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Sample records for chest ct radiation

  1. Evaluation of radiation doses delivered in different chest CT protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Gorycki, Tomasz; Lasek, Iwona; Kamiński, Kamil; Studniarek, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background There are differences in the reference diagnostic levels for the computed tomography (CT) of the chest as cited in different literature sources. The doses are expressed either in weighted CT dose index (CTDIVOL) used to express the dose per slice, dose-length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). The purpose of this study was to assess the radiation dose used in Low Dose Computer Tomography (LDCT) of the chest in comparison with routine chest CT examinations as well as to ...

  2. CT of the chest in suspected child abuse using submillisievert radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cornerstone of child abuse imaging is the skeletal survey, but initial imaging with radiographs may not demonstrate acute and non-displaced fractures, especially those involving the ribs. Given the high mortality of undiagnosed non-accidental trauma, timely diagnosis is crucial. CT is more sensitive in assessing rib fractures; however the effective radiation dose of a standard chest CT is high. We retrospectively identified four children (three boys, one girl; age range 1-4 months) admitted between January 2013 and February 2014 with high suspicion for non-accidental trauma from unexplained fractures of the long bones; these children all had CT of the chest when no rib fractures were evident on the skeletal survey. The absorbed radiation dose estimates for organs and tissue from the four-view chest radiographs and subsequent CT were determined using Monte Carlo photon transport software, and the effective dose was calculated using published tissue-weighting factors. In two children, CT showed multiple fractures of the ribs, scapula and vertebral body that were not evident on the initial skeletal survey. The average effective dose for a four-view chest radiograph across the four children was 0.29 mSv and the average effective dose for the chest CT was 0.56 mSv. Therefore the effective dose of a chest CT is on average less than twice that of a four-view chest radiograph. Our protocol thus shows that a reduced-dose chest CT may be useful in the evaluation of high specificity fractures of non-accidental trauma when the four-view chest radiographs are negative. (orig.)

  3. CT of the chest in suspected child abuse using submillisievert radiation dose

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    Sanchez, Thomas R.; Seibert, J.A.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca [Medical Center Children' s Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lee, Justin S. [University of California-Davis, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Coulter, Kevin P. [Medical Center Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The cornerstone of child abuse imaging is the skeletal survey, but initial imaging with radiographs may not demonstrate acute and non-displaced fractures, especially those involving the ribs. Given the high mortality of undiagnosed non-accidental trauma, timely diagnosis is crucial. CT is more sensitive in assessing rib fractures; however the effective radiation dose of a standard chest CT is high. We retrospectively identified four children (three boys, one girl; age range 1-4 months) admitted between January 2013 and February 2014 with high suspicion for non-accidental trauma from unexplained fractures of the long bones; these children all had CT of the chest when no rib fractures were evident on the skeletal survey. The absorbed radiation dose estimates for organs and tissue from the four-view chest radiographs and subsequent CT were determined using Monte Carlo photon transport software, and the effective dose was calculated using published tissue-weighting factors. In two children, CT showed multiple fractures of the ribs, scapula and vertebral body that were not evident on the initial skeletal survey. The average effective dose for a four-view chest radiograph across the four children was 0.29 mSv and the average effective dose for the chest CT was 0.56 mSv. Therefore the effective dose of a chest CT is on average less than twice that of a four-view chest radiograph. Our protocol thus shows that a reduced-dose chest CT may be useful in the evaluation of high specificity fractures of non-accidental trauma when the four-view chest radiographs are negative. (orig.)

  4. Estimated risk of radiation-induced cancer from paediatric chest CT: two-year cohort study

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    Niemann, Tilo [Cantonal Hospital Baden, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); University Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Colas, Lucie; Santangelo, Teresa; Faivre, Jean Baptiste; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [University Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Roser, Hans W.; Bremerich, Jens [University of Basel Hospital, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical Physics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-03-01

    The increasing absolute number of paediatric CT scans raises concern about the safety and efficacy and the effects of consecutive diagnostic ionising radiation. To demonstrate a method to evaluate the lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence/mortality due to a single low-dose helical chest CT in a two-year patient cohort. A two-year cohort of 522 paediatric helical chest CT scans acquired using a dedicated low-dose protocol were analysed retrospectively. Patient-specific estimations of radiation doses were modelled using three different mathematical phantoms. Per-organ attributable cancer risk was then estimated using epidemiological models. Additional comparison was provided for naturally occurring risks. Total lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence remains low for all age and sex categories, being highest in female neonates (0.34%). Summation of all cancer sites analysed raised the relative lifetime attributable risk of organ cancer incidence up to 3.6% in female neonates and 2.1% in male neonates. Using dedicated scan protocols, total lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence and mortality for chest CT is estimated low for paediatric chest CT, being highest for female neonates. (orig.)

  5. Chest CT using spectral filtration: radiation dose, image quality, and spectrum of clinical utility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the radiation dose, image quality, and clinical utility of non-enhanced chest CT with spectral filtration. We retrospectively analysed 25 non-contrast chest CT examinations acquired with spectral filtration (tin-filtered Sn100 kVp spectrum) compared to 25 examinations acquired without spectral filtration (120 kV). Radiation metrics were compared. Image noise was measured. Contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) and figure-of-merit (FOM) were calculated. Diagnostic confidence for the assessment of various thoracic pathologies was rated by two independent readers. Effective chest diameters were comparable between groups (P = 0.613). In spectral filtration CT, median CTDIvol, DLP, and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) were reduced (0.46 vs. 4.3 mGy, 16 vs. 141 mGy*cm, and 0.65 vs. 5.9 mGy, all P < 0.001). Spectral filtration CT had higher image noise (21.3 vs. 13.2 HU, P < 0.001) and lower CNR (47.2 vs. 75.3, P < 0.001), but was more dose-efficient (FOM 10,659 vs. 2,231/mSv, P < 0.001). Diagnostic confidence for parenchymal lung disease and osseous pathologies was lower with spectral filtration CT, but no significant difference was found for pleural pathologies, pulmonary nodules, or pneumonia. Non-contrast chest CT using spectral filtration appears to be sufficient for the assessment of a considerable spectrum of thoracic pathologies, while providing superior dose efficiency, allowing for substantial radiation dose reduction. (orig.)

  6. Chest CT using spectral filtration: radiation dose, image quality, and spectrum of clinical utility

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    Braun, Franziska M.; Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Sommer, Wieland H.; Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Meinel, Felix G. [University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    To determine the radiation dose, image quality, and clinical utility of non-enhanced chest CT with spectral filtration. We retrospectively analysed 25 non-contrast chest CT examinations acquired with spectral filtration (tin-filtered Sn100 kVp spectrum) compared to 25 examinations acquired without spectral filtration (120 kV). Radiation metrics were compared. Image noise was measured. Contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) and figure-of-merit (FOM) were calculated. Diagnostic confidence for the assessment of various thoracic pathologies was rated by two independent readers. Effective chest diameters were comparable between groups (P = 0.613). In spectral filtration CT, median CTDI{sub vol}, DLP, and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) were reduced (0.46 vs. 4.3 mGy, 16 vs. 141 mGy*cm, and 0.65 vs. 5.9 mGy, all P < 0.001). Spectral filtration CT had higher image noise (21.3 vs. 13.2 HU, P < 0.001) and lower CNR (47.2 vs. 75.3, P < 0.001), but was more dose-efficient (FOM 10,659 vs. 2,231/mSv, P < 0.001). Diagnostic confidence for parenchymal lung disease and osseous pathologies was lower with spectral filtration CT, but no significant difference was found for pleural pathologies, pulmonary nodules, or pneumonia. Non-contrast chest CT using spectral filtration appears to be sufficient for the assessment of a considerable spectrum of thoracic pathologies, while providing superior dose efficiency, allowing for substantial radiation dose reduction. (orig.)

  7. Chest CT in infants and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) is a powerful and irreplaceable imaging technique in the evaluation of thoracic disease in infants and children. Recent advances in CT technology, with multi-detector equipment now widely available in most institutions, allowing a highly detailed evaluation of the chest in a short time period has resulted in expanding indications of chest CT in paediatric patients. Its improved diagnostic yield along with a widespread availability has also resulted in an increased number of CT examinations in children, not always with beneficial impact on patient management and outcome. Accordingly with the ALARA concept, a judicious and correct use of CT is strongly advisable in order to reduce unnecessary high dose radiation exposure. The objective of this paper is to review the use of chest CT in paediatric patients focused mainly on basic technical aspects and clinical applications in the evaluation of the lungs, mediastinum and chest wall

  8. Excess radiation and organ dose in chest and abdominal CT due to CT acquisition beyond expected anatomical boundaries

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    Zanca, Federica; Demeter, Martine; Oyen, Raymond; Bosmans, Hilde [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2012-04-15

    To assess the extent of extra imaging beyond the prescribed anatomical margins for chest and abdominal CT and to determine associated extra patient and organ dose estimates. For 167 consecutive patients undergoing routine chest and/or abdominal examination with 128-slice CT, extra imaging length was evaluated on coronal images. Effective and organ doses (thyroid, liver, breasts, testes) were calculated. Paired t-test was applied to evaluate statistically significant differences between prescribed and actual imaging length, and associated doses. 133 (80%) examinations had extra coverage (mean 4.6 cm, range 1-19.5 cm). Significantly higher (P < 0.05) effective doses for chest CT (mean 4.8 mSv vs 4.2 mSv for actual vs prescribed volume of interest), abdominal CT (8.4 mSv vs 7.9 mSv) or thorax-abdominal CT (12.8 mSv vs 11.9 mSv) were found. A significantly higher (P < 0.001) organ dose was estimated for thyroid (extra dose 99% corresponding to 5.1 mSv), liver (56%, 2.2 mSv), testes (115%, 7.6 mSv), and breasts (163%, 1.5 mSv). Imaging beyond anatomical limits during routine chest and abdominal CT results in higher organ and effective doses. Continuous training of the technologists remains important. Physicians and technologists must be kept aware of the additional dose associated with extra imaging. (orig.)

  9. Radiation dose and image quality in pediatric chest CT: effects of iterative reconstruction in normal weight and overweight children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New CT reconstruction techniques may help reduce the burden of ionizing radiation. To quantify radiation dose reduction when performing pediatric chest CT using a low-dose protocol and 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) compared with age/gender-matched chest CT using a conventional dose protocol and reconstructed with filtered back projection (control group) and to determine its effect on image quality in normal weight and overweight children. We retrospectively reviewed 40 pediatric chest CT (M:F = 21:19; range: 0.1-17 years) in both groups. Radiation dose was compared between the two groups using paired Student's t-test. Image quality including noise, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability was subjectively assessed by three pediatric radiologists using a four-point scale (superior, average, suboptimal, unacceptable). Eight children in the ASIR group and seven in the control group were overweight. All radiation dose parameters were significantly lower in the ASIR group (P < 0.01) with a greater than 57% dose reduction in overweight children. Image noise was higher in the ASIR group in both normal weight and overweight children. Only one scan in the ASIR group (1/40, 2.5%) was rated as diagnostically suboptimal and there was no unacceptable study. In both normal weight and overweight children, the ASIR technique is associated with a greater than 57% mean dose reduction, without significantly impacting diagnostic image quality in pediatric chest CT examinations. However, CT scans in overweight children may have a greater noise level, even when using the ASIR technique. (orig.)

  10. 3D automatic exposure control for 64-detector row CT: Radiation dose reduction in chest phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of three-dimensional (3D) automatic exposure control (AEC) for low-dose CT examination in a chest phantom study. Materials and methods: A chest CT phantom including simulated focal ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and nodules was scanned with a 64-detector row CT with and without AEC. Performance of 3D AEC included changing targeted standard deviations (SDs) of image noise from scout view. To determine the appropriate targeted SD number for identification, the capability of overall identification with the CT protocol adapted to each of the targeted SDs was compared with that obtained with CT without AEC by means of receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: When targeted SD values equal to or higher than 250 were used, areas under the curve (Azs) of nodule identification with CT protocol using AEC were significantly smaller than that for CT protocol without AEC (p < 0.05). When targeted SD numbers at equal to or more than 180 were adapted, Azs of CT protocol with AEC had significantly smaller than that without AEC (p < 0.05). Conclusion: This phantom study shows 3D AEC is useful for low-dose lung CT examination, and can reduce the radiation dose while maintaining good identification capability and good image quality.

  11. 3D automatic exposure control for 64-detector row CT: Radiation dose reduction in chest phantom study

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    Matsumoto, Keiko, E-mail: palm_kei@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Shimokato, Yamanashi (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Kono, Atsushi [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Inokawa, Hiroyasu [Toshiba Medical Systems, Ohtawara, Tochigi (Japan); Onishi, Yumiko [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Nogami, Munenobu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Division of Image-Based Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Takenaka, Daisuke [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Araki, Tsutomu [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Shimokato, Yamanashi (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of three-dimensional (3D) automatic exposure control (AEC) for low-dose CT examination in a chest phantom study. Materials and methods: A chest CT phantom including simulated focal ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and nodules was scanned with a 64-detector row CT with and without AEC. Performance of 3D AEC included changing targeted standard deviations (SDs) of image noise from scout view. To determine the appropriate targeted SD number for identification, the capability of overall identification with the CT protocol adapted to each of the targeted SDs was compared with that obtained with CT without AEC by means of receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: When targeted SD values equal to or higher than 250 were used, areas under the curve (Azs) of nodule identification with CT protocol using AEC were significantly smaller than that for CT protocol without AEC (p < 0.05). When targeted SD numbers at equal to or more than 180 were adapted, Azs of CT protocol with AEC had significantly smaller than that without AEC (p < 0.05). Conclusion: This phantom study shows 3D AEC is useful for low-dose lung CT examination, and can reduce the radiation dose while maintaining good identification capability and good image quality.

  12. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in pediatric chest CT: a study in 30 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2010-04-01

    Radiation-dose awareness and optimization in CT can greatly benefit from a dosereporting system that provides radiation dose and cancer risk estimates specific to each patient and each CT examination. Recently, we reported a method for estimating patientspecific dose from pediatric chest CT. The purpose of this study is to extend that effort to patient-specific risk estimation and to a population of pediatric CT patients. Our study included thirty pediatric CT patients (16 males and 14 females; 0-16 years old), for whom full-body computer models were recently created based on the patients' clinical CT data. Using a validated Monte Carlo program, organ dose received by the thirty patients from a chest scan protocol (LightSpeed VCT, 120 kVp, 1.375 pitch, 40-mm collimation, pediatric body scan field-of-view) was simulated and used to estimate patient-specific effective dose. Risks of cancer incidence were calculated for radiosensitive organs using gender-, age-, and tissue-specific risk coefficients and were used to derive patientspecific effective risk. The thirty patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-10.4 mSv/100 mAs and normalized effective risk of 0.5-5.8 cases/1000 exposed persons/100 mAs. Normalized lung dose and risk of lung cancer correlated strongly with average chest diameter (correlation coefficient: r = -0.98 to -0.99). Normalized effective risk also correlated strongly with average chest diameter (r = -0.97 to -0.98). These strong correlations can be used to estimate patient-specific dose and risk prior to or after an imaging study to potentially guide healthcare providers in justifying CT examinations and to guide individualized protocol design and optimization.

  13. The measurement of organic radiation dose of multi-slice CT scanning by using the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Using the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom to measure the absorbed dose of various tissues and organs under different noise index, and to assess the radiation dose of MSCT chest scanning with the effective dose (ED). Methods: The equivalence of the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom (CDP-1 C) and the adult chest on CT sectional anatomy and X-ray attenuation was demonstrated. The absorbed doses of various tissues and organs under different noise index were measured by laying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) inside the phantom, and the corresponding dose-length products (DLP) were recorded. Both of them were later converted into ED and comparison was conducted to analyze the dose levels of chest CT scanning with automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) under different noise index. Student t-test was applied using SPSS 12.0 statistical software. Results: The Phantom was similar to the human body on CT sectional anatomy. The average CT value of phantom are - 788.04 HU in lung, 45.64 HU in heart, 65.84 HU in liver, 254.32 HU in spine and the deviations are 0.10%, 3.04%, 4.49% and 4.36% respectively compared to humans. The difference of average CT value of liver was statistically significant (t=-8.705, P0.05). As the noise index increased from 8.5 to 22.5, the DLP decreased from 393.57 mGy · cm to 78.75 mGy · cm and the organs dose declined. For example, the average absorbed dose decreased from 22.38 mGy to 3.66 mGy in lung. Compared to ED calculating by absorbed dose, the ED calculating by DLP was lower. The ED values of the two methods were 6.69 mSv and 8.77 mSv when the noise index was set at 8.5. Conclusions: Application of the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom to carry out CT dose assessment is more accurate. The noise index should be set more than 8.5 during the chest CT scanning based on ATCM technique. (authors)

  14. Evaluation of image quality and radiation dose by adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique level for chest CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this research is to determine the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) level that enables optimal image quality and dose reduction in the chest computed tomography (CT) protocol with ASIR. A chest phantom with 0-50 % ASIR levels was scanned and then noise power spectrum (NPS), signal and noise and the degree of distortion of peak signal-to noise ratio (PSNR) and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) were measured. In addition, the objectivity of the experiment was measured using the American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom. Moreover, on a qualitative basis, five lesions' resolution, latitude and distortion degree of chest phantom and their compiled statistics were evaluated. The NPS value decreased as the frequency increased. The lowest noise and deviation were at the 20 % ASIR level, mean 126.15±22.21. As a result of the degree of distortion, signal-to-noise ratio and PSNR at 20 % ASIR level were at the highest value as 31.0 and 41.52. However, maximum absolute error and RMSE showed the lowest deviation value as 11.2 and 16. In the ACR phantom study, all ASIR levels were within acceptable allowance of guidelines. The 20 % ASIR level performed best in qualitative evaluation at five lesions of chest phantom as resolution score 4.3, latitude 3.47 and the degree of distortion 4.25. The 20 % ASIR level was proved to be the best in all experiments, noise, distortion evaluation using ImageJ and qualitative evaluation of five lesions of a chest phantom. Therefore, optimal images as well as reduce radiation dose would be acquired when 20 % ASIR level in thoracic CT is applied. (authors)

  15. Radiation Dose Reduction of Chest CT with Iterative Reconstruction in Image Space - Part II: Assessment of Radiologists' Preferences Using Dual Source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the impact of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithms on radiologists' preferences, and whether an iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) can be used for dose reduction in chest CT. Standard dose chest CT (SDCT) in 50 patients and low dose chest CT (LDCT) in another 50 patients were performed, using a dual-source CT, with 120 kVp and same reference mAs (50 mAs for SDCT and 25 mAs for LDCT) employed to both tubes by modifying the dual-energy scan mode. Full-dose data were obtained by combining the data from both tubes and half-dose data were separated from one tube. These were reconstructed by using a filtered back projection (FBP) and IRIS: full-dose FBP (F-FBP); full-dose IRIS (F-IRIS); half-dose FBP (H-FBP) and half-dose IRIS (H-IRIS). Ten H-IRIS/F-IRIS, 10 H-FBP/H-IRIS, 40 F-FBP/F-IRIS and 40 F-FBP/H-IRIS pairs of each SDCT and LDCT were randomized. The preference for clinical usage was determined by two radiologists with a 5-point-scale system for the followings: noise, contrast, and sharpness of mediastinum and lung. Radiologists preferred IRIS over FBP images in the same radiation dose for the evaluation of the lungs in both SDCT (p = 0.035) and LDCT (p < 0.001). When comparing between H-IRIS and F-IRIS, decreased radiation resulted in decreased preference. Observers preferred H-IRIS over F-FBP for the lungs in both SDCT and LDCT, even with reduced radiation dose by half in IRIS image (p < 0.05). Radiologists' preference may be influenced by both radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm. According to our preliminary results, dose reduction at 50% with IRIS may be feasible for lung parenchymal evaluation.

  16. Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction Using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D improves chest CT image quality and reduces radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuneo Yamashiro

    Full Text Available To assess the advantages of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D for image quality improvement and dose reduction for chest computed tomography (CT.Institutional Review Boards approved this study and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-eight subjects underwent chest CT at five institutions using identical scanners and protocols. During a single visit, each subject was scanned using different tube currents: 240, 120, and 60 mA. Scan data were converted to images using AIDR3D and a conventional reconstruction mode (without AIDR3D. Using a 5-point scale from 1 (non-diagnostic to 5 (excellent, three blinded observers independently evaluated image quality for three lung zones, four patterns of lung disease (nodule/mass, emphysema, bronchiolitis, and diffuse lung disease, and three mediastinal measurements (small structure visibility, streak artifacts, and shoulder artifacts. Differences in these scores were assessed by Scheffe's test.At each tube current, scans using AIDR3D had higher scores than those without AIDR3D, which were significant for lung zones (p<0.0001 and all mediastinal measurements (p<0.01. For lung diseases, significant improvements with AIDR3D were frequently observed at 120 and 60 mA. Scans with AIDR3D at 120 mA had significantly higher scores than those without AIDR3D at 240 mA for lung zones and mediastinal streak artifacts (p<0.0001, and slightly higher or equal scores for all other measurements. Scans with AIDR3D at 60 mA were also judged superior or equivalent to those without AIDR3D at 120 mA.For chest CT, AIDR3D provides better image quality and can reduce radiation exposure by 50%.

  17. Reducing the radiation dose with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique for chest CT in adults: a parameter study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Wenyun; Ding Xiaobo; Kong Boyu; Fan Baoyan; Chen Liang

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently there is a trend towards reducing radiation dose while maintaining image quality during computer tomography (CT) examination.This results from the concerns about radiation exposure from CT and the potential increase in the incidence of radiation induced carcinogenesis.This study aimed to investigate the lowest radiation dose for maintaining good image quality in adult chest scanning using GE CT equipment.Methods Seventy-two adult patients were examined by Gemstone Spectral CT.They were randomly divided into six groups.We set up a different value of noise index (NI) when evaluating each group every other number from 13.0 to 23.0.The original images were acquired with a slice of 5 mm thickness.For each group,several image series were reconstructed using different levels of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) (30%,50%,and 70%).We got a total of 18 image sequences of different combinations of NI and ASIR percentage.On one hand,quantitative indicators,such as CT value and standard deviation (SD),were assessed at the region of interest.The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated.The volume CT dose index (CTDI) and dose length product (DLP) were recorded.On the other hand,two radiologists with >5 years of experience blindly reviewed the subjective image quality using the standards we had previously set.Results The different combinations of noise index and ASIR were assessed.There was no significant difference in CT values among the 18 image sequences.The SD value was reduced with the noise index's reduction or ASIR's increase.There was a trend towards gradually lower SNR and CNR with an NI increase.The CTDI and DLP were diminishing as the NI increased.The scores from subjective image quality evaluation were reduced in all groups as the ASIR increased.Conclusions Increasing NI can reduce radiation dose.With the premise of maintaining the same image quality,using a suitable percentage of

  18. Actinomycosis involving the chest wall: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of pulmonary actinomycosis with extension to involve the chest wall that were evaluated using computerized tomography are reported. In both cases, the relation of pulmonary and chest wall disease was best shown using CT

  19. Response to the argument on the risk of cancer with chest CT screening. Is low-dose chest CT safe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The steady increase in the annual number of chest CT screening has become a worldwide concern because of its associated risk of lung cancer. Epidemiological studies, however, have shown that repeated exposure to low-dose radiation does not increase the risk of lung cancer. In addition, a recent randomized controlled study on chest CT screening has shown its usefulness for reducing lung cancer mortality. We reviewed the risk of lung cancer after repeated exposure to low-dose radiation, the efficacy of chest CT screening, and device technology for reducing the irradiation dose. (author)

  20. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

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    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Krane, Elliot J. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Holmes, Tyson H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Robinson, Terry E. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Cystic Fibrosis Center for Excellence in Pulmonary Biology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  1. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  2. Model-based iterative reconstruction technique for radiation dose reduction in chest CT: comparison with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To prospectively evaluate dose reduction and image quality characteristics of chest CT reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) compared with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). One hundred patients underwent reference-dose and low-dose unenhanced chest CT with 64-row multidetector CT. Images were reconstructed with 50 % ASIR-filtered back projection blending (ASIR50) for reference-dose CT, and with ASIR50 and MBIR for low-dose CT. Two radiologists assessed the images in a blinded manner for subjective image noise, artefacts and diagnostic acceptability. Objective image noise was measured in the lung parenchyma. Data were analysed using the sign test and pair-wise Student's t-test. Compared with reference-dose CT, there was a 79.0 % decrease in dose-length product with low-dose CT. Low-dose MBIR images had significantly lower objective image noise (16.93 ± 3.00) than low-dose ASIR (49.24 ± 9.11, P < 0.01) and reference-dose ASIR images (24.93 ± 4.65, P < 0.01). Low-dose MBIR images were all diagnostically acceptable. Unique features of low-dose MBIR images included motion artefacts and pixellated blotchy appearances, which did not adversely affect diagnostic acceptability. Diagnostically acceptable chest CT images acquired with nearly 80 % less radiation can be obtained using MBIR. MBIR shows greater potential than ASIR for providing diagnostically acceptable low-dose CT images without severely compromising image quality. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of radiation doses between newborns and 6-y-old children undergoing head, chest and abdominal CT examinations-A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation doses in paediatric computed tomography (CT) were investigated for various types of recent CT scanners with newborn and 6-y-old phantoms in which silicon-photodiode dosemeters were implanted at various organ positions. In the head, chest and abdominal CT for the newborn phantom, doses for organs within the scan region were 21-40, 3-8 and 3-12 mGy, respectively. The corresponding doses for the child phantom were 20-37, 2-11 and 4-17 mGy, respectively. In the head, chest and abdominal CT, the effective doses were respectively 2.1-3.3, 2.0-6.0 and 2.2-10.0 mSv for the newborn, and 1.0-2.0, 1.2-6.6 and 2.9-11.8 mSv for the child. Radiation doses for the newborn were at the same levels as those for the child, excepting effective doses in head CT for the newborn, which were 1.8 times higher than those for the child. (authors)

  4. CT of blunt chest trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While trauma is still the leading cause of death in the pediatric age range, it is surprising how little the CT appearances of pediatric chest injury have been investigated in the literature. We have reviewed the CT findings of blunt chest trauma in 44 children for whom chest CT examinations were requested to investigate the extent of intrathoracic injury. We noted a propensity for pulmonary contusions to be located posteriorly or posteromedially, and for them to be anatomically nonsegmental and crescentic in shape. This is possibly attributable to the relatively compliant anterior chest wall in children. The CT appearances of other major thoracic injuries are described, including pulmonary lacerations, pneumothoraces, malpositioned chest tubes, mediastinal hematomas, aortic injury, tracheobronchial injury, hemopericardium, and spinal injuries with paraspinal fluid collections. Children demonstrating findings incidental to the actual injury yet important to the subsequent therapy are also presented. We conclude that, in the event of clinically significant blunt chest trauma, the single supine chest examination in the trauma room is insufficient to adequately identify the extent of intrathoracic injury. With the exception of concern for aortic injury for which aortography is indicated, a dynamically enhanced CT scan of the thorax should be performed as clinically significant findings may result in altered therapy. (orig.)

  5. Low-dose spiral CT: applicability to paediatric chest imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Spiral CT of the chest is an imaging technique with unequivocal indications and proven higher sensitivity and specificity than conventional chest X-rays. However, particularly in children, attempts should be made to reduce radiation exposure to a minimum. Objective. To evaluate whether a low-dose technique in spiral CT scanning results in adequate diagnostic information. Materials and methods. In a prospective study, 27 children (range 3 weeks to 14 years, mean 7 years) underwent a low-dose CT examination of the chest for various indications. The tube energy was 12.5 mAs (n = 5), 25 mAs (n = 17), 50 mAs (n = 3), or 75 mAs (n = 2) per slice. Two radiologists evaluated, in consensus, the CT scans with respect to their diagnostic value and comparison was made with 20 standard-dose chest CT examinations of adults (175 mAs per slice, mean age 56 years) with respect to technical image quality (noise and artefacts). In a second part of the study, dose measurements were carried out by means of exposing thermoluminescent dosimeters attached to a water/air phantom simulating a child's chest. Results. All low-dose CT scans were of diagnostic image quality and no additional studies were necessary. The average image noise was significantly higher than in standard-dose CT examinations (SD 39.5 compared with 12.5 for unenhanced soft tissue, P < 0.01), but did not hinder accurate diagnosis. Artefacts were exclusively due to patient motion. Radiation exposure per slice was approx. 4 mGy at 25 mAs and 34 mGy at 250 mAs, regardless of slice thickness. Conclusions. For all indications in paediatric CT scanning of the chest, low-dose technique provides adequate image quality without loss of diagnostic information. The radiation exposure is approximately 5-20 % of a standard-dose CT. (orig.)

  6. Radiation dose reduction with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) technique for chest CT in children: An intra-individual comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To retrospectively compare radiation dose and image quality of pediatric chest CT using a routine dose protocol reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) (the Routine study) and a low-dose protocol with 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) (the ASIR study). Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed chest CT performed in pediatric patients who underwent both the Routine study and the ASIR study on different days between January 2010 and August 2011. Volume CT dose indices (CTDIvol), dose length products (DLP), and effective doses were obtained to estimate radiation dose. The image quality was evaluated objectively as noise measured in the descending aorta and paraspinal muscle, and subjectively by three radiologists for noise, sharpness, artifacts, and diagnostic acceptability using a four-point scale. The paired Student's t-test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Twenty-six patients (M:F = 13:13, mean age 11.7) were enrolled. The ASIR studies showed 60.3%, 56.2%, and 55.2% reductions in CTDIvol (from 18.73 to 7.43 mGy, P < 0.001), DLP (from 307.42 to 134.51 mGy × cm, P < 0.001), and effective dose (from 4.12 to 1.84 mSv, P < 0.001), respectively, compared with the Routine studies. The objective noise was higher in the paraspinal muscle of the ASIR studies (20.81 vs. 16.67, P = 0.004), but was not different in the aorta (18.23 vs. 18.72, P = 0.726). The subjective image quality demonstrated no difference between the two studies. Conclusion: A low-dose protocol with 50% ASIR allows radiation dose reduction in pediatric chest CT by more than 55% while maintaining image quality

  7. Third-generation dual-source 70-kVp chest CT angiography with advanced iterative reconstruction in young children: image quality and radiation dose reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rompel, Oliver; Janka, Rolf; Lell, Michael M.; Uder, Michael; Hammon, Matthias [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Gloeckler, Martin; Dittrich, Sven [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); Cesnjevar, Robert [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Many technical updates have been made in multi-detector CT. To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of high-pitch second- and third-generation dual-source chest CT angiography and to assess the effects of different levels of advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE) in newborns and children. Chest CT angiography (70 kVp) was performed in 42 children (age 158 ± 267 days, range 1-1,194 days). We evaluated subjective and objective image quality, and radiation dose with filtered back projection (FBP) and different strength levels of ADMIRE. For comparison were 42 matched controls examined with a second-generation 128-slice dual-source CT-scanner (80 kVp). ADMIRE demonstrated improved objective and subjective image quality (P <.01). Mean signal/noise, contrast/noise and subjective image quality were 11.9, 10.0 and 1.9, respectively, for the 80 kVp mode and 11.2, 10.0 and 1.9 for the 70 kVp mode. With ADMIRE, the corresponding values for the 70 kVp mode were 13.7, 12.1 and 1.4 at strength level 2 and 17.6, 15.6 and 1.2 at strength level 4. Mean CTDI{sub vol}, DLP and effective dose were significantly lower with the 70-kVp mode (0.31 mGy, 5.33 mGy*cm, 0.36 mSv) compared to the 80-kVp mode (0.46 mGy, 9.17 mGy*cm, 0.62 mSv; P <.01). The third-generation dual-source CT at 70 kVp provided good objective and subjective image quality at lower radiation exposure. ADMIRE improved objective and subjective image quality. (orig.)

  8. Third-generation dual-source 70-kVp chest CT angiography with advanced iterative reconstruction in young children: image quality and radiation dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many technical updates have been made in multi-detector CT. To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of high-pitch second- and third-generation dual-source chest CT angiography and to assess the effects of different levels of advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE) in newborns and children. Chest CT angiography (70 kVp) was performed in 42 children (age 158 ± 267 days, range 1-1,194 days). We evaluated subjective and objective image quality, and radiation dose with filtered back projection (FBP) and different strength levels of ADMIRE. For comparison were 42 matched controls examined with a second-generation 128-slice dual-source CT-scanner (80 kVp). ADMIRE demonstrated improved objective and subjective image quality (P <.01). Mean signal/noise, contrast/noise and subjective image quality were 11.9, 10.0 and 1.9, respectively, for the 80 kVp mode and 11.2, 10.0 and 1.9 for the 70 kVp mode. With ADMIRE, the corresponding values for the 70 kVp mode were 13.7, 12.1 and 1.4 at strength level 2 and 17.6, 15.6 and 1.2 at strength level 4. Mean CTDIvol, DLP and effective dose were significantly lower with the 70-kVp mode (0.31 mGy, 5.33 mGy*cm, 0.36 mSv) compared to the 80-kVp mode (0.46 mGy, 9.17 mGy*cm, 0.62 mSv; P <.01). The third-generation dual-source CT at 70 kVp provided good objective and subjective image quality at lower radiation exposure. ADMIRE improved objective and subjective image quality. (orig.)

  9. Image quality in children with low-radiation chest CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and model-based iterative reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihang Sun

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate noise reduction and image quality improvement in low-radiation dose chest CT images in children using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR and a full model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR algorithm. METHODS: Forty-five children (age ranging from 28 days to 6 years, median of 1.8 years who received low-dose chest CT scans were included. Age-dependent noise index (NI was used for acquisition. Images were retrospectively reconstructed using three methods: MBIR, 60% of ASIR and 40% of conventional filtered back-projection (FBP, and FBP. The subjective quality of the images was independently evaluated by two radiologists. Objective noises in the left ventricle (LV, muscle, fat, descending aorta and lung field at the layer with the largest cross-section area of LV were measured, with the region of interest about one fourth to half of the area of descending aorta. Optimized signal-to-noise ratio (SNR was calculated. RESULT: In terms of subjective quality, MBIR images were significantly better than ASIR and FBP in image noise and visibility of tiny structures, but blurred edges were observed. In terms of objective noise, MBIR and ASIR reconstruction decreased the image noise by 55.2% and 31.8%, respectively, for LV compared with FBP. Similarly, MBIR and ASIR reconstruction increased the SNR by 124.0% and 46.2%, respectively, compared with FBP. CONCLUSION: Compared with FBP and ASIR, overall image quality and noise reduction were significantly improved by MBIR. MBIR image could reconstruct eligible chest CT images in children with lower radiation dose.

  10. Patient radiation exposure and image quality evaluation with the use of iDose4 iterative reconstruction algorithm in chest-abdomen-pelvis CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of iDose4 iterative reconstruction algorithm on radiation dose and imaging quality at chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP) CT examinations. Seventeen patients were considered; all patients had a previous CT scan with the standard filter back-projection (FBP) protocol and a follow-up scan with the iDose4 protocol at the same scanner. Image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were objectively calculated. Two radiologists evaluated noise, sharpness, contrast, diagnostic confidence and artefacts. Radiation exposure quantities were calculated. iDose4 resulted in 46 % dose reduction combined with significantly lower noise and higher SNR and CNR compared with FBP. iDose4 images had significantly lower subjective image noise and enhanced sharpness and contrast. Diagnostic confidence was high and image artefacts were minor for both algorithms. iDose4 provides great potential for reducing patient radiation burden while improving imaging quality in CAP CT examinations. (authors)

  11. Low-dose spiral CT: applicability to paediatric chest imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogalla, P.; Stoever, B.; Scheer, I.; Juran, R.; Hamm, B. (Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Humboldt-Univ. Berlin (Germany)); Gaedicke, G. (Department of Pediatrics, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany))

    1999-08-01

    Background. Spiral CT of the chest is an imaging technique with unequivocal indications and proven higher sensitivity and specificity than conventional chest X-rays. However, particularly in children, attempts should be made to reduce radiation exposure to a minimum. Objective. To evaluate whether a low-dose technique in spiral CT scanning results in adequate diagnostic information. Materials and methods. In a prospective study, 27 children (range 3 weeks to 14 years, mean 7 years) underwent a low-dose CT examination of the chest for various indications. The tube energy was 12.5 mAs (n = 5), 25 mAs (n = 17), 50 mAs (n = 3), or 75 mAs (n = 2) per slice. Two radiologists evaluated, in consensus, the CT scans with respect to their diagnostic value and comparison was made with 20 standard-dose chest CT examinations of adults (175 mAs per slice, mean age 56 years) with respect to technical image quality (noise and artefacts). In a second part of the study, dose measurements were carried out by means of exposing thermoluminescent dosimeters attached to a water/air phantom simulating a child's chest. Results. All low-dose CT scans were of diagnostic image quality and no additional studies were necessary. The average image noise was significantly higher than in standard-dose CT examinations (SD 39.5 compared with 12.5 for unenhanced soft tissue, P < 0.01), but did not hinder accurate diagnosis. Artefacts were exclusively due to patient motion. Radiation exposure per slice was approx. 4 mGy at 25 mAs and 34 mGy at 250 mAs, regardless of slice thickness. Conclusions. For all indications in paediatric CT scanning of the chest, low-dose technique provides adequate image quality without loss of diagnostic information. The radiation exposure is approximately 5-20 % of a standard-dose CT. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 17 refs.

  12. Nodule detection by CT screening of chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer screening using helical computed tomography (CT) has been carried out at the ''Anti-lung cancer association, Tokyo'' since 1993. We found 43 lung cancer cases (0.163%) during the 18-year period before introducing helical CT, but 76 lung cancer cases (0.436%) in 11 years after introducing helical CT. Among the cases detected in the screening period using helical CT, 74% were in stage IA, and the average size of the primary tumors was 17.3 mm. These data were better than in the screening period without helical CT. Of the 76 lung cancer cases detected after the introduction of helical CT, 19 cases (25%) were visible chest X-ray films, but 70 cases (92%) were visible on CT. We had 52 cases detected on repeated CT screenings, 41 cases (79%) of these cases were retrospectively found to have had a primary tumor overlooked previous CT screening images. In this seminar, former CT screening images of lung cancer cases were presented and we discussed how to improve earlier diagnosis. (author)

  13. Evaluation of time-related changes in lung detail findings after radiation therapy to the chest using multidetector-row CT. Usefulness of precision scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-related changes in lung detail findings after radiation therapy to the chest were evaluated using multidetector-row CT. The frequency of individual findings and time-related changes in percent incidence of findings were compared between ordinary scanning at 3 mm raw thickness and 8 mm recon thickness, and precision scanning set at 0.5 mm for both parameters. For both scanning methods, the most frequently detected finding was ground-glass opacity (GGO). For all findings other than GGO and consolidation, the frequency of detection was greater with precision scanning than with ordinary scanning. GGO was also the finding showing the greatest difference in frequency of detection between the two scanning methods; because ordinary scanning tended to overvalue GGO, a demonstrative experiment was conducted using a lung detail phantom. Regarding time-related changes in percent incidence of findings, precision scanning was equivalent or superior to ordinary scanning at all time points except after 3 months. These results, combined with the more accurate evaluation of various lung detail changes after radiation therapy to the chest, including GGO (reversible lesion), suggest the usefulness of precision scanning in combination with ordinary scanning. (author)

  14. Chest radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... during cancer treatment Eating extra calories when sick - adults Lymphedema - self-care Radiation therapy - questions to ask your doctor Safe eating during cancer treatment When you have diarrhea When you have nausea and vomiting Update Date ...

  15. Brown fat distribution in the chest wall of infants - normal appearance, distribution and evolution on CT scans of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While reviewing chest CT scans of infants, we repeatedly observed hyperdense enhancing tissue in the chest wall that is not well described in radiology literature. This study was undertaken to describe the imaging features of this tissue in chest walls of infants. CT scans of the chest conducted on all infants between April 2008 and October 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. CT studies with any deviation from normal radiation or contrast dose or those with chest wall anatomical distortion were excluded. One hundred eighty-eight infants were scanned, with 202 MDCTs, of which 180 (89.1%) received contrast agent. Fifty-four of 180 (30%) cases revealed focal areas of hyperdensity in various locations. All positive cases ranged between 2 days and 9 months of age. The areas of distribution of hyperdensity had excellent correlation with known areas of brown fat in the chest wall, known from nuclear medicine studies, and hence we concluded these to represent the same. Brown fat in the chest wall can be seen as enhancing tissue on contrast CT scans done on infants. This is a normal morphological component with the brown fat converting to normal fat. It is important to recognize it in the chest wall of infants to avoid misinterpretation. (orig.)

  16. Brown fat distribution in the chest wall of infants - normal appearance, distribution and evolution on CT scans of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Priya; Babyn, Paul S.; Shammas, Amer; Miller, Stephen F. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    While reviewing chest CT scans of infants, we repeatedly observed hyperdense enhancing tissue in the chest wall that is not well described in radiology literature. This study was undertaken to describe the imaging features of this tissue in chest walls of infants. CT scans of the chest conducted on all infants between April 2008 and October 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. CT studies with any deviation from normal radiation or contrast dose or those with chest wall anatomical distortion were excluded. One hundred eighty-eight infants were scanned, with 202 MDCTs, of which 180 (89.1%) received contrast agent. Fifty-four of 180 (30%) cases revealed focal areas of hyperdensity in various locations. All positive cases ranged between 2 days and 9 months of age. The areas of distribution of hyperdensity had excellent correlation with known areas of brown fat in the chest wall, known from nuclear medicine studies, and hence we concluded these to represent the same. Brown fat in the chest wall can be seen as enhancing tissue on contrast CT scans done on infants. This is a normal morphological component with the brown fat converting to normal fat. It is important to recognize it in the chest wall of infants to avoid misinterpretation. (orig.)

  17. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Omar, Hesham R.; Mangar, Devanand; Khetarpal, Suneel; Shapiro, David H; Kolla, Jaya; Rashad, Rania; Helal, Engy; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP) chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a true occult ...

  18. Differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodule : chest radiography vs CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracies of chest radiographs and chest CT in the diagnosis of a solitary pulmonary nodule(SPN), and to determine the role of CT and CT findings which aid in the differential diagnosis of nodules. A retrospective study was done on 54 patients in whom SPN was found on chest radiographs and chest CT was carried out. The study involved 25 benign and 29 malignant nodules, confirmed histopathologically and clinically. Chest radiographs and CT scans were reviewed separately in randomized order by two chest radiologists who for each film listed the three most likely diagnoses in descending order. The radiologists recorded the confidence value of the most probable diagnosis, and also the marginal and internal characteristics of nodules and their size, as nodules seen on chest CT scans. Diagnostic rates in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant nodules were 65.7% by radiography and 77.8% by CT. Correct first-choice diagnosis was by radiography in 30.6% of cases, and by CT in 41.7%. Using radiographs, and the correct diagnosis was among the top-three choices in 61.1% of cases;with CT, the corresponding figure was 76.8%. Overall, a confident diagnosis was reached more often with the CT(41.7%) than with the chest radiograph(21.4%); diagnostic accuracy was 60.0% and 52.2%, respectively. CT findings which imply a benign nodule include smooth margins and diffuse internal calcifications, whereas marginal lobulations, air-bronchograms, internal low density without cavitation, eccentric calcifications, and large size suggest malignancy. We found that CT findings such as well-defined margins, spiculations, pleural tail or internal homogeneity did not contribute in the differentiation between benign and malignant nodules. CT is superior to chest radiography in the differential diagnosis of the solitary pulmonary nodule. Using CT, diagnosis was accurate and made with a high level of confidence, especially with the

  19. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9-18.2 kg) were created based on the patients' actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120 kVp, 70 or 75 mA, 0.4 s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20 mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-5.3 mSv/100 mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4-12.6 mGy/100 mAs and 11.2-13.3 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%-18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%-77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r=-0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=-0.99, heart: r=-0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific organ dose for

  20. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Global Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9-18.2 kg) were created based on the patients' actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120 kVp, 70 or 75 mA, 0.4 s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20 mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-5.3 mSv/100 mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4-12.6 mGy/100 mAs and 11.2-13.3 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%-18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%-77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r=-0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=-0.99, heart: r=-0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific organ

  1. Estimation of breast dose and cancer risk in chest and abdomen CT procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation doses to patents that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. Lack of optimized protocols be an additional source of increased dose in developing countries. The aims of this study are first, to measure patient doses during CT chest and abdomen procedures, second, to estimate the radiation dose to the breast, and third to quantify the radiation risks during the procedures. Patient doses from two common CT examinations were obtained from four hospitals in Khartoum.The patient doses were estimated using measurement of CT dose indexes (CTDI), exposure-related parameters, and the IMPACT spreadsheet based on NRPB conversion factors. A large variation of mean organ doses among hospitals was observed for similar CT examinations. These variations largely originated from different CT scanning protocols used in different hospitals and scanner type. The largest range was found for CT of the chest, for which the dose varied from 2.3 to 47 (average 24.7) mSv and for abdomen CT, it was 1.6 to 18.8 (average 10.2) mSv. Radiation dose to the breast ranged from 1.6 to 32.9 mSv for the chest and 1.1 to 13.2 mSv for the abdomen. The radiation risk per procedure was high. The obtained values were mostly higher than the values of organ doses reported from the other studies. It was concluded that current clinical chest and abdomen protocols result in variable radiation doses to the breast. The magnitude of exposure may have implications for imaging strategies.(Author)

  2. Sedation versus general anaesthesia in paediatric patients undergoing chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: CT of the chest in paediatric patients often requires sedation or general anaesthesia to minimize motion artefacts. Both sedation and general anaesthesia are associated with atelectasis which obscures the underlying pulmonary pathology. We conducted a prospective study to compare these two methods with respect to degree of motion artefacts and extent of atelectasis. Material and Methods: Nineteen patients undergoing 22 chest CT examinations were randomly selected for either sedation or general anaesthesia. The total area of atelectasis and the degree of motion artefacts were measured. Results: The mean percentage of atelectasis was 6.67% for general anaesthesia and 0.01% for sedation (p=0.01). There was no significant difference in the quality of the images between the sedation patients and the general anaesthesia patients. Conclusion: Whenever the clinical condition permits it, sedation rather than general anaesthesia should be given to paediatric patients undergoing chest CT. (orig.)

  3. Computed tomography of the chest with model-based iterative reconstruction using a radiation exposure similar to chest X-ray examination: preliminary observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neroladaki, Angeliki; Botsikas, Diomidis; Boudabbous, Sana; Becker, Christoph D.; Montet, Xavier [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2013-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic image quality of ultra-low-dose chest computed tomography (ULD-CT) obtained with a radiation dose comparable to chest radiography and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in comparison with standard dose diagnostic CT (SDD-CT) or low-dose diagnostic CT (LDD-CT) reconstructed with FBP alone. Unenhanced chest CT images of 42 patients acquired with ULD-CT were compared with images obtained with SDD-CT or LDD-CT in the same examination. Noise measurements and image quality, based on conspicuity of chest lesions on all CT data sets were assessed on a five-point scale. The radiation dose of ULD-CT was 0.16 {+-} 0.006 mSv compared with 11.2 {+-} 2.7 mSv for SDD-CT (P < 0.0001) and 2.7 {+-} 0.9 mSv for LDD-CT. Image quality of ULD-CT increased significantly when using MBIR compared with FBP or ASIR (P < 0.001). ULD-CT reconstructed with MBIR enabled to detect as many non-calcified pulmonary nodules as seen on SDD-CT or LDD-CT. However, image quality of ULD-CT was clearly inferior for characterisation of ground glass opacities or emphysema. Model-based iterative reconstruction allows detection of pulmonary nodules with ULD-CT with radiation exposure in the range of a posterior to anterior (PA) and lateral chest X-ray. (orig.)

  4. Generalities of anomalous CT chest non tumoral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation is about the generalities of multidetector CT in the pulmonary, the diaphragmatic, the pleural and the mediastinum pathology.These techniques as well as the virtual endoscopy allow visualize volumetric thorax reconstructions, brain diseases, opacities, radiolucent images, respiratory and vascular diseases, pneumonia, embolism, AIDS stage, tuberculosis, tumors, etc

  5. CT chest under general anesthesia: pulmonary, anesthetic and radiologic dilemmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today's practice of medicine involves ever more complex patients whose care is coordinated with multidisciplinary teams. Caring for these patients can challenge all members of the health care team. Sedation/anesthesia in infants/toddlers as well as uncooperative or intellectually or emotionally impaired children who require imaging studies of the chest are ongoing challenges. High-quality computed tomography (CT) chest imaging studies in children under general anesthesia are extremely important for accurate interpretation and subsequent medical decision-making. Anesthesia-induced atelectasis may obscure or mimic true pathology creating a significant quality issue. Obtaining a high-quality, motion-free chest imaging study in infants and children under general anesthesia remains a difficult task in many institutions. Meticulous attention to anesthesia and imaging techniques and specialized knowledge are required to properly perform and interpret chest imaging studies. In this commentary, we discuss the continuous struggle to obtain high-quality CT chest imaging under general anesthesia. We will also discuss the major concerns of the anesthesiologist, radiologist and pulmonologist and why cooperation and coordination among these providers are critical for an optimal quality study.

  6. CT chest under general anesthesia: pulmonary, anesthetic and radiologic dilemmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Towe, Christopher [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Fleck, Robert J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Today's practice of medicine involves ever more complex patients whose care is coordinated with multidisciplinary teams. Caring for these patients can challenge all members of the health care team. Sedation/anesthesia in infants/toddlers as well as uncooperative or intellectually or emotionally impaired children who require imaging studies of the chest are ongoing challenges. High-quality computed tomography (CT) chest imaging studies in children under general anesthesia are extremely important for accurate interpretation and subsequent medical decision-making. Anesthesia-induced atelectasis may obscure or mimic true pathology creating a significant quality issue. Obtaining a high-quality, motion-free chest imaging study in infants and children under general anesthesia remains a difficult task in many institutions. Meticulous attention to anesthesia and imaging techniques and specialized knowledge are required to properly perform and interpret chest imaging studies. In this commentary, we discuss the continuous struggle to obtain high-quality CT chest imaging under general anesthesia. We will also discuss the major concerns of the anesthesiologist, radiologist and pulmonologist and why cooperation and coordination among these providers are critical for an optimal quality study.

  7. Chest wall tuberculosis; CT findings in 14 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To present CT findings of chest wall tuberculosis. CT scans were obtained in 14 patients with proven chest wall tuberculosis. Diagnosis was confirmed by means of right open thoracostomy with abscess evacuation (n=1), excision and curettage (n=11) or excision and curettage along with resection of the involved lung (n=2). The images were assessed with emphasis for the extrapleural, pleural, and pulmonary lesions. All patients showed juxtacostal soft tissue mass with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. The lesions were located in the left hemithorax in eight patients and in the right in six. Multiple lesions were found in three patients (two in one and three in two). Rib destruction was observed in four patients. Intercostal muscle involvement of thickening and enhancement were shown in all patients. Thirteen patients (93%) had evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis: active pulmonary tuberculosis in nine and stable tuberculosis in four. Pleural lesions, including empyema necessitatis in six, were observed in eleven (79%). On CT scan, chest wall tuberculosis is characterized by juxtacostal soft tissue lesion with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. Rib destruction may be associated. Additionally, enhancing intercostal muscle suggest direct inflammatory process of tuberculosis and spread channel to the chest wall involvement of pleuropulmonary tuberculosis

  8. Low-dose spiral CT in pediatric diagnostic evaluation of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conclusion drawn by the authors is that it should be possible to reduce the radiation dose in pediatric CT imaging of the chest by a factor of at least 3, as compared to normal CT imaging of adult patients. However, there is no rule of thumb to be given as to what tube amperes might be best for low-dose CT. The authors achieved suitable results applying the spiral scanning technique and between 25 mA and 75 mA for examination of children. (orig./CB)

  9. Case report: Pulmonary syphilis mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases on chest CT and integrated PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of syphilis with pulmonary involvement. Chest CT scan and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT showed multiple pulmonary nodules mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases. This was confirmed on follow-up images that showed therapeutic response to penicillin

  10. Case report: Pulmonary syphilis mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases on chest CT and integrated PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Jun Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of syphilis with pulmonary involvement. Chest CT scan and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET/CT showed multiple pulmonary nodules mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases. This was confirmed on follow-up images that showed therapeutic response to penicillin.

  11. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yakun [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Li, Xiang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Department of Physics, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (United States); Segars, W. Paul [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, and Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan, E-mail: samei@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Departments of Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Given the radiation concerns inherent to the x-ray modalities, accurately estimating the radiation doses that patients receive during different imaging modalities is crucial. This study estimated organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices for the three clinical chest x-ray imaging techniques (chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT) using 59 anatomically variable voxelized phantoms and Monte Carlo simulation methods. Methods: A total of 59 computational anthropomorphic male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) adult phantoms were used in this study. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for a clinical radiography system with the capability of conducting chest radiography and tomosynthesis (Definium 8000, VolumeRAD, GE Healthcare) and a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). A Monte Carlo dose simulation program (PENELOPE, version 2006, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain) was used to mimic these two clinical systems. The Duke University (Durham, NC) technique charts were used to determine the clinical techniques for the radiographic modalities. An exponential relationship between CTDI{sub vol} and patient diameter was used to determine the absolute dose values for CT. The simulations of the two clinical systems compute organ and tissue doses, which were then used to calculate effective dose and risk index. The calculation of the two dose metrics used the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103 and BEIR VII report. Results: The average effective dose of the chest posteroanterior examination was found to be 0.04 mSv, which was 1.3% that of the chest CT examination. The average effective dose of the chest tomosynthesis examination was found to be about ten times that of the chest posteroanterior examination and about 12% that of the chest CT examination. With increasing patient average chest diameter, both the effective dose and risk index for CT increased considerably in an exponential fashion, while these two dose

  12. Chest Computed Tomography (CT) Immediately after CT-Guided Transthoracic Needle Aspiration Biopsy as a Predictor of Overt Pneumothorax

    OpenAIRE

    Noh, Tae June; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kang, Young Ae; Kwon, Sung-Youn; Yoon, Ho-Il; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Kyung Won; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Choon-Taek

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims This study examined the correlation between pneumothorax detected by immediate post-transthoracic needle aspiration-biopsy (TTNB) chest computed tomography (CT) and overt pneumothorax detected by chest PA, and investigated factors that might influence the correlation. Methods Adult patients who had undergone CT-guided TTNB for lung lesions from May 2003 to June 2007 at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital were included. Immediate post-TTNB CT and chest PA follow-up at 4 ...

  13. Radiation dose reduction in chest CT—Review of available options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The present status of proliferating CT examinations was presented. • Technical improvements of CT scanners for radiation dose reduction were reviewed. • Advantage and disadvantage of methods for CT radiation dose reduction were discussed. • Evidences for safety of CT radiation dose reduction were reviewed. - Abstract: Computed tomography currently accounts for the majority of radiation exposure related to medical imaging. Although technological improvement of CT scanners has reduced the radiation dose of individual examinations, the benefit was overshadowed by the rapid increase in the number of CT examinations. Radiation exposure from CT examination should be kept as low as reasonably possible for patient safety. Measures to avoid inappropriate CT examinations are needed. Principles and information on radiation dose reduction in chest CT are reviewed in this article. The reduction of tube current and tube potential are the mainstays of dose reduction methods. Study results indicate that routine protocols with reduced tube current are feasible with diagnostic results comparable to conventional standard dose protocols. Tube current adjustment is facilitated by the advent of automatic tube current modulation systems by setting the appropriate image quality level for the purpose of the examination. Tube potential reduction is an effective method for CT pulmonary angiography. Tube potential reduction often requires higher tube current for satisfactory image quality, but may still contribute to significant radiation dose reduction. Use of lower tube potential also has considerable advantage for smaller patients. Improvement in image production, especially the introduction of iterative reconstruction methods, is expected to lower radiation dose significantly. Radiation dose reduction in CT is a multifaceted issue. Understanding these aspects leads to an optimal solution for various indications of chest CT

  14. Radiation dose reduction in chest CT—Review of available options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Takeshi, E-mail: tkubo@kuhpkyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2, Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Kauczor, Hans Ulrich, E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Clinic Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Hatabu, Hiroto, E-mail: hhatabu@partners.org [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The present status of proliferating CT examinations was presented. • Technical improvements of CT scanners for radiation dose reduction were reviewed. • Advantage and disadvantage of methods for CT radiation dose reduction were discussed. • Evidences for safety of CT radiation dose reduction were reviewed. - Abstract: Computed tomography currently accounts for the majority of radiation exposure related to medical imaging. Although technological improvement of CT scanners has reduced the radiation dose of individual examinations, the benefit was overshadowed by the rapid increase in the number of CT examinations. Radiation exposure from CT examination should be kept as low as reasonably possible for patient safety. Measures to avoid inappropriate CT examinations are needed. Principles and information on radiation dose reduction in chest CT are reviewed in this article. The reduction of tube current and tube potential are the mainstays of dose reduction methods. Study results indicate that routine protocols with reduced tube current are feasible with diagnostic results comparable to conventional standard dose protocols. Tube current adjustment is facilitated by the advent of automatic tube current modulation systems by setting the appropriate image quality level for the purpose of the examination. Tube potential reduction is an effective method for CT pulmonary angiography. Tube potential reduction often requires higher tube current for satisfactory image quality, but may still contribute to significant radiation dose reduction. Use of lower tube potential also has considerable advantage for smaller patients. Improvement in image production, especially the introduction of iterative reconstruction methods, is expected to lower radiation dose significantly. Radiation dose reduction in CT is a multifaceted issue. Understanding these aspects leads to an optimal solution for various indications of chest CT.

  15. Utility of chest CT for differentiating primary and secondary achalasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To determine the computed tomography (CT) findings of primary and secondary achalasia and to assess the utility of CT for differentiating these conditions. Methods: A computerized search revealed 13 patients with primary achalasia and 15 with secondary achalasia who underwent chest CT during a 10-year period. The images were reviewed to determine whether there was distal oesophageal narrowing (including the length/contour of narrowing), oesophageal dilation, oesophageal wall thickening (including degree/symmetry/pattern of thickening), a soft-tissue mass at the gastro-oesophageal junction, mediastinal adenopathy, or other findings of malignant tumour. Results: Eleven (85%) of 13 patients with primary achalasia had distal oesophageal narrowing at CT that was smooth in all patients; four (31%) had oesophageal wall thickening that was smooth and symmetric in all patients; none had a soft-tissue mass at the gastro-oesophageal junction or mediastinal lymphadenopathy; and two (15%) had pulmonary metastases from unrelated lung cancers. In contrast, 12 (80%) of 15 patients with secondary achalasia had distal oesophageal narrowing at CT; 11 (73%) had distal oesophageal wall thickening that was nodular/lobulate and asymmetric in seven (64%) and smooth and symmetric in four (36%); six (40%) had a soft-tissue mass at the gastro-oesophageal junction; seven (47%) had mediastinal lymphadenopathy; and all 15 had other findings of malignant tumour. Conclusion: CT is a useful technique for differentiating primary and secondary achalasia. Distal oesophageal wall thickening that is nodular/lobulate and asymmetric, a soft-tissue mass at the gastro-oesophageal junction, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and pulmonary, hepatic, or osseous metastases are findings that favour secondary achalasia. - Highlights: • CT is a useful technique for differentiating primary and secondary achalasia. • Nodular/lobulated distal oesophageal wall thickening favors secondary achalasia. • A soft

  16. Paediatrician awareness of radiation dose and inherent risks in chest imaging studies-A questionnaire study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess paediatricians' knowledge regarding radiation exposure of chest imaging. Materials and methods: German paediatricians were surveyed using a questionnaire. Participants were asked to estimate effective dose (ED) of radiographs (CR) and computed tomography (CT). Further questions included dose-saving of paediatric CT-protocols, ALARA principle, and awareness of the link between radiation and cancer development. Length and type of occupation and amount of ordered procedures were evaluated. Results: 137 paediatricians participated with 59% and 39% correctly estimating ED of an adult (0.01-0.1 mSv) and newborn CR (0.01-0.1 mSv), respectively. ED of an adult chest CT (1-10 mSv) was underestimated by 28%, whereas ED of cardiac CT (10-100 mSv) was underestimated by 54%. 35% of participants correctly estimated ED of a chest CT in an infant (10-100 mSv) which was underestimated by 56%. Neither length nor type of occupation showed significant impact on dose estimations. 14% of paediatricians stated that MRI causes radiation, whereas 4% correctly estimated the potential of paediatric CT-protocols. 15% were familiar with the ALARA principle and 26% were aware of a publication concerning radiation and malignancy. Conclusion: Paediatricians demonstrated an increased level of awareness compared to previous surveys. However, estimation of ED of CT remained difficult. Increased information transfer and education seem pressing in the light of increasing radiological examinations.

  17. Paediatrician awareness of radiation dose and inherent risks in chest imaging studies-A questionnaire study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyer, Christoph M., E-mail: christoph.heyer@rub.de [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Berufgenossenschaftliches Universitaetsklinikum Bergmannsheil GmbH, Ruhr-University of Bochum, Buerkle-de-la-Camp Platz 1, D-44789 Bochum (Germany); Hansmann, Jan; Peters, Soeren A.; Lemburg, Stefan P. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Berufgenossenschaftliches Universitaetsklinikum Bergmannsheil GmbH, Ruhr-University of Bochum, Buerkle-de-la-Camp Platz 1, D-44789 Bochum (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Objective: To assess paediatricians' knowledge regarding radiation exposure of chest imaging. Materials and methods: German paediatricians were surveyed using a questionnaire. Participants were asked to estimate effective dose (ED) of radiographs (CR) and computed tomography (CT). Further questions included dose-saving of paediatric CT-protocols, ALARA principle, and awareness of the link between radiation and cancer development. Length and type of occupation and amount of ordered procedures were evaluated. Results: 137 paediatricians participated with 59% and 39% correctly estimating ED of an adult (0.01-0.1 mSv) and newborn CR (0.01-0.1 mSv), respectively. ED of an adult chest CT (1-10 mSv) was underestimated by 28%, whereas ED of cardiac CT (10-100 mSv) was underestimated by 54%. 35% of participants correctly estimated ED of a chest CT in an infant (10-100 mSv) which was underestimated by 56%. Neither length nor type of occupation showed significant impact on dose estimations. 14% of paediatricians stated that MRI causes radiation, whereas 4% correctly estimated the potential of paediatric CT-protocols. 15% were familiar with the ALARA principle and 26% were aware of a publication concerning radiation and malignancy. Conclusion: Paediatricians demonstrated an increased level of awareness compared to previous surveys. However, estimation of ED of CT remained difficult. Increased information transfer and education seem pressing in the light of increasing radiological examinations.

  18. Estimation of cartilaginous region in noncontrast CT of the chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Safdar, Nabile; Yu, Glenna; Myers, Emmarie; Sandler, Anthony; Linguraru, Marius George

    2014-03-01

    Pectus excavatum is a posterior depression of the sternum and adjacent costal cartilages and is the most common congenital deformity of the anterior chest wall. Its surgical repair can be performed via minimally invasive procedures that involve sternum and cartilage relocation and benefit from adequate surgical planning. In this study, we propose a method to estimate the cartilage regions in thoracic CT scans, which is the first step of statistical modeling of the osseous and cartilaginous structures for the rib cage. The ribs and sternum are first segmented by using interactive region growing and removing the vertebral column with morphological operations. The entire chest wall is also segmented to estimate the skin surface. After the segmentation, surface meshes are generated from the volumetric data and the skeleton of the ribs is extracted using surface contraction method. Then the cartilage surface is approximated via contracting the skin surface to the osseous structure. The ribs' skeleton is projected to the cartilage surface and the cartilages are estimated using cubic interpolation given the joints with the sternum. The final cartilage regions are formed by the cartilage surface inside the convex hull of the estimated cartilages. The method was validated with the CT scans of two pectus excavatum patients and three healthy subjects. The average distance between the estimated cartilage surface and the ground truth is 2.89 mm. The promising results indicate the effectiveness of cartilage surface estimation using the skin surface.

  19. Evaluation of the efficiency of bismuth breast shield in CT chest paediatric examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of bismuth breast shield in CT chest paediatric examinations when automatic exposure control techniques are used. The influence in the radiation dose and the image quality has been evaluated with and without the breast shield in the scoutview. In addition the radiation dose in shielded and non-shielded areas has been compared. Measurements were made in a 16 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA phantom simulating a newborn, and older children were simulated controlling the maximum intensities allowed by the automatic exposure control system AutomA. The highest dose reduction (59%) was obtained with AutomA system and when the breast shield is not used in the scoutview. This reduction in the radiation dose does not mean a significant increase of noise level. The use of the breast shield in the scoutview yielded an increase in the radiation dose in non-shielded areas. The use of bismuth breast shield is recommended only after the scoutview in order to optimise the radiation dose in CT chest paediatric examination when using automatic exposure control AutomA. (Author)

  20. Chest CT study of patients with asbestos exposure, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin-slice high-resolution computed tomographic (CT) findings of 36 patients (34 men, 2 women) with histories of long-term (11 to 43 years) occupational asbestos exposure (AS) were analyzed for pulmonary abnormalities, which were classified by the subpleural curvilinear shadow (SCLS) and/or the extent of honeycomb shadow (HS) into five types (O to IV). SCLS was detected in 22 patients (62 %), and HS in 14 patients (39 %). SCLS was distributed mainly in the lower lobe in patients with mild pulmonary fibrosis (Types I and II) and in segments where fibrosis was mild in patients with HS (Types III and IV). This may reflect the initiation of pulmonary fibrosis leading to the formation of a HS. Most (63.7 %) SCLS measured > 5 cm but < 10 cm in length and occurred < 1 cm from the inner chest wall in all cases. Radiologic-pathologic correlation of SCLS and HS in CT imagings, achieved in two post mortem specimens, seemed to indicate that SCLS was associated with the initial change of fibrosing bronchiolo-alveolitis, which is characteristic of pulmonary asbestosis. Thin-slice high-resolution CT findings of 36 patients with AS and 33 patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) were compared. Though the incidence of SCLS was low (21 %) in this series of IIP, its presence suggests that SCLS is not specific to pulmonary asbestosis but occurs also in chronic interstitial pneumonia. In order to explore the mechanism of the appearance of SCLS, further analysis of CT and histopathologic findings not only of pulmonary asbestosis and IIP but also of many other pulmonary interstitial diseases is necessary. It could be considered that thin-slice high-resolution CT which first detected SCLS is very useful in the visualization of fine structures of the lungs. (author)

  1. An audit of CT chest surveillance following oral cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, G; Hughes, T; Hanlon, R; Jones, H Lewis; Rogers, S N

    2016-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the chest is an integral part of the staging of patients with oral cancer. It identifies metastases, synchronous pulmonary primaries, and detects small nodules of indeterminate character that require a follow-up scan. We aimed to find out how many patients with small nodules had had subsequent scans, and the outcome of those who did. Between 2010 and 2013, 413 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) were treated with curative intent or were actively monitored at the Merseyside and Cheshire Regional Surgical Head and Neck Unit. A total of 324 (78%) had CT at diagnosis. The scans of 246 were clear, metastases were detected in 4, and 51 showed abnormalities. Forty-nine of the patients with abnormalities were recommended for further interval scans but only 20 (41%) actually had them. Further pathological findings were found in 11 (increase in the size of the nodule n=2; metastatic disease n=5; and primary pulmonary tumour n=4). A substantial number of patients did not have the recommended follow-up scans and potentially serious disease was found in some who did. As a result of this audit we have changed the process regarding the booking of CT surveillance scans, and we now check periodically that they have been done. The audit will be repeated to include other sites in the head and neck. PMID:27156437

  2. Abnormal chest shadow on CT in immunosuppressed patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Nakamura, Hiroshi (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1992-12-01

    An abnormal chest shadow was observed on CT scans in 25 cases of 23 immunosuppressed patients. Pulmonary disease was pathologically confirmed to be pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PC pneumonia) in four patients, cytomegalovirus pneumonia (CMV pneumonia) in one, bacterial pneumonia in seven, fungal infection in three, miliary tuberculosis in one, leukemic infiltration in two, lymphangitis carcinomatosa in three, drug-induced pneumonitis in three, and ARDS in one. In almost all patients, especially those with infectious diseases such as PC pneumonia, CMV pneumonia, and bacterial pneumonia, the abnormal shadow was wide and visible in the bilateral lung fields. We presumed that such findings as lobular shadow, centrilobular shadow, and mosaic pattern reflected the extension of disease via the respiratory tract, and that those findings are typical of infectious diseases. Because such findings as abnormal linear shadow and swelling of a broncho-vascular bundle were very frequently recognized in patients with lymphangitis carcinomatosa and frequently recognized in those with drug-induced pneumonitis, these diseases may be distinguished from other diseases. An area of slightly increased density was frequently recognized in patients with PC pneumonia, bacterial pneumonia, and drug-induced pneumonitis. Such lesions were pathologically confirmed to be located in the interstitium and/or alveolus. CT was extremely useful in comprehending the character and extension of particular diseases among various diseases. As the number of patients studied was small, the utility of CT in immunosuppressed patients requires further investigation in a larger number of patients. (author).

