieved at an FP rate of 5.0 FPs/image. When the authors used a database developed at the University of Chicago, the sensitivities was 83.3% (40/48) and 77.1% (37/48) at an FP rate of 5.0 (240/48) FPs/image and 2.0 (96/48) FPs /image, respectively. Conclusions: These results compare favorably to those described for

  5. Chest drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Chris

    2014-07-15

    As an intensive care nurse with experience of caring for critically ill patients in the UK and on deployed operations overseas, I found the CPD article useful in reviewing the pathophysiology of a pneumothorax, use of intrapleural chest drains, observations that should be recorded, and nursing care and management of a patient with an intrapleural chest drain. Reflecting on the time out activities in the CPD article was valuable. PMID:25005418

  6. Radiologic findings of diffuse Pulmonary hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Mi Ra; Song, Koun Sik; Lee, Jin Seong; Lim, Tae Hwan [Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-01

    To describe the chest radiographic and CT findings of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage. Two radiologists retrospectively analysed the chest radiographic and CT findings of six patients with diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage. Using open lung biopsy(n=3D2) and transbronchial lung biopsy or bronchoalveolar lavage(n=3D4), diagnosis was based on the presence of hemosiderin-laden macrophage or intra-alveolar hemorrhage. Underlying diseases were Wegener's granulomatosis(n=3D2), antiphospholipid antibody syndrome(n=3D2), Henoch-Schonlein purpura(n=3D1), and idopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis(n=3D1). In all patients, sequential chest radiographs, obtained during a one to six-month period, were available. HRCT scans were obtained in five patinets, and conventional CT scans in one. Follow-up HRCT scans were obtained in two. We also analyzed the patterns of involvement, distribution and sequential changes in the pulmonary abnormalities seen on chest radiographs and CT scans. Chest radiographs showed multifocal patchy consolidation(n=3D6), ground-glass opacity(n=3D3), and multiple granular or nodular opacity(n=3D3). These lesions were intermingled in five patients, while in one there was consolidation only. Sequential chest radiographs demonstrated the improvement of initial pulmonary abnormalities and appearance of new lesions elsewhere within 5-6 days, though within 7-25 (average, 13) days, these had almost normalized. HRCT scans showed patchy consolidation(n=3D5), multiple patchy ground-glass opacity(n=3D5), or ill-defined air space nodules(n=3D4). These lesions were intermingled in five patients, and in one, ground-glass opacity only was noted. In two patients there were interlobular septal thickening and intalobular reticular opacity. The distribution of these abnormalities was almost always bilateral, diffuse with no zonal predominancy, and spared the apex of the lung and subpleural region were less affected. Although chest radiographic and CT findings of diffuse pulmonary

  7. Radiologic findings of diffuse Pulmonary hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the chest radiographic and CT findings of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage. Two radiologists retrospectively analysed the chest radiographic and CT findings of six patients with diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage. Using open lung biopsy(n=3D2) and transbronchial lung biopsy or bronchoalveolar lavage(n=3D4), diagnosis was based on the presence of hemosiderin-laden macrophage or intra-alveolar hemorrhage. Underlying diseases were Wegener's granulomatosis(n=3D2), antiphospholipid antibody syndrome(n=3D2), Henoch-Schonlein purpura(n=3D1), and idopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis(n=3D1). In all patients, sequential chest radiographs, obtained during a one to six-month period, were available. HRCT scans were obtained in five patinets, and conventional CT scans in one. Follow-up HRCT scans were obtained in two. We also analyzed the patterns of involvement, distribution and sequential changes in the pulmonary abnormalities seen on chest radiographs and CT scans. Chest radiographs showed multifocal patchy consolidation(n=3D6), ground-glass opacity(n=3D3), and multiple granular or nodular opacity(n=3D3). These lesions were intermingled in five patients, while in one there was consolidation only. Sequential chest radiographs demonstrated the improvement of initial pulmonary abnormalities and appearance of new lesions elsewhere within 5-6 days, though within 7-25 (average, 13) days, these had almost normalized. HRCT scans showed patchy consolidation(n=3D5), multiple patchy ground-glass opacity(n=3D5), or ill-defined air space nodules(n=3D4). These lesions were intermingled in five patients, and in one, ground-glass opacity only was noted. In two patients there were interlobular septal thickening and intalobular reticular opacity. The distribution of these abnormalities was almost always bilateral, diffuse with no zonal predominancy, and spared the apex of the lung and subpleural region were less affected. Although chest radiographic and CT findings of diffuse pulmonary

  8. Roentgenographic findings in hyaline membrane disease treated with exogenous surfactant: comparison with control group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare, with the use of chest radiographic findings, improvement and complications in newborns treated with exogenous surfactant for hyaline membrane disease (HMD), and an untreated control group. Thirty-six patients with HMD were randomly assigned to a control group (n=18) or surfactant treated group (n=18). As part of an initial evaluation of their pulmonary status, we then performed a retrospective statistical analysis of chest radiographic findings obtained in exogenous surfactant treated and untreated infants within the first 90 minutes of life. Subsequent examinations were performed at less than 24 hours of age. Chest radiograph before treatment showed no significant differences between the two groups, but significant improvement was noted in the surfactant treated group, in contrast to the control group. The most common chest radiographic finding after surfactant administration was uniform (n=15) or disproportionate (n=2) improvement of pulmonary aeration. Patent ductus arteriosus developed in three treated neonates and in four cases in the control group. Air leak occurred in three cases in the treated group and in five cases in the control group. In one treated patient pulmonary hemorrhage developed and intracranial hemorrhage occurred in three treated neonates and in four cases in the control group. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia was developed in 6 cases of treated group and 3 cases of control group. A chest radiograph is considered to be helpful in the evaluation of improvement and complications of HMD in infants treated with surfactant

  9. Natural History of Disease in Atomic Bomb Exposed Twins in Hiroshima : Findings of Chest X-Ray and Electrocardiogram

    OpenAIRE

    Satow, Yukio; Ohmae, Kiyokazu; Okamoto, Naomasa; Abe, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Shoji

    1982-01-01

    The subjects of this study are mainly pairs of monozygotic twins, one of whom was exposed to the atomic bomb and the other not exposed, and the natural history of the diseases of these twins was analyzed to find out genetic and environmental factors of the diseases and some biological effect of the atomic bomb exposure or other. In this study, 13 pairs of monozygotic and 5 pairs of dizygotic twins and other 34 cases of non-twins were examined by means of heart and lung X-ray films and electro...

  10. Radiologic findings of pulmonary endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the radiologic findings of pulmonary endometriosis. This study involved five patients with catamenial hemoptysis diagnosed as pulmonary endometriosis. All cases were diagnosed on the basis of bronchoscopic abnormalities. In one patient, endometrial glandular cells were seen on transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsy. In three, hemoptysis ceased after Danazol treatment. The pattern, location and number of parenchymal abnormalities and the presence or absence of pleural lesion were analyzed retrospectively on plain chest radiographs (n=3D5) and CT scans(n=3D5). Follow-up study for each menstrual period was performed in two cases and changes from the initial lesion were assessed. Plain chest radiographic findings showed focal ground-glass opacity in three cases;two were in the right lung and one in the left. CT findings included ground-glass attenuation (n=3D3) and a mixed pattern of ground-glass attenuations and consolidations(n=3D2). Sites were single in four cases, and in one case, there were two; thus there were in all six lesions. Five of these were located in the right lung and subpleural region, continving to the pleura. Pleural lesion was not detected on either chest radiographs or CT scans. Follow-up CT scans (n=3D2) showed a similar lesion at the same site. In patient with repeated catamenial hemoptysis, CT may be helpful for the diagnosis of pulmonary endometriosis by exclusion of other diseases.=20

  11. Radiologic findings of pulmonary endometriosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seon Bok; Lee, Eil Seong; Jung, Hae Kyoung; Kim, Uk Jung; Yi, Jeong Geun; Kang, Ik Won [Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kook, Shin Ho [Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Sung [Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Dae Sik [Kangnung Hospital, Kangnung (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-01

    To describe the radiologic findings of pulmonary endometriosis. This study involved five patients with catamenial hemoptysis diagnosed as pulmonary endometriosis. All cases were diagnosed on the basis of bronchoscopic abnormalities. In one patient, endometrial glandular cells were seen on transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsy. In three, hemoptysis ceased after Danazol treatment. The pattern, location and number of parenchymal abnormalities and the presence or absence of pleural lesion were analyzed retrospectively on plain chest radiographs (n=3D5) and CT scans(n=3D5). Follow-up study for each menstrual period was performed in two cases and changes from the initial lesion were assessed. Plain chest radiographic findings showed focal ground-glass opacity in three cases;two were in the right lung and one in the left. CT findings included ground-glass attenuation (n=3D3) and a mixed pattern of ground-glass attenuations and consolidations(n=3D2). Sites were single in four cases, and in one case, there were two; thus there were in all six lesions. Five of these were located in the right lung and subpleural region, continving to the pleura. Pleural lesion was not detected on either chest radiographs or CT scans. Follow-up CT scans (n=3D2) showed a similar lesion at the same site. In patient with repeated catamenial hemoptysis, CT may be helpful for the diagnosis of pulmonary endometriosis by exclusion of other diseases.=20.

