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Sample records for chesapeake impact crater

  1. Chesapeake Bay impact structure: Morphology, crater fill, and relevance for impact structures on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, J.W.; Ormo, J.; Powars, D.S.; Gohn, G.S.

    2006-01-01

    The late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure (CBIS) on the Atlantic margin of Virginia is one of the largest and best-preserved "wet-target" craters on Earth. It provides an accessible analog for studying impact processes in layered and wet targets on volatile-rich planets. The CBIS formed in a layered target of water, weak clastic sediments, and hard crystalline rock. The buried structure consists of a deep, filled central crater, 38 km in width, surrounded by a shallower brim known as the annular trough. The annular trough formed partly by collapse of weak sediments, which expanded the structure to ???85 km in diameter. Such extensive collapse, in addition to excavation processes, can explain the "inverted sombrero" morphology observed at some craters in layered targets. The distribution of crater-fill materials i n the CBIS is related to the morphology. Suevitic breccia, including pre-resurge fallback deposits, is found in the central crater. Impact-modified sediments, formed by fluidization and collapse of water-saturated sand and silt-clay, occur in the annular trough. Allogenic sediment-clast breccia, interpreted as ocean-resurge deposits, overlies the other impactites and covers the entire crater beneath a blanket of postimpact sediments. The formation of chaotic terrains on Mars is attributed to collapse due to the release of volatiles from thick layered deposits. Some flat-floored rimless depressions with chaotic infill in these terrains are impact craters that expanded by collapse farther than expected for similar-sized complex craters in solid targets. Studies of crater materials in the CBIS provide insights into processes of crater expansion on Mars and their links to volatiles. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2006.

  2. The Chesapeake Bay crater: geology and geophysics of a Late Eocene submarine impact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poag, C. Wylie; Koeberl, Christian; Reimold, Wolf Uwe

    2004-01-01

    The list of impact craters documented on Earth is short. Only about 165 genuine impact structures have been identified to date (Table 1.1). Even so, the number is steadily increasing at the rate of ∼3–5 per year (Grieve et al. 1995; Earth Impact Database at http://www.unb.ca/passc/Impact/Database/). In stark contrast, most other rocky planets and satellites of our solar system are pockmarked by thousands to hundreds of thousands of impact features (Beatty et al. 1999). Nevertheless, impact specialists acknowledge that Earth, too, has undergone billions of years of bolide bombardment (Melosh 1989; Schoenberg et al. 2002). The most intense bombardment, however, took place during Earth’s earliest history (∼3.8–4 Ga; Ryder 1990; Cohen et al. 2000; Ryder et al. 2000). Traces of most terrestrial impacts have been completely erased or strongly altered by the dynamic processes of a thick atmosphere, deep ocean, and mobile crust, a combination unique to our planet. Planetary geologists now recognize that processes associated with bolide impacts are fundamental to planetary accretion and surface modification (Melosh 1989; Peucker-Ehrenbrink and Schmitz 2001). Incoming meteorites may have been primary sources for Earth’s water, and, perhaps, even organic life as we know it (Thomas et al. 1997; Kring 2000). There is little doubt that impacts played a major role in the evolution of Earth’s biota (Ryder et al. 1996; Hart 1996).

  3. Description of Tessaracoccus profundi sp.nov., a deep-subsurface actinobacterium isolated from a Chesapeake impact crater drill core (940 m depth)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finster, K.W.; Cockell, C.S.; Voytek, M.A.; Gronstal, A.L.; Kjeldsen, K.U.

    2009-01-01

    A novel actinobacterium, designated CB31T, was isolated from a 940 m depth sample of a drilling core obtained from the Chesapeake meteor impact crater. The strain was isolated aerobically on R2A medium agar plates supplemented with NaCl (20 g l-1) and MgCl2???6H 2O (3 g l-1). The colonies were circular, convex, smooth and orange. Cells were slightly curved, rod-shaped in young cultures and often appeared in pairs. In older cultures cells were coccoid. Cells stained Gram-positive, were non-motile and did not form endospores. The diagnostic diamino acid of the peptidoglycan was ll-diaminopimelic acid. The polar lipids included phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidglycerol, four different glycolipids, two further phospholipids and one unidentified lipid. The dominant menaquinone was MK-9(H4) (70%). The major cellular fatty acid was anteiso C15:0 (83%). The DNA G + C content was 68 mol%. The strain grew anaerobically by reducing nitrate to nitrite or by fermenting glucose. It was catalase positive and oxidase negative. It grew between 10 and 45??C, with an optimum between 35 and 40??C. The pH range for growth was 5.7-9.3, with an optimum at pH 7.5. The closest phylogenetic neighbors based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identity were members of the genus Tessaracoccus (95-96% identity). On the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic distinctiveness, strain CB31T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Tessaracoccus, for which we propose the name Tessaracoccus profundi sp. nov.. It is the first member of this genus that has been isolated from a deep subsurface environment. The type strain is CB31T (=NCIMB 14440T = DSM 21240T). ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  4. Impact craters on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles A.; Lorenz, Ralph; Kirk, Randy; Lopes, Rosaly; Mitchell, Karl; Stofan, Ellen; ,

    2010-01-01

    Five certain impact craters and 44 additional nearly certain and probable ones have been identified on the 22% of Titan's surface imaged by Cassini's high-resolution radar through December 2007. The certain craters have morphologies similar to impact craters on rocky planets, as well as two with radar bright, jagged rims. The less certain craters often appear to be eroded versions of the certain ones. Titan's craters are modified by a variety of processes including fluvial erosion, mass wasting, burial by dunes and submergence in seas, but there is no compelling evidence of isostatic adjustments as on other icy moons, nor draping by thick atmospheric deposits. The paucity of craters implies that Titan's surface is quite young, but the modeled age depends on which published crater production rate is assumed. Using the model of Artemieva and Lunine (2005) suggests that craters with diameters smaller than about 35 km are younger than 200 million years old, and larger craters are older. Craters are not distributed uniformly; Xanadu has a crater density 2-9 times greater than the rest of Titan, and the density on equatorial dune areas is much lower than average. There is a small excess of craters on the leading hemisphere, and craters are deficient in the north polar region compared to the rest of the world. The youthful age of Titan overall, and the various erosional states of its likely impact craters, demonstrate that dynamic processes have destroyed most of the early history of the moon, and that multiple processes continue to strongly modify its surface. The existence of 24 possible impact craters with diameters less than 20 km appears consistent with the Ivanov, Basilevsky and Neukum (1997) model of the effectiveness of Titan's atmosphere in destroying most but not all small projectiles.

  5. Experimental impact crater morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, A.; Poelchau, M. H.; Hoerth, T.; Schaefer, F.; Thoma, K.; Deutsch, A.; Kenkmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    The research group MEMIN (Multidisciplinary Experimental and Impact Modelling Research Network) is conducting impact experiments into porous sandstones, examining, among other parameters, the influence of target pore-space saturation with water, and projectile velocity, density and mass, on the cratering process. The high-velocity (2.5-7.8 km/s) impact experiments were carried out at the two-stage light-gas gun facilities of the Fraunhofer Institute EMI (Germany) using steel, iron meteorite (Campo del Cielo IAB), and aluminium projectiles with Seeberg Sandstone as targets. The primary objectives of this study within MEMIN are to provide detailed morphometric data of the experimental craters, and to identify trends and characteristics specific to a given impact parameter. Generally, all craters, regardless of impact conditions, have an inner depression within a highly fragile, white-coloured centre, an outer spallation (i.e. tensile failure) zone, and areas of arrested spallation (i.e. spall fragments that were not completely dislodged from the target) at the crater rim. Within this general morphological framework, distinct trends and differences in crater dimensions and morphological characteristics are identified. With increasing impact velocity, the volume of craters in dry targets increases by a factor of ~4 when doubling velocity. At identical impact conditions (steel projectiles, ~5km/s), craters in dry and wet sandstone targets differ significantly in that "wet" craters are up to 76% larger in volume, have depth-diameter ratios generally below 0.19 (whereas dry craters are almost consistently above this value) at significantly larger diameters, and their spallation zone morphologies show very different characteristics. In dry craters, the spall zone surfaces dip evenly at 10-20° towards the crater centre. In wet craters, on the other hand, they consist of slightly convex slopes of 10-35° adjacent to the inner depression, and of sub-horizontal tensile

  6. Chesapeake Bay impact structure: A blast from the past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powars, David S.; Edwards, Lucy E.; Gohn, Gregory S.; Horton, Jr., J. Wright

    2015-10-28

    About 35 million years ago, a 2-mile-wide meteorite smashed into Earth in what is now the lower Chesapeake Bay in Virginia. The oceanic impact vaporized, melted, fractured, and displaced rocks and sediments and sent billions of tons of water, sediments, and rocks into the air. Glassy particles of solidified melt rock rained down as far away as Texas and the Caribbean. Large tsunamis affected most of the North Atlantic basin. The resulting impact structure is more than 53 miles wide and has a 23-mile-wide, filled central crater surrounded by collapsed sediments. Now buried by hundreds of feet of younger sediments, the Chesapeake Bay impact structure is among the 20 largest known impact structures on Earth.

  7. Impact Cratering Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the von Mises and Mohr-Coulomb strength models with and without damage effects and developed a model for dilatancy. The models and results are given in O'Keefe et al. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting with the bolide in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements. These features included a central uplift, an inner ring, circular terracing and faulting. This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths of approximately 0.1 GPa and at depth strengths of approximately 1.0 GPa. We modeled the damage in geologic materials using a phenomenological approach, which coupled the Johnson-Cook damage model with the CTH code geologic strength model. The objective here was not to determine the distribution of fragment sizes, but rather to determine the effect of brecciated and comminuted material on the crater evolution, fault production, ejecta distribution, and final crater morphology.

  8. Deep drilling in the Chesapeake Bay impact structure - An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohn, G.S.; Koeberl, C.; Miller, K.G.; Reimold, W.U.

    2009-01-01

    The late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure lies buried at moderate depths below Chesapeake Bay and surrounding landmasses in southeastern Virginia, USA. Numerous characteristics made this impact structure an inviting target for scientific drilling, including the location of the impact on the Eocene continental shelf, its threelayer target structure, its large size (??85 km diameter), its status as the source of the North American tektite strewn field, its temporal association with other late Eocene terrestrial impacts, its documented effects on the regional groundwater system, and its previously unstudied effects on the deep microbial biosphere. The Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Drilling Project was designed to drill a deep, continuously cored test hole into the central part of the structure. A project workshop, funding proposals, and the acceptance of those proposals occurred during 2003-2005. Initial drilling funds were provided by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Supplementary funds were provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Science Mission Directorate, ICDP, and USGS. Field operations were conducted at Eyreville Farm, Northampton County, Virginia, by Drilling, Observation, and Sampling of the Earth's Continental Crust (DOSECC) and the project staff during September-December 2005, resulting in two continuously cored, deep holes. The USGS and Rutgers University cored a shallow hole to 140 m in April-May 2006 to complete the recovered section from land surface to 1766 m depth. The recovered section consists of 1322 m of crater materials and 444 m of overlying postimpact Eocene to Pleistocene sediments. The crater section consists of, from base to top: basement-derived blocks of crystalline rocks (215 m); a section of suevite, impact melt rock, lithic impact breccia, and cataclasites (154 m); a thin interval of quartz sand and lithic blocks (26 m); a

  9. Venus - Lavinia Region Impact Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Three large meteorite impact craters, with diameters that range from 37 to 50 kilometers (23 to 31 miles), are seen in this image of the Lavinia region of Venus. The image is centered at 27 degrees south latitude and 339 degrees east longitude (longitude on Venus is measured from 0 degrees to 360 degrees east), and covers an area 550 kilometers (342 miles) wide by about 500 kilometers (311 miles) long. Situated in a region of fractured plains, the craters show many features typical of meteorite impact craters, including rough (bright) material around the rim, terraced inner walls and central peaks. Numerous domes, probably caused by volcanic activity, are seen in the southeastern corner of the mosaic. The domes range in diameter from 1 to 12 kilometers (0.6 to 7 miles). Some of the domes have central pits that are typical of some types of volcanoes. North is at the top of the image.

  10. Impacts into Sandstone: Crater Morphology, Crater Scaling and the Effects of Porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelchau, M. H.; Dufresne, A.; Kenkmann, T.

    2011-03-01

    Crater morphology results from impact cratering experiments in sandstone within the MEMIN program are presented and compared to other brittle materials. The effects of porosity on crater shape, volume and cratering efficiency are analyzed.

  11. Postimpact deposition in the Chesapeake Bay impact structure: Variations in eustasy, compaction, sediment supply, and passive-aggressive tectonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulpecz, A.A.; Miller, K.G.; Browning, J.V.; Edwards, L.E.; Powars, D.S.; McLaughlin, P.P., Jr.; Harris, A.D.; Feigenson, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    The Eyreville and Exmore, Virginia, core holes were drilled in the inner basin and annular trough, respectively, of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure, and they allow us to evaluate sequence deposition in an impact crater. We provide new high-resolution geochronologic (<1 Ma) and sequence-stratigraphic interpretations of the Exmore core, identify 12 definite (and four possible) postimpact depositional sequences, and present comparisons with similar results from Eyreville and other mid- Atlantic core holes. The concurrence of increases in ??18O with Chesapeake Bay impact structure sequence boundaries indicates a primary glacioeustatic control on deposition. However, regional comparisons show the differential preservation of sequences across the mid-Atlantic margin. We explain this distribution by the compaction of impactites, regional sediment-supply changes, and the differential movement of basement structures. Upper Eocene strata are thin or missing updip and around the crater, but they thicken into the inner basin (and offshore to the southeast) due to rapid crater infilling and concurrent impactite compaction. Oligocene sequences are generally thin and highly dissected throughout the mid-Atlantic region due to sediment starvation and tectonism, except in southeastern New Jersey. Regional tectonic uplift of the Norfolk Arch coupled with a southward decrease in sediment supply resulted in: (1) largely absent Lower Miocene sections around the Chesapeake Bay impact structure compared to thick sections in New Jersey and Delaware; (2) thick Middle Miocene sequences across the Delmarva Peninsula that thin south of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure; and (3) upper Middle Miocene sections that pinch out just north of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure. Conversely, the Upper Miocene-Pliocene section is thick across Virginia, but it is poorly represented in New Jersey because of regional variations in relative subsidence. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  12. Low-emissivity impact craters on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, C. M.; Elachi, C.; Moore, H. J.; Basilevsky, A. T.; Ivanov, B. A.; Schaber, G. G.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of 144 impact craters on Venus has shown that 11 of these have floors with average emissivities lower than 0.8. The remaining craters have emissivities between 0.8 and 0.9, independent of the specific backscatter cross section of the crater floors. These 144 impact craters were chosen from a possible 164 craters with diameters greater than 30 km as identified by researchers for 89 percent of the surface of Venus. We have only looked at craters below 6053.5 km altitude because a mineralogical change causes high reflectivity/low emissivity above the altitude. We have also excluded all craters with diameters smaller than 30 km because the emissivity footprint at periapsis is 16 x 24 km and becomes larger at the poles.

  13. The Explorer's Guide to Impact Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierazzo, E.; Osinski, G.; Chuang, F.

    2004-12-01

    Impact cratering is a fundamental geologic process of our solar system. It competes with other processes, such as plate tectonics, volcanism, or fluvial, glacial and eolian activity, in shaping the surfaces of planetary bodies. In some cases, like the Moon and Mercury, impact craters are the dominant landform. On other planetary bodies impact craters are being continuously erased by the action of other geological processes, like volcanism on Io, erosion and plate tectonics on the Earth, tectonic and volcanic resurfacing on Venus, or ancient erosion periods on Mars. The study of crater populations is one of the principal tools for understanding the geologic history of a planetary surface. Among the general public, impact cratering has drawn wide attention through its portrayal in several Hollywood movies. Questions that are raised after watching these movies include: ``How do scientists learn about impact cratering?'', and ``What information do impact craters provide in understanding the evolution of a planetary surface?'' Fundamental approaches used by scientists to learn about impact cratering include field work at known terrestrial craters, remote sensing studies of craters on various solid surfaces of solar system bodies, and theoretical and laboratory studies using the known physics of impact cratering. We will provide students, science teachers, and the general public an opportunity to experience the scientific endeavor of understanding and exploring impact craters through a multi-level approach including images, videos, and rock samples. This type of interactive learning can also be made available to the general public in the form of a website, which can be addressed worldwide at any time.

  14. Anatomy of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure revealed by seismic imaging, Delmarva Peninsula, Virginia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, R.D.; Powars, D.S.; Gohn, G.S.; Horton, J.W.; Goldman, M.R.; Hole, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    A 30-km-long, radial seismic reflection and refraction survey completed across the northern part of the late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure (CBIS) on the Delmarva Peninsula, Virginia, USA, confirms that the CBIS is a complex central-peak crater. We used a tomographic P wave velocity model and low-fold reflection images, constrained by data from two deep boreholes located on the profile, to interpret the structure and composition of the upper 5 km of crust. The seismic images exhibit well-defined structural features, including (with increasing radial distance) a collapsed central uplift, a breccia-filled moat, and a collapsed transient-crater margin (which collectively constitute a ???40-km-wide collapsed transient crater), and a shallowly deformed annular trough. These seismic images are the first to resolve the deep structure of the crater (>1 km) and the boundaries between the central uplift, moat, and annular trough. Several distinct seismic signatures distinguish breccia units from each other and from more coherent crystalline rocks below the central uplift, moat, and annular trough. Within the moat, breccia extends to a minimum depth of 1.5 km or a maximum of 3.5 km, depending upon the interpretation of the deepest layered materials. The images show ???350 to 500 m of postimpact sediments above the impactites. The imaged structure of the CBIS indicates a complex sequence of event during the cratering process that will provide new constraints for numerical modeling. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. A Buried Precambrian Impact Crater in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    Field evidence indicates that the source of the Stac Fada impact deposit (Mesoproterozoic) in NW Scotland was to the east, and that the now buried crater is represented by the 40+ km diameter Lairg Gravity Low.

  16. The missing large impact craters on Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, S.; Ermakov, A. I.; Raymond, C. A.; Fu, R. R.; O'Brien, D. P.; Bland, M. T.; Ammannito, E.; de Sanctis, M. C.; Bowling, T.; Schenk, P.; Scully, J. E. C.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Williams, D. A.; Hiesinger, H.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-07-01

    Asteroids provide fundamental clues to the formation and evolution of planetesimals. Collisional models based on the depletion of the primordial main belt of asteroids predict 10-15 craters >400 km should have formed on Ceres, the largest object between Mars and Jupiter, over the last 4.55 Gyr. Likewise, an extrapolation from the asteroid Vesta would require at least 6-7 such basins. However, Ceres' surface appears devoid of impact craters >~280 km. Here, we show a significant depletion of cerean craters down to 100-150 km in diameter. The overall scarcity of recognizable large craters is incompatible with collisional models, even in the case of a late implantation of Ceres in the main belt, a possibility raised by the presence of ammoniated phyllosilicates. Our results indicate that a significant population of large craters has been obliterated, implying that long-wavelength topography viscously relaxed or that Ceres experienced protracted widespread resurfacing.

  17. Physics of soft impact and cratering

    CERN Document Server

    Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the impact dynamics and cratering of soft matter to describe its importance, difficulty, and wide applicability to planetary-related problems. A comprehensive introduction to the dimensional analysis and constitutive laws that are necessary to discuss impact mechanics and cratering is first provided. Then, particular coverage is given to the impact of granular matter, which is one of the most crucial constituents for geophysics. While granular matter shows both solid-like and fluid-like behaviors, neither solid nor fluid dynamics is sufficient to fully understand the physics of granular matter. In order to reveal its fundamental properties, extensive impact tests have been carried out recently. The author reveals the findings of these recent studies as well as what remains unsolved in terms of impact dynamics. Impact crater morphology with various soft matter impacts also is discussed intensively. Various experimental and observational results up to the recent Itokawa asteroid’s terrain...

  18. Impact mechanics at Meteor Crater, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Eugene Merle

    1959-01-01

    Meteor Crator is a bowl-shaped depression encompassed by a rim composed chiefly of debris stacked in layers of different composition. Original bedrock stratigraphy is preserved, inverted, in the debris. The debris rests on older disturbed strata, which are turned up at moderate to steep angles in the wall of the crater and are locally overturned near the contact with the debris. These features of Meteor Crater correspond closely to those of a crater produced by nuclear explosion where depth of burial of the device was about 1/5 the diameter of the resultant crater. Studies of craters formed by detonation of nuclear devices show that structures of the crater rims are sensitive to the depth of explosion scaled to the yield of the device. The structure of Meteor Crater is such as would be produced by a very strong shock originating about at the level of the present crater floor, 400 feet below the original surface. At supersonic to hypersonic velocity an impacting meteorite penetrates the ground by a complex mechanism that includes compression of the target rocks and the meteorite by shock as well as hydrodynamic flow of the compressed material under high pressure and temperature. The depth of penetration of the meteorite, before it loses its integrity as a single body, is a function primarily of the velocity and shape of the meteorite and the densities and equations of state of the meteorite and target. The intensely compressed material then becomes dispersed in a large volume of breccia formed in the expanding shock wave. An impact velocity of about 15 km/sec is consonant with the geology of Meteor Crater in light of the experimental equation of state of iron and inferred compressibility of the target rocks. The kinetic energy of the meteorite is estimated by scaling to have been from 1.4 to 1.7 megatons TNT equivalent.

  19. Impact craters: An ice study on Rhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Mastrapa, Rachel M. E.; Lewis, Emma; White, Oliver L.

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this project is to study the properties of H2O ice in the environment of the Saturn satellites and in particular to measure the relative amounts of crystalline and amorphous H2O ice in and around two craters on Rhea. The craters are remnants of cataclysmic events that, by raising the local temperature, melted the ice, which subsequently crystallized. Based on laboratory experiments it is expected that, when exposed to ion bombardment at the temperatures typical of the Saturn satellites, the crystalline structure of the ice will be broken, resulting in the disordered, amorphous phase. We therefore expect the ice in and around the craters to be partially crystalline and partially amorphous. We have designed a technique that estimates the relative amounts of crystalline and amorphous H2O ice based on measurements of the distortion of the 2-μm spectral absorption band. The technique is best suited for planetary surfaces that are predominantly icy, but works also for surfaces slightly contaminated with other ices and non-ice components. We apply the tool to two areas around the Inktomi and the Obatala craters. The first is a young impact crater on the leading hemisphere of Rhea, the second is an older one on the trailing hemisphere. For each crater we obtain maps of the fraction of crystalline ice, which were overlain onto Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images of the satellite searching for correlations between crystallinity and geography. For both craters the largest fractions of crystalline ice are in the center, as would be intuitively expected since the 'ground zero' areas should be most affected by the effects of the impact. The overall distribution of the crystalline ice fraction maps the shape of the crater and, in the case of Inktomi, of the rays. The Inktomi crater ranges between a maximum fraction of 67% crystalline ice to a minimum of 39%. The Obatala crater varies between a maximum of 51% and a minimum of 33%. Based on simplifying assumptions

  20. The size-frequency distribution of elliptical impact craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, G. S.; Elbeshausen, D.; Davison, T. M.; Robbins, S. J.; Hynek, B. M.

    2011-10-01

    Impact craters are elliptical in planform if the impactor's trajectory is below a threshold angle of incidence. Laboratory experiments and 3D numerical simulations demonstrate that this threshold angle decreases as the ratio of crater size to impactor size increases. According to impact cratering scaling laws, this implies that elliptical craters occur at steeper impact angles as crater size or target strength increases. Using a standard size-frequency distribution for asteroids impacting the terrestrial planets we estimate the fraction of elliptical craters as a function of crater size on the Moon, Mars, Earth, Venus and Mercury. In general, the expected fraction of elliptical craters is ~ 2-4% for craters between 5 and 100-km in diameter, consistent with the observed population of elliptical craters on Mars. At larger crater sizes both our model and observations suggest a dramatic increase in the fraction of elliptical craters with increasing crater diameter. The observed fraction of elliptical craters larger than 100-km diameter is significantly greater than our model predictions, which may suggest that there is an additional source of large elliptical craters other than oblique impact.

  1. Paleomagnetism of Lonar Crater Impact Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick-Bethell, I.; Weiss, B. P.; Maloof, A. C.; Stewart, S. T.; Louzada, K. L.; Soule, S. A.; Swanson-Hysell, N.

    2006-12-01

    The source of magnetic fields on extraterrestrial bodies is largely unknown. There is particularly little information about magnetic fields on asteroids and the Moon for the last 3 billion years because most samples from these bodies predate this time. An exception is the small amount of impact-melt which has been continuously created by hypervelocity impactors over most of solar system history. Impact melt can be used to test the controversial hypothesis that magnetic fields on extraterrestrial bodies were predominantly the product of impact-produced plasmas rather than of core dynamos. However, to date only a small amount of impact melt has been analyzed paleomagnetically. To assess the quality of impact melts as recorders of magnetic fields, in January 2004 and January 2005 we collected thousands of samples of basaltic glass from the perimeter of Lonar Crater, a 1.8 km diameter impact crater which formed approximately 50,000 years ago in the Deccan Traps in Maharashtra, India. Lonar crater is a unique extraterrestrial analog because it is the only fresh impact crater on the Earth in a basaltic target. Most glass samples have rounded features and are between 0.01 and 1 cm in size, indicating that they are fladen and impact spherules (microtektites) formed from molten ejecta that cooled in mid-air while subject to rotational and aerodynamic forces. We have found that both types of glasses are strongly magnetic (saturation remanence of ~2 A m-1), contain ferromagnetic crystals that are predominantly single domain in size, and have no significant remanence anisotropy. The glasses also carry a natural remanent magnetization (NRM) presumably acquired just after the impact. However, alternating field demagnetization results in large directional changes of the magnetic moment, with little decrease in moment intensity. We interpret this unusual behavior as progressive removal of different coercivity components that cooled while the orientation of the spinning glasses

  2. Impact and cratering rates onto Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstreet, Sarah; Gladman, Brett; McKinnon, William B.

    2015-09-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft fly-through of the Pluto system in July 2015 will provide humanity's first data for the crater populations on Pluto and its binary companion, Charon. In principle, these surfaces could be dated in an absolute sense, using the observed surface crater density (# craters/km2 larger than some threshold crater diameter D). Success, however, requires an understanding of both the cratering physics and absolute impactor flux. The Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS) L7 synthetic model of classical and resonant Kuiper belt populations (Petit, J.M. et al. [2011]. Astron. J. 142, 131-155; Gladman, B. et al. [2012]. Astron. J. 144, 23-47) and the scattering object model of Kaib et al. (Kaib, N., Roškar, R., Quinn, T. [2011]. Icarus 215, 491-507) calibrated by Shankman et al. (Shankman, C. et al. [2013]. Astrophys. J. 764, L2-L5) provide such impact fluxes and thus current primary cratering rates for each dynamical sub-population. We find that four sub-populations (the q 100km) connects to smaller projectiles, we compute cratering rates using five model impactor size distributions: a single power-law, a power-law with a knee, a power-law with a divot, as well as the "wavy" size distributions described in Minton et al. (Minton, D.A. et al. [2012]. Asteroids Comets Meteors Conf. 1667, 6348) and Schlichting et al. (Schlichting, H.E., Fuentes, C.I., Trilling, D.E. [2013]. Astron. J. 146, 36-42). We find that there is only a small chance that Pluto has been hit in the past 4 Gyr by even one impactor with a diameter larger than the known break in the projectile size distribution (d ≈ 100km) which would create a basin on Pluto (D ⩾ 400km in diameter). We show that due to present uncertainties in the impactor size distribution between d = 1-100km , computing absolute ages for the surface of Pluto is entirely dependent on the extrapolation to small sizes and thus fraught with uncertainty. We show, however, what the ages would be for several cases

  3. Impact cratering experiments in brittle targets with variable thickness: Implications for deep pit craters on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michikami, T.; Hagermann, A.; Miyamoto, H.; Miura, S.; Haruyama, J.; Lykawka, P. S.

    2014-06-01

    High-resolution images reveal that numerous pit craters exist on the surface of Mars. For some pit craters, the depth-to-diameter ratios are much greater than for ordinary craters. Such deep pit craters are generally considered to be the results of material drainage into a subsurface void space, which might be formed by a lava tube, dike injection, extensional fracturing, and dilational normal faulting. Morphological studies indicate that the formation of a pit crater might be triggered by the impact event, and followed by collapse of the ceiling. To test this hypothesis, we carried out laboratory experiments of impact cratering into brittle targets with variable roof thickness. In particular, the effect of the target thickness on the crater formation is studied to understand the penetration process by an impact. For this purpose, we produced mortar targets with roof thickness of 1-6 cm, and a bulk density of 1550 kg/m3 by using a mixture of cement, water and sand (0.2 mm) in the ratio of 1:1:10, by weight. The compressive strength of the resulting targets is 3.2±0.9 MPa. A spherical nylon projectile (diameter 7 mm) is shot perpendicularly into the target surface at the nominal velocity of 1.2 km/s, using a two-stage light-gas gun. Craters are formed on the opposite side of the impact even when no target penetration occurs. Penetration of the target is achieved when craters on the opposite sides of the target connect with each other. In this case, the cross section of crater somehow attains a flat hourglass-like shape. We also find that the crater diameter on the opposite side is larger than that on the impact side, and more fragments are ejected from the crater on the opposite side than from the crater on the impact side. This result gives a qualitative explanation for the observation that the Martian deep pit craters lack a raised rim and have the ejecta deposit on their floor instead. Craters are formed on the opposite impact side even when no penetration

  4. Ancient Impact and Aqueous Processes at Endeavour Crater, Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Knoll, Andrew Herbert; Squyres, S. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J. F.; Calef, F., III; Clark, B.C.; Cohen, B. A.; Crumpler, L. A.; P.A. Souza; Farrand, W. H.; Gellert, R.; Grant, J; Hurowitz, J. A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; J. R. Johnson

    2012-01-01

    The rover Opportunity has investigated the rim of Endeavour Crater, a large ancient impact crater on Mars. Basaltic breccias produced by the impact form the rim deposits, with stratigraphy similar to that observed at similar-sized craters on Earth. Highly localized zinc enrichments in some breccia materials suggest hydrothermal alteration of rim deposits. Gypsum-rich veins cut sedimentary rocks adjacent to the crater rim. The gypsum was precipitated from low-temperature aqueous fluids flowing...

  5. Impact-derived features of the Xiuyan meteorite crater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ming

    2008-01-01

    Up to now, 176 meteorite impact craters have been found on the Earth. Among these craters, none of them lies in China. The Xiuyan crater is located in the Liaodong Peninsula of China. This bowl-shaped crater has a diameter of 1.8 km and depth of about 150 m. The impact-derived features include planar deformation features (PDFs) in quartz, shatter cones, impact breccia, and radial valleys on the wall of rim. It is the first confirmed meteorite impact crater in China.

  6. On the scaling of crater dimensions. II - Impact processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsapple, K. A.; Schmidt, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    Holsapple and Schmidt (1980) previously addressed the problem of the scaling of explosive cratering. Their analysis included results which show under which conditions the scaling can be bounded between quarter-root and cube-root rules. The present investigation is an extension of the earlier analysis and approaches the case of impact cratering. More restrictive bounds are found for impact cratering than for the explosive case. These stronger results come from considering the role of the impactor momentum as an independent variable for impact cratering. Attention is given to impact cratering variables, general scaling rules, the bounds on scaling rules, a generalization to more variables, and previous scaling rules and results.

  7. Characterization of Boulders Ejected from Small Impact Craters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.D. Bart; H.J. Melosh; R.G. Strom

    2004-01-01

    When an asteroid or comet impacts the surface of a solid body, some of the surface material is often ejected from the crater in the form of blocks. We are characterizing the size and location of such blocks around craters on the Moon and Mars. The lunar craters were observed in Lunar Orbiter III ima

  8. The Microstructure of Lunar Micrometeorite Impact Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, S. K.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The peak of the mass flux of impactors striking the lunar surface is made up of objects approximately 200 micrometers in diameter that erode rocks, comminute regolith grains, and produce agglutinates. The effects of these micro-scale impacts are still not fully understood. Much effort has focused on evaluating the physical and optical effects of micrometeorite impacts on lunar and meteoritic material using pulsed lasers to simulate the energy deposited into a substrate in a typical hypervelocity impact. Here we characterize the physical and chemical changes that accompany natural micrometeorite impacts into lunar rocks with long surface exposure to the space environment (12075 and 76015). Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations were obtained from cross-sections of approximately 10-20 micrometers diameter craters that revealed important micro-structural details of micrometeorite impact processes, including the creation of npFe (sup 0) in the melt, and extensive deformation around the impact site.

  9. Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Drilling Project Completes Coring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    the Scientific Staff of the Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Drilling Project

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Drilling Project (CBIS Project completed its coring operations during September–December 2005 and April–May 2006. Cores were collected continuously to a total depth of 1766 m. The recovered section consists of 1322 m of impactites beneath 444 m of post-impact continental shelf sediments.The CBIS Project is a joint venture of the International Continental Scientifi c Drilling Program (ICDP and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS. Project activities began with a planning workshop in September 2003 attended by sixtythree scientists from ten countries. Field operations began with site preparation in July 2005, and coring began in September 2005. Drilling, Observation and Sampling of theEarth’s Continental Crust (DOSECC was the general contractor for the drilling operations throughout 2005.

  10. Crater morphology in sandstone targets: The MEMIN impact parameter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, Anja; Poelchau, Michael H.; Kenkmann, Thomas; Deutsch, Alex; Hoerth, Tobias; SchńFer, Frank; Thoma, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Hypervelocity (2.5-7.8 km s-1) impact experiments into sandstone were carried out to investigate the influence of projectile velocity and mass, target pore space saturation, target-projectile density contrast, and target layer orientation on crater size and shape. Crater size increases with increasing projectile velocity and mass as well as with increasing target pore space saturation. Craters in water-saturated porous targets are generally shallower and larger in volume and in diameter than craters from equivalent impacts into dry porous sandstone. Morphometric analyses of the resultant craters, 5-40 cm in diameter, reveal features that are characteristic of all of our experimental craters regardless of impact conditions (I) a large central depression within a fragile, light-colored central part, and (II) an outer spallation zone with areas of incipient spallation. Two different mechanical processes, grain fragmentation and intergranular tensile fracturing, are recorded within these crater morphologies. Zone (I) approximates the shape of the transient crater formed by material compression, displacement, comminution, and excavation flow, whereas (II) is the result of intergranular tensile fracturing and spallation. The transient crater dimensions are reconstructed by fitting quadric parabolas to crater profiles from digital elevation models. The dimensions of this transient and of the final crater show the same trends: both increase in volume with increasing impact energy, and with increasing water saturation of the target pore space. The relative size of the transient crater (in percent of the final crater volume) decreases with increasing projectile mass and velocity, signifying a greater contribution of spallation on the final crater size when projectile mass and velocity are increased.

  11. The Impact Cratering Record of Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesonen, L. J.

    1996-02-01

    The current database of craterform structures in Fennoscandia contains 22 structures of impact origin and about fifty other structures which lack sufficient evidence for impact. The discovery rate of new structures has been one or two per year during the past ten years. The proven impact structures are located in southern Fennoscandia and the majority have been found in Proterozoic target rocks. The age of the structures varies from prehistoric to ≤ 1000 Ma and their diameters (D) from 0.04 km to 55 km. Nine of the structures contain impact melt. A characteristic feature of the Fennoscandian impact record is a relatively large number of small (≤ 5 km) but old (> 200 Ma) structures: this is a result of success of geophysical methods to discover small but old impact structures in an eroded shield covered with relatively thin overburden. Some of the large circular structures in satellite images and/or in geophysical maps may represent deeply eroded scars of very old impacts, but due to the lack of shock metamorphic features, impact-generated rocks or identified ejecta layers, they cannot yet be classified as impact sites. Two huge structures are proposed here as possible impact sites on the basis of circular satellite images and distinct geophysical anomalies: the Lycksele structure in northern Sweden (D ~ 120 km, see also Witschard, 1984) and the Valga structure in Latvia/Estonia (D ~ 180 km). However, endogeneous explanations, like buried granites, basement domings, or fault-bounded blocks are also possible for these structures. Hints, such as distal ejecta layers or impact produced breccia dykes, of an Archaean or Early Proterozoic impact structure have not been found in Fennoscandia so far. New ways of searching for these structures are proposed with particular emphasis on high-resolution integrated geophysical methods. The impact cratering rate in Fennoscandia is ~ 2.0 · 10-14 km-2 a-1 (for craters with D > 3 km) corresponding to about two events per every

  12. Mexican site for K/T impact crater?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, K. O.; Ocampo, A. C.; Duller, C. E.

    1991-05-01

    Research throughout the Caribbean suggests that the geophysical anomalies in the Yucatan first noted by Penfield and Camargo (1981) and called the Chicxulub crater could be the site of the impact purported to have caused the K/T extinctions. A semicircular ring of sink holes, known locally as cenotes, which correlates with the geophysical anomalies has been identified, and it is argued that the origin of the cenote ring is related to postimpact subsidence of the Chicxulub crater rim. If there is indeed a crater, the region within the cenote ring corresponds to its floor and the crater rim diameter is probably larger than 200 km. If confirmed as a site of impact, the Chicxulub crater would be the largest terrestrial impact crater known, which is consistent with the uniqueness of the K/T global catastrophe.

  13. Two-dimensional computer simulation of hypervelocity impact cratering: some preliminary results for Meteor Crater, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computational approach used for subsurface explosion cratering was extended to hypervelocity impact cratering. Meteor (Barringer) Crater, Arizona, was selected for the first computer simulation because it is one of the most thoroughly studied craters. It is also an excellent example of a simple, bowl-shaped crater and is one of the youngest terrestrial impact craters. Initial conditions for this calculation included a meteorite impact velocity of 15 km/s, meteorite mass of 1.67 x 108 kg, with a corresponding kinetic energy of 1.88 x 1016 J (4.5 megatons). A two-dimensional Eulerian finite difference code called SOIL was used for this simulation of a cylindrical iron projectile impacting at normal incidence into a limestone target. For this initial calculation, a Tillotson equation-of-state description for iron and limestone was used with no shear strength. Results obtained for this preliminary calculation of the formation of Meteor Crater are in good agreement with field measurements. A color movie based on this calculation was produced using computer-generated graphics. 19 figures, 5 tables, 63 references

  14. Coesite in suevites from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, John C.; Horton, J. Wright; Chou, I.-Ming; Belkin, Harvey E.

    2016-05-01

    The occurrence of coesite in suevites from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure is confirmed within a variety of textural domains in situ by Raman spectroscopy for the first time and in mechanically separated grains by X-ray diffraction. Microtextures of coesite identified in situ investigated under transmitted light and by scanning electron microscope reveal coesite as micrometer-sized grains (1-3 μm) within amorphous silica of impact-melt clasts and as submicrometer-sized grains and polycrystalline aggregates within shocked quartz grains. Coesite-bearing quartz grains are present both idiomorphically with original grain margins intact and as highly strained grains that underwent shock-produced plastic deformation. Coesite commonly occurs in plastically deformed quartz grains within domains that appear brown (toasted) in transmitted light and rarely within quartz of spheroidal texture. The coesite likely developed by a mechanism of solid-state transformation from precursor quartz. Raman spectroscopy also showed a series of unidentified peaks associated with shocked quartz grains that likely represent unidentified silica phases, possibly including a moganite-like phase that has not previously been associated with coesite.

  15. Is the Large Crater on the Asteroid (2867) Steins Really an Impact Crater?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. J. W.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    The large crater on the asteroid (2867) Steins attracted much attention when it was first observed by the Rosetta spacecraft in 2008. Initially, it was widely thought to be unusually large compared to the size of the asteroid. It was quickly realized that this was not the case and there are other examples of similar (or larger) craters on small bodies in the same size range; however, it is still widely accepted that it is a crater arising from an impact onto the body which occurred after its formation. The asteroid (2867) Steins also has an equatorial bulge, usually considered to have arisen from redistribution of mass due to spin-up of the body caused by the YORP effect. Conversely, it is shown here that, based on catastrophic disruption experiments in laboratory impact studies, a similarly shaped body to the asteroid Steins can arise from the break-up of a parent in a catastrophic disruption event; this includes the presence of a large crater-like feature and equatorial bulge. This suggests that the large crater-like feature on Steins may not be a crater from a subsequent impact, but may have arisen directly from the fragmentation process of a larger, catastrophically disrupted parent.

  16. IS THE LARGE CRATER ON THE ASTEROID (2867) STEINS REALLY AN IMPACT CRATER?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, A. J. W.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J., E-mail: m.j.burchell@kent.ac.uk [Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, School of Physical Science, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NH (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-01

    The large crater on the asteroid (2867) Steins attracted much attention when it was first observed by the Rosetta spacecraft in 2008. Initially, it was widely thought to be unusually large compared to the size of the asteroid. It was quickly realized that this was not the case and there are other examples of similar (or larger) craters on small bodies in the same size range; however, it is still widely accepted that it is a crater arising from an impact onto the body which occurred after its formation. The asteroid (2867) Steins also has an equatorial bulge, usually considered to have arisen from redistribution of mass due to spin-up of the body caused by the YORP effect. Conversely, it is shown here that, based on catastrophic disruption experiments in laboratory impact studies, a similarly shaped body to the asteroid Steins can arise from the break-up of a parent in a catastrophic disruption event; this includes the presence of a large crater-like feature and equatorial bulge. This suggests that the large crater-like feature on Steins may not be a crater from a subsequent impact, but may have arisen directly from the fragmentation process of a larger, catastrophically disrupted parent.

  17. Martian impact cratering rate over the last 3 billions years derived from layered ejecta craters dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagain, Anthony; Bouley, Sylvain; Costard, François; Baratoux, David

    2016-04-01

    All chronology models used in dating planetary surfaces are based on the lunar chronology system. The cratering density of the Moon has been calibrated with absolute ages from Apollo lunar samples. However, there are no lunar samples between 3 Gy and 800 My and only four samples have been dated between 800 My and present. Therefore, the evolution of the cratering rate after the LHB and before 3 Gy is well constrained. The cratering rate between 3 Gy and present has been assumed to be constant [1, 2]. Nevertheless, this assumption is challenged by the analysis of the geological record, such as the frequency of landslide on Mars as a function of time [3, 4]. It is therefore necessary to re-examine the validity of this assumption and place constraints on the cratering rate since the last 3 Gy. For this purpose, we study the rate of impact cratering using small craters on a set of 53 layered ejecta craters larger than 5 km in diameter in Acidalia Planitia, Mars. LECs larger than 5km have large enough surfaces to date their formation by counting craters larger than 100m present on their blankets. Furthermore, limits of their ejecta blankets are clearly defined by a terminal bead. In order to determine the crater emplacement ages, we have applied the methodology dating described in our previous study [6] on all ejecta layers. Errors on measured ages were calculated following [7]. The age of the study area is 2.8±0.2 Gy. Our crater counts on distal ejecta blankets reveal ages younger than the age of the surrounding surface, as expected. It is essential to take into account errors on measured ages. The statistical sample used to build this emplacement frequency distribution and our dating methodology are sufficiently reliable to deduce that a constant impact cratering rate over the last 3 Gy is not a correct approximation. The excessive number of craters emplaced 1Gy ago compared to the cratering rate used suggests a decreased impact cratering rate over the last 1Gy and

  18. Impact craters on venus: initial analysis from magellan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R J; Arvidson, R E; Boyce, J M; Campbell, D B; Guest, J E; Schaber, G G; Soderblom, L A

    1991-04-12

    Magellan radar images of 15 percent of the planet show 135 craters of probable impact origin. Craters more than 15 km across tend to contain central peaks, multiple central peaks, and peak rings. Many craters smaller than 15 km exhibit multiple floors or appear in clusters; these phenomena are attributed to atmospheric breakup of incoming meteoroids. Additionally, the atmosphere appears to have prevented the formation of primary impact craters smaller than about 3 km and produced a deficiency in the number of craters smaller than about 25 km across. Ejecta is found at greater distances than that predicted by simple ballistic emplacement, and the distal ends of some ejecta deposits are lobate. These characteristics may represent surface flows of material initially entrained in the atmosphere. Many craters are surrounded by zones of low radar albedo whose origin may have been deformation of the surface by the shock or pressure wave associated with the incoming meteoroid. Craters are absent from several large areas such as a 5 million square kilometer region around Sappho Patera, where the most likely explanation for the dearth of craters is volcanic resurfacing. There is apparently a spectrum of surface ages on Venus ranging approximately from 0 to 800 million years, and therefore Venus must be a geologically active planet.

  19. Impact craters on Venus: Initial analysis from Magellan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R.J.; Arvidson, R. E.; Boyce, J.M.; Campbell, D.B.; Guest, J.E.; Schaber, G.G.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    Magellan radar images of 15 percent of the planet show 135 craters of probable impact origin. Craters more than 15 km across tend to contain central peaks, multiple central peaks, and peak rings. Many craters smaller than 15 km exhibit multiple floors or appear in clusters; these phenomena are attributed to atmospheric breakup of incoming meteoroids. Additionally, the atmosphere appears to have prevented the formation of primary impact craters smaller than about 3 km and produced a deficiency in the number of craters smaller than about 25 km across. Ejecta is found at greater distances than that predicted by simple ballistic emplacement, and the distal ends of some ejecta deposits are lobate. These characteristics may represent surface flows of material initially entrained in the atmosphere. Many craters are surrounded by zones of low radar albedo whose origin may have been deformation of the surface by the shock or pressure wave associated with the incoming meteoroid. Craters are absent from several large areas such as a 5 million square kilometer region around Sappho Patera, where the most likely explanation for the dearth of craters is volcanic resurfacing, There is apparently a spectrum of surface ages on Venus ranging approximately from 0 to 800 million years, and therefore Venus must be a geologically active planet.

  20. Experimental Impact Cratering into Sandstone: A MEMIN-Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelchau, M. H.; Deutsch, A.; Kenkmann, T.; Hoerth, T.; Schäfer, F.; Thoma, K.; Memin Team

    2011-03-01

    The MEMIN Project is currently focused on impact experiments into sandstone. First results are presented here, including the evaluation of high-speed cameras, ejecta catchment devices, crater morphology, and chemical projectile-target interaction.

  1. Comparing Characteristics of Polygonal Impact Craters on Mercury and Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Polygonal impact craters (PICs) are defined as craters, which rims are composed of at least two straight segments. These PICs are often found on terrestrial planets like Mercury, Venus, and Mars and on the Moon. In our current study we compare characteristics of PICs: the numbers, the mean diameters, and the PICs' ages on Mercury and Venus. The surfaces of both planets show significant differences in age - Mercury’s surface is about 4.5 Gyr, but Venus' not more than 1 Gyr old. The age of polygonal impact craters correspond to this difference. (author)

  2. Surficial geology of the Chicxulub impact crater, Yucatan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Kevin O.; Ocampo, Adriana C.; Duller, Charles E.

    1993-11-01

    The Chicxulub impact crater in northwestern Yucatan, Mexico is the primary candidate for the proposed impact that caused mass extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous Period. The crater is buried by up to a kilometer of Tertiary sediment and the most prominent surface expression is a ring of sink holes, known locally as cenotes, mapped with Landsat imagery. This 165 +/- 5 km diameter Cenote Ring demarcates a boundary between unfractured limestones inside the ring, and fractured limestones outside. The boundary forms a barrier to lateral ground water migration, resulting in increased flows, dissolution, and collapse thus forming the cenotes. The subsurface geology indicates that the fracturing that created the Cenote Ring is related to slumping in the rim of the buried crater, differential thicknesses in the rocks overlying the crater, or solution collapse within porous impact deposits. The Cenote Ring provides the most accurate position of the Chicxulub crater's center, and the associated faults, fractures, and stratigraphy indicate that the crater may be approximately 240 km in diameter.

  3. Mars: New Determination of Impact Crater Production Function Size Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, William K.

    2006-12-01

    Several authors have questioned our knowledge of Martian impact crater production function size-frequency distribution (PFSFD), especially at small diameters D. Plescia (2005) questioned whether any area of Mars shows size distributions used for estimating crater retention ages on Mars. McEwen et al. (2005) and McEwen and Bierhaus (2006) suggested existing PFSFD’s are hopelessly confused by the presence of secondaries, and that my isochrons give primary crater densities off by factors of several thousand at small D. In 2005, I addressed some of these concerns, noting my curves do not estimate primary crater densities per se, but show total numbers of primaries + semi-randomly “distant secondaries” (negating many McEwen et al. critiques). In 2006 I have conducted new crater counts on a PFSFD test area suggested by Ken Tanaka. This area shows young lava flows of similar crater density, west of Olympus Mons (around 30 deg N, 100 deg W). Multiple crater counts were made on several adjacent Odyssey THEMIS images and MGS MOC images, giving the SFD over a range of 11mMcEwen, A.S., Bierhaus, E.B., 2006, Ann. Rev. Earth. Planet. Sci. 34, 535-567. McEwen, A.S., 2005, Icarus 176, 351-381. Plescia, J.B. 2005, LPSC 36, 2171.

  4. Low-velocity impact craters in ice and ice-saturated sand with implications for Martian crater count ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, S. K.; Kieffer, S. W.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reports on a series of low-velocity impact experiments performed in ice and ice-saturated sand. It is found that crater diameters in ice-saturated sand were about 2 times larger than in the same energy and velocity range in competent blocks of granite, basalt and cement, while craters in ice were 3 times larger. It is shown that if this dependence of crater size on strength persists to large hypervelocity impact craters, then surface of geologic units composed of ice or ice-saturated soil would have greater crater count ages than rocky surfaces with identical influx histories. Among the conclusions are that Martian impact crater energy versus diameter scaling may also be a function of latitude.

  5. Zumba crater, Daedalia Planum, Mars: Geologic investigation of a young, rayed impact crater and its secondary field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Frank C.; Crown, David A.; Tornabene, Livio L.

    2016-05-01

    Zumba is a ∼2.9 km diameter rayed crater on Mars located on extensive lava plains in Daedalia Planum to the southwest of Arsia Mons. It is a well-preserved young crater with large ejecta rays that extend for hundreds of kilometers from the impact site. The rays are thermally distinct from the background lava flows in THEMIS daytime and nighttime thermal infrared data, a unique characteristic among martian rayed craters. Concentrated within the rays are solitary or dense clusters of secondary craters with associated diffuse dark-toned deposits along with fewer secondary craters lacking dark-toned deposits. Using CTX images, we have mapped secondary craters with dark-toned deposits, collectively termed "secondary fields", to investigate their distribution as a function of distance from the impact site. The mapped secondary field was then used to investigate various aspects of the crater-forming event such as the surface angle and direction of the projectile, the effect of secondary craters on surface age estimates, and the number of secondary craters produced by the impact event. From our mapping, a total of 13,064 secondary fields were documented out to a 200 km radial distance beyond a 15 km-wide non-secondary zone around Zumba crater. Results show that the highest areal coverage of secondary fields occurs within 100 km of Zumba and within its rays, decreasing radially with distance to a background scattering of small secondary fields that are moderately oblique impact projectile coming from the south. Using primary craters in a ∼101 km2 sample region and all craters (primaries and secondaries) from 43 select secondary fields in two map sectors in the study area, we obtain ages of ∼580 ± 100 Ma and ∼650 ± 70 Ma, respectively, for the lava flows into which Zumba impacted. These ages are consistent with and intermediate to 0.1-1 Ga volcanic flow units within and near Daedalia Planum. For craters within the secondary fields, a log differential plot of the

  6. Raindrop impact on sand: dynamic and crater formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song-Chuan; de Jong, Rianne; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2015-03-01

    Droplet impact on a granular bed is very common in nature, industry, and agriculture and extends from raindrops falling on earth to wet granulation in the production process of many pharmaceuticals. In contrast to more traditionally studied impact phenomena, such as a droplet impact on solid substrate and solid object impact on fluid-like substrate, raindrop impact on sand induces more complicated interactions. First, both the intruder and the target deform during impact; second, the liquid composing the droplet may penetrate into the substrate during the impact and may, in the end, completely merge with the grains. These complex interactions between the droplet intruder and the granular target create the very diverse crater morphologies that has been described in the literature. An appealing and natural question is how the craters are formed. To gain insight in the mechanism of crater formation, we resolve the dynamics with high-speed laser profilometry and study the dependence of the dynamics on impact speed and packing fraction of the granular substrate. Finally, we establish a dynamical model to explain the various crater morphologies.

  7. Zumba crater, Daedalia Planum, Mars: Geologic investigation of a young, rayed impact crater and its secondary field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Frank C.; Crown, David A.; Tornabene, Livio L.

    2016-05-01

    Zumba is a ∼2.9 km diameter rayed crater on Mars located on extensive lava plains in Daedalia Planum to the southwest of Arsia Mons. It is a well-preserved young crater with large ejecta rays that extend for hundreds of kilometers from the impact site. The rays are thermally distinct from the background lava flows in THEMIS daytime and nighttime thermal infrared data, a unique characteristic among martian rayed craters. Concentrated within the rays are solitary or dense clusters of secondary craters with associated diffuse dark-toned deposits along with fewer secondary craters lacking dark-toned deposits. Using CTX images, we have mapped secondary craters with dark-toned deposits, collectively termed "secondary fields", to investigate their distribution as a function of distance from the impact site. The mapped secondary field was then used to investigate various aspects of the crater-forming event such as the surface angle and direction of the projectile, the effect of secondary craters on surface age estimates, and the number of secondary craters produced by the impact event. From our mapping, a total of 13,064 secondary fields were documented out to a 200 km radial distance beyond a 15 km-wide non-secondary zone around Zumba crater. Results show that the highest areal coverage of secondary fields occurs within 100 km of Zumba and within its rays, decreasing radially with distance to a background scattering of small secondary fields that are primary craters in a ∼101 km2 sample region and all craters (primaries and secondaries) from 43 select secondary fields in two map sectors in the study area, we obtain ages of ∼580 ± 100 Ma and ∼650 ± 70 Ma, respectively, for the lava flows into which Zumba impacted. These ages are consistent with and intermediate to 0.1-1 Ga volcanic flow units within and near Daedalia Planum. For craters within the secondary fields, a log differential plot of the data shows a pronounced downward deflection of the binned points for

  8. Fractal dimensions of rampart impact craters on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Delwyn; Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Mouginis-Mark, Peter; Bruno, Barbara C.

    1993-01-01

    Ejecta blanket morphologies of Martian rampart craters may yield important clues to the atmospheric densities during impact, and the nature of target materials (e.g., hard rock, fine-grained sediments, presence of volatiles). In general, the morphologies of such craters suggest emplacement by a fluidized, ground hugging flow instead of ballistic emplacement by dry ejecta. We have quantitatively characterized the shape of the margins of the ejecta blankets of 15 rampart craters using fractal geometry. Our preliminary results suggest that the craters are fractals and are self-similar over scales of approximately 0.1 km to 30 km. Fractal dimensions (a measure of the extent to which a line fills a plane) range from 1.06 to 1.31. No correlations of fractal dimension with target type, elevation, or crater size were observed, though the data base is small. The range in fractal dimension and lack of correlation may be due to a complex interplay of target properties (grain size, volatile content), atmospheric pressure, and crater size. The mere fact that the ejecta margins are fractals, however, indicates that viscosity and yield strength of the ejecta were at least as low as those of basalts, because silicic lava flows are not generally fractals.

  9. Cratering on a Comet: Expectations for Deep Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, P. H.

    2001-11-01

    In 2005, the Deep Impact Mission will witness the collision of a 350kg impactor into Comet P-Temple 1. Laboratory impact experiments provide scaling laws that relate impactor mass to crater diameter and depth for various target and impactor properties. A series of experiments have been performed at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range in order to assess the effects of the density and impedance ratio between target and impactor, target compressibility, target porosity, and impact angle. Although the maximum velocity achievable in the laboratory is below that for Deep Impact (7km/sec versus 10.3 km/sec), varying impactor diameter and velocity allows extrapolating beyond this range, for certain assumptions. This approach has been used for various particulate targets including pumice (1.1 to 1.5 g/cc, sand (1.7g/cc), vermiculite (0.09 g/cc), and micro-spheres (0.05g/cc), which provide the maximum possible diameter produced on Temple 1. Smaller sizes are expected if strength, rather than gravity, controls limits of crater growth or if internal energy losses (e.g., pore-space collapse) reduce the coupling efficiency. Crater size also can be augmented through back pressures created by vapor expansion within the crater cavity. The maximum predicted crater diameters (without back pressure) for the DI impact into a 0.3 g/cc porous target are: 89 m (pumice), 124 m (fine sand), 98m (fine sand with compaction losses). Formation times approach 200 seconds. Crater size, plume evolution (size and photometry), formation time, ejection (curtain) angle, and the ejecta deposit will all contribute to meaningful interpretations of the near-surface properties.

  10. Fluid mechanical scaling of impact craters in unconsolidated granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Colin S.; Dowling, David R.

    2015-11-01

    A single scaling law is proposed for the diameter of simple low- and high-speed impact craters in unconsolidated granular materials where spall is not apparent. The scaling law is based on the assumption that gravity- and shock-wave effects set crater size, and is formulated in terms of a dimensionless crater diameter, and an empirical combination of Froude and Mach numbers. The scaling law involves the kinetic energy and speed of the impactor, the acceleration of gravity, and the density and speed of sound in the target material. The size of the impactor enters the formulation but divides out of the final empirical result. The scaling law achieves a 98% correlation with available measurements from drop tests, ballistic tests, missile impacts, and centrifugally-enhanced gravity impacts for a variety of target materials (sand, alluvium, granulated sugar, and expanded perlite). The available measurements cover more than 10 orders of magnitude in impact energy. For subsonic and supersonic impacts, the crater diameter is found to scale with the 1/4- and 1/6-power, respectively, of the impactor kinetic energy with the exponent crossover occurring near a Mach number of unity. The final empirical formula provides insight into how impact energy partitioning depends on Mach number.

  11. Formation of complex impact craters - Evidence from Mars and other planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the depth vs diameter data of Arthur (1980), is given along with geomorphic data for 73 Martian craters. The implications for the formation of complex impact craters on solid planets is discussed. The analysis integrates detailed morphological observations on planetary craters with geologic data from terrestrial meteorite and explosion craters. The simple to complex transition for impact craters on Mars appears at diameters in the range of 3 to 8 km. Five features appear sequentially with increasing crater size, flat floors, central peaks and shallower depths, scalloped rims, and terraced walls. This order suggests that a shallow depth of excavation and a rebound mechanism have produced the central peaks, not centripetal collapse and deep sliding. Simple craters are relatively uniform in shape from planet to planet, but complex craters vary considerably. Both the average onset diameter for complex impact craters on Mars and the average depth of complex craters vary inversely with gravitational acceleration on four planets.

  12. Search for Impact Craters in Iran: Citizen Science as a Useful Method

    CERN Document Server

    Pourkhorsandi, Hamed

    2013-01-01

    To recognition probable impact craters in Iran, we use Google Earth data in the first step. Some probable structures identified and studies suggest non-impact origin for them. Studies on other craters in Iran are in progress.

  13. Impact craters at falling of large asteroids in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    Catastrophes of different scale that are associated with the fall of celestial bodies to the Earth - occurred repeatedly in its history. But direct evidence of such catastrophes has been discovered recently. Thus, in the late 1970s studies of terrestrial rocks showed that in layers of the earth's crust that corresponded to the period of 65 million years before the present, marked by the mass extinction of some species of living creatures, and the beginning of the rapid development of others. It was then - a large body crashed to Earth in the Gulf of Mexico in Central America. The consequence of this is the Chicxulub crater with a diameter of ~170 km on Yucatan Peninsula. Modern Earth's surface retains many traces of collisions with large cosmic bodies. To indicate the craters with a diameter of more than 2 km using the name "astrobleme". Today, it found more than 230. The largest astroblems sizes exceeding 200 km. Ukraine also has some own astroblems. In Ukraine, been found nine large impact craters. Ukrainian crystalline shield, because of its stability for a long time (more than 1.5 billion years), has the highest density of large astroblems on the Earth's surface. The largest of the Ukrainian astroblems is Manevytska. It has a diameter of 45 km. There are also Ilyinetskyi (7 km), Boltysh (25 km), Obolon' (20 km), Ternivka (12-15 km), Bilylivskyi (6 km), Rotmystrivka (3 km) craters. Zelenohayska astrobleme founded near the village Zelenyi Gay in Kirovograd region and consists of two craters: larger with diameter 2.5-3.5 km and smaller - with diameter of 800 m. The presence of graphite, which was the basis for the research of the impact diamond in astroblems of this region. As a result, the diamonds have been found in rocks of Ilyinetskyi crater; later it have been found in rocks in the Bilylivska, Obolon' and other impact structures. The most detailed was studied the geological structure and the presence of diamonds in Bilylivska astrobleme

  14. Impact Crater Experiments for Introductory Physics and Astronomy Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Activity-based collisional analysis is developed for introductory physics and astronomy laboratory experiments. Crushable floral foam is used to investigate the physics of projectiles undergoing completely inelastic collisions with a low-density solid forming impact craters. Simple drop experiments enable determination of the average acceleration,…

  15. SOLID STATE PHYSICS OF IMPACT CRATER FORMATION: FURTHER CONSIDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Celebonovic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact craters exist on solid surface planets, their satellites and many asteroids. The aim of this paper is to propose a theoretical expression for the product ρr3 v2 1 , where the three symbols denote the mass density, radius and speed of the impactor. The expression is derived using well known results of solid state physics, and it can be used in estimating parameters of impactors which have led to formation of craters on various solid bodies in the Solar System.

  16. Hypervelocity impact study: The effect of impact angle on crater morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Gary; Hill, David; Rose, Frank E.; Zee, Ralph; Best, Steve; Crumpler, Mike

    1993-01-01

    The Space Power Institute (SPI) of Auburn University has conducted preliminary tests on the effects of impact angle on crater morphology for hypervelocity impacts. Copper target plates were set at angles of 30 deg and 60 deg from the particle flight path. For the 30 deg impact, the craters looked almost identical to earlier normal incidence impacts. The only difference found was in the apparent distribution of particle residue within the crater, and further research is needed to verify this. The 60 deg impacts showed marked differences in crater symmetry, crater lip shape, and particle residue distribution. Further research on angle effects is planned, because the particle velocities for these shots were relatively slow (7 km/s or less).

  17. An Impact Crater in Palm Valley, Central Australia?

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W; O'Neill, Craig; Britton, Tui R

    2012-01-01

    We explore the origin of a ~280 m wide, heavily eroded circular depression in Palm Valley, Northern Territory, Australia using gravity, morphological, and mineralogical data collected from a field survey in September 2009. From the analysis of the survey, we debate probable formation processes, namely erosion and impact, as no evidence of volcanism is found in the region or reported in the literature. We argue that the depression was not formed by erosion and consider an impact origin, although we acknowledge that diagnostics required to identify it as such (e.g. meteorite fragments, shatter cones, shocked quartz) are lacking, leaving the formation process uncertain. We encourage further discussion of the depression's origin and stress a need to develop recognition criteria that can help identify small, ancient impact craters. We also encourage systematic searches for impact craters in Central Australia as it is probable that many more remain to be discovered.

  18. Hydrogeology associated to faulting of the Chicxulub Impact Crater rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Hernandez-Terrones, L.; Almazan-Becerril, A.; Valadez-Cruz, F.

    2011-12-01

    The only surface expression of the Chicxulub Impact Crater is a Ring of Cenotes (sinkholes) whose density varies from several cenotes per kilometer, to several kilometers between each cenote. This ring has a radius of approximately 90 km and it is centered at Chicxulub Puerto. It is not known today whether the Ring of Cenotes is the surface expression of the transient cavity as some authors have suggested, or whether it is the outer rim of the impact structure. The center of the ring is approximately coincident with the center of the Chicxulub Impact Crater. Reactivation of K/T rim faults had been associated to the formation of the ring of cenotes. However, none of these models project such faults to the Tertiary sedimentary sequence; therefore we can only infer that the cenotes are associated to these faults. Other hypotheses include "post impact subsidence induced by slumping and viscous relaxation in the rim" and "slumping in the rim of the buried crater, differential thickness in the rocks overlying the crater, or solution collapse within porous impact deposits", others suggest duration of subaerial exposure and weathering as a principal reason both for difference in permeability and cenote density inside and outside the Ring. This is consistent with the evolution of surface features reported. While sedimentation occurred in the basin outlined by the Ring, erosion and karst weathering were taking place outside the Ring. The karst features are associated with gravity gradients, which have been interpreted as corresponding to peripheral faults of the buried crater. We conducted geoelectric tomography perpendicular to the ring of cenotes, where we mapped the karstic features in the area and we interpret the high permeability in this area, to be associated to the faults generated by the differential compaction of the sedimentary sequence within the crater. This fault system generates a secondary porosity with high permeability that allows the circulation of water

  19. The MEMIN research unit: First results from impact cratering experiments into quartzite and tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelchau, M. H.; Hoerth, T.; Schäfer, F.; Deutsch, A.; Thoma, K.; Kenkmann, T.

    2012-09-01

    The MEMIN research unit is focused on performing and evaluating impact cratering experiments into geological materials. As a research unit, MEMIN uses a multidisciplinary approach, with different subprojects analyzing various aspects of the same cratering experiments, including crater morphology, ejecta dynamics, subsurface deformation, etc., along with numerical simulations of the impact process. A series of impact cratering experiments into quartzite and tuff targets is planned for June 2012. We intend to have completed a preliminary evaluation of these experiments for the EPSC conference.

  20. Suevites from the Rochechouart Impact Crater, France, and the Lake Mien Impact Crater, Sweden: The Search for Robust Carbon Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, R. M.; Langenhorst, F.; Stoffler, D.; Pillinger, C. T.; Gilmour, I.

    1995-09-01

    Suevite from the 24km Ries crater in southern Germany has recently been shown to contain diamond, lonsdaleite and silicon carbide (1). These minerals are of impact, not meteoritic, origin and probably formed by a combination of shock and plasma processes with the contribution due to each mechanism yet to be resolved (1). Diamonds are increasingly becoming an accepted impact signature and have been reported for several Ukranian impact craters including Zapadnaya (2) and also for the Popigai impact crater in Siberia (3). We have also found diamonds associated with the K/T boundary event 65 Ma ago in North America (4) and Mexico (5). The genesis of suevite at the Ries is thought to be within a fireball at very high temperatures and travelling at high velocities. Shocked minerals are associated with the suevite as are the high pressure polymorphs of quartz namely coesite and stishovite (6). Such an extreme temperature and pressure history for the suevite make it an ideal rock type to search for impact diamonds, we are therefore endeavouring to study other suevites from further impact craters, including Rochechouart and Mien. The 165-200 Ma Rochechouart impact crater in the Massif Central, France, is thought to have originally been some 20 km across and therefore is very similar in size to the Ries (7). The basement material of gneisses and granites is also akin to the Ries and as such makes it an ideal candidate for diamond poltypes and possibly silicon carbide. Lake Mien in Sweden has no outcrops of suevite breccia but does have glacial erratic blocks of suevite. The impact crater is only some 7-9 km in size and has an age of 120 Ma (8). It affords a useful method of investigating the importance of size as a controlling factor in formation of carbon impact minerals. The samples were treated with an acid demineralization procedure first developed for the extraction of diamond from meteorites and modified for the particular needs of studying terrestrial samples

  1. Unified force law for granular impact cratering

    OpenAIRE

    H. Katsuragi; Durian, D. J.

    2007-01-01

    Experiments on the low-speed impact of solid objects into granular media have been used both to mimic geophysical events and to probe the unusual nature of the granular state of matter. Observations have been interpreted in terms of conflicting stopping forces: product of powers of projectile depth and speed; linear in speed; constant, proportional to the initial impact speed; and proportional to depth. This is reminiscent of high-speed ballistics impact in the 19th and 20th centuries, when a...