  3. Patient-centered clinical impact of incidentally detected abnormalities on chest CT scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherine G. Moftah

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The clinically significant different incidental abnormalities on chest CT scans represented 10.4% of all incidental findings, 3.3% were due to malignancies. The clinical impact of incidental abnormalities on chest CT may be of utmost importance on patient care.

  4. Pediatric chest CT after trauma: impact on surgical and clinical management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Rina P. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Hilmes, Melissa A.; Kan, J.H. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Yu, Chang [Vanderbilt University, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States); Ray, Jackie [Vanderbilt University, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Chest CT after pediatric trauma is frequently performed but its clinical impact, particularly with respect to surgical intervention, has not been adequately evaluated. To assess the impact of chest CT compared with chest radiography on pediatric trauma management. Two hundred thirty-five consecutive pediatric trauma patients who had both chest CT and radiography were identified. Images were reviewed and findings were categorized and correlated with subsequent chest interventions, blinded to final outcome and management. Of the 235 children, 38.3% (90/235) had an abnormal chest radiograph and 63.8% (150/235) had an abnormal chest CT (P < 0.0001). Chest interventions followed in 4.7% (11/235); of these, the findings could be made 1 cm above the dome of the liver in 91% (10/11). Findings requiring chest intervention included pneumothorax (PTX) and vertebral fractures. PTX was found on 2.1% (5/235) of chest radiographs and 20.0% (47/235) of chest CTs (P < 0.0001); 1.7% (4/235) of the children received a chest tube for PTX, 0.85% (2/235) seen on chest CT only. Vertebral fractures were present in 3.8% of the children (9/235) and 66.7% (6/9) of those cases were treated with spinal fusion or brace. There were no instances of mediastinal vascular injury. Most intrathoracic findings requiring surgical management in our population were identified in the lower chest and would be included in routine abdominopelvic CT exams; this information needs to be taken into consideration in the diagnostic algorithm of pediatric trauma patients. (orig.)

  5. Pediatric chest CT after trauma: impact on surgical and clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest CT after pediatric trauma is frequently performed but its clinical impact, particularly with respect to surgical intervention, has not been adequately evaluated. To assess the impact of chest CT compared with chest radiography on pediatric trauma management. Two hundred thirty-five consecutive pediatric trauma patients who had both chest CT and radiography were identified. Images were reviewed and findings were categorized and correlated with subsequent chest interventions, blinded to final outcome and management. Of the 235 children, 38.3% (90/235) had an abnormal chest radiograph and 63.8% (150/235) had an abnormal chest CT (P < 0.0001). Chest interventions followed in 4.7% (11/235); of these, the findings could be made 1 cm above the dome of the liver in 91% (10/11). Findings requiring chest intervention included pneumothorax (PTX) and vertebral fractures. PTX was found on 2.1% (5/235) of chest radiographs and 20.0% (47/235) of chest CTs (P < 0.0001); 1.7% (4/235) of the children received a chest tube for PTX, 0.85% (2/235) seen on chest CT only. Vertebral fractures were present in 3.8% of the children (9/235) and 66.7% (6/9) of those cases were treated with spinal fusion or brace. There were no instances of mediastinal vascular injury. Most intrathoracic findings requiring surgical management in our population were identified in the lower chest and would be included in routine abdominopelvic CT exams; this information needs to be taken into consideration in the diagnostic algorithm of pediatric trauma patients. (orig.)

  6. Cardiac pathologies incidentally detected with non-gated chest CT; Inzidentelle Pathologien des Herzens im Thorax-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Axel; Kroepil, P.; Lanzman, R.S.; Moedder, U. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Duesseldorf, Heinrich-Heine-Univ. (Germany); Choy, G.; Abbara, S. [Cardiovascular Imaging Section, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Cardiac imaging using electrocardiogram-gated multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) permits noninvasive diagnosis of congenital and acquired cardiac pathologies and has thus become increasingly important in the last years. Several studies investigated the incidence and relevance of incidental extracardiac structures within the lungs, mediastinum, chest wall, and abdomen with gated coronary CT. This resulted in the general acceptance of the review of extracardiac structures as a routine component of coronary CT interpretation. On the other hand radiologists tend to neglect pericardial and cardiac pathologies in non-gated chest CT, which is primarily performed for the evaluation of the respiratory system or for tumor staging. Since the introduction of multi-detector spiral CT technology, the incidental detection of cardiac and pericardial findings has become possible using non-gated chest CT. This article reviews the imaging appearances and differential diagnostic considerations of incidental cardiac entities that may be encountered in non-gated chest CT. (orig.)

  7. Low-dose spiral CT in pediatric diagnostic evaluation of the chest; Niedrigdosis-Spiral-CT in der paediatrischen Thoraxbildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogalla, P.; Stoever, B.; Scheer, I.; Juran, R.; Hamm, B. [Radiologie der Charite der Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany); Gaedicke, G. [Paediatrie der Charite, Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    The conclusion drawn by the authors is that it should be possible to reduce the radiation dose in pediatric CT imaging of the chest by a factor of at least 3, as compared to normal CT imaging of adult patients. However, there is no rule of thumb to be given as to what tube amperes might be best for low-dose CT. The authors achieved suitable results applying the spiral scanning technique and between 25 mA and 75 mA for examination of children. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Zusammenfassend wird fuer moeglich gehalten, die Strahlendosis bei der paediatrischen Thorax-CT gegenueber der normalen Thorax-CT bei Erwachsenen um einen Faktor von mindestens 3 zu reduzieren. Allerdings gibt es keine Regel dafuer, welche Roehrenstromeinstellung fuer Niedrigdosis-CT die Beste ist. Wir sind zu dem Ergebnis gekommen, dass bei Einsatz des Spiral-Scanning-Verfahrens 25 mA bis 75 mA zur Untersuchung der Kinderthorax ausreichen. (orig.)

  8. AP diameter shows the strongest correlation with CTDI and DLP in abdominal and chest CT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zarb, Francis

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among cross-sectional diameters, weight and computed tomography (CT) dose descriptors (CTDI and DLP) to identify which is best used as a measure for the establishment of DRLs in CT. Data (gender, weight, cross-sectional diameters, dose descriptors) from 56 adult patients attending for either a CT examination of the abdomen or chest was obtained from two spiral CT units using automatic milliampere modulation. The AP diameter was demonstrated as the main contributing factor influencing the dose in CT (CTDI: r(2) = 0.269, p-value < or =0.001; DLP: r(2) = 0.260, p-value < or =0.001) since it has a greater correlation with radiation dose than body weight and can thus be its substitute in dose-reduction strategies and establishment of DRLs. The advantages of using the AP diameter are that it can easily be measured prior to scanning or retrospectively from previous CT images. However, further studies on the practicality of this approach are recommended.

  9. Clinical value of CARE dose 4D technique in decreasing CT scanning dose of adult chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the value of CARE Dose 4D technique in decreasing radiation dose and improving image quality of multi-slice spiral CT in adult chest scanning. Methods: 100 patients of chest CT scanning were equally divided into study group and control group randomly. CARE Dose 4D Technique was used in study group. Effective mAs value, volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) were displayed automatically in machine while chest scanning; those values and actual mAs value of every image were recorded respectively. The image quality at apex of lung, lower edge of aorta arch, middle area of left atrium and base of lung on every image of 400 images was judged and classified as three level (excellent, good, poor) by two deputy chief physicians with double blind method, the image noise at corresponding parts was measured. Results: While setting 80 mAs for quality reference mAs, the effective mAs value in study group most decreased 44 mAs than control group with an average decrease of 9.60 (12.0%), CTDIvol with 4.75 mGy with an average decrease of 0.95 mCy (11.0%), DLP 99.50% in study group, with 98.0% in control group. But it was higher at apex of lung and base of lung, lower at middle area of left atrium, and similar at lower edge of aorta arch in study group than contrast group. The image noise were lower at apex of lung and base of lung in study group than control group (t =6.299 and 2.332, all P<0.05), higher at middle area of left atrium in study group than control group (t=3.078, P<0.05) and similar at lower edge of aorta arch in study group than control group (t=1.191, P>0.05). Conclusions: CARE Dose 4D technique provides a function regulated mAs real-time on line, it not only raises utilization rate of radiation and decreases radiation dose, but also promises and increases image quality in chest CT scanning, and has some clinical significance. (authors)

  10. Clinical evaluation of automatic tube voltage selection in chest CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, Tilo; Henry, Simon; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Yasunaga, Kanna; Bendaoud, Sofiane; Simeone, Ariana; Remy, Jacques [University Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain [University Lille Nord de France, Department of Medical Statistics (EA 2694), Lille (France); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens Medical Systems, Department of Research and Development, Forchheim (Germany); Remy-Jardin, Martine [Hospital Calmette, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Lille cedex (France)

    2013-10-15

    To evaluate the clinical impact of automatic tube voltage selection on chest CT angiography (CTA). Ninety-three patients were prospectively evaluated with a CT protocol aimed at comparing two successive CTAs acquired under similar technical conditions except for the kV selection: (1) the initial CTA was systematically obtained at 120 kVp and 90 ref mAs; (2) the follow-up CTA was obtained with an automatic selection of the kilovoltage (Care KV; Siemens Healthcare) for optimised CTA. At follow-up, 90 patients (97 %) underwent CTA with reduced tube voltage, 100 kV (n = 26; 28 %) and 80 kV (n = 64; 69 %), resulting in a significant dose-length-product reduction (follow-up: 87.27; initial: 141.88 mGy.cm; P < 0.0001; mean dose reduction: 38.5 %) and a significant increase in the CNR at follow-up (follow-up: 11.5 {+-} 3.5 HU; initial: 10.9 {+-} 3.7 HU; P = 0.03). The increase in objective image noise at follow-up (follow-up: 23.2 {+-} 6.7 HU vs. 17.8 {+-} 5.1 HU; P < 0.0001) did not alter the diagnostic value of images. Automatic tube voltage selection reduced the radiation dose delivered during chest CT angiograms by 38.5 % while improving the contrast-to-noise ratio of the examinations. (orig.)

  11. Role of Multidetector CT in Evaluation of Acute Chest Pain: Non-Cardiac Vascular and Pulmonary Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania S Sayed *, Hisham M Mansour **, Mohammad H Khaleel ***, Sherif H Abo Gamra ** and Merhan A Nasr

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Triage of patients with acute chest pain is one of the most important issues currently facing physicians in the emergency department. Acute chest pain may be a symptom of a number of serious conditions and is generally considered a medical emergency. The causes of acute chest pain range from non-serious to life threatening. A rapid, accurate and cost-effective approach for the evaluation of emergency department patients with chest pain is needed. Aim of the work: This work aims to emphasize the role of multidetector CT in assessment of non-cardiac vascular and pulmonary causes of acute chest pain.Method: The studied group included 89 patients (59 men and 30 women presented by acute chest pain. All patients were subjected to MDCT and/or MDCT angiography using a Toshiba 64 detectors CT scanner. Results: The high spatial resolution and relatively non-invasive nature make MSCT angiography a strong and serious competitor to established vascular imaging techniques. Having the additional ability to simultaneously acquire information on other organs, which enables the early diagnosis of complications. Conclusion: Continued technical improvements in acquisition speed and spatial resolution of computed tomography images, and development of more efficient image reconstruction algorithms which reduce patient exposure to radiation and contrast result in increased popularity of MDCT.

  12. Assessment of chest pain in the emergency room: What is the role of multidetector CT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chest pain is one of the most frequent complaints for patients seen in the emergency department. The current article describes the clinical stratification of patients who present to the emergency department with chest pain and discusses imaging options and analysis for these patients. It reviews conventional imaging approaches to assessing chest pain including chest radiography and stress testing. The main discussion focuses on the potential utility use of cross-sectional imaging, particularly multidetector CT, in the evaluation of chest pain in the emergency department

  13. Diagnostic modalities x-ray and CT chest differ in the management of thoracic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Chapagain

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe difference in the management of blunt trauma to the chest on the basis of conventional xray and computerised tomography of the chest. Methods: This prospective study was conducted between December 2011 to October 2012 in COMS in Bharatpur,a tertiary referral centre in central Nepal . Clinically stable thoracic injury patients were first evaluated with chest x-ray and the management on this basis was recorded. The findings of the CT chest were assessed and the type of management on the basis of CT was also recorded. Outcome was assessed in terms of mortality, morbidity, hospital and ICU stay with respect to the management on the basis of chest x-ray and CT scan. Results: Of the 129 patients, 74.4% were male and 25.6% were female with the patients ranging in age from 7 to 87 years (mean = 40.41 years. The most common mechanism of trauma to the chest was as a result of a motor vehicle accident (69.8%, followed by fall injury (20.2%. X-ray chest diagnosed rib fracture in 62%, haemothorax in 37%, pneumothorax in 27%, lung contusion in 10% and haemopneumothorax in 21% patients. Similarly CT chest diagnosed rib fracture in 86%, haemothorax in 54%, pneumothorax in 36%, lung contusion in 30% and haemopneumothorax in 30% patients. Mean hospital stay was 9.5 days in the group of patients having management on the basis of x-ray chest relative to mean stay of 10.2 days in the CT- chest group. In the management on the basis of xray group, there was a mean ICU stay of 2.8days compared to mean stays of 3.2 days in CT chest group. Conclusion: Though CT scan of the chest is more informative and differs the management of the blunt chest trauma, one should not forget to advise the cost effective, easily available and initial guiding agent, xray chest for early management of the chest injury patient. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i1.12764 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol.10(1; 22-31

  14. Image quality and age-specific dose estimation in head and chest CT examinations with organ-based tube-current modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Yamauchi, M; Imai, K; Ikeda, M; Aoyama, T

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an organ-based tube-current modulation (OBTCM) system on image quality and age-specific dose in head and chest CT examinations. Image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image entropy were assessed using statistical and entropy analyses. Radiation doses for newborn, 6-y-old child and adult phantoms were measured with in-phantom dosimetry systems. The quality of CT images obtained with OBTCM was not different from that obtained without OBTCM. In head CT scans, the eye lens dose decreased by 20-33 % using OBTCM. In chest CT scans, breast dose decreased by 5-32 % using OBTCM. Posterior skin dose, however, increased by 11-20 % using OBTCM in head and chest CT scans. The reduction of effective dose using OBTCM was negligibly small. Detailed image quality and dose information provided in this study can be effectively used for OBTCM application. PMID:23734058

  15. Children, CT Scan and Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Morteza Bajoghli; Farshad Bajoghli; Nazila Tayari; Reza Rouzbahani

    2010-01-01

    Children are more sensitive to radiation than adults. Computer-ized tomography (CT) consists of 25 % of all medical imaging. It was estimated that more than 2% of all carcinomas in the USA are due to CT scans. There is an ongoing focus on the reduction of CT scan radiation dose. Awareness about risk-benefits of CT has increased. Reduction of radiological exam is an important issue because the accumulation effects of radiation can be hazardous. In addition, proper protocol should be followed f...

  16. Cardiac CT for the assessment of chest pain: Imaging techniques and clinical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Hans-Christoph, E-mail: christoph.becker@med.uni-muenchen.de [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Grosshadern Clinic, Department of Clinical Radiology, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Johnson, Thorsten [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Grosshadern Clinic, Department of Clinical Radiology, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Immediate and efficient risk stratification and management of patients with acute chest pain in the emergency department is challenging. Traditional management of these patients includes serial ECG, laboratory tests and further on radionuclide perfusion imaging or ECG treadmill testing. Due to the advances of multi-detector CT technology, dedicated coronary CT angiography provides the potential to rapidly and reliably diagnose or exclude acute coronary artery disease. Life-threatening causes of chest pain, such as aortic dissection and pulmonary embolism can simultaneously be assessed with a single scan, sometimes referred to as “triple rule out” scan. With appropriate patient selection, cardiac CT can accurately diagnose heart disease or other sources of chest pain, markedly decrease health care costs, and reliably predict clinical outcomes. This article reviews imaging techniques and clinical results for CT been used to evaluate patients with chest pain entering the emergency department.

  17. 20 percent lower lung cancer mortality with low-dose CT vs chest X-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists have found a 20 percent reduction in deaths from lung cancer among current or former heavy smokers who were screened with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) versus those screened by chest X-ray.

  18. Cardiac CT for the assessment of chest pain: Imaging techniques and clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immediate and efficient risk stratification and management of patients with acute chest pain in the emergency department is challenging. Traditional management of these patients includes serial ECG, laboratory tests and further on radionuclide perfusion imaging or ECG treadmill testing. Due to the advances of multi-detector CT technology, dedicated coronary CT angiography provides the potential to rapidly and reliably diagnose or exclude acute coronary artery disease. Life-threatening causes of chest pain, such as aortic dissection and pulmonary embolism can simultaneously be assessed with a single scan, sometimes referred to as “triple rule out” scan. With appropriate patient selection, cardiac CT can accurately diagnose heart disease or other sources of chest pain, markedly decrease health care costs, and reliably predict clinical outcomes. This article reviews imaging techniques and clinical results for CT been used to evaluate patients with chest pain entering the emergency department.

  19. Triple Rule Out versus CT Angiogram Plus Stress Test for Evaluation of Chest Pain in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly N. Sawyer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Undifferentiated chest pain in the emergency department (ED is a diagnostic challenge. One approach includes a dedicated chest computed tomography (CT for pulmonary embolism or dissection followed by a cardiac stress test (TRAD. An alternative strategy is a coronary CT angiogram with concurrent chest CT (Triple Rule Out, TRO. The objective of this study was to describe the ED patient course and short-term safety for these evaluation methods. Methods: This was a retrospective observational study of adult patients presenting to a large, community ED for acute chest pain who had non-diagnostic electrocardiograms (ECGs and normal biomarkers. We collected demographics, ED length of stay, hospital costs, and estimated radiation exposures. We evaluated 30-day return visits for major adverse cardiac events. Results: A total of 829 patients underwent TRAD, and 642 patients had TRO. Patients undergoing TRO tended to be younger (mean 52.3 vs 56.5 years and were more likely to be male (42.4% vs. 30.4%. TRO patients tended to have a shorter ED length of stay (mean 14.45 vs. 21.86 hours, to incur less cost (median $449.83 vs. $1147.70, and to be exposed to less radiation (median 7.18 vs. 16.6mSv. No patient in either group had a related 30-day revisit. Conclusion: Use of TRO is feasible for assessment of chest pain in the ED. Both TRAD and TRO safely evaluated patients. Prospective studies investigating this diagnostic strategy are needed to further assess this approach to ED chest pain evaluation.

  20. Pulmonary Aspergillus chest wall involvement in chronic granulomatous disease: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary Aspergillus infection in patients with chronic granulomatous disease tends to involve the chest wall and consequently carries a high mortality rate. We report the findings of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in three such cases. We suggest that CT and MRI have a complementary role in evaluating chest wall invasion by pulmonary Aspergillus infection in chronic granulomatous disease. (orig./GDG)

  1. Evaluation of variation of voltage (kV) absorbed dose in chest CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most important diagnostic techniques images today. The increasing utilization of CT implies a significant increase of population exposure to ionizing radiation. Optimization of practice aims to reduce doses to patients because the image quality is directly related to the diagnosis. You can decrease the amount of dose to the patient, and maintain the quality of the image. There are several parameters that can be manipulated in a CT scan and these parameters can be used to reduce the energy deposited in the patient. Based on this, we analyzed the variation of dose deposited in the lungs, breasts and thyroid, by varying the supply voltage of the tube. Scans of the thorax were performed following the protocol of routine chest with constant and variable current for the same applied voltage. Moreover, a female phantom was used and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100), model bat, were used to record the specific organ doses. Scans were performed on a GE CT scanner, model 64 Discovery channels. Higher doses were recorded for the voltage of 120 kV with 200 mAs in the lungs (22.46 mGy) and thyroid (32.22 mGy). For scans with automatic mAs, variable between 100 and 440, this same tension contributed to the higher doses. The best examination in terms of the dose that was used with automatic 80 kV mAs, whose lungs and thyroid received lower dose. For the best breast exam was 100 kV. Since the increase in the 80 kV to 100 kV no impact so much the dose deposited in the lungs, it can be concluded that lowering the applied voltage to 100 kV resulted in a reduction in the dose absorbed by the patient. These results can contribute to optimizing scans of the chest computed tomography

  2. Automated tube potential selection for standard chest and abdominal CT in follow-up patients with testicular cancer: comparison with fixed tube potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnannt, Ralph; Winklehner, Anna; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Eberli, Daniel [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic for Urology, Zurich (Switzerland); Knuth, Alexander [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic for Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-09-15

    To evaluate prospectively, in patients with testicular cancer, the radiation dose-saving potential and image quality of contrast-enhanced chest and abdominal CT with automated tube potential selection. Forty consecutive patients with testicular cancer underwent contrast-enhanced arterio-venous chest and portal-venous abdominal CT with automated tube potential selection (protocol B; tube potential 80-140 kVp), which is based on the attenuation of the CT topogram. All had a first CT at 120 kVp (protocol A) using the same 64-section CT machine and similar settings. Image quality was assessed; dose information (CTDI{sub vol}) was noted. Image noise and attenuation in the liver and spleen were significantly higher for protocol B (P < 0.05 each), whereas attenuation in the deltoid and erector spinae muscles was similar. In protocol B, tube potential was reduced to 100 kVp in 18 chest and 33 abdominal examinations, and to 80 kVp in 5 abdominal CT examinations; it increased to 140 kVp in one patient. Image quality of examinations using both CT protocols was rated as diagnostic. CTDI{sub vol} was significantly lower for protocol B compared to protocol A (reduction by 12%, P < 0.01). In patients with testicular cancer, radiation dose of chest and abdominal CT can be reduced with automated tube potential selection, while image quality is preserved. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of radiation dosage in chest digital tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of chest digital tomosynthesis (DTS) for lung lesion screening by comparing the effective dose of chest DTS with chest digital radiography (DR), low-dose MSCT and MSCT examinations. Methods: The Fluke lung/chest phantom underwent posterior-anterior (PA), left lateral (LAT) chest DR and DTS with automatic exposure control technique. Using RTI DoseGuard and WinODS, the dose area product (DAP) and effective dose of PA, LAT and total DTS were calculated. CareDose technique was used for MSCT and low-dose MSCT scans, the dose length products (DLP) was acquired.According to the DLP to E (k) conversion coefficient in ICRP 103, the effective dose of low-dose MSCT and MSCT were calculated. Paired t test was used for comparison of the mean effective dose of DTS, DR and low-dose MSCT. Results: The mean effective dose was 0.13 mSv for chest DR and 0.11 mSv for DTS examination. The mean effective dose of low-dose MSCT and MSCT scans were 1.13 mSv and 6.38 mSv. The effective dose of chest DTS was comparable to that of chest DR, and was approximately 1/10 and 1/60 times lower than that of low-dose MSCT and MSCT scans. There was no statistical difference between chest DTS and DR (t=3.514, P>0.01), and there was a significant difference between chest DTS and low-dose MSCT (t=178.769, P<0.01). Conclusion: DTS is a new X-ray tomography which has the advantage of low radiation dosage in chest examination for lung lesion screening comparing with low-dose MSCT. (authors)

  4. Children, CT scan and radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Bajoghli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Children are more sensitive to radiation than adults. Computer-ized tomography (CT consists of 25 % of all medical imaging. It was estimated that more than 2% of all carcinomas in the USA are due to CT scans. There is an ongoing focus on the reduction of CT scan radiation dose. Awareness about risk-benefits of CT has increased. Reduction of radiological exam is an important issue because the accumulation effects of radiation can be hazardous. In addition, proper protocol should be followed for diagnostic pro-cedures of ionization radiation and computerized tomography. Effective radiation dose should range from 0.8 to 10.5 millisievert. The same protocol should be followed in different hospitals as well. Basic principles of radiation protection should be monitored. As much as possible, both technician and radiologist must be pre-sent during computerized tomography for children, and MRI and ultrasound should be replaced if possible.

  5. Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children: Chest Radiographic and CT Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chest radiographic and CT findings of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in children, the population that is more vulnerable to respiratory infection than adults. The study population comprised 410 children who were diagnosed with an H1N1 infection from August 24, 2009 to November 11, 2009 and underwent chest radiography at Dankook University Hospital in Korea. Six of these patients also underwent chest CT. The initial chest radiographs were classified as normal or abnormal. The abnormal chest radiographs and high resolution CT scans were assessed for the pattern and distribution of parenchymal lesions, and the presence of complications such as atelectasis, pleural effusion, and pneumomediastinum. The initial chest radiograph was normal in 384 of 410 (94%) patients and abnormal in 26 of 410 (6%) patients. Parenchymal abnormalities seen on the initial chest radiographs included prominent peribronchial marking (25 of 26, 96%), consolidation (22 of 26, 85%), and ground-glass opacities without consolidation (2 of 26, 8%). The involvement was usually bilateral (19 of 26, 73%) with the lower lung zone predominance (22 of 26, 85%). Atelectasis was observed in 12 (46%) and pleural effusion in 11 (42%) patients. CT (n = 6) scans showed peribronchovascular interstitial thickening (n = 6), ground-glass opacities (n = 5), centrilobular nodules (n = 4), consolidation (n = 3), mediastinal lymph node enlargement (n = 5), pleural effusion (n = 3), and pneumomediastinum (n = 3). Abnormal chest radiographs were uncommon in children with a swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection. In children, H1N1 virus infection can be included in the differential diagnosis, when chest radiographs and CT scans show prominent peribronchial markings and ill-defined patchy consolidation with mediastinal lymph node enlargement, pleural effusion and pneumomediastinum

  6. Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children: Chest Radiographic and CT Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Min Jeong; Lee, Young Seok; Lee, Jee Young; Lee, Kun Song [Dankook University College of Medicine, Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chest radiographic and CT findings of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in children, the population that is more vulnerable to respiratory infection than adults. The study population comprised 410 children who were diagnosed with an H1N1 infection from August 24, 2009 to November 11, 2009 and underwent chest radiography at Dankook University Hospital in Korea. Six of these patients also underwent chest CT. The initial chest radiographs were classified as normal or abnormal. The abnormal chest radiographs and high resolution CT scans were assessed for the pattern and distribution of parenchymal lesions, and the presence of complications such as atelectasis, pleural effusion, and pneumomediastinum. The initial chest radiograph was normal in 384 of 410 (94%) patients and abnormal in 26 of 410 (6%) patients. Parenchymal abnormalities seen on the initial chest radiographs included prominent peribronchial marking (25 of 26, 96%), consolidation (22 of 26, 85%), and ground-glass opacities without consolidation (2 of 26, 8%). The involvement was usually bilateral (19 of 26, 73%) with the lower lung zone predominance (22 of 26, 85%). Atelectasis was observed in 12 (46%) and pleural effusion in 11 (42%) patients. CT (n = 6) scans showed peribronchovascular interstitial thickening (n = 6), ground-glass opacities (n = 5), centrilobular nodules (n = 4), consolidation (n = 3), mediastinal lymph node enlargement (n = 5), pleural effusion (n = 3), and pneumomediastinum (n = 3). Abnormal chest radiographs were uncommon in children with a swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection. In children, H1N1 virus infection can be included in the differential diagnosis, when chest radiographs and CT scans show prominent peribronchial markings and ill-defined patchy consolidation with mediastinal lymph node enlargement, pleural effusion and pneumomediastinum

  7. Attenuation and image quality in the use of protective bismuth in chest CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For chest CT scans are protective of bismuth (Bi) with the aim of reducing the dose in the breast. The aim of this study was to evaluate the attenuation with thermoluminescent dosimeters in the glandular dose average when using these protective breast CT scans and to evaluate the image quality with and without protective Bismuth.

  8. Chest CT abnormalities and quality of life: relationship in adult cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcoyne, Aoife; Lavelle, Lisa P.; McCarthy, Colin J.; McEvoy, Sinead H.; Fleming, Hannah; Gallagher, Annika; Loeve, Martine; Tiddens, Harm; McKone, Edward; Gallagher, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the relationship between lung parenchymal abnormalities on chest CT and health-related quality of life in adult cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods The chest CT scans of 101 consecutive CF adults (mean age 27.8±7.9, 64 males) were prospectively scored by two blinded radiologists in consensus using a modified Bhalla score. Health-related quality of life was assessed using the revised Quittner Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire (CFQ-R). Multiple regressions were performed with each of the CFQ-R domains and all clinical and imaging findings to assess independent correlations. Results There were 18 inpatients and 83 outpatients. For the cohort of inpatients, CT abnormalities were significantly (P<0.005 for all) associated with Respiratory Symptoms (Air Trapping), and also with Social Functioning (Consolidation) and Role Functioning (Consolidation). For outpatients, CT abnormalities were significantly (P<0.005 for all) associated with Respiratory Symptoms (Consolidation) and also with Physical Functioning (Consolidation), Vitality (Consolidation, Severity of Bronchiectasis), Eating Problems (airway wall thickening), Treatment Burden (Total CT Score), Body Image (Severity of Bronchiectasis) and Role Functioning (Tree-in-bud nodules). Consolidation was the commonest independent CT predictor for both inpatients (predictor for 2 domains) and outpatients (predictor in 3 domains). Several chest CT abnormalities excluded traditional measures such as FEV1 and BMI from the majority of CFQ-R domains. Conclusions Chest CT abnormalities are significantly associated with quality of life measures in adult CF, independent of clinical or spirometric measurements. PMID:27047946

  9. Unenhanced third-generation dual-source chest CT using a tin filter for spectral shaping at 100 kVp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubenreisser, Holger, E-mail: holger.haubenreisser@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Meyer, Mathias; Sudarski, Sonja [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Allmendinger, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare Sector, CT Division, Forchheim (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Henzler, Thomas [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Spectral shaping can be done using an additional tin filter. • Spectral shaping can lead to a significantly lower dose for non-contrast CT. • The low dose protocol maintains sufficient image quality for diagnosis. • The protocol used should be used for non-contrast enhanced chest CT when possible. - Abstract: Objective: To prospectively investigate image quality and radiation dose of 100 kVp spectral shaping chest CT using a dedicated tin filter on a 3rd generation dual-source CT (DSCT) in comparison to standard 100 kVp chest CT. Methods: Sixty patients referred for a non-contrast chest on a 3rd generation DSCT were prospectively included and examined at 100 kVp with a dedicated tin filter. These patients were retrospectively matched with patients that were examined on a 2nd generation DSCT at 100 kVp without tin filter. Objective and subjective image quality was assessed in various anatomic regions and radiation dose was compared. Results: Radiation dose was decreased by 90% using the tin filter (3.0 vs 0.32 mSv). Soft tissue attenuation and image noise was not statistically different for both examination techniques (p > 0.05), however image noise was found to be significantly higher in the trachea when using the additional tin filter (p = 0.002). SNR was found to be statistically similar in pulmonary tissue, significantly lower when measured in air and significantly higher in the aorta for the scans on the 3rd generation DSCT. Subjective image quality with regard to overall quality and image noise and sharpness was not statistically significantly different (p > 0.05). Conclusion: 100 kVp spectral shaping chest CT by means of a tube-based tin-filter on a 3rd generation DSCT allows 90% dose reduction when compared to 100 kVp chest CT on a 2nd generation DSCT without spectral shaping.

  10. Unenhanced third-generation dual-source chest CT using a tin filter for spectral shaping at 100 kVp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Spectral shaping can be done using an additional tin filter. • Spectral shaping can lead to a significantly lower dose for non-contrast CT. • The low dose protocol maintains sufficient image quality for diagnosis. • The protocol used should be used for non-contrast enhanced chest CT when possible. - Abstract: Objective: To prospectively investigate image quality and radiation dose of 100 kVp spectral shaping chest CT using a dedicated tin filter on a 3rd generation dual-source CT (DSCT) in comparison to standard 100 kVp chest CT. Methods: Sixty patients referred for a non-contrast chest on a 3rd generation DSCT were prospectively included and examined at 100 kVp with a dedicated tin filter. These patients were retrospectively matched with patients that were examined on a 2nd generation DSCT at 100 kVp without tin filter. Objective and subjective image quality was assessed in various anatomic regions and radiation dose was compared. Results: Radiation dose was decreased by 90% using the tin filter (3.0 vs 0.32 mSv). Soft tissue attenuation and image noise was not statistically different for both examination techniques (p > 0.05), however image noise was found to be significantly higher in the trachea when using the additional tin filter (p = 0.002). SNR was found to be statistically similar in pulmonary tissue, significantly lower when measured in air and significantly higher in the aorta for the scans on the 3rd generation DSCT. Subjective image quality with regard to overall quality and image noise and sharpness was not statistically significantly different (p > 0.05). Conclusion: 100 kVp spectral shaping chest CT by means of a tube-based tin-filter on a 3rd generation DSCT allows 90% dose reduction when compared to 100 kVp chest CT on a 2nd generation DSCT without spectral shaping

  11. Study of the CT peripheral dose variation in a chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Computed Tomography (CT) grows every year and is a diagnostic method that has revolutionized radiology with advances in procedures for obtaining image. However, the indiscriminate use of this method generates relatively high doses in patients. The diagnostic reference levels (DRL) is a practical tool to promote the evaluation of existing protocols. The optimization and the periodic review of the protocols are important to balance the risk of radiation. The purpose of this study is to investigate, in a chest scan, the variation of dose in CT. To measure the dose profile are used lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters distributed in cylinders positioned in peripheral and central regions of a phantom of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The data obtained allow to observe the variation of the dose profile inside the phantom. The peripheral region shows higher dose values than the central region. The longitudinal variation can be observed and the maximum dose was recorded at the edges of the phantom (15,99 ± 2,80) mGy at the midpoint of the longitudinal axis. The results will contribute to disseminate the proper procedure and optimize the dosimetry and the tests of quality control in CT, as well as make a critical analysis of the DRL. (Author)

  12. Study of the CT peripheral dose variation in a chest phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, T. C.; Da Silva, T. A. [Development Center of Nuclear Technology / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Mourao F, A. P., E-mail: alonso@cdtn.br [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Nuclear Energy Department, Program of Nuclear Science and Techniques, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Computed Tomography (CT) grows every year and is a diagnostic method that has revolutionized radiology with advances in procedures for obtaining image. However, the indiscriminate use of this method generates relatively high doses in patients. The diagnostic reference levels (DRL) is a practical tool to promote the evaluation of existing protocols. The optimization and the periodic review of the protocols are important to balance the risk of radiation. The purpose of this study is to investigate, in a chest scan, the variation of dose in CT. To measure the dose profile are used lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters distributed in cylinders positioned in peripheral and central regions of a phantom of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The data obtained allow to observe the variation of the dose profile inside the phantom. The peripheral region shows higher dose values than the central region. The longitudinal variation can be observed and the maximum dose was recorded at the edges of the phantom (15,99 ± 2,80) mGy at the midpoint of the longitudinal axis. The results will contribute to disseminate the proper procedure and optimize the dosimetry and the tests of quality control in CT, as well as make a critical analysis of the DRL. (Author)

  13. Comparison of image quality and radiation dose between high-pitch mode and low-pitch mode spiral chest CT in small uncooperative children: The effect of respiratory rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Ho; Choi, Young Hun; Cho, Hyun-Hae; Lee, So Mi [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Su-Mi [SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In-One [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    To compare image quality and radiation dose between high-pitch mode (HPM) and low-pitch mode (LPM) CT in young children. Forty-seven children (mean age 35.6 months; range, 0-126 months) underwent 49 CT examinations in HPM or LPM and were divided into high or low respiratory rate (RR) groups. A qualitative image quality was compared between the two modes. The volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and dose-length product (DLP) were evaluated from the dose reports, and effective doses were assessed using a paediatric phantom. Image quality was generally better for HPM than LPM (diagnostic acceptance score, 4.00 vs. 3.46, P = 0.004); the difference was more prominent in the high RR group (4.00 vs. 3.22, P = 0.001). However, there was no significant difference in the low RR group. The mean DLP value was higher in HPM than LPM (29.48 mGy . cm vs. 23.46 mGy . cm, P = 0.022), while CTDI{sub vol} was not significantly different. The total effective radiation dose was 26 % higher in HPM than LPM (1.82 mSv vs. 1.44 mSv). LPM can be considered for paediatric lung evaluation in young children with low RRs to reduce radiation dose while maintaining favourable image quality. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of image quality and radiation dose between high-pitch mode and low-pitch mode spiral chest CT in small uncooperative children: The effect of respiratory rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare image quality and radiation dose between high-pitch mode (HPM) and low-pitch mode (LPM) CT in young children. Forty-seven children (mean age 35.6 months; range, 0-126 months) underwent 49 CT examinations in HPM or LPM and were divided into high or low respiratory rate (RR) groups. A qualitative image quality was compared between the two modes. The volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose-length product (DLP) were evaluated from the dose reports, and effective doses were assessed using a paediatric phantom. Image quality was generally better for HPM than LPM (diagnostic acceptance score, 4.00 vs. 3.46, P = 0.004); the difference was more prominent in the high RR group (4.00 vs. 3.22, P = 0.001). However, there was no significant difference in the low RR group. The mean DLP value was higher in HPM than LPM (29.48 mGy . cm vs. 23.46 mGy . cm, P = 0.022), while CTDIvol was not significantly different. The total effective radiation dose was 26 % higher in HPM than LPM (1.82 mSv vs. 1.44 mSv). LPM can be considered for paediatric lung evaluation in young children with low RRs to reduce radiation dose while maintaining favourable image quality. (orig.)

  15. Radiographic, CT and MRI spectrum of hydatid disease of the chest: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty patients with thoracic hydatidosis (Echinococcus granulosus) were studied. The hydatid cysts were located in the lung parenchyma (70%), mediastinum (6.7%), inside the heart (10%), the pleurae (10%) and the chest wall (3.3%). Complications of thoracic hydatid cysts, such as rupture, infection, pleural involvement, spread and calcifications are presented. Computed tomography (CT) without and/or with contrast enhancement was performed in all patients (30). Findings from conventional chest radiographs were compared with CT and confirmed by pathology (30). In 10 cases (33.3%), magnetic resonance imaging was also performed. The diagnostic spectrum of hydatid cysts, including variations and developmental stages, is presented in this pictorial essay. (orig.)

  16. Radiodiagnostic measurements radiation load of children by chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the district of Slovak Republic we have tried to estimate the radiation load of children to 15 years by chest radiodiagnostic examinations. Our data were collected using measurements with TLD for 100 patients divided in 5 age categories at six radiodiagnostic departments. The analysis of obtained absorbed doses as a function of age for chest radiodiagnostic examinations has shown, that the investigated Slovak radiodiagnostic centres use rather lower voltage techniques and the entrance surface doses are much higher than the proposed value of European Communities. (authors)

  17. Dual-source CT in chest pain diagnosis; Dual-source-CT in der Diagnostik des Thoraxschmerzes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Nikolaou, K.; Fink, C.; Rist, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.R. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Becker, A.; Knez, A. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Abteilung Kardiologie, Medizinische Klinik I, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    With the depiction of pulmonary arteries, coronary arteries, and the aorta, CT angiography of the chest offers a comprehensive diagnostic work-up of unclear chest pain. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of dual-source CT in this patient group. A total of 47 patients suffering from unclear chest pain were examined with a Siemens Somatom Definition. Volume and flow of contrast media (Ultravist, Schering) were adapted to the body weight. The examinations were evaluated with regard to image quality and contrast opacification and to the diagnostic accuracy with reference to the final clinical diagnosis. Adequate contrast opacification was achieved in all examinations. The depiction of the coronary arteries was diagnostic in all cases. The cause of chest pain could be identified in 41 cases. Among the diagnoses were coronary and myocardial pathologies, valvular disease, aortic aneurysms and dissections, pulmonary embolism, and pneumonic consolidation. DSCT angiography of the chest offers a very good image quality even at high heart rates so that a high diagnostic accuracy is achieved in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.) [German] Die EKG-getriggerte CT-Angiographie kann mit der Darstellung von Koronar-, Lungenarterien und Aorta eine umfassende Abklaerung des unklaren Thoraxschmerzes leisten. Ziel unserer Untersuchungen war es, die diagnostische Wertigkeit des Dual-source-CT in diesem Patientenkollektiv festzustellen. 47 Patienten mit unklarem Thoraxschmerz wurden an einem Siemens Somatom Definition untersucht. Menge und Injektionsgeschwindigkeit des Kontrastmittels (Ultravist, Schering) wurden auf das Koerpergewicht adaptiert. Die Untersuchungen wurden hinsichtlich der Bildqualitaet und Kontrastierung sowie der diagnostischen Genauigkeit im Vergleich zur endgueltigen klinischen Diagnose beurteilt. Bei allen Untersuchungen wurde eine ausreichende Kontrastierung erzielt. Die Darstellung der Koronararterien war in allen Faellen diagnostisch

  18. Roles of enhanced chest CT and PET-CT in determining the malignancy potential of a single pulmonary nodule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) often presents as a diagnostic challenge and a string of imaging tests are performed. This study was aimed to evaluate the roles of 18F -fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined CT, and enhanced chest CT in determining the malignancy potential of the SPN in question. Both the enhanced chest CT and PET-CT images of 89 patients with SPN of unknown significance taken from December 2003 to April 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. The size of the nodule, degree of enhancement, and presence of calcification, speculation, lobulation, cavity, or air bronchogram were noted from the enhanced CT. From the PET-CT, peak SUV values were also computed. Then, using multiple regression analysis, a numeric equation for determining the malignancy potential was computed. In 61 of the 89 cases malignancy confirmed by histological examination, and in 28 cases, benign nature was assumed from either histology or clinical course. The equation for determining the malignancy potential required only lobulation and peak SUV value information, both factors that can be found on PET-CT images. The other variables such as above mentioned size of the nodule, degree of enhancement, and presence of calcification, speculation, cavity, or air bronchogram were not statistically meaningful. Though enhanced CT aids in the diagnosis of SPN, it is not necessary in determining the malignancy potential of the SPN, as only the peak SUV and presence of lobulation are the required variables in our newly formulated equation

  19. High-resolution chest CT in the evaluation of dyspneic smokers with pulmonary fibrosis and normal spirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates the utility of high- resolution CT (HRCT) of the chest in dyspneic smokers who present with normal or near-normal spirometric measurement and a reduced diffusing capacity. Eight dyspneic smokers with near-normal spirometric measurements were imaged with a Picker Fastrac scanner. Prone 3-mm images and supine 10-mm images of the chest were obtained. All CT scans and concurrently obtained plain chest radiographs were reviewed by two chest radiologists and two pulmonologists. One outside CT scan and plain film of a ventilator-dependent, postpneumonectomy patient was also included

  20. Volumetric measurement of pulmonary nodules at low-dose chest CT : effect of reconstruction setting on measurement variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.; de Bock, G.H.; van Klaveren, R.J.; van Ooyen, P.; Tukker, W.; Zhao, Y.; Dorrius, M.D.; Proenca, R.V.; Post, W.J.; Oudkerk, M.

    2010-01-01

    To assess volumetric measurement variability in pulmonary nodules detected at low-dose chest CT with three reconstruction settings. The volume of 200 solid pulmonary nodules was measured three times using commercially available semi-automated software of low-dose chest CT data-sets reconstructed wit

  1. Possibilities for exposure reduction in computed tomography examination of acute chest pain; Moeglichkeiten der Dosisreduktion bei CT-Untersuchungen des akuten Thoraxschmerzes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, H.C. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Electrocardiogram-gated (ECG) computed tomography (CT) investigations can be accompanied by high amounts of radiation exposure. This is particularly true for the investigation of patients with unclear and acute chest pain. The common approach in patients with acute chest pain is standard spiral CT of the chest. The chest pain or triple-rule-out CT protocol is a relatively new ECG-gated protocol of the entire chest. This article reviews and discusses different techniques for the CT investigation of patients with acute chest pain. By applying the appropriate scan technique, the radiation exposure for an ECG-gated protocol must not necessarily be higher than a standard chest CT scan Aortic pathologies are far better depicted by ECG-gated scan protocols and depending on the heart rate coronary artery disease can also be detected at the same time. The use of ECG-triggered scans will not support the diagnostics of the pulmonary arteries. However, in unspecific chest pain an ECG-triggered scan protocol can provide information on the differential diagnosis. (orig.) [German] EKG-getriggerte CT-Untersuchungen koennen mit einer relativ hohen Strahlenexposition einhergehen. Dies gilt im besonderen Masse fuer die Untersuchung des gesamten Thorax bei Patienten mit unklarem akutem Thoraxschmerz. Bisher wurden Untersuchungen bei Patienten mit akutem Thoraxschmerz in Spiraltechnik ohne EKG-Triggerung durchgefuehrt. Das ''Chest-pain-'' oder ''Triple-rule-out''-Protokoll ist ein neues EKG-getriggertes Untersuchungsprotokoll des gesamten Thorax. Im vorliegenden Artikel werden verschiedene Techniken zur CT-Untersuchung von Patienten mit akutem Thoraxschmerz vorgestellt und besprochen. Mit der richtigen Untersuchungstechnik muss die Strahlenexposition fuer ein EKG-getriggertes Untersuchungsprotokoll nicht hoeher sein als eine Standarduntersuchung ohne EKG. Mit einem EKG-getriggerten Untersuchungsprotokoll laesst sich die Aorta in Hinblick auf

  2. Techniques and radiation dose in CT examinations of adult patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation dose to patients that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. Lake of optimized protocols could be an additional source of increased dose. The aim of this study was to measure radiation doses in CT examination of the adults in three Sudanese hospitals. Details were obtained from approximately 160 CT examination carried out in 3 hospitals (3 CT scanners). Effective dose was calculated for each examination using CT dose indices. exposure related parameters and CT D1- to- effective dose conversion factors. CT air kerma index (CT D1) and dose length products (DLP) determined were below the established international reference dose levels. The mean effective doses in this study for the head, chest, and abdomen are 0.82, 3.7 and 5.4 mGy respectively. These values were observed that the effective dose per examination was lower in Sudan than in other countries. The report of a CT survey done in these centers indicates that the mean DLP values for adult patients were ranged from 272-460 mGy cm (head) 195-995 mGy cm (chest), 270-459 mGy cm (abdomen). There are a number of observed parameters that greatly need optimization, such as minimize the scan length, without missing any vital anatomical regions, modulation of exposure parameters (kV, mA, exposure time, and slice thickness) based on patient size and age. Another possible method is through use of contrast media only to optimize diagnostic yield. The last possible method is the use of radio protective materials for protection however, in order to achieve the above optimization strategies: there is great demand to educate CT personnel on the effects of scan parameter settings on radiation dose to patients and image quality required for accurate diagnosis. (Author)

  3. Chronic diffuse infiltrative lung disease: Chest radiography diagnostic accuracy of CT versus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors compared the accuracy of chest radiographic and CT findings in predicting diagnoses in 118 patients with chronic diffuse infiltrative lung disease, using three independent observers. First-choice diagnosis was correct with 57% of radiographs and 76% of CT scans (P<.001). CT was most accurate in silicosis (93%), UIP (89%), lymphangitic carcinomatosis (85%), and sarcoidosis (77%). The observers had a high degree of confidence in their first-choice diagnoses with 23% of radiographs and 49% of CT scans and were correct when confident in 77% and 93% of cases, respectively (P<.001). Observers correctly predicted whether a transbronchial or an open lung biopsy was indicated with 65% of radiographs and 87% of CT scans (P<.001). The authors conclude that CT is superior to the radiograph in evaluation of chronic infiltrative lung disease

  4. Digital tomosynthesis for aortic arch calcification evaluation: performance comparison with chest radiography with CT as the reference standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Recently developed digital tomosynthesis has shown improved detection of pulmonary lesions with a radiation dose comparable to conventional CR but with a much lower radiation dose than CT. Purpose. To compare the diagnostic performance of digital tomosynthesis (DT) with that of chest radiography (CR) for the detection of aortic arch calcification (AAC). Material and Methods. The study included 100 patients who underwent multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), DT, and CR (DT and CR were obtained within one week of CT examination). We evaluated and compared the diagnostic performances of DT and CR for the detection of AAC with MDCT as the reference standard. The extent (four grades 0-3) of AAC on DT and CR was also compared with CT calcium score. Inter-observer agreement was analyzed by using kappa statistics. Results. On DT, overall accuracy for AAC was superior to that of CR (94% and 71%, respectively, P < 0.01). Inter-observer agreement was good with DT and CR (kappa values = 0.74 and 0.62, respectively) for the presence of AAC, and good with DT and moderate with CR (kappa value = 0.64 and 0.53, respectively) for AAC grading. The overall correlation coefficient on AAC grading between DT and CT (calcium score) was superior to that between CR and CT (0.90 and 0.60, respectively). Conclusion. DT is superior to CR for detection and extent evaluation of AAC

  5. Multislice CT: update on radiation and screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With ever-expanding applications, increasing availability, and accessibility of CT scanners, concerns have been raised about radiation exposure associated with CT scanning. Global statistics and projections suggest increasing use of CT scanning and its contribution to radiation exposure is a cause for concern. Several strategies based on modulation of scanning parameters and technologic improvisations have been developed in an effort to reduce associated radiation dose. This article discusses the basis for rising concern regarding radiation dose associated with CT scanning. The fundamentals of CT dose estimation are described along with strategies that aim to reduce radiation dose associated with CT scanning based on patient characteristics, study indications, and technological innovations. (orig.)

  6. Chest CT for suspected pulmonary complications of oncologic therapies: how I review and report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In cancer patient during or following oncologic therapies with respiratory symptoms and pulmonary pathology at chest CT the differential diagnosis includes infection, therapy-induced disease and tumour progression.Although CT morphology may be typical or even pathognomonic in some conditions the diagnosis is usually made by a synopsis of imaging, clinical and laboratory features.Close communication with referring colleagues and a good knowledge of potential side effects of therapeutic concepts, their time course and CT morphology is crucial in the differential diagnosis.This review describes a personal approach to the radiological diagnosis of therapy-induced pulmonary abnormalities in cancer patients. PMID:27067027

  7. CT staging of colorectal cancer: What do you find in the chest?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQueen, A.S., E-mail: andrewmcqueen7@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Scott, J. [Department of Radiology, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-15

    Aim: To clarify the chest computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with a new diagnosis of colorectal adenocarcinoma. Materials and methods: Patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC) over a 3-year period were retrospectively studied. All CT examinations were performed within a single NHS Trust using the same CT system and protocol. Two primary outcomes were assessed: the presence of pulmonary metastases and the identification of a significant, unexpected chest abnormality. Results: Five hundred and fourteen out of 568 (90.5%) CRC patients underwent complete CT staging. Thirty-one patients (6%) had lung metastases, of which four (0.8%) were isolated. Three hundred and fifty-three (68.7%) had no evidence of pulmonary metastases, but 130 (25.3%) had indeterminate lung nodules (ILNs). The ILNs of 12 patients were subsequently confirmed as metastases on follow-up. A major non-metastatic finding (pulmonary embolism or synchronous primary malignancy) was found in 15/514 patients (3%). Conclusions: Thoracic CT altered the initial TNM stage in fewer than 1% of CRC patients, but the detection of significant incidental chest disease and the establishment of an imaging baseline are useful outcomes of this imaging strategy. One-quarter of all staging examinations demonstrated ILNs.

  8. Dose reduction with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction for paediatric CT: phantom study and clinical experience on chest and abdomen CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the benefit and limits of iterative reconstruction of paediatric chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT). The study compared adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with filtered back projection (FBP) on 64-channel MDCT. A phantom study was first performed using variable tube potential, tube current and ASIR settings. The assessed image quality indices were the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the noise power spectrum, low contrast detectability (LCD) and spatial resolution. A clinical retrospective study of 26 children (M:F = 14/12, mean age: 4 years, range: 1-9 years) was secondarily performed allowing comparison of 18 chest and 14 abdominal CT pairs, one with a routine CT dose and FBP reconstruction, and the other with 30 % lower dose and 40 % ASIR reconstruction. Two radiologists independently compared the images for overall image quality, noise, sharpness and artefacts, and measured image noise. The phantom study demonstrated a significant increase in SNR without impairment of the LCD or spatial resolution, except for tube current values below 30-50 mA. On clinical images, no significant difference was observed between FBP and reduced dose ASIR images. Iterative reconstruction allows at least 30 % dose reduction in paediatric chest and abdominal CT, without impairment of image quality. (orig.)

  9. Radiation dose optimization in CT planning of corrective scoliosis surgery. A phantom study.

    OpenAIRE

    Abul-Kasim, Kasim; Gunnarsson, Mikael; Maly, Pavel; Ohlin, Acke; Sundgren, Pia

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the possibility of obtaining a helical CT scan of a long segment of vertebral column, optimally reduce the radiation dose, compare the radiation dose of the low dose helical CT with that of some of the CT protocols used in clinical practice and finally assess the impact of such a dose reduction on the image quality. A chest phantom was examined with a 16-slice CT scanner. Six scans were performed with different radiation doses. The lowest radiation dose whi...

  10. Quantification of Emphysema with a Three-Dimensional Chest CT Scan: Correlation with the Visual Emphysema Scoring on Chest CT, Pulmonary Function Tests and Dyspnea Severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Jeong; Hwang, Jung Hwa [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    We wanted to prospectively evaluate the correlation between the quantification of emphysema using 3D CT densitometry with the visual emphysema score, pulmonary function tests (PFT) and the dyspnea score in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Non-enhanced chest CT with 3D reconstruction was performed in 28 men with COPD (age 54-88 years). With histogram analysis, the total lung volume, mean lung density and proportion of low attenuation lung volume below predetermined thresholds were measured. The CT parameters were compared with the visual emphysema score, the PFT and the dyspnea score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was well correlated with the DLco and FEV{sub 1}/FVC. A Low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU and -930 HU was correlated with visual the emphysema score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was correlated with the dyspnea score, although the correlations between the other CT parameters and the dyspnea score were not significant. Objective quantification of emphysema using 3D CT densitometry was correlated with the visual emphysema score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was correlated with the DLco, the FEV{sub 1}/FVC and the dyspnea score.

  11. Quantification of Emphysema with a Three-Dimensional Chest CT Scan: Correlation with the Visual Emphysema Scoring on Chest CT, Pulmonary Function Tests and Dyspnea Severity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We wanted to prospectively evaluate the correlation between the quantification of emphysema using 3D CT densitometry with the visual emphysema score, pulmonary function tests (PFT) and the dyspnea score in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Non-enhanced chest CT with 3D reconstruction was performed in 28 men with COPD (age 54-88 years). With histogram analysis, the total lung volume, mean lung density and proportion of low attenuation lung volume below predetermined thresholds were measured. The CT parameters were compared with the visual emphysema score, the PFT and the dyspnea score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was well correlated with the DLco and FEV1/FVC. A Low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU and -930 HU was correlated with visual the emphysema score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was correlated with the dyspnea score, although the correlations between the other CT parameters and the dyspnea score were not significant. Objective quantification of emphysema using 3D CT densitometry was correlated with the visual emphysema score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was correlated with the DLco, the FEV1/FVC and the dyspnea score.

  12. Step-and-shoot prospectively ECG-gated vs. retrospectively ECG-gated with tube current modulation coronary CT angiography using 128-slice MDCT patients with chest pain: diagnostic performance and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background With increasing awareness for radiation exposure, the study of diagnostic accuracy of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) with low radiation dose techniques is mandatory to both radiologist and clinician. Purpose To compare diagnostic performance and effective radiation dose between step-and-shoot prospectively ECG-gated and retrospectively ECG-gated with tube current modulation (TCM) CCTA using 128-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Material and Methods We retrospectively evaluated 60 patients who underwent CCTA with either of two different low-dose techniques using 128-slice MDCT (23 patients for step-and shoot-prospectively ECG-gated and 37 patients for retrospectively ECG-gated with TCM CCTA) followed by conventional coronary angiography. All coronary arteries and all segments thereof, except anatomical variants or small size (< 1.5 mm) ones, were included in analysis. Results In per-segment analysis, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 91/96%, 95/94%, 75/73%, and 98/99% for step-and-shoot prospectively ECG-gated and retrospectively ECG gated with TCM CCTA, respectively, relative to conventional coronary angiography. Effective radiation dose were 1.75 ± 0.83 mSv, 4.91 ± 1.71 mSv in the step-and-shoot prospectively ECG-gated and retrospectively ECG-gated with TCM CCTA groups, respectively. Conclusion The two low-radiation dose CCTA techniques using 128-slice MDCT yields comparable diagnostic performance for coronary artery disease in symptomatic patients with low heart rates

  13. Coronary calcium screening with dual-source CT: reliability of ungated, high-pitch chest CT in comparison with dedicated calcium-scoring CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutt, Antoine; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [CHRU et Universite de Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain; Deken, Valerie [CHRU et Universite de Lille, Department of Biostatistics (EA 2694), Lille (France); Molinari, Francesco [Centre Hospitalier General de Tourcoing, Department of Radiology, Tourcoing (France)

    2016-06-15

    To investigate the reliability of ungated, high-pitch dual-source CT for coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening. One hundred and eighty-five smokers underwent a dual-source CT examination with acquisition of two sets of images during the same session: (a) ungated, high-pitch and high-temporal resolution acquisition over the entire thorax (i.e., chest CT); (b) prospectively ECG-triggered acquisition over the cardiac cavities (i.e., cardiac CT). Sensitivity and specificity of chest CT for detecting positive CAC scores were 96.4 % and 100 %, respectively. There was excellent inter-technique agreement for determining the quantitative CAC score (ICC = 0.986). The mean difference between the two techniques was 11.27, representing 1.81 % of the average of the two techniques. The inter-technique agreement for categorizing patients into the four ranks of severity was excellent (weighted kappa = 0.95; 95 % CI 0.93-0.98). The inter-technique differences for quantitative CAC scores did not correlate with BMI (r = 0.05, p = 0.575) or heart rate (r = -0.06, p = 0.95); 87.2 % of them were explained by differences at the level of the right coronary artery (RCA: 0.8718; LAD: 0.1008; LCx: 0.0139; LM: 0.0136). Ungated, high-pitch dual-source CT is a reliable imaging mode for CAC screening in the conditions of routine chest CT examinations. (orig.)

  14. Segmentation of the whole breast from low-dose chest CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Salvatore, Mary; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    The segmentation of whole breast serves as the first step towards automated breast lesion detection. It is also necessary for automatically assessing the breast density, which is considered to be an important risk factor for breast cancer. In this paper we present a fully automated algorithm to segment the whole breast in low-dose chest CT images (LDCT), which has been recommended as an annual lung cancer screening test. The automated whole breast segmentation and potential breast density readings as well as lesion detection in LDCT will provide useful information for women who have received LDCT screening, especially the ones who have not undergone mammographic screening, by providing them additional risk indicators for breast cancer with no additional radiation exposure. The two main challenges to be addressed are significant range of variations in terms of the shape and location of the breast in LDCT and the separation of pectoral muscles from the glandular tissues. The presented algorithm achieves robust whole breast segmentation using an anatomy directed rule-based method. The evaluation is performed on 20 LDCT scans by comparing the segmentation with ground truth manually annotated by a radiologist on one axial slice and two sagittal slices for each scan. The resulting average Dice coefficient is 0.880 with a standard deviation of 0.058, demonstrating that the automated segmentation algorithm achieves results consistent with manual annotations of a radiologist.

  15. Association between Image Characteristics on Chest CT and Severe Pleural Adhesion during Lung Cancer Surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Nam Jin

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the association between image characteristics on preoperative chest CT and severe pleural adhesion during surgery in lung cancer patients. We included consecutive 124 patients who underwent lung cancer surgeries. Preoperative chest CT was retrospectively reviewed to assess pleural thickening or calcification, pulmonary calcified nodules, active pulmonary inflammation, extent of emphysema, interstitial pneumonitis, and bronchiectasis in the operated thorax. The extent of pleural thickening or calcification was visually estimated and categorized into two groups: localized and diffuse. We measured total size of pulmonary calcified nodules. The extent of emphysema, interstitial pneumonitis, and bronchiectasis was also evaluated with a visual scoring system. The occurrence of severe pleural adhesion during lung cancer surgery was retrospectively investigated from the electrical medical records. We performed logistic regression analysis to determine the association of image characteristic on chest CT with severe pleural adhesion. Localized pleural thickening was found in 8 patients (6.5%, localized pleural calcification in 8 (6.5%, pulmonary calcified nodules in 28 (22.6%, and active pulmonary inflammation in 22 (17.7%. There was no patient with diffuse pleural thickening or calcification in this study. Trivial, mild, and moderate emphysema was found in 31 (25.0%, 21 (16.9%, and 12 (9.7% patients, respectively. Severe pleural adhesion was found in 31 (25.0% patients. The association of localized pleural thickening or calcification on CT with severe pleural adhesion was not found (P = 0.405 and 0.107, respectively. Size of pulmonary calcified nodules and extent of emphysema were significant variables in a univariate analysis (P = 0.045 and 0.005, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, moderate emphysema was significantly associated with severe pleural adhesion (odds ratio of 11.202, P = 0.001. In conclusion

  16. Low-dose helical chest CT in asbestos exposed workers in the Veneto Region: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To evaluate the preliminary results of low-dose helical chest CT in a group of individuals with an occupational exposure to asbestos. Materials and methods. Between October 2000 and May 2004, 1512 asymptomatic subjects, selected by Occupational Health physicians of the Veneto Region among those with a significant exposure to asbestos, underwent low-dose helical chest CT without contrast media administration. According to their features, all pulmonary nodules identified underwent pathology, further CT evaluation or follow-up with low-dose CT. Results. Apart tram benign pleural findings (in 40% of subjects), 590 pulmonary nodules were identified. Eleven nodules underwent pathologic examination, which detected 5 malignant lesions, and 51 were evaluated with other CT techniques, in all cases demonstrating benign features. In followup low-dose CT scans, performed in the remaining 528 nodules, a minimal increase in size occurred in 4 cases only. Conclusions. Screening for clinically relevant pulmonary lesions in asymptomatic people with occupational exposure to asbestos may be useful if rigorous enrolment criteria are adopted. The management of abnormal findings is cost-effective if it is based on the morphological features of each finding

  17. Evaluation of automated attenuation-based tube potential selection in combination with organ-specific dose reduction for contrast-enhanced chest CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the influence of attenuation-based tube potential selection (ATPS) in combination with organ-specific dose reduction (OSDR) on radiation dose and image quality of contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) examinations. Material and methods: Seventy consecutive patients (59.2 ± 16.1 years; 49 men; 21 women) were randomized into two groups and underwent contrast-enhanced chest CT using a 128 section CT scanner. CT examinations were performed as standard protocol in group A (n = 35) and with the activated novel dose-saving devices, OSDR and ATPS, in group B (n = 35). Objective [signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR)] and subjective image quality (five-point scale; 1 = non diagnostic; 5 = excellent) as well as radiation dose (CTDIvol) were analysed. Results: CTDIvol of the protocol using OSDR and ATPS was significantly lower than in standard chest CT examinations (3.4 ± 1 versus 6.1 ± 2.3 mGy; p < 0.001). Although the level of noise was slightly elevated in group B (14.1 ± 1.7 versus 11.4 ± 1.9 HU; p < 0.01), no significant differences in SNR (17.1 ± 5 versus 16.3 ± 4.7) or subjective image quality (mean score of 4.6 versus 4.4) were observed between both imaging protocols. Conclusion: Attenuation-based tube potential selection in combination with organ-specific dose reduction essentially reduces the dose of chest CT in patients with normal body mass index (BMI) in clinical routine while maintaining subjective and objective image quality. - Highlights: • ATPS in combination with OSDR essentially reduces radiation exposure in chest CT. • ATPS combined with OSDR does not compromise image quality of chest CT examinations. • ATPS and OSDR can be recommended for clinical routine

  18. The measurement of organic radiation dose of multi-slice CT scanning by using the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom%中国人仿真胸部体模检测多层螺旋CT扫描组织器官剂量的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭刚; 曾勇明; 罗天友; 赵峰; 张志伟; 郁仁强; 彭盛坤

    2011-01-01

    目的 利用中国人仿真胸部模型来测量不同噪声指数下胸部各组织器官的吸收剂量,计算有效剂量(ED)并对MSCT胸部扫描进行剂量评估.方法 对CDP-1C型中国人仿真胸部体模在CT体层解剖和X线衰减两方面进行等效性论证;通过在体模内布放热释光剂量计(TLD)来测量不同噪声水平下各组织器官的吸收剂量,并记录相应的剂量长度乘积(DLP);将两者分别换算为ED后选择单因素t检验方法进行对比研究,分析自动管电流调制(ATCM)技术时不同噪声指数胸部CT扫描的剂量水平.结果 中国人仿真胸部体模与成人CT胸部图像的结构相似.体模主要器官平均CT值为肺-788.04 HU、心脏45.64 HU、肝脏65.84 HU、脊柱254.32 HU,与成人偏差程度分别为肺0.10%、心脏3.04%、肝脏4.49%、脊柱4.36%.肝脏的平均CT值差异有统计学意义(t=-8.705,P<0.05);肺、心脏和脊柱平均CT值与人体差异无统计学意义(t值分别为-0.752、-1.219、-1.138,P>0.05).当噪声指数从8.5逐渐增至22.5时,DLP从393.57 mGy·cm递减至78.75 mGy·cm,各器官吸收剂量呈下降趋势(以肺为例,平均吸收剂量从22.38 mGy递减至3.66 mGy).应用DLP所计算的ED较器官吸收剂量计算的ED偏低(以噪声指数为8.5为例,两种方法的ED分别为6.69和8.77 mSv).结论 应用中国人仿真体模来进行CT剂量评估更为准确;基于ATCM技术的胸部CT扫描噪声指数设定至少应大于8.5.%Objective Using the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom to measure the absorbed dose of various tissues and organs under different noise index, and to assess the radiation dose of MSCT chest scanning with the effective dose(ED). Methods The equivalence of the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom(CDP-1C) and the adult chest on CT sectional anatomy and X-ray attenuation was demonstrated. The absorbed doses of various tissues and organs under different noise index were measured by laying thermoluminescent

  19. Where Does It Lead? Imaging Features of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices on Chest Radiograph and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzman, Rotem S.; Blondin, Dirk; Furst, Gunter; Scherer, Axel; R Miese, Falk; Kroepil, Patric [University of Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Winter, Joachim [University Hospital Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Abbara, Suhny [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (US)

    2011-10-15

    Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are being increasingly employed in patients suffering from cardiac rhythm disturbances. The principal objective of this article is to familiarize radiologists with pacemakers and ICDs on chest radiographs and CT scans. Therefore, the preferred lead positions according to pacemaker types and anatomic variants are introduced in this study. Additionally, the imaging features of incorrect lead positions and defects, as well as complications subsequent to pacemaker implantation are demonstrated herein.