  12. Radiographic imaging study of pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in renal transplantation recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To improve the understanding of the imaging features of pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) in renal transplantation recipient. Methods: Twenty-four renal transplantation recipients suffered from PCP. There were 19 males and 5 females, the age ranged from 23 to 62 years (mean 39.2 years). The mean time duration from renal transplantation to onset of illness was 5.6 months, and the mean time from onset of illness to consultation was 5.5 days. All patients had fever and dyspnea. The chest radiographic imaging was reviewed and the dynamic imaging changes were followed up. Results: Pathology showed alveolar exudation, inflammation in the interstitium and alveolar lumen, fibrosis in lung interstitium, and erosion of alveolar epithelium. Initial chest X-ray demonstrated diffuse changes in only 10 patients. Of the 10 patients, 3 showed ground-glass changes, 2 showed ground-glass and reticular changes, and 4 showed consolidation. But all patients had abnormal ill-defined ground-glass findings on thoracic CT images, 9 of them showed reticulum among ground-glass changes, and 12 of them showed consolidation among ground-glass changes. Among patients with clinical deterioration, chest radiographs and CT showed progression of pulmonary infiltrations, and it reached the top level within 1 to 2 weeks. With successful response to therapy, chest radiographs and CT showed resolution of the lung opacities, but the resolution was retarded for about 1 week, complete resolution would need 4 weeks. Conclusion: The radiographic imaging features of PCP in renal transplantation recipient were diffuse interstitial alterations and consolidations, and with fast progression. With successful response to therapy, it showed resolution of the lung opacities, but the resolution was retarded for about 1 week, and complete resolution would need 4 weeks. Chest CT was more sensitive than radiographs. (authors)

  13. Pulmonary high-resolution computed tomography findings in nephropathia epidemica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paakkala, Antti, E-mail: antti.paakkala@pshp.fi [Medical Imaging Centre, Tampere University Hospital, 33521 Tampere (Finland); Jaervenpaeae, Ritva, E-mail: ritva.jarvenpaa@pshp.fi [Medical Imaging Centre, Tampere University Hospital, 33521 Tampere (Finland); Maekelae, Satu, E-mail: satu.marjo.makela@uta.fi [Department of Internal Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, 33521 Tampere (Finland); Medical School, University of Tampere, 33521 Tampere (Finland); Huhtala, Heini, E-mail: heini.huhtala@uta.fi [School of Public Health, University of Tampere, 33521 Tampere (Finland); Mustonen, Jukka, E-mail: jukka.mustonen@uta.fi [Department of Internal Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, 33521 Tampere (Finland); Medical School, University of Tampere, 33521 Tampere (Finland)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate lung high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with Puumala hantavirus-induced nephropathia epidemica (NE), and to determine if these findings correspond to chest radiograph findings. Materials and methods: HRCT findings and clinical course were studied in 13 hospital-treated NE patients. Chest radiograph findings were studied in 12 of them. Results: Twelve patients (92%) showed lung parenchymal abnormalities in HRCT, while only 8 had changes in their chest radiography. Atelectasis, pleural effusion, intralobular and interlobular septal thickening were the most common HRCT findings. Ground-glass opacification (GGO) was seen in 4 and hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy in 3 patients. Atelectasis and pleural effusion were also mostly seen in chest radiographs, other findings only in HRCT. Conclusion: Almost every NE patient showed lung parenchymal abnormalities in HRCT. The most common findings of lung involvement in NE can be defined as accumulation of pleural fluid and atelectasis and intralobular and interlobular septal thickening, most profusely in the lower parts of the lung. As a novel finding, lymphadenopathy was seen in a minority, probably related to capillary leakage and overall fluid overload. Pleural effusion is not the prominent feature in other viral pneumonias, whereas intralobular and interlobular septal thickening are characteristic of other viral pulmonary infections as well. Lung parenchymal findings in HRCT can thus be taken not to be disease-specific in NE and HRCT is useful only for scientific purposes.

  14. Pulmonary high-resolution computed tomography findings in nephropathia epidemica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate lung high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with Puumala hantavirus-induced nephropathia epidemica (NE), and to determine if these findings correspond to chest radiograph findings. Materials and methods: HRCT findings and clinical course were studied in 13 hospital-treated NE patients. Chest radiograph findings were studied in 12 of them. Results: Twelve patients (92%) showed lung parenchymal abnormalities in HRCT, while only 8 had changes in their chest radiography. Atelectasis, pleural effusion, intralobular and interlobular septal thickening were the most common HRCT findings. Ground-glass opacification (GGO) was seen in 4 and hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy in 3 patients. Atelectasis and pleural effusion were also mostly seen in chest radiographs, other findings only in HRCT. Conclusion: Almost every NE patient showed lung parenchymal abnormalities in HRCT. The most common findings of lung involvement in NE can be defined as accumulation of pleural fluid and atelectasis and intralobular and interlobular septal thickening, most profusely in the lower parts of the lung. As a novel finding, lymphadenopathy was seen in a minority, probably related to capillary leakage and overall fluid overload. Pleural effusion is not the prominent feature in other viral pneumonias, whereas intralobular and interlobular septal thickening are characteristic of other viral pulmonary infections as well. Lung parenchymal findings in HRCT can thus be taken not to be disease-specific in NE and HRCT is useful only for scientific purposes.

  15. High-Resolution Computed Tomography and Chest X-Ray Findings of Interstitial Lung Disease Related to Systemic Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sheikh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Interstitial lung disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with scleroderma. For this reason an early diagnosis of lung involvement is warranted. The best approach to detect pulmonary disease particularly alveolitis (inflammatory NSIP as a reversible phase is controversial. The aim of this study is estimating the advantage of HRCT as a noninvasive screening test to detect the pattern of ILD related to systemic sclerosis.Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional study, 52 patients with scleroderma who referred to rheumatologic medical center from 2010 to 2011 were evaluated for ILD by the use of history, physical examination, CXR and HRCT. Finally, all the data were analyzed using SPSS13 software.Results: HRCT was normal in 21 patients (40.4%, and NSIP in 19 patients (36.5% and UIP in 12 patients (23.1% were reported. CXR was normal in 19 (36.5% and mild reticular pattern in 15 (28.8%, overt reticular pattern in 14 (26.9% and honey combing in 4 (7.7% were seen. HRCT findings were abnormal in 6(11.5% patients without dyspnea, 22(42.3% without cough, 20(38.4% without crackle in lung auscultation and 26(50% without clubbing in physical examination. In 2(3.8% patients no pulmonary signs and symptoms UIP were reported.Conclusion: HRCT is a noninvasive method to detect lung involvement in early phases independent of presence or absence of pulmonary signs and symptoms.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(2:16-22

  16. Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia in the immunocompromised patient: radiologic findings and follow-up in 12 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, P.M.; Miller, R.R.; Mueller, N.L. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-08-01

    A study group consisting of 12 consecutive immunocompromised patients were examined to assess the radiographic, computed tomography (CT) and pathologic findings and response to therapy of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP). These patients had pathologically proven cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, and chest radiographs and CT scans had been obtained within 9 days of their diagnosis. All the patients were treated with corticosteroids and underwent follow-up chest radiography. The findings of the radiography included consolidation (10 patients), reticulation (3 patients) and small nodules (2 patients). None of the radiographic abnormalities were localized to particular zones of the lung. CT findings included ground-glass attenuation (9 patients), consolidation (6 patients), small nodules (5 patients) and reticulation (2 patients). In 8 of the 12 patients, these abnormalities were most marked in the subpleural and peribronchovascular regions. The follow-up radiographs showed improvement in all but one patients. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  17. Radiation doses from common radiographic procedures: a ten year perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a semi-empirical model patient doses for a number of plain film radiographic procedures following the implementation of Computed Radiography (CR) technology in our Hospital have been evaluated. The results are presented in terms of the entrance surface dose (ESD) and the effective dose. A comparison of these results, with those reported previously for 1988, suggests that with the exception of chest radiography, patient doses have decreased although in many instances the decreases are not statistically significant. The finding for chest examinations stands apart from all others in that the introduction of CR technology has resulted in a substantial increase in patient dose for the PA view by at least 18%. The major reason for these apparently contradictory findings has its roots in the effectively variable speed of CR systems and the willingness of radiologists to accept more noise in some CR images

  18. Pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis in the setting of lung growth abnormality: radiographic and pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Monette; Vade, Aruna; Lim-Dunham, Jennifer Eden [Loyola University Health System, Department of Radiology, Maywood, IL (United States); Masuda, Emi [Henry Ford Hospital, Department of Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States); Massarani-Wafai, Rasan [Loyola University Health System, Department of Pathology, Maywood, IL (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis (PIG) is a rare pediatric interstitial lung disease. We report a case of a term boy presenting with tachypnea at birth requiring supplemental oxygen. Chest radiographs followed by high-resolution CT (HRCT) demonstrated hyperinflation and diffuse interstitial markings interspersed with multiple cystic spaces. An open lung biopsy demonstrated a minor component of PIG superimposed upon poor alveolarization. PIG in the setting of lung growth abnormality might be more common than previously described. Additionally, radiographic findings associated with most pediatric interstitial lung diseases are nonspecific, and histopathologic correlation is essential for diagnosis. (orig.)

  19. Pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis in the setting of lung growth abnormality: radiographic and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis (PIG) is a rare pediatric interstitial lung disease. We report a case of a term boy presenting with tachypnea at birth requiring supplemental oxygen. Chest radiographs followed by high-resolution CT (HRCT) demonstrated hyperinflation and diffuse interstitial markings interspersed with multiple cystic spaces. An open lung biopsy demonstrated a minor component of PIG superimposed upon poor alveolarization. PIG in the setting of lung growth abnormality might be more common than previously described. Additionally, radiographic findings associated with most pediatric interstitial lung diseases are nonspecific, and histopathologic correlation is essential for diagnosis. (orig.)

  20. What Is Chest MRI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Chest MRI? Chest MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe, noninvasive test. "Noninvasive" means that ... your chest wall, heart, and blood vessels. Chest MRI uses radio waves, magnets, and a computer to ...