  2. Impact cratering – fundamental process in geoscience and planetary science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J K Pati; W U Reimold

    2007-04-01

    Impact cratering is a geological process characterized by ultra-fast strain rates, which generates extreme shock pressure and shock temperature conditions on and just below planetary surfaces. Despite initial skepticism, this catastrophic process has now been widely accepted by geoscientists with respect to its importance in terrestrial – indeed, in planetary – evolution. About 170 impact structures have been discovered on Earth so far, and some more structures are considered to be of possible impact origin. One major extinction event, at the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary, has been firmly linked with catastrophic impact, but whether other important extinction events in Earth history, including the so-called “Mother of All Mass Extinctions” at the Permian–Triassic boundary, were triggered by huge impact catastrophes is still hotly debated and a subject of ongoing research. There is a beneficial side to impact events as well, as some impact structures worldwide have been shown to contain significant (in some cases, world class) ore deposits, including the gold– uranium province of the Witwatersrand basin in South Africa, the enormous Ni and PGE deposits of the Sudbury structure in Canada, as well as important hydrocarbon resources, especially in North America. Impact cratering is not a process of the past, and it is mandatory to improve knowledge of the past-impact record on Earth to better constrain the probability of such events in the future. In addition, further improvement of our understanding of the physico–chemical and geological processes fundamental to the impact cratering process is required for reliable numerical modeling of the process, and also for the correlation of impact magnitude and environmental effects. Over the last few decades, impact cratering has steadily grown into an integrated discipline comprising most disciplines of the geosciences as well as planetary science, which has created positive spin-offs including the study of

  3. Geological remote sensing signatures of terrestrial impact craters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geological remote sensing techniques can be used to investigate structural, depositional, and shock metamorphic effects associated with hypervelocity impact structures, some of which may be linked to global Earth system catastrophies. Although detailed laboratory and field investigations are necessary to establish conclusive evidence of an impact origin for suspected crater landforms, the synoptic perspective provided by various remote sensing systems can often serve as a pathfinder to key deposits which can then be targetted for intensive field study. In addition, remote sensing imagery can be used as a tool in the search for impact and other catastrophic explosion landforms on the basis of localized disruption and anomaly patterns. In order to reconstruct original dimensions of large, complex impact features in isolated, inaccessible regions, remote sensing imagery can be used to make preliminary estimates in the absence of field geophysical surveys. The experienced gained from two decades of planetary remote sensing of impact craters on the terrestrial planets, as well as the techniques developed for recognizing stages of degradation and initial crater morphology, can now be applied to the problem of discovering and studying eroded impact landforms on Earth. Preliminary results of remote sensing analyses of a set of terrestrial impact features in various states of degradation, geologic settings, and for a broad range of diameters and hence energies of formation are summarized. The intention is to develop a database of remote sensing signatures for catastrophic impact landforms which can then be used in EOS-era global surveys as the basis for locating the possibly hundreds of missing impact structures

  4. Impact-generated Hydrothermal Activity at the Chicxulub Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kring, D. A.; Zurcher, L.; Abramov, O.

    2007-05-01

    Borehole samples recovered from PEMEX exploration boreholes and an ICDP scientific borehole indicate the Chicxulub impact event generated hydrothermal alteration throughout a large volume of the Maya Block beneath the crater floor and extending across the bulk of the ~180 km diameter crater. The first indications of hydrothermal alteration were observed in the crater discovery samples from the Yucatan-6 borehole and manifest itself in the form of anhydrite and quartz veins. Continuous core from the Yaxcopoil-1 borehole reveal a more complex and temporally extensive alteration sequence: following a brief period at high temperatures, impact- melt-bearing polymict breccias and a thin, underlying unit of impact melt were subjected to metasomatism, producing alkali feldspar, sphene, apatite, and magnetite. As the system continued to cool, smectite-series phyllosilicates appeared. A saline solution was involved. Stable isotopes suggest the fluid was dominated by a basinal brine created mostly from existing groundwater of the Yucatan Peninsula, although contributions from down-welling water also occurred in some parts of the system. Numerical modeling of the hydrothermal system suggests circulation occurred for 1.5 to 2.3 Myr, depending on the permeability of the system. Our understanding of the hydrothermal system, however, is still crude. Additional core recovery projects, particularly into the central melt sheet, are needed to better evaluate the extent and duration of hydrothermal alteration.

  5. Granular impact cratering by liquid drops: Understanding raindrop imprints through an analogy to asteroid strikes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Runchen; Zhang, Qianyun; Tjugito, Hendro; Cheng, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    When a granular material is impacted by a sphere, its surface deforms like a liquid yet it preserves a circular crater like a solid. Although the mechanism of granular impact cratering by solid spheres is well explored, our knowledge on granular impact cratering by liquid drops is still very limited. Here, by combining high-speed photography with high-precision laser profilometry, we investigate liquid-drop impact dynamics on granular surface and monitor the morphology of resulting impact cra...

  6. The MEMIN research unit: Scaling impact cratering experiments in porous sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelchau, Michael H.; Kenkmann, Thomas; Thoma, Klaus; Hoerth, Tobias; Dufresne, Anja; SchńFer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The MEMIN research unit (Multidisciplinary Experimental and Modeling Impact research Network) is focused on analyzing experimental impact craters and experimental cratering processes in geological materials. MEMIN is interested in understanding how porosity and pore space saturation influence the cratering process. Here, we present results of a series of impact experiments into porous wet and dry sandstone targets. Steel, iron meteorite, and aluminum projectiles ranging in size from 2.5 to 12 mm were accelerated to velocities of 2.5-7.8 km s-1, yielding craters with diameters between 3.9 and 40 cm. Results show that the target's porosity reduces crater volumes and cratering efficiency relative to nonporous rocks. Saturation of pore space with water to 50% and 90% increasingly counteracts the effects of porosity, leading to larger but flatter craters. Spallation becomes more dominant in larger-scale experiments and leads to an increase in cratering efficiency with increasing projectile size for constant impact velocities. The volume of spalled material is estimated using parabolic fits to the crater morphology, yielding approximations of the transient crater volume. For impacts at the same velocity these transient craters show a constant cratering efficiency that is not affected by projectile size.

  7. Moessbauer studies on impactites from Lonar impact crater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, H. C., E-mail: hcverma@iitk.ac.in [I I T Kanpur, Department of Physics (India); Misra, S., E-mail: misrasaumitra@gmail.com [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism (India); Shyam Prasad, M., E-mail: shyam@nio.org [National Institute of Oceanography, Geological Oceanography Division (India); Bijlani, N.; Tripathi, A., E-mail: rpt2002@sify.com [J.N.V. University, Department of Physics (India); Newsom, Horton, E-mail: newsom@unm.edu [University of New Mexico, Institute of Meteoritics and Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences (United States)

    2008-09-15

    Iron mineralogy has been studied using Moessbauer spectroscopy on eight glassy impactite samples from different parts of the Lonar Crater Rim Region. Distinct changes are observed when compared to the host basaltic samples. Significant amount of Fe{sup 3+} phase is observed in the impactite samples whereas this phase is known to be almost absent in the basalt. Besides this we have a strong Fe{sup 2+} doublet showing up corresponding to the main iron-containing mineral. The Moessbauer results are very similar to those with glasses from Ries crater which is also believed to have formed by meteoritic impact but on nonbasaltic rock bed. Besides the glassy samples, we also study some spherules found in the crater region and some fine glassy particles on the surfaces of melt impact bombs. These contain a good amount of magnetically ordered phase, most likely nanosize hematite. Interestingly, part of it is strongly attracted by a magnet and part of it is not. But both parts show a significantly strong six-line component corresponding to hematite.

  8. The MEMIN Research Unit: New results from impact cratering experiments into geological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelchau, M. H.; Deutsch, A.; Thoma, K.; Kenkmann, T.

    2013-09-01

    The MEMIN research unit (Multidisciplinary Experimental and Modeling Impact research Network) is focused on performing hypervelocity impact experiments, analyzing experimental impact craters and modeling cratering rocesses in geological materials. The main goal of the MEMIN project is to comprehensively quantify impact processes by conducting stringently controlled experimental impact cratering campaigns on the mesoscale with a multidisciplinary analytical approach. As a unique feature we use two-stage light gas guns capable of producing impact craters in thedecimeter size-range in solid rocks that, in turn, allow detailed spatial analysis of petrophysical, structural, and geochemical changes in target rocks and ejecta.

  9. Morphometry of impact craters on Mercury from MESSENGER altimetry and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susorney, Hannah C. M.; Barnouin, Olivier S.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Johnson, Catherine L.

    2016-06-01

    Data acquired by the Mercury Laser Altimeter and the Mercury Dual Imaging System on the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury provide a means to measure the geometry of many of the impact craters in Mercury's northern hemisphere in detail for the first time. The combination of topographic and imaging data permit a systematic evaluation of impact crater morphometry on Mercury, a new calculation of the diameter Dt at which craters transition with increasing diameter from simple to complex forms, and an exploration of the role of target properties and impact velocity on final crater size and shape. Measurements of impact crater depth on Mercury confirm results from previous studies, with the exception that the depths of large complex craters are typically shallower at a given diameter than reported from Mariner 10 data. Secondary craters on Mercury are generally shallower than primary craters of the same diameter. No significant differences are observed between the depths of craters within heavily cratered terrain and those of craters within smooth plains. The morphological attributes of craters that reflect the transition from simple to complex craters do not appear at the same diameter; instead flat floors first appear with increasing diameter in craters at the smallest diameters, followed with increasing diameter by reduced crater depth and rim height, and then collapse and terracing of crater walls. Differences reported by others in Dt between Mercury and Mars (despite the similar surface gravitational acceleration on the two bodies) are confirmed in this study. The variations in Dt between Mercury and Mars cannot be adequately attributed to differences in either surface properties or mean projectile velocity.

  10. Impact Crater of the Australasian Tektites, Southern Laos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieh, K.; Herrin, J. S.; Wiwegwin, W.; Charusiri, P.; Singer, B. S.; Singsomboun, K.; Jicha, B. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Australasian strewn field, a horizon of glassy clasts formed of molten ejecta from the impact of a bolide about 770,000 years ago, covers about a tenth of the Earth - from Indochina to Australia and from the Indian to western Pacific oceans. The distribution of chemical and physical characteristics of these tektites implies a very large impact somewhere in central Indochina. A half-century of unsuccessful searching for the impact crater implies obscuration by either erosion or burial. Geomorphological and stratigraphic evidence suggests that the crater lies buried beneath lavas and cinder cones of a 100-km wide volcanic shield centered atop the Bolaven Plateau of southern Laos. One critical test of this hypothesis, using precise 40Ar/39Ar dating, is now in progress - are these highly weathered basalts younger than the tektites? Although volcanic rocks cover most of the area proximal to our purported impact site, a thick, crudely bedded, bouldery to pebbly breccia that crops out southeast of the obscured crater rim appears to be part of an ejecta blanket. The basal unit of this fining-upward sequence comprises large boulders of late-Mesozoic sandstone bedrock that display in situ shattering. This implies emplacement ballistically rather than by debris-flow. Old surfaces in the surrounding region (as others have noted) and on the Plateau have a mantle of pebbly, detrital lateritic debris that in its upper 15 cm contains angular tektite fragments. We hypothesize that this debris is a proximal fall bed produced by shock-induced comminution and ejection of a lateritic soil that covered the Plateau bedrock. Deposition was nearly complete when sparse tektite fragments ejected from nearer the center of the impact began to land. At many sites this pebbly, lateritic bed is overlain by a thick silty bed that others have associated with aeolian erosion of a barren, incinerated tropical landscape. See Herrin et al (this meeting) for more on the volcanic rocks.

  11. Fullerenes in an impact crater on the LDEF spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radicati di Brozolo, F.; Bunch, T. E.; Fleming, R. H.; Macklin, J.

    1994-01-01

    The fullerenes C60 and C70 have been found to occur naturally on Earth and have also been invoked to explain features in the absorption spectra of interstellar clouds. But no definitive spectroscopic evidence exists for fullerenes in space and attempts to find fullerenes in carbonaceous chondrites have been unsuccessful. Here we report the observation of fullerenes associated with carbonaceous impact residue in a crater on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft. Laser ionization mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy indicate the presence of fullerenes in the crater and in adjacent ejecta. Man-made fullerenes survive experimental hypervelocity (approximately 6.1 km s-1) impacts into aluminium targets, suggesting that space fullerenes contained in a carbonaceous micrometeorite could have survived the LDEF impact at velocities towards the lower end of the natural particle encounter range (fullerenes were unlikely to have formed as instrumental artefacts, nor are they present as contaminants. Although we cannot specify the origin of the fullerenes with certainty, the most plausible source is the chondritic impactor. If, alternatively, the impact produced the fullerenes in situ on LDEF, then this suggests a viable mechanism for fullerene production in space.

  12. Wildfires Caused by Formation of Small Impact Craters: A Kaali Crater Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losiak, Anna; Belcher, Claire; Hudspith, Victoria; Zhu, Menghua; Bronikowska, Malgorzata; Jõeleht, Argo; Plado, Juri

    2016-04-01

    Formation of ~200-km Chicxulub 65 Ma ago was associated with release of significant amount of thermal energy [1,2,3] which was sufficient to start wildfires that had either regional [4] or global [5] range. The evidence for wildfires caused by impacts smaller than Chicxulub is inconclusive. On one hand, no signs of fires are associated with the formation of 24-km Ries crater [6]. On the other hand, the Tunguska site was burned after the impact and the numerical models of the bolide-produced thermal radiation suggest that the Tunguska-like event would produce a thermal flux to the surface that is sufficient to ignite pine needles [7]. However, in case of Tunguska the only proof for the bolide starting the fire comes from an eyewitness description collected many years after the event. Some authors [8] suggest that this fire might have been caused "normaly" later during the same year, induced on dead trees killed by the Tunguska fall. More recently it was observed that the Chelyabinsk meteor [9] - smaller than Tunguska event - did not produced a fire. In order to explore this apparent relationship in more detail, we have studied the proximal ejecta from a 100-m in diameter, ~3500 years old [10] Kaali crater (Estonia) within which we find pieces of charred organic material. Those pieces appear to have been produced during the impact, according to their stratigraphic location and following 14C analysis [19] as opposed to pre- or post-impact forest fires. In order to determine the most probable formation mechanism of the charred organic material found within Kaali proximal ejecta blanket, we: 1) Analyzed charcoal under SEM to identify the charred plants and determine properties of the charcoal related to the temperature of its formation [11]. Detected homogenization of cell walls suggests that at least some pieces of charcoal were formed at >300 °C [11]. 2) Analyzed the reflectance properties of the charred particles in order to determine the intensity with which

  13. The Chicxulub multi-ring impact crater, Yucatan carbonate platform, Gulf of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Jaime Urrutia-Fucugauchi; Antonio Camargo-Zanoguera; Ligia Pérez-Cruz; Guillermo Pérez-Cruz

    2011-01-01

    The Chicxulub impact crater is part of a select group of unique geological sites, being a natural laboratory to investigate crater formation processes and global effects of large-scale impacts. Chicxulub is one of only three multi-ring craters documented in the terrestrial record and impact has been related to the global environmental/climatic effects and mass extinction that mark the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary. The crater is buried under ~1.0 km of carbonate sediments in the Yucata...

  14. Impact craters and landslide volume distribution in Valles Marineris, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Blasio, Fabio

    2014-05-01

    The landslides in the wide gorge system of Valles Marineris (Mars) exhibit volumes of the or-der of several hundred 1,000 km3 and runouts often in the excess of 80 km. Most landslides have occurred at the borders of the valleys, where the unbalanced weight of the 5-8 km high headwalls has been evidently sufficient to cause instability. Previous analysis has shown that the mechanical conditions of instability would not have been reached without external triggering fac-tors, if the wallslope consisted of intact rock. Among the factors that have likely promoted instability, we are currently analyzing: i) the possibility of rock weakening due to weathering; ii) the alternation of weak layers within more massive rock; weak layers might for example due to evaporites, the possible presence of ice table at some depth, or water; iii) weakening due to impact damage prior to the formation of Valles Marineris; studies of impact craters on Earth show that the volumes of damaged rock extends much deeper than the crater itself; iv) direct triggering of a landslide due to the seismic waves generated by a large meteoroid impact in the vicinity, and v) direct triggering of a landslide con-sequent to impact at the headwall, with impulsive release of momentum and short but intense increase of the triggering force. We gathered a large database for about 3000 Martian landslides that allow us to infer some of their statistical properties supporting our analyses, and especially to discriminate among some of the above listed predisposing and triggering factors. In particular, we analyse in this contribution the frequency distribution of landslide volumes starting from the assumption that these events are controlled by the extent of the shock damage zones. Relative position of the impact point and damage zones with respect to the Valles Marineris slopes could in fact control the released volumes. We perform 3D slope stability analy-sis under different geometrical constraints (e.g. crater

  15. Phobos grooves and impact craters: A stereographic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simioni, Emanuele; Pajola, Maurizio; Massironi, Matteo; Cremonese, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Phobos parallel grooves were first observed on Viking images 38 years ago and since then they have been greatly debated leading to several formation hypotheses. Nevertheless, none of them have been favoured and widely accepted. In this work, we provide a different approach, assuming that Phobos grooves can be the expression of fracture planes, and deriving their spatial distribution and orientation on 3D reconstructions, we point out that any origin related only to craters at Phobos surface should be ruled out, since the majority of the grooves is unrelated to any craters now present at its surface. This raises the intriguing possibility that such grooves, if expression of fracture planes, are remnant features of an ancient parent body from which Phobos could have originated. Such scenario has never been considered for Phobos, though this origin was already proposed for the formation of 433 Eros grooves (Buczkowski, D.L., Barnouin-Jha, O.S., Prockter, L.M. [2008]. Icarus 193, 39). If this idea holds true, the observed groove distribution could be explained as the result of possible major impacts on the larger parent body, which were inherited by the "Phobos shard".

  16. Characterization of the Morphometry of Impact Craters Hosting Polar Deposits in Mercury's North Polar Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpe Matthieu; Zuber, Maria T.; Yang, Di; Neumann, Gregory A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Mazarico, Erwan; Vilas, Faith

    2012-01-01

    Earth-based radar images of Mercury show radar-bright material inside impact craters near the planet s poles. A previous study indicated that the polar-deposit-hosting craters (PDCs) at Mercury s north pole are shallower than craters that lack such deposits. We use data acquired by the Mercury Laser Altimeter on the MESSENGER spacecraft during 11 months of orbital observations to revisit the depths of craters at high northern latitudes on Mercury. We measured the depth and diameter of 537 craters located poleward of 45 N, evaluated the slopes of the northern and southern walls of 30 PDCs, and assessed the floor roughness of 94 craters, including nine PDCs. We find that the PDCs appear to have a fresher crater morphology than the non-PDCs and that the radar-bright material has no detectable influence on crater depths, wall slopes, or floor roughness. The statistical similarity of crater depth-diameter relations for the PDC and non-PDC populations places an upper limit on the thickness of the radar-bright material (< 170 m for a crater 11 km in diameter) that can be refined by future detailed analysis. Results of the current study are consistent with the view that the radar-bright material constitutes a relatively thin layer emplaced preferentially in comparatively young craters.

  17. Impact cratering in sandstone: The MEMIN pilot study on the effect of pore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenkmann, Thomas; Wünnemann, Kai; Deutsch, Alexander; Poelchau, Michael H.; Schäfer, Frank; Thoma, Klaus

    2011-06-01

    Planetary surfaces are subjected to meteorite bombardment and crater formation. Rocks forming these surfaces are often porous and contain fluids. To understand the role of both parameters on impact cratering, we conducted laboratory experiments with dry and wet sandstone blocks impacted by centimeter-sized steel spheres. We utilized a 40 m two-stage light-gas gun to achieve impact velocities of up to 5.4 km s-1. Cratering efficiency, ejection velocities, and spall volume are enhanced if the pore space of the sandstone is filled with water. In addition, the crater morphologies differ substantially from wet to dry targets, i.e., craters in wet targets are larger, but shallower. We report on the effects of pore water on the excavation flow field and the degree of target damage. We suggest that vaporization of water upon pressure release significantly contributes to the impact process.

  18. The two Suvasvesi impact structures, Finland: Argon isotopic evidence for a "false" impact crater doublet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, Martin; Schwarz, Winfried H.; Trieloff, Mario; Buchner, Elmar; Hopp, Jens; Tohver, Eric; Pesonen, Lauri J.; Lehtinen, Martti; Moilanen, Jarmo; Werner, Stephanie C.; Öhman, Teemu

    2016-05-01

    The two neighboring Suvasvesi North and South impact structures in central-east Finland have been discussed as a possible impact crater doublet produced by the impact of a binary asteroid. This study presents 40Ar/39Ar geochronologic data for impact melt rocks recovered from the drilling into the center of the Suvasvesi North impact structure and melt rock from glacially transported boulders linked to Suvasvesi South. 40Ar/39Ar step-heating analysis yielded two essentially flat age spectra indicating a Late Cretaceous age of ~85 Ma for the Suvasvesi North melt rock, whereas the Suvasvesi South melt sample gave a Neoproterozoic minimum (alteration) age of ~710 Ma. Although the statistical likelihood for two independent meteorite strikes in close proximity to each other is rather low, the remarkable difference in 40Ar/39Ar ages of >600 Myr for the two Suvasvesi impact melt samples is interpreted as evidence for two temporally separate, but geographically closely spaced, impacts into the Fennoscandian Shield. The Suvasvesi North and South impact structures are, thus, interpreted as a "false" crater doublet, similar to the larger East and West Clearwater Lake impact structures in Québec, Canada, recently shown to be unrelated. Our findings have implications for the reliable recognition of impact crater doublets and the apparent rate of binary asteroid impacts on Earth and other planetary bodies in the inner solar system.

  19. Origin of small pits in martian impact craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Joseph M.; Wilson, Lionel; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Hamilton, Christopher W.; Tornabene, Livio L.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a numerical model for the formation of the closely-spaced pits found in the thin, ejecta-related deposits superposed on the floors, interior terrace blocks, and near-rim ejecta blankets of well-preserved martian impact craters. Our model predicts the explosive degassing of water from this pitted material, which is assumed to originally be water-bearing, impact melt-rich breccia at the time of deposition. This process is analogous to what occurred in the fall-out suevite deposits at the Ries impact structure in Germany. At Ries, impact heating of water-bearing target material resulted in the rapid degassing of its water and other volatiles. The martian environment plays an important role in enhancing the effects of this degassing by increasing the flow-speed of the escaping gas. The high flow-rate of gas through particulate materials, such as suevite, tends to quickly form segregation channels or vent pipes, similar to those found in the Ries deposits. These pipes act as conduits for the efficient high-speed escape of the gas and small clasts that it entrains. Escaping gas and entrained clasts abraded and eroded the conduit walls, flaring them to form pits above a network of pipes.

  20. An object-based classification method for automatic detection of lunar impact craters from topographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamshi, Gasiganti T.; Martha, Tapas R.; Vinod Kumar, K.

    2016-05-01

    Identification of impact craters is a primary requirement to study past geological processes such as impact history. They are also used as proxies for measuring relative ages of various planetary or satellite bodies and help to understand the evolution of planetary surfaces. In this paper, we present a new method using object-based image analysis (OBIA) technique to detect impact craters of wide range of sizes from topographic data. Multiresolution image segmentation of digital terrain models (DTMs) available from the NASA's LRO mission was carried out to create objects. Subsequently, objects were classified into impact craters using shape and morphometric criteria resulting in 95% detection accuracy. The methodology developed in a training area in parts of Mare Imbrium in the form of a knowledge-based ruleset when applied in another area, detected impact craters with 90% accuracy. The minimum and maximum sizes (diameters) of impact craters detected in parts of Mare Imbrium by our method are 29 m and 1.5 km, respectively. Diameters of automatically detected impact craters show good correlation (R2 > 0.85) with the diameters of manually detected impact craters.

  1. Central ring structure identified in one of the world's best-preserved impact craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, A. C.; Niessen, F.; Kopsch, C.

    2006-03-01

    Seismic refraction and reflection data were acquired in 2000 and 2003 to study the morphology and sedimentary fill of the remote El'gygytgyn crater (Chukotka, northeastern Siberia; diameter 18 km). These data allow a first insight into the deeper structure of this unique impact crater. Wide-angle data from sonobuoys reveal a five-layer model: a water layer, two lacustrine sedimentary units that fill a bowl-shaped apparent crater morphology consisting of an upper layer of fallback breccia with P-wave velocities of ˜3000 m/s, and a lower layer of brecciated bedrock (velocities >3600 m/s). The lowermost layer shows a distinct anticline structure that, by analogy with other terrestrial and lunar craters of similar size, can be interpreted as a central ring structure. The El'gygytgyn crater exhibits a well-expressed morphology that is typical of craters formed in crystalline target rocks.

  2. Global Geometric Properties of Martian Impact Craters: A Preliminary Assessment Using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, J. B.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Schnetzler, C.; Frawley, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    Impact craters on Mars have been used to provide fundamental insights into the properties of the martian crust, the role of volatiles, the relative age of the surface, and on the physics of impact cratering in the Solar System. Before the three-dimensional information provided by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument which is currently operating in Mars orbit aboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), impact features were characterized morphologically using orbital images from Mariner 9 and Viking. Fresh-appearing craters were identified and measurements of their geometric properties were derived from various image-based methods. MOLA measurements can now provide a global sample of topographic cross-sections of martian impact features as small as approx. 2 km in diameter, to basin-scale features. We have previously examined MOLA cross-sections of Northern Hemisphere and North Polar Region impact features, but were unable to consider the global characteristics of these ubiquitous landforms. Here we present our preliminary assessment of the geometric properties of a globally-distributed sample of martian impact craters, most of which were sampled during the initial stages of the MGS mapping mission (i.e., the first 600 orbits). Our aim is to develop a framework for reconsidering theories concerning impact cratering in the martian environment. This first global analysis is focused upon topographically-fresh impact craters, defined here on the basis of MOLA topographic profiles that cross the central cavities of craters that can be observed in Viking-based MDIM global image mosaics. We have considered crater depths, rim heights, ejecta topologies, cross-sectional "shapes", and simple physical models for ejecta emplacement. To date (May, 1999), we have measured the geometric properties of over 1300 impact craters in the 2 to 350 km diameter size interval. A large fraction of these measured craters were sampled with cavity-center cross-sections during the first

  3. Dating a small impact crater: An age of Kaali crater (Estonia) based on charcoal emplaced within proximal ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losiak, A.; Wild, E. M.; Geppert, W. D.; Huber, M. S.; Jõeleht, A.; Kriiska, A.; Kulkov, A.; Paavel, K.; Pirkovic, I.; Plado, J.; Steier, P.; VäLja, R.; Wilk, J.; Wisniowski, T.; Zanetti, M.

    2016-04-01

    The estimates of the age of the Kaali impact structure (Saaremaa Island, Estonia) provided by different authors vary by as much as 6000 years, ranging from ~6400 to ~400 before current era (BCE). In this study, a new age is obtained based on 14C dating charred plant material within the proximal ejecta blanket, which makes it directly related to the impact structure, and not susceptible to potential reservoir effects. Our results show that the Kaali crater was most probably formed shortly after 1530-1450 BCE (3237 ± 10 14C yr BP). Saaremaa was already inhabited when the bolide hit the Earth, thus, the crater-forming event was probably witnessed by humans. There is, however, no evidence that this event caused significant change in the material culture (e.g., known archeological artifacts) or patterns of human habitation on Saaremaa.

  4. Preliminary Examination of Impact Craters on Al Foil from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, R.; Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination Team; 29,000 Stardust@home Dusters

    2011-12-01

    The Interstellar Dust Collector from the NASA Stardust mission provides an unprecedented opportunity for direct laboratory study of particles from the contemporary interstellar dust (ISD) stream in order to obtain such information as grain composition and microstructure. The collector is comprised of two collection media: silica aerogel tiles and Al foil strips. Preliminary examination (PE) of particles captured in each medium is on-going. To-date, four grains analyzed in situ in aerogel with synchrotron X-ray techniques show track trajectories and elemental composition that indicate a probable interstellar origin. In addition, we report here the discovery of one crater on an Al foil for which the residue elemental composition and crater shape are consistent with the impact of a grain of interstellar origin, although an interplanetary origin has not been ruled out. Automated mapping by SEM is the primary tool for identifi-cation of craters on the Al foils. A complete map of each foil requires collection of several thousand images at a resolution of ~ 50 nm/px. Automated software has been developed to identify crater candidates, but so far it has not replaced manual efforts. Identified candidates are then re-imaged at ~ 15 nm/px, for confirmation as impact craters. Fifteen foils have been imaged; crater identification is complete for eight, yielding 32 craters. The average areal density of craters is 9.7 cm-2, which extrapolates to ~1500 craters on the total foil collection area. Initial elemental analysis of residues in six craters has been performed with a combination of Auger spectroscopy, conventional, off-axis energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), on-axis, silicon drift-detector EDX. Additional analysis by TEM of the residue composition and crater morphology was obtained on FIB cross-sections of four of the craters. All craters contained detectable levels of Si and O. One crater was found to contain Mg, Si, O, Fe, Ni, S, Ca and Cr, indicative of an

  5. Cracking associated with micrometeoroid impact craters in anodized aluminum alloy clamps on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murr, Lawrence E.; Niou, Chorng S.; Quinones, Stella; Murr, Kyle S.

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is a reusable hollow-cylindrical satellite sustaining a total of 57 different experiments. The 130 sq m of spacecraft surface area included anodized 6061-T6 Al alloy bay frames and clamps for holding experiment trays in the bay areas. Attention is presently given to the micrometeoroid impact crater features observed on two tray clamps recovered from the LDEF leading-edge locations. It is found that even very subtle surface modifications in structural alloy anodizing can influence micrometeoroid impact crater cracking, notable radial cracking due to the ejecta-rim of the impact craters.

  6. Evidence for coeval Late Triassic terrestrial impacts from the Rochechouart (France) meteorite crater

    CERN Document Server

    Carporzen, L; Carporzen, Laurent; Gilder, Stuart A.

    2006-01-01

    High temperature impact melt breccias from the Rochechouart (France) meteorite crater record magnetization component with antipodal, normal and reverse polarities. The corresponding paleomagnetic pole for this component lies between the 220 Ma and 210 Ma reference poles on the Eurasian apparent polar wander path, consistent with the 214 $\\pm$ 8 Ma 40Ar/39Ar age of the crater. Late Triassic tectonic reconstructions of the Eurasian and North American plates place this pole within 95% confidence limits of the paleomagnetic pole from the Manicouagan (Canada) meteorite impact crater, which is dated at 214 $\\pm$ 1 Ma. Together, these observations reinforce the hypothesis of a Late Triassic, multiple meteorite impact event on Earth.

  7. Scaling of liquid-drop impact craters in wet granular media

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qianyun; Gao, Ming; Zhao, Runchen; Cheng, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Combining high-speed photography with laser profilometry, we study the dynamics and the morphology of liquid-drop impact cratering in wet granular media---a ubiquitous phenomenon relevant to many important geological, agricultural, and industrial processes. By systematically investigating important variables such as impact energy, the size of impinging drops and the degree of liquid saturation in granular beds, we uncover a novel scaling for the size of impact craters. We show that this scali...

  8. Small craters on the meteoroid and space debris impact experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, Donald H.

    1995-01-01

    Examination of 9.34 m(exp 2) of thick aluminum plates from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) using a 25X microscope revealed 4341 craters that were 0.1 mm in diameter or larger. The largest was 3 mm in diameter. Most were roughly hemispherical with lips that were raised above the original plate surface. The crater diameter measured was the diameter at the top of the raised lips. There was a large variation in the number density of craters around the three-axis gravity-gradient stabilized spacecraft. A model of the near-Earth meteoroid environment is presented which uses a meteoroid size distribution based on the crater size distribution on the space end of the LDEF. An argument is made that nearly all the craters on the space end must have been caused by meteoroids and that very few could have been caused by man-made orbital debris. However, no chemical analysis of impactor residue that will distinguish between meteoroids and man-made debris is yet available. A small area (0.0447 m(exp 2)) of one of the plates on the space end was scanned with a 200X microscope revealing 155 craters between 10 micron and 100 micron in diameter and 3 craters smaller than 10 micron. This data was used to extend the size distribution of meteoroids down to approximately 1 micron. New penetration equations developed by Alan Watts were used to relate crater dimensions to meteoroid size. The equations suggest that meteoroids must have a density near 2.5 g/cm(exp 3) to produce craters of the shape found on the LDEF. The near-Earth meteoroid model suggests that about 80 to 85 percent of the 100 micron to 1 mm diameter craters on the twelve peripheral rows of the LDEF were caused by meteoroids, leaving 15 to 20 percent to be caused by man-made orbital debris.

  9. Scaling of liquid-drop impact craters in wet granular media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianyun; Gao, Ming; Zhao, Runchen; Cheng, Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Combining high-speed photography with laser profilometry, we study the dynamics and the morphology of liquid-drop impact cratering in wet granular media-a ubiquitous phenomenon relevant to many important geological, agricultural, and industrial processes. By systematically investigating important variables such as impact energy, the size of impinging drops, and the degree of liquid saturation in granular beds, we uncover a scaling law for the size of impact craters. We show that this scaling can be explained by considering the balance between the inertia of impinging drops and the strength of impacted surface. Such a theoretical understanding confirms that the unique energy partition originally proposed for liquid-drop impact cratering in dry granular media also applies for impact cratering in wet granular media. Moreover, we demonstrate that compressive stresses, instead of shear stresses, control the process of granular impact cratering. Our study enriches the picture of generic granular impact cratering and sheds light on the familiar phenomena of raindrop impacts in granular media. PMID:26565233

  10. The detailed characterization of Martian impact craters from the 1/16 degree MOLA global topography grid

    OpenAIRE

    Wallis, D.; McBride, N.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a new project to obtain a global characterisation of Martian impact crater morphology from the 1/16 degree MOLA topography dataset. A new mathematical method applicable to both symmetric and asymmetric craters is used.

  11. Attenuation of Storm Surge Flooding By Wetlands in the Chesapeake Bay: An Integrated Geospatial Framework Evaluating Impacts to Critical Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, A.; Haddad, J.; Lawler, S.; Ferreira, C.

    2014-12-01

    Areas along the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries are extremely vulnerable to hurricane flooding, as evidenced by the costly effects and severe impacts of recent storms along the Virginia coast, such as Hurricane Isabel in 2003 and Hurricane Sandy in 2012. Coastal wetlands, in addition to their ecological importance, are expected to mitigate the impact of storm surge by acting as a natural protection against hurricane flooding. Quantifying such interactions helps to provide a sound scientific basis to support planning and decision making. Using storm surge flooding from various historical hurricanes, simulated using a coupled hydrodynamic wave model (ADCIRC-SWAN), we propose an integrated framework yielding a geospatial identification of the capacity of Chesapeake Bay wetlands to protect critical infrastructure. Spatial identification of Chesapeake Bay wetlands is derived from the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI), National Land Cover Database (NLCD), and the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP). Inventories of population and critical infrastructure are extracted from US Census block data and FEMA's HAZUS-Multi Hazard geodatabase. Geospatial and statistical analyses are carried out to develop a relationship between wetland land cover, hurricane flooding, population and infrastructure vulnerability. These analyses result in the identification and quantification of populations and infrastructure in flooded areas that lie within a reasonable buffer surrounding the identified wetlands. Our analysis thus produces a spatial perspective on the potential for wetlands to attenuate hurricane flood impacts in critical areas. Statistical analysis will support hypothesis testing to evaluate the benefits of wetlands from a flooding and storm-surge attenuation perspective. Results from geospatial analysis are used to identify where interactions with critical infrastructure are relevant in the Chesapeake Bay.

  12. Comparing Radar and Optical Data Sets of Lunar Impact Crater Ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickle, A. M.; Patterson, G.; Cahill, J.; Grier, J.

    2015-12-01

    Impact cratering is a primary weathering process of airless bodies and is the dominant method of redistributing material across the lunar surface. Crater ejecta blankets are a window into the impact cratering process and can provide important information on the properties of subsurface materials as well as surface evolution. Radar scattering information, in particular the circular polarization ratio (CPR), provides a useful means of investigating these properties. Using data returned from the Mini-RF instrument onboard NASA's LRO, we observe significant diversity in the CPR around young mare craters as a function of distance from the crater rim, regardless of crater size or relative age. Some commonalities in the scattering profiles are observed for all crater diameters: higher CPR values occur near the crater rim that decay with radial distance outward, larger craters have a higher CPR than smaller craters, and the overall shapes of the profiles are similar such that the main scattering characteristics of the studied craters can generally be grouped into three main categories. Comparing CPR profiles with data at other wavelengths provides additional insights and suggests two interesting results. The first is that comparisons of radar and optical data imply relationships between mare subsurface stratigraphy and structure and the relative size of the material found within the ejecta blanket. Of the examined craters, twelve have shelves of approximately constant CPR as well as discrete layers outcropping in the subsurface, and nine fall along a trend line when comparing shelf-width with thickness of subsurface layers. The second is that comparisons of radar data with other wavelengths may provide insights into the maturity of the surface. For example, some examined craters have laterally extensive, optically bright ejecta blankets suggesting that a region of rough, high-CPR material should be present near the crater rim, though this is not observed. Radar data is

  13. Understanding Spatial Statistics for Purposes of Identifying Non-Primary and Saturated Impact Crater Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, J. D.; Robbins, S. J.; Kirchoff, M. R.; Bierhaus, E. B.; Weaver, B. P.

    2015-05-01

    We discuss some traditional unidimensional summarization statistics and some newer spatial point statistical methods for understanding and identifying non-primary and saturated impact crater populations observed on a variety of solar system bodies.

  14. Numerical modeling of seismic anomalies at impact craters on a laboratory scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuennemann, K.; Grosse, C. U.; Hiermaier, S.; Gueldemeister, N.; Moser, D.; Durr, N.

    2011-12-01

    Almost all terrestrial impact craters exhibit a typical geophysical signature. The usually observed circular negative gravity anomaly and reduced seismic velocities in the vicinity of crater structures are presumably related to an approximately hemispherical zone underneath craters where rocks have experienced intense brittle plastic deformation and fracturing during formation (see Fig.1). In the framework of the "MEMIN" (multidisciplinary experimental and modeling impact crater research network) project we carried out hypervelocity cratering experiments at the Fraunhofer Institute for High-Speed Dynamics on a decimeter scale to study the spatiotemporal evolution of the damage zone using ultrasound, acoustic emission techniques, and numerical modeling of crater formation. 2.5-10 mm iron projectiles were shot at 2-5.5 km/s on dry and water-saturated sandstone targets. The target material was characterized before, during and after the impact with high spatial resolution acoustic techniques to detect the extent of the damage zone, the state of rocks therein and to record the growth of cracks. The ultrasound measurements are applied analog to seismic surveys at natural craters but used on a different - i.e. much smaller - scale. We compare the measured data with dynamic models of crater formation, shock, plastic and elastic wave propagation, and tensile/shear failure of rocks in the impacted sandstone blocks. The presence of porosity and pore water significantly affects the propagation of waves. In particular the crushing of pores due to shock compression has to be taken into account. We present preliminary results showing good agreement between experiments and numerical model. In a next step we plan to use the numerical models to upscale the results from laboratory dimensions to the scale of natural impact craters.

  15. Measured and Modeled Morphometry of Simple Impact Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, W. A.; Collins, G. S.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss the measured diameter dependence of well-preserved simple crater morphometry on Mars and compare with iSALE simulations. We also describe future work to fully characterize the dependence on impactor velocity and mass, and target properties.

  16. Impact Metamorphism of Sandstones at Amguid Crater, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoui, R.; Belhai, D.

    2016-08-01

    Amguid is a 450 m diameter sample crater; it is emplaced in Lower Devonian sandstones.We have carried out a petrographic study in order to investigate shock effects recorded in these sandstones and define shock stages in Amguid.

  17. Characterization of toxic impacts on living marine resources in tidal rivers of the Chesapeake Bay

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, M.H.; Hyland, J. L.; Key, P B; Wirth, E. F.; Balthis, W. L.; Cooksey, C.; K. Chung; Leight, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    In 1999, the Chesapeake Bay Program completed a survey of existing data on chemical contaminants and the potential for bioeffects in 38 tidal river systems of Chesapeake Bay. This review led to the identification of 20 areas for which there were insufficient data to adequately characterize the potential for contaminant bioeffects on the Bay’s living resources. The goal of the present study was to estimate the current status of ecological condition in five of these areas and thus help to...

  18. Chicxulub's Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary Twin Crater. Was There a Double Impact in the Yucatan Peninsula?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, A. Z.; Juarez, J. S.

    2004-05-01

    In 1980, Alvarez and co-authors proposed that the K/T extinctions were caused by the effects of a celestial body falling on Earth. After a long search for the impact site, the 1981 work by Penfield and Camargo on a 170 km structure in the Yucatan Peninsula got the attention of the specialists, and it was later proved that it was the crater created by the impact of that celestial body. New data suggests the existence of a second impact crater close to Chicxulub, both being of the same age and created by two fragments of the same celestial boby. A new magnetic map plotted as a color-coded shaded relief surface, reveals a feature not evident before: two interlaced ringed anomalies of about 100 and 50 km diameters, the larger one related to the magnetic signature of the Chicxulub Crater, and the second located at its E-SE edge. The 50 km anomaly, with morphology similar to Chicxulub's, is interpreted as also corresponding to an impact crater, centered at about 89 Deg. Long. W and 21 Deg. Lat. N, close to the city of Izamal. The anomaly size indicates that the diameter of the IZAMAL CRATER is about 85 km. The Chicxulub Crater, being buried under several hundred meters of Tertiary carbonate rocks, is not visible from the surface or from space; although some surface expression of its morphology has been reported. The best known is the ring of cenotes (sink holes) at the crater's rim, visible on satellite images and photographs. The JPL/NASA image PIA03379, is a color-coded shaded relief image of terrain elevation in which the topography was exagerated to highlight the Chicxulub Crater rim. On this image, a semi circular arc of dark spots is also visible immediately to the E-SE of the Chicxulub Crater rim. These spots are interpreted as large irregular karstic depressions, similar to the ones along the cenote ring of Chicxulub. On the evidence of the spatial relationship of the magnetic anomalies and the satellite image features, we tested how well the proposed Izamal

  19. Contamination assessment in microbiological sampling of the Eyreville core, Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronstal, A.L.; Voytek, M.A.; Kirshtein, J.D.; Von der, Heyde; Lowit, M.D.; Cockell, C.S.

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the deep subsurface biosphere is limited due to difficulties in recovering materials. Deep drilling projects provide access to the subsurface; however, contamination introduced during drilling poses a major obstacle in obtaining clean samples. To monitor contamination during the 2005 International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP)-U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deep drilling of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure, four methods were utilized. Fluorescent microspheres were used to mimic the ability of contaminant cells to enter samples through fractures in the core material during retrieval. Drilling mud was infused with a chemical tracer (Halon 1211) in order to monitor penetration of mud into cores. Pore water from samples was examined using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fl uorescence spectroscopy to characterize dissolved organic carbon (DOC) present at various depths. DOC signatures at depth were compared to signatures from drilling mud in order to identify potential contamination. Finally, microbial contaminants present in drilling mud were identified through 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) clone libraries and compared to species cultured from core samples. Together, these methods allowed us to categorize the recovered core samples according to the likelihood of contamination. Twenty-two of the 47 subcores that were retrieved were free of contamination by all the methods used and were subsequently used for microbiological culture and culture-independent analysis. Our approach provides a comprehensive assessment of both particulate and dissolved contaminants that could be applied to any environment with low biomass. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  20. Ejecta velocity distribution of impact craters formed on quartz sand: Effect of projectile density on crater scaling law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujido, Sayaka; Arakawa, Masahiko; Suzuki, Ayako I.; Yasui, Minami

    2015-12-01

    In order to clarify the effects of projectile density on ejecta velocity distributions for a granular target, impact cratering experiments on a quartz sand target were conducted by using eight types of projectiles with different densities ranging from 11 g cm-3 to 1.1 g cm-3, which were launched at about 200 m s-1 from a vertical gas gun at Kobe University. The scaling law of crater size, the ejection angle of ejecta grains, and the angle of the ejecta curtain were also investigated. The ejecta velocity distribution obtained from each projectile was well described by the π-scaling theory of v0/√{gR} =k2(x0/R)-1/μ, where v0, g, R and x0 are the ejection velocity, gravitational acceleration, crater radius and ejection position, respectively, and k2 and μ are constants mostly depending on target material properties (Housen, K.R., Holsapple, K.A. [2011]. Icarus 211, 856-875). The value of k2 was found to be almost constant at 0.7 for all projectiles except for the nylon projectile, while μ increased with the projectile density, from 0.43 for the low-density projectile to 0.6-0.7 for the high-density projectile. On the other hand, the π-scaling theory for crater size gave a μ value of 0.57, which was close to the average of the μ values obtained from ejecta velocity distributions. The ejection angle, θ, of each grain decreased slightly with distance, from higher than 45° near the impact point to 30-40° at 0.6 R. The ejecta curtain angle is controlled by the two elementary processes of ejecta velocity distribution and ejection angle; it gradually increased from 52° to 63° with the increase of the projectile density. The comparison of our experimental results with the theoretical model of the crater excavation flow known as the Z-model revealed that the relationship between μ and θ obtained by our experiments could not be described by the Z-model (Maxwell, D.E. [1977]. In: Roddy, D.J., Pepin, R.O., Merrill, R.B. (Eds.), Impact and Explosion Cratering

  1. Mossbauer studies on impactites from Lonar impact crater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Verma, H.C.; Misra, S.; ShyamPrasad, M.; Bijlani, N.; Tripathi, A.; Newsom, H.

    codes and short descriptions of the samples studied Sample code Description Source GE1 Glassy material of size ∼ 1 cm Prof N Bhandari, Physical from the northern side Research Laboratory, India of the Rim GE2 Glassy material from some distance away from... from the Lonar crater region and one sample from the Ries crater are studied in this work using Mössbauer spectroscopy. The sample Codes and their short descriptions are given in Table 1. The samples GE1, GE2 and GE3 are ejecta material in the form...

  2. Experimental impact cratering provides ground truth data for understanding planetary-scale collision processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelchau, Michael H.; Deutsch, Alex; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Impact cratering is generally accepted as one of the primary processes that shape planetary surfaces in the solar system. While post-impact analysis of craters by remote sensing or field work gives many insights into this process, impact cratering experiments have several advantages for impact research: 1) excavation and ejection processes can be directly observed, 2) physical parameters of the experiment are defined and can be varied, and 3) cratered target material can be analyzed post-impact in an unaltered, uneroded state. The main goal of the MEMIN project is to comprehensively quantify impact processes by conducting a stringently controlled experimental impact cratering campaign on the meso-scale with a multidisciplinary analytical approach. As a unique feature we use two-stage light gas guns capable of producing impact craters in the decimeter size-range in solid rocks that, in turn, allow detailed spatial analysis of petrophysical, structural, and geochemical changes in target rocks and ejecta. In total, we have carried out 24 experiments at the facilities of the Fraunhofer EMI, Freiburg - Germany. Steel, aluminum, and iron meteorite projectiles ranging in diameter from 2.5 to 12 mm were accelerated to velocities ranging from 2.5 to 7.8 km/s. Targets were solid rocks, namely sandstone, quartzite and tuff that were either dry or saturated with water. In the experimental setup, high speed framing cameras monitored the impact process, ultrasound sensors were attached to the target to record the passage of the shock wave, and special particle catchers were positioned opposite of the target surface to capture the ejected target and projectile material. In addition to the cratering experiments, planar shock recovery experiments were performed on the target material, and numerical models of the cratering process were developed. The experiments resulted in craters with diameters up to 40 cm, which is unique in laboratory cratering research. Target porosity

  3. Grazing Impacts Upon Earth's Surface: Towards an Understanding of the Rio Cuarto Crater Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, Martin

    2014-10-01

    The origin of the Rio Cuarto crater field, Argentina has been widely debated since the early 1990s when it was first brought to public attention. In a binary on-off sense, however, the craters are either of a terrestrial origin or they formed via a large asteroid impact. While there are distinct arguments in favour of the former option being the correct interpretation, it is the latter possibility that is principally investigated here, and five distinct impact formation models are described. Of the impact scenarios it is found that the most workable model, although based upon a set of fine-tuned initial conditions, is that in which a large, 100-150-m initial diameter asteroid, entered Earth's atmosphere on a shallow angle path that resulted in temporary capture. In this specific situation a multiple-thousand kilometer long flight path enables the asteroid to survive atmospheric passage, without suffering significant fragmentation, and to impact the ground as a largely coherent mass. Although the odds against such an impact occurring are extremely small, the crater field may nonetheless be interpreted as having potentially formed via a very low-angle, smaller than 5° to the horizon, impact with a ground contact speed of order 5 km/s. Under this scenario, as originally suggested by Schultz and Lianza (Nature 355:234, 1992), the largest of the craters (crater A) in the Rio Cuarto structure was produced in the initial ground impact, and the additional, smaller craters are interpreted as being formed through the down-range transport of decapitated impactor material and crater A ejecta.

  4. Identification of Possible Interstellar Dust Impact Craters on Stardust Foil I033N,1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, A.; ISPE Team; 29,000 Stardust@home Dusters

    2011-12-01

    The Interstellar Dust Collector onboard NASA's Stardust Mission - the first to return solid extraterrestrial material to Earth from beyond the Moon - was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total of 229 days prior to the spacecraft's return in 2006 [1]. Aluminum foils and aerogel tiles on the collector may have captured the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust. Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) focuses in part on crater identification and analysis of residue within the craters to determine the nature and origin of the impacting particles. Thus far, ISPE has focused on nine foils and found a total of 20 craters. The number density of impact craters on the foils exceeds by far estimates made from interstellar flux calculations [2]. To identify craters, foil I1033N,1 was scanned with the Field Museum's Evo 60 Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) at a resolution of 52 nm/pixel with a 15 kV and 170-240 pA beam. Contamination was monitored according to the ISPE protocol: four 4 μm × 3 μm areas of C layers of different thicknesses on a Stardust-type Al foil were irradiated 20 times for 50 s each, while the C and Al signals were recorded with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The C/Al ratio did not increase after 20 repetitions on each of the four areas. The same experiment repeated 7 months later yielded identical results. Thus, analysis with the SEM results in no detectable contamination. Crater candidates were manually selected from SEM images, then reimaged at higher resolution (17 nm/pixel) in order to eliminate false detections. The foil was then sent to Washington University for Auger Nanoprobe elemental analysis of crater 11_175 (diam. 1.1 μm), and to the Naval Research Laboratory for focused ion beam work and transmission electron microscopy and EDS. Twelve crater candidates (diam. 0.28 - 1.1 μm), both elliptical and circular, were identified. The number density of craters on foil 1033N is 15.8 cm^-2. Auger measurements

  5. Asteroid Impacts, Crater Scaling Laws, and a Proposed Younger Age for Venus's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottke, William; Ghent, Rebecca; Mazrouei, Sara; Robbins, Stuart; Vokrouhlicky, David

    2015-11-01

    A fascinating on-going debate concerns the asteroid sizes needed to form certain large craters. For example, numerical hydrocode models predict that ~12-14 km and ~8 km diameter asteroids are needed to produce craters like Chicxulub (~180 km) and Popigai (~100 km), respectively. The abundance of extraterrestrial Ir/Os measured at well-characterized impact boundaries on land and in oceanic cores, however, predict far smaller projectiles, 4-6 km and 2.5-4 km, respectively (e.g., Paquay et al. 2014; F. Kyte, pers. comm). To test who might be right by proxy, we transformed the near-Earth object (NEO) size distribution (Harris & D'Abramo 2015), where > 90% of the D > 1 km asteroids are known, into a model crater size distribution and compared it to the distribution of D > 20 km craters formed on the Moon, Mars, and Venus over the last ~1-3 Gyr. Here we kept things simple and assumed that f described the ratio between all crater and asteroid diameters of interest (i.e., f = D_crater / D_proj).To our surprise, we found f ~ 23-26 produced excellent matches for the crater size distributions on the Moon, Mars, and Venus, despite their differences in gravity, surface properties, impact velocities, etc. These same values work well for the Earth as well. Consider that terrestrial crater production rates derived by Shoemaker (1998) indicate 340 +/- 170 D > 20 km craters formed over the last 120 Myr. Using f = 25, we get the same value; a D > 0.8 km asteroid makes a D > 20 km crater, and they hit Earth every 0.35 Myr on average (e.g., Bottke et al. 2002), for a total of ~340 over 120 Myr. Accordingly, we predict Chicxulub and Popigai were made by D ~ 7 and D ~ 4 km asteroids, respectively, values close to their predicted sizes from Ir/Os measurements. This result also potentially explains why Chicxulub formed ~65 Myr ago; the interval between D ~ 7 km impacts on Earth is close to this rate.The NEO model by Bottke et al. (2002) also suggests asteroids hit Venus at roughly the same

  6. Crustal structure of the Chicxulub Impact crater imaged with magnetotelluric exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Martyn; Enriquez, Oscar Campos; Belmonte, Salvador; Arzate, Jorge; Bedrosian, Paul

    2002-08-01

    The electrical resistivity structure of the Chicxulub Impact crater has been imaged using broadband magnetotelluric exploration. A 1-2 km thick sequence of conductive Tertiary sedimentary rocks was imaged within the crater. The shallow resistivity of this layer increases across the cenote ring. This is primarily due to a decrease in porosity, although the groundwater composition may have some effect. While this layer reduces the sensitivity of MT, several features can be discerned beneath it. In the center of the crater the structural high is imaged as a region of high resistivity. In the outer part of the crater, lower resistivities in the upper crust may be due to mineralization or hydrothermal alteration.

  7. Martian Polar Impact Craters: A Preliminary Assessment Using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Garvin, J. B.

    1999-01-01

    Our knowledge of the age of the layered polar deposits and their activity in the volatile cycling and climate history of Mars is based to a large extent on their apparent ages as determined from crater counts. Interpretation of the polar stratigraphy (in terms of climate change) is complicated by reported differences in the ages of the northern and southern layered deposits. The north polar residual ice deposits are thought to be relatively young, based on the reported lack of any fresh impact craters in Viking Orbiter Images. Herkenhoff et al., report no craters at all on the North polar layered deposits or ice cap, and placed an upper bound on the surface age (or, alternatively, the vertical resurfacing rate) of 100 thousand years to 10 million years, suggesting that the north polar region is an active resurfacing site. In contrast, the southern polar region was found to have at least 15 impact craters in the layered deposits and cap. Plaut et al, concluded that the surface was less than or = 120 million years old. This reported age difference factor of 100 to 1000 increases complexity in climate and volatile modeling. Recent MOLA results for the topography of the northern polar cap document a handful or more of possible craters, which could result in revised age or resurfacing estimates for the northern cap. This study is a preliminary look at putative craters in both polar caps. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Determination of impact crater size-frequency distributions in GIS environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneissl, Thomas; van Gasselt, Stephan; Neukum, Gerhard

    2010-05-01

    Analysis of crater size-frequency distributions (CSFD) of impact craters on planetary surfaces is a well-established method to derive absolute ages on the basis of remotelysensed image data. Although modelling approaches and the derivation of absolute ages from a given CSFD have been described in considerable depth since the late 1960s, there is no standardized methodology and guideline for measuring impact-crater diameters and area sizes that are both needed in order to determine absolute ages in a correct way. Distortions of distances (i.e., diameters) and areas within different map projections are considerable error sources within this measurement phase. In order to address that problem and to minimize such errors, a software extension for ESRI's ArcMap (ArcGIS) has been developed where CSFDs on planetary surfaces can be measured independently of image and data frame map projections and which can be theoretically transferred to every GI system capable of working with different map projections. Using this new approach each digitized impact crater is internally projected to a stereographic map projection with the crater's central-point set as the projection center. In this projection the circle is defined without any distortion of its shape (i.e., conformality). Using a sinusoidal map projection with a center longitude set to the crater's centralpoint, the diameter of the impact crater is measured along this central meridian which is true-scale and does not show any distortion. The crater is re-projected to the map projection of the current data frame and stored as vector geometry with attributes (shapefile). Output of this workflow comprises correct impact-crater diameters and area sizes in sinusoidal map projections and can be used for further processing, e.g., absolute age determinations. For GIS-based measurements we strongly recommend our procedure to be the standardised methodology to determine CSFD on planetary surfaces in order to minimize map distortion

  9. Impact Craters on Earth: Lessons for Understanding Martian Geological Materials and Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinski, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Impact cratering is one of the most ubiquitous geological processes in the Solar System and has had a significant influence on the geological evolution of Mars. Unlike the Moon and Mercury, the Martian impact cratering record is notably diverse, which is interpreted to reflect interactions during the impact process with target volatiles and/or the atmosphere. The Earth also possesses a volatile-rich crust and an atmosphere and so is one of the best analogues for understanding the effects of impact cratering on Mars. Furthermore, fieldwork at terrestrial craters and analysis of samples is critical to ground-truth observations made based on remote sensing data from Martian orbiters, landers, and rovers. In recent years, the effect of target lithology on various aspects of the impact cratering process has emerged as a major research topic. On Mars, volatiles have been invoked to be the primary factor influencing the morphology of ejecta deposits - e.g., the formation of single-, double- and multiple-layered ejecta deposits - and central uplifts - e.g., the formation of so-called "central pit" craters. Studies of craters on Earth have also shown that volatiles complicate the identification of impactites - i.e., rocks produced and/or affected by impact cratering. Identifying impactites on Earth is challenging, often requiring intensive and multi-technique laboratory analysis of hand specimens. As such, it is even more challenging to recognize such materials in remote datasets. Here, observations from the Haughton (d = 23 km; Canada), Ries (d = 24 km; Germany), Mistastin (d = 28 km; Canada), Tunnunik, (d = 28 km; Canada), and West Clearwater Lake (d = 36 km; Canada) impact structures are presented. First, it is shown that some impactites mimic intrusive, volcanic, volcanoclastic and in some cases sedimentary clastic rocks. Care should, therefore, be taken in the identification of seemingly unusual igneous rocks at rover landing sites as they may represent impact melt

  10. Distribution, Origin, and Realtions to Flow of Salty Ground Water Along the Western Margin of the Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure in Eastern Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, R.; Bruce, S.

    2002-05-01

    The Chesapeake Bay impact structure closely coincides with parts of some aquifers in eastern Virginia that contain saltwater as much as 30 miles landward of the coast. The impact structure has thereby been inferred to play some role in controlling the presence of this "inland saltwater wedge", which formed under unstressed conditions prior to present-day ground-water withdrawals. That the impact severely disrupted the previously stratified sediments casts doubt on conceptualizations of a regionally contiguous, vertically layered system of aquifers and confining units. In addition, large and increasing ground-water withdrawals have resulted in continuing water-level declines and altered flow directions that create the potential for saltwater intrusion. Hence, the origin and emplacement of the saltwater must be known to predict its reaction to stresses being placed upon the flow system. Specific conductances and concentrations of chloride in ground water along the western margin of the impact structure reflect a transitional interface between freshwater to the west and seawater to the east that coincides aerially with the margin of the impact structure. Ratios of bromide to chloride and chlorine-36 to total chloride, and of stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes, indicate chloride to have originated primarily from mixing of freshwater and seawater across the interface. In addition, deep ground water east of the interface having specific conductances which exceed that of seawater likely resulted from partial evaporation of seawater, either (1) in restricted coastal environments under arid conditions, (2) by rapid vaporization caused by the impact event, and (or) (3) by residual heat and associated hydrothermal activity following the impact. Mixing of freshwater and seawater has been theorized to take place in a "differential flushing" manner that left residual seawater to form the saltwater wedge. Seawater emplaced during inundation of the land surface persisted around

  11. Planar deformation features in quartz from impact-produced polymict breccia of the Xiuyan crater, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Koeberl, Christian; Xiao, Wansheng; Xie, Xiande; Tan, Dayong

    2011-05-01

    The 1.8 km-diameter Xiuyan crater is an impact structure in northeastern China, exposed in a Proterozoic metamorphic rock complex. The major rocks of the crater are composed of granulite, hornblendite, gneiss, tremolite marble, and marble. The bottom at the center of the crater covers about 100 m thick lacustrine sediments underlain by 188 m thick crater-fill breccia. A layer of polymict breccia composed of clasts of granulite, gneiss, hornblendite, and fragments of glass as well as clastic matrix, occurs near the base, in the depth interval from 260 to 295 m. An investigation in quartz from the polymict breccia in the crater-fill units reveals abundant planar deformation features (PDFs). Quartz with multiple sets of PDFs is found in clasts of granulite that consist of mainly quartz and feldspar, and in fine-grained matrix of the impact-produced polymict breccia. A universal stage was used to measure the orientation of PDFs in 70 grains of quartz from five thin sections made from the clasts of granulite of polymict breccia recovered at the depth of 290 m. Forty-four percent of the quartz grains contain three sets of PDFs, and another 40% contain two sets of PDFs. The most abundant PDFs are rhombohedron forms of ?, ?, and ? with frequency of 33.5, 22.3, and 9.6%, respectively. A predominant PDF form of ? in quartz suggests a shock pressure >20 GPa. The occurrence of PDFs in quartz from the polymict breccia provides crucial evidence for shock metamorphism of target rocks and confirms the impact origin of this crater, which thus appears to be the first confirmed impact crater in China.

  12. Geomorphologic mapping of the lunar crater Tycho and its impact melt deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, T.; van der Bogert, C. H.; Hiesinger, H.

    2016-07-01

    Using SELENE/Kaguya Terrain Camera and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) data, we produced a new, high-resolution (10 m/pixel), geomorphological and impact melt distribution map for the lunar crater Tycho. The distal ejecta blanket and crater rays were investigated using LROC wide-angle camera (WAC) data (100 m/pixel), while the fine-scale morphologies of individual units were documented using high resolution (∼0.5 m/pixel) LROC narrow-angle camera (NAC) frames. In particular, Tycho shows a large coherent melt sheet on the crater floor, melt pools and flows along the terraced walls, and melt pools on the continuous ejecta blanket. The crater floor of Tycho exhibits three distinct units, distinguishable by their elevation and hummocky surface morphology. The distribution of impact melt pools and ejecta, as well as topographic asymmetries, support the formation of Tycho as an oblique impact from the W-SW. The asymmetric ejecta blanket, significantly reduced melt emplacement uprange, and the depressed uprange crater rim at Tycho suggest an impact angle of ∼25-45°.

  13. Impact cratering of the terrestrial planets and the Moon during the giant planet instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, Fernando Virgilio; Nesvorny, David; Bottke, William

    2016-10-01

    The dynamical instability of the giant planets and the planetesimal driven migration both have major implications for the crater record of the terrestrial planets and the Moon. The crater record can thus provide contraints to the behavior of the planets in the early Solar System. Here we determine the impact fluxes and the crater production rates on the terrestrial planets and the Moon from impactors originating in the primordial asteroid main belt (2.1 to 3.2 au) and the E-belt (1.5 to 2.1 au - Bottke et al. 2012). We determine the impact flux over the age of the Solar System, with particular focus on the instability of the giant planets in the jumping Jupiter model. We start with a population of asteroids uniformly distributed in the orbital parameters space, and numerically evolve them as test particles under the gravitational perturbations of the giant and terrestrial planets. We test the effects on this population due to different jumping Jupiter evolutions (the idealized jump as in Bottke et al. 2012 or models taken from Nesvorny & Morbidelli 2012). The number of impacts is determined by applying Opik's theory. We compute the impact rates on different targets (Mercury, Venus, Earth, Moon, and Mars) and from different source regions in the asteroid belt (E-belt, inner belt, outer belt). By properly calibrating the impact rates, and using crater scaling laws, we estimate the number and size distribution of craters. We show how the impact flux and crater production rates depend on the different parameters of the model such as the initial orbital distribution of the asteroids, time of the instability, different evolution of the planets, initial size distribution of the impactors, etc.

  14. Secondary submicrometer impact cratering on the surface of asteroid 25143 Itokawa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Dennis; Yakame, Shogo; Karouji, Yuzuru; Uesugi, Masayuki; Langenhorst, Falko

    2016-09-01

    Particle RA-QD02-0265 returned by the Hayabusa spacecraft from near-Earth asteroid 25143 Itokawa displayed a unique abundance of submicrometer-sized (≤500 nm) impact craters, which are rarely observed among the Hayabusa samples. The particle consists of intensely twinned diopside that was subjected to a large-scale shock event before exposure to the space environment on the surface of 25143 Itokawa. Intense (sub-)micrometer-scale impact cratering may suggest a long surface exposure and, hence, a long residence time of regolith material on the surface of small asteroids, bearing implications for the dynamical evolution of these bodies. However, our combined FE-SEM and FIB/TEM study shows that the degree of solar wind-induced space weathering and the accumulation of solar flare tracks are not exceptionally different from other Hayabusa particles with surface exposure ages estimated to be less than 1 ka. A 500 nm wide crater on the surface of RA-QD02-0265 exhibits microstructural damage to a depth of 400 nm below its floor and contains residues of Fe-Ni metal, excluding a formation by space craft exhausts or curatorial handling. The geometrical clustering among the 15 craters is unlikely random, and we conclude that the craters have formed through the impacts of secondary projectiles (at least partially Fe-Ni metal) created in a nearby (micro-)impact event. Besides structural damage by the solar wind and deposition of impact-generated melts and vapors, secondary impact cratering on the submicrometer-scale is another potential mechanism to modify the spectral properties of individual regolith grains. The lack of extensively exposed regolith grains supports a dynamic regolith on the surface of 25143 Itokawa.

  15. Large rock slides in impact craters on the Moon and Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Maria Teresa; Xiao, Zhiyong; Komatsu, Goro; Peruccacci, Silvia; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2015-11-01

    Impact craters are the most common surface features on the Moon and Mercury. On these two bodies, we recognized and mapped large landslides on the walls of impact craters. Through visual inspection of high-resolution imagery, we compiled an inventory of 60 landslides on the Moon and a second inventory of 58 landslides on Mercury. Adopting categories used to catalog terrestrial mass movements, we classified the landslides on the Moon and Mercury as rock slides. We determined the probability density distribution of their planimetric area, and we compared the distributions with similar distributions for terrestrial and martian landslides using data from the literature. We found that rock slides mapped in impact craters on the Moon are, on average, larger than analogous rock slides on Mercury. The relationship between the area of the individual rock slides and the area of the hosting crater suggests that rock slides on Mercury initiate in smaller craters. We hypothesize that the above findings are an effect of the weaker surface gravity of the Moon compared to that of Mercury and/or an effect of the rock material properties.

  16. Numerical modeling of an impact-induced hydrothermal system at the Sudbury crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, Oleg; Kring, David A.

    2004-10-01

    Large impact events, like the one that formed the Sudbury crater in Ontario, Canada, at 1.85 Ga, significantly increase the temperature of target rocks. The heat sources generated by such an impact event can drive the circulation of groundwater, establishing a hydrothermal system. We report on the results of numerical modeling of postimpact cooling with and without the presence of water at the Sudbury crater. A hydrothermal system is initiated in the annular trough between the peak ring and final crater rim, perhaps venting through faults that bound blocks of the crust in the modification zone of the crater. Although circulation through the overlying breccias may occur in the center of the crater, the central melt sheet is initially impermeable to circulating fluids. By ~105 years the central melt sheet crystallizes and partially cools, allowing fluids to flow through it. Host rock permeability is the main factor affecting fluid circulation and lifetimes of hydrothermal systems. High permeabilities lead to a rapid system cooling, while lower permeabilities allow a steady transport of hot fluids to the surface, resulting in high surface temperatures for longer periods of time than cooling by conduction alone. The simulations presented in this paper show that a hydrothermal system at a Sudbury-sized impact crater can remain active for several hundred thousand to several million years, depending on assumed permeability. These results suggest that a hydrothermal system induced by an impact event can remain active for sufficiently long periods of time to be biologically significant, supporting the idea that impact events may have played an important biological role, especially early in Earth's history.

  17. Microbial mats of the Tswaing impact crater: results of a South African exobiology expedition and implications for the search for biological molecules on Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Cockell, C. S.; Brandt, D. (Dieter); Hand, K.; Lee, P C

    2001-01-01

    We describe microbial mats from the Tswaing impact crater in South Africa. The mats provide insights into the unique biological characteristics of impact craters and can help strategies for the search for biomolecules on Mars.

  18. An Approach to Understanding Complex Socio-Economic Impacts and Responses to Climate Disruption in the Chesapeake Bay Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, R. K.; Nix, M.; Ihde, A. G.; Paxton, L. J.; Weiss, M.; Simpkins, S.; Fountain, G. H.; APl GAIA Team

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we describe the application of a proven methodology for modeling the complex social and economic interactions of a system under stress to the regional issues that are tied to global climate disruption. Under the auspices of the GAIA project (http://gaia.jhuapl.edu), we have investigated simulating the complex interplay between climate, politics, society, industry, and the environment in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed and associated geographic areas of Maryland, Virginia, and Pennsylvania. This Chesapeake Bay simulation draws on interrelated geophysical and climate models to support decision-making analysis about the Bay. In addition to physical models, however, human activity is also incorporated via input and output calculations. For example, policy implications are modeled in relation to business activities surrounding fishing, farming, industry and manufacturing, land development, and tourism. This approach fosters collaboration among subject matter experts to advance a more complete understanding of the regional impacts of climate change. Simulated interactive competition, in which teams of experts are assigned conflicting objectives in a controlled environment, allow for subject exploration which avoids trivial solutions that neglect the possible responses of affected parties. Results include improved planning, the anticipation of areas of conflict or high risk, and the increased likelihood of developing mutually acceptable solutions.