  20. Where Does It Lead? Imaging Features of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices on Chest Radiograph and CT

    OpenAIRE

    Lanzman, Rotem S.; Winter, Joachim; Blondin, Dirk; Fürst, Günter; Scherer, Axel; Miese, Falk R; Abbara, Suhny; Kröpil, Patric

    2011-01-01

    Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are being increasingly employed in patients suffering from cardiac rhythm disturbances. The principal objective of this article is to familiarize radiologists with pacemakers and ICDs on chest radiographs and CT scans. Therefore, the preferred lead positions according to pacemaker types and anatomic variants are introduced in this study. Additionally, the imaging features of incorrect lead positions and defects, as well as complica...

  1. Severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia in immunocompetent adults: chest radiographic and CT findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dingyu; Fu, Yangyang; Wang, Zhiwei; Cao, Jian; Walline, Joseph; Zhu, Huadong

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe adenovirus pneumonia and its associated imaging features are well-described in immunocompromised patients but are rare and poorly understood in immunocompetent adults. We sought to describe the radiographic and CT findings of severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in eight immunocompetent adults. Methods We reviewed systematically chest imaging manifestations of laboratory-confirmed severe adenovirus pneumonia in eight immunocompetent adults from April 2012 to April 2014. Results All patients showed abnormal results on initial chest radiograph and CT, with the exception of one normal initial chest radiograph. The abnormalities of the initial chest radiographs were unilateral (n=4) or bilateral (n=3), including consolidation (n=4), dense patchy opacity (n=3), ground glass opacity (GGO) (n=1), and pleural effusion (n=1). The initial CT findings consisted of unilateral (n=5) and bilateral (n=3) abnormalities, including consolidation (n=8), GGO (n=2), pleural effusion (n=3) and small nodules (n=1). Focal consolidation was the predominant finding in six patients whose initial CT scans were examined within one week after illness onset. Follow-up radiologic findings showed rapid development of bilateral consolidation within ten days after illness onset, usually accompanied by adjacent ground-glass opacity and pleural effusion. The parenchymal abnormalities began to absorb around two weeks after illness onset, with no appearances of fibrosis. Conclusions Severe adenovirus CAP in immunocompetent adults mainly appears as focal consolidation followed by rapid progression to bilateral consolidation, usually accompanied by adjacent GGO and pleural effusion, which may resemble bacterial pneumonia. Adenovirus should be considered in severe pneumonia cases with negative cultures and failure to respond to antibiotics.

  2. Low grade coal worker's pneumoconiosis. Comparison of CT and chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared CT with chest radiography (CR) in the assessment of low grade coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) in a population of 83 subjects. All subjects had a high-voltage p.a. CR, graded according to the ILO classification between 0/0 and 1/1, a conventional CT (CCT) using contiguous 1-cm-thick sections on the entire thorax and a set of 10 high-resolution CT (HRCT) images. CR and CT were separately read by consensus by 2 teams of 2 trained readers. CR were coded 0/0 in 9 subjects; 0/1 in 31; 1/0 in 28; 1/1 in 15. Among these groups of patients, micronodules were detected by CT in respectively 2 (22%), 14 (45%), 17 (61%) and 10 (67%) patients. In all groups, micronodules were more often detected by CT when the opacities detected on CR were scored as rounded (p, q) than irregular (s, t). Among the patients graded 0/0 or 0/1, CT showed micronodules in 40%. By contrast, among the patients graded 1/0 or 1/1, CT did not show micronodules in 37%, but revealed in numerous patients that opacities detected on CR were related to bronchiectasis and/or emphysema only. Comparative analysis of HRCT and CCT showed that both techniques are complementary and proved the usefulness of CCT in the detection or confirmation of low profusion of micronodules. (orig.)

  3. Prevalence and clinical significance of incidental cardiac findings in non-ECG-gated chest CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of incidental cardiac findings in non-ECG-gated chest CT. Non-ECG-gated chest CT examinations of 300 patients were retrospectively analyzed for incidental cardiac findings. Subsequently, these findings were evaluated for their clinical relevance by a cardiologist. A total of 107 out of 300 examined patients had 174 incidental cardiac findings including coronary calcification (90), aortic/mitral valve calcification (42), iatrogenic changes (23), pericardial effusion (6), dilatation of the heart (4), myocardial changes (3), thrombus in the left ventricle (2), constrictive pericarditis (2) and atrial myxoma (1). Of the cardiac findings 51% were described in the written report and in 53 out of the 107 patients the cardiac findings were unknown. Newly detected incidental findings from 8 patients were rated as clinically significant: pericardial effusion (4), constrictive pericarditis (1), thrombus in the left ventricle (1), atrial myxoma (1) and dilatation of the heart (1). Incidental cardiac findings are frequent in non-ECG-gated chest CT and may have a high clinical relevance. (orig.)

  4. Classification of pulmonary emphysema from chest CT scans using integral geometry descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rikxoort, E. M.; Goldin, J. G.; Galperin-Aizenberg, M.; Brown, M. S.

    2011-03-01

    To gain insight into the underlying pathways of emphysema and monitor the effect of treatment, methods to quantify and phenotype the different types of emphysema from chest CT scans are of crucial importance. Current standard measures rely on density thresholds for individual voxels, which is influenced by inspiration level and does not take into account the spatial relationship between voxels. Measures based on texture analysis do take the interrelation between voxels into account and therefore might be useful for distinguishing different types of emphysema. In this study, we propose to use Minkowski functionals combined with rotation invariant Gaussian features to distinguish between healthy and emphysematous tissue and classify three different types of emphysema. Minkowski functionals characterize binary images in terms of geometry and topology. In 3D, four Minkowski functionals are defined. By varying the threshold and size of neighborhood around a voxel, a set of Minkowski functionals can be defined for each voxel. Ten chest CT scans with 1810 annotated regions were used to train the method. A set of 108 features was calculated for each training sample from which 10 features were selected to be most informative. A linear discriminant classifier was trained to classify each voxel in the lungs into a subtype of emphysema or normal lung. The method was applied to an independent test set of 30 chest CT scans with varying amounts and types of emphysema with 4347 annotated regions of interest. The method is shown to perform well, with an overall accuracy of 95%.

  5. A case of radiation ulcer of chest wall with osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of anterior chest skin ulcer with rib and sternum osteomyelitis following radiation therapy for post operative mammary carcinoma. Operation was performed six times including debridement with sternum and rib resection reconstruction and skin grafting. It took about one and a half years after first operation to heal the ulcer with osteomyelitis. Principle of treatment for radiation ulcer accompanied by osteomyelitis is complete resection of the damaged lesion. However, it is difficult to evaluate the exact area of the damaged lesion. Therefore it is not rare to repeat its recurrence and have trouble with its treatment. In this case, it was considered that the resected area was insufficient on the initial operation. In order to treat for radiation ulcers accompanied by osteomyelitis, enough resection of the damaged lesion in the initial operation is necessary. Ultimately, in our case, the resection of all sternum, part of the right second to fifth rib and part of left second to seventh rib was necessary. It is generally said that reconstructing bone structure is required in the case of wide defect of chest wall. Though, we did not perform reconstruction of the bone structures, there is no problem in the condition of respiratory system. The surrounding soft tissues changed to hard enough to avoid paradoxical breathing. (author)

  6. Radiation Load of Children by Chest Radiodiagnostic Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiodiagnostic examinations of children present particular importance from the radiation hygiene point of view. The estimation of the radiation load of pediatric patient is not easy, because of the lack of information about organ weighting factors for various ages of patients, as well as due to the differences in applied X-ray examination parameters. In the district of Slovak Republic, in which also the working Nuclear Power Plant Jaslovske Bohunice is included, efforts were done to estimate the radiation load of children to 15 years by chest radiodiagnostic examinations. The data of entrance surface doses were collected using measurements with TLD for 100 patients divided in 5 age categories at six radiodiagnostic departments. The calculations of the total absorbed dose were performed using the measured ESD values (entrance surface dose in mGy) integrated over the X-ray beam area, the conversion factors between the imparted energy and the dose-area product and the known irradiation parameters (kV, HVL, mass, etc.). The analysis of the obtained absorbed doses (Ea) as a function of age for chest PA radiodiagnostic examinations has shown, that the investigated Slovak radiodiagnostic centres use rather lower voltage techniques and the entrance surface doses are much higher than the proposed value of European Communities. (author)

  7. Chest CT findings in patients with non-cardiovascular causes of chest pain: Focusing on pulmonary tuberculosis in a tuberculosis endemic country

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Won; Shim, Sung Shine; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Ryu, Yon Ju [Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To review the common causes of non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) according to the location and lesion type as seen on chest CT, and to evaluate CT findings in tuberculosis (TB) as a cause of NCCP. In the period 2009 to 2012, patients having NCCP without definitive evidence of acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary thromboembolism, and aortic dissection, were included. In total, 162 patients (60.5% male; 39.5% female), with a mean age of 51 years, were enrolled. CT images were evaluated by location and lesion type, for causes of NCCP. Chest CT revealed that the most common location for the cause of NCCP was the pleura (45.1%), followed by the subpleural lung parenchyma (30.2%). The most common lesion causing NCCP was TB (33.3%), followed by pneumonia (19.1%). Of the 54 TB cases, 40 (74.1%) were stable TB and 14 (25.9%) were active TB; among these 54 patients, NCCP was most commonly the result of fibrotic pleural thickening (55.6%), followed by subpleural stable pulmonary TB (14.8%). Results of chest CT revealed that TB was a major cause of NCCP in a TB endemic area. Among the TB patients, fibrotic pleural thickening in patients with stable TB was the most common cause of NCCP.

  8. Chest CT findings in patients with non-cardiovascular causes of chest pain: Focusing on pulmonary tuberculosis in a tuberculosis endemic country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To review the common causes of non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) according to the location and lesion type as seen on chest CT, and to evaluate CT findings in tuberculosis (TB) as a cause of NCCP. In the period 2009 to 2012, patients having NCCP without definitive evidence of acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary thromboembolism, and aortic dissection, were included. In total, 162 patients (60.5% male; 39.5% female), with a mean age of 51 years, were enrolled. CT images were evaluated by location and lesion type, for causes of NCCP. Chest CT revealed that the most common location for the cause of NCCP was the pleura (45.1%), followed by the subpleural lung parenchyma (30.2%). The most common lesion causing NCCP was TB (33.3%), followed by pneumonia (19.1%). Of the 54 TB cases, 40 (74.1%) were stable TB and 14 (25.9%) were active TB; among these 54 patients, NCCP was most commonly the result of fibrotic pleural thickening (55.6%), followed by subpleural stable pulmonary TB (14.8%). Results of chest CT revealed that TB was a major cause of NCCP in a TB endemic area. Among the TB patients, fibrotic pleural thickening in patients with stable TB was the most common cause of NCCP

  9. Air trapping on chest CT is associated with worse ventilation distribution in infants with cystic fibrosis diagnosed following newborn screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham L Hall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In school-aged children with cystic fibrosis (CF structural lung damage assessed using chest CT is associated with abnormal ventilation distribution. The primary objective of this analysis was to determine the relationships between ventilation distribution outcomes and the presence and extent of structural damage as assessed by chest CT in infants and young children with CF. METHODS: Data of infants and young children with CF diagnosed following newborn screening consecutively reviewed between August 2005 and December 2009 were analysed. Ventilation distribution (lung clearance index and the first and second moment ratios [LCI, M(1/M(0 and M(2/M(0, respectively], chest CT and airway pathology from bronchoalveolar lavage were determined at diagnosis and then annually. The chest CT scans were evaluated for the presence or absence of bronchiectasis and air trapping. RESULTS: Matched lung function, chest CT and pathology outcomes were available in 49 infants (31 male with bronchiectasis and air trapping present in 13 (27% and 24 (49% infants, respectively. The presence of bronchiectasis or air trapping was associated with increased M(2/M(0 but not LCI or M(1/M(0. There was a weak, but statistically significant association between the extent of air trapping and all ventilation distribution outcomes. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that in early CF lung disease there are weak associations between ventilation distribution and lung damage from chest CT. These finding are in contrast to those reported in older children. These findings suggest that assessments of LCI could not be used to replace a chest CT scan for the assessment of structural lung disease in the first two years of life. Further research in which both MBW and chest CT outcomes are obtained is required to assess the role of ventilation distribution in tracking the progression of lung damage in infants with CF.

  10. Fetal shielding combined with state of the art CT dose reduction strategies during maternal chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Custom bismuth-antimony shields were previously shown to reduce fetal dose by 53% on an 8DR (detector row) CT scanner without dynamic adaptive section collimation (DASC), automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) or adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). The purpose of this study is to compare the effective maternal and average fetal organ dose reduction both with and without bismuth-antimony shields on a 64DR CT scanner using DASC, ATCM and ASiR during maternal CTPA. Materials and methods: A phantom with gravid prosthesis and a bismuth-antimony shield were used. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) measured fetal radiation dose. The average fetal organ dose and effective maternal dose were determined using 100 kVp, scanning from the lung apices to the diaphragm utilizing DASC, ATCM and ASiR on a 64DR CT scanner with and without shielding in the first and third trimester. Isolated assessment of DASC was done via comparing a new 8DR scan without DASC to a similar scan on the 64DR with DASC. Results: Average third trimester unshielded fetal dose was reduced from 0.22 mGy ± 0.02 on the 8DR to 0.13 mGy ± 0.03 with the conservative 64DR protocol that included 30% ASiR, DASC and ATCM (42% reduction, P < 0.01). Use of a shield further reduced average third trimester fetal dose to 0.04 mGy ± 0.01 (69% reduction, P < 0.01). The average fetal organ dose reduction attributable to DASC alone was modest (6% reduction from 0.17 mGy ± 0.02 to 0.16 mGy ± 0.02, P = 0.014). First trimester fetal organ dose on the 8DR protocol was 0.07 mGy ± 0.03. This was reduced to 0.05 mGy ± 0.03 on the 64DR protocol without shielding (30% reduction, P = 0.009). Shields further reduced this dose to below accurately detectable levels. Effective maternal dose was reduced from 4.0 mSv on the 8DR to 2.5 mSv on the 64DR scanner using the conservative protocol (38% dose reduction). Conclusion: ASiR, ATCM and DASC combined significantly reduce effective maternal and fetal

  11. Fetal shielding combined with state of the art CT dose reduction strategies during maternal chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterson, Leslie C., E-mail: lch088@mail.usask.ca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Leswick, David A.; Fladeland, Derek A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Hunt, Megan M.; Webster, Stephen [Saskatchewan Ministry of Labour Relations and Workplace Safety (Canada); Lim, Hyun [Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Custom bismuth-antimony shields were previously shown to reduce fetal dose by 53% on an 8DR (detector row) CT scanner without dynamic adaptive section collimation (DASC), automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) or adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). The purpose of this study is to compare the effective maternal and average fetal organ dose reduction both with and without bismuth-antimony shields on a 64DR CT scanner using DASC, ATCM and ASiR during maternal CTPA. Materials and methods: A phantom with gravid prosthesis and a bismuth-antimony shield were used. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) measured fetal radiation dose. The average fetal organ dose and effective maternal dose were determined using 100 kVp, scanning from the lung apices to the diaphragm utilizing DASC, ATCM and ASiR on a 64DR CT scanner with and without shielding in the first and third trimester. Isolated assessment of DASC was done via comparing a new 8DR scan without DASC to a similar scan on the 64DR with DASC. Results: Average third trimester unshielded fetal dose was reduced from 0.22 mGy ± 0.02 on the 8DR to 0.13 mGy ± 0.03 with the conservative 64DR protocol that included 30% ASiR, DASC and ATCM (42% reduction, P < 0.01). Use of a shield further reduced average third trimester fetal dose to 0.04 mGy ± 0.01 (69% reduction, P < 0.01). The average fetal organ dose reduction attributable to DASC alone was modest (6% reduction from 0.17 mGy ± 0.02 to 0.16 mGy ± 0.02, P = 0.014). First trimester fetal organ dose on the 8DR protocol was 0.07 mGy ± 0.03. This was reduced to 0.05 mGy ± 0.03 on the 64DR protocol without shielding (30% reduction, P = 0.009). Shields further reduced this dose to below accurately detectable levels. Effective maternal dose was reduced from 4.0 mSv on the 8DR to 2.5 mSv on the 64DR scanner using the conservative protocol (38% dose reduction). Conclusion: ASiR, ATCM and DASC combined significantly reduce effective maternal and fetal

  12. Blinded Validation of Breath Biomarkers of Lung Cancer, a Potential Ancillary to Chest CT Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Michael; Bauer, Thomas L.; Cataneo, Renee N.; Lebauer, Cassie; Mundada, Mayur; Pass, Harvey I.; Ramakrishna, Naren; Rom, William N.; Vallières, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background Breath volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been reported as biomarkers of lung cancer, but it is not known if biomarkers identified in one group can identify disease in a separate independent cohort. Also, it is not known if combining breath biomarkers with chest CT has the potential to improve the sensitivity and specificity of lung cancer screening. Methods Model-building phase (unblinded): Breath VOCs were analyzed with gas chromatography mass spectrometry in 82 asymptomatic smokers having screening chest CT, 84 symptomatic high-risk subjects with a tissue diagnosis, 100 without a tissue diagnosis, and 35 healthy subjects. Multiple Monte Carlo simulations identified breath VOC mass ions with greater than random diagnostic accuracy for lung cancer, and these were combined in a multivariate predictive algorithm. Model-testing phase (blinded validation): We analyzed breath VOCs in an independent cohort of similar subjects (n = 70, 51, 75 and 19 respectively). The algorithm predicted discriminant function (DF) values in blinded replicate breath VOC samples analyzed independently at two laboratories (A and B). Outcome modeling: We modeled the expected effects of combining breath biomarkers with chest CT on the sensitivity and specificity of lung cancer screening. Results Unblinded model-building phase. The algorithm identified lung cancer with sensitivity 74.0%, specificity 70.7% and C-statistic 0.78. Blinded model-testing phase: The algorithm identified lung cancer at Laboratory A with sensitivity 68.0%, specificity 68.4%, C-statistic 0.71; and at Laboratory B with sensitivity 70.1%, specificity 68.0%, C-statistic 0.70, with linear correlation between replicates (r = 0.88). In a projected outcome model, breath biomarkers increased the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of chest CT for lung cancer when the tests were combined in series or parallel. Conclusions Breath VOC mass ion biomarkers identified lung cancer in a

  13. Paediatric CT examinations in 19 developing countries: Frequency and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of this study were to investigate the frequency of computed tomography (CT) examinations for paediatric patients below 15 y of age in 128 CT facilities in 28 developing countries of Africa, Asia and Eastern Europe and to assess the magnitude of CT doses. Radiation dose data were available from 101 CT facilities in 19 countries. The dose assessment was performed in terms of weighted CT dose index (CTDIw), volume CT index and dose length product (DLP) for chest, chest (high resolution), lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis CT examinations using standard methods. The results show that on average the frequency of paediatric CT examinations was 20, 16 and 5% of all CT examinations in participating centres in Africa, Asia and Eastern Europe, respectively. Eleven CT facilities in six countries were found to use adult CT exposure parameters for paediatric patients, thus indicating limited awareness and the need for optimisation. CT images were of adequate quality for diagnosis. The CTDIw variations ranged up to a factor of 55 (Africa), 16.3 (Asia) and 6.6 (Eastern Europe). The corresponding DLP variations ranged by a factor of 10, 20 and 8, respectively. Generally, the CTDIw and DLP values in Japan are lower than the corresponding values in the three regions in this study. The study has indicated a stronger need in many developing countries to justify CT examinations in children and their optimisation. Awareness, training and monitoring of radiation doses is needed as a way forwards. (authors)

  14. Evaluation of a Chest Circumference-Adapted Protocol for Low-Dose 128-Slice Coronary CT Angiography with Prospective Electrocardiogram Triggering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chenying; Wang, Zufei; Ji, Jiansong; Wang, Hailin; Hu, Xianghua; Chen, Chunmiao [Department of Radiology, Lishui Central Hospital, The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Lishui, Zhejiang 323000 (China)

    2015-11-01

    To assess the effect of chest circumference-adapted scanning protocol on radiation exposure and image quality in patients undergoing prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered coronary CT angiography (CCTA). One hundred-eighty-five consecutive patients, who had undergone prospective ECG triggering CCTA with a 128-slice CT, were included in the present study. Nipple-level chest circumference, body weight and height were measured before CT examinations. Patients were divided into four groups based on kV/ref·mAs = 100/200, 100/250, 120/200, and 120/250, when patient's chest circumference was ≤ 85.0 (n = 56), 85.0-90.0 (n = 53), 90.0-95.0 (n = 44), and > 95.0 (n = 32), respectively. Image quality per-segment was independently assessed by two experienced observers. Image noise and attenuation were also measured. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. The effective radiation dose was calculated using CT dose volume index and the dose-length product. A significant correlation was observed between patients' chest circumference and body mass index (r = 0.762, p < 0.001). Chest circumference ranged from 74 to 105 cm, and the mean effective radiation dose was 1.9-3.8 mSv. Diagnostic image quality was obtained in 98.5% (2440/2478) of all evaluated coronary segments without any significant differences among the four groups (p = 0.650). No significant difference in image noise was observed among the four groups (p = 0.439), thus supporting the validity of the chest circumference-adapted scanning protocol. However, vessel attenuation, SNR and CNR were significantly higher in the 100 kV groups than in the 120 kV groups (p < 0.05). A measure of chest circumference can be used to adapt tube voltage and current for individualized radiation dose control, with resultant similar image noise and sustained diagnostic image quality.

  15. Chest CT scanning for clinical suspected thoracic aortic dissection: beware the alternate diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoongsuwan, Nisa; Stern, Eric J

    2002-11-01

    The aim of the study was retrospectively to evaluate the spectrum of chest diseases in patients presenting with clinical suspicion of thoracic aortic dissection in the emergency department. We performed a retrospective medical records review of 86 men and 44 women (ages ranging between 23 and 106 years) with clinically suspected aortic dissection, for CT scan findings and final clinical diagnoses dating between January 1996 and September 2001. All images were obtained by using a standard protocol for aortic dissection. We found aortic dissection in 32 patients (24.6%), 22 of which were Stanford classification type A and 10 Stanford type B. In 70 patients (53.9%), chest pain could not be explained by the CT scan findings. However, in 28 patients (21.5%), CT scanning did reveal an alternate diagnosis that, along with the clinical impression, probably explained the patients' presenting symptoms, including: hiatal hernia (7), pneumonia (5), intrathoracic mass (4), pericardial effusion/hemopericardium (3), esophageal mass/rupture (2), aortic aneurysm without dissection (2), pulmonary embolism (2), pleural effusion (1), aortic rupture (1), and pancreatitis (1). In cases where there is clinical suspicion of aortic dissection, CT scan findings of an alternate diagnosis for the presenting symptoms are only slightly less common than the finding of aortic dissection itself. Although the spectrum of findings will vary depending upon your patient population, beware the alternate diagnosis. PMID:15290550

  16. CT findings of the chest in adults with aspirated foreign bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zissin, R.; Shapiro-Feinberg, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba (Israel); Rozenman, J.; Apter, S.; Hertz, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Tel Aviv (Israel); Smorjik, J. [Dept. of Pulmonary Medicine, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba (Israel)

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the imaging findings in adult patients with tracheobronchial foreign body aspiration. Nineteen patients (11 men and 8 women; age range 26-89 years) with foreign-body aspiration were retrospectively reviewed. Nine patients were outpatients with non-specific symptoms and ten were hospitalized with nonresolving pneumonia (n=6), after detection of a dental fragment on a chest radiograph following intubation (n=3), and there was one mentally retarded patient with empyema. An aspirated dental fragment was seen on a chest radiograph in 3 patients and an endobronchial foreign body on CT in 16, appearing as a dense structure within the bronchial lumen. The foreign body was right sided in 14 cases and left sided in 5. Three cases were missed at first interpretation. Associated findings on CT were volume loss, hyperlucency with air trapping and bronchiectasis in the affected lobe. Thirteen patients were managed with bronchoscopy, whereas 2 needed thoracotomy. In 1 patient bronchoscopy failed to detect a foreign body, indicating a false-positive CT diagnosis. One patient expelled an aspirated tablet and two refused invasive procedure. The foreign bodies found mainly were bones and dental fragments. A high clinical suspicion is necessary to diagnose a foreign body. Since CT is often used to evaluate various respiratory problems in adults, it may be the first imaging modality to discover an unsuspected aspirated foreign body in the bronchial tree. (orig.) (orig.)

  17. A study of chest CT examinations by 8 DAS multi detector row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution CT images of 1.25 mm in slice thickness and routine images of 7.5 mm in slice thickness are usually obtained for lung examinations in our hospital. However these can't be obtained in one scan, and lead to increase CT dose. We considered that we could obtain their images in one scan and could decrease CT dose, if we scan the whole lung field by detector row 1.25 mm. We confirmed availability of thin detector row scans in consideration of Slice Sensitivity Profiles in z-direction (SSPz) and Standard Deviation (SD), and CT Dose Index (CTDI) under each condition. (author)

  18. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and network system for chest diagnosis based on multislice CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Mori, Kiyoshi; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Kakinuma, Ryutarou; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Masuda, Hideo; Machida, Suguru

    2007-03-01

    Multislice CT scanner advanced remarkably at the speed at which the chest CT images were acquired for mass screening. Mass screening based on multislice CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. To overcome this problem, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images and a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification. Moreover, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by using a lung cancer screening algorithm built into mobile helical CT scanner for the lung cancer mass screening done in the region without the hospital. We also have developed electronic medical recording system and prototype internet system for the community health in two or more regions by using the Virtual Private Network router and Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system for safety of medical information. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have now developed a new computer-aided workstation and database that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. This paper describes basic studies that have been conducted to evaluate this new system.

  19. Cardiovascular disease prediction: do pulmonary disease-related chest CT features have added value?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jairam, Pushpa M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Jong, Pim A. de; Mali, Willem P.T.M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Isgum, Ivana [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Graaf, Yolanda van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Collaboration: PROVIDI study-group

    2015-06-01

    Certain pulmonary diseases are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore we investigated the incremental predictive value of pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural features over cardiovascular imaging findings. A total of 10,410 patients underwent diagnostic chest CT for non-cardiovascular indications. Using a case-cohort approach, we visually graded CTs from the cases and from an approximately 10 % random sample of the baseline cohort (n = 1,203) for cardiovascular, pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural findings. The incremental value of pulmonary disease-related CT findings above cardiovascular imaging findings in cardiovascular event risk prediction was quantified by comparing discrimination and reclassification. During a mean follow-up of 3.7 years (max. 7.0 years), 1,148 CVD events (cases) were identified. Addition of pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural features to a cardiovascular imaging findings-based prediction model led to marginal improvement of discrimination (increase in c-index from 0.72 (95 % CI 0.71-0.74) to 0.74 (95 % CI 0.72-0.75)) and reclassification measures (net reclassification index 6.5 % (p < 0.01)). Pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural features have limited predictive value in the identification of subjects at high risk of CVD events beyond cardiovascular findings on diagnostic chest CT scans. (orig.)

  20. Cardiovascular disease prediction: do pulmonary disease-related chest CT features have added value?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain pulmonary diseases are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore we investigated the incremental predictive value of pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural features over cardiovascular imaging findings. A total of 10,410 patients underwent diagnostic chest CT for non-cardiovascular indications. Using a case-cohort approach, we visually graded CTs from the cases and from an approximately 10 % random sample of the baseline cohort (n = 1,203) for cardiovascular, pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural findings. The incremental value of pulmonary disease-related CT findings above cardiovascular imaging findings in cardiovascular event risk prediction was quantified by comparing discrimination and reclassification. During a mean follow-up of 3.7 years (max. 7.0 years), 1,148 CVD events (cases) were identified. Addition of pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural features to a cardiovascular imaging findings-based prediction model led to marginal improvement of discrimination (increase in c-index from 0.72 (95 % CI 0.71-0.74) to 0.74 (95 % CI 0.72-0.75)) and reclassification measures (net reclassification index 6.5 % (p < 0.01)). Pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural features have limited predictive value in the identification of subjects at high risk of CVD events beyond cardiovascular findings on diagnostic chest CT scans. (orig.)

  1. CT fluoroscopy-guided vs. multislice CT biopsy mode-guided lung biopsies: Accuracy, complications and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy, the frequency of complications, the duration of the interventions and the radiation doses of CT fluoroscopy (CTF) guided biopsies of lung lesions with those of multislice CT (MS-CT) biopsy mode-guided biopsies. Methods: Data and images from 124 consecutive patients undergoing CTF-guided lung biopsy (group A) and 132 MS-CT-biopsy mode-guided lung biopsy (group B) were reviewed. CTF-guided biopsies were performed on a Siemens Emotion 6 CT scanner with intermittent or continuous CT-fluoroscopy, MS-CT biopsy mode-guided biopsies were performed on a Siemens Emotion 16 CT scanner. All biopsies were performed with a coaxial needle technique. Results: The two groups (A vs. B) did not differ significantly regarding sensitivity (95.5% vs. 95.9%), specificity (96.7% vs. 95.5%), negative predictive value (87.9% vs. 84%) or positive predictive value (98.8% vs. 98.9%). Pneumothorax was observed in 30.0% and 32.5% of the patients, respectively. Chest tube placement was necessary in 4% (group A) and 13% (group B) of the patients. The duration of the intervention was significantly longer in group A (median 37 min vs. 32 min, p = 0.04). The mean CT dose index (CTDI) was 422 in group A and 36.3 in group B (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Compared to CTF-guided biopsies, chest biopsies using the MS-CT biopsy mode show dramatically lower CTDI levels. Although the diagnostic yield of the procedures do not differ significantly, biopsies using the MS-CT-biopsy mode have a three-fold higher rate of chest tube placement.

  2. Proton MRI in the evaluation of pulmonary sarcoidosis: Comparison to chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jonathan H., E-mail: chungj@njhealth.org [Radiology, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO (United States); Little, Brent P., E-mail: bplittle2@hotmail.com [Radiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Forssen, Anna V., E-mail: ForssenA@NJHealth.org [Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO (United States); Yong, Jin, E-mail: JinG@NJHealth.org [Radiology, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO (United States); Diagnostic Radiology, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Nambu, Atsushi, E-mail: nambu-a@gray.plala.or.jp [Radiology, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO (United States); Radiology, University of Yamanashi, Chuo City (Japan); Kazlouski, Demitry, E-mail: demitry.kazlouski@gmail.com [Radiology, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO (United States); Puderbach, Michael, E-mail: m.puderbach@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Chest Clinics at University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Biederer, Juergen, E-mail: juergen.biederer@uni-heidelberg.de [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Lynch, David A., E-mail: LynchD@NJHealth.org [Radiology, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of proton MRI of the lung in sarcoidosis patients and the agreement between the imaging appearance of pulmonary sarcoidosis on MRI and CT. Materials and methods: Chest CT scans and dedicated pulmonary MRI scans (including HASTE, VIBE, and TrueFISP sequences) were performed within 90 days of each other in 29 patients. The scans were scored for gross parenchymal opacification, reticulation, nodules, and masses using a 3-point lobar scale. Total and subset scores for corresponding MRI and CT scans were compared using the Spearman correlation test, Bland–Altman plots, and Cohen's quadratic-weighted kappa analysis. MRI scores were compared to CT by lobe and disease category, using percentage agreement, Spearman rank correlation, and Cohen's quadratic-weighted kappa. Results: The mean (±s.d.) time between MRI and CT scans was 33 ± 32 days. There was substantial correlation and agreement between total disease scoring on MRI and CT with a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.774 (p < 0.0001) and a Cohen's weighted kappa score of 0.646. Correlation and agreement were highest for gross parenchymal opacification (0.695, 0.528) and reticulation (0.609, 0.445), and lowest in the setting of nodules (0.501, 0.305). Agreement testing was not performed for mass scores due to low prevalence. Upper lobe scoring on MRI and CT demonstrated greater agreement compared to the lower lobes (average difference in Cohen's weighted kappa score of 0.112). Conclusion: There is substantial correlation and agreement between MRI and CT in the scoring of pulmonary sarcoidosis, though MRI evaluation in the upper lobes may be more accurate than in the lower lobes.

  3. Proton MRI in the evaluation of pulmonary sarcoidosis: Comparison to chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of proton MRI of the lung in sarcoidosis patients and the agreement between the imaging appearance of pulmonary sarcoidosis on MRI and CT. Materials and methods: Chest CT scans and dedicated pulmonary MRI scans (including HASTE, VIBE, and TrueFISP sequences) were performed within 90 days of each other in 29 patients. The scans were scored for gross parenchymal opacification, reticulation, nodules, and masses using a 3-point lobar scale. Total and subset scores for corresponding MRI and CT scans were compared using the Spearman correlation test, Bland–Altman plots, and Cohen's quadratic-weighted kappa analysis. MRI scores were compared to CT by lobe and disease category, using percentage agreement, Spearman rank correlation, and Cohen's quadratic-weighted kappa. Results: The mean (±s.d.) time between MRI and CT scans was 33 ± 32 days. There was substantial correlation and agreement between total disease scoring on MRI and CT with a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.774 (p < 0.0001) and a Cohen's weighted kappa score of 0.646. Correlation and agreement were highest for gross parenchymal opacification (0.695, 0.528) and reticulation (0.609, 0.445), and lowest in the setting of nodules (0.501, 0.305). Agreement testing was not performed for mass scores due to low prevalence. Upper lobe scoring on MRI and CT demonstrated greater agreement compared to the lower lobes (average difference in Cohen's weighted kappa score of 0.112). Conclusion: There is substantial correlation and agreement between MRI and CT in the scoring of pulmonary sarcoidosis, though MRI evaluation in the upper lobes may be more accurate than in the lower lobes

  4. Which Iodine concentration in chest CT? - A prospective study in 300 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In computed tomography(CT) several contrast media with different iodine concentrations are available. The aim of this study is to prospectively compare contrast media with iodine concentrations of 300, 370 and 400 mg iodine/ml for chest- CT. 300 consecutive patients were prospectively enrolled, under a waiver of the local ethics committee. The first (second, third) 100 patients, received contrast medium with 300(370, 400)mg iodine/ml. Injection protocols were adapted for an identical iodine delivery rate(1.3 mg/s) and total iodine load(33 g) for all three groups. Standardized MDCT of the chest (16 x 0.75 mm, 120 kVp, 100 mAseff.) was performed. Intravascular attenuation values were measured in the pulmonary trunk and the ascending aorta; subjective image quality was rated on a 3-point-scale. Discomfort during and after injection was evaluated. There were no statistically significant differences in contrast enhancement comparing the three contrast media at the pulmonary trunk(p = 0.3198) and at the ascending aorta(p = 0.0840). Image quality(p = 0.0176) and discomfort during injection(p 0.7034) were comparable for all groups. General discomfort after injection of contrast media with 300 mg iodine/ml was statistically significant higher compared to 370 mg iodine/ml(p = 0.00019). Given identical iodine delivery rates of 1.3 g/s and iodine loads of 33 g, contrast media with concentrations of 300, 370 and 400 mg iodine/ml do not result in different intravascular enhancement in chest-CT. (orig.)

  5. Comparison between plain chest film and CT in estimating the size of pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regarding the patients diagnosed as having traumatic and spontaneous pneumothorax at our emergency center within the past 6 years we examined the distribution of pneumothorax shown by plain chest film and CT, and compared the pneumothorax rate evaluated by Kircher's method with plain chest film and that by one slice method with CT, which was based on full slice integration method with CT. Occult pneumothorax was found in 47.6% of traumatic cases and 11.1% of spontaneous cases. The distribution of pneumothoraces showed no significant differences. However, as compared with classical pneumothorax, the ratio of pneumothoraces in the apicolateral recess in the occult pneumothoraces tended to be lower, whereas the ratio of the ones in the anteromedial recess and in the subpulmonic recess tended to be comparatively high. The plain chest film of occult pneumothorax had been taken on supine position in most cases of traumatic pneumothorax and in more than half the cases of spontaneous pneumothorax. This was considered to be the cause of the unique distribution of pneumothorax. The pneumothorax rate evaluated by Kircher's method tended to be underestimated in comparison with the basic rate, where the correlation coefficient was R=0.84 for traumatic pneumothorax and R=0.14 for spontaneous pneumothorax. Especially in the cases of low pneumothorax rate the correlation was poor. The pneumothorax rate calculated by one slice method produced better figures with the correlation coefficient of R=0.92 for traumatic pneumothorax and R=0.85 for spontaneous pneumothorax. The one slice method was considered to be effective in evaluation of the degree of serious cases, and also for the choice of treatment modality for pneumothorax. (author)

  6. Comparison between plain chest film and CT in estimating the size of pneumothorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seto, Yuichi [Saint Marianna Univ., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-08-01

    Regarding the patients diagnosed as having traumatic and spontaneous pneumothorax at our emergency center within the past 6 years we examined the distribution of pneumothorax shown by plain chest film and CT, and compared the pneumothorax rate evaluated by Kircher`s method with plain chest film and that by one slice method with CT, which was based on full slice integration method with CT. Occult pneumothorax was found in 47.6% of traumatic cases and 11.1% of spontaneous cases. The distribution of pneumothoraces showed no significant differences. However, as compared with classical pneumothorax, the ratio of pneumothoraces in the apicolateral recess in the occult pneumothoraces tended to be lower, whereas the ratio of the ones in the anteromedial recess and in the subpulmonic recess tended to be comparatively high. The plain chest film of occult pneumothorax had been taken on supine position in most cases of traumatic pneumothorax and in more than half the cases of spontaneous pneumothorax. This was considered to be the cause of the unique distribution of pneumothorax. The pneumothorax rate evaluated by Kircher`s method tended to be underestimated in comparison with the basic rate, where the correlation coefficient was R=0.84 for traumatic pneumothorax and R=0.14 for spontaneous pneumothorax. Especially in the cases of low pneumothorax rate the correlation was poor. The pneumothorax rate calculated by one slice method produced better figures with the correlation coefficient of R=0.92 for traumatic pneumothorax and R=0.85 for spontaneous pneumothorax. The one slice method was considered to be effective in evaluation of the degree of serious cases, and also for the choice of treatment modality for pneumothorax. (author).

  7. Automated detection system for pulmonary emphysema on 3D chest CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Zhou, Xiangrong; Iwano, Shingo; Itoh, Shigeki; Fujita, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takeo

    2004-05-01

    An automatic extraction of pulmonary emphysema area on 3-D chest CT images was performed using an adaptive thresholding technique. We proposed a method to estimate the ratio of the emphysema area to the whole lung volume. We employed 32 cases (15 normal and 17 abnormal) which had been already diagnosed by radiologists prior to the study. The ratio in all the normal cases was less than 0.02, and in abnormal cases, it ranged from 0.01 to 0.26. The effectiveness of our approach was confirmed through the results of the present study.

  8. Patient-specific dose calculations for pediatric CT of the chest, abdomen and pelvis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organ dose is essential for accurate estimates of patient dose from CT. To determine organ doses from a broad range of pediatric patients undergoing diagnostic chest-abdomen-pelvis CT and investigate how these relate to patient size. We used a previously validated Monte Carlo simulation model of a Philips Brilliance 64 multi-detector CT scanner (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) to calculate organ doses for 40 pediatric patients (M:F = 21:19; range 0.6-17 years). Organ volumes and positions were determined from the images using standard segmentation techniques. Non-linear regression was performed to determine the relationship between volume CT dose index (CTDIvol)-normalized organ doses and abdominopelvic diameter. We then compared results with values obtained from independent studies. We found that CTDIvol-normalized organ dose correlated strongly with exponentially decreasing abdominopelvic diameter (R2 > 0.8 for most organs). A similar relationship was determined for effective dose when normalized by dose-length product (R2 = 0.95). Our results agreed with previous studies within 12% using similar scan parameters (e.g., bowtie filter size, beam collimation); however results varied up to 25% when compared to studies using different bowtie filters. Our study determined that organ doses can be estimated from measurements of patient size, namely body diameter, and CTDIvol prior to CT examination. This information provides an improved method for patient dose estimation. (orig.)

  9. Patient-specific dose calculations for pediatric CT of the chest, abdomen and pelvis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kost, Susan D.; Carver, Diana E.; Stabin, Michael G. [Vanderbilt University, Physics and Astronomy Department, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Fraser, Nicholas D.; Pickens, David R.; Price, Ronald R.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Organ dose is essential for accurate estimates of patient dose from CT. To determine organ doses from a broad range of pediatric patients undergoing diagnostic chest-abdomen-pelvis CT and investigate how these relate to patient size. We used a previously validated Monte Carlo simulation model of a Philips Brilliance 64 multi-detector CT scanner (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) to calculate organ doses for 40 pediatric patients (M:F = 21:19; range 0.6-17 years). Organ volumes and positions were determined from the images using standard segmentation techniques. Non-linear regression was performed to determine the relationship between volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol})-normalized organ doses and abdominopelvic diameter. We then compared results with values obtained from independent studies. We found that CTDI{sub vol}-normalized organ dose correlated strongly with exponentially decreasing abdominopelvic diameter (R{sup 2} > 0.8 for most organs). A similar relationship was determined for effective dose when normalized by dose-length product (R{sup 2} = 0.95). Our results agreed with previous studies within 12% using similar scan parameters (e.g., bowtie filter size, beam collimation); however results varied up to 25% when compared to studies using different bowtie filters. Our study determined that organ doses can be estimated from measurements of patient size, namely body diameter, and CTDI{sub vol} prior to CT examination. This information provides an improved method for patient dose estimation. (orig.)

  10. Chest computed tomography-based scoring of thoracic sarcoidosis: Inter-rater reliability of CT abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuvel, D.A.V. den; Es, H.W. van; Heesewijk, J.P. van; Spee, M. [St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, Department of Radiology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Jong, P.A. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Zanen, P.; Grutters, J.C. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Division Heart and Lungs, Utrecht (Netherlands); St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, Center of Interstitial Lung Diseases, Department of Pulmonology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2015-09-15

    To determine inter-rater reliability of sarcoidosis-related computed tomography (CT) findings that can be used for scoring of thoracic sarcoidosis. CT images of 51 patients with sarcoidosis were scored by five chest radiologists for various abnormal CT findings (22 in total) encountered in thoracic sarcoidosis. Using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis, inter-rater reliability was analysed and reported according to the Guidelines for Reporting Reliability and Agreement Studies (GRRAS) criteria. A pre-specified sub-analysis was performed to investigate the effect of training. Scoring was trained in a distinct set of 15 scans in which all abnormal CT findings were represented. Median age of the 51 patients (36 men, 70 %) was 43 years (range 26 - 64 years). All radiographic stages were present in this group. ICC ranged from 0.91 for honeycombing to 0.11 for nodular margin (sharp versus ill-defined). The ICC was above 0.60 in 13 of the 22 abnormal findings. Sub-analysis for the best-trained observers demonstrated an ICC improvement for all abnormal findings and values above 0.60 for 16 of the 22 abnormalities. In our cohort, reliability between raters was acceptable for 16 thoracic sarcoidosis-related abnormal CT findings. (orig.)

  11. Interactive lung segmentation in abnormal human and animal chest CT scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kockelkorn, Thessa T. J. P., E-mail: thessa@isi.uu.nl; Viergever, Max A. [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M. [Department of Radiology, Meander Medical Centre, 3813 TZ Amersfoort, The Netherlands and Diagnostic Image Analysis Group, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bozovic, Gracijela [Center for Diagnostic Imaging and Physiology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, SE-221 85 Lund (Sweden); Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate [Cancer Imaging Laboratory, Center for Applied Medical Research, University of Navarra, ES-31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain); Rikxoort, Eva M. van [Diagnostic Image Analysis Group, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Brown, Matthew S. [Center for Computer Vision and Imaging Biomarkers, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States); Jong, Pim A. de [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Ginneken, Bram van [Diagnostic Image Analysis Group, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Many medical image analysis systems require segmentation of the structures of interest as a first step. For scans with gross pathology, automatic segmentation methods may fail. The authors’ aim is to develop a versatile, fast, and reliable interactive system to segment anatomical structures. In this study, this system was used for segmenting lungs in challenging thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods: In volumetric thoracic CT scans, the chest is segmented and divided into 3D volumes of interest (VOIs), containing voxels with similar densities. These VOIs are automatically labeled as either lung tissue or nonlung tissue. The automatic labeling results can be corrected using an interactive or a supervised interactive approach. When using the supervised interactive system, the user is shown the classification results per slice, whereupon he/she can adjust incorrect labels. The system is retrained continuously, taking the corrections and approvals of the user into account. In this way, the system learns to make a better distinction between lung tissue and nonlung tissue. When using the interactive framework without supervised learning, the user corrects all incorrectly labeled VOIs manually. Both interactive segmentation tools were tested on 32 volumetric CT scans of pigs, mice and humans, containing pulmonary abnormalities. Results: On average, supervised interactive lung segmentation took under 9 min of user interaction. Algorithm computing time was 2 min on average, but can easily be reduced. On average, 2.0% of all VOIs in a scan had to be relabeled. Lung segmentation using the interactive segmentation method took on average 13 min and involved relabeling 3.0% of all VOIs on average. The resulting segmentations correspond well to manual delineations of eight axial slices per scan, with an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.933. Conclusions: The authors have developed two fast and reliable methods for interactive lung segmentation in

  12. Interactive lung segmentation in abnormal human and animal chest CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Many medical image analysis systems require segmentation of the structures of interest as a first step. For scans with gross pathology, automatic segmentation methods may fail. The authors’ aim is to develop a versatile, fast, and reliable interactive system to segment anatomical structures. In this study, this system was used for segmenting lungs in challenging thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods: In volumetric thoracic CT scans, the chest is segmented and divided into 3D volumes of interest (VOIs), containing voxels with similar densities. These VOIs are automatically labeled as either lung tissue or nonlung tissue. The automatic labeling results can be corrected using an interactive or a supervised interactive approach. When using the supervised interactive system, the user is shown the classification results per slice, whereupon he/she can adjust incorrect labels. The system is retrained continuously, taking the corrections and approvals of the user into account. In this way, the system learns to make a better distinction between lung tissue and nonlung tissue. When using the interactive framework without supervised learning, the user corrects all incorrectly labeled VOIs manually. Both interactive segmentation tools were tested on 32 volumetric CT scans of pigs, mice and humans, containing pulmonary abnormalities. Results: On average, supervised interactive lung segmentation took under 9 min of user interaction. Algorithm computing time was 2 min on average, but can easily be reduced. On average, 2.0% of all VOIs in a scan had to be relabeled. Lung segmentation using the interactive segmentation method took on average 13 min and involved relabeling 3.0% of all VOIs on average. The resulting segmentations correspond well to manual delineations of eight axial slices per scan, with an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.933. Conclusions: The authors have developed two fast and reliable methods for interactive lung segmentation in

  13. Chest CT study of patients with asbestos exposure, 1. Thin-slice high-resolution CT study of pulmonary abnormality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatakeyama, Masayuki

    1988-02-01

    Thin-slice high-resolution computed tomographic (CT) findings of 36 patients (34 men, 2 women) with histories of long-term (11 to 43 years) occupational asbestos exposure (AS) were analyzed for pulmonary abnormalities, which were classified by the subpleural curvilinear shadow (SCLS) and/or the extent of honeycomb shadow (HS) into five types (O to IV). SCLS was detected in 22 patients (62 %), and HS in 14 patients (39 %). SCLS was distributed mainly in the lower lobe in patients with mild pulmonary fibrosis (Types I and II) and in segments where fibrosis was mild in patients with HS (Types III and IV). This may reflect the initiation of pulmonary fibrosis leading to the formation of a HS. Most (63.7 %) SCLS measured > 5 cm but < 10 cm in length and occurred < 1 cm from the inner chest wall in all cases. Radiologic-pathologic correlation of SCLS and HS in CT imagings, achieved in two post mortem specimens, seemed to indicate that SCLS was associated with the initial change of fibrosing bronchiolo-alveolitis, which is characteristic of pulmonary asbestosis. Thin-slice high-resolution CT findings of 36 patients with AS and 33 patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) were compared. Though the incidence of SCLS was low (21 %) in this series of IIP, its presence suggests that SCLS is not specific to pulmonary asbestosis but occurs also in chronic interstitial pneumonia. In order to explore the mechanism of the appearance of SCLS, further analysis of CT and histopathologic findings not only of pulmonary asbestosis and IIP but also of many other pulmonary interstitial diseases is necessary. It could be considered that thin-slice high-resolution CT which first detected SCLS is very useful in the visualization of fine structures of the lungs.

  14. Alternative diagnoses based on CT angiography of the chest in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Eleci Vaz; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Seligman, Renato; Knorst, Marli Maria, E-mail: mknorst@gmail.com [Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Guerra, Vinicius Andre [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Pneumologicas; Sarmento, Muriel Bossle; Guazzelli, Pedro Arends; Hoffmeister, Mariana Costa [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-01-15

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of alternative diagnoses based on chest CT angiography (CTA) in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) who tested negative for PTE, as well as whether those alternative diagnoses had been considered prior to the CTA. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, retrospective study involving 191 adult patients undergoing CTA for suspected PTE between September of 2009 and May of 2012. Chest X-rays and CTAs were reviewed to determine whether the findings suggested an alternative diagnosis in the cases not diagnosed as PTE. Data on symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, length of hospital stay, and mortality were collected. Results: On the basis of the CTA findings, PTE was diagnosed in 47 cases (24.6%). Among the 144 patients not diagnosed with PTE via CTA, the findings were abnormal in 120 (83.3%). Such findings were consistent with an alternative diagnosis that explained the symptoms in 75 patients (39.3%). Among those 75 cases, there were only 39 (20.4%) in which the same alterations had not been previously detected on chest X-rays. The most common alternative diagnosis, made solely on the basis of the CTA findings, was pneumonia (identified in 20 cases). Symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, and the in-hospital mortality rate did not differ significantly between the patients with and without PTE. However, the median hospital stay was significantly longer in the patients with PTE than in those without (18.0 and 9.5 days, respectively; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Our results indicate that chest CTA is useful in cases of suspected PTE, because it can confirm the diagnosis and reveal findings consistent with an alternative diagnosis in a significant number of patients. (author)

  15. Thin-section chest CT findings of primary Sjoegren's syndrome: correlation with pulmonary function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to describe thin-section CT findings of lung involvement in patients with primary Sjoegren's syndrome (PSS), and to correlate them with pulmonary function tests (PFT). The chest thin-section CT examinations of 35 patients with proven diagnosis of PSS and respiratory symptoms were retrospectively assessed by two observers, in a first step independently with interobserver evaluation, and in a second step in consensus. The extent of the most frequent CT findings was scored. Correlation was made with PFT in 31 of these patients. Three main CT patterns were identified with good interobserver agreement (kappa coefficient 0.71): 19 of 35 (54%) large and/or small airways disease; 7 of 35 (20%) interstitial lung fibrosis (ILF); and 5 of 35 (14%) suggestive of lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP). The CT scans were normal in 2 patients (6%) and showed only dilatation of pulmonary vessels due to pulmonary arterial hypertension in two others (6%). Airway disease patients had predominantly obstructive profiles (mean FEV1/FVC ratio 69.7±12.7%, mean MEF25 50.1±22.9%), whereas patients with ILF and LIP had predominantly restrictive profiles and/or a decreased diffusing lung capacity (mean TLC 87.0±26.0 and 64.6±18.6%, mean DLCO 57.4±21.2 and 52.0±8.0%). Significant correlation (pCO (r=-0.70) and between the score of air trapping and FEV1 (r=-1.0). In patients with PSS and respiratory symptoms, thin-section CT may provide characterization of lung involvement which correlates with pulmonary function. (orig.)

  16. Radiation exposure in CT-guided interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloeckner, Roman, E-mail: Roman.Kloeckner@unimedizin-mainz.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Santos, Daniel Pinto dos; Schneider, Jens [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Kara, Levent [Department of Radiology, Inselspital Bern, Freiburgstraße 18, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Dueber, Christoph; Pitton, Michael B. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate radiation exposure in computed tomography (CT)-guided interventions, to establish reference levels for exposure, and to discuss strategies for dose reduction. Materials and methods: We analyzed 1576 consecutive CT-guided procedures in 1284 patients performed over 4.5 years, including drainage placements; biopsies of different organs; radiofrequency and microwave ablations (RFA/MWA) of liver, bone, and lung tumors; pain blockages, and vertebroplasties. Data were analyzed with respect to scanner settings, overall radiation doses, and individual doses of planning CT series, CT intervention, and control CT series. Results: Eighy-five percent of the total radiation dose was applied during the pre- and post-interventional CT series, leaving only 15% applied by the CT-guided intervention itself. Single slice acquisition was associated with lower doses than continuous CT-fluoroscopy (37 mGy cm vs. 153 mGy cm, p < 0.001). The third quartile of radiation doses varied considerably for different interventions. The highest doses were observed in complex interventions like RFA/MWA of the liver, followed by vertebroplasty and RFA/MWA of the lung. Conclusions: This paper suggests preliminary reference levels for various intervention types and discusses strategies for dose reduction. A multicenter registry of radiation exposure including a broader spectrum of scanners and intervention types is needed to develop definitive reference levels.

  17. Radiation exposure in CT-guided interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate radiation exposure in computed tomography (CT)-guided interventions, to establish reference levels for exposure, and to discuss strategies for dose reduction. Materials and methods: We analyzed 1576 consecutive CT-guided procedures in 1284 patients performed over 4.5 years, including drainage placements; biopsies of different organs; radiofrequency and microwave ablations (RFA/MWA) of liver, bone, and lung tumors; pain blockages, and vertebroplasties. Data were analyzed with respect to scanner settings, overall radiation doses, and individual doses of planning CT series, CT intervention, and control CT series. Results: Eighy-five percent of the total radiation dose was applied during the pre- and post-interventional CT series, leaving only 15% applied by the CT-guided intervention itself. Single slice acquisition was associated with lower doses than continuous CT-fluoroscopy (37 mGy cm vs. 153 mGy cm, p < 0.001). The third quartile of radiation doses varied considerably for different interventions. The highest doses were observed in complex interventions like RFA/MWA of the liver, followed by vertebroplasty and RFA/MWA of the lung. Conclusions: This paper suggests preliminary reference levels for various intervention types and discusses strategies for dose reduction. A multicenter registry of radiation exposure including a broader spectrum of scanners and intervention types is needed to develop definitive reference levels

  18. Bicuspid aortic valves: Diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT for bicuspid aortic valves. Materials and methods: The standard axial chest CT scans of 20 patients with known bicuspid aortic valves were blindly, randomly analyzed for (i) the appearance of the valve cusps, (ii) the largest aortic sinus area, (iii) the longest aortic cusp length, (iv) the thickest aortic valve cusp and (v) valve calcification. A second blinded reader independently analyzed the appearance of the valve cusps. Forty-two age- and sex-matched patients with known tricuspid aortic valves were used as controls. Retrospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT multiphase reconstructions of the aortic valve were used as the gold-standard. Results: Fourteen (21%) scans were scored as unevaluable (7 bicuspid, 7 tricuspid). Of the remainder, there were 13 evaluable bicuspid valves, ten of which showed an aortic valve line sign, while the remaining three showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance owing to fused valve cusps. The 35 evaluable tricuspid aortic valves all showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance (P = 0.001). Kappa analysis = 0.62 indicating good interobserver agreement for the aortic valve cusp appearance. Aortic sinus areas, aortic cusp lengths and aortic cusp thicknesses of ≥3.8 cm2, 3.2 cm and 1.6 mm respectively on standard axial chest CT best distinguished bicuspid from tricuspid aortic valves (P < 0.0001 for all). Of evaluable scans, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of standard axial chest CT in diagnosing bicuspid aortic valves was 77% (CI 0.54–1.0), 100%, 100% and 70% respectively. Conclusion: The aortic valve is evaluable in approximately 80% of standard chest 64-slice CT scans. Bicuspid aortic valves may be diagnosed on evaluable scans with good diagnostic accuracy. An aortic valve line sign, enlarged aortic sinuses and elongated, thickened valve cusps are specific CT

  19. Mosaic Pattern of Lung Attenuation on Chest CT in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamonpun Ussavarungsi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A mosaic pattern of lung attenuation on chest computed tomography (CT may be due to various etiologies. There is limited published data on CT results when used to evaluate pulmonary hypertension (PH. We retrospectively studied the frequency of mosaic pattern in patients with PH and the cause of the PH by diagnostic group, as well as the correlation between the mosaic pattern and the following: demographics, severity of the PH, main pulmonary artery (PA size, PA/aorta (PA/Ao ratio, pulmonary function tests (PFT, and ventilation perfusion scan results. Overall, 18% of the cohort had CT mosaic pattern (34/189. Mosaic pattern was present in 17/113 (15% in Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension, 5/13 (28% in Group 2 pulmonary venous hypertension and 8/50 (16% in Group 3 PH. Conversely, Group 4 chronic thromboembolic PH was more prevalent in 4/8 (50%. Main PA size, PA/Ao ratio, and segmental perfusion defect were positively associated with mosaic pattern. In contrast, factors such as age, gender, body mass index, functional class, hemodynamic data, and PFT values were not associated with mosaic pattern. Mosaic pattern is not specific as an isolated finding for distinguishing the subtype of PH.

  20. Unrequested information from routine diagnostic chest CT predicts future cardiovascular events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An increase in the number of CT investigations will likely result in a an increase in unrequested information. Clinical relevance of these findings is unknown. This is the first follow-up study to investigate the prognostic relevance of subclinical coronary (CAC) and aortic calcification (TAC) as contained in routine diagnostic chest CT in a clinical care population. The follow-up of 10,410 subjects (>40 years) from a multicentre, clinical care-based cohort of patients included 240 fatal to 275 non-fatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) events (mean follow-up 17.8 months). Patients with a history of CVD were excluded. Coronary (0-12) and aortic calcification (0-8) were semi-quantitatively scored. We used Cox proportional-hazard models to compute hazard ratios to predict CVD events. CAC and TAC were significantly and independently predictive of CVD events. Compared with subjects with no calcium, the adjusted risk of a CVD event was 3.7 times higher (95% CI, 2.7-5.2) among patients with severe coronary calcification (CAC score ≥6) and 2.7 times higher (95% CI, 2.0-3.7) among patients with severe aortic calcification (TAC score ≥5). Subclinical vascular calcification on CT is a strong predictor of incident CVD events in a routine clinical care population. (orig.)

  1. Aortic wall low density on chest CT: atheromatous plaque vs. thrombosed false lumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A curvilinear or thick band-like low density on aortic wall on CT scan is sometimes problematic. The point is whether its represents atheromatous plaque of thrombosed false lumen of the dissecting aneurysm. We reviewed 212 randomly selected chest CT cases with regard to low density on the thoracic aorta. Thirty two patients showed visible low density on the aorta. Seven patients had dissecting aneurysm confirmed by aortography and/or CT scan. Atheromatous palque did not exceed 4mm in its maximum thickness and appeared as curvilinear rim, while thrombosed false lumen of the dissecting aneurysm exceeded 10mm in its maximum thickness in all cases with the shape of crescent, half-moon or thick band. Maximum transverse diameter of thoracic aorta was more than 4cm in all cases of dissecting aneurysm while none of the atheromatous plaque cases showed more than 4cm. Thrombosed false lumen of the dissecting aneurysm can reliably be distinguished from atheroma by its thicker low density region and larger size of the aorta.

  2. Ultra low-dose chest CT using filtered back projection: Comparison of 80-, 100- and 120 kVp protocols in a prospective randomized study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali, E-mail: rkhawaja@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Thoracic Radiology, MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Singh, Sarabjeet [Division of Thoracic Radiology, MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Madan, Rachna [Division of Thoracic Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Sharma, Amita; Padole, Atul; Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz; Digumarthy, Subba; Shepard, Jo-Anne; Kalra, Mannudeep K. [Division of Thoracic Radiology, MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Filtered back projection technique enables acceptable image quality for chest CT examinations at 0.9 mGy (estimated effective dose of 0.5 mSv) for selected sizes of patients. • Lesion detection (such as solid non-calcified lung nodules) in lung parenchyma is optimal at 0.9 mGy, with limited visualization of thyroid nodules in FBP images. • Further dose reduction down to 0.4 mGy is possible for most patients undergoing follow-up chest CT for evaluation of larger lung nodules and GGOs. • Our results may help set the reference ALARA dose for chest CT examinations reconstructed with filtered back projection technique using the minimum possible radiation dose with acceptable image quality and lesion detection. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess lesion detection and diagnostic image quality of filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction technique in ultra low-dose chest CT examinations. Methods and materials: In this IRB-approved ongoing prospective clinical study, 116 CT-image-series at four different radiation-doses were performed for 29 patients (age, 57–87 years; F:M – 15:12; BMI 16–32 kg/m{sup 2}). All patients provided written-informed-consent for the acquisitions of additional ultra low-dose (ULD) series on a 256-slice MDCT (iCT, Philips Healthcare). In-addition to their clinical standard-dose chest CT (SD, 120 kV mean CTDI{sub vol}, 6 ± 1 mGy), ULD-CT was subsequently performed at three-dose-levels (0.9 mGy [120 kV]; 0.5 mGy [100 kV] and 0.2 mGy [80 kV]). Images were reconstructed with FBP (2.5 mm * 1.25 mm) resulting into four-stacks: SD-FBP (reference-standard), FBP{sub 0.9}, FBP{sub 0.5}, and FBP{sub 0.2}. Four thoracic-radiologists from two-teaching-hospitals independently-evaluated data for lesion-detection and visibility-of-small-structures. Friedman's-non-parametric-test with post hoc Dunn's-test was used for data-analysis. Results: Interobserver-agreement was substantial between radiologists (k = 0.6–0.8). With

  3. Ultra low-dose chest CT using filtered back projection: Comparison of 80-, 100- and 120 kVp protocols in a prospective randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Filtered back projection technique enables acceptable image quality for chest CT examinations at 0.9 mGy (estimated effective dose of 0.5 mSv) for selected sizes of patients. • Lesion detection (such as solid non-calcified lung nodules) in lung parenchyma is optimal at 0.9 mGy, with limited visualization of thyroid nodules in FBP images. • Further dose reduction down to 0.4 mGy is possible for most patients undergoing follow-up chest CT for evaluation of larger lung nodules and GGOs. • Our results may help set the reference ALARA dose for chest CT examinations reconstructed with filtered back projection technique using the minimum possible radiation dose with acceptable image quality and lesion detection. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess lesion detection and diagnostic image quality of filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction technique in ultra low-dose chest CT examinations. Methods and materials: In this IRB-approved ongoing prospective clinical study, 116 CT-image-series at four different radiation-doses were performed for 29 patients (age, 57–87 years; F:M – 15:12; BMI 16–32 kg/m2). All patients provided written-informed-consent for the acquisitions of additional ultra low-dose (ULD) series on a 256-slice MDCT (iCT, Philips Healthcare). In-addition to their clinical standard-dose chest CT (SD, 120 kV mean CTDIvol, 6 ± 1 mGy), ULD-CT was subsequently performed at three-dose-levels (0.9 mGy [120 kV]; 0.5 mGy [100 kV] and 0.2 mGy [80 kV]). Images were reconstructed with FBP (2.5 mm * 1.25 mm) resulting into four-stacks: SD-FBP (reference-standard), FBP0.9, FBP0.5, and FBP0.2. Four thoracic-radiologists from two-teaching-hospitals independently-evaluated data for lesion-detection and visibility-of-small-structures. Friedman's-non-parametric-test with post hoc Dunn's-test was used for data-analysis. Results: Interobserver-agreement was substantial between radiologists (k = 0.6–0.8). With pooled analysis, 146-pulmonary (27

  4. Automated Image Retrieval of Chest CT Images Based on Local Grey Scale Invariant Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrais Porto, Marcelo; Cordeiro d'Ornellas, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Textual-based tools are regularly employed to retrieve medical images for reading and interpretation using current retrieval Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) but pose some drawbacks. All-purpose content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems are limited when dealing with medical images and do not fit well into PACS workflow and clinical practice. This paper presents an automated image retrieval approach for chest CT images based local grey scale invariant features from a local database. Performance was measured in terms of precision and recall, average retrieval precision (ARP), and average retrieval rate (ARR). Preliminary results have shown the effectiveness of the proposed approach. The prototype is also a useful tool for radiology research and education, providing valuable information to the medical and broader healthcare community. PMID:26262345

  5. Changes in External Radiation Dose Rate for PET-CT Test Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyzes changes in the external radiation dose rate of PET-CT test patients as a part of providing basic materials for reduction of radiation exposure to PET-CT test patients. In theory the measurement of external radiation dose rate of PET-CT test patients shows that the further the distance from the patient injected with radioactive pharmaceutical and a longer time elapsement from the injection leads to a smaller amount of radiation. Particularly, the amount of radiation marked the highest in the chest was at 4.17 minutes immediately after the intravenous injection and in the head after 77.47 minutes after urination in advance to the PET-CT test. As in the generalized information, it is desired to keep distance between the patient and caretakers or professionals to reduce the amount of radiation exposure from PET-CT test patients and to resume contact the patient after the time when the radiation has reduced. If contact is unavoidable, it is desired to keep at least 200 cm from the patient. In addition, the amount of radiation reached the highest in the chest at first and then in the head from 77 minutes after injection. Accordingly, it would be helpful in achieving the optimization if contact is made based on the patient's physical characteristics. This study is significant as it measures changes in radiation the dose rate by; distance from the PET-CT test patient, time elapsed, and specific parts of body. Further studies based on the findings in this paper are required to analyze changes in radiation dose rate in accordance with individual characteristics unique to PET-CT patients and to utilize the results to reduce the amount of radiation patient, caretakers and professions are exposed.