  1. Radiographic findings of post-operative double stapled trans anal rectal resection (STARR) in patient with obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo's procedure of double stapled trans anal rectal resection (STARR) has been evocated as surgical treatment of the obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS) in patients with rectal mucosal prolapse. The aim of this study was to investigate the post-interventional findings of this technique, to help radiologist in knowledge of the changed morphology of the rectal lumen, also in attempt to recognize some potential related complications

  2. Comparing Clinicopathologic and Radiographic Findings Between TT-UMP, Classical, and Non-Encapsulated Follicular Variants of Papillary Thyroid Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baser, Husniye; Topaloglu, Oya; Tam, Abbas Ali; Alkan, Afra; Kilicarslan, Aydan; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2016-09-01

    Thyroid tumors of uncertain malignant potential (TT-UMP) comprise an accepted subgroup of follicular-patterned thyroid tumors for which benignancy or malignancy cannot be precisely assessed. We aimed to evaluate the demographic characteristics, ultrasound (US) findings, and cytological results of patients with TT-UMP and compare these findings to a classical variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (CV-PTC) and non-encapsulated follicular variant of PTC (NEFV-PTC) patients; we also evaluated the immunohistochemical characteristics of patients with TT-UMP. Twenty-four patients with TT-UMP, 672 with CV-PTC, and 132 with NEFV-PTC were included in the study. Mean longitudinal nodule size and median nodule volume were higher in the TT-UMP group than in the CV-PTC and NEFV-PTC groups (p  0.05). However, none of the patients with TT-UMP were called malignant; 105 patients (31.2 %) of CV-PTC and 11 patients (9.5 %) of NEFV-PTC (infiltrative FV) were classified as malignant cytologically. Tumor size was higher in the TT-UMP group than in the CV-PTC and NEFV-PTC groups (p tumor sizes than CV-PTC and NEFV-PTC patients; US features were similar between NEFV-PTC and TT-UMP patients. PMID:27256097

  3. Neurofibromatose tipo 1: aspectos radiológicos do tórax Type 1 neurofibromatosis: radiological findings of the chest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Pontes Muniz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar alterações e frequências nas radiografias simples do tórax sugestivas de neurofibromatose tipo 1 e avaliar a possibilidade de inclusão de massa no mediastino posterior como critério de diagnóstico de neurofibromatose tipo 1. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram realizadas radiografias com técnica padrão de tórax em póstero-anterior e em perfil de 141 pacientes com neurofibromatose tipo 1, atendidos no Serviço de Radiologia do Hospital de Base e Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto, SP. Os resultados obtidos foram avaliados por métodos não paramétricos ao nível de 0,05 de significância (p = 0,05. RESULTADOS: No presente estudo, 141 pacientes com neurofibromatose tipo 1 realizaram radiografia de tórax, sendo as alterações mais frequentes: erosão óssea das costelas (19,8%, peito escavado (12,0%, cifoescoliose (3,5% e massas no mediastino posterior (7,1%. Esses resultados sugerem que as massas (neurofibroma e meningocele devem ser incluídas como critério diagnóstico para neurofibromatose tipo 1, juntamente com displasia do osso esfenoide, pseudoartrose e afinamento do córtex de ossos longos, conforme definido pelo National Institutes of Health. CONCLUSÃO: A presença das massas no mediastino posterior associada às alterações ósseas características definidas pelo National Institutes of Health indicam ser um achado consistente para se considerar como critério diagnóstico da doença.OBJECTIVE: To identify chest radiography findings suggestive of type 1 neurofibromatosis, establishing their frequency and evaluating the possibility of including the presence of posterior mediastinal masses as a criterion for the diagnosis of type 1 neurofibromatosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The present study included 141 patients with type 1 neurofibromatosis assisted at the Service of Radiology of Hospital de Base and Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil, and submitted to standard chest

  4. The significance of routine radiographic findings with respect to subsequent racing performance and longevity in Standardbred trotters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective cohort study was made of the racing performance of trotters which had been subjected routinely to radiography before they started training and racing. Sixty-one per cent (148) of the 243 horses, foaled in 3 consecutive years, had one or more abnormal findings categorised into 5 relevant groups based on radiography, of which osteochondrosis (OCD) was the most specific diagnosis. Parameters used to reflect racing performance were: proportion of horses starting in races, number of starts per year, earnings per year, earnings per start and racing longevity. No significant association between the presence or type of radiological abnormalities and the subsequent performance and longevity could be found. Horses with multiple lesions, however, had a tendency to lower earnings and poorer survival than horses with single lesions

  5. A pilot study evaluating erect chest imaging in children, using the Lodox Statscan digital X-ray machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupesh Baloo Daya

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Chest radiography accounts for a significant proportion of ionising radiation in children. The radiation dose of radiographs performed on the Lodox Statscan system has been shown to be lower than that of a computed radiography (CR system. The role of the Lodox Statscan (hereafter referred to as the Statscan in routine erect chest radiography in children has not been evaluated. Objective: To evaluate the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of erect paediatric chest radiographs obtained with the Statscan and compare this with conventional erect chest images obtained with a CR system. Materials and Methods: Thirty three children with suspected chest pathology were enrolled randomly over a period of three months. Erect chest radiographs were obtained with the Statscan, and a Shimadzu R-20J X-ray machine coupled with a Fuji FCR 5000 CR system. Image quality and diagnostic accuracy and diagnostic capability were evaluated between the two modalities. Results: The erect Statscan allowed superior visualisation of the three major airways. Statscan images however, demonstrated exposure and movement artifacts with hemidiaphragms and ribs most prone to movement. Bronchovascular clarity was also considered unsatisfactory on the Statscan images. Conclusion: The Statscan has limitations in erect chest radiography in terms of movement artefacts, exposure fluctuations, and poor definition of lung markings. Despite this, the Statscan allows better visualisation of the major airways, equivalent to a ‘high KV’ film at a fraction of the radiation dose. This supports the finding of an earlier study evaluating Statscan images in trauma cases, where the images were taken supine. Statscan has great potential in assisting in the diagnosis of childhood tuberculosis where airway narrowing occurs as a result of nodal compression.

  6. Mycoplasma pneumonia in children: radiographic pattern analysis and difference in resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By analysing frequency and disease progression, this study aimed to investigate and predict the prognosis of mycoplasma pneumonia according to radiographic pattern. We retrospectively reviewed plain chest radiographs of 230 patients in whom mycoplasm pneumonia had been serologically confirmed. Their age ranged from two months to 14 years and two months, and 203(88.3%) were younger than eight years. Radiographic patterns were classified as air space consolidation, bronchopneumonic, interstitial pneumonic or diffuse mixed infiltrating type. The radiologic resolution period for each type was analysed by the resolution of symptoms and normalization of radiologic findings. The bronchopneumonic type, which was the most common, was seen in 82 patients(35.6%), airspace consolidation in 58(25.2%), interstitial in 55(23.9%), and diffuse mixed in 22(9.57%). In thirteen patients(5.7%), chest radiographs were normal, though the clinical and radiologic resolution period for each type was variable. The mean resolution period of the air space consolidation type was 14.5 days, bronchopneumonic, 7.6 days ; interstitial, 10.5 days, and diffuse mixed, 15.6 days. The airspace consolidation type needed the longest recovery period, exceeded only by the diffuse mixed type. The bronchopneumonic type was the most common radiographic pattern of mycoplasma pneumonia. The prognosis of the airspace consolidation type seems to be poorest, since this required the longest recovery period

  7. Computer aided diagnosis in digital chest radiography: evaluation of pulmonary emphysema in COPD patients

    OpenAIRE

    Coppini, Giuseppe; Ferdeghini, Ezio Maria; Paterni, Marco; Tonelli, Lucia; Bauleo, Carolina; Monti, Simonetta; Miniati, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    Computer-aided quantitative analysis of chest radiographs is a useful tool in describing alterations in lung shape that occur in patients with emphysema. In the present study, the analysis was limited to the lateral chest radiograph, but we expect that the use of the postero-anterior view may further improve the rate of correct classification.

  8. Cash's textbook of chest, heart and vascular disorders for physiotherapists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very high proportion of the patients treated by physiotherapy will have had a chest radiograph (x-ray) either because their primary disease is pulmonary or there is some long standing heart or lung illness which should be taken into account during the management of an acute problem. This chapter outlines the principles involved in reading the radiograph

  9. Assessing the role of routine chest radiography in asymptomatic students during registration at a university in an endemic area of tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moifo Boniface

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Routine chest radiographs are usually obtained from asymptomatic individuals during routine medical visits probably to detect the presence of occult disease. In sub-Saharan countries tuberculosis is endemic among young individuals; primary tuberculosis might be the most probable occult disease sought for. Aims: The aim was to determine the diagnostic yield and cost-effectiveness of routine chest radiography in an asymptomatic student population in Yaounde during registration at a university. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional descriptive study carried out in a University-affiliated hospital in Yaounde, Cameroon. Materials and Methods: Postero-anterior (PA chest radiographs were obtained from students during a routine medical visit before university admission. Radiographic results were coded as normal, minor, or major findings. The estimated cost per radiograph was that of the study setting at the time of the study. Statistical Analysis Used: Epi Info software version 3.3.2 of February 9 2005 (CDC Atlanta was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of 758 students enrolled, there were 280 males and 478 females (sex ratio 1:2. The mean age of the study population was 21 years (age range 15-33 years. All enrolled cases were asymptomatic. There were 739 normal radiographs (97.5%, while 19 radiographs (2.5 % showed minor abnormalities. No major abnormality was seen. The estimated direct cost of all the radiographs obtained was 3,941,600 F CFA ($ 8,760. Conclusions: Routine chest radiography has a low diagnostic yield in asymptomatic students even in a setting where tuberculosis is endemic, and is therefore not cost-effective.

