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Sample records for chest ct intensive-care

  1. Quality of intensive care chest imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.; Wein, B.; Keulers, P.; Stargardt, A.; Guenther, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have evaluated the image quality of a stimulable phosphorous plate system in intensive care chest radiography. Four radiologists examined 308 chest radiographs (200 conventional, 108 digital) according to the following criteria: visibility of catheters, tubes (artificial objects), bronchi, central and peripheral vessels, diaphragm, trachea, and retrocardial lung parenchyma. Detectability of these structures was classified as good, poor, or impossible to see. In addition, optical density was measured in the region of liver, heart, and lung. Results were evaluated by Student and υ test

  2. CT of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    There appears to be a limited role for computed tomography in the evaluation of chest trauma. The literature contains few papers specifically addressing the use of CT in the setting of chest trauma. Another series of articles relates anecdotal experiences in this regard. This paucity of reports attests to the remarkable amount of information present on conventional chest radiographs as well as the lack of clear indications for CT in the setting of chest trauma. In this chapter traumatic lesions of various areas of the thorax are discussed. The conventional radiographic findings are briefly described and the potential or proven application of CT is addressed

  3. On-demand rather than daily-routine chest radiography prescription may change neither the number nor the impact of chest computed tomography and ultrasound studies in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröner, Anke; Binnekade, Jan M; Graat, Marleen E; Vroom, Margreeth B; Stoker, Jaap; Spronk, Peter E; Schultz, Marcus J

    2008-01-01

    Elimination of daily-routine chest radiographs (CXRs) may influence chest computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound practice in critically ill patients. This was a retrospective cohort study including all patients admitted to a university-affiliated intensive care unit during two consecutive periods of 5 months, one before and one after elimination of daily-routine CXR. Chest CT and ultrasound studies were identified retrospectively by using the radiology department information system. Indications for and the diagnostic/therapeutic yield of chest CT and ultrasound studies were collected. Elimination of daily-routine CXR resulted in a decrease of CXRs per patient day from 1.1 +/- 0.3 to 0.6 +/- 0.4 (P chest CT studies nor the ratio of chest CT studies per patient day changed with the intervention: Before elimination of daily-routine CXR, 52 chest CT studies were obtained from 747 patients; after elimination, 54 CT studies were obtained from 743 patients. Similarly, chest ultrasound practice was not affected by the change of CXR strategy: Before and after elimination, 21 and 27 chest ultrasound studies were performed, respectively. Also, timing of chest CT and ultrasound studies was not different between the two study periods. During the two periods, 40 of 106 chest CT studies (38%) and 18 of 48 chest ultrasound studies (38%) resulted in a change in therapy. The combined therapeutic yield of chest CT and ultrasound studies did not change with elimination of daily-routine CXR. Elimination of daily-routine CXRs may not affect chest CT and ultrasound practice in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit.

  4. Radiological diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis: CT versus chest radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fugeng; Pan Jishu; Chen Qihang; Zhou Cheng; Yu Jingying; Tang Dairong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of CT or Chest radiograph in diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis. Methods: The study population included 21 patients with chest wall tuberculosis confirmed by operation or biopsy. Chest radiograph and plain CT were performed in all eases, while enhanced CT in 9 cases, and all images were reviewed by 2 radiologists. Results: Single soft tissue mass of the chest wall was detected in all cases on CT, but not on chest radiograph(χ 2 =42.000, P 2 =4.421, P<0.05). Conclusion: CT, especially enhanced CT scan is the first choice in the diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis. (authors)

  5. Construction of an Interface Terminology on SNOMED CT Generic Approach and Its Application in Intensive Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakhshi-Raiez, F.; Ahmadian, L.; Cornet, R.; de Jonge, E.; de Keizer, N. F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide a generic approach for developing a domain-specific interface terminology on SNOMED CT and to apply this approach to the domain of intensive care. Methods: The process of developing an interface terminology on SNOMED CT can be regarded as six sequential phases: domain analysis,

  6. Clinical Utility of Chest Computed Tomography in Patients with Rib Fractures CT Chest and Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Brandon C; Overbey, Douglas M; Tesfalidet, Feven; Schramm, Kristofer; Stovall, Robert T; French, Andrew; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Burlew, Clay C; Barnett, Carlton; Moore, Ernest E; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2016-12-01

    Chest CT is more sensitive than a chest X-ray (CXR) in diagnosing rib fractures; however, the clinical significance of these fractures remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the added diagnostic use of chest CT performed after CXR in patients with either known or suspected rib fractures secondary to blunt trauma. Retrospective cohort study of blunt trauma patients with rib fractures at a level I trauma center that had both a CXR and a CT chest. The CT finding of ≥ 3 additional fractures in patients with ≤ 3 rib fractures on CXR was considered clinically meaningful. Student's t-test and chi-square analysis were used for comparison. We identified 499 patients with rib fractures: 93 (18.6%) had CXR only, 7 (1.4%) had chest CT only, and 399 (79.9%) had both CXR and chest CT. Among these 399 patients, a total of 1,969 rib fractures were identified: 1,467 (74.5%) were missed by CXR. The median number of additional fractures identified by CT was 3 (range, 4 - 15). Of 212 (53.1%) patients with a clinically meaningful increase in the number of fractures, 68 patients underwent one or more clinical interventions: 36 SICU admissions, 20 pain catheter placements, 23 epidural placements, and 3 SSRF. Additionally, 70 patients had a chest tube placed for retained hemothorax or occult pneumothorax. Overall, 138 patients (34.5%) had a change in clinical management based upon CT chest. The chest X-ray missed ~75% of rib fractures seen on chest CT. Although patients with a clinical meaningful increase in the number of rib fractures were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit, there was no associated improvement in pulmonary outcomes.

  7. CT findings of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Tong; Kim Young Il

    1998-01-01

    Trauma is the third leading cause of death, irrespective of age, and the leading cause of death in persons under 40 persons under 40 years of age. Most pleural, pulmonary, mediastinal, and diaphragmatic injuries are not seen on conventional chest radiographs, or are underestimated. In patients with chest trauma, CT scanning is an effective and sensitive method of detecting thoracic injuries and provides accurate information regarding their pattern and extent. (author). 5 refs., 17 figs

  8. CT angiography - chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your provider if you take the diabetes medication metformin (Glucophage). You may need to take extra precautions. ... Damage to kidneys from contrast dye CT scans use more radiation than regular x-rays. Having many ...

  9. The value of routine chest radiographs in a paediatric intensive care unit: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valk, J.W.; Ploetz, F.B.; Schuerman, F.A.B.A.; Vught, H. van; Kramer, P.P.G.; Beek, E.J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Background. In many paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) chest X-ray films (CXRs) are required as part of the daily examination or after completion of invasive procedures. Objective. First, to evaluate if the American College of Radiology (ACR) guidelines for adult patients are appropriate for paediatric pa- tients. Second, to assess the diagnostic efficacy of the CXRs. Materials and methods. One-hundred-seventy-four CXRs acquired in 74 patients, either routinely or after invasive procedures, were analysed. The indication of the obtained CXRs, or the absence of indication in patients in whom no CXRs was taken, was compared with ACR guidelines. The position of medical devices was evaluated. Changes in cardiopulmonary status were noted. Results. Sixty-seven percent of the CXRs were in accordance with the ACR guidelines, and in 74 % of pa- tients in whom no CXRs were taken this was also in accordance with these guidelines. Sixteen percent of the endotracheal tubes, 23 % of central venous lines and 15 % of nasogastric tubes were malpositioned. Changes in cardiopulmonary status, after the initial film, were noted in 63 %. Conclusions. The indications for the majority of CXRs in our PICU appeared to be in accordance with ACR guidelines. The high percentage of malpositioned tubes and lines and the number of cardiopulmonary changes on CXRs in a PICU underline the value of these films. Adjustments of the ACR guidelines for particular groups of paediatric patients may limit the number of CXRs taken and may further increase diagnostic efficacy. (orig.)

  10. A usability evaluation of a SNOMED CT based compositional interface terminology for intensive care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakhshi-Raiez, F.; de Keizer, N. F.; Cornet, R.; Dorrepaal, M.; Dongelmans, D.; Jaspers, M. W. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the usability of a large compositional interface terminology based on SNOMED CT and the terminology application for registration of the reasons for intensive care admission in a Patient Data Management System. Design: Observational study with user-based usability evaluations

  11. In diagnosis of pleural effusion and pneumothorax in the intensive care unit patients: Can chest us replace bedside plain radiography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ElShaimaa Mohamed Mohamed

    2018-06-01

    Conclusions: In evaluation of ICU patients with pleural effusion and pneumothorax, chest US is the first bedside tool with high diagnostic performance. These chest conditions are urgent especially in seriously ill patients, as both need US guided drainage. Chest US has many advantages, including non invasive examination in multiple planes, free of radiation hazard, less expensive, real-time, high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy in chest lesions detection. Lung ultrasound is being exclusive than bedside chest X-ray and equal to chest CT in diagnosing pleural effusion and pneumothorax.

  12. Laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis: chest CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, Helena Ribeiro; Zanetti, Glaucia; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ranke, Felipe Mussi von [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Escuissato, Dante Luiz [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador (Brazil). Dept. de Medicina e Apoio Diagnostico; Hochhegger, Bruno [Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), RS (Brazil). Diagnostico por Imagem; Irion, Klaus Loureiro [Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Souza, Carolina Althoff [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-07-15

    To evaluate the findings on chest CTs in 16 patients (8 men and 8 women) with laryngotracheobronchial papillomatosis. Methods: This was a retrospective study involving patients ranging from 2 to 72 years of age. The evaluation of the CT scans was independently performed by two observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. The inclusion criteria were presence of abnormalities on the CT scans, and the diagnosis was confirmed by anatomopathological examination of the papillomatous lesions. Results: The most common symptoms were hoarseness, cough, dyspnea, and recurrent respiratory infections. The major CT findings were nodular formations in the trachea, solid or cavitated nodules in the lung parenchyma, air trapping, masses, and consolidation. Nodular formations in the trachea were observed in 14 patients (87.5%). Only 2 patients had lesions in lung parenchyma without tracheal involvement. Only 1 patient had no pulmonary dissemination of the disease, showing airway involvement only. Solid and cavitated lung nodules were observed in 14 patients (87.5%) and 13 (81.2%), respectively. Masses were observed in 6 patients (37.5%); air trapping, in 3 (18.7%); consolidation in 3 (18.7%); and pleural effusion, in 1 (6.3%). Pulmonary involvement was bilateral in all cases. Conclusions: The most common tomography findings were nodular formations in the trachea, as well as solid or cavitated nodules and masses in the lung parenchyma. Malignant transformation of the lesions was observed in 5 cases. (author)

  13. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

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    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Krane, Elliot J. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Holmes, Tyson H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Robinson, Terry E. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Cystic Fibrosis Center for Excellence in Pulmonary Biology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  14. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee; Krane, Elliot J.; Holmes, Tyson H.; Robinson, Terry E.

    2014-01-01

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  15. CT of blunt chest trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, D.; Babyn, P.S.; Palder, S.; Bergmann, K.

    1993-01-01

    While trauma is still the leading cause of death in the pediatric age range, it is surprising how little the CT appearances of pediatric chest injury have been investigated in the literature. We have reviewed the CT findings of blunt chest trauma in 44 children for whom chest CT examinations were requested to investigate the extent of intrathoracic injury. We noted a propensity for pulmonary contusions to be located posteriorly or posteromedially, and for them to be anatomically nonsegmental and crescentic in shape. This is possibly attributable to the relatively compliant anterior chest wall in children. The CT appearances of other major thoracic injuries are described, including pulmonary lacerations, pneumothoraces, malpositioned chest tubes, mediastinal hematomas, aortic injury, tracheobronchial injury, hemopericardium, and spinal injuries with paraspinal fluid collections. Children demonstrating findings incidental to the actual injury yet important to the subsequent therapy are also presented. We conclude that, in the event of clinically significant blunt chest trauma, the single supine chest examination in the trauma room is insufficient to adequately identify the extent of intrathoracic injury. With the exception of concern for aortic injury for which aortography is indicated, a dynamically enhanced CT scan of the thorax should be performed as clinically significant findings may result in altered therapy. (orig.)

  16. Indications for chest CT. Retrospective study of cases with normal chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, Shiro

    1995-01-01

    The usefulness of computed tomography (CT) in thoracic radiology is now well appreciated, and the number of chest CTs has greatly increased. There are, however, many chest CT cases that are completely or almost completely normal. Indications for chest CT should be re-evaluated considering the cost and radiation exposure associated with the examination. Reviewing the reports of 4930 chest CT examinations performed in three hospitals during the period of two years, the author found 620 (12.6%) negative CT examinations. In 312 of the 620, the CT was requested because of 'abnormal shadow' on chest radiograph. When the same chest radiographs were re-evaluated by two radiologists, no abnormality was noted in 257 cases (82.4%). CT examinations were considered justified in only 55 cases (17.6%). There was a significant difference in the frequency of normal chest CT examinations between the university hospital and two other hospitals. The causes of false positive interpretation of chest radiographs were analyzed, and it was felt that fundamental knowledge necessary to interpret chest radiographs was lacking. The importance of close cooperation between clinicians and radiologists should be emphasized. (author)

  17. Chest pain: Coronary CT in the ER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Maffei (Erica); S. Seitun (Sara); A.I. Guaricci (Andrea); F. Cademartiri (Filippo)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractCardiac CT has developed into a robust clinical tool during the past 15 years. Of the fields in which the potential of cardiac CT has raised more interest is chest pain in acute settings. In fact, the possibility to exclude with high reliability obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD)

  18. Possibilities of CT examinations by chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ftacnikova, B.

    1994-01-01

    Chest trauma represents the most frequent associated injury in multiply injured patients. The success of treatment depends also on prompt and effective diagnosis and extent of the injuries, on quality interdisciplinary approach. Author presents contributions of computed tomography (CT) in the management of 77 critically injured patients. Attention is focused on the efficacy of CT examination routinely employed in the setting of thoracic trauma and its relationship to following rationalization of treatment. CT scans of thorax is modality of choice for evaluating patients with occult pneumothorax, chest wall deformity of rib fractures, early diagnosis of lung contusion and laceration. (author). 13 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs

  19. Spiral CT for evaluation of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehnert, W.; Weise, R.

    1997-01-01

    After implementation of spiral CT in our department, we carried out an analysis for determining anew the value of CT as a modality of chest trauma diagnosis in the emergency department. The retrospective study covers a period of 10 months and all emergency patients with chest trauma exmined by spiral CT. The major lesions of varying seriousness covered by this study are: pneumothorax, hematothorax, pulmonary contusion or laceration, mediastinal hematoma, rupture of a vessel, injury of the heart and pericardium. The various fractures are not included in this study. In many cases, spiral CT within relatively short time yields significant diagnostic findings, frequently saving additional angiography. A rigid diagnostic procedure cannot be formulated. Plain-film chest radiography still remains a diagnostic modality of high value. (Orig.) [de

  20. A usability evaluation of a SNOMED CT based compositional interface terminology for intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi-Raiez, F; de Keizer, N F; Cornet, R; Dorrepaal, M; Dongelmans, D; Jaspers, M W M

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the usability of a large compositional interface terminology based on SNOMED CT and the terminology application for registration of the reasons for intensive care admission in a Patient Data Management System. Observational study with user-based usability evaluations before and 3 months after the system was implemented and routinely used. Usability was defined by five aspects: effectiveness, efficiency, learnability, overall user satisfaction, and experienced usability problems. Qualitative (the Think-Aloud user testing method) and quantitative (the System Usability Scale questionnaire and Time-on-Task analyses) methods were used to examine these usability aspects. The results of the evaluation study revealed that the usability of the interface terminology fell short (SUS scores before and after implementation of 47.2 out of 100 and 37.5 respectively out of 100). The qualitative measurements revealed a high number (n=35) of distinct usability problems, leading to ineffective and inefficient registration of reasons for admission. The effectiveness and efficiency of the system did not change over time. About 14% (n=5) of the revealed usability problems were related to the terminology content based on SNOMED CT, while the remaining 86% (n=30) was related to the terminology application. The problems related to the terminology content were more severe than the problems related to the terminology application. This study provides a detailed insight into how clinicians interact with a controlled compositional terminology through a terminology application. The extensiveness, complexity of the hierarchy, and the language usage of an interface terminology are defining for its usability. Carefully crafted domain-specific subsets and a well-designed terminology application are needed to facilitate the use of a complex compositional interface terminology based on SNOMED CT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chest CT findings in pediatric Wegener's granulomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, Daniel; Akikusa, Jonathan; Manson, David; Silverman, Earl; Schneider, Rayfel

    2007-01-01

    Although pulmonary involvement occurs in the majority of children and adolescents with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), relatively little has been published regarding the CT imaging manifestations in this group of patients. To determine the frequency and types of chest CT abnormalities in active pediatric WG (pWG). The study was a retrospective examination of 29 chest CT examinations performed at diagnosis (n=14) and during disease flares (n=15) in 18 children. The most common abnormalities were nodules (seen in 90% of examinations), ground-glass opacification (52%), and air-space opacification (45%). Of examinations with nodules, 73% demonstrated nodules >5 mm in diameter and 69% demonstrated more than five nodules; 17% had cavitary lesions. The only abnormality with a significant difference in prevalence between diagnosis and disease flares was air-space opacification, present in 71% and 20%, respectively (P < 0.01). In accordance with the findings of published adult studies and at variance with those of prior pediatric studies, our findings indicate that chest CT abnormalities in active pWG are frequent, most commonly comprising nodules and ground-glass opacification, which may be difficult to detect on plain radiography. We therefore advocate the routine use of chest CT for all affected patients, both at the time of presentation and during disease flares. (orig.)

  2. The clinical value of daily routine chest radiographs in a mixed medical-surgical intensive care unit is low.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graat, Marleen E; Choi, Goda; Wolthuis, Esther K; Korevaar, Johanna C; Spronk, Peter E; Stoker, Jaap; Vroom, Margreeth B; Schultz, Marcus J

    2006-02-01

    The clinical value of daily routine chest radiographs (CXRs) in critically ill patients is unknown. We conducted this study to evaluate how frequently unexpected predefined major abnormalities are identified with daily routine CXRs, and how often these findings lead to a change in care for intensive care unit (ICU) patients. This was a prospective observational study conducted in a 28-bed, mixed medical-surgical ICU of a university hospital. Over a 5-month period, 2,457 daily routine CXRs were done in 754 consecutive ICU patients. The majority of these CXRs did not reveal any new predefined major finding. In only 5.8% of daily routine CXRs (14.3% of patients) was one or more new and unexpected abnormality encountered, including large atelectases (24 times in 20 patients), large infiltrates (23 in 22), severe pulmonary congestion (29 in 25), severe pleural effusion (13 in 13), pneumothorax/pneumomediastinum (14 in 13), and malposition of the orotracheal tube (32 in 26). Fewer than half of the CXRs with a new and unexpected finding were ultimately clinically relevant; in only 2.2% of all daily routine CXRs (6.4% of patients) did these radiologic abnormalities result in a change to therapy. Subgroup analysis revealed no differences between medical and surgical patients with regard to the incidence of new and unexpected findings on daily routine CXRs and the effect of new and unexpected CXR findings on daily care. In the ICU, daily routine CXRs seldom reveal unexpected, clinically relevant abnormalities, and they rarely prompt action. We propose that this diagnostic examination be abandoned in ICU patients.

  3. Chest tube placement in thorax trauma - comparison chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heim, P.; Maas, R.; Buecheler, E.; Tesch, C.

    1998-01-01

    Estimation of chest tube placement in patients with thoracic trauma with regard to chest tube malposition in chest radiography in the supine position compared to additional computed tomography of the thorax. Material and methods: Apart from compulsory chest radiography after one or multiple chest tube insertions, 31 severely injured patients with thoracic trauma underwent a CT scan of the thorax. These 31 patients with 40 chest tubes constituted the basis for the present analysis. Results: In chest radiography in the supine position there were no chest tube malpositions (n=40); In the CT scans 25 correct positions, 7 pseudo-malpositions, 6 intrafissural and 2 intrapulmonary malpositions were identified. Moreover 16 sufficient, 18 insufficient and 6 indifferent functions of the chest tubes were seen. Conclusion: In case of lasting clinical problems and questionable function of the chest tube, chest radiography should be supplemented by a CT scan of the thorax in order to estimate the position of the chest tube. (orig.) [de

  4. Clinical Utility of Chest Computed Tomography in Patients with Rib Fractures CT Chest and Rib Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Brandon C.; Overbey, Douglas M.; Tesfalidet, Feven; Schramm, Kristofer; Stovall, Robert T.; French, Andrew; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Burlew, Clay C.; Barnett, Carlton; Moore, Ernest E.; Pieracci, Fredric M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chest CT is more sensitive than a chest X-ray (CXR) in diagnosing rib fractures; however, the clinical significance of these fractures remains unclear. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the added diagnostic use of chest CT performed after CXR in patients with either known or suspected rib fractures secondary to blunt trauma. Methods Retrospective coho...

  5. Early appearance of SARS on chest CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Xiaoguang; Feng Suchen; Xia Guoguang; Zhao Tao; Gu Xiang; Qu Hui

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the early appearance of SARS on chest CT scan and its role in the early diagnosis. Methods: Forty cases of SARS in keeping with the criteria of the Ministry of Health had chest CT scans within 7 days of onset of symptoms, and CR chest X-ray films were available as well. These chest X-rays and CT images were retrospectively reviewed to determine if there were any abnormalities on the images. The lesions on the chest CT images were then further analyzed in terms of the number, location, size, and density. Results: Positive abnormalities on chest CT scans were revealed in all 40 SARS cases. Positive findings on CR chest films were showed in only 25 cases, equivocal in 6, and normal in 9 cases. The main abnormalities seen on CT and X-rays were pulmonary infiltrations varied markedly in severity. 70 % cases had 1 or 2 lesions on chest CT scan, 30 % cases had 3 or more lesions. The lesions seen on chest CT scan tended to be ground-glass opacification, sometimes with consolidation which was very faint and inhomogeneous, easily missed on chest X-rays. Typically the lesions were located in the periphery of the lung, or both central and peripheral lung, but very rare in a pure central location. They were commonly in the shape of patch or ball. Conclusions: Chest CT scan is much more sensitive in detecting the lesions of the lung in SARS. The early appearance of SARS on chest CT scan is characteristic but non-specific, indicating that chest CT scan plays a very important role in the early diagnosis and differential diagnosis of SARS

  6. Reduction of adult fingers visualized on pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) chest radiographs after radiation technologist and PICU staff radiation safety education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tynan, J.R.; Duncan, M.D.; Burbridge, B.E.

    2009-01-01

    A recent publication from our centre revealed a disturbing finding of a significant incidence of adult fingers seen on the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) chest radiographs. This is inappropriate occupational exposure to diagnostic radiation. We hypothesized that the incidence of adult fingers on PICU chest radiographs would decline after radiation safety educational seminars were given to the medical radiation technologists and PICU staff. The present study's objectives were addressed by using a pretest-posttest design. Two cross-sectional PICU chest radiograph samples, taken before and after the administration of radiation safety education for our medical radiation technologists and PICU staff, were compared by using a χ 2 test. There was a 61.2% and 76.9% reduction in extraneous adult fingers, directly exposed to the x-ray beam and those seen in the coned regions of the film, respectively, on PICU chest radiographs (66.7% reduction overall). This reduction was statistically significant (χ2 = 20.613, P < .001). Limiting unnecessary occupational radiation exposure is a critical issue in radiology. There was a statistically and clinically significant association between radiation safety education and the decreased number of adult fingers seen on PICU chest radiographs. This study provides preliminary evidence in favour of the benefit of radiation safety seminars. (author)

  7. Diagnosis of Grave's disease with pulmonary hypertension on chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa Yeon; Yoo, Seung Min; Kim, Hye Rin; Chun, Eun Ju; White, Charles S

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of chest CT findings to diagnose Grave's disease in pulmonary hypertension. We retrospectively evaluated chest CT and the medical records of 13 patients with Grave's disease with (n=6) or without pulmonary hypertension (n=7) and in 17 control patients. Presence of iso-attenuation of diffusely enlarged thyroid glands compared with adjacent neck muscle on non-enhanced CT as a diagnostic clue of Grave's disease, and assessment of pulmonary hypertension on CT has high diagnostic accuracy. Chest CT has the potential to diagnose Grave's disease with pulmonary hypertension in the absence of other information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pulmonary effects of synthetic marijuana: chest radiography and CT findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Eugene A; Henry, Travis S; Veeraraghavan, Srihari; Staton, Gerald W; Gal, Anthony A

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the first chest radiographic and CT descriptions of organizing pneumonia in response to smoking synthetic marijuana. Chest radiographs showed a diffuse miliary-micronodular pattern. Chest CT images showed diffuse centrilobular nodules and tree-in-bud pattern and a histopathologic pattern of organizing pneumonia with or without patchy acute alveolar damage. This distinct imaging pattern should alert radiologists to include synthetic marijuana abuse in the differential diagnosis.

  9. Diagnostic Yield of Recommendations for Chest CT Examination Prompted by Outpatient Chest Radiographic Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H. Benjamin; Gilman, Matthew D.; Wu, Carol C.; Cushing, Matthew S.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Zhao, Jing; Pandharipande, Pari V.; Shepard, Jo-Anne O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic yield of recommended chest computed tomography (CT) prompted by abnormalities detected on outpatient chest radiographic images. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval; informed consent was waived. Reports of all outpatient chest radiographic examinations performed at a large academic center during 2008 (n = 29 138) were queried to identify studies that included a recommendation for a chest CT imaging. The radiology information system was queried for these patients to determine if a chest CT examination was obtained within 1 year of the index radiographic examination that contained the recommendation. For chest CT examinations obtained within 1 year of the index chest radiographic examination and that met inclusion criteria, chest CT images were reviewed to determine if there was an abnormality that corresponded to the chest radiographic finding that prompted the recommendation. All corresponding abnormalities were categorized as clinically relevant or not clinically relevant, based on whether further work-up or treatment was warranted. Groups were compared by using t test and Fisher exact test with a Bonferroni correction applied for multiple comparisons. Results There were 4.5% (1316 of 29138 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 4.3%, 4.8%]) of outpatient chest radiographic examinations that contained a recommendation for chest CT examination, and increasing patient age (P recommendation for chest CT examination. Of patients within this subset who met inclusion criteria, 65.4% (691 of 1057 [95% CI: 62.4%, 68.2%) underwent a chest CT examination within the year after the index chest radiographic examination. Clinically relevant corresponding abnormalities were present on chest CT images in 41.4% (286 of 691 [95% CI: 37.7%, 45.2%]) of cases, nonclinically relevant corresponding abnormalities in 20.6% (142 of 691 [95% CI: 17.6%, 23.8%]) of cases, and no corresponding abnormalities in 38

  10. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Omar, Hesham R; Mangar, Devanand; Khetarpal, Suneel; Shapiro, David H; Kolla, Jaya; Rashad, Rania; Helal, Engy; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP) chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a tru...

  11. The clinical value of daily routine chest radiographs in a mixed medical-surgical intensive care unit is low

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graat, Marleen E.; Choi, Goda; Wolthuis, Esther K.; Korevaar, Johanna C.; Spronk, Peter E.; Stoker, Jaap; Vroom, Margreeth B.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The clinical value of daily routine chest radiographs (CXRs) in critically ill patients is unknown. We conducted this study to evaluate how frequently unexpected predefined major abnormalities are identified with daily routine CXRs, and how often these findings lead to a change in care

  12. Evaluation of CT findings in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome in intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Ryoichi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Sato, Morihito; Yoshida, Masashi; Ura, Nobuyuki; Kaneko, Masamitsu

    1996-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings of 19 critically ill patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in ICU were analyzed retrospectively. ARDS was diagnosed according to Murray's criteria (Lung Injury Score> 2.5). The CT findings obtained were diffuse increased lung opacities [100%] (ground-glass opacity [100%] and air-space consolidation [74%]), lobular distributions of increased opacity [53%], loss of lung volume [53%], bronchiectasis and bronchioloectasis [42%] , fine reticular opacity [26%] and peribronchovascular distributions of increased density [11%]. Among those findings, diffuse increased lung opacities were seen in almost all patients. Especially ground-glass opacity was seen in all patients and distributed in the whole lung. Air-space consolidation was observed in 14 patients and involved mainly lower lung fields. Loss of lung volume and bronchiectasis and bronchioloectasis were likely to exist in the same area of air-space consolidation. Lobular distributions of increased opacity was seen in 10 patients without specific distribution. Those findings were thought to be relatively specific CT findings of ARDS. It is concluded that CT findings provide more information than bedside plain roentgenograms and was useful for clinical management of patients with ARDS. (author)

  13. Evaluation of radiation doses delivered in different chest CT protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorycki, Tomasz; Lasek, Iwona; Kamiński, Kamil; Studniarek, Michał

    2014-01-01

    There are differences in the reference diagnostic levels for the computed tomography (CT) of the chest as cited in different literature sources. The doses are expressed either in weighted CT dose index (CTDI VOL ) used to express the dose per slice, dose-length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). The purpose of this study was to assess the radiation dose used in Low Dose Computer Tomography (LDCT) of the chest in comparison with routine chest CT examinations as well as to compare doses delivered in low dose chest CT with chest X-ray doses. CTDI VOL and DLP doses were taken to analysis from routine CT chest examinations (64 MDCT TK LIGHT SPEED GE Medical System) performed in 202 adult patients with FBP reconstruction: 51 low dose, 106 helical, 20 angio CT, and 25 high resolution CT protocols, as well as 19 helical protocols with iterative ASIR reconstruction. The analysis of chest X-ray doses was made on the basis of reports from 44 examinations. Mean values of CTDI VOL and DLP were, respectively: 2.1 mGy and 85.1 mGy·cm, for low dose, 9.7 mGy and 392.3 mGy·cm for helical, 18.2 mGy and 813.9 mGy·cm for angio CT, 2.3 mGy and 64.4 mGy·cm for high resolution CT, 8.9 mGy. and 317.6 mGy·cm for helical ASIR protocols. Significantly lower CTDI VOL and DLP values were observed for low dose and high resolution CT versus the remaining CT protocols; doses delivered in CT ASIR protocols were also lower (80–81%). The ratio between medial doses in low dose CT and chest X-ray was 11.56. Radiation dose in extended chest LDCT with parameters allowing for identification of mediastinal structures and adrenal glands is still much lower than that in standard CT protocols. Effective doses predicted for LDCT may exceed those used in chest X-ray examinations by a factor of 4 to 12, depending on LDCT scan parameters. Our results, as well as results from other authors, suggest a possibility of reducing the dose by means of iterative reconstruction. Efforts towards further dose

  14. Radiation Exposure to Staff in Intensive Care Unit with Portable CT Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bedside radiological procedures pose a risk of radiation exposure to ICU staff. The perception of risk may increase the degree of caution among the health care staff and raise new barriers preventing patients from obtaining prompt care. Objective. The aim of this study was to estimate the annual cumulative radiation dose to individual ICU staff. Methods. In this prospective study, forty subjects were required to wear thermoluminescent dosimeter badges during their working hours. The badges were analyzed to determine the exposure after 3 months. Results. A total of 802 radiological procedures were completed at bedside during the study period. The estimated annual dosage to doctors and nurses on average was 0.99 mSv and 0.88 mSv (p<0.001, respectively. Residents were subjected to the highest radiation exposure (1.04 mSv per year, p=0.002. The radiation dose was correlated with day shift working hours (r=0.426; p=0.006 and length of service (r=-0.403; p<0.01. Conclusions. With standard precautions, bedside radiological procedures—including portable CT scans—do not expose ICU staff to high dose of ionizing radiation. The level of radiation exposure is related to the daytime working hours and length of service.

  15. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Hesham R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a true occult pneumothorax where an initial AP chest X-ray revealed no evidence of pneumothorax and a CT chest immediately performed revealed evidence of pneumothorax. The second case represents an example of a missed rather than a truly occult pneumothorax where the initial chest radiograph revealed clues suggesting the presence of pneumothorax which were missed by the reading radiologist. The third case emphasizes the fact that "occult pneumothorax is predictable". The presence of subcutaneous emphesema and pulmonary contusion should call for further imaging with CT chest to rule out pneumothorax. Thoracic CT scan is therefore the "gold standard" for early detection of a pneumothorax in trauma patients. This report aims to sensitize readers to the entity of occult pneumothorax and create awareness among intensivists and ER physicians regarding the proper diagnosis and management.

  16. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hesham R; Mangar, Devanand; Khetarpal, Suneel; Shapiro, David H; Kolla, Jaya; Rashad, Rania; Helal, Engy; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-09-27

    Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP) chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a true occult pneumothorax where an initial AP chest X-ray revealed no evidence of pneumothorax and a CT chest immediately performed revealed evidence of pneumothorax. The second case represents an example of a missed rather than a truly occult pneumothorax where the initial chest radiograph revealed clues suggesting the presence of pneumothorax which were missed by the reading radiologist. The third case emphasizes the fact that "occult pneumothorax is predictable". The presence of subcutaneous emphesema and pulmonary contusion should call for further imaging with CT chest to rule out pneumothorax. Thoracic CT scan is therefore the "gold standard" for early detection of a pneumothorax in trauma patients. This report aims to sensitize readers to the entity of occult pneumothorax and create awareness among intensivists and ER physicians regarding the proper diagnosis and management.

  17. Radiation exposure from Chest CT: Issues and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Michael M.; Rizzo, Stefania; Kanarek, David; Shephard, Jo-Anne O.

    2004-01-01

    Concerns have been raised over alleged overuse of CT scanning and inappropriate selection of scanning methods, all of which expose patients to unnecessary radiation. Thus, it is important to identify clinical situations in which techniques with lower radiation dose such as plain radiography or no radiation such as MRI and occasionally ultrasonography can be chosen over CT scanning. This article proposes the arguments for radiation dose reduction in CT scanning of the chest and discusses recommended practices and studies that address means of reducing radiation exposure associated with CT scanning of the chest. PMID:15082885

  18. The role of CT in assessing chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capsa, R.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Objective: Thoracic pain represents the common feature of a wide range of diseases of different causes. Usually, chest pain requires a fast workup, in order to eliminate potentially hazardous underlying conditions. The objective of the paper consists of presenting the role of computerized tomography (CT) in assessing the different causes and conditions related to chest pain. Materials and methods: The educational presentation relies on current literature data and mostly on images obtained from patients admitted in the various clinics and departments of our hospital, suffering from chest pain as admittance condition or as a symptom appeared during the hospital stay. Results: There are various radiological and imaging options for assessing a patient with chest pain, with reference to the underlying condition, type of pain onset (acute or chronic), specific indications and contraindications. From all these, CT is considered one of the most useful imaging options, in terms of diagnosis accuracy, fast workup, cost and availability. This paper focuses on the role of CT, presenting the most important diseases and conditions related to potential occurrence of chest pain and the most specific CT signs and findings usually reported in this setting. Furthermore, the presentation separates acute and chronic conditions, presenting the actual imaging protocols employed in this circumstances. Finally, there are considerations regarding CT rule-out protocols used in patients with acute chest pain in emergency conditions. Conclusions: Fast and accurate diagnosis is crucial for patient outcome, often life-saving, but currently there is no single algorithm in the imaging assessment of chest pain, while choosing the best imaging option relies mainly on history, clinical and laboratory data. CT is one of the most important imaging options available in patients with both acute and chronic chest pain. CT rule-out techniques have still to establish their clear role in a

  19. CT guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the chest: initial experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this article is to report our first experience of CT guided percutaneous thoracic biopsy and to demonstrate the accuracy and safety of this procedure. This was a retrospective study of 28 CT-Guided Percutaneous Needle Biopsies of the Chest performed on 24 patients between November 2014 and April 2015.

  20. Unilateral Hemithorax Opacification on Chest Radiograph : Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Chest Ultrasonography with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namkung, Sook; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kwon, O Jung [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Seung Eun [Sangkye Paek Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of chest ultrasonography (US) with computed tomography (CT) inpatients with opacification more than one third of unilateral hemithorax on chest radiograph (CXR). Chest US and CT scans from 41 consecutive patients with opacification more than one third of unilateral hemithorax on CXR were prospectively evaluated by two independent radiologists. Each radiologist recorded 1) the nature of pleural effusion (transudate vs. exudate), 2) presence or absence of pulmonary lesion, 3) the characteristic of pulmonary lesion (consolidation or atelectasis and tumor), and 4) presence of solid pleural tumor. The diagnostic accuracy of chest US was compared with CT scan in patients with pleural, pulmonary or other disease. In 32 patients with pleural effusion, differentiation between transudate and exudate was feasible in 27 (84%) patients with US and 26 (81%) patients with CT. In 32 patients with pulmonary and other pleural diseases, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of US in lesion detection were 86%, 75% and 83% respectively when CT was regarded as a diagnostic gold standard. The diagnostic accuracy of chest US is comparable to CT in patients with hemithorax opacification on CXR

  1. Unilateral Hemithorax Opacification on Chest Radiograph : Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Chest Ultrasonography with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namkung, Sook; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kwon, O Jung; Chung, Seung Eun

    1996-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of chest ultrasonography (US) with computed tomography (CT) inpatients with opacification more than one third of unilateral hemithorax on chest radiograph (CXR). Chest US and CT scans from 41 consecutive patients with opacification more than one third of unilateral hemithorax on CXR were prospectively evaluated by two independent radiologists. Each radiologist recorded 1) the nature of pleural effusion (transudate vs. exudate), 2) presence or absence of pulmonary lesion, 3) the characteristic of pulmonary lesion (consolidation or atelectasis and tumor), and 4) presence of solid pleural tumor. The diagnostic accuracy of chest US was compared with CT scan in patients with pleural, pulmonary or other disease. In 32 patients with pleural effusion, differentiation between transudate and exudate was feasible in 27 (84%) patients with US and 26 (81%) patients with CT. In 32 patients with pulmonary and other pleural diseases, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of US in lesion detection were 86%, 75% and 83% respectively when CT was regarded as a diagnostic gold standard. The diagnostic accuracy of chest US is comparable to CT in patients with hemithorax opacification on CXR

  2. Intra-abdominal fat area measurement using chest CT data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Hiroshi; Midorikawa, Shigeo; Hashimoto, Kouji; Ishii, Akira; Saitou, Kumi; Andou, Tomonori; Kitamura, Naoko; Sakuma, Koutarou

    2007-01-01

    Intra-abdominal fat obesity, which is linked with the metabolic syndrome, is usually characterized by measuring intra-abdominal fat area at the umbilical level of abdominal CT scan. In recent year, the chances of chest CT scanning are increased, as lung cancer screening survey or individual medical examination. Thus, we presented a method of measuring the areas of intra-abdominal fat and subcutaneous fat at the lower slice of chest CT scan. Fat areas found with this method were significantly correlated with those obtained at the umbilical level. (author)

  3. Pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis: assessment with chest CT at chest radiography dose levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Caroline W; Basten, Ines A; Ilsen, Bart; Buls, Nico; Van Gompel, Gert; De Wachter, Elke; Nieboer, Koenraad H; Verhelle, Filip; Malfroot, Anne; Coomans, Danny; De Maeseneer, Michel; de Mey, Johan

    2014-11-01

    To investigate a computed tomographic (CT) protocol with iterative reconstruction at conventional radiography dose levels for the assessment of structural lung abnormalities in patients with cystic fibrosis ( CF cystic fibrosis ). In this institutional review board-approved study, 38 patients with CF cystic fibrosis (age range, 6-58 years; 21 patients 18 years) underwent investigative CT (at minimal exposure settings combined with iterative reconstruction) as a replacement of yearly follow-up posteroanterior chest radiography. Verbal informed consent was obtained from all patients or their parents. CT images were randomized and rated independently by two radiologists with use of the Bhalla scoring system. In addition, mosaic perfusion was evaluated. As reference, the previous available conventional chest CT scan was used. Differences in Bhalla scores were assessed with the χ(2) test and intraclass correlation coefficients ( ICC intraclass correlation coefficient s). Radiation doses for CT and radiography were assessed for adults (>18 years) and children (chest CT protocol can replace the two yearly follow-up chest radiographic examinations without major dose penalty and with similar diagnostic quality compared with conventional CT.

  4. High resolution CT of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barneveld Binkhuysen, F H [Eemland Hospital (Netherlands), Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    Compared to conventional CT high resolution CT (HRCT) shows several extra anatomical structures which might effect both diagnosis and therapy. The extra anatomical structures were discussed briefly in this article. (18 refs.).

  5. 1024 matrix image reconstruction: usefulness in high resolution chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Sun Young; Chung, Myung Jin; Chong, Se Min; Sung, Yon Mi; Lee, Kyung Soo

    2006-01-01

    We tried to evaluate whether high resolution chest CT with a 1,024 matrix has a significant advantage in image quality compared to a 512 matrix. Each set of 512 and 1024 matrix high resolution chest CT scans with both 0.625 mm and 1.25 mm slice thickness were obtained from 26 patients. Seventy locations that contained twenty-four low density lesions without sharp boundary such as emphysema, and forty-six sharp linear densities such as linear fibrosis were selected; these were randomly displayed on a five mega pixel LCD monitor. All the images were masked for information concerning the matrix size and slice thickness. Two chest radiologists scored the image quality of each ar rowed lesion as follows: (1) undistinguishable, (2) poorly distinguishable, (3) fairly distinguishable, (4) well visible and (5) excellently visible. The scores were compared from the aspects of matrix size, slice thickness and the different observers by using ANOVA tests. The average and standard deviation of image quality were 3.09 (± .92) for the 0.625 mm x 512 matrix, 3.16 (± .84) for the 0.625 mm x 1024 matrix, 2.49 (± 1.02) for the 1.25 mm x 512 matrix, and 2.35 (± 1.02) for the 1.25 mm x 1024 matrix, respectively. The image quality on both matrices of the high resolution chest CT scans with a 0.625 mm slice thickness was significantly better than that on the 1.25 mm slice thickness (ρ < 0.001). However, the image quality on the 1024 matrix high resolution chest CT scans was not significantly different from that on the 512 matrix high resolution chest CT scans (ρ = 0.678). The interobserver variation between the two observers was not significant (ρ = 0.691). We think that 1024 matrix image reconstruction for high resolution chest CT may not be clinical useful

  6. CT analysis of pulmonary injuries from blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Shoko

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the CT findings of pulmonary parenchymal injuries due to blunt chest trauma and to categorize CT findings on the basis of their outcome. The materials of this study consist of 62 patients who had pulmonary injuries on CT obtained within 6 hours after blunt chest trauma. CT findings were analysed with regards to the shape, size, and distribution of the lesions. Follow-up CT scans were obtained in 35 patients at intervals from 1 day to 1 month after the initial CT study. CT showed ill-defined opacities in 59 patients (64 lesions in the peripheral area and 95 in the non-peripheral area) and pulmonary nodules with or without cavitary lesions in 30 patients (7 lesions in the peripheral area and 31 in the non-peripheral area). Follow-up CT allowed the classification of these pulmonary injuries into 3 types; the non-peripheral, ill-defined opacities showing immediate clearing, nodules with or without cavitary lesions over 1 cm in diameter showing prolongation, and the peripheral ill-defined opacities adjacent to the thoracic cage, and small nodules with or without cavitary lesions within 1 cm in diameter, showing various courses. CT has marked advantage over plain chest radiographs not only in the detection rate but in accurate estimation of the prognosis of the lesions. (author)

  7. Chest CT findings of toxocariasis: Correlation with laboratory results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, J.H.; Lee, I.J.; Kim, J.-H.; Kim, D.-G.; Hwang, H.J.; Koh, S.H.; Lee, K.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To assess the relationship between chest computed tomography (CT) findings of patients with toxocariasis and levels of serological markers. Materials and methods: A total of 38 cases of patients diagnosed with toxocariasis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), CT, and serological markers were retrospectively reviewed. The presence of nodule with or without ground-glass opacity (GGO) halo, consolidation, focal GGO, pleural effusion, and lymphadenopathy at chest CT were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed with the Fisher's exact test. Results: The most common chest CT findings were nodule (n = 12, 31.6%) and focal GGO (n = 12, 31.6%). In patients with normal eosinophil levels, focal GGO (n = 9, 37.5%) was the most common finding. In contrast, nodule with a GGO halo (n = 7, 50%) was the most common finding in the eosinophilia group. Nodule with a GGO halo was more common in the eosinophilia group, with a statistically significant difference (p = 0.017). Nodule was more common in the eosinophilia group, and focal GGO was more common in the normal eosinophil group. Conclusion: The most common chest CT findings in toxocariasis were nodule with or without GGO halo, and focal GGO. In the eosinophilia group, nodule with a GGO halo was significantly more frequent. Other CT findings did not show a statistically significant relationship with serological markers

  8. Chest CT findings in pediatric Wegener's granulomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, Daniel [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Akikusa, Jonathan [Royal Children' s Hospital Melbourne, Department of Rheumatology, Melbourne (Australia); Manson, David [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Radiology, Toronto (Canada); Silverman, Earl; Schneider, Rayfel [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Rheumatology, Toronto (Canada)

    2007-01-15

    Although pulmonary involvement occurs in the majority of children and adolescents with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), relatively little has been published regarding the CT imaging manifestations in this group of patients. To determine the frequency and types of chest CT abnormalities in active pediatric WG (pWG). The study was a retrospective examination of 29 chest CT examinations performed at diagnosis (n=14) and during disease flares (n=15) in 18 children. The most common abnormalities were nodules (seen in 90% of examinations), ground-glass opacification (52%), and air-space opacification (45%). Of examinations with nodules, 73% demonstrated nodules >5 mm in diameter and 69% demonstrated more than five nodules; 17% had cavitary lesions. The only abnormality with a significant difference in prevalence between diagnosis and disease flares was air-space opacification, present in 71% and 20%, respectively (P < 0.01). In accordance with the findings of published adult studies and at variance with those of prior pediatric studies, our findings indicate that chest CT abnormalities in active pWG are frequent, most commonly comprising nodules and ground-glass opacification, which may be difficult to detect on plain radiography. We therefore advocate the routine use of chest CT for all affected patients, both at the time of presentation and during disease flares. (orig.)

  9. Dual-source CT in chest pain diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Nikolaou, K.; Fink, C.; Rist, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.R.; Becker, A.; Knez, A.

    2007-01-01

    With the depiction of pulmonary arteries, coronary arteries, and the aorta, CT angiography of the chest offers a comprehensive diagnostic work-up of unclear chest pain. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of dual-source CT in this patient group. A total of 47 patients suffering from unclear chest pain were examined with a Siemens Somatom Definition. Volume and flow of contrast media (Ultravist, Schering) were adapted to the body weight. The examinations were evaluated with regard to image quality and contrast opacification and to the diagnostic accuracy with reference to the final clinical diagnosis. Adequate contrast opacification was achieved in all examinations. The depiction of the coronary arteries was diagnostic in all cases. The cause of chest pain could be identified in 41 cases. Among the diagnoses were coronary and myocardial pathologies, valvular disease, aortic aneurysms and dissections, pulmonary embolism, and pneumonic consolidation. DSCT angiography of the chest offers a very good image quality even at high heart rates so that a high diagnostic accuracy is achieved in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.) [de

  10. Computer-aided segmentation system for 3D chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasawa, Tae; Komagata, Takanobu; Ogura, Takashi; Iwao, Yuma; Goto, Toshiyuki; Asakura, Akira; Inoue, Tomio

    2012-01-01

    We will introduce the quantitative analysis of the chest CT images using computer-assisted segmentation system (Gaussian Histogram Normalized Correlation; GHNC). This system can divide the lung into several patterns, for example, normal, emphysema and fibrous lesion, and measure each lesion volume quantitatively. We analyzed 3D-CT images of 20 patients with lung cancer. GHNC could measure the volumes of emphysema and fibrosis lesions, respectively. GHNC analysis will be feasible for preoperative CT evaluation, especially in the patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. (author)

  11. Generalities of anomalous CT chest non tumoral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dibarboure, L.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is about the generalities of multidetector CT in the pulmonary, the diaphragmatic, the pleural and the mediastinum pathology.These techniques as well as the virtual endoscopy allow visualize volumetric thorax reconstructions, brain diseases, opacities, radiolucent images, respiratory and vascular diseases, pneumonia, embolism, AIDS stage, tuberculosis, tumors, etc

  12. Automated image quality assessment for chest CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Anthony P; Xie, Yiting; Liu, Shuang

    2018-02-01

    Medical image quality needs to be maintained at standards sufficient for effective clinical reading. Automated computer analytic methods may be applied to medical images for quality assessment. For chest CT scans in a lung cancer screening context, an automated quality assessment method is presented that characterizes image noise and image intensity calibration. This is achieved by image measurements in three automatically segmented homogeneous regions of the scan: external air, trachea lumen air, and descending aorta blood. Profiles of CT scanner behavior are also computed. The method has been evaluated on both phantom and real low-dose chest CT scans and results show that repeatable noise and calibration measures may be realized by automated computer algorithms. Noise and calibration profiles show relevant differences between different scanners and protocols. Automated image quality assessment may be useful for quality control for lung cancer screening and may enable performance improvements to automated computer analysis methods. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. CT chest under general anesthesia: pulmonary, anesthetic and radiologic dilemmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed; Towe, Christopher; Fleck, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Today's practice of medicine involves ever more complex patients whose care is coordinated with multidisciplinary teams. Caring for these patients can challenge all members of the health care team. Sedation/anesthesia in infants/toddlers as well as uncooperative or intellectually or emotionally impaired children who require imaging studies of the chest are ongoing challenges. High-quality computed tomography (CT) chest imaging studies in children under general anesthesia are extremely important for accurate interpretation and subsequent medical decision-making. Anesthesia-induced atelectasis may obscure or mimic true pathology creating a significant quality issue. Obtaining a high-quality, motion-free chest imaging study in infants and children under general anesthesia remains a difficult task in many institutions. Meticulous attention to anesthesia and imaging techniques and specialized knowledge are required to properly perform and interpret chest imaging studies. In this commentary, we discuss the continuous struggle to obtain high-quality CT chest imaging under general anesthesia. We will also discuss the major concerns of the anesthesiologist, radiologist and pulmonologist and why cooperation and coordination among these providers are critical for an optimal quality study.

  14. CT chest under general anesthesia: pulmonary, anesthetic and radiologic dilemmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Towe, Christopher [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Fleck, Robert J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Today's practice of medicine involves ever more complex patients whose care is coordinated with multidisciplinary teams. Caring for these patients can challenge all members of the health care team. Sedation/anesthesia in infants/toddlers as well as uncooperative or intellectually or emotionally impaired children who require imaging studies of the chest are ongoing challenges. High-quality computed tomography (CT) chest imaging studies in children under general anesthesia are extremely important for accurate interpretation and subsequent medical decision-making. Anesthesia-induced atelectasis may obscure or mimic true pathology creating a significant quality issue. Obtaining a high-quality, motion-free chest imaging study in infants and children under general anesthesia remains a difficult task in many institutions. Meticulous attention to anesthesia and imaging techniques and specialized knowledge are required to properly perform and interpret chest imaging studies. In this commentary, we discuss the continuous struggle to obtain high-quality CT chest imaging under general anesthesia. We will also discuss the major concerns of the anesthesiologist, radiologist and pulmonologist and why cooperation and coordination among these providers are critical for an optimal quality study.

  15. Chest wall tuberculosis; CT findings in 14 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Young Min; Lee, Sang Yong; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Chong Soo; Chung, Gyung Ho; Sohn, Myung Hee; Choi, Ki Chul [Chonbuk National Univ. School of Medicine, Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Woo [Daejoen Eulji Hospital, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Juhng, Seon Kwan [Wonkwang Univ. Medical School, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    To present CT findings of chest wall tuberculosis. CT scans were obtained in 14 patients with proven chest wall tuberculosis. Diagnosis was confirmed by means of right open thoracostomy with abscess evacuation (n=1), excision and curettage (n=11) or excision and curettage along with resection of the involved lung (n=2). The images were assessed with emphasis for the extrapleural, pleural, and pulmonary lesions. All patients showed juxtacostal soft tissue mass with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. The lesions were located in the left hemithorax in eight patients and in the right in six. Multiple lesions were found in three patients (two in one and three in two). Rib destruction was observed in four patients. Intercostal muscle involvement of thickening and enhancement were shown in all patients. Thirteen patients (93%) had evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis: active pulmonary tuberculosis in nine and stable tuberculosis in four. Pleural lesions, including empyema necessitatis in six, were observed in eleven (79%). On CT scan, chest wall tuberculosis is characterized by juxtacostal soft tissue lesion with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. Rib destruction may be associated. Additionally, enhancing intercostal muscle suggest direct inflammatory process of tuberculosis and spread channel to the chest wall involvement of pleuropulmonary tuberculosis.

  16. Chest wall tuberculosis; CT findings in 14 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Young Min; Lee, Sang Yong; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Chong Soo; Chung, Gyung Ho; Sohn, Myung Hee; Choi, Ki Chul; Kim, Dong Woo; Juhng, Seon Kwan

    1996-01-01

    To present CT findings of chest wall tuberculosis. CT scans were obtained in 14 patients with proven chest wall tuberculosis. Diagnosis was confirmed by means of right open thoracostomy with abscess evacuation (n=1), excision and curettage (n=11) or excision and curettage along with resection of the involved lung (n=2). The images were assessed with emphasis for the extrapleural, pleural, and pulmonary lesions. All patients showed juxtacostal soft tissue mass with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. The lesions were located in the left hemithorax in eight patients and in the right in six. Multiple lesions were found in three patients (two in one and three in two). Rib destruction was observed in four patients. Intercostal muscle involvement of thickening and enhancement were shown in all patients. Thirteen patients (93%) had evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis: active pulmonary tuberculosis in nine and stable tuberculosis in four. Pleural lesions, including empyema necessitatis in six, were observed in eleven (79%). On CT scan, chest wall tuberculosis is characterized by juxtacostal soft tissue lesion with central low attenuation and peripheral rim enhancement. Rib destruction may be associated. Additionally, enhancing intercostal muscle suggest direct inflammatory process of tuberculosis and spread channel to the chest wall involvement of pleuropulmonary tuberculosis

  17. Atelectasis on pediatric chest CT: comparison of sedation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, M.A.; McEachern, A.M.; Jamieson, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Background. A change in practice at our institution resulted in increased use of anesthesia for CT scan of the chest in children who required sedation. Objective. To determine whether there is a difference in the frequency or severity of pulmonary atelectasis on CT scan in children sedated by anesthesiologists compared with children sedated by radiologists using intravenous pentobarbital. Materials and methods. Retrospective blinded review of 60 CT scans of the chest performed in 41 children. Forty-one studies in children sedated by radiologists (median age 29 months) were compared with 19 studies in children sedated by anesthesiologists (median age 25 months). Results. Atelectasis sufficient to obscure pulmonary metastases was shown in 5 of 41 (12 %) radiology sedations and 13 of 19 (68 %) anesthesiology sedations (P < 0.01). Higher grades of atelectasis were recorded in children under anesthesia (P < 0.01). Conclusion. Atelectasis is more frequent and more severe in children undergoing general anesthesia compared with intravenous pentobarbital sedation. Consideration should be given to the use of forced inspiration in children anesthetized for CT scan of the chest. (orig.)

  18. Case report: Pulmonary syphilis mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases on chest CT and integrated PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Jun Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of syphilis with pulmonary involvement. Chest CT scan and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET/CT showed multiple pulmonary nodules mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases. This was confirmed on follow-up images that showed therapeutic response to penicillin.

  19. Case report: Pulmonary syphilis mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases on chest CT and integrated PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Jun; Seon, Hyun Ju; Shin, Hyo Hyun; Choi, Yoo-Duk

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of syphilis with pulmonary involvement. Chest CT scan and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT showed multiple pulmonary nodules mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases. This was confirmed on follow-up images that showed therapeutic response to penicillin

  20. Early experiences with crowdsourcing airway annotations in chest CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheplygina, Veronika; Perez-Rovira, Adria; Kuo, Wieying

    2016-01-01

    Measuring airways in chest computed tomography (CT) images is important for characterizing diseases such as cystic fibrosis, yet very time-consuming to perform manually. Machine learning algorithms offer an alternative, but need large sets of annotated data to perform well. We investigate whether...... a number of further research directions and provide insight into the challenges of crowdsourcing in medical images from the perspective of first-time users....

  1. CT dose profiles and MSAD calculation in a chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; Silva, Teogenes Augusto da

    2011-01-01

    For optimizing patient doses in computed tomography (CT), the Brazilian legislation has only established diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in terms of Multiple Scan Average Dose (MSAD) in a typical adult as a quality control parameter for CT scanners. Compliance with the DRLs can be verified by measuring the Computed Tomography Air Kerma Index with a calibrated pencil ionization chamber or by obtaining the dose distribution in CT scans. An analysis of the quality of five CT scanners in Belo Horizonte was done in terms of dose profile of chest scans and MSAD determinations. Measurements were done with rod shape lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) distributed in cylinders positioned in peripheral and central regions of a polymethylmethacrylate chest phantom. The peripheral regions presented higher dose values. The longitudinal dose variation can be observed and the maximum dose was recorded at the edges of the phantom at the midpoint of the longitudinal axis. The MSAD results were in according to the DRL of 25 mGy established by Brazilian legislation. The results contribute to disseminate to hospitals and radiologists the proper procedure to use the thermoluminescent dosimeters for the calculation of the MSAD from the CT dose profiles and to notice the compliance with the DRLs. (author)

  2. Spiral CT for evaluation of chest trauma; Spiral-CT beim Thoraxtrauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehnert, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Dresden (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Weise, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Dresden (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    1997-07-01

    After implementation of spiral CT in our department, we carried out an analysis for determining anew the value of CT as a modality of chest trauma diagnosis in the emergency department. The retrospective study covers a period of 10 months and all emergency patients with chest trauma exmined by spiral CT. The major lesions of varying seriousness covered by this study are: pneumothorax, hematothorax, pulmonary contusion or laceration, mediastinal hematoma, rupture of a vessel, injury of the heart and pericardium. The various fractures are not included in this study. In many cases, spiral CT within relatively short time yields significant diagnostic findings, frequently saving additional angiography. A rigid diagnostic procedure cannot be formulated. Plain-film chest radiography still remains a diagnostic modality of high value. (Orig.) [Deutsch] Nach Einfuehrung der Spiral-CT in unserer Einrichtung versuchten wir, den Stellenwert der Computertomographie in der Notfalldiagnostik des Thoraxtraumas neu zu bestimmen. Dazu wurden retrospektiv ueber einen Zeitraum von 10 Monaten alle mittels Spiral-CT untersuchten Notfallpatienten mit Thoraxverletzungen ausgewertet. Im Vordergrund standen folgende Befunde unterschiedlichen Schweregrades: Pneumothorax, Haematothorax, Lungenkontusion/-lazeration, Mediastinalhaematom, Gefaessruptur, Herz- und Herzbeutelverletzung. Auf die unterschiedlichen Frakturen wird bewusst nicht naeher eingegangen. In vielen Faellen liefert die Spiral-CT mit relativ geringem Zeitaufwand wesentliche diagnostische Aussagen. Haeufig kann auf eine Angiographie verzichtet werden. Ein starres diagnostisches Stufenschema laesst sich nicht definieren. Die Thoraxuebersichtsaufnahme besitzt einen unveraendert hohen Stellenwert. (orig.)

  3. Protocol optimization in chest CT scans of child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrao L, L. T.; Amaral de O, F.; Prata M, A. [Biomedical Engineering Center, Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, 30421-169, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Bustos F, M., E-mail: luanaabrao@gmail.com [Universidad Federal de Minas Gerais, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Av. Pres. Antonio Carlos 6627, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2017-10-15

    The dissemination of Computed Tomography (CT), a radiodiagnostic technique, has significant increase in the patient dose. In the last years, this technique has shown a high growth due to clinical cases of medical emergencies, neoplasm and pediatric traumas. Dose measurement is important to correlate with the deleterious effects of radiation on the organism and radiation future effects is related with stochastic risks due to tissue radiosensitivity, allied to the life expectancy of the child. In this work, a cylindrical phantom, representing an adult chest made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), was used and a new born chest phantom with a shape oblong was developed based on the dimensions of a typical newborn. In a Ge CT scanner, Discovery model, with 64 channels, the central slice of the phantoms were irradiated successively in order to obtain dose measurements using an ionizing pencil camera. Based in the measurements, dose index was calculated (CTDI{sub vol}). The radiological service chest protocol using a voltage of 120 kV was used for scanning 10 cm of the central area of the adult and newborn phantom, in helical mode. An acquisition of images was performed using this radiological service chest protocol to compare with the protocol optimized. In the newborn phantom was also used protocols optimized using a voltage of 120 and 80 kV. The voltage of 80 kV has the lowest dose index for the pediatric object phantom. This work allowed the comparison between absorbed dose variations by the pediatric phantom changing the X-ray tube supply voltage. This dose variation has shown how important is specific protocols for children. (Author)

  4. Protocol optimization in chest CT scans of child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrao L, L. T.; Amaral de O, F.; Prata M, A.; Bustos F, M.

    2017-10-01

    The dissemination of Computed Tomography (CT), a radiodiagnostic technique, has significant increase in the patient dose. In the last years, this technique has shown a high growth due to clinical cases of medical emergencies, neoplasm and pediatric traumas. Dose measurement is important to correlate with the deleterious effects of radiation on the organism and radiation future effects is related with stochastic risks due to tissue radiosensitivity, allied to the life expectancy of the child. In this work, a cylindrical phantom, representing an adult chest made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), was used and a new born chest phantom with a shape oblong was developed based on the dimensions of a typical newborn. In a Ge CT scanner, Discovery model, with 64 channels, the central slice of the phantoms were irradiated successively in order to obtain dose measurements using an ionizing pencil camera. Based in the measurements, dose index was calculated (CTDI vol ). The radiological service chest protocol using a voltage of 120 kV was used for scanning 10 cm of the central area of the adult and newborn phantom, in helical mode. An acquisition of images was performed using this radiological service chest protocol to compare with the protocol optimized. In the newborn phantom was also used protocols optimized using a voltage of 120 and 80 kV. The voltage of 80 kV has the lowest dose index for the pediatric object phantom. This work allowed the comparison between absorbed dose variations by the pediatric phantom changing the X-ray tube supply voltage. This dose variation has shown how important is specific protocols for children. (Author)

  5. Subpleural thoracic fat as defined with CT of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.J.; Glazer, H.S.; Molina, P.L.; Sagel, S.S.

    1988-01-01

    Consecutive computed tomographic (CT) examinations of the chest (n=202) were reviewed to determine the location, thickness, and extent of subpleural fat. Patient age, thickness of subcutaneous fat, and adjacent pleural or parenchymal abnormalities were recorded. Subpleural fat was most often identified in the paravertebral region (48%) and in the apices (23%). Fatty deposits anterolaterally were seen in seven individuals. Subpleural fat thickness ranged from 1 to 19 mm, except in the apex, where fat sometimes filled the space. A direct relationship between subcutaneous fat thickness and a higher incidence of subpleural fat was observed in the paravertebral region. Subpleural fat occurs commonly in the paravertebral regions but is unusual in other areas

  6. Findings chest radiograph and CT in mediastinitis: effcacy of CT in patients with delayed diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Eun Ju; Hong, Yong Kook; Choe, Kyu Ok

    1999-01-01

    To analyse the causes the radiologic findings in patients with mediastinitis and to evaluate the efficacy of chest CT scanning in patients with delayed diagnosis. Seventeen patients with histopathologically(n=15) or clinically diagnosed(n=2) mediastinitis were involved in this study. Eleven of the former group underwent surgery, and in four, tube drainage was performed. All underwent chest radiography and CT scanning, and in seven patients, the causes of delayed diagnosis were analysed. The most common cause of mediastinitis was esophageal rupture(n=11). Others were extension from neck abscess to the mediastinum(n=3), complications after a Benthall procedure(n=1), tuberculous lymphadenitis(n=1) and mycotic aneurysm(n=1). Patients with esophageal rupture suffered from underlying diseases such as esophageal cancer(n=2), iatrogenic esophageal rupture(n=2), Boerhaave's syndrome(n=2), and esophagitis(n=1). In patients with neck abscess (n=3), each was secondary to infected cystic hygroma, Ludwig angina, or deep neck infection, respectively. On chest CT, patients with esophageal rupture(n=11) had an abscess in the posterior mediastinum ; nine abscesses extended to the cervical area along the retropharyngeal space, and the patient with Ludwig angina had an abscess involving all compartments of the mediastinum. Among the total of 17 patients, diagnostic delays were found in seven, while five had spontaneous esophageal ruptures and two suffered complications after a Benthall procedure and Tbc lymphadenitis, respectively. The causes of diagnostic delay varied. Among seven patients, pnevmonia was initially diagnosed in two, who were treated ; one had multiorgan failure, and one was suffering from pericardial effusion and lung abscess. In three other patients, chest radiographs initially showed non-specific findings, leading to delayed CT examination. The most common cause of mediastinitis was esophageal rupture, and in these patients, chest radiographs and clinical symptoms

  7. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Global Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9-18.2 kg) were created based on the patients' actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120 kVp, 70 or 75 mA, 0.4 s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20 mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-5.3 mSv/100 mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4-12.6 mGy/100 mAs and 11.2-13.3 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%-18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%-77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r=-0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=-0.99, heart: r=-0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific organ

  8. Clinical utility of coronary CT angiography with low-dose chest CT in the evaluation of patients with atypical chest pain: a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Soo Jin; Choo, Ki Seok; Kim, Chang Won

    2008-01-01

    To determine the clinical utility of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) with low-dose chest CT in the evaluation of patients with atypical chest pain. Ninety-six patients (mean age 60.2 years; age range, 41-68 years; 70 males) were referred for CCTA with low-dose chest CT (16-slice MDCT, Siemens) for an evaluation of atypical chest pain. When significant stenoses (lumen diameter reduction > 50%) were detected on CCTA, invasive coronary angiography (CA) was performed as the standard of reference. In all patients, medical chart review or telephone contact with patients was used to evaluate the contribution of CCTA with low-dose chest CT to the final clinical diagnosis, at least 6 months after performing CCTA. Among 96 patients, seven patients (7%) had significant stenoses as detected on CCTA, whereas two patients (2%) had significant stenoses and five patients had insignificant stenoses or no stenosis, as detected on conventional catheter angiography. In 18 (19%) of the 89 patients without significant stenosis detected on CCTA, this protocol provided additional information that suggested or confirmed an alternate clinical diagnosis. In patients with atypical chest pain, CCTA with low-dose chest CT could help to exclude ischemic heart disease and could provide important ancillary information for the final diagnosis

  9. Cardiac pathologies incidentally detected with non-gated chest CT; Inzidentelle Pathologien des Herzens im Thorax-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Axel; Kroepil, P.; Lanzman, R.S.; Moedder, U. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Duesseldorf, Heinrich-Heine-Univ. (Germany); Choy, G.; Abbara, S. [Cardiovascular Imaging Section, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Cardiac imaging using electrocardiogram-gated multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) permits noninvasive diagnosis of congenital and acquired cardiac pathologies and has thus become increasingly important in the last years. Several studies investigated the incidence and relevance of incidental extracardiac structures within the lungs, mediastinum, chest wall, and abdomen with gated coronary CT. This resulted in the general acceptance of the review of extracardiac structures as a routine component of coronary CT interpretation. On the other hand radiologists tend to neglect pericardial and cardiac pathologies in non-gated chest CT, which is primarily performed for the evaluation of the respiratory system or for tumor staging. Since the introduction of multi-detector spiral CT technology, the incidental detection of cardiac and pericardial findings has become possible using non-gated chest CT. This article reviews the imaging appearances and differential diagnostic considerations of incidental cardiac entities that may be encountered in non-gated chest CT. (orig.)