  6. Low-dose chest CT with milli metric thin slices: myth or reality?; Scanner thoracique basse dose en coupes millimetriques: mythe ou realite?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corneloup, O.; Laurent, F. [Hopital Cardiologique, Haut Leveque, CHU de Bordeaux, Unite d' Imagerie Thoracique et cardiovasculaire, 33 - Pessac (France); Delval, O.; Morin, M.; Vandermarcq, P. [Hopital Jean Bernard, CHU de Poitiers, Service de Radiologie, 86 - Poitiers (France)

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of millimetric thin slices low dose chest CT. Forty one patients underwent a chest CT thin slices (1 mm every 10 mm) exploration using both a 170 milli-amperage and a low dose acquisition using 80 mA. The examination were read by 2 senior radiologists specialized in chest imaging without knowledge of acquisition parameters and in a random order. A statistical analysis of interobserver agreement was performed using Kappa analysis. Doses of both acquisition were estimated by comparing the dose length product calculated by the CT software and by using a simulation software. Excellent interobserver and inter-modalities agreements were found. A 53% decrease in dose was estimated with the low dose modality compare to the normal dose. Low dose thin slice chest CT using 80 mA has a similar diagnosis accuracy as standard dose thin slice chest CT and delivers half dose of irradiation. (authors)

  7. Automated coronary artery calcification detection on low-dose chest CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yiting; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia; Yankelevitz, David; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2014-03-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) measurement from low-dose CT images can be used to assess the risk of coronary artery disease. A fully automatic algorithm to detect and measure CAC from low-dose non-contrast, non-ECG-gated chest CT scans is presented. Based on the automatically detected CAC, the Agatston score (AS), mass score and volume score were computed. These were compared with scores obtained manually from standard-dose ECG-gated scans and low-dose un-gated scans of the same patient. The automatic algorithm segments the heart region based on other pre-segmented organs to provide a coronary region mask. The mitral valve and aortic valve calcification is identified and excluded. All remaining voxels greater than 180HU within the mask region are considered as CAC candidates. The heart segmentation algorithm was evaluated on 400 non-contrast cases with both low-dose and regular dose CT scans. By visual inspection, 371 (92.8%) of the segmentations were acceptable. The automated CAC detection algorithm was evaluated on 41 low-dose non-contrast CT scans. Manual markings were performed on both low-dose and standard-dose scans for these cases. Using linear regression, the correlation of the automatic AS with the standard-dose manual scores was 0.86; with the low-dose manual scores the correlation was 0.91. Standard risk categories were also computed. The automated method risk category agreed with manual markings of gated scans for 24 cases while 15 cases were 1 category off. For low-dose scans, the automatic method agreed with 33 cases while 7 cases were 1 category off.

  8. Volumetric measurement of pulmonary nodules at low-dose chest CT: Effect of reconstruction setting on measurement variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Wang (Cathy); G.H. de Bock (Geertruida); R.J. van Klaveren (Rob); P. van Ooyen (Peter); W. Tukker (Wim); Y. Zhao (Yingru); M.D. Dorrius (Monique); R.V. Proença; W.J. Post (Wendy); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To assess volumetric measurement variability in pulmonary nodules detected at low-dose chest CT with three reconstruction settings. Methods: The volume of 200 solid pulmonary nodules was measured three times using commercially available semi-automated software of low-dose ches

  9. Chest wall deformity and respiratory distress in a 17-year-old patient with achondroplasia: CT and MRI evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A marked thoracic deformity associated with intrathoracic tracheal narrowing was seen in a 17-year old with achondroplasia and dyspnea. The role of chest deformity and its evaluation by CT and MRI in achondroplastic patients with respiratory symptoms are considered. (orig.)

  10. Chest wall deformity and respiratory distress in a 17-year-old patient with achondroplasia: CT and MRI evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, T.E.; Siegel, M.J.; McAlister, W.H. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology)

    1992-06-01

    A marked thoracic deformity associated with intrathoracic tracheal narrowing was seen in a 17-year old with achondroplasia and dyspnea. The role of chest deformity and its evaluation by CT and MRI in achondroplastic patients with respiratory symptoms are considered. (orig.).

  11. Pulmonary Metastasis from Rectal Cancer on Chest CT Is Correlated with 3T MRI Primary Tumor Location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the association between the incidence of pulmonary metastasis on chest CT and the location of the primary tumor on rectal MRI. One hundred and nine consecutive patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent chest CT and 3T rectal MRI. Two radiologists classified the tumor on MRI as an upper (> 10 cm from the anal verge), mid (5-10 cm), or lower rectal tumor (< 5 cm) by consensus. All chest CT scans were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of metastasis. We used Fisher's exact test to evaluate the correlation between the incidence of pulmonary metastasis with the location of the rectal cancer and the Mantel-Haenszel test to control for local tumor stage. We only included the 60 patients with upper (n = 26) or lower (n = 34) rectal cancer, because of the complicated venous drainage system of the mid rectum. Among these, 9 (15%) showed evidence of pulmonary metastasis on chest CT and almost all (89%, 8/9) patients had lower rectal cancer. The incidence of pulmonary metastasis between the two groups was statistically different (p < 0.05) when local tumor stage was controlled. The incidence of pulmonary metastasis was significantly higher for lower than upper rectal cancers when the T-stage of the tumor was accounted for.

  12. Long-Term Clinical Impact of Coronary CT Angiography in Patients With Recent Acute-Onset Chest Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Jesper J; Hove, Jens D; Sørgaard, Mathias;

    2015-01-01

    to treatment guided by either coronary CTA or standard care (bicycle exercise electrocardiogram or myocardial perfusion imaging). In the coronary CTA-guided group, a functional test was included in cases of nondiagnostic coronary CTA images or coronary stenoses of borderline severity. The primary endpoint......OBJECTIVES: The aim of the CATCH (CArdiac cT in the treatment of acute CHest pain) trial was to investigate the long-term clinical impact of a coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA)-guided treatment strategy in patients with recent acute-onset chest pain compared to standard care....... BACKGROUND: The prognostic implications of a coronary CTA-guided treatment strategy have not been compared in a randomized fashion to standard care in patients referred for acute-onset chest pain. METHODS: Patients with acute chest pain but normal electrocardiograms and troponin values were randomized...

  13. Model-based iterative reconstruction in pediatric chest CT: assessment of image quality in a prospective study of children with cystic fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mieville, Frederic A.; Bochud, Francois O.; Verdun, Francis R. [Lausanne University Hospital, Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne (Switzerland); Berteloot, Laureline; Brunelle, Francis [Necker Children' s Hospital of Paris and University of Paris Descartes, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Grandjean, Albane; Ayestaran, Paul [General Electric Medical Systems Europe, Paris (France); Gudinchet, Francois; Schmidt, Sabine [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-03-15

    The potential effects of ionizing radiation are of particular concern in children. The model-based iterative reconstruction VEO trademark is a technique commercialized to improve image quality and reduce noise compared with the filtered back-projection (FBP) method. To evaluate the potential of VEO trademark on diagnostic image quality and dose reduction in pediatric chest CT examinations. Twenty children (mean 11.4 years) with cystic fibrosis underwent either a standard CT or a moderately reduced-dose CT plus a minimum-dose CT performed at 100 kVp. Reduced-dose CT examinations consisted of two consecutive acquisitions: one moderately reduced-dose CT with increased noise index (NI = 70) and one minimum-dose CT at CTDI{sub vol} 0.14 mGy. Standard CTs were reconstructed using the FBP method while low-dose CTs were reconstructed using FBP and VEO. Two senior radiologists evaluated diagnostic image quality independently by scoring anatomical structures using a four-point scale (1 = excellent, 2 = clear, 3 = diminished, 4 = non-diagnostic). Standard deviation (SD) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were also computed. At moderately reduced doses, VEO images had significantly lower SD (P < 0.001) and higher SNR (P < 0.05) in comparison to filtered back-projection images. Further improvements were obtained at minimum-dose CT. The best diagnostic image quality was obtained with VEO at minimum-dose CT for the small structures (subpleural vessels and lung fissures) (P < 0.001). The potential for dose reduction was dependent on the diagnostic task because of the modification of the image texture produced by this reconstruction. At minimum-dose CT, VEO enables important dose reduction depending on the clinical indication and makes visible certain small structures that were not perceptible with filtered back-projection. (orig.)

  14. Model-based iterative reconstruction in pediatric chest CT: assessment of image quality in a prospective study of children with cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential effects of ionizing radiation are of particular concern in children. The model-based iterative reconstruction VEO trademark is a technique commercialized to improve image quality and reduce noise compared with the filtered back-projection (FBP) method. To evaluate the potential of VEO trademark on diagnostic image quality and dose reduction in pediatric chest CT examinations. Twenty children (mean 11.4 years) with cystic fibrosis underwent either a standard CT or a moderately reduced-dose CT plus a minimum-dose CT performed at 100 kVp. Reduced-dose CT examinations consisted of two consecutive acquisitions: one moderately reduced-dose CT with increased noise index (NI = 70) and one minimum-dose CT at CTDIvol 0.14 mGy. Standard CTs were reconstructed using the FBP method while low-dose CTs were reconstructed using FBP and VEO. Two senior radiologists evaluated diagnostic image quality independently by scoring anatomical structures using a four-point scale (1 = excellent, 2 = clear, 3 = diminished, 4 = non-diagnostic). Standard deviation (SD) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were also computed. At moderately reduced doses, VEO images had significantly lower SD (P < 0.001) and higher SNR (P < 0.05) in comparison to filtered back-projection images. Further improvements were obtained at minimum-dose CT. The best diagnostic image quality was obtained with VEO at minimum-dose CT for the small structures (subpleural vessels and lung fissures) (P < 0.001). The potential for dose reduction was dependent on the diagnostic task because of the modification of the image texture produced by this reconstruction. At minimum-dose CT, VEO enables important dose reduction depending on the clinical indication and makes visible certain small structures that were not perceptible with filtered back-projection. (orig.)

  15. Frequently asked questions in the interpretation of preoperative and postoperative chest CT scans related to lung cancer imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advent of multidetector-row CT, lung cancer imaging is much more promising than before. However, the effectiveness of multidetector-row CT in making an initial diagnosis, staging, and evaluating post-treatment changes of lung cancer still remains to be proved. Fast imaging along with volumetric data set and attendant multi-planar imaging provide much more details on the anatomic changes and pathology associated with lung cancer. However, with images showing anatomic and pathologic changes only, radiologists confront with several questions the answers of which may help evaluate lung cancer more thoroughly. The frequent questions that I have in daily practice of chest CT interpretation are as follows

  16. Radiation Dose in the Thyroid and the Thyroid Cancer Risk Attributable to CT Scans for Pediatric Patients in One General Hospital of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Ping Su

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To quantify the radiation dose in the thyroid attributable to different CT scans and to estimate the thyroid cancer risk in pediatric patients. Methods: The information about pediatric patients who underwent CT scans was abstracted from the radiology information system in one general hospital between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2012. The radiation doses were calculated using the ImPACT Patient Dosimetry Calculator and the lifetime attributable risk (LAR of thyroid cancer incidence was estimated based on the National Academies Biologic Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII model. Results: The subjects comprised 922 children, 68% were males, and received 971 CT scans. The range of typical radiation dose to the thyroid was estimated to be 0.61–0.92 mGy for paranasal sinus CT scans, 1.10–2.45 mGy for head CT scans, and 2.63–5.76 mGy for chest CT scans. The LAR of thyroid cancer were as follows: for head CT, 1.1 per 100,000 for boys and 8.7 per 100,000 for girls; for paranasal sinus CT scans, 0.4 per 100,000 for boys and 2.7 per 100,000 for girls; for chest CT scans, 2.2 per 100,000 for boys and 14.2 per 100,000 for girls. The risk of thyroid cancer was substantially higher for girls than for the boys, and from chest CT scans was higher than that from head or paransal sinus CT scans. Conclusions: Chest CT scans caused higher thyroid dose and the LAR of thyroid cancer incidence, compared with paransal sinus or head CT scans. Therefore, physicians should pay more attention to protect the thyroid when children underwent CT scans, especially chest CT scans.

  17. Role of contrast-enhanced helical CT in the evaluation of acute thoracic aortic injuries after blunt chest trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaglione, M.; Pinto, A.; Pinto, F.; Romano, L.; Ragozzino, A. [Dept. of Emergency Radiology, Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Grassi, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Naples (Italy)

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the value of contrast-enhanced helical CT for detecting and managing acute thoracic aortic injury (ATAI). Between June 1995 and February 2000, 1419 consecutive chest CT examinations were performed in the setting of major blunt trauma. The following CT findings were considered indicative of ATAI: intimal flap; pseudoaneurysm; contour irregularity; lumen abnormality; and extravasation of contrast material. On the basis of these direct findings no further diagnostic investigations were performed. Isolated mediastinal hematoma on CT scans was considered an indirect sign of ATAI: In these cases, thoracic aortography was performed even if CT indicated normal aorta. Seventy-seven patients had abnormal CT scans: Among the 23 patients with direct CT signs, acute thoracic aortic injuries was confirmed at thoracotomy in 21. Two false-positive cases were observed. The 54 remaining patients had isolated mediastinal hematoma without aortic injuries at CT and corresponding negative angiograms. The 1342 patients with negative CT scans were included in the 8-month follow-up program and did not show any adverse sequela based on clinical and radiographic criteria. Contrast-enhanced helical CT has a critical role in the exclusion of thoracic aortic injuries in patient with major blunt chest trauma and prevents unnecessary thoracic aortography. Direct CT signs of ATAI do not require further diagnostic investigations to confirm the diagnosis: Isolated aortic bands or contour vessel abnormalities should be first considered as possible artifacts or related to non-traumatic etiologies especially when mediastinal hematoma is absent. In cases of isolated mediastinal hematoma other possible sources of bleeding should be considered before directing patients to thoracic aortography. (orig.)

  18. Role of contrast-enhanced helical CT in the evaluation of acute thoracic aortic injuries after blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the value of contrast-enhanced helical CT for detecting and managing acute thoracic aortic injury (ATAI). Between June 1995 and February 2000, 1419 consecutive chest CT examinations were performed in the setting of major blunt trauma. The following CT findings were considered indicative of ATAI: intimal flap; pseudoaneurysm; contour irregularity; lumen abnormality; and extravasation of contrast material. On the basis of these direct findings no further diagnostic investigations were performed. Isolated mediastinal hematoma on CT scans was considered an indirect sign of ATAI: In these cases, thoracic aortography was performed even if CT indicated normal aorta. Seventy-seven patients had abnormal CT scans: Among the 23 patients with direct CT signs, acute thoracic aortic injuries was confirmed at thoracotomy in 21. Two false-positive cases were observed. The 54 remaining patients had isolated mediastinal hematoma without aortic injuries at CT and corresponding negative angiograms. The 1342 patients with negative CT scans were included in the 8-month follow-up program and did not show any adverse sequela based on clinical and radiographic criteria. Contrast-enhanced helical CT has a critical role in the exclusion of thoracic aortic injuries in patient with major blunt chest trauma and prevents unnecessary thoracic aortography. Direct CT signs of ATAI do not require further diagnostic investigations to confirm the diagnosis: Isolated aortic bands or contour vessel abnormalities should be first considered as possible artifacts or related to non-traumatic etiologies especially when mediastinal hematoma is absent. In cases of isolated mediastinal hematoma other possible sources of bleeding should be considered before directing patients to thoracic aortography. (orig.)

  19. Radiodiagnostic measurements radiation load of children by chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim of optimisation of the radiographic examinations in paediatric radiology the entrance surface doses measured by chest examinations, as the most frequent procedure for children in Slovakia were surveyed. In this paper the results of measurements and calculations of doses obtained by paediatric patients with ages ranging from newborn to 15 years, who undergone chest radiodiagnostic examinations during the year 1996 are presented.. The obtained results are compared with dose assessment procedures based on total absorbed dose calculations using the published conversion factors between energy impaired to the patient and and entrance surface doses integrated over the beam area

  20. Fat quantification and analysis of lung transplant patients on unenhanced chest CT images based on standardized anatomic space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.; Wu, Caiyun; Christie, Jason; Lederer, David J.

    2016-03-01

    Chest fat estimation is important for identifying high-risk lung transplant candidates. In this paper, an approach to chest fat quantification based on a recently formulated concept of standardized anatomic space (SAS) is presented. The goal of this paper is to seek answers to the following questions related to chest fat quantification on single slice versus whole volume CT, which have not been addressed in the literature. What level of correlation exists between total chest fat volume and fat areas measured on single abdominal and thigh slices? What is the anatomic location in the chest where maximal correlation of fat area with fat volume can be expected? Do the components of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) have the same area-to-volume correlative behavior or do they differ? The SAS approach includes two steps: calibration followed by transformation which will map the patient slice locations non-linearly to SAS. The optimal slice locations found for SAT and VAT based on SAS are different and at the mid-level of the T8 vertebral body for SAT and mid-level of the T7 vertebral body for VAT. Fat volume and area on optimal slices for SAT and VAT are correlated with Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.97 and 0.86, respectively. The correlation of chest fat volume with abdominal and thigh fat areas is weak to modest.

  1. Diagnostic image quality of a comprehensive high-pitch dual-spiral cardiothoracic CT protocol in patients with undifferentiated acute chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamberg, Fabian, E-mail: fbamberg@med.lmu.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Marcus, Roy; Sommer, Wieland; Schwarz, Florian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Becker, Christoph R.; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Johnson, Thorsten R.C. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Objective: To evaluate diagnostic image quality of high-pitch dual source comprehensive cardiothoracic CT protocol in patients presenting with acute undifferentiated chest pain. Materials and methods: Consecutive symptomatic subjects (n = 51) with undifferentiated acute chest pain underwent ECG-synchronized high-pitch dual-spiral chest CT angiography (Definition Flash, Siemens Medical Solutions, 2 × 100 kVp or 2 × 120 kV if BMI > 30, collimation: 128 × 0.6 mm, pitch: 3.2). Independent investigators determined the image quality of each cardiac and pulmonary vessel segment, measured contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR), and determined radiation exposure. In addition, the prevalence of CT findings (pulmonary embolism (PE), aortic dissection (AD) and significant coronary stenosis (≥50%)) was determined. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to determine the subpopulation with highest diagnostic quality. Results: Among 51 subjects (66% male, average age: 63 ± 15.8), the prevalence of positive CT findings was moderate (overall: 11.7%). Overall, image quality of the pulmonary, aortic and coronary vasculature was good (1.26 ± 0.43 and CNR: 2.52) with an average radiation dose of 3.82 mSv and 3.2% of segments rated non-evaluable. The image quality was lowest in the coronary arteries (p = 0.02), depending on the heart rate (r = 0.52, p < 0.001). In subjects with a heart rate of ≤65 bpm (n = 30) subjective image quality and CNR of the coronary arteries were higher (1.6 ± 0.5 vs. 2.1 ± 0.5, p = 0.03 and 1.21 ± 0.3 vs. 1.02 ± 0.3, p = 0.05) with only 1.5% segments classified as non-evaluable. Conclusion: High-pitch dual-spiral comprehensive cardiothoracic CT provides low radiation exposure with excellent image quality at heart rates ≤65 bpm. In subjects with higher heart rates, image quality of the aortic and pulmonary vasculature remains excellent, while the assessment of the coronary arteries degrades substantially.

  2. Diagnostic image quality of a comprehensive high-pitch dual-spiral cardiothoracic CT protocol in patients with undifferentiated acute chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate diagnostic image quality of high-pitch dual source comprehensive cardiothoracic CT protocol in patients presenting with acute undifferentiated chest pain. Materials and methods: Consecutive symptomatic subjects (n = 51) with undifferentiated acute chest pain underwent ECG-synchronized high-pitch dual-spiral chest CT angiography (Definition Flash, Siemens Medical Solutions, 2 × 100 kVp or 2 × 120 kV if BMI > 30, collimation: 128 × 0.6 mm, pitch: 3.2). Independent investigators determined the image quality of each cardiac and pulmonary vessel segment, measured contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR), and determined radiation exposure. In addition, the prevalence of CT findings (pulmonary embolism (PE), aortic dissection (AD) and significant coronary stenosis (≥50%)) was determined. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to determine the subpopulation with highest diagnostic quality. Results: Among 51 subjects (66% male, average age: 63 ± 15.8), the prevalence of positive CT findings was moderate (overall: 11.7%). Overall, image quality of the pulmonary, aortic and coronary vasculature was good (1.26 ± 0.43 and CNR: 2.52) with an average radiation dose of 3.82 mSv and 3.2% of segments rated non-evaluable. The image quality was lowest in the coronary arteries (p = 0.02), depending on the heart rate (r = 0.52, p < 0.001). In subjects with a heart rate of ≤65 bpm (n = 30) subjective image quality and CNR of the coronary arteries were higher (1.6 ± 0.5 vs. 2.1 ± 0.5, p = 0.03 and 1.21 ± 0.3 vs. 1.02 ± 0.3, p = 0.05) with only 1.5% segments classified as non-evaluable. Conclusion: High-pitch dual-spiral comprehensive cardiothoracic CT provides low radiation exposure with excellent image quality at heart rates ≤65 bpm. In subjects with higher heart rates, image quality of the aortic and pulmonary vasculature remains excellent, while the assessment of the coronary arteries degrades substantially.

  3. Adaptive wiener filter based on Gaussian mixture distribution model for denoising chest X-ray CT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent decades, X-ray CT imaging has become more important as a result of its high-resolution performance. However, it is well known that the X-ray dose is insufficient in the techniques that use low-dose imaging in health screening or thin-slice imaging in work-up. Therefore, the degradation of CT images caused by the streak artifact frequently becomes problematic. In this study, we applied a Wiener filter (WF) using the universal Gaussian mixture distribution model (UNI-GMM) as a statistical model to remove streak artifact. In designing the WF, it is necessary to estimate the statistical model and the precise co-variances of the original image. In the proposed method, we obtained a variety of chest X-ray CT images using a phantom simulating a chest organ, and we estimated the statistical information using the images for training. The results of simulation showed that it is possible to fit the UNI-GMM to the chest X-ray CT images and reduce the specific noise. (author)

  4. Measurements of patient chest dose for multi-slice X-ray CT examinations using PIN photodiode dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organ and tissue doses delivered during chest CT examinations were measured as a function of scanning parameters including tube current, slice thickness, and pitch of the multi-slice CT scanner. Measurements were carried out by using a chest dosimetry phantom that incorporated lung and vertebra models, and by putting PIN photodiode dosimeters into the phantom at sites of the esophagus or stomach, lung, bone marrow, and skin. Absorbed doses at each site in the phantom measured for a constant scan area indicated that these values could be precisely calculated from the value obtained at any scanning parameter by using inverse proportionality of dose to pitch and the data of x-ray intensity as a function of tube current and slice thickness measured for the CT scanner used. Relative dose at each site was found to be constant regardless of the scanning parameters, indicating that the dose value at each site could be calculated from that measured at only one point in the phantom. Effective doses and effective dose equivalents were estimated from organ or tissue doses for chest CT examinations, and were found to be 1.5 to 3 times larger than the average values of effective dose equivalent appearing in the literature. (author)

  5. Coronary artery visibility in free-breathing young children on non-gated chest CT: impact of temporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridoux, Alexandre; Hutt, Antoine; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Pagniez, Julien; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [CHRU et Universite de Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), 59037 Lille Cedex (France); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare, Department of Research and Development in CT, Forchheim (Germany); Duhamel, Alain [Universite de Lille, Department of Biostatistics, Lille (France)

    2015-11-15

    Dual-source CT allows scanning of the chest with high pitch and high temporal resolution, which can improve the detection of proximal coronary arteries in infants and young children when scanned without general anesthesia, sedation or beta-blockade. To compare coronary artery visibility between higher and standard temporal resolution. We analyzed CT images in 93 children who underwent a standard chest CT angiographic examination with reconstruction of images with a temporal resolution of 75 ms (group 1) and 140 ms (group 2). The percentage of detected coronary segments was higher in group 1 than in group 2 when considering all segments (group 1: 27%; group 2: 24%; P = 0.0004) and proximal segments (group 1: 37%; group 2: 32%; P = 0.0006). In both groups, the highest rates of detection were observed for the left main coronary artery (S1) (group 1: 65%; group 2: 58%) and proximal left anterior descending coronary artery (S2) (group 1: 43%; group 2: 42%). Higher rates of detection were seen in group 1 for the left main coronary artery (P = 0.03), proximal right coronary artery (P = 0.01), proximal segments of the left coronary artery (P = 0.02) and proximal segments of the left and right coronary arteries (P = 0.0006). Higher temporal resolution improved the visibility of proximal coronary arteries in pediatric chest CT. (orig.)

  6. Coronary artery visibility in free-breathing young children on non-gated chest CT: impact of temporal resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dual-source CT allows scanning of the chest with high pitch and high temporal resolution, which can improve the detection of proximal coronary arteries in infants and young children when scanned without general anesthesia, sedation or beta-blockade. To compare coronary artery visibility between higher and standard temporal resolution. We analyzed CT images in 93 children who underwent a standard chest CT angiographic examination with reconstruction of images with a temporal resolution of 75 ms (group 1) and 140 ms (group 2). The percentage of detected coronary segments was higher in group 1 than in group 2 when considering all segments (group 1: 27%; group 2: 24%; P = 0.0004) and proximal segments (group 1: 37%; group 2: 32%; P = 0.0006). In both groups, the highest rates of detection were observed for the left main coronary artery (S1) (group 1: 65%; group 2: 58%) and proximal left anterior descending coronary artery (S2) (group 1: 43%; group 2: 42%). Higher rates of detection were seen in group 1 for the left main coronary artery (P = 0.03), proximal right coronary artery (P = 0.01), proximal segments of the left coronary artery (P = 0.02) and proximal segments of the left and right coronary arteries (P = 0.0006). Higher temporal resolution improved the visibility of proximal coronary arteries in pediatric chest CT. (orig.)

  7. Reduced volume of contrast media; effect on vascular opacification and image quality in spiral CT of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the effect of reduced volume of contrast media on vascular opacification and image quality in spiral CT of the chest. Sixty patients referred for chest CT were examined with spiral CT with 60ml (n=30) or 90ml(n=30) of 30% ionic contrast media(Rayvist 300r, Schering, Germany) alternately. Injection rate of each group was as follows; 2.0ml/sec for 20 seconds followed by 1.0ml/sec for 20 seconds in 60ml group and 2.0ml/sec for 45 seconds in 90ml group. Twenty-five seconds scanning delay was employed. For the objective comparison of vascular opacification, CT numbers were measured at superior vena cava, ascending and descending aorta, right and left pulmonary artery, left atrium, and inferior vena cava. For the subjective comparison three radiologists scored the grade of vascular opacification and image quality blindly and independently. All data were analyzed statistically. The mean values of measured CT numbers in 90ml group were higher than those in 60ml group (p<.05) at the same level. The overall mean score of vascular opacification in 90ml group was 2.86, and 2.31 in 60ml group(p<.0001). In the overall mean score of image quality, there was no statistically significant difference between 90ml group(2.46) and 60ml group(2.40). Although there is some degradation of vascular opacification in 60ml group, overall image quality is not degraded. Therefore, 60ml of contrast media can be used in spiral CT of the chest without degradation of overall image quality except in spiral CT angiography

  8. Bicuspid aortic valves: Diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, David J., E-mail: david.murphy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); McEvoy, Sinead H., E-mail: s.mcevoy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Iyengar, Sri, E-mail: sri.iyengar@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Feuchtner, Gudrun, E-mail: Gudrun.Feuchtner@i-med.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Cury, Ricardo C., E-mail: r.cury@baptisthealth.net [Department of Radiology, Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, 8900 North Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176 (United States); Roobottom, Carl, E-mail: carl.roobottom@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Baumueller, Stephan, E-mail: Hatem.Alkadhi@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem, E-mail: stephan.baumueller@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Dodd, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonniedodd@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT for bicuspid aortic valves. Materials and methods: The standard axial chest CT scans of 20 patients with known bicuspid aortic valves were blindly, randomly analyzed for (i) the appearance of the valve cusps, (ii) the largest aortic sinus area, (iii) the longest aortic cusp length, (iv) the thickest aortic valve cusp and (v) valve calcification. A second blinded reader independently analyzed the appearance of the valve cusps. Forty-two age- and sex-matched patients with known tricuspid aortic valves were used as controls. Retrospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT multiphase reconstructions of the aortic valve were used as the gold-standard. Results: Fourteen (21%) scans were scored as unevaluable (7 bicuspid, 7 tricuspid). Of the remainder, there were 13 evaluable bicuspid valves, ten of which showed an aortic valve line sign, while the remaining three showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance owing to fused valve cusps. The 35 evaluable tricuspid aortic valves all showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance (P = 0.001). Kappa analysis = 0.62 indicating good interobserver agreement for the aortic valve cusp appearance. Aortic sinus areas, aortic cusp lengths and aortic cusp thicknesses of ≥3.8 cm{sup 2}, 3.2 cm and 1.6 mm respectively on standard axial chest CT best distinguished bicuspid from tricuspid aortic valves (P < 0.0001 for all). Of evaluable scans, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of standard axial chest CT in diagnosing bicuspid aortic valves was 77% (CI 0.54–1.0), 100%, 100% and 70% respectively. Conclusion: The aortic valve is evaluable in approximately 80% of standard chest 64-slice CT scans. Bicuspid aortic valves may be diagnosed on evaluable scans with good diagnostic accuracy. An aortic valve line sign, enlarged aortic sinuses and elongated, thickened valve cusps are specific CT

  9. Distribution of the radiation dose in multislice computer tomography of the chest – phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most commonly used form of reporting doses in multislice computed tomography involves a CT dose index per slice and dose-length product for the whole series. The purpose of this study was to analyze the actual dose distribution in routine chest CT examination protocols using an antropomorphic phantom. We included in the analysis readings from a phantom filled with thermoluminescent detectors (Art Phantom Canberra) during routine chest CT examinations (64 MDCT TK LIGHT SPEED GE Medical System) performed using three protocols: low-dose, helical and angio-CT. Mean dose values (mSv) reported from anterior parts of the phantom sections in low-dose/helical/angio-CT protocols were as follows: 3.74; 16.95; 30.17; from central parts: 3.18; 14.15; 26.71; from posterior parts: 3.01; 12.47; 24.98 respectively. Correlation coefficients for mean doses registered in anterior parts of the phantom between low-dose/helical, low-dose/angio-CT and helical/angio-CT protocols were 0.49; 0.63; 0.36; from central parts: 0.73; 0.66; 0.83, while in posterior parts values were as follows: 0.06; 0.21; 0.57. The greatest doses were recorded in anterior parts of all phantom sections in all protocols in reference to largest doses absorbed in the anterior part of the chest during CT examination. The doses were decreasing from anterior to posterior parts of all sections. In the long axis of the phantom, in all protocols, lower doses were measured in the upper part of the phantom and at the very lowest part

  10. Acute or chronic transplant rejection - high resolution CT of the chest in lung transplant recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Aim of the study was to evaluate the postoperative changes in patients with single (SLTX) or double lung transplantation (DLTX) with HRCT and to correlate those findings with the clinical diagnosis. Material and methods: 29 patients with SLTX (n = 14) or DLTX (n = 15) were observed for more than 6 years after transplantation by HRCT (n = 82). CT examinations were performed in inspiration and expiration (n = 70) with a slice thickness of 1 mm and a feed of 10 mm. The image material was evaluated by 2 experienced radiologists in consensus. Criteria for acute rejection at HRCT were: ground glass opacities and focal air trapping in expiration. Criteria for chronic transplant rejection were: bronchial dilatation, bronchial wall thickening and thickening of interlobar septae. The clinical evaluation consisted of laboratory tests, lung function tests, and bronchoscopy including bronchial lavage in special cases. Results: 20/29 patients are still alive (mean 21 months). 5/9 patients died because of chronic transplantant rejection, 1 patient suffered from a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma localised at the right hilus. Severe threatening pneumonia occurred in 13 cases. 10/29 patients showed symptoms of acute rejection. Expiratory HRCT found a focal air trapping in all cases and extended ground glass opacities in 11/14 cases. Also a bronchial dilatation was observed in more than 50% (9/14). 12/29 patients suffered from chronic transplant rejection. HRCT showed bronchial dilatation in 26/27 investigations and severe ground glass opacities in 21/27 investigations. Thickening of the interlobal septa as well as centrilobular opacities were found in more than 50% of the examinations. Conclusion: High resolution CT of the chest in patients after lung transplantation is able to show numerous pathological alterations. Without clinical information a confident differentiation in acute or chronic transplant rejection or pneumonia can be difficult or impossible. (orig.)

  11. Automated aortic calcification detection in low-dose chest CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yiting; Htwe, Yu Maw; Padgett, Jennifer; Henschke, Claudia; Yankelevitz, David; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2014-03-01

    The extent of aortic calcification has been shown to be a risk indicator for vascular events including cardiac events. We have developed a fully automated computer algorithm to segment and measure aortic calcification in low-dose noncontrast, non-ECG gated, chest CT scans. The algorithm first segments the aorta using a pre-computed Anatomy Label Map (ALM). Then based on the segmented aorta, aortic calcification is detected and measured in terms of the Agatston score, mass score, and volume score. The automated scores are compared with reference scores obtained from manual markings. For aorta segmentation, the aorta is modeled as a series of discrete overlapping cylinders and the aortic centerline is determined using a cylinder-tracking algorithm. Then the aortic surface location is detected using the centerline and a triangular mesh model. The segmented aorta is used as a mask for the detection of aortic calcification. For calcification detection, the image is first filtered, then an elevated threshold of 160 Hounsfield units (HU) is used within the aorta mask region to reduce the effect of noise in low-dose scans, and finally non-aortic calcification voxels (bony structures, calcification in other organs) are eliminated. The remaining candidates are considered as true aortic calcification. The computer algorithm was evaluated on 45 low-dose non-contrast CT scans. Using linear regression, the automated Agatston score is 98.42% correlated with the reference Agatston score. The automated mass and volume score is respectively 98.46% and 98.28% correlated with the reference mass and volume score.

  12. Aspergillus infection of the respiratory tract after lung transplantation: chest radiographic and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of our study was to assess radiographic and CT findings in lung transplant patients with evidence of Aspergillus colonization or infection of the airways and correlate the findings with clinical, laboratory, bronchoalveolar lavage, biopsy and autopsy findings. The records of 189 patients who had undergone lung transplantation were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of Aspergillus colonization or infection of the airways. Aspergillus was demonstrated by culture or microscopy of sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or histologically from lung biopsies or postmortem studies in 44 patients (23 %). Notes and radiographs were available for analysis in 30 patients. In 12 of the 30 patients (40 %) chest radiographs remained normal. In 11 of 18 patients with abnormal radiographs pulmonary abnormalities were attributed to invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in the absence of other causes for pulmonary abnormalities (8 patients) or because of histological demonstration of IPA (3 patients). In these 11 patients initial radiographic abnormalities were focal areas of patchy consolidation (8 patients), ill-defined pulmonary nodules (2 patients) or a combination of both (1 patient). In some of the lesions cavitation was demonstrated subsequently. At CT a ''halo'' of decreased density was demonstrated in some of the nodules and lesion morphology and location were shown more precisely. Demonstration of Aspergillus from the respiratory tract after lung transplantation does not necessarily reflect IPA but may represent colonization of the airways or semi-invasive aspergillosis. The findings in patients with IPA did not differ from those described in the literature in other immunocompromised patients, suggesting that surgical disruption of lymphatic drainage and nervous supply or effects of preservation and transport of the transplant lung do not affect the radiographic appearances. (orig.)

  13. Radiation exposure of children during radiodiagnostic examination of chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organ doses in a tissue-equivalent anthropomorphous child phantom (corresponding to the age of 1 to 3 years) were measured during chest radiography by thermoluminescence dosimetry. The effective dose obtained by children of selected age was 0.044 mSv. The reproducibility of dose determination on phantom and on patient are compared. The obtained results are analyzed from the standpoint of optimization and reduction of patient doses. (author)

  14. Estimated radiation exposure and cancer risk from CT and PET/CT scans in patients with lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guttikonda, Ravi [Imaging Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States); Herts, Brian R., E-mail: hertsb@ccf.org [Imaging Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States); Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States); Dong, Frank [Imaging Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States); Baker, Mark E. [Imaging Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States); Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States); Fenner, Kathleen B.; Pohlman, Brad [Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to estimate total effective dose and cancer risk related to treatment monitoring and surveillance computed tomography (CT) scans in a cohort of patients diagnosed with lymphoma. Methods: 76 patients with head, neck, chest, abdomen or pelvis CT and whole-body positron emission tomography (PET)/CT were identified from an institutional lymphoma database; this included 54 (71%) patients with non-Hodgkin and 22 (29%) patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma. Average treatment and surveillance periods were 8 months (range, 3–14 mo) and 23 months (range, 1–40 mo), respectively. Radiation exposure was estimated from the dose-length product (DLP) for CT scans and milli-Curies and DLP for PET/CT scans. Cancer risk was estimated using the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation model. Results: During their treatment period, 45 patients had 161 CT exams and 39 patients had 73 PET/CT exams. Mean effective dose was 39.3 mSv (range, 7.1–100 mSv). During the surveillance period, 60 patients had 378 CT exams and 25 patients had 39 PET/CT exams. Mean effective dose was 53.2 mSv (range, 2.6–154 mSv). Seventeen of 76 (22.4%) patients had total cumulative doses greater than 100 mSv. The mean increase in estimated cancer risk was 0.40%; the greatest estimated risk to any one patient was 1.19%. Conclusion: Mean total effective dose and mean estimated cancer risk were low in patients with lymphoma undergoing serial imaging, suggesting that theoretical risks of radiation-induced cancer need not be a major consideration in radiologic follow-up.

  15. Estimated radiation exposure and cancer risk from CT and PET/CT scans in patients with lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to estimate total effective dose and cancer risk related to treatment monitoring and surveillance computed tomography (CT) scans in a cohort of patients diagnosed with lymphoma. Methods: 76 patients with head, neck, chest, abdomen or pelvis CT and whole-body positron emission tomography (PET)/CT were identified from an institutional lymphoma database; this included 54 (71%) patients with non-Hodgkin and 22 (29%) patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma. Average treatment and surveillance periods were 8 months (range, 3–14 mo) and 23 months (range, 1–40 mo), respectively. Radiation exposure was estimated from the dose-length product (DLP) for CT scans and milli-Curies and DLP for PET/CT scans. Cancer risk was estimated using the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation model. Results: During their treatment period, 45 patients had 161 CT exams and 39 patients had 73 PET/CT exams. Mean effective dose was 39.3 mSv (range, 7.1–100 mSv). During the surveillance period, 60 patients had 378 CT exams and 25 patients had 39 PET/CT exams. Mean effective dose was 53.2 mSv (range, 2.6–154 mSv). Seventeen of 76 (22.4%) patients had total cumulative doses greater than 100 mSv. The mean increase in estimated cancer risk was 0.40%; the greatest estimated risk to any one patient was 1.19%. Conclusion: Mean total effective dose and mean estimated cancer risk were low in patients with lymphoma undergoing serial imaging, suggesting that theoretical risks of radiation-induced cancer need not be a major consideration in radiologic follow-up

  16. Radiation protection of patients during CT fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT fluoroscopy provides pseudo real-time cross sectional imaging and has been used in our clinic for biopsies, drainage and pain control. In the fluoroscopic configuration the radiologist stands in the room adjacent to the table as in conventional angiography. Because of concerns regarding patient doses, measurements were made to estimate doses. Effective doses were calculated using the method of Huda and the data of NRPB. It was found that as far as the patient is concerned, two minutes of CT fluoroscopy gave a similar effective dose as a standard abdomen CT exam. As in other CT scanners, the scattered dose decreases rapidly away from the radiation plane and is 1 mGy per minute at 10 from the image plane. (author)

  17. CT–fluoroscopy in chest interventional radiology: Sliding scale of imaging parameters based on radiation exposure dose and factors increasing radiation exposure dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To verify the usefulness of a sliding scale of imaging parameters to reduce radiation exposure during chest interventional radiology (IR), and to identify factors that increase radiation exposure in order to obtain acceptable computed tomography (CT)–fluoroscopy image quality. Materials and methods: The institutional review board approved this retrospective study, for which the need for informed consent was waived. Interventional radiologists determined the optimal CT–fluoroscopy imaging parameters using the sliding scale based on the radiation exposure dose. The imaging parameters were changed from those generating low radiation (120 kV/10 mA, 1.2 mGy/s) to others generating higher radiation exposure until acceptable image quality was obtained for each procedure. Validation of the imaging parameter sliding scale was done using regression analysis. Factors that increase radiation exposure were identified using multiple regression analysis. Results: In 125 patients, 217 procedures were performed, of which 72 procedures (33.2%, 72/217) were performed with imaging parameters of minimum radiation exposure, but increased radiation exposure was necessary in 145 (66.8%, 145/217). Significant correlation was found between the radiation exposure dose and the percentage achievement of acceptable image quality (R2 = 0.98). Multivariate regression analysis showed that high body weight (p < 0.0001), long device passage (p < 0.0001), and lesions above the aortic arch (p = 0.04) were significant independent factors increasing radiation exposure. Conclusion: Although increased radiation exposure dose might be necessary to obtain acceptable chest CT–fluoroscopy images depending on the patient, lesion, and procedure characteristics, a sliding scale of imaging parameters helps to reduce radiation exposure.

  18. The value of chest CT scan and tumor markers detection in sputum for early diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xu; CAO Aihong; PENG Mengqing; HU Chunfeng; LIU Delin; GU Tao; LIU Hui

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the diagnostic value of chest CT scan combined with telomerase activity and p16 gene methylation from exfoliated cells of sputum in 55 cases of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN; ≤30 mm)suspected early peripheral lung cancer. Methods The sputum specimens from 34 cases of cancer nodules and 21 cases of benign lesion were detected for telomerase activity by TRAP-PCR-ELISA and p16 gene methylation by PCR-based methylation analysis. Results The qualitative diagnostic accuracy of CT scan was 61.8%(34/55) for SPN provided by pathology. Cytology analysis of sputum was positive in 13 cases (38.2%). Telomerase activity was positive in 29 cases: sensitivity was 79.4%, specificity was 90.5%, accuracy was 83.6%; p16 gene methylation was found in 11 cases: sensitivity was 32.4%, specificity was 100.0%, and accuracy was 58.2%. The sensitivity was increased to 86.1% by combination of telomerase activity and p16 gene methylation. Compared with nodules without malignant CT signs, expression of telomerase activity and p16 methylation of SPN with malignant CT signs (lobulation or spiculate protuberance or spicule sign) had a significant difference (P<0.01). Conclusion The results suggest that chest CT scan combined with telomerase activity and p16 gene methylation detection in sputum for patients with peripheral lung cancer may enhance the diagnostic value of radiology and conventional cytology.

  19. Radiation exposure distribution in patients undergoing CT brain scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of surface exposures in patients undergoing single and multiple computerized tomographic brain scans with Hitachi CT-W500 was measured by LiF(Mg, Ti) thermoluminescent dosimetry. It was found that there was no significant difference in the sufrace exposures from different scanning slices. However, the exposure doses at different scanning angles around the head were different significantly. The reference point of the maximum surface exposure was at the temporal part of the head. the maximum surface exposure was at 1.65 x 10-3 C·kg-1 while the average exposure was 1.55 x 10-3 C·kg-1. The ratio of the average dose resulting from nine scans to that from a single scan was 1.3, and the surface exposure contribution of scattered radiation was computed. At the same time the radiation doses to eyes, thyroid, chest and gonads of patiens at corresponding position were also measured and were compared with those from CT cranial scans in children and skull radiographic procedures respectively

  20. Radiation Exposure in X-Ray and CT Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A-Z Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams What are x-rays and what do ... natural background radiation for: ABDOMINAL REGION: Computed Tomography (CT)-Abdomen and Pelvis 10 mSv 3 years Computed ...

  1. Obesity Increases the Risk of Chest Wall Pain From Thoracic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly being used to treat thoracic tumors. We attempted here to identify dose-volume parameters that predict chest wall toxicity (pain and skin reactions) in patients receiving thoracic SBRT. Patients and Methods: We screened a database of patients treated with SBRT between August 2004 and August 2008 to find patients with pulmonary tumors within 2.5 cm of the chest wall. All patients received a total dose of 50 Gy in four daily 12.5-Gy fractions. Toxicity was scored according to the NCI-CTCAE V3.0. Results: Of 360 patients in the database, 265 (268 tumors) had tumors within 30, or volume of the chest wall receiving 30 Gy. Body mass index (BMI) was also strongly associated with the development of chest pain: patients with BMI ≥29 had almost twice the risk of chronic pain (p = 0.03). Among patients with BMI >29, diabetes mellitus was a significant contributing factor to the development of chest pain. Conclusion: Safe use of SBRT with 50 Gy in four fractions for lesions close to the chest wall requires consideration of the chest wall volume receiving 30 Gy and the patient's BMI and diabetic state.

  2. Lung parenchymal change after the resolution of adenovirus pneumonia : chest radiographs and high-resolution CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate lung parenchymal change as seen on chest radiographs and high-resolution CT (HRCT) after the resolution of adenovirus pneumonia (a common cause of lower respiratory infection in infants and children),and the usefulness of HRCT during follow-up. Material and Methods : Four to 13(mean, 8) months after recovery, ten patients infected with adenovirus pneumonia underwent HRCT and chest radiographs. Eight were boys and two were girls, and their mean age was 26(range, 14-45) months. Adenovirus pneumonia had been confirmed by viral isolation in culture or serologic test. CT scanning was performed during quiet breathing ; collimation was 2 mm and the interval from apex to diaphragm was 5-10 mm. Lung settings were 1600 HU (window width) and -700 HU(level). CT findings were assessed and compared with chest radiographs by two chest radiologists, who reached a consensus. The patients were clinically followed up for one year. Result : On chest radiographs, hyperlucent lung was seen in 8 of 10 patients (80%) ; in one other there was partial collapse, and in one, findings were normal. The most common HRCT finding was a mosaic pattern of lung attenuation with decreased pulmonary vascularity in the area of lower attenuation ; this was seen in 8 of 10 patients (80%). Other findings were partial collapse, bronchiectasis, and bronchial wall thickening, each seen in two patients, and reticulonodular density, seen in one. In two patients HRCT findings were normal ; in one of these, chest findings were normal but a mosaic pattern of lung attenuation was found in all lobes. During follow-up, three patients wheezed continuously. Conclusion : In cases of adenovirus pneumonia, HRCT demonstrated more specific parenchymal change than did chest radiographs ; a mosaic pattern of lung attenuation was seen, with decreased pulmonary vascularity in areas of lower attenuation ; bronchiectasis,bronchial wall thickening, and reticulo-odular density were also noted. These findings were

  3. The Value and Prognostic Role of the CT Scan versus Chest Radiography in the Follow-up of Intubated Burn Patients with Possible Inhalation Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Spyropoulou, G.A.; Iconomou, T.; Tsagarakis, M.; Tsoutsos, D.

    2005-01-01

    The admission and follow-up chest radiographs as well as the follow-up CT scans of 13 burn patients admitted to our clinic requiring ventilatory support were analysed for signs of inhalation injury and pulmonary complications. The findings were compared with the results of the clinical examination, the blood gas tests, and bronchoscopy. Eleven out of the 13 patients underwent bronchoscopy revealing inhalation injury. The CT scan detected pleural effusion in two patients with a normal chest ra...

  4. Pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer on radiological findings: Evaluation of chest CT findings in pathologically proven 76 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate chest CT features of pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung malignancy. We retrospectively reviewed chest CT findings for 76 consecutive patients (21-84 years, average: 63 years; M : F = 30 : 46) who underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure under the suspicion of lung cancer and were pathologically diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis by bronchoscopic biopsy (n = 49), transthoracic needle biopsy (n = 17), and surgical resection (n = 10). We categorized the chest CT patterns of those lesions as follows: bronchial narrowing or obstruction without a central mass like lesion (pattern 1), central mass-like lesion with distal atelectasis or obstructive pneumonia (pattern 2), peripheral nodule or mass including mass-like consolidation (pattern 3), and cavitary lesion (pattern 4). CT findings were reviewed with respect to the patterns and the locations of the lesions, parenchymal abnormalities adjacent to the lesions, the size, the border and pattern of enhancement for the peripheral nodule or mass and the thickness of the cavitary wall in the cavitary lesion. We also evaluated the abnormalities regarding the lymph node and pleura. Pattern 1 was the most common finding (n = 34), followed by pattern 3 (n = 23), pattern 2 (n = 11) and finally, pattern 4 (n = 8). The most frequently involving site in pattern 1 and 2 was the right middle lobe (n = 14/45). However, in pattern 3 and 4, the superior segment of right lower lobe (n = 5/31) was most frequently involved. Ill-defined small nodules and/or larger confluent nodules were found in the adjacent lung and at the other segment of the lung in 31 patients (40.8%). Enlarged lymph nodes were most commonly detected in the right paratracheal area (n = 9/18). Pleural effusion was demonstrated in 10 patients. On the CT, pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer most commonly presented with bronchial narrowing or obstruction without a central mass-like lesion, which resulted in distal atelectasis and obstructive

  5. Dual-source chest CT angiography with high temporal resolution and high pitch modes: evaluation of image quality in 140 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacelli, Nunzia; Remy-Jardin, Martine; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Remy, Jacques [University Centre of Lille (EA 2694), Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare, Computed Tomography, Forchheim (Germany); Delannoy, Valerie; Duhamel, Alain [University Centre of Lille (EA 2694), Department of Biostatistics, Lille (France)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate image quality of dual-source computed tomography (CT) angiograms acquired with high temporal resolution and high pitch modes. Two groups of 70 consecutive patients underwent chest CT angiography with dual-source, single-energy CT, with an 83-ms temporal resolution and a pitch of 2 (group 1) or a pitch of 3 (group 2). Subjective and objective image quality and the diagnostic value were assessed by two radiologists in consensus. The radiation dose was recorded. The image quality was always diagnostic in both groups, rated as excellent in 97% of group 1 (68/70) and 98.5% of group 2 (69/70) examinations. Although no statistically significant difference in subjective image noise was found between the two groups (p = 0.3055), objective noise was found to be statistically higher in group 2 (p<0.0001). The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were found to be significantly higher in group 1 than in group 2 (p=0.0014). The acquisition time was significantly shorter in group 2 than in group 1 (p<0.0001). The dose-length product was significantly lower in group 2 than in group 1 (p < 0.0001). High temporal resolution and high pitch modes provided standard CT angiographic examinations of excellent quality for thoracic applications in routine clinical practice. (orig.)

  6. Extravasation of contrast medium into brain parenchyma and CSF space after CT or DSA of the chest or abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of clinical and CT findings in patients with signs of disruption of the blood-brain or blood-CSF barrier after i.v. or i.a. administration of non-ionic contrast media. Methods: 1. Retrospective analysis of 8 patients with clinical and CT findings of disruption of the blood-brain or blood-CSF barrier after i.v. or i.a. administration of non-ionic contrast media (200-450 ml). 2. Prospective analysis of 30 intensive care patients with sepsis and suspected abscess, who underwent CT of the chest and abdomen with 240 ml of a non-ionic contrast medium followed by cranial CT to rule out septic lesions. Results: The retrospective analysis proved that disruption of the blood-brain barrier may occur in elderly patients with risk factors after injection of higher amounts of contrast media. In the prospective study, equivalent CT phenomena were observed in 3 of 30 patients with sepsis. Conclusions: Hypoxemic and toxics damage to the blood-brain barrier as well as higher amounts of contrast media may result in extravasation of contrast medium into the CSF space, which can be demonstrated by CT. For differential diagnosis, the clinical symptoms and CT patterns of a disruption of the blood-brain or blood-CSF barrier should be known. (orig.)

  7. Identification and characterization of focal ground-glass opacity in the lungs by high-resolution CT using thin-section multidetector helical CT. Experimental study using a chest CT phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate how much the radiation dose can be reduced for the identification and characterization of focal ground-glass opacities (GGOs) by high resolution computed tomography (HRCT). A chest CT phantom including GGO nodules was scanned with a 40-detector CT scanner. The scanning parameters were as follows: tube voltage 120 kVp; beam collimation 32 x 1.25 mm; thickness and intervals 1.25 mm; tube current and rotation time 180, 150, 120, 90, 60, and 30 mA. 180 mA was the standard. Using a three-point scale at different currents, we visually evaluated image quality. Furthermore, we carried out observer performance tests using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to evaluate the ability to identify GGO nodules at each current. By visual analysis, the scores for all particulars were significantly lower on images obtained at less than 120 mA than at 180 mA (Steel's test, P30 mA. (author)

  8. Computer-aided recognition of emphysema on digital chest radiography.

    OpenAIRE

    Miniati, Massimo; Coppini, Giuseppe; Monti, Simonetta; Bottai, Matteo; Paterni, Marco; Ferdeghini, Ezio Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) is the benchmark for diagnosis emphysema, but is costly and imparts a substantial radiation burden to the patient. Objective To develop a computer-aided procedure that allows recognition of emphysema on digital chest radiography by using simple descriptors of the lung shape. The procedure was tested against CT. Methods Patients (N=225), who had undergone postero-anterior and lateral digital chest radiographs and CT for diagnostic purposes, were studied and ...

  9. Management of radiation necrosis and advanced cancer of the chest wall in patients with breast malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggressive resection, with individualized reconstruction by several methods, is of value in many patients with radiation necrosis and/or advanced breast cancer of the chest wall. Although this does not always significantly lengthen survival, it can improve the quality of life markedly in many instances. Remarkably large defects can be reconstructed with single-stage procedures

  10. Chest-CT protocol standardization for multicentre trial in cystic fibrosis (CF) infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciet, P.; Graniel, K. Gonzalez; Stick, S.;

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To standardise the scan protocol for CT scanners of participating centres in a multi-centre study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01270074) for the prevention of radiologically defined bronchiectasis in CF infants by ensuring the maximum image quality at the minimum radiation dose. Methods and...... Materials: Three different sized phantoms (QRM, Germany) were used to assess scanners’ performance of automatic exposure control (AEC). CTDI and DLP were recorded. The phantoms contained various inserts to assess slice-sensitivity-profile, in-plane spatial resolution, noise and the Hounsfield Unit (HU......) scale. Scans were made for several dose levels and reconstruction kernels. Images were analysed with custom-made software (MatLab, USA) to obtain the standard deviation of the noise, point-spread-function (PSF) and slice thickness. Results: Eight different scanners with 64 slices or more from 4...

  11. Novel influenza A (H1N1) infection: chest CT findings from 21 cases in Seoul, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, S.S., E-mail: sinisim@ewha.ac.k [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Y.J. [Division of Pulmonary and Critical care medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Aim: To retrospectively evaluate the computed tomography (CT) appearances of novel influenza A (H1N1) infection. Materials and methods: Chest CT images obtained at clinical presentation in 21 patients (eight men, 13 women; mean age, 37 years; age range, 6-82 years) with confirmed novel influenza A (H1N1) infection were assessed. The radiological appearances of pulmonary parenchymal abnormalities, distribution, and extent of involvement on initial chest CT images were documented. The study group was divided on the basis of age [group 1, patients <18 years old (n = 8); group 2, patients {>=}18 years old (n = 13)]. Medical records were reviewed for underlying medical conditions and laboratory findings. The occurrence of recognizable CT patterns was compared for each group using the images from the initial CT examination. Results: The most common CT pattern observed in all patients was ground-glass attenuated (GGA) lesions (20/21, 95%). Bronchial wall thickening (9/21, 43%) was the second most common CT finding. Other common CT findings were consolidation (6/21, 29%), pleural effusion (6/21, 29%), pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum (5/21, 24%), and atelectasis (5/21, 24%). Among these, atelectasis and pneumomediastinum (pneumothorax) were only observed in group 1. The GGA lesions showed predilections for diffuse multifocal (10/20, 50%) or lower zone (8/20, 40%) distribution. Involvement of central lung parenchyma (12/20, 60%) was more common than a mixed peripheral and central pattern (6/20, 30%) or a subpleural pattern (2/20, 10%) at the time of presentation. Patchy GGA lesions were more frequent (18/20, 90%) than diffuse GGA lesions, and 75% (15/20) of these lesions had a bronchovascular distribution. Bilateral disease was present in all patients with GGA lesions. Bronchial wall thickening was predominantly centrally located and the distribution of the consolidation was non-specific. Conclusion: The predominantly centrally located GGA lesions, with common multifocal

  12. Novel influenza A (H1N1) infection: chest CT findings from 21 cases in Seoul, Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To retrospectively evaluate the computed tomography (CT) appearances of novel influenza A (H1N1) infection. Materials and methods: Chest CT images obtained at clinical presentation in 21 patients (eight men, 13 women; mean age, 37 years; age range, 6-82 years) with confirmed novel influenza A (H1N1) infection were assessed. The radiological appearances of pulmonary parenchymal abnormalities, distribution, and extent of involvement on initial chest CT images were documented. The study group was divided on the basis of age [group 1, patients <18 years old (n = 8); group 2, patients ≥18 years old (n = 13)]. Medical records were reviewed for underlying medical conditions and laboratory findings. The occurrence of recognizable CT patterns was compared for each group using the images from the initial CT examination. Results: The most common CT pattern observed in all patients was ground-glass attenuated (GGA) lesions (20/21, 95%). Bronchial wall thickening (9/21, 43%) was the second most common CT finding. Other common CT findings were consolidation (6/21, 29%), pleural effusion (6/21, 29%), pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum (5/21, 24%), and atelectasis (5/21, 24%). Among these, atelectasis and pneumomediastinum (pneumothorax) were only observed in group 1. The GGA lesions showed predilections for diffuse multifocal (10/20, 50%) or lower zone (8/20, 40%) distribution. Involvement of central lung parenchyma (12/20, 60%) was more common than a mixed peripheral and central pattern (6/20, 30%) or a subpleural pattern (2/20, 10%) at the time of presentation. Patchy GGA lesions were more frequent (18/20, 90%) than diffuse GGA lesions, and 75% (15/20) of these lesions had a bronchovascular distribution. Bilateral disease was present in all patients with GGA lesions. Bronchial wall thickening was predominantly centrally located and the distribution of the consolidation was non-specific. Conclusion: The predominantly centrally located GGA lesions, with common multifocal or

  13. Automated Coronary Artery Calcification Scoring in Non-Gated Chest CT: Agreement and Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takx, Richard A. P.; de Jong, Pim A.; Leiner, Tim; Oudkerk, Matthijs; de Koning, Harry J.; Mol, Christian P.; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the agreement and reliability of fully automated coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring in a lung cancer screening population. Materials and Methods 1793 low-dose chest CT scans were analyzed (non-contrast-enhanced, non-gated). To establish the reference standard for CAC, first automated calcium scoring was performed using a preliminary version of a method employing coronary calcium atlas and machine learning approach. Thereafter, each scan was inspected by one of four trained raters. When needed, the raters corrected initially automaticity-identified results. In addition, an independent observer subsequently inspected manually corrected results and discarded scans with gross segmentation errors. Subsequently, fully automatic coronary calcium scoring was performed. Agatston score, CAC volume and number of calcifications were computed. Agreement was determined by calculating proportion of agreement and examining Bland-Altman plots. Reliability was determined by calculating linearly weighted kappa (κ) for Agatston strata and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for continuous values. Results 44 (2.5%) scans were excluded due to metal artifacts or gross segmentation errors. In the remaining 1749 scans, median Agatston score was 39.6 (P25–P75∶0–345.9), median volume score was 60.4 mm3 (P25–P75∶0–361.4) and median number of calcifications was 2 (P25–P75∶0–4) for the automated scores. The κ demonstrated very good reliability (0.85) for Agatston risk categories between the automated and reference scores. The Bland-Altman plots showed underestimation of calcium score values by automated quantification. Median difference was 2.5 (p25–p75∶0.0–53.2) for Agatston score, 7.6 (p25–p75∶0.0–94.4) for CAC volume and 1 (p25–p75∶0–5) for number of calcifications. The ICC was very good for Agatston score (0.90), very good for calcium volume (0.88) and good for number of calcifications (0.64). Discussion Fully automated

  14. 登革热的胸部CT表现%CT appearance of dengue fever in the chest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周军; 周芳; 谢绍春; 黄勇; 雷斌

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe and analyze the chest CT appearance in dengue fever. Methods Imaging data of chest CT in 75 patients with dengue fever was retrospectively analyzed. Results On chest CT of dengue fever,17 cases were negative, 58 cases were positive. The main performance was interstitial abnormalities, pleural ef-fusion, pleural thickening, bullae. And there were ground-glass opacity(n=17), dual markings increased disorder(n=14), interlobular septal thickening(n=15), parenchymal bands(n=9) , subpleural line(n=7), air-space nodules(n=6), pleural effusion (n=22),interlobar effusion (n=3), bullae (n=5), pleural thickening (n=4). Conclusion Dengue fever has some characteristic imaging features. And the main features were interstitial abnormalities. Combined the chest CT appear-ance with clinical manifestation and laboratory findings, the diagnostic accuracy can be improved.%目的:探讨登革热的CT表现。方法回顾性分析75例经临床确诊的登革热患者的胸部CT资料。结果胸部CT中,17例表现为阴性,58例有阳性表现,主要表现有肺间质病变、胸腔积液、胸膜增厚、肺大泡,其中肺间质实变的表现有磨玻璃样改变17例,双侧肺纹理增多14例,肺小叶间隔增厚15例,长索条9例,胸膜下线7例,气腔结节6例,另外,胸腔积液22例,叶间胸膜积液3例,肺大泡5例,胸膜增厚4例。结论登革热的胸部CT表现以肺间质病变等为主要特点,结合临床表现及实验室检查可提高对登革热的认识。

  15. An education and training programme for radiological institutes: impact on the reduction of the CT radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish an education and training programme for the reduction of CT radiation doses and to assess this programme's efficacy. Ten radiological institutes were counselled. The optimisation programme included a small group workshop and a lecture on radiation dose reduction strategies. The radiation dose used for five CT protocols (paranasal sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary angiography and abdomen) was assessed using the dose-length product (DLP) before and after the optimisation programme. The mean DLP values were compared with national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). The average reduction of the DLP after optimisation was 37% for the sinuses (180 vs. 113 mGycm, P < 0.001), 9% for the brain (982 vs. 896 mGycm, P < 0.05), 24% for the chest (425 vs. 322 mGycm, P < 0.05) and 42% for the pulmonary arteries (352 vs. 203 mGycm, P < 0.001). No significant change in DLP was found for abdominal CT. The post-optimisation DLP values of the sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary arteries and abdomen were 68%, 10%, 20%, 55% and 15% below the DRL, respectively. The education and training programme for radiological institutes is effective in achieving a substantial reduction in CT radiation dose. (orig.)

  16. An education and training programme for radiological institutes: impact on the reduction of the CT radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindera, Sebastian T.; Allmen, Gabriel von; Vock, Peter; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt [University of Berne, University Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Berne, Berne (Switzerland); Treier, Reto; Trueb, Philipp R. [Federal Office of Public Health, Radiation Protection Division, Berne (Switzerland); Nauer, Claude [University of Berne, University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University Hospital Berne, Berne (Switzerland)

    2011-10-15

    To establish an education and training programme for the reduction of CT radiation doses and to assess this programme's efficacy. Ten radiological institutes were counselled. The optimisation programme included a small group workshop and a lecture on radiation dose reduction strategies. The radiation dose used for five CT protocols (paranasal sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary angiography and abdomen) was assessed using the dose-length product (DLP) before and after the optimisation programme. The mean DLP values were compared with national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). The average reduction of the DLP after optimisation was 37% for the sinuses (180 vs. 113 mGycm, P < 0.001), 9% for the brain (982 vs. 896 mGycm, P < 0.05), 24% for the chest (425 vs. 322 mGycm, P < 0.05) and 42% for the pulmonary arteries (352 vs. 203 mGycm, P < 0.001). No significant change in DLP was found for abdominal CT. The post-optimisation DLP values of the sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary arteries and abdomen were 68%, 10%, 20%, 55% and 15% below the DRL, respectively. The education and training programme for radiological institutes is effective in achieving a substantial reduction in CT radiation dose. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of Radiation Dose and Image Quality for Patients Undergoing Computed Tomography (CT) Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT), is an X-ray procedure that generates high quality cross-sectional images of the body, and by comparison to other radiological diagnosis, CT is responsible for higher doses to patients. The aim of this work is to study the CT practice in some CT units in different hospitals in Egypt, in order to investigate the radiation doses imparted to patients during CT examinations and image quality. Dose measurements were performed for the most common applied CT examinations covering radiation sensitive organs in the head and trunk regions. Selected CT examinations are; routine head, routine chest, routine abdomen and routine pelvis. Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI)w was calculated for each scanner from an average of three measurements in the head phantom and another three measurements in the body phantom. DLP values were estimated for each type of examination. Mean values of CTDIw had a range of 36.0-69.0 mGy for head and 11.0-30.0 mGy for chest, abdomen and pelvis examinations. Organ dose and hence effective dose, calculated using Monte Carlo simulation technique. The effects of selecting tube KV and mAs on both spatial resolution and low contrast detectability were examined for two groups of KV values (90 and 120), the mAs values were degraded from 100 to 300 mAs in 100 mAs interval in first case, and from 50 to 300 mAs, in 50 mAs interval in second case

  18. Quantitative analysis of dynamic airway changes after methacholine and salbutamol inhalation on xenon-enhanced chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Joon; Goo, Jin Mo; Kim, Jong Hyo; Park, Eun-Ah [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang Hyun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Healthcare Gangnam Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jae-Woo; Park, Heung-Woo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang-Heon [Seoul National University Hospital, Healthcare Gangnam Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To investigate the dynamic changes in airways in response to methacholine and salbutamol inhalation and to correlate the xenon ventilation index on xenon-enhanced chest CTs in asthmatics. Thirty-one non-smokers (6 normal, 25 asthmatics) underwent xenon-enhanced chest CT and pulmonary function tests. Images were obtained at three stages (basal state, after methacholine inhalation and after salbutamol inhalation), and the total xenon ventilation index (TXVI) as well as airway values were measured and calculated. The repeated measures ANOVA and Spearman's correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. TXVI in the normal group did not significantly change (P > 0.05) with methacholine and salbutamol. For asthmatics, however, the TXVI significantly decreased after methacholine inhalation and increased after salbutamol inhalation (P < 0.05). Of the airway parameters, the airway inner area (IA) significantly increased after salbutamol inhalation in all airways (P < 0.01) in asthmatics. Airway IA, wall thickness and wall area percentage did not significantly decrease after methacholine inhalation (P > 0.05). IA of the large airways was well correlated with basal TXVI, FEV{sub 1} and FVC (P < 0.05). Airway IA is the most reliable parameter for reflecting the dynamic changes after methacholine and salbutamol inhalation, and correlates well with TXVI in asthmatics on xenon-enhanced CT. (orig.)