  10. Drop attack during chest radiography: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest radiography is the first line of thoracic imaging performed in patients with thoracic diseases. It is probably the most frequently performed type of X-ray examination. It is recommended to be performed in the full upright position except where the patient's condition will not permit. This is because the erect technique allows full expansion of the lungs, prevents engorgement of pulmonary vessels and also helps in fluid level evaluation. However, little is reported on the negative effects associated with erect radiography. Herein, we present a case of drop attack during erect chest radiography. - Highlights: • Radiographers should be aware of the possibilities of drop attach during erect chest radiography. • A patient's determination to stand for chest radiograph may not always relate with the ability. • The causes of some drop attacks may be unknown. • Watching patients during radiographic exposure is essential. • Being alert and working very fast during erect chest examinations is important

  11. Influence of pre-anaesthetic thoracic radiographs on ASA physical status classification and anaesthetic protocols in traumatized dogs and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if pre-anaesthetic thoracic radiographs contribute to the anaesthetic management of trauma patients by comparing American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification (ASA grade) with and without information from thoracic radiography findings. Case records of 157 dogs and cats being anaesthetized with or without post-traumatic, pre-anaesthetic chest radiographs were retrospectively evaluated for clinical parameters, radiographic abnormalities and anaesthetic protocol. Animals were retrospectively assigned an ASA grade. ASA grades, clinical signs of respiratory abnormalities and anaesthesia protocols were compared between animals with and without chest radiographs. The group of animals without pre-anaesthetic radiographs was anaesthetized earlier after trauma and showed less respiratory abnormalities at presentation. The retrospectively evaluated ASA grade significantly increased with the information from thoracic radiography. Animals with a higher ASA grade were less frequently mechanically ventilated. Pre-anaesthetic radiographs may provide important information to assess the ASA grade in traumatized patients and may therefore influence the anesthesia protocol

  12. Radiographic plain film and CT findings in lipoid pneumonia in infants following aspiration of mineral oil used in the treatment of partial small bowel obstruction by Ascaris lumbricoides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four children developed lipoid pneumonia following ingestion of mineral oil for the treatment of partial small bowel obstruction by Ascaris lumbricoides whorl. CT of the chest showed negative Hounsfield numbers which may prove useful in diagnosis. (orig.)

  13. Radiographic plain film and CT findings in lipoid pneumonia in infants following aspiration of mineral oil used in the treatment of partial small bowel obstruction by Ascaris lumbricoides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, G.A. de; Del Caro, S.R.; Bender Lamego, C.M.; Mercon de Vargas, P.R.; Vervloet, V.E.C.

    1985-02-01

    Four children developed lipoid pneumonia following ingestion of mineral oil for the treatment of partial small bowel obstruction by Ascaris lumbricoides whorl. CT of the chest showed negative Hounsfield numbers which may prove useful in diagnosis.

  14. Radiographic resolution of lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis (LIP) in children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV): not a sign of clinical deterioration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. The literature and anecdotal evidence associate the resolution of radiographic findings of lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis (LIP) with a decline in immune and clinical status of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected children. Objective. As our clinical impression was the opposite, we sought to elucidate this contradiction. Materials and methods. Of 52 pediatric patients infected with the HIV currently being followed at our institution, 20 (38.5 %) carried the diagnosis of LIP and 13 (65 %) of these have had complete resolution of radiographic findings of LIP. We retrospectively reviewed the chest radiographs, CD4 counts, and clinical history of these 13 patients. Results. Of the 13 patients who had resolution of radiographic findings, 11 (84.6 %) had no significant change in CD4 count at the time of resolution and remained clinically stable during a mean follow-up period of 32 months. Two patients (15.3 %) developed severe CD4 lymphocytopenia at the time of resolution of LIP, but clinically remained stable. None of these 13 patients had a recurrence of LIP, even with subsequent increases in CD4 count. Conclusion. We suggest that in contradiction to previously published data, resolution of LIP on chest radiographs is not an indicator for poor prognosis for the HIV-infected pediatric patient. (orig.)

  15. Problems in radiographic detection and diagnosis of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayabuchi, N; Russell, W J; Murakami, J

    1989-01-01

    All chest radiographs of 107 proven lung cancer patients who received consecutive biennial chest radiography were reviewed to elucidate problems detecting their cancers, and diagnosing them when initially radiographically detected. Subjects, members of a fixed population sample, originally numbered 20,000 persons, 17,000 of whom consistently received consecutive biennial chest radiography during examinations for late effects of atomic-bomb radiation. Among the 107 subjects, 64 had radiographic manifestations of cancer; 47 were initially correctly diagnosed; 17 were not. Eleven of the 17 were initially equivocal, diagnosable only after subsequent radiography and retrospective review of serial radiographs. Diagnostic problems consisted of 1) six detection errors with cancer images superimposed on musculoskeletal and cardiovascular structures, reducible by stereoscopic p.a. instead of single p.a. radiography; immediate tentative interpretations; and by comparing earlier with current radiographs. 2) Eight decision errors, wherein cancers mimicked other diseases, were reducible by greater index of suspicion and scrutiny during interpretations. PMID:2923739

  16. Observer variation in chest radiography of acute lower respiratory infections in children: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge of the accuracy of chest radiograph findings in acute lower respiratory infection in children is important when making clinical decisions. I conducted a systematic review of agreement between and within observers in the detection of radiographic features of acute lower respiratory infections in children, and described the quality of the design and reporting of studies, whether included or excluded from the review. Included studies were those of observer variation in the interpretation of radiographic features of lower respiratory infection in children (neonatal nurseries excluded) in which radiographs were read independently and a clinical population was studied. I searched MEDLINE, HealthSTAR and HSRPROJ databases (1966 to 1999), handsearched the reference lists of identified papers and contacted authors of identified studies. I performed the data extraction alone. Ten studies of observer interpretation of radiographic features of lower respiratory infection in children were identified. Seven of the studies satisfied four or more of the seven design and reporting criteria. Six studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. Inter-observer agreement varied with the radiographic feature examined. Kappa statistics ranged from around 0.80 for individual radiographic features to 0.27–0.38 for bacterial vs viral etiology. Little information was identified on observer agreement on radiographic features of lower respiratory tract infections in children. Agreement varied with the features assessed from 'fair' to 'very good'. Aspects of the quality of the methods and reporting need attention in future studies, particularly the description of criteria for radiographic features

  17. Radiologic findings of neonatal sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To review the simple radiographic and sonographic findings in infants with neonatal sepsis. We retrospectively analyzed simple chest and abdominal radiographs, and brain sonograms in 36 newborn infants (preterm : term=23 :13). With neonatal sepsis diagnosed by blood culture and clinical manifestations. Pulmonary parenchymal infiltrate excluding respiratory distress syndrome and pulmonary edema or atelectasis was found in 22 infants (61%). Paralytic ileus, hepatosplenomegaly, and necrotizing enterocolitis were present in 18(50%), 9(25%), and 1(3%) infants, respectively, while skeletal changes suggesting osteomyelitis were found in three. Brain sonography was performed in 29 infants and in four, abnormalities were seen ; these comprised three germinal matrix hemorrhages and one intraparenchymal hemorrhage. In six patients(17%) radiologic examinations revealed no abnormality. In patients with neonatal sepsis, pulmonary infiltrates and paralytic ileus were common abnormalities. Although these were nonspecific, radiologic findings may be used to supplement clinical and laboratory findings in diagnosing neonatal sepsis and planning its treatment

  18. Radiologic findings of neonatal sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sam Soo; Han, Dae Hee; Choi, Guk Myeong; Jung, Hye Won [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hye Kyung; Han, Bokyung Kim; Lee, Nam Yong [Sansung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-01

    To review the simple radiographic and sonographic findings in infants with neonatal sepsis. We retrospectively analyzed simple chest and abdominal radiographs, and brain sonograms in 36 newborn infants (preterm : term=23 :13). With neonatal sepsis diagnosed by blood culture and clinical manifestations. Pulmonary parenchymal infiltrate excluding respiratory distress syndrome and pulmonary edema or atelectasis was found in 22 infants (61%). Paralytic ileus, hepatosplenomegaly, and necrotizing enterocolitis were present in 18(50%), 9(25%), and 1(3%) infants, respectively, while skeletal changes suggesting osteomyelitis were found in three. Brain sonography was performed in 29 infants and in four, abnormalities were seen ; these comprised three germinal matrix hemorrhages and one intraparenchymal hemorrhage. In six patients(17%) radiologic examinations revealed no abnormality. In patients with neonatal sepsis, pulmonary infiltrates and paralytic ileus were common abnormalities. Although these were nonspecific, radiologic findings may be used to supplement clinical and laboratory findings in diagnosing neonatal sepsis and planning its treatment.