  19. Lunar Impact Basins: Stratigraphy, Sequence and Ages from Superposed Impact Crater Populations Measured from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.; Kadish, S. J.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-01-01

    Impact basin formation is a fundamental process in the evolution of the Moon and records the history of impactors in the early solar system. In order to assess the stratigraphy, sequence, and ages of impact basins and the impactor population as a function of time, we have used topography from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to measure the superposed impact crater size-frequency distributions for 30 lunar basins (D = 300 km). These data generally support the widely used Wilhelms sequence of lunar basins, although we find significantly higher densities of superposed craters on many lunar basins than derived by Wilhelms (50% higher densities). Our data also provide new insight into the timing of the transition between distinct crater populations characteristic of ancient and young lunar terrains. The transition from a lunar impact flux dominated by Population 1 to Population 2 occurred before the mid-Nectarian. This is before the end of the period of rapid cratering, and potentially before the end of the hypothesized Late Heavy Bombardment. LOLA-derived crater densities also suggest that many Pre-Nectarian basins, such as South Pole-Aitken, have been cratered to saturation equilibrium. Finally, both crater counts and stratigraphic observations based on LOLA data are applicable to specific basin stratigraphic problems of interest; for example, using these data, we suggest that Serenitatis is older than Nectaris, and Humboldtianum is younger than Crisium. Sample return missions to specific basins can anchor these measurements to a Pre-Imbrian absolute chronology.

  20. Experimental Study on Impact Craters Formed on Basalt Target Covered with Weak Mortar Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, M.; Dohi, K.; Okamoto, C.; Hasegawa, S.

    2011-03-01

    High-velocity impact experiments on layered targets were conducted to investigate the formation mechanism of tiny complex crates with the size less than 1 km found on the Moon. Then the crater morphology was found to change with the upper layer thickness.

  1. A Simple Method Enabling Students to Model Impact Cratering from 0° to 90°.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgener, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    A simple, inexpensive method to produce craters with impact angles ranging from 0° to 90° is presented. It utilizes low speed pellet guns and soft clay. Varying the hardness of the clay and speed of the pellets allows a wide range of experiments.

  2. Tenoumer impact crater, Mauritania: Impact melt genesis from a lithologically diverse target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze, Dina Simona; Jourdan, Fred; Hecht, Lutz; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Schmitt, Ralf-Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Impact melt rocks from the 1.9 km diameter, simple bowl-shaped Tenoumer impact crater in Mauritania have been analyzed chemically and petrologically. They are heterogeneous and can be subdivided into three types based on melt matrix color, occurrence of lithic clast components, amount of vesiculation (melt degassing), different proportions of carbonate melt mingled into silicate melt, and bulk rock chemical composition. These heterogeneities have two main causes (1) due to the small size of the impact crater, there was probably no coherent melt pool where a homogeneous mixture of melts, derived from different target lithologies, could be created; and (2) melt rock heterogeneity occurring at the thin section scale is due to fast cooling during and after the dynamic ejection and emplacement process. The overall period of crystal growth from these diverse melts was extremely short, which provides a further indication that complete chemical equilibration of the phases could not be achieved in such short time. Melt mixing processes involved in the generation of impact melts are, thus, recorded in nonequilibrium growth features. Variable mixing processes between chemically different melt phases and the formation of hybrid melts can be observed even at millimeter scales. Due to extreme cooling rates, different mixing and mingling stages are preserved in the varied parageneses of matrix minerals and in the mineral chemistry of microlites. 40Ar39Ar step-heating chronology on specimens from three melt rock samples yielded five concordant inverse isochron ages. The inverse isochron plots show that minute amounts of inherited 40Ar* are present in the system. We calculated a weighted mean age of 1.57 ± 0.14 Ma for these new results. This preferred age represents a refinement from the previous range of 21 ka to 2.5 Ma ages based on K/Ar and fission track dating.

  3. Roter Kamm impact crater, Namibia: Geochemistry of basement rocks and breccias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Koeberl, Christian; Bishop, Janice

    1994-06-01

    The Roter Kamm crater in the southern Namib Desert has previously been identified as an impact structure on the basis of crater morphology and the presence of impact melt breccias which contain shock metamorphosed quartz and lithic clasts. To better define the variety of target rocks and breccias, we studied the petrography and chemical composition of a new suite of twenty-eight basement and breccia samples from the Roter Kamm crater. Based on chemical data for target lithologies and breccias we suggest that the crater was formed in a two-layer target region: an upper layer of Gariep metasediments (schist, marble, ± quartzite and sandstone) overlying the crystalline basement of the Namaqualand Metamorphic Complex. The basement was also heavily intruded by coarse-grained quartz veins and quartz- and quartz-feldspar pegmatites. The clast population in the melt breccias indicates that impact-induced melting involved mainly metasedimentary target rocks, with rarely detected contributions from pegmatite and granite/granodiorite. Three varieties of melt breccias can be defined: (1) "schistose," (2) quartzitic melt breccias, (3) "true" impact melt breccias. These melt breccia types are chemically heterogeneous, and even the impact melt breccias may have been produced in situ and not from a coherent melt body. The shapes of the schistose melt breccias, previously thought to be ejected impact breccias, are most likely caused by erosion, and these breccias are now interpreted to be locally derived. The crater basement as exposed at the rim was structurally severely affected and, at least locally, considerable thermal energy was generated during formation of large volumes of cataclastic, mylonitic, and pseudotachylitic breccias. Analyses of mylonite and pseudotachylites from the crater rim, as well as their respective host rocks, show that these breccias were mainly formed from local material. Analyses of pseudotachylite-like breccias indicate that these possible friction

  4. Constraining the Origin of Impact Craters on Al Foils from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Rhonda M.; Achilles, Cheri; Allen, Carlton; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, Sasa; Bassim, Nabil; Bastien, Ron S.; Bechtel, H. A.; Borg, Janet; Brenker, Frank E.; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Butterworth, Anna L.; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M.; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Flynn, George; Fougeray, Patrick; Frank, David; Sandford, Scott A.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary examination (PE) of the aerogel tiles and Al foils from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector has revealed multiple impact features. Some are most likely due to primary impacts of interstellar dust (ISD) grains, and others are associated with secondary impacts of spacecraft debris, and possibly primary impacts of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) [1, 2]. The current focus of the PE effort is on constraining the origin of the individual impact features so that definitive results from the first direct laboratory analysis of contemporary ISD can be reported. Because crater morphology depends on impacting particle shape and composition, in addition to the angle and direction of impact, unique particle trajectories are not easily determined. However, elemental analysis of the crater residues can distinguish real cosmic dust from the spacecraft debris, due to the low cosmic abundance of many of the elements in the spacecraft materials. We present here results from the elemental analysis of 24 craters and discuss the possible origins of 4 that are identified as candidate ISD impacts

  5. The effect of a thin weak layer covering a basalt block on the impact cratering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohi, Koji; Arakawa, Masahiko; Okamoto, Chisato; Hasegawa, Sunao; Yasui, Minami

    2012-04-01

    To clarify the effect of a surface regolith layer on the formation of craters in bedrock, we conducted impact-cratering experiments on two-layered targets composed of a basalt block covered with a mortar layer. A nylon projectile was impacted on the targets at velocities of 2 and 4 km s-1, and we investigated the crater size formed on the basalt. The crater size decreased with increased mortar thickness and decreased projectile mass and impact velocity. The normalized crater volume, πV, of all the data was successfully scaled by the following exponential equation with a reduction length λ0: π=b0πY-b1exp(-λ/λ0), where λ is the normalized thickness T/Lp, T and Lp are the mortar thickness and the projectile length, respectively, b0 and b1 are fitted parameters obtained for a homogeneous basalt target, 10-2.7±0.7 and -1.4 ± 0.3, respectively, and λ0 is obtained to be 0.38 ± 0.03. This empirical equation showing the effect of the mortar layer was physically explained by an improved non-dimensional scaling parameter, πY∗, defined by πY∗=Y/(ρup2), where up was the particle velocity of the mortar layer at the boundary between the mortar and the basalt. We performed the impact experiments to obtain the attenuation rate of the particle velocity in the mortar layer and derived the empirical equation of {u}/{v}=0.50exp-{λ}/{1.03}, where vi is the impact velocity of the projectile. We propose a simple model for the crater formation on the basalt block that the surface mortar layer with the impact velocity of up collides on the surface of the basalt block, and we confirmed that this model could reproduce our empirical equation showing the effect of the surface layer on the crater volume of basalt.

  6. Analysis of Cometary Dust Impact Residues in the Aluminum Foil Craters of Stardust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, G. A.; Kearsley, A. T.; Vicenzi, E. P.; Teslich, N.; Dai, Z. R.; Rost, D.; Horz, F.; Bradley, J. P.

    2007-01-01

    In January 2006, the sample return capsule from NASA s Stardust spacecraft successfully returned to Earth after its seven year mission to comet Wild-2. While the principal capture medium for comet dust was low-density graded silica aerogel, the 1100 series aluminum foil (approximately 100 m thick) which wrapped around the T6064 aluminum frame of the sample tray assembly (STA) contains micro-craters that constitute an additional repository for Wild-2 dust. Previous studies of similar craters on spacecraft surfaces, e.g. the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), have shown that impactor material can be preserved for elemental and mineralogical characterization, although the quantity of impact residue in Stardust craters far exceeds previous missions. The degree of shock-induced alteration experienced by the Wild-2 particles impacting on foil will generally be greater than for those captured in the low-density aerogel. However, even some of the residues found in LDEF craters showed not only survival of crystalline silicates but even their solar flare tracks, which are extremely fragile structures and anneal at around 600 C. Laboratory hypervelocity experiments, using analogues of Wild-2 particles accelerated into flight-grade foils under conditions close to those of the actual encounter, showed retention of abundant projectile residues at the Stardust encounter velocity of 6.1 km/s. During the preliminary examination (PE) of the returned foils, using optical and electron microscopy studies, a diverse range in size and morphologies of micro-craters was identified. In this abstract we consider the state of residue preservation in a diverse range of craters with respect to their elemental composition and inferred mineralogy of the original projectiles.

  7. Hypervelocity dust impact craters on photovoltaic devices imaged by ion beam induced charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypervelocity dust has a speed of greater than 5 km/s and is a significant problem for equipment deployed in space such as satellites because of impacts that damage vulnerable components. Photovoltaic (PV) arrays are especially vulnerable because of their large surface area and the performance can be degraded owing to the disruption of the structure of the junction in the cells making up the array. Satellite PV arrays returned to Earth after service in orbit reveal a large number of craters larger than 5 μm in diameter arising from hypervelocity dust impacts. Extensive prior work has been done on the analysis of the morphology of craters in PV cells to understand the origin of the micrometeoroid that caused the crater and to study the corresponding mechanical damage to the structure of the cell. Generally, about half the craters arise from natural micrometeoroids, about one third from artificial Al-rich debris, probably from solid rocket exhausts, and the remainder from miscellaneous sources both known and unknown. However to date there has not been a microscopic study of the degradation of the electrical characteristics of PV cells exposed to hypervelocity dust impacts. Here we present an ion beam induced charge (IBIC) pilot study by a 2 MeV He microbeam of craters induced on a Hamamatsu PIN diode exposed to artificial hypervelocity Al dust from a dust accelerator. Numerous 5–30 μm diameter craters were identified and the charge collection efficiency of the crater and surrounds mapped with IBIC with bias voltages between 0 and 20 V. At highest bias, it was found the efficiency of the crater had been degraded by about 20% compared to the surrounding material. The speed distribution achieved in the Al dust accelerator was peaked at about 4 km/s compared to 11–68 km/s for dust encountered in low Earth orbit. We are able to extrapolate the charge collection efficiency degradation rate of unbiased cells in space based on our current measurements and the

  8. Hypervelocity dust impact craters on photovoltaic devices imaged by ion beam induced charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Changyi [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Wu, Yiyong; Lv, Gang [National Key Laboratory of Materials Behavior and Evaluation Technology in Space Environments, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Rubanov, Sergey [Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Jamieson, David N., E-mail: d.jamieson@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2015-04-01

    Hypervelocity dust has a speed of greater than 5 km/s and is a significant problem for equipment deployed in space such as satellites because of impacts that damage vulnerable components. Photovoltaic (PV) arrays are especially vulnerable because of their large surface area and the performance can be degraded owing to the disruption of the structure of the junction in the cells making up the array. Satellite PV arrays returned to Earth after service in orbit reveal a large number of craters larger than 5 μm in diameter arising from hypervelocity dust impacts. Extensive prior work has been done on the analysis of the morphology of craters in PV cells to understand the origin of the micrometeoroid that caused the crater and to study the corresponding mechanical damage to the structure of the cell. Generally, about half the craters arise from natural micrometeoroids, about one third from artificial Al-rich debris, probably from solid rocket exhausts, and the remainder from miscellaneous sources both known and unknown. However to date there has not been a microscopic study of the degradation of the electrical characteristics of PV cells exposed to hypervelocity dust impacts. Here we present an ion beam induced charge (IBIC) pilot study by a 2 MeV He microbeam of craters induced on a Hamamatsu PIN diode exposed to artificial hypervelocity Al dust from a dust accelerator. Numerous 5–30 μm diameter craters were identified and the charge collection efficiency of the crater and surrounds mapped with IBIC with bias voltages between 0 and 20 V. At highest bias, it was found the efficiency of the crater had been degraded by about 20% compared to the surrounding material. The speed distribution achieved in the Al dust accelerator was peaked at about 4 km/s compared to 11–68 km/s for dust encountered in low Earth orbit. We are able to extrapolate the charge collection efficiency degradation rate of unbiased cells in space based on our current measurements and the

  9. UNAM Scientific Drilling Program of Chicxulub Impact Structure-Evidence for a 300 kilometer crater diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Marin, L.; Trejo-Garcia, A.

    As part of the UNAM drilling program at the Chicxulub structure, two 700 m deep continuously cored boreholes were completed between April and July, 1995. The Peto UNAM-6 and Tekax UNAM-7 drilling sites are ˜150 km and 125 km, respectively, SSE of Chicxulub Puerto, near the crater's center. Core samples from both sites show a sequence of post-crater carbonates on top of a thick impact breccia pile covering the disturbed Mesozoic platform rocks. At UNAM-7, two impact breccia units were encountered: (1) an upper breccia, mean magnetic susceptibility is high (˜55 × 10-6 SI units), indicating a large component of silicate basement has been incorporated into this breccia, and (2) an evaporite-rich, low susceptibility impact breccia similar in character to the evaporite-rich breccias observed at the PEMEX drill sites further out. The upper breccia was encountered at ˜226 m below the surface and is ˜125 m thick; the lower breccia is immediately subjacent and is >240 m thick. This two-breccia sequence is typical of the suevite-Bunte breccia sequence found within other well preserved impact craters. The suevitic upper unit is not present at UNAM-6. Instead, a >240 m thick evaporite-rich breccia unit, similar to the lower breccia at UNAM-7, was encountered at a depth of ˜280 m. The absence of an upper breccia equivalent at UNAM-6 suggests some portion of the breccia sequence has been removed by erosion. This is consistent with interpretations that place the high-standing crater rim at 130-150 km from the center. Consequently, the stratigraphic observations and magnetic susceptibiity records on the upper and lower breccias (depth and thickness) support a ˜300 km diameter crater model.

  10. Evidence for coeval Late Triassic terrestrial impacts from the Rochechouart (France) meteorite crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilder, S. A.; Carporzen, L.

    2006-12-01

    High temperature impact melt breccias from the Rochechouart (France) meteorite crater record a magnetization component with antipodal, normal and reverse polarities. The corresponding paleomagnetic pole for this component lies between the 220 Ma and 210 Ma reference poles on the Eurasian apparent polar wander path, consistent with the 214 ± 8 Ma ^{40} Ar/ ^{39} Ar age of the crater [Kelley and Spray, 1997]. Late Triassic tectonic reconstructions of the Eurasian and North American plates place this pole within 95 % confidence limits of the paleomagnetic pole from the Manicouagan (Canada) meteorite impact crater, which is dated at 214 ± 1 Ma [Hodych and Dunning, 1992]. Together, these observations reinforce the hypothesis of Spray et al. [1998] for a Late Triassic, multiple meteorite impact event on Earth. References: Hodych, J. P., and G. R. Dunning (1992), Did the Manicouagan impact trigger end-of-Triassic mass extinction?, Geology, 20, 51-54. Kelley, S. P., and J. G. Spray (1997), A late Triassic age for the Rochechouart impact structure, France, Meteor., 32, 629-636. Spray, J. G., S. P. Kelley, and D. B. Rowley (1998), Evidence for a late Triassic multiple impact event on Earth, Nature, 392, 171-173.

  11. Insights into the stratigraphy of Mars' northern plains from impact crater mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lu; Ehlmann, Bethany; Carter, John; Ernst, Carolyn; CRISM Team

    2016-10-01

    The northern lowland of Mars has an ancient basement, buried underneath widespread Hesperian lavas and outflow channel sediments, and may have recorded geologic and aqueous activity related to global climate, e.g., the existence of a northern ocean. To better understand the geologic record of this depositional basin, we conducted a comprehensive survey of the mineralogy of northern plains impact craters, using 1905 images covering 689 impact craters, acquired by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Mafic minerals are detected in 33% of all the craters, and hydrated minerals in 10% of the craters. Thus, though the northern plains surface is relatively spectrally homogeneous, the subsurface is spectrally diverse and includes a set of mafic (olivine and pyroxene) and hydrated minerals (Fe/Mg phyllosilicate, chlorite/prehnite, hydrated silica etc.) similar to the southern highlands. The distribution of hydrated minerals, especially Fe/Mg phyllosilicates, is more concentrated in large craters, while mafic minerals are relatively insensitive to crater size. This is consistent with a deeper origin for hydrated minerals compared to mafic minerals, or alternatively the post-impact formation of hydrated minerals due to impact-induced hydrothermal alteration only in the largest craters. Under the assumption of excavation from depth, we calculate the possible origin of these hydrated minerals to be -5000 ~ -6000 m relative to the global Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter (MOLA) datum, possibly representing the ancient basement buried by 1-2 km layer with mafic minerals. In contrast, the mafic materials are derived from only ~200 m deep. We also delineate several distinct topographic and geographic provinces. The large number of mafic mineral detections in Chryse Planitia probably indicates the influence of a local volcanic source; and Arcadia and Amazonis Planitiae probably have been resurfaced more recently

  12. Geometric properties of Martian impact craters: Preliminary results from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, James B.; Frawley, James J.

    1998-12-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) acquired high spatial and vertical resolution topographic data for 18 tracks across the northern hemisphere of Mars during the Fall of 1997. It sampled 98 minimally degraded impact craters between the latitudes of 80°N and 12°S The best fitting depth (d) versus diameter (D) power-law relationship for these craters is: d = 0.14 D0.90 for simple varieties, and d = 0.25 D0.49 for complex structures. The simple-to-complex transition diameter is 8 km (+/-0.5 km). The cross-sectional “shape” of the crater cavities was determined by fitting a power-function to each profile. Variation in the exponent (n) suggest the craters flatten with increasing diameter and impact energy. The ejecta thickness is skewed suggesting that use of existing empirical expressions for the expected radial decay of ejecta thickness is inappropriate for Mars in most cases.

  13. Mapping Buried Impact Craters in the Chryse Basin to Understand the Distribution of Outflow Channel Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Moira; Frey, Herbert V.

    2016-01-01

    The Chryse Basin's location in the northern hemisphere of Mars allowed it to collect water from a number of major outflow channels. These outflows likely deposited significant amounts of sediment within the Basin. This project's goal was to see if mapping buried impact craters, revealed as Quasi-Circular Depressions (QCDs) in Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data, could be used to determine the distribution and variation of sediment thickness within the Basin. QCDs, including likely buried impact craters, were mapped to test the hypothesis that further into the basin there would be fewer smaller craters because thicker sediments would have preferentially covered them. Mapping was done using Gridview, an interactive graphics program that manipulates data, in this case topographic data from MOLA. It should be possible to estimate the thickness of the sediment from the smallest buried craters found in a given area, and therefore map out the change in sediment thickness across the basin. The smallest QCDs beginning to be completely covered by sediment were just below 30 km in diameter. The minimum sediment needed to cover a QCD of this size was calculated to be between 1-2km. Therefore, the absence of QCDs below 30 km in the NE corner of Chryse could be explained by sediment at least that thick. Lower thickness is expected elsewhere in the basin, especially in the SW, where more QCDs with smaller diameters were found. The method of mapping buried impact craters provides a way to determine variations in sediment thickness within the Chryse Basin. This method could be used on other sediment-covered areas to learn about past water flow.

  14. Identification of Impact Craters in Foils from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, R. M.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Bechtel, H. A.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; Butterworth, A. L.; Cloetens, P.; Davis, A. M.; Floss, C.; Flynn, G. J.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Gruen, E.; Heck, P. R.; Hillier, J. K.; Hoppe, P.; Howard, L.; Sandford, S. A.; Tsou, P.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collection tray provides the first opportunity for the direct laboratory-based measurement of contemporary interstellar dust. The total exposed surface of the tray was approximately 0.1 square meters, including 153 square centimeters of Al foil in addition to the silica aerogel tiles that are the primary collection medium. Preliminary examination of aerogel tiles has already revealed 16 tracks from particle impacts with an orientation consistent with an interstellar origin, and to date four of the particles associated with these tracks have a composition consistent with an extraterrestrial origin. Tentative identification of impact craters on three foil samples was also reported previously. Here we present the definitive identification of 20 impact craters on five foils.

  15. Internal structure of the Chicxulub Impact crater imaged with magnetotelluric exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, O.; Unsworth, M.; Bedrosian, P.; Belmonte, S.; Arzate, J.; Lazorek, M.; Zimmer, U.

    2001-12-01

    The magnetotelluric technique allows remote sensing of the Earth's subsurface structure using natural, low frequency radio waves. It measures the electrical resistivity, a parameter that contains information about the lithology and fluid content of subsurface rock units. In January 2001, magnetotelluric (MT) data were collected on two radial profiles across the Chicxulub impact crater in Yucatan, Mexico. Each profile extended from the centre of the crater near Puerto Chicxulub to beyond the cenote ring. The MT data were processed and then combined with data collected in previous years by UNAM. The combined data set was then inverted to give a two-dimensional image of the subsurface resistivity structure of the crater. The following features can be resolved in the subsurface resistivity model. The Tertiary sedimentary sequence that fills the crater has a resistivity of 1-3 ohm-m and is approximately 2 km deep. In the basement a zone of high resistivity is imaged from the centre of the impact structure to a radius of approximately 45 km. This high resistivity at shallow depth can be interpreted as uplifted basement rocks of the structural high in the centre of the crater. Between radial distances of 50 and 70 km is a zone of lower resistivities in the upper 5-10 km of the crust. This coincides with the observed low in the Bouguer gravity anomaly. The coincidence of these two anomalies suggests a common origin. This is most probably due to a region of breccia that exhibits both low electrical resistivity and density.

  16. Raindrop impact on sand: a dynamic explanation of crater morphologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, S.; Jong, de R.; Meer, van der D.

    2015-01-01

    As a droplet impacts upon a granular substrate, both the intruder and the target undergo deformation, during which the liquid may penetrate into the substrate. These three aspects together distinguish it from other impact phenomena in the literature. We perform high-speed, double-laser profilometry

  17. Craters on Pluto and Charon: The Influence of Low Gravities, Low Impact Speeds, and Unique Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, K. N.; Schenk, P.; McKinnon, W. B.; Robbins, S. J.; Moore, J. M.; Bray, V. J.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, S. A.; Grundy, W. M.; Beyer, R. A.; Howett, C.; Dalle Ore, C.; White, O. L.; Parker, A. H.; Porter, S.; Zangari, A. M.; Young, L. A.; Olkin, C.; Ennico Smith, K.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The surfaces of Pluto and Charon display a wide variety of crater landforms. Pluto and Charon present a unique regime to investigate cratering physics due to a combination of circumstances: 1) their relatively low gravities—Pluto's gravity (~0.66 m s-2) falls between those of the large icy satellites of Jupiter and their mid-sized saturnian cousins, while Charon's gravity (0.28 m s-2) is more similar to the latter, 2) the low primary impact velocities onto Pluto and Charon's surfaces (average ~2 km s-1), and 3) the mix of surface ices likely present (e.g., N2, CO, CH4, H2O). We use available images from both the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI; Cheng et al., 2008, SSR 140, 189-215) and data from the Ralph (Reuter et al., 2008, SSR 140, 129-154) color/composition instruments to characterize crater morphologies and ejecta characteristics. This presentation will focus on understanding formation of craters on Pluto and Charon (with reference to deformation/degradation processes described in other presentations) and will include comparison to icy satellites. We will also discuss what inferences can be drawn about impactor characteristics.

  18. Fragment shapes in impact experiments ranging from cratering to catastrophic disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michikami, Tatsuhiro; Hagermann, Axel; Kadokawa, Tokiyuki; Yoshida, Akifumi; Shimada, Akira; Hasegawa, Sunao; Tsuchiyama, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory impact experiments have found that impact fragments tend to be elongated. Their shapes, as defined by axes a, b and c, these being the maximum dimensions of the fragment in three mutually orthogonal planes (a ⩾ b ⩾ c), are distributed around mean values of the axial ratios b/a ∼ 0.7 and c/a ∼ 0.5. This corresponds to a:b:c in the simple proportion 2:√2:1. The shape distributions of some boulders on Asteroid Eros, the small- and fast-rotating asteroids (diameter <200 m and rotation period <1 h), and asteroids in young families, are similar to those of laboratory fragments created in catastrophic disruptions. Catastrophic disruption is, however, a process that is different from impact cratering. In order to systematically investigate the shapes of fragments in the range from impact cratering to catastrophic disruption, impact experiments for basalt targets 5-15 cm in size were performed. A total of 28 impact experiments were carried out by firing a spherical nylon projectile (diameter 7.14 mm) perpendicularly into the target surface at velocities of 1.60-7.13 km/s. More than 12,700 fragments with b ⩾ 4 mm generated in the impact experiments were measured. We found that the mean value of c/a in each impact decreases with decreasing impact energy per unit target mass. For instance, the mean value of c/a in an impact cratering event is nearly 0.2, which is considerably smaller than c/a in a catastrophic disruption (∼0.5). The data presented here can provide important evidence to interpret the shapes of asteroids and boulders on asteroid surfaces, and can constrain current interpretations of asteroid formation. As an example, by applying our experimental results to the boulder shapes on Asteroid Itokawa's surface, we can infer that Itokawa's parent body must have experienced a catastrophic disruption.

  19. Identification of buried lunar impact craters from GRAIL data and implications for the nearside maria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Alexander J.; Soderblom, Jason M.; Andrews-Hanna, Jeffrey C.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2016-03-01

    Gravity observations from the dual Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) spacecraft have revealed more than 100 quasi-circular mass anomalies, 26-300 km in diameter, on the lunar nearside. These anomalies are interpreted to be impact craters filled primarily by mare deposits, and their characteristics are consistent with those of impact structures that formed prior to, and during, intervals of flooding of feldspathic terrane by mare basalt lavas. We determine that mare deposits have an average density contrast of 850-200+300 kg m-3 relative to the surrounding crust. The presence of a large population of volcanically buried craters with minimal topographic expression and diameters up to 300 km requires an average nearside mare thickness of at least 1.5 km and local lenses of mare basalt as thick as ~7 km.

  20. The XLLGG — A Hypervelocity Launcher for Impact Cratering Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexow, B.; Bückle, A.; Wickert, M.; Hiermaier, S.

    2015-09-01

    Hypervelocity launchers are used to accelerate projectiles that simulate impacting meteoroids or asteroids. The XLLGG (eXtra Large Light Gas Gun) at the EMI (Ernst-Mach-Institute) was used within the MEMIN program.

  1. Dinocyst taphonomy, impact craters, cyst ghosts, and the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lucy E.

    2012-01-01

    Dinocysts recovered from sediments related to the Chesapeake Bay impact structure in Virginia and the earliest Eocene suboxic environment in Maryland show strange and intriguing details of preservation. Features such as curled processes, opaque debris, breakage, microborings and cyst ghosts, among others, invite speculation about catastrophic depositional processes, rapid burial and biological and chemical decay. Selected specimens from seven cores taken in the coastal plain of Virginia and Maryland show abnormal preservation features in various combinations that merit illustration, description, discussion and further study. Although the depositional environments described are extreme, many of the features discussed are known from, or could be found in, other environments. These environments will show both similarities to and differences from the extreme environments here.

  2. Global Geometric Properties of Martian Impact Craters: An Assessment from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Digital Elevation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, J. B.; Frawley, J. J.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Schnetzler, C.

    2000-01-01

    Global geometric characteristics of topographically fresh impact craters have been assessed, for the first time, from gridded MOLA topography. Global trends of properties such as depth/diameter differ from previous estimates. Regional differences are observed.

  3. Using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Data to Assess Impact Crater Modification in the Arrhenius Region of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, J. B.; Grosfils, E. B.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.

    2000-01-01

    This study combines MOLA altimetry with photographic imagery to begin assessing the extent to which sedimentary and volcanic processes have affected impact crater morphology in the Arrhenius region of Mars.

  4. Development and Execution of an Impact Cratering Application on a Computational Grid

    OpenAIRE

    Huedo, E.; Lepinette, A.; R.S. Montero; Llorente, I.M.; Vázquez, L

    2005-01-01

    Impact cratering is an important geological process of special interest in Astrobiology. Its numerical simulation comprises the execution of a high number of tasks, since the search space of input parameter values includes the projectile diameter, the water depth and the impactor velocity. Furthermore, the execution time of each task is not uniform because of the different numerical properties of each experimental configuration. Grid technology is a promising platform to execute this kind of ...

  5. Molecular dynamics study of crater formation by core-shell structured cluster impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Seki, Toshio; Matsuo, Jiro

    2012-07-01

    Crater formation processes by the impacts of large clusters with binary atomic species were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Argon and xenon atoms are artificially organized in core-shell cluster structures with various component ratios and irradiated on a Si(1 0 0) target surface. When the cluster has Xe1000 core covered with 1000 Ar atoms, and impacts at a total of 20 keV, the core Xe cluster penetrates into the deep area, and a crater with a conical shape is left on the target. On the other hand, in the case of a cluster with the opposite structure, Ar1000 core covered with 1000 Xe atoms, the cluster stops at a shallow area of the target. The incident cluster atoms are mixed and tend to spread in a lateral direction, which results in a square shaped crater with a shallower hole and wider opening. The MD simulations suggest that large cluster impacts cause different irradiation effects by changing the structure, even if the component ratio is the same.

  6. Molecular dynamics study of crater formation by core-shell structured cluster impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crater formation processes by the impacts of large clusters with binary atomic species were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Argon and xenon atoms are artificially organized in core-shell cluster structures with various component ratios and irradiated on a Si(1 0 0) target surface. When the cluster has Xe1000 core covered with 1000 Ar atoms, and impacts at a total of 20 keV, the core Xe cluster penetrates into the deep area, and a crater with a conical shape is left on the target. On the other hand, in the case of a cluster with the opposite structure, Ar1000 core covered with 1000 Xe atoms, the cluster stops at a shallow area of the target. The incident cluster atoms are mixed and tend to spread in a lateral direction, which results in a square shaped crater with a shallower hole and wider opening. The MD simulations suggest that large cluster impacts cause different irradiation effects by changing the structure, even if the component ratio is the same.

  7. The bioeconomic impact of different management regulations on the Chesapeake Bay blue crab fishery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, David B.; Lipton, Douglas W.; Miller, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    The harvest of blue crabs Callinectes sapidus in Chesapeake Bay declined 46% between 1993 and 2001 and remained low through 2008. Because the total market value of this fishery has declined by an average of US $ 3.3 million per year since 1993, the commercial fishery has been challenged to maintain profitability. We developed a bioeconomic simulation model of the Chesapeake Bay blue crab fishery to aid managers in determining which regulations will maximize revenues while ensuring a sustainable harvest. We compared 15 different management scenarios, including those implemented by Maryland and Virginia between 2007 and 2009, that sought to reduce female crab harvest and nine others that used seasonal closures, different size regulations, or the elimination of fishing for specific market categories. Six scenarios produced the highest revenues: the 2008 and 2009 Maryland regulations, spring and fall closures for female blue crabs, and 152- and 165-mm maximum size limits for females. Our most important finding was that for each state the 2008 and 2009 scenarios that implemented early closures of the female crab fishery produced higher revenues than the 2007 scenario, in which no early female closures were implemented. We conclude that the use of maximum size limits for female crabs would not be feasible despite their potentially high revenue, given the likelihood that the soft-shell and peeler fisheries cannot be expanded beyond their current capacity and the potentially high mortality rate for culled individuals that are the incorrect size. Our model results support the current use of seasonal closures for females, which permit relatively high exploitation of males and soft-shell and peeler blue crabs (which have high prices) while keeping the female crab harvest sustainable. Further, our bioeconomic model allows for the inclusion of an economic viewpoint along with biological data when target reference points are set by managers.

  8. Delineating Bukit Bunuh impact crater boundary by geophysical and geotechnical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azwin, I. N., E-mail: nurazwinismail@yahoo.com; Rosli, S.; Nordiana, M. M.; Ragu, R. R.; Mark, J. [Geophysics Section, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Mokhtar, S. [Centre for Global Archaeological Research Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-03-30

    Evidences of crater morphology and shock metamorphism in Bukit Bunuh, Lenggong, Malaysia were found during the archaeological research conducted by the Centre for Global Archaeological Research Malaysia, Universiti Sains Malaysia. In order to register Bukit Bunuh as one of the world meteorite impact site, detailed studies are needed to verify the boundary of the crater accordingly. Geophysical study was conducted utilising the seismic refraction and 2-D electrical resistivity method. Seismic refraction survey was done using ABEM MK8 24 channel seismograph with 14Hz geophones and 40kg weight drop while 2-D electrical resistivity survey was performed using ABEM SAS4000 Terrameter and ES10-64C electrode selector with pole-dipole array. Bedrock depths were digitized from the sections obtained. The produced bedrock topography map shows that there is low bedrock level circulated by high elevated bedrock and interpreted as crater and rim respectively with diameter approximately 8km. There are also few spots of high elevated bedrock appear at the centre of the crater which interpreted as rebounds zone. Generally, the research area is divided into two layers where the first layer with velocity 400-1100 m/s and resistivity value of 10-800 Om predominantly consists of alluvium mix with gravel and boulders. Second layer represents granitic bedrock with depth of 5-50m having velocity >2100 m/s and resistivity value of >1500 Om. This research is strengthen by good correlation between geophysical data and geotechnical borehole records executed inside and outside of the crater, on the rim, as well as at the rebound area.

  9. Delineating Bukit Bunuh impact crater boundary by geophysical and geotechnical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azwin, I. N.; Rosli, S.; Mokhtar, S.; Nordiana, M. M.; Ragu, R. R.; Mark, J.

    2015-03-01

    Evidences of crater morphology and shock metamorphism in Bukit Bunuh, Lenggong, Malaysia were found during the archaeological research conducted by the Centre for Global Archaeological Research Malaysia, Universiti Sains Malaysia. In order to register Bukit Bunuh as one of the world meteorite impact site, detailed studies are needed to verify the boundary of the crater accordingly. Geophysical study was conducted utilising the seismic refraction and 2-D electrical resistivity method. Seismic refraction survey was done using ABEM MK8 24 channel seismograph with 14Hz geophones and 40kg weight drop while 2-D electrical resistivity survey was performed using ABEM SAS4000 Terrameter and ES10-64C electrode selector with pole-dipole array. Bedrock depths were digitized from the sections obtained. The produced bedrock topography map shows that there is low bedrock level circulated by high elevated bedrock and interpreted as crater and rim respectively with diameter approximately 8km. There are also few spots of high elevated bedrock appear at the centre of the crater which interpreted as rebounds zone. Generally, the research area is divided into two layers where the first layer with velocity 400-1100 m/s and resistivity value of 10-800 Om predominantly consists of alluvium mix with gravel and boulders. Second layer represents granitic bedrock with depth of 5-50m having velocity >2100 m/s and resistivity value of >1500 Om. This research is strengthen by good correlation between geophysical data and geotechnical borehole records executed inside and outside of the crater, on the rim, as well as at the rebound area.

  10. Impact cratering experiments into quartzite, sandstone and tuff: The effects of projectile size and target properties on spallation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelchau, Michael H.; Kenkmann, Thomas; Hoerth, Tobias; Schäfer, Frank; Rudolf, Michael; Thoma, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    Impact cratering experiments were performed on quartzite, tuff, and dry and water-saturated sandstones in the framework of the MEMIN research unit. 2.5-12 mm diameter projectiles were accelerated to ∼5 km/s. Evaluation of the resulting craters shows that crater volumes and crater efficiencies of large-scale experiments are greater than predicted by strength scaling laws. A method to approximate the transient crater volume shows that this effect is largely due to an increase in spallation. Strength scaling laws are used to determine the reduction of tensile strength in large-scale experiments and show a decrease by a factor of 1.8-3.6. This strength reduction can be correlated with a decrease in strain rate for larger projectiles, and with the Weibull theory of strength reduction for larger rock sample sizes. Further variations in spallation are observed between different target materials; a decrease in spall is suggested to be controlled by increased porosity.

  11. The Chicxulub crater - impact metamorphism of sulfate and carbonate lithologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, A.; Langenhorst, F.; Hornemann, U.; Ivanov, B. A.

    2003-04-01

    It is discussed whether in the aftermath of the Chicxulub event, impact-released CO_2 and SO_x have changed the Earth's climate, acting also as lethal thread for life. Undoubtedly, vaporization of carbonates and sulfates, which are major target lithologies at the Chicxulub impact site, occurred in the footprint of the projectile. What happened to these lithologies outside this very restricted zone was so far unconstrained. Petrologic observations on PEMEX and UNAM as well as on the CSDP cores allow to set up a general classification for shock-related pro-grade effects on sulfate and carbonate sedimentary rocks. Shock effects in lithic breccias are restricted to brecciation and formation of twins in calcite. Suevites mostly lack melted carbonate clasts; annealing effects in anhydrite fragments are absent. The underlying melt breccias contain anhydrite fragments still displaying a sedimentary texture, and limestone clasts, whose texture reflect crystallization from melt. Impact melt breccias from deeper levels frequently contain partially resorbed anhydrite clasts and a melt matrix with the Ca-rich mineral assemblage quartz + plagioclase + clinopyroxene; this mineral assemblage provides evidence for partial dissociation of CaSO_4. Large clasts of anhydrite consist of equant crystals with 120^o triple junctions, a feature indicative for re-crystallization in the solid state. Tagamites (impact melt rocks) are virtually free of clasts from sedimentary lithologies. These rocks have an extremely high formation temperature, which caused total dissociation of CaSO_4 and CaCO_3. Finally, up to 100 μm wide veins of anhydrite + calcite + quartz cut the matrix of all lithologies except the tagamites. They probably represent "degassing vents". The given scheme is in qualitative accordance with data of shock recovery and annealing experiments as well as with modeling results. In addition, it substantiates that annealing plays a fundamental role in the impact metamorphism of

  12. IMPACT CRATERING ON MERCURY: CONSEQUENCES FOR THE SPIN EVOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impact basins identified by Mariner 10 and Messenger flyby images provide us with a fossilized record of the impactor flux of asteroids on Mercury during the last stages of the early solar system. The distribution of these basins is not uniform across the surface and is consistent with a primordial synchronous rotation. By analyzing the size of the impacts, we derive a simple collisional model coherent with the observations. When combining it with the secular evolution of the spin of Mercury, we are able to reproduce the present 3/2 spin-orbit resonance (∼50% of chances), as well as a primordial synchronous rotation. This result is robust with respect to variations in the dissipation and collisional models, or in the initial spin state of the planet.

  13. Postimpact heat conduction and compaction-driven fluid flow in the Chesapeake Bay impact structure based on downhole vitrinite reflectance data, ICDP-USGS Eyreville deep core holes and Cape Charles test holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinconico, M.L.; Sanford, W.E.; Wright, Horton W.J.J., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Vitrinite reflectance data from the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP)-U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Eyreville deep cores in the centralcrater moat of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure and the Cape Charles test holes on the central uplift show patterns of postimpact maximum-temperature distribution that result from a combination of conductive and advective heat flow. Within the crater-fill sediment-clast breccia sequence at Eyreville, an isoreflectance (-0.44% Ro) section (525-1096 m depth) is higher than modeled background coastal-plain maturity and shows a pattern typical of advective fluid flow. Below an intervening granite slab, a short interval of sediment-clast breccia (1371-1397 m) shows a sharp increase in reflectance (0.47%-0.91% Ro) caused by conductive heat from the underlying suevite (1397-1474 m). Refl ectance data in the uppermost suevite range from 1.2% to 2.1% Ro. However, heat conduction alone is not sufficient to affect the temperature of sediments more than 100 m above the suevite. Thermal modeling of the Eyreville suevite as a 390 ??C cooling sill-like hot rock layer supplemented by compaction- driven vertical fluid flow (0.046 m/a) of cooling suevitic fluids and deeper basement brines (120 ??C) upward through the sediment breccias closely reproduces the measured reflectance data. This scenario would also replace any marine water trapped in the crater fill with more saline brine, similar to that currently in the crater, and it would produce temperatures sufficient to kill microbes in sediment breccias within 450 m above the synimsuevite. A similar downhole maturity pattern is present in the sediment-clast breccia over the central uplift. High-reflectance (5%-9%) black shale and siltstone clasts in the suevite and sediment-clast breccia record a pre-impact (Paleozoic?) metamorphic event. Previously published maturity data in the annular trough indicate no thermal effect there from impact-related processes. ?? 2009 The

  14. Deep Onshore Crustal Structure of Chicxulub Impact Crater Hinted From Mt Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzate, J. A.; Campos-Enríquez, J. O.

    This detailed MT study provides information about the deep continental structure of the Chicxulub impact crater (Yucatan, Mexico). In particular MT images of the elec- trical resistivity distribution along three radial profiles confirm the presence of shallow high resistive material at the crater center. Over this resitive high the MT soundings are featured by a sharper rise in resistivity related to the basement. This uplifted base- ment material coincides with the central structural high inferred in previous gravity, magnetic and MT studies. The top to the uplifted material is about 5 km in agreement with a recent seismic study. Its diameter is about 40 km and according to our images the basement material has been uplifted from a depth of about 10 km. The cenotes ring mark the rim of a deep basin featured by low resistivities. These low resistivities are interpreted as due to the fluids filling and interconecting the fractures of this portion.

  15. Impact cratering on Mercury: consequences for the spin evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, Alexandre C M; 10.1088/2041-8205/751/2/L43

    2012-01-01

    Impact basins identified by Mariner 10 and Messenger flyby images provide us a fossilized record of the impactor flux of asteroids on Mercury during the last stages of the early Solar System. The distribution of these basins is not uniform across the surface, and is consistent with a primordial synchronous rotation (Wieczorek et al. 2012). By analyzing the size of the impacts, we show that the distribution for asteroid diameters D < 110 km is compatible with an index power law of 1.2, a value that matches the predicted primordial distribution of the main-belt. We then derive a simple collisional model coherent with the observations, and when combining it with the secular evolution of the spin of Mercury, we are able to reproduce the present 3/2 spin-orbit resonance (about 50% of chances), as well as a primordial synchronous rotation. This result is robust with respect to variations in the dissipation and collisional models, or in the initial spin state of the planet.

  16. The Role of Nonlocal Sediment Transport in Shaping Impact Crater Walls on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, A. M.; Furbish, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    With increasing interest in the concept of ';nonlocal' sediment transport on steep, regolith covered hillslopes, clearer connections between theoretical formulations of nonlocal transport and natural landforms are needed. Scree slopes that form within impact craters provide useful, interesting study sites, due in part to their reasonably well-known initial morphologies. Recent research also suggests that the surface of Mars may be more erosionally active than previously thought. By using elevations derived from LiDAR data for Earth and HiRISE images for Mars together with a probabilistic description of nonlocal transport that includes entrainment and disentrainment rates, comparisons are made between Barringer Meteorite Crater in Arizona and Martian craters of various ages. This enables commentary on whether nonlocal transport produces similar slopes, despite the differing transport processes and acceleration due to gravity for the two planets. Physical insight is obtained through laboratory experiments where gravel particles are dropped on a loose granular slope composed of similar sized gravel inclined at different slopes, including the angle of repose and a flat layer of gravel. Total travel distances were obtained for approximately 500 particles dropped from three different heights for each slope angle. The resulting distributions of travel distances are exponential-like, but for steeper slopes these distributions may decay less rapidly than an exponential function, indicating a decreasing likelihood of disentrainment with increasing travel distance. These approximately dynamically scaled experiments will help clarify the relationship between drop height, slope, surface roughness, and mean travel distance. A description of the disentrainment rate based partly on these findings will to be incorporated in a numerical model that simulates impact crater erosion for Earth and Mars. This will test the theoretical similarity of two locations that are physically very

  17. Investigation of impact materials around Barringer Meteor Crater by SEMEDX and micro-PIXE techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Up to date (2008), 174 terrestrial impact craters have been explored on the Earth's surface. They were created by hitting asteroids, meteorites and/or comets. The most famous and well-preserved meteorite crater is the Barringer Meteor Crater in Arizona, USA which is approximately 50,000 years old. It was created by an iron meteorite. In recent years, much effort has been devoted to the elemental characterization of various impact materials collected in its near environment by the leadership of the late Prof. Gyula Szoeor. Especially, their Fe-rich inclusions were studied supposedly originated from the projectile of the impacted meteorite. In this report, results for some non-spherical, aggregate-like specimens are shown. The application of Scanning Electron Microscope combined with Energy Dispersive Xray Analysis (SEM-EDX) and a Scanning Nuclear Microprobe (SNM) is a powerful technique for the complex characterization of such materials. SEM provides the fine textural information and the concentration of the major elements. SNM with Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) method serves for the determination of both the major constituents and the important minor and trace elements such as the Platinum Group Elements (PGEs): Ru, Rh, Pd, etc. In this report analytical data are presented for S-Fe-Ni-Cu systems in order to feature the major characteristics of impact metamorphism of materials. A part of the work was presented in the 11th Int. Conf. on Nuclear Microprobe Technology and Applications (Hungary) and 71st Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society (Japan) conferences. Detailed results are under publication in a NIM B volume. Acknowledgements Support from the EU co-funded Economic Competitiveness Operative Programme GVOP- 3.2.1.-2004-04-0402/3.0, the Hungarian-Slovenian intergovernmental S and T cooperation program (SLO-16/2005 GVOP) as well as from the Hungarian Research Foundation (OTKA) under contract No T046579 are

  18. Heat flow pattern at the Chicxulub impact crater, northern Yucatan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Cardeña, J. M.; Campos-Enríquez, J. O.; Unsworth, M.

    2016-02-01

    Along an east-west profile crossing the Chicxulub impact structure in northern Yucatán, México, Curie depths were obtained from statistical-spectral analysis of a grid of aeromagnetic data (256 km wide and 600 km long). These depths were corrected for flight height and depth to the sea floor to determine the geothermal gradient, assuming a temperature of 580 °C for the Curie temperature. Heat flow was then calculated from the geothermal gradients using a value of 2.67 W/m-K for the mean crustal thermal conductivity. The results show a conspicuous heat flow high above on the impact basin. In this location, the heat flow is 80 mW/m2 approximately. Available offshore estimates of the depth to the crustal magnetic source bases, on the northern Yucatán platform, and onshore heat flow determination on 8 shallow bore holes, and in a 1511 m deep one, support the existence of this major high heat flow anomaly associated with the impact crater. This high heat flow might be related to the impact through: (1) an uplift of the crystalline basement rocks in the center of the crater; and (2) impact induced radioactive element concentration into the crust below the impact structure. Higher thermal conductivities at the lower crust might also play a key role. Available seismological and thermal property data are compatible with these mechanisms.

  19. Target-projectile interaction during impact melting at Kamil Crater, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Agnese; D'Orazio, Massimo; Cordier, Carole; Folco, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    In small meteorite impacts, the projectile may survive through fragmentation; in addition, it may melt, and chemically and physically interact with both shocked and melted target rocks. However, the mixing/mingling between projectile and target melts is a process still not completely understood. Kamil Crater (45 m in diameter; Egypt), generated by the hypervelocity impact of the Gebel Kamil Ni-rich ataxite on sandstone target, allows to study the target-projectile interaction in a simple and fresh geological setting. We conducted a petrographic and geochemical study of macroscopic impact melt lapilli and bombs ejected from the crater, which were collected during our geophysical campaign in February 2010. Two types of glasses constitute the impact melt lapilli and bombs: a white glass and a dark glass. The white glass is mostly made of SiO2 and it is devoid of inclusions. Its negligible Ni and Co contents suggest derivation from the target rocks without interaction with the projectile (compression stage and the excavation stage, projectile and target liquids formed at their interface and chemically interact in a restricted zone. Projectile contamination affected only a shallow portion of the target rocks. The SiO2 melt that eventually solidified as white glass behaved as an immiscible liquid and did not interact with the projectile. During the excavation stage dark glass melt engulfed and coated the white glass melt, target fragments, and got stuck to iron meteorite shrapnel fragments. This model could also explain the common formation of white and dark glasses in small impact craters generated by iron bodies (e.g., Wabar).

  20. Using the viscoelastic relaxation of large impact craters to study the thermal history of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Saman; Dombard, Andrew J.; Buczkowski, Debra L.; Robbins, Stuart J.; Williams, Rebecca M.

    2016-07-01

    We simulate the long-term deformation of Martian craters and investigate the role of lower crustal flow in the evolution of surface and subsurface topography. Using the finite element method and a viscoelastic rheological model, we model the deformation of more than 30 large craters and Quasi-Circular Depressions (QCDs), in the diameter range of ∼200-500 km, in both the Northern Lowlands and Southern Highlands. We determine the most appropriate background heat fluxes that produce the current topography beneath the impacts at the crust-mantle boundary (ranges from 40 to ∼90 mW m-2). Our study shows that a higher background heat flux leads to more relaxation at the surface and subsurface. By applying various viscous creep parameters for hydrous and anhydrous rheologies, we demonstrate that Mars's interior is wet to a certain degree, which is consistent with other estimates. Since craters and QCDs are distributed fairly equally on the surface of the Red Planet, this study provides a less regionally biased picture of the thermal history of early Mars than in previous studies. Based on our results, the ancient average background heat flux in the Northern Lowlands was higher than that of the Southern Highlands, which could indicate that whatever process formed the crustal dichotomy had a thermal signature at least through the middle Noachian.

  1. Changes in blast zone albedo patterns around new martian impact craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daubar, I. J.; Dundas, C. M.; Byrne, S.; Geissler, P.; Bart, G. D.; McEwen, A. S.; Russell, P. S.; Chojnacki, M.; Golombek, M. P.

    2016-03-01

    "Blast zones" (BZs) around new martian craters comprise various albedo features caused by the initial impact, including diffuse halos, extended linear and arcuate rays, secondary craters, ejecta patterns, and dust avalanches. We examined these features for changes in repeat images separated by up to four Mars years. Here we present the first comprehensive survey of the qualitative and quantitative changes observed in impact blast zones over time. Such changes are most likely due to airfall of high-albedo dust restoring darkened areas to their original albedo, the albedo of adjacent non-impacted surfaces. Although some sites show drastic changes over short timescales, nearly half of the sites show no obvious changes over several Mars years. Albedo changes are more likely to occur at higher-latitude sites, lower-elevation sites, and at sites with smaller central craters. No correlation was seen between amount of change and Dust Cover Index, relative halo size, or historical regional albedo changes. Quantitative albedo measurements of the diffuse dark halos relative to their surroundings yielded estimates of fading lifetimes for these features. The average lifetime among sites with measurable fading is ∼15 Mars years; the median is ∼8 Mars years for a linear brightening. However, at approximately half of sites with three or more repeat images, a nonlinear function with rapid initial fading followed by a slow increase in albedo provides a better fit to the fading behavior; this would predict even longer lifetimes. The predicted lifetimes of BZs are comparable to those of slope streaks, and considered representative of fading by global atmospheric dust deposition; they last significantly longer than dust devil or rover tracks, albedo features that are erased by different processes. These relatively long lifetimes indicate that the measurement of the current impact rate by Daubar et al. (Daubar, I.J. et al. [2013]. Icarus 225, 506-516. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j

  2. A symbiotic view of the origin of life at hydrothermal impact crater-lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sankar

    2016-07-27

    Submarine hydrothermal vents are generally considered as the likely habitats for the origin and evolution of early life on Earth. The theory suffers from the 'concentration problem' of cosmic and terrestrial biomolecules because of the vastness of the Eoarchean global ocean. An attractive alternative site would be highly sequestered, small, hydrothermal crater-lakes that might have cradled life on early Earth. A new symbiotic model for the origin of life at hydrothermal crater-lakes is proposed here. Meteoritic impacts on the Eoarchean crust at the tail end of the Heavy Bombardment period might have played important roles in the origin of life. Impacts and collisions that created hydrothermal crater lakes on the Eoarchean crust inadvertently became the perfect crucibles for prebiotic chemistry with building blocks of life, which ultimately led to the first organisms by prebiotic synthesis. In this scenario, life arose through four hierarchical stages of increasing molecular complexity in multiple niches of crater basins. In the cosmic stage (≥4.6 Ga), the building blocks of life had their beginnings in the interstellar space during the explosion of a nearby star. Both comets and carbonaceous chondrites delivered building blocks of life and ice to early Earth, which were accumulated in hydrothermal impact crater-lakes. In the geologic stage (∼4 Ga), crater basins contained an assortment of cosmic and terrestrial organic compounds, powered by hydrothermal, solar, tidal, and chemical energies, which drove the prebiotic synthesis. At the water surface, self-assembled primitive lipid membranes floated as a thick oil slick. Archean Greenstone belts in Greenland, Australia, and South Africa possibly represent the relics of these Archean craters, where the oldest fossils of thermophilic life (∼3.5 Ga) have been detected. In the chemical stage, monomers such as nucleotides and amino acids were selected from random assemblies of the prebiotic soup; they were

  3. A symbiotic view of the origin of life at hydrothermal impact crater-lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sankar

    2016-07-27

    Submarine hydrothermal vents are generally considered as the likely habitats for the origin and evolution of early life on Earth. The theory suffers from the 'concentration problem' of cosmic and terrestrial biomolecules because of the vastness of the Eoarchean global ocean. An attractive alternative site would be highly sequestered, small, hydrothermal crater-lakes that might have cradled life on early Earth. A new symbiotic model for the origin of life at hydrothermal crater-lakes is proposed here. Meteoritic impacts on the Eoarchean crust at the tail end of the Heavy Bombardment period might have played important roles in the origin of life. Impacts and collisions that created hydrothermal crater lakes on the Eoarchean crust inadvertently became the perfect crucibles for prebiotic chemistry with building blocks of life, which ultimately led to the first organisms by prebiotic synthesis. In this scenario, life arose through four hierarchical stages of increasing molecular complexity in multiple niches of crater basins. In the cosmic stage (≥4.6 Ga), the building blocks of life had their beginnings in the interstellar space during the explosion of a nearby star. Both comets and carbonaceous chondrites delivered building blocks of life and ice to early Earth, which were accumulated in hydrothermal impact crater-lakes. In the geologic stage (∼4 Ga), crater basins contained an assortment of cosmic and terrestrial organic compounds, powered by hydrothermal, solar, tidal, and chemical energies, which drove the prebiotic synthesis. At the water surface, self-assembled primitive lipid membranes floated as a thick oil slick. Archean Greenstone belts in Greenland, Australia, and South Africa possibly represent the relics of these Archean craters, where the oldest fossils of thermophilic life (∼3.5 Ga) have been detected. In the chemical stage, monomers such as nucleotides and amino acids were selected from random assemblies of the prebiotic soup; they were

  4. The Impact of Competition on Raising Mathematics Competency at Camelot Elementary School in Chesapeake, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, L. B.; Johnson, D.

    2012-12-01

    In 1995, the Virginia Department of Education approved a federal mandate for No Child Left Behind 2001 Education Act implementing the Standards of Learning (SOL) in four content areas: Mathematics, Science, English, and History and Social Sciences. These new guidelines set forth learning and achievement expectations for content areas for grades K-12 in Virginia's Public Schools. Given the SOL mandates, Virginia's elementary teachers and school leaders utilized research for specific teaching methods intended to encourage score improvements on end of year mathematics tests. In 2001, the concept of the Math Sprint Competition was introduced to Camelot Elementary School in Chesapeake Virginia, by researchers at Elizabeth City State University of Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Camelot Elementary, a K-5 school, is a Title I school nestled in a lower middle class neighborhood and houses a high number of minority students. On average, these students achieve lower test score gains than students in higher socioeconomic status district schools. Defined as a test-review based in relay format that utilizes released SOL test items, Math Sprint promotes mathematical skills outlined in Virginia SOL's and encourages competition among students that motivated them to quickly pick up on new material and retain the old material in order to out-do the others. Research identified was based on specific relationships between student competition and statewide testing results in mathematics for grades three, four, and five at Camelot Elementary. Data was compiled from results of the Math Sprint Competition and research focused on methods for motivating students encouraged by the use of a math sprint competition. Individual Pearson Product Moment Correlations were conducted to determine which variables possess strong and statistically significant relationships. Significantly, positive results came from 2005 to 2010 math sprints data from which students participated.

  5. 10Be Content in Suevite Breccia from the Bosumtwi Impact Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losiak, Anna; Wild, Eva Maria; Michlmayr, Leonard; Koeberl, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Introduction: According to the current understanding of meteorite impact processes, surface target material is transported from a crater in the form of ejecta or is vaporized/melted (e.g., [1]). The formation model of tektites from the surface of the target rocks has been established using the 10Be content of tektites (e.g., [2]), and chemical comparison with the possible target surface material (e.g., [3]); it was also reproduced by computer modeling (e.g., [4]). On the other hand, some observations ([5, 6]) suggest that part of the surface material may be incorporated into the crater-fill. The aim of this study is to check if surface-derived material is present in suevitic breccias to better understand formation mechanisms of fallback breccias. Also, 10Be can be used to trace contamination of rocks in the top layer of the suevitic layer by meteoric (lake) water. This abstract is an update (based on more data now available) of the previous report presented during the Metsoc75 conference. Samples: The Bosumtwi crater was chosen as study site because of its relatively large size (10.5 km in diameter), young age of 1.07 Ma [7], good state of preservation, and availability of core samples. Clasts from suevitic breccia selected for this study come from the LB-07A and LB-08A cores that are located within the crater and represent fallback breccia (e.g., [7]). Of 41 analyzed samples (22 single clasts and 21 matrix samples - 11 of those being monomictic breccia), 36 came from core LB-07A (in the zone outside the central uplift) and represent depths of 333.7 - 407.9 m and 5 are from core LB-08A (on the flank of the central uplift) from depths 239.5 - 264.9 m. Methods: For each sample, 0.8 g of finely grounded material from clasts containing in situ produced and meteoric 10Be was dissolved in a mixture of HF and HNO3 by microwave digestion. A 9Be carrier (1 mg or 0.6 mg, 10Be/9Be ratio: 2.82±0.31*10-15 [2? uncertainty]) was added to the sample, and then Be was chemically

  6. Computer simulations of large asteroid impacts into oceanic and continental sites--preliminary results on atmospheric, cratering and ejecta dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddy, D.J.; Schuster, S.H.; Rosenblatt, M.; Grant, L.B.; Hassig, P.J.; Kreyenhagen, K.N.

    1987-01-01

    Computer simulations have been completed that describe passage of a 10-km-diameter asteroid through the Earth's atmosphere and the subsequent cratering and ejecta dynamics caused by impact of the asteroid into both oceanic and continental sites. The asteroid was modeled as a spherical body moving vertically at 20 km/s with a kinetic energy of 2.6 ?? 1030 ergs (6.2 ?? 107 Mt ). Detailed material modeling of the asteroid, ocean, crustal units, sedimentary unit, and mantle included effects of strength and fracturing, generic asteroid and rock properties, porosity, saturation, lithostatic stresses, and geothermal contributions, each selected to simulate impact and geologic conditions that were as realistic as possible. Calculation of the passage of the asteroid through a U.S. Standard Atmosphere showed development of a strong bow shock wave followed by a highly shock compressed and heated air mass. Rapid expansion of this shocked air created a large low-density region that also expanded away from the impact area. Shock temperatures in air reached ???20,000 K near the surface of the uplifting crater rim and were as high as ???2000 K at more than 30 km range and 10 km altitude. Calculations to 30 s showed that the shock fronts in the air and in most of the expanding shocked air mass preceded the formation of the crater, ejecta, and rim uplift and did not interact with them. As cratering developed, uplifted rim and target material were ejected into the very low density, shock-heated air immediately above the forming crater, and complex interactions could be expected. Calculations of the impact events showed equally dramatic effects on the oceanic and continental targets through an interval of 120 s. Despite geologic differences in the targets, both cratering events developed comparable dynamic flow fields and by ???29 s had formed similar-sized transient craters ???39 km deep and ???62 km across. Transient-rim uplift of ocean and crust reached a maximum altitude of nearly

  7. Tectonic-karstic origin of the alleged "impact crater" of Lake Isli (Imilchil district, High Atlas, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibouh, Hassan; Michard, André; Charrière, André; Benkaddour, Abdelfattah; Rhoujjati, Ali

    2014-03-01

    The scenic lakes Tislit and Isli of the Imilchil area in the central High Atlas of Morocco have been recently promoted to the rank of "dual impact crater" by a group of geoscientists. This was promptly denied by a group of meteorite specialists, but the first team reiterated their impact crater interpretation, now restricted to Lake Isli. This alleged 40-kyr-old impact crater would be associated with the Agoudal meteorite recognized further in the southeast. Here, we show that the lake formed during the Lowe-Middle Pleistocene in a small Pliocene (?) pull-apart basin through additional collapsing due to karst phenomena in the underlying limestones. This compares with the formation of a number of lakes of the Atlas Mountains. None of the "proofs" produced in support of a meteoritic origin of Lake Isli coincides with the geology of the area.

  8. Development and Execution of an Impact Cratering Application on a Computational Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Huedo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact cratering is an important geological process of special interest in Astrobiology. Its numerical simulation comprises the execution of a high number of tasks, since the search space of input parameter values includes the projectile diameter, the water depth and the impactor velocity. Furthermore, the execution time of each task is not uniform because of the different numerical properties of each experimental configuration. Grid technology is a promising platform to execute this kind of applications, since it provides the end user with a performance much higher than that achievable on any single organization. However, the scheduling of each task on a Grid involves challenging issues due to the unpredictable and heterogeneous behavior of both the Grid and the numerical code. This paper evaluates the performance of a Grid infrastructure based on the Globus toolkit and the GridWay framework, which provides the adaptive and fault tolerance functionality required to harness Grid resources, in the simulation of the impact cratering process. The experiments have been performed on a testbed composed of resources shared by five sites interconnected by RedIRIS, the Spanish Research and Education Network.

  9. Impact Cratering Experiments into Quartzite and Tuff: First Results from the MEMIN Research Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelchau, M. H.; Hoerth, T.; Schäfer, F.; Deutsch, A.; Thoma, K.; Kenkmann, T.

    2012-09-01

    The effects of porosity on the cratering process will be examined in experiments planned for June 2012. Porosity in combination with target strength is expected to have an effect on crater morphology and ejection behavior.

  10. Hong Kong is an impact crater: Proof from the geomorphological and geological evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chu-Lok; Wu, Siben; Luo, Xiuquan

    1992-01-01

    Hong Kong is a city in southern China. The urban districts of Hong Kong, Kowloon, and Victoria Harbour are situated within Hong Kong. Hong Kong is surrounded by mountains with a diameter of 11 km. Three million people live inside the basin. The round structure of the mountains in Hong Kong has been describd as a granite dome that is deeply eroded (batholith). The circularity of the mountains, the existence of a central hill, the inner slope of the mountains being greater than the outer slope, the presence of deep layer rock inside the basin, and the depth-to-diameter ratio were studied. All this evidence shows that the Hong Kong structure satisfies the geomorphological requirement of an impact crater. Some shock metamorphic phenomena of the rocks in Hong Kong such as planar features, microspherilitic silica glass (lechaterlierite), fused margins of rock fragments, concussion fractures, impact glass in which some schlierens are consistent with pyroxene spiculites, etc., were first discovered in Oct. 1990. In Hong Kong Island, an impact melt sheet was observed from the Victoria Peak to the southern shore. Quenching fractures of quartz in Kowloon fine-grained granite was also discovered. In our work, the K-Ar age (83.34 + 1.26 m.y.) of the impact melt rock, which is younger in comparison to the K-Ar age (117 m.y.) in Hong Kong and Kowloon granite, was measured, and the phenomena indicate that after the granite body formed, there was another geologic event. Maybe it is the Hong Kong cratering event.

  11. Chicxulub Impact Crater and Yucatan Carbonate Platform - Stratigraphy and Petrography of PEMEX Borehole Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Cirlos, A. G.; Perez-Drago, G.; Perez-Cruz, L.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2008-12-01

    Chicxulub impact crater is the best preserved of the three large multi-ring structures documented in the terrestrial record. Chicxulub, formed 65 Ma ago, is associated with the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary layer and the impact related to the organism extinctions and events marking the boundary. The crater is buried under Tertiary sediments in the Yucatan carbonate platform in the southern Gulf of Mexico. The structure was initially recognized from gravity and magnetic anomalies in the PEMEX exploration surveys of the northwestern Yucatan peninsula. The exploration program included eight deep boreholes completed from 1952 through the 1970s. The investigations showing Chicxulub as a large complex impact crater formed at the K/T boundary have relayed on the PEMEX decades-long exploration program. However, despite frequent use of PEMEX information and core samples, significant parts of the database and cores remain to be evaluated, analyzed and incorporated with results from recent efforts. Access to PEMEX Core Repository has permitted to study the cores and collect new samples from some of the boreholes. We analyzed cores from Yucatan-6, Chicxulub-1, Sacapuc-1, Ticul-1, Yucatan-1 and Yucatan-4 boreholes to make new detailed stratigraphic correlations and petrographic characterization, using information from PEMEX database and the recent studies. In C-1 cores, breccias show 4-8 cm clasts of fine grained altered melt dispersed in a medium to coarse grained matrix composed of pyroxene and feldspar with little macroscopic alteration. Clasts contain 0.2 to 0.1 cm fragments of silicate material (basement) that show variable degrees of digestion. Melt samples from C-1 N10 comes from interval 1,393-1,394 m, and show a fine-to-medium grained coherent microcrystalline groundmass. Melt and breccias in Y-6 extend from about 1,100 m to more than 1,400 m. Sequence is well sorted, with an apparent gradation in both the lithic and melt clasts. In this presentation we report on

  12. Microbial Mats in the Tswaing Impact Crater: Results of a South African Exobiology Expedition and Implications for the Search for Biological Molecules on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, C. S.; Brandt, D.; Hand, K.; Lee, P. C.

    2001-01-01

    We describe microbial mats from the Tswaing impact crater in South Africa. The mats provide insights into the unique biological characteristics of impact craters and can help strategies for the search for biomolecules on Mars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Application of nondestructive testing methods to study the damage zone underneath impact craters of MEMIN laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Dorothee; Poelchau, Michael H.; Stark, Florian; Grosse, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the Multidisciplinary Experimental and Modeling Impact Research Network (MEMIN) research group, the damage zones underneath two experimentally produced impact craters in sandstone targets were investigated using several nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. The 20 × 20 × 20 cm sandstones were impacted by steel projectiles with a radius of 1.25 mm at approximately 5 km s-1, resulting in craters with approximately 6 cm diameter and approximately 1 cm depth. Ultrasound (US) tomography and vibrational analysis were applied before and after the impact experiments to characterize the damage zone, and micro-computer tomography (μ-CT) measurements were performed to visualize subsurface fractures. The newly obtained experimental data can help to quantify the extent of the damage zone, which extends to about 8 cm depth in the target. The impacted sandstone shows a local p-wave reduction of 18% below the crater floor, and a general reduction in elastic moduli by between approximately 9 and approximately 18%, depending on the type of elastic modulus. The results contribute to a better empirical and theoretical understanding of hypervelocity events and simulations of cratering processes.