  10. Chest CT study of patients with asbestos exposure, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakeyama, Masayuki

    1988-01-01

    Thin-slice high-resolution computed tomographic (CT) findings of 36 patients (34 men, 2 women) with histories of long-term (11 to 43 years) occupational asbestos exposure (AS) were analyzed for pulmonary abnormalities, which were classified by the subpleural curvilinear shadow (SCLS) and/or the extent of honeycomb shadow (HS) into five types (O to IV). SCLS was detected in 22 patients (62 %), and HS in 14 patients (39 %). SCLS was distributed mainly in the lower lobe in patients with mild pulmonary fibrosis (Types I and II) and in segments where fibrosis was mild in patients with HS (Types III and IV). This may reflect the initiation of pulmonary fibrosis leading to the formation of a HS. Most (63.7 %) SCLS measured > 5 cm but < 10 cm in length and occurred < 1 cm from the inner chest wall in all cases. Radiologic-pathologic correlation of SCLS and HS in CT imagings, achieved in two post mortem specimens, seemed to indicate that SCLS was associated with the initial change of fibrosing bronchiolo-alveolitis, which is characteristic of pulmonary asbestosis. Thin-slice high-resolution CT findings of 36 patients with AS and 33 patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) were compared. Though the incidence of SCLS was low (21 %) in this series of IIP, its presence suggests that SCLS is not specific to pulmonary asbestosis but occurs also in chronic interstitial pneumonia. In order to explore the mechanism of the appearance of SCLS, further analysis of CT and histopathologic findings not only of pulmonary asbestosis and IIP but also of many other pulmonary interstitial diseases is necessary. It could be considered that thin-slice high-resolution CT which first detected SCLS is very useful in the visualization of fine structures of the lungs. (author)

  11. Detection of breast abnormalities on enhanced chest CT: Correlation with breast composition on mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eun Mi; Kang, Hee; Shin, Young Gyung; Yun, Jong Hyouk; Oh, Kyung Seung [Dept. of Radiology, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    To investigate the capability of enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) for detecting breast abnormalities and to assess the influence of breast composition on this detectability. From 2000 to 2013, 75 patients who underwent mammography, breast sonography, and enhanced chest CT within one month and had abnormalities on sonography were included. Detection rate of breast abnormality on enhanced chest CT was compared among 4 types of breast composition by the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. Contribution of breast composition, size and enhancement of target lesions to detectability of enhanced chest CT was assessed using logistic regression and chi-square test. Of the 75 target lesions, 34 (45.3%) were detected on enhanced chest CT, corresponding with those on breast sonography; there were no significantly different detection rates among the 4 types of breast composition (p = 0.078). Breast composition [odds ratio (OR) = 1.07, p = 0.206] and enhancement (OR = 21.49, p = 0.998) had no significant effect, but size (OR = 1.23, p = 0.004) was a significant contributing factor influencing the detectability of enhanced chest CT for breast lesions. About half of the cases (45.3%) demonstrated breast lesions on chest CT corresponding with target lesions on sonography. Breast composition defined on mammography did not affect the detectability of enhanced chest CT for breast lesions.

  12. Abnormal chest shadow on CT in immunosuppressed patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    1992-01-01

    An abnormal chest shadow was observed on CT scans in 25 cases of 23 immunosuppressed patients. Pulmonary disease was pathologically confirmed to be pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PC pneumonia) in four patients, cytomegalovirus pneumonia (CMV pneumonia) in one, bacterial pneumonia in seven, fungal infection in three, miliary tuberculosis in one, leukemic infiltration in two, lymphangitis carcinomatosa in three, drug-induced pneumonitis in three, and ARDS in one. In almost all patients, especially those with infectious diseases such as PC pneumonia, CMV pneumonia, and bacterial pneumonia, the abnormal shadow was wide and visible in the bilateral lung fields. We presumed that such findings as lobular shadow, centrilobular shadow, and mosaic pattern reflected the extension of disease via the respiratory tract, and that those findings are typical of infectious diseases. Because such findings as abnormal linear shadow and swelling of a broncho-vascular bundle were very frequently recognized in patients with lymphangitis carcinomatosa and frequently recognized in those with drug-induced pneumonitis, these diseases may be distinguished from other diseases. An area of slightly increased density was frequently recognized in patients with PC pneumonia, bacterial pneumonia, and drug-induced pneumonitis. Such lesions were pathologically confirmed to be located in the interstitium and/or alveolus. CT was extremely useful in comprehending the character and extension of particular diseases among various diseases. As the number of patients studied was small, the utility of CT in immunosuppressed patients requires further investigation in a larger number of patients. (author)

  13. Pediatric chest CT after trauma: impact on surgical and clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Rina P.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Hilmes, Melissa A.; Kan, J.H.; Yu, Chang; Ray, Jackie

    2010-01-01

    Chest CT after pediatric trauma is frequently performed but its clinical impact, particularly with respect to surgical intervention, has not been adequately evaluated. To assess the impact of chest CT compared with chest radiography on pediatric trauma management. Two hundred thirty-five consecutive pediatric trauma patients who had both chest CT and radiography were identified. Images were reviewed and findings were categorized and correlated with subsequent chest interventions, blinded to final outcome and management. Of the 235 children, 38.3% (90/235) had an abnormal chest radiograph and 63.8% (150/235) had an abnormal chest CT (P < 0.0001). Chest interventions followed in 4.7% (11/235); of these, the findings could be made 1 cm above the dome of the liver in 91% (10/11). Findings requiring chest intervention included pneumothorax (PTX) and vertebral fractures. PTX was found on 2.1% (5/235) of chest radiographs and 20.0% (47/235) of chest CTs (P < 0.0001); 1.7% (4/235) of the children received a chest tube for PTX, 0.85% (2/235) seen on chest CT only. Vertebral fractures were present in 3.8% of the children (9/235) and 66.7% (6/9) of those cases were treated with spinal fusion or brace. There were no instances of mediastinal vascular injury. Most intrathoracic findings requiring surgical management in our population were identified in the lower chest and would be included in routine abdominopelvic CT exams; this information needs to be taken into consideration in the diagnostic algorithm of pediatric trauma patients. (orig.)

  14. Pediatric chest CT after trauma: impact on surgical and clinical management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Rina P. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Hilmes, Melissa A.; Kan, J.H. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Yu, Chang [Vanderbilt University, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States); Ray, Jackie [Vanderbilt University, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Chest CT after pediatric trauma is frequently performed but its clinical impact, particularly with respect to surgical intervention, has not been adequately evaluated. To assess the impact of chest CT compared with chest radiography on pediatric trauma management. Two hundred thirty-five consecutive pediatric trauma patients who had both chest CT and radiography were identified. Images were reviewed and findings were categorized and correlated with subsequent chest interventions, blinded to final outcome and management. Of the 235 children, 38.3% (90/235) had an abnormal chest radiograph and 63.8% (150/235) had an abnormal chest CT (P < 0.0001). Chest interventions followed in 4.7% (11/235); of these, the findings could be made 1 cm above the dome of the liver in 91% (10/11). Findings requiring chest intervention included pneumothorax (PTX) and vertebral fractures. PTX was found on 2.1% (5/235) of chest radiographs and 20.0% (47/235) of chest CTs (P < 0.0001); 1.7% (4/235) of the children received a chest tube for PTX, 0.85% (2/235) seen on chest CT only. Vertebral fractures were present in 3.8% of the children (9/235) and 66.7% (6/9) of those cases were treated with spinal fusion or brace. There were no instances of mediastinal vascular injury. Most intrathoracic findings requiring surgical management in our population were identified in the lower chest and would be included in routine abdominopelvic CT exams; this information needs to be taken into consideration in the diagnostic algorithm of pediatric trauma patients. (orig.)

  15. CT coronary angiographic evaluation of suspected anginal chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Alastair J; Newby, David E

    2016-02-15

    Non-invasive imaging plays a critical role in the assessment of patients presenting with suspected angina chest pain. However, wide variations in practice across Europe and North America highlight the lack of consensus in selecting the appropriate first-line test for the investigation of coronary artery disease (CAD). CT coronary angiography (CTCA) has a high negative predictive value for excluding the presence of CAD. As such, it serves as a potential 'gatekeeper' to downstream testing by reducing the rate of inappropriate invasive coronary angiography. Two recent large multicentre randomised control trials have provided insights into whether CTCA can be incorporated into chest pain care pathways to improve risk stratification of CAD. They demonstrate that using CTCA enhances diagnostic certainty and improves the targeting of appropriate invasive investigations and therapeutic interventions. Importantly, reductions in cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction appear to be attained through the more appropriate use of preventative therapy and coronary revascularisation when guided by CTCA. With this increasing portfolio of evidence, CTCA should be considered the non-invasive investigation of choice in the evaluation of patients with suspected angina pectoris due to coronary heart disease. NCT01149590, post-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Dual energy CT of the chest: how about the dose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenzle, Jan C; Sommer, Wieland H; Neumaier, Klement; Michalski, Gisela; Lechel, Ursula; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Becker, Christoph R; Reiser, Maximilian F; Johnson, Thorsten R C

    2010-06-01

    New generation Dual Source computed tomography (CT) scanners offer different x-ray spectra for Dual Energy imaging. Yet, an objective, manufacturer independent verification of the dose required for the different spectral combinations is lacking. The aim of this study was to assess dose and image noise of 2 different Dual Energy CT settings with reference to a standard chest scan and to compare image noise and contrast to noise ratios (CNR). Also, exact effective dose length products (E/DLP) conversion factors were to be established based on the objectively measured dose. An anthropomorphic Alderson phantom was assembled with thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) and its chest was scanned on a Dual Source CT (Siemens Somatom Definition) in dual energy mode at 140 and 80 kVp with 14 x 1.2 mm collimation. The same was performed on another Dual Source CT (Siemens Somatom Definition Flash) at 140 kVp with 0.8 mm tin filter (Sn) and 100 kVp at 128 x 0.6 mm collimation. Reference scans were obtained at 120 kVp with 64 x 0.6 mm collimation at equivalent CT dose index of 5.4 mGy*cm. Syringes filled with water and 17.5 mg iodine/mL were scanned with the same settings. Dose was calculated from the TLD measurements and the dose length products of the scanner. Image noise was measured in the phantom scans and CNR and spectral contrast were determined in the iodine and water samples. E/DLP conversion factors were calculated as ratio between the measured dose form the TLDs and the dose length product given in the patient protocol. The effective dose measured with TLDs was 2.61, 2.69, and 2.70 mSv, respectively, for the 140/80 kVp, the 140 Sn/100 kVp, and the standard 120 kVp scans. Image noise measured in the average images of the phantom scans was 11.0, 10.7, and 9.9 HU (P > 0.05). The CNR of iodine with optimized image blending was 33.4 at 140/80 kVp, 30.7 at 140Sn/100 kVp and 14.6 at 120 kVp. E/DLP conversion factors were 0.0161 mSv/mGy*cm for the 140/80 kVp protocol, 0.0181 m

  17. Patient doses in chest CT examinations: Comparison of various CT scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božović Predrag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from study on patient exposure level in chest CT examinations. CT scanners used in this study were various Siemens and General Electric (GE models. Data on patient doses were collected for adult and pediatric patients. Doses measured for adult patients were lower then those determined as Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRL for Europe, while doses for pediatric patients were similar to those found in published data. As for the manufactures, slightly higher doses were measured on GE devices, both for adult and pediatric patients.

  18. Chest Computed Tomography (CT) Immediately after CT-Guided Transthoracic Needle Aspiration Biopsy as a Predictor of Overt Pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Tae June; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kang, Young Ae; Kwon, Sung-Youn; Yoon, Ho-Il; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Kyung Won; Lee, Jae Ho

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims This study examined the correlation between pneumothorax detected by immediate post-transthoracic needle aspiration-biopsy (TTNB) chest computed tomography (CT) and overt pneumothorax detected by chest PA, and investigated factors that might influence the correlation. Methods Adult patients who had undergone CT-guided TTNB for lung lesions from May 2003 to June 2007 at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital were included. Immediate post-TTNB CT and chest PA follow-up at 4 and 16 hours after CT-guided TTNB were performed in 934 patients. Results Pneumothorax detected by immediate chest CT (CT-pneumothorax) was found in 237 (25%) and overt pneumothorax was detected by chest PA follow-up in 92 (38.8%) of the 237 patients. However, overt pneumothorax was found in 18 (2.6%) of the 697 patients without CT-pneumothorax. The width and depth of CT-pneumothorax were predictive risk factors for overt pneumothorax. Conclusions CT-pneumothorax is very sensitive for predicting overt pneumothorax, and the width and depth on CT-pneumothorax are reliable risk factors for predicting overt pneumothorax. PMID:19949733

  19. Findings chest radiograph and CT in mediastinitis: effcacy of CT in patients with delayed diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Eun Ju; Hong, Yong Kook; Choe, Kyu Ok [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-01-01

    To analyse the causes the radiologic findings in patients with mediastinitis and to evaluate the efficacy of chest CT scanning in patients with delayed diagnosis. Seventeen patients with histopathologically(n=15) or clinically diagnosed(n=2) mediastinitis were involved in this study. Eleven of the former group underwent surgery, and in four, tube drainage was performed. All underwent chest radiography and CT scanning, and in seven patients, the causes of delayed diagnosis were analysed. The most common cause of mediastinitis was esophageal rupture(n=11). Others were extension from neck abscess to the mediastinum(n=3), complications after a Benthall procedure(n=1), tuberculous lymphadenitis(n=1) and mycotic aneurysm(n=1). Patients with esophageal rupture suffered from underlying diseases such as esophageal cancer(n=2), iatrogenic esophageal rupture(n=2), Boerhaave's syndrome(n=2), and esophagitis(n=1). In patients with neck abscess (n=3), each was secondary to infected cystic hygroma, Ludwig angina, or deep neck infection, respectively. On chest CT, patients with esophageal rupture(n=11) had an abscess in the posterior mediastinum ; nine abscesses extended to the cervical area along the retropharyngeal space, and the patient with Ludwig angina had an abscess involving all compartments of the mediastinum. Among the total of 17 patients, diagnostic delays were found in seven, while five had spontaneous esophageal ruptures and two suffered complications after a Benthall procedure and Tbc lymphadenitis, respectively. The causes of diagnostic delay varied. Among seven patients, pnevmonia was initially diagnosed in two, who were treated ; one had multiorgan failure, and one was suffering from pericardial effusion and lung abscess. In three other patients, chest radiographs initially showed non-specific findings, leading to delayed CT examination. The most common cause of mediastinitis was esophageal rupture, and in these patients, chest radiographs and clinical

  20. Metabonomics and Intensive Care

    OpenAIRE

    Antcliffe, D; Gordon, AC

    2016-01-01

    This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency medicine 2016. Other selected articles can be found online at http://www.biomedcentral.com/collections/annualupdate2016. Further information about the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from http://www.springer.com/series/8901.

  1. Analysis the findings of chest radiograph and CT scan in 217 acute thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shaoying

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate chest radiograph and CT scan in assessing acute thoracic trauma. Methods: Retrospectively analyzed the findings of chest radiograph and CT scan in 217 cases of acute thoracic trauma and positive rate of each modality was compared. Results: The positive rate of rib and clavicle fracture was higher in chest radiograph than these in CT scan. But the positive rate of chest wall hematoma, mediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema, pneumothorax, hydropneumothorax, damage of lung parenchyma and traumatic pulmonary atelectasis was higher in CT scan than those in chest radiograph. Conclusion: The application of the combined imaging modalities improves assessing of acute thoracic trauma, because the imaging manifestation of the lesion is various. (authors)

  2. Predictors of abnormal chest CT after blunt trauma: a critical appraisal of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brink, M.; Kool, D.R.; Dekker, H.M.; Deunk, J.; Jager, G.J.; Kuijk, C. van; Edwards, M.J.R.; Blickman, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To identify and to evaluate predictors that determine whether chest computed tomography (CT) is likely to reveal relevant injuries in adult blunt trauma patients. Methods: After a comprehensive literature search for original studies on blunt chest injury diagnosis, two independent observers included studies on the accuracy of parameters derived from history, physical examination, or diagnostic imaging that might predict injuries at (multidetector row) CT in adults and that allowed construction of 2 x 2 contingency tables. For each article, methodological quality was scored and relevant predictors for injuries at CT were extracted. For each predictor, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) including 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results: Of 147 articles initially identified, the observers included 10 original studies in consensus. Abnormalities at physical examination (abnormal respiratory effort, need for assisted ventilation, reduced airentry, coma, chest wall tenderness) and pelvic fractures were significant predictors (DOR: 2.1-6.7). The presence of any injuries at conventional radiography of the chest (eight articles) was a more powerful significant predictor (DOR: 2.2-37). Abnormal chest ultrasonography (four articles) was the most accurate predictor for chest injury at CT (DOR: 491-infinite). Conclusion: The current literature indicates that in blunt trauma patients with abnormal physical examination, abnormal conventional radiography, or abnormal ultrasonography of the chest, CT was likely to reveal relevant chest injuries. However, there was no strong evidence to suggest that CT could be omitted in patients without these criteria, or whether these findings are beneficial for patients

  3. Multi-Detector CT Findings of Palpable Chest Wall Masses in Children: A Pictorial Essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chan Ho; Kim, Young Tong [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Hyun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    A wide variety of diseases manifest as palpable chest wall masses in children. These include normal variation, congenital anomalies, trauma, infection, axillary lymphadenopathies, soft tissue tumors and bone tumors. Given that most of these diseases are associated with chest wall deformity, diagnosis is difficult by physical examination or ultrasonography alone. However, multi-detector CT with three dimensional reconstruction is useful in the characterization and differential diagnosis of palpable chest wall lesions. In this article, we review the spectrum of palpable chest wall diseases and illustrate their multi-detector CT presentation.

  4. Regional variance of visually lossless threshold in compressed chest CT images: Lung versus mediastinum and chest wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Bohyoung; Kim, Kil Joong; Chun, Eun Ju; Bajpai, Vasundhara; Kim, Young Hoon; Hahn, Seokyung; Lee, Kyung Won

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the visually lossless threshold (VLT) for the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) 2000 compression of chest CT images and to demonstrate the variance of the VLT between the lung and mediastinum/chest wall. Subjects and methods: Eighty images were compressed reversibly (as negative control) and irreversibly to 5:1, 10:1, 15:1 and 20:1. Five radiologists determined if the compressed images were distinguishable from their originals in the lung and mediastinum/chest wall. Exact tests for paired proportions were used to compare the readers' responses between the reversible and irreversible compressions and between the lung and mediastinum/chest wall. Results: At reversible, 5:1, 10:1, 15:1, and 20:1 compressions, 0%, 0%, 3-49% (p < .004, for three readers), 69-99% (p < .001, for all readers), and 100% of the 80 image pairs were distinguishable in the lung, respectively; and 0%, 0%, 74-100% (p < .001, for all readers), 100%, and 100% were distinguishable in the mediastinum/chest wall, respectively. The image pairs were less frequently distinguishable in the lung than in the mediastinum/chest wall at 10:1 (p < .001, for all readers) and 15:1 (p < .001, for two readers). In 321 image comparisons, the image pairs were indistinguishable in the lung but distinguishable in the mediastinum/chest wall, whereas there was no instance of the opposite. Conclusion: For JPEG2000 compression of chest CT images, the VLT is between 5:1 and 10:1. The lung is more tolerant to the compression than the mediastinum/chest wall.

  5. Regional variance of visually lossless threshold in compressed chest CT images: Lung versus mediastinum and chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Jung [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kholee@snubhrad.snu.ac.kr; Kim, Bohyoung; Kim, Kil Joong; Chun, Eun Ju; Bajpai, Vasundhara; Kim, Young Hoon [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center (Korea, Republic of); Hahn, Seokyung [Medical Research Collaborating Center, Seoul National University Hospital, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Won [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    Objective: To estimate the visually lossless threshold (VLT) for the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) 2000 compression of chest CT images and to demonstrate the variance of the VLT between the lung and mediastinum/chest wall. Subjects and methods: Eighty images were compressed reversibly (as negative control) and irreversibly to 5:1, 10:1, 15:1 and 20:1. Five radiologists determined if the compressed images were distinguishable from their originals in the lung and mediastinum/chest wall. Exact tests for paired proportions were used to compare the readers' responses between the reversible and irreversible compressions and between the lung and mediastinum/chest wall. Results: At reversible, 5:1, 10:1, 15:1, and 20:1 compressions, 0%, 0%, 3-49% (p < .004, for three readers), 69-99% (p < .001, for all readers), and 100% of the 80 image pairs were distinguishable in the lung, respectively; and 0%, 0%, 74-100% (p < .001, for all readers), 100%, and 100% were distinguishable in the mediastinum/chest wall, respectively. The image pairs were less frequently distinguishable in the lung than in the mediastinum/chest wall at 10:1 (p < .001, for all readers) and 15:1 (p < .001, for two readers). In 321 image comparisons, the image pairs were indistinguishable in the lung but distinguishable in the mediastinum/chest wall, whereas there was no instance of the opposite. Conclusion: For JPEG2000 compression of chest CT images, the VLT is between 5:1 and 10:1. The lung is more tolerant to the compression than the mediastinum/chest wall.

  6. The significance of collateral vessels, as seen on chest CT, in predicting SVC obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeouk, Young Soo; Kim, Sung Jin; Bae, Il Hun; Kim, Jae Youn; Hwang, Seung Min; Han, Gi Seok; Park, Kil Sun; Kim, Dae Young

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the significance of collateral veins, as seen on chest CT, in the diagnosis of superior vena cava obstruction. We retrospectively the records of 81 patients in whom collateral veins were seen on chest CT. On spiral CT(n=49), contrast material was infused via power injector, and on conventional CT(n=32), 50 ml bolus infusion was followed by 50 ml drip infusion. Obstruction of the SVC was evaluated on chest CT; if, however, evaluation of the SVC of its major tributaries was difficult, as in five cases, the patient underwent SVC phlebography. Collateral vessels were assigned to one of ten categories. On conventional CT, the jugular venous arch in the only collateral vessel to predict SVC obstruction; on spiral CT, however, collateral vessels are not helpful in the diagnosis of SVC obstruction, but are a nonspecific finding. (author). 12 refs., 2 tab., 2 figs

  7. Assessment of chest pain in the emergency room: What is the role of multidetector CT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Charles; Read, Katrina; Kuo, Dick

    2006-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most frequent complaints for patients seen in the emergency department. The current article describes the clinical stratification of patients who present to the emergency department with chest pain and discusses imaging options and analysis for these patients. It reviews conventional imaging approaches to assessing chest pain including chest radiography and stress testing. The main discussion focuses on the potential utility use of cross-sectional imaging, particularly multidetector CT, in the evaluation of chest pain in the emergency department

  8. Posterior diaphragmatic defect detected on chest CT: the incidence according to age and the lateral chest radiographic appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Son Youl; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Heo, Jeong Nam; Park, Choong Ki

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to investigate the incidence of posterior diaphragmatic defect on chest CT in various age groups and its lateral chest radiographic appearances. The chest CT scans of 78 patients of various ages with posterior diaphragmatic defect were selected among 1,991 patients, and they were analyzed for the incidence of defect in various age groups, the defect location and the herniated contents. Their lateral chest radiographs were analyzed for the shape of the posterior diaphragm and the posterior costophrenic sulcus. The patients' ages ranged from 34 to 87 with the tendency of a higher incidence in the older patients. The defect most frequently involved the medial two thirds (n = 49, 50.4%) and middle one third (n = 36, 37%) of the posterior diaphragm. The retroperitoneal fat was herniated into the thorax through the defect in all patients, and sometimes with the kidney (n = 8). Lateral chest radiography showed a normal diaphragmatic contour (n = 51, 49.5%), blunting of the posterior costophrenic sulcus (n = 41, 39.8%), focal humping of the posterior diaphragm (n = 7, 6.8%), or upward convexity (n = 4, 3.9%) of the posterior costophrenic sulcus on the affected side. The posterior diaphragmatic defect discovered in asymptomatic patients who are without a history of peridiaphragmatic disease is most likely acquired, and this malady increases in incidence according to age. An abnormal contour of the posterior diaphragm or the costophrenic sulcus on a lateral chest radiograph may be a finding of posterior diaphragmatic defect

  9. CT of the chest in suspected child abuse using submillisievert radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Thomas R.; Seibert, J.A.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Lee, Justin S.; Coulter, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    The cornerstone of child abuse imaging is the skeletal survey, but initial imaging with radiographs may not demonstrate acute and non-displaced fractures, especially those involving the ribs. Given the high mortality of undiagnosed non-accidental trauma, timely diagnosis is crucial. CT is more sensitive in assessing rib fractures; however the effective radiation dose of a standard chest CT is high. We retrospectively identified four children (three boys, one girl; age range 1-4 months) admitted between January 2013 and February 2014 with high suspicion for non-accidental trauma from unexplained fractures of the long bones; these children all had CT of the chest when no rib fractures were evident on the skeletal survey. The absorbed radiation dose estimates for organs and tissue from the four-view chest radiographs and subsequent CT were determined using Monte Carlo photon transport software, and the effective dose was calculated using published tissue-weighting factors. In two children, CT showed multiple fractures of the ribs, scapula and vertebral body that were not evident on the initial skeletal survey. The average effective dose for a four-view chest radiograph across the four children was 0.29 mSv and the average effective dose for the chest CT was 0.56 mSv. Therefore the effective dose of a chest CT is on average less than twice that of a four-view chest radiograph. Our protocol thus shows that a reduced-dose chest CT may be useful in the evaluation of high specificity fractures of non-accidental trauma when the four-view chest radiographs are negative. (orig.)

  10. CT of the chest in suspected child abuse using submillisievert radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Thomas R.; Seibert, J.A.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca [Medical Center Children' s Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lee, Justin S. [University of California-Davis, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Coulter, Kevin P. [Medical Center Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The cornerstone of child abuse imaging is the skeletal survey, but initial imaging with radiographs may not demonstrate acute and non-displaced fractures, especially those involving the ribs. Given the high mortality of undiagnosed non-accidental trauma, timely diagnosis is crucial. CT is more sensitive in assessing rib fractures; however the effective radiation dose of a standard chest CT is high. We retrospectively identified four children (three boys, one girl; age range 1-4 months) admitted between January 2013 and February 2014 with high suspicion for non-accidental trauma from unexplained fractures of the long bones; these children all had CT of the chest when no rib fractures were evident on the skeletal survey. The absorbed radiation dose estimates for organs and tissue from the four-view chest radiographs and subsequent CT were determined using Monte Carlo photon transport software, and the effective dose was calculated using published tissue-weighting factors. In two children, CT showed multiple fractures of the ribs, scapula and vertebral body that were not evident on the initial skeletal survey. The average effective dose for a four-view chest radiograph across the four children was 0.29 mSv and the average effective dose for the chest CT was 0.56 mSv. Therefore the effective dose of a chest CT is on average less than twice that of a four-view chest radiograph. Our protocol thus shows that a reduced-dose chest CT may be useful in the evaluation of high specificity fractures of non-accidental trauma when the four-view chest radiographs are negative. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of the Significance of Incidental Breast Lesions Detected by Chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Chang, Yun Woo; Hwang, Jung Hwa; Kim, Hyung Hwan; Lee, Eun Hye; Yang, Seung Boo

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the significance of incidentally detected breast lesions on a chest CT scan. Thirty-six incidental breast lesions in 26 patients were detected on a chest CT scan and were correlated with breast sonography, retrospectively. Among them, twenty-four breast lesions in 20 patients that were correlated with chest CT and sonography were available to pathology or follow up sonography. The CT findings were compared with sonographic findings according to the pathologic results. Incidentally detected breast lesions on a chest CT scan were correlated with sonography in 86% (31/36). Among 24 lesions that were available to pathology or follow up sonography, seven (29.2%) lesions were malignant and 17 (70.8%) lesions were benign. CT revealed a significant difference between benign and malignant lesions in terms of shape and margin (p = 0.007; p = 0.008, respectively). The CT findings were well correlated with sonographic findings in shape and margin (p = 0.001, respectively). Incidentally detected breast lesions on chest CT can be correlated with sonography. An irregular shape or a non-circumscribed margin of breast lesions on a CT scan can be considered as a suggestive sign of malignancy.

  12. Diagnostic modalities x-ray and CT chest differ in the management of thoracic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Chapagain

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe difference in the management of blunt trauma to the chest on the basis of conventional xray and computerised tomography of the chest. Methods: This prospective study was conducted between December 2011 to October 2012 in COMS in Bharatpur,a tertiary referral centre in central Nepal . Clinically stable thoracic injury patients were first evaluated with chest x-ray and the management on this basis was recorded. The findings of the CT chest were assessed and the type of management on the basis of CT was also recorded. Outcome was assessed in terms of mortality, morbidity, hospital and ICU stay with respect to the management on the basis of chest x-ray and CT scan. Results: Of the 129 patients, 74.4% were male and 25.6% were female with the patients ranging in age from 7 to 87 years (mean = 40.41 years. The most common mechanism of trauma to the chest was as a result of a motor vehicle accident (69.8%, followed by fall injury (20.2%. X-ray chest diagnosed rib fracture in 62%, haemothorax in 37%, pneumothorax in 27%, lung contusion in 10% and haemopneumothorax in 21% patients. Similarly CT chest diagnosed rib fracture in 86%, haemothorax in 54%, pneumothorax in 36%, lung contusion in 30% and haemopneumothorax in 30% patients. Mean hospital stay was 9.5 days in the group of patients having management on the basis of x-ray chest relative to mean stay of 10.2 days in the CT- chest group. In the management on the basis of xray group, there was a mean ICU stay of 2.8days compared to mean stays of 3.2 days in CT chest group. Conclusion: Though CT scan of the chest is more informative and differs the management of the blunt chest trauma, one should not forget to advise the cost effective, easily available and initial guiding agent, xray chest for early management of the chest injury patient. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i1.12764 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol.10(1; 22-31

  13. Fully automated gynecomastia quantification from low-dose chest CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Sonnenblick, Emily B.; Azour, Lea; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2018-02-01

    Gynecomastia is characterized by the enlargement of male breasts, which is a common and sometimes distressing condition found in over half of adult men over the age of 44. Although the majority of gynecomastia is physiologic or idiopathic, its occurrence may also associate with an extensive variety of underlying systemic disease or drug toxicity. With the recent large-scale implementation of annual lung cancer screening using low-dose chest CT (LDCT), gynecomastia is believed to be a frequent incidental finding on LDCT. A fully automated system for gynecomastia quantification from LDCT is presented in this paper. The whole breast region is first segmented using an anatomyorientated approach based on the propagation of pectoral muscle fronts in the vertical direction. The subareolar region is then localized, and the fibroglandular tissue within it is measured for the assessment of gynecomastia. The presented system was validated using 454 breast regions from non-contrast LDCT scans of 227 adult men. The ground truth was established by an experienced radiologist by classifying each breast into one of the five categorical scores. The automated measurements have been demonstrated to achieve promising performance for the gynecomastia diagnosis with the AUC of 0.86 for the ROC curve and have statistically significant Spearman correlation r=0.70 (p early detection as well as the treatment of both gynecomastia and the underlying medical problems, if any, that cause gynecomastia.

  14. Derivation and validation of two decision instruments for selective chest CT in blunt trauma: a multicenter prospective observational study (NEXUS Chest CT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Robert M; Langdorf, Mark I; Nishijima, Daniel; Baumann, Brigitte M; Hendey, Gregory W; Medak, Anthony J; Raja, Ali S; Allen, Isabel E; Mower, William R

    2015-10-01

    Unnecessary diagnostic imaging leads to higher costs, longer emergency department stays, and increased patient exposure to ionizing radiation. We sought to prospectively derive and validate two decision instruments (DIs) for selective chest computed tomography (CT) in adult blunt trauma patients. From September 2011 to May 2014, we prospectively enrolled blunt trauma patients over 14 y of age presenting to eight US, urban level 1 trauma centers in this observational study. During the derivation phase, physicians recorded the presence or absence of 14 clinical criteria before viewing chest imaging results. We determined injury outcomes by CT radiology readings and categorized injuries as major or minor according to an expert-panel-derived clinical classification scheme. We then employed recursive partitioning to derive two DIs: Chest CT-All maximized sensitivity for all injuries, and Chest CT-Major maximized sensitivity for only major thoracic injuries (while increasing specificity). In the validation phase, we employed similar methodology to prospectively test the performance of both DIs. We enrolled 11,477 patients-6,002 patients in the derivation phase and 5,475 patients in the validation phase. The derived Chest CT-All DI consisted of (1) abnormal chest X-ray, (2) rapid deceleration mechanism, (3) distracting injury, (4) chest wall tenderness, (5) sternal tenderness, (6) thoracic spine tenderness, and (7) scapular tenderness. The Chest CT-Major DI had the same criteria without rapid deceleration mechanism. In the validation phase, Chest CT-All had a sensitivity of 99.2% (95% CI 95.4%-100%), a specificity of 20.8% (95% CI 19.2%-22.4%), and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 99.8% (95% CI 98.9%-100%) for major injury, and a sensitivity of 95.4% (95% CI 93.6%-96.9%), a specificity of 25.5% (95% CI 23.5%-27.5%), and a NPV of 93.9% (95% CI 91.5%-95.8%) for either major or minor injury. Chest CT-Major had a sensitivity of 99.2% (95% CI 95.4%-100%), a specificity of

  15. Cardiac CT for the assessment of chest pain: Imaging techniques and clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Hans-Christoph; Johnson, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    Immediate and efficient risk stratification and management of patients with acute chest pain in the emergency department is challenging. Traditional management of these patients includes serial ECG, laboratory tests and further on radionuclide perfusion imaging or ECG treadmill testing. Due to the advances of multi-detector CT technology, dedicated coronary CT angiography provides the potential to rapidly and reliably diagnose or exclude acute coronary artery disease. Life-threatening causes of chest pain, such as aortic dissection and pulmonary embolism can simultaneously be assessed with a single scan, sometimes referred to as “triple rule out” scan. With appropriate patient selection, cardiac CT can accurately diagnose heart disease or other sources of chest pain, markedly decrease health care costs, and reliably predict clinical outcomes. This article reviews imaging techniques and clinical results for CT been used to evaluate patients with chest pain entering the emergency department.

  16. Predictors of abnormal chest CT after blunt trauma: a critical appraisal of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Kool, D.R.; Dekker, H.M.; Deunk, J.; Jager, G.J.; Kuijk, C. van; Edwards, M.J.R.; Blickman, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To identify and to evaluate predictors that determine whether chest computed tomography (CT) is likely to reveal relevant injuries in adult blunt trauma patients. METHODS: After a comprehensive literature search for original studies on blunt chest injury diagnosis, two independent observers

  17. Effect of Localizer Radiography Projection on Organ Dose at Chest CT with Automatic Tube Current Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltybaeva, Natalia; Krauss, Andreas; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To calculate the effect of localizer radiography projections to the total radiation dose, including both the dose from localizer radiography and that from subsequent chest computed tomography (CT) with tube current modulation (TCM). Materials and Methods An anthropomorphic phantom was scanned with 192-section CT without and with differently sized breast attachments. Chest CT with TCM was performed after one localizer radiographic examination with anteroposterior (AP) or posteroanterior (PA) projections. Dose distributions were obtained by means of Monte Carlo simulations based on acquired CT data. For Monte Carlo simulations of localizer radiography, the tube position was fixed at 0° and 180°; for chest CT, a spiral trajectory with TCM was used. The effect of tube start angles on dose distribution was investigated with Monte Carlo simulations by using TCM curves with fixed start angles (0°, 90°, and 180°). Total doses for lungs, heart, and breast were calculated as the sum of the dose from localizer radiography and CT. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of attenuation measured in 14 circular regions of interest. The Wilcoxon signed rank test, paired t test, and Friedman analysis of variance were conducted to evaluate differences in noise, TCM curves, and organ doses, respectively. Results Organ doses from localizer radiography were lower when using a PA instead of an AP projection (P = .005). The use of a PA projection resulted in higher TCM values for chest CT (P chest CT. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  18. Fat segmentation on chest CT images via fuzzy models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Wu, Caiyun; Pednekar, Gargi; Subramanian, Janani Rajan; Lederer, David J.; Christie, Jason; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-03-01

    Quantification of fat throughout the body is vital for the study of many diseases. In the thorax, it is important for lung transplant candidates since obesity and being underweight are contraindications to lung transplantation given their associations with increased mortality. Common approaches for thoracic fat segmentation are all interactive in nature, requiring significant manual effort to draw the interfaces between fat and muscle with low efficiency and questionable repeatability. The goal of this paper is to explore a practical way for the segmentation of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) components of chest fat based on a recently developed body-wide automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) methodology. The AAR approach involves 3 main steps: building a fuzzy anatomy model of the body region involving all its major representative objects, recognizing objects in any given test image, and delineating the objects. We made several modifications to these steps to develop an effective solution to delineate SAT/VAT components of fat. Two new objects representing interfaces of SAT and VAT regions with other tissues, SatIn and VatIn are defined, rather than using directly the SAT and VAT components as objects for constructing the models. A hierarchical arrangement of these new and other reference objects is built to facilitate their recognition in the hierarchical order. Subsequently, accurate delineations of the SAT/VAT components are derived from these objects. Unenhanced CT images from 40 lung transplant candidates were utilized in experimentally evaluating this new strategy. Mean object location error achieved was about 2 voxels and delineation error in terms of false positive and false negative volume fractions were, respectively, 0.07 and 0.1 for SAT and 0.04 and 0.2 for VAT.

  19. Low-dosage helical CT applications for chest medical checkup and lung cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ping; Cui Fa; Liang Huanqing; Zheng Minfei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: A discussion on low-dosage helical CT applications on chest medical checkup and lung cancer screening. Methods: On the 100 chest medical check up with three different of protocols, including standard-dosage (the tube current was 230 mAs) were compared with low-dose (tube current was 50 mAs or 30 mAs). Results: Low-dosage helical CT scan provides excellent images. In 100 chest medical checkup, 39 nodules or masses were revealed, enlarged lymph node was noted in 1 case; emphysema or bullae was demonstrated in 3 segments; thickening of bronchial wall was shown in 2 cases; and localized pleural thickening was found in 1 case. Conclusion: In chest checkup or lung cancer screening low-dosage helical CT (tube current 30 mAs) will not only guarantee image quality but also reduce the radiation dose during the examination. (authors)

  20. Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children: Chest Radiographic and CT Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Min Jeong; Lee, Young Seok; Lee, Jee Young; Lee, Kun Song [Dankook University College of Medicine, Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chest radiographic and CT findings of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in children, the population that is more vulnerable to respiratory infection than adults. The study population comprised 410 children who were diagnosed with an H1N1 infection from August 24, 2009 to November 11, 2009 and underwent chest radiography at Dankook University Hospital in Korea. Six of these patients also underwent chest CT. The initial chest radiographs were classified as normal or abnormal. The abnormal chest radiographs and high resolution CT scans were assessed for the pattern and distribution of parenchymal lesions, and the presence of complications such as atelectasis, pleural effusion, and pneumomediastinum. The initial chest radiograph was normal in 384 of 410 (94%) patients and abnormal in 26 of 410 (6%) patients. Parenchymal abnormalities seen on the initial chest radiographs included prominent peribronchial marking (25 of 26, 96%), consolidation (22 of 26, 85%), and ground-glass opacities without consolidation (2 of 26, 8%). The involvement was usually bilateral (19 of 26, 73%) with the lower lung zone predominance (22 of 26, 85%). Atelectasis was observed in 12 (46%) and pleural effusion in 11 (42%) patients. CT (n = 6) scans showed peribronchovascular interstitial thickening (n = 6), ground-glass opacities (n = 5), centrilobular nodules (n = 4), consolidation (n = 3), mediastinal lymph node enlargement (n = 5), pleural effusion (n = 3), and pneumomediastinum (n = 3). Abnormal chest radiographs were uncommon in children with a swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection. In children, H1N1 virus infection can be included in the differential diagnosis, when chest radiographs and CT scans show prominent peribronchial markings and ill-defined patchy consolidation with mediastinal lymph node enlargement, pleural effusion and pneumomediastinum

  1. Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection in Children: Chest Radiographic and CT Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Min Jeong; Lee, Young Seok; Lee, Jee Young; Lee, Kun Song

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chest radiographic and CT findings of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in children, the population that is more vulnerable to respiratory infection than adults. The study population comprised 410 children who were diagnosed with an H1N1 infection from August 24, 2009 to November 11, 2009 and underwent chest radiography at Dankook University Hospital in Korea. Six of these patients also underwent chest CT. The initial chest radiographs were classified as normal or abnormal. The abnormal chest radiographs and high resolution CT scans were assessed for the pattern and distribution of parenchymal lesions, and the presence of complications such as atelectasis, pleural effusion, and pneumomediastinum. The initial chest radiograph was normal in 384 of 410 (94%) patients and abnormal in 26 of 410 (6%) patients. Parenchymal abnormalities seen on the initial chest radiographs included prominent peribronchial marking (25 of 26, 96%), consolidation (22 of 26, 85%), and ground-glass opacities without consolidation (2 of 26, 8%). The involvement was usually bilateral (19 of 26, 73%) with the lower lung zone predominance (22 of 26, 85%). Atelectasis was observed in 12 (46%) and pleural effusion in 11 (42%) patients. CT (n = 6) scans showed peribronchovascular interstitial thickening (n = 6), ground-glass opacities (n = 5), centrilobular nodules (n = 4), consolidation (n = 3), mediastinal lymph node enlargement (n = 5), pleural effusion (n = 3), and pneumomediastinum (n = 3). Abnormal chest radiographs were uncommon in children with a swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection. In children, H1N1 virus infection can be included in the differential diagnosis, when chest radiographs and CT scans show prominent peribronchial markings and ill-defined patchy consolidation with mediastinal lymph node enlargement, pleural effusion and pneumomediastinum

  2. Chest Fat Quantification via CT Based on Standardized Anatomy Space in Adult Lung Transplant Candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubing Tong

    Full Text Available Overweight and underweight conditions are considered relative contraindications to lung transplantation due to their association with excess mortality. Yet, recent work suggests that body mass index (BMI does not accurately reflect adipose tissue mass in adults with advanced lung diseases. Alternative and more accurate measures of adiposity are needed. Chest fat estimation by routine computed tomography (CT imaging may therefore be important for identifying high-risk lung transplant candidates. In this paper, an approach to chest fat quantification and quality assessment based on a recently formulated concept of standardized anatomic space (SAS is presented. The goal of the paper is to seek answers to several key questions related to chest fat quantity and quality assessment based on a single slice CT (whether in the chest, abdomen, or thigh versus a volumetric CT, which have not been addressed in the literature.Unenhanced chest CT image data sets from 40 adult lung transplant candidates (age 58 ± 12 yrs and BMI 26.4 ± 4.3 kg/m2, 16 with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, 16 with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, and the remainder with other conditions were analyzed together with a single slice acquired for each patient at the L5 vertebral level and mid-thigh level. The thoracic body region and the interface between subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT and visceral adipose tissue (VAT in the chest were consistently defined in all patients and delineated using Live Wire tools. The SAT and VAT components of chest were then segmented guided by this interface. The SAS approach was used to identify the corresponding anatomic slices in each chest CT study, and SAT and VAT areas in each slice as well as their whole volumes were quantified. Similarly, the SAT and VAT components were segmented in the abdomen and thigh slices. Key parameters of the attenuation (Hounsfield unit (HU distributions were determined from each chest slice and from the

  3. The Beatles, the Nobel Prize, and CT scanning of the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Lawrence R

    2010-01-01

    From its first test scan on a mouse, in 1967, to current medical practice, the CT scanner has become a core imaging tool in thoracic diagnosis. Initially financed by money from Beatles' record sales, the first patient scan was performed in 1971. Only 8 years later, a Nobel Prize in Physics and Medicine was awarded to Hounsfield and Cormack for their discovery. This article traces the history of CT scanner development and how each technical advance expanded chest diagnostic frontiers. Chest imaging now accounts for 30% of all CT scanning.

  4. Prevalence and Diagnostic Performance of Isolated and Combined NEXUS Chest CT Decision Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Ali S; Mower, William R; Nishijima, Daniel K; Hendey, Gregory W; Baumann, Brigitte M; Medak, Anthony J; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2016-08-01

    The use of chest computed tomography (CT) to evaluate emergency department patients with adult blunt trauma is rising. The NEXUS Chest CT decision instruments are highly sensitive identifiers of adult blunt trauma patients with thoracic injuries. However, many patients without injury exhibit one of more of the criteria so cannot be classified "low risk." We sought to determine screening performance of both individual and combined NEXUS Chest CT criteria as predictors of thoracic injury to inform chest CT imaging decisions in "non-low-risk" patients. This was a secondary analysis of data on patients in the derivation and validation cohorts of the prospective, observational NEXUS Chest CT study, performed September 2011 to May 2014 in 11 Level I trauma centers. Institutional review board approval was obtained at all study sites. Adult blunt trauma patients receiving chest CT were included. The primary outcome was injury and major clinical injury prevalence and screening performance in patients with combinations of one, two, or three of seven individual NEXUS Chest CT criteria. Across the 11 study sites, rates of chest CT performance ranged from 15.5% to 77.2% (median = 43.6%). We found injuries in 1,493/5,169 patients (28.9%) who had chest CT; 269 patients (5.2%) had major clinical injury (e.g., pneumothorax requiring chest tube). With sensitivity of 73.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 68.1 to 78.6) and specificity of 83.9 (95% CI = 83.6 to 84.2) for major clinical injury, abnormal chest-x-ray (CXR) was the single most important screening criterion. When patients had only abnormal CXR, injury and major clinical injury prevalences were 60.7% (95% CI = 52.2% to 68.6%) and 12.9% (95% CI = 8.3% to 19.4%), respectively. Injury and major clinical injury prevalences when any other single criterion alone (other than abnormal CXR) was present were 16.8% (95% CI = 15.2% to 18.6%) and 1.1% (95% CI = 0.1% to 1.8%), respectively. Injury and major clinical injury prevalences

  5. Chest CT scans are frequently abnormal in asymptomatic patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallipuram, Janaki; Dhalla, Sidika; Bell, Chaim M; Dresser, Linda; Han, Heekyung; Husain, Shahid; Minden, Mark D; Paul, Narinder S; So, Miranda; Steinberg, Marilyn; Vallipuram, Mayuran; Wong, Gary; Morris, Andrew M

    2017-04-01

    Chest computed tomography (CT) findings of nodules, ground glass opacities, and consolidations are often interpreted as representing invasive fungal infection in individuals with febrile neutropenia. We assessed whether these CT findings were present in asymptomatic individuals with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at low risk of invasive fungal disease. A retrospective study of consecutive asymptomatic adult patients with newly diagnosed AML over a 2-year period was performed at a tertiary care oncology center. Radiology reports of baseline chest CTs were reviewed. Of 145 CT scans, the majority (88%) had pulmonary abnormalities. Many (70%) had one or both of unspecified opacities (52%) and nodules (49%). Ground glass opacities (18%) and consolidations (12%) occurred less frequently. Radiologists suggested pneumonia as a possible diagnosis in 32% (n = 47) of scans. Chest CT may result in over-diagnosis of invasive fungal disease in individuals with febrile neutropenia if interpreted without correlation to the patients' clinical status.

  6. Lung nodule detection by microdose CT versus chest radiography (standard and dual-energy subtracted).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Lukas; Bütikofer, Yanik; Ott, Daniel; Huber, Adrian; Landau, Julia; Roos, Justus E; Heverhagen, Johannes T; Christe, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of microdose CT using a comparable dose as for conventional chest radiographs in two planes including dual-energy subtraction for lung nodule assessment. We investigated 65 chest phantoms with 141 lung nodules, using an anthropomorphic chest phantom with artificial lung nodules. Microdose CT parameters were 80 kV and 6 mAs, with pitch of 2.2. Iterative reconstruction algorithms and an integrated circuit detector system (Stellar, Siemens Healthcare) were applied for maximum dose reduction. Maximum intensity projections (MIPs) were reconstructed. Chest radiographs were acquired in two projections with bone suppression. Four blinded radiologists interpreted the images in random order. A soft-tissue CT kernel (I30f) delivered better sensitivities in a pilot study than a hard kernel (I70f), with respective mean (SD) sensitivities of 91.1%±2.2% versus 85.6%±5.6% (p=0.041). Nodule size was measured accurately for all kernels. Mean clustered nodule sensitivity with chest radiography was 45.7%±8.1% (with bone suppression, 46.1%±8%; p=0.94); for microdose CT, nodule sensitivity was 83.6%±9% without MIP (with additional MIP, 92.5%±6%; pmicrodose CT for readers 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 84.3%, 90.7%, 68.6%, and 45.0%, respectively. Sensitivities with chest radiography for readers 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 42.9%, 58.6%, 36.4%, and 90.7%, respectively. In the per-phantom analysis, respective sensitivities of microdose CT versus chest radiography were 96.2% and 75% (pmicrodose CT, the applied dose was 0.1323 mSv. Microdose CT is better than the combination of chest radiography and dual-energy subtraction for the detection of solid nodules between 5 and 12 mm at a lower dose level of 0.13 mSv. Soft-tissue kernels allow better sensitivities. These preliminary results indicate that microdose CT has the potential to replace conventional chest radiography for lung nodule detection.

  7. Computed tomography for neurological intensive care patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodiek, S.; Neu, I.

    1977-01-01

    The first 100 computed tomographic (CT) examinations of the patients on the neurological intensive care ward are discussed and reported on the basis of selected typical findings. Characteristic patterns of the CT findings in determined cerebral diseases are explained. The possibility and necessity of CT observations of the development of inflammatory and cerebrovascular processes in particular are emphasized. A comparison of our experience with CT and other neuroradiological methods, is made. The clinical diagnoses, including the respective number of cases and the pertinent CT findings, are presented in a Table. (orig.) [de

  8. Reduced-dose chest CT with 3D automatic exposure control vs. standard chest CT: Quantitative assessment of emphysematous changes in smokers’ lung parenchyma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Hisanobu; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Yamazaki, Youichi; Matsumoto, Keiko; Onishi, Yumiko; Takenaka, Daisuke; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Nishio, Mizuho; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Murase, Kenya; Nishimura, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the capability of reduced-dose chest CT with three-dimensional (3D) automatic exposure control (AEC) on quantitative assessment of emphysematous change in smoker’ lung parenchyma, compared to standard chest CT. Methods: Twenty consecutive smoker patients (mean age 62.8 years) underwent CT examinations using a standard protocol (150 mAs) and a protocol with 3D-AEC. In this study, the targeted standard deviations number was set to 160. For quantitative assessment of emphysematous change in lung parenchyma in each subject using the standard protocol, a percentage of voxels less than −950 HU in the lung (%LAA −950 ) was calculated. The 3D-AEC protocol's %LAA was computed from of voxel percentages under selected threshold CT value. The differences of radiation doses between these two protocols were evaluated, and %LAAs −950 was compared with the 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs. Results: Mean dose length products were 780.2 ± 145.5 mGy cm (standard protocol), and 192.0 ± 95.9 (3D-AEC protocol). There was significant difference between them (paired Student's t test, p −950 and 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs. In adopting the feasible threshold CT values of the 3D-AEC protocol, the 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs were significantly correlated with %LAAs −950 (r = 0.98, p < 0.001) and limits of agreement from Bland–Altman analysis was 0.52 ± 4.3%. Conclusions: Changing threshold CT values demonstrated that reduced-dose chest CT with 3D-AEC can substitute for the standard protocol in assessments of emphysematous change in smoker’ lung parenchyma.

  9. Chest CT findings in breast cancer patients treated with postoperative irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yeon Joo; Kim, Kun Il; Lee, Suk Hong; Kim, Dong Won; Bae, Yeong Tae [College of Medicine, Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    The determine the chest CT findings in breast cancer patients who have undergone postoperative irradiation. The chest CT findings in 36 female patients who underwent breast surgery and radiotherapy between May 1996 and March 2000 were rerospectively analysed. Prior to radiotheraphy, baseline chest CT depicted normal parenchyma in all cases. In 11 patients, the ipsilateral breast and chest wall were irradiated using opposed tangential fields, while 25 were treated by the four fields method (opposed tangential fields plus anterior and posterior supraclavicular/high axillary fields), with a total dose of 5040-5400 cGy for 5-9 weeks. CT after radiotherapy demonstrated reticular opacity (n=24), perpendicular linear opacity (n=15), traction bronchiectasis (n=7), consolidation (n=6), ground glass attenuation (n=3), pathologic rib fractures (n=3) pleural effusion (n=2), and pleural thickening (n=1), while in five patients no abnormality was observed. in addition, in the anterolateral lung area of 23 (64%) of 36 patients who underwent tangential beam irradiation, CT demonstrated peripheral opacities. When supraclavicular and axillary portals were used, radiation-induced lung changes mostly occurred at the apex of the lung (n=24). Chest radiographs were abnormal in 26 patients and normal in ten; in five of these ten, CT demonstrated reticular opacity. Depending on the irradiation CT findings of radiation-induced lung injury in breast cancer include areas of increased opacity with or without fibrosis, in apical and/or anterior subpleural regions. CT may help differentiate radiation-induced parenchymal change from superimposed or combined lung disease.

  10. Pulmonary manifestations in HIV patients: The role of chest films, CT and HRCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauczor, H.U.; Schnuetgen, M.; Fischer, B.; Schwickert, H.C.; Haertel, S.; Schadmand-Fischer, S.; Gerken, G.; Schweden, F.

    1995-01-01

    64 HIV patients were examined prospectively. 15 had no respiratory symptoms (group I), 30 had non-specific respiratory symptoms (group II), 19 complained of dyspnoea (group III). Chest radiographs and CT were performed within a week. In patients with positive findings, bronchoscopy was carried out with bacteriological and histological examinations. In group I, 13% of chest radiographs and 40% of CT's showed infiltrative changes. In group II, the figures were 27% and 57% respectively. In group III, abnormalities were found in all cases by both examinations. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Radiographic, CT and MRI spectrum of hydatid disease of the chest: a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinner, W.N. von [Dept. of Radiology MBC28, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1993-01-01

    Thirty patients with thoracic hydatidosis (Echinococcus granulosus) were studied. The hydatid cysts were located in the lung parenchyma (70%), mediastinum (6.7%), inside the heart (10%), the pleurae (10%) and the chest wall (3.3%). Complications of thoracic hydatid cysts, such as rupture, infection, pleural involvement, spread and calcifications are presented. Computed tomography (CT) without and/or with contrast enhancement was performed in all patients (30). Findings from conventional chest radiographs were compared with CT and confirmed by pathology (30). In 10 cases (33.3%), magnetic resonance imaging was also performed. The diagnostic spectrum of hydatid cysts, including variations and developmental stages, is presented in this pictorial essay. (orig.)

  12. Chest ultrasound in the evaluation of complicated pneumonia in the ICU patients: Can be viable alternative to CT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham El Sheikh

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Chest US provides an accurate evaluation of the pleural and parenchymal abnormalities associated with complicated pneumonia in the ICU patients. Considering that chest US is a bedside and avoids transportation of the patient outside ICU, free of radiation exposure and easily repeatable, chest US appears to be an attractive alternative to CT.

  13. Aortic valve calcification - a commonly observed but frequently ignored finding during CT scanning of the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Prashanth; Sallomi, David; George, Bindu; Patel, Hitesh; Patel, Nikhil; Lloyd, Guy

    2012-06-01

    To describe the frequency and severity of Aortic valve calcification (AVC) in an unselected cohort of patients undergoing chest CT scanning and to assess the frequency with which AVC was being reported in the radiology reports. Consecutive CT scan images of the chest and the radiological reports (December 2009 to May 2010) were reviewed at the district general hospital (DGH). AVC on CT scan was visually graded on a scale ranging from 0 to IV (0 = no calcification, IV = severe calcification). Total of 416 (232 male; 184 female) CT chest scans [Contrast enhanced 302 (72%), unenhanced 114 (28%)] were reviewed. Mean age was 70.55 ± 11.48 years. AVC in CT scans was identified in 95 of the 416 patients (22.83%). AVC classification was as follows: Grade I: 60 (63.15%), Grade II: 22 (23.15%), Grade III: 9 (9.47%), Grade IV: 4 (4.21%). Only one CT report mentioned AVC. Only 31 of 95 AVC had Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). The interval time between CT scan and TTE was variable.   Aortic valve calcification in CT chest scans is a common finding and studies have shown that it is strongly related to the presence and severity of aortic valve disease. As CT scans are considered as a valuable additional screening tool for detection of aortic stenosis, AVC should always be commented upon in the radiology reports. Furthermore, patients with at least Grade III and IV AVC should be sent for TTE. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Increased opacity of left pericardiac area on chest radiograph : correlation with CT findings and its frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Ik; Kim, Jeung Sook; Kwak, Jin Young; Ryu, Chang Woo; Yoon, Sam Hyun

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of extrapericardial fat in the left cardiac border, and with regard to left extrapericardial fat, to correlate chest radiographs with CT scans. This study involved 132 consecutive patients who underwent chest PA and lateral radiographs, and chest CT scans. According to the results of chest PA radiograph, patients were divided into three groups: those with a clear left cardiac border; those with an indistinct left cardiac border; and those with an indistinct left cardiac border with increased density; cardiophrenic angle, as seen on lateral radiograph, the presence of increased density in the anterior cardiophrenic angle, as seen on lateral radiographs was evaluated. On the basis of the results of CT scanning, patients were classified into four groups according to the amount of left extrapericardial fat : negative, minimum, moderate, and maximum. Left extrapericardial fat, as seen on CT, was correlated with the conspicuity of left cardiac border seen on PA radiograph and the presence of increased density in the anterior cardiophrenic angle, as seen on lateral radiograph. The conspicuousness of the left cardiac border, as seen on PA chest radiograph, correlated with the presence of left extrapericardial fat, as seen on CT, and was related to the amount of left extrapericardial fat. Increased density of the anterior cardiophrenic angle, as seen on lateral radiographs, correlated with the presence of left extrapericardial fat on CT, but the absence of increased density on lateral radiograph corresponds to the absence or a minimal amount of left extrapericardial fat, as seen on CT. (author). 8 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs

  15. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Visualized on CT Scans but Not Chest Radiographs: Pathogens, Severity, and Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, Cameron P; Grijalva, Carlos G; Wunderink, Richard G; Williams, Derek J; Waterer, Grant W; Anderson, Evan J; Zhu, Yuwei; Hart, Eric M; Carroll, Frank; Bramley, Anna M; Jain, Seema; Edwards, Kathryn M; Self, Wesley H

    2018-03-01

    The clinical significance of pneumonia visualized on CT scan in the setting of a normal chest radiograph is uncertain. In a multicenter prospective surveillance study of adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), we compared the presenting clinical features, pathogens present, and outcomes of patients with pneumonia visualized on a CT scan but not on a concurrent chest radiograph (CT-only pneumonia) and those with pneumonia visualized on a chest radiograph. All patients underwent chest radiography; the decision to obtain CT imaging was determined by the treating clinicians. Chest radiographs and CT images were interpreted by study-dedicated thoracic radiologists blinded to the clinical data. The study population included 2,251 adults with CAP; 2,185 patients (97%) had pneumonia visualized on chest radiography, whereas 66 patients (3%) had pneumonia visualized on CT scan but not on concurrent chest radiography. Overall, these patients with CT-only pneumonia had a clinical profile similar to those with pneumonia visualized on chest radiography, including comorbidities, vital signs, hospital length of stay, prevalence of viral (30% vs 26%) and bacterial (12% vs 14%) pathogens, ICU admission (23% vs 21%), use of mechanical ventilation (6% vs 5%), septic shock (5% vs 4%), and inhospital mortality (0 vs 2%). Adults hospitalized with CAP who had radiological evidence of pneumonia on CT scan but not on concurrent chest radiograph had pathogens, disease severity, and outcomes similar to patients who had signs of pneumonia on chest radiography. These findings support using the same management principles for patients with CT-only pneumonia and those with pneumonia seen on chest radiography. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. All rights reserved.

  16. Estimated risk of radiation-induced cancer from paediatric chest CT: two-year cohort study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, Tilo [Cantonal Hospital Baden, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); University Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Colas, Lucie; Santangelo, Teresa; Faivre, Jean Baptiste; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [University Lille Nord de France, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Roser, Hans W.; Bremerich, Jens [University of Basel Hospital, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical Physics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-03-01

    The increasing absolute number of paediatric CT scans raises concern about the safety and efficacy and the effects of consecutive diagnostic ionising radiation. To demonstrate a method to evaluate the lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence/mortality due to a single low-dose helical chest CT in a two-year patient cohort. A two-year cohort of 522 paediatric helical chest CT scans acquired using a dedicated low-dose protocol were analysed retrospectively. Patient-specific estimations of radiation doses were modelled using three different mathematical phantoms. Per-organ attributable cancer risk was then estimated using epidemiological models. Additional comparison was provided for naturally occurring risks. Total lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence remains low for all age and sex categories, being highest in female neonates (0.34%). Summation of all cancer sites analysed raised the relative lifetime attributable risk of organ cancer incidence up to 3.6% in female neonates and 2.1% in male neonates. Using dedicated scan protocols, total lifetime attributable risk of cancer incidence and mortality for chest CT is estimated low for paediatric chest CT, being highest for female neonates. (orig.)