  19. Radiographic quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The control and evaluation of radiographic quality vary considerably from institution to institution, and this has resulted in increased government legislation in most jurisdictions, which attempts to provide some measure of uniformity in standards of equipment installation, maintenance, and use. Where legislation is not yet in place, it is pending, so that all facilities using x-radiation are, or soon will be, legally bound to operate within accepted guidelines. These guidelines are established to provide the radiologist with radiographs of optimum diagnostic quality while keeping the radiation dose to the patient and radiology personnel as low as possible. There are many excellent publications that provide detailed step-by-step instructions on each facet of radiographic quality control these procedures will, therefore, not be covered in detail here. The following information may, however, be of interest as it relates primarily to pediatric radiography and will prove useful to those initiating quality control and evaluation programs

  20. Radiographic artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the early days of radiology, artifacts have appeared on radiographs. Actually, the first radiograph ever taken had an artifact present, a metallic ring on the patient's hand. Artifacts are a common cause of repeat radiographs; they often occur in unexpected places, with many peculiar internal objects being detected. Without a complete history many unusual artifactual shadows cannot be adequately identified. This chapter is presented in ''atlas'' format, using a pictorial review of various artifacts. Few radiological interpretation texts show any artifacts, despite their common occurrence. This provided the impetus to add this atlas to the book. In order to avoid the production of these artifacts, close attention to patient preparation and positioning and good darkroom procedures are necessary. The use of up-to-date, good quality x-ray equipment is also very helpful

  1. Cash's textbook of chest, heart and vascular disorders for physiotherapists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downie, P.A.; Innocenti, D.M.; Jackson, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book includes a chapter on chest radiographs. A very high proportion of the patients treated by physiotherapy will have had a chest radiograph (x-ray) either because their primary disease is pulmonary or there is some long standing heart or lung illness which should be taken into account during the management of an acute problem. The chapter outlines the principles involved in reading the radiograph.

  2. Diffuse panbronchiolitis: high-resolution CT findings and correlation with pulmonary function test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffuse panbronchiolitis(DPB) is a chronic inflammatory airway disease of unknown causes mainly affecting the respiratory bronchioles and the more proximal bronchi. Findings on chest radiographs and high-resolution CT(HRCT) are well known and Akira classified HRCT findings of DPB into four types. Purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between findings of HRCT and PFT. We retrospectively analyzed the chest radiographs and HRCT images of eleven patients with DPB and compared CT classification with pulmonary function test. Chest radiographs usually showed small nodular opacities throughout the both middle and lower lungs. The HRCT findings of DPB were centrilobularly distributed small nodular densities, branching linear densities contiguous with small round densities, dilated and thickened peripheral and central airways including bronchioles. More than one CT type by Akira's classification, usually two or three types, were found in nine patients. There was good correlation between CT types and FEV1%(ρ < 0.05), CT types and FEV1/FVC (ρ < 0.05) respectively. HRCT seems to be more useful for diagnosis and disease progression of DPB as compared with the chest radiographs or clinical stage such as pulmonary functions test

  3. Hypogenetic lung syndrome in an adolescent: Imaging findings with short review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahamed Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypogenetic lung syndrome is more popularly known as a scimitar syndrome (SS. It is a rare developmental lung malformation which almost always occurs on the right side. The two most constant features of this syndrome are anomalous pulmonary venous return into systemic circulation, most frequently via inferior vena cava (IVC, and lung hypoplasia. We are reporting such a case illustrating most typical and some uncommon features on chest radiograph and multislice computer tomography (MSCT of chest. Focal herniation of liver through a diaphragmatic defect presenting as an ovoid soft tissue mass in right lower paraspinal region on chest X ray mimicking sequestration is an interesting but rare finding.

  4. Digital luminescence radiography of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a digital system in chest radiology compared to the conventional film-screen system. The first studies (1-3) were purely clinical, had two parts, one clinical and one using phantoms, and the 5:th used solely phantoms. Except for the first - pilot - study, the studies were performed as receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. From one exposure, two digital radiographs were obtained, one simulating the film-screen radiograph and one enhanced, using an unsharp mask. The conventional radiograph was compared to this double-image, but in addition to this, even to the simulated normal and enhanced separately (1-3). To evaluate the value of inverted (positive) radiographs, the original digital (negative) radiographs were inverted, and then compared to the originals (4). As digitzation means easy storing and transfer of data and possibility of electronic display, the diagnostic performance of an interactive workstation was assessed (5). In the clinical studies, a variety of chest affections were used: atelectasis, tumor, pneumothorax, fibrosis, mediastinal and bony changes, tuberculosis, incompensations and enlargement of the heart (1), pneumothorax (2), fibrosis (3), and tumor (4). In the phantom studies, test objects simulating tumors (4) and pneumothorax (5) were used. In no study was statistical significant difference seen between the digital and conventional system (p>0.05). Neither in the clinical nor the phantom study did inversion of the radiographs improve diagnostic performance. The workstation performed almost equally well as the radiographs even with a resolution of 1.25 1p/mm compared to the digital radiographs 2.5 and film-screen radiographs 5 1p/mm. (au) (50 refs.)

  5. Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia in children with AIDS: high-resolution CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary involvement in children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) represents a wide spectrum of diseases. Among the non-infectious, non-neoplastic affections associated with AIDS, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP) is now a well-recognized entity, but its radiological pattern studied with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) has rarely been described in children. The aim of this study was to illustrate the HRCT spectrum of pulmonary involvement in children with LIP and to evaluate its usefulness in the early diagnosis of this entity. Twelve children with AIDS, aged 3-9 years (mean age 5 years 7 months), underwent chest radiographs and HRCT. A control group of 7 healthy aged-matched children was also studied in the same conditions. Diagnosis of LIP was based on clinical data and HRCT findings. Eight children of 12 had a reticulonodular pattern on chest radiographs. Two children had normal chest films and two children showed peribronchiolar thickening. High-resolution CT displayed micronodules, 1-3 mm in diameter, with a perilymphatic distribution in all patients. High-resolution CT demonstrated also subpleural nodules in children without reticulonodular opacities on chest radiographs. High-resolution CT is able to define a more specific pattern of abnormalities than conventional chest radiographs in children with LIP, allows an earlier and more confident diagnosis and may be useful for the detection of other pathologies associated with AIDS, such as opportunistic infections or superimposed malignancies. (orig.)

  6. Prevalence and clinical significance of incidental cardiac findings in non-ECG-gated chest CT scans; Praevalenz und klinische Bedeutung inzidenteller Herzbefunde im nicht EKG-getriggerten Thorax-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quentin, M.; Kroepil, P.; Lanzman, R.S.; Blondin, D.; Miese, F.; Scherer, A. [Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Institut fuer Radiologie, Duesseldorf (Germany); Steiner, S. [Klinikum der Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Klinik fuer Kardiologie, Pneumologie und Angiologie, Duesseldorf (Germany); Choy, G.; Abbara, S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Cardiovascular Imaging Section, Boston (United States)

    2011-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of incidental cardiac findings in non-ECG-gated chest CT. Non-ECG-gated chest CT examinations of 300 patients were retrospectively analyzed for incidental cardiac findings. Subsequently, these findings were evaluated for their clinical relevance by a cardiologist. A total of 107 out of 300 examined patients had 174 incidental cardiac findings including coronary calcification (90), aortic/mitral valve calcification (42), iatrogenic changes (23), pericardial effusion (6), dilatation of the heart (4), myocardial changes (3), thrombus in the left ventricle (2), constrictive pericarditis (2) and atrial myxoma (1). Of the cardiac findings 51% were described in the written report and in 53 out of the 107 patients the cardiac findings were unknown. Newly detected incidental findings from 8 patients were rated as clinically significant: pericardial effusion (4), constrictive pericarditis (1), thrombus in the left ventricle (1), atrial myxoma (1) and dilatation of the heart (1). Incidental cardiac findings are frequent in non-ECG-gated chest CT and may have a high clinical relevance. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Studie war es, die Praevalenz und klinische Bedeutung inzidenteller Herzbefunde im nicht EKG-getriggerten Thorax-CT ohne primaer kardiale Fragestellung zu evaluieren. Dreihundert nicht EKG-getriggerte Thorax-CT-Untersuchungen wurden retrospektiv bzgl. inzidenteller Herzbefunde analysiert. Die klinische Bedeutung wurde von einem Kardiologen bewertet. Von 300 Patienten hatten 107 insgesamt 174 Herzbefunde: Koronarsklerose (90), Aorten-/Mitralklappenverkalkung (42), iatrogene Veraenderungen (23), Perikarderguss (6), Herzvergroesserung (4), Myokardpathologien (3), Perikardverkalkungen (2), Thrombus im linken Ventrikel (2) und Myxom (1). Im radiologischen Bericht wurden 51% aller Herzbefunde beschrieben. Bei 53 der 107 Patienten mit Herzbefund waren diese klinisch nicht bekannt. Als

  7. Lung disease assessment in primary ciliary dyskinesia: a comparison between chest high-field magnetic resonance imaging and high-resolution computed tomography findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacotucci Paola

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is associated with pulmonary involvement that requires periodical assessment. Chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT has become the method of choice to evaluate chronic lung disease, but entails exposure to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been proposed as a potential radiation-free technique in several chest disorders. Aim of our study is to evaluate whether high-field MRI is as effective as HRCT in identifying PCD pulmonary abnormalities. We also analyzed the relationships between the severity and extension of lung disease, and functional data. Methods Thirteen PCD patients (8 children/5 adults; median age, 15.2 yrs underwent chest HRCT and high-field 3T MRI, spirometry, and deep throat or sputum culture. Images were scored using a modified version of the Helbich system. Results HRCT and MRI total scores were 12 (range, 6–20 and 12 (range, 5–17, respectively. Agreement between HRCT and MRI scores was good or excellent (r > 0.8. HRCT and MRI total scores were significantly related to forced vital capacity (r = -0.5, p = 0.05; and r = -0.7, p = 0.009, respectively and forced expiratory volume at 1 second (r = -0.6, p = 0.03; and r = -0.7, p = 0.009, respectively. Conclusion Chest high-field 3T MRI appears to be as effective as HRCT in assessing the extent and severity of lung abnormalities in PCD. MRI scores might be used for longitudinal assessment and be an outcome surrogate in future studies.