  14. Chicxulub Impact Crater and Yucatan Carbonate Platform - PEMEX Oil Exploratory Wells Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Drago, G.; Gutierrez-Cirlos, A. G.; Pérez-Cruz, L.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2008-12-01

    Geophysical oil exploration surveys carried out by PEMEX in the 1940's revealed occurrence of an anomalous pattern of semi-circular concentric gravity anomalies. The Bouguer gravity anomalies covered an extensive area over the flat carbonate platform in the northwestern Yucatan Peninsula; strong density contrasts were suggestive of a buried igneous complex or basement uplift beneath the carbonates, which was referred as the Chicxulub structure. The exploration program carried out afterwards included a drilling program, starting with Chicxulub-1 well in 1952 and comprising eight deep boreholes through the 1970s. An aeromagnetic survey in late 1970's showed high amplitude anomalies in the gravity anomaly central sector. Thus, research showing Chicxulub as a large complex impact crater formed at the K/T boundary was built on the PEMEX decades-long exploration program. Despite frequent reference to PEMEX information and samples, original data and cores have not been openly available for detailed evaluation and integration with results from recent investigations. Core samples largely remain to be analyzed and interpreted in the context of recent marine, aerial and terrestrial geophysical surveys and the drilling/coring projects of UNAM and ICDP. In this presentation we report on the stratigraphy and paleontological data for PEMEX wells: Chicxulub- 1 (1582m), Sacapuc-1 (1530m), Yucatan-6 (1631m), Ticul-1 (3575m) Yucatan-4 (2398m), Yucatan-2 (3474m), Yucatan-5A (3003m) and Yucatan-1 (3221m). These wells remain the deepest drilled in Chicxulub, providing samples of impact lithologies, carbonate sequences and basement, which give information on post- and pre-impact stratigraphy and crystalline basement. We concentrate on stratigraphic columns, lateral correlations and integration with UNAM and ICDP borehole data. Current plans for deep drilling in Chicxulub crater target the peak ring and central sector, with offshore and onshore boreholes proposed to the IODP and ICDP

  15. Analytical Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy of Laboratory Impacts on Stardust Aluminium Foils: Interpreting Impact Crater Morphology and the Composition of Impact Residues.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearsley, A T; Graham, G A; Burchell, M J; Cole, M J; Dai, Z R; Teslich, N; Chater, R; Wozniakiewicz, P A; Spratt, J; Jones, G

    2006-10-19

    The known encounter velocity (6.1kms{sup -1}) between the Stardust spacecraft and the dust emanating from the nucleus of comet Wild 2 has allowed realistic simulation of dust collection in laboratory experiments designed to validate analytical methods for the interpretation of dust impacts on the aluminium foil components of the Stardust collector. In this report we present information on crater gross morphology, the pre-existing major and trace element composition of the foil, geometrical issues for energy dispersive X-ray analysis of the impact residues in scanning electron microscopes, and the modification of dust chemical composition during creation of impact craters as revealed by analytical transmission electron microscopy. Together, these observations help to underpin the interpretation of size, density and composition for particles impacted upon the Stardust aluminium foils.

  16. Impacts into quartz sand: Crater formation, shock metamorphism, and ejecta distribution in laboratory experiments and numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünnemann, Kai; Zhu, Meng-Hua; StöFfler, Dieter

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the ejection mechanics by a complementary approach of cratering experiments, including the microscopic analysis of material sampled from these experiments, and 2-D numerical modeling of vertical impacts. The study is based on cratering experiments in quartz sand targets performed at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range. In these experiments, the preimpact location in the target and the final position of ejecta was determined by using color-coded sand and a catcher system for the ejecta. The results were compared with numerical simulations of the cratering and ejection process to validate the iSALE shock physics code. In turn the models provide further details on the ejection velocities and angles. We quantify the general assumption that ejecta thickness decreases with distance according to a power-law and that the relative proportion of shocked material in the ejecta increase with distance. We distinguish three types of shock metamorphic particles (1) melt particles, (2) shock lithified aggregates, and (3) shock-comminuted grains. The agreement between experiment and model was excellent, which provides confidence that the models can predict ejection angles, velocities, and the degree of shock loading of material expelled from a crater accurately if impact parameters such as impact velocity, impactor size, and gravity are varied beyond the experimental limitations. This study is relevant for a quantitative assessment of impact gardening on planetary surfaces and the evolution of regolith layers on atmosphereless bodies.

  17. The Dawn Mission & Asteroid Mappers: The Impact of Crowd-Sourced Crater Counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, B. E.; Scully, J. E.; Hart, R.; Russell, C. T.; Wise, J.; Cobb, W. H.; Ristvey, J.; Counley, J.; Hess, N.

    2012-12-01

    While the driving principle for a science investigation may be the pursuit of knowledge, the process of acquiring that knowledge that matters as much as the result. This process is known to many as the scientific method, a concept regularly taught in schools but that remains in many cases poorly tied to science outreach. But with the growth of the Citizen Science movement, we have entered a new era for both science and science outreach marked by the accessibility of tools that allow the public to experience science first hand in a manner previously unimagined. Gone are the days when a launch and a landing are all that are seen of a mission. Now, it's time to let the public in on the fun, and of course, all the work. In a time of large data returns and dwindling science budgets, citizen science may help scientists and educators with two fundamental problems: (1) increasing awareness and (2) accomplishing the key science investigations. The Dawn Mission has long been on the path towards involving the public in the process of science, and with the advent of the new Asteroid Mappers project, joint with CosmoQuest, the long-term goal of presenting the data to the public in a meaningful manner will be achieved. And in the long run, the public may also prove key to accomplishing mission science. Vesta is a unique body in the solar system, a likely a witness to the earliest stages of solar system formation and the environment within the main asteroid belt. Its impact history will be critical not only to understanding the initial population of the asteroid belt and thus impact hazards on the early Earth, but also the production of Vesta's impact family and the samples of Vesta, the HED meteorites, we have on Earth. Thus determining the impact crater population and distribution is a critical mission goal. Because craters are easily recognized and relatively straightforward to measure, a careful member of the public may be able to perform the same basic tasks as a scientist

  18. Polar organic compounds in pore waters of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure, Eyreville core hole: Character of the dissolved organic carbon and comparison with drilling fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, C.E.; Sanford, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    Pore waters from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure cores recovered at Eyreville Farm, Northampton County, Virginia, were analyzed to characterize the dissolved organic carbon. After squeezing or centrifuging, a small volume of pore water, 100 ??L, was taken for analysis by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. Porewater samples were analyzed directly without filtration or fractionation, in positive and negative mode, for polar organic compounds. Spectra in both modes were dominated by low-molecular-weight ions. Negative mode had clusters of ions differing by -60 daltons, possibly due to increasing concentrations of inorganic salts. The numberaverage molecular weight and weight-average molecular weight values for the pore waters from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure are higher than those reported for other aquatic sources of natural dissolved organic carbon as determined by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. In order to address the question of whether drilling mud fluids may have contaminated the pore waters during sample collection, spectra from the pore waters were compared to spectra from drilling mud fluids. Ions indicative of drilling mud fluids were not found in spectra from the pore waters, indicating there was no detectable contamination, and highlighting the usefulness of this analytical technique for detecting potential contamination during sample collection. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  19. Monte Carlo models of the interaction between impact cratering and volcanic resurfacing on Venus: The effect of the Beta-Atla-Themis anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, I.

    2013-10-01

    Detailed Monte Carlo models of the interaction of impact cratering and volcanic resurfacing, which included the Beta-Atla-Themis (BAT) volcanic concentration, were used to test different planetary resurfacing histories. The results were compared with: (1) the randomness of the spatial distribution of craters, (2) the number of modified craters, (3) the number of dark-floored craters due to volcanic flooding, (4) the frequency-area distribution of volcanic units, (5) the frequency-size distribution of craters and modified craters, and (6) the spatial distribution of craters and modified craters with respect to the BAT anomaly. Two catastrophic and two equilibrium resurfacing models were tested. The two catastrophic models consisted of one with a drastic decay and the other with a moderate decay of volcanic activity following the catastrophic event. The two equilibrium models consisted of one with a gradual decay of volcanic activity at the end of the model and the other with a magmatic event followed by a gradual decay of volcanic activity. Both equilibrium models and the catastrophic model with moderate decay fail to reproduce the small reduction of the crater density in the BAT area. The model that best fits all the observations is a global catastrophic resurfacing event followed by a drastic decay of volcanic activity. Thus, a Venus global catastrophic resurfacing event erasing all previous craters with little post-resurfacing volcanism is supported by this study.

  20. Impact of Environmental Policies on the Adoption of Animal Waste Management Practices in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, Jeff; Ribaudo, Marc

    2012-01-01

    We use data from the ERS-NASS ARMS surveys to compare the use of best management practices on poultry and livestock farms inside the watershed and outside the watershed. Animal operations within the Chesapeake Bay States were found to be adopting some important manure management practices at a greater rate than operations outside the watershed. Adoption was taking place before the implementation of the TMDL, indicating that farmers may have been acting in response to building public pressure ...

  1. This Dynamic Planet: World map of volcanoes, earthquakes, impact craters and plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkin, Tom; Tilling, Robert I.; Vogt, Peter R.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Kimberly, Paul; Stewart, David B.

    2006-01-01

    Our Earth is a dynamic planet, as clearly illustrated on the main map by its topography, over 1500 volcanoes, 44,000 earthquakes, and 170 impact craters. These features largely reflect the movements of Earth's major tectonic plates and many smaller plates or fragments of plates (including microplates). Volcanic eruptions and earthquakes are awe-inspiring displays of the powerful forces of nature and can be extraordinarily destructive. On average, about 60 of Earth's 550 historically active volcanoes are in eruption each year. In 2004 alone, over 160 earthquakes were magnitude 6.0 or above, some of which caused casualties and substantial damage. This map shows many of the features that have shaped--and continue to change--our dynamic planet. Most new crust forms at ocean ridge crests, is carried slowly away by plate movement, and is ultimately recycled deep into the earth--causing earthquakes and volcanism along the boundaries between moving tectonic plates. Oceans are continually opening (e.g., Red Sea, Atlantic) or closing (e.g., Mediterranean). Because continental crust is thicker and less dense than thinner, younger oceanic crust, most does not sink deep enough to be recycled, and remains largely preserved on land. Consequently, most continental bedrock is far older than the oldest oceanic bedrock. (see back of map) The earthquakes and volcanoes that mark plate boundaries are clearly shown on this map, as are craters made by impacts of extraterrestrial objects that punctuate Earth's history, some causing catastrophic ecological changes. Over geologic time, continuing plate movements, together with relentless erosion and redeposition of material, mask or obliterate traces of earlier plate-tectonic or impact processes, making the older chapters of Earth's 4,500-million-year history increasingly difficult to read. The recent activity shown on this map provides only a present-day snapshot of Earth's long history, helping to illustrate how its present surface came to

  2. Early post-impact sedimentation around the central high of the Mjølnir impact crater (Barents Sea, Late Jurassic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dypvik, Henning; Sandbakken, Pål T.; Postma, George; Mørk, Atle

    2004-06-01

    The Mjølnir bolide created the 40-km diameter Mjølnir crater, when it impacted the black, mostly anoxic clays of the Hekkingen Formation in the paleo-Barents Sea about 142±2.6 million years ago. The normally calm, 300-500 m deep epicontinental depositional environment was suddenly disrupted by the dramatic effect of the impact, resulting in a brief period of extreme sediment reworking and redeposition. The hypoxic to anoxic depositional conditions characteristic of the Hekkingen Formation returned to the impact site soon after the collapse, when the major modification phases of the Mjølnir crater were completed. We have studied a shallow core (121 m long) retrieved from the flanks of the central high in the Mjølnir crater. The core shows a complex depositional succession of the Ragnarok Formation, which is related to both the uplift and the subsequent collapse and drowning of the central high. The basal part of the core consists of chaotically organised, large folded slabs of pre-impact substrate, which we infer to be related to the rapid steepening of the slope of the central high during its rising shortly after the impact. The slump deposits are overlain by a diamict, which is interpreted to originate from debris flows that originate by liquefaction and subsequent remoulding and remobilisation of sediment from the collapsing central high. The diamict is in turn covered by a brecciated, graded mudstone that records the action of impact-related tsunami and the subsequent submergence of the impact crater. A sequence of mainly debris flow and turbidite deposits separates the impact-related deposit from the overlying shelf sediments of the Hekkingen Formation and forms the last post-impact sedimentary recorder of the presence of a central high in the crater.

  3. Probing the Hidden Geology of Isidis Planitia (Mars with Impact Craters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziella Caprarelli

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated Isidis Planitia, a 1325 km diameter multi-ring impact basin intersecting the Martian hemispheric dichotomy, located in the eastern hemisphere, between Syrtis Major and Utopia Planitia. From Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter gridded data we observed that in the center of Isidis the −3700 m and −3800 m isolines strike NW-SE, being quasi-parallel to the diameter of the basin. We interpreted this as evidence that the basement of Isidis Planitia was faulted prior to being completely covered by layers of sediments and volcanic rocks. Plotting the morphometric data of impact craters located on the floor of the basin in a measured depths vs. predicted depths diagram (MPD, we concluded that the fault planes should dip SW, which is consistent with the location of the most topographically depressed sector of Isidis Planitia. We also estimated a minimum vertical displacement of ~1–2 km. Considering that the crust under Isidis Planitia is only a few km thick, our estimate implies brittle behavior of the lithosphere under the basin, suggesting that a low geothermal gradient and rheologically strong material characterize this Martian location.

  4. Natural occurrence of pure nano-polycrystalline diamond from impact crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Irifune, Tetsuo; Litasov, Konstantin D.; Yamashita, Tomoharu; Isobe, Futoshi; Afanasiev, Valentin P.; Pokhilenko, Nikolai P.

    2015-01-01

    Consolidated bodies of polycrystalline diamond with grain sizes less than 100 nm, nano-polycrystalline diamond (NPD), has been experimentally produced by direct conversion of graphite at high pressure and high temperature. NPD has superior hardness, toughness and wear resistance to single-crystalline diamonds because of its peculiar nano-textures, and has been successfully used for industrial and scientific applications. Such sintered nanodiamonds have, however, not been found in natural mantle diamonds. Here we identified natural pure NPD, which was produced by a large meteoritic impact about 35 Ma ago in Russia. The impact diamonds consist of well-sintered equigranular nanocrystals (5–50 nm), similar to synthetic NPD, but with distinct [111] preferred orientation. They formed through the martensitic transformation from single-crystal graphite. Stress-induced local fragmentation of the source graphite and subsequent rapid transformation to diamond in the limited time scale result in multiple diamond nucleation and suppression of the overall grain growth, producing the unique nanocrystalline texture of natural NPD. A huge amount of natural NPD is expected to be present in the Popigai crater, which is potentially important for applications as novel ultra-hard material. PMID:26424384

  5. Eucrite Impact Melt NWA 5218 - Evidence for a Large Crater on Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Axel; Hiroi, Takahiro; Ross, Daniel K.; Herrin, Jason S.; Rumble, Douglas, III; Kring, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 5218 is a 76 g achondrite that is classified as a eucrite [1]. However, an initial classification [2] describes it as a "eucrite shock-melt breccia...(in which) large, partially melted cumulate basalt clasts are set in a shock melt flow...". We explore the petrology of this clast-bearing impact melt rock (Fig. 1), which could be a characteristic lithology at large impact craters on asteroid Vesta [3]. Methods: Optical microscopy, scanning electronmicroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were used on a thin section (Fig. 1) for petrographic characterization. The impact melt composition was determined by 20 m diameter defocused-beam analyses with a Cameca SX-100 electron microprobe. The data from 97 spots were corrected for mineral density effects [4]. Constituent mineral phases were analyzed with a focusedbeam. Bidirectonal visible and near-infrared (VNIR) and biconical FT-IR reflectance spectra were measured on the surface of a sample slab on its central melt area and on an eucrite clast, and from 125-500 m and rock. The thin section captures a central, subophitic-textured melt that contains 1 cm to tens of m-size subangular to rounded, variably-shocked eucrite clasts. Clasts >100 m are coarse-grained with equigranular 1 mm size plagioclase, quartz, and clinopyroxene (Fig. 1). Single crystals of chromite, ilmenite, zircon, Ca-Mg phosphate, Fe-metal, and troilite are embedded in the melt. Polymineralic clasts are mostly compositionally similar to the above mentioned larger clasts but scarce granulitic fragments are observed as well.

  6. Vargeão Dome Impact Crater and the Cerro do Jarau Structure (Brazil) — A First Report After Recent Fieldwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaag, P. T.; Reimold, W. U.; de Oliveira, G. J. G.; Crósta, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    Impact craters in volcanic targets are significantly underrepresented on Earth but are prominent features on other planets. We investigated two structures (Brazil) in volcanics, in particular targeting structural geological observations.

  7. Mud volcanism and morphology of impact craters in Utopia Planitia on Mars: Evidence for the ancient ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Hiesinger, H.; Erkeling, G.; Reiss, D.

    2014-01-01

    Results of our detailed geological mapping and interpretation of the nature and relative and absolute model ages of units and structures in the SW portion of Utopia Planitia (20-45°N, 100-120°E) suggest the following. (1) The size-frequency distribution (SFD) of craters that both are buried by materials of the Vastitas Borealis units (VB) and superpose its surface indicate that the absolute model ages of terrain predating the emplacement of the VB is ˜3.7 Ga. (2) Lack of craters that are partly embayed by materials of the VB in the SW portion of Utopia Planitia implies that the emplacement of the VB was faster than the rate of accumulation of impact craters and is consistent with the geologically short time of emplacement of the VB due to catastrophic release of water from outflow channels (e.g., Carr, M.H. [1996]. Water on Mars. Oxford University Press, New York, p. 229). (3) The SFD of craters that superpose the surface of the VB indicates an absolute model age of ˜3.6-3.5 Ga. The absolute model ages of etched flows, which represent the upper stratigraphic limit of the VB, are estimated to be ˜3.5 Ga. (4) The majority of the larger (i.e., >1 km) impact craters show ejecta morphologies (rampart and pancake-like ejecta) that are indicative of the presence of ice/water in the target materials. The distal portions of the pancake-like ejecta are heavily degraded (not due to embayment). This suggests that these craters formed in targets that contained higher abundances of volatiles. (5) The diameter ranges of the craters with either rampart- or pancake-like ejecta are overlapping (from ˜2 to ˜60 km). Craters with pancake-like ejecta are concentrated within the central portion of the Utopia basin (less than ˜1000 km from the basin center) and rampart craters occur at the periphery of the basin. This pattern of the crater spatial distribution suggests that materials within the center of Utopia Planitia contained more ice/water. (6) Etched flows around the central

  8. Looking Beneath an Impakt Crater — Non-Destructive Testing for Hypervelocity Impact Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, D.; Grosse, C.; Güldemeister, N.; Buhl, E.; Wünnemann, K.; Kenkmann, T.

    2012-03-01

    In the framework of the "MEMIN" project, ultrasound tomography gives an overview about the inner damage zone. The comparison to numerical simulations and optical evaluation will give an association about terrestrial craters.

  9. Venus Crater Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This web page leads to a database of images and information about the 900 or so impact craters on the surface of Venus by diameter, latitude, and name.

  10. The extra-large light-gas gun of the Fraunhofer EMI: Applications for impact cratering research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexow, B.; Wickert, M.; Thoma, K.; SchńFer, F.; Poelchau, M. H.; Kenkmann, T.

    2013-01-01

    The extra-large light-gas gun (XLLGG) at the Fraunhofer Ernst-Mach-Institut (EMI, Efringen-Kirchen, Germany) is a two-stage light-gas gun that can accelerate projectile masses of up to 100 g up to velocities of 6 km s-1. The accelerator's set-up allows various combinations of pump and launch tubes for applications in different fields of hypervelocity impact research. In the framework of the MEMIN (Multidisciplinary Experimental and Modeling Impact Research Network) program, the XLLGG is used for mesoscale cratering experiments with projectiles made of steel and of iron meteorites, and targets consisting of sandstone and other rocks. The craters produced with this equipment reach a diameter of up to 40 cm, a size unique in laboratory cratering research. With the implementation of neural networks, the acceleration process is being optimized, currently yielding peak velocities of 7.8 km s-1 for a 100 g projectile. Here, we summarize technical aspects of the XLLGG.

  11. The impact of urban expansion and agricultural legacies on trace metal accumulation in fluvial and lacustrine sediments of the lower Chesapeake Bay basin, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxon, T M; Odhiambo, B K; Giancarlo, L C

    2016-10-15

    The progressively declining ecological condition of the Chesapeake Bay is attributed to the influx of contaminants associated with sediment loads supplied by its largest tributaries. The continued urban expansion in the suburbs of Virginia cities, modern agricultural activities in the Shenandoah Valley, the anthropogenic and climate driven changes in fluvial system hydrodynamics and their potential associated impacts on trace metals enrichment in the bay's tributaries necessitate constant environmental monitoring of these important water bodies. Eight (210)Pb and (137)Cs dated sediment cores and seventy two sediment grab samples were used to analyze the spatial and temporal distributions of Al, Ca, Mg, Cr, Cd, As, Se, Pb, Cu, Zn, Mn, and Fe in the waterways of the Virginia portion of the Chesapeake Bay basin. The sediment cores for trace metal historical fluctuation analysis were obtained in lower fluvial-estuarine environments and reservoirs in the upper reaches of the basin. The trace metal profiles revealed high basal enrichment factors (EF) of between 0.05 and 40.24, which are interpreted to represent early nineteenth century agricultural activity and primary resource extraction. Surficial enrichment factors on both cores and surface grab samples ranged from 0.01 (Cu) to 1421 (Cd), with Pb, Cu, Zn, and Cd enrichments a plausible consequence of modern urban expansion and industrial development along major transportation corridors. Contemporary surficial enrichments of As, Se, and Cr also ranged between 0 and 137, with the higher values likely influenced by lithological and atmospheric sources. Pearson correlation analyses suggest mining and agricultural legacies, coupled with aerosol deposition, are responsible for high metal concentrations in western lakes and headwater reaches of fluvial systems, while metal accumulation in estuarine reaches of the major rivers can be attributed to urban effluence and the remobilization of legacy sediments. PMID:27310532

  12. 10Be content in clasts from fallout suevitic breccia in drill cores from the Bosumtwi impact crater, Ghana: Clues to preimpact target distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losiak, Anna; Wild, Eva Maria; Michlmayr, Leonard; Koeberl, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Rocks from drill cores LB-07A (crater fill) and LB-08A (central uplift) into the Bosumtwi impact crater, Ghana, were analyzed for the presence of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be. The aim of the study was to determine the extent to which target rocks of various depths were mixed during the formation of the crater-filling breccia, and also to detect meteoric water infiltration within the impactite layer. 10Be abundances above background were found in two (out of 24) samples from the LB-07A core, and in none of five samples from the LB-08A core. After excluding other possible explanations for an elevated 10Be signal, we conclude that it is most probably due to a preimpact origin of those clasts from target rocks close to the surface. Our results suggest that in-crater breccias were well mixed during the impact cratering process. In addition, the lack of a 10Be signal within the rocks located very close to the lake sediment-impactite boundary suggests that infiltration of meteoric water below the postimpact crater floor was limited. This may suggest that the infiltration of the meteoric water within the crater takes place not through the aerial pore-space, but rather through a localized system of fractures.

  13. Is There any Relationship Between the Santa Elena Depression and Chicxulub Impact Crater, Northwestern Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefticariu, L.

    2005-05-01

    The Terminal Cretaceous Chicxulub Impact Crater had a strong control on the depositional and diagenetic history of the northern Yucatan Platform during most of the Cenozoic Era. The Chicxulub Sedimentary Basin (henceforth Basin), which approximately coincides with the impact crater, is circumscribed by a concentration of karstic sinkholes known as the Ring of Cenotes. Santa Elena Depression (henceforth Depression) is the name proposed for the bowl-shaped buried feature, first contoured by geophysical studies, immediately south of the Basin, in the area where the Ticul 1 and UNAM 5 wells were drilled. Lithologic, petrographic, and biostratigraphic data on PEMEX, UNAM, and ICDP cores show that: 1) Cenozoic deposits are much thicker inside the Basin than inside the Depression, 2) in general, the Cenozoic formations from inside the Depression are the thickest among those outside the Basin, 3) variably dolomitized pelagic or outer-platform wackestone or mudstone occur both inside the Basin and Depression, 4) the age of the deeper-water sedimentary carbonate rocks is Paleocene-Eocene inside the Basin and Paleocene?-Early Eocene inside the Depression, 5) the oldest formations that crop out are of Middle Eocene age at the edge of the Basin and Early-Middle Eocene age inside the Depression, 6) saline lake deposits, that consist chiefly of anhydrite, gypsum, and fine carbonate, and also contain quartz, chert, clay, zeolite, potassium feldspar, pyrite, and fragments of wood, are present in the Cenozoic section of the UNAM 5 core between 282 and 198 m below the present land surface, 7) the dolomite, subaerial exposure features (subaerial crusts, vugs, karst, dedolomite), and vug-filling cement from the Eocene formations are more abundant inside the Depression than inside the Basin. The depositional environments that are proposed for explaining the Cenozoic facies succession within the Santa Elena Depression are: 1) deeper marine water (Paleocene?-Early Eocene), 2) relatively

  14. Corrigendum to "Impact and Cratering Rates onto Pluto" [Icarus 258 (2015) 267-288

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstreet, Sarah; Gladman, Brett; McKinnon, William B.

    2016-08-01

    The authors regret that an error was found in the code used to compute Charon primary crater densities by mistakenly using Pluto's diameter instead of Charon's diameter, causing the Charon cumulative crater density plots and R-plots (Figure 12) to have values that were too low by a factor of ≈12002/6002 ≈ 4. The corrected figure presented here implies younger surface ages (by roughly a factor of four) for Charon and should be used for interpretation of the New Horizons data.

  15. The Effect of Pre-Impact Porosity and Vertical Density Gradients on the Gravity Signature of Lunar Craters as Seen by GRAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbury, C.; Johnson, B. C.; Melosh, H., IV; Collins, G. S.; Blair, D. M.; Soderblom, J. M.; Nimmo, F.; Bierson, C. J.; Phillips, R. J.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    As a result of NASA's dual spacecraft Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission [Zuber et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231507], we now know that the lunar crust is highly porous and that the porosity varies laterally [Wieczorek et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231530] and vertically [Besserer et al., 2014; doi:10.1002/2014GL060240]. Analysis of complex craters located within the lunar highlands reveals that: 1) craters larger than diameter D~210 have positive Bouguer Anomalies (BAs), 2) craters with D ≲ 100 km have both positive and negative BAs that vary about the (near 0) mean by approximately ± 25 mGal, and, 3) D and BA are anticorrelated for craters with D ≲ 100 km [Soderblom et al., 2015; submitted]. Numerical modeling by Milbury et al. [2015, LPSC] shows that pre-impact porosity is the dominant influence on the gravity signature of complex craters with D ≲ 100 km, and mantle uplift dominates the gravity for those with D > 140 km. Phillips et al. [2015, LPSC] showed that complex craters located in the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin tend to have more-negative BAs than similar craters in the highlands. By including (pre-impact) vertical porosity/density gradients in our impact simulations, we reproduce the observed anticorrelation between BA and D for D ≲ 100 km, and the observed difference between the BAs of SPA and highland craters. We use the iSALE hydrocode including pore space compaction [Wünnemann et al., 2006; doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2005.10.013] and dilatant bulking [Collins, 2014; doi:10.1002/2014JE004708] to understand how the gravity signature of impact craters develop. In this study we vary density/porosity with depth. We find that simulations that have constant porosity with depth have a lower BA for a given crater diameter than those with varying porosity. We used two different mean porosities (7% and 14%) and found that the BA increases with increasing porosity, similar to simulations with constant porosity. Larger

  16. Lake evolution during the Early Danian Dan-C2 hyperthermal, Boltysh impact crater, Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebinghaus, Alena; Jolley, David W.

    2016-04-01

    Lacustrine facies record complex relationships between lake evolution and environmental conditions and provide proxies for climate changes. However, lacustrine successions formed during past hyperthermals as recorded from negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) are of limited availability and thus less well understood. Here, we present a complete lacustrine record of the Early Danian Dan-C2 hyperthermal at c. 65.2 Ma from a core drilled in the K-Pg Boltysh impact crater, Ukraine. This borehole allows a detailed facies analysis and reconstruction of lake evolution and associated plant ecosystem in correspondence with rapid climate change. The Boltysh borehole reveals a c. 400 m thick siliciclastic and organic-rich succession overlying impact melt-breccia dated at 65.17 ± 0.64 Ma. Based on detailed core logging, 8 distinctive facies associations are identified, including 1) littoral mudstones, 2) siliciclastic shoreline deposits, 3) siliciclastic littoral to sublittoral deposits, 4) mudstone laminites, 5) organic-rich mudstones, and deposits of 6) coarse-grained, 7) fine-grained density currents, and 8) debris flows. Based on the occurrence of these facies associations 3 major phases of lake evolution are distinguished: 1) an initial pre-CIE rising clastic-dominated lake phase characterised by the presence of coarse-grained density and debris flow deposits, 2) an organic-rich fluctuating shallow lake phase during the main phase of the CIE, characterised by alternating packages of the mudstone laminites and organic-rich mudstones; and 3) a rising clastic-dominated lake during and post-CIE recovery phase, which shows a high presence of siliciclastic shoreline and littoral to sublittoral deposits. This study provides a full record of lacustrine response to climate change during the Dan-C2 hyperthermal, and subsequently allows us to infer lake formation and environmental conditions at different stages during climate warming. The high resolution sedimentary record

  17. Geologic Mapping of Bakhuysen Crater, Mars: Analogies to the Ries Impact Ejecta with Insights into Martian Impact Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudill, C. M.; Osinski, G. R.; Tornabene, L. L.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we report the mapping and geologic interpretation of 150-km diameter Bakhuysen Crater, Mars, which supports previous work suggesting similar mechanisms of multi-unit ejecta emplacement on other comparable rocky bodies.

  18. The Chicxulub Multiring Impact Crater and the Cretaceous/Paleogene Boundary: Results From Geophysical Surveys and Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Perez-Cruz, Ligia

    2010-03-01

    The Chicxulub crater has attracted considerable attention as one of the three largest terrestrial impact structures and its association with the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary (K/Pg). Chicxulub is a 200 km-diameter multi-ring structure formed 65.5 Ma ago in the Yucatan carbonate platform in the southern Gulf of Mexico and which has since been buried by Paleogene and Neogene carbonates. Chicxulub is one of few large craters with preserved ejecta deposits, which include the world-wide K/Pg boundary clay layer. The impact has been related to the global major environmental and climatic effects and the organism mass extinction that mark the K/Pg boundary, which affected more than 70 % of organisms, including the dinosaurs, marine and flying reptiles, ammonites and a large part of the marine microorganisms. The impact and crater formation occur instantaneously, with excavation of the crust down to 25 km depths in fractions of second and lower crust uplift and crater formation in a few hundreds of seconds. Energy released by impact and crustal deformation generates seismic waves traveling the whole Earth, and resulting in intense fracturing and deformation at the target site. Understanding of the physics of impacts on planetary surfaces and modeling of processes of crustal deformation, rheological behavior of materials at high temperatures and pressures remain a major challenge in geosciences. Study of the Chicxulub crater and the global effects and mass extinction requires inter- and multidisciplinary approaches, with researchers from many diverse fields beyond the geosciences. With no surface exposures, geophysical surveys and drilling are required to study the crater. Differential compaction between the impact breccias and the surrounding carbonate rocks has produced a ring-fracture structure that at the surface reflects in a small topographic depression and the karstic cenote ring. The crater structure, located half offshore and half on-land, has been imaged by

  19. The self-secondary crater population of the Hokusai crater on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiyong; Prieur, Nils C.; Werner, Stephanie C.

    2016-07-01

    Whether or not self-secondaries dominate small crater populations on continuous ejecta deposits and floors of fresh impact craters has long been a controversy. This issue potentially affects the age determination technique using crater statistics. Here the self-secondary crater population on the continuous ejecta deposits of the Hokusai crater on Mercury is unambiguously recognized. Superposition relationships show that this population was emplaced after both the ballistic sedimentation of excavation flows and the subsequent veneering of impact melt, but it predated the settlement and solidification of melt pools on the crater floor. Fragments that formed self-secondaries were launched via impact spallation with large angles. Complex craters on the Moon, Mercury, and Mars probably all have formed self-secondaries populations. Dating young craters using crater statistics on their continuous ejecta deposits can be misleading. Impact melt pools are less affected by self-secondaries. Overprint by subsequent crater populations with time reduces the predominance of self-secondaries.

  20. Aluminum Foils of the Stardust Interstellar Collector: The Challenge of Recognizing Micrometer-sized Impact Craters made by Interstellar Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Westphal, A. J.; Burchell, M. J.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary Examination (PE) of the Stardust cometary collector revealed material embedded in aerogel and on aluminium (Al) foil. Large numbers of sub-micrometer impact craters gave size, structural and compositional information. With experience of finding and analyzing the picogram to nanogram mass remains of cometary particles, are we now ready for PE of the Interstellar (IS) collector? Possible interstellar particle (ISP) tracks in the aerogel are being identified by the stardust@home team. We are now assessing challenges facing PE of Al foils from the interstellar collector.

  1. Power-Law Scaling of the Impact Crater Size-Frequency Distribution on Pluto: A Preliminary Analysis Based on First Images from New Horizons' Flyby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholkmann F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent (14 th July 2015 flyby of NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft of the dwarf planet Pluto resulted in the first high-resolution images of the geological surface- features of Pluto. Since previous studies showed that the impact crater size-frequency distribution (SFD of different celestial objects of our solar system follows power-laws, the aim of the present analysis was to determine, for the first time, the power-law scaling behavior for Pluto’s crater SFD based on the first images available in mid-September 2015. The analysis was based on a high-resolution image covering parts of Pluto’s re- gions Sputnik Planum , Al-Idrisi Montes and Voyager Terra . 83 impact craters could be identified in these regions and their diameter ( D was determined. The analysis re- vealed that the crater diameter SFD shows a statistically significant power-law scaling ( α = 2.4926±0.3309 in the interval of D values ranging from 3.75±1.14 km to the largest determined D value in this data set of 37.77 km. The value obtained for the scaling coefficient α is similar to the coefficient determined for the power-law scaling of the crater SFDs from the other celestial objects in our solar system. Further analysis of Pluto’s crater SFD is warranted as soon as new images are received from the spacecraft.

  2. Meteorite crater impact study: a new way to study seismology at school with exciting experiments, and an example of meteorite astroblema in France (Rochechouart)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrer, Diane; Berenguer, Jean-Luc; MacMurray, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The InSIGHT mission to Mars (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) supported by NASA, IPGP and CNES, is a great opportunity for teachers and pupils to study the Red planet, but also to study other fields of geology at school, such as seismology. With our pupils, we are following the InSight mission and we look forward to analyze seismic data registered by the SEIS seismometer , once it will be available (the InSight mission will launch in 2018 from California, and will land to Mars in 2018 or 2019). As this mission needs meteorite impacts to generate seismic waves ( to discover the Martian interior structure) , we've decided to model those meteorite strikes in the classroom. With our pupils, we've modeled meteorite impact craters with different impactors , such as tennis balls, baseballs, or pingpong balls, and used an analogue substratum made by flour and cocoa. Then, we kept on going our geophysical investigation , studying several parameters. For instance, we've studied the link between size of impactor and size of crater , the link between mass of impactor and Crater Formation, and the link between velocity of impactor and crater formation. In this geophysical approach , potential energy and kinetic energy can be introduced in terms of energy transfer as the impactor falls ( calculation of the velocity of impact and plotting that against crater diameter using v = (2gh)1/2). For each crater formation made in class by students, we have registered seismological data thanks to Audacity software, and study the seismic signal propagation. This exemple of hands-on activity with pupils, and its wide range of geophysical calculation shows how we can do simple experiment modeling meteorite crater impact and exploit registered seismological data at school. We've finaly focused our work with the very famous example of the astroblema of Rochechouart in the South-west of France ( crater formation : - 214 My) , in which it's easy to

  3. 75 FR 11837 - Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Commodity Credit Corporation Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative AGENCY: Commodity Credit Corporation and... program funds for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative. SUMMARY: The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC... Watershed Initiative for agricultural producers in the Chesapeake Bay watershed in the States of...

  4. Formation of Craters in Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanissra Boonyaleepun

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The diameter of craters formed by spheres of varying mass dropped into sand at low speed was studied. The relationship between the diameter of the crater formed and the kinetic energy of the projectile at impact was found to be of the same general form as that for planetary meteor craters. The relationship is shown to be a power law with exponent 0.17.

  5. Formation of Craters in Sand

    OpenAIRE

    Vanissra Boonyaleepun; Se-Won Jang

    2007-01-01

    The diameter of craters formed by spheres of varying mass dropped into sand at low speed was studied. The relationship between the diameter of the crater formed and the kinetic energy of the projectile at impact was found to be of the same general form as that for planetary meteor craters. The relationship is shown to be a power law with exponent 0.17

  6. Formation of Craters in Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanissra Boonyaleepun

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The diameter of craters formed by spheres of varying mass dropped into sand at low speed was studied. The relationship between the diameter of the crater formed and the kinetic energy of the projectile at impact was found to be of the same general form as that for planetary meteor craters. The relationship is shown to be a power law with exponent 0.17

  7. Chronicle of Bukit Bunuh for possible complex impact crater by 2-D resistivity imaging (2-DERI) with geotechnical borehole records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinmin, M.; Saad, R.; Saidin, M.; Ismail, N. A.

    2015-03-01

    A 2-D resistivity imaging (2-DERI) study was conducted at Bukit Bunuh, Lenggong, Perak. Archaeological Global Research Centre, Universiti Sains Malaysia shows the field evidence of shock metamorphisms (suevite breccia) and crater morphology at Bukit Bunuh. A regional 2-DERI study focusing at Bukit Bunuh to identify the features of subsurface and detail study was then executed to verify boundary of the crater with the rebound effects at Bukit Bunuh which covered approximately 132.25 km2. 2-DERI survey used resistivity equipment by ABEM SAS4000 Terrameter and ES10-64C electrode slector with pole-dipole array. The survey lines were carried out using `roll-along' technique. The data were processed and analysed using RES2DINV, Excel and Surfer software to obtain resistivity results for qualitative interpretations. Bedrock depths were digitized from section by sections obtained. 2-DERI results gives both regional and detail study shows that the study area was divided into two main zones, overburden consists of alluvium mix with boulders embedded with resistivity value of 10-800 Ωm and granitic bedrock with resistivity value of >1500 Ωm and depth 5-50 m. The low level bedrock was circulated by high level bedrock (crater rim) was formed at the same area with few spots of high level bedrock which appeared at the centre of the rim which suspected as rebound zones (R). Assimilations of 2-DERI with boreholes are successful give valid and reliable results. The results of the study indicates geophysical method are capable to retrieve evidence of meteorite impact subsurface of the studied area.

  8. Chesapeake Bay Program Water Quality Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Chesapeake Information Management System (CIMS), designed in 1996, is an integrated, accessible information management system for the Chesapeake Bay Region....

  9. Geology of Holden Crater and the Holden and Ladon Multi-Ring Impact Basins, Margaritifer Terra, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, R. P., III; Grant, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Geologic mapping at 1:500K scale of Mars quads 15s027, 20s027, 25s027, and 25s032 (Fig. 1) is in progress to constrain the geologic and geomorphic history of southwestern Margaritifer Terra. This work builds on earlier maps at 1:5M [1] and 1:15M scales [2], recent to concurrent 1:500Kscale mapping of adjacent areas to the east [3-5], and studies of drainage basin evolution along the Uzboi-Ladon-M (ULM; the third valley in the sequence has no formal name) Valles basin overflow system and nearby watersheds [6-9]. Two of the six landing sites under consideration for the Mars Science Laboratory rover are in this map area, targeting finely layered, phyllosilicate-rich strata and alluvial fans in Holden crater [10-12] (26degS, 34degW, 150 km diameter) or deposits southeast of a likely delta in Eberswalde crater [13-16] (24degS, 33degW, 50 km in diameter). Diverse processes including larger and smaller impacts, a wide range in fluvial activity, and local to regional structural influences have all affected the surface morphology.

  10. 岫岩陨石撞击坑结构高精度地震探测研究%High-resolution seismic exploration of Xiuyan impact crater structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵成彬; 刘明军; 樊计昌; 姬计法; 郭新景; 李春周; 杨利普

    2011-01-01

    The Xiuyan impact crater with a rim-rim diameter of 1. 8 km is located at northern hills in the Liaodong peninsula, Liaoning province, China. It is reserved well and confirmed to be a meteorite impact crater. A special geophysical field resulted from the meteorite impact and subsequent deposit at the crater makes different medium velocity and density between inside and outside of the crater. In the project, velocity structures, stratum structures and whole configuration of the crater are gotten using the differences of seismic velocity and wave impedance from the combined exploration of reflection and refraction. Based on the reflection features, the crater body formed by the direct impact has a diameter about 1. 8 km, and a depth about 800 m, and the depth affected by the impact is about 1. 4 km. The crater structure is divided into 3 parts, slow deposit area, rapid deposit area and affected area. According to the seismic velocity features, the velocity at the crater center where the depth is 800 m reaches 7. 0 km/s, the isoline of 7. 0 km/s is consistent with the crater configuration, but the velocity reached 7. 0 km/s at the depth of 500~600 m in the edge of the crater. The structure of the crater body and the physical property of rocks confirm further the Xiuyan crater origin from meteorite impact.%我国的岫岩陨石撞击坑位于辽东半岛北部低山丘陵地区,直径1.8 km,保存完好,已被多方面的证据证实为陨石撞击坑.陨石的撞击和此后的沉积作用在坑内形成了特殊的地球物理场,使坑内与坑外的介质在速度、密度等方面存在差异.本次通过采用反射和折射地震相结合的探测方法,利用陨石撞击所形成的岩石的地震波速度和波阻抗差异,获得了陨石坑的速度结构、地层结构和整体形态.根据地层反射特征,直接撞击形成的区域为直径约1.8 km、深度800 m左右的坑体;受撞击影响的深度约1.4 km.撞击坑的结构分为慢速沉积

  11. Analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy of laboratory impacts on Stardust aluminum foils: interpreting impact crater morphology and the composition of impact residues

    CERN Document Server

    Kearsley, A T; Burchell, M J; Cole, M J; Dai, Z R; Teslich, N; Bradley, J P; Chater, R; Wozniakiewicz, P A; Spratt, J; Jones, G

    2006-01-01

    The known encounter velocity (6.1kms-1) and particle incidence angle (perpendicular) between the Stardust spacecraft and the dust emanating from the nucleus of comet Wild 2 fall within a range that allows simulation in laboratory light gas gun experiments designed to validate analytical methods for the interpretation of dust impacts on the aluminum foil components of the Stardust collector. Buckshot of a wide size, shape and density range of mineral, glass, polymer and metal grains, have been fired to impact perpendicularly upon samples of Stardust Al1100 foil, tightly wrapped onto aluminium alloy plate as an analogue of foil on the spacecraft collector. We have not yet been able to produce laboratory impacts by projectiles with weak and porous aggregate structure, as may occur in some cometary dust grains. In this report we present information on crater gross morphology and its dependence on particle size and density, the pre-existing major and trace element composition of the foil, geometrical issues for en...

  12. Uppermost impact fallback layer in the Bosumtwi crater (Ghana): Mineralogy, geochemistry, and comparison with Ivory Coast tektites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberl, Christian; Brandstätter, Franz; Glass, Billy P.; Hecht, Lutz; Mader, Dieter; Reimold, Wolf Uwe

    In 2004, an International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) drilling project at the Bosumtwi impact crater, Ghana (10.5 km in diameter, 1.07 Myr old), was performed to study the sediments that fill the lake as well as the underlying impactites. In one (LB-05) of 16 cores drilled into the lake sediments, the zone between the impact breccias and the post-impact sediments was penetrated, preserving the final, fine-grained impact fallback layer. This ~30 cm thick layer contains in the top 10 cm “accretionary” lapilli, microtektite-like glass spherules, and shocked quartz grains. Glass particles -- mostly of splash form less than 1 mm size -- make up the bulk of the grains (~70-78% by number) in the coarser size fraction (>125 μm) of the top of the fallback layer. About one-third of all quartz grains in the uppermost part of the layer are shocked, with planar deformation features (PDFs); almost half of these grains are highly shocked, with 3 or more sets of PDFs. K-feldspar grains also occur and some show shock deformation. The abundance of shocked quartz grains and the average shock level as indicated by the number of sets of PDFs, for both quartz and K-feldspar, decrease with depth into the layer. The well-preserved glass spherules and fragments are chemically rather homogeneous within each particle, and also show relatively small variations between the various particles. On average, the composition of the fallback spherules from core LB-5B is very similar to the composition of Ivory Coast tektites and microtektites, with the exception of CaO contents, which are about 1.5 to 2 times higher in the fallback spherules. This is a rare case in which the uppermost fallback layer and the transition to the post-impact sediments has been preserved in an impact structure; its presence indicates that the impactite sequence at Bosumtwi is complete and that Bosumtwi is a very well-preserved impact crater.

  13. Power-Law Scaling of the Impact Crater Size-Frequency Distribution on Pluto: A Preliminary Analysis Based on First Images from New Horizons' Flyby

    OpenAIRE

    Scholkmann F.

    2016-01-01

    The recent (14 th July 2015) flyby of NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft of the dwarf planet Pluto resulted in the first high-resolution images of the geological surface- features of Pluto. Since previous studies showed that the impact crater size-frequency distribution (SFD) of different celestial objects of our solar system follows power-laws, the aim of the present analysis was to determine, for the first time, the power-law scaling behavior for Pluto’s crater SFD ba...

  14. The Impact Crater Size-Frequency Distribution on Pluto Follows a Truncated Pareto Distribution: Results from a First Data Set Based on the Recent New Horizons' Flyby

    CERN Document Server

    Zaninetti, L

    2015-01-01

    Recently it could be shown ( that the impact crater size-frequency distribution of Pluto (based on an analysis of first images obtained by the recent New Horizons flyby) follows a power law alpha = 2.4926 in the interval of diameter (D) values ranging from 3.75 km to the largest determined value of 37.77 km. A reanalysis of this data set revealed that the whole crater SFD (i.e., with values in the interval of 1.2-37.7 km) can be described by a truncated Pareto distribution.

  15. Stratigraphy, Sequence, and Crater Populations of Lunar Impact Basins from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Data: Implications for the Late Heavy Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.; Kadish, S. J.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-01-01

    New measurements of the topography of the Moon from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA)[1] provide an excellent base-map for analyzing the large crater population (D.20 km)of the lunar surface [2, 3]. We have recently used this data to calculate crater size-frequency distributions (CSFD) for 30 lunar impact basins, which have implications for their stratigraphy and sequence. These data provide an avenue for assessing the timing of the transitions between distinct crater populations characteristic of ancient and young lunar terrains, which has been linked to the late heavy bombardment (LHB). We also use LOLA data to re-examine relative stratigraphic relationships between key lunar basins.

  16. Moon - 'Ghost' craters formed during Mare filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Hartmann, W. K.; Wood, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    This paper discusses formation of 'pathological' cases of crater morphology due to interaction of craters with molten lavas. Terrestrial observations of such a process are discussed. In lunar maria, a number of small impact craters (D less than 10 km) may have been covered by thin layers of fluid lavas, or formed in molten lava. Some specific lunar examples are discussed, including unusual shallow rings resembling experimental craters deformed by isostatic filling.

  17. Magnetic Susceptibility and Geochemistry Records in the Yax-1 Borehole in the Chicxulub Impact Crater: A paleoclimatic approach in the K/Pg and P/E Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marca-Castillo, M.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Fucugauchi, J. U.; Buitrón Sánchez, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Chicxulub impact crater is located in the northwestern sector of Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. It is the best-preserved multi-ring impact crater on Earth. Several studies have been focused in this crater structure due its association with the Cretaceous/Paleogenous boundary events. The aim of this study is document the abrupt climate changes during the K/Pg and P/E boundaries based on the stratigraphy, magnetic properties (magnetic susceptibility) and geochemical (major elements) records in the Yaxcopoil-1 (Yax-1) borehole in the Chicxulub impact crater. The Yax 1 was drilled at 20° 44' 38.45'' N, 89° 43' 6.70'' W. Two intervals from 830 to 750 and between 750 and 700 m depth were selected for this study. Magnetic susceptibility logs and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) measures were taken every 10 cm using a Bartington magnetic susceptibility meter and a Thermo Scientific Niton XL3tGOLDD XRF analyzer. Results show variations in magnetic susceptibility logs and major elements (Ca, Si, Fe, Ti and Si) content in the K/Pg boundary at ca. 794 m depth. Magnetic susceptibility decrease abruptly, Ca values increase, and the other elements show low values. Geochemical results, manly the Ca-record, suggest that the P/E boundary might have happened around 745 m depth. These values are compared with 13C isotopes and they coincide with the Carbon Isotope Excursion (CIE), suggesting their relationship with the abrupt climate change and with the ocean acidification.

  18. Description of Tessaracoccus profundi sp.nov., a deep-subsurface actinobacterium isolated from a Chesapeake impact crater drill core (940 m depth)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finster, Kai; Cockell, C.S.; Voytek, M.A.;

    2009-01-01

    grew anaerobically by reducing nitrate to nitrite or by fermenting glucose. It was catalase positive and oxidase negative. It grew between 10 and 45°C, with an optimum between 35 and 40°C. The pH range for growth was 5.7-9.3, with an optimum at pH 7.5. The closest phylogenetic neighbors based on 16S r...

  19. Moon-Mercury: Relative preservation states of secondary craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    Geologic mapping of the Kuiper quadrangle of Mercury and other geologic studies of the planet indicate that secondary craters are much better preserved than those on the moon around primary craters of similar size and morphology. Among the oldest recognized secondary craters on the moon associated with craters 100 km across or less are those of Posidonius, Atlas and Plato; these craters have been dated as middle to late Imbrian in age. Many craters on Mercury with dimensions, morphologies and superposed crater densities similar to these lunar craters have fields and clusters of fresher appearing secondary craters. The apparent differences between secondary-crater morphology and parent crater may be due in part to: (1) rapid isostatic adjustment of the parent crater; (2) different impact fluxes between the two planets; and (or) (3) to the greater concentration of Mercurian secondaries around impact areas, thereby accentuating crater forms. Another factor which may contribute to the better state of preservation of Mercurian secondaries relative to the moon is the difference in crater ejecta velocities on both bodies. These velocities have been calculated for fields of secondary craters at about equal ranges from lunar and Mercurian parent craters. Results show that ejection velocities of material producing most of the secondary craters are rather low (<1 km/s) but velocities on Mercury are about 50% greater than those on the moon for equivalent ranges. Higher velocities may produce morphologically enhanced secondary craters which may account for their better preservation with time. ?? 1977.

  20. Compilation of a Global GIS Crater Database for the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Nadine G.; Mest, S. C.; Gibbs, V. B.; Kinser, R. M.

    2012-10-01

    We are using primarily Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) information to compile a new global database of lunar impact craters 5 km in diameter and larger. Each crater’s information includes coordinates of the crater center (ULCN 2005), crater diameter (major and minor diameters if crater is elliptical), azimuthal angle of orientation if crater is elliptical, ejecta and interior morphologies if present, crater preservation state, geologic unit, floor depth, average rim height, central peak height and basal diameter if present, and elevation and elemental/mineralogy data of surroundings. LROC WAC images are used in ArcGIS to obtain crater diameters and central coordinates and LROC WAC and NAC images are used to classify interior and ejecta morphologies. Gridded and individual spot data from LOLA are used to obtain crater depths, rim heights, and central peak height and basal diameter. Crater preservational state is based on crater freshness as determined by the presence/absence of specific interior and ejecta morphologies and elevated crater rim together with the ratio of current crater depth to depth expected for fresh crater of identical size. The crater database currently contains data on over 15,000 craters covering 80% of the nearside and 15% of the farside. We also include information allowing cross-correlation of craters in our database with those in existing crater catalogs, including the ground-based “System of Lunar Craters” by Arthur et al. (1963-1966), the Lunar Orbiter/Apollo-based crater catalog compiled by Andersson and Whitaker (1982), and the Apollo-based morphometric crater database by Pike (1980). We find significant differences in crater diameter and classification between these earlier crater catalogs and our new compilation. Utilizing the capability of GIS to overlay different datasets, we will report on how specific crater features such as central peaks, wall terraces, and impact melt deposits correlate with parameters such as elevation

  1. Geology of Lofn Crater, Callisto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Ronald; Heiner, Sarah; Klemaszewski, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Lofn crater is a 180-km-diameter impact structure in the southern cratered plains of Callisto and is among the youngest features seen on the surface. The Lofn area was imaged by the Galileo spacecraft at regional-scale resolutions (875 m/pixel), which enable the general geology to be investigated. The morphology of Lofn crater suggests that (1) it is a class of impact structure intermediate between complex craters and palimpsests or (2) it formed by the impact of a projectile which fragmented before reaching the surface, resulting in a shallow crater (even for Callisto). The asymmetric pattern of the rim and ejecta deposits suggests that the impactor entered at a low angle from the northwest. The albedo and other characteristics of the ejecta deposits from Lofn also provide insight into the properties of the icy lithosphere and subsurface configuration at the time of impact. The "target" for the Lofn impact is inferred to have included layered materials associated with the Adlinda multiring structure northwest of Loh and ejecta deposits from the Heimdall crater area to the southeast. The Lofn impact might have penetrated through these materials into a viscous substrate of ductile ice or possibly liquid water. This interpretation is consistent with models of the current interior of Callisto based on geophysical information obtained from the Galileo spacecraft.

  2. Impacts of Watershed Characteristics and Crop Rotations on Winter Cover Crop Nitrate-Nitrogen Uptake Capacity within Agricultural Watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangchul; Yeo, In-Young; Sadeghi, Ali M; McCarty, Gregory W; Hively, W Dean; Lang, Megan W

    2016-01-01

    The adoption rate of winter cover crops (WCCs) as an effective conservation management practice to help reduce agricultural nutrient loads in the Chesapeake Bay (CB) is increasing. However, the WCC potential for water quality improvement has not been fully realized at the watershed scale. This study was conducted to evaluate the long-term impact of WCCs on hydrology and NO3-N loads in two adjacent watersheds and to identify key management factors that affect the effectiveness of WCCs using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and statistical methods. Simulation results indicated that WCCs are effective for reducing NO3-N loads and their performance varied based on planting date, species, soil characteristics, and crop rotations. Early-planted WCCs outperformed late-planted WCCs on the reduction of NO3-N loads and early-planted rye (RE) reduced NO3-N loads by ~49.3% compared to the baseline (no WCC). The WCCs were more effective in a watershed dominated by well-drained soils with increased reductions in NO3-N fluxes of ~2.5 kg N·ha-1 delivered to streams and ~10.1 kg N·ha-1 leached into groundwater compared to poorly-drained soils. Well-drained agricultural lands had higher transport of NO3-N in the soil profile and groundwater due to increased N leaching. Poorly-drained agricultural lands had lower NO3-N due to extensive drainage ditches and anaerobic soil conditions promoting denitrification. The performance of WCCs varied by crop rotations (i.e., continuous corn and corn-soybean), with increased N uptake following soybean crops due to the increased soil mineral N availability by mineralization of soybean residue compared to corn residue. The WCCs can reduce N leaching where baseline NO3-N loads are high in well-drained soils and/or when residual and mineralized N availability is high due to the cropping practices. The findings suggested that WCC implementation plans should be established in watersheds according to local edaphic and agronomic

  3. Impacts of Watershed Characteristics and Crop Rotations on Winter Cover Crop Nitrate-Nitrogen Uptake Capacity within Agricultural Watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangchul Lee

    Full Text Available The adoption rate of winter cover crops (WCCs as an effective conservation management practice to help reduce agricultural nutrient loads in the Chesapeake Bay (CB is increasing. However, the WCC potential for water quality improvement has not been fully realized at the watershed scale. This study was conducted to evaluate the long-term impact of WCCs on hydrology and NO3-N loads in two adjacent watersheds and to identify key management factors that affect the effectiveness of WCCs using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT and statistical methods. Simulation results indicated that WCCs are effective for reducing NO3-N loads and their performance varied based on planting date, species, soil characteristics, and crop rotations. Early-planted WCCs outperformed late-planted WCCs on the reduction of NO3-N loads and early-planted rye (RE reduced NO3-N loads by ~49.3% compared to the baseline (no WCC. The WCCs were more effective in a watershed dominated by well-drained soils with increased reductions in NO3-N fluxes of ~2.5 kg N·ha-1 delivered to streams and ~10.1 kg N·ha-1 leached into groundwater compared to poorly-drained soils. Well-drained agricultural lands had higher transport of NO3-N in the soil profile and groundwater due to increased N leaching. Poorly-drained agricultural lands had lower NO3-N due to extensive drainage ditches and anaerobic soil conditions promoting denitrification. The performance of WCCs varied by crop rotations (i.e., continuous corn and corn-soybean, with increased N uptake following soybean crops due to the increased soil mineral N availability by mineralization of soybean residue compared to corn residue. The WCCs can reduce N leaching where baseline NO3-N loads are high in well-drained soils and/or when residual and mineralized N availability is high due to the cropping practices. The findings suggested that WCC implementation plans should be established in watersheds according to local edaphic and agronomic

  4. Detection of erosion events using 10Be profiles: example of the impact of agriculture on soil erosion in the Chesapeake Bay area (U.S.A.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valette-Silver, J. N.; Brown, L.; Pavich, M.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.

    1986-01-01

    10Be concentration, total carbon and grain-size were measured in cores collected in undisturbed estuarine sediments of three tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. These cores were previously studied by Davis [1] and Brush [2,3] for pollen content, age and sedimentation rate. In this work, we compare the results obtained for these various analyses. In the cores, we observed two increases in 10Be concentration concomitant with two major changes in the pollen composition of the sediments. These two pollen changes each correspond to well-dated agricultural horizons reflecting different stages in the introduction of European farming techniques [2]. In the Chesapeake Bay area, the agricultural development, associated with forest clearing, appears to have triggered the erosion, transport, and sedimentation into the river mouths of large quantities of 10Be-rich soils. This phenomenon explains the observed rise in the sedimentation rate associated with increases in agricultural land-use. ?? 1986.

  5. Evidence of Non-Impact Cratering Origin of Imilchil (Morocco) Lakes (Isli and Tislit)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaabout, S.; Chennaoui Aoudjehane, H.; Reimold, W. U.; Aboulahris, M.; Aoudjehane, M.

    2013-08-01

    Isli and Tislit lakes (High Atlas Mountains, Morocco) were recently proposed as impact structures, related to the Agoudal iron meteorite found about twenty km from the lakes. Our study did not provide any evidence for such an origin.

  6. Cratering on Ceres: Implications for its crust and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesinger, H.; Marchi, S.; Schmedemann, N.; Schenk, P.; Pasckert, J. H.; Neesemann, A.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kneissl, T.; Ermakov, A. I.; Fu, R. R.; Bland, M. T.; Nathues, A.; Platz, T.; Williams, D. A.; Jaumann, R.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Ruesch, O.; Schmidt, B.; Park, R. S.; Preusker, F.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2016-09-01

    Thermochemical models have predicted that Ceres, is to some extent, differentiated and should have an icy crust with few or no impact craters. We present observations by the Dawn spacecraft that reveal a heavily cratered surface, a heterogeneous crater distribution, and an apparent absence of large craters. The morphology of some impact craters is consistent with ice in the subsurface, which might have favored relaxation, yet large unrelaxed craters are also present. Numerous craters exhibit polygonal shapes, terraces, flowlike features, slumping, smooth deposits, and bright spots. Crater morphology and simple-to-complex crater transition diameters indicate that the crust of Ceres is neither purely icy nor rocky. By dating a smooth region associated with the Kerwan crater, we determined absolute model ages (AMAs) of 550 million and 720 million years, depending on the applied chronology model.

  7. Vegetation history of Central Chukotka deduced from permafrost paleoenvironmental records of the El'gygytgyn Impact Crater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Andreev

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Frozen sediments from three cores bored in permafrost surrounding of the El'gygytgyn Impact Crater Lake have been studied for pollen, non-pollen palynomorphs, plant macrofossils, and rhizopods. The palynological study of the cores contributes to a higher resolution of time intervals presented in a poor temporal resolution in the lacustrine sediments; namely the Allerød and succeeding periods. Moreover, permafrost records better reflect local environmental changes, thus, allowing more reliable reconstruction of the local paleoenvironments. The new data confirm that shrub tundra with dwarf birch, shrub alder and willow dominated in the lake surroundings during the Allerød warming. Younger Dryas pollen assemblages reflect abrupt changes to grass-sedge-herb dominated environments reflecting significant climate deterioration. Low shrub tundra with dwarf birch and willow dominate the lake vicinity at the onset of the Holocene. The founds of larch seeds indicate its local presence around 11 000 cal. yr BP and, thus a northward shift of treeline by about 100 km during the early Holocene thermal optimum. Forest tundra with larch and shrub alder stands grew in the area during the early Holocene. After ca. 3500 cal. yr BP similar-to-modern plant communities became common in the lake vicinity.

  8. Hematite, pyroxene, and phyllosilicates on Mars: Implications from oxidized impact melt rocks from Manicouagan Crater, Quebec, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard V.; Golden, D. C.; Bell, James F., III; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Visible and near-IR reflectivity, Mossbauer, and X ray diffraction data were obtained on powders of impact melt rock from the Manicouagan Impact Crater located in Quebec, Canada. The iron mineralogy is dominated by pyroxene for the least oxidized samples and by hematite for the most oxidized samples. Phyllosilicate (smectite) contents up to 15 wt % were found in some heavily oxidized samples. Nanophase hematite and/or paramagnetic ferric iron is observed in all samples. No hydrous ferric oxides (e.g., goethite, lepidocrocite, and ferrihydrite) were detected, which implies the alteration occurred above 250 C. Oxidative alteration is thought to have occurred predominantly during late-stage crystallization and subsolidus cooling of the impact melt by invasion of oxidizing vapors and/or solutions while the impact melt rocks were still hot. The near-IR band minimum correlated with the extent of aleration (Fe(3+)/Fe(sub tot)) and ranged from approx. 1000 nm (high-Ca pyroxene) to approx. 850 nm (bulk, well-crystalline hematite) for least and most oxidized samples, respectively. Intermediate band positions (900-920 nm) are attributed to low-Ca pyroxene and/or a composite band from hematite-pyroxene assemblages. Manicouagan data are consistent with previous assignments of hematite and pyroxene to the 850 and 1000 nm bands observed in Martian reflectivity spectra. Manicouagan data also show that possible assignments for intermediate band positions (900-920 nm) in Martian spectra are pyroxene and/or hematite-pyroxene assemblages. By analogy with impact melt sheets and in agreement with observables for Mars, oxidative alteration of Martian impact melt sheets above 250 C and subsequent erosion could produce rocks and soils with variable proportions of hematite (both bulk and nanophase), pyroxene, and phyllosilicates as iron-bearing mineralogies. If this process is dominant, these phases on Mars were formed rapidly at relatively high temperatures on a sporadic basis throughout

  9. Chesapeake Bay Watershed - Protecting the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers through science, restoration, and partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2012-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay, the Nation's largest estuary, has been degraded due to the impact of human-population increase, which has doubled since 1950, resulting in degraded water quality, loss of habitat, and declines in populations of biological communities. Since the mid-1980s, the Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP), a multi-agency partnership which includes the Department of Interior (DOI), has worked to restore the Bay ecosystem. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has the critical role of providing unbiased scientific information that is utilized to document and understand ecosystem change to help assess the effectiveness of restoration strategies in the Bay and its watershed. The USGS revised its Chesapeake Bay science plan for 2006-2011 to address the collective needs of the CBP, DOI, and USGS with a mission to provide integrated science for improved understanding and management of the Bay ecosystem. The USGS science themes for this mission are: Causes and consequences of land-use change; Impact of climate change and associated hazards; Factors affecting water quality and quantity; Ability of habitat to support fish and bird populations; and Synthesis and forecasting to improve ecosystem assessment, conservation, and restoration.

  10. The shapes of fragments in hypervelocity impact experiments ranging from cratering to catastrophic disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michikami, T.; Hagermann, A.; Kadokawa, T.; Yoshida, A.; Shimada, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Tsuchiyama, A.

    2015-12-01

    Laboratory impact experiments have found that the shapes of impact fragments as defined by axes a, b and c, these being the maximum dimensions of the fragment in three mutually orthogonal planes (a ≥ b ≥ c) are distributed around mean values of the axial ratios b/a ~0.7 and c/a ~0.5, i.e., corresponding to a : b: c in the simple proportion 2: √2: 1. The shape distributions of some boulders on asteroid Eros, the small- and fast-rotating asteroids (diameter 8 m) on asteroid Itokawa. The mean value of c/a of these boulders is 0.46, which is similar to the value for catastrophic disruption. This implies that the parent body of Itokawa could have experienced a catastrophic disruption.

  11. Characteristics of Polygonal Craters on (1) Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Katharina A.; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Buczkowski, Debra L.; von der Gathen, Isabel; Kersten, Elke; Mest, Scott C.; Naß, Andrea; Neesemann, Adrian; Preusker, Frank; Roatsch, Thomas; Schröder, Stefan E.; Schulzeck, Fanziska; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Stephan, Katrin; Wagner, Roland; Williams, David A.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Chistopher T.

    2016-04-01

    The Dawn spacecraft arrived at Ceres in March 2015. There, the on-board Framing Camera (FC) collects image data with a resolution of up to 35 m/pixel, which reveal a large variety of impact crater morphologies including polygonal craters. Polygonal craters show straight rim sections aligned to form an angular shape. They are commonly associated with fractures in the target material, which may be preserved as linear structures on Ceres [3, 4]. On Ceres, we find polygonal craters with a size ranging between 5 km and 280 km in diameter. However, the majority of polygonal craters have diameters ranging between 10 km and 50 km diameter. A preferential hexagonal shape is observed and some polygonal craters exhibit central peaks or relaxed crater floors. On average there are eight to ten polygonal craters per 100,000 km², however the northern latitudes have a slightly higher and the southern latitudes a slightly lower polygonal crater density. This may hint at an older and younger age of the northern (> 60° N) and southern regions (> 60° S) compared to the mid latitudes, respectively. Alternatively, the relaxation of craters may be advanced in the mid latitudes which are generally warmer than the poles and thus support the relaxation of depressions. Also, the southern region harbors relatively large craters which may have altered or destroyed preexisting structures in the crust which are necessary for the formation of polygonal craters. Most polygonal craters have six or seven straight rim sections; however, there is a tendency for fewer edges with decreasing crater size. Although this observation may be biased due to the map resolution, it is also possible that the impactor creating a relatively small polygonal crater embeds less energy and thus forms the straight rim sections during the excavation stage. This may result in fewer straight rim sections compared to more energetic impactors which form their polygonal shape during the modification stage. Straight rim

  12. The Impact Crater Size-Frequency Distribution on Pluto Follows a Truncated Pareto Distribution: Results from a First Data Set Based on the Recent New Horizons' Flyby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaninetti L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently it could be shown (Scholkmann, Prog. in Phys. , 2016, v. 12(1, 26-29 that the impact crater size-frequency distribution of Pluto (based on an analysis of first images obtained by the recent New Horizons’ flyby follows a power law (α =2.4926±0.3309 in the interval of diameter ( D values ranging from 3.75±1.14 km to the largest deter- mined value of 37.77 km. A reanalysis of this data set revealed that the whole crater SFD (i.e., with values in the interval of 1.2–37.7 km can be described by a truncated Pareto distribution.

  13. Probing the Hidden Geology of Isidis Planitia (Mars) with Impact Craters

    OpenAIRE

    Graziella Caprarelli; Roberto Orosei

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated Isidis Planitia, a 1325 km diameter multi-ring impact basin intersecting the Martian hemispheric dichotomy, located in the eastern hemisphere, between Syrtis Major and Utopia Planitia. From Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter gridded data we observed that in the center of Isidis the −3700 m and −3800 m isolines strike NW-SE, being quasi-parallel to the diameter of the basin. We interpreted this as evidence that the basement of Isidis Planitia was faulted prior to being ...

  14. The Global TanDEM-X Digital Elevation Model and the Terrestrial Impact Crater Record

    OpenAIRE

    Gottwald, Manfred; Fritz, Thomas; Breit, Helko; Schättler, Birgit; Harris, Alan

    2016-01-01

    The German TanDEM-X mission produced a new DEM with unprecedented accuracy. From December 2010 to March 2015 the two X-band radar satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X have been operated in close formation as a single-pass SAR interferometer. The data acquired in bistatic mode were processed to yield a global DEM with an independent pixel spacing of 12 m and an absolute height error of < 10 m. We used this DEM to generate a TanDEM-X sample of more than 120 confirmed impact structures, all ma...