  19. Quantitative analysis of dynamic airway changes after methacholine and salbutamol inhalation on xenon-enhanced chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the dynamic changes in airways in response to methacholine and salbutamol inhalation and to correlate the xenon ventilation index on xenon-enhanced chest CTs in asthmatics. Thirty-one non-smokers (6 normal, 25 asthmatics) underwent xenon-enhanced chest CT and pulmonary function tests. Images were obtained at three stages (basal state, after methacholine inhalation and after salbutamol inhalation), and the total xenon ventilation index (TXVI) as well as airway values were measured and calculated. The repeated measures ANOVA and Spearman's correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. TXVI in the normal group did not significantly change (P > 0.05) with methacholine and salbutamol. For asthmatics, however, the TXVI significantly decreased after methacholine inhalation and increased after salbutamol inhalation (P 0.05). IA of the large airways was well correlated with basal TXVI, FEV1 and FVC (P < 0.05). Airway IA is the most reliable parameter for reflecting the dynamic changes after methacholine and salbutamol inhalation, and correlates well with TXVI in asthmatics on xenon-enhanced CT. (orig.)

  20. Thin-section chest CT findings of primary Sjoegren's syndrome: correlation with pulmonary function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taouli, Bachir; Mourey, Isabelle [Department of Radiology, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Brauner, Michel W.; Lemouchi, Djamel [Department of Radiology, Universite Paris XIII, Bobigny (France); Grenier, Philippe A. [Department of Radiology, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France)

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe thin-section CT findings of lung involvement in patients with primary Sjoegren's syndrome (PSS), and to correlate them with pulmonary function tests (PFT). The chest thin-section CT examinations of 35 patients with proven diagnosis of PSS and respiratory symptoms were retrospectively assessed by two observers, in a first step independently with interobserver evaluation, and in a second step in consensus. The extent of the most frequent CT findings was scored. Correlation was made with PFT in 31 of these patients. Three main CT patterns were identified with good interobserver agreement (kappa coefficient 0.71): 19 of 35 (54%) large and/or small airways disease; 7 of 35 (20%) interstitial lung fibrosis (ILF); and 5 of 35 (14%) suggestive of lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP). The CT scans were normal in 2 patients (6%) and showed only dilatation of pulmonary vessels due to pulmonary arterial hypertension in two others (6%). Airway disease patients had predominantly obstructive profiles (mean FEV{sub 1}/FVC ratio 69.7{+-}12.7%, mean MEF{sub 25} 50.1{+-}22.9%), whereas patients with ILF and LIP had predominantly restrictive profiles and/or a decreased diffusing lung capacity (mean TLC 87.0{+-}26.0 and 64.6{+-}18.6%, mean DL{sub CO} 57.4{+-}21.2 and 52.0{+-}8.0%). Significant correlation (p<0.01) was found between the scores of ground-glass attenuation and TLC (r=-0.84) and DL{sub CO} (r=-0.70) and between the score of air trapping and FEV1 (r=-1.0). In patients with PSS and respiratory symptoms, thin-section CT may provide characterization of lung involvement which correlates with pulmonary function. (orig.)

  1. Multidisciplinary approach to treatment of radiation-induced chest wall sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, H Volkan; Gandolfi, Brad M; Williams, Judson B; D'Amico, Thomas A; Zenn, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    Radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS) is a rare complication following therapeutic external irradiation for lung cancer patients. Patients with RIS may develop recurrence or metastasis of the previous disease and also at high risk for early chest wall complications following operation, which requires close follow-up and multidisciplinary approach. We present a challenging case of RIS with a multidisciplinary teamwork in the decision-making and successful management. PMID:25663293

  2. Awareness of radiation exposure of thoracic CT scans and conventional radiographs: what do non-radiologists know?; Einschaetzung der Strahlenbelastung radiologischer Thorax-Verfahren: Was ist Nichtradiologen bekannt?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyer, C.M.; Peters, S.; Lemburg, S.; Nicolas, V. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). BG Kliniken Bergmannsheil, Inst. fuer Diagnostische, Interventionelle Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: Assessment of the knowledge of non-radiological physicians concerning radiation exposure during radiological procedures on the thorax. Material and Methods: 124 non-radiological physicians from the departments of surgery, internal medicine, anesthesiology, and neurology at a university hospital were questioned during a four-week period using a standardized questionnaire as to the effective dose (ED) of different radiological procedures on the thorax. The interviewees were asked to estimate the ED of chest X-rays and CT examinations and to compare these with the ED of other radiological methods. Length of professional experience, field of clinical training, and hierarchical position were also documented. The T-test and chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. Results: 119/124 (96.0 %) physicians with an average work experience of 8.2 years (0.3 - 32 years) were willing to participate. 47/119 (39.5 %) correctly estimated the ED of conventional chest X-ray (0.01 - 0.1 mSv), and 40/119 (33.6 %) correctly gauged the ED of adult chest CT (1 - 10 mSv). The ED of cardiac CT and pediatric chest CT without dose reduction (10 - 100 mSv) were correctly judged by 31/119 (26.1 %) and 32/119 (26.9 %), respectively. The correct ratio of the ED of chest X-ray to that of chest CT (factor 100 - 1000) was given by 28/119 (23.5 %), while 86/119 (72.3 %) underestimated the ratio. 50/119 (42.0 %) and 35/119 (29.4 %) correctly stated that the ED of pediatric chest CT without dose reduction and that of cardiac CT are greater than that of adult chest CT. 24/119 (20.2 %) and 10/119 (8.4 %) thought that the ED of low-dose chest CT is smaller than that of chest X-ray or chest MRI, respectively. The length of professional experience, field of clinical training, and hierarchical position of the participants did not have a significant influence on the test results. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of the efficiency of bismuth breast shield in CT chest paediatric examinations; Valoracion en el paciente pediatrico de la eficacia de los protectores de bien procedimientos de TC de torax con sistemas de control automatico de intensidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevillano, D.; Espana, M. L.; Castro, P.; Minguez, C.; Albi, G.; Garcia, E.; Lopez Franco, P.

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of bismuth breast shield in CT chest paediatric examinations when automatic exposure control techniques are used. The influence in the radiation dose and the image quality has been evaluated with and without the breast shield in the scoutview. In addition the radiation dose in shielded and non-shielded areas has been compared. Measurements were made in a 16 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA phantom simulating a newborn, and older children were simulated controlling the maximum intensities allowed by the automatic exposure control system AutomA. The highest dose reduction (59%) was obtained with AutomA system and when the breast shield is not used in the scoutview. This reduction in the radiation dose does not mean a significant increase of noise level. The use of the breast shield in the scoutview yielded an increase in the radiation dose in non-shielded areas. The use of bismuth breast shield is recommended only after the scoutview in order to optimise the radiation dose in CT chest paediatric examination when using automatic exposure control AutomA. (Author)

  4. Radiation exposure during chest X-ray examinations in a premature intensive care unit: phantom studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duetting, T.; Foerste, B.; Darge, K.; Troeger, J. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Paediatric Radiology; Knoch, T. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Central Radiation Protection

    1999-03-01

    Background. There are few reports on the radiation dose received by infants, their family and radiographers exposed to scatter radiation in a premature baby intensive care unit. Objective. To evaluate the degree of radiation exposure from diagnostic X-ray examinations with mobile X-ray machines in a premature intensive care unit. Materials and methods. The radiation exposure of an adjacent newborn, the radiographer and other persons in the room was simulated using phantoms during X-ray examination of the chest using vertical and horizontal beams. Results. Most of the measured doses were below the registration limit of the measuring apparatus and had to be extrapolated by multiple exposures. Without exception, the maximal doses were significantly lower than the permitted limit for persons not professionally exposed to X-rays. Conclusions. Recommendations to avoid unnecessary radiation exposure are given. (orig.) With 2 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs.

  5. Radiation exposure during chest X-ray examinations in a premature intensive care unit: phantom studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. There are few reports on the radiation dose received by infants, their family and radiographers exposed to scatter radiation in a premature baby intensive care unit. Objective. To evaluate the degree of radiation exposure from diagnostic X-ray examinations with mobile X-ray machines in a premature intensive care unit. Materials and methods. The radiation exposure of an adjacent newborn, the radiographer and other persons in the room was simulated using phantoms during X-ray examination of the chest using vertical and horizontal beams. Results. Most of the measured doses were below the registration limit of the measuring apparatus and had to be extrapolated by multiple exposures. Without exception, the maximal doses were significantly lower than the permitted limit for persons not professionally exposed to X-rays. Conclusions. Recommendations to avoid unnecessary radiation exposure are given. (orig.)

  6. Registration of chest PET and CT images. Fusion technique using the PET/Tr image by the respiration compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional registration of PET images of the chest with CT images is performed by rotating and shifting those images while used median lines and contours on axial images as the reference indexes. For the thoracic and the abdominal regions, therefore, the respiratory movements have prevented us from achieving satisfactory levels of registration reproducibility and accuracy. In order to solve this, we have analyzed respiratory movements of the chest and derived an image fusion method. Respiratory movements of the lung along each axis (X-axis: left-right, Y-axis: dorsoventral, and Z-axis: craniocaudal) during deep breathing were analyzed using CT-3D images. In addition, respiratory movements of the lung and thorax in the Y-axis and Z-axis directions during deep breathing and at rest were also analyzed by using an MR system that is the non-invasive method and allows for acquiring arbitrary tomographic images. Respiratory movements were compensated for on PET images of the lung. Moving average deviations in the Y-axis and Z-axis directions, which were obtained from the analytical result of respiration (30 samples), were used to derive the compensatory values. The analysis of CT-3D images showed that the movements in the X-axis direction were negligible. Registration of PET images with CT images was found useful when it performed on the sagittal planes. The analysis of MR images on sagittal planes revealed that the region extending from the apex of the lung to the posterior wall of the lung was useful for reference indexes for registration. The PET image by the compensation of the respiration transfer difference in the pulmonary hilum division was fusion on the CT image. In the pulmonary hilum division, the improvement in the accuracy of 3.6 mm in the dorsoventral and 6.1 mm in the craniocaudal direction was obtained in comparison with the fusion only of the reference index. The developed image fusion technique compensating the respiratory movements was found to be

  7. Pulmonary intimal sarcoma: a rare differential diagnosis for arterial filling defects on a chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a rare case of pulmonary intimal sarcoma mimicking pulmonary embolism in a 40-year-old woman. Although extremely rare, these tumors must be considered in patients who present inappropriate imaging findings that suggest embolism. Chest computed tomography is the modality of choice to determine the extent of the tumor. We present a female patient with suspected embolism that was in fact found to be an endothelial sarcoma of the pulmonary arteries

  8. Gradual progression of intrapulmonary lymph nodes associated with usual interstitial pneumonia in progressive systemic sclerosis on chest radiographs and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 40 year old female visited the clinic for evaluation of Raynaud's phenomenon for a period of four years. The initial chest radiograph showed a fine reticular density and ground glass opacity with lower lobe predominance. These findings are consistent interstitial fibrosis. Additionally, high resolution CT showed multiple, small, coexisting nodular opacities, ranging from 3 to 7 mm in size in both lungs. These nodules grew up to 1.5 cm and showed moderate enhancement. Because of the rareness of intrapulmonary lymph node in patient of progressive systemic sclerosis, we couldn't exclude the possibility of malignancy. These nodules are turned out to be intrapulmonary lymph nodes on video assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy

  9. Gradual progression of intrapulmonary lymph nodes associated with usual interstitial pneumonia in progressive systemic sclerosis on chest radiographs and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Joon Young; Chung, Myung Hee; Kim, Seon Mun [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Hyun [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    A 40 year old female visited the clinic for evaluation of Raynaud's phenomenon for a period of four years. The initial chest radiograph showed a fine reticular density and ground glass opacity with lower lobe predominance. These findings are consistent interstitial fibrosis. Additionally, high resolution CT showed multiple, small, coexisting nodular opacities, ranging from 3 to 7 mm in size in both lungs. These nodules grew up to 1.5 cm and showed moderate enhancement. Because of the rareness of intrapulmonary lymph node in patient of progressive systemic sclerosis, we couldn't exclude the possibility of malignancy. These nodules are turned out to be intrapulmonary lymph nodes on video assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy.

  10. Radiation safety education reduces the incidence of adult fingers on neonatal chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A previous audit revealed a high frequency of adult fingers visualised on neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) chest radiographs—representing an example of inappropriate occupational radiation exposure. Radiation safety education was provided to staff and we hypothesised that the education would reduce the frequency of adult fingers visualised on NICU chest radiographs. Two cross-sectional samples taken before and after the administration of the education were compared. We examined fingers visualised directly in the beam, fingers in the direct beam but eliminated by technologists editing the image, and fingers under the cones of the portable x-ray machine. There was a 46.2% reduction in fingers directly in the beam, 50.0% reduction in fingers directly in the beam but cropped out, and 68.4% reduction in fingers in the coned area. There was a 57.1% overall reduction in adult fingers visualised, which was statistically significant (Z value − 7.48, P < 0.0001). This study supports radiation safety education in minimising inappropriate occupational radiation exposure. (paper)

  11. Radiation exposure of children during radiodiagnostic examinations of chest in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higher individual somatic radiation risk in the younger age groups has been until now inadequately considered in radiation protection. It is therefore essential to develop appropriate radiation protection measures also in the field of diagnostic radiology for paediatric patients. The European Communities elaborated Guidelines on 'Quality Criteria for Radiodiagnostic Radiographic Images in Paediatrics'. Reference dose values for selected types of examinations and for 5 year old children were proposed. In our contribution we have tried to estimate the radiation load of children to 15 years, which underwent chest radiodiagnostic examinations during 1996 in a Slovak district. Our data of entrance surface doses were collected using measurements with TLD for 149 patients divided into 5 age categories at nine radiodiagnostic departments. The calculations of the total absorbed dose were performed using the measured ESD values integrated over the X-ray beam area, the conversion factors between the imparted energy and the dose-area product and the known irradiation parameters (kV, HVL, mass, etc.). The analysis of the obtained absorbed doses as a function of age for chest PA radiodiagnostic examinations has shown that the investigated Slovak radiodiagnostic centres use rather lower voltage techniques and the entrance surface doses are much higher than the proposed value of the EC. (author)

  12. CT imaging of congenital lung lesions: effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different iterative reconstruction techniques are available for use in pediatric computed tomography (CT), but these techniques have not been systematically evaluated in infants. To determine the effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance, image quality and radiation dose in infants undergoing CT evaluation for congenital lung lesions. A retrospective review of contrast-enhanced chest CT in infants (<1 year) with congenital lung lesions was performed. CT examinations were reviewed to document the type of lung lesion, vascular anatomy, image noise measurements and image reconstruction method. CTDIvol was used to calculate size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). CT findings were correlated with intraoperative and histopathological findings. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used to compare image noise measurements and radiation dose estimates between groups. Fifteen CT examinations used filtered back projection (FBP; mean age: 84 days), 15 used adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR; mean age: 93 days), and 11 used model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR; mean age: 98 days). Compared to operative findings, 13/15 (87%), 14/15 (93%) and 11/11 (100%) lesions were correctly characterized using FBP, ASiR and MBIR, respectively. Arterial anatomy was correctly identified in 12/15 (80%) using FBP, 13/15 (87%) using ASiR and 11/11 (100%) using MBIR. Image noise was less for MBIR vs. ASiR (P < 0.0001). Mean SSDE was different among groups (P = 0.003; FBP = 7.35 mGy, ASiR = 1.89 mGy, MBIR = 1.49 mGy). Congenital lung lesions can be adequately characterized in infants using iterative CT reconstruction techniques while maintaining image quality and lowering radiation dose. (orig.)

  13. CT imaging of congenital lung lesions: effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggerty, Jay E.; Smith, Ethan A.; Dillman, Jonathan R. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kunisaki, Shaun M. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Different iterative reconstruction techniques are available for use in pediatric computed tomography (CT), but these techniques have not been systematically evaluated in infants. To determine the effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance, image quality and radiation dose in infants undergoing CT evaluation for congenital lung lesions. A retrospective review of contrast-enhanced chest CT in infants (<1 year) with congenital lung lesions was performed. CT examinations were reviewed to document the type of lung lesion, vascular anatomy, image noise measurements and image reconstruction method. CTDI{sub vol} was used to calculate size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). CT findings were correlated with intraoperative and histopathological findings. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used to compare image noise measurements and radiation dose estimates between groups. Fifteen CT examinations used filtered back projection (FBP; mean age: 84 days), 15 used adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR; mean age: 93 days), and 11 used model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR; mean age: 98 days). Compared to operative findings, 13/15 (87%), 14/15 (93%) and 11/11 (100%) lesions were correctly characterized using FBP, ASiR and MBIR, respectively. Arterial anatomy was correctly identified in 12/15 (80%) using FBP, 13/15 (87%) using ASiR and 11/11 (100%) using MBIR. Image noise was less for MBIR vs. ASiR (P < 0.0001). Mean SSDE was different among groups (P = 0.003; FBP = 7.35 mGy, ASiR = 1.89 mGy, MBIR = 1.49 mGy). Congenital lung lesions can be adequately characterized in infants using iterative CT reconstruction techniques while maintaining image quality and lowering radiation dose. (orig.)

  14. PET/CT in radiation therapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regarding treatment planning in radiotherapy PET offers advantages in terms of tumor delineation and the description of biological processes. To define the real impact of this investigation in radiation treatment planning, following experimental, clinical and cost/benefit analysis are required. FDG-PET has a significant impact on GTV and PTV delineation in lung cancer and can detect lymph node involvement and differentiation of malignant tissue from atelectasis. In high-grade gliomas and meningiomas, methionine-PET helps to define the GTV and differentiate tumor from normal tissue. In head and neck cancer, cervix cancer and prostate cancer the value of FDG-PET for radiation treatment planning is still under investigation. For example, FDG-PET can be superior to CT and MRI in the detection of lymph node metastases in head and neck, unknown primary cancer and differentiation of viable tumor tissue after treatment. Therefore, it could play an important role in GTV definition and sparing of normal tissue. For other entities like gastro-intestinal cancer, lymphomas, sarcoma etc., the data of the literature are yet insufficient. The imaging of hypoxia, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, apoptosis and gene expression leads to the identification of different areas of a biologically heterogeneous tumor mass that can be individually targeted using IMRT. In addition, a biological dose distribution can be generated, the so-called dose painting. However, systematical experimental and clinical trials are necessary to validate this hypothesis. (orig.)

  15. Clinical indications and radiation doses to the conceptus associated with CT imaging in pregnancy: a retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woussen, S.; Vanbeckevoort, D.; Bosmans, H.; Oyen, R. [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Lopez-Rendon, X.; Zanca, F. [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-04-15

    To perform an internal audit at a university hospital with the aim of evaluating the number, clinical indication and operating procedure of computed tomography (CT) performed on pregnant patients and of estimating the radiation doses to the conceptus. A retrospective review was conducted of all CT examinations performed in a single centre on pregnant patients between January 2008 and July 2013. The radiation doses to the conceptus were estimated. The results were compared with published data. The number of CT examinations during pregnancy increased from 3-4 per year in 2008-2011 to 11 per year in 2012. The mean estimated conceptus radiation dose was considered negligible for CT of the head and cervical spine, being less than 0.01 mGy, and for CT of the chest, less than 0.1 mGy. The estimated conceptus radiation dose from abdominopelvic CT was on average 28.7 mGy (range 6.7-60.5 mGy). The number of CT scans of pregnant patients increased threefold during the last few years. Most clinical indications and doses were in line with good clinical practice and literature; only in two cases the dose to the conceptus was higher than 50 mGy. (orig.)

  16. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret;

    2013-01-01

    are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before...

  17. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript ... time! Spotlight Recently posted: Pediatric MRI Intravascular Ultrasound Video: Chest CT Video:Thyroid Ultrasound Video: Head CT ...

  18. Examination of the chest computed tomography scan condition optimization in consideration of the influence of the position of the arms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography automatic exposure control (CT-AEC) technique is calculated from a localizer radiograph. When we perform neck and chest CT examination, at first, we acquire localizer radiograph and neck images by placing the arm in a lowered position. Next, the arm is raised for the chest scan. Therefore, the localizer radiograph and subject information are different in the chest scan. In this situation, the chest scan with the use of the CT-AEC causes radiation over-dose. The purpose of this study is to optimize the CT-AEC by controlling noise index (NI), and make a chest CT scan condition considering the position of the arms. We measured the image noise (SD) in the phantom by using CT-AEC. In addition, dose length product (DLP) was recorded. Moreover, we examined the correlation with the clinical images. The results of our experiments show that radiation dose can be reduced with the image quality kept by controlling NI. (author)

  19. CT-based quantitative evaluation of radiation-induced lung fibrosis: a study of interobserver and intraobserver variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Jae Sung; Cho, Oyeon; Noh, O Kyu; Oh, Young Taek; Chun, Misun; Kim, Mi Hwa; Park, Jae Jin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The degree of radiation-induced lung fibrosis (RILF) can be measured quantitatively by fibrosis volume (VF) on chest computed tomography (CT) scan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interobserver and intraobserver variability in CT-based measurement of VF. We selected 10 non-small cell lung cancer patients developed with RILF after postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) and delineated VF on the follow-up chest CT scanned at more than 6 months after radiotherapy. Three radiation oncologists independently delineated VF to investigate the interobserver variability. Three times of delineation of VF was performed by two radiation oncologists for the analysis of intraobserver variability. We analysed the concordance index (CI) and inter/intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The median CI was 0.61 (range, 0.44 to 0.68) for interobserver variability and the median CIs for intraobserver variability were 0.69 (range, 0.65 to 0.79) and 0.61(range, 0.55 to 0.65) by two observers. The ICC for interobserver variability was 0.974 (p < 0.001) and ICCs for intraobserver variability were 0.996 (p < 0.001) and 0.991 (p < 0.001), respectively. CT-based measurement of VF with patients who received PORT was a highly consistent and reproducible quantitative method between and within observers.

  20. Feasibility of epicardial adipose tissue quantification in non-ECG-gated low-radiation-dose CT: comparison with prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is an important indicator of cardiovascular risk. This parameter is generally assessed on ECG-gated computed tomography (CT) images. Purpose: To evaluate feasibility and reliability of EAT quantification on non-gated thoracic low-radiation-dose CT examinations with respect to prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisition. Material and Methods: Sixty consecutive asymptomatic smokers (47 men; mean age 64 ± 9.8 years) underwent low-dose CT of the chest and prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisitions (64-slice dual-source CT). The two examinations were reconstructed with the same range, field of view, slice thickness, and convolution algorithm. Two independent observers blindly quantified EAT volume using commercially available software. Data were compared with paired sample Student t-test, concordance correlation coefficients (CCC), and Bland-Altman plots. Results: No statistically significant difference was observed for EAT volume quantification with low-dose-CT (141.7 ± 58.3 mL) with respect to ECG-gated CT (142.7 ± 57.9 mL). Estimation of CCC showed almost perfect concordance between the two techniques for EAT-volume assessment (CCC, 0.99; mean difference, 0.98 ± 5.1 mL). Inter-observer agreement for EAT volume estimation was CCC: 0.96 for low-dose-CT examinations and 0.95 for ECG-gated CT. Conclusion: Non-gated low-dose CT allows quantifying EAT with almost the same concordance and reliability as using dedicated prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisition protocols

  1. Feasibility of epicardial adipose tissue quantification in non-ECG-gated low-radiation-dose CT: comparison with prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon-Yarza, Isabel; Viteri-Ramirez, Guillermo; Saiz-Mendiguren, Ramon; Slon-Roblero, Pedro J.; Paramo, Maria [Dept. of Radiology, Clinica Univ. de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Bastarrika, Gorka [Dept. of Radiology, Clinica Univ. de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Cardiac Imaging Unit, Clinica Univ. de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain)], e-mail: bastarrika@unav.es

    2012-06-15

    Background: Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is an important indicator of cardiovascular risk. This parameter is generally assessed on ECG-gated computed tomography (CT) images. Purpose: To evaluate feasibility and reliability of EAT quantification on non-gated thoracic low-radiation-dose CT examinations with respect to prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisition. Material and Methods: Sixty consecutive asymptomatic smokers (47 men; mean age 64 {+-} 9.8 years) underwent low-dose CT of the chest and prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisitions (64-slice dual-source CT). The two examinations were reconstructed with the same range, field of view, slice thickness, and convolution algorithm. Two independent observers blindly quantified EAT volume using commercially available software. Data were compared with paired sample Student t-test, concordance correlation coefficients (CCC), and Bland-Altman plots. Results: No statistically significant difference was observed for EAT volume quantification with low-dose-CT (141.7 {+-} 58.3 mL) with respect to ECG-gated CT (142.7 {+-} 57.9 mL). Estimation of CCC showed almost perfect concordance between the two techniques for EAT-volume assessment (CCC, 0.99; mean difference, 0.98 {+-} 5.1 mL). Inter-observer agreement for EAT volume estimation was CCC: 0.96 for low-dose-CT examinations and 0.95 for ECG-gated CT. Conclusion: Non-gated low-dose CT allows quantifying EAT with almost the same concordance and reliability as using dedicated prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisition protocols.

  2. Crackle analysis for chest auscultation and comparison with high-resolution CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of our study was to clarify the correlation between respiratory sounds and the high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings of lung diseases. Respiratory sounds were recorded using a stethoscope in 41 patients with crackles. All had undergone inspiratory and expiratory CT. Subjects included 18 patients with interstitial pneumonia and 23 without interstitial pneumonia. Two parameters, two-cycle duration (2CD) and initial deflection width (IDW) of the ''crackle,'' were induced by time-expanded waveform analysis. Two radiologists independently assessed 11 HRCT findings. An evaluation was carried out to determine whether there was a significant difference in the two parameters between the presence and absence of each HRCT finding. The two parameters of crackles were significantly shorter in the interstitial pneumonia group than the non-interstitial pneumonia group. Ground-glass opacity, honeycombing, lung volume reduction, traction bronchiectasis, centrilobular nodules, emphysematous change, and attenuation and volume change between inspiratory and expiratory CT were correlated with one or two parameters in all patients, whereas the other three findings were not. Among the interstitial pneumonia group, traction bronchiectasis, emphysematous change, and attenuation and volume change between inspiratory and expiratory CT were significantly correlated with one or two parameters. Abnormal respiratory sounds were correlated with some HRCT findings. (author)

  3. The optimization of low-dose scanning protocols of 64-slice spiral CT in the adult chest: a multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the image quality of chest low dose CT (LDCT) using automatic exposure control (AEC) and constant current. control (CCC) and explore a more reasonable scanning protocol. Methods: Two hundred and eighty participants were examined with 64 CT scanner at 7 centers in China. All were divided into 4 groups. Two groups underwent LDCT using AEC with standard deviation set at 25 (Al) and 30 (A2) respectively and the tube current ranged from 10 mA to 80 mA. The other two groups underwent LDCT using CCC with tube current set at 40 mA (Cl) and 50 mA (C2) respectively. The axial and MPR images were evaluated by two radiologists who were blinded to the scanning protocols. The radiation dose, noise and the image quality of the 4 groups were compared and analyzed statistically. Differences of radiation dose and noise among groups were determined with variance analysis and t test, image quality with Mann- Whitney test and the consistency of diagnosis with Kappa test. Results: There was a significant lower DLP in AEC group than in CCC group [(82.62±40.31) vs (110.81±18.21) mGy · cm (F=56.88, P 0.05]. The noisy of AEC group was higher than that of CCC group both on lung window (41.50±9.58 vs 40.86±7.03) and mediastinum window (41.19±7.83 vs 40.92±9.89), but there was no significant difference (Flung=0.835, P=0.476, Fwediastinum=1.910, P=0.128). The quality score of axial image in AEC group was higher than that in CCC group (superior margin of the brachiocephalic vein level: 4.49± 0.56 vs 4.38±0.64, superior margin of the aortic arch: 4.86±0.23 vs 4.81±0.32, the right superior lobar bronchus Level: 4.87±0.27 vs 4.84±0.22, the right middle lobar bronchus Level: 4.90±0.25 vs 4.88±0.21) except on the right inferior pulmonary vein level (4.92±0.25 vs 4.93±0.17) and superior margin of the left diaphragmatic dome level (4.91±0.27 vs 4.93±0.22) on lung window, but no significant differences (F=0.076-1.748, P>0.05) were observed. A significant higher

  4. Aspects of radiation protection during chest X-radiography; Strahlenhygienische Aspekte bei der Roentgenuntersuchung des Thorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidenbusch, M.C.; Schneider, K. [Dr. von Haunersches Kinderspital, Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie - Kinderradiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Radiation safety in conventional X-ray diagnostics is based on the concepts of justification, optimization of an X-ray examination and limitation of the radiation exposure achieved during the examination. Optimization of an X-ray examination has to be considered as a multimodal process in which all technical components of the X-ray equipment have to be adapted to each other and also have to be adapted to the anthropometric characteristics of patients and the clinical indications. In this article the technical components of a conventional pediatric chest X-radiograph are presented, and recommendations for optimizing chest X-rays in children are provided. The following measures are of prime importance: correct x-ray beam limitation, using the posteroanterior projection when possible and not using anti-scatter grids in children under approximately 8 years old. In pediatric radiology chest x-rays that are taken not at the peak of inspiration can also be of some diagnostic significance. Optimization of an X-ray examination inevitably results in the limitation of radiation exposure. (orig.) [German] Die Strahlenhygiene in der konventionellen radiologischen Diagnostik basiert auf der Trias Rechtfertigung, Optimierung bzw. Limitierung der Roentgenuntersuchung bzw. Strahlenexposition. Die Optimierung einer Roentgenuntersuchung ist als multimodaler Prozess aufzufassen, in welchem saemtliche technische Komponenten der Roentgeneinrichtung sowohl miteinander als auch mit den anthropometrischen Eigenschaften des Patienten und der klinischen Fragestellung abzustimmen sind. Im vorliegenden Beitrag werden die technischen Komponenten bei der konventionellen Roentgenuntersuchung des paediatrischen Thorax in ihrer Beziehung zueinander dargestellt und Empfehlungen fuer eine Optimierung der konventionellen Thoraxaufnahme bei Kindern ausgesprochen. Die wichtigsten Massnahmen bestehen in einer korrekten Einblendung, in der Anfertigung der Aufnahmen im posteroanterioren Strahlengang und im

  5. Radiation dose and cancer risk from pediatric CT examinations on 64-slice CT: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To measure the radiation dose from CT scans in an anthropomorphic phantom using a 64-slice MDCT, and to estimate the associated cancer risk. Materials and methods: Organ doses were measured with a 5-year-old phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Four protocols; head CT, thorax CT, abdomen CT and pelvis CT were studied. Cancer risks, in the form of lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of cancer incidence, were estimated by linear extrapolation using the organ radiation doses and the LAR data. Results: The effective doses for head, thorax, abdomen and pelvis CT, were 0.7 mSv, 3.5 mSv, 3.0 mSv, 1.3 mSv respectively. The organs with the highest dose were; for head CT, salivary gland (22.33 mGy); for thorax CT, breast (7.89 mGy); for abdomen CT, colon (6.62 mGy); for pelvis CT, bladder (4.28 mGy). The corresponding LARs for boys and girls were 0.015-0.053% and 0.034-0.155% respectively. The organs with highest LARs were; for head CT, thyroid gland (0.003% for boys, 0.015% for girls); for thorax CT, lung for boys (0.014%) and breast for girls (0.069%); for abdomen CT, colon for boys (0.017%) and lung for girls (0.016%); for pelvis CT, bladder for both boys and girls (0.008%). Conclusion: The effective doses from these common pediatric CT examinations ranged from 0.7 mSv to 3.5 mSv and the associated lifetime cancer risks were found to be up to 0.16%, with some organs of higher radiosensitivity including breast, thyroid gland, colon and lungs.

  6. Comparative evaluation of clinical history, chest radiographs, standard CT, thin-section CT, reference-phantom CT in the classification of solitary pulmonary nodule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty-five consecutive patients with solitary pulmonary nodules were evaluated by CT (General Electric 9800 instrument, 512-pixel matrix) performed using standard 10-mm sections, thin (1.5-mm) sections, and a commercially available CIRS model III phantom. For each of the techniques a consensus score was established as to whether the nodule was benign, indeterminate, or malignant, at three levels of confidence. Of the 35 proved nodules, 29 were benign and six malignant. When CT was performed using the phantom, 68% of benign nodules were correctly classified. None of the nodules classified as benign on thin-section CT or phantom CT proved to be malignant. Thin-section CT alone correctly indicated a benign process in 52% and a malignant process in 83% of pertinent cases. Standard-section CT was accurate only in 20% of benign and 33% of malignant nodules. Although thin-section CT is better than standard section CT for the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules, phantom CT adds further to the characterization of the benign process. A diagnostic algorithms is suggested

  7. Volume-monitored chest CT: a simplified method for obtaining motion-free images near full inspiratory and end expiratory lung volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Kathryn S. [The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Long, Frederick R. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, The Children' s Radiological Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Flucke, Robert L. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Castile, Robert G. [The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Center for Perinatal Research, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Lung inflation and respiratory motion during chest CT affect diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility. To describe a simple volume-monitored (VM) method for performing reproducible, motion-free full inspiratory and end expiratory chest CT examinations in children. Fifty-two children with cystic fibrosis (mean age 8.8 {+-} 2.2 years) underwent pulmonary function tests and inspiratory and expiratory VM-CT scans (1.25-mm slices, 80-120 kVp, 16-40 mAs) according to an IRB-approved protocol. The VM-CT technique utilizes instruction from a respiratory therapist, a portable spirometer and real-time documentation of lung volume on a computer. CT image quality was evaluated for achievement of targeted lung-volume levels and for respiratory motion. Children achieved 95% of vital capacity during full inspiratory imaging. For end expiratory scans, 92% were at or below the child's end expiratory level. Two expiratory exams were judged to be at suboptimal volumes. Two inspiratory (4%) and three expiratory (6%) exams showed respiratory motion. Overall, 94% of scans were performed at optimal volumes without respiratory motion. The VM-CT technique is a simple, feasible method in children as young as 4 years to achieve reproducible high-quality full inspiratory and end expiratory lung CT images. (orig.)

  8. Volume-monitored chest CT: a simplified method for obtaining motion-free images near full inspiratory and end expiratory lung volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung inflation and respiratory motion during chest CT affect diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility. To describe a simple volume-monitored (VM) method for performing reproducible, motion-free full inspiratory and end expiratory chest CT examinations in children. Fifty-two children with cystic fibrosis (mean age 8.8 ± 2.2 years) underwent pulmonary function tests and inspiratory and expiratory VM-CT scans (1.25-mm slices, 80-120 kVp, 16-40 mAs) according to an IRB-approved protocol. The VM-CT technique utilizes instruction from a respiratory therapist, a portable spirometer and real-time documentation of lung volume on a computer. CT image quality was evaluated for achievement of targeted lung-volume levels and for respiratory motion. Children achieved 95% of vital capacity during full inspiratory imaging. For end expiratory scans, 92% were at or below the child's end expiratory level. Two expiratory exams were judged to be at suboptimal volumes. Two inspiratory (4%) and three expiratory (6%) exams showed respiratory motion. Overall, 94% of scans were performed at optimal volumes without respiratory motion. The VM-CT technique is a simple, feasible method in children as young as 4 years to achieve reproducible high-quality full inspiratory and end expiratory lung CT images. (orig.)

  9. Study on scan conditions in the chest by four multi detector-row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our hospital, Toshiba's Aquilion (AQ) and Siemens' Volume Zoom (VZ) that are both four multi detector-row CT (MDCT) are working at present. In the lung CT, when pulmonary nodules or diffuse lung diseases are detected on CT images obtained by the use of beam collimation of 2.0 mm x 4 in AQ or 2.5 mm x 4 in VZ, the patient needs additional scans by using thinner beam collimation. However, this technique involves a problem that cannot scan the same target region as the first examination. High-resolution CT (HRCT) is generally defined to an image obtained by slice thickness of 1 mm to 3 mm. In this paper, however, we especially refers HRCT as an image obtained by slice thickness of 1 mm or less in the case of acquiring more detailed patient's data. Beam collimation of two MDCT scanners was set to 1.0 mm x 4 in order to efficiently employ a feature of MDCT that images of various slice thickness obtained by one scan can be reconstructed. We compared the images reconstructed from 5 mm slice-thickness images and 1 mm slice-thickness images in terms of changing of standard deviation (SD) and the occurrence of artifacts. As the results, the increase of SD and streak artifacts were confirmed under some conditions. The beam collimation of 1 mm x 4 needed to increase helical pitch, allowing for the patient's breath-holding time. We conclude to be useful for setting the beam collimation to 1 mm x 4, considering the reduction of the patient's exposure dose, the improvement of shape reappearance, and a shortening in examination time. (author)

  10. Emphysema Quantification Using Low Dose Chest CT: Changes in Follow-Up Examinations of Asymptomatic Smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Eun Ho; Sun, Joo Sung; Kang, Doo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kwang Joo; Park, Kyung Joo [Dept. of Pulmolary Medicine, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    To evaluate the changes of emphysema quantification in a follow-up low dose CT compared with pulmonary function test (PFT) results in asymptomatic smokers. We selected 66 asymptomatic smokers (> 40 years old) who underwent a follow-up low dose CT at least one year after the first CT as well as PFT within the same time period. Emphysema quantification was performed using an automated measurement software and an emphysema index (EI) was calculated using multiple threshold values (-970--900 HU). The interval change of EI ({Delta} EI) was compared with the change in the PFT values. Mean follow-up %forced expiratory volume in 1 second (88.1), %forced vital capacity (FVC) (89.5) and forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% of vital capacity (3.21) were significantly lower compared with the values of initial tests (93.3, 93.1, 3.48). The mean EIs (2.4-25.6%) increased on follow-up CTs compared with initial EIs (2.1-24.5%), though the increase was not statistically significant. In a group with a follow-up period of 2 years or more (n = 32), EI significantly increased when using -900 HU as the threshold. The ({Delta} EIs were poorly correlated with the ({Delta} PFT values, but significantly correlated with ({Delta} FVC (r = -0.32--0.27). Emphysema quantification using low dose CT was not effective for the evaluation of short-term changes in less than a 2-year period, but may be used for long term follow-up series in asymptomatic smokers.

  11. CT saber-sheath trachea. Correlation with clinical, chest radiographic and functional findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigaux, J.P. (Services de Radiologie, de Pneumologie, Cliniques Universitaires UCL Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium)); Hermes, G. (Services de Radiologie, de Pneumologie, Cliniques Universitaires UCL Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium)); Dubois, P. (Services de Radiologie, de Pneumologie, Cliniques Universitaires UCL Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium)); Beers, B. van (Services de Radiologie, de Pneumologie, Cliniques Universitaires UCL Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium)); Delaunois, L. (Services de Radiologie, de Pneumologie, Cliniques Universitaires UCL Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium)); Jamart, J. (Services de Radiologie, de Pneumologie, Cliniques Universitaires UCL Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium))

    1994-05-01

    The diagnosis of saber-sheath trachea is easy at CT due to its cross-sectional imaging, but the significance of this CT sign has not been evaluated in the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Various signs of COPD were compared between a series of 20 patients with a saber-sheath trachea at CT (tracheal index [<=]66%) and a group of 20 pneumologic control patients without saber-sheath trachea (tracheal index [>=]70%). These signs include clinical and standard radiographic indices of COPD, sternum-spine distance and 3 functional tests of COPD: forced expiratory volume in one second, carbon monoxide diffusing lung capacity, and funtional residual capacity (FRC). A significant difference was found between the 2 groups, concerning the values of FRC and of sternum-spine distance (p<10[sup -2]). The tracheal index was significantly correlated with the FRC values and with the sternum-spine distance. No other significant difference was observed. It is concluded that saber-sheath trachea is basically a sign of hyperinflation. (orig./MG).

  12. Quantification of pneumothorax volume on chest radiographs: comparison between the collins' and the axel's methods with three-dimensional CT as the standard of reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was twofold. In a preliminary study, we evaluated the accuracy of 3-D (three-dimensional) CT for the estimation of pneumothorax volume and for providing the optimal postprocessing method for clinical study. In the clinical study, we determined which of the two methods, Collins' and Axel's, was more accurate for the estimation of pneumothorax volume, as seen on chest radiographs, using 3-D CT as the standard of reference. In the preliminary study, 3-D CT was applied to phantoms and to four patients with pneumothorax using two different postprocessing methods, manual contour delineation and thresholding. In the clinical study, 3-D CT was performed in 13 patients with pneumothorax. For the purpose of evaluating conventional radiographs, a localizer scan was used for comparing the accuracy of Collins' method with that of Axel's method, with 3-D CT as the standard of reference. The preliminary study revealed that 3-D CT estimated pneumothorax volume with great accuracy and that manual contour delineation and thresholding measured volume equally well. Because of the shorter postprocessing time required with thresholding than with manual contour delineation (5 min versus 30 min), the former was used during clinical study. The results of this indicated close correlation between the measurements obtained using Collins' method on chest radiographs and those obtained by 3-D CT(r=0.95, p0.05). 3-D CT can estimate pneumothorax volume with great accuracy. Collins' method is superior to Axel's method for the quantification of pneumothorax volume as seen on chest radiographs

  13. Image quality of thickened slabs in multislice CT chest examinations: postprocessing vs. direct reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Postprocessing offers the possibility of real-time creation of thickened slabs from a set of thin slices. This allows the interactive change from thick to thin slices for better evaluation of unclear lesions. As a result the clinical workflow of MSCT evaluation can be improved. However, to be able to apply this postprocessing software in the clinical routine, degradations in the image quality (compared to standard original reconstructed images) have to be avoided. The purpose of this study was to compare the image quality of thickened slabs from MSCT chest examinations that have either been directly reconstructed from the raw data or have been retrospectively generated via postprocessing. Materials and Methods: Chest MSCT examinations of 20 patients (mean age: 56 years) were performed on a 16-slice MSCT scanner (Mx8000IDT16, Philips, Best, Netherlands) using the following scan parameters: 120 kV, 94 effective mAs, 16 x 1.5 mm collimation, 512 x 512 matrix, field of view 371 x 371 mm, (CTDI-vol 6.3 mGy, DLP = 210 mGyxcm). Slices with a thickness of 3 and 5 mm were generated for each examination both directly from the raw data and via postprocessing. Corresponding images from postprocessing and direct reconstruction (lung/soft tissue window) were evaluated by two radiologists with respect to 5 criteria on the basis of a five-point scale: organ structure, contour of small objects, contrast, image noise and artifacts. Differences between both data sets regarding image quality were assessed for each of the 5 criteria using a Wilcoxon test with Bonferroni correction. In addition, image noise was analyzed quantitatively in a region of interest in the aorta. Results: For the lung and soft tissue window, both reviewers and all criteria, no differences in image quality were detected between the thickened slices obtained via direct reconstruction and the postprocessing method. In 96 % and 95 % of the cases images of the two reconstruction methods were graded

  14. Serial chest CT findings in interstitial lung disease associated with polymyositis-dermatomyositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: A retrospective study was carried out in two institutions to determine serial changes in the pattern, distribution, and extent of interstitial lung disease (ILD) associated with polymyositis (PM)-dermatomyositis (DM) using HRCT. Subjects and methods: Twenty patients with PM-DM and clinical suspicion of ILD who underwent at least two serial HRCT examinations were retrospectively evaluated by two readers. Patients were classified according to the dominant CT pattern which was correlated with clinical evolution and underlying histology when available (n=6). Results: Patients were classified into four groups according to the dominant pattern: ground-glass attenuation and reticulation (group 1, n=9); honeycombing (group 2, n=4); airspace consolidation (group 3, n=4), and normal or almost normal lung (group 4, n=3). Under medical treatment, serial HRCT showed that the extent of areas of ground-glass opacities (group 1) decreased in five patients, stabilized in two, and increased in two. Pathologic findings demonstrated usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) in two cases and unspecified interstitial pneumonia in one. In group 2, extent of honeycombing increased in three cases and stabilized in one. In group 3, dramatic resolution of airspace consolidation occurred in three cases. Clinical deterioration with extensive consolidation at CT and diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) at histology occurred in one patient of each of the three previous groups. Lesions stayed invisible or progressed slightly in the fourth group. Conclusion: In ILD associated with PM-DM, clinical deterioration and DAD in the follow-up can be observed whatever the HRCT pattern. However, unfavorable evolution is constant when honeycombing is present at the initial CT

  15. Automatic classication of pulmonary function in COPD patients using trachea analysis in chest CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rikxoort, E. M.; de Jong, P. A.; Mets, O. M.; van Ginneken, B.

    2012-03-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a chronic lung disease that is characterized by airflow limitation. COPD is clinically diagnosed and monitored using pulmonary function testing (PFT), which measures global inspiration and expiration capabilities of patients and is time-consuming and labor-intensive. It is becoming standard practice to obtain paired inspiration-expiration CT scans of COPD patients. Predicting the PFT results from the CT scans would alleviate the need for PFT testing. It is hypothesized that the change of the trachea during breathing might be an indicator of tracheomalacia in COPD patients and correlate with COPD severity. In this paper, we propose to automatically measure morphological changes in the trachea from paired inspiration and expiration CT scans and investigate the influence on COPD GOLD stage classification. The trachea is automatically segmented and the trachea shape is encoded using the lengths of rays cast from the center of gravity of the trachea. These features are used in a classifier, combined with emphysema scoring, to attempt to classify subjects into their COPD stage. A database of 187 subjects, well distributed over the COPD GOLD stages 0 through 4 was used for this study. The data was randomly divided into training and test set. Using the training scans, a nearest mean classifier was trained to classify the subjects into their correct GOLD stage using either emphysema score, tracheal shape features, or a combination. Combining the proposed trachea shape features with emphysema score, the classification performance into GOLD stages improved with 11% to 51%. In addition, an 80% accuracy was achieved in distinguishing healthy subjects from COPD patients.

  16. Accuracy study of different registration methods for cone beam CT and planning CT in image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of image registration based on bony structure (RBS) and grey-scale (RGS) in positioning correction of radiation treatment, and their reliability in clinical application. Methods: Setup errors of anthropomorphic phantom (chest and abdomen, head and neck) were simulated with x-, y-, z-directions.CBCT images were acquired for each simulation and registered with planning CT. using bony structure and grey-scale registration separately. Geometry accuracy of all registration were then obtained and analyzed. Results: The errors of RBS and RGS in x-, y-, z-directions were (-0.65 ±0.22) mm and (-0.70±0.17) mm (P=0.00), (1.02 ±0.27) mm and (0.90±0.20) mm (P=0.00), (1.46 ± 0.53) mm and (1.47 ± 0.47) mm (P=0.54) for head and neck positioning; with (0.82±0.33) mm and (0.79±0.18) mm (P=0.03), (2.45±1.17) mm and (1.61 ±0.84) mm (P=0.00), (1.44 ± 3.25) mm and (0.19 ± 1.11) mm (P=0.00) for chest and abdomen positioning. Conclusions: RGS is more accurate and stable than RBS. The accuracy of image registration is a little better for head and neck than that for chest and abdomen. The algorithms of image registration used in clinical application needs to be tested independently and the systematic error needs to be corrected before applying in different treatment techniques according to their accuracy requirement. (authors)

  17. Technique and clinical applications of full-inflation and end-exhalation controlled-ventilation chest CT in infants and young children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. The inability of young children to cooperate with breath holding limits the usefulness of chest CT. Objective. To describe the technique and utility of a non-invasive method called controlled-ventilation CT (CVCT) for obtaining motion-free full-inflation and end-exhalation images of the lung in infants and young children. Materials and methods. Eighty-seven children (ages 1 week to 5 years, mean 2 years) underwent CVCT of the chest during suspended respiration at full-lung inflation and end-exhalation for a variety of clinical indications. Respiratory pauses were produced using conscious sedation and positive-pressure face-mask ventilation. Forty-one of 87 children had recordings of respiratory motion during CVCT. Results. Respiratory pause lengths increased with age (P < 0.003), were highly reproducible (r = 0.85), and lasted sufficiently long to be practical for full-inflation (24 ± 9 s) and end-exhalation (12 ± 5 s) CT scanning. Full-inflation CVCT was useful in evaluating tracheal and bronchial stenosis, bronchial wall thickening, early bronchiectasis, bronchial fistula, extent of interstitial fibrosis, and lung nodules. End-exhalation CVCT was useful in evaluating tracheomalacia and air trapping. Conclusion. Controlled-ventilation chest CT is a practical and reliable technique that promises to be clinically useful for a number of clinical indications in infants and young children. (orig.)

  18. Chest computed tomography using iterative reconstruction vs filtered back projection (Part 2): image quality of low-dose CT examinations in 80 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontana, Francois; Pagniez, Julien; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Hachulla, Anne-Lise; Remy, Jacques [University Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain [University Lille Nord de France, Department of Medical Statistics, Lille (France); Flohr, Thomas [Computed Tomography Division, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim (Germany); Remy-Jardin, Martine [University Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); Hospital Calmette, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Lille cedex (France)

    2011-03-15

    To evaluate the image quality of an iterative reconstruction algorithm (IRIS) in low-dose chest CT in comparison with standard-dose filtered back projection (FBP) CT. Eighty consecutive patients referred for a follow-up chest CT examination of the chest, underwent a low-dose CT examination (Group 2) in similar technical conditions to those of the initial examination, (Group 1) except for the milliamperage selection and the replacement of regular FBP reconstruction by iterative reconstructions using three (Group 2a) and five iterations (Group 2b). Despite a mean decrease of 35.5% in the dose-length-product, there was no statistically significant difference between Group 2a and Group 1 in the objective noise, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios and distribution of the overall image quality scores. Compared to Group 1, objective image noise in Group 2b was significantly reduced with increased SNR and CNR and a trend towards improved image quality. Iterative reconstructions using three iterations provide similar image quality compared with the conventionally used FBP reconstruction at 35% less dose, thus enabling dose reduction without loss of diagnostic information. According to our preliminary results, even higher dose reductions than 35% may be feasible by using more than three iterations. (orig.)

  19. Thin-section chest CT findings in systemic lupus erythematosus with antiphospholipid syndrome: A comparison with systemic lupus erythematosus without antiphospholipid syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess thin-section chest CT findings in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), in comparison with SLE without APS. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and thin-section CT findings of 17 consecutive patients with an established diagnosis of SLE with APS, comparing with 37 consecutive SLE patients without APS, between 2004 and 2008, and patients who had other autoimmune disease, such as Sjögren syndrome, were excluded. No significant differences were seen between the two groups in age, gender, smoking habits, or history of steroid pulse and biological therapy. CT images of 2 mm thickness obtained with a 16- or 64-detector row CT were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists in consensus on ultra high-resolution gray-scale monitors. Results: The frequency of thin-section CT abnormalities was higher in SLE with APS group (82%) than in SLE without APS group (43%). Ground-glass opacity (59%), architectural distortion (47%), reticulation (41%), enlarged peripheral pulmonary artery (29%), and mosaic attenuation (29%) were significantly more common in the SLE with APS group than in the SLE without APS group (Fisher's exact test, p < 0.01). Conclusion: SLE patients with APS have increased prevalence of thin-section chest CT abnormalities than those without APS.

  20. Comparison of chest-CT findings of Influenza virus-associated pneumonia in immunocompetent vs. immunocompromised patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by Influenza viruses do not significantly differ between immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients or between different types and subtypes of Influenza virus. • Patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by Influenza viruses seem to be interchangeable which might in part explain the great overlap in CT-imaging findings that has been reported in the past. • Interestingly, pattern transition from interstitial into airway-centric pattern seems to be frequent in immunocompromised patients receiving specific antiviral therapy, whereas the conversion of the airway-centric pattern into an interstitial pattern was observed more frequent in immunocompetent patients developing ARDS. - Abstract: Purpose: To retrospectively compare CT-patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by different Influenza virus types and subtypes in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients for possible discrimination. Materials and methods: Retrospective database search at our institution yielded 237 patients who were tested positive for Influenza virus type A or type B by bronchoalveolar lavage between January 2009 and April 2014. Fifty-six of these patients (female 26; male 30; median age 55.8 y, range 17–86 y; SD ± 14.4 y) underwent chest-HRCT due to a more severe clinical course of pulmonary infection. We registered all CT-findings compatible with pulmonary infection classifying them as airway predominant (tree-in-bud, centrilobular nodules, bronchial wall thickening ± peribronchial ground-glass opacity and consolidation) vs. interstitial-parenchymal predominant (bilateral, symmetrical GGO, consolidation, crazy paving and/or interlobular septal thickening). Twenty-six patients (46.4%) had follow-up CT-studies (0.78 mean, SD ± 5.8 scans). Results: Thirty-six patients were immunocompromised (group I) whereas 20 patients were immunocompetent (group II). An airway-centric pattern of infection was found in 15 patients (group

  1. Comparison of chest-CT findings of Influenza virus-associated pneumonia in immunocompetent vs. immunocompromised patients

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    Kloth, C., E-mail: christopher.kloth@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Forler, S.; Gatidis, S. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Beck, R. [Institute of Medical Virology and Epidemiology of Viral Diseases, Eberhard-Karls-University, Elfriede-Aulhorn-Straße 6, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Spira, D.; Nikolaou, K.; Horger, M. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by Influenza viruses do not significantly differ between immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients or between different types and subtypes of Influenza virus. • Patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by Influenza viruses seem to be interchangeable which might in part explain the great overlap in CT-imaging findings that has been reported in the past. • Interestingly, pattern transition from interstitial into airway-centric pattern seems to be frequent in immunocompromised patients receiving specific antiviral therapy, whereas the conversion of the airway-centric pattern into an interstitial pattern was observed more frequent in immunocompetent patients developing ARDS. - Abstract: Purpose: To retrospectively compare CT-patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by different Influenza virus types and subtypes in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients for possible discrimination. Materials and methods: Retrospective database search at our institution yielded 237 patients who were tested positive for Influenza virus type A or type B by bronchoalveolar lavage between January 2009 and April 2014. Fifty-six of these patients (female 26; male 30; median age 55.8 y, range 17–86 y; SD ± 14.4 y) underwent chest-HRCT due to a more severe clinical course of pulmonary infection. We registered all CT-findings compatible with pulmonary infection classifying them as airway predominant (tree-in-bud, centrilobular nodules, bronchial wall thickening ± peribronchial ground-glass opacity and consolidation) vs. interstitial-parenchymal predominant (bilateral, symmetrical GGO, consolidation, crazy paving and/or interlobular septal thickening). Twenty-six patients (46.4%) had follow-up CT-studies (0.78 mean, SD ± 5.8 scans). Results: Thirty-six patients were immunocompromised (group I) whereas 20 patients were immunocompetent (group II). An airway-centric pattern of infection was found in 15 patients (group

  2. Attenuation-based automatic kilovolt (kV)-selection in computed tomography of the chest: Effects on radiation exposure and image quality

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    Eller, Achim; Wuest, Wolfgang; Scharf, Michael; Brand, Michael [Department of Radiology, University Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, Stephan [Department of Cardiology, University Erlangen (Germany); Uder, Michael [Department of Radiology, University Erlangen (Germany); Imaging Science Institute, Erlangen (Germany); Lell, Michael M., E-mail: Michael.lell@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Radiology, University Erlangen (Germany); Imaging Science Institute, Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Objectives: To evaluate an automated attenuation-based kV-selection in computed tomography of the chest in respect to radiation dose and image quality, compared to a standard 120 kV protocol. Materials and methods: 104 patients were examined using a 128-slice scanner. Fifty examinations (58 ± 15 years, study group) were performed using the automated adaption of tube potential (100–140 kV), based on the attenuation profile of the scout scan, 54 examinations (62 ± 14 years, control group) with fixed 120 kV. Estimated CT dose index (CTDI) of the software-proposed setting was compared with a 120 kV protocol. After the scan CTDI volume (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) were recorded. Image quality was assessed by region of interest (ROI) measurements, subjective image quality by two observers with a 4-point scale (3 – excellent, 0 – not diagnostic). Results: The algorithm selected 100 kV in 78% and 120 kV in 22%. Overall CTDIvol reduction was 26.6% (34% in 100 kV) overall DLP reduction was 22.8% (32.1% in 100 kV) (all p < 0.001). Subjective image quality was excellent in both groups. Conclusion: The attenuation based kV-selection algorithm enables relevant dose reduction (∼27%) in chest-CT while keeping image quality parameters at high levels.

  3. Attenuation-based automatic kilovolt (kV)-selection in computed tomography of the chest: Effects on radiation exposure and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To evaluate an automated attenuation-based kV-selection in computed tomography of the chest in respect to radiation dose and image quality, compared to a standard 120 kV protocol. Materials and methods: 104 patients were examined using a 128-slice scanner. Fifty examinations (58 ± 15 years, study group) were performed using the automated adaption of tube potential (100–140 kV), based on the attenuation profile of the scout scan, 54 examinations (62 ± 14 years, control group) with fixed 120 kV. Estimated CT dose index (CTDI) of the software-proposed setting was compared with a 120 kV protocol. After the scan CTDI volume (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) were recorded. Image quality was assessed by region of interest (ROI) measurements, subjective image quality by two observers with a 4-point scale (3 – excellent, 0 – not diagnostic). Results: The algorithm selected 100 kV in 78% and 120 kV in 22%. Overall CTDIvol reduction was 26.6% (34% in 100 kV) overall DLP reduction was 22.8% (32.1% in 100 kV) (all p < 0.001). Subjective image quality was excellent in both groups. Conclusion: The attenuation based kV-selection algorithm enables relevant dose reduction (∼27%) in chest-CT while keeping image quality parameters at high levels

  4. Image quality assessment of ultra low-dose chest CT using sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction

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    Lee, So Won; Shim, Sung Shine; Lee, Jeong Kyong [School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yookyung [School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Department of Radiology, 1071, Anyangcheon-ro, Yangcheon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seok Jeong; Ryu, Yon Ju; Chang, Jung Hyun [School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Division of Pulmonology in the Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    To assess the image quality of ultra-low-dose computed tomography (ULDCT) using sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) compared to reduced dose CT (RDCT). Eighty-one consecutive patients underwent non-enhanced ULDCT using 80 kVp and 30 mAs and contrast-enhanced RDCT using automated tube potential selection and tube current modulation. CT images were reconstructed with SAFIRE. Image noise and subjective image quality of normal structures and various pulmonary lesions were assessed. The mean effective doses were 0.29 ± 0.03 and 2.88 ± 1.11 mSv for ULDCT and RDCT, respectively. ULDCT had significantly higher noise (p < 0.001). Image quality of five normal structures was diagnostic in 91.1 % of ULDCT and 100 % of RDCT. With ULDCT, the frequencies of non-diagnostic image quality were 2.0 (1/50), 4.6 (13/280), 25.5 (14/55), and 40.0 (8/20)% for BMIs of < 20, 20-25, 25-30, and >30. In the assessment of pulmonary lesions, non-diagnostic image quality was observed for 11.2 % of all lesions, 60.9 % of decreased attenuation (significantly more frequent for upper lung lesions), and 23.5 % of ground-glass nodules. ULDCT generates diagnostic images in patients with a BMI ≤25, but is of limited use for lesions with decreased attenuation, ground-glass nodules, or those located in the upper lobe. (orig.)

  5. The relationship between aortic calcification on chest radiography and ionizing radiation in RERF's Adult Health Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aortic calcification has been reported to be an indicator of atherosclerosis and a predictor of coronary heart disease. However, the relationship between aortic calcification and conventional coronary risk factors or recently reported coronary risk factors including ionizing radiation, which is one kind of oxidative stress, has not been established. Objective: To investigate the relationship between aortic calcification and ionizing radiation in a longitudinal study design. The study cohort comprises the Radiation Effects Research Foundation's Adult Health Study participants which include atomic-bomb survivors and sex- and age-matched controls. A total of 522 men and 938 women identified as not having aortic calcification based on plain chest X-ray examinations at baseline examination between 1991 and 1993 were assessed regarding the presence of aortic calcification (mild/ severe calcification) about 10 years later. The relationship between cumulative incidence of aortic calcification and atomic-bomb radiation was analyzed using logistic regression analysis after adjusting for sex, age, and other coronary risk factors such as blood pressure, total cholesterol, and inflammation markers. Age-adjusted cumulative incidence of aortic calcification showed a possible increase with atomic-bomb radiation dose for both total aortic calcification and severe aortic calcification. But after adjusting for other coronary risk factors such as smoking, SBP, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, and leukocyte neutropils, radiation dose was not a significant predictor of cumulative incidence of severe aortic calcification. Age-adjusted increase of cumulative incidence of aortic calcification with atomic-bomb radiation dose suggests ionizing radiation is one predictor of atheroscelerosis. Nevertheless, its predictive impact may not be as significant as conventional coronary risk factors

  6. Radiation Protection Challenges and Trends in PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is now an essential imaging modality in various clinical circumstances, especially in the management of oncology patients. Customization of therapy through PET/CT imaging is actually becoming an indispensable process in the strategy of oncological management, that is, initial diagnosis and staging, treatment selection, planning of external beam radiation therapy, and follow-up and detection of recurrence after therapy. Standardization of PET/CT images for therapy response assessment and application of high precision radiation therapy planning will require strict quality control of the imaging. Considering the increasing number of PET/CT procedures and such higher imaging quality, measures of radiation protection for both patients and staff members should evolve to sustain the application of this modality in medical practices

  7. Radiation dose from multidetector CT studies in children: results from the first Italian nationwide survey

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    Granata, Claudio [IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Origgi, Daniela; Palorini, Federica [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Department of Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); Matranga, Domenica [University of Palermo, Department of Sciences for Health Promotion and Mother and Child Care ' ' G. D' Alessandro' ' , Palermo (Italy); Salerno, Sergio [University of Palermo, Department of Medical and Forensic Biopathology and Biotechnologies, Section of Radiology, Palermo (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) scanners have contributed to the widespread use of CT in paediatric imaging. However, concerns are raised for the associated radiation exposure. Very few surveys on radiation exposure from MDCT studies in children are available. The aim of this study was to outline the status of radiation exposure in children from MDCT practice in Italy. In this retrospective multicentre study we asked Italian radiology units with an MDCT scanner with at least 16 slices to provide dosimetric and acquisition parameters of CT examinations in three age groups (1-5, 6-10, 11-15 years) for studies of head, chest and abdomen. The dosimetric results were reported in terms of third-quartile volumetric CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) (mGy), size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) (mGy), dose length product (DLP) (mGy cm), and total DLP for multiphase studies. These results were compared with paediatric European and adult Italian published data. A multivariate analysis assessed the association of CTDI{sub vol} with patient characteristics and scanning modalities. We collected data from 993 MDCT examinations performed at 25 centres. For age groups 1-5 years, 6-10 years and 11-15 years, the CTDI{sub vol}, DLP and total DLP values were statistically significantly below the values observed in our analogous national survey in adults, although the difference decreased with increasing age. CTDI{sub vol} variability among centres was statistically significant (variance = 0.07; 95% confidence interval = 0.03-0.16; P < 0.001). This study reviewed practice in Italian centres performing paediatric imaging with MDCT scanners. The variability of doses among centres suggests that the use of standardised CT protocols should be encouraged. (orig.)

  8. Radiation dose from multidetector CT studies in children: results from the first Italian nationwide survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) scanners have contributed to the widespread use of CT in paediatric imaging. However, concerns are raised for the associated radiation exposure. Very few surveys on radiation exposure from MDCT studies in children are available. The aim of this study was to outline the status of radiation exposure in children from MDCT practice in Italy. In this retrospective multicentre study we asked Italian radiology units with an MDCT scanner with at least 16 slices to provide dosimetric and acquisition parameters of CT examinations in three age groups (1-5, 6-10, 11-15 years) for studies of head, chest and abdomen. The dosimetric results were reported in terms of third-quartile volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol) (mGy), size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) (mGy), dose length product (DLP) (mGy cm), and total DLP for multiphase studies. These results were compared with paediatric European and adult Italian published data. A multivariate analysis assessed the association of CTDIvol with patient characteristics and scanning modalities. We collected data from 993 MDCT examinations performed at 25 centres. For age groups 1-5 years, 6-10 years and 11-15 years, the CTDIvol, DLP and total DLP values were statistically significantly below the values observed in our analogous national survey in adults, although the difference decreased with increasing age. CTDIvol variability among centres was statistically significant (variance = 0.07; 95% confidence interval = 0.03-0.16; P < 0.001). This study reviewed practice in Italian centres performing paediatric imaging with MDCT scanners. The variability of doses among centres suggests that the use of standardised CT protocols should be encouraged. (orig.)