  17. Hematogenous candida pneumonia in major burn patients: plain chest radiograph and thin-section CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Heon; Lee, Eil Seong; Shim, Ya Seong; Kim, Ji Hun; Suh, Hong Kil; Cho, Sin Young; Kim, Dae Sun; Lee, Kil Woo; Kang, Ik Won

    1995-01-01

    To describe plain radiographic and thin-section CT findings of hematogenous candida pneumonia in major burn patients. We reviewed nine cases of hematogenous candida pneumonia in major burn patients who had positive blood culture for candida and findings of pneumonia on plain chest radiograph. On five of nine cases, thin-section CT was done. We evaluated retrospectively nine cases for onset, the pattern, distribution, and size of lesions on plain chest radiograph and thin-section CT. On plain chest radiograph, randomly distributed 2-10 mm nodules were seen in six cases(66%) and randomly distributed 10-15 mm consolidations in remaining three cases(33%). Lesion occurred in 11th to 75th post-burn day(average, 34th post-burn day). Other findings were cardiomegaly in three cases, atelectasis in three cases, and pulmonary edema in one case. Thin-section CT showed variable shaped subpleural nodules in all five cases. The size of nodules were 1-5 mm in two cases(40%) and 5-10 mm(60%) in three cases. Feeding vessel signs were seen in two cases. Other findings were atelectasis in three cases, cardiomegaly in three cases, ground-glass opacity and interlobular septal thickenings by pulmonary edema in two cases. Plain chest radiographic findings of hematogenous candida pneumonia in major burn patients are randomly distributed nodules or consolidations of variable size. Thin-section CT findings are variable shaped subpleural nodules less than 1 cm

  18. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk for pediatric chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M; Colsher, James G; Frush, Donald P

    2011-06-01

    To estimate patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk for pediatric chest computed tomography (CT) and to evaluate factors affecting dose and risk, including patient size, patient age, and scanning parameters. The institutional review board approved this study and waived informed consent. This study was HIPAA compliant. The study included 30 patients (0-16 years old), for whom full-body computer models were recently created from clinical CT data. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to estimate organ dose from eight chest protocols, representing clinically relevant combinations of bow tie filter, collimation, pitch, and tube potential. Organ dose was used to calculate effective dose and risk index (an index of total cancer incidence risk). The dose and risk estimates before and after normalization by volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDI(vol)) or dose-length product (DLP) were correlated with patient size and age. The effect of each scanning parameter was studied. Organ dose normalized by tube current-time product or CTDI(vol) decreased exponentially with increasing average chest diameter. Effective dose normalized by tube current-time product or DLP decreased exponentially with increasing chest diameter. Chest diameter was a stronger predictor of dose than weight and total scan length. Risk index normalized by tube current-time product or DLP decreased exponentially with both chest diameter and age. When normalized by DLP, effective dose and risk index were independent of collimation, pitch, and tube potential (chest CT protocols. http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.11101900/-/DC1. RSNA, 2011

  19. Simple pulmonary eosinophilia (loeffler's syndrome): chest radiographic and CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kyung Jae; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Tae Sung; Chung, Man Pyo; Choi, Dong Chull; Kwon, O Jung [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to describe the chest radiographic and CT findings of simple pulmonary eosinophilia. Twenty-six patients with simple pulmonary eosinophilia underwent chest radiography and CT scanning; the results were analyzed retrospectively by two chest radiologists, focusing on the patterns and distribution of the parenchymal abnormalities. The chest radiographs were normal in eight patients (31%), while among the remaining 18 patients, they showed subtle opacity (n=3D9), nodules (n=3D8), consolidation (n=3D2), and mass (n=3D1). Follow-up chest radiographs (m=3D18) demonstrated complete (n=3D16) or partial (n=3D1) resolution of parenchymal lesions or migratory lesions (n=3D1). On CT, nodule(s) (n=3D19) were most commonly seen, followed by ground-glass opacity (n=3D16), consolidation (n=3D3), and mass (n=3D1). A peripheral halo surrounding a nodule or an area of consolidation was seen in 18 patients. The nodules(s) (n=3D19) were subpleural (n=3D13) or random (=3D6). Areas of ground-glass opacity (n=3D16) were subpleural (n=3D13), random (n=3D2), or central (n=3D1). All lesions were patchy rather than diffuse. Follow-up CT in nine patients showed complete (n=3D7) or partial (n=3D2) resolution of parenchymal lesions. Chest radiographs of patients with simple pulmonary eosinophilia often reveal no abnormality. The most common finding is subtle opacity or nodule(s), while CT reveals transient nodule(s) with a surrounding halo or transient areas of ground glass opacity. (author)

  20. The “dirty chest”—correlations between chest radiography, multislice CT and tobacco burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, J; Goltz, J P; Lorenz, F; Obermann, A; Kirchner, E M; Kickuth, R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Cigarette smoking-induced airway disease commonly results in an overall increase of non-specific lung markings on chest radiography. This has been described as “dirty chest”. As the morphological substrate of this condition is similar to the anthracosilicosis of coal workers, we hypothesised that it is possible to quantify the radiological changes using the International Labour Organization (ILO) classification of pneumoconiosis. The aims of this study were to evaluate whether there is a correlation between the extent of cigarette smoking and increased lung markings on chest radiography and to correlate the chest radiographic scores with findings on CT studies. Methods In a prospective analysis a cohort of 85 smokers was examined. The cigarette consumption was evaluated in pack years (defined as 20 cigarettes per day over 1 year). Film reading was performed by two board-certified radiologists. Chest radiographs were evaluated for the presence of thickening of bronchial walls, the presence of linear or nodular opacities, and emphysema. To correlate the smoking habits with the increase of overall lung markings in chest radiography, the ILO profusion score was converted to numbers ranging from zero to nine. Chest radiographs were rated according to the complete set of standard films of the revised ILO classification. Results 63/85 (74%) of the smokers showed an increase in overall lung markings on chest radiography; 32 (37%) had an ILO profusion score of chest radiography and the cigarette consumption quantified as pack years (r=0.68). The majority of the heavy smokers (>40 pack years) showed emphysema; there was no significant difference between the prevalence of emphysema as diagnosed by CT (62%) or chest radiography (71%) (pchest radiography. PMID:21937617

  1. Estimation of breast dose and cancer risk in chest and abdomen CT procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltahir, Suha Abubaker Ali

    2013-05-01

    The use of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation doses to patents that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. Lack of optimized protocols be an additional source of increased dose in developing countries. The aims of this study are first, to measure patient doses during CT chest and abdomen procedures, second, to estimate the radiation dose to the breast, and third to quantify the radiation risks during the procedures. Patient doses from two common CT examinations were obtained from four hospitals in Khartoum.The patient doses were estimated using measurement of CT dose indexes (CTDI), exposure-related parameters, and the IMPACT spreadsheet based on NRPB conversion factors. A large variation of mean organ doses among hospitals was observed for similar CT examinations. These variations largely originated from different CT scanning protocols used in different hospitals and scanner type. The largest range was found for CT of the chest, for which the dose varied from 2.3 to 47 (average 24.7) mSv and for abdomen CT, it was 1.6 to 18.8 (average 10.2) mSv. Radiation dose to the breast ranged from 1.6 to 32.9 mSv for the chest and 1.1 to 13.2 mSv for the abdomen. The radiation risk per procedure was high. The obtained values were mostly higher than the values of organ doses reported from the other studies. It was concluded that current clinical chest and abdomen protocols result in variable radiation doses to the breast. The magnitude of exposure may have implications for imaging strategies.(Author)

  2. Dose reduction with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction for paediatric CT: phantom study and clinical experience on chest and abdomen CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, F; Pavia, Y; Pierrat, N; Lasalle, S; Neuenschwander, S; Brisse, H J

    2014-01-01

    To assess the benefit and limits of iterative reconstruction of paediatric chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT). The study compared adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with filtered back projection (FBP) on 64-channel MDCT. A phantom study was first performed using variable tube potential, tube current and ASIR settings. The assessed image quality indices were the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the noise power spectrum, low contrast detectability (LCD) and spatial resolution. A clinical retrospective study of 26 children (M:F = 14/12, mean age: 4 years, range: 1-9 years) was secondarily performed allowing comparison of 18 chest and 14 abdominal CT pairs, one with a routine CT dose and FBP reconstruction, and the other with 30 % lower dose and 40 % ASIR reconstruction. Two radiologists independently compared the images for overall image quality, noise, sharpness and artefacts, and measured image noise. The phantom study demonstrated a significant increase in SNR without impairment of the LCD or spatial resolution, except for tube current values below 30-50 mA. On clinical images, no significant difference was observed between FBP and reduced dose ASIR images. Iterative reconstruction allows at least 30 % dose reduction in paediatric chest and abdominal CT, without impairment of image quality. • Iterative reconstruction helps lower radiation exposure levels in children undergoing CT. • Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) significantly increases SNR without impairing spatial resolution. • For abdomen and chest CT, ASIR allows at least a 30 % dose reduction.

  3. Application of Super-Resolution Convolutional Neural Network for Enhancing Image Resolution in Chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Kensuke; Ota, Junko; Ishida, Takayuki

    2017-10-18

    In this study, the super-resolution convolutional neural network (SRCNN) scheme, which is the emerging deep-learning-based super-resolution method for enhancing image resolution in chest CT images, was applied and evaluated using the post-processing approach. For evaluation, 89 chest CT cases were sampled from The Cancer Imaging Archive. The 89 CT cases were divided randomly into 45 training cases and 44 external test cases. The SRCNN was trained using the training dataset. With the trained SRCNN, a high-resolution image was reconstructed from a low-resolution image, which was down-sampled from an original test image. For quantitative evaluation, two image quality metrics were measured and compared to those of the conventional linear interpolation methods. The image restoration quality of the SRCNN scheme was significantly higher than that of the linear interpolation methods (p < 0.001 or p < 0.05). The high-resolution image reconstructed by the SRCNN scheme was highly restored and comparable to the original reference image, in particular, for a ×2 magnification. These results indicate that the SRCNN scheme significantly outperforms the linear interpolation methods for enhancing image resolution in chest CT images. The results also suggest that SRCNN may become a potential solution for generating high-resolution CT images from standard CT images.

  4. Utility of CT scan for the diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, A.; Le Breton, C.; Tassart, M.; Korzec, J.; Bigot, J.M.; Carette, M.F. [Department of Radiology, Tenon Hospital, Paris (France)

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the utility of CT scan findings for the diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis, excluding the spine. We reviewed 15 patients (13 Africans and 2 Indians) with chest wall tuberculosis, retrospectively. The radiologic examination consisted of a plain X-ray and a CT scan of the chest for each patient. The site of disease was the rib in 13 patients or the body of the sternum in 2 patients. One rib was involved in 11 patients, 2 contiguous ribs (one site) in 2 patients, and bilateral disease (two sites) was observed in the remaining patient. The 14 rib sites involved the posterior arc or costovertebral joint in 11 cases, the anterior arc in 2 cases, and the anterior and middle arc in 1 case. The CT scan findings were an abscess (n = 14) or a soft tissue mass (n = 2), osteolytic lesions (n = 13), periosteal reaction (n = 10), and sequestrum (n = 14). Bone sclerosis was observed only in 3 cases of rib involvement. The association of a soft tissue abscess, an osteolytic lesion, and sequestrum, especially in immigrants to France, suggests chest wall tuberculosis on CT scan. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 11 refs.

  5. Cross-sectional imaging with CT and/or MRI of pediatric chest tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyttenbach, R.; Vock, P.; Tschaeppeler, H.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of the spectrum of pediatric chest masses, to present the results of cross-sectional imaging with CT and/or MRI, and to define diagnostic criteria to limit differential diagnosis. Seventy-eight children with thoracic mass lesions were retrospectively evaluated using CT (72 patients) and/or MR imaging (12 patients). All masses were evaluated for tissue characteristics (attenuation values or signal intensity, enhancement, and calcification) and were differentiated according to age, gender, location, and etiology. Twenty-eight of 38 (74 %) mediastinal masses were malignant (neuroblastoma, malignant lymphoma). Thirty of 38 (79 %) pulmonary masses were metastatic in origin, all with an already known primary tumor (osteosarcoma, Wilms tumor). With one exception, all remaining pulmonary lesions were benign. Seventeen of 21 (81 %) chest wall lesions were malignant (Ewing sarcoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor). The majority of mediastinal and chest wall tumors in children is malignant. Lung lesions are usually benign, unless a known extrapulmonary tumor suggests pulmonary metastases. Cross-sectional imaging with CT and/or MRI allows narrowing of the differential diagnosis of pediatric chest masses substantially by defining the origin and tissue characteristics. Magnetic resonance imaging is preferred for posterior mediastinal lesions, whereas CT should be used for pulmonary lesions. For the residual locations both modalities are complementary. (orig.)

  6. Computer-Aided Segmentation and Volumetry of Artificial Ground-Glass Nodules at Chest CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Ernst Th.; Jacobs, Colin; van Ginneken, Bram; Willemink, Martin J.; Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; de Jong, Pim A.

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to investigate a new software program for semiautomatic measurement of the volume and mass of ground-glass nodules (GGNs) in a chest phantom and to investigate the influence of CT scanner, reconstruction filter, tube voltage, and tube current. MATERIALS AND

  7. Evaluation of Image Quality in Low Tube-Voltage Chest CT Scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Cho, Jae Hwan; Park, Cheol Soo

    2010-01-01

    The patients who visited this department for pulmonary disease and need CT scans for Follow-up to observe change of CT value, evaluation of image quality and decrease of radiation dose as change of kVp. Subjects were the patients of 20 persons visited this department for pulmonary disease and Somatom Sensation 16(Semens, Enlarge, Germany) was used. Measurement of CT value as change of kVp was done by setting up ROI diameter of 1cm at the height of thyroid, aortic arch, right pulmonary artery in arterial phase image using 100 kVp, measuring 3 times, and recorded the average. CT value of phantom was measured by scanning phantoms which means contrast media diluted by normal saline by various ratio with tube voltage of 80 kVp, 100 kVp, 120 kVp, 140 kVp and recorded the average of 3 CT values of center of phantom image. In analysing radiation dose, CTDIVOL values of the latest arterial phase image of 120 kVp and as this research set that of 100 kVp were analyzed comparatively. 2 observers graded quality of chest images by 5 degrees (Unacceptable, Suboptimal, Adequate, Good, Excellent). CT value of chest image increased at 100 kVp by 14.06%∼27.26% in each ROI than 120 kVp. CT value of phantom increased as tube voltage lowered at various concentration of contrast media. CTDIVOL decreased at 100 kVp(5.00 mGy) by 36% than 120 kVp(7.80 mGy) in radiation dose analysis. here were 0 Unacceptable, 1 Suboptimal, 3 Adequate, 10 Good, 6 Excellent in totally 20 persons. Chest CT scanning with low kilo-voltage for patients who need CT scan repeatedly can bring images valuable for diagnose, and decrease radiation dose against patients

  8. Dose reduction with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction for paediatric CT: phantom study and clinical experience on chest and abdomen CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, F.; Lasalle, S.; Neuenschwander, S.; Brisse, H.J. [Institut Curie, Imaging Department, Paris (France); Pavia, Y.; Pierrat, N. [Institut Curie, Medical Physics Department, Paris (France)

    2014-01-15

    To assess the benefit and limits of iterative reconstruction of paediatric chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT). The study compared adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with filtered back projection (FBP) on 64-channel MDCT. A phantom study was first performed using variable tube potential, tube current and ASIR settings. The assessed image quality indices were the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the noise power spectrum, low contrast detectability (LCD) and spatial resolution. A clinical retrospective study of 26 children (M:F = 14/12, mean age: 4 years, range: 1-9 years) was secondarily performed allowing comparison of 18 chest and 14 abdominal CT pairs, one with a routine CT dose and FBP reconstruction, and the other with 30 % lower dose and 40 % ASIR reconstruction. Two radiologists independently compared the images for overall image quality, noise, sharpness and artefacts, and measured image noise. The phantom study demonstrated a significant increase in SNR without impairment of the LCD or spatial resolution, except for tube current values below 30-50 mA. On clinical images, no significant difference was observed between FBP and reduced dose ASIR images. Iterative reconstruction allows at least 30 % dose reduction in paediatric chest and abdominal CT, without impairment of image quality. (orig.)

  9. Dose reduction with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction for paediatric CT: phantom study and clinical experience on chest and abdomen CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, F.; Lasalle, S.; Neuenschwander, S.; Brisse, H.J.; Pavia, Y.; Pierrat, N.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the benefit and limits of iterative reconstruction of paediatric chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT). The study compared adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with filtered back projection (FBP) on 64-channel MDCT. A phantom study was first performed using variable tube potential, tube current and ASIR settings. The assessed image quality indices were the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the noise power spectrum, low contrast detectability (LCD) and spatial resolution. A clinical retrospective study of 26 children (M:F = 14/12, mean age: 4 years, range: 1-9 years) was secondarily performed allowing comparison of 18 chest and 14 abdominal CT pairs, one with a routine CT dose and FBP reconstruction, and the other with 30 % lower dose and 40 % ASIR reconstruction. Two radiologists independently compared the images for overall image quality, noise, sharpness and artefacts, and measured image noise. The phantom study demonstrated a significant increase in SNR without impairment of the LCD or spatial resolution, except for tube current values below 30-50 mA. On clinical images, no significant difference was observed between FBP and reduced dose ASIR images. Iterative reconstruction allows at least 30 % dose reduction in paediatric chest and abdominal CT, without impairment of image quality. (orig.)

  10. Significance of coronary artery calcification detected incidentally with chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, E.H.; Greenberg, R.; Miller, S.W.; Shepard, J.O.; Bourgouin, P.M.; McLoud, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    Coronary artery calcifications are well seen on CT scans because of high contrast resolution. Individual vessels were scored 0-3+ based on degree of calcification in over 40 patients who also underwent cardiac catheterization. Though relatively insensitive, the presence of dense calcifications had a specificity of roughly 60% to 70% for the presence of severe stenosis. In addition, 30 patients with calcification on CT scans and 30 age-matched controls, all of whom underwent thoracotomy, were compared with respect to prior cardiac history, estimated anesthetic risk, and postoperative cardiac complications. Patients with calcifications were more likely to have evidence of coronary disease and/or encounter postoperative cardiac complications

  11. Doses in pediatric patients undergoing chest and abdomen CT examinations. Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jornada, Tiago S.; Silva, Teogenes A. da

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a non-invasive method of image production that imparts significant doses to a patient, it is expected that pediatric CT examinations will increase the risk of induced cancer in children. In this study the effective doses in a five year-old child submitted to chest or abdomen CT scans were assessed for comparison purposes. The CTEXPO computed program was used with data from routine protocols of a 0 to 13 year-old children in two public hospitals in Belo Horizonte. Hospital A used a Siemens Dual-Slice unit with 80 kV, 41 mA and pitch 2 for chest or abdomen; hospital B used a Multislice GE unit with 120 kV, 45 mA and pitch 1 for chest and 120 kV, 55 mA. and pitch 1 for abdomen. Results of effective doses in a five year-old child were 1.7 and 1.0 mSv in hospital A and 9.1 and 7.2 mSv in hospital B, for chest and abdomen, respectively. Results were compared to the reference effective doses of 7.2 and 5.0 mSv for chest and abdomen respectively that were derived from the air kerma length product values given in ICRP publication 87. Results of hospital A showed that low dose exposures also can be achieved in CT scans of children. Results showed that even a hospital with a modern facility (hospital B) can provided doses higher than reference values if protocols are not adjusted for children. Preliminary results suggested that there is a room for optimizing children exposure submitted to CT scans. (author)

  12. Lung nodule detection on chest CT: evaluation of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Jae; Gamsu, Gordon; Czum, Julianna; Johnson, Rebecca; Chakrapani, Sanjay; Wu, Ning

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the capacity of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system to detect lung nodules in clinical chest CT. A total of 210 consecutive clinical chest CT scans and their reports were reviewed by two chest radiologists and 70 were selected (33 without nodules and 37 with 1-6 nodules, 4-15.4 mm in diameter). The CAD system (ImageChecker CT LN-1000) developed by R2 Technology, Inc. (Sunnyvale, CA) was used. Its algorithm was designed to detect nodules with a diameter of 4-20 mm. The two chest radiologists working with the CAD system detected a total of 78 nodules. These 78 nodules form the database for this study. Four independent observers interpreted the studies with and without the CAD system. The detection rates of the four independent observers without CAD were 81% (63/78), 85% (66/78), 83% (65/78), and 83% (65/78), respectively. With CAD their rates were 87% (68/78), 85% (66/78), 86% (67/78), and 85% (66/78), respectively. The differences between these two sets of detection rates did not reach statistical significance. In addition, CAD detected eight nodules that were not mentioned in the original clinical radiology reports. The CAD system produced 1.56 false-positive nodules per CT study. The four test observers had 0, 0.1, 0.17, and 0.26 false-positive results per study without CAD and 0.07, 0.2, 0.23, and 0.39 with CAD, respectively. The CAD system can assist radiologists in detecting pulmonary nodules in chest CT, but with a potential increase in their false positive rates. Technological improvements to the system could increase the sensitivity and specificity for the detection of pulmonary nodules and reduce these false-positive results

  13. What is the clinical significance of chest CT when the chest x-ray result is normal in patients with blunt trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kea, Bory; Gamarallage, Ruwan; Vairamuthu, Hemamalini; Fortman, Jonathan; Lunney, Kevin; Hendey, Gregory W; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2013-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been shown to detect more injuries than plain radiography in patients with blunt trauma, but it is unclear whether these injuries are clinically significant. This study aimed to determine the proportion of patients with normal chest x-ray (CXR) result and injury seen on CT and abnormal initial CXR result and no injury on CT and to characterize the clinical significance of injuries seen on CT as determined by a trauma expert panel. Patients with blunt trauma older than 14 years who received emergency department chest imaging as part of their evaluation at 2 urban level I trauma centers were enrolled. An expert trauma panel a priori classified thoracic injuries and subsequent interventions as major, minor, or no clinical significance. Of 3639 participants, 2848 (78.3%) had CXR alone and 791 (21.7%) had CXR and chest CT. Of 589 patients who had chest CT after a normal CXR result, 483 (82.0% [95% confidence interval [CI], 78.7-84.9%]) had normal CT results, and 106 (18.0% [95% CI, 15.1%-21.3%]) had CTs diagnosing injuries-primarily rib fractures, pulmonary contusion, and incidental pneumothorax. Twelve patients had injuries classified as clinically major (2.0% [95% CI, 1.2%-3.5%]), 78 were clinically minor (13.2% [95% CI, 10.7%-16.2%]), and 16 were clinically insignificant (2.7% (95% CI, 1.7%-4.4%]). Of 202 patients with CXRs suggesting injury, 177 (87.6% [95% CI, 82.4%-91.5%]) had chest CTs confirming injury and 25 (12.4% [95% CI, 8.5%-17.6%]) had no injury on CT. Chest CT after a normal CXR result in patients with blunt trauma detects injuries, but most do not lead to changes in patient management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The methods for detecting multiple small nodules from 3D chest X-ray CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayase, Yosuke; Mekada, Yoshito; Mori, Kensaku; Toriwaki, Jun-ichiro; Natori, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a method for detecting small nodules, whose CT values and diameters are more than -600 Hounsfield unit (H.U.) and 2 mm, from three-dimensional chest X-ray CT images. The proposed method roughly consists of two submodules: initial detection of nodule candidates by discriminating between nodule regions and other regions such as blood vessels or bronchi using a shape feature computed from distance values inside the regions and reduction of false positive (FP) regions by using a minimum directional difference filter called minimum directional difference filter (Min-DD) changing its radius suit to the size of the initial candidates. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated by using seven cases of chest X-ray CT images including six abnormal cases where multiple lung cancers are observed. The experimental results for nodules (361 regions in total) showed that sensitivity and FP regions are 71% and 7.4 regions in average per case. (author)

  15. Intrapulmonary pseudo-malposition of chest tubes on computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flueckiger, F.; Kullnig, P.; Juettner-Smolle, F.; Melzer, G.; Graz Univ.

    1991-01-01

    The diagnosis of an intrapulmonary malposition of chest tubes on CT may be problematic. We report about 13 chest tubes which were suspected on CT to be in an intrapulmonary malposition. In all cases as well as clinical and radiological follow up ruled out such a malposition. The use of a stiff tube and the presence of a soft lung parenchyma obviously led to a sinking of the tube into a 'channel'. Whereas after removal of the tube in case of such a pseudo-malposition solely a transitory local fluid collection and later a tender scar is seen, real intrapumonary malposition leads to parenchymal injury and concomitant complications. The diagnosis of intrapulmonary malposition should be doubted, if the drain is positioned within the pleural space after having crossed the lung parenchyma in a supposed intrapulmonary rout. The CT criterias of this pseudo-malposition are presented and discussed. (orig.) [de

  16. Coronary calcium screening with dual-source CT: reliability of ungated, high-pitch chest CT in comparison with dedicated calcium-scoring CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutt, Antoine; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [CHRU et Universite de Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain; Deken, Valerie [CHRU et Universite de Lille, Department of Biostatistics (EA 2694), Lille (France); Molinari, Francesco [Centre Hospitalier General de Tourcoing, Department of Radiology, Tourcoing (France)

    2016-06-15

    To investigate the reliability of ungated, high-pitch dual-source CT for coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening. One hundred and eighty-five smokers underwent a dual-source CT examination with acquisition of two sets of images during the same session: (a) ungated, high-pitch and high-temporal resolution acquisition over the entire thorax (i.e., chest CT); (b) prospectively ECG-triggered acquisition over the cardiac cavities (i.e., cardiac CT). Sensitivity and specificity of chest CT for detecting positive CAC scores were 96.4 % and 100 %, respectively. There was excellent inter-technique agreement for determining the quantitative CAC score (ICC = 0.986). The mean difference between the two techniques was 11.27, representing 1.81 % of the average of the two techniques. The inter-technique agreement for categorizing patients into the four ranks of severity was excellent (weighted kappa = 0.95; 95 % CI 0.93-0.98). The inter-technique differences for quantitative CAC scores did not correlate with BMI (r = 0.05, p = 0.575) or heart rate (r = -0.06, p = 0.95); 87.2 % of them were explained by differences at the level of the right coronary artery (RCA: 0.8718; LAD: 0.1008; LCx: 0.0139; LM: 0.0136). Ungated, high-pitch dual-source CT is a reliable imaging mode for CAC screening in the conditions of routine chest CT examinations. (orig.)

  17. Chest CT using spectral filtration: radiation dose, image quality, and spectrum of clinical utility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Franziska M.; Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Sommer, Wieland H.; Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Meinel, Felix G. [University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    To determine the radiation dose, image quality, and clinical utility of non-enhanced chest CT with spectral filtration. We retrospectively analysed 25 non-contrast chest CT examinations acquired with spectral filtration (tin-filtered Sn100 kVp spectrum) compared to 25 examinations acquired without spectral filtration (120 kV). Radiation metrics were compared. Image noise was measured. Contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) and figure-of-merit (FOM) were calculated. Diagnostic confidence for the assessment of various thoracic pathologies was rated by two independent readers. Effective chest diameters were comparable between groups (P = 0.613). In spectral filtration CT, median CTDI{sub vol}, DLP, and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) were reduced (0.46 vs. 4.3 mGy, 16 vs. 141 mGy*cm, and 0.65 vs. 5.9 mGy, all P < 0.001). Spectral filtration CT had higher image noise (21.3 vs. 13.2 HU, P < 0.001) and lower CNR (47.2 vs. 75.3, P < 0.001), but was more dose-efficient (FOM 10,659 vs. 2,231/mSv, P < 0.001). Diagnostic confidence for parenchymal lung disease and osseous pathologies was lower with spectral filtration CT, but no significant difference was found for pleural pathologies, pulmonary nodules, or pneumonia. Non-contrast chest CT using spectral filtration appears to be sufficient for the assessment of a considerable spectrum of thoracic pathologies, while providing superior dose efficiency, allowing for substantial radiation dose reduction. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of the image quality of chest CT scans: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins N, P. I.; Prata M, A., E-mail: priscillainglid@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Centro de Engenharia Biomedica, Av. Amazonas 5253, 30421-169 Nova Suica, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered one of the most important methods of medical imaging employed nowadays, due to its non-invasiveness and the high quality of the images it is able to generate. However, the diagnostic radiation dose received by an individual over the year often exceeds the dose received on account of background radiation. Therefore, it is important to know and to control the dose distribution in the patient by varying the image acquisition parameters. The aim of this study is to evaluate the variation of the image quality of chest CT scans performed by two phantoms. In this paper, a cylindrical Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) chest phantom was used and a second PMMA phantom has been developed with the same volume but an oblong shape, based on the actual dimensions of a male human thorax, in the axillary region. Ten-centimeter scans of the central area of each phantom were performed by a 16-channel Toshiba CT scanner, model Alexion. The scanning protocol employed was the radiology service protocol for chest scans. The noise survey was conducted within the image of the center slice, in five regions: one central and four peripheral areas close to the edge of the object (anterior, posterior, left and right). The recorded values showed that the oblong phantom, with a shape that is more similar to the actual human chest, has a considerably smaller noise, especially in the anterior, posterior and central regions. (Author)

  19. Evaluation of the image quality of chest CT scans: a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins N, P. I.; Prata M, A.

    2016-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered one of the most important methods of medical imaging employed nowadays, due to its non-invasiveness and the high quality of the images it is able to generate. However, the diagnostic radiation dose received by an individual over the year often exceeds the dose received on account of background radiation. Therefore, it is important to know and to control the dose distribution in the patient by varying the image acquisition parameters. The aim of this study is to evaluate the variation of the image quality of chest CT scans performed by two phantoms. In this paper, a cylindrical Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) chest phantom was used and a second PMMA phantom has been developed with the same volume but an oblong shape, based on the actual dimensions of a male human thorax, in the axillary region. Ten-centimeter scans of the central area of each phantom were performed by a 16-channel Toshiba CT scanner, model Alexion. The scanning protocol employed was the radiology service protocol for chest scans. The noise survey was conducted within the image of the center slice, in five regions: one central and four peripheral areas close to the edge of the object (anterior, posterior, left and right). The recorded values showed that the oblong phantom, with a shape that is more similar to the actual human chest, has a considerably smaller noise, especially in the anterior, posterior and central regions. (Author)

  20. Quantification of Emphysema with a Three-Dimensional Chest CT Scan: Correlation with the Visual Emphysema Scoring on Chest CT, Pulmonary Function Tests and Dyspnea Severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Jeong; Hwang, Jung Hwa [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    We wanted to prospectively evaluate the correlation between the quantification of emphysema using 3D CT densitometry with the visual emphysema score, pulmonary function tests (PFT) and the dyspnea score in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Non-enhanced chest CT with 3D reconstruction was performed in 28 men with COPD (age 54-88 years). With histogram analysis, the total lung volume, mean lung density and proportion of low attenuation lung volume below predetermined thresholds were measured. The CT parameters were compared with the visual emphysema score, the PFT and the dyspnea score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was well correlated with the DLco and FEV{sub 1}/FVC. A Low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU and -930 HU was correlated with visual the emphysema score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was correlated with the dyspnea score, although the correlations between the other CT parameters and the dyspnea score were not significant. Objective quantification of emphysema using 3D CT densitometry was correlated with the visual emphysema score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was correlated with the DLco, the FEV{sub 1}/FVC and the dyspnea score.

  1. Quantification of Emphysema with a Three-Dimensional Chest CT Scan: Correlation with the Visual Emphysema Scoring on Chest CT, Pulmonary Function Tests and Dyspnea Severity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Jeong; Hwang, Jung Hwa

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to prospectively evaluate the correlation between the quantification of emphysema using 3D CT densitometry with the visual emphysema score, pulmonary function tests (PFT) and the dyspnea score in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Non-enhanced chest CT with 3D reconstruction was performed in 28 men with COPD (age 54-88 years). With histogram analysis, the total lung volume, mean lung density and proportion of low attenuation lung volume below predetermined thresholds were measured. The CT parameters were compared with the visual emphysema score, the PFT and the dyspnea score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was well correlated with the DLco and FEV 1 /FVC. A Low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU and -930 HU was correlated with visual the emphysema score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was correlated with the dyspnea score, although the correlations between the other CT parameters and the dyspnea score were not significant. Objective quantification of emphysema using 3D CT densitometry was correlated with the visual emphysema score. A low attenuation lung volume below -950 HU was correlated with the DLco, the FEV 1 /FVC and the dyspnea score.

  2. Computed radiography in neonatal intensive care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlo, L.; Bighi, S.; Cervi, P.M.; Lupi, L.

    1991-01-01

    The Authors report their experience in the employment of a computerized digital radiographic system in Neonatal Intensive Care. The analog screen-film system is replaced by photosensitive imaging plates, scanned after X-ray exposure by a laser that releases the digital image, which can then be manipulated on computer work-stations. In a period of twelve months about 200 chest-abdomen X-ray examinations in Neonatal Intensive Care have been performed using this method with good technical and diagnostic results. The use of digital radiography in the neonatal area is of high interest: this system produces good quality images, there is a reduction in radiation dose and 'retakes', the system allows selective enhancement of different structures and their magnification. (orig.)

  3. Intensive Care Unit Delirium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsuk Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Delirium is described as a manifestation of acute brain injury and recognized as one of the most common complications in intensive care unit (ICU patients. Although the causes of delirium vary widely among patients, delirium increases the risk of longer ICU and hospital length of stay, death, cost of care, and post-ICU cognitive impairment. Prevention and early detection are therefore crucial. However, the clinical approach toward delirium is not sufficiently aggressive, despite the condition’s high incidence and prevalence in the ICU setting. While the underlying pathophysiology of delirium is not fully understood, many risk factors have been suggested. As a way to improve delirium-related clinical outcome, high-risk patients can be identified. A valid and reliable bedside screening tool is also needed to detect the symptoms of delirium early. Delirium is commonly treated with medications, and haloperidol and atypical antipsychotics are commonly used as standard treatment options for ICU patients although their efficacy and safety have not been established. The approaches for the treatment of delirium should focus on identifying the underlying causes and reducing modifiable risk factors to promote early mobilization.

  4. Detection of skeletal muscle metastasis: torso FDG PET-CT versus contrast-enhanced chest or abdomen CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Young; Yi, Jeong Geun; Song, Inyoung; Lee, Won Woo; Chung, Hyun Woo; Park, Jeong Hee; Moon, Sung Gyu

    2015-07-01

    Skeletal muscle metastasis (SMM) in cancer patients has not been sufficiently evaluated regarding prevalence and proper method of detection. To determine the prevalence of SMM and compare the diagnostic competencies for SMM of torso F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and contrast-enhanced chest or abdomen CT. We investigated 18,225 PET-CT studies of 6359 cancer patients performed from 2005 to 2012. The PET-CT studies describing potential SMM were retrieved and the corresponding medical records were reviewed. The gold standard for SMM was histopathologically-proven SMM or imaging study-based disease progression. The detectability of SMM was compared between PET-CT and contrast-enhanced CT. Twenty-six patients had 84 SMM lesions, representing a SMM prevalence of 0.41%. Lung cancer was the most common SMM-associated malignancy (54%) and the gluteal/pelvic girdle muscle was the most frequently involved SMM site (37%). All 84 SMM lesions were visualized on PET-CT (100%). Of these PET-CT positive 84 SMM lesions, 51 lesions were in the CT field of view (FOV) (61%), whereas 33 lesions were out of the CT FOV (39%). Among these 51 lesions, 17 lesions showed rim-enhancing nodules/masses (33%), eight lesions showed homogeneously enhancing nodules (16%), three lesions showed heterogeneously enhancing nodules (6%), and 23 SMM lesions (45%) were non-diagnostic by CT. All 51 SMM lesions within CT FOV were detected on PET-CT (100%), whereas only 28 were visualized on CT (54.9%), resulting in a significant difference (P SMM was revealed by PET-CT. The prevalence of SMM was as low as 0.41% in the current large cohort of cancer patients. Torso PET-CT was a more competent modality than contrast-enhanced CT in the detection of SMM. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. CT findings of foreign bodies in the chest: a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Hyun; Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shick; Shin, Hyung Cheol [Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    The most common causes of tracheobronchial foreign bodies are peanuts in children, and meat and dentures in adults. The most common causes of esophageal foreign bodies are coins in children and meat in adults. It is passable to diagnose a foreign body by visualization on a chest radiograph, if the foreign bodies are radio opaque. However, if the foreign bodies are radiolucent and the patients do not remember the history of aspiration, it is important to evaluate CT findings for foreign bodies and their complications. We describe the CT findings of various thoracic foreign bodies in children and adults.

  6. Radiation doses during chest examinations using dose modulation techniques in multislice CT scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone Roshan; Pradip Joe; Dinakran Paul; Srikanth B

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the radiation dose and image quality using a manual protocol and dose modulation techniques in a 6-slice CT scanner. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty-one patients who underwent contrast-enhanced CT of the chest were included in the study. For the manual protocol settings, constant tube potential (kV) and tube current-time product (mAs) of 140 kV and 120 mAs, respectively, were used. The angular and z-axis dose modulation techniques utilized a constant tu...

  7. CT findings of foreign bodies in the chest: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Hyun; Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shick; Shin, Hyung Cheol

    2008-01-01

    The most common causes of tracheobronchial foreign bodies are peanuts in children, and meat and dentures in adults. The most common causes of esophageal foreign bodies are coins in children and meat in adults. It is passable to diagnose a foreign body by visualization on a chest radiograph, if the foreign bodies are radio opaque. However, if the foreign bodies are radiolucent and the patients do not remember the history of aspiration, it is important to evaluate CT findings for foreign bodies and their complications. We describe the CT findings of various thoracic foreign bodies in children and adults

  8. Pitfalls and artifacts in the interpretation of oncologic PET/CT of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Capobianco, Julia; Oliveira, Marco Antonio Conde de, E-mail: gustavo.meirelles@grupofleury.com.br [Grupo Fleury, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    PET/CT is widely used for the evaluation of patients with thoracic malignancies. Although the levels of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake are usually high in neoplastic diseases, they can also be physiological, due to artifacts. In addition, FDG uptake can occur in benign conditions such as infectious, inflammatory, and iatrogenic lesions. Furthermore, some malignant tumors, such as adenocarcinoma in situ (formerly known as bronchoalveolar carcinoma) and carcinoid tumors, may not show FDG uptake. Here, we illustrate the main pitfalls and artifacts in the interpretation of the results of oncologic PET/CT of the chest, outlining strategies for avoiding misinterpretation. (author)

  9. Where Does It Lead? Imaging Features of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices on Chest Radiograph and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzman, Rotem S.; Blondin, Dirk; Furst, Gunter; Scherer, Axel; R Miese, Falk; Kroepil, Patric [University of Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Winter, Joachim [University Hospital Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Abbara, Suhny [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (US)

    2011-10-15

    Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are being increasingly employed in patients suffering from cardiac rhythm disturbances. The principal objective of this article is to familiarize radiologists with pacemakers and ICDs on chest radiographs and CT scans. Therefore, the preferred lead positions according to pacemaker types and anatomic variants are introduced in this study. Additionally, the imaging features of incorrect lead positions and defects, as well as complications subsequent to pacemaker implantation are demonstrated herein.

  10. Where Does It Lead? Imaging Features of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices on Chest Radiograph and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzman, Rotem S.; Blondin, Dirk; Furst, Gunter; Scherer, Axel; R Miese, Falk; Kroepil, Patric; Winter, Joachim; Abbara, Suhny

    2011-01-01

    Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are being increasingly employed in patients suffering from cardiac rhythm disturbances. The principal objective of this article is to familiarize radiologists with pacemakers and ICDs on chest radiographs and CT scans. Therefore, the preferred lead positions according to pacemaker types and anatomic variants are introduced in this study. Additionally, the imaging features of incorrect lead positions and defects, as well as complications subsequent to pacemaker implantation are demonstrated herein.

  11. Dense volumetric detection and segmentation of mediastinal lymph nodes in chest CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Hirohisa; Roth, Holger R.; Bhatia, Kanwal K.; Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Iwano, Shingo; Homma, Hirotoshi; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Natori, Hiroshi; Schnabel, Julia A.; Mori, Kensaku

    2018-02-01

    We propose a novel mediastinal lymph node detection and segmentation method from chest CT volumes based on fully convolutional networks (FCNs). Most lymph node detection methods are based on filters for blob-like structures, which are not specific for lymph nodes. The 3D U-Net is a recent example of the state-of-the-art 3D FCNs. The 3D U-Net can be trained to learn appearances of lymph nodes in order to output lymph node likelihood maps on input CT volumes. However, it is prone to oversegmentation of each lymph node due to the strong data imbalance between lymph nodes and the remaining part of the CT volumes. To moderate the balance of sizes between the target classes, we train the 3D U-Net using not only lymph node annotations but also other anatomical structures (lungs, airways, aortic arches, and pulmonary arteries) that can be extracted robustly in an automated fashion. We applied the proposed method to 45 cases of contrast-enhanced chest CT volumes. Experimental results showed that 95.5% of lymph nodes were detected with 16.3 false positives per CT volume. The segmentation results showed that the proposed method can prevent oversegmentation, achieving an average Dice score of 52.3 +/- 23.1%, compared to the baseline method with 49.2 +/- 23.8%, respectively.

  12. Classification of pulmonary emphysema from chest CT scans using integral geometry descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rikxoort, E. M.; Goldin, J. G.; Galperin-Aizenberg, M.; Brown, M. S.

    2011-03-01

    To gain insight into the underlying pathways of emphysema and monitor the effect of treatment, methods to quantify and phenotype the different types of emphysema from chest CT scans are of crucial importance. Current standard measures rely on density thresholds for individual voxels, which is influenced by inspiration level and does not take into account the spatial relationship between voxels. Measures based on texture analysis do take the interrelation between voxels into account and therefore might be useful for distinguishing different types of emphysema. In this study, we propose to use Minkowski functionals combined with rotation invariant Gaussian features to distinguish between healthy and emphysematous tissue and classify three different types of emphysema. Minkowski functionals characterize binary images in terms of geometry and topology. In 3D, four Minkowski functionals are defined. By varying the threshold and size of neighborhood around a voxel, a set of Minkowski functionals can be defined for each voxel. Ten chest CT scans with 1810 annotated regions were used to train the method. A set of 108 features was calculated for each training sample from which 10 features were selected to be most informative. A linear discriminant classifier was trained to classify each voxel in the lungs into a subtype of emphysema or normal lung. The method was applied to an independent test set of 30 chest CT scans with varying amounts and types of emphysema with 4347 annotated regions of interest. The method is shown to perform well, with an overall accuracy of 95%.

  13. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial (NTM) Disease in Immunocompetent Patients: Expanding Image Findings on Chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyo Hyun; Seon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Mok Hee; Choi, Song; Song, Sang Gook; Shin, Sang Soo; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Park, Jin Gyoon [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the chest CT features of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease regardless of the specific organisms. This study included 74 consecutive patients (35 men, 39 women; mean age, 63 years; age range, 25-89 years) who were diagnosed with NTM disease according to the American Thoracic Society Guidelines (1997 and 2007) between January 2005 and July 2007. Chest CT images were randomly reviewed by two radiologists with consensus. The most common organism associated with NTM disease is M. avium-intracellulare complex (87.8%), followed by M. abscesses, M. kansasii, and M. chelonae. The most common chest CT finding was a nodular bronchiectatic lesion (n = 35, 46.7%), followed by a cavitary lesion of the upper lobe (n = 21, 28.0%), combined lesions of two prior subtypes (n = 6, 8.0%), consolidative lesion (s) (n = 5, 6.7%), a bronchogenic spreading pulmonary tuberculosis-like lesion (n = 5, 6.7%), a cavitary mass lesion with small satellite nodules (n = 2, 2.7%), and a miliary nodular lesion (n = 1, 1.3%). More than 5 segments were involved in 60 cases (81.1%). The nodular bronchiectatic lesion or cavitary lesion of upper lobe presents with multi-segmental involvement and the occurrence of combined consolidation is indicative of NTM disease

  14. Air trapping on chest CT is associated with worse ventilation distribution in infants with cystic fibrosis diagnosed following newborn screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham L Hall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In school-aged children with cystic fibrosis (CF structural lung damage assessed using chest CT is associated with abnormal ventilation distribution. The primary objective of this analysis was to determine the relationships between ventilation distribution outcomes and the presence and extent of structural damage as assessed by chest CT in infants and young children with CF. METHODS: Data of infants and young children with CF diagnosed following newborn screening consecutively reviewed between August 2005 and December 2009 were analysed. Ventilation distribution (lung clearance index and the first and second moment ratios [LCI, M(1/M(0 and M(2/M(0, respectively], chest CT and airway pathology from bronchoalveolar lavage were determined at diagnosis and then annually. The chest CT scans were evaluated for the presence or absence of bronchiectasis and air trapping. RESULTS: Matched lung function, chest CT and pathology outcomes were available in 49 infants (31 male with bronchiectasis and air trapping present in 13 (27% and 24 (49% infants, respectively. The presence of bronchiectasis or air trapping was associated with increased M(2/M(0 but not LCI or M(1/M(0. There was a weak, but statistically significant association between the extent of air trapping and all ventilation distribution outcomes. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that in early CF lung disease there are weak associations between ventilation distribution and lung damage from chest CT. These finding are in contrast to those reported in older children. These findings suggest that assessments of LCI could not be used to replace a chest CT scan for the assessment of structural lung disease in the first two years of life. Further research in which both MBW and chest CT outcomes are obtained is required to assess the role of ventilation distribution in tracking the progression of lung damage in infants with CF.

  15. Chest CT findings in patients with non-cardiovascular causes of chest pain: Focusing on pulmonary tuberculosis in a tuberculosis endemic country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, So Won; Shim, Sung Shine; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Ryu, Yon Ju

    2015-01-01

    To review the common causes of non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) according to the location and lesion type as seen on chest CT, and to evaluate CT findings in tuberculosis (TB) as a cause of NCCP. In the period 2009 to 2012, patients having NCCP without definitive evidence of acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary thromboembolism, and aortic dissection, were included. In total, 162 patients (60.5% male; 39.5% female), with a mean age of 51 years, were enrolled. CT images were evaluated by location and lesion type, for causes of NCCP. Chest CT revealed that the most common location for the cause of NCCP was the pleura (45.1%), followed by the subpleural lung parenchyma (30.2%). The most common lesion causing NCCP was TB (33.3%), followed by pneumonia (19.1%). Of the 54 TB cases, 40 (74.1%) were stable TB and 14 (25.9%) were active TB; among these 54 patients, NCCP was most commonly the result of fibrotic pleural thickening (55.6%), followed by subpleural stable pulmonary TB (14.8%). Results of chest CT revealed that TB was a major cause of NCCP in a TB endemic area. Among the TB patients, fibrotic pleural thickening in patients with stable TB was the most common cause of NCCP

  16. Chest CT findings in patients with non-cardiovascular causes of chest pain: Focusing on pulmonary tuberculosis in a tuberculosis endemic country

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Won; Shim, Sung Shine; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Ryu, Yon Ju [Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To review the common causes of non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) according to the location and lesion type as seen on chest CT, and to evaluate CT findings in tuberculosis (TB) as a cause of NCCP. In the period 2009 to 2012, patients having NCCP without definitive evidence of acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary thromboembolism, and aortic dissection, were included. In total, 162 patients (60.5% male; 39.5% female), with a mean age of 51 years, were enrolled. CT images were evaluated by location and lesion type, for causes of NCCP. Chest CT revealed that the most common location for the cause of NCCP was the pleura (45.1%), followed by the subpleural lung parenchyma (30.2%). The most common lesion causing NCCP was TB (33.3%), followed by pneumonia (19.1%). Of the 54 TB cases, 40 (74.1%) were stable TB and 14 (25.9%) were active TB; among these 54 patients, NCCP was most commonly the result of fibrotic pleural thickening (55.6%), followed by subpleural stable pulmonary TB (14.8%). Results of chest CT revealed that TB was a major cause of NCCP in a TB endemic area. Among the TB patients, fibrotic pleural thickening in patients with stable TB was the most common cause of NCCP.

  17. Lateral topography for reducing effective dose in low-dose chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Dong-Ho; Lim, Daekeon; Hwang, Wi-Sub; Park, Seong-Hoon; Jeong, Ok-man; Kang, Kyung Wook; Kang, Hohyung

    2013-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess radiation exposure during low-dose chest CT by using lateral topography and to compare the lateral topographic findings with findings obtained with anteroposterior topography alone and anteroposterior and lateral topography combined. From November 2011 to February 2012, 210 male subjects were enrolled in the study. Age, weight, and height of the men were recorded. All subjects were placed into one of three subgroups based on the type of topographic image obtained: anteroposterior topography, lateral topography, and both anteroposterior and lateral topography. Imaging was performed with a 128-MDCT scanner. CT, except for topography, was the same for all subjects. A radiologist analyzed each image, recorded scan length, checked for any insufficiencies in the FOV, and calculated the effective radiation dose. One-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons were used to compare the effective radiation exposure and scan length between groups. The mean scan length in the anteroposterior topography group was significantly greater than that of the lateral topography group and the combined anteroposterior and lateral topography group (p topography group (0.735 ± 0.033 mSv) was significantly lower than that for the anteroposterior topography group (0.763 ± 0.038 mSv) and the combined anteroposterior and lateral topography group (0.773 ± 0.038) (p < 0.001). Lateral topographic low-dose CT was associated with a lower effective radiation dose and scan length than either anteroposterior topographic low-dose chest CT or low-dose chest CT with both anteroposterior and lateral topograms.

  18. CT of the chest in the evaluation of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); MacDonald, Cathy; Gundogan, Munire; Manson, David [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Adatia, Ian [UCSF Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a rare disease in children. By definition it is a diagnosis of exclusion, and CT of the chest is primarily performed to exclude other causes. Previous studies have defined CT features suggestive of the diagnosis of IPAH, but these have all been limited to the adult population. Contrast-enhanced chest CT and high-resolution CT findings in IPAH were evaluated in an attempt to define features consistently seen in children with this condition. The chest CT scans performed at initial presentation were reviewed in 17 children with echocardiographic or angiographic evidence of IPAH. There were nine boys and eight girls, ranging in age from 1 month to 17 years. The extrapulmonary findings included cardiomegaly with right-sided cardiac enlargement, which was seen in 13 children. The central pulmonary arteries were enlarged in 15 children, with peripheral enlargement in two. In six children this resulted in bronchial compression. In addition, mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy was noted in three children. Prominent intrapulmonary features included a peripheral vasculopathy, with enlarged tortuous vessels, seen in eight children. Ill-defined ground-glass centrilobular opacities were also noted in eight children, representing the most common parenchymal abnormality. Other findings included septal lines in five, diffuse ground-glass opacification in four and focal hyperlucent zones in three. Mosaic attenuation was seen in one child. A variety of imaging findings are identified in IPAH. Features particularly consistent with the diagnosis include peripheral vasculopathy and centrilobular opacities in the setting of cardiomegaly and central pulmonary arterial enlargement. (orig.)

  19. CT of the chest in the evaluation of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz; MacDonald, Cathy; Gundogan, Munire; Manson, David; Adatia, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a rare disease in children. By definition it is a diagnosis of exclusion, and CT of the chest is primarily performed to exclude other causes. Previous studies have defined CT features suggestive of the diagnosis of IPAH, but these have all been limited to the adult population. Contrast-enhanced chest CT and high-resolution CT findings in IPAH were evaluated in an attempt to define features consistently seen in children with this condition. The chest CT scans performed at initial presentation were reviewed in 17 children with echocardiographic or angiographic evidence of IPAH. There were nine boys and eight girls, ranging in age from 1 month to 17 years. The extrapulmonary findings included cardiomegaly with right-sided cardiac enlargement, which was seen in 13 children. The central pulmonary arteries were enlarged in 15 children, with peripheral enlargement in two. In six children this resulted in bronchial compression. In addition, mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy was noted in three children. Prominent intrapulmonary features included a peripheral vasculopathy, with enlarged tortuous vessels, seen in eight children. Ill-defined ground-glass centrilobular opacities were also noted in eight children, representing the most common parenchymal abnormality. Other findings included septal lines in five, diffuse ground-glass opacification in four and focal hyperlucent zones in three. Mosaic attenuation was seen in one child. A variety of imaging findings are identified in IPAH. Features particularly consistent with the diagnosis include peripheral vasculopathy and centrilobular opacities in the setting of cardiomegaly and central pulmonary arterial enlargement. (orig.)

  20. Iterative metal artefact reduction (MAR) in postsurgical chest CT: comparison of three iMAR-algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aissa, Joel; Boos, Johannes; Sawicki, Lino Morris; Heinzler, Niklas; Krzymyk, Karl; Sedlmair, Martin; Kröpil, Patric; Antoch, Gerald; Thomas, Christoph

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of three novel iterative metal artefact (iMAR) algorithms on image quality and artefact degree in chest CT of patients with a variety of thoracic metallic implants. 27 postsurgical patients with thoracic implants who underwent clinical chest CT between March and May 2015 in clinical routine were retrospectively included. Images were retrospectively reconstructed with standard weighted filtered back projection (WFBP) and with three iMAR algorithms (iMAR-Algo1 = Cardiac algorithm, iMAR-Algo2 = Pacemaker algorithm and iMAR-Algo3 = ThoracicCoils algorithm). The subjective and objective image quality was assessed. Averaged over all artefacts, artefact degree was significantly lower for the iMAR-Algo1 (58.9 ± 48.5 HU), iMAR-Algo2 (52.7 ± 46.8 HU) and the iMAR-Algo3 (51.9 ± 46.1 HU) compared with WFBP (91.6 ± 81.6 HU, p algorithms, respectively. iMAR-Algo2 and iMAR-Algo3 reconstructions decreased mild and moderate artefacts compared with WFBP and iMAR-Algo1 (p algorithms led to a significant reduction of metal artefacts and increase in overall image quality compared with WFBP in chest CT of patients with metallic implants in subjective and objective analysis. The iMARAlgo2 and iMARAlgo3 were best for mild artefacts. IMARAlgo1 was superior for severe artefacts. Advances in knowledge: Iterative MAR led to significant artefact reduction and increase image-quality compared with WFBP in CT after implementation of thoracic devices. Adjusting iMAR-algorithms to patients' metallic implants can help to improve image quality in CT.

  1. Incremental Role of Mammography in the Evaluation of Gynecomastia in Men Who Have Undergone Chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenblick, Emily B; Salvatore, Mary; Szabo, Janet; Lee, Karen A; Margolies, Laurie R

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether additional breast imaging is clinically valuable in the evaluation of patients with gynecomastia incidentally observed on CT of the chest. In a retrospective analysis, 62 men were identified who had a mammographic diagnosis of gynecomastia and had also undergone CT within 8 months (median, 2 months). We compared the imaging findings of both modalities and correlated them with the clinical outcome. Gynecomastia was statistically significantly larger on mammograms than on CT images; however, there was a high level of concordance in morphologic features and distribution of gynecomastia between mammography and CT. In only one case was gynecomastia evident on mammographic but not CT images, owing to cachexia. Two of the 62 men had ductal carcinoma, which was obscured by gynecomastia. Both of these patients had symptoms suggesting malignancy. The appearance of gynecomastia on CT scans and mammograms was highly correlated. Mammography performed within 8 months of CT is unlikely to reveal cancer unless there is a suspicious clinical finding or a breast mass eccentric to the nipple. Men with clinical symptoms of gynecomastia do not need additional imaging with mammography to confirm the diagnosis if they have undergone recent cross-sectional imaging.

  2. The relationship between image quality and CT dose index of multi-slice low-dose chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xiaohua; Shao Jiang; Shi Jingyun; You Zhengqian; Li Shijun; Xue Yongming

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the rationality and possibility of multi-slice low-dose CT scan in the examination of the chest. Methods: (1) X-ray dose index measurement: 120 kV tube voltage, 0.75 s rotation, 8 mm and 3 mm slice thickness, and the tube current setting of 115.0, 40.0, 25.0, and 7.5 mAs were employed in every section. The X-ray radiation dose was measured and compared statistically. (2) phantom measurement of homogeneity and noise: The technical parameters were 120 kV, 0.75 s, 8 mm and 3 mm sections, and every slice was scanned using tube current of 115.0, 40.0, 25.0, and 7.5 mAs. Five same regions of interest were measured on every image. The homogeneity and noise level of CT were appraised. (3) The multi-slice low-dose CT in patients: 30 patients with mass and 30 with patch shadow in the lung were selected randomly. The technical parameters were 120 kV, 0.75 s, 8 mm and 3 mm slice thickness. 115.0, 40.0, 25.0, 15.0, and 7.5 mAs tube current were employed in each same slice. Otherwise, 15 cases with helical scan were examined using 190, 150, 40, 25, and 15 mAs tube current. The reconstruction images of MIP, MPR, CVR, HRCT, 3D, CT virtual endoscopy, and variety of interval reconstruction were compared. (4) Evaluation of image quality: CT images were evaluated by four doctors using single-blind method, and 3 degrees including normal image, image with few artifact, and image with excessive artifact, were employed and analyzed statistically. Results: (1) The CT dose index with 115.0 mAs tube current exceeded those of 40.0, 25.0, and 7.5 mAs by about 60%, 70%, and 85%, respectively. (2) The phantom measurement showed that the lower of CT dose the lower of homogeneity, the lower of CT dose the higher of noise level. (3) Result of image quality evaluation: The percentage of the normal image had no significant difference between 8 and 3 mm in 115, 40, and 25 mAs (P>0.05). Conclusion: Multi-slice low-dose chest CT technology may protect the patients and guarantee the

  3. Routine chest and abdominal high-pitch CT: An alternative low dose protocol with preserved image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amacker, Nadja A.; Mader, Caecilia; Alkadhi, Hatem; Leschka, Sebastian; Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the radiation dose and image quality of the high-pitch dual source computer tomography (DSCT) for routine chest and abdominal scans. Methods: 130 consecutive patients (62 female, 68 male, median age 55 years) were included. All patients underwent 128-slice high-pitch DSCT (chest n = 99; abdomen n = 84) at a pitch of 3.2. Two observers independently rated image quality using a 4-point score (1: excellent to 4: non-diagnostic). Image noise was measured and operational radiation dose quantities were recorded. An additional group of 132 patients (chest, n = 80; abdomen n = 52) scanned with standard-pitch CT matched for age, gender, and body mass index (BMI) served as control group. Results: Interobserver agreement for image quality rating was good (k = 0.74). Subjective image quality of high-pitch CT was diagnostic in all patients (median score chest; 2, median score abdomen: 2). Image noise of high-pitch CT was comparable to standard-pitch for the chest (p = 0.32) but increased in the abdomen (p < 0.0001). For high-pitch CT radiation dose was 4.4 ± 0.9 mSv (chest) and 6.5 ± 1.2 mSv (abdomen). These values were significantly lower compared to standard-pitch CT (chest: 5.5 ± 1.2 mSv; abdomen: 11.3 ± 3.8 mSv). Conclusion: Based on the technical background high-pitch dual source CT may serve as an alternative scan mode for low radiation dose routine chest and abdominal CT.

  4. Detection of pulmonary metastatic nodules: usefulness of low-dose multidetector CT in comparison with chest radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Nam; Lee, Ki Nam; Yang, Doo Kyung; Lee, Soo Keol

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of low-dose multidetector CT for the detection and follow-up of pulmonary metastatic nodules in patients suffering with malignancy. We retrospectively reviewed the conventional chest radiographs and low-dose multidetector CT (low-dose CT) scans of 81 patients who had been under the diagnosis of malignancy. We reviewed the detection of pulmonary nodules and we counted the number of nodules detected by each method. The nodules were confirmed by surgical operation and by the radiologic criteria. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of each method for detecting metastatic nodules were compared with χ 2 tests. Low-dose CT depicted more nodules than did chest radiograph, and the indeterminate nodules seen on chest radiograph may be clearly benign on low-dose CT (eg. calcified granulomas or bony lesions). The accuracy of low-dose CT (75.3%) was significantly higher than that of chest radiograph (49.4%) for the detection for metastatic nodules (ρ < 0.05). Low-dose CT may provide better information than does chest radiograph for diagnosing pulmonary metastasis

  5. The Danish Intensive Care Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Møller, Morten Hylander; Nielsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of this database is to improve the quality of care in Danish intensive care units (ICUs) by monitoring key domains of intensive care and to compare these with predefined standards. STUDY POPULATION: The Danish Intensive Care Database (DID) was established in 2007...... and standardized mortality ratios for death within 30 days after admission using case-mix adjustment (initially using age, sex, and comorbidity level, and, since 2013, using SAPS II) for all patients and for patients with septic shock. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The DID currently includes 335,564 ICU admissions during 2005...

  6. The oblique interface in the right cardiophrenic angle: chest radiographic-CT correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeung Sook; Lee, Kyung Soo; Choo, Sung Wook; Choo, In Wook

    1996-01-01

    An oblique interface in the right cardiophrenic angle, extending superomedially from right retrocardiac or supradiaphragmatic region inferolaterally to peridiaphragmatic region, is occasionally observed on posteroanterior chest radiograph. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of visualization of the interface on chest radiographs and to elucidate its nature on radiographic-CT correlation. Posteroanterior chest radiographs from 300 consecutive subjects were analyzed to evaluate the frequency and demographic data about an oblique interface in the right cardiophrenic angle. Thin-section CT scans(1-mm collimation and 5-mm intervals) were obtained from the subjects with positive interface on chest radiograph for assessment of the nature of the interface. The demographic data in the subjects with and without the interface were tested statistically to note any difference between two groups. Oblique interface in the right cardiophrenic angle was present in 29 subjects(9.7%) on chest radiograph. The age of the subjects with positive interface(13 men and 16 women) ranged from 19 to 70 years(mean±SD, 47±12.7 years) whereas the age of the subjects without the interface from 16 to 82 years (mean±SD, 50±9.1 years)(p>0.1). The body weight of the subjects with the interface ranged from 41 to 72 Kg(mean±SD, 60±8.0Kg) whereas the body weight of the subjects without the interface from 41 to 85Kg(mean±SD, 63±10.1Kg)(p>0.1). On CT scan, it was formed due to contact between the epipericardial fat and the right middle lobe of the lung in 27 subjects(93%) and between the inferior vena cava and the medial basal segment of the right lower lobe of the lung in two(7%). Oblique interface in the right cardiophrenic angle is occasionally visualized on chest radiograph. It is formed due to contact between the right middle lobe of the lung and pericardial fat in most cases. The frequency of visualization of the interface has no relationship to age and body weight of the

  7. Is visual assessment of thyroid attenuation on unenhanced CT of the chest useful for detecting hypothyroidism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldjian, P D; Chen, T

    2016-11-01

    To determine if visual assessment of the attenuation of morphologically normal appearing thyroid glands on unenhanced computed tomography (CT) of the chest is useful for identifying patients with decreased thyroid function. This was a retrospective study of 765 patients who underwent both unenhanced CT of the chest and thyroid function tests performed within 1 year of the CT examination. Attenuation of the thyroid gland was visually assessed in each patient relative to the attenuation of the surrounding muscles to categorise the gland as "low attenuation" (attenuation similar to surrounding muscles) or "high attenuation" (attenuation greater than surrounding muscles). Thyroid attenuation was quantitatively measured in each case to determine the validity of the visual assessment. Results of thyroid function tests were used to classify thyroid function as hypothyroid, euthyroid, or hyperthyroid. Data were analysed to determine the relationship between visual assessment of thyroid attenuation and status of thyroid function. Thyroid glands of low attenuation were present in 4.2% (32/765) of the patients. Nearly half (47%) of the patients with low-attenuation thyroids had hypofunctioning thyroid glands. Compared to patients with high-attenuation thyroids, patients with low-attenuation thyroids were significantly more likely to have decreased thyroid function (clinical and subclinical hypothyroidism) and significantly less likely to be euthyroid (p<0.0001). Quantitative measurement of thyroid attenuation confirmed the validity of the visual assessment. Low attenuation of an otherwise normal-appearing thyroid gland on unenhanced CT of the chest is strongly associated with decreased thyroid function. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mediastinal lymph node detection and station mapping on chest CT using spatial priors and random forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiamin; Hoffman, Joanne; Zhao, Jocelyn; Yao, Jianhua; Lu, Le; Kim, Lauren; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Summers, Ronald M., E-mail: rms@nih.gov [Imaging Biomarkers and Computer-aided Diagnosis Laboratory, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center Building, 10 Room 1C224 MSC 1182, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1182 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated system for mediastinal lymph node detection and station mapping for chest CT. Methods: The contextual organs, trachea, lungs, and spine are first automatically identified to locate the region of interest (ROI) (mediastinum). The authors employ shape features derived from Hessian analysis, local object scale, and circular transformation that are computed per voxel in the ROI. Eight more anatomical structures are simultaneously segmented by multiatlas label fusion. Spatial priors are defined as the relative multidimensional distance vectors corresponding to each structure. Intensity, shape, and spatial prior features are integrated and parsed by a random forest classifier for lymph node detection. The detected candidates are then segmented by the following curve evolution process. Texture features are computed on the segmented lymph nodes and a support vector machine committee is used for final classification. For lymph node station labeling, based on the segmentation results of the above anatomical structures, the textual definitions of mediastinal lymph node map according to the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer are converted into patient-specific color-coded CT image, where the lymph node station can be automatically assigned for each detected node. Results: The chest CT volumes from 70 patients with 316 enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes are used for validation. For lymph node detection, their system achieves 88% sensitivity at eight false positives per patient. For lymph node station labeling, 84.5% of lymph nodes are correctly assigned to their stations. Conclusions: Multiple-channel shape, intensity, and spatial prior features aggregated by a random forest classifier improve mediastinal lymph node detection on chest CT. Using the location information of segmented anatomic structures from the multiatlas formulation enables accurate identification of lymph node stations.

  9. Mediastinal lymph node detection and station mapping on chest CT using spatial priors and random forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jiamin; Hoffman, Joanne; Zhao, Jocelyn; Yao, Jianhua; Lu, Le; Kim, Lauren; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an automated system for mediastinal lymph node detection and station mapping for chest CT. Methods: The contextual organs, trachea, lungs, and spine are first automatically identified to locate the region of interest (ROI) (mediastinum). The authors employ shape features derived from Hessian analysis, local object scale, and circular transformation that are computed per voxel in the ROI. Eight more anatomical structures are simultaneously segmented by multiatlas label fusion. Spatial priors are defined as the relative multidimensional distance vectors corresponding to each structure. Intensity, shape, and spatial prior features are integrated and parsed by a random forest classifier for lymph node detection. The detected candidates are then segmented by the following curve evolution process. Texture features are computed on the segmented lymph nodes and a support vector machine committee is used for final classification. For lymph node station labeling, based on the segmentation results of the above anatomical structures, the textual definitions of mediastinal lymph node map according to the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer are converted into patient-specific color-coded CT image, where the lymph node station can be automatically assigned for each detected node. Results: The chest CT volumes from 70 patients with 316 enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes are used for validation. For lymph node detection, their system achieves 88% sensitivity at eight false positives per patient. For lymph node station labeling, 84.5% of lymph nodes are correctly assigned to their stations. Conclusions: Multiple-channel shape, intensity, and spatial prior features aggregated by a random forest classifier improve mediastinal lymph node detection on chest CT. Using the location information of segmented anatomic structures from the multiatlas formulation enables accurate identification of lymph node stations.