  8. Radiographic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this disclosure, a radiographic method is described by which a decrease in the duration of exposure to (X-)radiation is obtained. In this way a greater accuracy can be achieved. A multiple detector system is applied in the present set-up. The method is compared to existing techniques

  9. Digital chest radiography: collimation and dose reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian;

    Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials:A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from...... one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years of age are included in the study. The clinical research is performed between September and November 2014 where 3rd year Radiography students collect data on four Danish x-ray departments using identical procedures under guidance of...... conference. Conclusion: Collimation improvement in basic chest radiography can reduce the radiation to female patients at chest x-ray examinations....

  10. Chest x-ray in Q-fever pneumonia: a series of 71 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest X ray features of 71 cases of Q-fever serologically confirmed and with clinical manifestations of acute respiratory disease were retrospectively assessed in order to evaluate the radiographic features. In 68 cases (96%) The X-ray films were abnormal. Segmental consolidation, sometimes multiple and bilateral were tue most usual findings. Nodular opacities were found in 6 cases (9%) and can mimic a tumor. Cavitacion , a very unusual findings, was found in two nodular consolidations(two patients). Laminar atelectasis was less common than proviously reported. As in other series, total resolution or with minimal scars occurs within 3 months 15 refs

  11. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  12. How do radiologists do it? The influence of experience and training on searching for chest nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four observer groups with different levels of expertise were tested to investigate the nature of expert performance. The task was the detection and localisation of significant pulmonary nodules in postero-anterior views of the chest. One hundred and twenty digitised chest images were used. The observer groups were 8 experienced radiologists, 5 experienced radiographers before and after six months training in chest image interpretation, and 8 undergraduate radiography students. Eye tracking was carried out to investigate differences in visual search strategies between observers. Detection performance was measured with an Alternate Free Response Operating Characteristic technique. Performance measures showed the experienced group of radiologists plus radiographers after training were better at the task than the remainder (t-test p = 0.046). Differences were shown in the eye-tracking parameters between the groups: saccadic amplitude (ANOVA p 0.00047), number of fixations before and after training (t-test p = 0.041), and scrutiny time per decision and per film for the experienced versus the inexperienced observers (t-test p = 0.02). Visual coverage reduced with increasing level of experience but this result did not reach significance. Generally there were distinct differences in the search strategies between the experienced and inexperienced observers and we discuss the significance of these findings. We believe the results support some recent theoretical models of expert performance and that the findings may prove to be helpful in 'fast-track' educational programmes of image interpretation for non-radiology practitioners

  13. Prevalence of edentulousness, prosthetic need and panoramic radiographic findings of totally and partially edentulous patients in a sample of Turkish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Avsever

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: Radiographic examination is crucial for pre-prosthetic evaluation on partially or totally edentulous patients that should considered as the first step to avoid the repetition of prosthetic rehabilitation, time waste, prestige loss and high treatment costs. [J Exp Integr Med 2014; 4(3.000: 220-226

  14. How accurately can digital images depict conventional radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how accurately the video image of a digitized chest radiograph can depict normal anatomic configurations of thoracic organs seen on a conventional radiograph. These configurations are important to diagnosis of diseases of the chest. Chest radiographs of 50 individuals diagnosed as normal were analyzed. Three chest physicians and one radiologist reviewed 50 pairs of digitized images (digitized in 0.125-mm pixel size, 10-bit gray scale, displayed on 1,024 x 1.536, 8-bit gray scale) constructed and conventional films. The visibility of eight structures (spinal process, trachea, right and left main bronchus, anterior tip of right fourth rib, vessels behind diaphragm and cardiac shadow, and descending aorta behind heart) was graded into five levels of confidence

  15. Errors in chest x-ray interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Reporting of adult chest x-rays by appropriately trained radiographers is frequently used in the United Kingdom as one method to maintain a patient focused radiology service in times of increasing workload. With models of advanced practice being developed in Australia, New Zealand and Canada, the spotlight is on the evidence base which underpins radiographer reporting. It is essential that any radiographer who extends their scope of practice to incorporate definitive clinical reporting perform at a level comparable to a consultant radiologist. In any analysis of performance it is important to quantify levels of sensitivity and specificity and to evaluate areas of error and variation. A critical review of the errors made by reporting radiographers in the interpretation of adult chest x-rays will be performed, examining performance in structured clinical examinations, clinical audit and a diagnostic accuracy study from research undertaken by the authors, and including studies which have compared the performance of reporting radiographers and consultant radiologists. overall performance will be examined and common errors discussed using a case based approach. Methods of error reduction, including multidisciplinary team meetings and ongoing learning will be considered

  16. Radiographers and trainee radiologists reporting accident radiographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buskov, L; Abild, A; Christensen, A;

    2013-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy and clinical validity of reporting radiographers with that of trainee radiologists whom they have recently joined in reporting emergency room radiographs at Bispebjerg University Hospital.......To compare the diagnostic accuracy and clinical validity of reporting radiographers with that of trainee radiologists whom they have recently joined in reporting emergency room radiographs at Bispebjerg University Hospital....

  17. Radiographic element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic elements are disclosed comprised of first and second silver halide emulsion layers separated by an interposed support capable of transmitting radiation to which the second image portion is responsive. At least the first imaging portion contains a silver halide emulsion in which thin tubular silver halide grains of intermediate aspect ratios (from 5:1 to 8:1) are present. Spectral sensitizing dye is adsorbed to the surface of the tubular grains. Increased photographic speeds can be realized at comparable levels of crossover. (author)

  18. Radiographic element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic elements are disclosed having first and second silver halide emulsion layers comprised of a dispersing medium and radiation-sensitive silver halide grains, and a support interposed between said silver halide emulsion layers capable of transmitting radiation to which said second silver halide emulsion layer is responsive. These elements are characterized in that at least said first silver halide emulsion layer contains tabular silver halide grains and spectral sensitizing dye adsorbed to the surface of the grains. Crossover can be improved in relation to the imaging characteristics. (author)

  19. Radiographic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention discloses a radiographic system comprising an X-ray source disposed to direct an X-ray beam through an adjustable shutter aperture in an aligned collimator and onto an image receptor in a holder located at a preselected distance from the source; and automatic means for preventing an X-ray exposure until prescribed operating conditions have been satisfied, the automatic means including a readily interchangeable read-only-memory module for storing the prescribed conditions therein and ascertaining whether or not the prescribed conditions have been met

  20. Associations between physical examination, laboratory, and radiographic findings and outcome and subsequent racing performance of foals with Rhodococcus equi infection: 115 cases (1984-1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective-To determine whether physical examination, laboratory, or radiographic abnormalities in foals with Rhodococcus equi infection were associated with survival, ability to race at least once after recovery, or, for foals that survived and went on to race, subsequent Facing performance. Design-Retrospective study. Animals-49 Thoroughbreds and 66 Standardbreds admitted to 1 of 6 veterinary teaching hospitals between 1984 and 1992 in which R equi infection was positively diagnosed. Procedure-Results of physical examination, laboratory testing, and thoracic radiography were reviewed. Indices of Facing performance were obtained for feats that recovered and eventually raced and compared with values for the US racing population. Results-83 (72%) feats survived. Foals that did not survive were more likely to have extreme tachycardia (heart rate > 100 beats/min), be in respiratory distress, and have severe radiographic abnormalities on thoracic radiographs at the time of initial examination than were foals that survived. Clinicopathologic abnormalities were not associated with whether feats did or did not survive. Forty-five of the 83 surviving foals (54%) eventually raced at least once, but none of the factors examined was associated with whether foals went on to race. Racing performance of foals that raced as adults was not significantly different from that of the US racing population. Clinical Implications-R equi infection in foals is associated with a decreased chance of racing as an adult, however, foals that eventually go on to race perform comparably to the US racing population

  1. The significance of radiology in the diagnosis of pyometra (endometritis post oestrum) in dogs: An evaluation of the correlation between radiographic and laboratoy findings in 131 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 131 bitches with proven pyometra or endometritis post oestrum (E. P. O.) a retrospective study of the lateral abdominal radiograph was carried out. In 31 (24%) of the cases (group 1) the uterine silhouette could not be perceived on the survey radiograph. In the other 100 cases (group 2) the uterus was clearly visible. Its diameter was measured and compared to the length of the second lumbar vertebra. The values for this ratio ranged between 0.4 and 3.5. The smallest uterine diameter perceived on the plain lateral abdominal radiograph measured 12 mm. Within group 2 the degree of uterine distension was significantly correlated with the number of white blood cells and the serum haptoglobin concentration. This correlation suggests a relation between the degree of uterine distension, the amount of uterine pus, the degree of uterine inflammation and the general inflammatory and stress reaction. Renal failure was more frequently observed in bitches with a greatly enlarged uterus than with a normal or only slightly enlarged uterus, although the degree of renal failure was not correlated to the uterine diameter. Within group 2 the closed type of pyometra was associated with a more enlarged uterus, but not with a higher leucocytosis

  2. Pneumocystis Jirovecii Pneumonia- Imaging findings in 19 patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Goudarzi

    2009-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP),formely called pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, is a serious disease in immunocompromised patients, particularly those with AIDS. However, many patients with this disease are unaware of their HIV serostatus, requiring early and prompt diagnosis of the disease. Early chest radiographic findings of PJP may be subtle or equivocal. On the other hand, advances in the treatment and prevention of the disease is associated with an increased rate of atypical manif...