  9. Radiation induced skin cancer the chest wall 30 years later from breast cancer operation

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    Miyamoto, Kouji; Togawa, Tamotsu; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Matsunami, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Tsuneko [Matsunami General Hospital, Kasamatsu, Gifu (Japan); Matsuo, Youichi

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes the skin cancer on the frontal chest wall induced by postoperative irradiation 30 years later from mastectomy. The patients was a 62-year-old woman, who received mastectomy of the right breast cancer (invasive ductal carcinoma, comedo type) at 31 years old, and received the postoperative radiotherapy of total 11,628 rad over 38 times. On the first medical examination in author`s hospital, the patient had an ulcer of about 10 cm diameter and was diagnosed the radiation induced skin cancer (well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma) in the biopsy. Because of the general condition of the patient was extremely bad and the skin cancer had highly developed, the excision was thought to be impossible. The radiotherapy (16 Gy) and combined local chemotherapy by OK 432 and Bleomycin were performed. In spite of the short term treatment, these therapies were effective on the reduction of the tumor size and the hemostasis, and brought the patient the improvement of QOL. The general condition of the patient improved to be stable and she recovered enough to go out from the hospital for 6 months. After 10 months, she showed anorexia and dyspnea and died after about 1 year from the admission. The present case is extremely rare, and it is required the radical therapy like the excision of chest wall at early stage. (K.H.)

  10. Radiation exposure to chest X-rays in the neonatal nursery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To measure how much very low birth-weight infants are exposed to chest X-rays during nursery, skin doses were calculated using phantoms under the same condition as that used in chest X-rays. Skin doses obtained were multiplied by the number of X-rays performed in 86 very low birth-weight infants (mean birth weight+-SD, 1163.0+-232.8 g; mean gestational age+-SD, 29.3+-3.0 week). Exposure doses per film ranged from 4.9 to 14.4 mR, with a mean dose of 6.1+-2.0 mR. Exposure doses per neonate ranged from 6.3 to 794.3 mR, with a mean dose of 170.4+-151.5 mR. The number of films per neonate ranged from one to 107, with a mean of 28.0+-24.9. Eighty-seven percent of X-rays were performed when the body weight was 1,500 g or less. Fourteen patients received 300 mR or more that may be the potential dose of radiation effects. (Namekawa, K)

  11. The results of an Australian and New Zealand Survey on the current practice of chest immobilisation during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine how widely chest immobilisation and 3D planning are currently being used, a survey was sent to each Chief Radiation Therapist of Australia (31) and New Zealand (6) in 2001. Questions were focused to radiation therapy practice when planning and treating patients with lung cancer with curative intent. There was a high response rate of 86 per cent (32/37) from the Radiation Oncology Departments of Australia (26/31) and New Zealand (6/6). 87.5 per cent (28/32) of departments use chest immobilisation (Australia, 22/26; New Zealand, 6/6) and of these, 82.1 per cent (23/28) use a 3D planning system. Furthermore, 78.6 per cent (22/28) practice conformal therapy. There are three main devices for chest immobilisation that are routinely used in Australia and one in New Zealand. The devices comprise: a) Personally contoured chest immobilisation (6/22) such as Vac Fix(Registered Trade Mark). This was the only device used in New Zealand. b) Adjustable chest immobilisation (7/22), consisting of movable shoulder and hand support such as Wing Board (Med-Tec(Registered Trade Mark)) or a device created in the department. c) A device comprised of (a) and (b), utilising the personalised contoured device and adjustable hand and shoulder supports (9/22). The results also showed that 65.6% (21/32) of users of chest immobilisation and no immobilisation reported satisfaction with the devices utilised in their department. Chest immobilisation was routinely used in 90.5% (19/21) of these departments. Copyright (2003) Australian Institute of Radiography

  12. Chest CT findings in patients with inflammatory myopathy and Jo1 antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoracic high-resolution computed tomography scans (HRCT) of 17 patients with inflammatory muscle disorders (IMD) and positive Jo1 antibodies were retrospectively reviewed regarding presence, extension, and distribution of pathological findings. Abnormal findings were found in 14 (82.3%) patients. The predominant CT abnormality was ground glass attenuation, which was present in seven patients (41.1%), having a bilateral and diffuse distribution. In general, lesions tended to appear in the lower lobes and more specifically in the lung bases. Interlobular septal thickening was found in six patients (35.3%); it was seen in the upper and lower lobes with peripheral distribution and bilateral localization in five out of six patients. Bronchiectases, reticular opacities, and honeycombing were found in six patients (35.3%). Air space consolidation was seen in about 17% of the patients. Lung involvement is a frequent feature of IMD patients with positive Jo1 antibodies and its most common radiological pattern is that of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia

  13. Chest CT findings in patients with inflammatory myopathy and Jo1 antibodies

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    Karadimitrakis, Stylianos; Plastiras, Sotiris C. [University of Athens Medical School, Department of Pathophysiology, Laiko University Hospital, 75 M. Asias Street, 11527 Athens (Greece); Zormpala, Alexandra; Chatzikonstantinou, Konstantinos [Department of Radiology, Laiko University Hospital, Athens (Greece); Boki, Kyriaki A. [University of Athens Medical School, Department of Pathophysiology, Laiko University Hospital, 75 M. Asias Street, 11527 Athens (Greece); Tzelepis, George E. [University of Athens Medical School, Department of Pathophysiology, Laiko University Hospital, 75 M. Asias Street, 11527 Athens (Greece)], E-mail: gtzelep@med.uoa.gr; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M. [University of Athens Medical School, Department of Pathophysiology, Laiko University Hospital, 75 M. Asias Street, 11527 Athens (Greece)

    2008-04-15

    Thoracic high-resolution computed tomography scans (HRCT) of 17 patients with inflammatory muscle disorders (IMD) and positive Jo1 antibodies were retrospectively reviewed regarding presence, extension, and distribution of pathological findings. Abnormal findings were found in 14 (82.3%) patients. The predominant CT abnormality was ground glass attenuation, which was present in seven patients (41.1%), having a bilateral and diffuse distribution. In general, lesions tended to appear in the lower lobes and more specifically in the lung bases. Interlobular septal thickening was found in six patients (35.3%); it was seen in the upper and lower lobes with peripheral distribution and bilateral localization in five out of six patients. Bronchiectases, reticular opacities, and honeycombing were found in six patients (35.3%). Air space consolidation was seen in about 17% of the patients. Lung involvement is a frequent feature of IMD patients with positive Jo1 antibodies and its most common radiological pattern is that of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia.

  14. Potential of right to left ventricular volume ratio measured on chest CT for the prediction of pulmonary hypertension: correlation with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure estimated by echocardiography

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    Lee, Heon [Soon Chun Hyang University, Department of Radiology, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok Yeon [Seoul Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo Jeong [Terarecon Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Kyun [Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Reddy, Ryan P.; Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2012-09-15

    To investigate the correlation of right ventricular (RV) to left ventricular (LV) volume ratio measured by chest CT with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) estimated by echocardiography. 104 patients (72.47 {+-} 13.64 years; 39 male) who had undergone chest CT and echocardiography were divided into two groups (hypertensive and normotensive) based upon an echocardiography-derived PASP of 25 mmHg. RV to LV volume ratios (RV{sub V}/LV{sub V}) were calculated. RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} was then correlated with PASP using regression analysis. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) for predicting pulmonary hypertension on chest CT was calculated. In the hypertensive group, the mean PASP was 46.29 {+-} 14.42 mmHg (29-98 mmHg) and there was strong correlation between the RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} and PASP (R = 0.82, p < 0.001). The intraobserver and interobserver correlation coefficients for RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} were 0.990 and 0.892. RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} was 1.01 {+-} 0.44 (0.51-2.77) in the hypertensive and 0.72 {+-} 0.14 (0.52-1.11) in the normotensive group (P <0.05). With 0.9 as the cutoff for RV{sub V}/LV{sub V}, sensitivity and specificity for predicting pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg were 79.5 % and 90 %, respectively. The AUC for predicting pulmonary hypertension was 0.87 RV/LV volume ratios on chest CT correlate well with PASP estimated by echocardiography and can be used to predict pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg with high sensitivity and specificity. (orig.)

  15. Potential of right to left ventricular volume ratio measured on chest CT for the prediction of pulmonary hypertension: correlation with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure estimated by echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the correlation of right ventricular (RV) to left ventricular (LV) volume ratio measured by chest CT with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) estimated by echocardiography. 104 patients (72.47 ± 13.64 years; 39 male) who had undergone chest CT and echocardiography were divided into two groups (hypertensive and normotensive) based upon an echocardiography-derived PASP of 25 mmHg. RV to LV volume ratios (RVV/LVV) were calculated. RVV/LVV was then correlated with PASP using regression analysis. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) for predicting pulmonary hypertension on chest CT was calculated. In the hypertensive group, the mean PASP was 46.29 ± 14.42 mmHg (29-98 mmHg) and there was strong correlation between the RVV/LVV and PASP (R = 0.82, p V/LVV were 0.990 and 0.892. RVV/LVV was 1.01 ± 0.44 (0.51-2.77) in the hypertensive and 0.72 ± 0.14 (0.52-1.11) in the normotensive group (P V/LVV, sensitivity and specificity for predicting pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg were 79.5 % and 90 %, respectively. The AUC for predicting pulmonary hypertension was 0.87 RV/LV volume ratios on chest CT correlate well with PASP estimated by echocardiography and can be used to predict pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg with high sensitivity and specificity. (orig.)

  16. Effect of staff training on radiation dose in pediatric CT

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    Hojreh, Azadeh, E-mail: azadeh.hojreh@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biological Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael, E-mail: michael.Weber@Meduniwien.Ac.At [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Homolka, Peter, E-mail: peter.Homolka@Meduniwien.Ac.At [Medical University of Vienna, Centre for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Pediatric patient CT doses were compared before and after staff training. • Staff training increasing dose awareness resulted in patient dose reduction. • Application of DRL reduced number of CT's with unusually high doses. • Continuous education and training are effective regarding dose optimization. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of staff training on radiation doses applied in pediatric CT scans. Methods: Pediatric patient doses from five CT scanners before (1426 scans) and after staff training (2566 scans) were compared statistically. Examinations included cranial CT (CCT), thoracic, abdomen–pelvis, and trunk scans. Dose length products (DLPs) per series were extracted from CT dose reports archived in the PACS. Results: A pooled analysis of non-traumatic scans revealed a statistically significant reduction in the dose for cranial, thoracic, and abdomen/pelvis scans (p < 0.01). This trend could be demonstrated also for trunk scans, however, significance could not be established due to low patient frequencies (p > 0.05). The percentage of scans performed with DLPs exceeding the German DRLs was reduced from 41% to 7% (CCT), 19% to 5% (thorax-CT), from 9% to zero (abdominal–pelvis CT), and 26% to zero (trunk; DRL taken as summed DRLs for thorax plus abdomen–pelvis, reduced by 20% accounting for overlap). Comparison with Austrian DRLs – available only for CCT and thorax CT – showed a reduction from 21% to 3% (CCT), and 15 to 2% (thorax CT). Conclusions: Staff training together with application of DRLs provide an efficient approach for optimizing radiation dose in pediatric CT practice.

  17. Effect of staff training on radiation dose in pediatric CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pediatric patient CT doses were compared before and after staff training. • Staff training increasing dose awareness resulted in patient dose reduction. • Application of DRL reduced number of CT's with unusually high doses. • Continuous education and training are effective regarding dose optimization. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of staff training on radiation doses applied in pediatric CT scans. Methods: Pediatric patient doses from five CT scanners before (1426 scans) and after staff training (2566 scans) were compared statistically. Examinations included cranial CT (CCT), thoracic, abdomen–pelvis, and trunk scans. Dose length products (DLPs) per series were extracted from CT dose reports archived in the PACS. Results: A pooled analysis of non-traumatic scans revealed a statistically significant reduction in the dose for cranial, thoracic, and abdomen/pelvis scans (p < 0.01). This trend could be demonstrated also for trunk scans, however, significance could not be established due to low patient frequencies (p > 0.05). The percentage of scans performed with DLPs exceeding the German DRLs was reduced from 41% to 7% (CCT), 19% to 5% (thorax-CT), from 9% to zero (abdominal–pelvis CT), and 26% to zero (trunk; DRL taken as summed DRLs for thorax plus abdomen–pelvis, reduced by 20% accounting for overlap). Comparison with Austrian DRLs – available only for CCT and thorax CT – showed a reduction from 21% to 3% (CCT), and 15 to 2% (thorax CT). Conclusions: Staff training together with application of DRLs provide an efficient approach for optimizing radiation dose in pediatric CT practice

  18. SU-D-BRA-06: Dual-Energy Chest CT: The Effects of Virtual Monochromatic Reconstructions On Texture Analysis Features

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    Sorensen, J; Duran, C; Stingo, F; Wei, W; Rao, A; Zhang, L; Court, L; Erasmus, J; Godoy, M [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of virtual monochromatic reconstructions on several commonly used texture analysis features in DECT of the chest. Further, to assess the effect of monochromatic energy levels on the ability of these textural features to identify tissue types. Methods: 20 consecutive patients underwent chest CTs for evaluation of lung nodules using Siemens Somatom Definition Flash DECT. Virtual monochromatic images were constructed at 10keV intervals from 40–190keV. For each patient, an ROI delineated the lesion under investigation, and cylindrical ROI’s were placed within 5 different healthy tissues (blood, fat, muscle, lung, and liver). Several histogram- and Grey Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM)-based texture features were then evaluated in each ROI at each energy level. As a means of validation, these feature values were then used in a random forest classifier to attempt to identify the tissue types present within each ROI. Their predictive accuracy at each energy level was recorded. Results: All textural features changed considerably with virtual monochromatic energy, particularly below 70keV. Most features exhibited a global minimum or maximum around 80keV, and while feature values changed with energy above this, patient ranking was generally unaffected. As expected, blood demonstrated the lowest inter-patient variability, for all features, while lung lesions (encompassing many different pathologies) exhibited the highest. The accuracy of these features in identifying tissues (76% accuracy) was highest at 80keV, but no clear relationship between energy and classification accuracy was found. Two common misclassifications (blood vs liver and muscle vs fat) accounted for the majority (24 of the 28) errors observed. Conclusion: All textural features were highly dependent on virtual monochromatic energy level, especially below 80keV, and were more stable above this energy. However, in a random forest model, these commonly used features were

  19. Options for radiation dose reduction in CT; Moeglichkeiten der Strahlenreduktion bei der CT des Koerperstamms

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    Euler, Andre; Schindera, Sebastian [Universitaetsspital Basel (Switzerland). Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Szuecs-Farkas, Zsolt [Spitalzentrum Biel (Switzerland). Radiologie

    2014-06-15

    The use of a computed tomography (CT) scan for the diagnostic workup of various diseases has increased tremendously within the last 10 years. One major cause of this development is related to the technical advances of the CT scanners, resulting in a growing number of clinical CT indications. Besides the diagnostic benefit for the patient population, the overall radiation exposure to the patient has increased. Thus, to slow down the increase in radiation exposure, methods for dose optimization are necessary. Radiologists and technicians are liable for a responsible utilization of the CT scan, which goes along with the ALARA principle ('as low as reasonably achievable'). In the present article, we present various practicable strategies for a dose optimization. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of variation of voltage (kV) absorbed dose in chest CT scans; Avaliacao da variacao da tensao (kV) na dose absorvida em varreduras de TC torax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonca, Bruna G.A.; Mourao, Arnaldo P., E-mail: brunabgam@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CENEB/CEFET-MG), Belo Horionte, MG, (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most important diagnostic techniques images today. The increasing utilization of CT implies a significant increase of population exposure to ionizing radiation. Optimization of practice aims to reduce doses to patients because the image quality is directly related to the diagnosis. You can decrease the amount of dose to the patient, and maintain the quality of the image. There are several parameters that can be manipulated in a CT scan and these parameters can be used to reduce the energy deposited in the patient. Based on this, we analyzed the variation of dose deposited in the lungs, breasts and thyroid, by varying the supply voltage of the tube. Scans of the thorax were performed following the protocol of routine chest with constant and variable current for the same applied voltage. Moreover, a female phantom was used and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100), model bat, were used to record the specific organ doses. Scans were performed on a GE CT scanner, model 64 Discovery channels. Higher doses were recorded for the voltage of 120 kV with 200 mAs in the lungs (22.46 mGy) and thyroid (32.22 mGy). For scans with automatic mAs, variable between 100 and 440, this same tension contributed to the higher doses. The best examination in terms of the dose that was used with automatic 80 kV mAs, whose lungs and thyroid received lower dose. For the best breast exam was 100 kV. Since the increase in the 80 kV to 100 kV no impact so much the dose deposited in the lungs, it can be concluded that lowering the applied voltage to 100 kV resulted in a reduction in the dose absorbed by the patient. These results can contribute to optimizing scans of the chest computed tomography.

  1. The impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality and radiation dose in thoracic and abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the image quality and radiation dose between iterative reconstruction (IR) and standard filtered back projection (FBP) in CT of the chest and abdomen. Materials and methods: Thoracic CT was performed in 50 patients (38 male, 12 female; mean age, 51 ± 23 yrs; range, 7–85 yrs) and abdominal CT was performed in 50 patients (36 male, 14 female; mean age, 62 ± 13 yrs; range, 20–85 yrs), using IR as well as FBP for image reconstruction. Image noise was quantitatively assessed measuring standard deviation of Hounsfield Units (HU) in defined regions of interest in subcutaneous tissue. Scan length and Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) were documented. Scan length, image noise, and CTDI of both reconstruction techniques were compared by using paired tests according to the nature of variables (McNemar test or Student t test). Overall subjective image quality and subjective image noise were compared. Results: There was no significant difference between the protocols in terms of mean scan length (p > 0.05). Image noise was statistically significantly higher with IR, although the difference was clinically insignificant (13.3 ± 3.0 HU and 13.6 ± 3.0 HU for thoracic CT and 11.5 ± 3.1 HU and 11.7 ± 3.0 HU for abdominal CT, p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in overall subjective image quality and subjective image noise. The radiation dose was significantly lower with IR. Volume-weighted CTDI decreased by 64% (6.2 ± 2.5 mGy versus 17.1 ± 9.5 mGy, p < 0.001) for thoracic CT and by 58% (7.8 ± 4.6 mGy versus 18.5 ± 8.6 mGy, p < 0.001) for abdominal CT. Conclusions: Our study shows that in thoracic and abdominal CT with IR, there is no clinically significant impact on image quality, yet a significant radiation dose reduction compared to FBP

  2. Coronal reformations of the chest on 64-row multi-detector row CT: Evaluation of image quality in comparison with 16-, 8- and 4-row multi-detector row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate image quality of coronal reformations of chest performed on 64-row MDCT in comparison with 16-, 8- and 4-row MDCT. Materials and methods: Consecutive patients who underwent pulmonary CT angiography using four different MDCT scanners were retrospectively studied with IRB approval: (1) n = 30, 64-row MDCT; (2) n = 30, 16-row MDCT; (3) n = 30, 8-row MDCT; (4) n = 30, 4-row MDCT. Coronal reformatted images (2 mm thickness and 2 mm intervals for 64-row MDCT; 5 mm thickness and 5 mm intervals for 16-, 8- and 4-row MDCT) were evaluated by consensus reading of two board-certified radiologists who were blinded to scanner type. The image quality of overall chest appearance and individual thoracic structures including heart, aorta and pulmonary arteries was graded using five-point scale. Grades from four different scanners were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test. A second evaluation was performed in 48 randomly selected patients (12 patients for each scanner). Reproducibility was assessed using weighted-kappa analysis. Result: Significant reproducibility was observed between the first and second evaluations in 48 patients both for image quality of overall chest (weighted kappa = 0.826) and each thoracic structure (mean weighted kappa = 0.803; range, 0.729-0.858). Image quality of overall chest and individual thoracic structures differed significantly among four different MDCT groups, with 64-row MDCT having the highest grades, followed by 16-, 8- and 4-row MDCT (mean grades for overall chest in each scanner: 3.9, 3.0, 2.4 and 1.9, respectively) (P < 0.0001 for overall chest and each thoracic structure). Conclusion: When comparing coronal reformations of chest using four different MDCT scanners, the 64-row MDCT had the highest image quality for overall chest appearance and individual thoracic structures, followed by 16-, 8- and finally 4-row MDCT

  3. Intracranial germinoma; typical CT appearances and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The typical CT appearances of intracranial germinomas are described in three cases. These consist of an isodense or hyperdense tumour in the mid-line, originating from the pineal body or infundibulum, with marked increase in density on contrast enhancement. Periventricular tumour expansion in relation to the entire supratentorial ventricular system is characteristic. The rapid tumour regression after small doses of radiation is stressed and complete regression of the tumour, as seen on CT, is a sign of its radio-curability. (orig.)

  4. Screening for distant metastases in head and neck cancer patients using FDG-PET and chest CT: validation of an algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senft, Asaf; Hoekstra, Otto S; Witte, Birgit I; Leemans, C René; de Bree, Remco

    2016-09-01

    In patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and high-risk factors, the combination of whole body FDG-PET and contrast-enhanced chest CT has the highest sensitivity and accuracy when screening for distant metastases. The aim of the present study was to retrospectively validate an earlier developed algorithm for interpreting the combination of screening PET and CT. The test cohort consisted of 47 consecutive HNSCC patients with high-risk factors for distant metastases, who had previously undergone FDG-PET and CT and had a minimum 12 months of follow-up. In 12 (26 %) patients, distant metastases were detected during screening or within 12-month follow-up. In patients with locoregional control during follow-up, the sensitivity and specificity were 55 % (95 % CI 23-83 %) and 97 % (95 % CI 82-99 %), respectively, for chest CT, 55 % (95 % CI 23-83 %) and 100 % (95 % CI 88-100 %), respectively, for PET and 73 % (95 % CI 39-94 %) and 100 % (95 % CI 88-100 %), respectively, for the combination of PET and CT. The proposed algorithm was considered to have been validated. In this algorithm, all FDG-PET positive scans for distant metastases (regardless of interpretation of a solid lung lesion on CT) and CT scans with suspicious pulmonary lesions of less than 5-mm diameter (regardless of FDG-PET findings) are considered positive for distant metastases. PMID:26350882

  5. Characteristics of pulmonary cysts in Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome: Thin-section CT findings of the chest in 12 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobino, Kazunori, E-mail: tobino@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Gunji, Yoko [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Kurihara, Masatoshi [Pneumothorax Center, Nissan Tamagawa Hospital, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); Kunogi, Makiko; Koike, Kengo [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Johkoh, Takeshi [Department of Radiology, Kinki Central Hospital of Mutual Aid Association of Public School Teachers, Kurumazuka 3-1, Itami, Hyogo 664-0872 (Japan); Kodama, Yuzo [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Iwakami, Shin-ichiro [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, Shizuoka Hospital, 1129 Nagaoka, Izunokuni, Shizuoka 410-2295 (Japan); Kikkawa, Mika [Biochemical Research Center, Division of Proteomics and Biomolecular Sciences, Juntendo University, Graduate School of Medicine, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo (Japan); Takahashi, Kazuhisa [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Seyama, Kuniaki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To describe in detail the characteristic chest computed tomography (CT) findings of Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome. Materials and methods: Thin-section chest CT scans of consecutive 12 patients with genetically diagnosed BHD syndrome were retrospectively evaluated by two observers, especially about the characteristics (distribution, number, size, shape and relation to pleura) of pulmonary cysts. Interobserver agreement in the identification of abnormalities on the CT images was achieved using the {kappa} statistic, and the degree of interobserver correlation for the characterization of pulmonary cysts was assessed using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results: Multiple pulmonary cysts were seen in all patients. The number of cysts in each patient was various (range, 29-407), and cysts of various sizes (from a few mm to 2 cm or more) were seen in all patient. 76.6% (mean) of cysts were irregular-shaped, and 40.5% (mean) of cysts were located along the pleura. The mean extent score of cysts was 13% of the whole lung, and the distribution of cysts was predominantly in the lower medial zone. Finally, cysts abutting or including the proximal portions of lower pulmonary arteries or veins were also seen in all patients. Conclusion: Multiple, irregular-shaped cysts of various sizes with lower medial lung zone predominance are characteristic CT findings of BHD syndrome. Cysts abutting or including the proximal portions of lower pulmonary arteries or veins may also exist in this syndrome in a high probability.

  6. Bone scan findings of chest wall pain syndrome after stereotactic body radiation therapy: implications for the pathophysiology of the syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Shane; Decker, Roy H.; Evans, Suzanne B.

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 72-year-old woman treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for peripherally located stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). After treatment she developed ipsilateral grade II chest wall pain. A bone scan showed nonspecific and heterogeneous increased radiotracer uptake in the volume of ribs receiving 30% of the prescription dose of radiation (V30). We present a color wash image demonstrating excellent concordance between the V30 and the area of scinti...

  7. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part II. Application to patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Department of Physics, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Current methods for estimating and reporting radiation dose from CT examinations are largely patient-generic; the body size and hence dose variation from patient to patient is not reflected. Furthermore, the current protocol designs rely on dose as a surrogate for the risk of cancer incidence, neglecting the strong dependence of risk on age and gender. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for estimating patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations. Methods: The study included two patients (a 5-week-old female patient and a 12-year-old male patient), who underwent 64-slice CT examinations (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at our institution in 2006. For each patient, a nonuniform rational B-spine (NURBS) based full-body computer model was created based on the patient's clinical CT data. Large organs and structures inside the image volume were individually segmented and modeled. Other organs were created by transforming an existing adult male or female full-body computer model (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. A Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for dose simulation on the LightSpeed VCT scanner was used to estimate patient-specific organ dose, from which effective dose and risks of cancer incidence were derived. Patient-specific organ dose and effective dose were compared with patient-generic CT dose quantities in current clinical use: the volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the effective dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP). Results: The effective dose for the CT examination of the newborn patient (5.7 mSv) was higher but comparable to that for the CT examination of the teenager patient (4.9 mSv) due to the size-based clinical CT protocols at our institution, which employ lower scan techniques for smaller

  8. Possibilities for exposure reduction in computed tomography examination of acute chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrocardiogram-gated (ECG) computed tomography (CT) investigations can be accompanied by high amounts of radiation exposure. This is particularly true for the investigation of patients with unclear and acute chest pain. The common approach in patients with acute chest pain is standard spiral CT of the chest. The chest pain or triple-rule-out CT protocol is a relatively new ECG-gated protocol of the entire chest. This article reviews and discusses different techniques for the CT investigation of patients with acute chest pain. By applying the appropriate scan technique, the radiation exposure for an ECG-gated protocol must not necessarily be higher than a standard chest CT scan Aortic pathologies are far better depicted by ECG-gated scan protocols and depending on the heart rate coronary artery disease can also be detected at the same time. The use of ECG-triggered scans will not support the diagnostics of the pulmonary arteries. However, in unspecific chest pain an ECG-triggered scan protocol can provide information on the differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  9. Prevalence and clinical significance of incidental cardiac findings in non-ECG-gated chest CT scans; Praevalenz und klinische Bedeutung inzidenteller Herzbefunde im nicht EKG-getriggerten Thorax-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quentin, M.; Kroepil, P.; Lanzman, R.S.; Blondin, D.; Miese, F.; Scherer, A. [Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Institut fuer Radiologie, Duesseldorf (Germany); Steiner, S. [Klinikum der Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Klinik fuer Kardiologie, Pneumologie und Angiologie, Duesseldorf (Germany); Choy, G.; Abbara, S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Cardiovascular Imaging Section, Boston (United States)

    2011-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of incidental cardiac findings in non-ECG-gated chest CT. Non-ECG-gated chest CT examinations of 300 patients were retrospectively analyzed for incidental cardiac findings. Subsequently, these findings were evaluated for their clinical relevance by a cardiologist. A total of 107 out of 300 examined patients had 174 incidental cardiac findings including coronary calcification (90), aortic/mitral valve calcification (42), iatrogenic changes (23), pericardial effusion (6), dilatation of the heart (4), myocardial changes (3), thrombus in the left ventricle (2), constrictive pericarditis (2) and atrial myxoma (1). Of the cardiac findings 51% were described in the written report and in 53 out of the 107 patients the cardiac findings were unknown. Newly detected incidental findings from 8 patients were rated as clinically significant: pericardial effusion (4), constrictive pericarditis (1), thrombus in the left ventricle (1), atrial myxoma (1) and dilatation of the heart (1). Incidental cardiac findings are frequent in non-ECG-gated chest CT and may have a high clinical relevance. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Studie war es, die Praevalenz und klinische Bedeutung inzidenteller Herzbefunde im nicht EKG-getriggerten Thorax-CT ohne primaer kardiale Fragestellung zu evaluieren. Dreihundert nicht EKG-getriggerte Thorax-CT-Untersuchungen wurden retrospektiv bzgl. inzidenteller Herzbefunde analysiert. Die klinische Bedeutung wurde von einem Kardiologen bewertet. Von 300 Patienten hatten 107 insgesamt 174 Herzbefunde: Koronarsklerose (90), Aorten-/Mitralklappenverkalkung (42), iatrogene Veraenderungen (23), Perikarderguss (6), Herzvergroesserung (4), Myokardpathologien (3), Perikardverkalkungen (2), Thrombus im linken Ventrikel (2) und Myxom (1). Im radiologischen Bericht wurden 51% aller Herzbefunde beschrieben. Bei 53 der 107 Patienten mit Herzbefund waren diese klinisch nicht bekannt. Als

  10. Low-dose CT scan screening for lung cancer: comparison of images and radiation doses between low-dose CT and follow-up standard diagnostic CT

    OpenAIRE

    ONO, KOJI; Hiraoka, Toru; Ono, Asami; Komatsu, Eiji; Shigenaga, Takehiko; Takaki, Hajime; Maeda, Toru; Ogusu, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Shintaro; Fukushima, Kiyoyasu; Kai, Michiaki

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study aim to compare image quality and radiation doses between low-dose CT and follow-up standard diagnostic CT for lung cancer screening. Methods In a single medical institution, 19 subjects who had been screened for lung cancer by low-dose CT before going through follow-up standard diagnostic CT were randomly selected. Both CT image sets for all subjects were independently evaluated by five specialized physicians. Results There were no significant differences between low-dos...

  11. Radiation protection in CT pelvis in Fantoma Rando by thermoluminescent dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents results of equivalent dose organ determining to both primary beam and scattered radiation in a computed tomography (CT) procedures. All measurements were carried out to abdomen and critical organ (gonads) area. Selected dosimeters showed a standard deviation of 4.1% below to the reference values established by international guide lines. The equivalent dose in gonads was 14.27 mGy. - Highlights: ► The areas surrounding the study, as is the area of the chest, abdomen and a radiosensitive organ in a study of the pelvis (gonads), we obtained a significant contribution. ► This variation can be attributed to three main factors: the number of cuts, the distance and the density difference. ► Increasing the dose equivalent as critical organ is due to completion of the study of the pelvis associated with having a number of overlapping slices.

  12. Radiation Protection in PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation is based on the following areas: radiological monitoring installations in the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals, personal dose, dosage advertising, nuclear medicine, PET, radiation protection of patients, requirements for medical practice, regulatory aspects, dose calculation, shields, quantities, center Cudim, cyclotron and synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals, biological effects of radiation protection practices.

  13. Patient radiation doses for electron beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo based computer model has been developed for electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) to calculate organ and effective doses in a humanoid hermaphrodite phantom. The program has been validated by comparison with experimental measurements of the CT dose index in standard head and body CT dose phantoms; agreement to better than 8% has been found. The robustness of the model has been established by varying the input parameters. The amount of energy deposited at the 12:00 position of the standard body CT dose phantom is most susceptible to rotation angle, whereas that in the central region is strongly influenced by the beam quality. The program has been used to investigate the changes in organ absorbed doses arising from partial and full rotation about supine and prone subjects. Superficial organs experience the largest changes in absorbed dose with a change in subject orientation and for partial rotation. Effective doses for typical clinical scan protocols have been calculated and compared with values obtained using existing dosimetry techniques based on full rotation. Calculations which make use of Monte Carlo conversion factors for the scanner that best matches the EBCT dosimetric characteristics consistently overestimate the effective dose in supine subjects by typically 20%, and underestimate the effective dose in prone subjects by typically 13%. These factors can therefore be used to correct values obtained in this way. Empirical dosimetric techniques based on the dose-length product yield errors as great as 77%. This is due to the sensitivity of the dose length product to individual scan lengths. The magnitude of these errors is reduced if empirical dosimetric techniques based on the average absorbed dose in the irradiated volume (CTDIvol) are used. Therefore conversion factors specific to EBCT have been calculated to convert the CTDIvol to an effective dose

  14. Attenuation and image quality in the use of protective bismuth in chest CT scans; Atenuacion y calidad de imagen en el empleo de protectores de bismuto en exploraciones de TC de torax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Ruiz-Zorrila, J.; Fernandez Leton, P.; Martinez Gomez, L. C.; Casa de Julian, M. A. de la; Gilarranz Moreno, R.; Zucca Aparicio, D.; Minambres Moro, A.; Perez Moreno, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    For chest CT scans are protective of bismuth (Bi) with the aim of reducing the dose in the breast. The aim of this study was to evaluate the attenuation with thermoluminescent dosimeters in the glandular dose average when using these protective breast CT scans and to evaluate the image quality with and without protective Bismuth.

  15. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Part 1: Impact on patient management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruettner, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.gruettner@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Fink, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Fink@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Walter, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.walter@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Meyer, Mathias, E-mail: mr.meyer.mathias@gmail.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Apfaltrer@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, Ashley River Tower, 25 Courtenay Drive, Charleston, SC 29425-2260 (United States); Saur, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.saur@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Sueselbeck, Tim, E-mail: tim.sueselbeck@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Traunwieser, Dominik, E-mail: dominik.traunwieser@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Takx, Richard, E-mail: richard.takx@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, Ashley River Tower, 25 Courtenay Drive, Charleston, SC 29425-2260 (United States); and others

    2013-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) or “triple-rule-out” CT angiography (TRO-CTA) on patient management in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Materials and methods: 100 patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) underwent coronary CTA or TRO-CTA for the evaluation of chest pain. Patients with a high and low cardiac risk profile were not included in this study. All patients with significant coronary stenosis >50% on coronary CTA underwent invasive coronary catheterization (ICC). Important other pathological findings were recorded. All patients had a 90-day follow-up period for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Results: Based on a negative coronary CTA 60 of 100 patients were discharged on the same day. None of the discharged patients showed MACE during the 90-day follow-up. Coronary CTA revealed a coronary stenosis >50% in 19 of 100 patients. ICC confirmed significant coronary stenosis in 17/19 patients. Among the 17 true positive patients, 9 underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation, 7 were received intensified medical therapy, and 1 patient underwent coronary artery bypass surgery. A TRO-CTA protocol was performed in 36/100 patients due to elevated D-dimer levels. Pulmonary embolism was present in 5 patients, pleural effusion of unknown etiology in 3 patients, severe right ventricular dysfunction with pericardial effusion in 1 patient, and an incidental bronchial carcinoma was diagnosed in 1 patient. Conclusion: Coronary CTA and TRO-CTA allow a rapid and safe discharge in the majority of patients presenting with acute chest pain and an intermediate risk for ACS while at the same time identifies those with significant coronary artery stenosis.

  16. Research on radiation exposure from CT part of hybrid camera and diagnostic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on radiation exposure from CT part of hybrid camera in seven different Departments of Nuclear Medicine (DNM) was conducted. Processed data and effective dose (E) estimations led to the idea of phantom verification and comparison of absorbed doses and software estimation. Anonymous data from about 100 examinations from each DNM was gathered. Acquired data was processed and utilized by dose estimation programs (ExPACT, ImPACT, ImpactDose) with respect to the type of examination and examination procedures. Individual effective doses were calculated using enlisted programs. Preserving the same procedure in dose estimation process allows us to compare the resulting E. Some differences and disproportions during dose estimation led to the idea of estimated E verification. Consequently, two different sets of about 100 of TLD 100H detectors were calibrated for measurement inside the Aldersnon RANDO Anthropomorphic Phantom. Standard examination protocols were examined using a 2 Slice CT- part of hybrid SPECT/CT. Moreover, phantom exposure from body examining protocol for 32 Slice and 64 Slice diagnostic CT scanner was also verified. Absorbed dose (DT,R) measured using TLD detectors was compared with software estimation of equivalent dose HT values, computed by E estimation software. Though, only limited number of cavities for detectors enabled measurement within the regions of lung, liver, thyroid and spleen–pancreas region, some basic comparison is possible. - Highlights: • Patient E estimations from CT part of SPECT/CT and PET/CT. • Phantom measurement on two High-end CTs and one CT from SPECT/CT. • Comparison of DT,R and HT

  17. Reduction of patient radiation dose in Spiral CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To optimize patient radiation dose in Spiral CT scan of dento-maxillo-facial region by measuring the absorbed dose in the phantom and to evaluate reliability of dose estimation methods using CTDI (CT Dose Index, FDA, USA). Spiral CT scanning with 'pitchs' (ratio of table speed to slice thickness per rotation) more than 1 was used for dose measurements. The dose was measured using a human phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories, USA) in the CT scan with a 3rd generation CT scanner of Somatom Plus (Siemens, Germany) for bone imaging. CTDI for this CT scanner were 9.2 mGy/100 mA at the center in an acrylic resin phantom with diameter of 16 cm and 8.5 mGy/100 mA at 1 cm depth from the phantom surface. X-ray tube voltage of 120 kV and tube current of 85 mA was used. Slice thickness was varied from 1 to 3 mm and table speed per rotation was also varied from 1 to 5 mm per rotation. X-Omat-V (Eastman Kodak, USA) films and TLD (Thermo-Luminescent-Dosimetry) dosimeters of the type of MSO-S (Kyokko, Japan) were used in the dosimetry. Patients radiation dose reduced with increasing the pitch of SPIRAL scan. Measured dose was uniformly distributed and well corresponded to the dose calculated using CTDI. However, measured doses on scanning with 1 mm slice thickness were always higher than those with 2 to 5 mm slice thickness. The lowest radiation dose was obtained with scanning with 2 mm slice thickness and table speed of 4 mm per rotation which give the dose of about 4 mGy per one CT examination in the imaged tissues. The highest dose per one CT examination was measured in 'dental CT' for the mandibular region with 1 mm slice thickness and table speed of 1 mm per rotation which gave 12 mGy by film dosimetry and 9 mGy by TLD dosimetry. SPIRAL scan with pitch more than 1 was effective for reduction of patient radiation dose without reducing the image quality. CTDI was also useful to estimate the dose except scans with 1 mm slice thickness. (author)

  18. Prefecture-wide multi-centre radiation dose survey as a useful tool for CT dose optimisation: report of Gunma radiation dose study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to verify the usefulness for the dose optimisation of setting a diagnostic reference level (DRL) based on the results of a prefecture-wide multi-centre radiation dose survey and providing data feedback. All hospitals/clinics in the authors' prefecture with computed tomography (CT) scanners were requested to report data. The first survey was done in July 2011, and the results of dose-length products (DLPs) for each CT scanner were fed back to all hospitals/clinics, with DRL set from all the data. One year later, a second survey was done in the same manner. The medians of DLP in the upper abdomen, whole body and coronary CT in 2012 were significantly smaller than those of the 2011 survey. The inter-quartile ranges of DLP in the head, chest, pelvis and coronary CT were also smaller in 2012. Radiation dose survey with data feedback may be helpful for CT dose optimisation. (authors)

  19. Application of Dual-source CT High-pitch Spiral in the Chest Screening%双源CT大螺距扫描在胸部筛查的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李贞旭; 殷洁; 吕国义; 李建灵; 向旭; 陈怡帆; 司尚干

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析双源 CT 大螺距扫描在胸部筛查的辐射剂量。方法选择180例行双源 CT 胸部扫描的患者随机分为三组,用螺距行胸部平扫并记录 CTDIvol、DLP 值,使用独立样本 t 检验比较3组扫描模式的辐射剂量间差异。结果三组病例中,图像 SD 值无统计学差异(P>0.05);三组病例的 CTDIvol 值、DLP 值差异均有统计学意义(P0.05);The three groups of cases CTDIvol value DLP, value dif erences were statistical y significant (P<0.05), and the radiation dose in group A to group B, C 64.2%、49.7%. Conclusion Dual-source spiral CT pitch scan is a new model under the premise of the clinical diagnosis for chest screening.

  20. The Role of Human Factor in Radiation Protection of Children During Chest X Ray Examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection depends on many factors. Our study deals with the human factor, the radiology technicians' routine work. If all technical malfunctions are excluded they are responsible for the patient dose. Depending on their education and experience, technicians perform X ray examinations with various end results: image quality, entrance surface dose, patient interaction etc. In hospital setting we have consecutively chosen the study group of 20 children that had a clinical indication for a chest X ray examination (standard PA radiogram), for each of three technicians working at the radiology ward. A Shimadzu X ray machine was used in all cases. 60 children were from 6 to 12 years old and all parents were informed about the aim and the experimental details of the study. All of them gave their informed consent. Radiophotoluminescent (RPL) and thermoluminescent (TLD) dosimeters were applied at the entrance of the beam in the center of the X ray field to measure the entrance surface dose (ESD). Three differently experienced technicians were unaware of the objective of the study. Parameters that were noted were the kV, mAs and the size of the radiation field. The results show a good correlation in ESD between two technicians. Doses were significantly higher for the third one. After the results were known, protocols were designed and after educational interference, we continued to measure ESD again on a group of 40 children. The doses were reduced and there was a good correlation between all three technicians. With this work we want to clarify and show the importance of continuous education and good teamwork for dose reduction. In a sequel study, with the same three technicians, we hope to have results that would show a better dose reduction. (author)

  1. Automatic CT simulation optimization for radiation therapy: A general strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Tan, Jun; Gay, Hiram; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Yu, Lifeng [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Anastasio, Mark A. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: In radiation therapy, x-ray computed tomography (CT) simulation protocol specifications should be driven by the treatment planning requirements in lieu of duplicating diagnostic CT screening protocols. The purpose of this study was to develop a general strategy that allows for automatically, prospectively, and objectively determining the optimal patient-specific CT simulation protocols based on radiation-therapy goals, namely, maintenance of contouring quality and integrity while minimizing patient CT simulation dose. Methods: The authors proposed a general prediction strategy that provides automatic optimal CT simulation protocol selection as a function of patient size and treatment planning task. The optimal protocol is the one that delivers the minimum dose required to provide a CT simulation scan that yields accurate contours. Accurate treatment plans depend on accurate contours in order to conform the dose to actual tumor and normal organ positions. An image quality index, defined to characterize how simulation scan quality affects contour delineation, was developed and used to benchmark the contouring accuracy and treatment plan quality within the predication strategy. A clinical workflow was developed to select the optimal CT simulation protocols incorporating patient size, target delineation, and radiation dose efficiency. An experimental study using an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom with added-bolus layers was used to demonstrate how the proposed prediction strategy could be implemented and how the optimal CT simulation protocols could be selected for prostate cancer patients based on patient size and treatment planning task. Clinical IMRT prostate treatment plans for seven CT scans with varied image quality indices were separately optimized and compared to verify the trace of target and organ dosimetry coverage. Results: Based on the phantom study, the optimal image quality index for accurate manual prostate contouring was 4.4. The optimal tube

  2. Automatic CT simulation optimization for radiation therapy: A general strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In radiation therapy, x-ray computed tomography (CT) simulation protocol specifications should be driven by the treatment planning requirements in lieu of duplicating diagnostic CT screening protocols. The purpose of this study was to develop a general strategy that allows for automatically, prospectively, and objectively determining the optimal patient-specific CT simulation protocols based on radiation-therapy goals, namely, maintenance of contouring quality and integrity while minimizing patient CT simulation dose. Methods: The authors proposed a general prediction strategy that provides automatic optimal CT simulation protocol selection as a function of patient size and treatment planning task. The optimal protocol is the one that delivers the minimum dose required to provide a CT simulation scan that yields accurate contours. Accurate treatment plans depend on accurate contours in order to conform the dose to actual tumor and normal organ positions. An image quality index, defined to characterize how simulation scan quality affects contour delineation, was developed and used to benchmark the contouring accuracy and treatment plan quality within the predication strategy. A clinical workflow was developed to select the optimal CT simulation protocols incorporating patient size, target delineation, and radiation dose efficiency. An experimental study using an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom with added-bolus layers was used to demonstrate how the proposed prediction strategy could be implemented and how the optimal CT simulation protocols could be selected for prostate cancer patients based on patient size and treatment planning task. Clinical IMRT prostate treatment plans for seven CT scans with varied image quality indices were separately optimized and compared to verify the trace of target and organ dosimetry coverage. Results: Based on the phantom study, the optimal image quality index for accurate manual prostate contouring was 4.4. The optimal tube

  3. Toward high-contrast breast CT at low radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyriläinen, Jani; Fernández, Manuel; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa; Virkkunen, Pekka; Leidenius, Marjut; von Smitten, Karl; Sipilä, Petri; Fiedler, Stefan; Suhonen, Heikki; Suortti, Pekka; Bravin, Alberto

    2008-10-01

    This study was approved by the local research ethics committee, and patient informed consent was obtained. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that high-spatial-resolution low-dose analyzer-based x-ray computed tomography (CT) can substantially improve the radiographic contrast of breast tissue in vitro when compared with that attained by using diagnostic mammography and CT. An excised human breast tumor was examined by using analyzer-based x-ray imaging with synchrotron radiation. The correspondence between analyzer-based x-ray images and diagnostic mammograms, CT images, and histopathologic findings was determined. Calcifications and fine details of soft tissue, which are at the contrast detection limit on diagnostic mammograms, are clearly visible on planar analyzer-based x-ray images. Analyzer-based x-ray CT yields high contrast from smoothly varying internal structures, such as tumorous mass lesions, corresponding to information on actual structures seen at histopathologic analysis. The mean glandular dose of 1.9 mGy in analyzer-based x-ray CT is approximately equivalent to the dose administered during single-view screening mammography. The improved visibility of mammographically indistinguishable lesions in vitro suggests that analyzer-based x-ray CT may be a valuable method in radiographic evaluation of the breast, thereby justifying further investigations. PMID:18796684

  4. Hyperthermia combined with radiation therapy for superficial breast cancer and chest wall recurrence: A review of the randomised data

    OpenAIRE

    Zagar, Timothy M.; OLESON, JAMES R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Craciunescu, Oana I; BLACKWELL, KIMBERLY L.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Jones, Ellen L.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperthermia has long been used in combination with radiation for the treatment of superficial malignancies, in part due to its radiosensitising capabilities. Patients who suffer superficial recurrences of breast cancer, be it in their chest wall following mastectomy, or in their breast after breast conservation, typically have poor clinical outcomes. They often develop distant metastatic disease, but one must not overlook the problems associated with an uncontrolled local failure. Morbidity ...

  5. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to ... to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit ...

  6. Abdominal spiral CT in children: which radiation exposure is required?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We decided to test to what extent dose reduction is possible in abdominal spiral computed tomography (CT) in young children without loss of anatomic diagnostic information. A retrospective study was performed of 30 abdominal CT examinations of children aged 3 months to 7 years. These were divided into two groups: group A with reduced radiation exposure (tube current 50 mA, CT dose index CTDIFDA ≤0.83 mGy) and group B with standard radiation exposure (tube current ≥100 mA, CTDIFDA ≥1.66 mGy). Image quality was assessed using a four-part scale ('excellent', 'good', 'sufficient', 'poor') on visual image impression and visibility of 32 anatomical details. Five experienced radiologists read the CT scans independently who were blinded to the examination parameters. Differences in ranked data were evaluated with Wilcoxon's rank sum test. No difference between groups A and B was observed in visual image impression. Detail visibility was significantly lower in group A, but the differences were limited to right upper quadrant structures (portal vein, common bile duct, pancreatic head, adrenals) and to arterial branches. Significant differences in visibility rated as 'poor' were only found for the hepatic, splenic and renal arteries; all other structures showed no difference between groups A and B. A protocol with reduced radiation exposure (50 mA, CTDIFDA ≤0.83 mGy) allowed the demonstration of most anatomic structures in abdominal spiral CT in young children. For the precise demonstration of small details (e.g. structures of the right upper quadrant), a protocol with standard radiation exposure (≥100 mAs) was superior. (orig.)

  7. Overview of two years of clinical experience of chest tomo-synthesis at Sahlgrenska university hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since December 2006, ∼ 3800 clinical chest tomo-synthesis examinations have been performed at our department at Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital. A subset of the examinations has been included in studies of the detectability of pulmonary nodules, using computed tomography (CT) as the gold standard. Visibility studies, in which chest tomo-synthesis and CT have been compared side-by side, have been used to determine the depiction potential of chest tomo-synthesis. Comparisons with conventional chest radiography have been made. In the clinical setting, chest tomo-synthesis has mostly been used as an additional examination. The most frequent indication for chest tomo-synthesis has been suspicion of a nodule or tumour. In visibility studies, tomo-synthesis has depicted over 90% of the nodules seen on the CT scan. The corresponding figure for chest radiography has been <30%. In the detection studies, the lesion-level sensitivity has been ∼ 60% for tomo-synthesis and 20% for chest radiography. In one of the detection studies, an analysis of all false-positive nodules was performed. This analysis showed that all findings had morphological correlates on the CT examinations. The majority of the false-positive nodules were localised in the immediate sub-pleural region. In conclusion, chest tomo-synthesis is an improved chest radiography method, which can be used to optimise the use of CT resources, thereby reducing the radiation dose to the patient population. However, there are some limitations with chest tomo-synthesis. For example, patients undergoing tomo-synthesis have to be able to stand still and hold their breath firmly for 10 s. Also, chest tomo-synthesis has a limited depth resolution, which may explain why pathology in the sub-pleural region is more difficult to interpret and artefacts from medical devices may occur. (authors)

  8. Computer-aided recognition of emphysema on digital chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Computed tomography (CT) is the benchmark for diagnosis emphysema, but is costly and imparts a substantial radiation burden to the patient. Objective: To develop a computer-aided procedure that allows recognition of emphysema on digital chest radiography by using simple descriptors of the lung shape. The procedure was tested against CT. Methods: Patients (N = 225), who had undergone postero-anterior and lateral digital chest radiographs and CT for diagnostic purposes, were studied and divided in a derivation (N = 118) and in a validation sample (N = 107). CT images were scored for emphysema using the picture-grading method. Simple descriptors that measure the bending characteristics of the lung profile on chest radiography were automatically extracted from the derivation sample, and applied to train a neural network to assign a probability of emphysema between 0 and 1. The diagnostic performance of the procedure was described by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: AUC was 0.985 (95% confidence interval, 0.965-0.998) in the derivation sample, and 0.975 (95% confidence interval, 0.936-0.998) in the validation sample. At a probability cutpoint of 0.55, the procedure yielded 92% sensitivity and 96% specificity in the derivation sample; 90% sensitivity and 97% specificity in the validation sample. False negatives on chest radiography had trace or mild emphysema on CT. Conclusions: The computer-aided procedure is simple and inexpensive, and permits quick recognition of emphysema on digital chest radiographs.

  9. Computer-aided recognition of emphysema on digital chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miniati, Massimo, E-mail: Massimo.Miniati@unifi.it [Department of Medical and Surgical Critical Care, University of Florence, 50134 Florence (Italy); Coppini, Giuseppe; Monti, Simonetta [Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Bottai, Matteo [Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Division of Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, 29208 Columbia, SC (United States); Paterni, Marco; Ferdeghini, Ezio Maria [Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Background: Computed tomography (CT) is the benchmark for diagnosis emphysema, but is costly and imparts a substantial radiation burden to the patient. Objective: To develop a computer-aided procedure that allows recognition of emphysema on digital chest radiography by using simple descriptors of the lung shape. The procedure was tested against CT. Methods: Patients (N = 225), who had undergone postero-anterior and lateral digital chest radiographs and CT for diagnostic purposes, were studied and divided in a derivation (N = 118) and in a validation sample (N = 107). CT images were scored for emphysema using the picture-grading method. Simple descriptors that measure the bending characteristics of the lung profile on chest radiography were automatically extracted from the derivation sample, and applied to train a neural network to assign a probability of emphysema between 0 and 1. The diagnostic performance of the procedure was described by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: AUC was 0.985 (95% confidence interval, 0.965-0.998) in the derivation sample, and 0.975 (95% confidence interval, 0.936-0.998) in the validation sample. At a probability cutpoint of 0.55, the procedure yielded 92% sensitivity and 96% specificity in the derivation sample; 90% sensitivity and 97% specificity in the validation sample. False negatives on chest radiography had trace or mild emphysema on CT. Conclusions: The computer-aided procedure is simple and inexpensive, and permits quick recognition of emphysema on digital chest radiographs.

  10. A visual query-by-example image database for chest CT images: potential role as a decision and educational support tool for radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, Giuseppe; Marsiglia, Hugo Raul; Pigatto, Francesca; Basilicata, Antonio; Gargiulo, Mario; Abate, Andrea Francesco; Nappi, Michele; Pulley, Jenny; Sasso, Francesco Silvano

    2005-03-01

    Primary reading or further evaluation of diagnostic imaging examination often needs a comparison between the actual findings and the relevant prior images of the same patient or similar radiological data found in other patients. This support is of clinical importance and may have significant effects on physicians' examination reading efficiency, service-quality, and work satisfaction. We developed a visual query-by-example image database for storing and retrieving chest CT images by means of a visual browser Image Management Environment (IME) and tested its retrieval efficiency. The visual browser IME included four fundamental features (segmentation, indexing, quick load and recall, user-friendly interface) in an integrated graphical environment for a user-friendly image database management. The system was tested on a database of 2000 chest CT images, randomly chosen from the digital archives of our institutions. A sample of eight heterogeneous images were used as queries and, for each of them a team of three expert radiologists selected the most similar images from the database (a set of 15 images containing similar abnormalities in the same position of the query). The sensitivity and the positive predictive factor, both averaged over the 8 test queries and 15 answers, were respectively 0.975 and 0.91 The IME system is currently under evaluation at our institutions as an experimental application. We consider it a useful work-in-progress tool for clinical practice facilitating searches for a variety of radiological tasks. PMID:15937719

  11. Radiation dose in cardiac CT angiography: Protocols and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims to evaluate the radiation dose exposure of patients submitted to cardiac computed tomography angiography. The effective dose was obtained from the product of dose-length product values and the conversion factor established in the European Working Group for Guidelines on Quality Criteria in CT. The image noise and contrast-and signal-to-noise ratios were obtained for all images. Sixty-four- and 256-slice CT angiographies were used in 211 (68.5 %) and 97 (31.5 %) patients, respectively. The calculated mean effective dose with prospective CT angiography was 6.0±1.0 mSv and the retrospective mode was 8.4±1.2 mSv. The mean image noise values were 38.5±9.5 and 21.4±5.3 for prospective and retrospective modes, respectively. It was observed that the image noise increased by 44.4 % using a prospective mode. Prospective CT angiography reduces radiation dose by ∼29 % compared with the retrospective mode, while maintaining diagnostic image quality and the ability to assess obstructions in patients. (authors)

  12. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  13. A comparison of radiation dose measured in CT dosimetry phantoms with calculations using EGS4 and voxel-based computational models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT is a high-dose examination and possibly the dominant contributor to dose from diagnostic radiology. Estimates of organ doses are obtained from Monte Carlo calculations and used to quantify radiation risk. To ensure the validity of using Monte Carlo calculations to estimate actual dose, measurements must be compared with calculations. We have measured doses to CT head and chest dosimetry phantoms and compared them with Monte Carlo (EGS4) calculated doses in voxel-based computational models of the phantoms. The simulation used an x-ray spectrum calculated from the specified values of the scanner's x-ray tube parameters. The scanner's beam-shaping filter was included in the modelling. Measured and calculated doses to both the head and chest phantoms agreed to within 7%. The inclusion of Rayleigh scattering in the calculations has a significant effect if only one slice is scanned but not if multiple slices are scanned. (author)

  14. Multiscale registration of planning CT and daily cone beam CT images for adaptive radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is the incorporation of daily images in the radiotherapy treatment process so that the treatment plan can be evaluated and modified to maximize the amount of radiation dose to the tumor while minimizing the amount of radiation delivered to healthy tissue. Registration of planning images with daily images is thus an important component of ART. In this article, the authors report their research on multiscale registration of planning computed tomography (CT) images with daily cone beam CT (CBCT) images. The multiscale algorithm is based on the hierarchical multiscale image decomposition of E. Tadmor, S. Nezzar, and L. Vese [Multiscale Model. Simul. 2(4), pp. 554-579 (2004)]. Registration is achieved by decomposing the images to be registered into a series of scales using the (BV, L2) decomposition and initially registering the coarsest scales of the image using a landmark-based registration algorithm. The resulting transformation is then used as a starting point to deformably register the next coarse scales with one another. This procedure is iterated at each stage using the transformation computed by the previous scale registration as the starting point for the current registration. The authors present the results of studies of rectum, head-neck, and prostate CT-CBCT registration, and validate their registration method quantitatively using synthetic results in which the exact transformations our known, and qualitatively using clinical deformations in which the exact results are not known.

  15. Use of omental pedicle flap for radiation induced chest wall ulcer. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 79-year-old female with breast carcinoma undergoing a classical Halsted radical mastectomy followed by irradiation (total; 180 Gy) 20 years before developed a left anterior chest wall ulcer. The ulcer was 10.0 x 8.0 cm in size with osteolysis of 3rd, 4th and 5th ribs, exposed pericardium, and parietal pleura with a pleuro-cutaneous fistula. After thorough debridement, an omental pedicle flap was transposed onto the chest wall defect and subsequently covered using a split-skin graft. The omental pedicle flap was 90% effective in covering the pericardial defect and resulted in a complete closure of the pleuro-cutaneous fistula. This report emphasises that an omental pedicle flap is effective in the treatment of radio-necrosis of the chest wall and also stresses the importance of judging the extent of debridement of radio-necrotic tissue. (author)

  16. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the economic impact of integrating coronary CT angiography (cCTA) or whole chest “triple-rule-out” CTA (TRO-CTA) in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain. Materials and methods: 100 consecutive emergency department patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for ACS underwent cCTA or TRO-CTA (cCTA group). Diagnostic performance, rate and length of hospitalization, hospital costs, hospital reimbursement and hospital profit were analyzed. All findings were compared to those of 100 different patients with acute chest pain that were evaluated with a standard of care (SOC) diagnostic algorithm (SOC group) that did not include cCTA. Diagnostic performance (“safety”) of both algorithms was defined as the absence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) over a 90-day follow-up period. Results: In the cCTA group 60/100 patients were safely discharged at the same day. 19/100 patients were hospitalized due to significant coronary stenosis on cCTA, which was confirmed by invasive coronary catheterization (ICC) in 17/19 patients. Relevant non-coronary disease that led to hospitalization were found in 21 patients of the cCTA group. In the SOC group all patients were hospitalized. 87 of these hospitalized patients underwent ICC for exclusion of coronary artery stenosis. A significant coronary artery stenosis was found in only 25 of these patients. Within the cCTA group no patient suffered from MACE over the 90-day follow-up period. In the SOC group 2 patients were rehospitalized during the 90-day follow-up period due to recurrent chest pain and 1 patient because of a pseudoaneurym of the left femoral artery after ICC. The median hospital costs per patient were significantly lower in the cCTA group than in the SOC group (428.9€ vs. 1575.0€, p < 0.001). The median reimbursement of the cCTA group was less compared to the SOC group (589.8€ vs. 2412.1€, p < 0.001) and patients in the cCTA group gained less profit than

  17. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzler, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.henzler@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Gruettner, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.gruettner@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Meyer, Mathias, E-mail: mr.meyer.mathias@gmail.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Rothhaar, Baerbel, E-mail: baerbel.rothhaar@umm.de [Business Development – Medical Controlling, University Medical Center, Mannheim (Germany); Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Apfaltrer@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Metzger, Franz, E-mail: franz.metzger@umm.de [Business Development – Medical Controlling, University Medical Center, Mannheim (Germany); Borggrefe, Martin, E-mail: martin.borggrefe@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoenberg, Stefan O., E-mail: stefan.schoenberg@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); and others

    2013-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the economic impact of integrating coronary CT angiography (cCTA) or whole chest “triple-rule-out” CTA (TRO-CTA) in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain. Materials and methods: 100 consecutive emergency department patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for ACS underwent cCTA or TRO-CTA (cCTA group). Diagnostic performance, rate and length of hospitalization, hospital costs, hospital reimbursement and hospital profit were analyzed. All findings were compared to those of 100 different patients with acute chest pain that were evaluated with a standard of care (SOC) diagnostic algorithm (SOC group) that did not include cCTA. Diagnostic performance (“safety”) of both algorithms was defined as the absence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) over a 90-day follow-up period. Results: In the cCTA group 60/100 patients were safely discharged at the same day. 19/100 patients were hospitalized due to significant coronary stenosis on cCTA, which was confirmed by invasive coronary catheterization (ICC) in 17/19 patients. Relevant non-coronary disease that led to hospitalization were found in 21 patients of the cCTA group. In the SOC group all patients were hospitalized. 87 of these hospitalized patients underwent ICC for exclusion of coronary artery stenosis. A significant coronary artery stenosis was found in only 25 of these patients. Within the cCTA group no patient suffered from MACE over the 90-day follow-up period. In the SOC group 2 patients were rehospitalized during the 90-day follow-up period due to recurrent chest pain and 1 patient because of a pseudoaneurym of the left femoral artery after ICC. The median hospital costs per patient were significantly lower in the cCTA group than in the SOC group (428.9€ vs. 1575.0€, p < 0.001). The median reimbursement of the cCTA group was less compared to the SOC group (589.8€ vs. 2412.1€, p < 0.001) and patients in the cCTA group gained less profit than

  18. Chest Wall Thickness Measurements and the Dosimetric Implications for Male Radiation Workers at the KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using ultrasound techniques, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has measured chest wall thicknesses of a group of male workers at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. A site-specific biometric equation has been developed for these workers. Chest wall thickness is an important modifier on lung counting efficiency. These data have been put into the perspective of the ICRP recommended dose limits for occupationally exposed workers:100 mSv in a 5-year period with a maximum of 50 mSv in any one year. For measured chest wall thicknesses of 1.9 cm to 4.1 cm and a 30 min counting time, the achievable MDAs for natural uranium in the KAERI lung counter vary from 5.75 mg to 11.28 mg. These values are close to, or even exceed, the predicted amounts of natural uranium that will remain in the lung (absorption type M and S) after an intake equal to the Annual Limit on Intake corresponding to a committed dose of 20 mSv. This paper shows that the KAERI lung counter probably cannot detect an intake of Type S natural uranium in a worker with a chest wall thickness equal to the average value (2.7 cm) under routine counting conditions

  19. Survey of radiation exposure for adult and pediatric patients undergoing CT procedures in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patient exposure from CT is among the highest in diagnostic radiology and contributes an increasingly greater proportion of the total collective dose from man-made sources of radiation. In addition, pediatric CT scans are often performed with the protocol used for a typical adult size. Recent dose surveys have indicated a large scope for dose reduction without compromising image quality required for the diagnosis. In Latin America the patient doses exposures from CT procedures are not estimated. The objective of this work was to evaluate the patient doses in routine procedures and analyze the adults and pediatrics protocols promoting a regional survey supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. As many as 30 hospitals from eleven Latin American countries participated in the survey. Scanning parameters of routine procedures were collected using specific questionnaires distributed to all participating hospitals. The values of CVOL and PKL were estimated based on the nCW established in the literature for each scanner. For the head scans CVOL values varied between 4 and 150 mGy and the PKL from 62-to 1780 mGy cm for adults, and CVOL from 7 to 90 mGy and PKL from 36 to 990 mGy cm for children. Values for abdomen scans CVOL values varied between 1 and 43 mGy and the PKL from 40 to 2192 mGy cm for adults, and CVOL from 1 to 81 mGy and PKL from 6 to 1560 mGy cm for children. Similar ranges were found for chest and pelvis scans. These results are compatibles with those from literature and indicate a large potential for optimization and dose reduction. However, some information about the technical factors, especially mAs, seems to be incoherent for the exam to obtain the image quality required. It indicates the inadequate training and insufficient knowledge of the scanner staff. (author)

  20. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source dual-energy CT: Radiation dose and image quality

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Lifeng; Christner, Jodie A.; Leng, Shuai; Wang, Jia; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the image quality of virtual monochromatic images synthesized from dual-source dual-energy computed tomography (CT) in comparison with conventional polychromatic single-energy CT for the same radiation dose.