  15. Ring of Cenotes (sinkholes), northwest Yucatan, Mexico: Its hydrogeologic characteristics and possible association with the Chicxulub impact crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Eugene; Marin, Luis; McClain, Jana; Velazquez, Guadalupe

    1995-01-01

    A 180-km-diameter semicircular band of abundant karst sinkholes (Ring of Cenotes) in northwest Yucatan, Mexico, coincides approximately with a concentric ring of the buried Chicxulub structure, a circular feature manifested in Cretaceous and older rocks, that has been identified as the product of the impact of a bolide. The ring, expressed in Tertiary rocks, marks a zone of high permeability as shown by (1) the sinkholes themselves, (2) breaks in the coastal dune system and high density of springs where the ring intersects the coast, and (3) water-level transects characterized by a decline in water level toward the ring. Any direct relation that exists between the Ring of Cenotes and the Chicxulub structure bears on regional hydrogeology. If the layer or zone responsible for the ring is deeply buried, it may act as a barrier to the movement of ground water across the main flow direction. Shallower zones of horizontal permeability could result in less complete diversion of ground water. Through its influence on Yucatan aquifer characteristics, the ring may provide a link between modern environmental problems and astrogeology. Possible origins for the Ring of Cenotes are (1) faulting, perhaps reactivated by post-Eocene mid-Miocene basin loading, (2) permeability in a buried reef complex developed in the shallow Paleocene sea around the crater rim, or (3) breccia collapse occasioned by consolidation or by solution of evaporite components. If the ring developed on ancient faults, it may outline hydrothermal systems and mineral deposits produced during Paleocene cooling of the Chicxulub melt sheet.

  16. Authentication controversies and impactite petrography of the New Quebec Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, Ursula B.; Kring, David A.

    1992-12-01

    The literature reports that led to the current acceptance of New Quebec Crater (Chubb Crater) as an authentic impact crater are reviewed, and it is noted that, for reasons that are not entirely clear, a meteoritic origin for the New Quebec Crater achieved wider acceptance at an earlier data than for the Lake Bosumtwi Crater, for which petrographic and chemical evidence is more abundant and compelling. The petrography of two impact melt samples from the New Quebec Crater was investigated, and new evidence is obtained on the degrees of shock metamorphism affecting the accessory minerals such as apatite, sphene, magnetite, and zircon.

  17. The variability of crater identification among expert and community crater analysts

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Stuart J; Kirchoff, Michelle R; Chapman, Clark R; Fassett, Caleb I; Herrick, Robert R; Singer, Kelsi; Zanetti, Michael; Lehan, Cory; Huang, Di; Gay, Pamela L

    2014-01-01

    The identification of impact craters on planetary surfaces provides important information about their geological history. Most studies have relied on individual analysts who map and identify craters and interpret crater statistics. However, little work has been done to determine how the counts vary as a function of technique, terrain, or between researchers. Furthermore, several novel internet-based projects ask volunteers with little to no training to identify craters, and it was unclear how their results compare against the typical professional researcher. To better understand the variation among experts and to compare with volunteers, eight professional researchers have identified impact features in two separate regions of the moon. Small craters (diameters ranging from 10 m to 500 m) were measured on a lunar mare region and larger craters (100s m to a few km in diameter) were measured on both lunar highlands and maria. Volunteer data were collected for the small craters on the mare. Our comparison shows t...

  18. Scientific Objectives of Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) and Deployable Camera 3 Digital (DCAM3-D): Observation of an Ejecta Curtain and a Crater Formed on the Surface of Ryugu by an Artificial High-Velocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, M.; Wada, K.; Saiki, T.; Kadono, T.; Takagi, Y.; Shirai, K.; Okamoto, C.; Yano, H.; Hayakawa, M.; Nakazawa, S.; Hirata, N.; Kobayashi, M.; Michel, P.; Jutzi, M.; Imamura, H.; Ogawa, K.; Sakatani, N.; Iijima, Y.; Honda, R.; Ishibashi, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Sawada, H.

    2016-10-01

    The Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) equipped on Hayabusa2 was developed to produce an artificial impact crater on the primitive Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) 162173 Ryugu (Ryugu) in order to explore the asteroid subsurface material unaffected by space weathering and thermal alteration by solar radiation. An exposed fresh surface by the impactor and/or the ejecta deposit excavated from the crater will be observed by remote sensing instruments, and a subsurface fresh sample of the asteroid will be collected there. The SCI impact experiment will be observed by a Deployable CAMera 3-D (DCAM3-D) at a distance of ˜1 km from the impact point, and the time evolution of the ejecta curtain will be observed by this camera to confirm the impact point on the asteroid surface. As a result of the observation of the ejecta curtain by DCAM3-D and the crater morphology by onboard cameras, the subsurface structure and the physical properties of the constituting materials will be derived from crater scaling laws. Moreover, the SCI experiment on Ryugu gives us a precious opportunity to clarify effects of microgravity on the cratering process and to validate numerical simulations and models of the cratering process.

  19. Tektite origin by hypervelocity asteroidal or cometary impact: The quest for the source craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberl, Christian

    Tektites are natural glasses that are chemically homogeneous, often spherically symmetrical objects several centimeters in size, and occur in four known strewn fields on the surface of the Earth: the North American, moldavite (or Central European), Ivory Coast, and Australasian strewn fields. Tektites found within such strewn fields are related to each other with respect to their petrological, physical, and chemical properties as well as their age. A theory of tektite origin needs to explain the similarity of tektites in respect to age and certain aspects of isotopic and chemical composition within one strewn field, as well as the variety of tektite materials present in each strewn field. In addition to tektites on land, microtektites (which are generally less than 1 mm in diameter) have been found in deep-sea cores. Tektites are classified into three groups: (1) normal or splash-form tektites, (2) aerodynamically shaped tektites, and (3) Muong Nong-type tektites (sometimes also called layered tektites). The aerodynamic ablation results from partial remelting of glass during atmospheric passage after it was ejected outside the terrestrial atmosphere and quenched from a hot liquid. Aerodynamically shaped tektites are known mainly from the Australasian strewn field where they occur as flanged-button australites. The shapes of splash-form tektites (spheres, droplets, teardrops, dumbbells, etc., or fragments thereof) are the result of the solidification of rotating liquids in the air or vacuum. Mainly due to chemical studies, it is now commonly accepted that tektites are the product of melting and quenching of terrestrial rocks during hypervelocity impact on the Earth. The chemistry of tektites is in many respects identical to the composition of upper crustal material.

  20. The biotic effects of large bolide impacts: size versus time and place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkden, Gordon; Parker, Julian

    2008-10-01

    In estimating the biotic effects of large terrestrial impacts we are reliant upon apparent crater diameter as a proxy for impact magnitude. This underlies the ‘kill-curve’ approach which graphs crater diameter directly against likely percentage losses of taxa. However, crater diameter is a complex product of syn- and post-impact processes that can be site-dependent. Furthermore, location (global positioning) and timing (moment in geological history) also strongly influence biotic effects. We examine four of our largest and best-documented Phanerozoic impacts to explore this more holistic size time place relationship. Only the c. 180 km end-Cretaceous Chicxulub crater (Mexico) links to any substantial immediate extinction and some of the worst effects stem from where it struck the planet (a continental margin carbonate platform site) and when (a time of high regional and global biodiversity). Both the c. 100 km late Triassic Manicouagan crater in NE Canada (arid continental interior, low regional and world biodiversity) and the c. 35 Ma 100 km Popigai crater, Siberia (continental arctic desert) provide much less damaging scenarios. However the c. 90 km Chesapeake Bay crater, Eastern USA (also c. 35 Ma) marks a far more sensitive (Chicxulub-like) site but it also proved relatively benign. Here the rheologically varied shallow marine target site produced an anomalously broad crater, and the scale of the impact has evidently been overestimated. We offer a new approach to the graphical prediction of biotic risk in which both crater diameter and a generalised time/place factor we term ‘vulnerability’ are variables.

  1. Automatic extraction of lunar impact craters from Chang'E images based on Hough transform and RANSAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhongfei; Kang, Zhizhong

    2016-03-01

    This article proposed an algorithm combining Hough transform and RANSAC algorithm for automatic extraction of lunar craters. (1) In order to suppress noise, the images were filtered; (2) The edge of image were extracted, subsequently, eliminate false edge points by qualifying the gradient direction and the area of connected domain; (3) The edge images were segmented through Hough transform, gathering the same crater edge points together; (4) The edge images after segmentation were fitted using RANSAC algorithm, getting the high precision parameter. High precision of the algorithm was verified by the experiments of images acquired by the Chang'E-1 satellites.

  2. A meteorite crater on Mt. Ararat?

    CERN Document Server

    Gurzadyan, V G

    2010-01-01

    We briefly report on a crater on the western slope of Mt.Ararat . It is located in an area closed to foreigners at an altitude around 2100m with geographic coordinates 39\\deg 47' 30"N, 44\\deg 14' 40"E. The diameter of the crater is around 60-70m, the depth is up to 15m. The origin of the crater, either of meteorite impact or volcanic, including the evaluation of its age, will need detailed studies.

  3. Target rocks, impact glasses, and melt rocks from the Lonar crater, India: Highly siderophile element systematics and Sr-Nd-Os isotopic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Toni; Luguet, Ambre; Wegner, Wencke; Acken, David; Koeberl, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The Lonar crater is a ~0.57-Myr-old impact structure located in the Deccan Traps of the Indian peninsula. It probably represents the best-preserved impact structure hosted in continental flood basalts, providing unique opportunities to study processes of impact cratering in basaltic targets. Here we present highly siderophile element (HSE) abundances and Sr-Nd and Os isotope data for target basalts and impactites (impact glasses and impact melt rocks) from the Lonar area. These tools may enable us to better constrain the interplay of a variety of impact-related processes such as mixing, volatilization, and contamination. Strontium and Nd isotopic compositions of impactites confirm and extend earlier suggestions about the incorporation of ancient basement rocks in Lonar impactites. In the Re-Os isochron plot, target basalts exhibit considerable scatter around a 65.6 Myr Re-Os reference isochron, most likely reflecting weathering and/or magma replenishment processes. Most impactites plot at distinctly lower 187Re/188Os and 187Os/188Os ratios compared to the target rocks and exhibit up to two orders of magnitude higher abundances of Ir, Os, and Ru. Moreover, the impactites show near-chondritic interelement ratios of HSE. We interpret our results in terms of an addition of up to 0.03% of a chondritc component to most impact glasses and impact melt rocks. The magnitude of the admixture is significantly lower than the earlier reported 12-20 wt% of extraterrestrial component for Lonar impact spherules, reflecting the typical difference in the distribution of projectile component between impact glass spherules and bulk impactites.

  4. Shallow Crustal Structure of Chicxulub Impact Crater Imaged With Seismic, Gravity and Magnetotelluric Data: Structure of the Central Uplift and Origin of the Cenotes Ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Enriquez, O.; Chavez Garcia, F.; Cruz Jimenez, H.; Acosta Chang, J.; Takafumi, M.; Arzate, J.; Unsworth, M.; Ramos Lopez, J.

    2002-12-01

    The shallow crustal structure of the onshore portion of the Chicxulub impact structure (Yucatan, Mexico) has been studied with seismic, gravity and MT exploration. A dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves along a 150-km long, east-west profile allowed to image the shallow Tertiary cover to a depth of 400 m. The thickness of the first layer increases towards the central basin, from less than 100 m immediately outside, to more than 200 m in the terrace zone. The second layer also increases its thickness from about 150 m outside the crater rim, to around 250 m in the vicinity of the rim. At the center of the crater the first layer is again about 100 m thick. The increase in thickness of the first two layers as we approach the sinkhole ring from the exterior of the crater is consistent with the existence of a central basin. The velocity distribution along our profile does not have low-velocity layers. Thus, a low velocity layer observed in the Tertiary cover in a previous study, may be delimited to a ring around the crater center. The inferred inward slope of the two shallow layers immediately outside the central basin correlates with a smooth gravity gradient. A gravity model based in detailed measurements along our profile enable us to associate the fracturing that favored the development of the sink holes at the eastern rim with the ring fracture mapped by offshore seismic line. Finally, preliminary results of ongoing magnetotelluric (MT) studies support the existence of the central structural high.

  5. New Evidence for Impact-induced Hydrothermal Alteration at the Lunar Crater, India: Implications for the Effect of Small Craters on the Mineralogical and Chemical Composition of the Martian Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerty, J.; Newsom, H. E.

    2001-01-01

    The Lunar crater has several unique characteristics that make it a valid analogue for similar craters on Mars. We have characterized the secondary alteration assemblage at Lunar in order to make implications for martian alteration materials. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Detection of groundwater conduits in limestones with gravity surveys: data from the area of the Chicxulub Impact crater, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsland, G. L.; Hurtado, M.; Pope, K. O.; Ocampo, A. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Small negative gravity anomalies are found in gravity data from along the northwestern shoreline of the Yucatan Peninsula. These anomalies are shown to be due to elongate, shallow anomalous porosity zones in the Tertiary carbonates. These zones are caused primarily by groundwater solution and are presently active conduits for groundwater flow. The association of these small gravity anomalies with known topographic and structural features of the area, which partially overlies the Chicxulub Impact crater, indicates their development was influenced by structures, faults and/or fractures, within the Tertiary and pre-Tertiary carbonates.

  7. The Cratering History of Asteroid (21) Lutetia

    CERN Document Server

    Marchi, S; Vincent, J -B; Morbidelli, A; Mottola, S; Marzari, F; Kueppers, M; Besse, S; Thomas, N; Barbieri, C; Naletto, G; Sierks, H

    2011-01-01

    The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft passed by the main belt asteroid (21) Lutetia the 10th July 2010. With its ~100km size, Lutetia is one of the largest asteroids ever imaged by a spacecraft. During the flyby, the on-board OSIRIS imaging system acquired spectacular images of Lutetia's northern hemisphere revealing a complex surface scarred by numerous impact craters, reaching the maximum dimension of about 55km. In this paper, we assess the cratering history of the asteroid. For this purpose, we apply current models describing the formation and evolution of main belt asteroids, that provide the rate and velocity distributions of impactors. These models, coupled with appropriate crater scaling laws, allow us to interpret the observed crater size-frequency distribution (SFD) and constrain the cratering history. Thanks to this approach, we derive the crater retention age of several regions on Lutetia, namely the time lapsed since their formation or global surface reset. We also investigate the influe...

  8. A Tale of 3 Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    11 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image captures some of the complexity of the martian upper crust. Mars does not simply have an impact-cratered surface, it's upper crust is a cratered volume. Over time, older craters on Mars have been eroded, filled, buried, and in some cases exhumed and re-exposed at the martian surface. The crust of Mars is layered to depths of 10 or more kilometers, and mixed in with the layered bedrock are a variety of ancient craters with diameters ranging from a few tens of meters (a few tens of yards) to several hundred kilometers (more than one or two hundred miles). The picture shown here captures some of the essence of the layered, cratered volume of the upper crust of Mars in a very simple form. The image shows three distinct circular features. The smallest, in the lower right quarter of the image, is a meteor crater surrounded by a mound of material. This small crater formed within a layer of bedrock that once covered the entire scene, but today is found only in this small remnant adjacent to the crater. The intermediate-sized crater, west (left) of the small one, formed either in the next layer down--that is, below the layer in which the small crater formed--or it formed in some layers that are now removed, but was big enough to penetrate deeply into the rock that is near the surface today. The largest circular feature in the image, in the upper right quarter of the image, is still largely buried. It formed in layers of rock that are below the present surface. Erosion has brought traces of its rim back to the surface of Mars. This picture is located near 50.0oS, 77.8oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates this October 2004 image from the upper left.

  9. A complete high resolution record of the Dan-C2 hyperthermal event in the lacustrine sediments of the Boltysh Impact crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, I.; Jolley, D. W.; Daly, R. J.; Kelley, S. P.; Gilmour, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    Drilling of the 65.17 Ma old, 24 km diameter, Boltysh impact crater in the Ukraine recovered over 400 m of Danian organic-rich lacustrine sediments [1]. We have undertaken geochemical and palynological investigations of the newly cored borehole, which demonstrate that these strata contain a unique high resolution record spanning CIEs) of around 1.5‰ within planktonic foraminiferal zone P1a, post-dating the K/Pg boundary. Geochemical and palynological investigations have enabled us to identify the Dan-C2 event in the lacustrine Boltysh crater fill where it is characterised by a 3-4‰ negative CIE. In common with other hyperthermal events, it has been suggested that the Dan-C2 reflects transient perturbations in the global carbon cycle, however, whether the Dan-C2 is a global event has been disputed. The event has been confirmed in the S. Atlantic but was not found in the equatorial Pacific leading to the suggestion that it was restricted to the Atlantic Ocean [3]. Its presence in the lacustrine sediments of the Boltysh crater fill disproves this contention. The Dan-C2 CIE has also been regarded as being of shorter duration and lower magnitude than the PETM hyperthermal [2]. This view is brought into question by the Boltysh carbon isotope record, which highlights the close comparability of Toarcian, Dan-C2 and PETM excursions. We have also have established the position of the Dan-C2 with respect to the K/Pg boundary [1] since its close proximity this boundary, also marked by a negative CIE, makes it probable that the event has been misidentified or even amalgamated with the K/Pg in many sequences. [1] Jolley, D. W. et al. (2010) Geology 38, 835-838. [2] Quillevere, F. et al. (2008) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 265, 600-615. [3] Westerhold, T. et al. (2011) Paleooceanog. 26, PA2216.

  10. Exploration of Victoria crater by the mars rover opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squyres, S. W.; Knoll, A.H.; Arvidson, R. E.; Ashley, James W.; Bell, J.F.; Calvin, W.M.; Christensen, P.R.; Clark, B. C.; Cohen, B. A.; De Souza, P.A.; Edgar, L.; Farrand, W. H.; Fleischer, I.; Gellert, Ralf; Golombek, M.P.; Grant, J.; Grotzinger, J.; Hayes, A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Jolliff, B.; Klingelhofer, G.; Knudson, A.; Li, R.; McCoy, T.J.; McLennan, S.M.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Morris, R.V.; Rice, J. W.; Schroder, C.; Sullivan, R.J.; Yen, A.; Yingst, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars rover Opportunity has explored Victoria crater, a ???750-meter eroded impact crater formed in sulfate-rich sedimentary rocks. Impact-related stratigraphy is preserved in the crater walls, and meteoritic debris is present near the crater rim. The size of hematite-rich concretions decreases up-section, documenting variation in the intensity of groundwater processes. Layering in the crater walls preserves evidence of ancient wind-blown dunes. Compositional variations with depth mimic those ???6 kilometers to the north and demonstrate that water-induced alteration at Meridiani Planum was regional in scope.

  11. Surface expression of the Chicxulub crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Kevin O.; Ocampo, Adriana C.; Kinsland, Gary L.; Smith, Randy

    1996-06-01

    Analyses of geomorphic, soil, and topographic data from the northern Yucatán Peninsula, México, confirm that the buried Chicxulub impact crater has a distinct surface expression and that carbonate sedimentation throughout the Cenozoic has been influenced by the crater. Late Tertiary sedimentation was mostly restricted to the region within the buried crater, and a semicircular moat existed until at least Pliocene time. The topographic expression of the crater is a series of features concentric with the crater. The most prominent is an ˜ 83-km-radius trough or moat containing sinkholes (the Cenote ring). Early Tertiary surfaces rise abruptly outside the moat and form a stepped topography with an outer trough and ridge crest at radii of ˜103 and ˜ 129 km, respectively. Two discontinuous troughs lie within the moat at radii of ˜ 41 and ˜ 62 km. The low ridge between the inner troughs corresponds to the buried peak ring. The moat corresponds to the outer edge of the crater floor demarcated by a major ring fault. The outer trough and the ˜ 62-km-radius inner trough also mark buried ring faults. The ridge crest corresponds to the topographic rim of the crater as modified by postimpact processes. These interpretations support previous findings that the principal impact basin has a diameter of ˜ 180 km, but concentric, low-relief slumping extends well beyond this diameter and the eroded crater rim may extend to a diameter of ˜ 260 km.

  12. Minerals of a soil developed in the meteoritic crater of Carancas, Peru, and evidences of phase changes on the impact event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loayza, María L. Cerón; Cabrejos, Jorge A. Bravo

    2014-01-01

    We report studies about the phase transformations in the soil of the Carancas meteoritic crater located in an inhabited area near the town of Carancas, in the Region of Puno, about 1,300 km southeast of Lima, Peru. The studies by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffractometry and transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy (at RT and 77 K) reveal that the sample consists mainly of quartz, albite and impactites such as coesite and stishovite (SiO2) that have experienced phase metamorphism or alterations, related to high pressures and temperatures, forming their corresponding polymorphs. The occurrence of these phases, with high content of SiO2, in the soil of the crater strengthens the hypothesis of its origin by metamorphism induced by impact; we observed also a magnetic sextet on the Mössbauer pattern, assigned to the Fe3 + in hematite, and three paramagnetic doublets, two of them associated with structural Fe3 + and Fe2 + cations, respectively, in illite and/or montmorillonite, and a third one due to an unidentified Fe3 + site.

  13. Recharge from a subsidence crater at the Nevada test site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, G. V.; Ely, D.M.; Hokett, S. L.; Gillespie, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    Current recharge through the alluvial fans of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is considered to be negligible, but the impact of more than 400 nuclear subsidence craters on recharge is uncertain. Many of the craters contain a playa region, but the impact of these playas has not been addressed. It was hypothesized that a crater playa would focus infiltration through the surrounding coarser-grained material, thereby increasing recharge. Crater U5a was selected because it represented a worst case for runoff into craters. A borehole was instrumented for neutron logging beneath the playa center and immediately outside the crater. Physical and hydraulic properties were measured along a transect in the crater and outside the crater. Particle-size analysis of the 14.6 m of sediment in the crater and morphological features of the crater suggest that a large ponding event of ≈63000 m3 had occurred since crater formation. Water flow simulations with HYDRUS-2D, which were corroborated by the measured water contents, suggest that the wetting front advanced initially by as much as 30 m yr−1 with a recharge rate 32 yr after the event of 2.5 m yr−1Simulations based on the measured properties of the sediments suggest that infiltration will occur preferentially around the playa perimeter. However, these sediments were shown to effectively restrict future recharge by storing water until removal by evapotranspiration (ET). This work demonstrated that subsidence craters may be self-healing.

  14. Novel approach of crater detection by crater candidate region selection and matrix-pattern-oriented least squares support vector machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Meng; Cao Yunfeng; Wu Qingxian

    2013-01-01

    Impacted craters are commonly found on the surface of planets,satellites,asteroids and other solar system bodies.In order to speed up the rate of constructing the database of craters,it is important to develop crater detection algorithms.This paper presents a novel approach to automatically detect craters on planetary surfaces.The approach contains two parts:crater candidate region selection and crater detection.In the first part,crater candidate region selection is achieved by Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi (KLT) detector.Matrix-pattern-oriented least squares support vector machine (MatLSSVM),as the matrixization version of least square support vector machine (SVM),inherits the advantages of least squares support vector machine (LSSVM),reduces storage space greatly and reserves spatial redundancies within each image matrix compared with general LSSVM.The second part of the approach employs MatLSSVM to design classifier for crater detection.Experimental results on the dataset which comprises 160 preprocessed image patches from Google Mars demonstrate that the accuracy rate of crater detection can be up to 88%.In addition,the outstanding feature of the approach introduced in this paper is that it takes resized crater candidate region as input pattern directly to finish crater detection.The results of the last experiment demonstrate that MatLSSVM-based classifier can detect crater regions effectively on the basis of KLT-based crater candidate region selection.

  15. Method for evaluation of laboratory craters using crater detection algorithm for digital topography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamunićcar, Goran; Vinković, Dejan; Lončarić, Sven; Vučina, Damir; Pehnec, Igor; Vojković, Marin; Gomerčić, Mladen; Hercigonja, Tomislav

    In our previous work the following has been done: (1) the crater detection algorithm (CDA) based on digital elevation model (DEM) has been developed and the GT-115225 catalog has been assembled [GRS, 48 (5), in press, doi:10.1109/TGRS.2009.2037750]; and (2) the results of comparison between explosion-induced laboratory craters in stone powder surfaces and GT-115225 have been presented using depth/diameter measurements [41stLPSC, Abstract #1428]. The next step achievable using the available technology is to create 3D scans of such labo-ratory craters, in order to compare different properties with simple Martian craters. In this work, we propose a formal method for evaluation of laboratory craters, in order to provide objective, measurable and reproducible estimation of the level of achieved similarity between these laboratory and real impact craters. In the first step, the section of MOLA data for Mars (or SELENE LALT for Moon) is replaced with one or several 3D-scans of laboratory craters. Once embedment was done, the CDA can be used to find out whether this laboratory crater is similar enough to real craters, as to be recognized as a crater by the CDA. The CDA evaluation using ROC' curve represents how true detection rate (TDR=TP/(TP+FN)=TP/GT) depends on the false detection rate (FDR=FP/(TP+FP)). Using this curve, it is now possible to define the measure of similarity between laboratory and real impact craters, as TDR or FDR value, or as a distance from the bottom-right origin of the ROC' curve. With such an approach, the reproducible (formally described) method for evaluation of laboratory craters is provided.

  16. Rising sea level, temperature, and precipitation impact plant and ecosystem responses to elevated CO2 on a Chesapeake Bay wetland: review of a 28-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Bert G

    2014-11-01

    An ongoing field study of the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on a brackish wetland on Chesapeake Bay, started in 1987, is unique as the longest continually running investigation of the effects of elevated CO2 on an ecosystem. Since the beginning of the study, atmospheric CO2 increased 18%, sea level rose 20 cm, and growing season temperature varied with approximately the same range as predicted for global warming in the 21st century. This review looks back at this study for clues about how the effects of rising sea level, temperature, and precipitation interact with high atmospheric CO2 to alter the physiology of C3 and C4 photosynthetic species, carbon assimilation, evapotranspiration, plant and ecosystem nitrogen, and distribution of plant communities in this brackish wetland. Rising sea level caused a shift to higher elevations in the Scirpus olneyi C3 populations on the wetland, displacing the Spartina patens C4 populations. Elevated CO2 stimulated carbon assimilation in the Scirpus C3 species measured by increased shoot and root density and biomass, net ecosystem production, dissolved organic and inorganic carbon, and methane production. But elevated CO2 also decreased biomass of the grass, S. patens C4. The elevated CO2 treatment reduced tissue nitrogen concentration in shoots, roots, and total canopy nitrogen, which was associated with reduced ecosystem respiration. Net ecosystem production was mediated by precipitation through soil salinity: high salinity reduced the CO2 effect on net ecosystem production, which was zero in years of severe drought. The elevated CO2 stimulation of shoot density in the Scirpus C3 species was sustained throughout the 28 years of the study. Results from this study suggest that rising CO2 can add substantial amounts of carbon to ecosystems through stimulation of carbon assimilation, increased root exudates to supply nitrogen fixation, reduced dark respiration, and improved water and nitrogen use efficiency.

  17. Processes Modifying Cratered Terrains on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The July encounter with Pluto by the New Horizons spacecraft permitted imaging of its cratered terrains with scales as high as approximately 100 m/pixel, and in stereo. In the initial download of images, acquired at 2.2 km/pixel, widely distributed impact craters up to 260 km diameter are seen in the near-encounter hemisphere. Many of the craters appear to be significantly degraded or infilled. Some craters appear partially destroyed, perhaps by erosion such as associated with the retreat of scarps. Bright ice-rich deposits highlight some crater rims and/or floors. While the cratered terrains identified in the initial downloaded images are generally seen on high-to-intermediate albedo surfaces, the dark equatorial terrain informally known as Cthulhu Regio is also densely cratered. We will explore the range of possible processes that might have operated (or still be operating) to modify the landscape from that of an ancient pristinely cratered state to the present terrains revealed in New Horizons images. The sequence, intensity, and type of processes that have modified ancient landscapes are, among other things, the record of climate and volatile evolution throughout much of the Pluto's existence. The deciphering of this record will be discussed. This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  18. Cratering Rates in the Outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K.; Levison, H.; Dones, L.; Schenk, P.

    1999-09-01

    We use numerical simulations of the orbital evolution of stray Kuiper Belt objects to relate the number of comets striking the planets to the number of Jupiter-family comets observed in the inner solar system. Cratering rates are obtained by accounting for gravitational focusing, cratering efficiency, and an intuitive average of the various available calibrations of cometary mass. The most telling craters are those of Triton, a retrograde moon in a prograde system. It is well-known that much of Triton's surface is relatively young. Less well-known is that Triton features the most startling hemispheric cratering asymmetry in the solar system: fresh impact craters are almost exclusively limited to the leading hemisphere. It would seem that Triton has been colliding almost exclusively with planetocentric debris. If so, then we conclude that Triton's trailing hemisphere is less than 10 million years old. Recent too must be the event that cratered the leading hemisphere. Once admitted we must consider planetocentric cratering of other, prograde satellites. In particular, the lack of a strong apex-antapex asymmetry on Ganymede is not as good an argument for nonsynchronous rotation as we once thought. Rather, many or most of Ganymede's craters might prove to be secondaries, most likely made by ejecta launched into orbit about Jupiter, only to return not too much later, like the insatiable shards of Texas in Armageddon II: The New Millenium.

  19. 33 CFR 334.170 - Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory. 334.170 Section 334.170 Navigation... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.170 Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range... on the west by the shore of Chesapeake Bay. (2) Area B. The sector of a circle bounded by radii of...

  20. Galileo SSI lunar observations: Copernican craters and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcewen, A. S.; Greeley, R.; Head, James W.; Pieters, C. M.; Fischer, E. M.; Johnson, T. V.; Neukum, G.

    1993-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft completed its first Earth-Moon flyby (EMI) in December 1990 and its second flyby (EM2) in December 1992. Copernican-age craters are among the most prominent features seen in the SSI (Solid-State Imaging) multispectral images of the Moon. The interiors, rays, and continuous ejecta deposits of these youngest craters stand out as the brightest features in images of albedo and visible/1-micron color ratios (except where impact melts are abundant). Crater colors and albedos (away from impact melts) are correlated with their geologic emplacement ages as determined from counts of superposed craters; these age-color relations can be used to estimate the emplacement age (time since impact event) for many Copernican-age craters on the near and far sides of the Moon. The spectral reflectivities of lunar soils are controlled primarily by (1) soil maturity, resulting from the soil's cumulative age of exposure to the space environment; (2) steady-state horizontal and vertical mixing of fresh crystalline materials ; and (3) the mineralogy of the underlying bedrock or megaregolith. Improved understanding of items (1) and (2) above will improve our ability to interpret item (3), especially for the use of crater compositions as probes of crustal stratigraphy. We have examined the multispectral and superposed crater frequencies of large isolated craters, mostly of Eratosthenian and Copernican ages, to avoid complications due to (1) secondaries (as they affect superposed crater counts) and (2) spatially and temporally nonuniform regolith mixing from younger, large, and nearby impacts. Crater counts are available for 11 mare craters and 9 highlands craters within the region of the Moon imaged during EM1. The EM2 coverage provides multispectral data for 10 additional craters with superposed crater counts. Also, the EM2 data provide improved spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratios over the western nearside.

  1. Lunar Crater Interiors with High Circular Polarization Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, C. M.; Campbell, B. A.; Morgan, G.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed 12.6-cm Earth-based radar images of the Moon to search for older craters (pre-Copernican) that display high values of the circular polarization ratio (CPR) on their interior walls. These craters have highly eroded rims and ejecta, indicating that there must be a source exposed within the crater interior that is continuously creating a rougher surface. Of particular interest are craters between 10-25 km in diameter that occur in smooth plains in the highlands, where competent layers are not expected as they are for the mare. After identifying these high-CPR interiors in pre-Copernican craters, we studied LROC NAC and Kaguya TC images to search for possible albedo and layering on crater interior walls that might signal the presence of anomalous material. Our results indicate that high-CPR craters generally have boulder fields clustered around their upper interior walls. We divide the high-CPR craters into three types: (1) craters on the layered mare lava flows; (2) craters in the highlands that correlate to mapped locations of smooth plains; and (3) craters on the highlands that are not associated with smooth plains. Most of the high-CPR craters in the highlands are associated with Eratosthenian-period craters, and most of these are also on smooth plains, indicating that impact melt sheets are a likely source for the boulders exposed on their interior walls. Statistical analyses will be performed after incorporating multiple lunar datasets into GIS to quantify these preliminary interpretations. Figure 1. Example of high-CPR crater Zagut A located on smooth plains in the highlands. LROC images showing boulders on (a) northern crater interior wall and (b) southern crater interior wall. (c) Stronlgy enhanced values of CPR are observed for the interior of Zagut A.

  2. International Assistance in Naming Craters on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, H. M.; Edmonds, J.; Hallau, K.; Hirshon, B.; Goldstein, J.; Hamel, J.; Hamel, S.; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's robotic MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft made history in March 2011 by becoming the first to orbit Mercury. During the mission, MESSENGER acquired more than 250,000 images and made many other kinds of measurements. Names are often given to surface features that are of special scientific interest, such as craters. To draw international attention to the achievements of the spacecraft and engineers and scientists who made the MESSENGER mission a success, the MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Team initiated a Name a Crater on Mercury Competition.Five craters of particular geological interest were chosen by the science team. In accordance with International Astronomical Union (IAU) rules for Mercury, impact craters are named in honor of those who have made outstanding or fundamental contributions to the arts and humanities. He or she must have been recognized as a historically significant figure in the arts for at least 50 years and deceased for the last three years. We were particularly interested in entries honoring people from nations and cultural groups underrepresented in the current list of crater names. From more than 3600 entries received from around the world, the EPO team was able to reduce the number of entries to about 1200 names of 583 different artists who met the contest eligibility criteria. Next, the proposed individuals were divided into five artistic field groups and distributed to experts in that respective field. Each expert reviewed approximately100 artists with their biographical information. They narrowed down their list to a top ten, then to a top five by applying a rubric. The final selection was based on the reviewer lists and scores, with at least three finalist names selected from each artistic field. Of the 17 finalists provided to the IAU, the following names were selected: Carolan crater, Enheduanna crater, Karsh crater, Kulthum crater, and Rivera crater. For more

  3. PyCraters: A Python framework for crater function analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a Python framework designed to automate the most common tasks associated with the extraction and upscaling of the statistics of single-impact crater functions to inform coefficients of continuum equations describing surface morphology evolution. Designed with ease-of-use in mind, the framework allows users to extract meaningful statistical estimates with very short Python programs. Wrappers to interface with specific simulation packages, routines for statistical extraction of out...

  4. Small crater populations on Vesta

    CERN Document Server

    Marchi, S; O'Brien, D P; Schenk, P; Mottola, S; De Sanctis, M C; Kring, D A; Williams, D A; Raymond, C A; Russell, C T

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Dawn mission has extensively examined the surface of asteroid Vesta, the second most massive body in the main belt. The high quality of the gathered data provides us with an unique opportunity to determine the surface and internal properties of one of the most important and intriguing main belt asteroids (MBAs). In this paper, we focus on the size frequency distributions (SFDs) of sub-kilometer impact craters observed at high spatial resolution on several selected young terrains on Vesta. These small crater populations offer an excellent opportunity to determine the nature of their asteroidal precursors (namely MBAs) at sizes that are not directly observable from ground-based telescopes (i.e., below ~100 m diameter). Moreover, unlike many other MBA surfaces observed by spacecraft thus far, the young terrains examined had crater spatial densities that were far from empirical saturation. Overall, we find that the cumulative power-law index (slope) of small crater SFDs on Vesta is fairly consistent with...

  5. Forecasting system predicts presence of sea nettles in Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher W.; Hood, Raleigh R.; Li, Zhen; Decker, Mary Beth; Gross, Thomas F.; Purcell, Jennifer E.; Wang, Harry V.

    Outbreaks of noxious biota, which occur in both aquatic and terrestrial systems, can have considerable negative economic impacts. For example, an increasing frequency of harmful algal blooms worldwide has negatively affected the tourism industry in many regions. Such impacts could be mitigated if the conditions that give rise to these outbreaks were known and could be monitored. Recent advances in technology and communications allow us to continuously measure and model many environmental factors that are responsible for outbreaks of certain noxious organisms. A new prototype ecological forecasting system predicts the likelihood of occurrence of the sea nettle (Chrysaora quinquecirrha), a stinging jellyfish, in the Chesapeake Bay.

  6. Retention time of rays around small lunar craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, S.; Honda, C.; Hirata, N.; Asada, N.; Demura, H.; Kitazato, K.; Ogawa, Y.; Terazono, J.; Moroda, T.; Ohtake, M.; Haruyama, J.; Matsunaga, T.

    2010-12-01

    Fresh lunar impact craters have rays which are bright features radially expanding from host craters. It has been suggested that the rays are erased by space weathering that modify surface materials by exposure to solar wind and micrometeorite bombardments, and by impact gardening that mixes surface materials and subsurface materials by meteorite bombardments (Wilhelms, 1987). Werner and Medvedev (2010) surveyed lunar rayed craters with Clementine UVVIS images and showed that retention time of the rays of craters larger than 5 km in diameter is 750 Myr. The purpose of this research is to estimate the retention time of rays around smaller lunar craters with high-resolution multiband images from Kaguya/MI (Multiband Imager). In our research, we surveyed rayed craters using OMAT (Optical Maturity) parameter developed by Lucey et al. (2000). The OMAT parameter is the optical index representing the degree of space weathering, which is derived from multiband images. Crater rays are not only bright, but also have larger OMAT value than the background. We conducted a survey of rayed craters from 300 m to 2 km in diameter in lunar highland with MI images and MI-OMAT data. A crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) plot is constructed for detected small rayed craters. Our preliminary result suggest that the CSFD of the rayed craters of less than 1 km in diameter falls beneath an isochrone 750 Ma, the ray retention time for large craters estimated by Werner and Medvedev (2010). This result supports an idea that the retention time of rayes depends on the crater diameter (Werner and Medvedev, 2010). Smaller craters would show shorter ray retention times.

  7. Magnetostratigraphy of the impact breccias and post-impact carbonates from borehole Yaxcopoil-1, Chicxulub impact crater, Yucatán, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolledo-Vieyra, Mario; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime

    2004-06-01

    We report the magnetostratigraphy of the sedimentary sequence between the impact breccias and the post-impact carbonate sequence conducted on samples recovered by Yaxcopoil-1 (Yax-1). Samples of impact breccias show reverse polarities that span up to ~56 cm into the postimpact carbonate lithologies. We correlate these breccias to those of PEMEX boreholes Yucatán-6 and Chicxulub-1, from which we tied our magnetostratigraphy to the radiometric age from a melt sample from the Yucatán-6 borehole. Thin section analyses of the carbonate samples showed a significant amount of dark minerals and glass shards that we identified as the magnetic carriers; therefore, we propose that the mechanism of magnetic acquisition within the carbonate rocks for the interval studied is detrital remanent magnetism (DRM). With these samples, we constructed the scale of geomagnetic polarities where we find two polarities within the sequence, a reverse polarity event within the impact breccias and the base of the post-impact carbonate sequence (up to 794.07 m), and a normal polarity event in the last ~20 cm of the interval studied. The polarities recorded in the sequence analyzed are interpreted to span from chron 29r to 29n, and we propose that the reverse polarity event lies within the 29r chron. The magnetostratigraphy of the sequence studied shows that the horizon at 794.11 m deep, interpreted as the K/T boundary, lies within the geomagnetic chron 29r, which contains the K/T boundary.

  8. Petrographic and geochemical comparisons between the lower crystalline basement-derived section and the granite megablock and amphibolite megablock of the Eyreville-B core, Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Gabrielle N.; Gibson, Roger L.; Horton, J. Wright; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Schmitt, Ralf T.; Bartosova, Katerina

    2009-01-01

    The Eyreville B core from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure, Virginia, USA, contains a lower basement-derived section (1551.19 m to 1766.32 m deep) and two megablocks of dominantly (1) amphibolite (1376.38 m to 1389.35 m deep) and (2) granite (1095.74 m to 1371.11 m deep), which are separated by an impactite succession. Metasedimentary rocks (muscovite-quartz-plagioclase-biotite-graphite ± fibrolite ± garnet ± tourmaline ± pyrite ± rutile ± pyrrhotite mica schist, hornblende-plagioclase-epidote-biotite-K-feldspar-quartz-titanite-calcite amphibolite, and vesuvianite-plagioclase-quartz-epidote calc-silicate rock) are dominant in the upper part of the lower basement-derived section, and they are intruded by pegmatitic to coarse-grained granite (K-feldspar-plagioclase-quartz-muscovite ± biotite ± garnet) that increases in volume proportion downward. The granite megablock contains both gneissic and weakly or nonfoliated biotite granite varieties (K-feldspar-quartz-plagioclase-biotite ± muscovite ± pyrite), with small schist xenoliths consisting of biotite-plagioclase-quartz ± epidote ± amphibole. The lower basement-derived section and both megablocks exhibit similar middle- to upper-amphibolite-facies metamorphic grades that suggest they might represent parts of a single terrane. However, the mica schists in the lower basement-derived sequence and in the megablock xenoliths show differences in both mineralogy and whole-rock chemistry that suggest a more mafic source for the xenoliths. Similarly, the mineralogy of the amphibolite in the lower basement-derived section and its association with calc-silicate rock suggest a sedimentary protolith, whereas the bulk-rock and mineral chemistry of the megablock amphibolite indicate an igneous protolith. The lower basement-derived granite also shows bulk chemical and mineralogical differences from the megablock gneissic and biotite granites.

  9. Do young martian ray craters have ages consistent with the crater count system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, William K.; Quantin, Cathy; Werner, Stephanie C.; Popova, Olga

    2010-08-01

    McEwen et al. (McEwen, A.S., Preblich, B.S., Turtle, E.P., Artemieva, N.A., Golombek, M.P., Hurst, M., Kirk, R.L., Burr, D.M., Christensen, P. [2005]. Icarus 176, 351-381) developed a useful test for the internal consistency of crater-count chronometry systems. They argued that certain multi-kilometer, fresh-looking martian craters with prominent rays should be the youngest or near-youngest craters in their size range. The "McEwen et al. test" is that the ages determined from crater densities of the smallest superimposed craters (typically diameter D ˜ 5-20 m) should thus be comparable to the expected formation intervals of the host primary. McEwen et al. concluded from MOC data that crater chronometry failed this test by factors of 700-2000. We apply HiRISE and other imagery to eight different young craters in order to re-evaluate their arguments. We use existing crater chronology systems as well as the reported observed production rate of 16 m craters (Malin, M.C., Edgett, K., Posiolova, L., McColley, S., Noe Dobrea, E. [2006]. Science 314, 1573-1557; Hartmann, W.K., Quantin, C., Mangold, N. [2007]. Icarus 186, 11-23; Kreslavsky [2007]. Seventh International Conference on Mars, 3325). Every case passes the McEwen et al. test. We conclude that the huge inconsistencies suggested by McEwen et al. are spurious. Many of these craters show evidence of impact into ice-rich material, and appear to have ice-flow features and sublimation pits on their floors. As production rate data improve, decameter-scale craters will provide a valuable way of dating these young martian geological formations and the processes that modify them.

  10. PyCraters: A Python framework for crater function analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a Python framework designed to automate the most common tasks associated with the extraction and upscaling of the statistics of single-impact crater functions to inform coefficients of continuum equations describing surface morphology evolution. Designed with ease-of-use in mind, the framework allows users to extract meaningful statistical estimates with very short Python programs. Wrappers to interface with specific simulation packages, routines for statistical extraction of output, and fitting and differentiation libraries are all hidden behind simple, high-level user-facing functions. In addition, the framework is extensible, allowing advanced users to specify the collection of specialized statistics or the creation of customized plots. The framework is hosted on the BitBucket service under an open-source license, with the aim of helping non-specialists easily extract preliminary estimates of relevant crater function results associated with a particular experimental system.

  11. Hydrogeomorphic Regions in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Generalized lithology (rock type) and physiography based on geologic formations were used to characterize hydrgeomorphic regions (HGMR) within the Chesapeake Bay...

  12. Cratering record in the inner solar system: Implications for earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal and external processes have reworked the Earth's surface throughout its history. In particular, the effect of meteorite impacts on the early history of the earth is lost due to fluvial, aeolian, volcanic and plate tectonic action. The cratering record on other inner solar system bodies often provides the only clue to the relative cratering rates and intensities that the earth has experienced throughout its history. Of the five major bodies within the inner solar system, Mercury, Mars, and the Moon retain scars of an early episode of high impact rates. The heavily cratered regions on Mercury, Mars, and the Moon show crater size-frequency distribution curves similar in shape and crater density, whereas the lightly cratered plains on the Moon and Mars show distribution curves which, although similar to each other, are statistically different in shape and density from the more heavily cratered units. The similarities among crater size-frequency distribution curves for the Moon, Mercury, and Mars suggest that the entire inner solar system was subjected to the two populations of impacting objects but Earth and Venus have lost their record of heavy bombardment impactors. Thus, based on the cratering record on the Moon, Mercury, and Mars, it can be inferred that the Earth experienced a period of high crater rates and basin formation prior to about 3.8 BY ago. Recent studies have linked mass extinctions to large terrestrial impacts, so life forms were unable to establish themselves until impact rates decreased substantially and terrestrial conditions became more benign. The possible periodicity of mass extinctions has led to the theory of fluctuating impact rates due to comet showers in the post heavy bombardment period. The active erosional environment on the Earth complicates attempts to verify these showers by erasing geological evidence of older impact craters

  13. Deriving Chesapeake Bay Water Quality Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tango, Peter J.; Batiuk, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Achieving and maintaining the water quality conditions necessary to protect the aquatic living resources of the Chesapeake Bay and its tidal tributaries has required a foundation of quantifiable water quality criteria. Quantitative criteria serve as a critical basis for assessing the attainment of designated uses and measuring progress toward meeting water quality goals of the Chesapeake Bay Program partnership. In 1987, the Chesapeake Bay Program partnership committed to defining the water quality conditions necessary to protect aquatic living resources. Under section 303(c) of the Clean Water Act, States and authorized tribes have the primary responsibility for adopting water quality standards into law or regulation. The Chesapeake Bay Program partnership worked with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to develop and publish a guidance framework of ambient water quality criteria with designated uses and assessment procedures for dissolved oxygen, water clarity, and chlorophyll a for Chesapeake Bay and its tidal tributaries in 2003. This article reviews the derivation of the water quality criteria, criteria assessment protocols, designated use boundaries, and their refinements published in six addendum documents since 2003 and successfully adopted into each jurisdiction's water quality standards used in developing the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load.

  14. Origin of the rock abundance anomaly at Tsiolkovskiy crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhagen, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Early Diviner measurements have indicated that Tsiolkovskiy crater has unexpectedly high rock abundance relative to its age. New datasets from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter enable further analysis of this crater through measurements of surface and near-subsurface rock populations at a variety of spatial scales and wavelengths. We used Diviner, Mini-RF, and LROC datasets to analyze the block population and distribution around Tsiolkovskiy crater. We found that Tsiolkovskiy has an external deposit where (1) Diviner rock abundance was anomalously high, similar to Copernican aged craters, (2) Diviner estimates of rock-free regolith thickness were anomalously low, consistent with CPR indicated well preserved massive impact melt, which is rough at the decimeter scale, and (4) LROC imagery provided clear examples of surface block population morphology similar to the crater interior. Furthermore, we used LROC imagery to perform a new calculation of modeled crater age consistent with an ancient origin at least 3.2 Ga. Together these data showed that Tsiolkovskiy has a unique massive impact melt and blocky ejecta deposit for a crater of its size and age and may be the youngest crater capable of producing this type and scale of deposit. To reconcile the anomalously blocky appearance of Tsiolkovskiy with its age, we propose mechanisms that support a higher surface rock production rate. The most likely scenario requires (1) Tsiolkovkiy's impactor and target properties and/or impact geometry to produce a massive impact melt deposit with sufficiently large blocks, and (2) the recent disruption of surface fines exposing original blocks from local, regional, and/or antipodal impacts. The source of this disruption is unknown, but Tsiolkovskiy crater is located antipodal to the Copernican-aged Aristarchus crater. Future modeling of the seismic effects of this impact may help to determine whether this was a likely source for the recent surface modification at Tsiolkovskiy crater.

  15. Retention time of crater ray materials on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, C.; Suzuki, S.; Hirata, N.; Morota, T.; Demura, H.; Ohtake, M.; Haruyama, J.; Asada, N.

    2011-12-01

    Surfaces of planetary bodies are scarred with numerous impact craterings. Much of fresh material ejected from the impact cratering is deposited in the area surrounding the crater. These ejecta blanket reveals bright ray because the ejecta shortly after the impact cratering are immature (fresh). Adjacent to the crater rim, the ejecta typically forms a thick, continuous layer and shows brighter feature. At larger distances from the crater rim, the ejecta may occur as discontinuous clumps of materials. Lunar crater rays disappear over time, and it is suggested that these are the reason why space weathering that is the process of surface materials alternated by exposure to solar wind, cosmic rays, and micro-meteorite bombardments and impact gardening that is the mixing process of surface and subsurface materials. Wilhelms described that the presence of crater rays is considered as the marker to define the Copernican - Eratosthenian boundary, and the persistence of immature rays is less than about 1.1 Ga. The Copernican is one of the lunar geological timescale and runs from approximately 1.1 Ga to the present day. This is defined by impact craters having bright immature rays. It is important to estimate the crater rays retention time for the well-understanding of lunar geology. The purpose of this research is to investigate crater ray retention time of lunar craters using high-resolution data from Multiband Imager (MI) and Terrain Camera (TC) onboard Kaguya. We surveyed craters from 300 m to 10 km in diameter in lunar highland. The craters larger than 1 km in diameter are plotted above the 750 Ma isochron which was estimated by Werner and Medvedev (2010). However, the distribution cannot be fitted by a single isochron, this might suggest that the retention time of crater ray materials is longer than 750 Myr. As a point of space weathering which related to production of nano-phase iron (Sasaki et al., 2001), the cause of long time to disappear the crater ray on the

  16. 月球正面撞击坑的空间分布特征分析%Analysis on the Spatial Distribution Characteristics of Lunar Near Side Impact Craters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周增坡; 程维明; 万丛; 侯琳

    2012-01-01

    通过IAU最新公布的撞击坑名录、“嫦娥一号”影像与DEM数据,本文使用数理统计和空间分析的方法研究了月球正面撞击坑分布的空间不均衡性.主要体现在:(1)月球正面直径较大的撞击坑主要分布在月陆区域,且集中趋势明显,而月海区域直径较大的撞击坑分布较少,周围有大量直径较小的撞击坑;(2)直径较大的撞击坑在月表具有一定随机性,而直径较小的撞击坑在月表的集中性明显;(3)赤道区域的撞击坑密度小于两极区域,前导半球的撞击坑数量小于后随半球;月海区域的撞击坑密度小于月陆区域;密度最大的区域位于月球正面的中南部;(4)月球正面深度大于2.5km的撞击坑主要集中在月陆区域,且在南极的中央经线附近更为集中;在57°N至24°S之间,深径比处于较高水平,最大值出现在14°N附近,均值在0.14左右波动,自该区域至南北两极,深径比逐渐减小,并在南极附近出现最小值;(5)月陆区域撞击坑坡度最大值的均值大于月海区域;坡度最大值的均值规律性明显,即自赤道至两极,撞击坑坡度最大值的均值逐渐增大.月球撞击坑的空间分布具有一定空间集聚性、经向和纬向差异性,该特征与撞击坑形成理论间的耦合关系仍需深入研究.%The mathematical statistics and spatial analyses for lunar near side impact craters are used to unravel potential spatial heterogeneity based on the crater nomenclature released by International Astronomical Union (IAU) and topography and imagery data from Chang'E - 1(CE - 1). The spatial heterogeneity is mainly embodied in the following aspects: (1)the craters with larger diameters dominantly distribute in the highland and show obvious concentration tendency, however, the mare have much fewer larger craters, accompanying by munificent smaller craters; (2) larger craters have the characteristics of randomness and the smaller crater are concentrated in

  17. Impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohse, Detlef; Bergmann, Raymond; Mikkelsen, Rene; Zeilstra, Christiaan; Meer, van der Devaraj; Versluis, Michel

    2004-01-01

    A lot of information on impacts of solid bodies on planets has been extracted from remote observations of impact craters on planetary surfaces; experiments however with large enough impact energies as compared to the energy stored in the ground are difficult. We approach this problem by downscaled e

  18. The Degradational History of Endeavour Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J. A.; Parker, T. J.; Crumpler, L. S.; Wilson, S. A.; Golombek, M. P.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    Endeavour crater (2.28 deg S, 354.77 deg E) is a Noachian-aged 22 km-diameter impact structure of complex morphology in Meridiani Planum. The degradation state of the crater has been studied using Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and Opportunity rover data. Exposed rim segments rise approximately 10 m to approximately 100 m above the level of the embaying Burns Formation and the crater is 200-500 m deep with the southern interior wall exposing over approximately 300 m relief. Both pre-impact rocks (Matijevic Formation) and Endeavour impact ejecta (Shoemaker Formation) are present at Cape York, but only the Shoemaker crops out (up to approximately 140 m) along the rim segment from Murray Ridge to Cape Tribulation. Study of pristine complex craters Bopolu and Tooting, and morphometry of other martian complex craters, enables us to approximate Endeavour's pristine form. The original rim likely averaged 410 m (+/-)200 m in elevation and a 250-275 m section of ejecta ((+/-)50-60 m) would have composed a significant fraction of the rim height. The original crater depth was likely between 1.5 km and 2.2 km. Comparison between the predicted original and current form of Endeavour suggests approximately 100-200 m rim lowering that removed most ejecta in some locales (e.g., Cape York) while thick sections remain elsewhere (e.g., Cape Tribulation). Almost complete removal of ejecta at Cape York and minimal observable offset across fractures indicates current differences in rim relief are not solely due to original rim relief. Rim segments are embayed by approximately 100-200 m thickness of plains rocks outside the crater, but thicker deposits lie inside the crater. Ventifact textures confirm ongoing eolian erosion with the overall extent difficult to estimate. Analogy with degraded Noachian-aged craters south of Endeavour, however, suggests fluvial erosion dominated rim degradation in the Noachian and was likely followed by approximately 10s of meters modification by alternate

  19. At Bright Band Inside Victoria Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A layer of light-toned rock exposed inside Victoria Crater in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars appears to mark where the surface was at the time, many millions of years ago, when an impact excavated the crater. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drove to this bright band as the science team's first destination for the rover during investigations inside the crater. Opportunity's left front hazard-identification camera took this image just after the rover finished a drive of 2.25 meters (7 feet, 5 inches) during the rover's 1,305th Martian day, or sol, (Sept. 25, 2007). The rocks beneath the rover and its extended robotic arm are part of the bright band. Victoria Crater has a scalloped shape of alternating alcoves and promontories around the crater's circumference. Opportunity descended into the crater two weeks earlier, within an alcove called 'Duck Bay.' Counterclockwise around the rim, just to the right of the arm in this image, is a promontory called 'Cabo Frio.'

  20. Autumn Afternoon in Hale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The seasons on Mars and Earth are anti-correlated at present: days are getting shorter and shadows are getting longer as autumn end sand the beginning of winter draws nearer in the martian southern hemisphere, just as the same is occurring in Earth's northern hemisphere. Long shadows are especially prominent in this high resolution view of mountains forming part of the central peaks of Hale Crater (left), a 136 kilometer-(85 mile)-diameter impact crater at 36oS, 37oW. The two pictures were taken simultaneously by the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera on November 10, 2000. The sun illuminates the scene from the northwest (upper left)about 22o above the horizon. Knowing the sun angle and the length of the longest shadow (1.6 km; 1.0 mi), the height of the largest peak in the high resolution view (right) is about 630 meters (2,070 ft) above the crater floor. Sand dunes blanket the middle portion of the high resolution view, and small gullies--possibly carved by water--can be seen on the slopes of some of the peaks at the upper left. Winter in the southern hemisphere will begin in mid-December 2000. The high resolution view covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide at a full-resolution scale of 3 meters (9.8 ft) per pixel.

  1. Cratering Equations for Zinc Orthotitanate Coated Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, James; Christiansen, Eric; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Ryan, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    The final STS-125 servicing mission (SM4) to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May of 2009 saw the return of the 2nd Wide Field Planetary Camera (WFPC2) aboard the shuttle Discovery. This hardware had been in service on HST since it was installed during the SM1 mission in December of 1993 yielding one of the longest low Earth orbit exposure times (15.4 years) of any returned space hardware. The WFPC2 is equipped with a 0.8 x 2.2 m radiator for thermal control of the camera electronics (Figure 1). The space facing surface of the 4.1 mm thick aluminum radiator is coated with Z93 zinc orthotitanate thermal control paint with a nominal thickness of 0.1 0.2 mm. Post flight inspections of the radiator panel revealed hundreds of micrometeoroid/orbital debris (MMOD) impact craters ranging in size from less than 300 to nearly 1000 microns in diameter. The Z93 paint exhibited large spall areas around the larger impact sites (Figure 2) and the craters observed in the 6061-T651 aluminum had a different shape than those observed in uncoated aluminum. Typical hypervelocity impact craters in aluminum have raised lips around the impact site. The craters in the HST radiator panel had suppressed crater lips, and in some cases multiple craters were present instead of a single individual crater. Humes and Kinard observed similar behavior after the WFPC1 post flight inspection and assumed the Z93 coating was acting like a bumper in a Whipple shield. Similar paint behavior (spall) was also observed by Bland2 during post flight inspection of the International Space Station (ISS) S-Band Antenna Structural Assembly (SASA) in 2008. The SASA, with similar Z93 coated aluminum, was inspected after nearly 4 years of exposure on the ISS. The multi-crater phenomena could be a function of the density, composition, or impact obliquity angle of the impacting particle. For instance, a micrometeoroid particle consisting of loosely bound grains of material could be responsible for creating the

  2. Structural uplift and ejecta thickness of lunar mare craters: New insights into the formation of complex crater rims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Tim; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Most complex impact craters on solid planetary surfaces throughout the Solar System exhibit elevated crater rims similar to the elevated crater rims of simple craters. In principal the final elevation of the crater rim is due to the deposition of ejecta on the structurally uplifted bedrock of the pre-impact surface. For simple craters the elevated crater rim is due to two well understood factors: (i) Emplacement of the coherent proximal ejecta material at the transient cavity rim (overturned flap) [1]. (ii) Structural uplift of the pre-impact surface in the proximity of the transient cavity [1, 2]. The amount of structural uplift at the rim of simple craters is due to plastic thickening of the target rock, the emplacement of interthrust wedges and/or the injection of dike material in the underlying target [1, 2, 3, 4]. Both factors, (i) and (ii), are believed to equally contribute to the structural uplift of simple craters. Larger craters have complex morphologies and the crater's extent may considerably exceed that of the transient cavity due to gravity-driven adjustment movements. For instance, the Ries crater's final diameter is twice of its transient cavity size. It is expected that both ejecta thickness and structural uplift decrease with increasing distance from the rim of the transient crater. For lunar craters the continuous ejecta extends up to 2 crater radii from the crater center. The ejecta blanket thickness ET at the rim crest of the transient crater (which is inside the final crater) is a function of the distance r from the crater center, with RT as the radius of the transient crater [2, 6, 7] and is expressed by the following function: (1) ET = 0.033 RT (r/RT)^-3.0 for r ≥ RT [5, 6] The structural uplift is largest at the transient cavity rim and gets rapidly smaller with increasing distance to the crater center and disappears after 1.3 - 1.7 crater radii [1]. These circumstances raise the question, how elevated rims of complex craters form? Based

  3. Craters on Earth, Moon, and Mars - Multivariate classification and mode of origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Testing extraterrestrial craters and candidate terrestrial analogs for morphologic similitude is treated as a problem in numerical taxonomy. According to a principal-components solution and a cluster analysis, 402 representative craters on the Earth, the Moon, and Mars divide into two major classes of contrasting shapes and modes of origin. Craters of net accumulation of material (cratered lunar domes, Martian calderas, and all terrestrial volcanoes except maars and tuff rings) group apart from craters of excavation (terrestrial meteorite impact and experimental explosion craters, typical Martian craters, and all other lunar craters). Maars and tuff rings belong to neither group but are transitional. The classification criteria are four independent attributes of topographic geometry derived from seven descriptive variables by the principal-components transformation. Morphometric differences between crater bowl and raised rim constitute the strongest of the four components.

  4. Mass Movement on Vesta at Steep Scarps and Crater Rims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, K.; Jaumann, R.; Otto, K.; Hoogenboom, T.; Wagner, R.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Garry, B.; Williams, D. A.; Yingst, R. A.; Scully, J.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Kneissl, T.; Schmedemann, N.; Kersten, E.; Stephan, K.; Matz, K.-D.; Pieters, C. M.; Preusker, F.; Roatsch, T.; Schenk, P.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Quadrangles Av-11 and Av-12 on Vesta are located at the northern rim of the giant Rheasilvia south polar impact basin. The primary geologic units in Av-11 and Av-12 include material from the Rheasilvia impact basin formation, smooth material and different types of impact crater structures (such as bimodal craters, dark and bright crater ray material and dark ejecta material). Av-11 and Av-12 exhibit almost the full range of mass wasting features observed on Vesta, such as slump blocks, spur-and-gully morphologies and landslides within craters. Processes of collapse, slope instability and seismically triggered events force material to slump down crater walls or scarps and produce landslides or rotational slump blocks. The spur-and-gully morphology that is known to form on Mars is also observed on Vesta; however, on Vesta this morphology formed under dry conditions.

  5. 一种类球型小行星表面撞击坑的自动提取方法%A Method for Automatic Detection of Impact Craters from the Surface of Similar-Spherical Asteroid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王栋; 邢帅; 徐青; 葛忠孝

    2016-01-01

    以类球型小行星模型数据为基础,提出一种球面窗口扫描与等值线分析相结合的撞击坑自动提取方法。首先,在极坐标系中建立小行星模型,设置方形球面窗口并映射模型数据;其次,在基本面上优化局部形貌信息,提取并分析其等值线,确定区域内的撞击坑特征;再以环带滚轮旋转、窗口横向扫描的方式获取整个小行星模型的撞击坑特征;最后,将所提取的撞击坑特征信息统一至小行星模型中。以Mimas和Dione小行星模型为例,实验结果表明该方法能够稳定、准确地提取模型表面的撞击坑特征,分析其表面撞击坑的分布情况,进一步说明其具有一定的实用性。%In this paper,a method for automatic extraction of impact craters is proposed by combining with spherical window scanning and contour analysis for similar-spherical asteroid model.First of all,the asteroid model is constructed in the polar coordinate system,the square spherical window is set and the corresponding model data is mapped.Secondly, local shape information on the basic curved surface,the contour lines are extracted and analyzed to identify the impact craters from local area.Then the way combined band rotation with window scanning is applied to obtain all the craters from whole asteroid model.Finally,all the extracted crater feature information are unitized into the asteroid model.Taking the topography models of Mimas and Dione asteroid as examples,the experimental results show that the method can be used to extract the craters steadily and accurately,and to analyze the distribution of craters on the surface.

  6. 33 CFR 165.556 - Regulated Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... areas, found in 33 CFR 165.13, apply to the regulated navigation area described in paragraph (a) of this...; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD. 165.556 Section 165.556 Navigation and..., Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD. (a) Location. The following area is a regulated navigation area:...

  7. Proceedings of the Geophysical Laboratory - Lawrence Radiation Laboratory Cratering Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordyke, M. D.

    1961-10-01

    The geological papers in this morning's session will deal descriptively with surficial features and end products of impact craters caused by meteorite falls. Such items as breccia, structural deformation, normal and inverse stratigraphy, glass (fused rock), and coesite will frequently be mentioned. Meteor and explosion crater data are presented.

  8. ANALYTICAL MODEL FOR MARS CRATER-SIZE FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Bruckman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a theoretical and analytical curve that reproduces essential features of the frequency distributions vs. diameter of the 42,000 impact craters contained in Barlow's Mars Catalog. The model is derived using reasonable simple assumptions that allow us to relate the present craters population with the craters population at each particular epoch. The model takes into consideration the reduction of the number of craters as a function of time caused by their erosion and obliteration, and this provides a simple and natural explanation for the presence of di erent slopes in the empirical log-log plot of number of craters (N vs. diameter (D. A mean life for martians craters as a function of diameter is deduced, and it is shown that this result is consistent with the corresponding determination of craters mean life based on Earth data. Arguments are given to suggest that this consistency follows from the fact that a crater mean life is proportional to its volumen. It also follows that in the absence of erosions and obliterations, when craters are preserved, we would have N / 1=D4:3, which is a striking conclusion, since the exponent 4:3 is larger than previously thought. Such an exponent implies a similar slope in the extrapolated impactors size-frequency distribution.

  9. Gravitational signatures of lunar floor-fractured craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorey, Clément; Michaut, Chloé; Wieczorek, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Lunar floor-fractured craters are impact craters characterized by distinctive shallow floors crossed by important networks of fractures. Different scenarios have been proposed to explain their formations but recent studies showed that the intrusion of magma at depth below the crater floor is the most plausible explanation. The intrusion of dense magma within the light upper-most part of the lunar crust should have left a positive signature in the gravity field. This study takes advantage of the unprecedented resolution of the lunar gravity field obtained from the NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, in combination with topographic data obtained from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument, to investigate the gravitational signatures of both normal and floor-fractured craters. Despite the large variability in their gravitational signatures, the floor-fractured and normal craters in the Highlands show significant differences: the gravitational anomalies are significantly larger at floor-fractured craters. The anomaly amplitudes for floor-fractured craters are in agreement with synthetic gravity anomalies based on the predicted intrusion shapes from a theoretical flow model. Our results are consistent with magmatic intrusions intruding a crust characterized by a 12% porosity and where the intrusion has no porosity. Similar studies have been carried out in the lunar maria and South Pole-Aikten basin. Although the average gravitational signature of floor-fractured craters is larger than at normal craters in these regions, they cannot be distinguished statistically due to the small number of craters and the large variability of the anomalies. In general, a better characterization of the signal due solely to the initial impact crater is needed to isolate the magmatic intrusion signal and characterize the density contrast between the magma and crust.

  10. Impact disruption and recovery of the deep subsurface biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, Charles S.; Voytek, Mary A.; Gronstal, Aaron L.; Finster, Kai; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Howard, Kieren; Reitner, Joachim; Gohn, Gregory S.; Sanford, Ward E.; Horton, J. Wright; Kallmeyer, Jens; Kelly, Laura; Powars, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Although a large fraction of the world's biomass resides in the subsurface, there has been no study of the effects of catastrophic disturbance on the deep biosphere and the rate of its subsequent recovery. We carried out an investigation of the microbiology of a 1.76 km drill core obtained from the ~35 million-year-old Chesapeake Bay impact structure, USA, with robust contamination control. Microbial enumerations displayed a logarithmic downward decline, but the different gradient, when compared to previously studied sites, and the scatter of the data are consistent with a microbiota influenced by the geological disturbances caused by the impact. Microbial abundance is low in buried crater-fill, ocean-resurge, and avalanche deposits despite the presence of redox couples for growth. Coupled with the low hydraulic conductivity, the data suggest the microbial community has not yet recovered from the impact ~35 million years ago. Microbial enumerations, molecular analysis of microbial enrichment cultures, and geochemical analysis showed recolonization of a deep region of impact-fractured rock that was heated to above the upper temperature limit for life at the time of impact. These results show how, by fracturing subsurface rocks, impacts can extend the depth of the biosphere. This phenomenon would have provided deep refugia for life on the more heavily bombarded early Earth, and it shows that the deeply fractured regions of impact craters are promising targets to study the past and present habitability of Mars.

  11. Creation of High Resolution Terrain Models of Barringer Meteorite Crater (Meteor Crater) Using Photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard B.; Navard, Andrew R.; Holland, Donald E.; McKellip, Rodney D.; Brannon, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Barringer Meteorite Crater or Meteor Crater, AZ, has been a site of high interest for lunar and Mars analog crater and terrain studies since the early days of the Apollo-Saturn program. It continues to be a site of exceptional interest to lunar, Mars, and other planetary crater and impact analog studies because of its relatively young age (est. 50 thousand years) and well-preserved structure. High resolution (2 meter to 1 decimeter) digital terrain models of Meteor Crater in whole or in part were created at NASA Stennis Space Center to support several lunar surface analog modeling activities using photogrammetric and ground based laser scanning techniques. The dataset created by this activity provides new and highly accurate 3D models of the inside slope of the crater as well as the downslope rock distribution of the western ejecta field. The data are presented to the science community for possible use in furthering studies of Meteor Crater and impact craters in general as well as its current near term lunar exploration use in providing a beneficial test model for lunar surface analog modeling and surface operation studies.