  3. Efficacy of daily bedside chest radiography as visualized by digital luminescence radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the diagnostic impact of daily bedside chest radiography in comparison with digital luminescence technique (DLR; storage phosphor radiography) and conventional film screen radiography, a prospective randomized study was completed in 210 mechanically ventilated patients with a total of 420 analysed radiographs. The patients were allocated to two groups: 150 patients underwent DLR, and 60 patients underwent conventional film screen radiography. Radiological analysis was performed consensually and therapeutic efficacy was assessed by the clinicians. There was no statistical significant difference between the frequency of abnormal findings seen on DLR and conventional film screen radiography. In total, 448 abnormal findings were present in 249 of 300 DLR and 97 of 120 conventional film screen radiographs. The most common findings were signs of overhydration (41 %), pleural effusion (31%), partial collapse of the lung (11%) and pneumothorax (2%). One hundred and twenty-three of 448 (27%) of these abnormal findings were thought to have a considerable impact on patient management. The high rate of abnormal findings with significant impact on patient management suggests that the use of daily bedside chest radiography may be reasonable. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  4. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used ... diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A ...

  5. Computer-aided recognition of emphysema on digital chest radiography.

    OpenAIRE

    Miniati, Massimo; Coppini, Giuseppe; Monti, Simonetta; Bottai, Matteo; Paterni, Marco; Ferdeghini, Ezio Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) is the benchmark for diagnosis emphysema, but is costly and imparts a substantial radiation burden to the patient. Objective To develop a computer-aided procedure that allows recognition of emphysema on digital chest radiography by using simple descriptors of the lung shape. The procedure was tested against CT. Methods Patients (N=225), who had undergone postero-anterior and lateral digital chest radiographs and CT for diagnostic purposes, were studied and ...

  6. Young Woman with a Fever and Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin H. Dwyer, MD, MPH

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old female presented to the emergency department with three days of subjective fevers, dry cough and pleuritic chest discomfort. On exam, her vital signs were significant for a heart rate of 106/minute and oxygen saturation of 95% on room air. Her lung exam revealed decreased breath sounds at the right base. A bedside lung ultrasound and a chest radiograph were performed (Figure 1a, Figure 2, and Video.

  7. The radiographic and MRI features of gout referred as suspected soft tissue sarcoma: a review of the literature and findings from 27 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Neil [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Imaging Department, London (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, Asif [The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-24

    Gout has been termed the ''great mimicker'', for its ability to resemble other pathological conditions. Whilst the typical imaging features of gout are well described, there is a relative paucity of literature describing more challenging cases of gout, where a malignant tumour has been considered in the differential diagnosis. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the radiographic and MRI features of 27 cases of gout that were initially referred to our centre as suspected soft tissue sarcoma, alongside a review of the literature. (orig.)

  8. Reading and interpretation of chest X-ray in adults with community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Carolina Moncada

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Traditional reading of chest X-rays usually has a low prognostic value and poor agreement. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the interobserver and intraobserver agreement using two reading formats in patients with community-acquired pneumonia, and to explore their association with etiology and clinical outcomes. METHODS: A pulmonologist and a radiologist, who were blind to clinical data, interpreted 211 radiographs using a traditional analysis format (type and location of pulmonary infiltrates and pleural findings, and a quantitative analysis (pulmonary damage categorized from 0 to 10. For both, the interobserver and intraobserver agreement was estimated (Kappa statistic and intraclass correlation coefficient. The latter was assessed in a subsample of 25 radiographs three months after the initial reading. Finally, the observers made a joint reading to explore its prognostic usefulness via multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Seventy-four chest radiographs were discarded due to poor quality. With the traditional reading, the mean interobserver agreement was moderate (0.43. It was considered good when the presence of pleural effusion, and the location of the infiltrates in the right upper lobe and both lower lobes, were evaluated; moderate for multilobar pneumonia; and poor for the type of infiltrates. The mean intraobserver agreement for each reviewer was 0.71 and 0.5 respectively. The quantitative reading had an agreement between good and excellent (interobserver 0.72, intraobserver 0.85 and 0.61. Radiological findings were neither associated to a specific pathogen nor to mortality. CONCLUSION: In patients with pneumonia, the interpretation of the chest X-ray, especially the smallest of details, depends solely on the reader.

  9. Chest x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  10. Anterior chest wall tuberculous abscess: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papavramidis Theodossis S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The granulomatous inflammation of tuberculosis usually involves the lungs and the hilar lymph nodes. Musculoskeletal tuberculosis (TB occurs in 1–3% of patients with TB, while TB of the chest wall constitutes 1% to 5% of all cases of musculoskeletal TB. Furthermore, nowadays it is rarer to find extrapulmonary TB in immunocompetent rather that non-immunocompetent patients. The present case reports a fifty-six-year-old immunocompetent man with an anterior chest wall tuberculous abscess. The rarity of the present case relates both to the localization of the tuberculous abscess, and to the fact that the patient was immunocompetent. The diagnosis of musculoskeletal tuberculous infection remains a challenge for clinicians and requires a high index of suspicion. The combination of indolent onset of symptoms, positive tuberculin skin test, and compatible radiographic findings, strongly suggests the diagnosis. TB, however, must be confirmed by positive culture or histologic proof. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are important to prevent serious bone and joint destruction.

  11. Extracapsular femoro-fabelo-tibial inter-connection technique used in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture - clinical and radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was aimed at evaluating the results of extracapsular femoro-fabelo-tibial inter-connection technique, for the treatment of spontaneous cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) in dogs, using for this purpose clinical and radiographic evaluation. In this study 13 dogs allocated in two groups were operated: unilateral rupture (RU) and bilateral rupture (RB). The weight ranged between 2.3 and 53kg (median 6.7kg) and the interval between the suspect of lesion observed by the owners and the surgical procedures ranged between three and 365 days (mean 123 days). None of the operated knee were observed intra-operative complication. After 30 days of postoperative the two groups showed statistically significant difference (P=0.05) in the evaluated parameters, except of the pain and willingness to hold up the contralateral limb on the group of the dogs with bilateral rupture. At the radiographic exam on the 0 and 180 days, the evolution of degenerative changes was seen in 84.6% of cases. The extracapsular femur-fabelo-tibial interconnection technique is efficient in the immediate stabilization of joint with CCLR, offering functional recovery for reduce the cranial displacement and internal rotation of the tibia, however it doesn’t stop the osteoarthritis progression

  12. Radiographic and CT features of radiation-induced organizing pneumonia syndrome after breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate radiographic and computed tomography features of radiation-induced organizing pneumonia syndrome after breast-conserving surgery. The appearances and distribution of lung parenchymal abnormalities were retrospectively analyzed on chest radiographs (n=12) and computed tomography scan images (n=10) of 12 women (range 37-78 years, mean 55.8 years) with radiation-induced organizing pneumonia syndrome after breast-conserving surgery. The principal radiographic feature was an airspace filling pattern in all patients that involved the middle and lower lung zones in 10 of the 12 patients. Multi-focal lesions manifesting airspace consolidation surrounded by ground-glass opacities were the predominant CT finding in all 10 of these patients. The main lesion was predominantly located in the lung periphery in nine patients and contiguously extended to the central portion of the lung in seven patients. Frequent ancillary findings were airway dilation within the consolidation and lobar volume loss in nine and eight patients, respectively. All had solitary (6/10) or multifocal (4/10) distant lung opacities, mostly consistent with the finding of ground-glass opacities (9/10). Migration of the lung disease was observed in ten patients on subsequent radiographs. The cardinal radiologic feature of this syndrome is airspace consolidation surrounded by ground-glass opacification with airway dilation and volume loss, involving primarily the irradiated, subpleural area, along with distant opacities. (author)

  13. A population-based cohort study of chest x-ray screening in smokers: lung cancer detection findings and follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case-control studies of mass screening for lung cancer (LC) by chest x-rays (CXR) performed in the 1990s in scarcely defined Japanese target populations indicated significant mortality reductions, but these results are yet to be confirmed in western countries. To ascertain whether CXR screening decreases LC mortality at community level, we studied a clearly defined population-based cohort of smokers invited to screening. We present here the LC detection results and the 10-year survival rates. The cohort of all smokers of > 10 pack-years resident in 50 communities of Varese, screening-eligible (n = 5,815), in July 1997 was invited to nonrandomized CXR screening. Self-selected participants (21% of cohort) underwent screening in addition to usual care; nonparticipants received usual care. The cohort was followed-up until December 2010. Kaplan-Meier LC-specific survival was estimated in participants, in nonparticipants, in the whole cohort, and in an uninvited, unscreened population (control group). Over the initial 9.5 years of study, 67 LCs were diagnosed in screening participants (51% were screen-detected) and 178 in nonparticipants. The rates of stage I LC, resectability and 5-year survival were nearly twice as high in participants (32% stage I; 48% resected; 30.5% 5-year survival) as in nonparticipants (17% stage I; 27% resected; 13.5% 5-year survival). There were no bronchioloalveolar carcinomas among screen-detected cancers, and median volume doubling time of incidence screen-detected LCs was 80 days (range, 44-318), suggesting that screening overdiagnosis was minimal. The 10-year LC-specific survival was greater in screening participants than in nonparticipants (log-rank, p = 0.005), and greater in the whole cohort invited to screening than in the control group (log-rank, p = 0.001). This favourable long-term effect was independently related to CXR screening exposure. In the setting of CXR screening offered to a population-based cohort of smokers, screening