  10. Evaluation of automatic image quality assessment in chest CT - A human cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Caro; De Crop, An; De Roo, Bieke; Smeets, Peter; Vergauwen, Merel; Dewaele, Tom; Van Borsel, Mathias; Achten, Eric; Van Hoof, Tom; Bacher, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    The evaluation of clinical image quality (IQ) is important to optimize CT protocols and to keep patient doses as low as reasonably achievable. Considering the significant amount of effort needed for human observer studies, automatic IQ tools are a promising alternative. The purpose of this study was to evaluate automatic IQ assessment in chest CT using Thiel embalmed cadavers. Chest CT's of Thiel embalmed cadavers were acquired at different exposures. Clinical IQ was determined by performing a visual grading analysis. Physical-technical IQ (noise, contrast-to-noise and contrast-detail) was assessed in a Catphan phantom. Soft and sharp reconstructions were made with filtered back projection and two strengths of iterative reconstruction. In addition to the classical IQ metrics, an automatic algorithm was used to calculate image quality scores (IQs). To be able to compare datasets reconstructed with different kernels, the IQs values were normalized. Good correlations were found between IQs and the measured physical-technical image quality: noise (ρ=-1.00), contrast-to-noise (ρ=1.00) and contrast-detail (ρ=0.96). The correlation coefficients between IQs and the observed clinical image quality of soft and sharp reconstructions were 0.88 and 0.93, respectively. The automatic scoring algorithm is a promising tool for the evaluation of thoracic CT scans in daily clinical practice. It allows monitoring of the image quality of a chest protocol over time, without human intervention. Different reconstruction kernels can be compared after normalization of the IQs. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Interstitial shadow on chest CT is associated with the onset of interstitial lung disease caused by chemotherapeutic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niho, Seiji; Goto, Koichi; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Kim, Y.H.; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kubota, Kaoru; Saijo, Nagahiro; Nishiwaki, Yutaka

    2006-01-01

    Pretreatment computerized tomography (CT) films of the chest was studied to clarify the influence of interstitial shadow on developing interstitial lung disease (ILD). Eligible patients were those lung cancer patients who started to receive first-line chemotherapy between October 2001 and March 2004. Patients who received thoracic radiotherapy to the primary lesion, mediastinum, spinal or rib metastases were excluded. We reviewed pretreatment conventional CT and plain X-ray films of the chest. Ground-glass opacity, consolidation or reticular shadow without segmental distribution was defined as interstitial shadow, with this event being graded as mild, moderate or severe. If interstitial shadow was detected on CT films of the chest, but not via plain chest X-ray, it was graded as mild. Patients developing ILD were identified from medial records. A total of 502 patients were eligible. Mild, moderate and severe interstitial shadow was identified in 7, 8 and 5% of patients, respectively. A total of 188 patients (37%) received tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment, namely gefitinib or erlotinib. Twenty-six patients (5.2%) developed ILD either during or after chemotherapy. Multivariate analyses revealed that interstitial shadow on CT films of the chest and treatment history with TKI were associated with the onset of ILD. It is recommended that patients with interstitial shadow on chest CT are excluded from future clinical trials until this issue is further clarified, as it is anticipated that use of chemotherapeutic agents frequently mediate onset of ILD in this context. (author)

  12. Usefulness of 2D fusion of postmortem CT and antemortem chest radiography studies for human identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkawa, Norihiro; Hirai, Toshinori; Nishii, Ryuichi; Yukawa, Nobuhiro

    2017-06-01

    To determine the feasibility of human identification through the two-dimensional (2D) fusion of postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) and antemortem chest radiography. The study population consisted of 15 subjects who had undergone chest radiography studies more than 12 months before death. Fused images in which a chest radiograph was fused with a PMCT image were obtained for those subjects using a workstation, and the minimum distance gaps between corresponding anatomical landmarks (located at soft tissue and bone sites) in the images obtained with the two modalities were calculated. For each fused image, the mean of all these minimum distance gaps was recorded as the mean distance gap (MDG). For each subject, the MDG obtained for the same-subject fused image (i.e., where both of the images that were fused derived from that subject) was compared with the MDGs for different-subject fused images (i.e., where only one of the images that were fused derived from that subject; the other image derived from a different subject) in order to determine whether same-subject fused images can be reliably distinguished from different-subject fused images. The MDGs of the same-subject fused images were found to be significantly smaller than the MDGs of the different-subject fused images (p chest radiography and postmortem CT images may assist in human identification.

  13. AP diameter shows the strongest correlation with CTDI and DLP in abdominal and chest CT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zarb, Francis

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among cross-sectional diameters, weight and computed tomography (CT) dose descriptors (CTDI and DLP) to identify which is best used as a measure for the establishment of DRLs in CT. Data (gender, weight, cross-sectional diameters, dose descriptors) from 56 adult patients attending for either a CT examination of the abdomen or chest was obtained from two spiral CT units using automatic milliampere modulation. The AP diameter was demonstrated as the main contributing factor influencing the dose in CT (CTDI: r(2) = 0.269, p-value < or =0.001; DLP: r(2) = 0.260, p-value < or =0.001) since it has a greater correlation with radiation dose than body weight and can thus be its substitute in dose-reduction strategies and establishment of DRLs. The advantages of using the AP diameter are that it can easily be measured prior to scanning or retrospectively from previous CT images. However, further studies on the practicality of this approach are recommended.

  14. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yakun; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Given the radiation concerns inherent to the x-ray modalities, accurately estimating the radiation doses that patients receive during different imaging modalities is crucial. This study estimated organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices for the three clinical chest x-ray imaging techniques (chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT) using 59 anatomically variable voxelized phantoms and Monte Carlo simulation methods. Methods: A total of 59 computational anthropomorphic male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) adult phantoms were used in this study. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for a clinical radiography system with the capability of conducting chest radiography and tomosynthesis (Definium 8000, VolumeRAD, GE Healthcare) and a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). A Monte Carlo dose simulation program (PENELOPE, version 2006, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain) was used to mimic these two clinical systems. The Duke University (Durham, NC) technique charts were used to determine the clinical techniques for the radiographic modalities. An exponential relationship between CTDI vol and patient diameter was used to determine the absolute dose values for CT. The simulations of the two clinical systems compute organ and tissue doses, which were then used to calculate effective dose and risk index. The calculation of the two dose metrics used the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103 and BEIR VII report. Results: The average effective dose of the chest posteroanterior examination was found to be 0.04 mSv, which was 1.3% that of the chest CT examination. The average effective dose of the chest tomosynthesis examination was found to be about ten times that of the chest posteroanterior examination and about 12% that of the chest CT examination. With increasing patient average chest diameter, both the effective dose and risk index for CT increased considerably in an exponential fashion, while these two dose metrics

  15. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yakun [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Li, Xiang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Department of Physics, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (United States); Segars, W. Paul [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, and Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan, E-mail: samei@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Departments of Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Given the radiation concerns inherent to the x-ray modalities, accurately estimating the radiation doses that patients receive during different imaging modalities is crucial. This study estimated organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices for the three clinical chest x-ray imaging techniques (chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT) using 59 anatomically variable voxelized phantoms and Monte Carlo simulation methods. Methods: A total of 59 computational anthropomorphic male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) adult phantoms were used in this study. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for a clinical radiography system with the capability of conducting chest radiography and tomosynthesis (Definium 8000, VolumeRAD, GE Healthcare) and a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). A Monte Carlo dose simulation program (PENELOPE, version 2006, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain) was used to mimic these two clinical systems. The Duke University (Durham, NC) technique charts were used to determine the clinical techniques for the radiographic modalities. An exponential relationship between CTDI{sub vol} and patient diameter was used to determine the absolute dose values for CT. The simulations of the two clinical systems compute organ and tissue doses, which were then used to calculate effective dose and risk index. The calculation of the two dose metrics used the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103 and BEIR VII report. Results: The average effective dose of the chest posteroanterior examination was found to be 0.04 mSv, which was 1.3% that of the chest CT examination. The average effective dose of the chest tomosynthesis examination was found to be about ten times that of the chest posteroanterior examination and about 12% that of the chest CT examination. With increasing patient average chest diameter, both the effective dose and risk index for CT increased considerably in an exponential fashion, while these two dose

  16. Characterization of the relation between CT technical parameters and accuracy of quantification of lung attenuation on quantitative chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Brian M; Stolin, Alexander V; Williams, Mark B; Gay, Spencer B; Brody, Alan S; Altes, Talissa A

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the compromise between CT technical parameters and the accuracy of CT quantification of lung attenuation. Materials that simulate water (0 H), healthy lung (-650 H), borderline emphysematous lung (-820 H), and severely emphysematous lung (-1,000 H) were placed at both the base and the apex of the lung of an anthropomorphic phantom and outside the phantom. Transaxial CT images through the samples were obtained while the effective tube current was varied from 440 to 10 mAs, kilovoltage from 140 to 80 kVp, and slice thickness from 0.625 to 10 mm. Mean +/- SD attenuation within the samples and the standard quantitative chest CT measurements, the percentage of pixels with attenuation less than -910 H and 15th percentile of attenuation, were computed. Outside the phantom, variations in CT parameters produced less than 2.0% error in all measurements. Within the anthropomorphic phantom at 30 mAs, error in measurements was much larger, ranging from zero to 200%. Below approximately 80 mAs, mean attenuation became increasingly biased. The effects were most pronounced at the apex of the lungs. Mean attenuation of the borderline emphysematous sample of apex decreased 55 H as the tube current was decreased from 300 to 30 mAs. Both the 15th percentile of attenuation and percentage of pixels with less than -910 H attenuation were more sensitive to variations in effective tube current than was mean attenuation. For example, the -820 H sample should have 0% of pixels less than -910 H, which was true at 400 mA. At 30 mA in the lung apex, however, the measurement was highly inaccurate, 51% of pixels being below this value. Decreased kilovoltage and slice thickness had analogous, but lesser, effects. The accuracy of quantitative chest CT is determined by the CT acquisition parameters. There can be significant decreases in accuracy at less than 80 mAs for thin slices in an anthropomorphic phantom, the most pronounced effects occurring in the lung

  17. Cardiovascular disease prediction: do pulmonary disease-related chest CT features have added value?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jairam, Pushpa M.; Jong, Pim A. de; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Isgum, Ivana; Graaf, Yolanda van der

    2015-01-01

    Certain pulmonary diseases are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore we investigated the incremental predictive value of pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural features over cardiovascular imaging findings. A total of 10,410 patients underwent diagnostic chest CT for non-cardiovascular indications. Using a case-cohort approach, we visually graded CTs from the cases and from an approximately 10 % random sample of the baseline cohort (n = 1,203) for cardiovascular, pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural findings. The incremental value of pulmonary disease-related CT findings above cardiovascular imaging findings in cardiovascular event risk prediction was quantified by comparing discrimination and reclassification. During a mean follow-up of 3.7 years (max. 7.0 years), 1,148 CVD events (cases) were identified. Addition of pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural features to a cardiovascular imaging findings-based prediction model led to marginal improvement of discrimination (increase in c-index from 0.72 (95 % CI 0.71-0.74) to 0.74 (95 % CI 0.72-0.75)) and reclassification measures (net reclassification index 6.5 % (p < 0.01)). Pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural features have limited predictive value in the identification of subjects at high risk of CVD events beyond cardiovascular findings on diagnostic chest CT scans. (orig.)

  18. Cardiovascular disease prediction: do pulmonary disease-related chest CT features have added value?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jairam, Pushpa M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Jong, Pim A. de; Mali, Willem P.T.M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Isgum, Ivana [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Graaf, Yolanda van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Collaboration: PROVIDI study-group

    2015-06-01

    Certain pulmonary diseases are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore we investigated the incremental predictive value of pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural features over cardiovascular imaging findings. A total of 10,410 patients underwent diagnostic chest CT for non-cardiovascular indications. Using a case-cohort approach, we visually graded CTs from the cases and from an approximately 10 % random sample of the baseline cohort (n = 1,203) for cardiovascular, pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural findings. The incremental value of pulmonary disease-related CT findings above cardiovascular imaging findings in cardiovascular event risk prediction was quantified by comparing discrimination and reclassification. During a mean follow-up of 3.7 years (max. 7.0 years), 1,148 CVD events (cases) were identified. Addition of pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural features to a cardiovascular imaging findings-based prediction model led to marginal improvement of discrimination (increase in c-index from 0.72 (95 % CI 0.71-0.74) to 0.74 (95 % CI 0.72-0.75)) and reclassification measures (net reclassification index 6.5 % (p < 0.01)). Pulmonary, mediastinal and pleural features have limited predictive value in the identification of subjects at high risk of CVD events beyond cardiovascular findings on diagnostic chest CT scans. (orig.)

  19. A method for smoothing segmented lung boundary in chest CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Yeny; Hong, Helen

    2007-03-01

    To segment low density lung regions in chest CT images, most of methods use the difference in gray-level value of pixels. However, radiodense pulmonary vessels and pleural nodules that contact with the surrounding anatomy are often excluded from the segmentation result. To smooth lung boundary segmented by gray-level processing in chest CT images, we propose a new method using scan line search. Our method consists of three main steps. First, lung boundary is extracted by our automatic segmentation method. Second, segmented lung contour is smoothed in each axial CT slice. We propose a scan line search to track the points on lung contour and find rapidly changing curvature efficiently. Finally, to provide consistent appearance between lung contours in adjacent axial slices, 2D closing in coronal plane is applied within pre-defined subvolume. Our method has been applied for performance evaluation with the aspects of visual inspection, accuracy and processing time. The results of our method show that the smoothness of lung contour was considerably increased by compensating for pulmonary vessels and pleural nodules.

  20. Proton MRI in the evaluation of pulmonary sarcoidosis: Comparison to chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jonathan H.; Little, Brent P.; Forssen, Anna V.; Yong, Jin; Nambu, Atsushi; Kazlouski, Demitry; Puderbach, Michael; Biederer, Juergen; Lynch, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of proton MRI of the lung in sarcoidosis patients and the agreement between the imaging appearance of pulmonary sarcoidosis on MRI and CT. Materials and methods: Chest CT scans and dedicated pulmonary MRI scans (including HASTE, VIBE, and TrueFISP sequences) were performed within 90 days of each other in 29 patients. The scans were scored for gross parenchymal opacification, reticulation, nodules, and masses using a 3-point lobar scale. Total and subset scores for corresponding MRI and CT scans were compared using the Spearman correlation test, Bland–Altman plots, and Cohen's quadratic-weighted kappa analysis. MRI scores were compared to CT by lobe and disease category, using percentage agreement, Spearman rank correlation, and Cohen's quadratic-weighted kappa. Results: The mean (±s.d.) time between MRI and CT scans was 33 ± 32 days. There was substantial correlation and agreement between total disease scoring on MRI and CT with a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.774 (p < 0.0001) and a Cohen's weighted kappa score of 0.646. Correlation and agreement were highest for gross parenchymal opacification (0.695, 0.528) and reticulation (0.609, 0.445), and lowest in the setting of nodules (0.501, 0.305). Agreement testing was not performed for mass scores due to low prevalence. Upper lobe scoring on MRI and CT demonstrated greater agreement compared to the lower lobes (average difference in Cohen's weighted kappa score of 0.112). Conclusion: There is substantial correlation and agreement between MRI and CT in the scoring of pulmonary sarcoidosis, though MRI evaluation in the upper lobes may be more accurate than in the lower lobes

  1. Comparison between plain chest film and CT in estimating the size of pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seto, Yuichi

    1995-01-01

    Regarding the patients diagnosed as having traumatic and spontaneous pneumothorax at our emergency center within the past 6 years we examined the distribution of pneumothorax shown by plain chest film and CT, and compared the pneumothorax rate evaluated by Kircher's method with plain chest film and that by one slice method with CT, which was based on full slice integration method with CT. Occult pneumothorax was found in 47.6% of traumatic cases and 11.1% of spontaneous cases. The distribution of pneumothoraces showed no significant differences. However, as compared with classical pneumothorax, the ratio of pneumothoraces in the apicolateral recess in the occult pneumothoraces tended to be lower, whereas the ratio of the ones in the anteromedial recess and in the subpulmonic recess tended to be comparatively high. The plain chest film of occult pneumothorax had been taken on supine position in most cases of traumatic pneumothorax and in more than half the cases of spontaneous pneumothorax. This was considered to be the cause of the unique distribution of pneumothorax. The pneumothorax rate evaluated by Kircher's method tended to be underestimated in comparison with the basic rate, where the correlation coefficient was R=0.84 for traumatic pneumothorax and R=0.14 for spontaneous pneumothorax. Especially in the cases of low pneumothorax rate the correlation was poor. The pneumothorax rate calculated by one slice method produced better figures with the correlation coefficient of R=0.92 for traumatic pneumothorax and R=0.85 for spontaneous pneumothorax. The one slice method was considered to be effective in evaluation of the degree of serious cases, and also for the choice of treatment modality for pneumothorax. (author)

  2. Which Iodine concentration in chest CT? - A prospective study in 300 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehlenbruch, Georg [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Aachen (Germany); University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Behrendt, Florian F.; Eddahabi, Mohammed A.; Das, Marco; Guenther, Rolf W.; Mahnken, Andreas H. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Knackstedt, Christian [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Pulmonology and Angiology, Aachen (Germany); Stanzel, Sven [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Institute of Medical Statistics, Aachen (Germany); Seidensticker, Peter [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Wildberger, Joachim E. [University Hospital Maastricht, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2008-12-15

    In computed tomography(CT) several contrast media with different iodine concentrations are available. The aim of this study is to prospectively compare contrast media with iodine concentrations of 300, 370 and 400 mg iodine/ml for chest- CT. 300 consecutive patients were prospectively enrolled, under a waiver of the local ethics committee. The first (second, third) 100 patients, received contrast medium with 300(370, 400)mg iodine/ml. Injection protocols were adapted for an identical iodine delivery rate(1.3 mg/s) and total iodine load(33 g) for all three groups. Standardized MDCT of the chest (16 x 0.75 mm, 120 kVp, 100 mAseff.) was performed. Intravascular attenuation values were measured in the pulmonary trunk and the ascending aorta; subjective image quality was rated on a 3-point-scale. Discomfort during and after injection was evaluated. There were no statistically significant differences in contrast enhancement comparing the three contrast media at the pulmonary trunk(p = 0.3198) and at the ascending aorta(p = 0.0840). Image quality(p = 0.0176) and discomfort during injection(p = 0.7034) were comparable for all groups. General discomfort after injection of contrast media with 300 mg iodine/ml was statistically significant higher compared to 370 mg iodine/ml(p = 0.00019). Given identical iodine delivery rates of 1.3 g/s and iodine loads of 33 g, contrast media with concentrations of 300, 370 and 400 mg iodine/ml do not result in different intravascular enhancement in chest-CT. (orig.)

  3. Automated detection system for pulmonary emphysema on 3D chest CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Zhou, Xiangrong; Iwano, Shingo; Itoh, Shigeki; Fujita, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takeo

    2004-05-01

    An automatic extraction of pulmonary emphysema area on 3-D chest CT images was performed using an adaptive thresholding technique. We proposed a method to estimate the ratio of the emphysema area to the whole lung volume. We employed 32 cases (15 normal and 17 abnormal) which had been already diagnosed by radiologists prior to the study. The ratio in all the normal cases was less than 0.02, and in abnormal cases, it ranged from 0.01 to 0.26. The effectiveness of our approach was confirmed through the results of the present study.

  4. Clinical value of CARE dose 4D technique in decreasing CT scanning dose of adult chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Aiqin; Zheng Wenlong; Xu Chongyong; Fang Bidong; Ge Wen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of CARE Dose 4D technique in decreasing radiation dose and improving image quality of multi-slice spiral CT in adult chest scanning. Methods: 100 patients of chest CT scanning were equally divided into study group and control group randomly. CARE Dose 4D Technique was used in study group. Effective mAs value, volume CT dose index (CTDI vol ) and dose length product (DLP) were displayed automatically in machine while chest scanning; those values and actual mAs value of every image were recorded respectively. The image quality at apex of lung, lower edge of aorta arch, middle area of left atrium and base of lung on every image of 400 images was judged and classified as three level (excellent, good, poor) by two deputy chief physicians with double blind method, the image noise at corresponding parts was measured. Results: While setting 80 mAs for quality reference mAs, the effective mAs value in study group most decreased 44 mAs than control group with an average decrease of 9.60 (12.0%), CTDI vol with 4.75 mGy with an average decrease of 0.95 mCy (11.0%), DLP 99.50% in study group, with 98.0% in control group. But it was higher at apex of lung and base of lung, lower at middle area of left atrium, and similar at lower edge of aorta arch in study group than contrast group. The image noise were lower at apex of lung and base of lung in study group than control group (t =6.299 and 2.332, all P<0.05), higher at middle area of left atrium in study group than control group (t=3.078, P<0.05) and similar at lower edge of aorta arch in study group than control group (t=1.191, P>0.05). Conclusions: CARE Dose 4D technique provides a function regulated mAs real-time on line, it not only raises utilization rate of radiation and decreases radiation dose, but also promises and increases image quality in chest CT scanning, and has some clinical significance. (authors)

  5. Significance of chest CT for localization of lung cancer detected by sputum cytology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Naoto; Shibuya, Hiroko

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses the method of localization of cancer detected by sputum cytology. Of the malignancies detected by sputum cytology, about 40% consisted of cancers in upper respiratory tract and lung cancers located peripherally beyond the range of optimal bronchoscopic visibility. Thus, in cases with positive sputum cytology, the otorhinolaryngeal examination and chest CT are necessary. And, it is often difficult to localize cancers by bronchofiberscopy and these examinations, so careful follow-up is necessary in cases, in which localization is not confirmed. (author)

  6. Chest computed tomography-based scoring of thoracic sarcoidosis: Inter-rater reliability of CT abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuvel, D.A.V. den; Es, H.W. van; Heesewijk, J.P. van; Spee, M. [St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, Department of Radiology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Jong, P.A. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Zanen, P.; Grutters, J.C. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Division Heart and Lungs, Utrecht (Netherlands); St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, Center of Interstitial Lung Diseases, Department of Pulmonology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2015-09-15

    To determine inter-rater reliability of sarcoidosis-related computed tomography (CT) findings that can be used for scoring of thoracic sarcoidosis. CT images of 51 patients with sarcoidosis were scored by five chest radiologists for various abnormal CT findings (22 in total) encountered in thoracic sarcoidosis. Using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis, inter-rater reliability was analysed and reported according to the Guidelines for Reporting Reliability and Agreement Studies (GRRAS) criteria. A pre-specified sub-analysis was performed to investigate the effect of training. Scoring was trained in a distinct set of 15 scans in which all abnormal CT findings were represented. Median age of the 51 patients (36 men, 70 %) was 43 years (range 26 - 64 years). All radiographic stages were present in this group. ICC ranged from 0.91 for honeycombing to 0.11 for nodular margin (sharp versus ill-defined). The ICC was above 0.60 in 13 of the 22 abnormal findings. Sub-analysis for the best-trained observers demonstrated an ICC improvement for all abnormal findings and values above 0.60 for 16 of the 22 abnormalities. In our cohort, reliability between raters was acceptable for 16 thoracic sarcoidosis-related abnormal CT findings. (orig.)

  7. Chest computed tomography-based scoring of thoracic sarcoidosis: Inter-rater reliability of CT abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuvel, D.A.V. den; Es, H.W. van; Heesewijk, J.P. van; Spee, M.; Jong, P.A. de; Zanen, P.; Grutters, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    To determine inter-rater reliability of sarcoidosis-related computed tomography (CT) findings that can be used for scoring of thoracic sarcoidosis. CT images of 51 patients with sarcoidosis were scored by five chest radiologists for various abnormal CT findings (22 in total) encountered in thoracic sarcoidosis. Using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis, inter-rater reliability was analysed and reported according to the Guidelines for Reporting Reliability and Agreement Studies (GRRAS) criteria. A pre-specified sub-analysis was performed to investigate the effect of training. Scoring was trained in a distinct set of 15 scans in which all abnormal CT findings were represented. Median age of the 51 patients (36 men, 70 %) was 43 years (range 26 - 64 years). All radiographic stages were present in this group. ICC ranged from 0.91 for honeycombing to 0.11 for nodular margin (sharp versus ill-defined). The ICC was above 0.60 in 13 of the 22 abnormal findings. Sub-analysis for the best-trained observers demonstrated an ICC improvement for all abnormal findings and values above 0.60 for 16 of the 22 abnormalities. In our cohort, reliability between raters was acceptable for 16 thoracic sarcoidosis-related abnormal CT findings. (orig.)

  8. Pneumothorax in intensive-care patients: Ranking of tangential views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantsch, H.; Winkler, M.; Pichler, W.; Mauritz, W.; Lechner, G.; Vienna Univ.

    1990-01-01

    In 55 intensive-care patients an additional tangential view of the chest was taken to demonstrate or exclude a pneumothorax in patients with sudden deterioration of gas exchange and negative ap-chest x-ray, if there was a suspicion of pneumothorax or a confirmed small pneumothorax in the ap-view. In 14 of 42 cases (33.3%) with negative or suspected ap-chest x-ray the tangential view revealed a pneumothorax. 6 of these 14 pneumothoraces were under tension. In 7 out of 11 patients (63.6%) with small pneumothorax, the tangential view showed additionally a tensionpneumothorax. (orig.) [de

  9. Focal breast lesions in clinical CT examinations of the chest. A retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, Kathrin Barbara; Houbois, Christian; Grinstein, Olga; Borggrefe, Jan; Puesken, Michael; Maintz, David; Hanstein, Bettina; Malter, Wolfram; Hellmich, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Based on radiological reports, the percentage of breast cancers visualized as incidental findings in routine CT examinations is estimated at ≤2%. In view of the rising number of CT examinations and the high prevalence of breast cancer, it was the goal of the present study to verify the frequency and image morphology of false-negative senological CT findings. All first contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest in adult female patients carried out in 2012 were retrospectively included. A senior radiologist systematically assessed the presence of breast lesions on all CT images using the BI-RADS system. All BI-RADS ≥3 notations were evaluated by a second senior radiologist. A consensus was obtained in case of differing BI-RADS assessments. Reference diagnoses were elaborated based on all available clinical, radiological and pathological data. The findings of the CT reports were classified according to the BI-RADS system and were compared with the retrospective consensus findings as well as with the reference diagnoses. The range of indications comprised a broad spectrum including staging and follow-up examinations of solid tumors/lymphoma (N = 701, 59.9 %) and vascular (190, 16.2 %), inflammatory (48, 4.1 %) and pulmonologic (22, 1.9 %) issues. BI-RADS 1/2 classifications were present in 92.5 % and BI-RADS 6 classifications were assessed in 1.7 % of the 1170 included examinations. 68 patients (5.8 %) had at least one lesion retrospectively classified as BI-RADS 3 - 5. The histological potential was known in 57 of these lesions as benign (46, 3.9 %) or malignant (11, 0.9 %). 13 BI-RADS 4/5 consensus assessments (1.1 %) were false-positive. 2 of the 10 lesions classified as being malignant based on the further clinical and radiological course were not mentioned in the written CT reports (0.2 %). Both false-negative CT reports were therapeutically and prognostically irrelevant. The relative frequency of BI-RADS 3 - 5 findings was 5.8 %. It reflects the situation

  10. Interactive lung segmentation in abnormal human and animal chest CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kockelkorn, Thessa T. J. P.; Viergever, Max A.; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M.; Bozovic, Gracijela; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate; Rikxoort, Eva M. van; Brown, Matthew S.; Jong, Pim A. de; Ginneken, Bram van

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Many medical image analysis systems require segmentation of the structures of interest as a first step. For scans with gross pathology, automatic segmentation methods may fail. The authors’ aim is to develop a versatile, fast, and reliable interactive system to segment anatomical structures. In this study, this system was used for segmenting lungs in challenging thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods: In volumetric thoracic CT scans, the chest is segmented and divided into 3D volumes of interest (VOIs), containing voxels with similar densities. These VOIs are automatically labeled as either lung tissue or nonlung tissue. The automatic labeling results can be corrected using an interactive or a supervised interactive approach. When using the supervised interactive system, the user is shown the classification results per slice, whereupon he/she can adjust incorrect labels. The system is retrained continuously, taking the corrections and approvals of the user into account. In this way, the system learns to make a better distinction between lung tissue and nonlung tissue. When using the interactive framework without supervised learning, the user corrects all incorrectly labeled VOIs manually. Both interactive segmentation tools were tested on 32 volumetric CT scans of pigs, mice and humans, containing pulmonary abnormalities. Results: On average, supervised interactive lung segmentation took under 9 min of user interaction. Algorithm computing time was 2 min on average, but can easily be reduced. On average, 2.0% of all VOIs in a scan had to be relabeled. Lung segmentation using the interactive segmentation method took on average 13 min and involved relabeling 3.0% of all VOIs on average. The resulting segmentations correspond well to manual delineations of eight axial slices per scan, with an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.933. Conclusions: The authors have developed two fast and reliable methods for interactive lung segmentation in

  11. Evaluation of variation of voltage (kV) absorbed dose in chest CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, Bruna G.A.; Mourao, Arnaldo P.

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most important diagnostic techniques images today. The increasing utilization of CT implies a significant increase of population exposure to ionizing radiation. Optimization of practice aims to reduce doses to patients because the image quality is directly related to the diagnosis. You can decrease the amount of dose to the patient, and maintain the quality of the image. There are several parameters that can be manipulated in a CT scan and these parameters can be used to reduce the energy deposited in the patient. Based on this, we analyzed the variation of dose deposited in the lungs, breasts and thyroid, by varying the supply voltage of the tube. Scans of the thorax were performed following the protocol of routine chest with constant and variable current for the same applied voltage. Moreover, a female phantom was used and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100), model bat, were used to record the specific organ doses. Scans were performed on a GE CT scanner, model 64 Discovery channels. Higher doses were recorded for the voltage of 120 kV with 200 mAs in the lungs (22.46 mGy) and thyroid (32.22 mGy). For scans with automatic mAs, variable between 100 and 440, this same tension contributed to the higher doses. The best examination in terms of the dose that was used with automatic 80 kV mAs, whose lungs and thyroid received lower dose. For the best breast exam was 100 kV. Since the increase in the 80 kV to 100 kV no impact so much the dose deposited in the lungs, it can be concluded that lowering the applied voltage to 100 kV resulted in a reduction in the dose absorbed by the patient. These results can contribute to optimizing scans of the chest computed tomography

  12. Radiologic assessment in the pediatric intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowitz, R.I.

    1984-01-01

    The severely ill infant or child who requires admission to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) often presents with a complex set of problems necessitating multiple and frequent management decisions. Diagnostic imaging plays an important role, not only in the initial assessment of the patient's condition and establishing a diagnosis, but also in monitoring the patient's progress and the effects of interventional therapeutic measures. Bedside studies obtained using portable equipment are often limited but can provide much useful information when a careful and detailed approach is utilized in producing the radiograph and interpreting the examination. This article reviews some of the basic principles of radiographic interpretation and details some of the diagnostic points which, when promptly recognized, can lead to a better understanding of the patient's condition and thus to improved patient care and management. While chest radiography is stressed, studies of other regions including the upper airway, abdomen, skull, and extremities are discussed. A brief consideration of the expanding role of new modality imaging (i.e., ultrasound, CT) is also included. Multiple illustrative examples of common and uncommon problems are shown

  13. Radiation dose levels in pediatric chest CT: experience in 499 children evaluated with dual-source single-energy CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martine, Remy-Jardin; Colas, Lucie; Jean-Baptiste, Faivre; Remy, Jacques [CHU Lille (EA 2694) University of Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Santangelo, Teresa [CHU Lille (EA 2694) University of Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, Department of Imaging, Rome (Italy); Duhamel, Alain [University of Lille (EA 2694), Department of Biostatistics, CHU Lille, Lille (France); Deschildre, Antoine [CHU Lille - University of Lille, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Lille (France)

    2017-02-15

    The availability of dual-source technology has introduced the possibility of scanning children at lower kVp with a high-pitch mode, combining high-speed data acquisition and high temporal resolution. To establish the radiation dose levels of dual-source, single-energy chest CT examinations in children. We retrospectively recorded the dose-length product (DLP) of 499 consecutive examinations obtained in children <50 kg, divided into five weight groups: group 1 (<10 kg, n = 129); group 2 (10-20 kg, n = 176); group 3 (20-30 kg, n = 99), group 4 (30-40 kg, n = 58) and group 5 (40-49 kg, n = 37). All CT examinations were performed with high temporal resolution (75 ms), a high-pitch mode and a weight-adapted selection of the milliamperage. CT examinations were obtained at 80 kVp with a milliamperage ranging between 40 mAs and 90 mAs, and a pitch of 2.0 (n = 162; 32.5%) or 3.0 (n = 337; 67.5%). The mean duration of data acquisition was 522.8 ± 192.0 ms (interquartile range 390 to 610; median 490). In the study population, the mean CT dose index volume (CTDIvol{sub 32}) was 0.83 mGy (standard deviation [SD] 0.20 mGy; interquartile range 0.72 to 0.94; median 0.78); the mean DLP{sub 32} was 21.4 mGy.cm (SD 9.1 mGy.cm; interquartile range 15 to 25; median 19.0); and the mean size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) was 1.7 mGy (SD 0.4 mGy; interquartile range 1.5 to 1.9; median 1.7). The DLP{sub 32}, CTDI{sub vol32} and SSDE were found to be statistically significant in the five weight categories (P < 0.0001). This study establishes the radiation dose levels for dual-source, single-kVp chest CT from a single center. In the five weight categories, the median values varied 15-37 mGy.cm for the DLP{sub 32}, 0.78-1.25 mGy for the CTDI{sub vol32} and 1.6-2.1 mGy for the SSDE. (orig.)

  14. Radiation dose levels in pediatric chest CT: experience in 499 children evaluated with dual-source single-energy CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martine, Remy-Jardin; Colas, Lucie; Jean-Baptiste, Faivre; Remy, Jacques; Santangelo, Teresa; Duhamel, Alain; Deschildre, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    The availability of dual-source technology has introduced the possibility of scanning children at lower kVp with a high-pitch mode, combining high-speed data acquisition and high temporal resolution. To establish the radiation dose levels of dual-source, single-energy chest CT examinations in children. We retrospectively recorded the dose-length product (DLP) of 499 consecutive examinations obtained in children <50 kg, divided into five weight groups: group 1 (<10 kg, n = 129); group 2 (10-20 kg, n = 176); group 3 (20-30 kg, n = 99), group 4 (30-40 kg, n = 58) and group 5 (40-49 kg, n = 37). All CT examinations were performed with high temporal resolution (75 ms), a high-pitch mode and a weight-adapted selection of the milliamperage. CT examinations were obtained at 80 kVp with a milliamperage ranging between 40 mAs and 90 mAs, and a pitch of 2.0 (n = 162; 32.5%) or 3.0 (n = 337; 67.5%). The mean duration of data acquisition was 522.8 ± 192.0 ms (interquartile range 390 to 610; median 490). In the study population, the mean CT dose index volume (CTDIvol 32 ) was 0.83 mGy (standard deviation [SD] 0.20 mGy; interquartile range 0.72 to 0.94; median 0.78); the mean DLP 32 was 21.4 mGy.cm (SD 9.1 mGy.cm; interquartile range 15 to 25; median 19.0); and the mean size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) was 1.7 mGy (SD 0.4 mGy; interquartile range 1.5 to 1.9; median 1.7). The DLP 32 , CTDI vol32 and SSDE were found to be statistically significant in the five weight categories (P < 0.0001). This study establishes the radiation dose levels for dual-source, single-kVp chest CT from a single center. In the five weight categories, the median values varied 15-37 mGy.cm for the DLP 32 , 0.78-1.25 mGy for the CTDI vol32 and 1.6-2.1 mGy for the SSDE. (orig.)

  15. The Danish Intensive Care Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiansen CF

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Christian Fynbo Christiansen,1 Morten Hylander Møller,2 Henrik Nielsen,1 Steffen Christensen3 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 2Department of Intensive Care 4131, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, 3Department of Intensive Care, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Aim of database: The aim of this database is to improve the quality of care in Danish intensive care units (ICUs by monitoring key domains of intensive care and to compare these with predefined standards. Study population: The Danish Intensive Care Database (DID was established in 2007 and includes virtually all ICU admissions in Denmark since 2005. The DID obtains data from the Danish National Registry of Patients, with complete follow-up through the Danish Civil Registration System. Main variables: For each ICU admission, the DID includes data on the date and time of ICU admission, type of admission, organ supportive treatments, date and time of discharge, status at discharge, and mortality up to 90 days after admission. Descriptive variables include age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index score, and, since 2010, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS II. The variables are recorded with 90%–100% completeness in the recent years, except for SAPS II score, which is 73%–76% complete. The DID currently includes five quality indicators. Process indicators include out-of-hour discharge and transfer to other ICUs for capacity reasons. Outcome indicators include ICU readmission within 48 hours and standardized mortality ratios for death within 30 days after admission using case-mix adjustment (initially using age, sex, and comorbidity level, and, since 2013, using SAPS II for all patients and for patients with septic shock. Descriptive data: The DID currently includes 335,564 ICU admissions during 2005–2015 (average 31,958 ICU admissions per year. Conclusion: The DID provides a

  16. Chest CT findings in patients with dysphagia and aspiration: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheeren, Betina; Hochhegger, Bruno; Gomes, Erissandra; Alves, Giordano; Marchiori, Edson

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to characterize chest CT findings in patients with dysphagia and pulmonary aspiration, identifying the characteristics and the methods used. The studies were selected from among those indexed in the Brazilian Virtual Library of Health, LILACS, Indice Bibliografico Espanol de Ciencias de la Salud, Medline, Cochrane Library, SciELO, and PubMed databases. The search was carried out between June and July of 2016. Five articles were included and reviewed, all of them carried out in the last five years, published in English, and coming from different countries. The sample size in the selected studies ranged from 43 to 56 patients, with a predominance of adult and elderly subjects. The tomographic findings in patients with dysphagia-related aspiration were varied, including bronchiectasis, bronchial wall thickening, pulmonary nodules, consolidations, pleural effusion, ground-glass attenuation, atelectasis, septal thickening, fibrosis, and air trapping. Evidence suggests that chest CT findings in patients with aspiration are diverse. In this review, it was not possible to establish a consensus that could characterize a pattern of pulmonary aspiration in patients with dysphagia, further studies of the topic being needed. (author)

  17. Evaluation of the efficiency of bismuth breast shield in CT chest paediatric examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevillano, D.; Espana, M. L.; Castro, P.; Minguez, C.; Albi, G.; Garcia, E.; Lopez Franco, P.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of bismuth breast shield in CT chest paediatric examinations when automatic exposure control techniques are used. The influence in the radiation dose and the image quality has been evaluated with and without the breast shield in the scoutview. In addition the radiation dose in shielded and non-shielded areas has been compared. Measurements were made in a 16 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA phantom simulating a newborn, and older children were simulated controlling the maximum intensities allowed by the automatic exposure control system AutomA. The highest dose reduction (59%) was obtained with AutomA system and when the breast shield is not used in the scoutview. This reduction in the radiation dose does not mean a significant increase of noise level. The use of the breast shield in the scoutview yielded an increase in the radiation dose in non-shielded areas. The use of bismuth breast shield is recommended only after the scoutview in order to optimise the radiation dose in CT chest paediatric examination when using automatic exposure control AutomA. (Author)

  18. Chest CT findings in patients with dysphagia and aspiration: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheeren, Betina; Hochhegger, Bruno, E-mail: betinascheeren@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), RS (Brazil); Gomes, Erissandra [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre (Brazil); Alves, Giordano; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-15

    The objective of this systematic review was to characterize chest CT findings in patients with dysphagia and pulmonary aspiration, identifying the characteristics and the methods used. The studies were selected from among those indexed in the Brazilian Virtual Library of Health, LILACS, Indice Bibliografico Espanol de Ciencias de la Salud, Medline, Cochrane Library, SciELO, and PubMed databases. The search was carried out between June and July of 2016. Five articles were included and reviewed, all of them carried out in the last five years, published in English, and coming from different countries. The sample size in the selected studies ranged from 43 to 56 patients, with a predominance of adult and elderly subjects. The tomographic findings in patients with dysphagia-related aspiration were varied, including bronchiectasis, bronchial wall thickening, pulmonary nodules, consolidations, pleural effusion, ground-glass attenuation, atelectasis, septal thickening, fibrosis, and air trapping. Evidence suggests that chest CT findings in patients with aspiration are diverse. In this review, it was not possible to establish a consensus that could characterize a pattern of pulmonary aspiration in patients with dysphagia, further studies of the topic being needed. (author)

  19. Three-dimensional automatic computer-aided evaluation of pleural effusions on chest CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Mark; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2011-03-01

    The ability to estimate the volume of pleural effusions is desirable as it can provide information about the severity of the condition and the need for thoracentesis. We present here an improved version of an automated program to measure the volume of pleural effusions using regular chest CT images. First, the lungs are segmented using region growing, mathematical morphology, and anatomical knowledge. The visceral and parietal layers of the pleura are then extracted based on anatomical landmarks, curve fitting and active contour models. The liver and compressed tissues are segmented out using thresholding. The pleural space is then fitted to a Bezier surface which is subsequently projected onto the individual two-dimensional slices. Finally, the volume of the pleural effusion is quantified. Our method was tested on 15 chest CT studies and validated against three separate manual tracings. The Dice coefficients were 0.74+/-0.07, 0.74+/-0.08, and 0.75+/-0.07 respectively, comparable to the variation between two different manual tracings.

  20. An Evaluation of pectus excavatum by means of body surface measurements on chest CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotani, Taichi; Ohama, Kazunori; Shimotake, Takashi; Ishikawa, Nobuki; Watanabe, Reiji

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether the body surface index replaces the Haller index in order to evaluate the severity of pectus excavatum. Sixty-nine cases with a diagnosis of pectus excavatum between August 2001 and January 2008 were prospectively enrolled in the study. The anterior-posterior chest dimension, lateral chest dimension and depth of the most profound depressed area were measured. The body surface index was expressed as an equation A/(B-C), where A was the transverse diameter, B was the anterior-posterior diameter and C was the depth of the depressed area. This index was compared to the Haller index in each patient. In this study, each value was measured on a chest CT scan. The body surface index significantly correlated with the Haller index, in which the coefficient of correlation was 0.879 (p<0.01). The body surface index corresponding to Haller index 3.25 seems to be 1.67. We could find the body surface index corresponding to each Haller index. We propose that an evaluation of pectus excavatum by means of body surface measurements is clinically useful, and may replace the Haller index. The body surface index may allow us to assess the severity of pectus excavatum without a CT scan, resulting in a reduction of radiation exposure for children with pectus excavatum. It's possible to evaluate the body surface index by using a relational table between this index and the Hailer index. We'll evaluate the body surface index by using values measured on a real body. (author)

  1. Alternative diagnoses based on CT angiography of the chest in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Eleci Vaz; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Seligman, Renato; Knorst, Marli Maria, E-mail: mknorst@gmail.com [Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Guerra, Vinicius Andre [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Pneumologicas; Sarmento, Muriel Bossle; Guazzelli, Pedro Arends; Hoffmeister, Mariana Costa [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-01-15

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of alternative diagnoses based on chest CT angiography (CTA) in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) who tested negative for PTE, as well as whether those alternative diagnoses had been considered prior to the CTA. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, retrospective study involving 191 adult patients undergoing CTA for suspected PTE between September of 2009 and May of 2012. Chest X-rays and CTAs were reviewed to determine whether the findings suggested an alternative diagnosis in the cases not diagnosed as PTE. Data on symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, length of hospital stay, and mortality were collected. Results: On the basis of the CTA findings, PTE was diagnosed in 47 cases (24.6%). Among the 144 patients not diagnosed with PTE via CTA, the findings were abnormal in 120 (83.3%). Such findings were consistent with an alternative diagnosis that explained the symptoms in 75 patients (39.3%). Among those 75 cases, there were only 39 (20.4%) in which the same alterations had not been previously detected on chest X-rays. The most common alternative diagnosis, made solely on the basis of the CTA findings, was pneumonia (identified in 20 cases). Symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, and the in-hospital mortality rate did not differ significantly between the patients with and without PTE. However, the median hospital stay was significantly longer in the patients with PTE than in those without (18.0 and 9.5 days, respectively; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Our results indicate that chest CTA is useful in cases of suspected PTE, because it can confirm the diagnosis and reveal findings consistent with an alternative diagnosis in a significant number of patients. (author)

  2. Usefulness of preoperative chest multidetector CT for evaluation of breast cancer: comparison with breast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yun Woo; Kim, Dong Hun; Lee, Min Hyuk

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of chest multidetector-row helical computed tomography (MDCT) in detecting breast cancer in preoperative metastasis work-ups and to assess the accuracy of MDCT compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MDCT were performed on 69 consecutive patients with 94 lesions of histologically proven breast cancer. Retrospectively, two radiologists performed a blind review of the MDCT images for margin, shape, mass enhancement pattern and the enhancing distribution of non-mass lesions with consensus. CT attenuation values were measured in the average HU on pre-enhancing and enhanced CT in gland, fat, muscle, and in masses with the largest region of interest (ROI). MDCT finding were analyzed and compared with breast MRI. Of the 91 breast lesions detected on MDCT, 64 were mass lesions and 24 were non-mass lesions on enhancement, 86 lesions were malignant and 5 were benign. Three pathologically proven malignant masses were not detected on MDCT. Positive predictive value, false positive rate and false negative rate were 94.5%, 5.3%, 3.2% respectively. The highly predictive features for malignancy were a spiculated or irregular margin, an irregular of round shape, and a heterogeneously or rim enhanced mass. Another highly predictive feature for malignancy was linear or segmentally distributed enhancing non-mass lesions. The CT values of masses in pre-enhanced scans were 38.6 ± 7.9 HU; these values increased to 110.9 ± 26.6 HU after contrast injection (90 sec). The attenuation values from enhancing CT of malignant lesions were significantly higher than those of non-enhancing lesions. The depiction of enhancing masses on MDCT compared with MR imaging were 88.6%. The extension of malignancy were equally well correlated MDCT with MR imaging. The diagnostic value of chest MDCT for preoperative staging is comparable with MR imaging for the detection and extension of lesions. Therefore, chest MDCT of breast cancer can add to the information obtained from

  3. TRIAGE OF PATIENTS TO ANGIOGRAPHY FOR DETECTION OF AORTIC RUPTURE AFTER BLUNT CHEST TRAUMA - COST-EFFECTIVENESS ANALYSIS OF USING CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HUNINK, MGM; BOS, JJ

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of dynamic chest CT, compared with plain chest radiography and immediate angiography, in deciding when angiography should be performed in hemodynamically stable patients with suspected aortic rupture after blunt chest

  4. Multidetector CT of blunt traumatic venous injuries in the chest, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly, Brian P; Steenburg, Scott D

    2011-01-01

    Venous injuries as a result of blunt trauma are rare. Even though current protocols for multidetector computed tomography (CT) of patients with trauma are designed to evaluate primarily the solid organs and arteries, blunt venous injuries may nevertheless be identified, or at least suspected, on the basis of the multidetector CT findings. Venous injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Diagnosis of a possible venous injury is crucial because the physical findings of a venous injury are nonspecific and may be absent. This article aims to make the radiologist aware of various venous injuries caused by blunt trauma and to provide helpful hints to aid in the identification of venous injuries. Multidetector CT technology, in combination with interactive manipulation of the raw dataset, can be useful in the creation of multiplanar reconstructed images and in the identification of a venous injury caused by blunt trauma. Familiarity with direct and indirect signs of venous injuries, as well as with examples of blunt traumatic venous injuries in the chest, abdomen, and pelvis, will help in the diagnosis of these injuries.

  5. Consequence of Mycobacterium avium complex pulmonary disease judging from the change of the chest CT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kiyohiro

    2008-01-01

    The long term consequence of the disease in Mycobacterium avium complex pulmonary disease (MACPD) is scarcely reported. This paper describes consequences of CT images and clinical symptoms in MACPD patients with rather poorer prognosis than usual during chemotherapy for one or more years in authors' hospital until May 2007. Subjects are 17 patients (average age 65.3 y, M 6/F 11) diagnosed as MACPD by the criteria by Jap. Soc. Tuberculosis (2003), whose follow up period is 14-105 (av. 58.1) months, and are classified in tuberculoid type (tt, 2 cases), bronchiectasis post surgery (2) and bronchia type (bt, 13, mostly primary MACPD). Chemotherapy is done with clarithromycin (CAM)+ethambutol (EB)+rifampicin (RHP) (+streptomycin (SM) for progression). Consequences of typical chest CT images are presented for each classification in this paper. Cavitation is seen even in bt as well as in tt and, if observed, the disease tends to deteriorate. In the secondary MACPD post surgery, the exacerbation of clinical symptom is often more severe despite slow changes in CT finding than in bt. Thus, careful follow up is necessary for the two cases above. (R.T.)

  6. CT evaluation of pulmonary parenchymal injury due to blunt chest trauma and its clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimi, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    The CT findings of pulmonary parenchymal injury due to blunt chest trauma in 73 patients and their clinical significance were analyzed. CT was obtained within 6 hours after trauma. Findings were analyzed according to the number of injured segments and severity which was classified into three grades. A correlation was also made with arterial blood PaO 2 and thoracic complications. Pulmonary parenchymal injury was identified in multisegmental portions bilaterally in most cases. It was most frequently observed in the posterior portion of the lung such as segment 6. More than 50% of lesions were classified as Grade 1. Pulmonary laceration, defined as patchy density with the cavitary lesion (Grade 3), was noted in 9.2%. There was a good correlation between extent of pulmonary injury and degree of hypoxia. The correlation of pneumothorax was also found with extensive lesion and frequency of Grade 3 lesion. Cases with pulmonary laceration tend to have extensive injury, and be related to the degree of hypoxia. In conclusion, CT evaluation of pulmonary parenchymal injury is valuable not only for morphological evaluation but also for estimation of hypoxia. (author)

  7. CT evaluation of pulmonary parenchymal injury due to blunt chest trauma and its clinical significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimi, Hiroshi (St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    The CT findings of pulmonary parenchymal injury due to blunt chest trauma in 73 patients and their clinical significance were analyzed. CT was obtained within 6 hours after trauma. Findings were analyzed according to the number of injured segments and severity which was classified into three grades. A correlation was also made with arterial blood PaO{sub 2} and thoracic complications. Pulmonary parenchymal injury was identified in multisegmental portions bilaterally in most cases. It was most frequently observed in the posterior portion of the lung such as segment 6. More than 50% of lesions were classified as Grade 1. Pulmonary laceration, defined as patchy density with the cavitary lesion (Grade 3), was noted in 9.2%. There was a good correlation between extent of pulmonary injury and degree of hypoxia. The correlation of pneumothorax was also found with extensive lesion and frequency of Grade 3 lesion. Cases with pulmonary laceration tend to have extensive injury, and be related to the degree of hypoxia. In conclusion, CT evaluation of pulmonary parenchymal injury is valuable not only for morphological evaluation but also for estimation of hypoxia. (author).

  8. Unrequested information from routine diagnostic chest CT predicts future cardiovascular events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Peter C.; Gondrie, Martijn J.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Graaf, Yolanda van der; Mali, Willem P.; Oen, Ayke L.; Prokop, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    An increase in the number of CT investigations will likely result in a an increase in unrequested information. Clinical relevance of these findings is unknown. This is the first follow-up study to investigate the prognostic relevance of subclinical coronary (CAC) and aortic calcification (TAC) as contained in routine diagnostic chest CT in a clinical care population. The follow-up of 10,410 subjects (>40 years) from a multicentre, clinical care-based cohort of patients included 240 fatal to 275 non-fatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) events (mean follow-up 17.8 months). Patients with a history of CVD were excluded. Coronary (0-12) and aortic calcification (0-8) were semi-quantitatively scored. We used Cox proportional-hazard models to compute hazard ratios to predict CVD events. CAC and TAC were significantly and independently predictive of CVD events. Compared with subjects with no calcium, the adjusted risk of a CVD event was 3.7 times higher (95% CI, 2.7-5.2) among patients with severe coronary calcification (CAC score ≥6) and 2.7 times higher (95% CI, 2.0-3.7) among patients with severe aortic calcification (TAC score ≥5). Subclinical vascular calcification on CT is a strong predictor of incident CVD events in a routine clinical care population. (orig.)

  9. Mosaic Pattern of Lung Attenuation on Chest CT in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamonpun Ussavarungsi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A mosaic pattern of lung attenuation on chest computed tomography (CT may be due to various etiologies. There is limited published data on CT results when used to evaluate pulmonary hypertension (PH. We retrospectively studied the frequency of mosaic pattern in patients with PH and the cause of the PH by diagnostic group, as well as the correlation between the mosaic pattern and the following: demographics, severity of the PH, main pulmonary artery (PA size, PA/aorta (PA/Ao ratio, pulmonary function tests (PFT, and ventilation perfusion scan results. Overall, 18% of the cohort had CT mosaic pattern (34/189. Mosaic pattern was present in 17/113 (15% in Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension, 5/13 (28% in Group 2 pulmonary venous hypertension and 8/50 (16% in Group 3 PH. Conversely, Group 4 chronic thromboembolic PH was more prevalent in 4/8 (50%. Main PA size, PA/Ao ratio, and segmental perfusion defect were positively associated with mosaic pattern. In contrast, factors such as age, gender, body mass index, functional class, hemodynamic data, and PFT values were not associated with mosaic pattern. Mosaic pattern is not specific as an isolated finding for distinguishing the subtype of PH.

  10. 3D automatic exposure control for 64-detector row CT: Radiation dose reduction in chest phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Keiko, E-mail: palm_kei@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Shimokato, Yamanashi (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Kono, Atsushi [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Inokawa, Hiroyasu [Toshiba Medical Systems, Ohtawara, Tochigi (Japan); Onishi, Yumiko [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Nogami, Munenobu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Division of Image-Based Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Takenaka, Daisuke [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Araki, Tsutomu [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Shimokato, Yamanashi (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of three-dimensional (3D) automatic exposure control (AEC) for low-dose CT examination in a chest phantom study. Materials and methods: A chest CT phantom including simulated focal ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and nodules was scanned with a 64-detector row CT with and without AEC. Performance of 3D AEC included changing targeted standard deviations (SDs) of image noise from scout view. To determine the appropriate targeted SD number for identification, the capability of overall identification with the CT protocol adapted to each of the targeted SDs was compared with that obtained with CT without AEC by means of receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: When targeted SD values equal to or higher than 250 were used, areas under the curve (Azs) of nodule identification with CT protocol using AEC were significantly smaller than that for CT protocol without AEC (p < 0.05). When targeted SD numbers at equal to or more than 180 were adapted, Azs of CT protocol with AEC had significantly smaller than that without AEC (p < 0.05). Conclusion: This phantom study shows 3D AEC is useful for low-dose lung CT examination, and can reduce the radiation dose while maintaining good identification capability and good image quality.

  11. Fetal shielding combined with state of the art CT dose reduction strategies during maternal chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterson, Leslie C., E-mail: lch088@mail.usask.ca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Leswick, David A.; Fladeland, Derek A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Saskatchewan (Canada); Hunt, Megan M.; Webster, Stephen [Saskatchewan Ministry of Labour Relations and Workplace Safety (Canada); Lim, Hyun [Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Custom bismuth-antimony shields were previously shown to reduce fetal dose by 53% on an 8DR (detector row) CT scanner without dynamic adaptive section collimation (DASC), automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) or adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). The purpose of this study is to compare the effective maternal and average fetal organ dose reduction both with and without bismuth-antimony shields on a 64DR CT scanner using DASC, ATCM and ASiR during maternal CTPA. Materials and methods: A phantom with gravid prosthesis and a bismuth-antimony shield were used. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) measured fetal radiation dose. The average fetal organ dose and effective maternal dose were determined using 100 kVp, scanning from the lung apices to the diaphragm utilizing DASC, ATCM and ASiR on a 64DR CT scanner with and without shielding in the first and third trimester. Isolated assessment of DASC was done via comparing a new 8DR scan without DASC to a similar scan on the 64DR with DASC. Results: Average third trimester unshielded fetal dose was reduced from 0.22 mGy ± 0.02 on the 8DR to 0.13 mGy ± 0.03 with the conservative 64DR protocol that included 30% ASiR, DASC and ATCM (42% reduction, P < 0.01). Use of a shield further reduced average third trimester fetal dose to 0.04 mGy ± 0.01 (69% reduction, P < 0.01). The average fetal organ dose reduction attributable to DASC alone was modest (6% reduction from 0.17 mGy ± 0.02 to 0.16 mGy ± 0.02, P = 0.014). First trimester fetal organ dose on the 8DR protocol was 0.07 mGy ± 0.03. This was reduced to 0.05 mGy ± 0.03 on the 64DR protocol without shielding (30% reduction, P = 0.009). Shields further reduced this dose to below accurately detectable levels. Effective maternal dose was reduced from 4.0 mSv on the 8DR to 2.5 mSv on the 64DR scanner using the conservative protocol (38% dose reduction). Conclusion: ASiR, ATCM and DASC combined significantly reduce effective maternal and fetal

  12. Fetal shielding combined with state of the art CT dose reduction strategies during maternal chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterson, Leslie C.; Leswick, David A.; Fladeland, Derek A.; Hunt, Megan M.; Webster, Stephen; Lim, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Custom bismuth-antimony shields were previously shown to reduce fetal dose by 53% on an 8DR (detector row) CT scanner without dynamic adaptive section collimation (DASC), automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) or adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). The purpose of this study is to compare the effective maternal and average fetal organ dose reduction both with and without bismuth-antimony shields on a 64DR CT scanner using DASC, ATCM and ASiR during maternal CTPA. Materials and methods: A phantom with gravid prosthesis and a bismuth-antimony shield were used. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) measured fetal radiation dose. The average fetal organ dose and effective maternal dose were determined using 100 kVp, scanning from the lung apices to the diaphragm utilizing DASC, ATCM and ASiR on a 64DR CT scanner with and without shielding in the first and third trimester. Isolated assessment of DASC was done via comparing a new 8DR scan without DASC to a similar scan on the 64DR with DASC. Results: Average third trimester unshielded fetal dose was reduced from 0.22 mGy ± 0.02 on the 8DR to 0.13 mGy ± 0.03 with the conservative 64DR protocol that included 30% ASiR, DASC and ATCM (42% reduction, P < 0.01). Use of a shield further reduced average third trimester fetal dose to 0.04 mGy ± 0.01 (69% reduction, P < 0.01). The average fetal organ dose reduction attributable to DASC alone was modest (6% reduction from 0.17 mGy ± 0.02 to 0.16 mGy ± 0.02, P = 0.014). First trimester fetal organ dose on the 8DR protocol was 0.07 mGy ± 0.03. This was reduced to 0.05 mGy ± 0.03 on the 64DR protocol without shielding (30% reduction, P = 0.009). Shields further reduced this dose to below accurately detectable levels. Effective maternal dose was reduced from 4.0 mSv on the 8DR to 2.5 mSv on the 64DR scanner using the conservative protocol (38% dose reduction). Conclusion: ASiR, ATCM and DASC combined significantly reduce effective maternal and fetal

  13. How is intensive care reimbursed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Donnelly, Maria; van Zanten, Arthur Rh

    2013-01-01

    Reimbursement schemes in intensive care are more complex than in other areas of healthcare, due to special procedures and high care needs. Knowledge regarding the principles of functioning in other countries can lead to increased understanding and awareness of potential for improvement. This can...... be achieved through mutual exchange of solutions found in other countries. In this review, experts from eight European countries explain their respective intensive care unit reimbursement schemes. Important conclusions include the apparent differences in the countries' reimbursement schemes---despite all...... of them originating from a DRG system, the high degree of complexity found, and the difficulties faced in several countries when collecting the data for this collaborative work. This review has been designed to help the intensivist clinician and researcher to understanding neighbouring countries...

  14. Chest wall deformity and respiratory distress in a 17-year-old patient with achondroplasia: CT and MRI evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, T.E.; Siegel, M.J.; McAlister, W.H. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology)

    1992-06-01

    A marked thoracic deformity associated with intrathoracic tracheal narrowing was seen in a 17-year old with achondroplasia and dyspnea. The role of chest deformity and its evaluation by CT and MRI in achondroplastic patients with respiratory symptoms are considered. (orig.).

  15. Chest wall deformity and respiratory distress in a 17-year-old patient with achondroplasia: CT and MRI evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, T.E.; Siegel, M.J.; McAlister, W.H.

    1992-01-01

    A marked thoracic deformity associated with intrathoracic tracheal narrowing was seen in a 17-year old with achondroplasia and dyspnea. The role of chest deformity and its evaluation by CT and MRI in achondroplastic patients with respiratory symptoms are considered. (orig.)

  16. Screening for lung cancer with digital chest radiography: sensitivity and number of secondary work-up CT examinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoop, Bartjan; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Gietema, Hester A.; de Jong, Pim A.; van Ginneken, Bram; van Klaveren, Rob J.; Prokop, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    To estimate the performance of digital chest radiography for detection of lung cancer. The study had ethics committee approval, and a nested case-control design was used and included 55 patients with lung cancer detected at computed tomography (CT) and confirmed with histologic examination and a

  17. Pulmonary Metastasis from Rectal Cancer on Chest CT Is Correlated with 3T MRI Primary Tumor Location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Na Yeon; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Beon Jin; Sung, Deuk Jae; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Oh, Yu Whan

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the association between the incidence of pulmonary metastasis on chest CT and the location of the primary tumor on rectal MRI. One hundred and nine consecutive patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent chest CT and 3T rectal MRI. Two radiologists classified the tumor on MRI as an upper (> 10 cm from the anal verge), mid (5-10 cm), or lower rectal tumor (< 5 cm) by consensus. All chest CT scans were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of metastasis. We used Fisher's exact test to evaluate the correlation between the incidence of pulmonary metastasis with the location of the rectal cancer and the Mantel-Haenszel test to control for local tumor stage. We only included the 60 patients with upper (n = 26) or lower (n = 34) rectal cancer, because of the complicated venous drainage system of the mid rectum. Among these, 9 (15%) showed evidence of pulmonary metastasis on chest CT and almost all (89%, 8/9) patients had lower rectal cancer. The incidence of pulmonary metastasis between the two groups was statistically different (p < 0.05) when local tumor stage was controlled. The incidence of pulmonary metastasis was significantly higher for lower than upper rectal cancers when the T-stage of the tumor was accounted for.

  18. Lung nodule detection in pediatric chest CT: quantitative relationship between image quality and radiologist performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Barnhart, Huiman X; Gaca, Ana Maria; Hollingsworth, Caroline L; Maxfield, Charles M; Carrico, Caroline W T; Colsher, James G; Frush, Donald P

    2011-05-01

    To determine the quantitative relationship between image quality and radiologist performance in detecting small lung nodules in pediatric CT. The study included clinical chest CT images of 30 pediatric patients (0-16 years) scanned at tube currents of 55-180 mA. Calibrated noise addition software was used to simulate cases at three nominal mA settings: 70, 35, and 17.5 mA, resulting in quantum noise of 7-32 Hounsfield Unit (HU). Using a validated nodule simulation technique, lung nodules with diameters of 3-5 mm and peak contrasts of 200-500 HU were inserted into the cases, which were then randomized and rated independently by four experienced pediatric radiologists for nodule presence on a continuous scale from 0 (definitely absent) to 100 (definitely present). The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) data were analyzed to quantify the relationship between diagnostic accuracy (area under the ROC curve, AUC) and image quality (the product of nodule peak contrast and displayed diameter to noise ratio, CDNR display). AUC increased rapidly from 0.70 to 0.87 when CDNR display increased from 60 to 130 mm, followed by a slow increase to 0.94 when CDNR display further increased to 257 mm. For the average nodule diameter (4 mm) and contrast (350 HU), AUC decreased from 0.93 to 0.71 with noise increased from 7 to 28 HU. We quantified the relationship between image quality and the performance of radiologists in detecting lung nodules in pediatric CT. The relationship can guide CT protocol design to achieve the desired diagnostic performance at the lowest radiation dose.