  1. Radiographic and CT features of radiation-induced organizing pneumonia syndrome after breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate radiographic and computed tomography features of radiation-induced organizing pneumonia syndrome after breast-conserving surgery. The appearances and distribution of lung parenchymal abnormalities were retrospectively analyzed on chest radiographs (n=12) and computed tomography scan images (n=10) of 12 women (range 37-78 years, mean 55.8 years) with radiation-induced organizing pneumonia syndrome after breast-conserving surgery. The principal radiographic feature was an airspace filling pattern in all patients that involved the middle and lower lung zones in 10 of the 12 patients. Multi-focal lesions manifesting airspace consolidation surrounded by ground-glass opacities were the predominant CT finding in all 10 of these patients. The main lesion was predominantly located in the lung periphery in nine patients and contiguously extended to the central portion of the lung in seven patients. Frequent ancillary findings were airway dilation within the consolidation and lobar volume loss in nine and eight patients, respectively. All had solitary (6/10) or multifocal (4/10) distant lung opacities, mostly consistent with the finding of ground-glass opacities (9/10). Migration of the lung disease was observed in ten patients on subsequent radiographs. The cardinal radiologic feature of this syndrome is airspace consolidation surrounded by ground-glass opacification with airway dilation and volume loss, involving primarily the irradiated, subpleural area, along with distant opacities. (author)

  2. Low-dose ECG-gated 64-slices helical CT angiography of the chest: evaluation of image quality in 105 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Agostino, A.G.; Remy-Jardin, M.; Khalil, C.; Remy, J. [University Center of Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Delannoy-Deken, V.; Duhamel, A. [University of Lille, Department of Medical Statistics, Lille (France); Flohr, T. [Siemens Medical, Research and Development Department, CT Division, Forchheim (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate image quality of low-dose electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated multislice helical computed tomography (CT) angiograms of the chest. One hundred and five consecutive patients with a regular sinus rhythm (72 men; 33 women) underwent ECG-gated CT angiographic examination of the chest without administration of beta blockers using the following parameters: (a) collimation 32 x 0.6 mm with z-flying focal spot for the acquisition of 64 overlapping 0.6-mm slices, rotation time 0.33 s, pitch 0.3; (b) 120 kV, 200 mAs; (c) use of two dose modulation systems, including adjustment of the mAs setting to the patient's size and anatomical shape and an ECG-controlled tube current. Subjective and objective image quality was evaluated by two radiologists in consensus on 3-mm-thick scans reconstructed at 55% of the response rate (RR) interval. The population and protocol characteristics included: (a) a mean [{+-}standard deviation (SD)] body mass index (BMI) of 24.47 ({+-}4.64); (b) a mean ({+-}SD) heart rate of 72.04 ({+-}15.76) bpm; (c) a mean ({+-}SD) scanning time of 18.3 ({+-}2.73) s; (d) a mean ({+-}SD) dose-length product (DLP) value of 260.57 ({+-}83.67) mGy/cm; (e) an estimated average effective dose of 4.95 ({+-}1.59) mSv. Subjective noise was depicted in a total of nine examinations (8.5%), always rated as mild. Objective noise was assessed by measuring the standard deviation of pixel values in a homogeneous region of interest within the trachea and descending aorta; SD was 15.91 HU in the trachea and 22.16 HU in the descending aorta, with no significant difference in the mean value of the standard deviations between the four categories of BMI except for obese patients, who had a higher mean SD within the aorta. Interpolation artefacts were depicted in 22 patients, with a mean heart rate significantly lower than that of patients without interpolation artifacts, rated as mild in 11 patients and severe in 11 patients. The severity of

  3. Measurement of radiation dose in cerebral CT perfusion study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiation dose in cerebral perfusion studies with a multi-detector row CT (MDCT) scanner on various voltage and current settings by using a human head phantom. Following the CT perfusion study protocol, continuous cine scans (1 sec/rotation x 60 sec) consisting of four 5-mm-thick contiguous slices were performed three times at variable tube voltages of 80 kV, 100 kV, 120 kV, and 140 kV with the same tube current setting of 200 mA and on variable current settings of 50 mA, 100 mA, 150 mA, and 200 mA with the same tube voltage of 80 kV. Radiation doses were measured using a total of 41 thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) placed in the human head phantom. Thirty-six TLDs were inside and three were on the surface of the slice of the X-ray beam center, and two were placed on the surface 3 cm caudal assuming the lens position. Average radiation doses of surface, inside, and lens increased in proportion to the increases of tube voltage and tube current. The lowest inside dose was 87.6±15.3 mGy, and the lowest surface dose was 162.5±6.7 mGy at settings of 80 kV and 50 mA. The highest inside dose was 1,591.5±179.7 mGy, and the highest surface dose was 2,264.6±123.7 mGy at 140 kV-200 mA. At 80 kV-50 mA, the average radiation dose of lens was the lowest at 5.5±0.0 mGy. At 140 kV-200 mA the radiation dose of lens was the highest at 127.2±0.6 mGy. In cerebral CT perfusion study, radiation dose can vary considerably. Awareness of the patient's radiation dose is recommended. (author)

  4. Influence of 'optical illusion' on the detectability of pneumothorax in diagnosis for chest CT images. Substantiation by visual psychological simulation images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some cases have been reported in which an optical illusion of lightness perception influences the detectability in diagnosis of low-density hematoma in head CT images in addition to the visual impression of the photographic density of the brain. Therefore, in this study, the author attempted to compare the detectability in diagnosis for chest images with pneumothorax using visual subjective evaluation, and investigated the influence of optical illusion on that detectability in diagnosis. Results indicated that in the window setting of lung, on such an occasion when the low-absorption free space with pneumothorax forms a crescent or the reduced lung borders on the chest-wall, an optical illusion in which the visual impression on the difference of the film contrast between the lung and the low-absorption free space with pneumothorax was psychologically emphasized when contrast was observed. In all cases the detectability in diagnosis for original images with the white thorax and mediastinum was superior to virtual images. Further, in case of the virtual double window setting of lung, thorax, and mediastinum, under the influence of the difference in the radiological anatomy of thorax and mediastinum as a result of the grouping theories of lightness computation, an optical illusion different from the original images was observed. (author)

  5. Estimation of frequency and pretest probability of CAD in patients presenting with recent onset chest pain by multi-detector CT angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Muayad Sultan

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: CAD was seen in 77.5% in those with recent onset chest pain. Higher incidence of significant CAD was seen in hypertensive and diabetic patients. Family history is still not a reliable factor in our society. Male patient <60 years old has higher incidence of CAD than female in same age group. Pretest probability for CAD is a simple and important test as all patients in higher probability have CAD and most of them have significant disease so it is better to direct referral of them to conventional angiography to gain a benefit from direct intervention, radiation and cost benefit.

  6. The chest features of patients with the novel influenza type A H1N1 on high resolution CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the chest features of patients with the novel influenza type A H1N1 on HRCT. Methods: One hundred and seventy-two chest HRCT examinations on 163 cases with Influenza type A H1N1 (9 cases were reexamed) were retrospectively analyzed using standard pulmonary window and mediastinal window, respectively. HRCT imaging appearances were summarized. Results: Ninety-seven cases showed normal on chest HRCT, while the others showed abnormalities of parenchymal and interstitial. Among them, HRCT identified ground-glass opacity in 35 cases (53.0%), centrilobular nodules in 30 cases (45.5%), thickening of intralobular septa in 31 cases (47.0%), intralobular thin reticulation and micro-nodule in 8 cases (12.1%), single-lobular inflammation in 19 cases (28.8%), consolidation of lung (the large consolidation and multiple small consolidations) in 15 cases (22.7%), pulmonary atelectasis in 3 cases (4.5%), and irregular lines in 2 cases (3.0%). Pleurisy was also revealed including 8 cases with right pleurisy, 5 cases with left pleurisy, 5 cases with left pleurisy, and 19 cases with bilateral pleurisy. Mediastinal and axillary lymphadenopathy were found in 7 cases, who were spared of pleural effusion. All above abnormalities resolved quickly after anti-virus treatment. Conclusion: Parenchymal and interstitial abnormalities, mediastinum and axillary fossa lymphadenopathy, and pleural effusion were the common findings on HRCT in patients with Influenza type A H1N1, which were similar to those of other viral pneumonia. (authors)

  7. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. ...

  8. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! ...

  9. Detailed analysis of the density change on chest CT of COPD using non-rigid registration of inspiration/expiration CT scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Young [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jeollabuk-do (Korea, Republic of); University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Joon Beom; Lee, Hyun Joo; Kim, Namkug; Lee, Eunsol; Lee, Sang Min; Oh, Sang Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hye Jeon [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, and Clinical Research Center for Chronic Obstructive Airway Diseases, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-14

    One objective was to evaluate the air trapping index (ATI), measured by inspiration/expiration CT, in COPD patients and nonsmokers. Another objective was to assess the association between the pulmonary function test (PFT) and CT parameters such as ATI or other indices, separately in the whole lung, in emphysema, and in hyperinflated and normal lung areas. One hundred and thirty-eight COPD patients and 29 nonsmokers were included in our study. The ATI, the emphysema index (EI), the gas trapping index (Exp -856) and expiration/inspiration ratio of mean lung density (E/Iratio of MLD) were measured on CT. The values of the whole lung, of emphysema, and of hyperinflated and normal lung areas were compared and then correlated with various PFT parameters. Compared with nonsmokers, COPD patients showed a higher ATI in the whole lung and in each lung lesion (all P < 0.05). The ATI showed a higher correlation than EI with FEF{sub 25-75%}, RV and RV/TLC, and was comparable to Exp -856 and the E/I ratio of MLD. The ATI of emphysema and hyperinflated areas on CT showed better correlation than the normal lung area with PFT parameters. Detailed analysis of density change at inspiration and expiration CT of COPD can provide new insights into pulmonary functional impairment in each lung area. (orig.)

  10. Detailed analysis of the density change on chest CT of COPD using non-rigid registration of inspiration/expiration CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One objective was to evaluate the air trapping index (ATI), measured by inspiration/expiration CT, in COPD patients and nonsmokers. Another objective was to assess the association between the pulmonary function test (PFT) and CT parameters such as ATI or other indices, separately in the whole lung, in emphysema, and in hyperinflated and normal lung areas. One hundred and thirty-eight COPD patients and 29 nonsmokers were included in our study. The ATI, the emphysema index (EI), the gas trapping index (Exp -856) and expiration/inspiration ratio of mean lung density (E/Iratio of MLD) were measured on CT. The values of the whole lung, of emphysema, and of hyperinflated and normal lung areas were compared and then correlated with various PFT parameters. Compared with nonsmokers, COPD patients showed a higher ATI in the whole lung and in each lung lesion (all P 25-75%, RV and RV/TLC, and was comparable to Exp -856 and the E/I ratio of MLD. The ATI of emphysema and hyperinflated areas on CT showed better correlation than the normal lung area with PFT parameters. Detailed analysis of density change at inspiration and expiration CT of COPD can provide new insights into pulmonary functional impairment in each lung area. (orig.)

  11. Low dose multi-detector CT of the chest (iLEAD Study): Visual ranking of different simulated mAs levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Detailed evaluation of the lung parenchyma might be impaired by use of low dose CT as image noise increases and subsequently image quality decreases. The aim of our study was to determine the accuracy of visual perception of differences in image quality and noise at low dose chest CT. Materials and methods: Forty-four patients suffering from emphysema underwent CT (Aquilion-16, 120 kV, 150 mAs, 1 mm-collimation). Original raw data were used for simulation of 10 different mAs settings from 10 mAs to 100 mAs in 10 mAs increments. Three representative hard copy images (carina, 4 cm above, 5 cm below) were printed for evaluation of lung parenchyma (high-resolution kernel, lung window) and mediastinum (soft-kernel, soft tissue window). Ranking of expected low mAs level was performed for lung and soft tissue separately based on visual perception by three-blinded chest radiologist independently. Results were compared to the real simulated mAs. Results: The accuracy for correct ranking of the original 150 mAs scan was 89% for lung and 86% for soft tissue while it was 99% for the simulated 10 mAs for both windows. In comparison to the lowest mAs a significant error increase was found for the lung at 60-100 mAs (with error increase of 30-47%) for reader-I; 60-100 mAs for (33-64%) for reader-II and 70-100 mAs (38-57%) for reader-III. For the soft tissue: 60-150 mAs (with error increase of 28-63%) for reader-I; 50-100 mAs (35-56%) for reader-II and 50-90 mAs (35-40%) for reader-III. Conclusion: Simulated dose levels below 60 mAs (=42 mAseff) were clearly differentiated from higher dose levels by all readers. Therefore, imaging doses could be lowered down to 60 mAs without a diagnostically relevant increase in noise impairing image quality.

  12. Low dose multi-detector CT of the chest (iLEAD Study): Visual ranking of different simulated mAs levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Ruprecht-Karls-University, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology (E010), German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: julia.leyzaporozhan@gmail.com; Ley, Sebastian [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Ruprecht-Karls-University, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology (E010), German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Krummenauer, Frank [Clinical Epidemiology and Health Economy Unit, Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital, Dresden (Germany); Ohno, Yoshiharu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Hatabu, Hiroto [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Ruprecht-Karls-University, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Detailed evaluation of the lung parenchyma might be impaired by use of low dose CT as image noise increases and subsequently image quality decreases. The aim of our study was to determine the accuracy of visual perception of differences in image quality and noise at low dose chest CT. Materials and methods: Forty-four patients suffering from emphysema underwent CT (Aquilion-16, 120 kV, 150 mAs, 1 mm-collimation). Original raw data were used for simulation of 10 different mAs settings from 10 mAs to 100 mAs in 10 mAs increments. Three representative hard copy images (carina, 4 cm above, 5 cm below) were printed for evaluation of lung parenchyma (high-resolution kernel, lung window) and mediastinum (soft-kernel, soft tissue window). Ranking of expected low mAs level was performed for lung and soft tissue separately based on visual perception by three-blinded chest radiologist independently. Results were compared to the real simulated mAs. Results: The accuracy for correct ranking of the original 150 mAs scan was 89% for lung and 86% for soft tissue while it was 99% for the simulated 10 mAs for both windows. In comparison to the lowest mAs a significant error increase was found for the lung at 60-100 mAs (with error increase of 30-47%) for reader-I; 60-100 mAs for (33-64%) for reader-II and 70-100 mAs (38-57%) for reader-III. For the soft tissue: 60-150 mAs (with error increase of 28-63%) for reader-I; 50-100 mAs (35-56%) for reader-II and 50-90 mAs (35-40%) for reader-III. Conclusion: Simulated dose levels below 60 mAs (=42 mAs{sub eff}) were clearly differentiated from higher dose levels by all readers. Therefore, imaging doses could be lowered down to 60 mAs without a diagnostically relevant increase in noise impairing image quali0008.

  13. Can the Physicians or Surgions Do without Chest Radiograph?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Bakhshayeshkaram

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available   "nThe question is how much information is there in chest radiographs ? "nWe can consider the approximate heart size. Rough quantification of heart failure, very basic anatomy of the heart. The chest radiograph is widely available, cheap and very low long term risk of radiation. Chest radiographs are required in the initial consultation of heart or lung diseases. Follow-up radiographs are only required in certain situations. Chest radiographs contain significant information. But nowadays we look less critically, because it is easy to order echo, CT or MRI. Examples of frequently encountered abnormalities seen in our daily practice: "n-Change in hilar size or adenopathy "n-Alteration in hilar contour "n-Bronchial wall thickening "n-Obscuration of normal hilar structures "n   

  14. Coronary artery calcification in clinical practice: what we have learned and why should it routinely be reported on chest CT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemesh, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    The recent acceptance of low dose chest computed tomography (LDCT) as a screening modality for early lung cancer detection will significantly increase the number of LDCT among high risk population. The target subjects are at the same time at high risk to develop cardiovascular (CV) events. The routine report on coronary artery calcification (CAC) will therefore, enhances the screening benefit by providing the clinicians with an additive powerful risk stratification tool for the management or primary prevention of CV events. This review will provide the radiologists with helpful information for the daily practice regarding on what is CAC, its clinical applications and how to diagnose, quantify and report on CAC while reading the LDCT. PMID:27195277

  15. Management of radiation necrosis of the chest wall following mastectomy: a new treatment option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for covering areas of osteoradionecrosis in the medial aspect of the chest wall has been described. Utilizing a tissue expander, the skin was stretched sufficiently to obtain a suitable length whereby the medial defect could be covered and the donor site closed primarily. Such an operative approach should be considered when the patient presents with a medially located ulcer of small to moderate size and when nonirradiated skin is regionally available. Using this technique, long myocutaneous flaps that require extensive dissection, loss of functioning muscle, and resulting donor defects are avoided

  16. Radiation protection in newer medical imaging techniques: CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multislice/detector computed tomography (CT) scanning, applied to visualization of the colon in CT colonography (CTC), also known as virtual colonoscopy (VC), is a relatively new application of CT introduced in recent years. The possibility of its application in population screening techniques raises a number of questions. Effort is required to ensure that the benefit of this new practice will not pose an undue level of detriment to the individual in multiple examinations. For practitioners and regulators, it is evident that innovation has been driven by both the imaging industry and by an ever increasing array of new applications generated and validated in the clinical environment. Regulation, industrial standardization, safety procedures and advice on best practice lag (inevitably) behind the industrial and clinical innovations being achieved. This series of Safety Reports (Nos 58, 60 and 61) is designed to help fill this growing vacuum, by bringing up to date and timely advice to bear on the problems involved. Under its statutory responsibility to establish standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation and to provide for worldwide application of these standards, the IAEA has developed the Fundamental Safety Principles and the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS). The BSS was issued by the IAEA and co-sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization (WHO), and requires radiation protection of patients undergoing medical exposures through justification of the procedures involved and through optimization. The IAEA programme on radiation protection of patients encourages the reduction of patient doses without losing diagnostic benefits. To facilitate this

  17. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and telemedicine network system for chest diagnosis based on multislice CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Eguchi, Kenji; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kakinuma, Ryutaru; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2009-02-01

    Mass screening based on multi-helical CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. Moreover, the doctor who diagnoses a medical image is insufficient in Japan. To overcome these problems, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images, a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification and a vertebra body analysis algorithm for quantitative evaluation of osteoporosis likelihood by using helical CT scanner for the lung cancer mass screening. The functions to observe suspicious shadow in detail are provided in computer-aided diagnosis workstation with these screening algorithms. We also have developed the telemedicine network by using Web medical image conference system with the security improvement of images transmission, Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system. Biometric face authentication used on site of telemedicine makes "Encryption of file" and "Success in login" effective. As a result, patients' private information is protected. We can share the screen of Web medical image conference system from two or more web conference terminals at the same time. An opinion can be exchanged mutually by using a camera and a microphone that are connected with workstation. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have developed a new computer-aided workstation and a new telemedicine network that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. The results of this study indicate that our radiological information system without film by using computer-aided diagnosis workstation and our telemedicine network system can increase diagnostic speed, diagnostic accuracy and

  18. Quantitative assessment of radiation-induced lung changes by computerized optical densitometry of routine chest x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REAT values, and the standard deviation was estimated at 1.35%. (d) REAT values estimated with this assay were significantly correlated with the scores of two experienced specialists, an oncologist and a radiologist (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient being 0.065, p -8). Conclusion: This assay quantifies radiation-induced lung injury from routine chest x-rays. Thus, it is possible to take advantage of the very large retrospective materials available in most oncological institutions. The assay has been validated in a phantom experiment and shown to be reproducible. Furthermore, it is technically easy to perform

  19. Observation of Allende and Antarctic meteorites by monochromatic X-ray CT based on synchrotron radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Hirano,Tatsumi/Funaki,Minoru/Nagata,Takesi/Taguchi,Isamu/ Hamada,Hiroki/Usami,Katsuhisa/Hayakawa,Kazunobu

    1990-01-01

    Three-dimensional CT images of the Allende meteorite with a high resolution of 10μm have been obtained nondestructively by a monochromatic X-ray computed tomography (CT) based on synchrotron radiation (SR). The metallic minerals, matrix and chondrules can be clearly observed in the CT images. The CT values, which express the image intensity, allow a quantitative elemental analysis including such as difference in the metallic minerals, i. e., pentlandite and troilite, using the comparison of C...

  20. Comparison of radiation dose estimates, image noise, and scan duration in pediatric body imaging for volumetric and helical modes on 320-detector CT and helical mode on 64-detector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced multidetector CT systems facilitate volumetric image acquisition, which offers theoretic dose savings over helical acquisition with shorter scan times. Compare effective dose (ED), scan duration and image noise using 320- and 64-detector CT scanners in various acquisition modes for clinical chest, abdomen and pelvis protocols. ED and scan durations were determined for 64-detector helical, 160-detector helical and volume modes under chest, abdomen and pelvis protocols on 320-detector CT with adaptive collimation and 64-detector helical mode on 64-detector CT without adaptive collimation in a phantom representing a 5-year-old child. Noise was measured as standard deviation of Hounsfield units. Compared to 64-detector helical CT, all acquisition modes on 320-detector CT resulted in lower ED and scan durations. Dose savings were greater for chest (27-46%) than abdomen/pelvis (18-28%) and chest/abdomen/pelvis imaging (8-14%). Noise was similar across scanning modes, although some protocols on 320-detector CT produced slightly higher noise. Dose savings can be achieved for chest, abdomen/pelvis and chest/abdomen/pelvis examinations on 320-detector CT compared to helical acquisition on 64-detector CT, with shorter scan durations. Although noise differences between some modes reached statistical significance, this is of doubtful diagnostic significance and will be studied further in a clinical setting. (orig.)

  1. Use of PET/CT instead of CT-only when planning for radiation therapy does not notably increase life years lost in children being treated for cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Josefine S.; Brodin, Nils Patrik; Christensen, Charlotte Birk;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: PET/CT may be more helpful than CT alone for radiation therapy planning, but the added risk due to higher doses of ionizing radiation is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk of cancer induction and mortality attributable to the [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) PET and CT scans ...

  2. Radiation protection in newer medical imaging techniques: Cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical imaging has seen many developments as it has evolved since the mid-1890s. In the last 30-40 years, the pace of innovation has increased, starting with the introduction of computed tomography (CT) in the early 1970s. During the last decade, the rate of change has accelerated further, in terms of continuing innovation and its global application. Most patient exposure now arises from practices that barely existed two decades ago. These developments are evident in the technology on which this volume is based - multislice/detector CT scanning and its application in cardiac imaging. However, this advance is achieved at the cost of a radiation burden to the individual patient, and possibly to the community, if its screening potential is exploited. Much effort will be required to ensure that the undoubted benefit of this new practice will not pose an undue level of detriment to the individual in multiple examinations. For practitioners and regulators, it is evident that innovation has been driven by both the imaging industry and an increasing array of new applications generated and validated in the clinical environment. Regulation, industrial standardization, safety procedures and advice on best practices lag (inevitably) behind the industrial and clinical innovations. This series of Safety Reports (Nos 58, 60 and 61) is designed to help fill this growing vacuum, by bringing up to date and timely advice from experienced practitioners to bear on the problems involved. The advice in this report has been developed as part of the IAEA's statutory responsibility to establish standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation and to provide for the worldwide application of these standards. The Fundamental Safety Principles and the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) were issued by the IAEA and co-sponsored by organizations including the Food and Agriculture

  3. Effect of automatic exposure control marker with chest radiography in radiation reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ji Sang; Choi, Byoung Wook; Shim, Ji Na; Ahn, Ho Sik; Jin, Duk Eun; Liml, Jae Sik; Kang, Sung Ho [Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Ho [LISTEM, Woonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Mo [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Konyang University, Nonsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    This study focused on effects of patient exposure dose reduction with AEC (Auto Exposure Control) marker that is designed for showing location of AEC in X-ray Chest radiography. It included 880 adults who have to use Chest X-ray Digital Radiography system (DRS, LISTEM, Korea). AEC (Ion chambers are posited in top of both sides) are used to every adult and set X-ray system as Field size 17 x 17 inch, 120 kVp, FFD 180 cm. 440 people of control group are posited on detector to include both sides of lung field and the other 440 people of experimental group are set to contact their lung directly to Ion chamber (making marker to shows location). Then, measured every DAP and, estimated patient effective dose by using PCXMC 2.0. The average age of control group (M:F=245:195) is 53.9 and the average BMI is 23.4. BMI ranges from under weight: 35, normal range: 279, over weight: 106 to obese: 20 and average DAP is 223.56 mGycm2, Mean effective dose is 0.045 mSv. The average age of experimental group (M:F=197:243) is 53.7 and the average BMI is 22.7. BMI ranges from under weight: 34, normal range: 315, over weight: 85 to obese: 6 and average DAP is 207.36 mGycm2, Mean effective dose is 0.041 mSv. Experimental group shows less Mean effective dose as 0.004mSv (9.7%) than control group. Also, patient numbers who got over exposure more than 0.056 mSv (limit point to know efficiency of AEC marker) is 65 in control group(14.7%), 19 in experimental group (4.3%) and take statistics with t-Test. The statistical difference between two groups is 0.006. In order to use proper amount of X-ray in auto exposure controlled chest X-ray system, matching location between ion chamber and body part is needed, and using AEC marker (designed for showing location of ion chamber) is a way to reduce unnecessary patient exposure dose.

  4. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and data base system for chest diagnosis based on multihelical CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images and a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification. We also have developed electronic medical recording system and prototype internet system for the community health in two or more regions by using the Virtual Private Network router, Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system for safety of medical information. The results of this study indicate that our computer-aided diagnosis workstation and network system can increase diagnostic speed, diagnostic accuracy and safety of medical information. (author)

  5. Calcified pulmonary thromboembolism in a child with sickle cell disease: value of multidetector CT in patients with acute chest syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staser, Jonathan A. [Indiana University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Alam, Tariq [Medical College of Ohio, Department of Radiology, Toledo, OH (United States); Applegate, Kimberly [Indiana University Medical Center, Sections of Pediatric Radiology and Health Services Research, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2006-06-15

    The incidence of pulmonary embolism in children is not clearly known, but is believed to be low. Risk factors for pulmonary thromboembolism include central venous catheter, malignancy, surgery, infection, trauma, and congenital hypercoagulable disorders. Children with sickle cell disease are prothrombotic and are at an increased risk of thromboembolism. The incidence of this event is unknown because these children are often not thoroughly imaged. We report here a case of a calcified pulmonary thromboembolism in a child with sickle cell disease and emphasize the use of multidetector CT in detection of pulmonary thromboembolism in children with sickle cell disease. (orig.)

  6. Calcified pulmonary thromboembolism in a child with sickle cell disease: value of multidetector CT in patients with acute chest syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of pulmonary embolism in children is not clearly known, but is believed to be low. Risk factors for pulmonary thromboembolism include central venous catheter, malignancy, surgery, infection, trauma, and congenital hypercoagulable disorders. Children with sickle cell disease are prothrombotic and are at an increased risk of thromboembolism. The incidence of this event is unknown because these children are often not thoroughly imaged. We report here a case of a calcified pulmonary thromboembolism in a child with sickle cell disease and emphasize the use of multidetector CT in detection of pulmonary thromboembolism in children with sickle cell disease. (orig.)

  7. Robotically Driven Interventions: A Method of Using CT Fluoroscopy without Radiation Exposure to the Physician1

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, Stephen B.; Patriciu, Alexandru; Bohlman, Mark E.; Kavoussi, Louis R.; Stoianovici, Dan

    2002-01-01

    Radiation exposure to physicians’ hands during interventional procedures with computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopic guidance may be high. A robot was developed that could hold, orient, and advance a needle, with CT fluoroscopic guidance. This robot could be either computer or joystick controlled. Twenty-three robotically guided percutaneous interventions were performed without complication. Physician radiation exposure was negligible during the CT fluoroscopy–guided procedures.

  8. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Consequently, all patients should be evaluated radiologically after blunt chest trauma to allow timely and appropriate treatment. Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are proven modalities with which to evaluate patients after blunt chest trauma. Over the last several years extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) has gained increasing importance for the initial assessment of seriously injured patients. In the acute phase of severely injured patients eFAST examinations are helpful to exclude pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemopericardium. Chest radiographs may also be used to diagnose a pneumothorax or hemothorax; however, the sensitivity is limited and CT is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate severely injured patients. (orig.)

  9. PET/CT in radiation therapy planning; PET/CT in der Strahlentherapieplanung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosu, A.L. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Krause, B.J. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Nestle, U. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    Regarding treatment planning in radiotherapy PET offers advantages in terms of tumor delineation and the description of biological processes. To define the real impact of this investigation in radiation treatment planning, following experimental, clinical and cost/benefit analysis are required. FDG-PET has a significant impact on GTV and PTV delineation in lung cancer and can detect lymph node involvement and differentiation of malignant tissue from atelectasis. In high-grade gliomas and meningiomas, methionine-PET helps to define the GTV and differentiate tumor from normal tissue. In head and neck cancer, cervix cancer and prostate cancer the value of FDG-PET for radiation treatment planning is still under investigation. For example, FDG-PET can be superior to CT and MRI in the detection of lymph node metastases in head and neck, unknown primary cancer and differentiation of viable tumor tissue after treatment. Therefore, it could play an important role in GTV definition and sparing of normal tissue. For other entities like gastro-intestinal cancer, lymphomas, sarcoma etc., the data of the literature are yet insufficient. The imaging of hypoxia, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, apoptosis and gene expression leads to the identification of different areas of a biologically heterogeneous tumor mass that can be individually targeted using IMRT. In addition, a biological dose distribution can be generated, the so-called dose painting. However, systematical experimental and clinical trials are necessary to validate this hypothesis. (orig.)

  10. PET-CT Fusion in Radiation Management of Patients with Anorectal Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare computed tomography (CT) with positron emission tomography-CT (PET-CT) scans with respect to anorectal tumor volumes, correlation in overlap, and influence on radiation treatment fields and patient care. Patients and Methods: From March to November 2003, 20 patients with rectal cancer and 3 patients with anal cancer were treated with preoperative or definitive chemoradiation, respectively. Computed tomography simulation data generated a CT gross tumor volume (CT-GTV) and CT planning target volume (CT-PTV) and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose PET (FDG-PET) created a PET-GTV and PET-PTV. The PET-CT and CT images were fused using manual coregistration. Patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal therapy to traditional doses. The PET, CT, and overlap volumes (OVs) were measured in cubic centimeters. Results: Mean PET-GTV was smaller than the mean CT-GTV (91.7 vs. 99.6 cm3). The mean OV was 46.7%. As tumor volume increased, PET and CT OV correlated significantly (p 10 and the posttreatment PET standardized uptake value was <6, 100% achieved pathologic downstaging (p = 0.047). Conclusions: Variation in volume was significant, with 17% and 26% of patients requiring a change in treatment fields and patient management, respectively. Positron emission tomography can change the management for anorectal tumors by early detection of metastatic disease or disease outside standard radiation fields

  11. Scatter radiation from chest radiographs: is there a risk to infants in a typical NICU?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the dose of scatter radiation to infants in a NICU in order to determine the minimal safe distance between isolettes. Dose secondary to scattered radiation from an acrylic phantom exposed to vertical and horizontal beam exposures at 56 kVp was measured at 93 cm and 125 cm from the center of the phantom. This corresponds to 2 and 3 ft between standard isolettes, respectively. For horizontal exposures, the dosimeter was placed directly behind a CR plate and scatter dose at 90-degrees and 135-degrees from the incident beam was also measured. Exposures were obtained at 160 mAs and the results were extrapolated to correspond to 2.5 mAs. Four measurements were taken at each point and averaged. At 125 cm and 93 cm there was minimal scatter compared to daily natural background radiation dose (8.493 μGy). Greatest scatter dose obtained from a horizontal beam exposure at 135 from the incident beam was still far below background radiation. Scatter radiation dose from a single exposure as well as cumulative scatter dose from numerous exposures is significantly below natural background radiation. Infants in neighboring isolettes are not at added risk from radiation scatter as long as the isolettes are separated by at least 2 ft. (orig.)

  12. Scatter radiation from chest radiographs: is there a risk to infants in a typical NICU?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinh, Angela M. [Albert Einstein/Yeshiva University, College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Schoenfeld, Alan H.; Levin, Terry L. [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate the dose of scatter radiation to infants in a NICU in order to determine the minimal safe distance between isolettes. Dose secondary to scattered radiation from an acrylic phantom exposed to vertical and horizontal beam exposures at 56 kVp was measured at 93 cm and 125 cm from the center of the phantom. This corresponds to 2 and 3 ft between standard isolettes, respectively. For horizontal exposures, the dosimeter was placed directly behind a CR plate and scatter dose at 90-degrees and 135-degrees from the incident beam was also measured. Exposures were obtained at 160 mAs and the results were extrapolated to correspond to 2.5 mAs. Four measurements were taken at each point and averaged. At 125 cm and 93 cm there was minimal scatter compared to daily natural background radiation dose (8.493 {mu}Gy). Greatest scatter dose obtained from a horizontal beam exposure at 135 from the incident beam was still far below background radiation. Scatter radiation dose from a single exposure as well as cumulative scatter dose from numerous exposures is significantly below natural background radiation. Infants in neighboring isolettes are not at added risk from radiation scatter as long as the isolettes are separated by at least 2 ft. (orig.)

  13. Cone Beam CT: radiation protection aspects and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology related to Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) give three-dimensional (3D) diagnostic results. It allows to give to the patient doses much lower than traditional TC technique. This type of equipment, introduced relatively recently, is rapidly spreading in the field of Radiology and in particular dental and maxillofacial and is meant to be used more and more frequently in clinical practice and in the coming years there will be an increase of radiological examinations performed with this technique. In January 2012 the ANPEQ formed, within the Permanent Commission's technical aspects of radiation protection-health ' the Working Party ' Cone Beam CT ' with the intention to draw up an operating report that provide guidelines for radiological protection of the operators and of the population, in full respect of the relevant operating areas by other operators, such as physicists, doctors etc. In the course of work it is proved the opportunity to share what worked with other associations dealing with radiation protection, AIFM (Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica), AIRP (Associazione Italiana di Radioprotezione), AIRM (Associazione Italiana di Radioprotezione Medica), organising a joint Conference on CBCT which was held at pisa on March 1, 2013. This report collects most of the contributions presented by individual speakers who participated in the Conference, by then state of the art in this innovative method.

  14. Acoustical markers for CAD-detected pulmonary nodules in chest CT: A way to avoid suggestion and distraction of radiologist's attention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Florian; Heindel, Walter; Wormanns, Dag

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the influence of visual and acoustical CAD markers on radiologist's performance with regard to suggestive and distractive effects. Materials and methods: Ten radiologists analyzed 150 pictures of chest CT slices. Every picture contained a visual CAD marker. 100 pictures showed one nodule: CAD marker marked this in 50 cases and in 50 cases a false positive finding (f.p.). The other 50 cases showed no nodule but an f.p. marker. After 3 years same images were presented to thirteen radiologists with only a sound as CAD marker. 55 of 150 images were marked, 30 true positive and 25 f.p. Sensitivity and f.p. rate were calculated for both marker types. Significance between sensitivities and f.p. rates were calculated by multiple-analysis-of-variance (MANOVA). Results: Without CAD mean sensitivity resp. f.p. were 57.7% /.13. In case of correct optical resp. acoustical marker sensitivity increased to 75.6% resp. 63.1%. For incorrect set marker mean f.p. rate increased to .31 resp. .24. MANOVA showed that marker's correctness highly significantly influenced sensitivity (pdistraction effect for misplaced CAD markers. A suggestive effect was remarkable especially for optical markers. However acoustical markers offered less increase of sensitivity.

  15. Lung Cancer Screening with Computer Aided Detection Chest Radiography: Design and Results of a Randomized, Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzone, Peter J.; Obuchowski, Nancy; Phillips, Michael; Risius, Barbara; Bazerbashi, Bana; Meziane, Moulay

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The sensitivity of CT based lung cancer screening for the detection of early lung cancer is balanced by the high number of benign lung nodules identified, the unknown consequences of radiation from the test, and the potential costs of a CT based screening program. CAD chest radiography may improve the sensitivity of standard chest radiography while minimizing the risks of CT based screening. Methods Study subjects were age 40–75 years with 10+ pack-years of smoking and/or an addi...

  16. The communication of the radiation risk from CT in relation to its clinical benefit in the era of personalized medicine. Pt. 1. The radiation risk from CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of radiation carcinogenesis has been debated for decades. Most estimates of the radiation risks from CT have been based on extrapolations from the lifespan follow-up study of atomic bomb survivors and on follow-up studies after therapeutic radiation, using the linear no-threshold theory. Based on this, many population-based projections of induction of future cancers by CT have been published that should not be used to estimate the risk to an individual because of their large margin of error. This has changed recently with the publication of three large international cohort follow-up studies, which link observed cancers to CT scans received in childhood. A fourth ongoing multi-country study in Europe is expected to have enough statistical power to address the limitations of the prior studies. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) report released in 2013 specifically addresses variability in response of the pediatric population exposed to ionizing radiation. Most authorities now conclude that there is enough evidence to link future cancers to the radiation exposure from a single CT scan in childhood but that cancer risk estimates for individuals must be based on the specifics of exposure, age at exposure and absorbed dose to certain tissues. Generalizations are not appropriate, and the communication of the CT risk to individuals should be conducted within the framework of personalized medicine. (orig.)

  17. The communication of the radiation risk from CT in relation to its clinical benefit in the era of personalized medicine. Pt. 1. The radiation risk from CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westra, Sjirk J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    The theory of radiation carcinogenesis has been debated for decades. Most estimates of the radiation risks from CT have been based on extrapolations from the lifespan follow-up study of atomic bomb survivors and on follow-up studies after therapeutic radiation, using the linear no-threshold theory. Based on this, many population-based projections of induction of future cancers by CT have been published that should not be used to estimate the risk to an individual because of their large margin of error. This has changed recently with the publication of three large international cohort follow-up studies, which link observed cancers to CT scans received in childhood. A fourth ongoing multi-country study in Europe is expected to have enough statistical power to address the limitations of the prior studies. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) report released in 2013 specifically addresses variability in response of the pediatric population exposed to ionizing radiation. Most authorities now conclude that there is enough evidence to link future cancers to the radiation exposure from a single CT scan in childhood but that cancer risk estimates for individuals must be based on the specifics of exposure, age at exposure and absorbed dose to certain tissues. Generalizations are not appropriate, and the communication of the CT risk to individuals should be conducted within the framework of personalized medicine. (orig.)

  18. SU-E-I-31: Differences Observed in Radiation Doses Across 2 Similar CT Scanners From Adult Brain-Neck CT Angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the difference in radiation doses from adult Brain-Neck CT angiography (CTA) between two CT scanners. Methods: We collected CT dose index data (CTDIvol, DLP) from adult Brain-Neck CTA performed with two CT scanners (Sensation 64 (S64) and Definition AS (AS), Siemens Healthcare) performed at two of our facilities from Jan 1st to Dec 31th, 2014. X-ray dose management software (Radmetrics, Bayer Healthcare) was used to mine these data. All exams were performed with Tube Current Modulation (Care Dose 4D), tube voltage of 120 kVp, quality reference mAs of 300, beam collimation of 64*0.6 mm. The rotation time was set to 0.5 sec for S64 and 1.0 sec for AS. We also scanned an anthropomorphic skull and chest phantom under routine Brain-Neck CTA protocol with the two scanners and extracted the tube current values from the raw projection data. Results: The mean CTDIvol and DLP in Brain-Neck CTA was 72 mGy and 2554 mGy*cm for AS, which was substantially larger than the mean values of 46 mGy and 1699 mGy*cm for S64. The maximum tube current was 583 mA for most cases on the S64 while the maximum was 666 mA for AS even though the rotation time set for AS was 1.0 sec. Measurements obtained with the anthropomorphic phantom showed that the tube current reached 583 mA at the shoulder region for S64 while it reached to 666 mA for AS. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that substantially different CT doses can Result from Brain-Neck CTA protocols even when similar scanners and similar settings are used. Though both scanners have a similar maximum mA rating, differences in mA were observed through the shoulders, resulting in substantially different CTDIvol values

  19. SU-E-I-31: Differences Observed in Radiation Doses Across 2 Similar CT Scanners From Adult Brain-Neck CT Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, K [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Nagoya, JP (Japan); UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McMillan, K; Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; McNitt-Gray, M [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the difference in radiation doses from adult Brain-Neck CT angiography (CTA) between two CT scanners. Methods: We collected CT dose index data (CTDIvol, DLP) from adult Brain-Neck CTA performed with two CT scanners (Sensation 64 (S64) and Definition AS (AS), Siemens Healthcare) performed at two of our facilities from Jan 1st to Dec 31th, 2014. X-ray dose management software (Radmetrics, Bayer Healthcare) was used to mine these data. All exams were performed with Tube Current Modulation (Care Dose 4D), tube voltage of 120 kVp, quality reference mAs of 300, beam collimation of 64*0.6 mm. The rotation time was set to 0.5 sec for S64 and 1.0 sec for AS. We also scanned an anthropomorphic skull and chest phantom under routine Brain-Neck CTA protocol with the two scanners and extracted the tube current values from the raw projection data. Results: The mean CTDIvol and DLP in Brain-Neck CTA was 72 mGy and 2554 mGy*cm for AS, which was substantially larger than the mean values of 46 mGy and 1699 mGy*cm for S64. The maximum tube current was 583 mA for most cases on the S64 while the maximum was 666 mA for AS even though the rotation time set for AS was 1.0 sec. Measurements obtained with the anthropomorphic phantom showed that the tube current reached 583 mA at the shoulder region for S64 while it reached to 666 mA for AS. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that substantially different CT doses can Result from Brain-Neck CTA protocols even when similar scanners and similar settings are used. Though both scanners have a similar maximum mA rating, differences in mA were observed through the shoulders, resulting in substantially different CTDIvol values.

  20. Reduction of false-positive shadows in computer. Aided diagnosis system for chest x-ray CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report how we have improved our method for reducing the false-positive rate in computer-aided diagnosis in the Lung cancer Screening system by CT (LSCT). We had changed the target size for the detection of cancers from more than 10 mm to more than 5 mm in diameter. As a result of this change, many false positives with a diameter of less than 10 mm were observed. In order to reduce this false-positive rate, we propose a method involving feature analysis of candidate cancers using feature parameters. First, we calculate 13 feature parameters containing 4 new parameters that we have defined. These new parameters were designed to reflect the shape features of candidate cancers less than 10 mm in diameter; specifically, revised circularity, modified elongation, convexity, and the ratio of convergent figures. Next, candidate cancers were divided into 4 classes based on the area and the thickness parameter, and cancers and false positives were distinguished based on the values of the feature parameters in each class. This reduction method was applied to LSCT images of 83 samples, and the method reduced the total number of candidate cancers from 12399 to 977. The average number of false positives per sample was 10.7, without any additional false positives. These results show the effectiveness of the proposed method. (author)

  1. Age Estimation in Living Adults using 3D Volume Rendered CT Images of the Sternal Plastron and Lower Chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldrini, Guillaume; Harter, Valentin; Witte, Yannick; Martrille, Laurent; Blum, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Age estimation is commonly of interest in a judicial context. In adults, it is less documented than in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate age estimation in adults using CT images of the sternal plastron with volume rendering technique (VRT). The evaluation criteria are derived from known methods used for age estimation and are applicable in living or dead subjects. The VRT images of 456 patients were analyzed. Two radiologists performed age estimation independently from an anterior view of the plastron. Interobserver agreement and correlation coefficients between each reader's classification and real age were calculated. The interobserver agreement was 0.86, and the correlation coefficients between readers classifications and real age classes were 0.60 and 0.65. Spearman correlation coefficients were, respectively, 0.89, 0.67, and 0.71. Analysis of the plastron using VRT allows age estimation in vivo quickly and with results similar than methods such as Iscan, Suchey-Brooks, and radiographs used to estimate the age of death. PMID:27092960

  2. Imaging lobular breast carcinoma: comparison of synchrotron radiation DEI-CT technique with clinical CT, mammography and histology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, S [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Bravin, A [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Keyrilaeinen, J [Department of Physical Sciences, POB 64, FIN-00014 Helsinki University (Finland); Fernandez, M [Department of Physical Sciences, POB 64, FIN-00014 Helsinki University (Finland); Suortti, P [Department of Physical Sciences, POB 64, FIN-00014 Helsinki University (Finland); Thomlinson, W [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Tenhunen, M [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 180, FIN-00029 HUS (Finland); Virkkunen, P [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 180, FIN-00029 HUS (Finland); Karjalainen-Lindsberg, M-L [Department of Pathology, HUCH Laboratory Diagnostics, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 400, FIN-00029 HUS (Finland)

    2004-01-21

    Different modalities for imaging cancer-bearing breast tissue samples are described and compared. The images include clinical mammograms and computed tomography (CT) images, CT images with partly coherent synchrotron radiation (SR), and CT and radiography images taken with SR using the diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The images are evaluated by a radiologist and compared with histopathological examination of the samples. Two cases of lobular carcinoma are studied in detail. The indications of cancer are very weak or invisible in the conventional images, but the morphological changes due to invasion of cancer become pronounced in the images taken by the DEI method. The strands penetrating adipose tissue are seen clearly in the DEI-CT images, and the histopathology confirms that some strands contain the so-called 'Indian file' formations of cancer cells. The radiation dose is carefully measured for each of the imaging modalities. The mean glandular dose (MGD) for 50% glandular breast tissue is about 1 mGy in conventional mammography and less than 0.25 mGy in projection DEI, while in the clinical CT imaging the MGD is very high, about 45 mGy. The entrance dose of 95 mGy in DEI-CT imaging gives rise to an MGD of 40 mGy, but the dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude, because the contrast is very large in most images.

  3. Impact of Fractionation and Dose in a Multivariate Model for Radiation-Induced Chest Wall Pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Din, Shaun U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Williams, Eric L.; Jackson, Andrew [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Rosenzweig, Kenneth E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Wu, Abraham J.; Foster, Amanda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yorke, Ellen D. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Rimner, Andreas, E-mail: rimnera@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of patient/tumor characteristics, radiation dose, and fractionation using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model to predict stereotactic body radiation therapy–induced grade ≥2 chest wall pain (CWP2) in a larger series and develop clinically useful constraints for patients treated with different fraction numbers. Methods and Materials: A total of 316 lung tumors in 295 patients were treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy in 3 to 5 fractions to 39 to 60 Gy. Absolute dose–absolute volume chest wall (CW) histograms were acquired. The raw dose-volume histograms (α/β = ∞ Gy) were converted via the LQ model to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (normalized total dose, NTD) with α/β from 0 to 25 Gy in 0.1-Gy steps. The Cox proportional hazards (CPH) model was used in univariate and multivariate models to identify and assess CWP2 exposed to a given physical and NTD. Results: The median follow-up was 15.4 months, and the median time to development of CWP2 was 7.4 months. On a univariate CPH model, prescription dose, prescription dose per fraction, number of fractions, D83cc, distance of tumor to CW, and body mass index were all statistically significant for the development of CWP2. Linear-quadratic correction improved the CPH model significance over the physical dose. The best-fit α/β was 2.1 Gy, and the physical dose (α/β = ∞ Gy) was outside the upper 95% confidence limit. With α/β = 2.1 Gy, V{sub NTD99Gy} was most significant, with median V{sub NTD99Gy} = 31.5 cm{sup 3} (hazard ratio 3.87, P<.001). Conclusion: There were several predictive factors for the development of CWP2. The LQ-adjusted doses using the best-fit α/β = 2.1 Gy is a better predictor of CWP2 than the physical dose. To aid dosimetrists, we have calculated the physical dose equivalent corresponding to V{sub NTD99Gy} = 31.5 cm{sup 3} for the 3- to 5-fraction groups.

  4. Impact of Fractionation and Dose in a Multivariate Model for Radiation-Induced Chest Wall Pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the role of patient/tumor characteristics, radiation dose, and fractionation using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model to predict stereotactic body radiation therapy–induced grade ≥2 chest wall pain (CWP2) in a larger series and develop clinically useful constraints for patients treated with different fraction numbers. Methods and Materials: A total of 316 lung tumors in 295 patients were treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy in 3 to 5 fractions to 39 to 60 Gy. Absolute dose–absolute volume chest wall (CW) histograms were acquired. The raw dose-volume histograms (α/β = ∞ Gy) were converted via the LQ model to equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (normalized total dose, NTD) with α/β from 0 to 25 Gy in 0.1-Gy steps. The Cox proportional hazards (CPH) model was used in univariate and multivariate models to identify and assess CWP2 exposed to a given physical and NTD. Results: The median follow-up was 15.4 months, and the median time to development of CWP2 was 7.4 months. On a univariate CPH model, prescription dose, prescription dose per fraction, number of fractions, D83cc, distance of tumor to CW, and body mass index were all statistically significant for the development of CWP2. Linear-quadratic correction improved the CPH model significance over the physical dose. The best-fit α/β was 2.1 Gy, and the physical dose (α/β = ∞ Gy) was outside the upper 95% confidence limit. With α/β = 2.1 Gy, VNTD99Gy was most significant, with median VNTD99Gy = 31.5 cm3 (hazard ratio 3.87, P<.001). Conclusion: There were several predictive factors for the development of CWP2. The LQ-adjusted doses using the best-fit α/β = 2.1 Gy is a better predictor of CWP2 than the physical dose. To aid dosimetrists, we have calculated the physical dose equivalent corresponding to VNTD99Gy = 31.5 cm3 for the 3- to 5-fraction groups

  5. Dose reduction using Bismuth protectors in chest computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This monography is about the Dose reduction using Bismuth protectors in chest CT. The radiation protection of specific areas is necessary when the tissues or radiosensitive organs are near the path of light beam. The correct use of protection represents a challenge for the radiologist because of the time and materials required. The method used was a prospective investigatio in CHPR (TC service) and the doses was measured with TLD dosimeters. It is important to use these protectors in children hospitals.

  6. The utility of digital subtraction chest radiographs as the detector for the early radiation pneumonitis in breast cancer patients treated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of radiation pneumonitis was reported 1-5% in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy. Early breast cancer has a better prognosis than other cancers, so the patients are expected to have a long disease-free survival. Radiation oncologists should have sensitive detectability for the early and asymptomatic radiation pneumonitis. I investigated prospectively the utility of digital subtraction chest radiography as a detector for radiation pneumonitis. Sixteen women with breast cancer treated by radiotherapy developed radiation pneumonitis between 1994 and 1998 at our university hospital. I analyzed the risk factors for radiation pneumonitis in these patients and compared them with the control group consisting of 50 cases of breast cancer not having radiation pneumonitis. These patients were classified 5 grades in term of the late toxic and radiological signs. The first grade indicated undetectable faint shadow on chest radiographs and the 5th grade demonstrated severe radiation pneumonitis indicated for medication. I performed subtraction of pre-radiotherapy images from radiographs demonstrating radiation pneumonitis. With the digital subtraction technique, I could detect the shadow as faint as the second grade. I concluded that the subtraction technique would be a feasible modality for examination of patients receiving radiotherapy for breast cancer. (author)

  7. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian; Thomsen, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quality improvement of basic radiography focusing on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials:A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from...... one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years of age are included in the study. The clinical research is performed between September and November 2014 where 3rd year Radiography students collect data on four Danish x-ray departments using identical procedures under guidance of...... conference. Conclusion: Collimation improvement in basic chest radiography can reduce the radiation to female patients at chest x-ray examinations....

  8. Management of chest keloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim June Kyu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Keloid formation is one of the most challenging clinical problems in wound healing. With increasing frequency of open heart surgery, chest keloid formations are not infrequent in the clinical practice. The numerous treatment methods including surgical excision, intralesional steroid injection, radiation therapy, laser therapy, silicone gel sheeting, and pressure therapy underscore how little is understood about keloids. Keloids have a tendency to recur after surgical excision as a single treatment. Stretching tension is clearly associated with keloid generation, as keloids tend to occur on high tension sites such as chest region. The authors treated 58 chest keloid patients with surgical excision followed by intraoperative and postoperative intralesional steroid injection. Even with minor complications and recurrences, our protocol results in excellent outcomes in cases of chest keloids.

  9. Reducing CT radiation dose with iterative reconstruction algorithms: The influence of scan and reconstruction parameters on image quality and CTDIvol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Iterative reconstruction (IR) and filtered back projection (FBP) were compared. • CT image noise was reduced by 12.4%–52.2% using IR in comparison to FBP. • IR did not affect high- and low-contrast resolution. • CTDIvol was reduced by 26–50% using hybrid IR at comparable image quality levels. • IR produced good to excellent image quality in patients. - Abstract: Objectives: In this phantom CT study, we investigated whether images reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction (IR) with reduced tube voltage and current have equivalent quality. We evaluated the effects of different acquisition and reconstruction parameter settings on image quality and radiation doses. Additionally, patient CT studies were evaluated to confirm our phantom results. Methods: Helical and axial 256 multi-slice computed tomography scans of the phantom (Catphan®) were performed with varying tube voltages (80–140 kV) and currents (30–200 mAs). 198 phantom data sets were reconstructed applying FBP and IR with increasing iterations, and soft and sharp kernels. Further, 25 chest and abdomen CT scans, performed with high and low exposure per patient, were reconstructed with IR and FBP. Two independent observers evaluated image quality and radiation doses of both phantom and patient scans. Results: In phantom scans, noise reduction was significantly improved using IR with increasing iterations, independent from tissue, scan-mode, tube-voltage, current, and kernel. IR did not affect high-contrast resolution. Low-contrast resolution was also not negatively affected, but improved in scans with doses <5 mGy, although object detectability generally decreased with the lowering of exposure. At comparable image quality levels, CTDIvol was reduced by 26–50% using IR. In patients, applying IR vs. FBP resulted in good to excellent image quality, while tube voltage and current settings could be significantly decreased. Conclusions: Our

  10. The impact of CT radiation dose reduction and iterative reconstruction algorithms from four different vendors on coronary calcium scoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemink, Martin J.; Takx, Richard A.P.; Jong, Pim A. de; Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Schilham, Arnold M.R.; Leiner, Tim [Utrecht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Bleys, Ronald L.A.W. [Utrecht University Medical Center, Department of Anatomy, Utrecht (Netherlands); Das, Marco; Wildberger, Joachim E. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Prokop, Mathias [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Buls, Nico; Mey, Johan de [UZ Brussel, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-09-15

    To analyse the effects of radiation dose reduction and iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms on coronary calcium scoring (CCS). Fifteen ex vivo human hearts were examined in an anthropomorphic chest phantom using computed tomography (CT) systems from four vendors and examined at four dose levels using unenhanced prospectively ECG-triggered protocols. Tube voltage was 120 kV and tube current differed between protocols. CT data were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and reduced dose CT data with IR. CCS was quantified with Agatston scores, calcification mass and calcification volume. Differences were analysed with the Friedman test. Fourteen hearts showed coronary calcifications. Dose reduction with FBP did not significantly change Agatston scores, calcification volumes and calcification masses (P > 0.05). Maximum differences in Agatston scores were 76, 26, 51 and 161 units, in calcification volume 97, 27, 42 and 162 mm{sup 3}, and in calcification mass 23, 23, 20 and 48 mg, respectively. IR resulted in a trend towards lower Agatston scores and calcification volumes with significant differences for one vendor (P < 0.05). Median relative differences between reference FBP and reduced dose IR for Agatston scores remained within 2.0-4.6 %, 1.0-5.3 %, 1.2-7.7 % and 2.6-4.5 %, for calcification volumes within 2.4-3.9 %, 1.0-5.6 %, 1.1-6.4 % and 3.7-4.7 %, for calcification masses within 1.9-4.1 %, 0.9-7.8 %, 2.9-4.7 % and 2.5-3.9 %, respectively. IR resulted in increased, decreased or similar calcification masses. CCS derived from standard FBP acquisitions was not affected by radiation dose reductions up to 80 %. IR resulted in a trend towards lower Agatston scores and calcification volumes. (orig.)

  11. Current concepts in F18 FDG PET/CT-based Radiation Therapy planning for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percy eLee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is an important component of cancer therapy for early stage as well as locally advanced lung cancer. The use of F18 FDG PET/CT has come to the forefront of lung cancer staging and overall treatment decision-making. FDG PET/CT parameters such as standard uptake value and metabolic tumor volume provide important prognostic and predictive information in lung cancer. Importantly, FDG PET/CT for radiation planning has added biological information in defining the gross tumor volume as well as involved nodal disease. For example, accurate target delineation between tumor and atelectasis is facilitated by utilizing PET and CT imaging. Furthermore, there has been meaningful progress in incorporating metabolic information from FDG PET/CT imaging in radiation treatment planning strategies such as radiation dose escalation based on standard uptake value thresholds as well as using respiratory gated PET and CT planning for improved target delineation of moving targets. In addition, PET/CT based follow-up after radiation therapy has provided the possibility of early detection of local as well as distant recurrences after treatment. More research is needed to incorporate other biomarkers such as proliferative and hypoxia biomarkers in PET as well as integrating metabolic information in adaptive, patient-centered, tailored radiation therapy.

  12. Characterization of scatter radiation in cone beam CT mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bob; Glick, Stephen J.; Groiselle, Corinne

    2005-04-01

    Cone beam CT mammography (CBCTM) is an emerging breast imaging technology and is currently under intensive investigation [1-3]. One of the major challenges in CBCTM is to understand the characteristics of scatter radiation and to find ways to reduce or correct its degrading effects. Since the breast shape, geometry and image formation process are significantly different from conventional mammography, all system components and parameters such as target/filter combination, kVp range, source to image distance, detector design etc. should be examined and optimized. In optimizing CBCTM systems, it is important to have knowledge of how different imaging parameters affect the recorded scatter within the image. In this study, a GEANT4 based Monte Carlo simulation package (GATE) was used to investigate the scatter magnitude and its" distribution in CBCTM. The influences of different air gaps, kVp settings, breast sizes and breast composition on the scatter primary ratio (SPR) and scatter profiles were examined. In general, the scatter to primary ratio (SPR) is strongly dependent on the breast size and air gap, and is only moderately dependent on the kVp setting and breast composition. These results may be used for optimization of CBCTM systems, as well as for developing scatter correction methods.

  13. Radiation exposure in multidetector CT: Dose comparison between late 1990s and early 2010's in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective dose under ordinary clinical computed tomography (CT) protocols using three kinds of 64-channel and a 40-channel CT ranged from 0.6 to 15.5 mSv in early 2010's. And the organ dose ranged from 1.6 to 130.4 mGy: orbital and brain doses for brain stroke CT were the highest. For the comparison of the effective dose between late 1990s and early 2010's, multidetector CT (MDCT) for high-resolution lung CT was 2.4 times higher than that of single-detector CT (SDCT) and the ratio was the highest. However, the effective dose at MDCT was 20 % lower than that of SDCT in chest CT due to applying dose-saving techniques. In organ dose comparisons, high-resolution lung CT at MDCT was 3.5-4.5 times higher than that of SDCT, and showed 1.1-1.5 times higher than that of SDCT in the head and chest CT. For the abdomen CT, the primary organ dose at MDCT was ∼30 % lower than that of SDCT. (authors)

  14. The diagnostic value of X-ray and CT scan of the chest trauma%X线平片和CT扫描对胸部创伤的诊断价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志勇; 陈俊

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To discuss the diagnostic value of X-ray and CT scan of the chest trauma.Methods:30 patients with chest trauma were selected,doing X-ray,CT examination. Results: 13 cases were pulmonary exudative change, in which X-ray showed normal in 2 cases, while CT lung found pale patchy and high-density shadow.6 cases were pneumothorax,in which it was difficult to see very little pneumothorax for X-ray, while CT scan was clear.In addition, X-ray and CT could clear diagnosis of pneumohemothorax in 6 cases,pulmonary hematoma in 5 cases,hemothorax in 8 cases,rib fracture in 9 cases, mediastinal and subcutaneous emphysema in 6 cases,pulmonary atelectasis in 1 case.Conclusion:X-ray and CT scan are important methods in diagnosis of chest trauma,and CT is superior to X-ray.%目的:探讨 X 线平片和 CT 扫描对胸部创伤的诊断价值。方法:收治胸部创伤患者30例,行 X 线、CT 检查。结果:肺部渗出性改变13例,平片显示正常2例,而CT检查则均发现肺部的浅淡斑片状、云絮状高密度影。气胸6例,极少量的气胸,用平片很难看到,而CT扫描却十分清晰。另外,血气胸6例,肺血肿5例,胸腔积血8例,肋骨骨折9例,纵隔及皮下气肿6例,肺不张1例,X线和CT均能明确诊断。结论:X线平片和CT扫描是诊断胸部创伤的重要方法,而CT扫描明显优于X线平片。

  15. Evaluation of the knowledge of physicians prescribing CT examinations on the radiation protection of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the knowledge of physicians prescribing CT examinations on the radiation protection of patients. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was distributed to all clinicians on medical staff who prescribe CT examinations. Several questions related to their prescription pattern and their knowledge of radiation protection. Results: Forty-four questionnaires were analyzed. While 70% of physicians claimed that they considered the risks from exposure to ionizing radiation when prescribing a CT examination, only 25% informed their patients about those risks. Knowledge of the radiation dose delivered during CT evaluation of the abdomen and pelvis was poorly understood and the risks related to small doses of radiation were grossly underestimated. Finally, only a third of clinicians had received training with regards to radiation protection. Conclusion: While most clinicians claim that they consider the risks from exposure to ionizing radiation when prescribing a CT examination, the risks are either not well known or not known at all. Increased formation of clinicians with regards to the radiation protection of patients, maybe through a dedicated clinical rotation while in medical school, could be a solution to improve the knowledge of hospital clinicians with regards to radiation protection. (authors)

  16. Cavitary Lesions and Nodular Infiltration Patterns in Multi-Drug Resistant TB and Non-Tuberculosis Mycobacterium: Comparison of Chest CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Kahkouee

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: By increasing of HIV frequency, MDRTB has also increased. Clinical and laboratory findings of multi-drug resistant TB (MDRTB and non-tuberculosis mycobacterium (NTM are very similar. Maybe imaging findings help early differentiation before culture result. This study has compared cavitary lesions and nodular infiltration patterns in the chest CT of MDRTB and NTM."nPatients and Methods: A retrospective study was performed on 66 hospitalized patients (43 MDRTB and 23 NTM in Masih Daneshvari Hospital (from 2006-2009. Lung CT scans were evaluated by a radiologist and two radiology residents without any information about the culture result. Nodular infiltrations were classified into 6 patterns (tree in bud, scattered nodule, lobar nodular infiltration, cavitary nodule, macronodule, miliary pattern and cavitary lesions to thick and thin, single and multiple with lobar distribution and satellite nodule adjacent to cavity. Chi-square statistics analysis was performed."nResult: Respectively in NTM and MDRTB: Mean age (51.5%-44.8%, sex (34.8% M and 65.2 F, 58.1% M and 41.9% F, treatment history (56.5%,83.7%, scattered nodular infiltration (47.8%, 60.5%, lobar nodular infiltration (13%, 9.3%, TIB (47.8%, 46.5%, miliary pattern (0%, 0%, cavitary nodule (21.7%, 27.9%, macro nodule (nodule≥10mm (43.5%, 25.6%, cavity (69.6%, 76.7%, thin wall cavity (65.2%, 46.5%, thick wall cavity (26.1%, 58.1%, satellite nodule adjacent to cavity (39.1%, 9.3%, single cavity (13%, 14%, lobar distribution of single cavity: RUL (8.7%, 4.7%, RML (0%, 0%, RLL (0%, 0%, LUL (4.3%, 4.7%, lingual (0%, 0%, LLL (0%, 4.7%, multiple cavity (56.5%, 60.5%, lobar distribution of multiple cavity: RUL (26.1%, 51.2%, RML (21.7%, 9.3%, RLL (26.1%, 23.3%, LUL (47.8%, 44.2%, lingual (26.1%, 18.6%, LLL (30.4%, 16.3%."nConclusion: Treatment history (p=0.016, satellite nodule adjacent to cavity (p=0.004, thick wall cavity (p=0.013 and multiple cavity in RUL (p=0.05 are more

  17. Radiation exposure of children in pediatric radiology. Pt. 3. Conversion coefficients for reconstruction of organ doses achieved during chest X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: calculation of conversion coefficients for the reconstruction of organ doses from entrance doses for chest radiographs of 0, 1, 5, 10, 15, and 30-year-old patients in conventional pediatric radiology for the radiographic settings recommended by the German and European guidelines for quality management in diagnostic radiology. Materials und methods: the conversion coefficients for pediatric chest radiographs were calculated using the commercially available personal computer program PCXMC developed by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (Saeteilyturvakeskus STUK). PCXMC is a Monte Carlo program for computing organ and effective doses in about 40 organs of mathematical hermaphrodite phantom models describing patients of different ages. The possible clinical variation of beam collimation was taken into consideration by defining optimal and suboptimal radiation fields on the phantoms' surfaces. Results: conversion coefficients for the reconstruction of organ doses from measured entrance doses during chest radiographs for 0, 1, 5, 10, 15, and 30-year-old pediatric patients were presented. Conversion coefficients were calculated for the standard sagittal and lateral beam projections and the standard focus film distances of 100 cm, 115 cm, and 150 cm using the standard radiation qualities according to the recommendations of the German and European guidelines for quality management in diagnostic radiology. These conversion coefficients allow the reconstruction of the absorbed dose in about 40 organs and tissues of the human body for optimal and suboptimal radiation field collimations. (orig.)

  18. Relationship of Image Quality and Radiation Dose for Chest Radiography in the Medical Institutions for Pneumoconiosis: A Comparison to the Korean Diagnostic Reference Level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the relationship of image quality to the measurement of radiation dose for chest radiography in the medical institutions for pneumoconiosis (MIPs). Film-screen radiography (FSR) (n = 24) and digital radiography (DR) (n = 5) were used as chest radiography modalities. The entrance surface dose (ESD) was measured from the exposure conditions routinely used for chest radiography using an ionization chamber dosimeter. All images were randomly selected for evaluating image quality from each of the MIPs, and independently rated by two experienced radiologists using a 3-point scale. ESD of DR was higher than FSR, excluding flat panel. However, image quality of DR was significantly higher than that of FSR, especially in flat panel and the charge-coupled device. ESD and tube voltage were not significantly correlated with image quality. DR more frequently exceeded the Korean diagnostic reference level for ESD than FSR (41.7% vs. 20.0%), though the difference was not statistically significant. DR used a higher radiation dose than FSR; however, there was a possibility of a radiation dose reduction in relation to image quality. We suggest that the MIPs transfer to a flat panel with automatic exposure control for a more effective radiation dose management.

  19. Relationship of Image Quality and Radiation Dose for Chest Radiography in the Medical Institutions for Pneumoconiosis: A Comparison to the Korean Diagnostic Reference Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Jeong [Clincal Research Team, Occupational Lung Diseases Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jai Soung [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Seon, Jong Ryul [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Daejeon Health Science College, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate the relationship of image quality to the measurement of radiation dose for chest radiography in the medical institutions for pneumoconiosis (MIPs). Film-screen radiography (FSR) (n = 24) and digital radiography (DR) (n = 5) were used as chest radiography modalities. The entrance surface dose (ESD) was measured from the exposure conditions routinely used for chest radiography using an ionization chamber dosimeter. All images were randomly selected for evaluating image quality from each of the MIPs, and independently rated by two experienced radiologists using a 3-point scale. ESD of DR was higher than FSR, excluding flat panel. However, image quality of DR was significantly higher than that of FSR, especially in flat panel and the charge-coupled device. ESD and tube voltage were not significantly correlated with image quality. DR more frequently exceeded the Korean diagnostic reference level for ESD than FSR (41.7% vs. 20.0%), though the difference was not statistically significant. DR used a higher radiation dose than FSR; however, there was a possibility of a radiation dose reduction in relation to image quality. We suggest that the MIPs transfer to a flat panel with automatic exposure control for a more effective radiation dose management.