  12. The Chesapeake Laser Tracker in Industrial Metrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruland, Robert E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-16

    In the summer of 1992, the survey and alignment team at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center acquired a CMS3000 laser tracker manufactured by Chesapeake Laser Systems in Lanham, Maryland. This paper gives a description of the principles of operation and calibration of the tracker. Several applications are explained and the results shared.

  13. Residual microstructure and damage geometry associated with high speed impact crater in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiB{sub 2} particles reinforced 2024 Al composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Q.; Sun, D.L., E-mail: sdl602@hit.edu.cn; Jiang, L.T.; Wu, G.H.; Chen, G.Q.

    2012-04-15

    The resistance of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + TiB{sub 2}/2024Al composite to hypervelocity impact was tested by a two-stage light gas gun. The impact damage behaviors of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + TiB{sub 2}/2024Al composite by different-sized Al projectiles with a velocity of 2.49 km/s and the residual microstructures associated with the crater impacted by a 1.2 mm aluminum projectile were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Both the diameters of craters at front face and spalling areas at back face increased with the aluminum projectile diameter. The diameter of perforation on the 2 mm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + TiB{sub 2}/Al composite target was zero when impacted by 1.2 mm aluminum projectile and it increased to 2.4 mm when the projectile diameter was 1.5 mm, indicating that the critical perforation diameter of the aluminum projectile was between 1.2 mm and 1.5 mm when the 2 mm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + TiB{sub 2}/Al composite target was impacted by 2.49 km/s aluminum projectiles. The diameter of perforation increases with the diameter of Al projectile. In addition, under each impact condition, the diameters of craters at front face were smaller than that of spalling areas at back face. Microstructure observations by transmission electron microscopy demonstrated four characteristics: stacking faults around TiB{sub 2} particle and dislocations within the TiB{sub 2} particle; twins in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle; recrystal grains in 2024 Al matrix; and mixture of amorphous microstructure and nanograins in the matrix. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stacking faults were produced around the edge of TiB{sub 2} particle after impact. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twins with the twin plane of (2{sup Macron }112) were observed in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle after impact. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recrystal grains with size of 100 nm were formed in aluminum matrix after impact. Black

  14. Remote Sensing and Electrodynamic Model of Chicxulub Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, V.; Silva, M.; Salguero, E.; Fucugauchi, J.

    2004-05-01

    Advances on space observational systems have opened new exiting possibilities to investigate our planet in an unprecedented detail and in a global scale. Information retrieved from surveys of other solar system bodies like our moon, planets and satellites, from missions like Apollo, have documented the origin of planetary surfaces and the role of impacts as a major process. Voyagers 1 and 2 and Galileo have showed impact craterism is a process rather generalized in all bodies of the solar system. Thus establishing it as part of the major processes to be considered for the evolution of our planet, together with tectonics, mantle process, volcanism, weathering, etc. Investigations on impact craters from solar systems provide valuable information on different surfaces, crustal thickness, existence of crust layers, type of material under the most superficial layer, type of bolide which formed crater, impact angle, etc. The studies constitute an important tool to rebuild the planets' geological history and develop theories on their internal structure. The Chicxulub crater in the carbonate platform of the Yucatan peninsula is one of the largest multiring structures found on Earth. The crater is some 180-200 km in diameter, is well preserved and has been studied in the past few years (geophysical surveys and drilling programs). The crater is buried under a thick sequence of tertiary carbonate rocks, and on the surface there are relatively few indications of the crater (e.g., topographic depression, ring of cenotes). In this study, it is analyzed and presented an electrodynamic model for an impact crater and its electrophysical properties, these data are derived from Fisher inverse matrix elements. We also present a surface model for the buried Chicxulub crater derived from remote sensing data.

  15. Volatile-rich Crater Interior Deposits on Mars: An Energy Balance Model of Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Patrick S.; Head, James W.; Hecht, Michael H.

    2003-01-01

    Several craters on Mars are partially filled by material emplaced by post-impact processes. Populations of such craters include those in the circumsouth polar cap region, in Arabia Terra, associated with the Medusae Fossae Formation, and in the northern lowlands proximal to the north polar cap. In this study, crater fill material refers to an interior mound, generally separated from the interior walls of the crater by a trough that may be continuous along the crater s circumference (i.e. a ring-shaped trough), or may only partially contact the crater walls (i.e. a crescent-shaped trough). The fill deposit is frequently off-center from the crater center and may be asymmetric, (i.e. not circular) in plan view shape. Here we test the hypothesis that asymmetries in volatile fill shape, profile, and center-location within a crater result from asymmetries in local energy balance within the crater due mainly to variation of solar insolation and radiative effects of the crater walls over the crater interior. We first focus on Korolev crater in the northern lowlands. We can then apply this model to other craters in different regions. If asymmetry in morphology and location of crater fill are consistent with radiative-dominated asymmetries in energy budget within the crater, then 1) the volatile-rich composition of the fill is supported (this process should not be effective at shaping volcanic or sedimentary deposits), and 2) the dominant factor determining the observed shape of volatile-rich crater fill is the local radiative energy budget within the crater (and erosive processes such as eolian deflation are not necessary).

  16. Does saturation cratering exist in the solar system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, W. K.

    1984-01-01

    A number of researchers have concluded that saturation equilibrium cratering exists nowhere in the solar system, and therefore that diameter distributions in even the most heavily cratered provinces reveal initial production functions related to impacting bodies. Based on this premise, different populations of impactors are identified in different epochs and regions of the solar system. These hypotheses are clearly crucial to interpreting planetary history and need further independent examination. The production function in the outer solar system may differ from that in the inner solar system, but it is also possible that viscous relaxation of ice craters or immediate flooding of craters that penetrate through an ice lithosphere into watery substrate may explain the greater deficiency of large craters on icy moons. This problem is controversial and needs more study.

  17. Origin of the anomalously rocky appearance of Tsiolkovskiy crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Neish, Catherine D.; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Cahill, Joshua T. S.; Ghent, Rebecca R.; Hayne, Paul O.; Lawrence, Samuel J.; Petro, Noah E.; Bandfield, Joshua L.

    2016-07-01

    Rock abundance maps derived from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) show Tsiolkovskiy crater to have high surface rock abundance and relatively low regolith thickness. The location of the enhanced rock abundance to the southeast of the crater is consistent with a massive, well-preserved impact melt deposit apparent in LRO Miniature Radio Frequency instrument circular polarization ratio data. A new model crater age using LRO Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera imagery suggests that while it originated in the Late Imbrian, Tsiolkovskiy may be the youngest lunar crater of its size (∼180 km diameter). Together these data show that Tsiolkovskiy has a unique surface rock population and regolith properties for a crater of its size and age. Explanation of these observations requires mechanisms that produce more large blocks, preserve boulders and large blocks from degradation to regolith, and/or uncover buried rocks. These processes have important implications for formation of regolith on the Moon.

  18. Field experiment for blasting crater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Tu-qiang

    2008-01-01

    A series of single hole blasting crater experiments and a variable distance multi-hole simultaneous blasting experiment was carded in the Yunfu Troilite Mine, according to the Livingston blasting crater theory. We introduce in detail, our methodology of data collection and processing from our experiments. Based on the burying depth of the explosives, the blasting crater volume was fitted by the method of least squares and the characteristic curve of the blasting crater was obtained using the MATLAB software. From this third degree polynomial, we have derived the optimal burying depth, the critical burying depth and the optimal explosive specific charge of the blasting crater.

  19. Geomorphology of Lowell crater region on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, N.; Varatharajan, I.

    2016-03-01

    Surface topography, surface morphology and crater chronology studies have been carried out for the Lowell crater region (occupying ∼198 × 198 km2 in the northwestern quadrant of the Orientale basin) using Kaguya TC-DTM, LRO-WAC data, and Chandrayaan-1 M3-750 nm image, to characterize and date Lowell impact event and to identify and assess the geological importance of the Lowell crater and effect of pre-existing geological conditions on the present day appearance of Lowell crater. The Lowell crater has been found to be polygonal in shape with an average diameter of 69.03 km. Its average rim height and depth from pre-existing surface are 1.02 km and 2.82 km respectively. A prominent central peak with average height of 1.77 km above the crater floor is present, which could have exposed undifferentiated mantle rocks. The peak exhibits a pronounced "V" shaped slumped zone on the eastern side and a distinct "V" shaped depression in the adjacent region on the crater floor. Several other peculiarities noticed and mapped here include W-E asymmetry in the degree of slumping of the walls and height of the topographic rim, N-S asymmetry in the proximal ejecta distribution with most of the material lying in the northern direction, concentration of exterior melt pools in the northeastern direction only, presence of several cross cutting pre-existing lineaments on the crater walls, presence of a superposed rayed crater on the eastern wall, and a geologically interesting resurfaced unit, which could be an outcome of recent volcanic activity in the region. It has been inferred that the Lowell crater formed due to impact of a ∼5.7 km diameter bolide in the Montes Rook region. The impact occurred at an angle of ∼30-45° from the S-SW direction. The age of the Lowell crater has been estimated as 374 ± 28 Ma, therefore it is a Younger Copernican crater consistent with the possibility expressed by McEwen et al. (McEwen, A.S., et al. [1993]. J. Geophys. Res. 98(E9), 17207

  20. The Morphology of Craters on Mercury: Results from MESSENGER Flybys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnouin, Oliver S.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Herrick, Robert R.; Chappelow, John E.; Murchie, Scott L.; Prockter, Louise M.

    2012-01-01

    Topographic data measured from the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) aboard the MESSENGER spacecraft were used for investigations of the relationship between depth and diameter for impact craters on Mercury. Results using data from the MESSENGER flybys of the innermost planet indicate that most of the craters measured with MLA are shallower than those previously measured by using Mariner 10 images. MDIS images of these same MLA-measured craters show that they have been modified. The use of shadow measurement techniques, which were found to be accurate relative to the MLA results, indicate that both small bowl-shaped and large complex craters that are fresh possess depth-to-diameter ratios that are in good agreement with those measured from Mariner 10 images. The preliminary data also show that the depths of modified craters are shallower relative to fresh ones, and might provide quantitative estimates of crater in-filling by subsequent volcanic or impact processes. The diameter that defines the transition from simple to complex craters on Mercury based on MESSENGER data is consistent with that reported from Mariner 10 data.

  1. The Variability of Crater Identification Among Expert and Community Crater Analysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, S. J.; Antonenko, I.; Kirchoff, M. R.; Chapman, C. R.; Fassett, C. I.; Herrick, R. R.; Singer, K.; Zanetti, M.; Lehan, C.; Huang, D.; Gay, P. L.

    2015-05-01

    We all know it in the back of our minds, but we tend to ignore the fact that crater identification and measurement is not an exact science. This work was to start to quantify the variation in how independent analysts identify and measure impacts.

  2. Craters on Earth, Moon, and Mars: Multivariate classification and mode of origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, R.J.

    1974-01-01

    Testing extraterrestrial craters and candidate terrestrial analogs for morphologic similitude is treated as a problem in numerical taxonomy. According to a principal-components solution and a cluster analysis, 402 representative craters on the Earth, the Moon, and Mars divide into two major classes of contrasting shapes and modes of origin. Craters of net accumulation of material (cratered lunar domes, Martian "calderas," and all terrestrial volcanoes except maars and tuff rings) group apart from craters of excavation (terrestrial meteorite impact and experimental explosion craters, typical Martian craters, and all other lunar craters). Maars and tuff rings belong to neither group but are transitional. The classification criteria are four independent attributes of topographic geometry derived from seven descriptive variables by the principal-components transformation. Morphometric differences between crater bowl and raised rim constitute the strongest of the four components. Although single topographic variables cannot confidently predict the genesis of individual extraterrestrial craters, multivariate statistical models constructed from several variables can distinguish consistently between large impact craters and volcanoes. ?? 1974.

  3. Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack D.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Grin, E.A.; Li, Ron; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, B.; Bell, J.F.; Yingst, R. Aileen

    2014-01-01

    Processes, environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

  4. Crater Morphologies on Pluto and Charon: Anticipating New Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, P.; Bray, V. J.; McKinnon, W. B.; White, O. L.; Moore, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Impact craters are among the few geologic features we have some confidence will be present in the Pluto/Charon system. Crater morphologies are important as tracers of thermal history (through the mechanism of viscous relaxation), and can be used to probe through icy crusts (in terms of excavating deeper layers as on Ganymede or penetrating through floating ice shells as on Europa). New Horizons will have the opportunity to examine crater morphologies on Pluto to resolutions Charon to ~250 meters over significant areas. Stereo-derived topography maps are anticipated over 20-35% of each body. The first task will be to place the observed craters (assuming they are not deeply eroded) into Solar System context. Crater morphology on icy satellites is controlled primarily by surface gravity. Charon has similar surface gravity to the icy Saturnian satellites and we expect craters on Charon to resemble those seen by Cassini, where the dominant landform will be prominent central peaks. Pluto surface gravity is midway between Ganymede and Rhea. Triton, with similar surface gravity and internal composition to Pluto, is of no help due to the paucity of resolved craters there. This opens the possibility of observing landforms seen on Ganymede, such as central dome craters, palimpsests and perhaps even a multiring basin or two, albeit at larger diameters than we would see on Ganymede. Several issues complicate our rosy picture. A key unresolved concern is that impact velocities in the Pluto system are only a few km/s, in the low end of the hypervelocity range. Numerical models imply possible differences during excavation, producing deeper simple craters than on the icy satellites. Impacts occurring at velocities well below the mean (topographic data sets is unclear. Any viscous relaxation (driven by internal or modest tidal heating) or mass wasting erosion (by volatile redistribution) will also work to reduce crater depths on Pluto in different ways, but cratering onto the likely

  5. An Igneous Origin for Features of a Candidate Crater-Lake System in Western Memnonia, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leverington, D. W.; Maxwell, T. A.

    2004-01-01

    The association of channels, inner terraces, and delta-like features with Martian impact craters has previously been interpreted as evidence in favor of the past existence of crater lakes on Mars. However, examination of a candidate crater-lake system in western Memnonia suggests instead that its features may have formed through igneous processes involving the flow and ponding of lava. Accumulations of material in craters and other topographic lows throughout much of the study region have characteristics consistent with those of volcanic deposits, and terraces found along the inner flanks of some of these craters are interpreted as having formed through drainage or subsidence of volcanic materials. Channels previously identified as inlets and outlets of the crater-lake system are interpreted instead as volcanic rilles. These results challenge previous interpretations of terrace and channel features in the study region and suggest that candidate crater lakes located elsewhere should be reexamined.

  6. Oblique View of Eros' Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This image, showing an oblique view of Eros' large central crater, was taken at a resolution of about 20 meters (65 feet) per pixel. The brightness or albedo patterns on the walls of this crater are clearly visible, with the brighter materials near the tops of the walls and darker materials on the lower walls. Boulders are seen inside this crater and the smaller nearby craters. The higher density of craters to the left of the large crater implies that this region is older than the smoother area seen associated with the saddle region on the opposite side of the asteroid.Built and managed by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland, NEAR was the first spacecraft launched in NASA's Discovery Program of low-cost, small-scale planetary missions. See the NEAR web page at http://near.jhuapl.edu for more details.

  7. Crater Count Ages of Young Martian Ray Craters: a Successful Test of the Crater Chronometry System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, William K.; Quantin, C.; Werner, S. C.; Popova, O.

    2008-09-01

    McEwen et al. (2005) developed a useful test of crater-count chronometry systems [1]. They argued that fresh-looking, Zunil-style Martian ray craters are the youngest or near-youngest craters in their size ranges. The "McEwen et al. test" is that crater-count ages from small craters (D 10-25 m), superimposed on these "Zunils," should be comparable to the expected formation intervals of these host Zunil-style primaries themselves, typically 1 to a few My. McEwen et al., however, found few or no small superposed craters in MOC frames, and concluded that crater chronometry systems are in error by factors of 700 to 2000. Since then, Malin et al. discovered that 10-25m craters form at essentially the rate we used in our isochron system [2,3,4]. Thus, 10-25m craters should be usable for dating these "Zunils." We re-evaluate the "McEwen et al. test" with HiRise images, studying three young craters they discussed, and five others. In every case we found small-crater populations, giving approximately the expected ages. We conclude that the alleged large errors are incorrect. The semi-independent crater count systems of Neukum and of Hartmann agree with the Malin cratering rate, are internally consistent, and appear to give valid age information within about a factor 2 to 4. We thank the International Space Science Institute (ISSI), Bern, for hosting our working group. [1] McEwen et al. 2005 Icarus,176, 351-381. [2] Malin, M. et al. 2006 Science 314, 1573-1557. [3] Hartmann, W.K. 2007 Icarus, 189, 274-278. [4] Kreslavsky, M.A. 2007 7th Internatl. Conf. on Mars, Abstract 3325.

  8. Craters on Mars: Global Geometric Properties from Gridded MOLA Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, J. B.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Frawley, J. J.

    2003-01-01

    Impact craters serve as natural probes of the target properties of planetary crusts and the tremendous diversity of morphological expressions of such features on Mars attests to their importance for deciphering the history of crustal assembly, modification, and erosion. This paper summarizes the key findings associated with a five year long survey of the three-dimensional properties of approx. 6000 martian impact craters using finely gridded MOLA topography. Previous efforts have treated representative subpopulations, but this effort treats global properties from the largest survey of impact features from the perspective of their topography ever assimilated. With the Viking missions of the mid-1970 s, the most intensive and comprehensive robotic expeditions to any Deep Space location in the history of humanity were achieved, with scientifically stunning results associated with the morphology of impact craters. The relationships illustrated and suggest that martian impact features are remarkably sensitive to target properties and to the local depositional processes.

  9. Relative Ages of the Highlands, Lowlands, and Transition Zone Along a Portion of the Mars Crustal Dichotomy from Densities of Visible and Buried Impact Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSoto, G. E.; Frey, H. V.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental age relationships of the different parts of the Mars Crustal Dichotomy is essential to fully understanding the events that shaped the early history and formation of the surface of Mars. A dominant question is what are the true relative ages of the Northern Lowlands and the Southern Highlands? Using MOLA data from the Mars Global Surveyor and Viking visual images, a dataset of both buried and visible crater diameters was created over a nine million sq km study area of a section of the dichotomy boundary stretching from Arabia Terra to Utopia Planitia. Cumulative frequency plots on a log-log scale were used to determine the relative ages for the Highlands, the Lowlands, and the Transition Zone, separately for the visible, the buried and the combined total (visible+ buried) populations. We find the overall Highland crater population in this area is slightly older than the Lowlands, consistent with previous global studies, but the Lowlands and Transition Zone are also very old and formed at roughly the same time. It appears that the formation of the Lowlands in this region formed contemporaneously with a large-scale resurfacing event in the Highlands, perhaps caused by the process responsible for the Lowland formation.

  10. Identification of craters on Moon using Crater Density Parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandana, Vandana

    2016-07-01

    Lunar craters are the most noticeable features on the face of the moon. They take up 40.96% of the lunar surface and, their accumulated area is approximately three times as much as the lunar surface area. There are many myths about the moon. Some says moon is made of cheese. The moon and the sun chase each other across the sky etc. but scientifically the moon are closest and are only natural satellite of earth. The orbit plane of the moon is tilted by 5° and orbit period around the earth is 27-3 days. There are two eclipse i.e. lunar eclipse and solar eclipse which always comes in pair. Moon surface has 3 parts i.e. highland, Maria, and crater. For crater diagnostic crater density parameter is one of the means for measuring distance can be easily identity the density between two craters. Crater size frequency distribution (CSFD) is being computed for lunar surface using TMC and MiniSAR image data and hence, also the age for the selected test sites of mars is also determined. The GIS-based program uses the density and orientation of individual craters within LCCs (as vector points) to identify potential source craters through a series of cluster identification and ejection modeling analyses. JMars software is also recommended and operated only the time when connected with server but work can be done in Arc GIS with the help of Arc Objects and Model Builder. The study plays a vital role to determine the lunar surface based on crater (shape, size and density) and exploring affected craters on the basis of height, weight and velocity. Keywords: Moon; Crater; MiniSAR.

  11. Ceres' internal structure as inferred from its large craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Simone; Raymond, Carol; Fu, Roger; Ermakov, Anton I.; O'Brien, David P.; De Sanctis, Cristina; Ammannito, Eleonora; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-10-01

    The Dawn spacecraft has gathered important data about the surface composition, internal structure, and geomorphology of Ceres, revealing a cratered landscape. Digital terrain models and global mosaics have been used to derive a global catalog of impact craters larger than 10 km in diameter. A surface dichotomy appears evident: a large fraction of the northern hemisphere is heavily cratered as the result of several billion of years of collisions, while portions of the equatorial region and southern hemisphere are much less cratered. The latter are associated with the presence of the two largest (~270-280 km) impact craters, Kerwan and Yalode. The global crater count shows a severe depletion for diameters larger than 100-150 km with respect to collisional models and other large asteroids, like Vesta. This is a strong indication that a significant population of large cerean craters has been obliterated over geological time-scales. This observation is supported by the overall topographic power spectrum of Ceres, which shows that long wavelengths in topography are suppressed (that is, flatter surface) compared to short wavelengths.Viscous relaxation of topography may be a natural culprit for the observed paucity of large craters. Relaxation accommodated by the creep of water ice is expected to result in much more rapid and complete decay of topography than inferred. In contrast, we favor a strong crust composed of a mixture of silicates and salt species (depression, known as Vendimia Planitia. The overall topography of Vendimia Planitia is compatible with a partially relaxed mega impact structure. The presence of such a large scale depression bears implications for the rheology of the deeper interior, potentially implying a transition to higher viscosity/higher density materials at a depth of ~200 km. This is compatible with the presence of a central mass concentration, as inferred from gravity measurements.

  12. Absolute ages from crater statistics: Using radiometric ages of Martian samples for determining the Martian cratering chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukum, G.

    1988-01-01

    In the absence of dates derived from rock samples, impact crater frequencies are commonly used to date Martian surface units. All models for absolute dating rely on the lunar cratering chronology and on the validity of its extrapolation to Martian conditions. Starting from somewhat different lunar chronologies, rather different Martian cratering chronologies are found in the literature. Currently favored models are compared. The differences at old ages are significant, the differences at younger ages are considerable and give absolute ages for the same crater frequencies as different as a factor of 3. The total uncertainty could be much higher, though, since the ratio of lunar to Martian cratering rate which is of basic importance in the models is believed to be known no better than within a factor of 2. Thus, it is of crucial importance for understanding the the evolution of Mars and determining the sequence of events to establish an unambiguous Martian cratering chronology from crater statistics in combination with clean radiometric ages of returned Martian samples. For the dating goal, rocks should be as pristine as possible from a geologically simple area with a one-stage emplacement history of the local formation. A minimum of at least one highland site for old ages, two intermediate-aged sites, and one very young site is needed.

  13. Basin Formation and Cratering on Mercury Revealed by MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, C. R.; Fassett, C.; Marchi, S.; Merline, W. J.; Ostrach, L. R.; Prockter, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury has been bombarded by asteroids and comets throughout its history. The resulting craters and basins are the dominant topographic features on the planet. Although visible basins contain some of the most interesting tectonic features, plains, and evidence of vertical stratigraphy, they fall far short of saturating the surface. Nevertheless, Mercury has a greater spatial density of peak-ring basins and protobasins than any other Solar System body, partly because these morphologies begin at smaller sizes than on most bodies. Cratering at approximately three times the cratering rate on the Moon, combined with likely plains-forming volcanism, prevents recognition of surface features older than 4.0 to 4.1 Ga. Severe losses of craters Mercury suggest that most plains formation ended about 3.6 to 3.7 Ga, though activity has continued in a few small regions until much more recently (e.g., inside the Rachmaninoff basin). Mercury, compared with other terrestrial bodies, is struck by projectiles impacting at much higher velocities, which is probably responsible for the formation of abundant secondary craters that dominate the numbers of craters Mercury-specific impactors ("vulcanoids") cannot be excluded, imaging searches by MESSENGER have revealed no remaining vulcanoids and no other evidence suggests that Mercury has been bombarded by anything other than the same populations of asteroids and comets that have impacted the Moon and other terrestrial planets from the end of the period of heavy bombardment 3.8 to 3.9 Ga to the present.

  14. Geomorphology and Geology of the Southwestern Margaritifer Sinus and Argyre Regions of Mars. Part 4: Flow Ejecta Crater Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, T. J.; Pieri, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Flow ejecta craters - craters surrounded by lobate ejecta blankets - are found throughout the study area. The ratio of the crater's diameter to that of the flow ejecta in this region is approximately 40 to 45%. Flow ejecta craters are dominantly sharply defined craters, with slightly degraded craters being somewhat less common. This is probably indicative of the ejecta's relatively low resistence to weathering and susceptibility to burial. Flow ejecta craters here seem to occur within a narrow range of crater sizes - the smallest being about 4km in diameter and the largest being about 27km in diameter. Ejecta blankets of craters at 4km are easily seen and those of smaller craters are simply not seen even in images with better than average resolution for the region. This may be due to the depth of excavation of small impacting bodies being insufficient to reach volatile-rich material. Flow ejecta craters above 24km are rare, and those craters above 27km do not display flow ejecta blankets. This may be a result of an excavation depth so great that the volatile content of the ejecta is insufficient to form a fluid ejecta blanket. The geomorphic/geologic unit appears also to play an important role in the formation of flow ejecta craters. Given the typical size range for the occurrence of flow ejecta craters for most units, it can be seen that the percentage of flow ejecta craters to the total number of craters within this size range varies significantly from one unit to the next. The wide variance in flow ejecta crater density over this relatively small geographical area argues strongly for a lithologic control of their distribution.

  15. Comparison of the Cratering Records of Ceres and Rhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmedemann, N.; Wagner, R. J.; Michael, G.; Kneissl, T.; Hiesinger, H.; Ivanov, B.; Denk, T.; Jaumann, R.; Neesemann, A.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C.

    2015-12-01

    Comparing the cratering records of dwarf planet Ceres and the Saturnian satellite Rhea, offers a great opportunity in comparative planetology to fill the gaps of understanding of the cratering history of the two bodies. Both bodies show strong indications for a water-ice rich crust. For Ceres, the amount of ice in the crust is indeterminate. Early Dawn imaging data shows complex craters on Ceres which are smaller than those on the basaltic asteroid Vesta. The smallest complex craters on Ceres are similar in size (~10-15 km) to those on Rhea, which might indicate a rather high water-ice content in Ceres' crust. The surface gravity on both bodies is almost equal, differing by only ~4%. Thus, regardless of their absolute values many variables required to relate projectile and crater size should be very similar on both bodies (surface gravity, strength to gravity transition, simple to complex transition, target density). The remaining variables such as projectile density and impact velocity are comparatively well known for Ceres but still in discussion for the Saturnian satellites. If the crater size-frequency distributions for craters >5 km from Rhea and Ceres are plotted together and are corrected for different projectile flux and exposure time, both records plot nearly on top of each other. This could indicate a common projectile population that impacted both bodies at nearly the same velocity. However, if the impacting projectile populations are very different, the impact velocity would have to compensate for such differences. Different ice temperatures may also play some role. Reducing the degrees of freedom increases the chance of understanding the projectile source and dynamics in the Saturnian system. We acknowledge the support of the Dawn and Cassini Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR), grants 50OW1101, 50OH1102 and 50OH0305.

  16. Lunar cold spots and crater production on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jean-Pierre; Bandfield, Joshua

    2016-10-01

    A new class of small, fresh impact craters has been recently identified on the Moon through the systematic mapping of lunar surface temperatures by the Diviner Lunar Radiometer instrument aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter [1]. These craters are distinguished by anomalously low nighttime temperatures at distances ~10–100 crater radii. This thermal behavior indicates that impacts modify the surrounding regolith surfaces making them highly insulating with little evidence for either significant deposition or erosion of surface material [2]. These thermophysically distinct surfaces, or "cold spots", appear to be common to all recent impacts and provide a means of uniquely identifying the most recent impact craters on the Moon. We have conducted a survey of the crater population associated with cold spots. Comparison with existing crater chronology models [e.g., 3] constrains the retention-age of the cold spots to ~200,000 yr with a size-frequency distribution (SFD) slope that is consistent with the modeled production function. This implies the rate at which cold spots fade to background levels is independent of initial cold spot size and that the SFD of crater production in the last 200 ka is similar to the long-term average used to establish modeled production functions, though the rate of cratering may have varied [4]. In addition, we observe a longitudinal heterogeneity in cold spot crater density that is consistent with that predicted to occur as a result of the Moon's synchronous rotation [5] and has been observed in the rayed crater population [6], with the cold spot density at the apex of motion (90°W) nearly twice that observed at the antapex (90°E).[1] Bandfield, J., et al. (2011) JGR 116, E00H02. [2] Bandfield, J., et al. (2014) Icarus, 231, 221-231. [3] Neukum, G., et al. (2001) SSR 96, 55–86. [4] Mazrouei, S. et al. (2015) LPSC 46, 2331. [5] Le Fleuvre, M., and Wieczorek, M. A. (2011) Icarus 214, 1-20. [6] Morota, T. and Furumoto, M. (2002) EPSL

  17. Calculation of ejecta thickness and structural uplift for Lunar and Martian complex crater rims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Tim; Sturm, Sebastian; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Crater rims of simple and complex craters have an elevation that is formed during the excavation stage of crater formation. For simple crater rims it is believed that the elevation is due to the sum of two equal parts, the thickness of the most proximal impact ejecta blanket (overturned flap) plus the thickness that results from plastic deformation including injection [1, 2, 3]. We intend to measure and quantify the kinematics of mass movements, especially concerning the question why complex impact craters have elevated crater rims like simple craters and precisely constrain the ejecta thickness and structural uplift of Lunar and Martian crater rims to understand what the main contributor to the elevated rim is [4]. We investigated a pristine 16 km-diameter unnamed Martian complex crater (21.52°N, 184.35°) and the lunar complex craters Bessel (21.8°N, 17.9°E) 16 km in diameter and Euler (23.3°N, 29.2°W) 28 km in diameter [5, 6]. In the crater walls of these craters we found columnar lavas on Mars and basaltic layering on the Moon. We used the uppermost layers of these exposed outcrops along the crater wall to determine the dip of the target rocks (Mars) and to distinguish between the bedrock and the overlying ejecta. We precisely measured the structural uplift and ejecta thickness of these complex craters. The unnamed crater on Mars has a mean rim height of 375.75 m, with a structural uplift of 233.88 m (57.44%), exposed as columnar lavas and the superposing ejecta has a height of 141.87 m (43.56%). For the Lunar complex crater Euler the mean total rim height is 790 ± 100 m, with a minimal structural uplift of 475 ± 100 m (60 ± 10 %), exposed as basaltic layers [e.g., 7, 8] and a maximum ejecta thickness of 315 ± 100 m (40 ± 10%). The Lunar complex crater Bessel has a total rim height of 430 ± 15 m , with a minimal structural uplift of 290 ± 15 m (67 ± 3 %), exposed as basaltic layers and a maximum ejecta thickness of 140 ± 115 m (33 ± 3%). For the

  18. Artificial Crater Formation on Satellite Surfaces Using an Orbiting Railgun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissly, R. W.; Miller, K. L.; Carlson, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    The specification of greater than 45kW of disposable power available on the JIMO spacecraft raises the possibility of a new class of instrumentation that has utility at such power levels. In this presentation we discuss the concept of an electromagnetic mass driver that can launch projectiles from orbit around one of the Galilean satellites directed on a trajectory that will impact the satellite surface. The resulting impact will create a crater that will provide information on the mechanical properties of surface and near-surface materials, expose subsurface materials for remote spectral identification, and form a vapor cloud that can be sensed for composition either remotely or in-situ. An analog for such a controlled cratering experiment is Deep Impact, a mission to observe the crater and ensuing ejecta cloud formed by a ballistic projectile into a comet surface in July, 2005.

  19. Transitioning a Chesapeake Bay Ecological Prediction System to Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C.; Green, D. S.; Eco Forecasters

    2011-12-01

    Ecological prediction of the impacts of physical, chemical, biological, and human-induced change on ecosystems and their components, encompass a wide range of space and time scales, and subject matter. They vary from predicting the occurrence and/or transport of certain species, such harmful algal blooms, or biogeochemical constituents, such as dissolved oxygen concentrations, to large-scale ecosystem responses and higher trophic levels. The timescales of ecological prediction, including guidance and forecasts, range from nowcasts and short-term forecasts (days), to intraseasonal and interannual outlooks (weeks to months), to decadal and century projections in climate change scenarios. The spatial scales range from small coastal inlets to basin and global scale biogeochemical and ecological forecasts. The types of models that have been used include conceptual, empirical, mechanistic, and hybrid approaches. This presentation will identify the challenges and progress toward transitioning experimental model-based ecological prediction into operational guidance and forecasting. Recent efforts are targeting integration of regional ocean, hydrodynamic and hydrological models and leveraging weather and water service infrastructure to enable the prototyping of an operational ecological forecast capability for the Chesapeake Bay and its tidal tributaries. A path finder demonstration predicts the probability of encountering sea nettles (Chrysaora quinquecirrha), a stinging jellyfish. These jellyfish can negatively impact safety and economic activities in the bay and an impact-based forecast that predicts where and when this biotic nuisance occurs may help management effects. The issuance of bay-wide nowcasts and three-day forecasts of sea nettle probability are generated daily by forcing an empirical habitat model (that predicts the probability of sea nettles) with real-time and 3-day forecasts of sea-surface temperature (SST) and salinity (SSS). In the first demonstration

  20. The Geology of the Marcia Quadrangle of Asteroid Vesta: Assessing the Effects of Large, Young Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David A.; Denevi, Brett W.; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Mest, Scott C.; Schenk, Paul M.; Yingst, R. Aileen; Buczowski, Debra L.; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Garry, W. Brent; McCord, Thomas B.; Combe, Jean-Phillipe; Jaumann, Ralf; Pieters, Carle M.; Nathues, Andreas; Le Corre, Lucille; Hoffmann, Martin; Reddy, Vishnu; Schafer, Michael; Roatsch, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Marchi, Simone; Kneissl, Thomas; Schmedemann, Nico; Neukum, Gerhard; Raymond, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    We used Dawn spacecraft data to identify and delineate geological units and landforms in the Marcia quadrangle of Vesta as a means to assess the role of the large, relatively young impact craters Marcia (approximately 63 kilometers diameter) and Calpurnia (approximately 53 kilometers diameter) and their surrounding ejecta field on the local geology. We also investigated a local topographic high with a dark-rayed crater named Aricia Tholus, and the impact crater Octavia that is surrounded by a distinctive diffuse mantle. Crater counts and stratigraphic relations suggest that Marcia is the youngest large crater on Vesta, in which a putative impact melt on the crater floor ranges in age between approximately 40 and 60 million years (depending upon choice of chronology system), and Marcia's ejecta blanket ranges in age between approximately 120 and 390 million years (depending upon choice of chronology system). We interpret the geologic units in and around Marcia crater to mark a major Vestan time-stratigraphic event, and that the Marcia Formation is one of the geologically youngest formations on Vesta. Marcia crater reveals pristine bright and dark material in its walls and smooth and pitted terrains on its floor. The smooth unit we interpret as evidence of flow of impact melts and (for the pitted terrain) release of volatiles during or after the impact process. The distinctive dark ejecta surrounding craters Marcia and Calpurnia is enriched in OH- or H-bearing phases and has a variable morphology, suggestive of a complex mixture of impact ejecta and impact melts including dark materials possibly derived from carbonaceous chondrite-rich material. Aricia Tholus, which was originally interpreted as a putative Vestan volcanic edifice based on lower resolution observations, appears to be a fragment of an ancient impact basin rim topped by a dark-rayed impact crater. Octavia crater has a cratering model formation age of approximately 280-990 million years based on counts

  1. Time history of the Martian dynamo from crater magnetic field analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, R. J.; Robbins, S. J.; Manga, M.; Halekas, J. S.; Frey, H.

    2013-12-01

    Large impacts simultaneously reset both the surface age and the magnetization of the entire depth of crust over areas comparable to the final size of the resulting craters. These properties make large impact craters (>300 km in diameter) ideal 'magnetic markers' for constraining the history of the Martian core dynamo. However the relationship between crustal magnetization and magnetic field measured in orbit is non-unique, making the measured magnetic field signature of an impact crater only a proxy for the magnetization (or lack thereof) below. Using Monte Carlo Fourier domain modeling of subsurface magnetization, we calculate probability distributions of the magnetic field signatures of partially and completely demagnetized craters. We compare these distributions to measured magnetic field signatures of 41 old impact craters on Mars larger than 300 km in diameter and calculate probabilities of their magnetization state. We compare these probabilities to cratering densities and absolute model ages and in this manner arrive at a robust time-history of Martian large crater magnetization and hence of the Martian dynamo. We conclude that the most likely scenario was a Mars dynamo active when the oldest detectable basins formed, ceasing before the Hellas and Utopia impacts, between 4.0 and 4.1 Ga (in model age) and not thereafter restarting. The Mars atmosphere was thereafter exposed directly to erosion by the solar wind, significantly altering the path of climate evolution. Further improvements to the history of the Martian dynamo will require better crater age estimates and lower altitude magnetic field data.

  2. Interpretation of Wild 2 Dust Fine Structure: Comparison of Stardust Aluminium Foil Craters to the Three-Dimensional Shape of Experimental Impacts by Artificial Aggregate Particles and Meteorite Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearsley, A T; Burchell, M J; Price, M C; Graham, G A; Wozniakiewicz, P J; Cole, M J; Foster, N J; Teslich, N

    2009-12-10

    New experimental results show that Stardust crater morphology is consistent with interpretation of many larger Wild 2 dust grains being aggregates, albeit most of low porosity and therefore relatively high density. The majority of large Stardust grains (i.e. those carrying most of the cometary dust mass) probably had density of 2.4 g cm{sup -3} (similar to soda-lime glass used in earlier calibration experiments) or greater, and porosity of 25% or less, akin to consolidated carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, and much lower than the 80% suggested for fractal dust aggregates. Although better size calibration is required for interpretation of the very smallest impacting grains, we suggest that aggregates could have dense components dominated by {micro}m-scale and smaller sub-grains. If porosity of the Wild 2 nucleus is high, with similar bulk density to other comets, much of the pore-space may be at a scale of tens of micrometers, between coarser, denser grains. Successful demonstration of aggregate projectile impacts in the laboratory now opens the possibility of experiments to further constrain the conditions for creation of bulbous (Type C) tracks in aerogel, which we have observed in recent shots. We are also using mixed mineral aggregates to document differential survival of pristine composition and crystalline structure in diverse fine-grained components of aggregate cometary dust analogues, impacted onto both foil and aerogel under Stardust encounter conditions.

  3. Preliminary Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum and laser probe dating of the M1 core of the Manson Impact Structure, Iowa: A K-T boundary crater candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunk, M. J.; Snee, L. W.; French, B. M.; Harlan, S. S.; Mcgee, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    Preliminary Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum and laser probe dating results from new drill core from the 35-km-diameter Manson Impact Structure (MIS), Iowa indicates a reasonable possibility that the MIS is a Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary impact event. Several different types of samples from a melt-matrix breccia, a unit of apparent crater fill intersected by the M1 core, were analyzed. Ar-40/Ar-39 results from these samples indicate a maximum age for the MIS of about 65.4 plus or minus 0.4(2 sigma) Ma. Petrographic analyses of the samples indicate a high probability that all the dated samples from the melt-matrix breccia contain relict grains that were not entirely melted or degassed at the time of impact, suggesting that the actual age of the MIS could be somewhat younger than our preliminary results indicate. The results are consistent with a previously published age estimate of shocked microcline from the MIS central uplift of 65.7 plus or minus 1.0 Ma.

  4. Morphology of meteoroid and space debris craters on LDEF metal targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, S. G.; Brownlee, D. E.; King, N. L.; Hoerz, F.

    1994-01-01

    We measured the depths, average diameters, and circularity indices of over 600 micrometeoroid and space debris craters on various metal surfaces exposed to space on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite, as a test of some of the formalisms used to convert the diameters of craters on space-exposed surfaces into penetration depths for the purpose of calculating impactor sizes or masses. The topics covered include the following: targe materials orientation; crater measurements and sample populations; effects of oblique impacts; effects of projectile velocity; effects of crater size; effects of target hardness; effects of target density; and effects of projectile properties.

  5. Geology of McLaughlin Crater, Mars: A Unique Lacustrine Setting with Implications for Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, J. R.; Niles, P. B.; Rogers, A. D.; Johnson, S. S.; Ashley, J. W.; Golombek, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    McLaughlin crater is a 92-kmdiameter Martian impact crater that contained an ancient carbonate- and clay mineral-bearing lake in the Late Noachian. Detailed analysis of the geology within this crater reveals a complex history with important implications for astrobiology [1]. The basin contains evidence for, among other deposits, hydrothermally altered rocks, delta deposits, deep water (>400 m) sediments, and potentially turbidites. The geology of this basin stands in stark contrast to that of some ancient basins that contain evidence for transient aqueous processes and airfall sediments (e.g. Gale Crater [2-3]).

  6. The Automatic Extraction and Recognition of Lunar Impact Craters Fusing CCD Images and DEM Data of Chang’e-1%融合嫦娥一号CCD影像与DEM数据的月球撞击坑自动提取和识别

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗中飞; 康志忠; 刘心怡

    2014-01-01

    As the extraction of lunar craters presently suffers from insufficient quantitative information and mis-extraction,this paper proposes an algorithm of automatic extraction and recognition of lunar impact craters fusing CCD images and DEM data of Chang’e-1.①The images of craters comply with specific rules derived from the illumination of sun,therefore the extraction of craters in CCD images is implemented by the matching of corresponding crater feature segments.② the mis-extraction of craters in CCD images is then eliminated in terms of the continuity of the aspects of crater wall,which are computed using DEM data.③ the edge points of a crater are extracted in the light of the abnormal change between the direction of the normal vector of an edge point and that of a non-edge point,the parameters of craters are then computed through the fitting of edge points and the types of craters are recognized according to the proportion of points on the bottom and the hatch of craters.The proposed approach is tested on CCD images and DEMdata of Chang’e-1.The results show that our proposed algorithm has good performance in the high-latitude areas where the distribution of lunar impact craters is uniform.%针对现阶段月球撞击坑定量信息提取不足和误提取的问题,提出一种融合CCD影像和 DEM数据进行撞击坑的自动提取及识别的算法.①在太阳光照下,撞击坑的影像特征满足特定的规律,通过条件匹配在CCD影像中提取撞击坑.②在 DEM中,利用撞击坑坑壁点的坡向值的连续性,对影像中误提取的撞击坑进行剔除.③在 D EM中,利用撞击坑边缘点法向量的突变性,提取撞击坑边缘点并进行拟合,计算撞击坑的参数,通过坑底点云所占比例以及剖面线特征识别撞击坑的类型.经过“嫦娥一号”影像与 D EM数据的验证,该算法在高纬度月球撞击坑分布均匀的区域应用效果较好.

  7. Treating Bony craters by osseous resection in periodontics: Crater therapy

    OpenAIRE

    V. Selahi Moghadam

    1989-01-01

    Treating bony craters by surgical method needs elimination or reduction of bony lesions as well as providing sufficient bone by minimum osteotomy in order to preserve supporting bone. Furcation preservation is very important. Most mandibular molars are overtreated from buccal aspect that leads to inverted morphology and affects buccal forcation. Identifying anatomical structures and their relation to lesions is essential. In crater therapy, furcation and tooth trunk are two ...

  8. Chesapeake Marshlands National Wildlife Refuge Complex: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Chesapeake Marshlands NWR Complex for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  9. Defining a data management strategy for USGS Chesapeake Bay studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Cassandra

    2013-01-01

    The mission of U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Chesapeake Bay studies is to provide integrated science for improved understanding and management of the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. Collective USGS efforts in the Chesapeake Bay watershed began in the 1980s, and by the mid-1990s the USGS adopted the watershed as one of its national place-based study areas. Great focus and effort by the USGS have been directed toward Chesapeake Bay studies for almost three decades. The USGS plays a key role in using “ecosystem-based adaptive management, which will provide science to improve the efficiency and accountability of Chesapeake Bay Program activities” (Phillips, 2011). Each year USGS Chesapeake Bay studies produce published research, monitoring data, and models addressing aspects of bay restoration such as, but not limited to, fish health, water quality, land-cover change, and habitat loss. The USGS is responsible for collaborating and sharing this information with other Federal agencies and partners as described under the President’s Executive Order 13508—Strategy for Protecting and Restoring the Chesapeake Bay Watershed signed by President Obama in 2009. Historically, the USGS Chesapeake Bay studies have relied on national USGS databases to store only major nationally available sources of data such as streamflow and water-quality data collected through local monitoring programs and projects, leaving a multitude of other important project data out of the data management process. This practice has led to inefficient methods of finding Chesapeake Bay studies data and underutilization of data resources. Data management by definition is “the business functions that develop and execute plans, policies, practices and projects that acquire, control, protect, deliver and enhance the value of data and information.” (Mosley, 2008a). In other words, data management is a way to preserve, integrate, and share data to address the needs of the Chesapeake Bay studies to better

  10. Distant Secondary Craters from Lyot Crater, Mars, and Implications for Ages of Planetary Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, S. J.; Hynek, B. M.

    2011-03-01

    We identified thousands of secondary craters in distinct clusters up to 5200 km from their primary crater, Lyot, on Mars. Their properties, relation to Lyot, and broader implications to secondary cratering and planetary ages will be discussed.

  11. 77 FR 64980 - Chesapeake Renewable Energy LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chesapeake Renewable Energy LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Chesapeake Renewable Energy LLC's application...

  12. 78 FR 44556 - Chesapeake Energy Marketing, Inc. v. Midcontinent Express Pipeline LLC; Notice of Complaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chesapeake Energy Marketing, Inc. v. Midcontinent Express Pipeline LLC... Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 385.206, Chesapeake Energy Marketing, Inc. (CEMI...

  13. Endocrine disrupter - estradiol - in Chesapeake Bay tributaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorabawila, Nelum [University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853 (United States); Gupta, Gian [University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853 (United States)]. E-mail: gcgupta@umes.edu

    2005-04-11

    Exogenous chemicals that interfere with natural hormonal functions are considered endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Estradiol (17{beta}-estradiol or E2) is the most potent of all xenoestrogens. Induction of vitellogenin (VTG) production in male fish occurs at E2 concentrations as low as 1 ng l{sup -1}. E2 reaches aquatic systems mainly through sewage and animal waste disposal. Surface water samples from ponds, rivers (Wicomico, Manokin and Pocomoke), sewage treatment plants (STPs), and coastal bays (Assawoman, Monie, Chincoteague, and Tangier Sound - Chesapeake Bay) on the Eastern Shore of Maryland were analyzed for E2 using enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). E2 concentrations in river waters varied between 1.9 and 6.0 ng l{sup -1}. Highest E2 concentrations in river waters were observed immediately downstream of STPs. E2 concentrations in all the coastal bays tested were 2.3-3.2 ng l{sup -1}.

  14. Geology of the Selk crater region on Titan from Cassini VIMS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderblom, J.M.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, L.A.; Barnes, J.W.; Jaumann, R.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Sotin, C.; Stephan, K.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of Titan obtained by the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have revealed Selk crater, a geologically young, bright-rimmed, impact crater located ???800. km north-northwest of the Huygens landing site. The crater rim-crest diameter is ???90. km; its floor diameter is ???60. km. A central pit/peak, 20-30. km in diameter, is seen; the ratio of the size of this feature to the crater diameter is consistent with similarly sized craters on Ganymede and Callisto, all of which are dome craters. The VIMS data, unfortunately, are not of sufficient resolution to detect such a dome. The inner rim of Selk crater is fluted, probably by eolian erosion, while the outer flank and presumed ejecta blanket appear dissected by drainages (particularly to the east), likely the result of fluvial erosion. Terracing is observed on the northern and western walls of Selk crater within a 10-15. km wide terrace zone identified in VIMS data; the terrace zone is bright in SAR data, consistent with it being a rough surface. The terrace zone is slightly wider than those observed on Ganymede and Callisto and may reflect differences in thermal structure and/or composition of the lithosphere. The polygonal appearance of the crater likely results from two preexisting planes of weakness (oriented at azimuths of 21?? and 122?? east of north). A unit of generally bright terrain that exhibits similar infrared-color variation and contrast to Selk crater extends east-southeast from the crater several hundred kilometers. We informally refer to this terrain as the Selk "bench." Both Selk and the bench are surrounded by the infrared-dark Belet dune field. Hypotheses for the genesis of the optically bright terrain of the bench include: wind shadowing in the lee of Selk crater preventing the encroachment of dunes, impact-induced cryovolcanism, flow of a fluidized-ejecta blanket (similar to the bright crater outflows observed on Venus), and erosion of a streamlined upland formed

  15. Long-term decline in the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa in central Chesapeake Bay, USA: An indirect effect of eutrophication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, David G.; Boynton, Walter R.; Roman, Michael R.

    2012-04-01

    A long-term abundance record of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa in the Maryland portion of Chesapeake Bay was compiled from 1966 to 2002. A significant downward trend in the summertime abundance of Acartia tonsa was found in central Chesapeake Bay. We propose that environmental and food web changes occurred as the Chesapeake Bay became increasingly impacted by human activity which eventually led to the overall decline of A. tonsa. Environmental changes included a long-term rise in water temperature and the volume of hypoxic water during the summer. These changes occurred during the same time period as increases in chlorophyll a concentration, declines in the landings of the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, and declines in abundance of the sea nettle Chrysaora quinquecirrha. A CUSUM analysis showed that each time-series experienced a change point during over the past 50 years. These changes occurred sequentially, with chlorophyll a concentration increasing beginning in 1969, water temperature and hypoxic volume increasing beginning in the early 1980s, more recent Maryland C. virginica landings begin declining in the early 1980s and A. tonsa and C. quinquecirrha declining starting in 1989. A stepwise regression analysis revealed that the reduction in A. tonsa abundance appeared to be most associated with a decreasing trend in C. quinquecirrha abundance, though only when trends in the two time-series were present. The drop in C. quinquecirrha abundance is associated with reduced predation on the ctenophore, Mnemiopsis leidyi, a key predator of A. tonsa. The long-term decline of A. tonsa has likely impacted trophic transfer to fish, particularly the zooplanktivorous bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli). A time-series of bay anchovy juvenile index showed a negative trend and the CUSUM analysis revealed 1993 as its starting point. Total fisheries landings, excluding menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus), in Chesapeake Bay have also declined during the same period and this

  16. 'Lyell' Panorama inside Victoria Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    During four months prior to the fourth anniversary of its landing on Mars, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity examined rocks inside an alcove called 'Duck Bay' in the western portion of Victoria Crater. The main body of the crater appears in the upper right of this stereo panorama, with the far side of the crater lying about 800 meters (half a mile) away. Bracketing that part of the view are two promontories on the crater's rim at either side of Duck Bay. They are 'Cape Verde,' about 6 meters (20 feet) tall, on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' about 15 meters (50 feet) tall, on the right. The rest of the image, other than sky and portions of the rover, is ground within Duck Bay. Opportunity's targets of study during the last quarter of 2007 were rock layers within a band exposed around the interior of the crater, about 6 meters (20 feet) from the rim. Bright rocks within the band are visible in the foreground of the panorama. The rover science team assigned informal names to three subdivisions of the band: 'Steno,' 'Smith,' and 'Lyell.' This view combines many images taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) from the 1,332nd through 1,379th Martian days, or sols, of the mission (Oct. 23 to Dec. 11, 2007). Images taken through Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers were mixed to produce an approximately true-color panorama. Some visible patterns in dark and light tones are the result of combining frames that were affected by dust on the front sapphire window of the rover's camera. Opportunity landed on Jan. 25, 2004, Universal Time, (Jan. 24, Pacific Time) inside a much smaller crater about 6 kilometers (4 miles) north of Victoria Crater, to begin a surface mission designed to last 3 months and drive about 600 meters (0.4 mile).

  17. Modelling the gravity and magnetic field anomalies of the Chicxulub crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, C. Ortiz; Pilkington, M.; Hildebrand, A. R.; Roest, W. R.; Grieve, R. A. F.; Keating, P.

    1993-01-01

    The approximately 180-km-diameter Chicxulub crater lies buried by approximately 1 km of sediment on the northwestern corner of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Geophysical, stratigraphic and petrologic evidence support an impact origin for the structure and biostratigraphy suggests that a K/T age is possible for the impact. The crater's location is in agreement with constraints derived from proximal K/T impact-wave and ejecta deposits and its melt-rock is similar in composition to the K/T tektites. Radiometric dating of the melt rock reveals an age identical to that of the K/T tektites. The impact which produced the Chicxulub crater probably produced the K/T extinctions and understanding the now-buried crater will provide constraints on the impact's lethal effects. The outstanding preservation of the crater, the availability of detailed gravity and magnetic data sets, and the two-component target of carbonate/evaporites overlying silicate basement allow application of geophysical modeling techniques to explore the crater under most favorable circumstances. We have found that the main features of the gravity and magnetic field anomalies may be produced by the crater lithologies.

  18. Combined position and diameter measures for lunar craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, D.W.G.

    1977-01-01

    The note addresses the problem of simultaneously measuring positions and diameters of circular impact craters on wide-angle photographs of approximately spherical planets such as the Moon and Mercury. The method allows for situations in which the camera is not aligned on the planet's center. ?? 1977.

  19. Ancient aqueous environments at Endeavour crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Squyres, S. W.; Bell, J.F.; Catalano, J.G.; Clark, B. C.; Crumpler, L.S.; de Souza, P.A.; Fairén, A.G.; Farrand, W. H.; Fox, V.K.; Gellert, Ralf; Ghosh, A.; Golombeck, M.P.; Grotzinger, J.P.; Guinness, E.A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Jolliff, B.L.; Knoll, A.H.; Li, R.; McLennan, S.M.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Morris, R.V.; Murchie, S.L.; Parker, T.J.; Paulsen, G.; Rice, J.W.; Ruff, S.W.; Smith, M.D.; Wolff, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Opportunity has investigated in detail rocks on the rim of the Noachian age Endeavour crater, where orbital spectral reflectance signatures indicate the presence of Fe+3-rich smectites. The signatures are associated with fine-grained, layered rocks containing spherules of diagenetic or impact origin. The layered rocks are overlain by breccias, and both units are cut by calcium sulfate veins precipitated from fluids that circulated after the Endeavour impact. Compositional data for fractures in the layered rocks suggest formation of Al-rich smectites by aqueous leaching. Evidence is thus preserved for water-rock interactions before and after the impact, with aqueous environments of slightly acidic to circum-neutral pH that would have been more favorable for prebiotic chemistry and microorganisms than those recorded by younger sulfate-rich rocks at Meridiani Planum.

  20. How old is Autolycus crater?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesinger, Harald; Pasckert, Jan Henrik; van der Bogert, Carolyn H.; Robinson, Mark S.

    2016-04-01

    Accurately determining the lunar cratering chronology is prerequisite for deriving absolute model ages (AMAs) across the lunar surface and throughout the Solar System [e.g., 1]. However, the lunar chronology is only constrained by a few data points over the last 1 Ga and there are no calibration data available between 1 and 3 Ga and beyond 3.9 Ga [2]. Rays from Autolycus and Aristillus cross the Apollo 15 landing site and presumably transported material to this location [3]. [4] proposed that at the Apollo 15 landing site about 32% of any exotic material would come from Autolycus crater and 25% would come from Aristillus crater. [5,6] proposed that the 39Ar-40Ar age of 2.1 Ga derived from three petrologically distinct, shocked Apollo 15 KREEP basalt samples, date Autolycus crater. Grier et al. [7] reported that the optical maturity (OMAT) characteristics of these craters are indistinguishable from the background values despite the fact that both craters exhibit rays that were used to infer relatively young, i.e., Copernican ages [8,9]. Thus, both OMAT characteristics and radiometric ages of 2.1 Ga and 1.29 Ga for Autolycus and Aristillus, respectively, suggest that these two craters are not Copernican in age. [10] interpreted newer U-Pb ages of 1.4 and 1.9 Ga from sample 15405 as the formation ages of Aristillus and Autolycus. If Autolycus is indeed the source of the dated exotic material collected at the Apollo 15 landing site, than performing crater size frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements for Autolycus offers the possibility to add a new calibration point to the lunar chronology, particularly in an age range that was previously unconstrained. We used calibrated and map-projected LRO NAC images to perform CSFD measurements within ArcGIS, using CraterTools [11]. CSFDs were then plotted with CraterStats [12], using the production and chronology functions of [13]. We determined ages of 3.72 and 3.85 Ga for the interior (Ai1) and ejecta area Ae3, which we

  1. 土地利用及不透水地表对河流流量的影响%Impacts of Land Use and Impervious Surface on Stream Flow Metrics in Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田迪; 李叙勇; Donald E. Weller; 白中科

    2011-01-01

    Using daily discharge data from the US Geological Survey, we calculated 34 stream flow metrics for 150 watersheds (area <282 km ) within the Chesapeake Bay basin, and selected 17 of the metrics. We quantified the proportions of forest, agriculture, grassland, developed land, and impervious surface in each watershed. For each of the three physiographic provinces, we correlated the flow metrics with the land cover proportions to elucidate how different land cover types affect the flow regime. Higher proportions of forest increased stream flow in relatively dry winters or springs and reduced stream flow in comparatively rainy autumns. Higher forest proportions also reduced flooding, prolonged pulses of higher flow, and reduced flow variability. Higher proportions of agriculture reduced flow variability and prolonged pulses of higher flow in all physiographic provinces and reduced flooding in the highland physiographic provinces. Higher grassland proportions reduced flooding and flow variability and prolonged high flow pulses in all provinces. Higher proportions of developed land and impervious surface reduced infiltration, increased flooding and flow during high rainfall periods, intensified flow variability, and shortened high flow pulses; there are different hydrologic effects in different urbanized areas.%利用美国地质调查局的逐日连续流量数据计算了美国切斯比克湾地区150个小流域的34个河流流量指标,并在整个区域和划分的3个自然地理区对选择的17个指标与4种土地利用类型和不透水地表做了相关分析。结果表明,森林在降水较少的冬春两季增加流量,雨量较高的秋季减少流量,森林面积比例的增加可以削减洪峰、延长洪峰历时、稳定流量变化。农业用地比例的增加表现为稳定流量变化,延长洪峰历时,在高原地区还可以削减洪峰流量。草地比例的提高均表现为削减洪峰流量,稳定流量变化,延长洪

  2. Cratering Experiments on the Self Armoring of Coarse-Grained Granular Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Güttler, Carsten; Nakamura, Akiko M

    2012-01-01

    Recently published crater statistics on the small asteroids 25143 Itokawa and 433 Eros show a significant depletion of craters below approx. 100 m in diameter. Possible mechanisms that were brought up to explain this lack of craters were seismic crater erasure and self armoring of a coarse, boulder covered asteroid surface. While seismic shaking has been studied in this context, the concept of armoring lacks a deeper inspection and an experimental ground truth. We therefore present cratering experiments of glass bead projectiles impacting into granular glass bead targets, where the grain sizes of projectile and target are in a similar range. The impact velocities are in the range of 200 to 300 m/s. We find that craters become fainter and irregular shaped as soon as the target grains are larger than the projectile sizes and that granular craters rarely form when the size ratio between projectile and target grain is around 1:10 or smaller. In that case, we observe a formation of a strength determined crater in ...

  3. Uncertainty in Model Predictions of Vibrio Vulnificus Response to Climate Variability and Change: A Chesapeake Bay Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, Erin A.; Zaitchik, Benjamin F.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Guikema, Seth D.; Del Castillo, Carlos E.

    2014-01-01

    The effect that climate change and variability will have on waterborne bacteria is a topic of increasing concern for coastal ecosystems, including the Chesapeake Bay. Surface water temperature trends in the Bay indicate a warming pattern of roughly 0.3-0.4 C per decade over the past 30 years. It is unclear what impact future warming will have on pathogens currently found in the Bay, including Vibrio spp. Using historical environmental data, combined with three different statistical models of Vibrio vulnificus probability, we explore the relationship between environmental change and predicted Vibrio vulnificus presence in the upper Chesapeake Bay. We find that the predicted response of V. vulnificus probability to high temperatures in the Bay differs systematically between models of differing structure. As existing publicly available datasets are inadequate to determine which model structure is most appropriate, the impact of climatic change on the probability of V. vulnificus presence in the Chesapeake Bay remains uncertain. This result points to the challenge of characterizing climate sensitivity of ecological systems in which data are sparse and only statistical models of ecological sensitivity exist.

  4. Uncertainty in model predictions of Vibrio vulnificus response to climate variability and change: a Chesapeake Bay case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin A Urquhart

    Full Text Available The effect that climate change and variability will have on waterborne bacteria is a topic of increasing concern for coastal ecosystems, including the Chesapeake Bay. Surface water temperature trends in the Bay indicate a warming pattern of roughly 0.3-0.4°C per decade over the past 30 years. It is unclear what impact future warming will have on pathogens currently found in the Bay, including Vibrio spp. Using historical environmental data, combined with three different statistical models of Vibrio vulnificus probability, we explore the relationship between environmental change and predicted Vibrio vulnificus presence in the upper Chesapeake Bay. We find that the predicted response of V. vulnificus probability to high temperatures in the Bay differs systematically between models of differing structure. As existing publicly available datasets are inadequate to determine which model structure is most appropriate, the impact of climatic change on the probability of V. vulnificus presence in the Chesapeake Bay remains uncertain. This result points to the challenge of characterizing climate sensitivity of ecological systems in which data are sparse and only statistical models of ecological sensitivity exist.

  5. Inferring conduit process from population studies of cinder cone craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemis, Karen G.

    2014-05-01

    One of the most observable aspects of magma conduits is of course their exit to the Earth's surface: the volcanic crater. The craters resulting from small mostly-monogenetic volcanic eruptions vary in considerable in size and shape, even after accounting for variation in size. Presumably, these variations tell us something about the state of the conduit at least in the ending stages of eruption. But what? This work explores the statistical properties of crater populations in Guatemala and elsewhere and speculates on the conduit processes that may explain the complex behavior. Crater depths are strongly correlated with cone slopes even when normalized by cone diameter, which suggests the importance of the impact of the volatile content (which may influence slope through fragmentation and the resulting grain size) and the duration of eruption (which may influence whether the cone is built to its maximum slope) despite erosion acting to reduce observed crater depths (cone slopes are known to decrease with erosion but cone diameters increase).

  6. Quantifying Slope Effects and Variations in Crater Density across a Single Geologic Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Heather; Mahanti, Prasun; Robinson, Mark; Povilaitis, Reinhold

    2016-10-01

    Steep underlying slopes (>~5°) significantly increase the rate of degradation of craters [1-3]. As a result, the density of craters is less on steeper slopes for terrains of the same age [2, 4]. Thus, when age-dating a planetary surface, an area encompassing one geologic unit of constant low slope is chosen. However, many key geologic units, such as ejecta blankets, lack sufficient area of constant slope to derive robust age estimates. Therefore, accurate age-dating of such units requires an accurate understanding of the effects of slope on age estimates. This work seeks to determine if the observed trend of decreasing crater density with increasing slopes [2] holds for craters >1 km and to quantify the effect of slope for craters of this size, focusing on the effect of slopes over the kilometer scale. Our study focuses on the continuous ejecta of Orientale basin, where we measure craters >1 km excluding secondaries that occur as chains or clusters. Age-dating via crater density measurements relies on uniform cratering across a single geologic unit. In the case of ejecta blankets and other impact related surfaces, this assumption may not hold due to the formation of auto- secondary craters. As such, we use LRO WAC mosaics [5], crater size-frequency distributions, absolute age estimates, a 3 km slope map derived from the WAC GLD100 [6], and density maps for various crater size ranges to look for evidence of non-uniform cratering across the continuous ejecta of Orientale and to determine the effect of slope on crater density. Preliminary results suggest that crater density does decrease with increasing slope for craters >1 km in diameter though at a slower rate than for smaller craters.References: [1] Trask N. J. and Rowan L. C. (1967) Science 158, 1529–1535. [2] Basilevsky (1976) Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 7th, p. 1005-1020. [3] Pohn and Offield (1970) USGS Prof. Pap., 153-162. [4] Xiao et al. (2013) Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett., 376, pgs. 1-11. doi:10.1016/j

  7. STRAWBERRY CRATER ROADLESS AREAS, ARIZONA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Edward W.; Light, Thomas D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey conducted in the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas, Arizona, indicate little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or fossil fuel resources in the area. The area contains deposits of cinder, useful for the production of aggregate block, and for deposits of decorative stone; however, similar deposits occur in great abundance throughout the San Francisco volcanic field outside the roadless areas. There is a possibility that the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas may overlie part of a crustal magma chamber or still warm pluton related to the San Francisco Mountain stratovolcano or to basaltic vents of late Pleistocene or Holocene age. Such a magma chamber or pluton beneath the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas might be an energy source from which a hot-, dry-rock geothermal energy system could be developed, and a probable geothermal resource potential is therefore assigned to these areas. 9 refs.

  8. Lonar Crater, India: An Analog for Mars in the Field and in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S. P.

    2016-09-01

    Fieldwork at Lonar Crater benefits impact studies; lab/sample data of shocked and altered basalts provide analogs for SNCs and rovers. Mission concepts can be evaluated in ejecta. Recent discoveries include shocked soil, shocked baked zones, and spall.

  9. Modeling the effect of hypoxia on macrobenthos production in the lower Rappahannock River, Chesapeake Bay, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Kersey Sturdivant

    Full Text Available Hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay has substantially increased in recent decades, with detrimental effects on macrobenthic production; the production of these fauna link energy transfer from primary consumers to epibenthic and demersal predators. As such, the development of accurate predictive models that determine the impact of hypoxia on macrobenthic production is important. A continuous-time, biomass-based model was developed for the lower Rappahannock River, a Bay tributary prone to seasonal hypoxia. Phytoplankton, zooplankton, and macrobenthic state variables were modeled, with a focus on quantitatively constraining the effect of hypoxia on macrobenthic biomass. This was accomplished through regression with Z': a sigmoidal function between macrobenthic biomass and dissolved oxygen concentration, derived using macrobenthic data collected from the Rappahannock River during the summers of 2007 and 2008, and applied to compute hypoxia-induced mortality as a rate process. The model was verified using independent monitoring data collected by the Chesapeake Bay Program. Simulations showed that macrobenthic biomass was strongly linked to dissolved oxygen concentrations, with fluctuations in biomass related to the duration and severity of hypoxia. Our model demonstrated that hypoxia negatively affected macrobenthic biomass, as longer durations of hypoxia and greater hypoxic severity resulted in an increasing loss in biomass. This exercise represents an important contribution to modeling anthropogenically impacted coastal ecosystems, by providing an empirically constrained relationship between hypoxia and macrobenthic biomass, and applying that empirical relationship in a mechanistic model to quantify the effect of the severity, duration, and frequency of hypoxia on benthic biomass dynamics.

  10. Modeling the effect of hypoxia on macrobenthos production in the lower Rappahannock River, Chesapeake Bay, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturdivant, Samuel Kersey; Brush, Mark J; Diaz, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay has substantially increased in recent decades, with detrimental effects on macrobenthic production; the production of these fauna link energy transfer from primary consumers to epibenthic and demersal predators. As such, the development of accurate predictive models that determine the impact of hypoxia on macrobenthic production is important. A continuous-time, biomass-based model was developed for the lower Rappahannock River, a Bay tributary prone to seasonal hypoxia. Phytoplankton, zooplankton, and macrobenthic state variables were modeled, with a focus on quantitatively constraining the effect of hypoxia on macrobenthic biomass. This was accomplished through regression with Z': a sigmoidal function between macrobenthic biomass and dissolved oxygen concentration, derived using macrobenthic data collected from the Rappahannock River during the summers of 2007 and 2008, and applied to compute hypoxia-induced mortality as a rate process. The model was verified using independent monitoring data collected by the Chesapeake Bay Program. Simulations showed that macrobenthic biomass was strongly linked to dissolved oxygen concentrations, with fluctuations in biomass related to the duration and severity of hypoxia. Our model demonstrated that hypoxia negatively affected macrobenthic biomass, as longer durations of hypoxia and greater hypoxic severity resulted in an increasing loss in biomass. This exercise represents an important contribution to modeling anthropogenically impacted coastal ecosystems, by providing an empirically constrained relationship between hypoxia and macrobenthic biomass, and applying that empirical relationship in a mechanistic model to quantify the effect of the severity, duration, and frequency of hypoxia on benthic biomass dynamics. PMID:24391904

  11. Reconstructing the infilling history within Robert Sharp Crater, Mars: Insights from morphology and stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossier, J.; Le Deit, L.; Hauber, E.; Mangold, N.; Carter, J.; Jaumann, R.