  19. The measurement of organic radiation dose of multi-slice CT scanning by using the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Gang; Zeng Yongming; Luo Tianyou; Zhao Feng; Zhang Zhiwei; Yu Renqiang; Peng Shengkun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Using the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom to measure the absorbed dose of various tissues and organs under different noise index, and to assess the radiation dose of MSCT chest scanning with the effective dose (ED). Methods: The equivalence of the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom (CDP-1 C) and the adult chest on CT sectional anatomy and X-ray attenuation was demonstrated. The absorbed doses of various tissues and organs under different noise index were measured by laying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) inside the phantom, and the corresponding dose-length products (DLP) were recorded. Both of them were later converted into ED and comparison was conducted to analyze the dose levels of chest CT scanning with automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) under different noise index. Student t-test was applied using SPSS 12.0 statistical software. Results: The Phantom was similar to the human body on CT sectional anatomy. The average CT value of phantom are - 788.04 HU in lung, 45.64 HU in heart, 65.84 HU in liver, 254.32 HU in spine and the deviations are 0.10%, 3.04%, 4.49% and 4.36% respectively compared to humans. The difference of average CT value of liver was statistically significant (t=-8.705, P 0.05). As the noise index increased from 8.5 to 22.5, the DLP decreased from 393.57 mGy · cm to 78.75 mGy · cm and the organs dose declined. For example, the average absorbed dose decreased from 22.38 mGy to 3.66 mGy in lung. Compared to ED calculating by absorbed dose, the ED calculating by DLP was lower. The ED values of the two methods were 6.69 mSv and 8.77 mSv when the noise index was set at 8.5. Conclusions: Application of the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom to carry out CT dose assessment is more accurate. The noise index should be set more than 8.5 during the chest CT scanning based on ATCM technique. (authors)

  20. CT of the chest with model-based, fully iterative reconstruction: comparison with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Yasutaka; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Nagasawa, Naoki; Murashima, Shuichi; Sakuma, Hajime

    2013-08-09

    The recently developed model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) enables significant reduction of image noise and artifacts, compared with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and filtered back projection (FBP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate lesion detectability of low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) with MBIR in comparison with ASIR and FBP. Chest CT was acquired with 64-slice CT (Discovery CT750HD) with standard-dose (5.7 ± 2.3 mSv) and low-dose (1.6 ± 0.8 mSv) conditions in 55 patients (aged 72 ± 7 years) who were suspected of lung disease on chest radiograms. Low-dose CT images were reconstructed with MBIR, ASIR 50% and FBP, and standard-dose CT images were reconstructed with FBP, using a reconstructed slice thickness of 0.625 mm. Two observers evaluated the image quality of abnormal lung and mediastinal structures on a 5-point scale (Score 5 = excellent and score 1 = non-diagnostic). The objective image noise was also measured as the standard deviation of CT intensity in the descending aorta. The image quality score of enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes on low-dose MBIR CT (4.7 ± 0.5) was significantly improved in comparison with low-dose FBP and ASIR CT (3.0 ± 0.5, p = 0.004; 4.0 ± 0.5, p = 0.02, respectively), and was nearly identical to the score of standard-dose FBP image (4.8 ± 0.4, p = 0.66). Concerning decreased lung attenuation (bulla, emphysema, or cyst), the image quality score on low-dose MBIR CT (4.9 ± 0.2) was slightly better compared to low-dose FBP and ASIR CT (4.5 ± 0.6, p = 0.01; 4.6 ± 0.5, p = 0.01, respectively). There were no significant differences in image quality scores of visualization of consolidation or mass, ground-glass attenuation, or reticular opacity among low- and standard-dose CT series. Image noise with low-dose MBIR CT (11.6 ± 1.0 Hounsfield units (HU)) were significantly lower than with low-dose ASIR (21.1 ± 2.6 HU, p standard-dose FBP CT (16.6 ± 2.3 HU, p 70%, MBIR can provide

  1. Evaluating of the relation among emphysematous changes detected by the chest CT, the smoking history and the respiratory function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayase, Taichiro; Higuchi, Tomoaki; Iwamoto, Tomohiro

    2008-01-01

    An influence of smoking on the respiratory function and pulmonary emphysema is well known. However, there are few reports evaluating the relation between smoking and emphysematous changes detected by the chest CT. In this study, we evaluated the relation among emphysematous changes detected by the chest CT, the smoking history and the respiratory function (%VC, FEV 1.0 %). Four hundred and sixty-six healthy members of Self-defense force (mean age; 50.1±5.32 years; all men) were recruited in this study. Emphysematous changes were confirmed by the chest CT in 26 subjects. (5.56%, group A) The remaining 440 subjects showed no emphysematous changes. (group B) On the other hand, 8 subjects (1.7%) were FEV 1.0 % 1.0 % was 76.7±4.7% in group A and 82.5±5.0% in group B (P<0.05). %VC was 117±11.3% in group A and 112±13.2% in group B (P<0.05). In addition, risk to show emphysematous changes in CT was high among the patients whose Brinkmann index (BI) value was over 600 (Odds ratio, 8.2; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.5 to 18.5). We conducted that it is possible to evaluate the influence of smoking on the respiratory function by the CT as well as respiratory function test. (author)

  2. Methods of counting ribs on chest CT: the modified sternomanubrial approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Kyung Sik; Kim, Sung Jin; Jeon, Min Hee; Lee, Seung Young; Bae, Il Hun [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of each method of counting ribs on chest CT and to propose a new method: the anterior approach with using the sternocostal joints. CT scans of 38 rib lesions of 27 patients were analyzed (fracture: 25, metastasis: 11, benign bone disease: 2). Each lesion was independently counted by three radiologists with using three different methods for counting ribs: the sternoclavicular approach, the xiphisternal approach and the modified sternomanubrial approach. The rib lesions were divided into three parts of evaluation of each method according to the location of the lesion as follows: the upper part (between the first and fourth thoracic vertebra), the middle part (between the fifth and eighth) and the lower part (between the ninth and twelfth). The most accurate method was a modified sternomanubrial approach (99.1%). The accuracies of a xiphisternal approach and a sternoclavicular approach were 95.6% and 88.6%, respectively. A modified sternomanubrial approach showed the highest accuracies in all three parts (100%, 100% and 97.9%, respectively). We propose a new method for counting ribs, the modified sternomanubrial approach, which was more accurate than the known methods in any parts of the bony thorax, and it may be an easier and quicker method than the others in clinical practice.

  3. 3D Convolutional Neural Network for Automatic Detection of Lung Nodules in Chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidian, Sardar; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas; Pezeshk, Aria

    2017-01-01

    Deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) form the backbone of many state-of-the-art computer vision systems for classification and segmentation of 2D images. The same principles and architectures can be extended to three dimensions to obtain 3D CNNs that are suitable for volumetric data such as CT scans. In this work, we train a 3D CNN for automatic detection of pulmonary nodules in chest CT images using volumes of interest extracted from the LIDC dataset. We then convert the 3D CNN which has a fixed field of view to a 3D fully convolutional network (FCN) which can generate the score map for the entire volume efficiently in a single pass. Compared to the sliding window approach for applying a CNN across the entire input volume, the FCN leads to a nearly 800-fold speed-up, and thereby fast generation of output scores for a single case. This screening FCN is used to generate difficult negative examples that are used to train a new discriminant CNN. The overall system consists of the screening FCN for fast generation of candidate regions of interest, followed by the discrimination CNN.

  4. Tree-structured vector quantization of CT chest scans: Image quality and diagnostic accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosman, P.C.; Tseng, C.; Gray, R.M.; Olshen, R.A.; Moses, L.E.; Davidson, H.C.; Bergin, C.J.; Riskin, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    The quality of lossy compressed images is often characterized by signal-to-noise ratios, informal tests of subjective quality, or receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves that include subjective appraisals of the value of an image for a particular application. The authors believe that for medical applications, lossy compressed images should be judged by a more natural and fundamental aspect of relative image quality: their use in making accurate diagnoses. They apply a lossy compression algorithm to medical images, and quantify the quality of the images by the diagnostic performance of radiologists, as well as by traditional signal-to-noise ratios and subjective ratings. The study is unlike previous studies of the effects of lossy compression in that they consider non-binary detection tasks, simulate actual diagnostic practice instead of using paired tests or confidence rankings, use statistical methods that are more appropriate for non-binary clinical data than are the popular ROC curves, and use low-complexity predictive tree-structured vector quantization for compression rather than DCT-based transform codes combined with entropy coding. Their diagnostic tasks are the identification of nodules (tumors) in the lungs and lymphadenopathy in the mediastinum from computerized tomography (CT) chest scans. For the image modality, compression algorithm, and diagnostic tasks they consider, the original 12 bit per pixel (bpp) CT image can be compressed to between 1 bpp and 2 bpp with no significant changes in diagnostic accuracy

  5. Chest X-ray and chest CT findings in patients diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis following solid organ transplantation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, Irai Luis; Schuhmacher Neto, Roberto; Marchiori, Edson; Pereira, Marisa; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to select articles including chest X-ray or chest CT findings in patients who developed pulmonary tuberculosis following solid organ transplantation (lung, kidney, or liver). The following search terms were used: "tuberculosis"; "transplants"; "transplantation"; "mycobacterium"; and "lung". The databases used in this review were PubMed and the Brazilian Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (Virtual Health Library). We selected articles in English, Portuguese, or Spanish, regardless of the year of publication, that met the selection criteria in their title, abstract, or body of text. Articles with no data on chest CT or chest X-ray findings were excluded, as were those not related to solid organ transplantation or pulmonary tuberculosis. We selected 29 articles involving a collective total of 219 patients. The largest samples were in studies conducted in Brazil and South Korea (78 and 35 patients, respectively). The imaging findings were subdivided into five common patterns. The imaging findings varied depending on the transplanted organ in these patients. In liver and lung transplant recipients, the most common pattern was the classic one for pulmonary tuberculosis (cavitation and "tree-in-bud" nodules), which is similar to the findings for pulmonary tuberculosis in the general population. The proportion of cases showing a miliary pattern and lymph node enlargement, which is most similar to the pattern seen in patients coinfected with tuberculosis and HIV, was highest among the kidney transplant recipients. Further studies evaluating clinical data, such as immunosuppression regimens, are needed in order to improve understanding of the distribution of these imaging patterns in this population.

  6. Role of contrast-enhanced helical CT in the evaluation of acute thoracic aortic injuries after blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaglione, M.; Pinto, A.; Pinto, F.; Romano, L.; Ragozzino, A.; Grassi, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the value of contrast-enhanced helical CT for detecting and managing acute thoracic aortic injury (ATAI). Between June 1995 and February 2000, 1419 consecutive chest CT examinations were performed in the setting of major blunt trauma. The following CT findings were considered indicative of ATAI: intimal flap; pseudoaneurysm; contour irregularity; lumen abnormality; and extravasation of contrast material. On the basis of these direct findings no further diagnostic investigations were performed. Isolated mediastinal hematoma on CT scans was considered an indirect sign of ATAI: In these cases, thoracic aortography was performed even if CT indicated normal aorta. Seventy-seven patients had abnormal CT scans: Among the 23 patients with direct CT signs, acute thoracic aortic injuries was confirmed at thoracotomy in 21. Two false-positive cases were observed. The 54 remaining patients had isolated mediastinal hematoma without aortic injuries at CT and corresponding negative angiograms. The 1342 patients with negative CT scans were included in the 8-month follow-up program and did not show any adverse sequela based on clinical and radiographic criteria. Contrast-enhanced helical CT has a critical role in the exclusion of thoracic aortic injuries in patient with major blunt chest trauma and prevents unnecessary thoracic aortography. Direct CT signs of ATAI do not require further diagnostic investigations to confirm the diagnosis: Isolated aortic bands or contour vessel abnormalities should be first considered as possible artifacts or related to non-traumatic etiologies especially when mediastinal hematoma is absent. In cases of isolated mediastinal hematoma other possible sources of bleeding should be considered before directing patients to thoracic aortography. (orig.)

  7. Radiation dose and image quality in pediatric chest CT: effects of iterative reconstruction in normal weight and overweight children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Haesung; Kim, Myung-Joon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Hyun Gi; Lee, Mi-Jung; Yoon, Choon-Sik; Choi, Jiin

    2015-01-01

    New CT reconstruction techniques may help reduce the burden of ionizing radiation. To quantify radiation dose reduction when performing pediatric chest CT using a low-dose protocol and 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) compared with age/gender-matched chest CT using a conventional dose protocol and reconstructed with filtered back projection (control group) and to determine its effect on image quality in normal weight and overweight children. We retrospectively reviewed 40 pediatric chest CT (M:F = 21:19; range: 0.1-17 years) in both groups. Radiation dose was compared between the two groups using paired Student's t-test. Image quality including noise, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability was subjectively assessed by three pediatric radiologists using a four-point scale (superior, average, suboptimal, unacceptable). Eight children in the ASIR group and seven in the control group were overweight. All radiation dose parameters were significantly lower in the ASIR group (P < 0.01) with a greater than 57% dose reduction in overweight children. Image noise was higher in the ASIR group in both normal weight and overweight children. Only one scan in the ASIR group (1/40, 2.5%) was rated as diagnostically suboptimal and there was no unacceptable study. In both normal weight and overweight children, the ASIR technique is associated with a greater than 57% mean dose reduction, without significantly impacting diagnostic image quality in pediatric chest CT examinations. However, CT scans in overweight children may have a greater noise level, even when using the ASIR technique. (orig.)

  8. Radiation dose and image quality in pediatric chest CT: effects of iterative reconstruction in normal weight and overweight children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Haesung; Kim, Myung-Joon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Hyun Gi; Lee, Mi-Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Choon-Sik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jiin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    New CT reconstruction techniques may help reduce the burden of ionizing radiation. To quantify radiation dose reduction when performing pediatric chest CT using a low-dose protocol and 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) compared with age/gender-matched chest CT using a conventional dose protocol and reconstructed with filtered back projection (control group) and to determine its effect on image quality in normal weight and overweight children. We retrospectively reviewed 40 pediatric chest CT (M:F = 21:19; range: 0.1-17 years) in both groups. Radiation dose was compared between the two groups using paired Student's t-test. Image quality including noise, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability was subjectively assessed by three pediatric radiologists using a four-point scale (superior, average, suboptimal, unacceptable). Eight children in the ASIR group and seven in the control group were overweight. All radiation dose parameters were significantly lower in the ASIR group (P < 0.01) with a greater than 57% dose reduction in overweight children. Image noise was higher in the ASIR group in both normal weight and overweight children. Only one scan in the ASIR group (1/40, 2.5%) was rated as diagnostically suboptimal and there was no unacceptable study. In both normal weight and overweight children, the ASIR technique is associated with a greater than 57% mean dose reduction, without significantly impacting diagnostic image quality in pediatric chest CT examinations. However, CT scans in overweight children may have a greater noise level, even when using the ASIR technique. (orig.)

  9. Radiation Dose Reduction of Chest CT with Iterative Reconstruction in Image Space - Part I: Studies on Image Quality Using Dual Source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Hye Jeon; Seo, Joon Beom; Lee, Jin Seong; Song, Jae Woo; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lim, Chae Hun; Kim, Song Soo

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the image quality (IQ) is improved with iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS), and whether IRIS can be used for radiation reduction in chest CT. Standard dose chest CT (SDCT) in 50 patients and low dose chest CT (LDCT) in another 50 patients were performed, using a dual-source CT, with 120 kVp and same reference mAs (50 mAs for SDCT and 25 mAs for LDCT) employed to both tubes by modifying a dual-energy scan mode. Full-dose data were obtained by combining the data from both tubes and half-dose data were separated from a single tube. These were reconstructed by using a filtered back projection (FBP) and IRIS: full-dose FBP (F-FBP); full-dose IRIS (F-IRIS); half-dose FBP (H-FBP) and half-dose IRIS (H-IRIS). Objective noise was measured. The subjective IQ was evaluated by radiologists for the followings: noise, contrast and sharpness of mediastinum and lung. Objective noise was significantly lower in H-IRIS than in F-FBP (p < 0.01). In both SDCT and LDCT, the IQ scores were highest in F-IRIS, followed by F-FBP, H-IRIS and H-FBP, except those for sharpness of mediastinum, which tended to be higher in FBP. When comparing CT images between the same dose and different reconstruction (F-IRIS/F-FBP and H-IRIS/H-FBP) algorithms, scores tended to be higher in IRIS than in FBP, being more distinct in half-dose images. However, despite the use of IRIS, the scores were lower in H-IRIS than in F-FBP. IRIS generally helps improve the IQ, being more distinct at the reduced radiation. However, reduced radiation by half results in IQ decrease even when using IRIS in chest CT.

  10. The patient experience of intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Lindahl, Berit

    2015-01-01

    : Nordic intensive care units. PARTICIPANTS: Patients in Nordic intensive care units. METHODS: We performed a literature search of qualitative studies of the patient experience of intensive care based on Nordic publications in 2000-2013. We searched the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, and Psyc...

  11. Bicuspid aortic valves: Diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, David J., E-mail: david.murphy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); McEvoy, Sinead H., E-mail: s.mcevoy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Iyengar, Sri, E-mail: sri.iyengar@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Feuchtner, Gudrun, E-mail: Gudrun.Feuchtner@i-med.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Cury, Ricardo C., E-mail: r.cury@baptisthealth.net [Department of Radiology, Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, 8900 North Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176 (United States); Roobottom, Carl, E-mail: carl.roobottom@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Baumueller, Stephan, E-mail: Hatem.Alkadhi@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem, E-mail: stephan.baumueller@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Dodd, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonniedodd@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT for bicuspid aortic valves. Materials and methods: The standard axial chest CT scans of 20 patients with known bicuspid aortic valves were blindly, randomly analyzed for (i) the appearance of the valve cusps, (ii) the largest aortic sinus area, (iii) the longest aortic cusp length, (iv) the thickest aortic valve cusp and (v) valve calcification. A second blinded reader independently analyzed the appearance of the valve cusps. Forty-two age- and sex-matched patients with known tricuspid aortic valves were used as controls. Retrospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT multiphase reconstructions of the aortic valve were used as the gold-standard. Results: Fourteen (21%) scans were scored as unevaluable (7 bicuspid, 7 tricuspid). Of the remainder, there were 13 evaluable bicuspid valves, ten of which showed an aortic valve line sign, while the remaining three showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance owing to fused valve cusps. The 35 evaluable tricuspid aortic valves all showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance (P = 0.001). Kappa analysis = 0.62 indicating good interobserver agreement for the aortic valve cusp appearance. Aortic sinus areas, aortic cusp lengths and aortic cusp thicknesses of ≥3.8 cm{sup 2}, 3.2 cm and 1.6 mm respectively on standard axial chest CT best distinguished bicuspid from tricuspid aortic valves (P < 0.0001 for all). Of evaluable scans, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of standard axial chest CT in diagnosing bicuspid aortic valves was 77% (CI 0.54–1.0), 100%, 100% and 70% respectively. Conclusion: The aortic valve is evaluable in approximately 80% of standard chest 64-slice CT scans. Bicuspid aortic valves may be diagnosed on evaluable scans with good diagnostic accuracy. An aortic valve line sign, enlarged aortic sinuses and elongated, thickened valve cusps are specific CT

  12. Adaptive wiener filter based on Gaussian mixture distribution model for denoising chest X-ray CT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabuchi, Motohiro; Yamane, Nobumoto; Morikawa, Yoshitaka

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades, X-ray CT imaging has become more important as a result of its high-resolution performance. However, it is well known that the X-ray dose is insufficient in the techniques that use low-dose imaging in health screening or thin-slice imaging in work-up. Therefore, the degradation of CT images caused by the streak artifact frequently becomes problematic. In this study, we applied a Wiener filter (WF) using the universal Gaussian mixture distribution model (UNI-GMM) as a statistical model to remove streak artifact. In designing the WF, it is necessary to estimate the statistical model and the precise co-variances of the original image. In the proposed method, we obtained a variety of chest X-ray CT images using a phantom simulating a chest organ, and we estimated the statistical information using the images for training. The results of simulation showed that it is possible to fit the UNI-GMM to the chest X-ray CT images and reduce the specific noise. (author)

  13. Coronary artery visibility in free-breathing young children on non-gated chest CT: impact of temporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridoux, Alexandre; Hutt, Antoine; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Pagniez, Julien; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [CHRU et Universite de Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), 59037 Lille Cedex (France); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare, Department of Research and Development in CT, Forchheim (Germany); Duhamel, Alain [Universite de Lille, Department of Biostatistics, Lille (France)

    2015-11-15

    Dual-source CT allows scanning of the chest with high pitch and high temporal resolution, which can improve the detection of proximal coronary arteries in infants and young children when scanned without general anesthesia, sedation or beta-blockade. To compare coronary artery visibility between higher and standard temporal resolution. We analyzed CT images in 93 children who underwent a standard chest CT angiographic examination with reconstruction of images with a temporal resolution of 75 ms (group 1) and 140 ms (group 2). The percentage of detected coronary segments was higher in group 1 than in group 2 when considering all segments (group 1: 27%; group 2: 24%; P = 0.0004) and proximal segments (group 1: 37%; group 2: 32%; P = 0.0006). In both groups, the highest rates of detection were observed for the left main coronary artery (S1) (group 1: 65%; group 2: 58%) and proximal left anterior descending coronary artery (S2) (group 1: 43%; group 2: 42%). Higher rates of detection were seen in group 1 for the left main coronary artery (P = 0.03), proximal right coronary artery (P = 0.01), proximal segments of the left coronary artery (P = 0.02) and proximal segments of the left and right coronary arteries (P = 0.0006). Higher temporal resolution improved the visibility of proximal coronary arteries in pediatric chest CT. (orig.)

  14. The evaluation of cardiac tamponade risk in patients with pericardial effusion detected by non-gated chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yasutoshi; Miyoshi, Fuminori; Kaminou, Toshio; Kaetsu, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2016-05-01

    Although pericardial effusion is often identified using non-gated chest computed tomography (CT), findings predictive of cardiac tamponade have not been adequately established. To determine the findings predictive of clinical cardiac tamponade in patients with moderate to large pericardial effusion using non-gated chest CT. We performed a retrospective analysis of 134 patients with moderate to large pericardial effusion who were identified from among 4581 patients who underwent non-gated chest CT. Cardiac structural changes, including right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT), were qualitatively evaluated. The inferior vena cava ratio with hepatic (IVCupp) and renal portions (IVClow) and effusion size were measured. The diagnostic performance of each structural change was calculated, and multivariate analysis was used to determine the predictors of cardiac tamponade. Of the 134 patients (mean age, 70.3 years; 64 men), 37 (28%) had cardiac tamponade. The sensitivity and specificity were 76% and 74% for RVOT compression; 87% and 84% for an IVClow ratio ≥0.77; and 60% and 77% for an effusion size ≥25.5 mm, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that RVOT compression, an IVClow ratio ≥0.77, and an effusion size ≥25.5 mm were independent predictors of cardiac tamponade. The combination of these three CT findings had a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 81%, 95%, and 91%, respectively. In patients with moderate to large pericardial effusion, non-gated chest CT provides additional information for predicting cardiac tamponade. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  15. Influence of model based iterative reconstruction algorithm on image quality of multiplanar reformations in reduced dose chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barras, Heloise; Dunet, Vincent; Hachulla, Anne-Lise; Grimm, Jochen; Beigelman-Aubry, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) reduces image noise and improves image quality (IQ) but its influence on post-processing tools including maximal intensity projection (MIP) and minimal intensity projection (mIP) remains unknown. To evaluate the influence on IQ of MBIR on native, mIP, MIP axial and coronal reformats of reduced dose computed tomography (RD-CT) chest acquisition. Raw data of 50 patients, who underwent a standard dose CT (SD-CT) and a follow-up RD-CT with a CT dose index (CTDI) of 2–3 mGy, were reconstructed by MBIR and FBP. Native slices, 4-mm-thick MIP, and 3-mm-thick mIP axial and coronal reformats were generated. The relative IQ, subjective IQ, image noise, and number of artifacts were determined in order to compare different reconstructions of RD-CT with reference SD-CT. The lowest noise was observed with MBIR. RD-CT reconstructed by MBIR exhibited the best relative and subjective IQ on coronal view regardless of the post-processing tool. MBIR generated the lowest rate of artefacts on coronal mIP/MIP reformats and the highest one on axial reformats, mainly represented by distortions and stairsteps artifacts. The MBIR algorithm reduces image noise but generates more artifacts than FBP on axial mIP and MIP reformats of RD-CT. Conversely, it significantly improves IQ on coronal views, without increasing artifacts, regardless of the post-processing technique

  16. Intensive Care for Eclampic Coma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to enhance the efficiency of treatment of puerperas with eclampic coma, by substantiating, developing, and introducing new algorithms for correction of systemic hemodynamic, metabolic disturbances, and perfusion-metabolic changes in brain tissues. Subjects and methods. Studies were conducted in 18 puerperas with eclampic coma (Group 2 in whom the authors used a new treatment algorithm aimed at maintaining baseline cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP, restoring volemic levels at the expense of interstitial fluid. A control group (Group 1 included 30 patients who received conventional standard therapy. Regional cerebral circulation was measured by a non-invasive (inhalation radioisotopic method, by applying the tracer 131Xe, as described by V. D. Obrist et al., on a modified КПРДИ-1 apparatus (USSR. The rate of brain oxygen uptake was determined from the oxygen content between the artery and the internal jugular vein. Central hemodynamic parameters were studied by the direct method of right heart catheterization using a flow-directed Swan-Ganz catheter. The volumes of total and extracellular fluids were estimated using 20% urea and mannitol solutions, respectively, at 0.2 g/kg weight by the procedure of V. M. Mogen. Circulating blood volume (CBV was determined by a radioisotopic method using 131iodine albumin on an УPI-7 apparatus (USSR. Cerebral spinal fluid pressure was measured by an ИиНД apparatus. Studies were made in four steps: 1 on admission; 2 on days 2—3; 3 during emergence from coma; 4 before transition. Results. The use of the new algorithm for intensive care for eclampic coma, which is aimed at improving the perfusion metabolic provision of brain structures, with a reduction in mean blood pressure by 10—15% of the baseline level, by administering magnesium sulfate and nimodipine, and at compensating for CBV by high-molecular-weight hydroxyethylated starch (stabizol, ensured early emergence from a comatose state

  17. An evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of the 1991 American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine and the 2001 Society of Critical Care Medicine/European Society of Intensive Care Medicine/American College of Chest Physicians/American Thoracic Society/Surgical Infection Society sepsis definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huifang; Heard, Stephen O; Mullen, Marie T; Crawford, Sybil; Goldberg, Robert J; Frendl, Gyorgy; Lilly, Craig M

    2012-06-01

    Limited research has been conducted to compare the test characteristics of the 1991 and 2001 sepsis consensus definitions. This study assessed the accuracy of the two sepsis consensus definitions among adult critically ill patients compared to sepsis case adjudication by three senior clinicians. Observational study of patients admitted to intensive care units. Seven intensive care units of an academic medical center. A random sample of 960 patients from all adult intensive care unit patients between October 2007 and December 2008. None. Sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the two consensus definitions were calculated by comparing the number of patients who met or did not meet consensus definitions vs. the number of patients who were or were not diagnosed with sepsis by adjudication. The 1991 sepsis definition had a high sensitivity of 94.6%, but a low specificity of 61.0%. The 2001 sepsis definition had a slightly increased sensitivity but a decreased specificity, which were 96.9% and 58.3%, respectively. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the two definitions were not statistically different (0.778 and 0.776, respectively). The sensitivities and areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of both definitions were lower at the 24-hr time window level than those of the intensive care unit stay level, though their specificities increased slightly. Fever, high white blood cell count or immature forms, low Glasgow coma score, edema, positive fluid balance, high cardiac index, low PaO2/FIO2 ratio, and high levels of creatinine and lactate were significantly associated with sepsis by both definitions and adjudication. Both the 1991 and the 2001 sepsis definition have a high sensitivity but low specificity; the 2001 definition has a slightly increased sensitivity but a decreased specificity compared to the 1991 definition. The diagnostic performances of both definitions were

  18. Long-Term Clinical Impact of Coronary CT Angiography in Patients With Recent Acute-Onset Chest Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Jesper J; Hove, Jens D; Sørgaard, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    . BACKGROUND: The prognostic implications of a coronary CTA-guided treatment strategy have not been compared in a randomized fashion to standard care in patients referred for acute-onset chest pain. METHODS: Patients with acute chest pain but normal electrocardiograms and troponin values were randomized...... to treatment guided by either coronary CTA or standard care (bicycle exercise electrocardiogram or myocardial perfusion imaging). In the coronary CTA-guided group, a functional test was included in cases of nondiagnostic coronary CTA images or coronary stenoses of borderline severity. The primary endpoint...... electrocardiograms and troponin values compared to standard care with a functional test. (Cardiac-CT in the Treatment of Acute Chest Pain [CATCH]; NCT01534000)....

  19. Radiation doses during chest examinations using dose modulation techniques in multislice CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingstone, Roshan S.; Pradip, Joe; Dinakran, Paul M.; Srikanth, B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the radiation dose and image quality using a manual protocol and dose modulation techniques in a 6-slice CT scanner. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty-one patients who underwent contrast-enhanced CT of the chest were included in the study. For the manual protocol settings, constant tube potential (kV) and tube current-time product (mAs) of 140 kV and 120 mAs, respectively, were used. The angular and z-axis dose modulation techniques utilized a constant tube potential of 140 kV; mAs values were automatically selected by the machine. Effective doses were calculated using dose-length product (DLP) values and the image quality was assessed using the signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio values. Mean effective doses using manual protocol for patients of weights 40-60 kg, 61-80 kg, and 81 kg and above were 8.58 mSv, 8.54 mSv, and 9.07 mSv, respectively. Mean effective doses using z-axis dose modulation for patients of weights 40-60 kg, 61-80 kg, and 81 kg and above were 4.95 mSv, 6.87 mSv, and 10.24 mSv, respectively. The SNR at the region of the liver for patients of body weight of 40-60 kg was 5.1 H, 6.2 H, and 8.8 H for manual, angular, and z-axis dose modulation, respectively. Conclusion: Dose reduction of up to 15% was achieved using angular dose modulation and of up to 42% using z-axis dose modulation, with acceptable diagnostic image quality compared to the manual protocol. (author)

  20. Interstitial Features at Chest CT Enhance the Deleterious Effects of Emphysema in the COPDGene Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Samuel Y; Harmouche, Rola; Ross, James C; Diaz, Alejandro A; Rahaghi, Farbod N; Sanchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo Vegas; Putman, Rachel K; Hunninghake, Gary M; Onieva, Jorge Onieva; Martinez, Fernando J; Choi, Augustine M; Bowler, Russell P; Lynch, David A; Hatabu, Hiroto; Bhatt, Surya P; Dransfield, Mark T; Wells, J Michael; Rosas, Ivan O; San Jose Estepar, Raul; Washko, George R

    2018-06-05

    Purpose To determine if interstitial features at chest CT enhance the effect of emphysema on clinical disease severity in smokers without clinical pulmonary fibrosis. Materials and Methods In this retrospective cohort study, an objective CT analysis tool was used to measure interstitial features (reticular changes, honeycombing, centrilobular nodules, linear scar, nodular changes, subpleural lines, and ground-glass opacities) and emphysema in 8266 participants in a study of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) called COPDGene (recruited between October 2006 and January 2011). Additive differences in patients with emphysema with interstitial features and in those without interstitial features were analyzed by using t tests, multivariable linear regression, and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Multivariable linear and Cox regression were used to determine if interstitial features modified the effect of continuously measured emphysema on clinical measures of disease severity and mortality. Results Compared with individuals with emphysema alone, those with emphysema and interstitial features had a higher percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (absolute difference, 6.4%; P < .001), a lower percentage predicted diffusing capacity of lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) (absolute difference, 7.4%; P = .034), a 0.019 higher right ventricular-to-left ventricular (RVLV) volume ratio (P = .029), a 43.2-m shorter 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) (P < .001), a 5.9-point higher St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) score (P < .001), and 82% higher mortality (P < .001). In addition, interstitial features modified the effect of emphysema on percentage predicted DLCO, RVLV volume ratio, 6WMD, SGRQ score, and mortality (P for interaction < .05 for all). Conclusion In smokers, the combined presence of interstitial features and emphysema was associated with worse clinical disease severity and higher mortality than was emphysema alone. In addition, interstitial features

  1. Aspergillus infection of the respiratory tract after lung transplantation: chest radiographic and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederich, S.; Scadeng, M.; Flower, C.D.R.; Dennis, C.; Stewart, S.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of our study was to assess radiographic and CT findings in lung transplant patients with evidence of Aspergillus colonization or infection of the airways and correlate the findings with clinical, laboratory, bronchoalveolar lavage, biopsy and autopsy findings. The records of 189 patients who had undergone lung transplantation were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of Aspergillus colonization or infection of the airways. Aspergillus was demonstrated by culture or microscopy of sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or histologically from lung biopsies or postmortem studies in 44 patients (23 %). Notes and radiographs were available for analysis in 30 patients. In 12 of the 30 patients (40 %) chest radiographs remained normal. In 11 of 18 patients with abnormal radiographs pulmonary abnormalities were attributed to invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in the absence of other causes for pulmonary abnormalities (8 patients) or because of histological demonstration of IPA (3 patients). In these 11 patients initial radiographic abnormalities were focal areas of patchy consolidation (8 patients), ill-defined pulmonary nodules (2 patients) or a combination of both (1 patient). In some of the lesions cavitation was demonstrated subsequently. At CT a ''halo'' of decreased density was demonstrated in some of the nodules and lesion morphology and location were shown more precisely. Demonstration of Aspergillus from the respiratory tract after lung transplantation does not necessarily reflect IPA but may represent colonization of the airways or semi-invasive aspergillosis. The findings in patients with IPA did not differ from those described in the literature in other immunocompromised patients, suggesting that surgical disruption of lymphatic drainage and nervous supply or effects of preservation and transport of the transplant lung do not affect the radiographic appearances. (orig.)

  2. Sleep in intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Jennum, Poul; Nikolic, Miki

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine if improving intensive care unit (ICU) environment would enhance sleep quality, assessed by polysomnography (PSG), in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Randomized controlled trial, crossover design. The night intervention "quiet routine...... Medicine) sleep scoring criteria were insufficient for the assessment of polysomnograms. Modified classification for sleep scoring in critically ill patients, suggested by Watson et al. (Crit Care Med 2013;41:1958-1967), was used. RESULTS: Sound level analysis showed insignificant effect...... patients. We were not able to further reduce the already existing low noise levels in the ICU and did not find any association between the environmental intervention and the presence of normal sleep characteristics in the PSG....

  3. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before chest CT can...

  4. Determination of the optimal dose reduction level via iterative reconstruction using 640-slice volume chest CT in a pig model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingli Liu

    Full Text Available To determine the optimal dose reduction level of iterative reconstruction technique for paediatric chest CT in pig models.27 infant pigs underwent 640-slice volume chest CT with 80kVp and different mAs. Automatic exposure control technique was used, and the index of noise was set to SD10 (Group A, routine dose, SD12.5, SD15, SD17.5, SD20 (Groups from B to E to reduce dose respectively. Group A was reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP, and Groups from B to E were reconstructed using iterative reconstruction (IR. Objective and subjective image quality (IQ among groups were compared to determine an optimal radiation reduction level.The noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR in Group D had no significant statistical difference from that in Group A (P = 1.0. The scores of subjective IQ in Group A were not significantly different from those in Group D (P>0.05. There were no obvious statistical differences in the objective and subjective index values among the subgroups (small, medium and large subgroups of Group D. The effective dose (ED of Group D was 58.9% lower than that of Group A (0.20±0.05mSv vs 0.48±0.10mSv, p <0.001.In infant pig chest CT, using iterative reconstruction can provide diagnostic image quality; furthermore, it can reduce the dosage by 58.9%.

  5. Emphysema quantification and lung volumetry in chest X-ray equivalent ultralow dose CT - Intra-individual comparison with standard dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli, Michael; Ottilinger, Thorsten; Warschkow, René; Leschka, Sebastian; Alkadhi, Hatem; Wildermuth, Simon; Bauer, Ralf W

    2017-06-01

    To determine whether ultralow dose chest CT with tin filtration can be used for emphysema quantification and lung volumetry and to assess differences in emphysema measurements and lung volume between standard dose and ultralow dose CT scans using advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE). 84 consecutive patients from a prospective, IRB-approved single-center study were included and underwent clinically indicated standard dose chest CT (1.7±0.6mSv) and additional single-energy ultralow dose CT (0.14±0.01mSv) at 100kV and fixed tube current at 70mAs with tin filtration in the same session. Forty of the 84 patients (48%) had no emphysema, 44 (52%) had emphysema. One radiologist performed fully automated software-based pulmonary emphysema quantification and lung volumetry of standard and ultralow dose CT with different levels of ADMIRE. Friedman test and Wilcoxon rank sum test were used for multiple comparison of emphysema and lung volume. Lung volumes were compared using the concordance correlation coefficient. The median low-attenuation areas (LAA) using filtered back projection (FBP) in standard dose was 4.4% and decreased to 2.6%, 2.1% and 1.8% using ADMIRE 3, 4, and 5, respectively. The median values of LAA in ultralow dose CT were 5.7%, 4.1% and 2.4% for ADMIRE 3, 4, and 5, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between LAA in standard dose CT using FBP and ultralow dose using ADMIRE 4 (p=0.358) as well as in standard dose CT using ADMIRE 3 and ultralow dose using ADMIRE 5 (p=0.966). In comparison with standard dose FBP the concordance correlation coefficients of lung volumetry were 1.000, 0.999, and 0.999 for ADMIRE 3, 4, and 5 in standard dose, and 0.972 for ADMIRE 3, 4 and 5 in ultralow dose CT. Ultralow dose CT at chest X-ray equivalent dose levels allows for lung volumetry as well as detection and quantification of emphysema. However, longitudinal emphysema analyses should be performed with the same scan protocol and

  6. Pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer on radiological findings: Evaluation of chest CT findings in pathologically proven 76 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Daun; Shin, Sang Soo; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Kim, Hyoung Ook; Seon, Hyun Ju; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate chest CT features of pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung malignancy. We retrospectively reviewed chest CT findings for 76 consecutive patients (21-84 years, average: 63 years; M : F = 30 : 46) who underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure under the suspicion of lung cancer and were pathologically diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis by bronchoscopic biopsy (n = 49), transthoracic needle biopsy (n = 17), and surgical resection (n = 10). We categorized the chest CT patterns of those lesions as follows: bronchial narrowing or obstruction without a central mass like lesion (pattern 1), central mass-like lesion with distal atelectasis or obstructive pneumonia (pattern 2), peripheral nodule or mass including mass-like consolidation (pattern 3), and cavitary lesion (pattern 4). CT findings were reviewed with respect to the patterns and the locations of the lesions, parenchymal abnormalities adjacent to the lesions, the size, the border and pattern of enhancement for the peripheral nodule or mass and the thickness of the cavitary wall in the cavitary lesion. We also evaluated the abnormalities regarding the lymph node and pleura. Pattern 1 was the most common finding (n = 34), followed by pattern 3 (n = 23), pattern 2 (n = 11) and finally, pattern 4 (n = 8). The most frequently involving site in pattern 1 and 2 was the right middle lobe (n = 14/45). However, in pattern 3 and 4, the superior segment of right lower lobe (n = 5/31) was most frequently involved. Ill-defined small nodules and/or larger confluent nodules were found in the adjacent lung and at the other segment of the lung in 31 patients (40.8%). Enlarged lymph nodes were most commonly detected in the right paratracheal area (n = 9/18). Pleural effusion was demonstrated in 10 patients. On the CT, pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer most commonly presented with bronchial narrowing or obstruction without a central mass-like lesion, which resulted in distal atelectasis and obstructive

  7. Pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer on radiological findings: Evaluation of chest CT findings in pathologically proven 76 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Daun; Shin, Sang Soo; Kim, Yun Hyeon [Chonnam National Univ. Hospital, Gwangju, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Ook; Seon, Hyun Ju; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National Univ. Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To evaluate chest CT features of pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung malignancy. We retrospectively reviewed chest CT findings for 76 consecutive patients (21-84 years, average: 63 years; M : F = 30 : 46) who underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure under the suspicion of lung cancer and were pathologically diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis by bronchoscopic biopsy (n = 49), transthoracic needle biopsy (n = 17), and surgical resection (n = 10). We categorized the chest CT patterns of those lesions as follows: bronchial narrowing or obstruction without a central mass like lesion (pattern 1), central mass-like lesion with distal atelectasis or obstructive pneumonia (pattern 2), peripheral nodule or mass including mass-like consolidation (pattern 3), and cavitary lesion (pattern 4). CT findings were reviewed with respect to the patterns and the locations of the lesions, parenchymal abnormalities adjacent to the lesions, the size, the border and pattern of enhancement for the peripheral nodule or mass and the thickness of the cavitary wall in the cavitary lesion. We also evaluated the abnormalities regarding the lymph node and pleura. Pattern 1 was the most common finding (n = 34), followed by pattern 3 (n = 23), pattern 2 (n = 11) and finally, pattern 4 (n = 8). The most frequently involving site in pattern 1 and 2 was the right middle lobe (n = 14/45). However, in pattern 3 and 4, the superior segment of right lower lobe (n = 5/31) was most frequently involved. Ill-defined small nodules and/or larger confluent nodules were found in the adjacent lung and at the other segment of the lung in 31 patients (40.8%). Enlarged lymph nodes were most commonly detected in the right paratracheal area (n = 9/18). Pleural effusion was demonstrated in 10 patients. On the CT, pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking lung cancer most commonly presented with bronchial narrowing or obstruction without a central mass-like lesion, which resulted in distal atelectasis and obstructive

  8. Is Weight-Based Adjustment of Automatic Exposure Control Necessary for the Reduction of Chest CT Radiation Dose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Priyanka; Gilman, Matthew D.; Shepard, Jo-Anne O.; Digumarthy, Subba R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of radiation dose reduction in the chest CT using a weight-based adjustment of the automatic exposure control (AEC) technique. Materials and Methods With Institutional Review Board Approval, 60 patients (mean age, 59.1 years; M:F = 35:25) and 57 weight-matched patients (mean age, 52.3 years, M:F = 25:32) were scanned using a weight-adjusted AEC and non-weight-adjusted AEC, respectively on a 64-slice multidetector CT with a 0.984:1 pitch, 0.5 second rotation time, 40 mm table feed/rotation, and 2.5 mm section thickness. Patients were categorized into 3 weight categories; 90 kg (n = 48). Patient weights, scanning parameters, CT dose index volumes (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) were recorded, while effective dose (ED) was estimated. Image noise was measured in the descending thoracic aorta. Data were analyzed using a standard statistical package (SAS/STAT) (Version 9.1, SAS institute Inc, Cary, NC). Results Compared to the non-weight-adjusted AEC, the weight-adjusted AEC technique resulted in an average decrease of 29% in CTDIvol and a 27% effective dose reduction (p 91 kg weight groups, respectively, compared to 20.3, 27.9 and 32.8 mGy, with non-weight-adjusted AEC. No significant difference was observed for objective image noise between the chest CT acquired with the non-weight-adjusted (15.0 ± 3.1) and weight-adjusted (16.1 ± 5.6) AEC techniques (p > 0.05). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that AEC should be tailored according to patient weight. Without weight-based adjustment of AEC, patients are exposed to a 17 - 43% higher radiation-dose from a chest CT. PMID:20046494

  9. Evaluation of image quality and radiation dose by adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique level for chest CT examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun Suk; Lee, Jong-Woong; Seo, Jeong Beom; Jung, Jae-Eun; Choi, Jiwon; Kweon, Dae Cheol

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) level that enables optimal image quality and dose reduction in the chest computed tomography (CT) protocol with ASIR. A chest phantom with 0-50 % ASIR levels was scanned and then noise power spectrum (NPS), signal and noise and the degree of distortion of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) were measured. In addition, the objectivity of the experiment was measured using the American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom. Moreover, on a qualitative basis, five lesions' resolution, latitude and distortion degree of chest phantom and their compiled statistics were evaluated. The NPS value decreased as the frequency increased. The lowest noise and deviation were at the 20 % ASIR level, mean 126.15 ± 22.21. As a result of the degree of distortion, signal-to-noise ratio and PSNR at 20 % ASIR level were at the highest value as 31.0 and 41.52. However, maximum absolute error and RMSE showed the lowest deviation value as 11.2 and 16. In the ACR phantom study, all ASIR levels were within acceptable allowance of guidelines. The 20 % ASIR level performed best in qualitative evaluation at five lesions of chest phantom as resolution score 4.3, latitude 3.47 and the degree of distortion 4.25. The 20 % ASIR level was proved to be the best in all experiments, noise, distortion evaluation using ImageJ and qualitative evaluation of five lesions of a chest phantom. Therefore, optimal images as well as reduce radiation dose would be acquired when 20 % ASIR level in thoracic CT is applied.

  10. Application of triple rule-out with 64-slice spiral CT in the diagnosis of acute chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Pengyu; Li Kuncheng; Du Xiangyin; Cao Lizhen; Liu Jiabin; Yang Yanhuui; Liang Zhigang; Zhu Xiaolian; Liu Jian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the performance of triple rule-out with 64-slice spiral CT in the combined examination of pulmonary artery, thoracic aorta and coronary artery for patients with acute chest pain. Methods: Seventy patients who presented with acute chest pain were included in the study. All of the patients underwent retrospective ECG-gated 64-slice computed tomography triple rule-out examination to evaluate the pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta and coronary arteries. Multi-planar reconstruction (MPR), maximum intensity projection (MIP), curved-planar reconstruction (CPR) and volume rendering (VR) were used to display pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta and coronary arteries. We evaluated the image quality of coronary artery and the enhancement of the pulmonary artery and thoracic aorta to estimate if the examination can fulfill the clinical demand for the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain. Results: The mean scan time was (8.5±1.0) s, and the dose of contrast medium injected was 100 ml. There were 95.7% (67/70) of patients whose CT values detected in the pulmonary artery and thoracic aorta after enhancement Were ≥200 HU. The image quality of 85.8% (720/839) coronary segments was classified as excellent, 8.6% (72/839) as good, and 5.6% (47/839) as poor. There were 20 eases with coronary stenoses ≥50%, 2 cases with pulmonary embolism, and 2 cases with aortic dissection. Conclusion: The triple rule-out examination with 64-slice spiral CT could depict pulmonary artery, thoracic aorta, and coronary artery in 8 s with good image quality. It has great potential in the etiological diagnosis for the patients with acute chest pain. (authors)

  11. Prevalence and Severity of Off-Centering During Diagnostic CT: Observations From 57,621 CT scans of the Chest, Abdomen, and/or Pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin-Akintayo, Oladunni O; Alexander, Lauren F; Neill, Rebecca; Krupinksi, Elizabeth A; Tang, Xiangyang; Mittal, Pardeep K; Small, William C; Moreno, Courtney C

    2018-02-23

    To determine distances between patient centroid and gantry isocenter during CT imaging of the chest, abdomen, and/or pelvis, and to evaluate differences based on patient gender, scan region, patient position, and gantry aperture. A water phantom and an anthropomorphic phantom were imaged in the centered position in the CT gantry and at several off-centered positions. Additionally, data from 57,621 adult chest, abdomen, and/or pelvic CT acquisitions were evaluated. Data were analyzed with an analysis of variance using the centroid-to-isocenter data as the dependent variable and the other parameters as independent variables. The majority of patient acquisitions (83.7% (48271/57621)) were performed with the patient's centroid positioned below isocenter (mean 1.7 cm below isocenter (SD 1.8 cm); range 12.1 cm below to 7.8 cm above isocenter). Off-centering in the x-axis was less severe (mean 0.01 cm left of isocenter (SD 1.6 cm)). Distance between centroid and isocenter in the y-axis did not differ as a function of sex but did differ based on scan region, patient position, and gantry aperture. Off-centering is common during CT imaging and has been previously demonstrated to impact dose and image quality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fully automated bone mineral density assessment from low-dose chest CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Gonzalez, Jessica; Zulueta, Javier; de-Torres, Juan P.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2018-02-01

    A fully automated system is presented for bone mineral density (BMD) assessment from low-dose chest CT (LDCT). BMD assessment is central in the diagnosis and follow-up therapy monitoring of osteoporosis, which is characterized by low bone density and is estimated to affect 12.3 million US population aged 50 years or older, creating tremendous social and economic burdens. BMD assessment from DXA scans (BMDDXA) is currently the most widely used and gold standard technique for the diagnosis of osteoporosis and bone fracture risk estimation. With the recent large-scale implementation of annual lung cancer screening using LDCT, great potential emerges for the concurrent opportunistic osteoporosis screening. In the presented BMDCT assessment system, each vertebral body is first segmented and labeled with its anatomical name. Various 3D region of interest (ROI) inside the vertebral body are then explored for BMDCT measurements at different vertebral levels. The system was validated using 76 pairs of DXA and LDCT scans of the same subject. Average BMDDXA of L1-L4 was used as the reference standard. Statistically significant (p-value correlation is obtained between BMDDXA and BMDCT at all vertebral levels (T1 - L2). A Pearson correlation of 0.857 was achieved between BMDDXA and average BMDCT of T9-T11 by using a 3D ROI taking into account of both trabecular and cortical bone tissue. These encouraging results demonstrate the feasibility of fully automated quantitative BMD assessment and the potential of opportunistic osteoporosis screening with concurrent lung cancer screening using LDCT.

  13. Computer-aided detection of lung nodules on chest CT: issues to be solved before clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Jin Mo

    2005-01-01

    Given the increasing resolution of modern CT scanners, and the requirements for large-scale lung-screening examinations and diagnostic studies, there is an increased need for the accurate and reproducible analysis of the large number of images. Nodule detection is one of the main challenges of CT imaging, as they can be missed due to their small size, low relative contrast, or because they are located in an area with complex anatomy. Recent developments in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) schemes are expected to aid radiologists in various tasks of chest imaging. In this era of multidetector row CT, the thoracic applications of greatest interest include the detection and volume measurement of lung nodules (1-7). Technology for CAD as applied to lung nodule detection on chest CT has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and is currently commercially available. The article by Lee et al. (5) in this issue of the Korean Journal of Radiology is one of the few studies to examine the influence of a commercially available CAD system on the detection of lung nodules. In this study, some additional nodules were detected with the help of a CAD system, but at the expense of increased false positivity. The nodule detection rate of the CAD system in this study was lower than that achieved by radiologist, and the authors insist that the CAD system should be improved further. Compared to the use of CAD on mammograms, CAD evaluations of chest CTs remain limited to the laboratory setting. In this field, apart from the issues of detection rate and false positive detections, many obstacles must be overcome before CAD can be used in a true clinical reading environment. In this editorial, I will list some of these issues, but I emphasize now that I believe these issues will be solved by improved CAD versions in the near future

  14. The influence of upper limb position on the effect of a contrast agent in chest CT enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Shi-Ting; Wang, Meng; Gao, Zhenhua; Tan, Guosheng; Cai, Huasong; Hu, Xiaoshu; Yang, Jianyong; Li, Zi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the influence of two different upper limb positions on contrast agent effects in chest CT enhancement. Materials and methods: In 142 patients undergoing contrast-enhanced CT chest scanning, an indwelling venous catheter was placed in the right hand and iodinated contrast agent was injected through a high-pressure single syringe pump. The patients were divided into three age groups (<40 years; 40–60 years; and >60 years) and randomly assigned to one of two upper limb position groups: (1) supine position, both upper limbs extended and raised above head in the same horizontal plane as the body; and (2) supine position, both upper limbs raised and crossed on the forehead, with the right arm on top. Differences in mean CT values on the two sides of the thoracic inlet along the right subclavian vein were used to evaluate the effects of the contrast agent. Results: Although contrast agent effects were not significantly different among the three age groups with either limb position, there was a significant difference between patients adopting the second limb positions (Chi-square value was 5.936, P < 0.05). An excellent or good contrast agent effect was observed in 63.08% of patients assuming the first limb position, as compared with 81.69% assuming the second position. Conclusion: For contrast-enhanced CT chest scans, use of the second limb position can reduce retention of the contrast agent in the right axillary vein and the right subclavian vein outside the thorax, increase contrast agent utilization, and decrease artifacts caused by high-density, local retention of the contrast agent

  15. X-ray diagnosis of pneumothorax in intensive care units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galanski, M.; Hartenauer, U.; Krumme, B.

    1981-01-01

    Pneumothorax is the most severe manifestation of pulmonary barotrauma which occurs in mechanical ventilation. Diagnosis of pneumothorax in intensive care radiology is of particular difficulty. Chest radiographs in supine position show a variety of signs which may be helpful but are not conclusive. There are different techniques for verification of ventrally located pneumothorax. 45 0 tangential radiographs of the hemithorax in question are most conclusive for demonstration of extrapulmonary air located inside the pleural cavity. This 45 0 technique is easy to carry out without changing the patients position. (orig.) [de

  16. Computer-aided detection (CAD) of solid pulmonary nodules in chest x-ray equivalent ultralow dose chest CT - first in-vivo results at dose levels of 0.13 mSv

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messerli, Michael, E-mail: Michael.Messerli@usz.ch [Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Kluckert, Thomas; Knitel, Meinhard [Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Rengier, Fabian [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg (Germany); Warschkow, René [Department of Surgery, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, University Zurich (Switzerland); Leschka, Sebastian [Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, University Zurich (Switzerland); Wildermuth, Simon; Bauer, Ralf W. [Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Computer-aided detection (CAD) of solid pulmonary nodules was compared in 202 patients in standard dose and ultralow dose CT. • The per–nodule sensitivity of CAD was 70% in standard dose CT and 68% in ultralow dose CT. • The per–nodule sensitivity of CAD in standard dose CT was similar to ultralow dose CT in all size subgroups (all p > 0.05). • Adding CAD markings in ultralow dose CT significantly improved the sensitivity of two radiologists from 77% to 88% and from 66% to 79%, respectively. • CAD can serve as an excellent second reader for nodule detection in CT even at dose levels similar to chest X-ray. - Abstract: Objectives: To determine the value of computer-aided detection (CAD) for solid pulmonary nodules in ultralow radiation dose single-energy computed tomography (CT) of the chest using third-generation dual-source CT at 100 kV and fixed tube current at 70 mAs with tin filtration. Methods: 202 consecutive patients undergoing clinically indicated standard dose chest CT (1.8 ± 0.7 mSv) were prospectively included and scanned with an additional ultralow dose CT (0.13 ± 0.01 mSv) in the same session. Standard of reference (SOR) was established by consensus reading of standard dose CT by two radiologists. CAD was performed in standard dose and ultralow dose CT with two different reconstruction kernels. CAD detection rate of nodules was evaluated including subgroups of different nodule sizes (<5, 5–7, >7 mm). Sensitivity was further analysed in multivariable mixed effects logistic regression. Results: The SOR included 279 solid nodules (mean diameter 4.3 ± 3.4 mm, range 1–24 mm). There was no significant difference in per–nodule sensitivity of CAD in standard dose with 70% compared to 68% in ultralow dose CT both overall and in different size subgroups (all p > 0.05). CAD led to a significant increase of sensitivity for both radiologists reading the ultralow dose CT scans (all p < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, the use

  17. Computer-aided detection (CAD) of solid pulmonary nodules in chest x-ray equivalent ultralow dose chest CT - first in-vivo results at dose levels of 0.13 mSv

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messerli, Michael; Kluckert, Thomas; Knitel, Meinhard; Rengier, Fabian; Warschkow, René; Alkadhi, Hatem; Leschka, Sebastian; Wildermuth, Simon; Bauer, Ralf W.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Computer-aided detection (CAD) of solid pulmonary nodules was compared in 202 patients in standard dose and ultralow dose CT. • The per–nodule sensitivity of CAD was 70% in standard dose CT and 68% in ultralow dose CT. • The per–nodule sensitivity of CAD in standard dose CT was similar to ultralow dose CT in all size subgroups (all p > 0.05). • Adding CAD markings in ultralow dose CT significantly improved the sensitivity of two radiologists from 77% to 88% and from 66% to 79%, respectively. • CAD can serve as an excellent second reader for nodule detection in CT even at dose levels similar to chest X-ray. - Abstract: Objectives: To determine the value of computer-aided detection (CAD) for solid pulmonary nodules in ultralow radiation dose single-energy computed tomography (CT) of the chest using third-generation dual-source CT at 100 kV and fixed tube current at 70 mAs with tin filtration. Methods: 202 consecutive patients undergoing clinically indicated standard dose chest CT (1.8 ± 0.7 mSv) were prospectively included and scanned with an additional ultralow dose CT (0.13 ± 0.01 mSv) in the same session. Standard of reference (SOR) was established by consensus reading of standard dose CT by two radiologists. CAD was performed in standard dose and ultralow dose CT with two different reconstruction kernels. CAD detection rate of nodules was evaluated including subgroups of different nodule sizes (<5, 5–7, >7 mm). Sensitivity was further analysed in multivariable mixed effects logistic regression. Results: The SOR included 279 solid nodules (mean diameter 4.3 ± 3.4 mm, range 1–24 mm). There was no significant difference in per–nodule sensitivity of CAD in standard dose with 70% compared to 68% in ultralow dose CT both overall and in different size subgroups (all p > 0.05). CAD led to a significant increase of sensitivity for both radiologists reading the ultralow dose CT scans (all p < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, the use

  18. Radiation doses to neonates requiring intensive care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.; Dellagrammaticas, H.D.

    1983-01-01

    Radiological investigations have become accepted as an important part of the range of facilities required to support severely ill newborn babies. Since the infants are so small, many of the examinations are virtually ''whole-body'' irradiations and it was thought that the total doses received might be appreciable. A group of such babies admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Sheffield over a six-month period have been studied. X-ray exposure factors used for each examination have been noted and total skin, gonad and bone marrow doses calculated, supplemented by measurements on phantoms. It is concluded that in most cases doses received are of the same order as those received over the same period from natural background radiation and probably less than those received from prenatal obstetric radiography, so that the additional risks from the diagnostic exposure are small. The highest doses are received in CT scans and barium examinations and it is recommended that the need for these should be carefully considered. (author)

  19. Automated tube potential selection for standard chest and abdominal CT in follow-up patients with testicular cancer: comparison with fixed tube potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnannt, Ralph; Winklehner, Anna; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Eberli, Daniel [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic for Urology, Zurich (Switzerland); Knuth, Alexander [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic for Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-09-15

    To evaluate prospectively, in patients with testicular cancer, the radiation dose-saving potential and image quality of contrast-enhanced chest and abdominal CT with automated tube potential selection. Forty consecutive patients with testicular cancer underwent contrast-enhanced arterio-venous chest and portal-venous abdominal CT with automated tube potential selection (protocol B; tube potential 80-140 kVp), which is based on the attenuation of the CT topogram. All had a first CT at 120 kVp (protocol A) using the same 64-section CT machine and similar settings. Image quality was assessed; dose information (CTDI{sub vol}) was noted. Image noise and attenuation in the liver and spleen were significantly higher for protocol B (P < 0.05 each), whereas attenuation in the deltoid and erector spinae muscles was similar. In protocol B, tube potential was reduced to 100 kVp in 18 chest and 33 abdominal examinations, and to 80 kVp in 5 abdominal CT examinations; it increased to 140 kVp in one patient. Image quality of examinations using both CT protocols was rated as diagnostic. CTDI{sub vol} was significantly lower for protocol B compared to protocol A (reduction by 12%, P < 0.01). In patients with testicular cancer, radiation dose of chest and abdominal CT can be reduced with automated tube potential selection, while image quality is preserved. (orig.)

  20. African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care is to provide a medium for the dissemination of original works in Africa and other parts of the world about anaesthesia and intensive care including the application of basic sciences ...

  1. [Quality management in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J; Braun, J-P

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of critical ill patients in the intensive care unit is tantamount to well-designed risk or quality management. Several tools of quality management and quality assurance have been developed in intensive care medicine. In addition to extern quality assurance by benchmarking with regard to the intensive care medicine, peer review procedures have been established for external quality assurance in recent years. In the process of peer review of an intensive care unit (ICU), external physicians and nurses visit the ICU, evaluate on-site proceedings, and discuss with the managing team of the ICU possibilities for optimization. Furthermore, internal quality management in the ICU is possible based on the 10 quality indicators of the German Interdisciplinary Society for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI, "Deutschen Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin"). Thereby every ICU has numerous possibilities to improve their quality management system.

  2. CORK Study in Cystic Fibrosis: Sustained Improvements in Ultra-Low-Dose Chest CT Scores After CFTR Modulation With Ivacaftor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, Nicola J; Einarsson, Gisli G; Twomey, Maria; Mooney, Denver; Mullane, David; NiChroinin, Muireann; O'Callaghan, Grace; Shanahan, Fergus; Murphy, Desmond M; O'Connor, Owen J; Shortt, Cathy A; Tunney, Michael M; Eustace, Joseph A; Maher, Michael M; Elborn, J Stuart; Plant, Barry J

    2018-02-01

    Ivacaftor produces significant clinical benefit in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) with the G551D mutation. Prevalence of this mutation at the Cork CF Centre is 23%. This study assessed the impact of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulation on multiple modalities of patient assessment. Thirty-three patients with the G551D mutation were assessed at baseline and prospectively every 3 months for 1 year after initiation of ivacaftor. Change in ultra-low-dose chest CT scans, blood inflammatory mediators, and the sputum microbiome were assessed. Significant improvements in FEV 1 , BMI, and sweat chloride levels were observed post-ivacaftor treatment. Improvement in ultra-low-dose CT imaging scores were observed after treatment, with significant mean reductions in total Bhalla score (P < .01), peribronchial thickening (P = .035), and extent of mucous plugging (P < .001). Reductions in circulating inflammatory markers, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 were demonstrated. There was a 30% reduction in the relative abundance of Pseudomonas species and an increase in the relative abundance of bacteria associated with more stable community structures. Posttreatment community richness increased significantly (P = .03). Early and sustained improvements on ultra-low-dose CT scores suggest it may be a useful method of evaluating treatment response. It paralleled improvement in symptoms, circulating inflammatory markers, and changes in the lung microbiota. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel influenza A (H1N1) infection: chest CT findings from 21 cases in Seoul, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, S.S., E-mail: sinisim@ewha.ac.k [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Y.J. [Division of Pulmonary and Critical care medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Aim: To retrospectively evaluate the computed tomography (CT) appearances of novel influenza A (H1N1) infection. Materials and methods: Chest CT images obtained at clinical presentation in 21 patients (eight men, 13 women; mean age, 37 years; age range, 6-82 years) with confirmed novel influenza A (H1N1) infection were assessed. The radiological appearances of pulmonary parenchymal abnormalities, distribution, and extent of involvement on initial chest CT images were documented. The study group was divided on the basis of age [group 1, patients <18 years old (n = 8); group 2, patients {>=}18 years old (n = 13)]. Medical records were reviewed for underlying medical conditions and laboratory findings. The occurrence of recognizable CT patterns was compared for each group using the images from the initial CT examination. Results: The most common CT pattern observed in all patients was ground-glass attenuated (GGA) lesions (20/21, 95%). Bronchial wall thickening (9/21, 43%) was the second most common CT finding. Other common CT findings were consolidation (6/21, 29%), pleural effusion (6/21, 29%), pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum (5/21, 24%), and atelectasis (5/21, 24%). Among these, atelectasis and pneumomediastinum (pneumothorax) were only observed in group 1. The GGA lesions showed predilections for diffuse multifocal (10/20, 50%) or lower zone (8/20, 40%) distribution. Involvement of central lung parenchyma (12/20, 60%) was more common than a mixed peripheral and central pattern (6/20, 30%) or a subpleural pattern (2/20, 10%) at the time of presentation. Patchy GGA lesions were more frequent (18/20, 90%) than diffuse GGA lesions, and 75% (15/20) of these lesions had a bronchovascular distribution. Bilateral disease was present in all patients with GGA lesions. Bronchial wall thickening was predominantly centrally located and the distribution of the consolidation was non-specific. Conclusion: The predominantly centrally located GGA lesions, with common multifocal

  4. Novel influenza A (H1N1) infection: chest CT findings from 21 cases in Seoul, Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, S.S.; Kim, Y.; Ryu, Y.J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To retrospectively evaluate the computed tomography (CT) appearances of novel influenza A (H1N1) infection. Materials and methods: Chest CT images obtained at clinical presentation in 21 patients (eight men, 13 women; mean age, 37 years; age range, 6-82 years) with confirmed novel influenza A (H1N1) infection were assessed. The radiological appearances of pulmonary parenchymal abnormalities, distribution, and extent of involvement on initial chest CT images were documented. The study group was divided on the basis of age [group 1, patients <18 years old (n = 8); group 2, patients ≥18 years old (n = 13)]. Medical records were reviewed for underlying medical conditions and laboratory findings. The occurrence of recognizable CT patterns was compared for each group using the images from the initial CT examination. Results: The most common CT pattern observed in all patients was ground-glass attenuated (GGA) lesions (20/21, 95%). Bronchial wall thickening (9/21, 43%) was the second most common CT finding. Other common CT findings were consolidation (6/21, 29%), pleural effusion (6/21, 29%), pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum (5/21, 24%), and atelectasis (5/21, 24%). Among these, atelectasis and pneumomediastinum (pneumothorax) were only observed in group 1. The GGA lesions showed predilections for diffuse multifocal (10/20, 50%) or lower zone (8/20, 40%) distribution. Involvement of central lung parenchyma (12/20, 60%) was more common than a mixed peripheral and central pattern (6/20, 30%) or a subpleural pattern (2/20, 10%) at the time of presentation. Patchy GGA lesions were more frequent (18/20, 90%) than diffuse GGA lesions, and 75% (15/20) of these lesions had a bronchovascular distribution. Bilateral disease was present in all patients with GGA lesions. Bronchial wall thickening was predominantly centrally located and the distribution of the consolidation was non-specific. Conclusion: The predominantly centrally located GGA lesions, with common multifocal or

  5. Missed rib fractures on evaluation of initial chest CT for trauma patients: pattern analysis and diagnostic value of coronal multiplanar reconstruction images with multidetector row CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S H; Sung, Y M; Kim, M S

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to review the prevalence and radiological features of rib fractures missed on initial chest CT evaluation, and to examine the diagnostic value of additional coronal images in a large series of trauma patients. 130 patients who presented to an emergency room for blunt chest trauma underwent multidetector row CT of the thorax within the first hour during their stay, and had follow-up CT or bone scans as diagnostic gold standards. Images were evaluated on two separate occasions: once with axial images and once with both axial and coronal images. The detection rates of missed rib fractures were compared between readings using a non-parametric method of clustered data. In the cases of missed rib fractures, the shapes, locations and associated fractures were evaluated. 58 rib fractures were missed with axial images only and 52 were missed with both axial and coronal images (p=0.088). The most common shape of missed rib fractures was buckled (56.9%), and the anterior arc (55.2%) was most commonly involved. 21 (36.2%) missed rib fractures had combined fractures on the same ribs, and 38 (65.5%) were accompanied by fracture on neighbouring ribs. Missed rib fractures are not uncommon, and radiologists should be familiar with buckle fractures, which are frequently missed. Additional coronal imagescan be helpful in the diagnosis of rib fractures that are not seen on axial images.