  14. Comparison of sputum acid-fast culture and chest radiography in pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While it is still a common practice of some clinicians to rely on chest radiography examination alone for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis, others still claim that absolute diagnosis of tuberculosis can firmly be established by bacteriological examination from secretions or tissues of the infected host. This study will evaluate the relationship between radiographic findings (CXR) and the likelihood of finding tubercle bacilli on sputum acid-fast bacilli (AFB) culture in pulmonary tuberculosis at Lung Center of the Philippines. Of 41 individuals who submitted their sputum for AFB culture, tubercle bacilli in the sputum was shown in 25 (60%) of cases and no growth of tubercle bacilli in 16 (40%) of cases. Chest radiography reading revealed tuberculosis in 100% of cases, of which when classified further, 22 (54%) has fibrohazed or hazy infiltrates on their CXR, 7 (17%) has cavitations or interpreted as moderate or far advanced TB, 12 (29%) has fibroid, nodular infiltrates or densities. In patients radiologically diagnosed as PTB minimal, sputum culture revealed tubercle bacilli in 15 (57%) among moderate, far advanced tuberculosis, and 6 (50%) among those with inactive or old tuberculosis. Therefore, the probability of detecting tubercle bacilli in pulmonary tuberculosis is not greatly influenced by radiographic findings. (auth.). 11 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  15. Chest radiography practice in critically ill patients: a postal survey in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korevaar Johanna C

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To ascertain current chest radiography practice in intensive care units (ICUs in the Netherlands. Methods Postal survey: a questionnaire was sent to all ICUs with > 5 beds suitable for mechanical ventilation; pediatric ICUs were excluded. When an ICU performed daily-routine chest radiographs in any group of patients it was considered to be a "daily-routine chest radiography" ICU. Results From the number of ICUs responding, 63% practice a daily-routine strategy, in which chest radiographs are obtained on a daily basis without any specific reason. A daily-routine chest radiography strategy is practiced less frequently in university-affiliated ICUs (50% as compared to other ICUs (68%, as well as in larger ICUs (> 20 beds, 50% as compared to smaller ICUs (P > 0.05. Remarkably, physicians that practice a daily-routine strategy consider daily-routine radiographs helpful in guiding daily practice in less than 30% of all performed radiographs. Chest radiographs are considered essential for verification of the position of invasive devices (81% and for diagnosing pneumothorax, pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (82%, 74% and 69%, respectively. On demand chest radiographs are obtained after introduction of thoracic drains, central venous lines and endotracheal tubes in 98%, 84% and 75% of responding ICUs, respectively. Chest films are also obtained in case of ventilatory deterioration (49% of responding ICUs, and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (59%, tracheotomy (58% and mini-tracheotomy (23%. Conclusion There is notable lack of consensus on chest radiography practice in the Netherlands. This survey suggests that a large number of intensivists may doubt the value of daily-routine chest radiography, but still practice a daily-routine strategy.

  16. Java interface to a computer-aided diagnosis system for acute pulmonary embolism using PIOPED findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Erik D.; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Gauger, Matthew; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.

    1999-05-01

    An interface to a Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system for diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism (PE) from PIOPED radiographic findings was developed. The interface is based on Internet technology which is user-friendly and available on a broad range of computing platforms. It was designed to be used as a research tool and as a data collection tool, allowing researchers to observe the behavior of a CAD system and to collect radiographic findings on ventilation-perfusion lung scans and chest radiographs. The interface collects findings from physicians in the PIOPED reporting format, processes those findings and presents them as inputs to an artificial neural network (ANN) previously trained on findings from 1,064 patients from the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) study. The likelihood of PE predicted by the ANN and by the physician using the system is then saved for later analysis.

  17. Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain George Hightower searches for genetic mutations that affect HIV's ability to infect the brain. Read Issue All Issues Explore Findings by Topic Cell Biology Cellular Structures, Functions, Processes, Imaging, Stress Response Chemistry and Biochemistry Enzymes, Molecular Probes, Metabolic ...

  18. Colonic interposition: radiographic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, F P; Orringer, M B

    1984-04-01

    This report reviews the clinical and radiographic features of 40 patients who underwent visceral esophageal substitution with colon for benign or malignant lesions of the esophagus. The incidence and radiographic identification of complications are discussed. All patients were routinely examined with barium esophagrams on postoperative day 10. If an anastomotic leak was suspected clinically before this time, studies were performed using water-soluble iodinated contrast material. Follow-up barium esophagrams were obtained 1-96 months after operation (average, 60 months) in 24 patients. Eight patients (21%) demonstrated asymptomatic "jejunization" of the colonic mucosa with no attributable clinical manifestations; this finding resolved in 1-3 months, without sequelae, and has not been reported before. The spectrum of ischemic changes in the colonic segment included mucosal edema, spasm, ulceration, loss of haustration, and frank necrosis. Radiographically detectable early postoperative complications included anastomotic leak in six (three pharyngocolic, three cervical esophagocolic) and aspiration of barium into the tracheobronchial tree due to incoordinated swallowing in eight. Late postoperative complications included anastomotic narrowing (12) malfunctioning of the colon due to impaired emptying (five), recurrent aspiration pneumonia (three), small bowel obstruction (three), transhiatal herniation of small bowel through the diaphragmatic hiatus (one), and reflux into the retained bypassed esophagus (one). PMID:6608225

  19. Emphysema in heavy smokers with normal chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the severity and extent of emphysema in heavy smokers by high-resolution CT (HRCT) and to correlate the findings with spirometric tests (STs) and symptomatology. Material and Methods: Fifty adult smokers with a mean age of 53 years with a smoking history of more than 30 pack years and normal chest radiographs underwent HRCT of the chest and ST (FEV1, FEV1/FVC, PEFR). Among these, 22 had symptoms of pulmonary disease and 28 were asymptomatic. Quantification of emphysema was done using a density mask program and the visual scoring method. The results were correlated with ST and symptomatology. Results: 58% (29 out of 50) of the subjects had significant emphysema on HRCT. Eleven out of 15 with normal ST showed emphysema on HRCT while 2 with airflow obstruction on ST showed normal CT scores. 14% (4 out of 28) asymptomatic subjects had severe emphysema compared to 64% of symptomatic subjects. Emphysematous changes were predominantly seen in upper lung zones in 48% of the patients while in 52% it was distributed equally in both upper and lower zones. The number of pack years of smoking showed a positive correlation with CT scores. The correlation between HRCT scores and ST was statistically significant. Conclusion: A significant number of asymptomatic and clinically undiagnosed smokers tend to have significant emphysema. HRCT helps in early detection of disease and thus helps implementation of preventive measures

  20. Emphysema in heavy smokers with normal chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sashidhar, K.; Monga, S.; Suri, S. [Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India). Dept. of Radiodiagnosis; Gulati, M.; Gupta, D. [Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India). Dept. of Pulmonary Medicine

    2002-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the severity and extent of emphysema in heavy smokers by high-resolution CT (HRCT) and to correlate the findings with spirometric tests (STs) and symptomatology. Material and Methods: Fifty adult smokers with a mean age of 53 years with a smoking history of more than 30 pack years and normal chest radiographs underwent HRCT of the chest and ST (FEV1, FEV1/FVC, PEFR). Among these, 22 had symptoms of pulmonary disease and 28 were asymptomatic. Quantification of emphysema was done using a density mask program and the visual scoring method. The results were correlated with ST and symptomatology. Results: 58% (29 out of 50) of the subjects had significant emphysema on HRCT. Eleven out of 15 with normal ST showed emphysema on HRCT while 2 with airflow obstruction on ST showed normal CT scores. 14% (4 out of 28) asymptomatic subjects had severe emphysema compared to 64% of symptomatic subjects. Emphysematous changes were predominantly seen in upper lung zones in 48% of the patients while in 52% it was distributed equally in both upper and lower zones. The number of pack years of smoking showed a positive correlation with CT scores. The correlation between HRCT scores and ST was statistically significant. Conclusion: A significant number of asymptomatic and clinically undiagnosed smokers tend to have significant emphysema. HRCT helps in early detection of disease and thus helps implementation of preventive measures.

  1. Radiological findings in nine AIDS patients with Rhodococcus equi pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicky, S; Cartei, F; Mayor, B; Frija, J; Gevenois, P A; Giron, J; Laurent, F; Perri, G; Schnyder, P

    1996-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi (R. equi) infections have been incidentally reported as a cause of pulmonary infection in severely immunocompromised hosts, including AIDS patients. Our purpose is to describe the radiological findings in nine AIDS patients with R. equi pneumonia assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), biopsies, cultures of sputum, and hemocultures. All patients were examined by chest radiographs and contrast-medium-enhanced chest CT. Dense pulmonary consolidations with or without cavitations accounted for the most striking radiological patterns. Chest CT also revealed six mediastinal involvements, strongly mimicking a lymphoma. Two of them had multiple bilateral pulmonary nodular opacities. Pleural effusion was not identified. Although intensive therapies were administered, seven among nine patients died within few months. In an AIDS patient living in a rural area or exposed to horses and presenting these radiological patterns, the possibility of R. equi pneumonia should be considered in the differential diagnosis along with other infectious diseases or lymphomas. PMID:8972317

  2. Adult Sail Sign: Radiographic and Computed Tomographic Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The sail sign is a well-known radiographic feature of the pediatric chest. This sign can be observed in an adult population as well, but for a different reason. Purpose: To investigate the sail sign appearing in adult chest radiography. Material and Methods: Based on two anecdotal adult cases in which frontal chest radiographs showed the sail sign, we prospectively screened radiographs of 10,238 patients to determine the incidence of the sail sign found in adults in their 40s or older. The cause of the sail sign was assessed using computed tomography (CT). Results: The sail sign was revealed in 10 (seven males, three females; median age 60.6 years) of 10,238 patients. Of these 10 patients with a sail sign on frontal radiographs, eight underwent CT. The frontal radiographs of these 10 patients showed a concave superior margin toward the lung in nine patients, a concave inferior margin in five, and a double-lined inferior margin in three. Lateral radiographs disclosed a focal opacity over the minor fissure in five of six patients, which was either fuzzy (n = 4) or sharp (n = 1) in its upper ma