    2015-10-01

    Robert Sharp (133.59°E, -4.12°N) is a 150 km diameter impact crater , located in the equatorial region of Mars, near Gale Crater, where the MSL rover Curiosity landed in August 2012. Using orbital data, an iron chlorine hydroxide named akaganéite that typically forms in highly saline and chlorinated aqueous environments on Earth has been detected in Robert Sharp crater [1]. Interestingly, akaganéite has also been detected in Gale Crater from the ground [2,3]. In order to reconstruct the paleo-environments in the region, we produce a geological map of Robert Sharp(Fig.1). Crater counts provide time constraints on its infilling history.

  12. Geomorphometric analysis of selected Martian craters using polar coordinate transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Zoltán; Koma, Zsófia; Székely, Balázs

    2016-04-01

    Centrally symmetric landform elements are very common features on the surface of the planet Mars. The most conspicuous ones of them are the impact craters of various size. However, a closer look on these features reveals that they show often asymmetric patterns as well. These are partially related to the geometry of the trajectory of the impacting body, but sometimes it is a result of surface processes (e.g., freeze/thaw cycles, mass movements). Geomorphometric studies have already been carried out to reveal these pecularities. Our approach, the application of polar coordinate transformation (PCT) very sensitively enhances the non-radial and non-circular shapes. We used digital terrain models (DTMs) derived from the ESA Mars Express HRSC imagery. The original DTM or its derivatives (e.g. slope angle or aspect) are PCT transformed. We analyzed the craters inter alia with scattergrams in polar coordinates. The resulting point cloud can be used directly for the analysis, but in some cases an interpolation should be applied to enhance certain non-circular features (especially in case of smaller craters). Visual inspection of the crater slopes, coloured by the aspect, reveals smaller features. Some of them are processing artefacts, but many of them are related to local undulations in the topography or indications of mass movements. In many cases the undulations of the crater rim are due to erosional processes. The drawbacks of the technology are related to the uneven resolution of the projected image: features in the crater centre should be left out from the analysis because PCT has a low resolution around the projection center. Furthermore, the success of the PCT depends on the correct definition of the projection centre: erroneously centered images are not suitable for analysis. The PCT transformed images are also suitable for radial averaging and calculation of standard deviations, resulting in typical, comparable craters shapes. These studies may lead to a deeper

  13. Imaging the Buried Chicxulub Crater with Gravity Gradients and Cenotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, A. R.; Pilkington, M.; Halpenny, J. F.; Ortiz-Aleman, C.; Chavez, R. E.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Connors, M.; Graniel-Castro, E.; Camara-Zi, A.; Vasquez, J.

    1995-09-01

    Differing interpretations of the Bouguer gravity anomaly over the Chicxulub crater, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, have yielded diameter estimates of 170 to 320 km. Knowing the crater's size is necessary to quantify the lethal perturbations to the Cretaceous environment associated with its formation. The crater's size (and internal structure) is revealed by the horizontal gradient of the Bouguer gravity anomaly over the structure, and by mapping the karst features of the Yucatan region. To improve our resolution of the crater's gravity signature we collected additional gravity measurements primarily along radial profiles, but also to fill in previously unsurveyed areas. Horizontal gradient analysis of Bouguer gravity data objectively highlights the lateral density contrasts of the impact lithologies and suppresses regional anomalies which may obscure the gravity signature of the Chicxulub crater lithologies. This gradient technique yields a striking circular structure with at least 6 concentric gradient features between 25 and 85 km radius. These features are most distinct in the southwest probably because of denser sampling of the gravity field. Our detailed profiles detected an additional feature and steeper gradients (up to 5 mGal/km) than the original survey. We interpret the outer four gradient maxima to represent concentric faults in the crater's zone of slumping as is also revealed by seismic reflection data. The inner two probably represent the margin of the central uplift and the peak ring and or collapsed transient cavity. Radial gradients in the SW quadrant over the inferred ~40 km-diameter central uplift (4) may represent structural "puckering" as revealed at eroded terrestrial craters. Gradient features related to regional gravity highs and lows are visible outside the crater, but no concentric gradient features are apparent at distances > 90 km radius. The marginal gradient features may be modelled by slump faults as observed in large complex craters on

  14. Stratigraphy of the crater Copernicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, R.

    1984-01-01

    The stratigraphy of copernicus based on its olivine absorption bands is presented. Earth based spectral data are used to develop models that also employ cratering mechanics to devise theories for Copernican geomorphology. General geologic information, spectral information, upper and lower stratigraphic units and a chart for model comparison are included in the stratigraphic analysis.

  15. A Giant Crater on 90 Antiope?

    CERN Document Server

    Descamps, P; Michalowski, T; Berthier, J; Pollock, J; Wiggins, P; Birlan, M; Colas, F; Vachier, F; Fauvaud, S; Fauvaud, M; Sareyan, J -P; Pilcher, F; Klinglesmith, D A

    2009-01-01

    Mutual event observations between the two components of 90 Antiope were carried out in 2007-2008. The pole position was refined to lambda0 = 199.5+/-0.5 eg and beta0 = 39.8+/-5 deg in J2000 ecliptic coordinates, leaving intact the physical solution for the components, assimilated to two perfect Roche ellipsoids, and derived after the 2005 mutual event season (Descamps et al., 2007). Furthermore, a large-scale geological depression, located on one of the components, was introduced to better match the observed lightcurves. This vast geological feature of about 68 km in diameter, which could be postulated as a bowl-shaped impact crater, is indeed responsible of the photometric asymmetries seen on the "shoulders" of the lightcurves. The bulk density was then recomputed to 1.28+/-0.04 gcm-3 to take into account this large-scale non-convexity. This giant crater could be the aftermath of a tremendous collision of a 100-km sized proto-Antiope with another Themis family member. This statement is supported by the fact ...

  16. Seismic Shaking Removal of Craters 0.2-0.5 km in Diameter on Asteroid 433 Eros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P. C.; Robinson, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    Impact cratering acts in a variety of ways to create a surprising range of scenery on small satellites and asteroids. The visible crater population is a self-modifying characteristic of these airless objects, and determining the various ways younger craters can add or subtract from the population is an important aspect of small body "geology." Asteroid 433 Eros, the most closely studied of any small body, has two aspects of its crater population that have attracted attention: a fall-off of crater densities below approx.100 m diameter relative to an expected equilibrium population [1] and regions of substantially lower large crater densities [2, 3, 4]. In this work we examine the global variation of the density of craters on Eros larger than 0.177 km, a size range above that involved in small crater depletion hypotheses [1, 5]. We counted all craters on Eros to a size range somewhat below 0.177 km diameter (and different from data used in [3]). The primary metric for this study is the number of craters between 0.177 and 1.0 km within a set radius of each grid point on the 2deg x 2deg shape model of Eros. This number can be expressed as an R-value [6], provided that it is remembered that the large bin size makes individual R values slightly different from those obtained in the usual root-2 bins.

  17. Cratering experiments in sands and a trial for general scaling law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, H.; Kawakami, S.-I.; Takagi, Y.; Kato, M.; Kumazawa, M.

    1983-01-01

    The results of the vertical impacts of aluminum projectiles into quartz sand are reported. The impacts are at velocities of 35 to 830 m/sec with a single-stage powder gun. The morphology of craters formed in loose sands is generally conical, whereas that of craters formed in self-compacted sands varies with increasing impact velocity from a flat-floor type to a double-ring type. The present data, together with previous experimental data and the 'late-stage equivalence' of Dienes and Walsh, are seen as indicating that the crater diameter is expressed by a function of the 'late-stage effective energy' but not of the impact kinetic energy. The diameter of a crater formed in a noncohesive sand is found to be proportional to one-fourth the power of the late-state effective energy. For general impact cratering in a target with a finite strength, a relation is given between the velocity and the diameter, suggesting that there are four regimes in the crater diameter versus kinetic energy relation.

  18. Numerical modeling of Stickney crater and its aftermath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Stephen R.; Michel, Patrick; Bruck Syal, Megan; Owen, J. Michael; Miller, Paul L.; Richardson, Derek C.; Zhang, Yun

    2016-10-01

    Phobos is characterized by a large crater called Stickney. Its collisional formation and its aftermath have important implications on the final structure, morphology, and surface properties of Phobos that still need further clarification. This is particularly important in the current environment, with space mission concepts to Phobos under active study by several space agencies. SPH hydrocode simulations of the impact that formed Stickney crater [1] have been performed. Using the Soft-Sphere Discrete Element Method (SSDEM) collisional routine of the N-body code pkdgrav [2], we take the outcome of SPH simulations as inputs and model the ensuing phase of the crater formation process and its ejecta evolution under the gravitational influence of Phobos and Mars. In our simulations, about 9 million particles comprise Phobos' shape [3], and the evolution of particles that are expected to form or leave the crater is followed using multiple plausible orbits for Phobos around Mars. We track the immediate fate of low-speed ejecta (~3–8 m/s), allowing us to test an hypothesis [4] that they may scour certain groove marks that have been observed on Phobos' surface and to quantify the amounts and locations of re-impacting ejecta. We also compute the orbital fate of ejecta whose speed is below the system escape speed (about 3 km/s). This allows us to estimate the thickness and distribution of the final ejecta blanket and to check whether crater chains may form. Finally, particles forming the crater walls are followed until achieving stability, allowing us to estimate the final crater depth and diameter. We will show examples of these simulations from a set of SPH initial conditions and over a range of parameters (e.g., material friction coefficients). Work ongoing to cover a larger range of plausible impact conditions, allowing us to explore different scenarios to explain Phobos' observed properties and to infer more, giving useful constraints to space mission studies. [1

  19. On the Nature of the Impactor That Formed the Shackleton Crater on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugacheva, Svetlana G.; Feoktistova, Ekaterina A.; Shevchenko, Vladislav V.

    2016-06-01

    The present paper attempts to assess the characteristics of the impactor that formed the Shackleton crater, located at the south pole of the Moon. The crater's morphometric parameters were analyzed based on the data of the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Conclusions were drawn regarding the possible range of the impact angle and the parameters of the transient crater, such as depth and volume. The thickness of ejecta deposits on the transient crater rim and the volume of these deposits at a certain distance from the crater rim were assessed. These assessments enabled determining the type and characteristics of impactors (velocity, density, size, and impact angle) that could have formed the Shackleton crater. It was shown that the Shackleton crater could have been formed by an impact of a low-velocity (3 km/s) comets with diameter 4-4.5 km, chondrite or achondrite with a diameter of 2 km at a 45°-50° angle, whose velocity did not exceed 6 km/s, as well as stony-iron or iron-nickel impactors with a 1-2 km diameter for stony-iron asteroids and 1-1.5 km for iron-nickel asteroids. The impact velocity of stony-iron impactors, according to the authors' calculations, can reach 12 km/s. The impact velocities of iron-nickel asteroids range from 6 to 9 km/s. The impactor's substance mass that could have remained in the crater after it was formed was assessed.

  20. Depth to Diameter Ratios of New Martian Craters from HiRISE Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daubar, Ingrid; McEwen, A. S.

    2009-09-01

    More than 90 new primary impact sites have been identified by the Context camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and confirmed with HiRISE. Before and after images date these impacts at only months to decades old. The 25-cm pixel scale of HiRISE data allows us to study the morphology of these extremely young and extremely small (10 meter-scale) craters. 142 craters were measured at 44 separate new impact sites. About half of those sites are single-crater impacts, while the rest consist of clusters of craters, which were measured individually when large enough to resolve. Depths were calculated from shadow measurements assuming a simple parabolic shape using the technique of Chappelow & Sharpton (2002). The measurements follow a power law fit: d=0.28*D0.97. No statistical difference was found between single-crater sites and cluster sites. These new impacts seem to result in slightly deeper craters on average than previously found for older, larger simple craters, although the fit converges with previous studies at larger sizes. If the difference is statistically significant, it could be related to their extreme youth, their small sizes, uncertainties in the depth measurements due to non-parabolic shapes, or the target material properties. Since detection relies on low-resolution identification of dark blast zones where surface dust has been disturbed, these new craters are concentrated in areas of uniform dust cover and often significant mantling. Morphological features such as flat floors and benches may provide a measure of the depth of this mantling and an estimate of its effect on the observed d/D.

  1. A new study of crater concentric ridges on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood-Stone, Corwin; Bray, Veronica J.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2016-07-01

    Crater concentric ridges (CCRs) are topographic ridges found in the ejecta blankets of fresh few-kilometer-scale lunar craters. These ridges, which were last studied in detail in the late 1970 s (referred to as 'lunar concentric dunes'), were hypothesized to form due to ballistic impact sedimentation and erosion. We have surveyed the Moon to find 59 craters with CCRs and have constructed mosaics of these craters where possible using high-resolution LROC NAC (Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera-Narrow Angle Camera) images. We then map from some of these mosaics in order to measure the CCRs and examine their morphologies. Ejecta scaling models and some of our observations of the CCRs contradict the current hypothesis for the formation of these features. We therefore propose new hypotheses to consider for the formation of CCRs, specifically interaction of ejecta with initial topography or formation via interactions of shocks in the ejecta. Additionally, for the first time we have found CCRs on Mercury, but they are rare or absent on Mars.

  2. Scaling craters in carbonates: Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of shock damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanskey, Carol A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Carbonate samples from the 8.9-Mt nuclear (near-surface explosion) crater, OAK, and a terrestrial impact crater, Meteor Crater, were analyzed for shock damage using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Samples from below the OAK apparent crater floor were obtained from six boreholes, as well as ejecta recovered from the crater floor. The degree of shock damage in the carbonate material was assessed by comparing the sample spectra to the spectra of Solenhofen and Kaibab limestone, which had been skocked to known pressures. Analysis of the OAK Crater borehole samples has identified a thin zone of allocthonous highly shocked (10-13 GPa) carbonate material underneath the apparent crater floor. This approx. 5- to 15-m-thick zone occurs at a maximum depth of approx. 125 m below current seafloor at the borehole, sited at the initial position of the OAK explosive, and decreases in depth towards the apparent crater edge. Because this zone of allocthonous shocked rock delineates deformed rock below, and a breccia of mobilized sand and collapse debris above, it appears to outline the transient crater. The transient crater volume inferred in this way is found to by 3.2 +/- 0.2 times 10(exp 6)cu m, which is in good agreement with a volume of 5.3 times 10(exp 6)cu m inferred from gravity scaling of laboratory experiments. A layer of highly shocked material is also found near the surface outside the crater. The latter material could represent a fallout ejecta layer. The ejecta boulders recovered from the present crater floor experienced a range of shock pressures from approx. 0 to 15 GPa with the more heavily shocked samples all occurring between radii of 360 and approx. 600 m. Moreover, the fossil content, lithology and Sr isotopic composition all demonstrate that the initial position of the bulk of the heavily shocked rock ejecta sampled was originally near surface rock at initial depths in the 32 to 45-m depth (below sea level) range. The EPR technique is also sensitive to

  3. Comparing Central Peak and Central Pit Craters on Mercury and Mars: Implications for Crustal Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Nadine G.; Horstman, Ryan M.

    2016-10-01

    We have measured and classified 20,782 impact craters on Mercury and 24,495 craters on Mars 5 km in diameter and larger for a comparison study of these features. We identified 1144 floor pit and 638 summit pit craters on Mars and 32 summit pit craters but no floor pits on Mercury. We also identified 1682 central peak craters on Mars and 1764 on Mercury. We computed the ratio of the pit or basal peak diameter to the crater diameter in each case and compared the results for the two bodies. Summit pits on Mars have a median pit-to-crater diameter (Dp/Dc) ratio of 0.12 compared to 0.09 on Mercury, indicating pits are slightly larger relative to their parent crater on Mars. We find no correlation of the distribution of Mercury's central pits with features attributed to volatiles, i.e. radar-bright polar craters and craters containing hollows. This indicates that Mercury's central pits form by collapse of a weak brecciated core in the central peak and do not require the presence of volatiles, as is commonly assumed for central pit formation. The median peak-to-crater diameter (Dpk/Dc) ratio for the peaks on which summit pits are found on both bodies is statistically identical to that of the respective normal unpitted central peaks. This indicates that the peaks on which summit pits occur form in the same manner as normal central peaks but subsequently undergo core collapse to create the summit pit. Interestingly, the median Dpk/Dc for Martian peaks is twice as high as for their Mercurian counterparts (0.30 versus 0.15, respectively). Because Mercury and Mars have essentially the same surface gravity, the only major difference between the two bodies that could explain this observation is target characteristics. Prior studies of the composition of the crust and the detection of larger-than-normal secondary craters have led to the proposal that Mercury's crust is stronger than the crusts of the other terrestrial planets. Mercury's low number of central pit craters, the

  4. Climate Change and the Evolution and Fate of the Tangier Islands of Chesapeake Bay, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, David M.; Dridge, Karin M.; Hudgins, Mark H.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change and associated sea level rise (SLR) are already impacting low-lying coastal areas, including islands, throughout the world. Many of these areas are inhabited, many will need to be abandoned in coming decades as SLR continues. We examine the evolution (1850-2013) of the last inhabited offshore island in Virginia waters of Chesapeake Bay USA, the Tangier Islands. Three SLR scenarios, a low, mid, and high, were considered. Since 1850, 66.75% of the islands landmass has been lost. Under the mid-range SLR scenario, much of the remaining landmass is expected to be lost in the next 50 years and the Town will likely need to be abandoned. The high SLR scenario will accelerate the land loss and subsidence, such that the Town may need to be abandoned in as few as 25 years. We propose a conceptual plan that would significantly extend the lifespan of the islands and Town.

  5. Method for crater detection from digital topography data: interpolation based improvement and application to Lunar SELENE LALT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamunićcar, Goran; Lončarić, Sven

    Crater detection algorithms (CDAs) are an important subject of recent scientific research, as evident from the numerous recent publications in the field [ASR, 42 (1), 6-19]. In our previous work: (1) all the craters from the major currently available manually assembled catalogues have been merged into the catalogue with 57633 known Martian impact-craters [PSS, 56 (15), 1992-2008]; and (2) the CDA (developed to search for still uncatalogued impact-craters using 1/128° MOLA data) has been used to extend GT-57633 catalogue with 57592 additional craters resulting in GT-115225 catalog [GRS, 48 (5), in press, doi:10.1109/TGRS.2009.2037750]. On the other hand, the most complete catalog for Moon is the Morphological catalog of Lunar craters [edited by V. V. Shevchenko], which includes information on 14923 craters larger than 10km, visible on the lunar nearside and farside. This was the main motivation for application of our CDA to newly available Lunar SELENE LALT data. However, one of the main differences between MOLA and LALT data is the highest available resolution, wherein MOLA is available in 1/128° and LALT in 1/16° . The consequence is that only the largest craters can be detected using LALT dataset. However, this is still an excellent opportunity for further work on CDA in order to prepare it for forthcoming LRO LOLA data (which is expected to be in even better resolution than MOLA). The importance is in the fact that morphologically Martian and Lunar craters are not the same. Therefore, it is important to use the dataset for Moon in order to work on the CDA which is meant for detection of Lunar craters as well. In order to overcome the problem of currently available topography data in low resolution only, we particularly concentrated our work on the CDA's capability to detect very small craters relative to available dataset (up to the extreme case wherein the radius is as small as only two pixels). For this purpose, we improved the previous CDA with a new

  6. McLaughlin Crater as a Candidate Landing Site for Humans on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, J. R.; Niles, P. B.; Sutter, B.; Bell, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    McLaughlin Crater is an ancient (Noachian) Martian impact crater located at 337.6 East, 21.9 North, just south of the dichotomy boundary. This site should be considered for future landed exploration because: a) it is located at the boundary of three types of scientifically important terrain that will yield key results about the geological evolution and habitability of Mars; b) it contains surfaces where radiometric dating can be related to age dates estimated from crater counting, c) it contains volatile-rich rocks that will not only yield interesting results regarding ancient atmospheric chemistry, but will also be high quality, accessible targets for in-situ resource utilization (ISRU), and d) the site within the crater provides a flat, low-risk and low-elevation landing zone, which will facilitate landing large payloads on Mars.

  7. Martian fresh crater depths: More evidence for subsurface volatiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadow measurements on Viking Orbiter photography have yielded depths for 172 fresh martian craters spanning a diameter range of 0.7 to 80 km. Most craters studied are shallower than their lunar and mercurian counterparts. While the martian data exhibit a break in the depth/diameter distribution similar to those found for the Moon and Mercury, the ''inflection'' occurs at a smaller diameter on Mars, and the slopes below and above the break are respectively less than and greater than those of the other two planets. In addition to possible substrate-related transient cavity modification mechanisms, flash vaporization of proposed subsurface H2O would alter the original impact-induced velocity field by enhancing horizontal to subhorizontal target flow an excavation, thus yielding shallower craters. On the basis of the observed distribution, it is suggested that this process is more active at diameters near the break in slope (approx.4 km), declining in efficiency with increasing diameter, and can account for many dissimilarities between the martian distribution and those of the Moon and Mercury, which cannot be reconciled with gravity , impact velocity, or projectile differences alone

  8. Mapping of Planetary Surface Age Based on Crater Statistics Obtained by AN Automatic Detection Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, A. L.; Mühlbauer, M.; Grumpe, A.; Pasckert, J. H.; Wöhler, C.; Hiesinger, H.

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of the impact crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) is a well-established approach to the determination of the age of planetary surfaces. Classically, estimation of the CSFD is achieved by manual crater counting and size determination in spacecraft images, which, however, becomes very time-consuming for large surface areas and/or high image resolution. With increasing availability of high-resolution (nearly) global image mosaics of planetary surfaces, a variety of automated methods for the detection of craters based on image data and/or topographic data have been developed. In this contribution a template-based crater detection algorithm is used which analyses image data acquired under known illumination conditions. Its results are used to establish the CSFD for the examined area, which is then used to estimate the absolute model age of the surface. The detection threshold of the automatic crater detection algorithm is calibrated based on a region with available manually determined CSFD such that the age inferred from the manual crater counts corresponds to the age inferred from the automatic crater detection results. With this detection threshold, the automatic crater detection algorithm can be applied to a much larger surface region around the calibration area. The proposed age estimation method is demonstrated for a Kaguya Terrain Camera image mosaic of 7.4 m per pixel resolution of the floor region of the lunar crater Tsiolkovsky, which consists of dark and flat mare basalt and has an area of nearly 10,000 km2. The region used for calibration, for which manual crater counts are available, has an area of 100 km2. In order to obtain a spatially resolved age map, CSFDs and surface ages are computed for overlapping quadratic regions of about 4.4 x 4.4 km2 size offset by a step width of 74 m. Our constructed surface age map of the floor of Tsiolkovsky shows age values of typically 3.2-3.3 Ga, while for small regions lower (down to 2.9 Ga) and higher

  9. The Spirit Rover's Athena science investigation at Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squyres, S. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J. F., III; Brueckner, J.; Cabrol, N. A.; Calvin, W.; Carr, M. H.; Christensen, P. R.; Clark, B. C.; Crumpler, L.; DesMarais, D. J.; D'Uston, C.; Economou, T.; Farmer, J.; Folkner, W.; Golombek, M.; Landis, G.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Parker, T.; Sims, M.; Smith, M.; Yen, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit and its Athena science payload have been used to investigate a landing site in Gusev crater. Gusev is hypothesized to be the site of a former lake, but no clear evidence for lacustrine sedimentation has been found to date. Instead, the dominant lithology is basalt, and the dominant geologic processes are impact events and eolian transport. Many rocks exhibit coatings and other characteristics that may be evidence for minor aqueous alteration. Any lacustrine sediments that may exist at this location within Gusev apparently have been buried by lavas that have undergone subsequent impact disruption.

  10. 33 CFR 334.310 - Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area. 334.310 Section 334.310 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....310 Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area. (a) The restricted area....

  11. 76 FR 4345 - A Method To Assess Climate-Relevant Decisions: Application in the Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... AGENCY A Method To Assess Climate-Relevant Decisions: Application in the Chesapeake Bay AGENCY... review draft document titled, ``A Method to Assess Climate-Relevant Decisions: Application in the.../conferences/peerreview/register-chesapeake.htm . The draft ``A Method to Assess Climate-Relevant...

  12. The Chesapeake: A Boating Guide to Weather. Educational Series Number 25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucy, Jon; And Others

    The purpose of this publication is to promote a better understanding of how basic weather features develop on Chesapeake Bay and enable boaters to enjoy the Bay's unique waterways. Sections include: (1) Chesapeake Bay climate; (2) general weather features; (3) seasonal trends; (4) sources of weather information and forecasts; (5) weather service…

  13. 75 FR 27552 - Guidance for Federal Land Management in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ... Information Executive Order 13508, Chesapeake Bay Protection and Restoration, dated May 12, 2009 (74 FR 23099... 24, 2010 (75 FR 91294, March 24). This final guidance incorporates revisions resulting from public... AGENCY Guidance for Federal Land Management in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed AGENCY:...

  14. The sedimentology and dynamics of crater-affiliated wind streaks in western Arabia Terra, Mars and Patagonia, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, J.A.P.; Tanaka, K.L.; Yamamoto, A.; Berman, D.C.; Zimbelman, J.R.; Kargel, J.S.; Sasaki, S.; Jinguo, Y.; Miyamoto, H.

    2010-01-01

    Wind streaks comprise recent aeolian deposits that have been extensively documented on Venus, Earth and Mars. Martian wind streaks are among the most abundant surface features on the planet and commonly extend from the downwind margins of impact craters. Previous studies of wind streaks emerging from crater interior deposits suggested that the mode of emplacement was primarily related to the deposition of silt-sized particles as these settled from plumes. We have performed geologic investigations of two wind streaks clusters; one situated in western Arabia Terra, a region in the northern hemisphere of Mars, and another in an analogous terrestrial site located in southern Patagonia, Argentina, where occurrences of wind streaks emanate from playas within maar craters. In both these regions we have identified bedforms in sedimentary deposits on crater floors, along wind-facing interior crater margins, and along wind streaks. These observations indicate that these deposits contain sand-sized particles and that sediment migration has occurred via saltation from crater interior deposits to wind streaks. In Arabia Terra and in Patagonia wind streaks initiate from crater floors that contain lithic and evaporitic sedimentary deposits, suggesting that the composition of wind streak source materials has played an important role in development. Spatial and topographic analyses suggest that regional clustering of wind streaks in the studied regions directly correlates to the areal density of craters with interior deposits, the degree of proximity of these deposits, and the craters' rim-to-floor depths. In addition, some (but not all) wind streaks within the studied clusters have propagated at comparable yearly (Earth years) rates. Extensive saltation is inferred to have been involved in its propagation based on the studied terrestrial wind streak that shows ripples and dunes on its surface and the Martian counterpart changes orientation toward the downslope direction where it

  15. Method for Identifying Lava Tubes Among Pit Craters Using Brightness Profile Across Pits on the Moon or Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jongil; Hong, Ik-Seon; Cho, Eunjin; Yi, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Caves can serve as major outposts for future human exploration of the Moon and Mars. In addition, caves can protect people and electronic equipment from external hazards such as cosmic ray radiation and meteorites impacts and serve as a shelter. Numerous pit craters have been discovered on the Moon and Mars and are potential entrances to caves; the principal topographic features of pit craters are their visible internal floors and pits with vertical walls. We have devised two topographical models for investigating the relationship between the topographical characteristics and the inner void of pit craters. One of our models is a concave floor void model and the other is a convex floor tube model. For each model, optical photographs have been obtained under conditions similar to those in which optical photographs have been acquired for craters on the Moon and Mars. Brightness profiles were analyzed for determining the profile patterns of the void pit craters. The profile patterns were compared to the brightness profiles of Martian pit craters, because no good-quality images of lunar pit craters were available. In future studies, the model profile patterns will be compared to those of lunar pit craters, and the proposed method will likely become useful for finding lunar caves and consequently for planning lunar bases for manned lunar expeditions.

  16. Reproductive health of yellow perch Perca flavescens in selected tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazer, Vicki S., E-mail: Vblazer@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, National Fish Health Research Laboratory, Leetown Science Center, 11649 Leetown Road, Kearneysville, WV 25430 (United States); Pinkney, Alfred E., E-mail: Fred_Pinkeny@fws.gov [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Chesapeake Bay Field Office, 177 Admiral Cochrane Drive, Annapolis, MD 21401 (United States); Jenkins, Jill A., E-mail: jenkinsj@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, National Wetlands Research Center, 700 Cajundome Blvd., Lafayette, LA 70506 (United States); Iwanowicz, Luke R., E-mail: Liwanowicz@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, National Fish Health Research Laboratory, Leetown Science Center, 11649 Leetown Road, Kearneysville, WV 25430 (United States); Minkkinen, Steven, E-mail: steve_minkkinen@fws.gov [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Chesapeake Bay Field Office, 177 Admiral Cochrane Drive, Annapolis, MD 21401 (United States); Draugelis-Dale, Rassa O., E-mail: daler@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, National Wetlands Research Center, 700 Cajundome Blvd., Lafayette, LA 70506 (United States); Uphoff, James H., E-mail: juphoff@dnr.state.md.us [Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Fisheries Service, Cooperative Oxford Laboratory, 904 South Morris Street, Oxford, MD 21654 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Reduced recruitment of yellow perch has been noted for a number of years in certain urbanized watersheds (South and Severn Rivers) of the Chesapeake Bay. Other rapidly developing watersheds such as Mattawoman Creek are more recently showing evidence of reduced recruitment of anadromous fishes. In this study, we used a battery of biomarkers to better document the reproductive health of adult yellow perch collected during spring spawning in 2007–2009. Perch were collected in the South and Severn Rivers, Mattawoman Creek and the less developed Choptank and Allen's Fresh watersheds for comparison. Gonadosomatic indices, plasma reproductive hormone concentrations, plasma vitellogenin concentrations and gonad histology were evaluated in mature perch of both sexes. In addition, sperm quantity (cell counts) and quality (total and progressive motility, spermatogenic stage and DNA integrity), were measured in male perch. Many of these biomarkers varied annually and spatially, with some interesting statistical results and trends. Male perch from the Choptank and Allen's Fresh had generally higher sperm counts. In 2008 counts were significantly lower in the perch from the Severn when compared to other sites. The major microscopic gonadal abnormality in males was the proliferation of putative Leydig cells, observed in testes from Severn and less commonly, Mattawoman Creek perch. Observations that could significantly impact egg viability were an apparent lack of final maturation, abnormal yolk and thin, irregular zona pellucida. These were observed primarily in ovaries from Severn, South and less commonly Mattawoman Creek perch. The potential association of these observations with urbanization, impervious surface and chemical contaminants is discussed. - Highlights: ► Reduced recruitment of yellow perch has occurred in urban tributaries of Chesapeake Bay. ► We compared reproductive health biomarkers in perch from two urban, one developing, two less developed

  17. Reproductive health of yellow perch Perca flavescens in selected tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduced recruitment of yellow perch has been noted for a number of years in certain urbanized watersheds (South and Severn Rivers) of the Chesapeake Bay. Other rapidly developing watersheds such as Mattawoman Creek are more recently showing evidence of reduced recruitment of anadromous fishes. In this study, we used a battery of biomarkers to better document the reproductive health of adult yellow perch collected during spring spawning in 2007–2009. Perch were collected in the South and Severn Rivers, Mattawoman Creek and the less developed Choptank and Allen's Fresh watersheds for comparison. Gonadosomatic indices, plasma reproductive hormone concentrations, plasma vitellogenin concentrations and gonad histology were evaluated in mature perch of both sexes. In addition, sperm quantity (cell counts) and quality (total and progressive motility, spermatogenic stage and DNA integrity), were measured in male perch. Many of these biomarkers varied annually and spatially, with some interesting statistical results and trends. Male perch from the Choptank and Allen's Fresh had generally higher sperm counts. In 2008 counts were significantly lower in the perch from the Severn when compared to other sites. The major microscopic gonadal abnormality in males was the proliferation of putative Leydig cells, observed in testes from Severn and less commonly, Mattawoman Creek perch. Observations that could significantly impact egg viability were an apparent lack of final maturation, abnormal yolk and thin, irregular zona pellucida. These were observed primarily in ovaries from Severn, South and less commonly Mattawoman Creek perch. The potential association of these observations with urbanization, impervious surface and chemical contaminants is discussed. - Highlights: ► Reduced recruitment of yellow perch has occurred in urban tributaries of Chesapeake Bay. ► We compared reproductive health biomarkers in perch from two urban, one developing, two less developed watersheds.

  18. Processing Images of Craters for Spacecraft Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yang; Johnson, Andrew E.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    A crater-detection algorithm has been conceived to enable automation of what, heretofore, have been manual processes for utilizing images of craters on a celestial body as landmarks for navigating a spacecraft flying near or landing on that body. The images are acquired by an electronic camera aboard the spacecraft, then digitized, then processed by the algorithm, which consists mainly of the following steps: 1. Edges in an image detected and placed in a database. 2. Crater rim edges are selected from the edge database. 3. Edges that belong to the same crater are grouped together. 4. An ellipse is fitted to each group of crater edges. 5. Ellipses are refined directly in the image domain to reduce errors introduced in the detection of edges and fitting of ellipses. 6. The quality of each detected crater is evaluated. It is planned to utilize this algorithm as the basis of a computer program for automated, real-time, onboard processing of crater-image data. Experimental studies have led to the conclusion that this algorithm is capable of a detection rate >93 percent, a false-alarm rate <5 percent, a geometric error <0.5 pixel, and a position error <0.3 pixel.

  19. Crater size-frequency distribution measurements and age of the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, K. A.; Zanetti, M.; Jolliff, B.; van der Bogert, C. H.; Hiesinger, H.

    2016-07-01

    The Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex (CBVC) is a 25 × 35 km feature on the lunar farside marked by elevated topography, high albedo, high thorium concentration, and high silica content. Morphologies indicate that the complex is volcanic in origin and compositions indicate that it represents rare silicic volcanism on the Moon. Constraining the timing of silicic volcanism at the complex is necessary to better understand the development of evolved magmas and when they were active on the lunar surface. We employ image analysis and crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements on several locations within the complex and at surrounding impact craters, Hayn (87 km diameter), and Compton (160 km diameter), to determine relative and absolute model ages of regional events. Using CSFD measurements, we establish a chronology dating regional resurfacing events and the earliest possible onset of CBVC volcanism at ∼3.8 Ga, the formation of Compton Crater at 3.6 Ga, likely resurfacing by volcanism at the CBVC at ∼3.5 Ga, and the formation of Hayn Crater at ∼1 Ga. For the CBVC, we find the most consistent results are obtained using craters larger than 300 m in diameter; the small crater population is affected by their approach to an equilibrium condition and by the physical properties of regolith at the CBVC.

  20. Atypical pit craters on Mars: new insights from THEMIS, CTX and HiRISE observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, Glen; Okubo, Chris H.; Titus, Timothy N.

    2015-01-01

    More than 100 pit craters in the Tharsis region of Mars exhibit morphologies, diameters and thermal behaviors that diverge from the much larger bowl-shaped pit craters that occur in most regions across Mars. These Atypical Pit Craters (APCs) generally have sharp and distinct rims, vertical or overhanging walls that extend down to their floors, surface diameters of ~50-350 m, and high depth-to-diameter (d/D) ratios that are usually greater than 0.3 (which is an upper-range value for impacts and bowl-shaped pit craters), and can exceed values of 1.8. Observations by the Mars Odyssey THermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) show that APC floor temperatures are warmer at night, and fluctuate with much lower diurnal amplitudes than nearby surfaces or adjacent bowl-shaped pit craters. Kīlauea volcano, Hawai'i, hosts pit craters that formed through subsurface collapse into active volcanic dikes, resulting in pits that can appear morphologically analogous to either APCs or bowl-shaped pit craters. Partially-drained dikes are sometimes exposed within the lower walls and floors of these terrestrial APC analogs and can form extensive cave systems with unique microclimates. Similar caves in martian pit craters are of great interest for astrobiology. This study uses new observations by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) and Context Camera (CTX) to refine previous work where seven APCs were described from lower-resolution THEMIS visible-wavelength (VIS) observations. Here, we identify locations of 115 APCs, map their distribution across the Tharsis region, characterize their internal morphologies with high-resolution observations, and discuss possible formation mechanisms.

  1. Size and structure of the Chicxulub crater revealed by horizontal gravity gradients and cenotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, A. R.; Pilkington, M.; Connors, M.; Ortiz-Aleman, C.; Chavez, R. E.

    1995-08-01

    IT is now widely believed that a large impact occurred on the Earth at the end of the Cretaceous period, and that the buried Chicxulub structure in Yucatán, Mexico, is the resulting crater24. Knowledge of the size and internal structure of the Chicxulub crater is necessary for quantifying the effects of the impact on the Cretaceous environment. Although much information bearing on the crater's structure is available, diameter estimates range from 170 to 300 km (refs 1á¤-7), corresponding to an order of magnitude variation in impact energy. Here we show the diameter of the crater to be ~180 km by examining the horizontal gradient of the Bouguer gravity anomaly over the structure. This size is confirmed by the distribution of karst features in the Yucatan region (mainly water-filled sinkholes, known as cenotes). The coincidence of cenotes and peripheral gravity-gradient maxima suggests that cenote formation is closely related to the presence of slump faults near the crater rim.

  2. Big Crater as Viewed by Pathfinder Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The 'Big Crater' is actually a relatively small Martian crater to the southeast of the Mars Pathfinder landing site. It is 1500 meters (4900 feet) in diameter, or about the same size as Meteor Crater in Arizona. Superimposed on the rim of Big Crater (the central part of the rim as seen here) is a smaller crater nicknamed 'Rimshot Crater.' The distance to this smaller crater, and the nearest portion of the rim of Big Crater, is 2200 meters (7200 feet). To the right of Big Crater, south from the spacecraft, almost lost in the atmospheric dust 'haze,' is the large streamlined mountain nicknamed 'Far Knob.' This mountain is over 450 meters (1480 feet) tall, and is over 30 kilometers (19 miles) from the spacecraft. Another, smaller and closer knob, nicknamed 'Southeast Knob' can be seen as a triangular peak to the left of the flanks of the Big Crater rim. This knob is 21 kilometers (13 miles) southeast from the spacecraft.The larger features visible in this scene - Big Crater, Far Knob, and Southeast Knob - were discovered on the first panoramas taken by the IMP camera on the 4th of July, 1997, and subsequently identified in Viking Orbiter images taken over 20 years ago. The scene includes rocky ridges and swales or 'hummocks' of flood debris that range from a few tens of meters away from the lander to the distance of South Twin Peak. The largest rock in the nearfield, just left of center in the foreground, nicknamed 'Otter', is about 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) long and 10 meters (33 feet) from the spacecraft.This view of Big Crater was produced by combining 6 individual 'Superpan' scenes from the left and right eyes of the IMP camera. Each frame consists of 8 individual frames (left eye) and 7 frames (right eye) taken with different color filters that were enlarged by 500% and then co-added using Adobe Photoshop to produce, in effect, a super-resolution panchromatic frame that is sharper than an individual frame would be.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery

  3. Why Landers Should Explore Fresh, Small Craters on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, L. E.; Herr, K. C.; Adams, P. M.

    2008-03-01

    Small, fresh craters at the Nevada Test Site are unique, high quality test beds to develop exploration techniques for new craters spotted on Mars by Malin et al. The NTS craters provide data to determine the optimum crater size for exploration.

  4. Floor-fractured craters on Ceres and implications for interior processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczkowski, Debra; Schenk, Paul M.; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Park, Ryan; Preusker, Frank; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-10-01

    Several of the impact craters on Ceres have patterns of fractures on their floors. These fractures appear similar to those found within a class of lunar craters referred to as Floor-Fractured Craters (FFCs) [Schultz, 1976].Lunar FFCs are characterized by anomalously shallow floors cut by radial, concentric, and/or polygonal fractures, and have been classified into crater classes, Types 1 through 6, based on their morphometric properties [Schultz, 1976; Jozwiak et al, 2012, 2015]. Models for their formation have included both floor uplift due to magmatic intrusion below the crater or floor shallowing due to viscous relaxation. However, the observation that the depth versus diameter (d/D) relationship of the FFCs is distinctly shallower than the same association for other lunar craters supports the hypotheses that the floor fractures form due to shallow magmatic intrusion under the crater [Jozwiak et al, 2012, 2015].FFCs have also been identified on Mars [Bamberg et al., 2014]. Martian FFCs exhibit morphological characteristics similar to the lunar FFCs, and analyses suggest that the Martian FCCs also formed due to volcanic activity, although heavily influenced by interactions with groundwater and/or ice.We have cataloged the Ceres FFCs according to the classification scheme designed for the Moon. Large (>50 km) Ceres FFCs are most consistent with Type 1 lunar FFCs, having deep floors, central peaks, wall terraces, and radial and/or concentric fractures. Smaller craters on Ceres are more consistent with Type 4 lunar FFCs, having less-pronounced floor fractures and a v-shaped moats separating the wall scarp from the crater interior.An analysis of the d/D ratio for Ceres craters shows that, like lunar FFCs, the Ceres FFCs are anomalously shallow. This suggests that the fractures on the floor of Ceres FFCs may be due the intrusion of a low-density material below the craters that is uplifting their floors. While on the Moon and Mars the intrusive material is hypothesized

  5. Cratering statistics on asteroids: Methods and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, C.

    2014-07-01

    Crater size-frequency distributions (SFDs) on the surfaces of solid-surfaced bodies in the solar system have provided valuable insights about planetary surface processes and about impactor populations since the first spacecraft images were obtained in the 1960s. They can be used to determine relative age differences between surficial units, to obtain absolute model ages if the impactor flux and scaling laws are understood, to assess various endogenic planetary or asteroidal processes that degrade craters or resurface units, as well as assess changes in impactor populations across the solar system and/or with time. The first asteroid SFDs were measured from Galileo images of Gaspra and Ida (cf., Chapman 2002). Despite the superficial simplicity of these studies, they are fraught with many difficulties, including confusion by secondary and/or endogenic cratering and poorly understood aspects of varying target properties (including regoliths, ejecta blankets, and nearly-zero-g rubble piles), widely varying attributes of impactors, and a host of methodological problems including recognizability of degraded craters, which is affected by illumination angle and by the ''personal equations'' of analysts. Indeed, controlled studies (Robbins et al. 2014) demonstrate crater-density differences of a factor of two or more between experienced crater counters. These inherent difficulties have been especially apparent in divergent results for Vesta from different members of the Dawn Science Team (cf. Russell et al. 2013). Indeed, they have been exacerbated by misuse of a widely available tool (Craterstats: hrscview.fu- berlin.de/craterstats.html), which incorrectly computes error bars for proper interpretation of cumulative SFDs, resulting in derived model ages specified to three significant figures and interpretations of statistically insignificant kinks. They are further exacerbated, and for other small-body crater SFDs analyzed by the Berlin group, by stubbornly adopting

  6. Combined analysis of 2-D electrical resistivity, seismic refraction and geotechnical investigations for Bukit Bunuh complex crater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest in studying impact crater on earth has increased tremendously due to its importance in geologic events, earth inhabitant history as well as economic value. The existences of few shock metamorphism and crater morphology evidences are discovered in Bukit Bunuh, Malaysia thus detailed studies are performed using geophysical and geotechnical methods to verify the type of the crater and characteristics accordingly. This paper presents the combined analysis of 2-D electrical resistivity, seismic refraction, geotechnical SPT N value, moisture content and RQD within the study area. Three stages of data acquisition are made starting with regional study followed by detailed study on West side and East side. Bulk resistivity and p-wave seismic velocity were digitized from 2-D resistivity and seismic sections at specific distance and depth for corresponding boreholes and samples taken. Generally, Bukit Bunuh shows the complex crater characteristics. Standard table of bulk resistivity and p-wave seismic velocity against SPT N value, moisture content and RQD are produce according to geological classifications of impact crater; inside crater, rim/slumped terrace and outside crater

  7. Towards a New Catalog of Lobed Martian Craters Compared with a New Global Crater Database, Complete to 1.5 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, S. J.; Hynek, B. M.

    2009-03-01

    Presenting preliminary results of a new crater database, focusing on lobed crater characteristics. Database is complete to at least 1.5 km-diameter craters and contains more characteristics of each crater than previous catalogs.

  8. Global Distribution of On-Set Diameters of Rampart Ejecta Craters on Mars: Their Implication to the History of Martian Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Joseph M.; Roddy, David J.; Soderblom, Lawrence A.; Hare, Trent

    2000-01-01

    A global map is presented of on-set diameters of rampart craters. These craters are proposed to result from impact into wet targets. This map shows both global latitudinal and regional trends that are consistent with the climate and geologic history of Mars.

  9. Determining proportions of lunar crater populations by fitting crater size distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Nan

    2016-01-01

    We determine the proportions of two mixed crater populations distinguishable by size distributions on the Moon. A "multiple power-law" model is built to formulate crater size distribution $N(D) \\propto D^{-\\alpha}$ whose slope $\\alpha$ varies with crater diameter $D$. Fitted size distribution of lunar highland craters characterized by $\\alpha = 1.17 \\pm 0.04$, $1.88 \\pm 0.07$, $3.17 \\pm 0.10$ and $1.40 \\pm 0.15$ for consecutive $D$ intervals divided by 49, 120 and 251 km and that of lunar Class 1 craters with a single slope $\\alpha = 1.96 \\pm 0.14$, are taken as Population 1 and 2 crater size distribution respectively, whose sum is then fitted to the size distribution of global lunar craters with $D$ between 10 and 100 km. Estimated crater densities of Population 1 and 2 are $44 \\times 10^{-5}$ and $5 \\times 10^{-5}$ km$^{-2}$ respectively, leading to the proportion of the latter $10 \\%$. The results underlines the need for considering the Population 1 craters and the relevant impactors, the primordial main-b...

  10. Landing site selection for Luna-Glob mission in crater Boguslawsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, M. A.; Hiesinger, H.; Abdrakhimov, A. M.; Basilevsky, A. T.; Head, J. W.; Pasckert, J.-H.; Bauch, K.; van der Bogert, C. H.; Gläser, P.; Kohanov, A.

    2015-11-01

    Boguslawsky crater (72.9°S, 43.3°E, ~100 km in diameter) is a primary target for the Luna-Glob mission. The crater has a morphologically smooth (at the resolution of WAC images), flat, and horizontal floor, which is about 55-60 km in diameter. Two ellipses were selected as specific candidate landing areas on the floor: the western ellipse is centered at 72.9°S, 41.3°E and the eastern ellipse is centered at 73.9°S, 43.9°E. Both ellipses represent areas from which Earth is visible during the entire year of 2016 and lack permanently shadowed areas. Boguslawsky crater is located on or near the rim of the South Pole-Aitken basin, which provides the unique possibility to sample some of the most ancient rocks on the Moon that probably pre-date the SPA impact event. The low depth/diameter ratio of Boguslawsky suggests that the crater has been partly filled after its formation. Although volcanic flooding of the crater cannot be ruled out, the more likely process of filling of Boguslawsky is the emplacement of ejecta from nearby and remote large craters/basins. Three morphologically distinctive units are the most abundant within the selected landing ellipses: rolling plains (rpc), flat plains (fp), and ejecta from crater Boguslawsky-D (ejf), which occurs on the eastern wall of Boguslawsky. The possible contribution of materials from unknown sources makes the flat and rolling plains less desirable targets for landing. In contrast, ejecta from Boguslawsky-D represents local materials re-distributed by the Boguslawsky-D impact from the wall onto the floor of Boguslawsky. Thus, this unit, which constitutes about 50% of the eastern landing ellipse, represents a target of clearer provenance and a higher scientific priority.

  11. Crater Formation Due to Lunar Plume Impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsell, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Thruster plume impingement on a surface comprised of small, loose particles may cause blast ejecta to be spread over a large area and possibly cause damage to the vehicle. For this reason it is important to study the effects of plume impingement and crater formation on surfaces like those found on the moon. Lunar soil, also known as regolith, is made up of fine granular particles on the order of 100 microns.i Whenever a vehicle lifts-off from such a surface, the exhaust plume from the main engine will cause the formation of a crater. This crater formation may cause laterally ejected mass to be deflected and possibly damage the vehicle. This study is a first attempt at analyzing the dynamics of crater formation due to thruster exhaust plume impingement during liftoff from the moon. Though soil erosion on the lunar surface is not considered, this study aims at examining the evolution of the shear stress along the lunar surface as the engine fires. The location of the regions of high shear stress will determine where the crater begins to form and will lend insight into how big the crater will be. This information will help determine the probability that something will strike the vehicle. The final sections of this report discuss a novel method for studying this problem that uses a volume of fluid (VOF)ii method to track the movement of both the exhaust plume and the eroding surface.

  12. Meteor Crater: An Analog for Using Landforms to Reconstruct Past Hydrologic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palucis, M. C.; Dietrich, W. E.; Howard, A. D.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Kring, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work suggests that debris flow activity has occurred on Mars in the last few million years during high orbital obliquities, but estimating the amount and frequency of liquid water needed to generate these types of flows is still poorly constrained. While it is relatively common to estimate water amounts needed to produce landforms on Mars, such as gullies or alluvial fans, this is something rarely done on Earth. Consequently, there is little field data on the linkage between climate (snowmelt or rainfall events) and the amount of runoff needed to produce specific volumes of sediment in a landform. Here, we present field and modeling data from Meteor Crater, which is a ~50,000 year old impact crater in northern Arizona (USA). Though it is very well preserved, it has developed gullies along its inner wall, similar in form to many gullies on Mars. Meteor Crater, similar to many Martian craters, has also gone through a change in a climate based on the ~30 m of lake sediments on its now dry floor, and what has eroded from its walls has deposited on its floor, making it a closed system. We show using LiDAR-derived topographic data and field observations that debris flows, likely generated by runoff entrainment into talus bordering bedrock cliffs of the crater walls, drove erosion and deposition processes at Meteor Crater. Cosmogenic dating of levee deposits indicates that debris flows ceased in the early Holocene, synchronous with regional drying. For a water-to-rock ratio of 0.3 at the time of transport, which is based on data from rotating drum experiments, it would have taken ~150,000 m3 of water to transport the estimated ~500,000 m3 of debris flow deposits found at the surface of the crater floor. This extensive erosion would require less than 0.4 m of total runoff over the 0.35 km2 upslope source area of the crater, or ~26 mm of runoff per debris flow event. Much more runoff did occur however, as evidenced by lake deposits on the crater floor and Holocene

  13. River Flow Control on the Phytoplankton Dynamics of Chesapeake Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Qingyun; WANG You; TANG Xuexi; LI Ming

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations support an emerging paradigm that climate variability dominates nutrient enrichment in costal ecosystems,which can explain seasonal and inter-annual variability of phytoplankton community composition,biomass (Chl-a),and primary production (PP).In this paper,we combined observation and modeling to investigate the regulation of phytoplankton dynamics in Chesapeake Bay.The year we chose is 1996 that has high river runoff and is usually called a ‘wet year’.A 3-D physical-biogeochemical model based on ROMS was developed to simulate the seasonal cycle and the regional distributions of phytoplankton biomass and primary production in Chesapeake Bay.Based on the model results,NO3 presents a strong contrast to the river nitrate load during spring and the highest concentration in the bay reaches around 80mmol N m3.Compared with the normal year,phytoplankton bloom in spring of 1996 appears in lower latitudes with a higher concentration.Quantitative comparison between the modeled and observed seasonal averaged dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations shows that the model produces reliable results.The correlation coefficient r2 for all quantities exceeds 0.95,and the skill parameter for the four seasons is all above 0.95.

  14. 'Lyell' Panorama inside Victoria Crater (Stereo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    During four months prior to the fourth anniversary of its landing on Mars, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity examined rocks inside an alcove called 'Duck Bay' in the western portion of Victoria Crater. The main body of the crater appears in the upper right of this stereo panorama, with the far side of the crater lying about 800 meters (half a mile) away. Bracketing that part of the view are two promontories on the crater's rim at either side of Duck Bay. They are 'Cape Verde,' about 6 meters (20 feet) tall, on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' about 15 meters (50 feet) tall, on the right. The rest of the image, other than sky and portions of the rover, is ground within Duck Bay. Opportunity's targets of study during the last quarter of 2007 were rock layers within a band exposed around the interior of the crater, about 6 meters (20 feet) from the rim. Bright rocks within the band are visible in the foreground of the panorama. The rover science team assigned informal names to three subdivisions of the band: 'Steno,' 'Smith,' and 'Lyell.' This view incorporates many images taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) from the 1,332nd through 1,379th Martian days, or sols, of the mission (Oct. 23 to Dec. 11, 2007). It combines a stereo pair so that it appears three-dimensional when seen through blue-red glasses. Some visible patterns in dark and light tones are the result of combining frames that were affected by dust on the front sapphire window of the rover's camera. Opportunity landed on Jan. 25, 2004, Universal Time, (Jan. 24, Pacific Time) inside a much smaller crater about 6 kilometers (4 miles) north of Victoria Crater, to begin a surface mission designed to last 3 months and drive about 600 meters (0.4 mile).

  15. Geology of the Gusec cratered plains from the Spirit rover transverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M. P.; Crumpler, L. S.; Grant, J. A.; Greely, R.; Cabrol, N. A.; Parker, T. J.; Rice, J. W., Jr.; Ward, J. G.; Arvidson, R. E.; Moersch, J. E.; Fergason, J. F.; Christensen, P. R.; Castano, A.; Castano, R.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Li, R.; Bell, J. F., III; Squyres, S. W.

    2006-01-01

    The cratered plains of Gusev traversed by Spirit are generally low-relief rocky plains dominated by impact and eolian processes. Ubiquitous shallow, soil-filled, circular depressions, called hollows, are modified impact craters. Rocks are dark, fine-grained basalts, and the upper 10 m of the cratered plains appears to be an impact-generated regolith developed over intact basalt flows. Systematic field observations across the cratered plains identified vesicular clasts and rare scoria similar to original lava flow tops, consistent with an upper inflated surface of lava flows with adjacent collapse depressions. Crater and hollow morphometry are consistent with most being secondaries. The size frequency distribution of rocks >0.1 m diameter generally follows exponential functions similar to other landing sites for total rock abundances of 5-35%. Systematic clast counts show that areas with higher rock abundance and more large rocks have higher thermal inertia. Plains with lower thermal inertia have fewer rocks and substantially more pebbles that are well sorted and evenly spaced, similar to a desert pavement or lag. Eolian bed forms (ripples and wind tails) have coarse surface lags, and many are dust covered and thus likely inactive. Deflation of the surface _5-25 cm likely exposed two-toned rocks and elevated ventifacts and transported fines into craters creating the hollows. This observed redistribution yields extremely slow average erosion rates of _0.03 nm/yr and argues for very little long-term net change of the surface and a dry and desiccating environment similar to today's since the Hesperian (or _3 Ga).

  16. Physical properties of craters on the Achaia region of asteroid (21) Lutetia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, A.; Bouley, S.; Jorda, L.; Groussin, O.; Baratoux, D.; Capanna, C.; Lamy, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Rosetta spacecraft flew by the main-belt asteroid (21) Lutetia on 10 July 2010. Images of the surface were acquired with the Narrow Angle Camera, from which Digital Terrain Models (DTM) of the surface were produced. These DTMs give access to the topography to study the physical properties of the craters of the asteroid. In this study, we focus on their depth-to-diameter ratio (d/D) to study their degradation. The d/D ratios are are derived from the DTM of Jorda et al. (2012), based on the method of Gaskell et al. (2008), which offers the best compromise between spatial resolution and the accuracy of the topographic reconstruction. Our values differ notably from previous studies (Vincent et al., 2012; Thomas et al., 2012). The discrepancy has been found to result from the fact that the local slope of the terrains on which the craters formed is ignored in these studies, whereas we rigorously takes this into account in our calculations. As a consequence, we find that d/D values for the fresh craters of Lutetia are consistent with the values found on other asteroids of similar size (within on order of magnitude) like (243) Ida or (951) Gaspra (Carr et al., 1994; Sullivan et al., 1996). The Achaia region may be divided into three units based on geomorphological analysis. A comparison of the crater density on the three units suggests two different ages, the youngest part corresponding to the Nicaea crater unit. Interestingly, the mean d/D values of the three units are different. The craters of these units were therefore differently affected by geological events (e.g., essentially impact and associated phenomena such as seismic shaking or ejecta blanketing) that occurred in the past history of Lutetia. Some of these events must be recent since several lineaments intersect most craters of one of the unit. Ejecta deposits have been previously noted on one part of Achaia and provide a good explanation for the low d/D values on this unit. Moreover, we suggest that

  17. Mini-RF and LROC observations of mare crater layering relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickle, A. M.; Patterson, G. W.; Cahill, J. T. S.; Bussey, D. B. J.

    2016-07-01

    The lunar maria cover approximately 17% of the Moon's surface. Discerning discrete subsurface layers in the mare provides some constraints on thickness and volume estimates of mare volcanism. Multiple types of data and measurement techniques allow probing the subsurface and provide insights into these layers, including detailed examination of impact craters, mare pits and sinuous rilles, and radar sounders. Unfortunately, radar sounding includes many uncertainties about the material properties of the lunar surface that may influence estimates of layer depth and thickness. Because they distribute material from depth onto the surface, detailed examination of impact ejecta blankets provides a reliable way to examine deeper material using orbital instruments such as cameras, spectrometers, or imaging radars. Here, we utilize Miniature Radio Frequency (Mini-RF) data to investigate the scattering characteristics of ejecta blankets of young lunar craters. We use Circular Polarization Ratio (CPR) information from twenty-two young, fresh lunar craters to examine how the scattering behavior changes as a function of radius from the crater rim. Observations across a range of crater size and relative ages exhibit significant diversity within mare regions. Five of the examined craters exhibit profiles with no shelf of constant CPR near the crater rim. Comparing these CPR profiles with LROC imagery shows that the magnitude of the CPR may be an indication of crater degradation state; this may manifest differently at radar compared to optical wavelengths. Comparisons of radar and optical data also suggest relationships between subsurface stratigraphy and structure in the mare and the block size of the material found within the ejecta blanket. Of the examined craters, twelve have shelves of approximately constant CPR as well as discrete layers outcropping in the subsurface, and nine fall along a trend line when comparing shelf-width with thickness of subsurface layers. These

  18. Mafic Materials in Scott Crater? A Test for Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Bonnie L.

    2007-01-01

    Clementine 750 nm and multispectral ratio data, along with Lunar Orbiter and radar data, were used to study the crater Scott in the lunar south polar region. The multispectral data provide evidence for mafic materials, impact melts, anorthositic materials, and a small pyroclastic deposit. High-resolution radar data and Lunar Orbiter photography for this area show differences in color and surface texture that correspond with the locations of the hypothesized mafic and anorthositic areas on the crater floor. This region provides a test case for the upcoming Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Verification of the existence of a mafic deposit at this location is relevant to future lunar resource utilization planning.

  19. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Assessment Program, Chesapeake Bay Summary Database (1998-2001)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study was based on the sediment quality triad (SQT) approach. A stratified probabilistic sampling design was utilized to characterize the Chesapeake Bay system...

  20. Integrated Pest Management Plan for Chesapeake Marshlands National Wildlife Refuge Complex 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — With this Integrated Pest Management Plan, the Chesapeake Marshlands National Wildlife Refuge Complex aims to demonstrate land stewardship in controlling invasive...

  1. Changes in Stream Water Temperatures in the Chesapeake Bay Region, 1960-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This map shows the changes in stream water temperatures in the Chesapeake Bay region from 1960 to 2014. Blue circles represent cooling trends in stream water...

  2. Contaminant exposure and reproductive success of ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) nesting in Chesapeake Bay regions of concern

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Chesapeake Bay osprey population has more than doubled in size since restrictions were placed on the production and use of and other in the 1970s. Ospreys are...

  3. Bald Eagle Movements, Distribution and Abundance on the Northern Chesapeake Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The primary objective of this study was to monitor bald eagle movements and to locate bald eagle intensive use areas on the northern Chesapeake Bay. An important...

  4. Atmospheric tides in Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Newman, C. E.; de la Torre Juárez, M.; Wilson, R. J.; Lemmon, M.; Smith, M. D.; Kahanpää, H.; Harri, A.-M.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric tides are the primary source of daily air pressure variation at the surface of Mars. These tides are forced by solar heating of the atmosphere and modulated by the presence of atmospheric dust, topography, and surface albedo and thermal inertia. This results in a complex mix of sun-synchronous and non-sun-synchronous tides propagating both eastward and westward around the planet in periods that are integer fractions of a solar day. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station on board the Mars Science Laboratory has observed air pressure at a regular cadence for over 1 Mars year and here we analyze and diagnose atmospheric tides in this pressure record. The diurnal tide amplitude varies from 26 to 63 Pa with an average phase of 0424 local true solar time, while the semidiurnal tide amplitude varies from 5 to 20 Pa with an average phase of 0929. We find that both the diurnal and semidiurnal tides in Gale Crater are highly correlated to atmospheric opacity variations at a value of 0.9 and to each other at a value of 0.77, with some key exceptions occurring during regional and local dust storms. We supplement our analysis with MarsWRF general circulation modeling to examine how a local dust storm impacts the diurnal tide in its vicinity. We find that both the diurnal tide amplitude enhancement and regional coverage of notable amplitude enhancement linearly scales with the size of the local dust storm. Our results provide the first long-term record of surface pressure tides near the martian equator.

  5. A novel sparse boosting method for crater detection in the high resolution planetary image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Yang, Gang; Guo, Lei

    2015-09-01

    Impact craters distributed on planetary surface become one of the main barriers during the soft landing of planetary probes. In order to accelerate the crater detection, in this paper, we present a new sparse boosting (SparseBoost) method for automatic detection of sub-kilometer craters. The SparseBoost method integrates an improved sparse kernel density estimator (RSDE-WL1) into the Boost algorithm and the RSDE-WL1 estimator is achieved by introducing weighted l1 penalty term into the reduced set density estimator. An iterative algorithm is proposed to implement the RSDE-WL1. The SparseBoost algorithm has the advantage of fewer selected features and simpler representation of the weak classifiers compared with the Boost algorithm. Our SparseBoost based crater detection method is evaluated on a large and high resolution image of Martian surface. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve less computational complexity in comparison with other crater detection methods in terms of selected features.

  6. The inner solar system cratering record and the evolution of impactor populations

    CERN Document Server

    Strom, Robert G; Xiao, Zhiyong; Ito, Takashi; Yoshida, Fumi; Ostrach, Lillian R

    2014-01-01

    We review previously published and newly obtained crater size-frequency distributions in the inner solar system. These data indicate that the Moon and the terrestrial planets have been bombarded by two populations of objects. Population 1, dominating at early times, had nearly the same size distribution as the present-day asteroid belt, and produced the heavily cratered surfaces with a complex, multi-sloped crater size-frequency distribution. Population 2, dominating since about 3.8-3.7 Ga, has the same size distribution as near-Earth objects (NEOs), had a much lower impact flux, and produced a crater size distribution characterized by a differential -3 single-slope power law in the crater diameter range 0.02 km to 100 km. Taken together with the results from a large body of work on age-dating of lunar and meteorite samples and theoretical work in solar system dynamics, a plausible interpretation of these data is as follows. The NEO population is the source of Population 2 and it has been in near-steady state...

  7. Closure plan for Corrective Action Unit 109: U-2bu subsidence crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U-2bu subsidence crater, Corrective Action Unit 109, will be closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection operational permit, and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The U-2bu subsidence crater is located in Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site. It was created in 1971 by an underground nuclear test with the name Miniata. The crater has a diameter of 288 meters (944 feet) and an approximate depth of 35 meters (115 feet). Based on the results of the analyses reported in the site characterization report, the only constituents of concern in the U-2bu subsidence crater include leachable lead and total petroleum hydrocarbons. Closure activities will include the excavation and disposal of impacted soil from the top of the crater. Upon completion of excavation, verification samples will be collected to show that the leachable lead has been removed to concentrations below the regulatory action level. After sample results show that the lead has been removed, the excavated area will be backfilled and a soil flood diversion berm will be constructed as a best management practice. An independent registered professional engineer will certify the site was closed following the approved Closure Plan. Post-closure care is not warranted for this site because closure activities will involve removal of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act constituents of concern

  8. Closure plan for Corrective Action Unit 109: U-2bu subsidence crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The U-2bu subsidence crater, Corrective Action Unit 109, will be closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection operational permit, and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The U-2bu subsidence crater is located in Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site. It was created in 1971 by an underground nuclear test with the name Miniata. The crater has a diameter of 288 meters (944 feet) and an approximate depth of 35 meters (115 feet). Based on the results of the analyses reported in the site characterization report, the only constituents of concern in the U-2bu subsidence crater include leachable lead and total petroleum hydrocarbons. Closure activities will include the excavation and disposal of impacted soil from the top of the crater. Upon completion of excavation, verification samples will be collected to show that the leachable lead has been removed to concentrations below the regulatory action level. After sample results show that the lead has been removed, the excavated area will be backfilled and a soil flood diversion berm will be constructed as a best management practice. An independent registered professional engineer will certify the site was closed following the approved Closure Plan. Post-closure care is not warranted for this site because closure activities will involve removal of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act constituents of concern.

  9. Closure Plan for Corrective Action Unit 109: U-2bu Subsidence Crater Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon Parsons

    1999-03-01

    The U-2bu subsidence crater, Corrective Action Unit 109, will be closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection operational permit, and the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order. The U-2bu subsidence crater is located in Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site. It was created in 1971 by an underground nuclear test with the name Miniata. The crater has a diameter of 288 meters (944 feet) and an approximate depth of 35 meters (115 feet). The subsidence crater was used as a land disposal unit for radioactive and hazardous waste from 1973 to 1988. Site disposal history is supported by memorandums, letters, and personnel who worked at the Nevada Test Site at the time of active disposal. Closure activities will include the excavation and disposal of impacted soil form the tip of the crater. Upon completion of excavation, verification samples will be collected to show that lead has been removed to concentrations be low regulatory action level. The area will then be backfilled and a soil flood diversion berm will be constructed, and certified by an independent professional engineer as to having followed the approved Closure Plan.

  10. A Radial Profile of Tycho Secondary Crater Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Kassandra; Campbell, D. B.; Campbell, B. A.; Carter, L. M.; Anderson, R. F.

    2009-09-01

    Determining the typical secondary crater production of individual primary events is an important step in gauging the extent of secondary crater contamination of crater-counting derived ages. Previous lunar observations of secondary crater production from individual primary events have focused on secondary craters near the parent primary and extrapolated to larger radial distances where morphological identification of secondaries is more difficult [Hirata and Nakamura, JGR, E03005, doi:10.1029/2005JE002484, 2006]. As some workers suggest that more distant secondaries may constitute much of the total secondary crater population [McEwen et al., Icarus, 176, 2005; Hirata and Nakamura, JGR, E03005, doi:10.1029/2005JE002484, 2006], lunar observational evidence in this regime is critical to building a robust picture of secondary crater production on the Moon. We present preliminary results of a survey of Tycho secondaries ranging in distance from 1-25 crater radii from the parent crater. Secondary craters in this study lie along a ray extending south from Tycho across Clavius crater and are identified by characteristic, asymmetric ejecta blankets visible in 2.38 GHz (12.6 cm) radar circular polarization ratio (CPR) images acquired during bi-static observations with the Arecibo and Green Bank telescopes. In addition to presenting the size-frequency distributions of these secondary craters and implications thereof, we compare the population of Tycho secondaries identified in the radar CPR near Pictet crater to that identified via morphology in optical images by Hirata and Nakamura, JGR, 2006.

  11. Application of machine learning using support vector machines for crater detection from Martian digital topography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamunićcar, Goran; Lončarić, Sven

    In our previous work, in order to extend the GT-57633 catalogue [PSS, 56 (15), 1992-2008] with still uncatalogued impact-craters, the following has been done [GRS, 48 (5), in press, doi:10.1109/TGRS.2009.2037750]: (1) the crater detection algorithm (CDA) based on digital elevation model (DEM) was developed; (2) using 1/128° MOLA data, this CDA proposed 414631 crater-candidates; (3) each crater-candidate was analyzed manually; and (4) 57592 were confirmed as correct detections. The resulting GT-115225 catalog is the significant result of this effort. However, to check such a large number of crater-candidates manually was a demanding task. This was the main motivation for work on improvement of the CDA in order to provide better classification of craters as true and false detections. To achieve this, we extended the CDA with the machine learning capability, using support vector machines (SVM). In the first step, the CDA (re)calculates numerous terrain morphometric attributes from DEM. For this purpose, already existing modules of the CDA from our previous work were reused in order to be capable to prepare these attributes. In addition, new attributes were introduced such as ellipse eccentricity and tilt. For machine learning purpose, the CDA is additionally extended to provide 2-D topography-profile and 3-D shape for each crater-candidate. The latter two are a performance problem because of the large number of crater-candidates in combination with the large number of attributes. As a solution, we developed a CDA architecture wherein it is possible to combine the SVM with a radial basis function (RBF) or any other kernel (for initial set of attributes), with the SVM with linear kernel (for the cases when 2-D and 3-D data are included as well). Another challenge is that, in addition to diversity of possible crater types, there are numerous morphological differences between the smallest (mostly very circular bowl-shaped craters) and the largest (multi-ring) impact

  12. Cratering rates from lunar xenospherules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, R.A.

    1993-05-25

    The goal of this project is to obtain the time history of impacts on the moon, with emphasis on recent impacts. In particular, the project could prove (or disprove) the existence of comet sores and provide the dates when they occurred.