  6. Lesion detection performance: comparative analysis of low-dose CT data of the chest on two hybrid imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessop, Maryam; Thompson, John D; Coward, Joanne; Sanderud, Audun; Jorge, José; de Groot, Martijn; Lança, Luís; Hogg, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Incidental findings on low-dose CT images obtained during hybrid imaging are an increasing phenomenon as CT technology advances. Understanding the diagnostic value of incidental findings along with the technical limitations is important when reporting image results and recommending follow-up, which may result in an additional radiation dose from further diagnostic imaging and an increase in patient anxiety. This study assessed lesions incidentally detected on CT images acquired for attenuation correction on two SPECT/CT systems. An anthropomorphic chest phantom containing simulated lesions of varying size and density was imaged on an Infinia Hawkeye 4 and a Symbia T6 using the low-dose CT settings applied for attenuation correction acquisitions in myocardial perfusion imaging. Twenty-two interpreters assessed 46 images from each SPECT/CT system (15 normal images and 31 abnormal images; 41 lesions). Data were evaluated using a jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating-characteristic analysis (JAFROC). JAFROC analysis showed a significant difference (P detection, with the figures of merit being 0.599 (95% confidence interval, 0.568, 0.631) and 0.810 (95% confidence interval, 0.781, 0.839) for the Infinia Hawkeye 4 and Symbia T6, respectively. Lesion detection on the Infinia Hawkeye 4 was generally limited to larger, higher-density lesions. The Symbia T6 allowed improved detection rates for midsized lesions and some lower-density lesions. However, interpreters struggled to detect small (5 mm) lesions on both image sets, irrespective of density. Lesion detection is more reliable on low-dose CT images from the Symbia T6 than from the Infinia Hawkeye 4. This phantom-based study gives an indication of potential lesion detection in the clinical context as shown by two commonly used SPECT/CT systems, which may assist the clinician in determining whether further diagnostic imaging is justified. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

  7. Deep convolutional neural networks for automatic coronary calcium scoring in a screening study with low-dose chest CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessmann, Nikolas; Išgum, Ivana; Setio, Arnaud A. A.; de Vos, Bob D.; Ciompi, Francesco; de Jong, Pim A.; Oudkerk, Matthjis; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Viergever, Max A.; van Ginneken, Bram

    2016-03-01

    The amount of calcifications in the coronary arteries is a powerful and independent predictor of cardiovascular events and is used to identify subjects at high risk who might benefit from preventive treatment. Routine quantification of coronary calcium scores can complement screening programs using low-dose chest CT, such as lung cancer screening. We present a system for automatic coronary calcium scoring based on deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs). The system uses three independently trained CNNs to estimate a bounding box around the heart. In this region of interest, connected components above 130 HU are considered candidates for coronary artery calcifications. To separate them from other high intensity lesions, classification of all extracted voxels is performed by feeding two-dimensional 50 mm × 50 mm patches from three orthogonal planes into three concurrent CNNs. The networks consist of three convolutional layers and one fully-connected layer with 256 neurons. In the experiments, 1028 non-contrast-enhanced and non-ECG-triggered low-dose chest CT scans were used. The network was trained on 797 scans. In the remaining 231 test scans, the method detected on average 194.3 mm3 of 199.8 mm3 coronary calcifications per scan (sensitivity 97.2 %) with an average false-positive volume of 10.3 mm3 . Subjects were assigned to one of five standard cardiovascular risk categories based on the Agatston score. Accuracy of risk category assignment was 84.4 % with a linearly weighted κ of 0.89. The proposed system can perform automatic coronary artery calcium scoring to identify subjects undergoing low-dose chest CT screening who are at risk of cardiovascular events with high accuracy.

  8. Combining automatic tube current modulation with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction for low-dose chest CT screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Hong Chen

    Full Text Available To reduce radiation dose while maintaining image quality in low-dose chest computed tomography (CT by combining adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR and automatic tube current modulation (ATCM.Patients undergoing cancer screening (n = 200 were subjected to 64-slice multidetector chest CT scanning with ASIR and ATCM. Patients were divided into groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 (n = 50 each, with a noise index (NI of 15, 20, 30, and 40, respectively. Each image set was reconstructed with 4 ASIR levels (0% ASIR, 30% ASIR, 50% ASIR, and 80% ASIR in each group. Two radiologists assessed subjective image noise, image artifacts, and visibility of the anatomical structures. Objective image noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR were measured, and effective dose (ED was recorded.Increased NI was associated with increased subjective and objective image noise results (P<0.001, and SNR decreased with increasing NI (P<0.001. These values improved with increased ASIR levels (P<0.001. Images from all 4 groups were clinically diagnosable. Images with NI = 30 and 50% ASIR had average subjective image noise scores and nearly average anatomical structure visibility scores, with a mean objective image noise of 23.42 HU. The EDs for groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 were 2.79 ± 1.17, 1.69 ± 0.59, 0.74 ± 0.29, and 0.37 ± 0.22 mSv, respectively. Compared to group 1 (NI = 15, the ED reductions were 39.43%, 73.48%, and 86.74% for groups 2, 3, and 4, respectively.Using NI = 30 with 50% ASIR in the chest CT protocol, we obtained average or above-average image quality but a reduced ED.

  9. Combining automatic tube current modulation with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction for low-dose chest CT screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Hong; Jin, Er-Hu; He, Wen; Zhao, Li-Qin

    2014-01-01

    To reduce radiation dose while maintaining image quality in low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) by combining adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and automatic tube current modulation (ATCM). Patients undergoing cancer screening (n = 200) were subjected to 64-slice multidetector chest CT scanning with ASIR and ATCM. Patients were divided into groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 (n = 50 each), with a noise index (NI) of 15, 20, 30, and 40, respectively. Each image set was reconstructed with 4 ASIR levels (0% ASIR, 30% ASIR, 50% ASIR, and 80% ASIR) in each group. Two radiologists assessed subjective image noise, image artifacts, and visibility of the anatomical structures. Objective image noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured, and effective dose (ED) was recorded. Increased NI was associated with increased subjective and objective image noise results (PASIR levels (PASIR had average subjective image noise scores and nearly average anatomical structure visibility scores, with a mean objective image noise of 23.42 HU. The EDs for groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 were 2.79 ± 1.17, 1.69 ± 0.59, 0.74 ± 0.29, and 0.37 ± 0.22 mSv, respectively. Compared to group 1 (NI = 15), the ED reductions were 39.43%, 73.48%, and 86.74% for groups 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Using NI = 30 with 50% ASIR in the chest CT protocol, we obtained average or above-average image quality but a reduced ED.

  10. Blunt-tip coaxial introducer: a revisited tool for difficult CT-guided biopsy in the chest and abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bazelaire, Cedric; Farges, Cecile; Mathieu, Olivier; Zagdanski, Anne-Marie; Bourrier, Pierre; Frija, Jacques; de Kerviler, Eric

    2009-08-01

    We describe a coaxial introducer provided with an additional blunt-tip stylet that allows safe access to difficult-to-reach lymph nodes in the chest, abdomen, and pelvis under CT control. Once the thoracic, abdominal, or pelvic wall is crossed by the introducer fitted with the sharp-tip stylet, the blunt-tip stylet replaces the sharp stylet for further progression in the fat toward the target. The soft-tip stylet carries a smaller risk of inadvertent perforation displacing vital structures.

  11. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and database system for chest diagnosis based on multi-helical CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Mori, Kiyoshi; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Kakinuma, Ryutarou; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Masuda, Hideo; Machida, Suguru; Sasagawa, Michizou

    2006-03-01

    Multi-helical CT scanner advanced remarkably at the speed at which the chest CT images were acquired for mass screening. Mass screening based on multi-helical CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. To overcome this problem, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images and a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification. We also have developed electronic medical recording system and prototype internet system for the community health in two or more regions by using the Virtual Private Network router and Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system for safety of medical information. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have now developed a new computer-aided workstation and database that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. This paper describes basic studies that have been conducted to evaluate this new system. The results of this study indicate that our computer-aided diagnosis workstation and network system can increase diagnostic speed, diagnostic accuracy and safety of medical information.

  12. Focal breast lesions in clinical CT examinations of the chest. A retrospective analysis; Senologische Befunde bei CT-Untersuchungen des Thorax. Eine retrospektive Auswertung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krug, Kathrin Barbara; Houbois, Christian; Grinstein, Olga; Borggrefe, Jan; Puesken, Michael; Maintz, David [Cologne Univ. Medical School, Cologne (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostical and Interventional Radiology; Hanstein, Bettina; Malter, Wolfram [Cologne Univ. Medical School, Cologne (Germany). Breast Center and Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Hellmich, Martin [Cologne Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology

    2017-10-15

    Based on radiological reports, the percentage of breast cancers visualized as incidental findings in routine CT examinations is estimated at ≤2%. In view of the rising number of CT examinations and the high prevalence of breast cancer, it was the goal of the present study to verify the frequency and image morphology of false-negative senological CT findings. All first contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest in adult female patients carried out in 2012 were retrospectively included. A senior radiologist systematically assessed the presence of breast lesions on all CT images using the BI-RADS system. All BI-RADS ≥3 notations were evaluated by a second senior radiologist. A consensus was obtained in case of differing BI-RADS assessments. Reference diagnoses were elaborated based on all available clinical, radiological and pathological data. The findings of the CT reports were classified according to the BI-RADS system and were compared with the retrospective consensus findings as well as with the reference diagnoses. The range of indications comprised a broad spectrum including staging and follow-up examinations of solid tumors/lymphoma (N = 701, 59.9 %) and vascular (190, 16.2 %), inflammatory (48, 4.1 %) and pulmonologic (22, 1.9 %) issues. BI-RADS 1/2 classifications were present in 92.5 % and BI-RADS 6 classifications were assessed in 1.7 % of the 1170 included examinations. 68 patients (5.8 %) had at least one lesion retrospectively classified as BI-RADS 3 - 5. The histological potential was known in 57 of these lesions as benign (46, 3.9 %) or malignant (11, 0.9 %). 13 BI-RADS 4/5 consensus assessments (1.1 %) were false-positive. 2 of the 10 lesions classified as being malignant based on the further clinical and radiological course were not mentioned in the written CT reports (0.2 %). Both false-negative CT reports were therapeutically and prognostically irrelevant. The relative frequency of BI-RADS 3 - 5 findings was 5.8 %. It reflects the situation

  13. Is Weight-Based Adjustment of Automatic Exposure Control Necessary for the Reduction of Chest CT Radiation Dose?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, Priyanka; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Gilman, Matthew D.; Shepard, Jo Anne O.; Digumarthy, Subba R. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States)

    2010-02-15

    To assess the effects of radiation dose reduction in the chest CT using a weight-based adjustment of the automatic exposure control (AEC) technique. With Institutional Review Board Approval, 60 patients (mean age, 59.1 years; M:F = 35:25) and 57 weight-matched patients (mean age, 52.3 years, M:F = 25:32) were scanned using a weight-adjusted AEC and nonweight- adjusted AEC, respectively on a 64-slice multidetector CT with a 0.984:1 pitch, 0.5 second rotation time, 40 mm table feed/rotation, and 2.5 mm section thickness. Patients were categorized into 3 weight categories; < 60 kg (n = 17), 60-90 kg (n = 52), and > 90 kg (n = 48). Patient weights, scanning parameters, CT dose index volumes (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) were recorded, while effective dose (ED) was estimated. Image noise was measured in the descending thoracic aorta. Data were analyzed using a standard statistical package (SAS/STAT) (Version 9.1, SAS institute Inc, Cary, NC). Compared to the non-weight-adjusted AEC, the weight-adjusted AEC technique resulted in an average decrease of 29% in CTDIvol and a 27% effective dose reduction (p < 0.0001). With weight-adjusted AEC, the CTDIvol decreased to 15.8, 15.9, and 27.3 mGy for the < 60, 60-90 and > 91 kg weight groups, respectively, compared to 20.3, 27.9 and 32.8 mGy, with non-weight adjusted AEC. No significant difference was observed for objective image noise between the chest CT acquired with the non-weight-adjusted (15.0 {+-} 3.1) and weight-adjusted (16.1 {+-} 5.6) AEC techniques (p > 0.05). The results of this study suggest that AEC should be tailored according to patient weight. Without weight-based adjustment of AEC, patients are exposed to a 17 - 43% higher radiation-dose from a chest CT.

  14. Chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case

  15. Intensive care patient diaries in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Storli, Sissel Lisa; Åkerman, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness and intensive care therapy are often followed by psychological problems such as nightmares, hallucinations, delusions, anxiety, depression, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress. Intensive care patient diaries have been kept by nurses and the patients' family since the early 1990s...... in the Scandinavian countries to help critically ill patients come to terms with their illness after hospital discharge. The aim of the study was to describe and compare the emergence and evolution of intensive care patient diaries in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. The study had a comparative international design using...... secondary analysis of qualitative data generated by key-informant telephone interviews with intensive care nurses (n=114). The study showed that diaries were introduced concurrently in the three Scandinavian countries as a grass-roots initiative by mutual cross-national inspiration. The concept has evolved...

  16. Intensive Care Management of Patients with Cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jody C

    2018-06-01

    Cirrhosis is a major worldwide health problem which results in a high level of morbidity and mortality. Patients with cirrhosis who require intensive care support have high mortality rates of near 50%. The goal of this review is to address the management of common complications of cirrhosis in the ICU. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an increase in hospitalizations due to advanced liver disease with an associated increase in intensive care utilization. Given an increasing burden on the healthcare system, it is imperative that we strive to improve our management cirrhotic patients in the intensive care unit. Large studies evaluating the management of patients in the intensive care setting are lacking. To date, most recommendations are based on extrapolation of data from studies in cirrhosis outside of the ICU or by applying general critical care principles which may or may not be appropriate for the critically ill cirrhotic patient. Future research is required to answer important management questions.

  17. Ultralow dose CT for pulmonary nodule detection with chest X-ray equivalent dose - a prospective intra-individual comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messerli, Michael [University Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Kluckert, Thomas; Knitel, Meinhard; Desbiolles, Lotus; Bauer, Ralf W.; Wildermuth, Simon [Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Waelti, Stephan [Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Gallen (Switzerland); University of Montreal, Department of Radiology, CHU Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Rengier, Fabian [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Warschkow, Rene [Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Department of Surgery, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem [University Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Leschka, Sebastian [Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Gallen (Switzerland); University Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-08-15

    To prospectively evaluate the accuracy of ultralow radiation dose CT of the chest with tin filtration at 100 kV for pulmonary nodule detection. 202 consecutive patients undergoing clinically indicated chest CT (standard dose, 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv) were prospectively included and additionally scanned with an ultralow dose protocol (0.13 ± 0.01 mSv). Standard dose CT was read in consensus by two board-certified radiologists to determine the presence of lung nodules and served as standard of reference (SOR). Two radiologists assessed the presence of lung nodules and their locations on ultralow dose CT. Sensitivity and specificity of the ultralow dose protocol was compared against the SOR, including subgroup analyses of different nodule sizes and types. A mixed effects logistic regression was used to test for independent predictors for sensitivity of pulmonary nodule detection. 425 nodules (mean diameter 3.7 ± 2.9 mm) were found on SOR. Overall sensitivity for nodule detection by ultralow dose CT was 91%. In multivariate analysis, nodule type, size and patients BMI were independent predictors for sensitivity (p < 0.001). Ultralow dose chest CT at 100 kV with spectral shaping enables a high sensitivity for the detection of pulmonary nodules at exposure levels comparable to plain film chest X-ray. (orig.)

  18. Quantitative analysis of dynamic airway changes after methacholine and salbutamol inhalation on xenon-enhanced chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Joon; Goo, Jin Mo; Kim, Jong Hyo; Park, Eun-Ah [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang Hyun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Healthcare Gangnam Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jae-Woo; Park, Heung-Woo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang-Heon [Seoul National University Hospital, Healthcare Gangnam Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To investigate the dynamic changes in airways in response to methacholine and salbutamol inhalation and to correlate the xenon ventilation index on xenon-enhanced chest CTs in asthmatics. Thirty-one non-smokers (6 normal, 25 asthmatics) underwent xenon-enhanced chest CT and pulmonary function tests. Images were obtained at three stages (basal state, after methacholine inhalation and after salbutamol inhalation), and the total xenon ventilation index (TXVI) as well as airway values were measured and calculated. The repeated measures ANOVA and Spearman's correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. TXVI in the normal group did not significantly change (P > 0.05) with methacholine and salbutamol. For asthmatics, however, the TXVI significantly decreased after methacholine inhalation and increased after salbutamol inhalation (P < 0.05). Of the airway parameters, the airway inner area (IA) significantly increased after salbutamol inhalation in all airways (P < 0.01) in asthmatics. Airway IA, wall thickness and wall area percentage did not significantly decrease after methacholine inhalation (P > 0.05). IA of the large airways was well correlated with basal TXVI, FEV{sub 1} and FVC (P < 0.05). Airway IA is the most reliable parameter for reflecting the dynamic changes after methacholine and salbutamol inhalation, and correlates well with TXVI in asthmatics on xenon-enhanced CT. (orig.)

  19. CT Chest and pulmonary functional changes in patients with HTLV-associated myelopathy in the Eastern Brazilian Amazon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fábio Magno Falcão

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare computed tomography (CT scans of chest and lung function among patients with Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV with and without HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. In this cross-sectional study performed between January 2013 and June 2016, we included 48 patients with HAM/TSP (19 women and 11 men and without HAM/TSP (12 women and 6 men. We compared CT findings and lung functions of these groups. Patients who had HAM/TSP had abnormal CT findings (P = 0.000, including more frequent bronchiectasis (P = 0.049, parenchymal bands (P = 0.007, interlobular septal thickening (P = 0.035, and pleural thickening (P = 0.009. In addition, neither patients with HAM/TSP (9/30; 30% nor the controls (0/18; 0% had obstructive or restrictive lung disease (P = 0.009. HTLV diagnosis should be considered in all patients with abnormal CT findings in whom no other cause is apparent. It is important to remember that lung disease increases the rates of morbidity and mortality in developing countries.

  20. [Quality assurance concepts in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, A; Braun, J P; Riessen, R; Dubb, R; Kaltwasser, A; Bingold, T M

    2015-11-01

    Intensive care medicine (ICM) is characterized by a high degree of complexity and requires intense communication and collaboration on interdisciplinary and multiprofessional levels. In order to achieve good quality of care in this environment and to prevent errors, a proactive quality and error management as well as a structured quality assurance system are essential. Since the early 1990s, German intensive care societies have developed concepts for quality management and assurance in ICM. In 2006, intensive care networks were founded in different states to support the implementation of evidence-based knowledge into clinical routine and to improve medical outcome, efficacy, and efficiency in ICM. Current instruments and concepts of quality assurance in German ICM include core intensive care data from the data registry DIVI REVERSI, quality indicators, peer review in intensive care, IQM peer review, and various certification processes. The first version of German ICM quality indicators was published in 2010 by an interdisciplinary and interprofessional expert commission. Key figures, indicators, and national benchmarks are intended to describe the quality of structures, processes, and outcomes in intensive care. Many of the quality assurance tools have proved to be useful in clinical practice, but nationwide implementation still can be improved.

  1. Possibilities for exposure reduction in computed tomography examination of acute chest pain; Moeglichkeiten der Dosisreduktion bei CT-Untersuchungen des akuten Thoraxschmerzes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, H.C. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Electrocardiogram-gated (ECG) computed tomography (CT) investigations can be accompanied by high amounts of radiation exposure. This is particularly true for the investigation of patients with unclear and acute chest pain. The common approach in patients with acute chest pain is standard spiral CT of the chest. The chest pain or triple-rule-out CT protocol is a relatively new ECG-gated protocol of the entire chest. This article reviews and discusses different techniques for the CT investigation of patients with acute chest pain. By applying the appropriate scan technique, the radiation exposure for an ECG-gated protocol must not necessarily be higher than a standard chest CT scan Aortic pathologies are far better depicted by ECG-gated scan protocols and depending on the heart rate coronary artery disease can also be detected at the same time. The use of ECG-triggered scans will not support the diagnostics of the pulmonary arteries. However, in unspecific chest pain an ECG-triggered scan protocol can provide information on the differential diagnosis. (orig.) [German] EKG-getriggerte CT-Untersuchungen koennen mit einer relativ hohen Strahlenexposition einhergehen. Dies gilt im besonderen Masse fuer die Untersuchung des gesamten Thorax bei Patienten mit unklarem akutem Thoraxschmerz. Bisher wurden Untersuchungen bei Patienten mit akutem Thoraxschmerz in Spiraltechnik ohne EKG-Triggerung durchgefuehrt. Das ''Chest-pain-'' oder ''Triple-rule-out''-Protokoll ist ein neues EKG-getriggertes Untersuchungsprotokoll des gesamten Thorax. Im vorliegenden Artikel werden verschiedene Techniken zur CT-Untersuchung von Patienten mit akutem Thoraxschmerz vorgestellt und besprochen. Mit der richtigen Untersuchungstechnik muss die Strahlenexposition fuer ein EKG-getriggertes Untersuchungsprotokoll nicht hoeher sein als eine Standarduntersuchung ohne EKG. Mit einem EKG-getriggerten Untersuchungsprotokoll laesst sich die Aorta in Hinblick auf

  2. Adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT and adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT for the assessment of acute chest pain: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weininger, Markus [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Ramachandra, Ashok [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Fink, Christian [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Rowe, Garrett W.; Costello, Philip [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Henzler, Thomas [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Recent innovations in CT enable the evolution from mere morphologic imaging to dynamic and functional testing. We describe our initial experience performing myocardial stress perfusion CT in a clinical population with acute chest pain. Methods and materials: Myocardial stress perfusion CT was performed on twenty consecutive patients (15 men, 5 women; mean age 65 ± 8 years) who presented with acute chest pain and were clinically referred for stress/rest SPECT and cardiac MRI. Prior to CT each patient was randomly assigned either to Group A or to Group B in a consecutive order (10 patients per group). Group A underwent adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT using a novel “shuttle” mode on a 2nd generation dual-source CT. Group B underwent adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT using the same CT scanner in dual-energy mode. Two experienced observers visually analyzed all CT perfusion studies. CT findings were compared with MRI and SPECT. Results: In Group A 149/170 myocardial segments (88%) could be evaluated. Real-time perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 86% (84%) sensitivity, 98% (92%) specificity, 94% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (92%) negative predictive value in comparison with perfusion MRI for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects. In Group B all myocardial segments were available for analysis. Compared with MRI, dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 93% (94%) sensitivity, 99% (98%) specificity, 92% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (94%) negative predictive value for detecting hypoperfused myocardial segments. Conclusion: Our results suggest the clinical feasibility of myocardial perfusion CT imaging in patients with acute chest pain. Compared to MRI and SPECT both, dynamic real-time perfusion CT and first-pass dual-energy perfusion CT showed good agreement for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects.

  3. Adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT and adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT for the assessment of acute chest pain: Initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weininger, Markus; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Ramachandra, Ashok; Fink, Christian; Rowe, Garrett W.; Costello, Philip; Henzler, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recent innovations in CT enable the evolution from mere morphologic imaging to dynamic and functional testing. We describe our initial experience performing myocardial stress perfusion CT in a clinical population with acute chest pain. Methods and materials: Myocardial stress perfusion CT was performed on twenty consecutive patients (15 men, 5 women; mean age 65 ± 8 years) who presented with acute chest pain and were clinically referred for stress/rest SPECT and cardiac MRI. Prior to CT each patient was randomly assigned either to Group A or to Group B in a consecutive order (10 patients per group). Group A underwent adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT using a novel “shuttle” mode on a 2nd generation dual-source CT. Group B underwent adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT using the same CT scanner in dual-energy mode. Two experienced observers visually analyzed all CT perfusion studies. CT findings were compared with MRI and SPECT. Results: In Group A 149/170 myocardial segments (88%) could be evaluated. Real-time perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 86% (84%) sensitivity, 98% (92%) specificity, 94% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (92%) negative predictive value in comparison with perfusion MRI for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects. In Group B all myocardial segments were available for analysis. Compared with MRI, dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 93% (94%) sensitivity, 99% (98%) specificity, 92% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (94%) negative predictive value for detecting hypoperfused myocardial segments. Conclusion: Our results suggest the clinical feasibility of myocardial perfusion CT imaging in patients with acute chest pain. Compared to MRI and SPECT both, dynamic real-time perfusion CT and first-pass dual-energy perfusion CT showed good agreement for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects.

  4. Prognostic value of CT-derived left atrial and left ventricular measures in patients with acute chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takx, Richard A.P. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Groningen/University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging − North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Nance, John W. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Bamberg, Fabian [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Abro, Joseph A. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Carr, Christine M. [Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Litwin, Sheldon E. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • LV mass and LA diameter are independent prognostic factor for composite MACE. • LV mass and LA diameter were not significant prognostic factors for MACE in African Americans. • Assessment of LV mass by CT may have a role in the management of patients. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine which left atrial (LA) and left ventricular (LV) parameters are associated with future major adverse cardiac event (MACE) and whether these measurements have independent prognostic value beyond risk factors and computed tomography (CT)-derived coronary artery disease measures. Materials and methods: This retrospective analysis was performed under an IRB waiver and in HIPAA compliance. Subjects underwent coronary CT angiography (CCTA) using a dual-source CT system for acute chest pain evaluation. LV mass, LV ejection fraction (EF), LV end-systolic volume (ESV) and LV end-diastolic volume (EDV), LA ESV and LA diameter, septal wall thickness and cardiac chamber diameters were measured. MACE was defined as cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or late revascularization. The association between cardiac CT measures and the occurrence of MACE was quantified using Cox proportional hazard analysis. Results: 225 subjects (age, 56.2 ± 11.2; 140 males) were analyzed, of whom 42 (18.7%) experienced a MACE during a median follow-up of 13 months. LA diameter (HR:1.07, 95%CI:1.01–1.13 per mm) and LV mass (HR:1.05, 95%CI:1.00–1.10 per g) remained significant prognostic factor of MACE after controlling for Framingham risk score. LA diameter and LV mass were also found to have prognostic value independent of each other. The other morphologic and functional cardiac measures were no significant prognostic factors for MACE. Conclusion: CT-derived LA diameter and LV mass are associated with future MACE in patients undergoing evaluation for chest pain, and portend independent prognostic value beyond traditional risk factors, coronary calcium score, and

  5. Ancillary lung parenchymal findings at spiral CT scanning in pulmonary embolism. Relationship to chest sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reissig, Angelika; Heyne, Jens-Peter; Kroegel, Claus

    2004-01-01

    Introduction/objective: The aim of the study was to compare findings of transthoracic sonography (TS) and of spiral computed tomography (sCT) in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods and patients: Peripheral parenchymal and pleural findings of TS and sCT were compared in 62 patients (25 females, 37 males; mean age 62.2 years) with suspected PE. Results: In 39 patients PE was established, of whose pleura-based lesions could be detected by TS in 30 patients and by sCT in 31 patients. Whilst in three of the patients parenchymal lesions were exclusively detected by sonography, no peripheral abnormalities could be discovered with either technique in five patients. Among the nine patients lacking peripheral abnormalities on sonography, four revealed peripheral lesions in sCT. In 23 patients without PE, peripheral consolidations at CT were detected in six patients whereas two showed lesions on TS. With respect to the appearance, pleura-based wedge-shaped consolidations were the main parenchymal alterations (82.4% at TS, 66.1% at sCT) as compared with non-wedge-shaped consolidations (17.6% at TS, 33.9% at sCT). Peripheral lesions were located preferentially within the lower lobes. In addition, both localised and basal pleural effusion associated with PE could be demonstrated in 58.9% at TS and in 23.1% by sCT. Discussions and conclusion: The study shows that in PE parenchymal and pleural changes are detectable by TS and sCT. If parenchymal findings are present at sCT, peripheral PE should be considered, even in the absence of directly visible emboli

  6. Ancillary lung parenchymal findings at spiral CT scanning in pulmonary embolism. Relationship to chest sonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reissig, Angelika E-mail: angelika.reissig@med.uni-jena.de; Heyne, Jens-Peter; Kroegel, Claus

    2004-03-01

    Introduction/objective: The aim of the study was to compare findings of transthoracic sonography (TS) and of spiral computed tomography (sCT) in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods and patients: Peripheral parenchymal and pleural findings of TS and sCT were compared in 62 patients (25 females, 37 males; mean age 62.2 years) with suspected PE. Results: In 39 patients PE was established, of whose pleura-based lesions could be detected by TS in 30 patients and by sCT in 31 patients. Whilst in three of the patients parenchymal lesions were exclusively detected by sonography, no peripheral abnormalities could be discovered with either technique in five patients. Among the nine patients lacking peripheral abnormalities on sonography, four revealed peripheral lesions in sCT. In 23 patients without PE, peripheral consolidations at CT were detected in six patients whereas two showed lesions on TS. With respect to the appearance, pleura-based wedge-shaped consolidations were the main parenchymal alterations (82.4% at TS, 66.1% at sCT) as compared with non-wedge-shaped consolidations (17.6% at TS, 33.9% at sCT). Peripheral lesions were located preferentially within the lower lobes. In addition, both localised and basal pleural effusion associated with PE could be demonstrated in 58.9% at TS and in 23.1% by sCT. Discussions and conclusion: The study shows that in PE parenchymal and pleural changes are detectable by TS and sCT. If parenchymal findings are present at sCT, peripheral PE should be considered, even in the absence of directly visible emboli.

  7. Anaesthesiological aspects of thorax-diagnostic procedures in intensive-care units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte am Esch, J.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnostic procedures of the thorax in intensive-care units are conventional X-ray chest images, chest images by digital luminescence radiography, sonography and transoesophageal Doppler echocardiography. In addition to these bedside methods the stationary usable techniques, such as computed tomography, digital subtraction angiography and the seldom in intensive care patients used computed nuclear spin resonance tomography (NMR) are applicable. The selection of the above mentioned techniques depends on the availability and the quality of the methods as well as the qualifications of the involved staff. The diagnostic procedures of the chest must be arranged depending on the decision if patients have to be transported or not. In conclusion it can be stated that in spite of growing technical preconditions the availability of the methods in immobile patients and the diagnostic potency of the techniques have to be examined. (orig.) [de

  8. Reporting of coronary artery calcification on chest CT studies in breast cancer patients at high risk of cancer therapy related cardiac events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Phillips

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The identification of coronary artery calcification (CAC detected coincidentally on chest CT exams could assist in cardiovascular risk assessment but may not be reported consistently on clinical studies. Cardiovascular risk factor stratification is important to predict short term cardiac events during cancer therapy and long term cardiac event free survival in cancer patients. We sought to determine the prevalence of CAC and clinical reporting rates in a cohort of cancer patients at high risk of cancer therapy related cardiac events. Methods: 408 Breast cancer patients who were referred to a cardiac oncology clinic were screened. Inclusion criteria included having had a CT chest and the absence of known coronary disease. Among those screened 263 patients were included in the study. Results: CAC was identified in 70 patients (26%. CAC was reported in 18% of studies. The reporting rates of CAC increased with the extent of coronary calcification (p < 0.01 and increased during the period of the study (p < 0.05. Conclusions: CAC was commonly detected on chest CT studies in this observational study of breast cancer patients at high risk of cardiac oncology events. The presence of CAC was often not reported clinically but reporting rates have increased over time. Recent SCCT/STR guidelines recommend reporting the presence of CAC on routine chest CT scans in recognition of the importance of CAC as a predictor of cardiovascular events. Reporting of CAC on chest CTs may help to further risk stratify breast cancer patients and improve cardiovascular outcomes in this vulnerable population. Keywords: Cardiac oncology, Coronary calcification and chest CT

  9. Analgesia, sedation, and memory of intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuzzo, M; Pinamonti, A; Cingolani, E; Grassi, L; Bianconi, M; Contu, P; Gritti, G; Alvisi, R

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this article was to investigate the relationship between analgesia, sedation, and memory of intensive care. One hundred fifty-two adult, cooperative intensive care unit (ICU) patients were interviewed 6 months after hospital discharge about their memory of intensive care. The patient was considered to be cooperative when he/she was aware of self and environment at the interview. The patients were grouped as follows: A (45 patients) substantially no sedation, B (85) morphine, and C (22) morphine and other sedatives. The patients having no memory of intensive care were 38%, 34%, and 23% respectively, in the three groups. They were less ill, according to SAPS II (P memories was not different among the three groups. Females reported at least one emotional memory more frequently than males (odds ratio 4.17; 95% CI 10.97-1.59). The patients receiving sedatives in the ICU are not comparable with those receiving only opiates or nothing, due to the different clinical condition. The lack of memory of intensive care is present in one third of patients and is influenced more by length of stay in ICU than by the sedation received. Sedation does not influence the incidence of factual, sensation, and emotional memories of ICU admitted patients. Females have higher incidences of emotional memories than males. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company

  10. Quantitation of pulmonary nodule's border structure by means of Fourier transform by using chest X-ray CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikata, Hidenori; Masuyama, Hiroshi; Kido, Shoji

    1998-01-01

    In order to evaluate quantitatively the border structure of pulmonary nodules by using chest X-ray CT images, we investigated whether the sum of high-frequency elements of the power spectrum in a Fourier-transformed nodule's contour line becomes a valuable measure of the border structure of pulmonary nodules. We expect that this measure clearly reflects the radiologic characteristics of a nodule, that is, the contour line is clear or unclear in benign or malignant nodules, respectively. We evaluated and analyzed images statistically for 31 patients (15 benign, 16 malignant), and we were able to recognize a measurable difference between the benign and malignant cases. We conclude that we can evaluate the border structure of a nodule by our proposed measure, and that this measure is valuable for quantitative differential diagnosis. (author)

  11. Gradual progression of intrapulmonary lymph nodes associated with usual interstitial pneumonia in progressive systemic sclerosis on chest radiographs and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Joon Young; Chung, Myung Hee; Kim, Seon Mun [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Hyun [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    A 40 year old female visited the clinic for evaluation of Raynaud's phenomenon for a period of four years. The initial chest radiograph showed a fine reticular density and ground glass opacity with lower lobe predominance. These findings are consistent interstitial fibrosis. Additionally, high resolution CT showed multiple, small, coexisting nodular opacities, ranging from 3 to 7 mm in size in both lungs. These nodules grew up to 1.5 cm and showed moderate enhancement. Because of the rareness of intrapulmonary lymph node in patient of progressive systemic sclerosis, we couldn't exclude the possibility of malignancy. These nodules are turned out to be intrapulmonary lymph nodes on video assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy.

  12. The impact of reconstruction techniques on observer performance for the detection and characterization of small pulmonary nodules in chest CT of children under 13 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, Martijn V.; Smets, Anne M. J. B.; van Schuppen, Joost; Deurloo, Eline E.; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia

    2018-01-01

    To compare three different reconstruction techniques of CT data for the detection of pulmonary nodules in children under 13 years. Secondly to assess the prevalence of perifissural nodular opacities. The study consisted of chest CTs of 31 children (median age 6.9 years, range 2.1-12.7), of whom 17

  13. [Intensive care medicine-survival and prospect of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, A

    2017-10-01

    Intensive care medicine has achieved a significant increase in survival rates from critical illness. In addition to short-term outcomes like intensive care unit or hospital mortality, long-term prognosis and prospect of life of intensive care patients have recently become increasingly important. Pure survival is no longer a sole goal of intensive care medicine. The prediction of an intensive care patient's individual course should include the period after intensive care. A relevant proportion of all intensive care patients is affected by physical, psychological, cognitive, and social limitations after discharge from the intensive care unit. The prognosis of the status of the patient after discharge from the intensive care unit is an important part of the decision-making process with respect to the implementation or discontinuation of intensive care measures. The heavy burden of intensive care treatment should not solely be argued by pure survival but an anticipated sound prospect of life.

  14. A coarse-to-fine approach for pericardial effusion localization and segmentation in chest CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiamin; Chellamuthu, Karthik; Lu, Le; Bagheri, Mohammadhadi; Summers, Ronald M.

    2018-02-01

    Pericardial effusion on CT scans demonstrates very high shape and volume variability and very low contrast to adjacent structures. This inhibits traditional automated segmentation methods from achieving high accuracies. Deep neural networks have been widely used for image segmentation in CT scans. In this work, we present a two-stage method for pericardial effusion localization and segmentation. For the first step, we localize the pericardial area from the entire CT volume, providing a reliable bounding box for the more refined segmentation step. A coarse-scaled holistically-nested convolutional networks (HNN) model is trained on entire CT volume. The resulting HNN per-pixel probability maps are then threshold to produce a bounding box covering the pericardial area. For the second step, a fine-scaled HNN model is trained only on the bounding box region for effusion segmentation to reduce the background distraction. Quantitative evaluation is performed on a dataset of 25 CT scans of patient (1206 images) with pericardial effusion. The segmentation accuracy of our two-stage method, measured by Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), is 75.59+/-12.04%, which is significantly better than the segmentation accuracy (62.74+/-15.20%) of only using the coarse-scaled HNN model.

  15. Association of aortic wall thickness on contrast-enhanced chest CT with major cerebro-cardiac events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresoldi, Silvia; Di Leo, Giovanni; Zoffoli, Elena; Munari, Alice; Primolevo, Alessandra; Cornalba, Gianpaolo; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    There is a significant association between aortic atherosclerosis and previous major cardiovascular events. Particularly, thoracic aortic atherosclerosis is closely related to the degree of coronary and carotid artery disease. Thus, there is a rationale for screening the thoracic aorta in patients who undergo a chest computed tomography (CT) for any clinical question, in order to detect patients at increased risk of cerebro-cardiovascular (CCV) events. To estimate the association between either thoracic aortic wall thickness (AWT) or aortic total calcium score (ATCS) and CCV events. One hundred and forty-eight non-cardiac patients (78 men; 67 ± 12 years) underwent chest contrast-enhanced multidetector CT (MDCT). The AWT was measured at the level of the left atrium (AWTref) and at the maximum AWT (AWTmax). Correlation with clinical CCV patients' history was estimated. The value of AWTmax and of a semi-quantitative ATCS as a marker for CCV events was assessed using receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis and multivariate regression analysis. Out of 148 patients, 59% reported sedentary lifestyle, 44% hypertension, 32% smoking, 23% hypercholesterolemia, 13% family history of cardiac disease, 12% diabetes, and 10% BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2); 9% reported myocardial infarction, 8% aortic aneurism, 8% myocardial revascularization, and 2% ischemic stroke. Twenty-six percent of patients had a medium-to-high ATCS. Both AWTmax and AWTref correlated with hypertension and age (P < 0.002). At the ROC analysis, a 4.8 mm threshold was associated to a 90% specificity and an odds ratio of 6.3 (AUC = 0.735). Assuming as threshold the AWTmax median value (4.3 mm) of patients who suffered from at least one CCV event in their history, a negative predictive value of 90%, a RR of 3.6 and an OR of 6.3 were found. At the multivariate regression analysis, AWTmax was the only independent variable associated to the frequency of CCV events. Patients with increased thoracic

  16. Chronic pneumonitis of infancy: high-resolution CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Oeystein E.; Owens, Catherine M.; Sebire, Neil J.; Jaffe, Adam

    2004-01-01

    Chronic pneumonitis of infancy (CPI) is a very rare entity. We report the chest radiography and high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings in an infant with histopathologically confirmed CPI. The child was admitted for intensive care 18 h after birth and died at 39 days of age. On HRCT there was diffuse ground-glass change, interlobular septal thickening and discrete centrilobular nodules. An accurate diagnosis is crucial for correct management; however, several entities with the same HRCT findings are recognized. (orig.)

  17. Model-based iterative reconstruction technique for radiation dose reduction in chest CT: comparison with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsura, Masaki; Matsuda, Izuru; Akahane, Masaaki; Sato, Jiro; Akai, Hiroyuki; Yasaka, Koichiro; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2012-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate dose reduction and image quality characteristics of chest CT reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) compared with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). One hundred patients underwent reference-dose and low-dose unenhanced chest CT with 64-row multidetector CT. Images were reconstructed with 50 % ASIR-filtered back projection blending (ASIR50) for reference-dose CT, and with ASIR50 and MBIR for low-dose CT. Two radiologists assessed the images in a blinded manner for subjective image noise, artefacts and diagnostic acceptability. Objective image noise was measured in the lung parenchyma. Data were analysed using the sign test and pair-wise Student's t-test. Compared with reference-dose CT, there was a 79.0 % decrease in dose-length product with low-dose CT. Low-dose MBIR images had significantly lower objective image noise (16.93 ± 3.00) than low-dose ASIR (49.24 ± 9.11, P < 0.01) and reference-dose ASIR images (24.93 ± 4.65, P < 0.01). Low-dose MBIR images were all diagnostically acceptable. Unique features of low-dose MBIR images included motion artefacts and pixellated blotchy appearances, which did not adversely affect diagnostic acceptability. Diagnostically acceptable chest CT images acquired with nearly 80 % less radiation can be obtained using MBIR. MBIR shows greater potential than ASIR for providing diagnostically acceptable low-dose CT images without severely compromising image quality. (orig.)

  18. Model-based iterative reconstruction technique for radiation dose reduction in chest CT: comparison with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsura, Masaki; Matsuda, Izuru; Akahane, Masaaki; Sato, Jiro; Akai, Hiroyuki; Yasaka, Koichiro; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    To prospectively evaluate dose reduction and image quality characteristics of chest CT reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) compared with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). One hundred patients underwent reference-dose and low-dose unenhanced chest CT with 64-row multidetector CT. Images were reconstructed with 50 % ASIR-filtered back projection blending (ASIR50) for reference-dose CT, and with ASIR50 and MBIR for low-dose CT. Two radiologists assessed the images in a blinded manner for subjective image noise, artefacts and diagnostic acceptability. Objective image noise was measured in the lung parenchyma. Data were analysed using the sign test and pair-wise Student's t-test. Compared with reference-dose CT, there was a 79.0 % decrease in dose-length product with low-dose CT. Low-dose MBIR images had significantly lower objective image noise (16.93 {+-} 3.00) than low-dose ASIR (49.24 {+-} 9.11, P < 0.01) and reference-dose ASIR images (24.93 {+-} 4.65, P < 0.01). Low-dose MBIR images were all diagnostically acceptable. Unique features of low-dose MBIR images included motion artefacts and pixellated blotchy appearances, which did not adversely affect diagnostic acceptability. Diagnostically acceptable chest CT images acquired with nearly 80 % less radiation can be obtained using MBIR. MBIR shows greater potential than ASIR for providing diagnostically acceptable low-dose CT images without severely compromising image quality. (orig.)

  19. Managing the overflow of intensive care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijsbergen, M.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; van Houdenhoven, M.; Litvak, Nelli

    2005-01-01

    Many hospitals in the Netherlands are confronted with capacity problems at their Intensive Care Units (ICUs) resulting in cancelling operations, overloading the staff with extra patients, or rejecting emergency patients. In practice, the last option is a common choice because juridically, as well as

  20. Patients' experiences of intensive care diaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bagger, Christine

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore patients' experiences and perceptions of receiving intensive care diaries. A focus group and intensive care diaries for four former ICU patients were analysed to understand what works and what needs further development for patients who receive a diary. The stud......-ICU patients to gradually construct or reconstruct their own illness narrative, which is pieced together by their fragmented memory, the diary, the pictures, the hospital chart and the accounts from family and friends.......The aim of the study was to explore patients' experiences and perceptions of receiving intensive care diaries. A focus group and intensive care diaries for four former ICU patients were analysed to understand what works and what needs further development for patients who receive a diary. The study...... that the diary alone provided incomplete information and reading the diary did not necessarily bring back memories, but helped complete their story. The patients needed to know what they had gone through in ICU and wished to share their story with their family. We conclude that diaries might help post...

  1. Performance and burnout in intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, GJ; Schaufeli, WB; LeBlanc, P; Zwerts, C; Miranda, DR

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between three different performance measures and burnout was explored in 20 Dutch Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Burnout (i.e. emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) proved to be significantly related to nurses' perceptions of performance as well as to objectively assessed unit

  2. [Medication errors in Spanish intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, P; Martín, M C; Alonso, A; Gutiérrez, I; Alvarez, J; Becerril, F

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the incidence of medication errors in Spanish intensive care units. Post hoc study of the SYREC trial. A longitudinal observational study carried out during 24 hours in patients admitted to the ICU. Spanish intensive care units. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit participating in the SYREC during the period of study. Risk, individual risk, and rate of medication errors. The final study sample consisted of 1017 patients from 79 intensive care units; 591 (58%) were affected by one or more incidents. Of these, 253 (43%) had at least one medication-related incident. The total number of incidents reported was 1424, of which 350 (25%) were medication errors. The risk of suffering at least one incident was 22% (IQR: 8-50%) while the individual risk was 21% (IQR: 8-42%). The medication error rate was 1.13 medication errors per 100 patient-days of stay. Most incidents occurred in the prescription (34%) and administration (28%) phases, 16% resulted in patient harm, and 82% were considered "totally avoidable". Medication errors are among the most frequent types of incidents in critically ill patients, and are more common in the prescription and administration stages. Although most such incidents have no clinical consequences, a significant percentage prove harmful for the patient, and a large proportion are avoidable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  3. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  4. Radiation Dose to Newborns in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahreyni Toossi, M. T.; Malekzadeh, M.

    2012-01-01

    With the increase of X-ray use for medical diagnostic purposes, knowing the given doses is necessary in patients for comparison with reference levels. The concept of reference doses or diagnostic reference levels has been developed as a practical aid in the optimization of patient protection in diagnostic radiology. To assess the radiation doses to neonates from diagnostic radiography (chest and abdomen). This study has been carried out in the neonatal intensive care unit of a province in Iran. Entrance surface dose was measured directly with thermoluminescent dosimeters. The population included 195 neonates admitted for a diagnostic radiography, in eight NICUs of different hospital types. The mean entrance surface dose for chest and abdomen examinations were 76.3 μGy and 61.5 μGy, respectively. Diagnostic reference levels for neonate in NICUs of the province were 88 μGy for chest and 98 μGy for abdomen examinations that were slightly higher than other studies. Risk of death due to radiation cancer incidence of abdomens examination was equal to 1.88 × 10 -6 for male and 4.43 × 10 -6 for female. For chest X-ray, it was equal to 2.54 × 10 -6 for male and 1.17 × 10 -5 for female patients. Diagnostic reference levels for neonates in our province were slightly higher than values reported by other studies such as European national diagnostic reference levels and the NRPB reference dose. The main reason was related to using a high mAs and a low kVp applied in most departments and also a low focus film distance. Probably lack of collimation also affected some exams in the NICUs.

  5. Crackle analysis for chest auscultation and comparison with high-resolution CT findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Takeo; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Kido, Shoji; Jiang, Zhongwei; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to clarify the correlation between respiratory sounds and the high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings of lung diseases. Respiratory sounds were recorded using a stethoscope in 41 patients with crackles. All had undergone inspiratory and expiratory CT. Subjects included 18 patients with interstitial pneumonia and 23 without interstitial pneumonia. Two parameters, two-cycle duration (2CD) and initial deflection width (IDW) of the "crackle," were induced by time-expanded waveform analysis. Two radiologists independently assessed 11 HRCT findings. An evaluation was carried out to determine whether there was a significant difference in the two parameters between the presence and absence of each HRCT finding. The two parameters of crackles were significantly shorter in the interstitial pneumonia group than the non-interstitial pneumonia group. Ground-glass opacity, honeycombing, lung volume reduction, traction bronchiectasis, centrilobular nodules, emphysematous change, and attenuation and volume change between inspiratory and expiratory CT were correlated with one or two parameters in all patients, whereas the other three findings were not. Among the interstitial pneumonia group, traction bronchiectasis, emphysematous change, and attenuation and volume change between inspiratory and expiratory CT were significantly correlated with one or two parameters. Abnormal respiratory sounds were correlated with some HRCT findings.

  6. Crackle analysis for chest auscultation and comparison with high-resolution CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Takeo; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi; Kido, Shoji; Jiang Zhongwei

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to clarify the correlation between respiratory sounds and the high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings of lung diseases. Respiratory sounds were recorded using a stethoscope in 41 patients with crackles. All had undergone inspiratory and expiratory CT. Subjects included 18 patients with interstitial pneumonia and 23 without interstitial pneumonia. Two parameters, two-cycle duration (2CD) and initial deflection width (IDW) of the ''crackle,'' were induced by time-expanded waveform analysis. Two radiologists independently assessed 11 HRCT findings. An evaluation was carried out to determine whether there was a significant difference in the two parameters between the presence and absence of each HRCT finding. The two parameters of crackles were significantly shorter in the interstitial pneumonia group than the non-interstitial pneumonia group. Ground-glass opacity, honeycombing, lung volume reduction, traction bronchiectasis, centrilobular nodules, emphysematous change, and attenuation and volume change between inspiratory and expiratory CT were correlated with one or two parameters in all patients, whereas the other three findings were not. Among the interstitial pneumonia group, traction bronchiectasis, emphysematous change, and attenuation and volume change between inspiratory and expiratory CT were significantly correlated with one or two parameters. Abnormal respiratory sounds were correlated with some HRCT findings. (author)

  7. Computer-aided diagnosis workstation and network system for chest diagnosis based on multislice CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Eguchi, Kenji; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Masuda, Hideo; Machida, Suguru

    2008-03-01

    Mass screening based on multi-helical CT images requires a considerable number of images to be read. It is this time-consuming step that makes the use of helical CT for mass screening impractical at present. To overcome this problem, we have provided diagnostic assistance methods to medical screening specialists by developing a lung cancer screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected lung cancers in helical CT images, a coronary artery calcification screening algorithm that automatically detects suspected coronary artery calcification and a vertebra body analysis algorithm for quantitative evaluation of osteoporosis likelihood by using helical CT scanner for the lung cancer mass screening. The function to observe suspicious shadow in detail are provided in computer-aided diagnosis workstation with these screening algorithms. We also have developed the telemedicine network by using Web medical image conference system with the security improvement of images transmission, Biometric fingerprint authentication system and Biometric face authentication system. Biometric face authentication used on site of telemedicine makes "Encryption of file" and Success in login" effective. As a result, patients' private information is protected. Based on these diagnostic assistance methods, we have developed a new computer-aided workstation and a new telemedicine network that can display suspected lesions three-dimensionally in a short time. The results of this study indicate that our radiological information system without film by using computer-aided diagnosis workstation and our telemedicine network system can increase diagnostic speed, diagnostic accuracy and security improvement of medical information.

  8. Chest CT features of cystic fibrosis in Korea: Comparison with non-cystic fibrosis diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, So Yeon; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Tae Jung; Kim, Tae Sung; Cha, Min Jae; Yoon, Hyun Jung

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a rare congenital disease in Korea, and its clinical and imaging findings are unclear. The objective of our study was to describe the clinical and CT features of CF in Korea and compare its features with those of other diseases mimicking CF. From November 1994 to December 2014, a presumptive diagnosis of CF was made in 23 patients based on clinical or radiological examination. After the exclusion of 10 patients without diagnostic confirmation, 13 patients were included in the study. A diagnosis of CF was made with the CF gene study. CT findings were evaluated for the presence and distribution of parenchymal abnormalities including bronchiectasis, tree-in-bud (TIB) pattern, mucus plugging, consolidation, and mosaic attenuation. Of the 13 patients, 7 (median age, 15 years) were confirmed as CF, 4 (median age, 19 years) had primary ciliary dyskinesia, 1 had bronchiectasis of unknown cause, and 1 had chronic asthma. CT of patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging in all patients, with upper lung predominance (57%). In CT of the non-CF patients, bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging were also predominant features, with lower lung predominance (50%). Korean patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, cellular bronchiolitis, mucus plugging, and mosaic attenuation, which overlapped with those of non-CF patients. CF gene study is recommended for the definitive diagnosis of CF in patients with these clinical and imaging features

  9. Chest CT features of cystic fibrosis in Korea: Comparison with non-cystic fibrosis diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, So Yeon; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Tae Jung; Kim, Tae Sung [Dept. of Radiology, and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Min Jae [Dept. of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hyun Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a rare congenital disease in Korea, and its clinical and imaging findings are unclear. The objective of our study was to describe the clinical and CT features of CF in Korea and compare its features with those of other diseases mimicking CF. From November 1994 to December 2014, a presumptive diagnosis of CF was made in 23 patients based on clinical or radiological examination. After the exclusion of 10 patients without diagnostic confirmation, 13 patients were included in the study. A diagnosis of CF was made with the CF gene study. CT findings were evaluated for the presence and distribution of parenchymal abnormalities including bronchiectasis, tree-in-bud (TIB) pattern, mucus plugging, consolidation, and mosaic attenuation. Of the 13 patients, 7 (median age, 15 years) were confirmed as CF, 4 (median age, 19 years) had primary ciliary dyskinesia, 1 had bronchiectasis of unknown cause, and 1 had chronic asthma. CT of patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging in all patients, with upper lung predominance (57%). In CT of the non-CF patients, bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging were also predominant features, with lower lung predominance (50%). Korean patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, cellular bronchiolitis, mucus plugging, and mosaic attenuation, which overlapped with those of non-CF patients. CF gene study is recommended for the definitive diagnosis of CF in patients with these clinical and imaging features.

  10. The future of intensive care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, L; Annane, D; Antonelli, M; Chiche, J D; Cuñat, J; Girard, T D; Jiménez, E J; Quintel, M; Ugarte, S; Mancebo, J

    2013-03-01

    Intensive care medical training, whether as a primary specialty or as secondary add-on training, should include key competences to ensure a uniform standard of care, and the number of intensive care physicians needs to increase to keep pace with the growing and anticipated need. The organisation of intensive care in multiple specialty or central units is heterogeneous and evolving, but appropriate early treatment and access to a trained intensivist should be assured at all times, and intensivists should play a pivotal role in ensuring communication and high-quality care across hospital departments. Structures now exist to support clinical research in intensive care medicine, which should become part of routine patient management. However, more translational research is urgently needed to identify areas that show clinical promise and to apply research principles to the real-life clinical setting. Likewise, electronic networks can be used to share expertise and support research. Individuals, physicians and policy makers need to allow for individual choices and priorities in the management of critically ill patients while remaining within the limits of economic reality. Professional scientific societies play a pivotal role in supporting the establishment of a defined minimum level of intensive health care and in ensuring standardised levels of training and patient care by promoting interaction between physicians and policy makers. The perception of intensive care medicine among the general public could be improved by concerted efforts to increase awareness of the services provided and of the successes achieved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  11. Performance evaluation of 3-D enhancement filters for detection of lung cancer from 3-D chest X-ray CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Akinobu; Hagai, Makoto; Toriwaki, Jun-ichiro; Hasegawa, Jun-ichi.

    1995-01-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of several three dimensional enhancement filters used in procedures for detecting lung cancer shadows from three dimensional (3D) chest X-ray CT images. Two dimensional enhancement filters such as Min-DD filter, Contrast filter and N-Quoit filter have been proposed for enhancing cancer shadows in conventional 2D X-ray images. In this paper, we extend each of these 2D filters to a 3D filter and evaluate its performance experimentally by using CT images with artificial and true lung cancer shadows. As a result, we find that these 3D filters are effective for determining the position of a lung cancer shadow in a 3D chest CT image, as compared with the simple procedure such as smoothing filter, and that the performance of these filters become lower in the hilar area due to the influence of the vessel shadows. (author)

  12. Impact of CT in patients with sepsis of unknown origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkhausen, J.; Stoeblen, F.; Mueller, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic relevance of CT in patients with sepsis of unknown origin. Material and Methods: Sixty-three consecutive intensive care patients with suspicion of an abscess and negative or inconclusive previous radiological examinations were included. CT was performed using the helical technique. A total of 45 abdominal and 38 chest examinations were evaluated. Results: 5/38 examinations of the chest revealed the source of sepsis (pleural empyema 2, lung abscess 1, mediastinitis 1, retrosternal abscess 1). 7/45 abdominal CT examinations showed the source of sepsis (intraabdominal abscess 2, hepatic abscess 3, intestinal perforation 1, gangrenous colitis 1). Conclusion: CT is useful for the evaluation of patients with fever or sepsis without a known source. Due to the detection of a spetic focus by CT, 19% of the patients in our study could be immediately referred to causal therapy as percutaneous drainage or surgery. (orig.)

  13. Impact of CT in patients with sepsis of unknown origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkhausen, J.; Stoeblen, F.; Mueller, R.D. [University Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Dominguez-Fernandez, E. [University Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of General Surgery; Henseke, P. [Nycomed-Amersham Arzneimittel GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    1999-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic relevance of CT in patients with sepsis of unknown origin. Material and Methods: Sixty-three consecutive intensive care patients with suspicion of an abscess and negative or inconclusive previous radiological examinations were included. CT was performed using the helical technique. A total of 45 abdominal and 38 chest examinations were evaluated. Results: 5/38 examinations of the chest revealed the source of sepsis (pleural empyema 2, lung abscess 1, mediastinitis 1, retrosternal abscess 1). 7/45 abdominal CT examinations showed the source of sepsis (intraabdominal abscess 2, hepatic abscess 3, intestinal perforation 1, gangrenous colitis 1). Conclusion: CT is useful for the evaluation of patients with fever or sepsis without a known source. Due to the detection of a spetic focus by CT, 19% of the patients in our study could be immediately referred to causal therapy as percutaneous drainage or surgery. (orig.)

  14. Volume-monitored chest CT: a simplified method for obtaining motion-free images near full inspiratory and end expiratory lung volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Kathryn S. [The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Long, Frederick R. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, The Children' s Radiological Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Flucke, Robert L. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Castile, Robert G. [The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Center for Perinatal Research, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Lung inflation and respiratory motion during chest CT affect diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility. To describe a simple volume-monitored (VM) method for performing reproducible, motion-free full inspiratory and end expiratory chest CT examinations in children. Fifty-two children with cystic fibrosis (mean age 8.8 {+-} 2.2 years) underwent pulmonary function tests and inspiratory and expiratory VM-CT scans (1.25-mm slices, 80-120 kVp, 16-40 mAs) according to an IRB-approved protocol. The VM-CT technique utilizes instruction from a respiratory therapist, a portable spirometer and real-time documentation of lung volume on a computer. CT image quality was evaluated for achievement of targeted lung-volume levels and for respiratory motion. Children achieved 95% of vital capacity during full inspiratory imaging. For end expiratory scans, 92% were at or below the child's end expiratory level. Two expiratory exams were judged to be at suboptimal volumes. Two inspiratory (4%) and three expiratory (6%) exams showed respiratory motion. Overall, 94% of scans were performed at optimal volumes without respiratory motion. The VM-CT technique is a simple, feasible method in children as young as 4 years to achieve reproducible high-quality full inspiratory and end expiratory lung CT images. (orig.)

  15. Quantification of pneumothorax volume on chest radiographs: comparison between the collins' and the axel's methods with three-dimensional CT as the standard of reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Keun; Kim, Hyung Jin; Lee, Kyung Hee; Kim, Joung Taek; Kim, Kwang Ho; Suh, Chang Hae; Han, Heon

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. In a preliminary study, we evaluated the accuracy of 3-D (three-dimensional) CT for the estimation of pneumothorax volume and for providing the optimal postprocessing method for clinical study. In the clinical study, we determined which of the two methods, Collins' and Axel's, was more accurate for the estimation of pneumothorax volume, as seen on chest radiographs, using 3-D CT as the standard of reference. In the preliminary study, 3-D CT was applied to phantoms and to four patients with pneumothorax using two different postprocessing methods, manual contour delineation and thresholding. In the clinical study, 3-D CT was performed in 13 patients with pneumothorax. For the purpose of evaluating conventional radiographs, a localizer scan was used for comparing the accuracy of Collins' method with that of Axel's method, with 3-D CT as the standard of reference. The preliminary study revealed that 3-D CT estimated pneumothorax volume with great accuracy and that manual contour delineation and thresholding measured volume equally well. Because of the shorter postprocessing time required with thresholding than with manual contour delineation (5 min versus 30 min), the former was used during clinical study. The results of this indicated close correlation between the measurements obtained using Collins' method on chest radiographs and those obtained by 3-D CT(r=0.95, p 0.05). 3-D CT can estimate pneumothorax volume with great accuracy. Collins' method is superior to Axel's method for the quantification of pneumothorax volume as seen on chest radiographs

  16. CT dose reduction using Automatic Exposure Control and iterative reconstruction: A chest paediatric phantoms study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greffier, Joël; Pereira, Fabricio; Macri, Francesco; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Larbi, Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) on radiation dose and image quality in paediatric chest scans (MDCT), with or without iterative reconstruction (IR). Three anthropomorphic phantoms representing children aged one, five and 10-year-old were explored using AEC system (CARE Dose 4D) with five modulation strength options. For each phantom, six acquisitions were carried out: one with fixed mAs (without AEC) and five each with different modulation strength. Raw data were reconstructed with Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and with two distinct levels of IR using soft and strong kernels. Dose reduction and image quality indices (Noise, SNR, CNR) were measured in lung and soft tissues. Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) was evaluated with a Catphan 600 phantom. The use of AEC produced a significant dose reduction (p<0.01) for all anthropomorphic sizes employed. According to the modulation strength applied, dose delivered was reduced from 43% to 91%. This pattern led to significantly increased noise (p<0.01) and reduced SNR and CNR (p<0.01). However, IR was able to improve these indices. The use of AEC/IR preserved image quality indices with a lower dose delivered. Doses were reduced from 39% to 58% for the one-year-old phantom, from 46% to 63% for the five-year-old phantom, and from 58% to 74% for the 10-year-old phantom. In addition, AEC/IR changed the patterns of NPS curves in amplitude and in spatial frequency. In chest paediatric MDCT, the use of AEC with IR allows one to obtain a significant dose reduction while maintaining constant image quality indices. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nodule detection methods using autocorrelation features on 3D chest CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, T.; Zhou, X.; Okura, S.; Fujita, H.; Kiryu, T.; Hoshi, H.

    2007-01-01

    Lung cancer screening using low dose X-ray CT scan has been an acceptable examination to detect cancers at early stage. We have been developing an automated detection scheme for lung nodules on CT scan by using second-order autocorrelation features and the initial performance for small nodules (< 10 mm) shows a high true-positive rate with less than four false-positive marks per case. In this study, an open database of lung images, LIDC (Lung Image Database Consortium), was employed to evaluate our detection scheme as an consistency test. The detection performance for solid and solitary nodules in LIDC, included in the first data set opened by the consortium, was 83% (10/12) true-positive rate with 3.3 false-positive marks per case. (orig.)

  18. Emphysema Quantification Using Low Dose Chest CT: Changes in Follow-Up Examinations of Asymptomatic Smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Eun Ho; Sun, Joo Sung; Kang, Doo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kwang Joo; Park, Kyung Joo [Dept. of Pulmolary Medicine, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    To evaluate the changes of emphysema quantification in a follow-up low dose CT compared with pulmonary function test (PFT) results in asymptomatic smokers. We selected 66 asymptomatic smokers (> 40 years old) who underwent a follow-up low dose CT at least one year after the first CT as well as PFT within the same time period. Emphysema quantification was performed using an automated measurement software and an emphysema index (EI) was calculated using multiple threshold values (-970--900 HU). The interval change of EI ({Delta} EI) was compared with the change in the PFT values. Mean follow-up %forced expiratory volume in 1 second (88.1), %forced vital capacity (FVC) (89.5) and forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% of vital capacity (3.21) were significantly lower compared with the values of initial tests (93.3, 93.1, 3.48). The mean EIs (2.4-25.6%) increased on follow-up CTs compared with initial EIs (2.1-24.5%), though the increase was not statistically significant. In a group with a follow-up period of 2 years or more (n = 32), EI significantly increased when using -900 HU as the threshold. The ({Delta} EIs were poorly correlated with the ({Delta} PFT values, but significantly correlated with ({Delta} FVC (r = -0.32--0.27). Emphysema quantification using low dose CT was not effective for the evaluation of short-term changes in less than a 2-year period, but may be used for long term follow-up series in asymptomatic smokers.

  19. CT saber-sheath trachea. Correlation with clinical, chest radiographic and functional findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trigaux, J.P.; Hermes, G.; Dubois, P.; Beers, B. van; Delaunois, L.; Jamart, J.

    1994-01-01

    The diagnosis of saber-sheath trachea is easy at CT due to its cross-sectional imaging, but the significance of this CT sign has not been evaluated in the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Various signs of COPD were compared between a series of 20 patients with a saber-sheath trachea at CT (tracheal index ≤66%) and a group of 20 pneumologic control patients without saber-sheath trachea (tracheal index ≥70%). These signs include clinical and standard radiographic indices of COPD, sternum-spine distance and 3 functional tests of COPD: forced expiratory volume in one second, carbon monoxide diffusing lung capacity, and funtional residual capacity (FRC). A significant difference was found between the 2 groups, concerning the values of FRC and of sternum-spine distance (p -2 ). The tracheal index was significantly correlated with the FRC values and with the sternum-spine distance. No other significant difference was observed. It is concluded that saber-sheath trachea is basically a sign of hyperinflation. (orig./MG)

  20. Association between spirometry controlled chest CT scores using computer-animated biofeedback and clinical markers of lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Thomas; Green, Kent; Buchvald, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    Background: Computed tomography (CT) of the lungs is the gold standard for assessing the extent of structural changes in the lungs. Spirometry-controlled chest CT (SCCCT) has improved the usefulness of CT by standardising inspiratory and expiratory lung volumes during imaging. This was a single...... (expressed as % of maximum score) to quantify different aspects of structural lung changes including bronchiectasis, airway wall thickening, mucus plugging, opacities, cysts, bullae and gas trapping. Clinical markers consisted of outcomes from pulmonary function tests, microbiological cultures from sputum......-centre cross-sectional study in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Using SCCCT we wished to investigate the association between the quantity and extent of structural lung changes and pulmonary function outcomes, and prevalence of known CF lung pathogens. Methods: CT images were analysed by CF-CT scoring...