  20. Value of CT and simulator accuracy in radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper assesses the value of CT in radiation oncology by examining the accuracy of greater- precision radiation therapy simulators. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A group of 91 patients for whom therapy was planned on a new simulator (Varian Ximatron CX Series Simulator) was compared with a group of 83 patients for whom therapy was planned on an older model simulator (Picker Therx Simulator). After each simulation, all patients underwent CT of the site to be treated to determine adequancy of coverage

  1. Chest drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Chris

    2014-07-15

    As an intensive care nurse with experience of caring for critically ill patients in the UK and on deployed operations overseas, I found the CPD article useful in reviewing the pathophysiology of a pneumothorax, use of intrapleural chest drains, observations that should be recorded, and nursing care and management of a patient with an intrapleural chest drain. Reflecting on the time out activities in the CPD article was valuable. PMID:25005418

  2. CT-assisted evaluation of the results of radiation and surgical treatment of paranasal and nasopharyngeal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 40 patients with bening and malignant paranasal sinusal and nasopharyngeal tumors were examined to evaluate the effectiveness of radiation and surgical treatment with the help of computerized tomography (CT). The aim of CT examinations was to reveal CT-findings of radiation pathomorphosis of a tumor mass and contiguous tissue, to determine their CT-structure, and to find residual masses after the treatment. CT-findings of three stages of tumor radiation pathomorphosis were determined. Some criteria of objective assessment of the rsults of radiation and surgical treatment of paranasal sinusal and nasopharyngeal tumors were proposed

  3. CT scanning of the brachial plexus, normal anatomy, pathology, and radiation fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brachial plexus is a region difficult to examine clinically and by conventional radiology. CT is ideally suited to image this area, and detailed anatomy of the plexus can be visualized. Sixty patients with brachial plexus symptoms underwent CT of the root of the neck and axilla. Forty-two of these had previously been treated with radiation therapy for carcinoma of the breast. CT was a sensitive modality for demonstrating abnormalities in this region, and radiation fibrosis could be differentiated from recurrent axillary disease. A greater degree of fibrosis did not correlate with different treatment schedules but with a higher fraction size

  4. Patient dose simulation in X-ray CT using a radiation treatment-planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical irradiation dosage has been increasing with the development of new radiological equipment and new techniques like interventional radiology. It is fair to say that patient dose has been increased as a result of the development of multi-slice CT. A number of studies on the irradiation dose of CT have been reported, and the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) is now used as a general means of determining CT dose. However, patient dose distribution in the body varies with the patient's constitution, bowel gas in the body, and conditions of exposure. In this study, patient dose was analyzed from the viewpoint of dose distribution, using a radiation treatment-planning computer. Percent depth dose (PDD) and the off-center ratio (OCR) of the CT beam are needed to calculate dose distribution by the planning computer. Therefore, X-ray CT data were measured with various apparatuses, and beam data were sent to the planning computer. Measurement and simulation doses in the elliptical phantom (Mix-Dp: water equivalent material) were collated, and the CT irradiation dose was determined for patient dose simulation. The rotational radiation treatment technique was used to obtain the patient dose distribution of CT, and patient dose was evaluated through simulation of the dose distribution. CT images of the thorax were sent to the planning computer and simulated. The result was that the patient dose distribution of the thorax was obtained for CT examination. (author)

  5. Radiation assessment to paediatric with F-18-FDG undergo whole-body PET/CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out on wholebody radiation dose assessment to paediatrics patient who undergo PET/CT scanner at Institut Kanser Negara. Consist of 68 patients with varies of malignancies and epilepsy disease case covering age between 2 years to 12 years old. This is a retrospective study from 2010-2014. The use of PET/CT scanner as an advanced tool has been proven to give an extra radiation dose to the patient. It is because of the radiation exposure from the combination of both CT and PET scans rather than a single CT or PET scan. Furthermore, a study on radiation dose to paediatric patient undergoing PET/CT is rare in Malaysia. So, the aim of this study is to estimate the wholebody effective dose to paediatric patient in Malaysia. Effective dose from PET scan was calculated based on the activity of F18 FDG and dose coefficient reported in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106. Effective dose from CT was determined using k coefficient as reported in ICRP publication 102 and Dose Length Product (DLP) value. The average effective dose from PET and CT were found to be 7.05mSv and 5.77mSv respectively. The mean wholebody effective dose received by a patient with combined PETCT examination was 12.78mSv. These results could be used as reference for dosimetry of a patient undergoing PETCT examination in Malaysia

  6. Radiation assessment to paediatric with F-18-FDG undergo whole-body PET/CT examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhalisa, H.; Mohamad, A. S.; Rafidah, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out on wholebody radiation dose assessment to paediatrics patient who undergo PET/CT scanner at Institut Kanser Negara. Consist of 68 patients with varies of malignancies and epilepsy disease case covering age between 2 years to 12 years old. This is a retrospective study from 2010-2014. The use of PET/CT scanner as an advanced tool has been proven to give an extra radiation dose to the patient. It is because of the radiation exposure from the combination of both CT and PET scans rather than a single CT or PET scan. Furthermore, a study on radiation dose to paediatric patient undergoing PET/CT is rare in Malaysia. So, the aim of this study is to estimate the wholebody effective dose to paediatric patient in Malaysia. Effective dose from PET scan was calculated based on the activity of F18 FDG and dose coefficient reported in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106. Effective dose from CT was determined using k coefficient as reported in ICRP publication 102 and Dose Length Product (DLP) value. The average effective dose from PET and CT were found to be 7.05mSv and 5.77mSv respectively. The mean wholebody effective dose received by a patient with combined PETCT examination was 12.78mSv. These results could be used as reference for dosimetry of a patient undergoing PETCT examination in Malaysia.

  7. Radiation assessment to paediatric with F-18-FDG undergo whole-body PET/CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhalisa, H., E-mail: dhalisa82@gmail.com; Rafidah, Z. [Kluster Oncology Science and Radiology, Advanced Medical Dental Institute, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), Bertam, Penang (Malaysia); Mohamad, A. S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, National Cancer Institute, No 4 Jalan P7, Presint 7, Putrajaya (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    This study was carried out on wholebody radiation dose assessment to paediatrics patient who undergo PET/CT scanner at Institut Kanser Negara. Consist of 68 patients with varies of malignancies and epilepsy disease case covering age between 2 years to 12 years old. This is a retrospective study from 2010-2014. The use of PET/CT scanner as an advanced tool has been proven to give an extra radiation dose to the patient. It is because of the radiation exposure from the combination of both CT and PET scans rather than a single CT or PET scan. Furthermore, a study on radiation dose to paediatric patient undergoing PET/CT is rare in Malaysia. So, the aim of this study is to estimate the wholebody effective dose to paediatric patient in Malaysia. Effective dose from PET scan was calculated based on the activity of F18 FDG and dose coefficient reported in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106. Effective dose from CT was determined using k coefficient as reported in ICRP publication 102 and Dose Length Product (DLP) value. The average effective dose from PET and CT were found to be 7.05mSv and 5.77mSv respectively. The mean wholebody effective dose received by a patient with combined PETCT examination was 12.78mSv. These results could be used as reference for dosimetry of a patient undergoing PETCT examination in Malaysia.

  8. Acute or chronic transplant rejection - high resolution CT of the chest in lung transplant recipients; Akute oder chronische Transplantat-Abstossung? - HRCT des Thorax bei Patienten nach Lungentransplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herber, S.; Heussel, C.P.; Thelen, M.; Kauczor, H.U. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Lill, J. [3. Medizinische Klinik, Schwerpunkt Pneumologie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz (Germany); Mayer, E. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Herz-Thorax-Gefaess-Chirurgie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz (Germany)

    2001-09-01

    Purpose: Aim of the study was to evaluate the postoperative changes in patients with single (SLTX) or double lung transplantation (DLTX) with HRCT and to correlate those findings with the clinical diagnosis. Material and methods: 29 patients with SLTX (n = 14) or DLTX (n = 15) were observed for more than 6 years after transplantation by HRCT (n = 82). CT examinations were performed in inspiration and expiration (n = 70) with a slice thickness of 1 mm and a feed of 10 mm. The image material was evaluated by 2 experienced radiologists in consensus. Criteria for acute rejection at HRCT were: ground glass opacities and focal air trapping in expiration. Criteria for chronic transplant rejection were: bronchial dilatation, bronchial wall thickening and thickening of interlobar septae. The clinical evaluation consisted of laboratory tests, lung function tests, and bronchoscopy including bronchial lavage in special cases. Results: 20/29 patients are still alive (mean 21 months). 5/9 patients died because of chronic transplantant rejection, 1 patient suffered from a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma localised at the right hilus. Severe threatening pneumonia occurred in 13 cases. 10/29 patients showed symptoms of acute rejection. Expiratory HRCT found a focal air trapping in all cases and extended ground glass opacities in 11/14 cases. Also a bronchial dilatation was observed in more than 50% (9/14). 12/29 patients suffered from chronic transplant rejection. HRCT showed bronchial dilatation in 26/27 investigations and severe ground glass opacities in 21/27 investigations. Thickening of the interlobal septa as well as centrilobular opacities were found in more than 50% of the examinations. Conclusion: High resolution CT of the chest in patients after lung transplantation is able to show numerous pathological alterations. Without clinical information a confident differentiation in acute or chronic transplant rejection or pneumonia can be difficult or impossible. (orig.) [German

  9. Low incidence of chest wall pain with a risk-adapted lung stereotactic body radiation therapy approach using three or five fractions based on chest wall dosimetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaud P Coroller

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To examine the frequency and potential of dose-volume predictors for chest wall (CW toxicity (pain and/or rib fracture for patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT using treatment planning methods to minimize CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation scheme. METHODS: We reviewed data from 72 treatment plans, from 69 lung SBRT patients with at least one year of follow-up or CW toxicity, who were treated at our center between 2010 and 2013. Treatment plans were optimized to reduce CW dose and patients received a risk-adapted fractionation of 18 Gy×3 fractions (54 Gy total if the CW V30 was less than 30 mL or 10-12 Gy×5 fractions (50-60 Gy total otherwise. The association between CW toxicity and patient characteristics, treatment parameters and dose metrics, including biologically equivalent dose, were analyzed using logistic regression. RESULTS: With a median follow-up of 20 months, 6 (8.3% patients developed CW pain including three (4.2% grade 1, two (2.8% grade 2 and one (1.4% grade 3. Five (6.9% patients developed rib fractures, one of which was symptomatic. No significant associations between CW toxicity and patient and dosimetric variables were identified on univariate nor multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Optimization of treatment plans to reduce CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation strategy of three or five fractions based on the CW V30 resulted in a low incidence of CW toxicity. Under these conditions, none of the patient characteristics or dose metrics we examined appeared to be predictive of CW pain.

  10. Study of dosimetric quantities applied to patient undergoing routine chest examinations by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological protection system has established a standard to protect persons against the harmful effects caused by ionizing radiation that is based on the justification, optimization and dose limitation principles. The increasing use of radiation in medicine and the related risks have stressed the discussion on patient radiation protection. The computed tomography (CT) is the diagnostic radiology technique that most contributes to patient doses and it requires optimization efforts. Diagnostic reference levels (DRL) has been established in many countries in terms of CT dosimetric quantities; in Brazil, the DRLs are still under investigation since the culture of patient protection is not very strong yet. The objective of this work was to investigate the dosimetric and protection quantities related to patients undergoing CT routine chest examinations. The ImPACT CT, CT Expo and ImpactDose softwares were used for calculations of the weight and volumetric air-kerma indexes (CW and CVOL), the air kerma - length product (PK,L), organ equivalent dose (HT) and the effective dose (E) for CT routine chest protocols in 19 tomographs in Belo Horizonte city. The CT Expo was selected to be validated against experimental measurements in three hospitals with thermoluminescent dosimeters and CT pencil ionization chamber in anthropomorphic and standard CT body phantoms. Experimental and calculated results indicated differences up to 97% for HT and E and acceptable agreement for CW ,CVOL and PK,L. All data from 19 tomographs showed that local DRLs for CT routine chest examinations may be chosen smaller than DRLs adopted in other countries; this would contribute to increase the radiological protection of patients. (author)

  11. Eye lens radiation exposure and repeated head CT scans: A problem to keep in mind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: The deterministic character of radiation-induced cataract is being called into question, raising the possibility of a risk in patients, especially children, exposed to ionizing radiation in case of repeated head CT-scans. This study aims to estimate the eye lens doses of a pediatric population exposed to repeated head CTs and to assess the feasibility of an epidemiological study. Methods: Children treated for a cholesteatoma, who had had at least one CT-scan of the middle ear before their tenth birthday, were included. Radiation exposure has been assessed from medical records and telephone interviews. Results: Out of the 39 subjects contacted, 32 accepted to participate. A total of 76 CT-scans were retrieved from medical records. At the time of the interview (mean age: 16 years), the mean number of CT per child was 3. Cumulative mean effective and eye lens doses were 1.7 mSv and 168 mGy, respectively. Conclusion: A relatively high lens radiation dose was observed in children exposed to repeated CT-scans. Due to that exposure and despite the difficulties met when trying to reach patients’ families, a large scale epidemiological study should be performed in order to assess the risk of radiation-induced cataracts associated with repeated head CT.

  12. Eye lens radiation exposure and repeated head CT scans: A problem to keep in mind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, Morgane; Jacob, Sophie [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/Laboratoire d' Epidemiologie, BP 17, 92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Roger, Gilles [Otolaryngology Department, Trousseau Hospital, Paris (France); Pelosse, Beatrice [Ophthalmology Department, Trousseau Hospital, Paris (France); Laurier, Dominique [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/Laboratoire d' Epidemiologie, BP 17, 92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Le Pointe, Hubert Ducou [Radiology Department, Trousseau Hospital, Paris (France); Bernier, Marie-Odile, E-mail: marie-odile.bernier@irsn.fr [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/Laboratoire d' Epidemiologie, BP 17, 92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2012-08-15

    Objectives: The deterministic character of radiation-induced cataract is being called into question, raising the possibility of a risk in patients, especially children, exposed to ionizing radiation in case of repeated head CT-scans. This study aims to estimate the eye lens doses of a pediatric population exposed to repeated head CTs and to assess the feasibility of an epidemiological study. Methods: Children treated for a cholesteatoma, who had had at least one CT-scan of the middle ear before their tenth birthday, were included. Radiation exposure has been assessed from medical records and telephone interviews. Results: Out of the 39 subjects contacted, 32 accepted to participate. A total of 76 CT-scans were retrieved from medical records. At the time of the interview (mean age: 16 years), the mean number of CT per child was 3. Cumulative mean effective and eye lens doses were 1.7 mSv and 168 mGy, respectively. Conclusion: A relatively high lens radiation dose was observed in children exposed to repeated CT-scans. Due to that exposure and despite the difficulties met when trying to reach patients' families, a large scale epidemiological study should be performed in order to assess the risk of radiation-induced cataracts associated with repeated head CT.

  13. Radiation exposure with spiral CT of the paranasal sinuses; Strahlenexposition bei der Spiral-CT der Nasennebenhoehlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammann, F.; Momino-Traserra, E.; Remy, C.; Claussen, C.D. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Pereira, P.L.; Baumann, I.; Koitschev, A. [Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany). Klinik fuer Hals-Nasen-Ohrenheilkunde

    2000-03-01

    Purpose: Determination of the radiation doses in spiral CT of the paranasal sinuses using a variety of mAs values and scan protocols. Material and methods: CT examinations of the paranasal sinuses were performed using an Alderson-Rando phantom. Radiation dose was determined by LiF-TLD at the level of high risk organs in the head and neck region for combinations of different scan parameters (2/3, 3/3, 3/4 mm) and decreasing charges (200, 150, 100, 50, 25 mAs) on a spiral CT. Additional measurements were performed on three other CT scanners using the 2/3 mm protocol at 50 mAs, and a single slice technique (5/5 mm) on one scanner. Results: The lowest dose values found were 1.88 mGy for the eye lenses, 1.35 mGy for the parotid gland, 0.03 mGy for the thyroid gland and 0.1 mGy for the medulla oblongata using 2 mm collimation and 3 mm table feed at 25 mAs. Maximal dose values resulted using the 3/3 mm protocol at 200 mAs (31.00 mGy for the eye lense, 0.65 mGy for the thyroid gland). There were no significant differences found between the different CT scanners. Conclusions: Using up-to-date CT scanners, radiation exposure may be reduced by a factor of 15-20 compared to that of conventional CT technique. Thus, the exposure of the eye lens comes to only a thousandth of the value supposedly inducing a cataract, as published by the ICRP. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Systematische Erfassung der Strahlenexposition bei der Spiral-CT der Nasennebenhoehlen bei unterschiedlichen Dosen und Scanprotokollen. Material und Methoden: Am Alderson-Rando-Phantom wurden die Dosen an Risikoorganen im Kopf-Halsbereich mittels LiF-TLD-Sonden fuer Kombinationen aus unterschiedlichen Scanparametern (2/3, 3/3, 3/4 mm) und absteigender Ladung (200, 150, 100, 50, 25 mAs) an einem Spiral-CT gemessen. Zusaetzlich wurden Messungen an drei weiteren CT-Geraeten mit dem 2/3-Protokoll bei 50 mAs sowie an einem dieser Geraete im Einzelschicht-Modus mit 5/5 mm durchgefuehrt. Ergebnisse: Die niedrigsten Dosen

  14. Effect of reconstruction algorithm on image quality and identification of ground-glass opacities and partly solid nodules on low-dose thin-section CT: Experimental study using chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of reconstruction algorithm on identification and image quality of ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and partly solid nodules on low-dose thin-section CT. Materials and methods: A chest CT phantom including simulated GGOs and partly solid nodules was scanned with five different tube currents and reconstructed by using standard (A) and newly developed (B) high-resolution reconstruction algorithms, followed by visually assessment of identification and image quality of GGOs and partly solid nodules by two chest radiologists. Inter-observer agreement, ROC analysis and ANOVA were performed to compare identification and image quality of each data set with those of the standard reference. The standard reference used 120 mA s in conjunction with reconstruction algorithm A. Results: Kappa values (κ) of overall identification and image qualities were substantial or almost perfect (0.60 < κ). Assessment of identification showed that area under the curve of 25 mA reconstructed with reconstruction algorithm A was significantly lower than that of standard reference (p < 0.05), while assessment of image quality indicated that 50 mA s reconstructed with reconstruction algorithm A and 25 mA s reconstructed with both reconstruction algorithms were significantly lower than standard reference (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Reconstruction algorithm may be an important factor for identification and image quality of ground-glass opacities and partly solid nodules on low-dose CT examination.

  15. Dose–Volume Parameters Predict for the Development of Chest Wall Pain After Stereotactic Body Radiation for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Chest wall (CW) pain has recently been recognized as an important adverse effect of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We developed a dose–volume model to predict the development of this toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with primary, clinically node-negative NSCLC received three to five fractions of SBRT to doses of 40–60 Gy and were prospectively followed. The dose–absolute volume histograms of two different definitions of the CW as an organ at risk (CW3cm and CW2cm) were examined for all 126 patients. Results: With a median follow-up of 16 months, the 2-year estimated actuarial incidence of Grade ≥ 2 CW pain was 39%. The median time to onset of Grade ≥ 2 CW pain (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, Version 3.0) was 9 months. There was no predictive advantage for biologically corrected dose over physical dose. Neither fraction number (p = 0.07) nor prescription dose (p = 0.07) were significantly correlated with the development of Grade ≥ 2 CW pain. Cox Proportional Hazards analysis identified significant correlation with a broad range of dose-volume combinations, with the CW volume receiving 30 Gy (V30) as one of the strongest predictors (p 3 of CW2cm, there was a significant correlation with Grade ≥ 2 CW pain (p = 0.004). Conclusions: CW toxicity after SBRT is common and long-term follow-up is needed to identify affected patients. A volume of CW ≥ 70 cm3 receiving 30 Gy is significantly correlated with Grade ≥ 2 CW pain. We are currently applying this constraint at our institution for patients receiving thoracic SBRT. An actuarial atlas of our data is provided as an electronic supplement to facilitate data-sharing and meta-analysis relating to CW pain.

  16. CT dosimetry and risk estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional approaches to CT dosimetry are inadequate because they fail to evaluate the risk to the patient. A risk related approach to CT dosimetry is developed which explicitly takes into account the non-uniform dose distribution in the body and the relative sensitivities of different organs and tissues. The principal radiological risks to patients undergoing CT examinations are the stochastic processes of carcinogenesis and genetic effects. Radiation risk estimates have been obtained for an EMI 5005 CT scanner by measuring the mean organ doses in a Rando phantom for CT studies on the head, chest, abdomen and pelvis. The application of these risk estimates to the population served by this CT scanner indicates that during the lifetime of the CT scanner, approximately 50,000 patients will undergo CT scanning and 60% will result in a positive diagnosis. The radiation detriment is estimated to be about 1 induced cancer and a negligible genetic effect. The radiation detriment is considerably smaller than the total detriment associated with contrast material used in 76% of the CT studies. (author)

  17. Radiation burden and risks associated with non-invasive coronary CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation load of patients undergoing coronary CT angiography by applying the retrospective ECG gating approach was estimated. The radiation burden is rather high and was found to be higher in men than in women, whereas the risk of secondary induced tumours appears to be higher in women than in men. (orig.)

  18. What did we learn from two decades of chest computed tomography in cystic fibrosis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Erasmus MC-Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rosenow, Tim [Erasmus MC-Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); The University of Western Australia, Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Perth (Australia); The University of Western Australia, School of Paediatrics and Child Health Research, Perth (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Despite our current treatment, many cystic fibrosis (CF) patients still show progressive bronchiectasis and small airways disease. Adequate detection and monitoring of progression of these structural abnormalities is needed to personalize treatment to the severity of CF lung disease of the patient. Chest computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard to diagnose and monitor bronchiectasis. Many studies have been done to validate the role of chest CT in CF and to improve the protocols. From these studies it became clear that for correct interpretation of the severity of bronchiectasis and small airways disease standardization of lung volume for the inspiratory and expiratory CT scan acquisition is needed. The risk related to the radiation exposure of a chest CT scan every second year is considered low. Automated and quantitative image analysis systems are developed to improve the reliability and sensitivity of assessments of structural lung changes in CF, particularly in early life. In this paper an overview is given of the lessons learned from two decades of monitoring CF lung disease using chest CT. (orig.)

  19. What did we learn from two decades of chest computed tomography in cystic fibrosis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite our current treatment, many cystic fibrosis (CF) patients still show progressive bronchiectasis and small airways disease. Adequate detection and monitoring of progression of these structural abnormalities is needed to personalize treatment to the severity of CF lung disease of the patient. Chest computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard to diagnose and monitor bronchiectasis. Many studies have been done to validate the role of chest CT in CF and to improve the protocols. From these studies it became clear that for correct interpretation of the severity of bronchiectasis and small airways disease standardization of lung volume for the inspiratory and expiratory CT scan acquisition is needed. The risk related to the radiation exposure of a chest CT scan every second year is considered low. Automated and quantitative image analysis systems are developed to improve the reliability and sensitivity of assessments of structural lung changes in CF, particularly in early life. In this paper an overview is given of the lessons learned from two decades of monitoring CF lung disease using chest CT. (orig.)

  20. Radiology illustrated. Chest radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Soo [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology; Han, Joungho [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Pathology; Chung, Man Pyo [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Medicine; Jeong, Yeon Joo [Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Pattern approach to the diagnosis of lung diseases based on CT scan appearances. Guide to quick and reliable differential diagnosis. CT-pathology correlation. Emphasis on state-of-the-art MDCT. The purpose of this atlas is to illustrate how to achieve reliable diagnoses when confronted by the different abnormalities, or ''disease patterns'', that may be visualized on CT scans of the chest. The task of pattern recognition has been greatly facilitated by the advent of multidetector CT (MDCT), and the focus of the book is very much on the role of state-of-the-art MDCT. A wide range of disease patterns and distributions are covered, with emphasis on the typical imaging characteristics of the various focal and diffuse lung diseases. In addition, clinical information relevant to differential diagnosis is provided and the underlying gross and microscopic pathology is depicted, permitting CT-pathology correlation. The entire information relevant to each disease pattern is also tabulated for ease of reference. This book will be an invaluable handy tool that will enable the reader to quickly and easily reach a diagnosis appropriate to the pattern of lung abnormality identified on CT scans.

  1. Radiation doses and image quality in pediatric chest X-ray for the diagnosis of pneumonia in selected Latin American countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Pneumonia and acute lower respiratory infections in general, is the leading cause of child death in developing countries. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 4 millions of children die annually due to this disease. Despite the growing use of vaccination as an alternate approach to reduce mortality, the increasing antimicrobial resistance and the high costs of vaccines remain important obstacles in the global struggle against the disease. The usual treatment strategy begins with a clinical examination of the patient followed by the prescription of a chest X-ray. Radiography would appear as the best available method for diagnosing pneumonia only if radiologists (and other health professionals such as pediatricians) knew how to interpret the images showed in the radiographs, and these meeting the standards of quality (anatomic structures, image contrast and optical density, and patient dose among other factors). On the other hand, special attention should be paid on patient doses due to children's specific radiosensitivity, repeated and extended use of chest x-ray in all Radiology Departments, and high rejection rate due to both equipment malfunction and to human skills shortcomings. Patient doses of chest X-ray performed to children less than 5 years old in PAHO Sentinel Hospitals for surveillance of bacterial pneumonias in various Latin American countries were estimated using technical parameters and equipment specifications. Image quality was compared to WHO criteria for chest X-rays quality. Results showing differences in patient doses translates on one hand the impact of specific characteristics of the radiological equipment, including equipment limitations and performance of the radiographs and on the other various and divers levels of health professionals skills and training on image quality interpretation and dose optimization. The study concludes that professionals' training and education on chest radiographs image quality constitutes

  2. Sandstorm in the chest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talluri MR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A 32 year old female presented with dry cough and progressive breathlessness of one year duration. There was no history suggestive of collagen vascular disease, lung parenchymal infection or allergic airway disease. Clinical evaluation showed basal fine inspiratory crepitations. Radiographic examination of the chest revealed a black pleura line and lung parenchymal calcification. CT scan of the chest demonstrated nodular calcification of lung parenchyma with a “crazy pavement” pattern, which is suggestive of alveolar calcification. Pulmonary function test showed a severe restrictive defect. On transbronchial lung biopsy calcific spherules suggestive of the alveolar microlithiasis were seen. Diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis was made and symptomatic treatment was given, as there is no specific therapy available. The case illustrates an unusual cause of shortness of breath in a young female with striking radiographic features.

  3. Focused radiation hepatitis after Bragg-peak proton therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation hepatitis is clearly demonstrated by noncontrast and contrast enhanced CT following radiotherapy for liver diseases. Radiation hepatitis is dependent on dose distribution and is usually demonstrated as nonsegmental bandlike lesion after photon therapy. We report a case of focused, oval-shaped radiation hepatitis that was induced by photon therapy. The attenuation difference was localized in a high-dose area caused by Bragg-peak proton therapy. 17 refs., 2 figs

  4. Radiation dose to the patient and the radiologist while performing on chest computed tomography: a program of early diagnosis of lung cancer, biopsy and treatment simulation guided radiation oncologist breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we determine the equivalent dose received by the operator and patient lung biopsies using thermoluminescence dosimeters, are established recommendations that this dose is as low as possible. It also reviews the acquisition protocols in both CT scans in early diagnosis program cited as the acquisition of CT for treatment planning dosimetric radiation oncologist in breast cancer.

  5. High resolution 3D dosimetry for microbeam radiation therapy using optical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical Computed Tomography (CT) is a promising technique for dosimetry of Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT), providing high resolution 3D dose maps. Here different MRT irradiation geometries are visualised showing the potential of Optical CT as a tool for future MRT trials. The Peak-to-Valley dose ratio (PVDR) is calculated to be 7 at a depth of 3mm in the radiochromic dosimeter PRESAGE®. This is significantly lower than predicted values and possible reasons for this are discussed

  6. Radiation Dose to the Thyroid and Gonads in Patients Undergoing Cardiac CT Angiography

    OpenAIRE

    Behroozi, Hamid; Davoodi, Mohammad; Aghasi, Shahriar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present data show a global increase in the rate of cardiovascular disease. Cardiac CT angiography has developed as a fast and non-invasive cardiac imaging modality following the introduction of multi-slice computed tomogaraphy. Objectives: The aim of this study was to measure the radiation dose to the thyroid and pelvis regions in patients undergoing cardiac CT angiography using the Care Dose 4D method of 64-slice scanner. Patients and Methods: Eighty-one patients (41 males an...

  7. Use of the EC quality criteria as a common method of inspecting CT laboratories - A pilot project by the Nordic radiation protection authorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of Nordic radiation protection co-operation, quality criteria for computed tomography (CT) as published by the European Commission were used for the evaluation of selected CT laboratories in each of the Nordic countries. The mean values for all five countries of the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw ) and dose length product (DLP) were 60 mGy and 740 mGy · cm for CT of the brain, 11 mGy and 420 mGy · cm for CT of the chest, and 40 mGy and 420 mGy · cm for CT of the lumbar spine, respectively. A comparison with the reference levels set in the above mentioned publication gives a diversified result: compliance for the DLP-values is generally achieved with good margins whereas the CTDIw-values were frequently larger for brain and lumbar spine examinations. The radiographic technique was generally also within the recommendations from the EC. Generally most of the image quality criteria were fulfilled, but it must be borne in mind that the study was biased in the way that two local radiologists in consensus evaluated their own images. Image material from only three patients was selected for each of the clinical indications, that means the project was not designed for ranking laboratories, but it is a way of making the departments aware of the need for optimisation regarding image quality and patient dose, and also of the problems associated with this task. During the study suggestions were brought forward concerning amendments of the quality criteria: some need a better definition, some are not relevant for the diagnostic task in question, some could be added. Instead of 'yes' and 'no', a range of maybe 5 levels of visualisation should be introduced in order to better characterize the level of diagnostic performance. (author)

  8. Application of high resolution synchrotron micro-CT radiation in dental implant osseointegration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neldam, Camilla Albeck; Lauridsen, Torsten; Rack, Alexander;

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a refined method using high-resolution synchrotron radiation microtomography (SRmicro-CT) to evaluate osseointegration and peri-implant bone volume fraction after titanium dental implant insertion. SRmicro-CT is considered gold standard evaluating bone...... microarchitecture. Its high resolution, high contrast, and excellent high signal-to-noise-ratio all contribute to the highest spatial resolutions achievable today. Using SRmicro-CT at a voxel size of 5 μm in an experimental goat mandible model, the peri-implant bone volume fraction was found to quickly increase...

  9. Large mediastinal tumor mass as a prognostic factor in Hodgkin's lymphoma. Is the definition on the basis of a chest radiograph in the era of CT obsolete?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, J.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Mueller, R.P. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Mueller, H.; Engert, A. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Medical Oncology; Kuhnert, G.; Kobe, C. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The risk factor 'large mediastinal tumor mass' is an internationally accepted unfavorable prognostic factor in the staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The definition of this risk factor varies considerably between large cooperative study groups. The purpose of the present analysis was to determine to which degree data obtained from chest radiograph (CRX) give the same results as those from CT scans (CT). Methods: A total of 145 de novo HL patients in early unfavorable and advanced stages were included in this study. A total of 94 patients had a large mediastinal tumor mass according to the guidelines of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG), while 51 had mediastinal lymph node involvement only. The size of mediastinal involvement and the thoracic diameter were measured on CRX and CT. Agreement between CRX and CT was determined by sensitivity and specificity analysis as well as descriptive statistics and correlations. Results: The correlation of the diameters on CRX with those of CT was 0.95 for the tumor size and 0.77 for the thoracic diameter. The diagnostic decision - large mediastinal mass or not - correlated with 0.81 between CRX and CT and was identical in 90.3% of cases. The sensitivity was 0.87 and the specificity 0.96 for CRX, which is considered the current standard. Conclusion: The results show that there is a high agreement between the measurements of CRX and CT. Diagnosis of a large mediastinal mass disagreed in 10% of patients. Since the correct diagnosis of this risk factor is decisive for the adequate multimodal treatment choice, CRX should not be omitted. (orig.)

  10. In-room CT techniques for image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate patient setup and target localization are essential to advanced radiation therapy treatment. Significant improvement has been made recently with the development of image-guided radiation therapy, in which image guidance facilitates short treatment course and high dose per fraction radiotherapy, aiming at improving tumor control and quality of life. Many imaging modalities are being investigated, including x-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonant imaging, magnetic resonant spectroscopic imaging, and kV/MV imaging with flat panel detectors. These developments provide unique imaging techniques and methods for patient setup and target localization. Some of them are different; some are complementary. This paper reviews the currently available kV x-ray CT systems used in the radiation treatment room, with a focus on the CT-on-rails systems, which are diagnostic CT scanners moving on rails installed in the treatment room. We will describe the system hardware including configurations, specifications, operation principles, and functionality. We will review software development for image fusion, structure recognition, deformation correction, target localization, and alignment. Issues related to the clinical implementation of in-room CT techniques in routine procedures are discussed, including acceptance testing and quality assurance. Clinical applications of the in-room CT systems for patient setup, target localization, and adaptive therapy are also reviewed for advanced radiotherapy treatments

  11. Scan Quality and Entrance Skin Dose in Thoracic CT: A Comparison between Bismuth Breast Shield and Posteriorly Centered Partial CT Scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives. To compare the effectiveness of the bismuth breast shield and partial CT scan in reducing entrance skin dose and to evaluate the effect of the breast shield on image quality (IQ). Methods. Nanodots were placed on an adult anthropomorphic phantom. Standard chest CT, CT with shield, and partial CT were performed. Nanodot readings and effective doses were recorded. 50 patients with chest CTs obtained both with and without breast shields were reviewed. IQ was evaluated by two radiologists and by measuring Hounsfield units (HUs) and standard deviation (SD) of HU in anterior subcutaneous region. Results. Breast shield and the partial CT scans reduced radiation to the anterior chest by 38% and 16%, respectively. Partial CT increased dose to the posterior chest by 37% and effective dose by 8%. Change in IQ in shield CT was observed in the anterior chest wall. Significant change in IQ was observed in 5/50 cases. The shield caused an increase of 20 HU (P = 0.021) and a 1.86 reduction in SD of HU (P = 0.027) in the anterior compared to posterior subcutaneous regions. Summary. Bismuth breast shield is more effective than the partial CT in reducing entrance skin dose while maintaining image quality

  12. Decreasing the effective radiation dose in pediatric craniofacial CT by changing head position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didier, Ryne A. [Oregon Health and Science University, School of Medicine, Portland, OR (United States); Kuang, Anna A. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Portland, OR (United States); Schwartz, Daniel L. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Psychiatry, Portland, OR (United States); Selden, Nathan R. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Neurological Surgery, Portland, OR (United States); Stevens, Donna M. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Portland, OR (United States); Bardo, Dianna M.E. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Portland, OR (United States); Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Neuroradiology, Portland, OR (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Children are exposed to ionizing radiation during pre- and post-operative evaluation for craniofacial surgery. The primary purpose of the study was to decrease effective radiation dose while preserving the diagnostic quality of the study. In this prospective study 49 children were positioned during craniofacial CT (CFCT) imaging with their neck fully extended into an exaggerated sniff position, parallel to the CT gantry, to eliminate the majority of the cervical spine and the thyroid gland from radiation exposure. Image-quality and effective radiation dose comparisons were made retrospectively in age-matched controls (n = 49). When compared to CT scans reviewed retrospectively, the prospective examinations showed a statistically significant decrease in z-axis length by 16% (P < 0.0001) and delivered a reduced effective radiation dose by 18% (P < 0.0001). The subjective diagnostic quality of the exams performed in the prospective arm was maintained despite a slight decrease in the quality of the brain windows. There was statistically significant improvement in the quality of the bone windows and three-dimensional reconstructed images. Altering the position of the head by extending the neck during pediatric craniofacial CT imaging statistically reduces the effective radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic quality of the images. (orig.)

  13. Decreasing the effective radiation dose in pediatric craniofacial CT by changing head position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Children are exposed to ionizing radiation during pre- and post-operative evaluation for craniofacial surgery. The primary purpose of the study was to decrease effective radiation dose while preserving the diagnostic quality of the study. In this prospective study 49 children were positioned during craniofacial CT (CFCT) imaging with their neck fully extended into an exaggerated sniff position, parallel to the CT gantry, to eliminate the majority of the cervical spine and the thyroid gland from radiation exposure. Image-quality and effective radiation dose comparisons were made retrospectively in age-matched controls (n = 49). When compared to CT scans reviewed retrospectively, the prospective examinations showed a statistically significant decrease in z-axis length by 16% (P < 0.0001) and delivered a reduced effective radiation dose by 18% (P < 0.0001). The subjective diagnostic quality of the exams performed in the prospective arm was maintained despite a slight decrease in the quality of the brain windows. There was statistically significant improvement in the quality of the bone windows and three-dimensional reconstructed images. Altering the position of the head by extending the neck during pediatric craniofacial CT imaging statistically reduces the effective radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic quality of the images. (orig.)

  14. CT appearance of radiation injury of the lung and clinical symptoms after stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the CT appearance of radiation injury to the lung and clinical symptoms after SRT (stereotactic radiation therapy) for small lung cancers. In this analysis, 35 patients with 39 primary or metastatic lung cancers were enrolled. The follow-up at the time of evaluation ranged from 6 to 44 months (median 18 months). SRT was performed by 3D conformal method which focuses a single high dose to the tumor. We evaluated the CT appearance of acute radiation pneumonitis (within 6 months) and radiation fibrosis (after 6 months) after SRT. Clinical symptoms were evaluated by CTCAE ver.3.0. CT appearance of acute radiation pneumonitis was classified as follows; 1) diffuse consolidation in 12 lesions (30.7%), 2) patchy consolidation and ground-grass opacities (GGO) in 6 lesions (15.4%), 3) diffuse GGO in 5 patients (12.8%), 4) patchy GGO in 1 lesion (2.6%), 5) no evidence of increasing density in 15 lesions (38.5%). CT appearance of radiation fibrosis was classified as follows; 1) modified conventional pattern (consolidation, volume loss and bronchiectasis similar to, but less extensive than conventional radiation fibrosis) in 18 lesions (46.2%), 2) mass-like pattern (focal consolidation limited around the tumor) in 10 lesions (25.6%), 3) scar-like pattern (linear opacity in the region of the tumor associated with volume loss) in 11 lesions (28.2%). Eleven of 15 lesions which had no evidence of increasing density of acute radiation pneumonitis progressed to scar-like pattern of radiation fibrosis. Most of these patients had pulmonary emphysema. Patients who were diagnosed more than Grade 2 pneumonitis were significantly more in diffuse consolidation pattern than in other pattern (p=0.00085). Patients who were diagnosed more than Grade 2 pneumonitis were significantly less in no evidence of increase density pattern than in other pattern (p=0.0026). CT appearance after SRT was classified into five patterns of acute radiation pneumonitis and

  15. What Is Chest MRI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Chest MRI? Chest MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe, noninvasive test. "Noninvasive" means that ... your chest wall, heart, and blood vessels. Chest MRI uses radio waves, magnets, and a computer to ...

  16. Ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos de; Mamede, Marcelo; Silveira, Mariana de Castro; Aguiar, Polyanna; Real, Raphaela Vila, E-mail: pridili@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Silva, Teogenes Augusto da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Objective: to evaluate the level of ambient radiation in a PET/CT center. Materials and methods: previously selected and calibrated TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters were utilized to measure room radiation levels. During 32 days, the detectors were placed in several strategically selected points inside the PET/CT center and in adjacent buildings. After the exposure period the dosimeters were collected and processed to determine the radiation level. Results: in none of the points selected for measurements the values exceeded the radiation dose threshold for controlled area (5 mSv/ year) or free area (0.5 mSv/year) as recommended by the Brazilian regulations. Conclusion: in the present study the authors demonstrated that the whole shielding system is appropriate and, consequently, the workers are exposed to doses below the threshold established by Brazilian standards, provided the radiation protection standards are followed. (author)

  17. Ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT imaging center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila do Carmo Santana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the level of ambient radiation in a PET/CT center. Materials and Methods: Previously selected and calibrated TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters were utilized to measure room radiation levels. During 32 days, the detectors were placed in several strategically selected points inside the PET/CT center and in adjacent buildings. After the exposure period the dosimeters were collected and processed to determine the radiation level. Results: In none of the points selected for measurements the values exceeded the radiation dose threshold for controlled area (5 mSv/year or free area (0.5 mSv/year as recommended by the Brazilian regulations. Conclusion: In the present study the authors demonstrated that the whole shielding system is appropriate and, consequently, the workers are exposed to doses below the threshold established by Brazilian standards, provided the radiation protection standards are followed.

  18. Use of PET/CT instead of CT-only when planning for radiation therapy does not notably increase life years lost in children being treated for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET/CT may be more helpful than CT alone for radiation therapy planning, but the added risk due to higher doses of ionizing radiation is unknown. To estimate the risk of cancer induction and mortality attributable to the [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) PET and CT scans used for radiation therapy planning in children with cancer, and compare to the risks attributable to the cancer treatment. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for 40 children (2-18 years old) who had been scanned using PET/CT as part of radiation therapy planning. The risk of inducing secondary cancer was estimated using the models in BEIR VII. The prognosis of an induced cancer was taken into account and the reduction in life expectancy, in terms of life years lost, was estimated for the diagnostics and compared to the life years lost attributable to the therapy. Multivariate linear regression was performed to find predictors for a high contribution to life years lost from the radiation therapy planning diagnostics. The mean contribution from PET to the effective dose from one PET/CT scan was 24% (range: 7-64%). The average proportion of life years lost attributable to the nuclear medicine dose component from one PET/CT scan was 15% (range: 3-41%). The ratio of life years lost from the radiation therapy planning PET/CT scans and that of the cancer treatment was on average 0.02 (range: 0.01-0.09). Female gender was associated with increased life years lost from the scans (P < 0.001). Using FDG-PET/CT instead of CT only when defining the target volumes for radiation therapy of children with cancer does not notably increase the number of life years lost attributable to diagnostic examinations. (orig.)

  19. Use of PET/CT instead of CT-only when planning for radiation therapy does not notably increase life years lost in children being treated for cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornerup, Josefine S.; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per [Rigshospitalet, Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Copenhagen (Denmark); The Niels Bohr Institute, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Brodin, Patrik [Rigshospitalet, Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Institute for Onco-Physics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY (United States); Birk Christensen, Charlotte; Borgwardt, Lise [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bjoerk-Eriksson, Thomas [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Kiil-Berthelsen, Anne [Rigshospitalet, Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-04-01

    PET/CT may be more helpful than CT alone for radiation therapy planning, but the added risk due to higher doses of ionizing radiation is unknown. To estimate the risk of cancer induction and mortality attributable to the [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) PET and CT scans used for radiation therapy planning in children with cancer, and compare to the risks attributable to the cancer treatment. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for 40 children (2-18 years old) who had been scanned using PET/CT as part of radiation therapy planning. The risk of inducing secondary cancer was estimated using the models in BEIR VII. The prognosis of an induced cancer was taken into account and the reduction in life expectancy, in terms of life years lost, was estimated for the diagnostics and compared to the life years lost attributable to the therapy. Multivariate linear regression was performed to find predictors for a high contribution to life years lost from the radiation therapy planning diagnostics. The mean contribution from PET to the effective dose from one PET/CT scan was 24% (range: 7-64%). The average proportion of life years lost attributable to the nuclear medicine dose component from one PET/CT scan was 15% (range: 3-41%). The ratio of life years lost from the radiation therapy planning PET/CT scans and that of the cancer treatment was on average 0.02 (range: 0.01-0.09). Female gender was associated with increased life years lost from the scans (P < 0.001). Using FDG-PET/CT instead of CT only when defining the target volumes for radiation therapy of children with cancer does not notably increase the number of life years lost attributable to diagnostic examinations. (orig.)

  20. Spiral-CT assisted detection and quantification of pulmonary reaction in breast cancer patients treated with cobalt- or linac megavoltage radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Object : The aim of the study is to sensitively detect and quantify the irradiation induced pulmonary side effects in breast cancer patients, using the quantitative spiral-CT analysis. Material and Method : We prospectively investigated 48 patients at an average of 62 yrs. on pulmonary reactions after postopera-tive radiotherapy on mamma carcinoma. The patients were treated with either tangential thoracic fields alone (26 pat) or tangents with additional opposing ap/pa-fields to the supraclavicular(sc) and axillary(ax) region(18 pat) or tangents and sc-ax-fields with an additional parasternal or dorsal field(4 pat). 44 patients underwent irradiation at the 1MV cobalt with 50Gy, while 4 patients were irradiated at the 6MV linac with 50Gy. Quantitative spiral chest-CT was performed before radiotherapy and six(6), respectively twelve(12) weeks after therapy. Using the 'region of interest (RoI)' technique, the peripheral, subpleural and apical lung parenchyma on corresponding slices of the pretherapeutic- and the follow-up chest-CT's was examined according to its' density and volume changes. Especially, the quantitative spiral-CT marks an distinct advantage, allowing the complete reception of the examined lung volume without skipping a slice because of patient's breathing. Results : While the lung regions, within the treatment volume of the tangents showed an average density increase of 10% ±6% at 6 weeks, respectively of 15% ±8% at 12 weeks after radiotherapy, there was only a minor increase at the apical parenchyma, irradiated with the sc-ax fields of 7% ±4%, respectively 10% ±5%. Two patients, receiving a parasternal field demonstrated a sharp density gain of 24% ±7% and 29% ±8%. There were no clinical symptoms suggesting a radiation pneumonitis. An age related density increase could be observed, revealing a gain of 12% ±7% in those patients older than 60 yrs (28pat), while in the younger group (20pat) the rise was 8% ±5%. Regarding the functional lung

  1. Ambient radiation levels in a microPET/CT research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on initial radiological evaluation and the exposure situation related to the worker task in a micro-positron emission tomography/computed tomography laboratory (microPET/CT). Selected and calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLD, of CaSO4:Dy were used to measure room radiation levels. The detectors were placed in several selected points inside the microPET/CT laboratory and adjacent rooms. In addition, the occupationally exposed workers were monthly evaluated for external and internal exposures. In none of the selected points the dose values exceeded the radiation dose limit established for supervised area, as well as the values obtained in individual monitoring. (author)

  2. Radiation Protection in Paediatric Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of examinations with radiation exposure has been increasing mainly due to advances in computed tomography (CT) technology, with a rapid expansion of CT utilization. Annually, 3.6 billion diagnostic and medical and dental examinations involving radiation are performed worldwide. The contribution of CT to collective dose due to medical X rays is up to 47–59%. A 2009 report of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) estimates that 8–10% of CT examinations in the United States of America are performed on children; the growth in CT utilization is higher in the paediatric than adult population in the USA; and there is a particularly pronounced rise in adolescents undergoing chest CT in the emergency department setting for suspected pulmonary embolism or trauma. The reasons for the growing incidence of CT are new indications for CT with the advent of multidetector CT, overcautious ordering related to medico-legal problems and probably financial incentive systems

  3. Weekly monitoring of the effects of conventional external beam radiation therapy on patients with head and neck, chest, and pelvis cancer by means of blood cells count

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the necessity of weekly monitoring by means of leukocyte and platelet counts of patients with head and neck, chest, and pelvis cancer submitted to conventional radiotherapy. Materials and methods: A hundred and one adult patients with cancer of head and neck (n = 11), chest (n = 35) and pelvis (n = 55), submitted to radiotherapy were assessed by means of leukocyte and platelet counts on a weekly basis, with a comparison between the results before and during the treatment and in correlation with the area treated, patient's sex and age group. Results: The most significant decrease in leukocytes was observed in the fourth week, when lymphocytes, total leukocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and platelets presented a decrease of 53.5%, 26.8%, 19.4%, 22.2% and 14.6%, respectively, in comparison with the values found before the beginning of the therapy. Geometric means for pelvis during the treatment were lower than those for chest, and head and neck. Lymphocytes demonstrated to be more sensitive to radiation therapy. No alteration was found in leukocyte or platelet counts in correlation with patients' sex or age. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, weekly leukocyte and platelet counts do not seem to be useful in the assessment patients submitted to conventional radiotherapy for localized cancer. (author)

  4. Weekly monitoring of the effects of conventional external beam radiation therapy on patients with head and neck, chest, and pelvis cancer by means of blood cells count

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundgren, Maria da Salete Fonseca dos Santos [Hospital Universitario Oswaldo Cruz, Recife, PE (Brazil). Radiotherapy Unit]. E-mail: salete@lundgren.med.br; Cavalcanti, Maria do Socorro de Mendonca [Universidade de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Sampaio, Divaldo de Almeida [Centro de Hematologia de Pernambuco (Hemope), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2008-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the necessity of weekly monitoring by means of leukocyte and platelet counts of patients with head and neck, chest, and pelvis cancer submitted to conventional radiotherapy. Materials and methods: A hundred and one adult patients with cancer of head and neck (n = 11), chest (n = 35) and pelvis (n = 55), submitted to radiotherapy were assessed by means of leukocyte and platelet counts on a weekly basis, with a comparison between the results before and during the treatment and in correlation with the area treated, patient's sex and age group. Results: The most significant decrease in leukocytes was observed in the fourth week, when lymphocytes, total leukocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and platelets presented a decrease of 53.5%, 26.8%, 19.4%, 22.2% and 14.6%, respectively, in comparison with the values found before the beginning of the therapy. Geometric means for pelvis during the treatment were lower than those for chest, and head and neck. Lymphocytes demonstrated to be more sensitive to radiation therapy. No alteration was found in leukocyte or platelet counts in correlation with patients' sex or age. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, weekly leukocyte and platelet counts do not seem to be useful in the assessment patients submitted to conventional radiotherapy for localized cancer. (author)

  5. Radiation exposure due to bedside chest radiography during intensive care. Cumulative dose and additional morbidity risk of long term therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Assessment of the additional morbidity risk due to repeated bedside chest radiography according to ICRP 60 during intensive care. Material and Methods: Ventral surface doses were recorded by thermoluminescence dosimetry in 2 man and 7 women, mean age 36±12 years, mean height 169±5 cm, mean weight 74±8 kg, receiving long-term ventilation therapy due to Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). Results: From 18 to 126 days duration of therapy 9 patients received a total of 348 bedside chest radiographs, mean 39±22 radiographs per patient. 217 chest radiographs yielded 217 surface doses and 217 gonadal doses. Patient's mean surface dose varys between at least 0,31±0,12 mGy and at most 0,56±0,09 mGy. The surface dose representing gonadal exposure is less than 0,03 mGy per exposure. The mean effective dose is about 0,15 mSv per exposure. The cumulative effective dose Heff ranges between 2,49 mSv and 14,09 mSv, thus estimating the additional individual cancer risk ranges between 0,01% and 0,07%. Conclusion: In comparison with the decreased prognosis of severely ill long-term ventilated patients the additional morbidity risk due to chest radiographs is a negligible quantity. (orig.)

  6. Initial clinical evaluation of stationary digital chest tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Allison E.; Shan, Jing; Wu, Gongting; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping; Heath, Michael; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David

    2016-03-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is the gold standard for image evaluation of lung disease, including lung cancer and cystic fibrosis. It provides detailed information of the lung anatomy and lesions, but at a relatively high cost and high dose of radiation. Chest radiography is a low dose imaging modality but it has low sensitivity. Digital chest tomosynthesis (DCT) is an imaging modality that produces 3D images by collecting x-ray projection images over a limited angle. DCT is less expensive than CT and requires about 1/10th the dose of radiation. Commercial DCT systems acquire the projection images by mechanically scanning an x-ray tube. The movement of the tube head limits acquisition speed. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of stationary digital chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) using a carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array in benchtop phantom studies. The stationary x-ray source allows for fast image acquisition. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of s-DCT for patient imaging. We have successfully imaged 31 patients. Preliminary evaluation by board certified radiologists suggests good depiction of thoracic anatomy and pathology.

  7. Leukemia and brain tumors among children after radiation exposure from CT scans: design and methodological opportunities of the Dutch Pediatric CT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulepas, Johanna M; Ronckers, Cécile M; Smets, Anne M J B; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Jahnen, Andreas; Lee, Choonsik; Kieft, Mariëtte; Laméris, Johan S; van Herk, Marcel; Greuter, Marcel J W; Jeukens, Cécile R L P N; van Straten, Marcel; Visser, Otto; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Hauptmann, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scans are indispensable in modern medicine; however, the spectacular rise in global use coupled with relatively high doses of ionizing radiation per examination have raised radiation protection concerns. Children are of particular concern because they are more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer compared with adults and have a long lifespan to express harmful effects which may offset clinical benefits of performing a scan. This paper describes the design and methodology of a nationwide study, the Dutch Pediatric CT Study, regarding risk of leukemia and brain tumors in children after radiation exposure from CT scans. It is a retrospective record-linkage cohort study with an expected number of 100,000 children who received at least one electronically archived CT scan covering the calendar period since the introduction of digital archiving until 2012. Information on all archived CT scans of these children will be obtained, including date of examination, scanned body part and radiologist's report, as well as the machine settings required for organ dose estimation. We will obtain cancer incidence by record linkage with external databases. In this article, we describe several approaches to the collection of data on archived CT scans, the estimation of radiation doses and the assessment of confounding. The proposed approaches provide useful strategies for data collection and confounder assessment for general retrospective record-linkage studies, particular those using hospital databases on radiological procedures for the assessment of exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation. PMID:24748424

  8. PET/CT-guided radiation therapy planning: From present to the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging using 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT has been successfully used in the diagnosis, initial staging, and response assessment of various malignant tumors. Advances in radiation therapy planning and delivery have ushered in the era of high-precision conformal radiotherapy allowing generation of dose distributions that conform closely to the shape of the target volume while minimizing high-dose regions in the surrounding normal tissues. Traditionally, radiation therapy planning has relied heavily on CT imaging, but recent times have witnessed tremendous enthusiasm for the use of PET/CT-guidance in radiotherapy planning. This has been largely stimulated by widespread availability and integration with treatment planning systems. However, several issues need to be addressed and challenges overcome to realize the full potential of this exciting technology. Integrating PET/CT fusion imaging into routine clinical practice can be challenging due to technical, administrative, financial, geographic, and personnel issues. Concerted efforts are urgently needed for the development of guidelines for appropriate application of this technology using standardized methodology. There is accumulating evidence that incorporating PET/CT imaging in radiotherapy planning for lung cancer, head and neck cancer and cervical cancer has a significant impact. This review highlights the promises and pitfalls of PET/CT imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning with a critical appraisal of the current best evidence for its application in the modern radiotherapy clinic, and provides a sneak preview into the future of such technology.

  9. Learning aspects and potential pitfalls regarding detection of pulmonary nodules in chest tomosynthesis and proposed related quality criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background In chest tomosynthesis, low-dose projections collected over a limited angular range are used for reconstruction of an arbitrary number of section images of the chest, resulting in a moderately increased radiation dose compared to chest radiography. Purpose To investigate the effects of learning with feedback on the detection of pulmonary nodules for observers with varying experience of chest tomosynthesis, to identify pitfalls regarding detection of pulmonary nodules, and present suggestions for how to avoid them, and to adapt the European quality criteria for chest radiography and computed tomography (CT) to chest tomosynthesis. Material and Methods Six observers analyzed tomosynthesis cases for presence of nodules in a jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristics (JAFROC) study. CT was used as reference. The same tomosynthesis cases were analyzed before and after learning with feedback, which included a collective learning session. The difference in performance between the two readings was calculated using the JAFROC figure of merit as principal measure of detectability. Results Significant improvement in performance after learning with feedback was found only for observers inexperienced in tomosynthesis. At the collective learning session, localization of pleural and sub pleural nodules or structures was identified as the main difficulty in analyzing tomosynthesis images. Conclusion The results indicate that inexperienced observers can reach a high level of performance regarding nodule detection in tomosynthesis after learning with feedback and that the main problem with chest tomosynthesis is related to the limited depth resolution

  10. Absorbed radiation doses in women undergone to PET-CT exams for cancer diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorbed dose in several organs and the effective dose in patients submitted to PET-CT exams with the radiopharmaceutical 18F-FDG were assessed. The ICRP-106 biokinetic model and thermoluminescent detectors in a anthropomorphic phantom were used. The use of the PET-CT image acquisition protocol, with the CT protocol for anatomical mapping, showed that 60% of effective dose was from the radiotracer administration, being the effective dose values for a female patient of (5.80 ± 1.57) mSv. In conclusion, patient doses can be reduced by using appropriate imaging acquisition in 18F-FDG PET-CT examinations and promoting the compliance with the radiation protection principles. (author)

  11. Radiation risk to critical organ during brain CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study was performed to evaluate dose to critical organ for patient undergoing CT brain in modern medical center a total of 61 patient were examined in this study. The data collected from Modern Medical Center for brain. The data collected from Modern Medical Center for brain. The eye lens dose was 31.31 mSv, skin 29.23 mSv, cranium 30.01 mSv, brain 34.50 mSv, mandible 4.39 mSv, thyroid 2.59 mSv. The organ dose value were comparable to the previous studies. (Author)

  12. Cervical spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cervical spine; Computed tomography scan of cervical spine; CT scan of cervical spine; Neck CT scan ... Risks of CT scans include: Being exposed to radiation Allergic reaction to contrast dye CT scans expose you to more radiation than ...

  13. CT outperforms radiographs at a comparable radiation dose in the assessment for spondylolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadell, Michael F.; Stewart, Jaime R.; Harned, Roger K.; Ingram, James D.; Miller, Angie L.; Strain, John D.; Weinman, Jason P. [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Gralla, Jane [University of Colorado Denver, Department of Pediatrics, Aurora, CO (United States); Bercha, Istiaq [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Lumbar spondylolysis, a unilateral or bilateral fracture at pars interarticularis, is a common cause of low back pain in children. The initial imaging study in the diagnosis of lumbar spondylolysis has historically been lumbar spine radiographs; however, radiographs can be equivocal or false-negative. Definitive diagnosis can be achieved with computed tomography (CT), but its use has been limited due to the dose of ionizing radiation to the patient. By limiting the z-axis coverage to the relevant anatomy and optimizing the CT protocol, we are able to provide a definitive diagnosis of fractures of the pars interarticularis at comparable or lower radiation dose than commonly performed lumbar spine radiographs. As there is no gold standard for the diagnosis of spondylolysis besides surgery, we compared interobserver agreement and degree of confidence to determine which modality is preferable. Sixty-two patients with low back pain ages 5-18 years were assessed for the presence of spondylolysis. Forty-seven patients were evaluated by radiography and 15 patients were evaluated by limited field-of-view CT. Both radiographic and CT examinations were assessed anonymously in random order for the presence or absence of spondylolysis by six raters. Agreement was assessed among raters using a Fleiss Kappa statistic for multiple raters. CT provided a significantly higher level of agreement among raters than radiographs (P < 0.001). The overall Kappa for rater agreement with radiographs was 0.24, 0.34 and 0.40 for 2, 3 or 4 views, respectively, and 0.88 with CT. Interobserver agreement is significantly greater using limited z-axis coverage CT when compared with radiographs. Radiologist confidence improved significantly with CT compared to radiographs regardless of the number of views. (orig.)

  14. Development of the patient positioning assistance system of radiation therapy with automatic registration using CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A patient's exact position reproducibility is an important problem that characteristic of a dose distribution in the IMRT (Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy) and the heavy ion beam therapy. In recent years, some medical institution implement system that communalized the bed of CT (Computed Tomography) and radiation therapy, but there are some problems that patient positioning using visual examination in objectivity and quantitatively. We developed patient positioning system with automated registration process between CT iso-center image and CT volume data before irradiation. Automatic registration method was cross correlation function with FFT (Fast Fourier Transform). We evaluated availability of the system. It was result in assisting high accuracy registration. The system was enough to assist for patient registration. Result of evaluated clinical study of prostate, we suggested that to aim at internal organ (prostate) for iso-center. (author)

  15. CT findings of organizing pneumonia after radiation therapy in breast-conserving therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organizing pneumonia is known as a rare complication after radiation therapy in breast-conserving therapy for breast cancer. CT findings consist of consolidation and ground-glass opacities including the irradiated lung and patchy infiltrates in the nonirradiated lung. Steroid therapy is very effective, but relapse is frequently seen. In relapsed disease, lesions tend to appear in the different site from prior lesions. Radiologists should notice that organizing pneumonia is one form of radiation lung injury with good prognosis. (author)

  16. Advances in image-guided radiation therapy-the role of PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the era of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), the greatest challenge remains target delineation, as the opportunity to maximize cures while simultaneously decreasing radiation dose to the surrounding normal tissues is to be realized. Over the last 2 decades, technological advances in radiographic imaging, biochemistry, and molecular biology have played an increasing role in radiation treatment planning, delivery, and evaluation of response. Previously, fluoroscopy formed the basis of radiation treatment planning. Beginning in the late 1980s, computed tomography (CT) has become the basis for modern radiation treatment planning and delivery, coincident with the rise of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). Additionally, multi-modality anatomic imaging registration was the solution pursued to augment delineation of tumors and surrounding structures on CT-based treatment planning. Although these imaging modalities provide the customary anatomic details necessary for radiation treatment planning, they have limitations, including difficulty with identification of small tumor deposits, tumor extension, and distinction from scar tissues. To overcome these limitations, PET and, more recently, PET-CT have been innovative regarding the extent of disease appraisal, target delineation in the treatment planning, and assessment of therapy response. We review the role of functional imaging in IGRT as it reassures transformations on the field of radiation oncology. As we move toward the era of IGRT, the use of multi-modality imaging fusion, and the introduction of more sensitive and specific PET-CT tracers may further assist target definition. Furthermore, the potential to predict early outcome or even detect early recurrence of tumor, may allow for the tailoring of intervention in cancer patients. The convergence of a biological target volume, and perhaps multi-tracer tumor, molecular, and genetic profile tumors will probably be vital in cancer treatment

  17. Radiation exposure and mortality risk from CT and PET imaging of patients with malignant lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Nievelstein, R. A. J.; Quarles van Ufford, H.M.E.; Kwee, T. C.; Bierings, M.B.; Ludwig, I.; Beek, F. J. A.; de Klerk, J. M. H.; Mali, W P Th M; de Bruin, P.W.; Geleijns, J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To quantify radiation exposure and mortality risk from computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) in patients with malignant lymphoma (Hodgkin’s disease [HD] or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma [NHL]). Methods First, organ doses were assessed for a typical diagnostic work-up in children with HD and adults with NHL. Subsequently, life tables were constructed for assessment of radiation risks, also taking into account the diseas...

  18. Study on radiation dose caused by 18F-FDG in PET/CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the radiation dose caused by 18F-flu- orodeoxyglucose (FDG) in PET/CT examination and to optimize the concerned radiation protection. Methods: Thirty patients from our conventional PET/CT examination were simple randomly selected, and they all underwent whole body PET/CT imaging. The radioactive dose of injected 18F-FDG was recorded. The internal radiation dose was calculated and the external radiation dose from patients was measured with the 451P-DE-SI ion chamber survey meter. The staff's dose was recorded with thermoluminescent detector (TLD). All dosimetry data were processed and analyzed statistically with Excel 2003. Results: The injected radioactive dose of 18F-FDG was (432.9 ± 51.8) MBq, and effective dose equivalent received per patient was (8.23 ± 0.99) mSv. The correlation coefficient (r) of the dose equivalent rate and distance was -0.994 by power function curve fitting, and that of dose equivalent rate and time was -0.988 by exponential curve fitting. The staff's dose was lower than the annual dose limit. Conclusions: The patient's internal radiation dose caused by 18F-FDG in PET/CT examination is low, nonetheless, the clinician should always consider optimizing and minimizing the necessary radiation received by the patients. The patients having been injected with 18F-FDG should stay in one place to decrease their radiation to the public. From the medical point of view in optimizing radiation exposure, there may still be a potential to lower the injected 18F-FDG activity. (authors)

  19. Radiation exposure and mortality risk from CT and PET imaging of patients with malignant lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nievelstein, R. A. J.; van Ufford, H. M. E. Quarles; Kwee, T. C.; Bierings, M. B.; Ludwig, I.; Beek, F. J. A.; de Klerk, J. M. H.; Mali, W. P. Th. M.; de Bruin, P. W.; Geleijns, J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To quantify radiation exposure and mortality risk from computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18-FDG) in patients with malignant lymphoma (Hodgkin's disease [HD] or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma [NHL]). Methods First, organ doses we

  20. Diagnostic Accuracy and Radiation Dose of CT Coronary Angiography in Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorre, Mette Medom; Abdulla, Jawdat

    2013-01-01

    Purpose:To determine by means of a systematic review and meta-analysis the diagnostic accuracy, associated radiation dose, and technical challenges of computed tomographic (CT) coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation.Materials and Methods:A systematic literature search was perfo...

  1. Comparison between x-ray tube-based and synchrotron radiation-based μCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunke, Oliver; Brockdorf, Kathleen; Drews, Susanne; Müller, Bert; Donath, Tilman; Herzen, Julia; Beckmann, Felix

    2008-08-01

    Nowadays, X-ray tube-based high-resolution CT systems are widely used in scientific research and industrial applications. But the potential, convenience and economy of these lab systems is often underestimated. The present paper shows the comparison of sophisticated conventional μCT with synchrotron radiation-based μCT (SRμCT). The different aspects and characteristics of both approaches like spatial and density resolution, penetration depth, scanning time or sample size is described in detail. The tube-based μCT measurements were performed with a granite-based nanotom®-CT system (phoenix|x-ray, Wunstorf, Germany) equipped with a 180 kV - 15 W high-power nanofocus® tube with tungsten or molybdenum targets. The tube offers a wide range of applications from scanning low absorbing samples in nanofocus® mode with voxel sizes below 500 nm and highly absorbing objects in the high power mode with focal spot and voxel sizes of a few microns. The SRμCT measurements were carried out with the absorption contrast set-up at the beamlines W 2 and BW 2 at HASYLAB/DESY, operated by the GKSS Research Center. The range of samples examined covers materials of very different absorption levels and related photon energies for the CT scans. Both quantitative and qualitative comparisons of CT scans using biomedical specimens with rather low X-ray absorption such as parts of the human spine as well as using composites from the field of materials science are shown.

  2. The effect of radiation dose reduction on clinical image quality in chest radiography of premature neonates using a dual-side readout technique computed radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate if the exposure could be reduced from the clinical setting (resulting in an effective dose of 8 μSv for a neonate of weight 0.7 kg and height 25 cm at a tube voltage of 90 kV) without negatively influencing the image quality for a dual-side readout technique computed radiography (CR) system in chest radiography of premature neonates. Chest radiographs of premature neonates were acquired with the double-side readout technique CR system. The images underwent simulated dose reduction in steps of 20% to represent five different radiation dose levels. Four image quality criteria, related to the visibility of important anatomical structures, were used in a visual grading study where five experienced radiologists rated how well the criteria were fulfilled for all images. When reducing the radiation dose, a decrease in image quality could be observed already at the 80% dose level for all the structures. The results indicate that a decrease in exposure from the clinically used setting affects the image quality negatively for the CR system. (authors)

  3. Is PET/CT efficient tool to evaluate the response after stereotactic radiation therapy for pancreas cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pancreas cancer, to evaluate the efficacy of PET/CT as tool to check the response after stereotactic radiation therapy and to define functional imaging role of PET/CT as alterative tool of computed tomography. From November 2003 to December 2004, among locally advanced pancreas cancer patients treated by stereotactic radiation therapy using CyberKnife(CK), 14 were evaluated by PET/CT before and after treatment. Four patients took PET/CT one month after CK, 4 patients 2 months after CK, and 6 patients 3 months after CK as the first evaluation of treatment. All of patients were also evaluated by