  1. Chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez A, Juan Carlos; Saenz M, Oscar; Martinez M, Camilo; Gonzales A Francisco; Nicolas R, Jose; Vergara V, Erika P; Pereira G, Alberto M

    2010-01-01

    In emergency departments, chest pain is one of the leading motives of consultation. We thus consider it important to review aspects such as its classification, causes, and clinical profiles. Initial assessment should include a full clinical history comprising thorough anamnesis and physical examination. Adequate interpretation of auxiliary tests, ordered in accordance with suspected clinical conditions, should lead to accurate diagnosis. We highlight certain symptoms and clinical signs, ECG and X-ray findings, cardiac bio markers, arterial blood gases, and CT-scanning. Scores of severity and prognosis such as TIMI are assessed. Optimal treatment of the clinical conditions leading to chest pain depends on adequate initial approach and assessment.

  2. Assessment of noise reduction potential and image quality improvement of a new generation adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR-V) in chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hui; Yu, Nan; Jia, Yongjun; Yu, Yong; Duan, Haifeng; Han, Dong; Ma, Guangming; Ren, Chenglong; He, Taiping

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the image quality improvement and noise reduction in routine dose, non-enhanced chest CT imaging by using a new generation adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR-V) in comparison with ASIR algorithm. 30 patients who underwent routine dose, non-enhanced chest CT using GE Discovery CT750HU (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) were included. The scan parameters included tube voltage of 120 kVp, automatic tube current modulation to obtain a noise index of 14HU, rotation speed of 0.6 s, pitch of 1.375:1 and slice thickness of 5 mm. After scanning, all scans were reconstructed with the recommended level of 40%ASIR for comparison purpose and different percentages of ASIR-V from 10% to 100% in a 10% increment. The CT attenuation values and SD of the subcutaneous fat, back muscle and descending aorta were measured at the level of tracheal carina of all reconstructed images. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was calculated with SD representing image noise. The subjective image quality was independently evaluated by two experienced radiologists. For all ASIR-V images, the objective image noise (SD) of fat, muscle and aorta decreased and SNR increased along with increasing ASIR-V percentage. The SD of 30% ASIR-V to 100% ASIR-V was significantly lower than that of 40% ASIR (p ASIR-V reconstructions had good diagnostic acceptability. However, the 50% ASIR-V to 70% ASIR-V series showed significantly superior visibility of small structures when compared with the 40% ASIR and ASIR-V of other percentages (p ASIR-V was the best series of all ASIR-V images, with a highest subjective image quality. The image sharpness was significantly decreased in images reconstructed by 80% ASIR-V and higher. In routine dose, non-enhanced chest CT, ASIR-V shows greater potential in reducing image noise and artefacts and maintaining image sharpness when compared to the recommended level of 40%ASIR algorithm. Combining both the objective and subjective evaluation of images, non

  3. Reducing nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Eileen; Alderdice, Fiona; McCall, Emma; Jenkins, John; Craig, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    Nosocomial infection is a common problem in neonatal intensive care. A pilot quality improvement initiative focussing on hand hygiene and aimed at reducing nosocomial infection in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants was introduced in five Neonatal Intensive Care Units. Line associated laboratory confirmed bloodstream infection (LCBSI) and ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) were chosen as main outcome measures. In VLBW infants, the rate of line associated LCBSI per 1000 central venous catheter days fell by 24%. The rate of VAP per 1000 ventilator days in VLBW infants fell by 38%. Pre- and post-intervention questionnaires showed a statistically significant increase in use of alcohol-based gels and increased knowledge of hand hygiene.

  4. Physiotherapy patients in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Miszewska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of the Minister of Health dated 20/12/2012 on medical standards of conduct in the field of Anaesthesiology and intensive therapy, for carrying out the activities of healing in section § 2.2 intense therapy defines as: "any proceedings to maintain vital functions, and treatment of patients in life-threatening States, caused by potentially reversible renal failure one or more basic body systems, in particular the respiration, cardiovascular, central nervous system". However, in point § 12.1. We read that "Treatment of patients under intensive care in the hospital is an interdisciplinary". Annex 1 to this regulation refers to the work of physiotherapist in the ICU (INTENSIVE CARE UNITS and reads as follows: "the equivalent of at least 0.5 FTE-physical therapist-up to a range of benefits to be performed (the third reference level". [6

  5. Technique and clinical applications of full-inflation and end-exhalation controlled-ventilation chest CT in infants and young children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, F.R.; Castile, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    Background. The inability of young children to cooperate with breath holding limits the usefulness of chest CT. Objective. To describe the technique and utility of a non-invasive method called controlled-ventilation CT (CVCT) for obtaining motion-free full-inflation and end-exhalation images of the lung in infants and young children. Materials and methods. Eighty-seven children (ages 1 week to 5 years, mean 2 years) underwent CVCT of the chest during suspended respiration at full-lung inflation and end-exhalation for a variety of clinical indications. Respiratory pauses were produced using conscious sedation and positive-pressure face-mask ventilation. Forty-one of 87 children had recordings of respiratory motion during CVCT. Results. Respiratory pause lengths increased with age (P < 0.003), were highly reproducible (r = 0.85), and lasted sufficiently long to be practical for full-inflation (24 ± 9 s) and end-exhalation (12 ± 5 s) CT scanning. Full-inflation CVCT was useful in evaluating tracheal and bronchial stenosis, bronchial wall thickening, early bronchiectasis, bronchial fistula, extent of interstitial fibrosis, and lung nodules. End-exhalation CVCT was useful in evaluating tracheomalacia and air trapping. Conclusion. Controlled-ventilation chest CT is a practical and reliable technique that promises to be clinically useful for a number of clinical indications in infants and young children. (orig.)

  6. Intensive Care Nursing And Time Management

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZCANLI, Derya; İLGÜN, Seda

    2008-01-01

    Time is not like other resources, because it can not be bought, sold, stolen, borrowed, stored, saved, multiplied or changed. All it can be done is spent. Time management means the effective use of resources, including time, in such a way that indi- viduals are effective in achieving important personal goals. With the increasing emphasis on efficiency in health care, how a nurse manages her time is an important consideration. Since intensive care nurs- ing is focused on the care and tr...

  7. Burnout Among Anesthetists and Intensive Care Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikalauskas, Audrius; Benetis, Rimantas; Širvinskas, Edmundas; Andrejaitienė, Judita; Kinduris, Šarūnas; Macas, Andrius; Padaiga, Žilvinas

    2018-01-01

    Burnout is a syndrome of depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and low personal accomplishment. Little is known about burnout in physicians. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of burnout among anesthetists and intensive care physicians, and associations between burnout and personal, as well as professional, characteristics. In total, 220 anesthetists and intensive care physicians were contacted by email, asking them to participate in the study. For depression screening the PHQ-2 questionnaire, for problem drinking, CAGE items were used. Burnout was measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Overall, 34% anesthetists and intensive care physicians indicated high levels of emotional exhaustion, 25% indicated high levels of depersonalization, and 38% showed low personal accomplishment. Burnout was found more frequent among subjects with problem drinking (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.5-6.8), depressiveness (OR 10.2, 95% CI 4.6-22.6), cardiovascular disorders (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.7-7.1), and digestive disorders (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.0). Some favorite after-work activities positively correlated with burnout, such as sedative medications abuse (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.8-12.5), alcohol abuse (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.3-4.5), eating more than usual (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.5), and transferring the accumulated stress to relatives (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.4-5.5). In contrast, reading of non-medical literature seemed to have a protective effect (OR 0.5, 95% CI 0.2-0.9). Burnout was highly prevalent among anesthetists and intensive care physicians with two fifths of them meeting diagnostic criteria. It was strongly correlated with problem drinking, depressiveness, cardiovascular and digestive disorders, use of sedatives and overeating.

  8. TU-F-CAMPUS-I-01: Investigation of the Effective Dose From Bolus Tracking Acquisitions at Different Anatomical Locations in the Chest for CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowik, P; Bujila, R; Merzan, D [Dept. of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Stationary table acquisitions (Bolus tracking) in X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) can Result in dose length products (DLP) comparable to spiral scans. It is today unclear whether or not the effective dose (E) for Bolus Tracking can be approximated using target region specific conversion factors (E/DLP). The purpose of this study was to investigate how E depends on the anatomical location of the Bolus Tracking in relation to Chest CT scans with the same DLP. Methods: Effective doses were approximated for the ICRP 110 adult Reference Male (AM) and adult Reference Female (FM) computational voxel phantoms using software for CT dose approximations (pre-simulated MC data). The effective dose was first approximated for a Chest CT scan using spiral technique and a CTDIvol (32 cm) of 6 mGy. The effective dose from the spiral scan was then compared to E approximated for contiguous Bolus Tracking acquisitions (1 cm separation), with a total collimation of 1 cm, over different locations of the chest of the voxel phantoms. The number of rotations used for the Bolus Tracking acquisitions was adjusted to yield the same DLP (32 cm) as the spiral scan. Results: Depending on the anatomical location of the Bolus Tracking, E ranged by factors of 1.3 to 6.8 for the AM phantom and 1.4 to 3.3 for the AF phantom, compared to the effective dose of the spiral scans. The greatest E for the Bolus Tracking acquisitions was observed for anatomical locations coinciding with breast tissue. This can be expected as breast tissue has a high tissue weighting factor in the calculation of E. Conclusion: For Chest CT scans, the effective dose from Bolus Tracking is highly dependent on the anatomical location where the scan is administered and will not always accurately be represented using target region specific conversion factors.

  9. Thin-section chest CT findings in systemic lupus erythematosus with antiphospholipid syndrome: A comparison with systemic lupus erythematosus without antiphospholipid syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oki, Hodaka; Aoki, Takatoshi; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Yamashita, Yoshiko; Hanamiya, Mai; Hayashida, Yoshiko; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Korogi, Yukunori

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess thin-section chest CT findings in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), in comparison with SLE without APS. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and thin-section CT findings of 17 consecutive patients with an established diagnosis of SLE with APS, comparing with 37 consecutive SLE patients without APS, between 2004 and 2008, and patients who had other autoimmune disease, such as Sjögren syndrome, were excluded. No significant differences were seen between the two groups in age, gender, smoking habits, or history of steroid pulse and biological therapy. CT images of 2 mm thickness obtained with a 16- or 64-detector row CT were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists in consensus on ultra high-resolution gray-scale monitors. Results: The frequency of thin-section CT abnormalities was higher in SLE with APS group (82%) than in SLE without APS group (43%). Ground-glass opacity (59%), architectural distortion (47%), reticulation (41%), enlarged peripheral pulmonary artery (29%), and mosaic attenuation (29%) were significantly more common in the SLE with APS group than in the SLE without APS group (Fisher's exact test, p < 0.01). Conclusion: SLE patients with APS have increased prevalence of thin-section chest CT abnormalities than those without APS.

  10. Screening for distant metastases in head and neck cancer patients by chest CT or whole body FDG-PET: A prospective multicenter trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senft, Asaf; Bree, Remco de; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Kuik, Dirk J.; Golding, Richard P.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Pruim, Jan; Hoogen, Frank J. van den; Roodenburg, Jan L.N.; Leemans, C. Rene

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of the study was to define the added value of whole body FDG-PET in screening for distant metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and risk factors. Materials and methods: In a multi-center prospective study between 1998 and 2003, 145 consecutive HNSCC patients with risk factors for distant metastases underwent chest CT and whole body FDG-PET for screening of distant metastases. The data of 92 evaluable patients who developed distant metastases or who had a follow-up of at least 12 months were analyzed. Besides their performance in clinical practice, the operational characteristics of PET and CT using ROC analyses were investigated. Results: Pretreatment screening identified distant metastases in 19 patients (21%). FDG-PET had a higher sensitivity (53% vs. 37%) and positive predictive value (80% vs. 75%) than CT. The combination of CT and FDG-PET had the highest sensitivity (63%). The ROC analyses of the five point ordinal scales revealed that the 'area under the curve' (AUC) of FDG-PET was significantly higher as compared to CT. Conclusion: In HNSCC patients with risk factors, pretreatment screening for distant metastases by chest CT is improved by FDG-PET

  11. Comparison of chest-CT findings of Influenza virus-associated pneumonia in immunocompetent vs. immunocompromised patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloth, C., E-mail: christopher.kloth@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Forler, S.; Gatidis, S. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Beck, R. [Institute of Medical Virology and Epidemiology of Viral Diseases, Eberhard-Karls-University, Elfriede-Aulhorn-Straße 6, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Spira, D.; Nikolaou, K.; Horger, M. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tübingen (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by Influenza viruses do not significantly differ between immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients or between different types and subtypes of Influenza virus. • Patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by Influenza viruses seem to be interchangeable which might in part explain the great overlap in CT-imaging findings that has been reported in the past. • Interestingly, pattern transition from interstitial into airway-centric pattern seems to be frequent in immunocompromised patients receiving specific antiviral therapy, whereas the conversion of the airway-centric pattern into an interstitial pattern was observed more frequent in immunocompetent patients developing ARDS. - Abstract: Purpose: To retrospectively compare CT-patterns of pulmonary infiltration caused by different Influenza virus types and subtypes in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients for possible discrimination. Materials and methods: Retrospective database search at our institution yielded 237 patients who were tested positive for Influenza virus type A or type B by bronchoalveolar lavage between January 2009 and April 2014. Fifty-six of these patients (female 26; male 30; median age 55.8 y, range 17–86 y; SD ± 14.4 y) underwent chest-HRCT due to a more severe clinical course of pulmonary infection. We registered all CT-findings compatible with pulmonary infection classifying them as airway predominant (tree-in-bud, centrilobular nodules, bronchial wall thickening ± peribronchial ground-glass opacity and consolidation) vs. interstitial-parenchymal predominant (bilateral, symmetrical GGO, consolidation, crazy paving and/or interlobular septal thickening). Twenty-six patients (46.4%) had follow-up CT-studies (0.78 mean, SD ± 5.8 scans). Results: Thirty-six patients were immunocompromised (group I) whereas 20 patients were immunocompetent (group II). An airway-centric pattern of infection was found in 15 patients (group

  12. Correlation of ultra-low dose chest CT findings with physiologic measures of asbestosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manners, David [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Wong, Patrick; Murray, Conor; Teh, Joelin [Royal Perth Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Perth (Australia); Kwok, Yi Jin [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Nedlands, WA (Australia); De Klerk, Nick; Franklin, Peter [University of Western Australia, School of Population Health, Perth, WA (Australia); Alfonso, Helman; Reid, Alison [Curtin University, School of Public Health, Perth, WA (Australia); Musk, A.W.B. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nedlands, WA (Australia); University of Western Australia, School of Population Health, Perth, WA (Australia); University of Western Australia, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Perth, WA (Australia); Brims, Fraser J.H. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nedlands, WA (Australia); University of Western Australia, School of Population Health, Perth, WA (Australia); Curtin University, Curtin Medical School, Perth (Australia)

    2017-08-15

    The correlation between ultra low dose computed tomography (ULDCT)-detected parenchymal lung changes and pulmonary function abnormalities is not well described. This study aimed to determine the relationship between ULDCT-detected interstitial lung disease (ILD) and measures of pulmonary function in an asbestos-exposed population. Two thoracic radiologists independently categorised prone ULDCT scans from 143 participants for ILD appearances as absent (score 0), probable (1) or definite (2) without knowledge of asbestos exposure or lung function. Pulmonary function measures included spirometry and diffusing capacity to carbon monoxide (DLCO). Participants were 92% male with a median age of 73.0 years. CT dose index volume was between 0.6 and 1.8 mGy. Probable or definite ILD was reported in 63 (44.1%) participants. Inter-observer agreement was good (k = 0.613, p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant correlation between the ILD score and both forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV{sub 1}) and forced vital capacity (FVC) (r = -0.17, p = 0.04 and r = -0.20, p = 0.02). There was a strong correlation between ILD score and DLCO (r = -0.34, p < 0.0001). Changes consistent with ILD on ULDCT correlate well with corresponding reductions in gas transfer, similar to standard CT. In asbestos-exposed populations, ULDCT may be adequate to detect radiological changes consistent with asbestosis. (orig.)

  13. Correlation of ultra-low dose chest CT findings with physiologic measures of asbestosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manners, David; Wong, Patrick; Murray, Conor; Teh, Joelin; Kwok, Yi Jin; De Klerk, Nick; Franklin, Peter; Alfonso, Helman; Reid, Alison; Musk, A.W.B.; Brims, Fraser J.H.

    2017-01-01

    The correlation between ultra low dose computed tomography (ULDCT)-detected parenchymal lung changes and pulmonary function abnormalities is not well described. This study aimed to determine the relationship between ULDCT-detected interstitial lung disease (ILD) and measures of pulmonary function in an asbestos-exposed population. Two thoracic radiologists independently categorised prone ULDCT scans from 143 participants for ILD appearances as absent (score 0), probable (1) or definite (2) without knowledge of asbestos exposure or lung function. Pulmonary function measures included spirometry and diffusing capacity to carbon monoxide (DLCO). Participants were 92% male with a median age of 73.0 years. CT dose index volume was between 0.6 and 1.8 mGy. Probable or definite ILD was reported in 63 (44.1%) participants. Inter-observer agreement was good (k = 0.613, p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant correlation between the ILD score and both forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 ) and forced vital capacity (FVC) (r = -0.17, p = 0.04 and r = -0.20, p = 0.02). There was a strong correlation between ILD score and DLCO (r = -0.34, p < 0.0001). Changes consistent with ILD on ULDCT correlate well with corresponding reductions in gas transfer, similar to standard CT. In asbestos-exposed populations, ULDCT may be adequate to detect radiological changes consistent with asbestosis. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of a Chest Circumference-Adapted Protocol for Low-Dose 128-Slice Coronary CT Angiography with Prospective Electrocardiogram Triggering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chenying; Wang, Zufei; Ji, Jiansong; Wang, Hailin; Hu, Xianghua; Chen, Chunmiao [Department of Radiology, Lishui Central Hospital, The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Lishui, Zhejiang 323000 (China)

    2015-11-01

    To assess the effect of chest circumference-adapted scanning protocol on radiation exposure and image quality in patients undergoing prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered coronary CT angiography (CCTA). One hundred-eighty-five consecutive patients, who had undergone prospective ECG triggering CCTA with a 128-slice CT, were included in the present study. Nipple-level chest circumference, body weight and height were measured before CT examinations. Patients were divided into four groups based on kV/ref·mAs = 100/200, 100/250, 120/200, and 120/250, when patient's chest circumference was ≤ 85.0 (n = 56), 85.0-90.0 (n = 53), 90.0-95.0 (n = 44), and > 95.0 (n = 32), respectively. Image quality per-segment was independently assessed by two experienced observers. Image noise and attenuation were also measured. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. The effective radiation dose was calculated using CT dose volume index and the dose-length product. A significant correlation was observed between patients' chest circumference and body mass index (r = 0.762, p < 0.001). Chest circumference ranged from 74 to 105 cm, and the mean effective radiation dose was 1.9-3.8 mSv. Diagnostic image quality was obtained in 98.5% (2440/2478) of all evaluated coronary segments without any significant differences among the four groups (p = 0.650). No significant difference in image noise was observed among the four groups (p = 0.439), thus supporting the validity of the chest circumference-adapted scanning protocol. However, vessel attenuation, SNR and CNR were significantly higher in the 100 kV groups than in the 120 kV groups (p < 0.05). A measure of chest circumference can be used to adapt tube voltage and current for individualized radiation dose control, with resultant similar image noise and sustained diagnostic image quality.

  15. Is diagnostic accuracy for detecting pulmonary nodules in chest CT reduced after a long day of reading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Berbaum, Kevin S.; Caldwell, Robert; Schartz, Kevin M.

    2012-02-01

    Radiologists are reading more cases with more images, especially in CT and MRI and thus working longer hours than ever before. There have been concerns raised regarding fatigue and whether it impacts diagnostic accuracy. This study measured the impact of reader visual fatigue by assessing symptoms, visual strain via dark focus of accommodation, and diagnostic accuracy. Twenty radiologists and 20 radiology residents were given two diagnostic performance tests searching CT chest sequences for a solitary pulmonary nodule before (rested) and after (tired) a day of clinical reading. 10 cases used free search and navigation, and the other 100 cases used preset scrolling speed and duration. Subjects filled out the Swedish Occupational Fatigue Inventory (SOFI) and the oculomotor strain subscale of the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) before each session. Accuracy was measured using ROC techniques. Using Swensson's technique yields an ROC area = 0.86 rested vs. 0.83 tired, p (one-tailed) = 0.09. Using Swensson's LROC technique yields an area = 0.73 rested vs. 0.66 tired, p (one-tailed) = 0.09. Using Swensson's Loc Accuracy technique yields an area = 0.77 rested vs. 0.72 tired, p (one-tailed) = 0.13). Subjective measures of fatigue increased significantly from early to late reading. To date, the results support our findings with static images and detection of bone fractures. Radiologists at the end of a long work day experience greater levels of measurable visual fatigue or strain, contributing to a decrease in diagnostic accuracy. The decrease in accuracy was not as great however as with static images.

  16. Visual quantification of diffuse emphysema with Sakal's method and high-resolution chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuerstein, I.M.; McElvaney, N.G.; Simon, T.R.; Hubbard, R.C.; Crystal, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the accuracy and efficacy of visual quantitation for a diffuse form of pulmonary emphysema with high-resolution CT (HRCT). Twenty- five adults patients with symptomatic emphysema due to α-antitrypsin deficiency prospectively underwent HRCT with 1.5-mm sections, a high-spatial-resolution algorithm, and targeted reconstruction. Photography was performed with narrow lung windows to accentuate diffuse emphysema. Emphysema was then scored with use of a modification of Sakai's extent and severity scoring method. The scans were all scored by the same blinded observer. Pulmonary function testing (PFT), including diffusing capacity measurement, was performed in all patients. Results were statistically correlated with the use of regression analysis

  17. Automated quantification of bronchiectasis, airway wall thickening and lumen tapering in chest CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez-Rovira, Adria; Kuo, Wieying; Petersen, Jens

    thickness and accompanying artery radius), and inter-branch Lumen-Ratio (LR, ratio between a branch's lumen and its parent branch lumen radius, a tapering measurement) were computed. Because CF-related structural abnormalities only affect a portion of branches, the 75th percentile was used as summarising......Purpose: To automatically quantify airway structural properties visualised on CT in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and controls, including: bronchiectasis, airway wall thickening, and lumen tapering. Methods and materials: The 3D surface of the airway lumen, outer wall, and bronchial arteries...... were obtained using a fully automatic, in-house developed, segmentation method. Subsequently, for each detected airway branch, the Airway-Artery Ratio (AAR, ratio between airway outer wall and accompanying artery radius, a bronchiectasis measurement), Wall-Artery Ratio (WAR, ratio between airway wall...

  18. Deep learning for biomarker regression: application to osteoporosis and emphysema on chest CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Germán.; Washko, George R.; San José Estépar, Raúl

    2018-03-01

    Introduction: Biomarker computation using deep-learning often relies on a two-step process, where the deep learning algorithm segments the region of interest and then the biomarker is measured. We propose an alternative paradigm, where the biomarker is estimated directly using a regression network. We showcase this image-tobiomarker paradigm using two biomarkers: the estimation of bone mineral density (BMD) and the estimation of lung percentage of emphysema from CT scans. Materials and methods: We use a large database of 9,925 CT scans to train, validate and test the network for which reference standard BMD and percentage emphysema have been already computed. First, the 3D dataset is reduced to a set of canonical 2D slices where the organ of interest is visible (either spine for BMD or lungs for emphysema). This data reduction is performed using an automatic object detector. Second, The regression neural network is composed of three convolutional layers, followed by a fully connected and an output layer. The network is optimized using a momentum optimizer with an exponential decay rate, using the root mean squared error as cost function. Results: The Pearson correlation coefficients obtained against the reference standards are r = 0.940 (p < 0.00001) and r = 0.976 (p < 0.00001) for BMD and percentage emphysema respectively. Conclusions: The deep-learning regression architecture can learn biomarkers from images directly, without indicating the structures of interest. This approach simplifies the development of biomarker extraction algorithms. The proposed data reduction based on object detectors conveys enough information to compute the biomarkers of interest.

  19. Incidence and Imaging Findings of Costal Cartilage Fractures in Patients with Blunt Chest Trauma: A Retrospective Review of 1461 Consecutive Whole-Body CT Examinations for Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummela, Mari T; Bensch, Frank V; Pyhältö, Tuomo T; Koskinen, Seppo K

    2018-02-01

    Purpose To assess the incidence of costal cartilage (CC) fractures in whole-body computed tomographic (CT) examinations for blunt trauma and to evaluate distribution of CC fractures, concomitant injuries, mechanism of injury, accuracy of reporting, and the effect on 30-day mortality. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained for this retrospective study. All whole-body CT examinations for blunt trauma over 36 months were reviewed retrospectively and chest trauma CT studies were evaluated by a second reader. Of 1461 patients who underwent a whole-body CT examination, 39% (574 of 1461) had signs of thoracic injuries (men, 74.0% [425 of 574]; mean age, 46.6 years; women, 26.0% [149 of 574]; mean age, 48.9 years). χ 2 and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Interobserver agreement was calculated by using Cohen kappa values. Results A total of 114 patients (men, 86.8% [99 of 114]; mean age, 48.6 years; women, 13.2% [15 of 114]; mean age, 45.1 years) had 221 CC fractures. The incidence was 7.8% (114 of 1461) in all whole-body CT examinations and 19.9% (114 of 574) in patients with thoracic trauma. Cartilage of rib 7 (21.3%, 47 of 221) was most commonly injured. Bilateral multiple consecutive rib fractures occurred in 36% (41 of 114) versus 14% (64 of 460) in other patients with chest trauma (OR, 3.48; 95% CI: 2.18, 5.53; P chest trauma with CC fractures (13%, 15 of 114) versus patients with chest trauma without CC fractures (4%, 18 of 460) (OR, 3.72; 95% CI: 1.81, 7.64; P = .0001), as well as aortic injuries (n = 4 vs n = 0; P = .0015; OR, unavailable). Kappa value for interobserver agreement in detecting CC fractures was 0.65 (substantial agreement). CC fractures were documented in 39.5% (45 of 114) of primary reports. The 30-day mortality of patients with CC fractures was 7.02% (eight of 114) versus 4.78% (22 of 460) of other patients with chest trauma (OR, 1.50; 95% CI: 0.65, 3.47; P = .3371). Conclusion

  20. Potential of right to left ventricular volume ratio measured on chest CT for the prediction of pulmonary hypertension: correlation with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure estimated by echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Heon [Soon Chun Hyang University, Department of Radiology, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok Yeon [Seoul Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo Jeong [Terarecon Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Kyun [Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Reddy, Ryan P.; Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2012-09-15

    To investigate the correlation of right ventricular (RV) to left ventricular (LV) volume ratio measured by chest CT with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) estimated by echocardiography. 104 patients (72.47 {+-} 13.64 years; 39 male) who had undergone chest CT and echocardiography were divided into two groups (hypertensive and normotensive) based upon an echocardiography-derived PASP of 25 mmHg. RV to LV volume ratios (RV{sub V}/LV{sub V}) were calculated. RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} was then correlated with PASP using regression analysis. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) for predicting pulmonary hypertension on chest CT was calculated. In the hypertensive group, the mean PASP was 46.29 {+-} 14.42 mmHg (29-98 mmHg) and there was strong correlation between the RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} and PASP (R = 0.82, p < 0.001). The intraobserver and interobserver correlation coefficients for RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} were 0.990 and 0.892. RV{sub V}/LV{sub V} was 1.01 {+-} 0.44 (0.51-2.77) in the hypertensive and 0.72 {+-} 0.14 (0.52-1.11) in the normotensive group (P <0.05). With 0.9 as the cutoff for RV{sub V}/LV{sub V}, sensitivity and specificity for predicting pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg were 79.5 % and 90 %, respectively. The AUC for predicting pulmonary hypertension was 0.87 RV/LV volume ratios on chest CT correlate well with PASP estimated by echocardiography and can be used to predict pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg with high sensitivity and specificity. (orig.)

  1. Potential of right to left ventricular volume ratio measured on chest CT for the prediction of pulmonary hypertension: correlation with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure estimated by echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Heon; Kim, Seok Yeon; Lee, Soo Jeong; Kim, Jae Kyun; Reddy, Ryan P.; Schoepf, U.J.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the correlation of right ventricular (RV) to left ventricular (LV) volume ratio measured by chest CT with pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) estimated by echocardiography. 104 patients (72.47 ± 13.64 years; 39 male) who had undergone chest CT and echocardiography were divided into two groups (hypertensive and normotensive) based upon an echocardiography-derived PASP of 25 mmHg. RV to LV volume ratios (RV V /LV V ) were calculated. RV V /LV V was then correlated with PASP using regression analysis. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) for predicting pulmonary hypertension on chest CT was calculated. In the hypertensive group, the mean PASP was 46.29 ± 14.42 mmHg (29-98 mmHg) and there was strong correlation between the RV V /LV V and PASP (R = 0.82, p V /LV V were 0.990 and 0.892. RV V /LV V was 1.01 ± 0.44 (0.51-2.77) in the hypertensive and 0.72 ± 0.14 (0.52-1.11) in the normotensive group (P V /LV V , sensitivity and specificity for predicting pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg were 79.5 % and 90 %, respectively. The AUC for predicting pulmonary hypertension was 0.87 RV/LV volume ratios on chest CT correlate well with PASP estimated by echocardiography and can be used to predict pulmonary hypertension over 40 mmHg with high sensitivity and specificity. (orig.)

  2. Comparison of radiation doses between newborns and 6-y-old children undergoing head, chest and abdominal CT examinations-A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, N.; Aoyama, T.; Koyama, S.; Yamauchi-Kawaura, C.; Fujii, K.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation doses in paediatric computed tomography (CT) were investigated for various types of recent CT scanners with newborn and 6-y-old phantoms in which silicon-photodiode dosemeters were implanted at various organ positions. In the head, chest and abdominal CT for the newborn phantom, doses for organs within the scan region were 21-40, 3-8 and 3-12 mGy, respectively. The corresponding doses for the child phantom were 20-37, 2-11 and 4-17 mGy, respectively. In the head, chest and abdominal CT, the effective doses were respectively 2.1-3.3, 2.0-6.0 and 2.2-10.0 mSv for the newborn, and 1.0-2.0, 1.2-6.6 and 2.9-11.8 mSv for the child. Radiation doses for the newborn were at the same levels as those for the child, excepting effective doses in head CT for the newborn, which were 1.8 times higher than those for the child. (authors)

  3. Accuracy of portable chest X-ray film in detection of intrathoracic abnormal findings in patients after esophagectomy in comparison with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Muneaki; Takeda, Junzo; Ochiai, Ryoichi; Fukushima, Kazuaki; Kouda, Eiichi

    1992-01-01

    To determine an accuracy of portable chest radiographs (CXR) in the diagnosis of pneumothorax, consolidation, passive collapse, subsegmental atelectasis, left and right pleural effusion, findings of 35 pairs of chest CT (CT) and CXR were compared in 21 patients after esophagectomy. The presence of abnormal findings on CXR and CT was evaluated separately by radiologists. Assuming that the diagnoses through CT were correct, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for CXR were examined in each of 6 abnormal findings. Comparison of CT findings with those of CXR resulted in the following sensitivities (SN) and specificities (SP): pneumothorax: SN=0.17, SP=1.0; consolidation: SN=0.82, SP=1.0; passive collapse: SN=0.83, SP=0.58; subsegmental atelectasis: SN=0.61, SP=1.0; left pleural effusion: SN=0.79, SP=0.29; right pleural effusion: SN=0.9, SP=0.8. These results demonstrated that CXR might miss pneumothorax and overestimate left pleural effusion. Positive predictive value was over 0.79 in each of 6 abnormal findings, which indicated an accuracy of abnormal findings seen on CXR was high. However, negative predictive value in left pleural effusion, which was 0.25, indicated difficulty in correct estimation of left pleural effusion. (author)

  4. Hand hygiene in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschudin-Sutter, Sarah; Pargger, Hans; Widmer, Andreas F

    2010-08-01

    Healthcare-associated infections affect 1.4 million patients at any time worldwide, as estimated by the World Health Organization. In intensive care units, the burden of healthcare-associated infections is greatly increased, causing additional morbidity and mortality. Multidrug-resistant pathogens are commonly involved in such infections and render effective treatment challenging. Proper hand hygiene is the single most important, simplest, and least expensive means of preventing healthcare-associated infections. In addition, it is equally important to stop transmission of multidrug-resistant pathogens. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization guidelines on hand hygiene in health care, alcohol-based handrub should be used as the preferred means for routine hand antisepsis. Alcohols have excellent in vitro activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including multidrug-resistant pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a variety of fungi, and most viruses. Some pathogens, however, such as Clostridium difficile, Bacillus anthracis, and noroviruses, may require special hand hygiene measures. Failure to provide user friendliness of hand hygiene equipment and shortage of staff are predictors for noncompliance, especially in the intensive care unit setting. Therefore, practical approaches to promote hand hygiene in the intensive care unit include provision of a minimal number of handrub dispensers per bed, monitoring of compliance, and choice of the most attractive product. Lack of knowledge of guidelines for hand hygiene, lack of recognition of hand hygiene opportunities during patient care, and lack of awareness of the risk of cross-transmission of pathogens are barriers to good hand hygiene practices. Multidisciplinary programs to promote increased use of alcoholic handrub lead to an increased compliance of healthcare

  5. Antibiotic Policies in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nese Saltoglu

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial management of patients in the Intensive Care Units are complex. Antimicrobial resistance is an increasing problem. Effective strategies for the prevention of antimicrobial resistance in ICUs have focused on limiting the unnecessary use of antibiotics and increasing compliance with infection control practices. Antibiotic policies have been implemented to modify antibiotic use, including national or regional formulary manipulations, antibiotic restriction forms, care plans, antibiotic cycling and computer assigned antimicrobial therapy. Moreover, infectious diseases consultation is a simple way to limit antibiotic use in ICU units. To improve rational antimicrobial using a multidisiplinary approach is suggested. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(4.000: 299-309

  6. SU-D-BRA-06: Dual-Energy Chest CT: The Effects of Virtual Monochromatic Reconstructions On Texture Analysis Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorensen, J; Duran, C; Stingo, F; Wei, W; Rao, A; Zhang, L; Court, L; Erasmus, J; Godoy, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of virtual monochromatic reconstructions on several commonly used texture analysis features in DECT of the chest. Further, to assess the effect of monochromatic energy levels on the ability of these textural features to identify tissue types. Methods: 20 consecutive patients underwent chest CTs for evaluation of lung nodules using Siemens Somatom Definition Flash DECT. Virtual monochromatic images were constructed at 10keV intervals from 40–190keV. For each patient, an ROI delineated the lesion under investigation, and cylindrical ROI’s were placed within 5 different healthy tissues (blood, fat, muscle, lung, and liver). Several histogram- and Grey Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM)-based texture features were then evaluated in each ROI at each energy level. As a means of validation, these feature values were then used in a random forest classifier to attempt to identify the tissue types present within each ROI. Their predictive accuracy at each energy level was recorded. Results: All textural features changed considerably with virtual monochromatic energy, particularly below 70keV. Most features exhibited a global minimum or maximum around 80keV, and while feature values changed with energy above this, patient ranking was generally unaffected. As expected, blood demonstrated the lowest inter-patient variability, for all features, while lung lesions (encompassing many different pathologies) exhibited the highest. The accuracy of these features in identifying tissues (76% accuracy) was highest at 80keV, but no clear relationship between energy and classification accuracy was found. Two common misclassifications (blood vs liver and muscle vs fat) accounted for the majority (24 of the 28) errors observed. Conclusion: All textural features were highly dependent on virtual monochromatic energy level, especially below 80keV, and were more stable above this energy. However, in a random forest model, these commonly used features were

  7. SU-D-BRA-06: Dual-Energy Chest CT: The Effects of Virtual Monochromatic Reconstructions On Texture Analysis Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, J; Duran, C; Stingo, F; Wei, W; Rao, A; Zhang, L; Court, L; Erasmus, J; Godoy, M [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of virtual monochromatic reconstructions on several commonly used texture analysis features in DECT of the chest. Further, to assess the effect of monochromatic energy levels on the ability of these textural features to identify tissue types. Methods: 20 consecutive patients underwent chest CTs for evaluation of lung nodules using Siemens Somatom Definition Flash DECT. Virtual monochromatic images were constructed at 10keV intervals from 40–190keV. For each patient, an ROI delineated the lesion under investigation, and cylindrical ROI’s were placed within 5 different healthy tissues (blood, fat, muscle, lung, and liver). Several histogram- and Grey Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM)-based texture features were then evaluated in each ROI at each energy level. As a means of validation, these feature values were then used in a random forest classifier to attempt to identify the tissue types present within each ROI. Their predictive accuracy at each energy level was recorded. Results: All textural features changed considerably with virtual monochromatic energy, particularly below 70keV. Most features exhibited a global minimum or maximum around 80keV, and while feature values changed with energy above this, patient ranking was generally unaffected. As expected, blood demonstrated the lowest inter-patient variability, for all features, while lung lesions (encompassing many different pathologies) exhibited the highest. The accuracy of these features in identifying tissues (76% accuracy) was highest at 80keV, but no clear relationship between energy and classification accuracy was found. Two common misclassifications (blood vs liver and muscle vs fat) accounted for the majority (24 of the 28) errors observed. Conclusion: All textural features were highly dependent on virtual monochromatic energy level, especially below 80keV, and were more stable above this energy. However, in a random forest model, these commonly used features were

  8. Guideline for stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbaek; Lorentzen, Kristian; Clausen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU), and is recommended in the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines 2012. The present guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine sums...

  9. Data privacy considerations in Intensive Care Grids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Jesus; Dikaiakos, Marios D; Kyprianou, Theodoros; Bilas, Angelos; Marazakis, Manolis

    2008-01-01

    Novel eHealth systems are being designed to provide a citizen-centered health system, however the even demanding need for computing and data resources has required the adoption of Grid technologies. In most of the cases, this novel Health Grid requires not only conveying patient's personal data through public networks, but also storing it into shared resources out of the hospital premises. These features introduce new security concerns, in particular related with privacy. In this paper we survey current legal and technological approaches that have been taken to protect a patient's personal data into eHealth systems, with a particular focus in Intensive Care Grids. However, thanks to a security analysis applied over the Intensive Care Grid system (ICGrid) we show that these security mechanisms are not enough to provide a comprehensive solution, mainly because the data-at-rest is still vulnerable to attacks coming from untrusted Storage Elements where an attacker may directly access them. To cope with these issues, we propose a new privacy-oriented protocol which uses a combination of encryption and fragmentation to improve data's assurance while keeping compatibility with current legislations and Health Grid security mechanisms.

  10. Diagnostic imaging in intensive care patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afione, Cristina; Binda, Maria del C.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of imaging diagnostic methods in the location of infection causes of unknown origin in the critical care patient. Material and methods: A comprehensive medical literature search has been done. Recommendations for the diagnostic imaging of septic focus in intensive care patients are presented for each case, with analysis based on evidence. The degree of evidence utilized has been that of Oxford Center for Evidence-based Medicine. Results: Nosocomial infection is the most frequent complication in the intensive care unit (25 to 33%) with high sepsis incidence rate. In order to locate the infection focus, imaging methods play an important role, as a diagnostic tool and to guide therapeutic procedures. The most frequent causes of infection are: ventilation associated pneumonia, sinusitis, intra-abdominal infections and an acute acalculous cholecystitis. This paper analyses the diagnostic imaging of hospital infection, with the evaluation of choice methods for each one and proposes an algorithm to assess the septic patient. Conclusion: There are evidences, with different degrees of recommendation, for the use of diagnostic imaging methods for infectious focuses in critical care patients. The studies have been selected based on their diagnostic precision, on the capacity of the medical team and on the availability of resources, considering the risk-benefit balance for the best safety of the patient. (author)

  11. Ultra low-dose chest CT using filtered back projection: Comparison of 80-, 100- and 120 kVp protocols in a prospective randomized study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali, E-mail: rkhawaja@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Thoracic Radiology, MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Singh, Sarabjeet [Division of Thoracic Radiology, MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Madan, Rachna [Division of Thoracic Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Sharma, Amita; Padole, Atul; Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz; Digumarthy, Subba; Shepard, Jo-Anne; Kalra, Mannudeep K. [Division of Thoracic Radiology, MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Filtered back projection technique enables acceptable image quality for chest CT examinations at 0.9 mGy (estimated effective dose of 0.5 mSv) for selected sizes of patients. • Lesion detection (such as solid non-calcified lung nodules) in lung parenchyma is optimal at 0.9 mGy, with limited visualization of thyroid nodules in FBP images. • Further dose reduction down to 0.4 mGy is possible for most patients undergoing follow-up chest CT for evaluation of larger lung nodules and GGOs. • Our results may help set the reference ALARA dose for chest CT examinations reconstructed with filtered back projection technique using the minimum possible radiation dose with acceptable image quality and lesion detection. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess lesion detection and diagnostic image quality of filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction technique in ultra low-dose chest CT examinations. Methods and materials: In this IRB-approved ongoing prospective clinical study, 116 CT-image-series at four different radiation-doses were performed for 29 patients (age, 57–87 years; F:M – 15:12; BMI 16–32 kg/m{sup 2}). All patients provided written-informed-consent for the acquisitions of additional ultra low-dose (ULD) series on a 256-slice MDCT (iCT, Philips Healthcare). In-addition to their clinical standard-dose chest CT (SD, 120 kV mean CTDI{sub vol}, 6 ± 1 mGy), ULD-CT was subsequently performed at three-dose-levels (0.9 mGy [120 kV]; 0.5 mGy [100 kV] and 0.2 mGy [80 kV]). Images were reconstructed with FBP (2.5 mm * 1.25 mm) resulting into four-stacks: SD-FBP (reference-standard), FBP{sub 0.9}, FBP{sub 0.5}, and FBP{sub 0.2}. Four thoracic-radiologists from two-teaching-hospitals independently-evaluated data for lesion-detection and visibility-of-small-structures. Friedman's-non-parametric-test with post hoc Dunn's-test was used for data-analysis. Results: Interobserver-agreement was substantial between radiologists (k = 0.6–0.8). With

  12. The chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdon, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    Radiographic interpretation of chest films of newborns in respiratory distress remains one of the most difficult aspects of pediatric radiology. Complex pulmonary and cardiac adjustments to extrauterine life are rapidly taking place. The small, fluid-filled fetal lung must rid itself of fluid and fill with air. The high vascular resistance of the fetal pulmonary bed and the open ductus arteriosus allow shunting of blood in both directions. Films taken in this period of time may show lungs that resemble those seen in congestive heart failure or fluid overload. When these findings are observed in infants who may appear dusky or even cyanotic, the result may be the diagnosis of disease in normal infants passing through a stormy transition period. To make things worse, the films are taken as portable surpine films, usually in an isolette in the intensive care unit (ICU). The phase of respiration is difficult, if not impossible, to control, and lateral films are usually not obtained. Many of the infants are on assisted ventilation either by tube or nasal prongs-nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-and lungs can appear over-inflated or whited out, depending on the pressures used and the phase of the respiratory cycle. Prolonged crying itself can make lungs appear semiopaque; the next breath may show such a dramatic reinflation that it is hard to believe the two films are of the same infant, made only seconds apart. Is the heart large? Or is it the thymus? Are the lungs ''wet''? Is there infection? Is there pulmonary vascular engorgement? Why are these films so hard to interpret? They have no easy answers. The radiologist must realize that the neonatal intensive care personnel, armed though they may be with blood gas values, are no better at interpreting films. If anything, they read into them what they wish to see

  13. Characteristics of pulmonary cysts in Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome: Thin-section CT findings of the chest in 12 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobino, Kazunori; Gunji, Yoko; Kurihara, Masatoshi; Kunogi, Makiko; Koike, Kengo; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kodama, Yuzo; Iwakami, Shin-ichiro; Kikkawa, Mika; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Seyama, Kuniaki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To describe in detail the characteristic chest computed tomography (CT) findings of Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome. Materials and methods: Thin-section chest CT scans of consecutive 12 patients with genetically diagnosed BHD syndrome were retrospectively evaluated by two observers, especially about the characteristics (distribution, number, size, shape and relation to pleura) of pulmonary cysts. Interobserver agreement in the identification of abnormalities on the CT images was achieved using the κ statistic, and the degree of interobserver correlation for the characterization of pulmonary cysts was assessed using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results: Multiple pulmonary cysts were seen in all patients. The number of cysts in each patient was various (range, 29-407), and cysts of various sizes (from a few mm to 2 cm or more) were seen in all patient. 76.6% (mean) of cysts were irregular-shaped, and 40.5% (mean) of cysts were located along the pleura. The mean extent score of cysts was 13% of the whole lung, and the distribution of cysts was predominantly in the lower medial zone. Finally, cysts abutting or including the proximal portions of lower pulmonary arteries or veins were also seen in all patients. Conclusion: Multiple, irregular-shaped cysts of various sizes with lower medial lung zone predominance are characteristic CT findings of BHD syndrome. Cysts abutting or including the proximal portions of lower pulmonary arteries or veins may also exist in this syndrome in a high probability.

  14. Characteristics of pulmonary cysts in Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome: Thin-section CT findings of the chest in 12 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobino, Kazunori, E-mail: tobino@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Gunji, Yoko [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Kurihara, Masatoshi [Pneumothorax Center, Nissan Tamagawa Hospital, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); Kunogi, Makiko; Koike, Kengo [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Johkoh, Takeshi [Department of Radiology, Kinki Central Hospital of Mutual Aid Association of Public School Teachers, Kurumazuka 3-1, Itami, Hyogo 664-0872 (Japan); Kodama, Yuzo [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Iwakami, Shin-ichiro [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, Shizuoka Hospital, 1129 Nagaoka, Izunokuni, Shizuoka 410-2295 (Japan); Kikkawa, Mika [Biochemical Research Center, Division of Proteomics and Biomolecular Sciences, Juntendo University, Graduate School of Medicine, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo (Japan); Takahashi, Kazuhisa [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Seyama, Kuniaki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To describe in detail the characteristic chest computed tomography (CT) findings of Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome. Materials and methods: Thin-section chest CT scans of consecutive 12 patients with genetically diagnosed BHD syndrome were retrospectively evaluated by two observers, especially about the characteristics (distribution, number, size, shape and relation to pleura) of pulmonary cysts. Interobserver agreement in the identification of abnormalities on the CT images was achieved using the {kappa} statistic, and the degree of interobserver correlation for the characterization of pulmonary cysts was assessed using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results: Multiple pulmonary cysts were seen in all patients. The number of cysts in each patient was various (range, 29-407), and cysts of various sizes (from a few mm to 2 cm or more) were seen in all patient. 76.6% (mean) of cysts were irregular-shaped, and 40.5% (mean) of cysts were located along the pleura. The mean extent score of cysts was 13% of the whole lung, and the distribution of cysts was predominantly in the lower medial zone. Finally, cysts abutting or including the proximal portions of lower pulmonary arteries or veins were also seen in all patients. Conclusion: Multiple, irregular-shaped cysts of various sizes with lower medial lung zone predominance are characteristic CT findings of BHD syndrome. Cysts abutting or including the proximal portions of lower pulmonary arteries or veins may also exist in this syndrome in a high probability.

  15. Model-based iterative reconstruction in pediatric chest CT: assessment of image quality in a prospective study of children with cystic fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mieville, Frederic A.; Bochud, Francois O.; Verdun, Francis R. [Lausanne University Hospital, Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne (Switzerland); Berteloot, Laureline; Brunelle, Francis [Necker Children' s Hospital of Paris and University of Paris Descartes, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Grandjean, Albane; Ayestaran, Paul [General Electric Medical Systems Europe, Paris (France); Gudinchet, Francois; Schmidt, Sabine [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-03-15

    The potential effects of ionizing radiation are of particular concern in children. The model-based iterative reconstruction VEO trademark is a technique commercialized to improve image quality and reduce noise compared with the filtered back-projection (FBP) method. To evaluate the potential of VEO trademark on diagnostic image quality and dose reduction in pediatric chest CT examinations. Twenty children (mean 11.4 years) with cystic fibrosis underwent either a standard CT or a moderately reduced-dose CT plus a minimum-dose CT performed at 100 kVp. Reduced-dose CT examinations consisted of two consecutive acquisitions: one moderately reduced-dose CT with increased noise index (NI = 70) and one minimum-dose CT at CTDI{sub vol} 0.14 mGy. Standard CTs were reconstructed using the FBP method while low-dose CTs were reconstructed using FBP and VEO. Two senior radiologists evaluated diagnostic image quality independently by scoring anatomical structures using a four-point scale (1 = excellent, 2 = clear, 3 = diminished, 4 = non-diagnostic). Standard deviation (SD) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were also computed. At moderately reduced doses, VEO images had significantly lower SD (P < 0.001) and higher SNR (P < 0.05) in comparison to filtered back-projection images. Further improvements were obtained at minimum-dose CT. The best diagnostic image quality was obtained with VEO at minimum-dose CT for the small structures (subpleural vessels and lung fissures) (P < 0.001). The potential for dose reduction was dependent on the diagnostic task because of the modification of the image texture produced by this reconstruction. At minimum-dose CT, VEO enables important dose reduction depending on the clinical indication and makes visible certain small structures that were not perceptible with filtered back-projection. (orig.)

  16. Cauda equina syndrome: A rare complication in intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagatsinh Yogendrasinh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 73-year-old married retired woman with a history of myocardial infarction and primary biliary cirrhosis was admitted to intensive care unit with complaints of chest pain. She was suspected to have pulmonary embolism (PE and was treated with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH and aspirin. She had computerized tomographic pulmonary angiography on next day, which ruled out any evidence of PE, until she was continued on LMWH. Three days later, she developed progressive right leg weakness and loss of sphincter control and patchy loss of sensation from T10 and below. She was seen by neurologist and had an MRI scan, which showed extensive subdural clot compressing the conus and lower half of the thoracic cord. She underwent T9-L1, L3, L5-S1 laminectomies, and evacuation and decompression of the clot. She showed very slight recovery following the surgery and left with residual paraparesis. This case is reported to raise awareness among intensivists to be cautious in establishing the diagnosis before prescribing the LMWH and be vigilant to diagnose cauda equina syndrome and treat promptly to avoid residual neurological problems.

  17. Delirium in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Arumugam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Delirium is characterized by impaired cognition with nonspecific manifestations. In critically ill patients, it may develop secondary to multiple precipitating or predisposing causes. Although it can be a transient and reversible syndrome, its occurrence in Intensive Care Unit (ICU patients may be associated with long-term cognitive dysfunction. This condition is often under-recognized by treating physicians, leading to inappropriate management. For appropriate management of delirium, early identification and risk factor assessment are key factors. Multidisciplinary collaboration and standardized care can enhance the recognition of delirium. Interdisciplinary team working, together with updated guideline implementation, demonstrates proven success in minimizing delirium in the ICU. Moreover, should the use of physical restraint be necessary to prevent harm among mechanically ventilated patients, ethical clinical practice methodology must be employed. This traditional narrative review aims to address the presentation, risk factors, management, and ethical considerations in the management of delirium in ICU settings.

  18. Extreme metabolic alkalosis in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Swagata

    2009-10-01

    Metabolic alkalosis is a commonly seen imbalance in the intensive care unit (ICU). Extreme metabolic alkalemia, however, is less common. A pH greater than 7.65 may carry a high risk of mortality (up to 80%). We discuss the entity of life threatening metabolic alkalemia by means of two illustrative cases - both with a pH greater than 7.65 on presentation. The cause, modalities of managing and complications of this condition is discussed from the point of view of both the traditional method of Henderson and Hasselbalch and the mathematical model based on physiochemical model described by Stewart. Special mention to the pitfalls in managing patients of metabolic alkalosis with concomitant renal compromise is made.

  19. Infection control in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Mohamed F; Askari, Reza

    2014-12-01

    It is critical for health care personnel to recognize and appreciate the detrimental impact of intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired infections. The economic, clinical, and social expenses to patients and hospitals are overwhelming. To limit the incidence of ICU-acquired infections, aggressive infection control measures must be implemented and enforced. Researchers and national committees have developed and continue to develop evidence-based guidelines to control ICU infections. A multifaceted approach, including infection prevention committees, antimicrobial stewardship programs, daily reassessments-intervention bundles, identifying and minimizing risk factors, and continuing staff education programs, is essential. Infection control in the ICU is an evolving area of critical care research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of Pulmonary Hypertension Caused by Left-Sided Heart Disease (World Health Organization Group 2) Based on Cardiac Chamber Volumes Derived From Chest CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviram, Galit; Rozenbaum, Zach; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Berliner, Shlomo; Topilsky, Yan; Fleischmann, Dominik; Sung, Yon K; Zamanian, Roham T; Guo, Haiwei Henry

    2017-10-01

    Evaluations of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) commonly include chest CT imaging. We hypothesized that cardiac chamber volumes calculated from the same CT scans can yield additional information to distinguish PH related to left-sided heart disease (World Health Organization group 2) from other PH subtypes. Patients who had PH confirmed by right heart catheterization and contrast-enhanced chest CT studies were enrolled in this retrospective multicenter study. Cardiac chamber volumes were calculated using automated segmentation software and compared between group 2 and non-group 2 patients with PH. This study included 114 patients with PH, 27 (24%) of whom were classified as group 2 based on their pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. Patients with group 2 PH exhibited significantly larger median left atrial (LA) volumes (118 mL vs 63 mL; P volumes (90 mL vs 76 mL; P = .02), and smaller median right ventricular (RV) volumes (173 mL vs 210 mL; P = .005) than did non-group 2 patients. On multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, and mean pulmonary arterial pressure, group 2 PH was significantly associated with larger median LA and LV volumes (P volume ratios of RA/LA, RV/LV, and RV/LA (P = .001, P = .004, and P volumes demonstrated a high discriminatory ability for group 2 PH (area under the curve, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.870-0.968). Volumetric analysis of the cardiac chambers from nongated chest CT scans, particularly with findings of an enlarged left atrium, exhibited high discriminatory ability for identifying patients with PH due to left-sided heart disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Radiation dose reduction with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) technique for chest CT in children: an intra-individual comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Myung-Joon; Yoon, Choon-Sik; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2012-09-01

    To retrospectively compare radiation dose and image quality of pediatric chest CT using a routine dose protocol reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) (the Routine study) and a low-dose protocol with 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) (the ASIR study). We retrospectively reviewed chest CT performed in pediatric patients who underwent both the Routine study and the ASIR study on different days between January 2010 and August 2011. Volume CT dose indices (CTDIvol), dose length products (DLP), and effective doses were obtained to estimate radiation dose. The image quality was evaluated objectively as noise measured in the descending aorta and paraspinal muscle, and subjectively by three radiologists for noise, sharpness, artifacts, and diagnostic acceptability using a four-point scale. The paired Student's t-test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used for statistical analysis. Twenty-six patients (M:F=13:13, mean age 11.7) were enrolled. The ASIR studies showed 60.3%, 56.2%, and 55.2% reductions in CTDIvol (from 18.73 to 7.43 mGy, PASIR studies (20.81 vs. 16.67, P=0.004), but was not different in the aorta (18.23 vs. 18.72, P=0.726). The subjective image quality demonstrated no difference between the two studies. A low-dose protocol with 50% ASIR allows radiation dose reduction in pediatric chest CT by more than 55% while maintaining image quality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiation dose reduction with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) technique for chest CT in children: An intra-individual comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hyun, E-mail: circle1128@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung-Joon, E-mail: mjkim@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Choon-Sik, E-mail: yooncs58@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi-Jung, E-mail: mjl1213@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To retrospectively compare radiation dose and image quality of pediatric chest CT using a routine dose protocol reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) (the Routine study) and a low-dose protocol with 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) (the ASIR study). Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed chest CT performed in pediatric patients who underwent both the Routine study and the ASIR study on different days between January 2010 and August 2011. Volume CT dose indices (CTDIvol), dose length products (DLP), and effective doses were obtained to estimate radiation dose. The image quality was evaluated objectively as noise measured in the descending aorta and paraspinal muscle, and subjectively by three radiologists for noise, sharpness, artifacts, and diagnostic acceptability using a four-point scale. The paired Student's t-test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Twenty-six patients (M:F = 13:13, mean age 11.7) were enrolled. The ASIR studies showed 60.3%, 56.2%, and 55.2% reductions in CTDIvol (from 18.73 to 7.43 mGy, P < 0.001), DLP (from 307.42 to 134.51 mGy × cm, P < 0.001), and effective dose (from 4.12 to 1.84 mSv, P < 0.001), respectively, compared with the Routine studies. The objective noise was higher in the paraspinal muscle of the ASIR studies (20.81 vs. 16.67, P = 0.004), but was not different in the aorta (18.23 vs. 18.72, P = 0.726). The subjective image quality demonstrated no difference between the two studies. Conclusion: A low-dose protocol with 50% ASIR allows radiation dose reduction in pediatric chest CT by more than 55% while maintaining image quality.

  3. Radiation dose reduction with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) technique for chest CT in children: An intra-individual comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Myung-Joon; Yoon, Choon-Sik; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively compare radiation dose and image quality of pediatric chest CT using a routine dose protocol reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) (the Routine study) and a low-dose protocol with 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) (the ASIR study). Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed chest CT performed in pediatric patients who underwent both the Routine study and the ASIR study on different days between January 2010 and August 2011. Volume CT dose indices (CTDIvol), dose length products (DLP), and effective doses were obtained to estimate radiation dose. The image quality was evaluated objectively as noise measured in the descending aorta and paraspinal muscle, and subjectively by three radiologists for noise, sharpness, artifacts, and diagnostic acceptability using a four-point scale. The paired Student's t-test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Twenty-six patients (M:F = 13:13, mean age 11.7) were enrolled. The ASIR studies showed 60.3%, 56.2%, and 55.2% reductions in CTDIvol (from 18.73 to 7.43 mGy, P < 0.001), DLP (from 307.42 to 134.51 mGy × cm, P < 0.001), and effective dose (from 4.12 to 1.84 mSv, P < 0.001), respectively, compared with the Routine studies. The objective noise was higher in the paraspinal muscle of the ASIR studies (20.81 vs. 16.67, P = 0.004), but was not different in the aorta (18.23 vs. 18.72, P = 0.726). The subjective image quality demonstrated no difference between the two studies. Conclusion: A low-dose protocol with 50% ASIR allows radiation dose reduction in pediatric chest CT by more than 55% while maintaining image quality

  4. Ethical challenges in neonatal intensive care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandås, Maria; Fredriksen, Sven-Tore D

    2015-12-01

    Neonatal nurses report a great deal of ethical challenges in their everyday work. Seemingly trivial everyday choices nurses make are no more value-neutral than life-and-death choices. Everyday ethical challenges should also be recognized as ethical dilemmas in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to investigate which types of ethical challenges neonatal nurses experience in their day-to-day care for critically ill newborns. Data were collected through semi-structured qualitative in-depth interviews. Phenomenological-hermeneutic analysis was applied to interpret the data. Six nurses from neonatal intensive care units at two Norwegian hospitals were interviewed on-site. The study is designed to comply with Ethical Guidelines for Nursing Research in the Nordic Countries and the Helsinki declaration. Findings suggest that nurses experience a diverse range of everyday ethical challenges related to challenging interactions with parents and colleagues, emotional strain, protecting the vulnerable infant, finding the balance between sensitivity and authority, ensuring continuity of treatment, and miscommunication and professional disagreement. A major finding in this study is how different agents involved in caring for the newborn experience their realities differently. When these realities collide, ethical challenges arise. Findings suggest that acting in the best interests of the child becomes more difficult in situations involving many agents with different perceptions of reality. The study presents new aspects which increases knowledge and understanding of the reality of nursing in a neonatal intensive care unit, while also demanding increased research in this field of care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Intensive care unit audit: invasive procedure surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariama Amaral Michels

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale and objective: currently, Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs constitute a serious public health problem. It is estimated that for every ten hospitalized patients, one will have infection after admission, generating high costs resulting from increased length of hospitalization, additional diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. The intensive care unit (ICU, due to its characteristics, is one of the most complex units of the hospital environment, a result of the equipment, the available technology, the severity of inpatients and the invasive procedures the latter are submitted to. The aim of the study was to evaluate the adherence to specifi c HAI prevention measures in invasive ICU procedures. Methods: This study had a quantitative, descriptive and exploratory approach. Among the risk factors for HAIs are the presence of central venous access, indwelling vesical catheter and mechanical ventilation, and, therefore, the indicators were calculated for patients undergoing these invasive procedures, through a questionnaire standardized by the Hospital Infection Control Commission (HICC. Results: For every 1,000 patients, 15 had catheter-related bloodstream infection, 6.85 had urinary tract infection associated with indwelling catheter in the fi rst half of 2010. Conclusion: most HAIs cannot be prevented, for reasons inherent to invasive procedures and the patients. However, their incidence can be reduced and controlled. The implementation of preventive measures based on scientifi c evidence can reduce HAIs signifi cantly and sustainably, resulting in safer health care services and reduced costs. The main means of prevention include the cleaning of hands, use of epidemiological block measures, when necessary, and specifi c care for each infection site. KEYWORDS Nosocomial infection. Intensive care units.

  6. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking ...

  7. Characteristics and outcomes of end-stage renal disease patients with active tuberculosis followed in intensive care units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulasli, Sevinc Sarinc; Ulubay, Gaye; Arslan, Nevra Gullu; Akcay, Sule; Eyuboglu, Fusun Oner; Sezer, Siren; Haberal, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a common problem in patients with chronic renal failure. In intensive care units, misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis of TB is common. Therefore, a description of characteristics of active TB in patients with renal failure followed in intensive care units is important to reduce mortality and transmission of the disease. This study was performed to describe the characteristics of patients with renal failure admitted to the intensive care units and having active TB and evaluate predictive factors for in hospital mortality. The hospital records of 24 patients (11 women, 13 men) having ESRD and TB between 2001-2006 were reviewed. Clinical, radiological, and laboratory data on admission were recorded. Possible parameters contributing to in-hospital mortality were obtained from the medical records. In-hospital mortality rate was 66.6%. Factors associated with mortality were decreased partial pressure of oxygen and malnutrition. Fever was reported in 8 patients and hemoptysis was reported in 3 patients. Eight patients had consolidation on chest radiograph, while 4 had normal findings Seventeen patients had pulmonary involvement, and 11 had extra pulmonary involvement. The mortality rate in TB patients followed in intensive care units is high, with 3 factors contributing to in-hospital mortality. Clinicians should consider active TB in renal failure patients being followed in the intensive care unit, even when results of a chest radiograph are normal especially in patients with unexplained poor general health or respiratory failure. (author)

  8. Clinical study for findings of pneumothoraces on the plain chest film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Mitsuaki

    1988-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty cases of pneumothoraces in intensive care unit in the last seven and half years were reviewed. In intensive care unit, plain chest films are likely to be obtained on supine position that make difficult to diagnose pneumothorax, because of unusual distribution of air in the pleural cavity. In our institution, they were obtained in supine position in 75 %. In our series of 207 supine chest cases, anteromedial and subpulmonic recesses were involved in 11.6 % and 25.6 % respectively. Twenty five cases (12 %) showed unusual location of air. Several radiographic signs have been previously described to recognize this condition. Basilar hyperlucency was most reliable sign (100 %) of detecting subpulmonary pneumothorax. Double diaphragm sign (60 %) and distinct cardiac apex (46.6 %) were also reliable signs. Almost all cases of unusual pneumothoraces were recognized on supine radiographs. However, CT was useful to detect unusual pneumothorax in patient with pneumomediastinum or pulmonary contusion. Unusual pneumothoraces were seen only in traumatized patients. The importance of careful observation of plain chest films to detecte unusual pneumothorax in patients with blunt chest trauma was stressed. (author)

  9. Clinical study for findings of pneumothoraces on the plain chest film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, Mitsuaki

    1988-11-01

    Two hundred and fifty cases of pneumothoraces in intensive care unit in the last seven and half years were reviewed. In intensive care unit, plain chest films are likely to be obtained on supine position that make difficult to diagnose pneumothorax, because of unusual distribution of air in the pleural cavity. In our institution, they were obtained in supine position in 75 %. In our series of 207 supine chest cases, anteromedial and subpulmonic recesses were involved in 11.6 % and 25.6 % respectively. Twenty five cases (12 %) showed unusual location of air. Several radiographic signs have been previously described to recognize this condition. Basilar hyperlucency was most reliable sign (100 %) of detecting subpulmonary pneumothorax. Double diaphragm sign (60 %) and distinct cardiac apex (46.6 %) were also reliable signs. Almost all cases of unusual pneumothoraces were recognized on supine radiographs. However, CT was useful to detect unusual pneumothorax in patient with pneumomediastinum or pulmonary contusion. Unusual pneumothoraces were seen only in traumatized patients. The importance of careful observation of plain chest films to detecte unusual pneumothorax in patients with blunt chest trauma was stressed.

  10. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest is performed to: assess abnormal masses, including cancer of the lungs or other tissues, which either cannot be assessed ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and ... tissues, except for lung abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging ...

  11. Intensive care bereavement practices across New Zealand and Australian intensive care units: a qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Maureen; Mitchell, Marion; James, Stephen; Wetzig, Krista

    2017-10-01

    End-of-life and bereavement care is an important consideration in intensive care. This study describes the type of bereavement care provided in intensive care units across Australia and New Zealand. Inductive qualitative content analysis was conducted on free-text responses to a web-based survey exploring unit-based bereavement practice distributed to nurse managers in 229 intensive care units in New Zealand and Australia. A total of 153 (67%) surveys were returned with 68 respondents making free-text responses. Respondents were mainly Australian (n = 54, 85·3%), from the public sector (n = 51, 75%) and holding Nurse Unit Managers/Charge Nurse roles (n = 39, 52·9%). From the 124 free-text responses, a total of 187 individual codes were identified focussing on bereavement care practices (n = 145, 77·5%), educational provision to support staff (n = 15, 8%) and organisational challenges (n = 27, 14·4%). Bereavement care practices described use of memory boxes, cultural specificity, annual memorial services and use of community support services. Educational provision identified local in-service programmes, and national bereavement courses for specialist bereavement nurse coordinators. Organisational challenges focussed on lack of funding, especially for provision of bereavement follow-up. This is the first Australasian-wide survey, and one of the few international studies, describing bereavement practices within intensive care, an important aspect of nursing practice. However, with funding for new bereavement services and education for staff lacking, there are continued challenges in developing bereavement care. Given knowledge about the impact of these areas of care on bereaved family members, this requires review. Nurses remain committed to supporting bereaved families during and following death in intensive care. With limited resource to support bereavement care, intensive care nurses undertake a range of bereavement care practices at time of death

  12. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Part 1: Impact on patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruettner, Joachim; Fink, Christian; Walter, Thomas; Meyer, Mathias; Apfaltrer, Paul; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Saur, Joachim; Sueselbeck, Tim; Traunwieser, Dominik; Takx, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) or “triple-rule-out” CT angiography (TRO-CTA) on patient management in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Materials and methods: 100 patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) underwent coronary CTA or TRO-CTA for the evaluation of chest pain. Patients with a high and low cardiac risk profile were not included in this study. All patients with significant coronary stenosis >50% on coronary CTA underwent invasive coronary catheterization (ICC). Important other pathological findings were recorded. All patients had a 90-day follow-up period for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Results: Based on a negative coronary CTA 60 of 100 patients were discharged on the same day. None of the discharged patients showed MACE during the 90-day follow-up. Coronary CTA revealed a coronary stenosis >50% in 19 of 100 patients. ICC confirmed significant coronary stenosis in 17/19 patients. Among the 17 true positive patients, 9 underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation, 7 were received intensified medical therapy, and 1 patient underwent coronary artery bypass surgery. A TRO-CTA protocol was performed in 36/100 patients due to elevated D-dimer levels. Pulmonary embolism was present in 5 patients, pleural effusion of unknown etiology in 3 patients, severe right ventricular dysfunction with pericardial effusion in 1 patient, and an incidental bronchial carcinoma was diagnosed in 1 patient. Conclusion: Coronary CTA and TRO-CTA allow a rapid and safe discharge in the majority of patients presenting with acute chest pain and an intermediate risk for ACS while at the same time identifies those with significant coronary artery stenosis

  13. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Part 1: Impact on patient management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruettner, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.gruettner@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Fink, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Fink@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Walter, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.walter@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Meyer, Mathias, E-mail: mr.meyer.mathias@gmail.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Apfaltrer@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, Ashley River Tower, 25 Courtenay Drive, Charleston, SC 29425-2260 (United States); Saur, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.saur@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Sueselbeck, Tim, E-mail: tim.sueselbeck@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Traunwieser, Dominik, E-mail: dominik.traunwieser@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Takx, Richard, E-mail: richard.takx@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, Ashley River Tower, 25 Courtenay Drive, Charleston, SC 29425-2260 (United States); and others

    2013-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) or “triple-rule-out” CT angiography (TRO-CTA) on patient management in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Materials and methods: 100 patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) underwent coronary CTA or TRO-CTA for the evaluation of chest pain. Patients with a high and low cardiac risk profile were not included in this study. All patients with significant coronary stenosis >50% on coronary CTA underwent invasive coronary catheterization (ICC). Important other pathological findings were recorded. All patients had a 90-day follow-up period for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Results: Based on a negative coronary CTA 60 of 100 patients were discharged on the same day. None of the discharged patients showed MACE during the 90-day follow-up. Coronary CTA revealed a coronary stenosis >50% in 19 of 100 patients. ICC confirmed significant coronary stenosis in 17/19 patients. Among the 17 true positive patients, 9 underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation, 7 were received intensified medical therapy, and 1 patient underwent coronary artery bypass surgery. A TRO-CTA protocol was performed in 36/100 patients due to elevated D-dimer levels. Pulmonary embolism was present in 5 patients, pleural effusion of unknown etiology in 3 patients, severe right ventricular dysfunction with pericardial effusion in 1 patient, and an incidental bronchial carcinoma was diagnosed in 1 patient. Conclusion: Coronary CTA and TRO-CTA allow a rapid and safe discharge in the majority of patients presenting with acute chest pain and an intermediate risk for ACS while at the same time identifies those with significant coronary artery stenosis.

  14. [Geriatric intensive care patients : Perspectives and limits of geriatric intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Werdan, U; Heppner, H-J; Michels, G

    2018-04-18

    Critically ill geriatric patients are vitally endangered due to the aging processes of organs, the frequently existing multimorbidity with subsequent polypharmacy and the typical geriatric syndrome of functional impairments. Aging processes in organs lower the clinical threshold for organ dysfunction and organ failure. Physiological organ aging processes with practical consequences for intensive care medicine are atypical manifestion of sepsis in immunosenescence, altered pharmacokinetics, reduced tolerance to hypovolemia due to proportionally reduced water compartment of the body in old age, the frequently only apparently normal function of the kidneys and the continuous reduction in pulmonary function in old age. The main reasons for changes in therapeutic targets are the will of the patient and risk-benefit considerations. The guidelines of the ethics section of the German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (DIVI) provide assistance and suggestions for a structured decision-making process.

  15. Measurement of irradiation doses secondary to bedside radiographs in a medical intensive care unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boles, J M; Boussert, F; Manens, J P; Le Cam, B; Bellet, M; Garre, M

    1987-01-01

    The authors prospectively studied the radiation doses to radio-sensitive organs secondary to bedside radiographs in intensive care patients and in a control phantom. Dosimeters were taped on different organs during each bedside X-ray. The mean radiation doses, expressed in 10(-5) Gy (m-rad), for an ''average patient'' who was hospitalized 9 days and had 6 chest X-rays were respectively: 292 to the sternal bone marrow; 239 to the thyroid gland; 3 to the testes; 1 to the ovaries; 605 to the eye for 2 maxillary sinus X-rays. No diffused irradiation was measured during a 2-month period in the intensive care unit nor on dosimeters worn by four nurses.

  16. Image quality in children with low-radiation chest CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and model-based iterative reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihang Sun

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate noise reduction and image quality improvement in low-radiation dose chest CT images in children using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR and a full model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR algorithm. METHODS: Forty-five children (age ranging from 28 days to 6 years, median of 1.8 years who received low-dose chest CT scans were included. Age-dependent noise index (NI was used for acquisition. Images were retrospectively reconstructed using three methods: MBIR, 60% of ASIR and 40% of conventional filtered back-projection (FBP, and FBP. The subjective quality of the images was independently evaluated by two radiologists. Objective noises in the left ventricle (LV, muscle, fat, descending aorta and lung field at the layer with the largest cross-section area of LV were measured, with the region of interest about one fourth to half of the area of descending aorta. Optimized signal-to-noise ratio (SNR was calculated. RESULT: In terms of subjective quality, MBIR images were significantly better than ASIR and FBP in image noise and visibility of tiny structures, but blurred edges were observed. In terms of objective noise, MBIR and ASIR reconstruction decreased the image noise by 55.2% and 31.8%, respectively, for LV compared with FBP. Similarly, MBIR and ASIR reconstruction increased the SNR by 124.0% and 46.2%, respectively, compared with FBP. CONCLUSION: Compared with FBP and ASIR, overall image quality and noise reduction were significantly improved by MBIR. MBIR image could reconstruct eligible chest CT images in children with lower radiation dose.

  17. Reducing false asystole alarms in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekimpe, Remi; Heldt, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    High rates of false monitoring alarms in intensive care can desensitize staff and therefore pose a significant risk to patient safety. Like other critical arrhythmia alarms, asystole alarms require immediate attention by the care providers as a true asystole event can be acutely life threatening. Here, it is illustrated that most false asystole alarms can be attributed to poor signal quality, and we propose and evaluate an algorithm to identify data windows of poor signal quality and thereby help suppress false asystole alarms. The algorithm combines intuitive signal-quality features (degree of signal saturation and baseline wander) and information from other physiological signals that might be available. Algorithm training and testing was performed on the MIMIC II and 2015 PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge databases, respectively. The algorithm achieved an alarm specificity of 81.0% and sensitivity of 95.4%, missing only one out of 22 true asystole alarms. On a separate neonatal data set, the algorithm was able to reject 89.7% (890 out of 992) of false asystole alarms while keeping all 22 true events. The results show that the false asystole alarm rate can be significantly reduced through basic signal quality evaluation.

  18. Exploring performance obstacles of intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurses, Ayse P; Carayon, Pascale

    2009-05-01

    High nursing workload, poor patient safety, and poor nursing quality of working life (QWL) are major issues in intensive care units (ICUs). Characteristics of the ICU and performance obstacles may contribute to these issues. The goal of this study was to comprehensively identify the performance obstacles perceived by ICU nurses. We used a qualitative research design and conducted semi-structured interviews with 15 ICU nurses of a medical-surgical ICU. Based on this qualitative study and a previously reported quantitative study, we identified seven main types of performance obstacles experienced by ICU nurses. Obstacles related to the physical environment (e.g., noise, amount of space), family relations (e.g., distractions caused by family, lack of time to spend with family), and equipment (e.g., unavailability, misplacement) were the most frequently experienced performance obstacles. The qualitative interview data provided rich information regarding the factors contributing to the performance obstacles. Overall, ICU nurses experience a variety of performance obstacles in their work on a daily basis. Future research is needed to understand the impact of performance obstacles on nursing workload, nursing QWL, and quality and safety of care.

  19. Nutritional Care in Iranian Intensive Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Intensive care units (ICUs) provides intensive treatment medicine to avoid complications such as malnutrition, infection and even death. As very little is currently known about the nutritional practices in Iranian ICUs, this study attempted to assess the various aspects of current nutrition support practices in Iranian ICUs. We conducted a cross-sectional study on 150 critically ill patients at 18 ICUs in 12 hospitals located in 2 provinces of Iran from February 2015 to March 2016. Data were collected through interview with supervisors of ICUs, medical record reviews and direct observation of patients during feeding. Our study showed that hospital-prepared enteral tube feeding formulas are the main formulas used in Iranian hospitals. None of the dietitians worked exclusively an ICU and only 30% of patients received diet counselling. Regular monitoring of nutritional status, daily energy and protein intake were not recorded in any of the participating ICUs. Patients were not monitored for anthropometric measurements such as mid-arm circumference (MAC) and electrolyte status. The nasogastric tube was not switched to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy or jejunostomy (PEG/PEGJ) in approximately 85% of patients receiving long-term enteral nutrition (EN) support. Our findings demonstrated that the quality of nutritional care was inappropriate in Iranian ICUs and improvement of nutritional care services within Iranian ICUs is necessary. PMID:29713622

  20. Dermatology in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The intensive care unit (ICU represents a special environment for patients. We analyzed patients in the ICU/ high care unit (HCU with respect to dermatology counselling and skin problems.Setting: Academic Teaching Hospital over a 10 month period.Methods: The total number of patients of the ICU was 1,208 with a mean stay of 4.1 days. In the HCU the mean stay was 16 days. Diagnosis leading to admission were analyzed. All files of dermatological counselling were evaluated in detail.Results: Fifty-five patients with dermatologic problems were identified: 19 women and 26 males. The age ranged from 22 to 90 years of life (mean ± standard deviation: 67.2 ± 17.4 years. The total number of consultations were 85. The range of repeated dermatological consultation ranged from two to ten. The major reasons were skin and soft tissue infections, adverse drug reactions, chronic wounds including pressure sores and skin irritation or dermatitis. Pre-existing skin conditions may complicate the treatment and care during ICU/HCU stay.Conclusion: A tight collaboration between of the medical staff of ICU/HCU and dermatology department will ensure a rapid diagnosis and treatment of various skin conditions in the ICU, without increasing the costs significantly. Interdisciplinary education of nursing staff contributes to improved skin care in the ICU/HCU and helps to prevent acute skin failure.

  1. The craft of intensive care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, Simon

    2013-06-01

    The practice of medicine is often represented as a dualism: is medicine a 'science' or an 'art'? This dualism has been long-lasting, with evident appeal for the medical profession. It also appears to have been rhetorically powerful, for example in enabling clinicians to resist the encroachment of 'scientific' evidence-based medicine into core areas of medical work such as individual clinical judgement. In this article I want to make the case for a more valid conceptualisation of medical practice: that it is a 'craft' activity. The case I make is founded on a theoretical synthesis of the concept of craft, combined with an analysis of ethnographic observations of routine medical practice in intensive care. For this context the craft aspects of medical work can be seen in how biomedical and other types of knowledge are used in practice, the embodied skills and practical judgement of practitioners and the technological and material environment. These aspects are brought together in two conceptual dimensions for 'craft': first, the application of knowledge; second, interaction with the material world. Some practical and political implications of a 'craft' metaphor for medical practice are noted. © 2013 The Author. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2013 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Invasive candidiasis in pediatric intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Sunit; Deep, Akash

    2009-10-01

    Candidemia and disseminated candidiasis are major causes of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients especially in the intensive care units (ICU). The incidence of invasive candidasis is on a steady rise because of increasing use of multiple antibiotics and invasive procedures carried out in the ICUs. Worldwide there is a shifting trend from C. albicans towards non albicans species, with an associated increase in mortality and antifungal resistance. In the ICU a predisposed host in one who is on broad spectrum antibiotics, parenteral nutrition, and central venous catheters. There are no pathognomonic signs or symptoms. The clinical clues are: unexplained fever or signs of severe sepsis or septic shock while on antibiotics, multiple, non-tender, nodular erythematous cutaneous lesions. The spectrum of infection with candida species range from superficial candidiasis of the skin and mucosa to more serious life threatening infections. Treatment of candidiasis involves removal of the most likely source of infection and drug therapy to speed up the clearance of infection. Amphotericin B remains the initial drug of first choice in hemodynamically unstable critically ill children in the wake of increasing resistance to azoles. Evaluation of newer antifungal agents and precise role of prophylactic therapy in ICU patients is needed.

  3. Intelligent ventilation in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigal Sviri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Automated, microprocessor-controlled, closed-loop mechanical ventilation has been used in our Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU at the Hadassah Hebrew-University Medical Center for the past 15 years; for 10 years it has been the primary (preferred ventilator modality. Design and setting. We describe our clinical experience with adaptive support ventilation (ASV over a 6-year period, during which time ASV-enabled ventilators became more readily available and were used as the primary (preferred ventilators for all patients admitted to the MICU. Results. During the study period, 1 220 patients were ventilated in the MICU. Most patients (84% were ventilated with ASV on admission. The median duration of ventilation with ASV was 6 days. The weaning success rate was 81%, and tracheostomy was required in 13%. Sixty-eight patients (6% with severe hypoxia and high inspiratory pressures were placed on pressure-controlled ventilation, in most cases to satisfy a technical requirement for precise and conservative administration of inhaled nitric oxide. The overall pneumothorax rate was less than 3%, and less than 1% of patients who were ventilated only using ASV developed pneumothorax. Conclusions. ASV is a safe and acceptable mode of ventilation for complicated medical patients, with a lower than usual ventilation complication rate.

  4. Potential intravenous drug interactions in intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiara Benevides Moreira

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To analyze potential intravenous drug interactions, and their level of severity associated with the administration of these drugs based on the prescriptions of an intensive care unit. METHOD Quantitative study, with aretrospective exploratory design, and descriptive statistical analysis of the ICU prescriptions of a teaching hospital from March to June 2014. RESULTS The sample consisted of 319 prescriptions and subsamples of 50 prescriptions. The mean number of drugs per patient was 9.3 records, and a higher probability of drug interaction inherent to polypharmacy was evidenced. The study identified severe drug interactions, such as concomitant administration of Tramadol with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (e.g., Metoclopramide and Fluconazole, increasing the risk of seizures due to their epileptogenic actions, as well as the simultaneous use of Ranitidine-Fentanyl®, which can lead to respiratory depression. CONCLUSION A previous mapping of prescriptions enables the characterization of the drug therapy, contributing to prevent potential drug interactions and their clinical consequences.

  5. Airborne fungi in an intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Gonçalves

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The presence of airborne fungi in Intensive Care Unit (ICUs is associated with increased nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was the isolation and identification of airborne fungi presented in an ICU from the University Hospital of Pelotas – RS, with the attempt to know the place’s environmental microbiota. 40 Petri plates with Sabouraud Dextrose Agar were exposed to an environment of an ICU, where samples were collected in strategic places during morning and afternoon periods for ten days. Seven fungi genera were identified: Penicillium spp. (15.18%, genus with the higher frequency, followed by Aspergillus spp., Cladosporium spp., Fusarium spp., Paecelomyces spp., Curvularia spp., Alternaria spp., Zygomycetes and sterile mycelium. The most predominant fungi genus were Aspergillus spp. (13.92% in the morning and Cladosporium spp. (13.92% in the afternoon. Due to their involvement in different diseases, the identified fungi genera can be classified as potential pathogens of inpatients. These results reinforce the need of monitoring the environmental microorganisms with high frequency and efficiently in health institutions.

  6. Noise in contemporary neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amber L; van Drongelen, Wim; Lasky, Robert E

    2007-05-01

    Weekly sound surveys (n = 63) were collected, using 5 s sampling intervals, for two modern neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Median weekly equivalent sound pressure levels (LEQ) for NICU A ranged from 61 to 63 dB (A weighted), depending on the level of care. NICU B L(EQ) measurements ranged from 55 to 60 dB (A weighted). NICU B was recently built with a focus on sound abatement, explaining much of the difference between the two NICUs. Sound levels exceeded 45 dB (A weighted), recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, more than 70% of the time for all levels of care. Hourly L(EQ)s below 50 dB (A weighted) and hourly L10s below 55 dB (A weighted), recommended by the Sound Study Group (SSG) of the National Resource Center, were also exceeded in more than 70% of recorded samples. A third SSG recommendation, that the 1 s L(MAX), should not exceed 70 dB (A weighted), was exceeded relatively infrequently (< 11% of the time). Peak impulse measurements exceeded 90 dB for 6.3% of 5 s samples recorded from NICU A and 2.8% of NICU B samples. Twenty-four h periodicities in sound levels as a function of regular staff activities were apparent, but short-term variability was considerable.

  7. Pharmacovigilance in Intensive Care Unit - An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimla Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The drug related complications are on the rise warranting special attention towards patient safety in Intensive Care Unit (ICU setup. Pharmacovigilance is the science about the detection, assessment and prevention of drug related problems. This review is aimed to highlight significant problems arising from medication errors with emphasis on special drugs used in ICU (oxygen, antibiotics, sedatives, analgesics and neuromuscular blocking drugs and their risk reduction strategies in ICU utilizing practice of pharmacovigilance. Human error, lack of communication among various health providers, inadequate knowledge about drugs, failure to follow protocols or recommended guidelines are important causes of drug related problems in ICU. It is imperative that ICU administrators and medical directors of hospitals consider adverse drug events (ADEs as system failures. Pharmacovigilance, an observational science is the need of the hour for patients admitted in ICUs. We need to give more emphasis on prevention rather than treating the potentially fatal complications arising from ADEs. Eternal vigilance is the key. Protocol based management, improvement of medication system, frequent audits, improved communication, good team work, a blame free environ-ment, inclusion of a pharmacist, leadership involvement and use of information technology in the ICU are possible solutions.

  8. Computed tomography of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, E.; Uhl, H.; Reinbold, W.D.; Wimmer, B.; Wenz, W.

    1987-01-01

    Chest CT scans were obtained in 86 patients suffering from serious blunt or penetrating chest trauma. The finding of mediastinal widening was by far the most common CT indication. CT proved to be a more sensitive method for detection of parenchymal lung lesions and occult pneumothorax than bedside radiographs. CT contributed substantially in differentiation of lung abscess and empyema, exclusion of mediastinal pathology and spinal injuries. Aortography is still indicated, even when CT findings are normal, if aortic laceration is clinically suspected. Despite all technical problems combined with CT examinations in the critically ill patient, we consider CT a valuable diagnostic tool for selected problems in the traumatized patient. (orig.) [de

  9. Computed tomography of chest trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinkel, E.; Uhl, H.; Reinbold, W.D.; Wimmer, B.; Wenz, W.

    1987-09-01

    Chest CT scans were obtained in 86 patients suffering from serious blunt or penetrating chest trauma. The finding of mediastinal widening was by far the most common CT indication. CT proved to be a more sensitive method for detection of parenchymal lung lesions and occult pneumothorax than bedside radiographs. CT contributed substantially in differentiation of lung abscess and empyema, exclusion of mediastinal pathology and spinal injuries. Aortography is still indicated, even when CT findings are normal, if aortic laceration is clinically suspected. Despite all technical problems combined with CT examinations in the critically ill patient, we consider CT a valuable diagnostic tool for selected problems in the traumatized patient.

  10. Repertoire of intensive care unit pneumonia microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Bousbia

    Full Text Available Despite the considerable number of studies reported to date, the causative agents of pneumonia are not completely identified. We comprehensively applied modern and traditional laboratory diagnostic techniques to identify microbiota in patients who were admitted to or developed pneumonia in intensive care units (ICUs. During a three-year period, we tested the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL of patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia, community-acquired pneumonia, non-ventilator ICU pneumonia and aspiration pneumonia, and compared the results with those from patients without pneumonia (controls. Samples were tested by amplification of 16S rDNA, 18S rDNA genes followed by cloning and sequencing and by PCR to target specific pathogens. We also included culture, amoeba co-culture, detection of antibodies to selected agents and urinary antigen tests. Based on molecular testing, we identified a wide repertoire of 160 bacterial species of which 73 have not been previously reported in pneumonia. Moreover, we found 37 putative new bacterial phylotypes with a 16S rDNA gene divergence ≥ 98% from known phylotypes. We also identified 24 fungal species of which 6 have not been previously reported in pneumonia and 7 viruses. Patients can present up to 16 different microorganisms in a single BAL (mean ± SD; 3.77 ± 2.93. Some pathogens considered to be typical for ICU pneumonia such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus species can be detected as commonly in controls as in pneumonia patients which strikingly highlights the existence of a core pulmonary microbiota. Differences in the microbiota of different forms of pneumonia were documented.

  11. Eye injury treatment in intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Moshetova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To describe eye injuries in intensive care unit (ICU patients with multitrauma, to study conjunctival microflora in these patients, and to develop etiologically and pathogenically targeted treatment and prevention of wound complications.Materials and methods. Study group included 50 patients (54 eyes with combined mechanical cerebral and eye injury. All patients underwent possible ophthalmological examination (biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy and ocular fundus photographing with portative fundus camera, tonometry, cranial CT and MRT, and bacteriological study of conjunctival smears. Results. Modern methods of ophthalmological examination of ICU patients provided correct diagnosis and prediction of wound healing. Eye injury treatment schedule provided maximum possible results in all ICU patients. Hospitalacquired infection results in asymptomatic dissemination of pathogenic microbes on ocular surface. Conclusions. 14-day topical treatment with antimicrobials, steroids, and NSAIDs reduces posttraumatic inflammation caused by mechanical eye injuries in ICU patients. Bacteriological studies of conjunctival smears demonstrate the presence of pathogenic flora in ICU patients. In these patients, the most effective antibacterial agents are third-generation fluoroquinolones. 

  12. Tracheotomy in the intensive care unit: Guidelines from a French expert panel: The French Intensive Care Society and the French Society of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouillet, Jean-Louis; Collange, Olivier; Belafia, Fouad; Blot, François; Capellier, Gilles; Cesareo, Eric; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Demoule, Alexandre; Diehl, Jean-Luc; Guinot, Pierre-Grégoire; Jegoux, Franck; L'Her, Erwan; Luyt, Charles-Edouard; Mahjoub, Yazine; Mayaux, Julien; Quintard, Hervé; Ravat, François; Vergez, Sébastien; Amour, Julien; Guillot, Max

    2018-06-01

    Tracheotomy is widely used in intensive care units, albeit with great disparities between medical teams in terms of frequency and modality. Indications and techniques are, however, associated with variable levels of evidence based on inhomogeneous or even contradictory literature. Our aim was to conduct a systematic analysis of the published data in order to provide guidelines. We present herein recommendations for the use of tracheotomy in adult critically ill patients developed using the grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation (GRADE) method. These guidelines were conducted by a group of experts from the French Intensive Care Society (Société de réanimation de langue française) and the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine (Société francaise d'anesthésie réanimation) with the participation of the French Emergency Medicine Association (Société française de médecine d'urgence), the French Society of Otorhinolaryngology. Sixteen experts and two coordinators agreed to consider questions concerning tracheotomy and its practical implementation. Five topics were defined: indications and contraindications for tracheotomy in intensive care, tracheotomy techniques in intensive care, modalities of tracheotomy in intensive care, management of patients undergoing tracheotomy in intensive care, and decannulation in intensive care. The summary made by the experts and the application of GRADE methodology led to the drawing up of 8 formal guidelines, 10 recommendations, and 3 treatment protocols. Among the 8 formal guidelines, 2 have a high level of proof (Grade 1±) and 6 a low level of proof (Grade 2±). For the 10 recommendations, GRADE methodology was not applicable and instead 10 expert opinions were produced. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  13. Diagnostic value of chest ultrasound after cardiac surgery: a comparison with chest X-ray and auscultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzani, Antonella; Manca, Tullio; Brusasco, Claudia; Santori, Gregorio; Valentino, Massimo; Nicolini, Francesco; Molardi, Alberto; Gherli, Tiziano; Corradi, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    Chest auscultation and chest x-ray commonly are used to detect postoperative abnormalities and complications in patients admitted to intensive care after cardiac surgery. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether chest ultrasound represents an effective alternative to bedside chest x-ray to identify early postoperative abnormalities. Diagnostic accuracy of chest auscultation and chest ultrasound were compared in identifying individual abnormalities detected by chest x-ray, considered the reference method. Cardiac surgery intensive care unit. One hundred fifty-one consecutive adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. All patients included were studied by chest auscultation, ultrasound, and x-ray upon admission to intensive care after cardiac surgery. Six lung pathologic changes and endotracheal tube malposition were found. There was a highly significant correlation between abnormalities detected by chest ultrasound and x-ray (k = 0.90), but a poor correlation between chest auscultation and x-ray abnormalities (k = 0.15). Chest auscultation may help identify endotracheal tube misplacement and tension pneumothorax but it may miss most major abnormalities. Chest ultrasound represents a valid alternative to chest x-ray to detect most postoperative abnormalities and misplacements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. CT guided transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsy (TFNAB) of the chest tumours; Transtorakalna biopsja aspiracyjna cienkoiglowa (TBAC) guzow umiejscowionych w klatce piersiowej pod kontrola obrazu tomografii komputerowej

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowacki, J; Legaszewski, T; Skrzelewski, S; Sraga, W [Katedra i Zaklad Radiologii Lekarskiej i Radiodiagnostyki, Zabrze (Poland); Slaska Akademia Medyczna, Katowice [Poland; Zajecki, W [Katedra i Klinika Chirurgii Klatki Piersiowej, Zabrze (Poland); Slaska Akademia Medyczna, Katowice [Poland; Harasim, J [Katedra i Zaklad Patomorfologii, Zabrze (Poland); Slaska Akademia Medyczna, Katowice [Poland; Polonska, A [Katedra i Klinika Fizjopneumonologii, Zabrze (Poland); Slaska Akademia Medyczna, Katowice [Poland

    2003-07-01

    Tumours spreading within the chest are nowadays diagnosed based on computed tomography (CT). The aim of this paper is to present a few years experience in transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsy of lung tumours and tumour-like lesions in adjacent tissues and organs during CT examination. To make an accurate diagnosis, the authors performed 124 TFNAB in 116 patients. About 2/3 of the biopsies were performed in patients with a tumour size from 1 to 5 cm in diameter, adjacent or located peripherally to the chest wall. The valuable cellular material, which enabled us to define a type of a disease and to make a final clinical diagnosis, was obtained in nearly 80% of cases. The complications were found in 10 patients (8.6% of all patients). Pneumothorax was found in eight cases and pulmonary bleeding (bleeding into pulmonary parenchyma and bleeding from respiratory duct) in two cases. The authors emphasized the significance of TFNAB in obtaining valuable material for fine spectrum study and discussed the problem of safety related to this procedure. (author)

  15. Safety of milrinone use in neonatal intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Samiee-Zafarghandy; S.R. Raman (Sudha R.); J.N. van den Anker (John); K. McHutchison (Kerstin); C.P. Hornik; R.H. Clark; P.B. Smith; D.K. Benjamin (Daniel K.); K. Berezny (Katherine); J. Barrett (Jeffrey); E.V. Capparelli (Edmund); M. Cohen-Wolkowiez (Michael); G.L. Kearns (Greg); M. Laughon (Matthew); A. Muelenaer (Andre); T. Michael O'Shea; I.M. Paul (Ian M.); K. Wade (Kelly); T.J. Walsh (Thomas J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Milrinone use in the neonatal intensive care unit has increased over the last 10. years despite a paucity of published safety data in infants. We sought to determine the safety of milrinone therapy among infants in the neonatal intensive care unit. Methods: We conducted a

  16. Swine-origin influenza A viral (H1N1) infection in children. Chest computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Soo-Ah; Kim, Hyo-Lim; Yoon, Jong-seo; Kang, Jin-Han; Lee, Joon-Sung; Chun, Ho-Jong

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the chest computed tomography (CT) findings in children with swine-origin influenza (H1N1) virus (S-OIV) infection. The radiologists retrospectively reviewed chest CT findings in 12 children with S-OIV infection and recorded the following findings: ground-glass opacities (GGO), consolidation, nodules, reticular opacities, peribronchial cuffing, and air trapping; distribution; affected lobes. The presence of pleural effusions, pneumomediastinum, pulmonary interstitial emphysema (PIE), and lymphadenopathy was also recorded. Chest CT revealed GGO (67%), consolidation (67%), nodules (25%), peribronchial cuffing (42%), and air trapping (33%). The distribution of the lesions was random (75%), peribronchial (17%), or subpleural (8%). The lobes affected were the lower (92%), upper (58%), and middle (17%) lobes. There were associated pleural effusions (42%), PIE (42%), pneumomediastinum (33%), and lymphadenopathy (75%). Among five patients with air-leak complications, three had a history of allergies and three required the intensive care unit. Chest CT findings in children with S-OIV infection were peribronchial thickening and a mixture of airspace consolidation and GGO with random distribution and lower lobe predominance. Pleural effusion, lymphadenopathy, PIE, and pneumomediastinum may be associated findings. (author)

  17. Potential intravenous drug interactions in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Maiara Benevides; Mesquita, Maria Gefé da Rosa; Stipp, Marluci Andrade Conceição; Paes, Graciele Oroski

    2017-07-20

    To analyze potential intravenous drug interactions, and their level of severity associated with the administration of these drugs based on the prescriptions of an intensive care unit. Quantitative study, with aretrospective exploratory design, and descriptive statistical analysis of the ICU prescriptions of a teaching hospital from March to June 2014. The sample consisted of 319 prescriptions and subsamples of 50 prescriptions. The mean number of drugs per patient was 9.3 records, and a higher probability of drug interaction inherent to polypharmacy was evidenced. The study identified severe drug interactions, such as concomitant administration of Tramadol with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (e.g., Metoclopramide and Fluconazole), increasing the risk of seizures due to their epileptogenic actions, as well as the simultaneous use of Ranitidine-Fentanyl®, which can lead to respiratory depression. A previous mapping of prescriptions enables the characterization of the drug therapy, contributing to prevent potential drug interactions and their clinical consequences. Analisar as potenciais interações medicamentosas intravenosas e seu grau de severidade associadas à administração desses medicamentos a partir das prescrições do Centro de Terapia Intensiva. Estudo quantitativo, tipologia retrospectiva exploratória, com análise estatística descritiva das prescrições medicamentosas do Centro de Terapia Intensiva de um Hospital Universitário, no período de março-junho/2014. A amostra foi composta de 319 prescrições e subamostras de 50 prescrições. Constatou-se que a média de medicamentos por paciente foi de 9,3 registros, e evidenciou-se maior probabilidade para ocorrência de interação medicamentosa inerente à polifarmácia. O estudo identificou interações medicamentosas graves, como a administração concomitante de Tramadol com medicamentos inibidores seletivos da recaptação da serotonina, (exemplo: Metoclopramida e Fluconazol

  18. Job satisfaction of neonatal intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Katie; Rubarth, Lori Baas; Miers, Linda J

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the job satisfaction of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses in the Midwestern United States. The factors explored in job satisfaction were monetary compensation (pay), job stress, caring for patients in stressful situations, level of autonomy, organizational support, level of knowledge of the specialty, work environment, staffing levels, communication with physicians, communication with neonatal nurse practitioners, interdisciplinary communication, team spirit, and the amount of required "floating" to other nursing units. Participants were 109 NICU nurses working as either staff nurses (n = 72) or advanced practice nurses (n = 37). Of the participants, 96% worked in a level 3 NICU. A descriptive, correlational design was used to study job satisfaction among NICU nurses. Nurses were recruited at 2 regional NICU conferences in 2009 and 2010. The questionnaire was a researcher-developed survey consisting of 14 questions in a Likert-type response rating 1 to 5, with an area for comments. Descriptive statistics and correlations were used to analyze the resulting data. The majority of participants were moderately satisfied overall in their current position and workplace (mean ranking = 4.07 out of 5.0). Kendall's Tau b (TB) revealed that the strongest positive correlations were between organizational support and team spirit with overall job satisfaction (TB = 0.53). : The individual factors with the highest mean scores were caring for patients in a stressful situation, level of autonomy, and communication between nurses and neonatal nurse practitioners. This indicates that our population of NICU nurses feels most satisfied caring for patients in stressful situations (m = 4.48), are satisfied with their level of autonomy (M = 4.17), and are satisfied with the interdisciplinary communication in their units (m = 4.13). Nurses in the NICU are relatively satisfied with their jobs. The small sample size (n = 109) of Midwest NICU

  19. Auditing an intensive care unit recycling program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicki, Mark A; McGain, Forbes; O'Shea, Catherine J; Bates, Samantha

    2015-06-01

    The provision of health care has significant direct environmental effects such as energy and water use and waste production, and indirect effects, including manufacturing and transport of drugs and equipment. Recycling of hospital waste is one strategy to reduce waste disposed of as landfill, preserve resources, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and potentially remain fiscally responsible. We began an intensive care unit recycling program, because a significant proportion of ICU waste was known to be recyclable. To determine the weight and proportion of ICU waste recycled, the proportion of incorrect waste disposal (including infectious waste contamination), the opportunity for further recycling and the financial effects of the recycling program. We weighed all waste and recyclables from an 11-bed ICU in an Australian metropolitan hospital for 7 non-consecutive days. As part of routine care, ICU waste was separated into general, infectious and recycling streams. Recycling streams were paper and cardboard, three plastics streams (polypropylene, mixed plastics and polyvinylchloride [PVC]) and commingled waste (steel, aluminium and some plastics). ICU waste from the waste and recycling bins was sorted into those five recycling streams, general waste and infectious waste. After sorting, the waste was weighed and examined. Recycling was classified as achieved (actual), potential and total. Potential recycling was defined as being acceptable to hospital protocol and local recycling programs. Direct and indirect financial costs, excluding labour, were examined. During the 7-day period, the total ICU waste was 505 kg: general waste, 222 kg (44%); infectious waste, 138 kg (27%); potentially recyclable waste, 145 kg (28%). Of the potentially recyclable waste, 70 kg (49%) was actually recycled (14% of the total ICU waste). In the infectious waste bins, 82% was truly infectious. There was no infectious contamination of the recycling streams. The PVC waste was 37% contaminated

  20. Delirium screening in intensive care: A life saving opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamond, E; Murray, S; Gibson, C E

    2018-02-01

    Delirium is described as 'acute brain failure' and constitutes a medical emergency which presents a hazard for people cared for in intensive care units. The Scottish intensive care society audit group recommend that all people cared for in intensive care units be screened for signs of delirium so that treatment and management of complications can be implemented at an early stage. There is inconsistent evidence about when and how the assessment of delirium is carried out by nursing staff in the intensive care setting. This narrative review explores the pathophysiology and current practices of delirium screening in intensive care. Consideration is given to the role of the nurse in detecting and managing delirium and some barriers to routine daily delirium screening are critically debated. It is argued that routine delirium screening is an essential element of safe, effective and person centred nursing care which has potential to reduce morbidity and mortality. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A conceptual framework of clinical nursing care in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção; Apostolidis, Thémistoklis; Brandão, Marcos Antônio Gomes

    2015-01-01

    to propose a conceptual framework for clinical nursing care in intensive care. descriptive and qualitative field research, carried out with 21 nurses from an intensive care unit of a federal public hospital. We conducted semi-structured interviews and thematic and lexical content analysis, supported by Alceste software. the characteristics of clinical intensive care emerge from the specialized knowledge of the interaction, the work context, types of patients and nurses characteristic of the intensive care and care frameworks. the conceptual framework of the clinic's intensive care articulates elements characteristic of the dynamics of this scenario: objective elements regarding technology and attention to equipment and subjective elements related to human interaction, specific of nursing care, countering criticism based on dehumanization.

  2. [Intelligent telemedicine in intensive care units. Bed-side operation of medical technology devices and IT in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrig, R; Rüth, R

    2009-03-01

    Patient data management systems (PDMS) may improve the quality of clinical documentation in intensive care medicine. In addition to the documentation, many PDMS offer the clinicians support for clinical decisions and workflow. The data recorded by the PDMS are available for data analysis to support administrative responsibilities (e.g., reimbursement, personnel management, quality management) or scientific questions. Within this process, semantic interoperability is a cornerstone for the integration of the PDMS into the IT infrastructure of the hospital, and the connection of medical devices is an essential precondition. Thus, a medical terminology system, like LOINC or SNOMED CT, is required, but are generally not widely used. This is partly caused by the fact that the effort necessary to implement a standard vocabulary is not equally shared between the sending and receiving systems. The solution could be medical devices that send LOINC-coded data. The experience of implementing LOINC into medical devices and information systems teaches us that more research and development of new functionalities for clinical information systems and PDMS to display and process (LOINC) coded data are needed.

  3. Guidelines for Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy (PDT) from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk; Guldager, Henrik; Rewers, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy is a common procedure in intensive care. This guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM) describes indications and contraindications, timing, complications...

  4. Impact of a clinical microbiology-intensive care consulting program in a cardiothoracic intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Fabio; Scolletta, Sabino; Marchetti, Luca; Galano, Angelo; Maglioni, Enivarco; Giani, Tommaso; Corsi, Elisabetta; Lombardi, Silvia; Biagioli, Bonizella; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2015-09-01

    A preintervention-postintervention study was carried out over a 4-year period to assess the impact of an antimicrobial stewardship intervention, based on clinical microbiologist ward rounds (clinical microbiology-intensive care partnership [CMICP]), at a cardiothoracic intensive care unit. Comparison of clinical data for 37 patients with diagnosis of bacteremia (18 from preintervention period, 19 from postintervention period) revealed that CMICP implementation resulted in (1) significant increase of appropriate empirical treatments (+34%, P = .029), compliance with guidelines (+28%, P = .019), and number of de-escalations (+42%, P = .032); and (2) decrease (average = 2.5 days) in time to optimization of antimicrobial therapy and levofloxacin (Δ 2009-2012 = -74 defined daily dose [DDD]/1,000 bed days) and teicoplanin (Δ 2009-2012 = -28 DDD/1,000 bed days) use. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The optimization of low-dose scanning protocols of 64-slice spiral CT in the adult chest: a multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Wei; Huang Yao; Wu Ning

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the image quality of chest low dose CT (LDCT) using automatic exposure control (AEC) and constant current. control (CCC) and explore a more reasonable scanning protocol. Methods: Two hundred and eighty participants were examined with 64 CT scanner at 7 centers in China. All were divided into 4 groups. Two groups underwent LDCT using AEC with standard deviation set at 25 (Al) and 30 (A2) respectively and the tube current ranged from 10 mA to 80 mA. The other two groups underwent LDCT using CCC with tube current set at 40 mA (Cl) and 50 mA (C2) respectively. The axial and MPR images were evaluated by two radiologists who were blinded to the scanning protocols. The radiation dose, noise and the image quality of the 4 groups were compared and analyzed statistically. Differences of radiation dose and noise among groups were determined with variance analysis and t test, image quality with Mann- Whitney test and the consistency of diagnosis with Kappa test. Results: There was a significant lower DLP in AEC group than in CCC group [(82.62±40.31) vs (110.81±18.21) mGy · cm (F=56.88, P 0.05]. The noisy of AEC group was higher than that of CCC group both on lung window (41.50±9.58 vs 40.86±7.03) and mediastinum window (41.19±7.83 vs 40.92±9.89), but there was no significant difference (F lung =0.835, P=0.476, F wediastinum =1.910, P=0.128). The quality score of axial image in AEC group was higher than that in CCC group (superior margin of the brachiocephalic vein level: 4.49± 0.56 vs 4.38±0.64, superior margin of the aortic arch: 4.86±0.23 vs 4.81±0.32, the right superior lobar bronchus Level: 4.87±0.27 vs 4.84±0.22, the right middle lobar bronchus Level: 4.90±0.25 vs 4.88±0.21) except on the right inferior pulmonary vein level (4.92±0.25 vs 4.93±0.17) and superior margin of the left diaphragmatic dome level (4.91±0.27 vs 4.93±0.22) on lung window, but no significant differences (F=0.076-1.748, P>0.05) were observed. A significant

  6. Pulmonary hypertension in patients with chronic pulmonary thromboembolism: chest radiograph and CT evaluation before and after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.C.; Kauczor, H.U.; Schild, H.H.; Renner, C.; Kirchhoff, E.; Lang, P.; Iversen, S.; Thelen, M.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of morphometric data on conventional radiography and CT predicting the presence and degree of pulmonary hypertension and to assess the reversibility after surgery. On preoperative X-ray films and CT scans of 50 patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to chronic thromboembolism, we measured the cardiothoracic ratio, basal diameter, length of cardiac contact to sternum, pulmonary trunk, right and left descending pulmonary artery, and the septum angle. These data were correlated with pulmonary arterial pressure. In 14 X-ray patients and 18 CT patients, with follow-up after surgical thromboendarterectomy the reversibility of these changes was assessed. A dilated pulmonary trunk was the most common abnormality (96% each on X-ray and CT). Pulmonary arteries were dilated on X-ray in 40% (right) and 14% (left), and on CT in 92% (right) and 96% (left). The best correlation with mean arterial pressure was found measuring the pulmonary trunk on CT (r=0.43, p<0.01). After surgery, reversibility was most significant for the pulmonary trunk on CT (p<0.0001). In patients with chronic pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hypertension can best be predicted by assessing the diameter of the pulmonary trunk both on X-ray and CT. No close correlation is present between the extent of any parameter and the level of the pulmonary pressure. (orig.)

  7. [Morbidity and mortality after intensive care management of hemorrhagic stroke in Djibouti].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benois, A; Raynaud, L; Coton, T; Petitjeans, F; Hassan, A; Ilah, A; Sergent, H; Grassin, F; Leberre, J

    2009-02-01

    Prospective data on management and outcome of stroke in Africa is scarce. The purpose of this prospective descriptive study is to present epidemiologic, clinical and outcome data for a series of patients with hemorrhagic stroke in Djibouti. All patients admitted to the intensive care unit of the Bouffard Medical-Surgical Center in Djibouti for cerebral hemorrhage documented by CT-scan of the brain were recruited in this study. A total of 18 patients including 16 men were enrolled. The median patient age in this series was 51.5 years [range, 20-72]. The median duration of intensive care was 3 days [range, 1-38]. Mean Glasgow score at time of admission was 9 [range, 3-14]. Five patients were brought in by emergency medical airlift. The main risk factors for stroke were arterial hypertension, smoking, and regular khat use. Mechanical ventilation was performed in 10 patients with a survival rate of 40%. Six patients (33%) died in the intensive care unit. Hospital mortality within one month was 39% and mortality at 6 months was 44.4%. One-year survival for patients with a Glasgow score < or = 7 at the time of admission was 33%. Arterial hypertension, khat use, and smoking appeared to be major risk factors for male Djiboutians. Neurologic intensive care techniques provided hospital mortality rates similar to those reported in hospitals located in Western countries. Functional outcome in local survivors appeared to be good despite the absence of functional intensive care. These data argue against the passive, fatalistic approach to management of hemorrhagic stroke and for primary prevention of cardiovascular risk factors.

  8. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzler, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.henzler@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Gruettner, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.gruettner@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Meyer, Mathias, E-mail: mr.meyer.mathias@gmail.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Rothhaar, Baerbel, E-mail: baerbel.rothhaar@umm.de [Business Development – Medical Controlling, University Medical Center, Mannheim (Germany); Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Apfaltrer@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Metzger, Franz, E-mail: franz.metzger@umm.de [Business Development – Medical Controlling, University Medical Center, Mannheim (Germany); Borggrefe, Martin, E-mail: martin.borggrefe@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoenberg, Stefan O., E-mail: stefan.schoenberg@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); and others

    2013-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the economic impact of integrating coronary CT angiography (cCTA) or whole chest “triple-rule-out” CTA (TRO-CTA) in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain. Materials and methods: 100 consecutive emergency department patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for ACS underwent cCTA or TRO-CTA (cCTA group). Diagnostic performance, rate and length of hospitalization, hospital costs, hospital reimbursement and hospital profit were analyzed. All findings were compared to those of 100 different patients with acute chest pain that were evaluated with a standard of care (SOC) diagnostic algorithm (SOC group) that did not include cCTA. Diagnostic performance (“safety”) of both algorithms was defined as the absence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) over a 90-day follow-up period. Results: In the cCTA group 60/100 patients were safely discharged at the same day. 19/100 patients were hospitalized due to significant coronary stenosis on cCTA, which was confirmed by invasive coronary catheterization (ICC) in 17/19 patients. Relevant non-coronary disease that led to hospitalization were found in 21 patients of the cCTA group. In the SOC group all patients were hospitalized. 87 of these hospitalized patients underwent ICC for exclusion of coronary artery stenosis. A significant coronary artery stenosis was found in only 25 of these patients. Within the cCTA group no patient suffered from MACE over the 90-day follow-up period. In the SOC group 2 patients were rehospitalized during the 90-day follow-up period due to recurrent chest pain and 1 patient because of a pseudoaneurym of the left femoral artery after ICC. The median hospital costs per patient were significantly lower in the cCTA group than in the SOC group (428.9€ vs. 1575.0€, p < 0.001). The median reimbursement of the cCTA group was less compared to the SOC group (589.8€ vs. 2412.1€, p < 0.001) and patients in the cCTA group gained less profit than

  9. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henzler, Thomas; Gruettner, Joachim; Meyer, Mathias; Rothhaar, Baerbel; Apfaltrer, Paul; Metzger, Franz; Borggrefe, Martin; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Schoenberg, Stefan O.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the economic impact of integrating coronary CT angiography (cCTA) or whole chest “triple-rule-out” CTA (TRO-CTA) in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain. Materials and methods: 100 consecutive emergency department patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for ACS underwent cCTA or TRO-CTA (cCTA group). Diagnostic performance, rate and length of hospitalization, hospital costs, hospital reimbursement and hospital profit were analyzed. All findings were compared to those of 100 different patients with acute chest pain that were evaluated with a standard of care (SOC) diagnostic algorithm (SOC group) that did not include cCTA. Diagnostic performance (“safety”) of both algorithms was defined as the absence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) over a 90-day follow-up period. Results: In the cCTA group 60/100 patients were safely discharged at the same day. 19/100 patients were hospitalized due to significant coronary stenosis on cCTA, which was confirmed by invasive coronary catheterization (ICC) in 17/19 patients. Relevant non-coronary disease that led to hospitalization were found in 21 patients of the cCTA group. In the SOC group all patients were hospitalized. 87 of these hospitalized patients underwent ICC for exclusion of coronary artery stenosis. A significant coronary artery stenosis was found in only 25 of these patients. Within the cCTA group no patient suffered from MACE over the 90-day follow-up period. In the SOC group 2 patients were rehospitalized during the 90-day follow-up period due to recurrent chest pain and 1 patient because of a pseudoaneurym of the left femoral artery after ICC. The median hospital costs per patient were significantly lower in the cCTA group than in the SOC group (428.9€ vs. 1575.0€, p < 0.001). The median reimbursement of the cCTA group was less compared to the SOC group (589.8€ vs. 2412.1€, p < 0.001) and patients in the cCTA group gained less profit than

  10. Secretion clearance strategies in Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntoumenopoulos, George; Hammond, Naomi; Watts, Nicola R; Thompson, Kelly; Hanlon, Gabrielle; Paratz, Jennifer D; Thomas, Peter

    2017-06-26

    To describe the processes of care for secretion clearance in adult, intubated and mechanically ventilated patients in Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Units (ICUs). A prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted through the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Clinical Trials Group (ANZICS CTG) Point Prevalence Program. Forty-seven ICUs collected data from 230 patients intubated and ventilated on the study day. Secretion clearance techniques beyond standard suctioning were used in 84/230 (37%) of patients during the study period. Chest wall vibration 34/84 (40%), manual lung hyperinflation 24/84 (29%), chest wall percussion 20/84 (24%), postural drainage/patient positioning 17/84 (20%) and other techniques including mobilisation 15/84 (18%), were the most common secretion clearance techniques employed. On average (SD), patients received airway suctioning 8.8 (5.0) times during the 24-h study period. Mucus plugging events were infrequent (2.7%). The additional secretion clearance techniques were provided by physiotherapy staff in 24/47 (51%) ICUs and by both nursing and physiotherapy staff in the remaining 23/47 (49%) ICUs. One-third of intubated and ventilated patients received additional secretion clearance techniques. Mucus plugging events were infrequent with these additional secretion clearance approaches. Prospective studies must examine additional secretion clearance practices, prevalence of mucus plugging episodes and impact on patient outcomes. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sleep and sedation in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carno, Margaret-Ann; Connolly, Heidi V

    2005-09-01

    Sleep is an important and necessary function of the human body. Somatic growth and cellular repair occur during sleep. Critically ill children have disturbed sleep while in the pediatric intensive care unit related both to the illness itself and to light, noise, and caregiver activities disrupting an environment conducive to sleep. Medications administered in the pediatric intensive care unit can also disrupt sleep. This article reviews what is known about sleep in the pediatric intensive care unit and the effects of common sedation medications on sleep.

  12. [Structure and functional organization of integrated cardiac intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherillo, Marino; Miceli, Domenico; Tubaro, Marco; Guiducci, Umberto

    2007-05-01

    The early invasive strategy for the treatment of acute coronary syndromes and the increasing number of older and sicker patients requiring prolonged and more complex intensive care have induced many changes in the function of the intensive care units. These changes include the statement that specially trained cardiologists and cardiac nurses who can manage patients with acute cardiac conditions should staff the intensive care units. This document indicates the structure of the units and specific recommendations for the number of beds, monitoring system, respirators, pacemaker/defibrillators and additional equipment.

  13. Guideline for stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbaek; Lorentzen, Kristian; Clausen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU), and is recommended in the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines 2012. The present guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine sums...... critically ill patients in the ICU outside the context of randomized controlled trials (GRADE 1C). No robust evidence supports recommendations for subpopulations in the ICU such as septic, burn, trauma, cardiothoracic or enterally fed patients. However, if SUP is considered clinically indicated in individual...

  14. Pediatric digital chest imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, R D; Cohen, M; Broderick, N J; Conces, D J

    1990-01-01

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology.

  15. Pediatric digital chest imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarver, R.D.; Cohen, M.; Broderick, N.J.; Conces, D.J. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology

  16. Comparative effectiveness of coronary CT angiography vs stress cardiac imaging in patients following hospital admission for chest pain work-up: The Prospective First Evaluation in Chest Pain (PERFECT) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uretsky, Seth; Argulian, Edgar; Supariwala, Azhar; Agarwal, Shiv K; El-Hayek, Georges; Chavez, Patricia; Awan, Hira; Jagarlamudi, Ashadevi; Puppala, Siva P; Cohen, Randy; Rozanski, Alan

    2017-08-01

    Because the frequency of cardiac event rates is low among chest pain patients following either performance of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) or stress testing, there is a need to better assess how these tests influence the central management decisions that follow from cardiac testing. The present study was performed to assess the relative impact of CCTA vs stress testing on medical therapies and downstream resource utilization among patients admitted for the work-up of chest pain. The admitted patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either cardiac imaging stress test or CCTA. Primary outcomes were time to discharge, change in medication usage, and frequency of downstream testing, cardiac interventions, and cardiovascular re-hospitalizations. We randomized 411 patients, 205 to stress testing, and 206 to CCTA. There were no differences in time to discharge or initiation of new cardiac medications at discharge. At 1 year follow-up, there was no difference in the number of patients who underwent cardiovascular downstream tests in the CCTA vs stress test patients (21% vs 15%, P = .1) or cardiovascular hospitalizations (14% vs 16%, P = .5). However, there was a higher frequency of invasive angiography in the CCTA group (11% vs 2%, P = .001) and percutaneous coronary interventions (6% vs 0%, P work-up to either CCTA or to stress testing resulted in similar discharge times, change in medical therapies at discharge, frequency of downstream noninvasive testing, and repeat hospitalizations. However, a higher frequency of invasive coronary angiography and revascularization procedures were performed in the CCTA arm. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01604655.).

  17. Radiation dose reduction in a neonatal intensive care unit in computed radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayre, A S; Torres, P; Gaona, E; Rivera, T; Franco, J; Molina, N

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dose received by chest x-rays in neonatal care with thermoluminescent dosimetry and to determine the level of exposure where the quantum noise level does not affect the diagnostic image quality in order to reduce the dose to neonates. In pediatric radiology, especially the prematurely born children are highly sensitive to the radiation because of the highly mitotic state of their cells; in general, the sensitivity of a tissue to radiation is directly proportional to its rate of proliferation. The sample consisted of 208 neonatal chest x-rays of 12 neonates admitted and treated in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). All the neonates were preterm in the range of 28-34 weeks, with a mean of 30.8 weeks. Entrance Surface Doses (ESD) values for chest x-rays are higher than the DRL of 50 μGy proposed by the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). In order to reduce the dose to neonates, the optimum image quality was achieved by determining the level of ESD where level noise does not affect the diagnostic image quality. The optimum ESD was estimated for additional 20 chest x-rays increasing kVp and reducing mAs until quantum noise affects image quality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Spontaneous obliteration of right ventricular pseudoaneurysm after blunt chest trauma: Diagnosis and follow-up with multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Kyung; Kang, Mi Jin; Kim, Jae Hyung [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Right ventricular (RV) pseudoaneurysm caused by trauma is very rare. We report a case of RV pseudoaneurysm which resolved without surgical treatment in a patient who survived a falling accident. Echocardiography failed to identify the pseudoaneurysm. Electrocardiography-gated CT showed a 17-mm-sized saccular pseusoaneurysm arsing from the RV outflow tract with a narrow neck. Follow-up CT after two months showed spontaneous obliteration of the lesion.

  19. Low-dose ECG-gated 64-slices helical CT angiography of the chest: evaluation of image quality in 105 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agostino, A.G.; Remy-Jardin, M.; Khalil, C.; Remy, J.; Delannoy-Deken, V.; Duhamel, A.; Flohr, T.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate image quality of low-dose electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated multislice helical computed tomography (CT) angiograms of the chest. One hundred and five consecutive patients with a regular sinus rhythm (72 men; 33 women) underwent ECG-gated CT angiographic examination of the chest without administration of beta blockers using the following parameters: (a) collimation 32 x 0.6 mm with z-flying focal spot for the acquisition of 64 overlapping 0.6-mm slices, rotation time 0.33 s, pitch 0.3; (b) 120 kV, 200 mAs; (c) use of two dose modulation systems, including adjustment of the mAs setting to the patient's size and anatomical shape and an ECG-controlled tube current. Subjective and objective image quality was evaluated by two radiologists in consensus on 3-mm-thick scans reconstructed at 55% of the response rate (RR) interval. The population and protocol characteristics included: (a) a mean [±standard deviation (SD)] body mass index (BMI) of 24.47 (±4.64); (b) a mean (±SD) heart rate of 72.04 (±15.76) bpm; (c) a mean (±SD) scanning time of 18.3 (±2.73) s; (d) a mean (±SD) dose-length product (DLP) value of 260.57 (±83.67) mGy/cm; (e) an estimated average effective dose of 4.95 (±1.59) mSv. Subjective noise was depicted in a total of nine examinations (8.5%), always rated as mild. Objective noise was assessed by measuring the standard deviation of pixel values in a homogeneous region of interest within the trachea and descending aorta; SD was 15.91 HU in the trachea and 22.16 HU in the descending aorta, with no significant difference in the mean value of the standard deviations between the four categories of BMI except for obese patients, who had a higher mean SD within the aorta. Interpolation artefacts were depicted in 22 patients, with a mean heart rate significantly lower than that of patients without interpolation artifacts, rated as mild in 11 patients and severe in 11 patients. The severity of interpolation artefacts

  20. Interpretation of neonatal chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Plain radiographs for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are obtained using the portable X-ray equipment in order to evaluate the neonatal lungs and also to check the position of the tubes and catheters used for monitoring critically-ill neonates. Neonatal respiratory distress is caused by a variety of medical or surgical disease conditions. Clinical information about the gestational week, respiratory symptoms, and any events during delivery is essential for interpretation of the neonatal chest radiographs. Awareness of common chest abnormality in the prematurely born or term babies is also very important for chest evaluation in the newborn. Furthermore, knowledge about complications such as air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia following treatment are required to accurately inform the clinicians. The purpose of this article was to briefly review radiographic findings of chest diseases in newborns that are relatively common in daily practice.

  1. Interpretation of neonatal chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Plain radiographs for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are obtained using the portable X-ray equipment in order to evaluate the neonatal lungs and also to check the position of the tubes and catheters used for monitoring critically-ill neonates. Neonatal respiratory distress is caused by a variety of medical or surgical disease conditions. Clinical information about the gestational week, respiratory symptoms, and any events during delivery is essential for interpretation of the neonatal chest radiographs. Awareness of common chest abnormality in the prematurely born or term babies is also very important for chest evaluation in the newborn. Furthermore, knowledge about complications such as air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia following treatment are required to accurately inform the clinicians. The purpose of this article was to briefly review radiographic findings of chest diseases in newborns that are relatively common in daily practice

  2. Influence of 'optical illusion' on the detectability of pneumothorax in diagnosis for chest CT images. Substantiation by visual psychological simulation images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henmi, Shuichi

    2008-01-01

    Some cases have been reported in which an optical illusion of lightness perception influences the detectability in diagnosis of low-density hematoma in head CT images in addition to the visual impression of the photographic density of the brain. Therefore, in this study, the author attempted to compare the detectability in diagnosis for chest images with pneumothorax using visual subjective evaluation, and investigated the influence of optical illusion on that detectability in diagnosis. Results indicated that in the window setting of lung, on such an occasion when the low-absorption free space with pneumothorax forms a crescent or the reduced lung borders on the chest-wall, an optical illusion in which the visual impression on the difference of the film contrast between the lung and the low-absorption free space with pneumothorax was psychologically emphasized when contrast was observed. In all cases the detectability in diagnosis for original images with the white thorax and mediastinum was superior to virtual images. Further, in case of the virtual double window setting of lung, thorax, and mediastinum, under the influence of the difference in the radiological anatomy of thorax and mediastinum as a result of the grouping theories of lightness computation, an optical illusion different from the original images was observed. (author)

  3. Intensive care management of severe tetanus at the university of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intensive care management of severe tetanus at the university of Benin teaching ... Journal Home > Vol 14, No 1 (2015) > ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... protocol in the centre, in line with evidence-based medical principles.

  4. Frequency of candidemias in a tertiary care intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaqub, K.M.; Usman, J.; Zaidi, S.B.H.; Khalil, A.; Noor, N.; Gill, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of fungal infections in intensive care unit (ICU) of Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, a tertiary care health facility. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Intensive Care Department of Military Hospital Rawalpindi from 01 Jan 2012 to 30 Jun 2012. Methodology: A total of 89 patients were screened with stay of more than 5 days in intensive care unit. Thirty cases were enrolled in the study for investigation of fungal infections that had fever even after 05 days of being on broad spectrum antibiotics. Culture was done on blood, urine and catheter tip samples as per clinical condition of a patient. Results: Candida infection was found in 23.4% of study cases. The mean age of study patients was 41.2 +- 20.0 years while 63.4% were female patients as compared to 36.7% males. Conclusion: Fungal infections especially candidemias are quite frequent in the intensive care units. (author)

  5. The changing face of neonatal intensive care in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-08-22

    Aug 22, 2007 ... of neonatal intensive care facilities for public sector patients ... The main differences between the survivors and non-survivors were in their birth weight and ..... private hospital: comparison of individual physicians' rates, risk.

  6. The continuous glucose monitoring sensor in neonatal intensive care

    OpenAIRE

    Beardsall, K; Ogilvy-Stuart, A; Ahluwalia, J; Thompson, M; Dunger, D

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of continuous glucose monitoring in the very low birthweight baby requiring intensive care, as these infants are known to be at high risk of abnormalities of glucose control.

  7. Obstetric intensive care admissions at a tertiary hospital in Limpopo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mortality of between 1 and 5%,[2,12] while others have reported .... ICU, and the need for a critical care specialist should be considered. ... Madan I, Jain NJ, Grotegut C, Nelson D, Dandolu V. Characteristics of obstetric intensive care.

  8. Dose reduction in chest CT: Comparison of the adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D, adaptive iterative dose reduction, and filtered back projection reconstruction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yoshitake, E-mail: yamada@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Jinzaki, Masahiro, E-mail: jinzaki@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hosokawa, Takahiro, E-mail: hosokawa@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Tanami, Yutaka, E-mail: tanami@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Sugiura, Hiroaki, E-mail: hsugiura@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Abe, Takayuki, E-mail: tabe@z5.keio.jp [Center for Clinical Research, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Kuribayashi, Sachio, E-mail: skuribay@a5.keio.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: To assess the effectiveness of adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR) and AIDR 3D in improving the image quality in low-dose chest CT (LDCT). Materials and methods: Fifty patients underwent standard-dose chest CT (SDCT) and LDCT simultaneously, performed under automatic exposure control with noise index of 19 and 38 (for a 2-mm slice thickness), respectively. The SDCT images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (SDCT-FBP images), and the LDCT images with FBP, AIDR and AIDR 3D (LDCT-FBP, LDCT-AIDR and LDCT-AIDR 3D images, respectively). On all the 200 lung and 200 mediastinal image series, objective image noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured in several regions, and two blinded radiologists independently assessed the subjective image quality. Wilcoxon's signed rank sum test with Bonferroni's correction was used for the statistical analyses. Results: The mean dose reduction in LDCT was 64.2% as compared with the dose in SDCT. LDCT-AIDR 3D images showed significantly reduced objective noise and significantly increased SNR in all regions as compared to the SDCT-FBP, LDCT-FBP and LDCT-AIDR images (all, P ≤ 0.003). In all assessments of the image quality, LDCT-AIDR 3D images were superior to LDCT-AIDR and LDCT-FBP images. The overall diagnostic acceptability of both the lung and mediastinal LDCT-AIDR 3D images was comparable to that of the lung and mediastinal SDCT-FBP images. Conclusions: AIDR 3D is superior to AIDR. Intra-individual comparisons between SDCT and LDCT suggest that AIDR 3D allows a 64.2% reduction of the radiation dose as compared to SDCT, by substantially reducing the objective image noise and increasing the SNR, while maintaining the overall diagnostic acceptability.

  9. Incidence of constipation in an intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra, Tatiana Lopes de Souza; Mendonça, Simone Sotero; Guimarães Marshall, Norma

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the incidence of constipation in critical patients on enteral nutrition in a hospital intensive care unit and to correlate this incidence with the variables found for critical patients. Methods The present investigation was a retrospective analytical study conducted in the intensive care unit of Hospital Regional da Asa Norte (DF) via the analysis of medical records of patients admitted during the period from January to December 2011. Data on the incidence of constipati...

  10. Myasthenic crisis patients who require intensive care unit management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Hideya; Yamashita, Satoshi; Hirano, Teruyuki; Nakajima, Makoto; Kimura, En; Maeda, Yasushi; Uchino, Makoto

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this report was to investigate predictive factors that necessitate intensive care in myasthenic crisis (MC). We retrospectively reviewed MC patients at our institution and compared ICU and ward management groups. Higher MG-ADL scale scores, non-ocular initial symptoms, infection-triggered findings, and higher MGFA classification were observed more frequently in the ICU group. In patients with these prognostic factors, better outcomes may be obtained with early institution of intensive care. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Ethics and law in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danbury, C M; Waldmann, C S

    2006-12-01

    Intensive Care Medicine epitomises the difficulties inherent in modern medicine. In this chapter we examine some key medicolegal and ethical areas that are evolving. The principles of autonomy and consent are well established, but developments in UK caselaw have shown that the courts may be moving away from their traditional deference of the medical profession. We examine some recent cases and discuss the impact that these cases may have on practice in Intensive Care.

  12. Small median tumor diameter at cure threshold (lung cancers in male smokers predicts both chest X-ray and CT screening outcomes in a novel simulation framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwasser, Deborah L; Kimmel, Marek

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of population-wide lung cancer screening strategies depends on the underlying natural course of lung cancer. We evaluate the expected stage distribution in the Mayo CT screening study under an existing simulation model of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) progression calibrated to the Mayo lung project (MLP). Within a likelihood framework, we evaluate whether the probability of 5-year NSCLC survival conditional on tumor diameter at detection depends significantly on screening detection modality, namely chest X-ray and computed tomography. We describe a novel simulation framework in which tumor pr