  13. Crater Retention Age Calculation of Lunar Geological Unit Using Small-Scale Craters%利用小型撞击坑测算月球地质单元撞击年龄

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李坤; 刘建军; 牟伶俐; 秦前清

    2012-01-01

    Crater counting is a method for estimating the age of a planet's surface. Based on the small craters' size frequency distribution (SFD) , the crater retention age is calculated. The influences of age uncertainty, degradation and secondary impact craters are also analyzed. The method is validated using the high-precision image data of Sinus Indium obtained by Chang'E -2. To avoid the influence of crater degradation and disappearance , whose diameter are usually less than about 350 m, and to escape the secondary impact craters, a large proportion of their diameter being less than about 30 m, craters greater than 350 m are used for the calculation of the crater retention age of the study units. The result is 3. 16 billion years, and the error is confined within a range of 100 million years.%撞击坑统计方法是估计行星表面年代的一种有效方法.利用小尺度撞击坑大小频率分布测定撞击年龄,并分析了计算模型的不确定性、撞击坑的退化、次级撞击坑影响等相关问题.选用嫦娥二号获取的虹湾地区高精度影像数据进行验证,确定该区域退化参数为350 m,直径小于30 m时次级撞击坑密集分布,使用350 m以上的撞击坑计算得到撞击年龄为3.16 Ga,误差控制在0.1Ga以内.

  14. Tempest in Vailulu'u Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, S. R.; Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A.; Young, C.; Baker, E.

    2005-12-01

    The summit crater of the Samoan submarine volcano, Vailulu'u, has been actively erupting since 2001. Based on water chemistry, CTD and temperature logger data from 2000 and 2001, we formulated a model for the hydrothermal system in the crater involving a tidally-modulated "breathing" (Staudigel et al., 2004). During low stands of internal waves (exterior to the crater), the crater exhales warm buoyant hydrothermal water that forms a "halo" around the crater rich in Mn, 3He, and particulates. During "high tides", cold dense external water is inhaled into the crater through the three breaches, and cascades to the crater floor. In April 2005, we used the HURL PISCES V submersible to deploy various temperature and particulate loggers and current meters in and around the crater; these were retrieved by Pisces V in July 2005. In addition, continuous CTD profiling was carried out over 12 hour tidal cycles at one location inside, and one outside, the crater. The accumulated data set fully reinforces our "breathing" model. An ADCP, deployed for 93 days in the NW breach at 752m, showed dominant easterly inflow currents and westerly outflow currents, with maximum velocities of approximately 25 cm/s. The flows were coherent for distances up to 50-60m above the ADCP; the mean inflow velocity and azimuth (20-40 m interval above the ADCP) was 7 cm/s due east; the mean outflow velocity and azimuth was 5 cm/s at 260 degrees. Mean inflows were consistently colder than outflows (5.00 C vs 5.20 C); the maximum observed range in temperature was 1.1 C, correlated with peak flow velocities. The coldest inflows would require very large regional internal wave amplitudes, up to 50-100 meters. A 2-D acoustic current meter was deployed on top of the west crater rim summit (582m) for 90 days, and in the S breach (697m) for 4 days. The summit flows are presumed to represent the regional scale currents; these were largely from the SW quadrant, with typical velocities of 8-15 cm/s, and peaks to

  15. Stratigraphy, mineralogy, and origin of layered deposits inside Terby crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansan, V.; Loizeau, D.; Mangold, N.; Le Mouélic, S.; Carter, J.; Poulet, F.; Dromart, G.; Lucas, A.; Bibring, J.-P.; Gendrin, A.; Gondet, B.; Langevin, Y.; Masson, Ph.; Murchie, S.; Mustard, J. F.; Neukum, G.

    2011-01-01

    The 174 km diameter Terby impact crater (28.0°S-74.1°E) located on the northern rim of the Hellas basin displays anomalous inner morphology, including a flat floor and light-toned layered deposits. An analysis of these deposits was performed using multiple datasets from Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey, Mars Express and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter missions, with visible images for interpretation, near-infrared data for mineralogical mapping, and topography for geometry. The geometry of layered deposits was consistent with that of sediments that settled mainly in a sub-aqueous environment, during the Noachian period as determined by crater counts. To the north, the thickest sediments displayed sequences for fan deltas, as identified by 100 m to 1 km long clinoforms, as defined by horizontal beds passing to foreset beds dipping by 6-10° toward the center of the Terby crater. The identification of distinct sub-aqueous fan sequences, separated by unconformities and local wedges, showed the accumulation of sediments from prograding/onlapping depositional sequences, due to lake level and sediment supply variations. The mineralogy of several layers with hydrated minerals, including Fe/Mg phyllosilicates, supports this type of sedimentary environment. The volume of fan sediments was estimated as >5000 km 3 (a large amount considering classical martian fan deltas such as Eberswalde (6 km 3)) and requires sustained liquid water activity. Such a large sedimentary deposition in Terby crater is characteristic of the Noachian/Phyllosian period during which the environment favored the formation of phyllosilicates. The latter were detected by spectral data in the layered deposits of Terby crater in three distinct layer sequences. During the Hesperian period, the sediments experienced strong erosion, possibly enhanced by more acidic conditions, forming the current morphology with three mesas and closed depressions. Small fluvial valleys and alluvial fans formed subsequently

  16. MOLA Topography and Morphometry of Rampart and Pedestal Craters, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, D. E.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Garvin, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    Martian rampart and pedestal craters have characteristic geometric parameter ranges that are significantly different than fresh craters. Combined MOLA geometric measurements and MOC analyses can be used to constrain their modification. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. 'Sharks Teeth' -- Sand Dunes in Proctor Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Sometimes, pictures received from Mars Global Surveyor's Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) are 'just plain pretty.' This image, taken in early September 2000, shows a group of sand dunes at the edge of a much larger field of dark-toned dunes in Proctor Crater. Located at 47.9oS, 330.4oW, in the 170 km (106 mile) diameter crater named for 19th Century British astronomer Richard A. Proctor (1837-1888), the dunes shown here are created by winds blowing largely from the east/northeast. A plethora of smaller, brighter ripples covers the substrate between the dunes. Sunlight illuminates them from the upper left.

  18. Impact microcrater morphology on Australian microtektites

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    ShyamPrasad, M.; Khedekar, V.D.

    . Their transitional nature can Fig. 10. Small craters: a) small doughnut-shaped craters with annular rings as crater rims; b) a bowl-shaped crater with flow rims; c) a pit-onlycrater with a raised rim and flow; d) a pit-only crater with incipient development..., aportion of the target that is angular is broken and raised; c) massive collision has pulled out a portion of the molten host. An overturned flapis seen, indicating the direction of the impact. Flow schlieren are also seen. A portion of the host that has...

  19. Field guide to fishes of the chesapeake bay

    CERN Document Server

    Murdy, Edward O.

    2013-01-01

    The only comprehensive field guide to the Chesapeake’s fishes, this book is an indispensable resource for both anglers and students of the Bay. Vivid illustrations by Val Kells complement the expertise of researchers Edward O. Murdy and John A. Musick. They describe fishes that inhabit waters ranging from low-salinity estuaries to the point where the Bay meets the Atlantic Ocean. Key features of this field guide include• full-color illustrations of more than 200 species• text that is presented adjacent to illustrations for easy reference• detailed descriptions of physical characteristics, range, occurrence in the Bay, reproduction, diet, and statistics from fisheries research• spot illustrations that highlight critical features of certain fish• illustrations of juveniles when they look different from adults• appendices that include identification keys Formatted as a compact field guide for students, scientists, researchers, and fishermen, Field Guide to Fishes of the Chesapeake Bay should be a ...

  20. The nomogram of density distribution of lunar craters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugacheva, S. G.; Bolkhovitinov, I. S.

    1994-12-01

    Least-square fits to the density of the distribution of lunar craters described by the approximating function are found for craters larger then 10 km in diamater. The nomogram of parameters of the approximating function is given for the estimate of density of primary, secondary and tertiary craters over an area of 104km2.

  1. The intercrater plains of Mercury and the Moon: Their nature, origin and role in terrestrial planet evolution. Cratering histories of the intercrater plains. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    The intercrater plains of Mercury and the Moon are defined, in part, by their high densities of small craters. The crater size frequency statistics presented in this chapter may help constrain the relative ages and origins of these surfaces. To this end, the effects of common geologic processes on crater frequency statistics are compared with the diameter frequency distributions of the intercrater regions of the Moon and Mercury. Such analyses may determine whether secondary craters dominate the distribution at small diameters, and whether volcanic plains or ballistic deposits form the intercrater surface. Determining the mass frequency distribution and flux of the impacting population is a more difficult problem. The necessary information such as scaling relationships between projectile energy and crater diameter, the relative fluxes of solar system objects, and the absolute ages of surface units is model dependent and poorly constrained, especially for Mercury.

  2. The Impact of Feed Management Software on Whole-Farm Nutrient Balance on Virginia Dairy Farms

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Brittany Allison

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural runoff is the largest source of nitrogen and phosphorus pollution entering the Chesapeake Bay, contributing 38% of nitrogen and 45% of phosphorus (USEPA, 2010). Since agricultural runoff is the number one contributing source of nitrogen and phosphorus entering the Chesapeake Bay, action needs to be taken to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus on agriculture production facilities, such as dairy farms. The impact of feed management software on whole-farm nutrient balance was studied on ...

  3. Wave and Hydrodynamic Modeling for Engineering Design of Jetties at Tangier Island in Chesapeake Bay, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihwa Lin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The protection of a boat canal at the western entrance of Tangier Island, Virginia, located in the lower Chesapeake Bay, is investigated using different structural alternatives. The existing entrance channel is oriented 45 deg with respect to the local shoreline, and exposed directly to the lower Bay without any protection. The adjacent shoreline has experienced progressive erosion in recent decades by flooding due to severe storms and waves. To protect the western entrance of the channel and shoreline, five different jetty and spur combinations were proposed to reduce wave energy in the lee of jetties. Environmental forces affecting the proposed jettied inlet system are quantified using the Coastal Modeling System, consisting of a spectral wave model and a depth-averaged circulation model with sediment transport calculations. Numerical simulations were conducted for design wave conditions and a 50-year return period tropical storm at the project site. Model results show a low crested jetty of 170-m length connecting to the north shore at a 45-deg angle, and a short south spur of 25-m long, provide adequate wave-reduction benefits among the five proposed alternatives. The model simulation indicates this alternative has the minimum impact on sedimentation around the structured inlet and boat canal.

  4. Effects of erosion control structures along a portion of the northern Chesapeake Bay shoreline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabawa, C.F.; Kerhin, R.T.; Bayley, S.

    1981-01-01

    A 6.500-meter reach of western Chesapeake Bay shoreline (lower Mayo Peninsula) lost about 1.1??106 cubic meters of sediment (equivalent to 170 cubic meters lost per meter of shoreline) between 1846 and 1932, when the first aerial photographs show the shoreline already substantially protected by a system of groins and intermittent bulkheading. These structures have eliminated the fastland as a source of erodable material, and have starved the supply of sand for littoral drift, thus limiting the extent of the beaches to the remaining groin fields. Volumes of sediment involved in these impacts are small in the overall sediment budget. Bulkheads produce no deficit in the budget since scouring of the beaches on their seaward sides makes up for the decreased erosion of protected fastland. Groins trap little of the potential littoral drift (computed to be about 104 cubic meters per meter of shoreline per year). The sand supply in the remaining beaches is nearly equivalent to the annual loss of sediment from the entire shoreline system due to the long-term rate of erosion of the shoreline and nearshore between 1846 and 1932. ?? 1981 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  5. Ground Ice on Mars: Numerical Modelling of a Terraced Crater in Arcadia Planitia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martellato, Elena; Cremonese, Gabriele; Lucchetti, Alice; Massironi, Matteo; Marzari, Francesco; Bramson, Ali M.; Byrne, Shane; Mattson, Sarah

    2014-11-01

    Simple craters are small impact structures, characterized by a bowl shape close to a parabola. Any departure from the canonical shape provides insight into subsurface target properties. Terraced craters are suggested to develop as a consequence of layers within the target having different strengths, with weak material overlying strong. For a population of terraced craters in Arcadia Planitia, the weak material is thought to be ice based on comparisons of SHARAD measurements of dielectric transitions and terrace depths [1].In this work we will present the preliminary results of the numerical investigation of one of the dozens of terraced craters mapped in Arcadia Planitia [1]. This crater is located at 46.58°N, 194.85°E and has a floor terrace (thought to be the ice-rock interface) at ~40 m depth with an additional, smaller wall-terrace (likely from additional structure within the ice) at ~17 m depth.Numerical modelling is performed through the iSALE shock physics code. Initially developed by [2], the code has been enhanced through modifications which include an elasto-plastic constitutive model, fragmentation models, various equations of state (EoS), multiple materials, and a novel porosity compaction model, called ɛ-α model [3, 4]. In addition, the code is well tested against laboratory experiments at low and high strain-rates [4] and other hydrocodes [5].We aim to compare the crater shape seen in the HiRISE stereo DTM with the simulations, in order to derive the best model setup, confirm remote sensing data, and lastly validate the target input parameters needed for the formation of this multi-terrace (dubbed ‘bullseye’) crater. We modelled the terraced crater by considering a 50 m-diameter basaltic projectile impacting at 7 km/s into a layered target made up of a 40 m ice layer on top of a basaltic crust.[1] Bramson et al: 8th Int Conf Mars, #1042, 2014[2] Amsden et al: Los Alamos Nat Lab, Report LA-8095, 1980[3] Collins et al: Meteorit & Planet Sci 39

  6. Putative crater-floor pingos, paleolakes and periglacial landscapes in north Utopia Planitia, Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soare, R. J.; Conway, S. J.; Dohm, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Pingos are perennial ice-cored (but non-glacial) hills or mounds. They evolve and persist only in continuous and deep permafrost, i.e. ground that is frozen for periods of no less than two years. In periglacial (or cold-climate, non-glacial) regions such as the Tuktoyaktuk Coastlands of northern Canada closed-system pingos originate where thermokarst lakes either have lost or are losing their water by drainage, evaporation or sublimation. Closed-system pingos form as a result of freeze-thaw cycling, permafrost aggradation and pore-water migration. If closed-system pingos were identified on Mars, particularly on late Amazonian terrain at near-polar latitudes, this would point to boundary-conditions of pressure and temperature at or above the triple point of water having occurred much more recently and closer to the polar regions than many workers have thought possible. In 2005, we found two crater-floor landscapes in northern Utopia Planitia with mounds that seemed to share a suite of morphological characteristics and landform associations with closed-system pingos on Earth (Soare et al. 2005). Since this study the HiRISE and CTX cameras on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have provided better coverage and higher resolution images of the area, allowing us to refine our previous work. We have identified two additional craters with similar assemblages and have verified the absence of such assemblages in other craters across a circum-global longitudinal transect spanning 20 degrees (~52°-72° N) of latitude. This allows us to evaluate the closed-system pingo hypothesis anew. Interestingly, the four principal mound-bearing craters occur within a tight latitudinal band from ~64°-71° N. This could be a marker of active albeit highly localised hydrological and freeze-thaw cycling. Conway et al. (2011) have identified perennial ice-domes on impact-crater floors at latitudes (~70° N) that are adjacent to the mound-bearing craters. They hypothesise that the ice domes

  7. A field study of the effects of elevated CO[sub 2] on ecosystem processes in a Chesapeake Bay wetland. [USA - Chesapeake Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, B.G. (Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgwater, MD (USA))

    1992-01-01

    Open top chambers are being used in a long-term project to determine the effects of elevated CO[sub 2] on ecosystem processes on a Chesapeake Bay wetland. Three communities are studied: mono-specific stands of the C3 sedge, Scirpus olneyi, and the C[sub 4] grass, Spartina patens, and a mixed community of these two species and the C[sub 4] grass, Distichlis spicata. Treatment began in the spring of 1987 and will continue through the 1994 growing season. During the first 4 years of exposure, elevated CO[sub 2] had the following effects on mono-specific stands of the C[sub 3] sedge: increased quantum yield and photosynthetic capacity, reduced dark respiration, increased numbers of shoots, roots and rhizomes, reduced nitrogen concentration of all tissues, increased nitrogen fixation and increased ecosystem carbon accumulation. In a mixed community of the sedge and C[sub 4] grass species, biomass of the C[sub 3] component increased over 100% and this was accompanied by decreased biomass in the C[sub 4] component of the community. Elevated CO[sub 2] reduced water loss, increased water potential and delayed senescence in all three species. Many factors contributed to CO[sub 2] stimulated carbon accumulation in the plant community dominated by the C[sub 3] sedge, including: sustained high photosynthetic capacity, decreased respiration, delayed senescence, and allocation of the additional carbon to roots and rhizomes. The complex interaction of these diverse responses suggests that the rising atmospheric CO[sub 2] may have a significant impact on ecosystem processes.

  8. Signs of Landscape Modifications at Martian Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for larger version The lower portion of this image from the Thermal Emission Imaging System camera (THEMIS) on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter shows a crater about 16 kilometers (10 miles) in diameter with features studied as evidence of deposition or erosion. The crater is centered at 40.32 degrees south latitude and 132.5 degrees east longitude, in the eastern portion of the Hellas basin on Mars. It has gullies and arcuate ridges on its north, pole-facing interior wall. This crater is in the center of a larger (60-kilometer or 37-mile diameter) crater with lobate flows on its north, interior wall. The image, number V07798008 in the THEMIS catalog, covers a swath of ground 17.4 kilometers (10.8 miles) wide. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science. THEMIS was developed by Arizona State University in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Slab Ice Characterization on Martian Richardson Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, F.; Andrieu, F.; Douté, S.

    2016-09-01

    We compare two models: granular and slab in order to study the ice properties in the Richardson crater using spectroscopy. Thanks to radiative transfer modeling, we determine compactness of CO2 ice, grain size, and abundances of water ice and dust.

  10. 'Lyell' Panorama inside Victoria Crater (False Color)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Photojournal note: This very large image (487.9 MB TIFF and 17.71 MB JPEG) may be too large for some web browsers to handle. Users may right-click on the TIFF or JPEG link in the legend above to download the file to their desktop. The image can then be viewed in an image manipulation application such as Adobe Photoshop. During four months prior to the fourth anniversary of its landing on Mars, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity examined rocks inside an alcove called 'Duck Bay' in the western portion of Victoria Crater. The main body of the crater appears in the upper right of this stereo panorama, with the far side of the crater lying about 800 meters (half a mile) away. Bracketing that part of the view are two promontories on the crater's rim at either side of Duck Bay. They are 'Cape Verde,' about 6 meters (20 feet) tall, on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' about 15 meters (50 feet) tall, on the right. The rest of the image, other than sky and portions of the rover, is ground within Duck Bay. Opportunity's targets of study during the last quarter of 2007 were rock layers within a band exposed around the interior of the crater, about 6 meters (20 feet) from the rim. Bright rocks within the band are visible in the foreground of the panorama. The rover science team assigned informal names to three subdivisions of the band: 'Steno,' 'Smith,' and 'Lyell.' This view combines many images taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) from the 1,332nd through 1,379th Martian days, or sols, of the mission (Oct. 23 to Dec. 11, 2007). Images taken through Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers were mixed to produce this view, which is presented in a false-color stretch to bring out subtle color differences in the scene. Some visible patterns in dark and light tones are the result of combining frames that were affected by dust on the front sapphire window of the rover's camera. Opportunity landed on Jan. 25, 2004

  11. Dropping stones in magma oceans - Effects of early lunar cratering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, W. K.

    1980-01-01

    A new methodology is used to calculate the accumulation rate of megaregolith materials for two models of early lunar cratering, both with and without episodes of late cataclysmic cratering. Results show that the pulverization of early rock layers was an important process competing with the formation of a coherent rock lithosphere at the surface of the hypothetical lunar magma ocean. If a magma ocean existed, then its initial cooling was marked by a period of pre-lithospheric chaos in which impacts punched through the initially thin rocky skin, mixing rock fragments with splashed magma. Furthermore, the results show that intense brecciation and pulverization of rock materials must have occurred to a depth of at least tens of kilometers in the first few hundred years of lunar history regardless of whether a 'terminal lunar cataclysm' occurred around 4.0 G.y. ago. The predicted pattern of brecciation and the ages of surviving rock fragments is similar to that actually observed among lunar samples. More reliable dating of basin-forming events and models of rock exhumation and survival are needed in order to understand better the relation between the early intense bombardment of the moon and the samples collected on the moon today.

  12. Thermal stability of water ice in Ceres' crater Oxo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formisano, Michelangelo; Federico, Costanzo; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Frigeri, Alessandro; Magni, Gianfranco; Tosi, Federico

    2016-10-01

    Dwarf planet Ceres, target of the NASA Dawn mission, exhibits evidences of ammoniated phyllosilicates on its surface [1], compatible with a likely outer Solar System origin. Considerable amounts of water ice have recently been detected in some craters by the Visible InfraRed mapping spectrometer (VIR) onboard Dawn in some small fresh crater, such as Oxo, located at about 40° N. The exposure mechanism of water ice is unknown: cryovolcanism, cometary type sublimation/recondensation [2]or impacts with other bodies are likely mechanisms. The evaluation of the time stability of the water ice is crucial to understand the plausible mechanism for its existence. For this purpose, we developed a 3D finite-elements model (FEM) by using the topography given by the shape model of Ceres derived on the basis of images acquired by the Framing Camera in the Survey mission phase. The illumination conditions are provided by the SPICE toolkit. We performed several simulations by analyzing the effect of thermal inertia and albedo on the temperature and rate of ice sublimation. The results of the simulations about the stability of water ice will be presented.[1] De Sanctis et al. NATURE, doi:10.1038/nature16172[2] Formisano et al. MNRAS, doi: 10.1093/mnras/stv2344

  13. Ultraviolet radiation and bio-optics in Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, B.R.; Girdner, S.F.; Buktenica, M.W.; Collier, R.W.; Urbach, E.; Larson, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    Crater Lake, Oregon, is a mid-latitude caldera lake famous for its depth (594 m) and blue color. Recent underwater spectral measurements of solar radiation (300-800 nm) support earlier observations of unusual transparency and extend these to UV-B wavelengths. New data suggest that penetration of solar UVR into Crater Lake has a significant ecological impact. Evidence includes a correlation between water column chlorophyll-a and stratospheric ozone since 1984, the scarcity of organisms in the upper water column, and apparent UV screening pigments in phytoplankton that vary with depth. The lowest UV-B diffuse attenuation coefficients (K d,320) were similar to those reported for the clearest natural waters elsewhere, and were lower than estimates for pure water published in 1981. Optical proxies for UVR attenuation were correlated with chlorophyll-a concentration (0-30 m) during typical dry summer months from 1984 to 2002. Using all proxies and measurements of UV transparency, decadal and longer cycles were apparent but no long-term trend since the first optical measurement in 1896. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  14. Lunar polar craters -- icy, rough or just sloping?

    CERN Document Server

    Eke, Vincent R; Lane, David A; Smith, David; Teodoro, Luis F A

    2013-01-01

    Circular Polarisation Ratio (CPR) mosaics from Mini-SAR on Chandrayaan-1 and Mini-RF on LRO are used to study craters near to the lunar north pole. The look direction of the detectors strongly affects the appearance of the crater CPR maps. Rectifying the mosaics to account for parallax also significantly changes the CPR maps of the crater interiors. It is shown that the CPRs of crater interiors in unrectified maps are biased to larger values than crater exteriors, because of a combination of the effects of parallax and incidence angle. Using the LOLA Digital Elevation Map (DEM), the variation of CPR with angle of incidence has been studied. For fresh craters, CPR~0.7 with only a weak dependence on angle of incidence or position interior or just exterior to the crater, consistent with dihedral scattering from blocky surface roughness. For anomalous craters, the CPR interior to the crater increases with both incidence angle and distance from the crater centre. Central crater CPRs are similar to those in the cra...

  15. Saliency detection and edge feature matching approach for crater extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Liu; Donghua Zhou; Lixin Chen; Maoyin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Craters are salient terrain features on planetary sur-faces, and provide useful information about the relative dating of geological unit of planets. In addition, they are ideal landmarks for spacecraft navigation. Due to low contrast and uneven il u-mination, automatic extraction of craters remains a chal enging task. This paper presents a saliency detection method for crater edges and a feature matching algorithm based on edges informa-tion. The craters are extracted through saliency edges detection, edge extraction and selection, feature matching of the same crater edges and robust el ipse fitting. In the edges matching algorithm, a crater feature model is proposed by analyzing the relationship between highlight region edges and shadow region ones. Then, crater edges are paired through the effective matching algorithm. Experiments of real planetary images show that the proposed approach is robust to different lights and topographies, and the detection rate is larger than 90%.

  16. Water-quality assessment of DOD installations/facilities in the Chesapeake Bay Region. Phase 3. Volume 2. Overall approach, findings and recommendations. Technical report, 1985-1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-11-01

    This report represents the culmination of a two-year, three-phase effort to determine the relative impact of DOD activities on the water quality and living resources of the Chesapeake Bay. Phase I defined the recent historical and present pollution potential of all 66 DOD installations in the Bay's drainage basin, and developed a preliminary screening procedure to categorize these installations according to existing or potential impacts on the Bay and its tributaries. Phase II developed and tested a detailed assessment methodology on six installations to define the character and extent of their impact on the Bay. Phase III applied this tested methodology to the remaining 31 installations identified in Phase I as needing more detailed assessment, and summarizes impacts and program recommendations from an installation, regional, and Bay-wide perspective. This volume presents detailed results of this analysis.

  17. Conceptual Design of a Chesapeake Bay Environmental Observatory (CBEO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, W. P.; di Toro, D.; Gross, T. F.; Kemp, W. M.; Burns, R.; Piasecki, M.; Zaslavsky, I.; Cuker, B. E.; Murray, L.

    2006-12-01

    A new project is underway to develop and deploy a Chesapeake Bay Environmental Observatory (CBEO), which is intended to serve as a prototype of cyberinfrastructure (CI) for environmental observatory networks (EONs) that will demonstrate the transformative power of CI. The CBEO will be developed by a team of highly qualified computer scientists, ecologists, oceanographers and environmental engineers with a track record of working together on environmental observatory projects and complex cross-discipline research efforts. The project approach has been organized around the following four concurrent interacting elements, which follow the acronym "NETS": (1) The CBEO:N group will incorporate the test bed CI into the national EONs by constructing a GEON-based node for the CBEO. This will entail resolving complex cross-disciplinary issues of semantics, syntax and inter- operability as well as developing new shared CI tools for data assimilation and interpolation. (2) CBEO:E is the education element and will use the CBEO to translate observational science for public consumption. Direct participation of multicultural students and a K-12 teacher are planned. The test-bed and network components (described below and above) will provide the focus of five workshops for users, managers and science educators; (3) Prior to full integration via CBEO:N, CBEO:T will rapidly construct a locally accessible CBEO test-bed prototype that will integrate a subset of currently available large data sets characterized by multiple variables and widely disparate time and space scales ? grab and continuous sampling at fixed stations, undulating towed sensors, and satellite and aircraft remote sensing. A novel feature will be the inclusion of the fifteen year (1986-2000) simulated data from the Bay-wide fine spatial (1-10 km) and temporal (0.02-1 hr) scale hydrodynamic and water quality model. CBEO:T will serve initially as the development platform for data integration, interpolation, and

  18. Geology of the Spirit landing site in Gusev crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M.; Athena Science Team

    Spirit, the first Mars Exploration Rover, successfully landed in a low albedo portion of Gusev crater at 14.5692S, 175.4729E. The landing site is a generally low relief somewhat rocky plain dominated by shallow circular depressions and low ridges. Hills ˜ 2 km to the east are over 100 m high and the rim of a 200 m diameter crater form the horizon 240 m to the northeast. The shallow circular depressions generally have rocky rims and smooth soil filled centers and may be secondary impact craters. The red soils appear to be cemented fines and sand (coarse and fine) and granules have been sorted into aeolian bedforms (many appear to be ripples with coarser granules at their crests). The albedo of the landing site is ˜ 0.19 likely due to the removal of bright, fine grained dust via dust devils. Preliminary rock counts suggest ˜ 5% of the surface is covered by rocks (varies by a factor of two in the scene), which is substantially less than at any of the three previous landing sites, although the size-frequency distribution follows a similar exponential. Boulder and cobbles are rare; the largest rock within 10 m of the lander is only ˜ 0.3 m diameter and there are substantially more pebbles trafficable surface generally similar in reddish color to the three previous landing sites albeit with substantially fewer rocks) were correctly predicted from remote sensing data and models during landing site selection. Most rocks appear angular and many appear fractured and/or fragmented, consistent with impact ejecta, although more rounded rocks may also be present. Many small rocks appear embedded and cemented in the soil, suggestive of a crusted gravel armor or lag. The redder patination along the base of some rocks may be a former soil horizon and argues for net deflation at the site. A vast majority of the rocks appear dark, fine grained, and pitted. Many appear to be ventifacts, with flutes and grooves formed by impacting sand in saltation. Most rocks appear coated with

  19. Huygens Crater: Insights into Noachian Volcanism, Stratigraphy, and Aqueous Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackiss, S. E.; Wray, J. J.; Seelos, K. D.; Niles, P. B.

    2015-01-01

    Huygens crater is a well preserved peak ring structure on Mars centered at 13.5 deg S, 55.5 deg E in the Noachian highlands between Terras Tyrrhena and Sabaea near the NW rim of Hellas basin. With a diameter of approximately 470 km, it uplifted and exhumed pre-Noachian crustal materials from depths greater than 25 km, penetrating below the thick, ubiquitous layer of Hellas ejecta. In addition, Huygens served as a basin for subsequent aqueous activity, including erosion/deposition by fluvial valley networks and subsurface alteration that is now exposed by smaller impacts. Younger mafic-bearing plains that partially cover the basin floor and surrounding intercrater areas were likely emplaced by later volcanism.

  20. Treatment of non-sparse cratering in planetary surface dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneissl, T.; Michael, G. G.; Schmedemann, N.

    2016-10-01

    We here propose a new technique to derive crater size-frequency distributions (CSFDs) from non-sparsely cratered surfaces, by accounting for the loss of craters due to subsequent crater/ejecta coverage. This approach, which we refer to as the buffered non-sparseness correction (BNSC), relates each crater to a measurement area found by excluding regions in the study area that have been resurfaced by larger craters and their ejecta blankets. The approach includes the well-known buffered crater counting (BCC) technique in order to consider the potential identification of craters whose centers are located outside the counting area. We demonstrate the new approach at two test sites on the Moon, one on the ancient lunar highlands outside the South Pole Aitken basin and the other on the much younger surface of lunar Mare Serenitatis. As expected, the correction has a much stronger effect on ancient, densely cratered surfaces than on younger, sparsely cratered surfaces. Furthermore, these first results indicate that the shapes of CSFDs on ancient terrains are actually very similar to the shapes of CSFDs on younger terrains.

  1. A Spanish Tagset for the CRATER Project

    OpenAIRE

    León, Fernando Sánchez

    1994-01-01

    This working paper describes the Spanish tagset to be used in the context of CRATER, a CEC funded project aiming at the creation of a multilingual (English, French, Spanish) aligned corpus using the International Telecommunications Union corpus. In this respect, each version of the corpus will be (or is currently) tagged. Xerox PARC tagger will be adapted to Spanish in order to perform the tagging of the Spanish version. This tagset has been devised as the ideal one for Spanish, and has been ...

  2. Sporadic Groundwater Upwelling in Deep Martian Craters: Evidence for Lacustrine Clays and Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, J. R.; Rogers, A. D.; Wright, S. P.; Niles, P.; Cuadros, J.

    2012-01-01

    While the surface of Mars may have had an active hydrosphere early in its history [1], it is likely that this water retreated to the subsurface early on due to loss of the magnetic field and early atmosphere [2]. This likely resulted in the formation of two distinct aqueous regimes for Mars from the Late Noachian onward: one dominated by redistribution of surface ice and occasional melting of snow/ice [3], and one dominated by groundwater activity [4]. The excavation of alteration minerals from deep in the crust by impact craters points to an active, ancient, deep hydrothermal system [5]. Putative sapping features [6] may occur where the groundwater breached the surface. Upwelling groundwater may also have played a critical role in the formation of massive, layered, cemented sediments in Sinus Meridiani [7,8], in the Valles Marineris [9], and possibly in Gale Crater [10], where the Curiosity Rover will land later this year. Understanding the past distribution, geochemistry, and significance of groundwater on Mars is critical to untangling the origins of deep alteration minerals, Hesperian sulfate deposits, and crater fill deposits at Gale Crater or in other locations.

  3. Analytical formulation of lunar cratering asymmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Nan

    2016-01-01

    We formulate the lunar cratering distribution and verify the cratering asymmetries generated by the main-belt asteroids (MBAs) as well as the near-Earth objects (NEOs). Based on a planar model that excludes the terrestrial and lunar gravitations on the impactors and assuming the impactor encounter speed with Earth $v_{\\rm{enc}}$ is higher than the lunar orbital speed $v_{\\rm{M}}$, we rigorously integrated the lunar cratering distribution, and derived its approximation to the first order of $v_{\\rm{M}}/v_{\\rm{enc}}$. Numerical simulations of lunar bombardment by the MBAs during the late heavy bombardment were performed with an Earth-Moon distance $a_{\\rm{M}}$ = 20--60 Earth radii in five cases. The analytical model directly proves the existence of a leading/trailing asymmetry and the absence of near/far asymmetry. The approximate form of the leading/trailing asymmetry is $(1 + A_1 \\cos\\beta)$, which decreases as the apex distance $\\beta$ increases. The numerical simulations show evidence of a pole/equator asym...

  4. Novel psychrotolerant picocyanobacteria isolated from Chesapeake Bay in the winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongle; Jiao, Nianzhi; Chen, Feng

    2015-08-01

    Picocyanobacteria are major primary producers in the ocean, especially in the tropical or subtropical oceans or during warm seasons. Many "warm" picocyanobacterial species have been isolated and characterized. However, picocyanobacteria in cold environments or cold seasons are much less studied. In general, little is known about the taxonomy and ecophysiology of picocyanobacteria living in the winter. In this study, 17 strains of picocyanobacteria were isolated from Chesapeake Bay, a temperate estuarine ecosystem, during the winter months. These winter isolates belong to five distinct phylogenetic lineages, and are distinct from the picocyanobacteria previously isolated from the warm seasons. The vast majority of the winter isolates were closely related to picocyanobacteria isolated from other cold environments like Arctic or subalpine waters. The winter picocyanobacterial isolates were able to maintain slow growth or prolonged dormancy at 4°C. Interestingly, the phycoerythrin-rich strains outperformed the phycocyanin-rich strains at cold temperature. In addition, winter picocyanobacteria changed their morphology when cultivated at 4°C. The close phylogenetic relationship between the winter picocyanobacteria and the picocyanobacteria living in high latitude cold regions indicates that low temperature locations select specific ecotypes of picocyanobacteria. PMID:26986796

  5. Variable climatic conditions dominate recent phytoplankton dynamics in Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Lawrence W., Jr.; Mallonee, Michael E.; Perry, Elgin S.; Miller, W. David; Adolf, Jason E.; Gallegos, Charles L.; Paerl, Hans W.

    2016-03-01

    Variable climatic conditions strongly influence phytoplankton dynamics in estuaries globally. Our study area is Chesapeake Bay, a highly productive ecosystem providing natural resources, transportation, and recreation for nearly 16 million people inhabiting a 165,000-km2 watershed. Since World War II, nutrient over-enrichment has led to multiple ecosystem impairments caused by increased phytoplankton biomass as chlorophyll-a (chl-a). Doubled nitrogen (N) loadings from 1945–1980 led to increased chl-a, reduced water clarity, and low dissolved oxygen (DO), while decreased N loadings from 1981–2012 suggest modest improvement. The recent 30+ years are characterized by high inter-annual variability of chl-a, coinciding with irregular dry and wet periods, complicating the detection of long-term trends. Here, we synthesize time-series data for historical and recent N loadings (TN, NO2 + NO3), chl-a, floral composition, and net primary productivity (NPP) to distinguish secular changes caused by nutrient over-enrichment from spatio-temporal variability imposed by climatic conditions. Wet years showed higher chl-a, higher diatom abundance, and increased NPP, while dry years showed lower chl-a, lower diatom abundance, and decreased NPP. Our findings support a conceptual model wherein variable climatic conditions dominate recent phytoplankton dynamics against a backdrop of nutrient over-enrichment, emphasizing the need to separate these effects to gauge progress toward improving water quality in estuaries.

  6. Amazonian mid- to high-latitude glaciation on Mars: Supply-limited ice sources, ice accumulation patterns, and concentric crater fill glacial flow and ice sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastook, James L.; Head, James W.

    2014-02-01

    Concentric crater fill (CCF) occurs in the interior of impact craters in mid- to high latitudes on Mars and is interpreted to have formed by glacial ice flow and debris covering. We use the characteristics and orientation of deposits comprising CCF, the thickness of pedestal deposits in mid- to high-latitude pedestal craters (Pd), the volumes of the current polar caps, and information about regional slopes and ice rheology to address questions about (1) the maximum thickness of regional ice deposits during the Late Amazonian, (2) the likelihood that these deposits flowed regionally, (3) the geological regions and features most likely to induce ice-flow, and (4) the locations and environments in which ice is likely to have been sequestered up to the present. We find that regional ice flow under Late Amazonian climate conditions requires ice thicknesses exceeding many hundreds of meters for slopes typical of the vast majority of the surface of Mars, a thickness for the mid-latitudes that is well in excess of the total volume available from polar ice reservoirs. This indicates that although conditions for mid- to high-latitude glaciation may have persisted for tens to hundreds of millions of years, the process is “supply limited”, with a steady state reached when the polar ice cap water ice supply becomes exhausted. Impact craters are by far the most abundant landform with associated slopes (interior wall and exterior rim) sufficiently high to induce glacial ice flow under Late Amazonian climate conditions, and topographic slope data show that Amazonian impact craters have been clearly modified, undergoing crater interior slope reduction and floor shallowing. We show that these trends are the predictable response of ice deposition and preferential accumulation and retention in mid- to high-latitude crater interiors during episodes of enhanced spin-axis obliquity. We demonstrate that flow from a single episode of an inter-crater terrain layer comparable to Pedestal

  7. The discovery of fullerenes in the 1.85 billion-year-old Sudbury meteorite crater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, L.; Bada, J.L. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); Winans, R.E.; Hunt, J.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bunch, T.E. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Moffett Field, CA (United States). Ames Research Center; French, B.M. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Fullerenes (C{sub 60}, C{sub 70}) have been identified by laser time-of-flight and electron-ionization mass spectroscopy in rock samples (black tuff in the Onaping formation) from the crater. They were likely synthesized within the impact plume from carbon contained in the meteorite. The isotopic ratios suggest {sup 13}C enrichment. They are associated with sulfur which may have protected them. This is the largest known deposit of naturally occurring fullerenes.

  8. Mineralogy of crater Haulani on dwarf planet Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Federico; Zambon, Francesca; Raponi, Andrea; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Ammannito, Eleonora; Capria, Maia Teresa; Giacomo Carrozzo, Filippo; Ciarniello, Mauro; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Formisano, Michelangelo; Hoffmann, Martin; Krohn, Katrin; Longobardo, Andrea; McFadden, Lucy Ann; Y McSween, Harry; Nathues, Andreas; Palomba, Ernesto; Pieters, Carle; Stephan, Katrin; Russell, Christopher T.; Raymond, Carol; Dawn/VIR Team

    2016-10-01

    On dwarf planet Ceres, several high-albedo units are visible at the local scale. Haulani crater, located in the equatorial quadrangle having the same name, is one of the notable bright units highlighted by the Dawn spacecraft since its first approach to Ceres in early 2015. Due to the images obtained by the Dawn Framing Camera, it was possible to reveal that Haulani's bright material displays a very small or even negative ("blue") spectral slope in the range from the visible to the near infrared light, which is a peculiar occurrence compared to the average surface of Ceres.Hyperspectral images returned by the Visible and InfraRed mapping spectrometer (VIR) onboard Dawn enabled a detailed mineralogical analysis of the Haulani crater area. Already at the spatial resolution of the Survey phase (~1.1 km/px), and even more so during HAMO (~0.38 km/px) and LAMO (~0.10 km/px) mission phases, Haulani crater shows considerable spectral variability. The spectral features centered at 2.7 and 3.06 µm, respectively indicative of the presence of hydrous minerals and ammoniated phyllosilicates, show a decrease of band depth in the floor and in the bright ejecta corresponding to the blue spectral slope. Spectral signatures at 3.4 and ~4 µm, indicative of carbonates, also show a moderate variability. Finally, Haulani shows the highest thermal contrast over the entire surface of Ceres, which may be linked to the albedo and texture of the material excavated by the impact, combined with its compactness in specific areas such as pitted terrain.The application of a spectral unmixing model on VIR data acquired in Survey and HAMO suggests that the observed spectral variations might be due to substantial differences in grain size, rather than to significant variations in composition. However, a comprehensive analysis shall include LAMO data acquired at higher pixel resolution.AcknowledgementsThis work is supported by the Italian Space Agency (ASI). VIR was funded and coordinated by the

  9. Shipboard magnetic field "noise" reveals shallow heavy mineral sediment concentrations in Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anjana K.; Vogt, Peter R.; Rosenbaum, Joseph G.; Newell, Wayne; Cronin, Thomas M.; Willard, Debra A.; Hagen, Rick A.; Brozena, John; Hofstra, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Shipboard magnetic field data collected over Chesapeake Bay exhibit low-amplitude, short-wavelength anomalies that most likely indicate shallow concentrations of heavy mineral sediments. Piston core layers and black sand beach samples exhibit enhanced magnetic susceptibilities and carry remanent magnetization, with mineralogical analyses indicating ilmenite and trace magnetite and/or maghemite and hematite. The anomalies are subtle and would be filtered as noise using traditional approaches, but can instead be highlighted using spectral methods, thus providing nearly continuous coverage along survey tracks. The distribution of the anomalies provides constraints on relevant sorting mechanisms. Comparisons to sonar data and previous grab samples show that two of three areas surveyed exhibit short-wavelength anomalies that are clustered over sand-covered areas, suggesting initial sorting through settling mechanisms. This is supported by a correlation between core magnetic susceptibility and grain size. Near the Choptank River, where sediment resuspension is wave-dominated, anomalies show a sharp decrease with seafloor depth that cannot be explained by signal attenuation alone. In Pocomoke Sound, where both tidal currents and wave-action impact sediment resuspension, anomalies show a more gradual decrease with depth. Near the mouth of the bay, where there is a higher influx of sediments from the continental shelf, short-wavelength anomalies are isolated and do not appear to represent heavy mineral sand concentrations. These combined observations suggest the importance of further sorting by erosional processes in certain parts of the bay. Additionally, comparisons of these data to cores sampling pre-Holocene sediments suggest that the sorting of heavy minerals in higher energy, shallow water environments provides a mechanism for correlations between core magnetic susceptibility and sea-level changes.

  10. Analysis of crater valleys, Noachis Terra, Mars: Evidence of fluvial and glacial processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, S. W.; Clarke, J. D. A.; Paull, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    The precise mechanism for the formation and evolution of crater valley networks in the Martian southern highlands remains under debate, with precipitation, groundwater flow, and melting induced by impact being suggested. We studied valley networks within four craters of the Noachis Terra highlands that were representative of similar features in Noachis Terra and where orbital data existed for analysis in order to characterise their morphology and infer possible processes involved in their formation and evolution. We found evidence for valleys carved by liquid water and ice-related processes. This included strong evidence of liquid water-based valley formation through melting of ice-rich deposits throughout our study area, suggesting an alternative to previously suggested rainfall or groundwater-based scenarios. The location of these valleys on steeply sloping crater walls, as opposed to the shallow slopes of the highlands where Martian valleys are typically found, suggested that our 'fluvial' valleys had not evolved a more structured fluvial morphology as valley networks found on the Martian plains. Our studied valleys' association with ice-rich material and abundant evidence for erosion caused by downslope flow of ice-rich material are consistent with a cold, wet Mars hypothesis where accumulation, flow, and melting of ice have been dominant factors in eroding crater valleys. Additionally, analysis of valley morphology with slope and aspect suggested a greater dependence on local geology and presence of volatiles than larger valley networks, though ice-related valleys were consistently wider for their length than valleys assessed as fluvial carved. We assessed that local conditions such as climate, geology, and availability of ice-rich material played a major role in the erosion of crater valleys at our study site.

  11. Local spectrophotometric properties of pyroclastic deposits at the Lavoisier lunar crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souchon, A. L.; Besse, S.; Pinet, P. C.; Chevrel, S. D.; Daydou, Y. H.; Josset, J.-L.; D'Uston, L.; Haruyama, J.

    2013-07-01

    We present a study of the Lavoisier lunar crater combining photometric data from the AMIE camera (SMART-1 mission) and hyperspectral data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper M3 (Chandrayaan-1 mission), with a special emphasis on the pyroclastic deposits considered to be present on the crater floor. The photometric parameters are in agreement with the general photometric behaviors of the lunar regolith, especially the backscattering properties. The assumed pyroclastic materials within Lavoisier present at first order a rather homogeneous photometric behavior, in favor of their surface state homogeneity. However, they are not significantly different from other "non-dark" patches on the crater's floor, whereas the assumed pyroclastic deposit of Lavoisier F displays clearly different photometric parameters, indicative of distinct physical surface properties from the pyroclastic materials within Lavoisier. Using laboratory data to get hindsight on the reliability of results from orbital datasets, we show that the use of more or less depleted phase curves for photometric inversions has a clear impact on the photometric parameters that are derived. The hyperspectral analysis of Lavoisier crater shows that the various pyroclastic deposits present the same mineralogical composition, distinct from the floor of the crater and the mare basalts. M3 spectra do not differentiate between the pyroclastic deposits within Lavoisier and Lavoisier F. They have the same spectral signatures, share a similar mineralogical composition, and probably the same volcanic origin. Therefore, the differences seen in the photometric analysis from the AMIE observations are indicative of variations in grain sizes, and/or roughness, and/or particles scattering properties, and/or compaction state. The combined mineralogical and photometric analysis is a very useful approach to document the nature of the pyroclastic deposits of the Moon, and possibly of other objects of the Solar System (e.g., Mercury) as

  12. Assessing the effectiveness of winter cover crop on nitrate reduction in two-paired sub-basins on the Coastal Plain of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Yeo, I. Y.; Sadeghi, A. M.; Mccarty, G.; Hively, W. D.; Lang, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Best management practices (BMPs) have been widely adopted to improve water quality throughout the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (CBW). Winter cover crops (WCC) use has been highlighted for the reduction of nitrate leaching over the fallow season. Although various WCC practices are currently conducted in local croplands, the water quality improvement benefits of WCC have not been studied thoroughly at the watershed scale. The objective of this study is to assess the long-term impacts of WCC on reducing nitrate loadings using a processed-based watershed model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). Remote sensing based estimates of WCC biomass will be used to calibrate plant growth processes of SWAT and its nutrient cycling. The study will be undertaken in two-paired agricultural watersheds in the Coastal Plain of CBW. Multiple WCC practice scenarios will be prepared to investigate how nitrate loading varies with crop species, planting dates, and implementation areas. The performance of WCC on two-paired watersheds will be compared in order to understand the effects of different watershed characteristics on nitrate uptake by crops. The results will demonstrate the nitrate reduction efficiency of different WCC practices and identify the targeting area for WCC implementation at the watershed scale. This study will not only integrate remote sensing data into the physically based model but also extend our understandings of WCC functions. This will provide key information for effective conservation decision making. Key words: Water quality, Chesapeake Bay Watershed, Winter Cover Crop, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)

  13. On the Binning and Associated Uncertainty of Crater Diameter Size-Frequency Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, B. P.; Robbins, S. J.; Plesko, C. S.; Riggs, J. D.

    2015-05-01

    The tabulation and graphical display of crater size-frequency data (crater diameters) is a critical part of analyzing crater populations, but despite a landmark 1979 paper, standardization remains elusive. We will discuss recommendations.

  14. Determining Statistically Significant Deviations from a Model Crater Production Function for Estimating Resurfacing Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, B. P.; Hilbe, J. M.; Robbins, S. J.; Plesko, C. S.; Riggs, J. D.

    2015-05-01

    Many crater analysts will search for deviations of observed crater population data from model crater populations and treat those deviations as a modification event - usually resurfacing. We will discuss how to assign confidences for these deviations.

  15. Crater size distributions on Ganymede and Callisto: fundamental issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Roland; Schmedemann, Nico; Werner, Stefanie; Ivanov, Boris; Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Crater size distributions on the two largest Jovian satellites Ganymede and Callisto and the origin of impactors are subject of intense and controversial debates. In this paper, we reinvestigate crater size distributions measured in surface units derived from a recently published global geologic map, based on Voyager and Galileo SSI images at a scale of 1 km/pxl (Collins G. C. et al. (2013), U. S. Geol. Surv., Sci. Inv. Map 3237). These units are used as a context to units mapped in more detail at higher resolution in Galileo SSI images. We focus on the following fundamental issues: (1) Similarity between shapes of crater distributions on the Galilean satellites and on inner solar system bodies; (2) production versus equilibrium distributions; (3) apex/antapex variations in crater distributions. First, our results show a strong similarity in shape between the crater distributions on the most densely cratered regions on Ganymede and Callisto with those in the lunar highlands. We conclude that the shape of the crater distributions on these two Jovian satellites implies the craters were preferentially formed from members of a collisionally evolved projectile family, derived either from Main Belt asteroids as candidates of impactors on the Jovian satellites, or from projectiles stemming from the outer solar system which have undergone collisional evolution, resulting in a size distribution similar to those of Main Belt asteroids. Second, the complex shape of the crater distributions on Ganymede and Callisto indicates they are mostly production distributions and can be used to infer the underlying shape of the projectile size distribution. Locally, equilibrium distributions occur, especially at smaller sub-kilometer diameters. Third, the most densely cratered regions on both satellites do not show apex-antapex variations in crater frequency, as inferred for bodies from heliocentric orbits (e.g., Zahnle K. et al. (2003), Icarus 163, 263-289). This indicates that these

  16. A Spanish Tagset for the CRATER Project

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-León, F

    1994-01-01

    This working paper describes the Spanish tagset to be used in the context of CRATER, a CEC funded project aiming at the creation of a multilingual (English, French, Spanish) aligned corpus using the International Telecommunications Union corpus. In this respect, each version of the corpus will be (or is currently) tagged. Xerox PARC tagger will be adapted to Spanish in order to perform the tagging of the Spanish version. This tagset has been devised as the ideal one for Spanish, and has been posted to several lists in order to get feedback to it.

  17. 33 CFR 334.350 - Chesapeake Bay off Fort Monroe, Va.; firing range danger zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Va.; firing range danger zone. 334.350 Section 334.350 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.350 Chesapeake Bay off Fort Monroe, Va.; firing range danger zone. (a) The danger zone. All of...

  18. BOOK REVIEW OF "CHESAPEAKE BAY BLUES: SCIENCE, POLITICS, AND THE STRUGGLE TO SAVE THE BAY"

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a book review of "Chesapeake Bay Blues: Science, Politics, and the Struggle to Save the Bay". This book is very well written and provides an easily understandable description of the political challenges faced by those proposing new or more stringent environmental regulat...

  19. 76 FR 70349 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... necessary to accommodate the annual Christmas parade event. DATES: This deviation is effective from 4 p.m... 117.997(g), to accommodate the annual Christmas parade event. Normally, the bridge opens on signal... of 8.5 feet, above mean high water. The Chesapeake annual Christmas parade event is scheduled...

  20. Derivation of habitat-specific dissolved oxygen criteria for Chesapeake Bay and its tidal tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batiuk, R.A.; Breitburg, D.L.; Diaz, R.J.; Cronin, T. M.; Secor, D.H.; Thursby, G.

    2009-01-01

    The Chesapeake 2000 Agreement committed its state and federal signatories to "define the water quality conditions necessary to protect aquatic living resources" in the Chesapeake Bay (USA) and its tidal tributaries. Hypoxia is one of the key water quality issues addressed as a result of the above Agreement. This paper summarizes the protection goals and specific criteria intended to achieve those goals for addressing hypoxia. The criteria take into account the variety of Bay habitats and the tendency towards low dissolved oxygen in some areas of the Bay. Stressful dissolved oxygen conditions were characterized for a diverse array of living resources of the Chesapeake Bay by different aquatic habitats: migratory fish spawning and nursery, shallow-water, open-water, deep-water, and deep-channel. The dissolved oxygen criteria derived for each of these habitats are intended to protect against adverse effects on survival, growth, reproduction and behavior. The criteria accommodate both spatial and temporal aspects of low oxygen events, and have been adopted into the Chesapeake Bay states - Maryland, Virginia, and Delaware - and the District of Columbia's water quality standards regulations. These criteria, now in the form of state regulatory standards, are driving an array of land-based and wastewater pollution reduction actions across the six-watershed.

  1. 75 FR 53298 - A Method to Assess Climate-Relevant Decisions: Application in the Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    ... AGENCY A Method to Assess Climate-Relevant Decisions: Application in the Chesapeake Bay AGENCY... 60-day public comment period for the draft document titled, ``A Method to Assess Climate-Relevant... and must be received by EPA by November 1, 2010. ADDRESSES: The draft ``A Method To Assess...

  2. 75 FR 34367 - Safety Zone; Shore Thing & Independence Day Fireworks, Chesapeake Bay, Norfolk, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Shore Thing & Independence Day Fireworks... is establishing a temporary safety zone on the Chesapeake Bay in the vicinity of Ocean View Beach Park, Norfolk, VA in support of the Shore Thing & Independence Day Fireworks event. This action...

  3. 76 FR 38300 - Safety Zone; Shore Thing and Independence Day Fireworks, Chesapeake Bay, Norfolk, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Shore Thing and Independence Day Fireworks... is establishing a temporary safety zone on the Chesapeake Bay in the vicinity of Ocean View Beach Park, Norfolk, VA in support of the Shore Thing and Independence Day Fireworks event. This action...

  4. 75 FR 14152 - Executive Order 13508; Chesapeake Bay Protection and Restoration Section 502; Guidance for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ...-effective tools and practices that reduce water pollution and requests public comment. The document was... Bay Protection and Restoration, dated May 12, 2009 (74 FR 23099, May 15, 2009), requires the... Chesapeake Bay watershed describing proven, cost-effective tools and practices that reduce water...

  5. 3 CFR 13508 - Executive Order 13508 of May 12, 2009. Chesapeake Bay Protection and Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... that are critical to effective Federal leadership; (c) describe the specific programs and strategies to... LEADERSHIP, PLANNING, AND ACCOUNTABILITY Sec. 201. Federal Leadership Committee. In order to begin a new era of shared Federal leadership with respect to the protection and restoration of the Chesapeake Bay,...

  6. 33 CFR 334.140 - Chesapeake Bay; U.S. Army Proving Ground Reservation, Aberdeen, Md.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....140 Chesapeake Bay; U.S. Army Proving Ground Reservation, Aberdeen, Md. (a) Restricted area defined. The following indicates the limits of the waters of or adjacent to the Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, and inside of which boundaries will lie the restricted area known as the Aberdeen Proving...

  7. LRO Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER): Instrument Overviw and Computer Simulations of Detector Response to SEPs and GCRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charara, Y.; Towsend, L.; Spence, H.; Blake, J. B.; Golightly, M.; Kepko, E.; Kasper, J.; Looper, M.; Mazur, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Mission, scheduled to be launched by the end of 2008, will carry six instruments to serve several exploratory objectives for a return of astronauts to the Moon. One of the six instruments, the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER), will characterize the lunar radiation environment and its biological impacts on humans. In this presentation, we provide an overview of CRaTER measurement objectives and implementation. CRaTER has two Tissue Equivalent Plastic volumes embedded between three pairs of solid-state detectors. We present preliminary computer calculations of expected CRaTER detector responses to Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) by simulating several SEPs and energetic, heavy, GCR particle spectra using two state-of-the-art Monte Carlo Codes, HETC-HEDS and BBFRAG.

  8. 36 CFR 7.2 - Crater Lake National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crater Lake National Park. 7.2 Section 7.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.2 Crater Lake National Park. (a)...

  9. Chemical hazards from acid crater lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bergen, M. J.; Sumarti, S.; Heikens, A.; Bogaard, T. A.; Hartiyatun, S.

    2003-04-01

    Acid crater lakes, which are hosted by a considerable number of active volcanoes, form a potential threat for local ecosystems and human health, as they commonly contain large amounts of dissolved chemicals. Subsurface seepage or overflow can lead to severe deterioration of the water quality of rivers and wells, as observations around several of these volcanoes have shown. The Ijen crater lake in East Java (Indonesia) is a striking example, as this reservoir of hyperacid (pHfluorosis is widespread among the ca. 100,000 residents of the area. A conspicuous spatial correlation between fluoride concentrations and the irrigation system suggest that long-term (century) infiltration of irrigation water may have affected the quality of groundwater. Fluorosis is also a problem in some villages within the caldera, where well water sources may have a more direct subsurface connection with the lake system. From our observations we conclude that water-quality monitoring is especially needed for health reasons in volcanic areas where volatile elements, derived from passively degassing magma, are intercepted by (sub) surface water bodies.

  10. Raw and Modified Raw Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay on Sept. 6, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  11. RES2DINV Format Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay on Sept. 8, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  12. RES2DINV Format Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay on Sept. 7, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  13. Raw and Modified Raw Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay on Sept. 7, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  14. Processed Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay on Sept. 7, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  15. Processed Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay on Sept. 8, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  16. Processed Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay on Sept. 6, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  17. Raw and Modified Raw Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay on Sept. 8, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  18. The effect of craters on the lunar neutron flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, V. R.; Bower, K. E.; Diserens, S.; Ryder, M.; Yeomans, P. E. L.; Teodoro, L. F. A.; Elphic, R. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Hermalyn, B.; Lavelle, C. M.; Lawrence, D. J.

    2015-08-01

    The variation of remotely sensed neutron count rates is measured as a function of cratercentric distance using data from the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer. The count rate, stacked over many craters, peaks over the crater center, has a minimum near the crater rim, and at larger distances, it increases to a mean value that is up to 1% lower than the mean count rate observed over the crater. A simple model is presented, based upon an analytical topographical profile for the stacked craters fitted to data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter. The effect of topography coupled with neutron beaming from the surface largely reproduces the observed count rate profiles. However, a model that better fits the observations can be found by including the additional freedom to increase the neutron emissivity of the crater area by ˜0.35% relative to the unperturbed surface. It is unclear what might give rise to this effect, but it may relate to additional surface roughness in the vicinities of craters. The amplitude of the crater-related signal in the neutron count rate is small, but not too small to demand consideration when inferring water-equivalent hydrogen (WEH) weight percentages in polar permanently shaded regions (PSRs). If the small crater-wide count rate excess is concentrated into a much smaller PSR, then it can lead to a large bias in the inferred WEH weight percentage. For instance, it may increase the inferred WEH for Cabeus crater at the Moon's south pole from ˜1% to ˜4%.

  19. The surface and interior evolution of Ceres revealed by fractures and secondary crater chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Buczkowski, Debra; Schmedemann, Nico; King, Scott; O'Brien, David P.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Raymond, Carol; Marchi, Simone; Russell, Christopher T.; Mitri, Giuseppe; Bland, Michael T.

    2016-10-01

    Dawn became the first spacecraft to visit and orbit Ceres, a dwarf planet and the largest body in the asteroid belt (radius ~470 km) (Russell et al., 2016). Before Dawn's arrival, telescopic observations and thermal evolution modeling indicated Ceres was differentiated, with an average density of 2,100 kg/m3 (e.g. McCord & Sotin, 2005; Castillo-Rogez & McCord, 2010). Moreover, pervasive viscous relaxation in a water-ice-rich outer layer was predicted to erase most features on Ceres' surface (Bland, 2013). However, a full understanding of Ceres' surface and interior evolution remained elusive. On the basis of global geologic mapping, we identify prevalent ≥1 km wide linear features that formed: 1) as the surface expression of subsurface fractures, and 2) as material ejected during impact-crater formation impacted and scoured the surface, forming secondary crater chains. The formation and preservation of these linear features indicates Ceres' outer layer is relatively strong, and is not dominated by viscous relaxation as predicted. The fractures also give us insights into Ceres' interior: their spacing indicates the fractured layer is ~30 km thick, and we interpret the fractures formed because of uplift and extension induced by an upwelling region, which is consistent with geodynamic modeling (King et al., 2016). In addition, we find that some secondary crater chains do not form radial patterns around their source impact craters, and are located in a different hemisphere from their source impact craters, because of Ceres' fast rotation (period of ~9 hours) and relatively small radius. Our results show Ceres has a surface and outer layer with characteristics that are different than predicted, and underwent complex surface and interior evolution. Our fuller understanding of Ceres, based on Dawn data, gives us important insights into the evolution of bodies in the asteroid belt, and provides unique constraints that can be used to evaluate predictions of the surface

  20. Hydrogen isotopes in individual alkenones from the Chesapeake Bay estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Valérie F.; Sachs, Julian P.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios of individual alkenones from haptophyte algae were measured in suspended particles and surface sediment from the Chesapeake Bay (CB) estuary, eastern USA, in order to determine their relationship to water δD values and salinity. δD values of four alkenones (MeC 37:2, MeC 37:3, EtC 38:2, EtC 38:3) from particles and sediments were between -165‰ and -221‰ and increased linearly ( R2 = 0.7-0.9) with water δD values from the head to the mouth of the Bay. Individual alkenones were depleted in deuterium by 156-188‰ relative to water. The MeC 37 alkenones were consistently enriched by ˜12‰ relative to the EtC 38 alkenones, and the di-unsaturated alkenones of both varieties were consistently enriched by ˜20‰ relative to the tri-unsaturated alkenones. All of the increase in alkenone δD values could be accounted for by the water δD increase. Consequently, no net change in alkenone-water D/ H fractionation occurred as a result of the salinity increase from 10 to 29. This observation is at odds with results from culture studies with alkenone-producing marine coccolithophorids, and from two field studies, one with a dinoflagellate sterol in the CB, and one with a wide variety of lipids in saline ponds on Christmas Island, that indicate a decline in D/ H fractionation with increasing salinity. Why D/ H fractionation in alkenones in the CB showed no dependence on salinity, while D/ H fractionation in CB dinsoterol decreased by 1‰ per unit increase in salinity remains to be determined. Two hypotheses we consider to be valid are that (i) the assemblage of alkenone-producing haptophytes changes along the Bay and each species has a different sensitivity to salinity, such that no apparent trend in αalkenone-water occurs along the salinity gradient, and (ii) greater osmoregulation capacity in coastal haptophytes may result in a diminished sensitivity of alkenone-water D/ H fractionation to salinity changes.

  1. Tracking Nonpoint Source Nitrogen and Carbon in Watersheds of Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, S.; Pennino, M. J.; Duan, S.; Blomquist, J.

    2012-12-01

    Humans have altered nitrogen and carbon cycles in rivers regionally with important impacts on coastal ecosystems. Nonpoint source nitrogen pollution is a leading contributor to coastal eutrophication and hypoxia. Shifts in sources of carbon impact downstream ecosystem metabolism and fate and transport of contaminants in coastal zones. We used a combination of stable isotopes and optical tracers to investigate fate and transport of nitrogen and carbon sources in tributaries of the largest estuary in the U.S., the Chesapeake Bay. We analyzed isotopic composition of water samples from major tributaries including the Potomac River, Susquehanna River, Patuxent River, and Choptank River during routine and storm event sampling over multiple years. A positive correlation between δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3- in the Potomac River above Washington D.C. suggested denitrification or biological uptake in the watershed was removing agriculturally-derived N during summer months. In contrast, the Patuxent River in Maryland showed elevated δ15N-NO3- (5 - 12 per mil) with no relationship to δ18O-NO3- suggesting the importance of wastewater sources. From the perspective of carbon sources, there were distinct isotopic values of the δ13C-POM of particulate organic matter and fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMS) for rivers influenced by their dominant watershed land use. EEMS showed that there were increases in the humic and fulvic fractions of dissolved organic matter during spring floods, particularly in the Potomac River. Stable isotopic values of δ13C-POM also showed rapid depletion suggesting terrestrial carbon "pulses" in the Potomac River each spring. The δ15N-POM peaked to 10 - 15 per mil each spring suggested a potential manure source or result of biological processing within the watershed. Overall, there were considerable changes in sources and transformations of nitrogen and carbon that varied across rivers and that contribute to nitrogen and carbon loads

  2. Riddles in the Dark: Imaging Inside Mercury's Permanently Shadowed Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, C. M.; Chabot, N. L.; Denevi, B. W.; Nair, H.; Deutsch, A. N.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Blewett, D. T.; Head, J. W.; Harmon, J. K.; Neumann, G. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Numerous lines of evidence independently point to the presence of water ice in Mercury's polar regions: Earth-based radar shows radar-bright regions; Mariner 10 and MESSENGER Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) images reveal that these regions are permanently (south polar region) or persistently (north polar region) shadowed; neutron spectrometry indicates hydrogen-rich material; thermal models support the presence of water ice; and Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) reflectance measurements at 1064 nm show high and low reflectance deposits consistent in location to where models predict surface and buried water ice, respectively. Throughout 2013, MESSENGER executed a campaign dedicated to imaging the permanently shadowed crater floors of Mercury's north polar region using sunlight scattered from nearby terrain. The campaign makes use of the broadband clear filter (central wavelength 700 nm, bandwidth 600 nm) of the MDIS wide-angle camera (WAC) to target and image radar-bright areas within all host craters > 10 km in diameter under multiple lighting conditions. To date, MESSENGER has imaged the interiors of nearly 20 craters that host radar-bright deposits, including the largest such deposits near the north pole that are likely to host surface water ice. The images reveal a variety of surface morphologies, ranging from the smooth crater floor of the fresh Kandinsky crater, to the moderately cratered floor of Tolkien crater, and to the battered floor of Prokofiev crater, in which the permanently shadowed region does not differ morphologically from the rest of the crater floor. Thus, no distinct morphology is identified in association with polar deposits, and craters hosting such material span the typical range of degradation states relative to their illuminated counterparts. MDIS images also reveal albedo differences in craters with floors not fully in permanent shadow. Prokofiev provides a special environment for viewing a radar- and MLA-bright region suspected to host

  3. Theory and experiments on centrifuge cratering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, R. M.; Holsapple, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    Centrifuge experimental techniques provide possibilities for laboratory simulation of ground motion and cratering effects due to explosive loadings. The results of a similarity analysis for the thermomechanical response of a continuum show that increased gravity is a necessary condition for subscale testing when identical materials for both model and prototype are being used. The general similarity requirements for this type of subscale testing are examined both theoretically and experimentally. The similarity analysis is used to derive the necessary and sufficient requirements due to the general balance and jump equations and gives relations among all the scale factors for size, density, stress, body forces, internal energy, heat supply, heat conduction, heat of detonation, and time. Additional constraints due to specific choices of material constitutive equations are evaluated separately. The class of constitutive equations that add no further requirements is identified. For this class of materials, direct simulation of large-scale cratering events at small scale on the centrifuge is possible and independent of the actual constitutive equations. For a rate-independent soil it is shown that a small experiment at gravity g and energy E is similar to a large event at 1 G but with energy equal to g3E. Consequently, experiments at 500 G with 8 grams of explosives can be used to simulate a kiloton in the field. A series of centrifuge experiments was performed to validate the derived similarity requirements and to determine the practicality of applying the technique to dry granular soils having little or no cohesion. Ten shots using Ottawa sand at various gravities confirmed reproducibility of results in the centrifuge environment, provided information on particle size effects, and demonstrated the applicability of the derived similitude requirements. These experiments used 0.5-4 grams of pentaerythritol-tetranitrate (PETN) and 1.7 grams of lead-azide explosives. They

  4. Crater Mapping in the Pluto-Charon System: Considerations, Approach, and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, S. J.; Singer, K. N.; Bray, V. J.; Schenk, P.; Zangari, A. M.; McKinnon, W. B.; Young, L. A.; Runyon, K. D.; Beyer, R. A.; Porter, S.; Lauer, T.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Ennico Smith, K.; Stern, A.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's New Horizons mission successfully made its closest approach to Pluto on July 14, 2015, at 11:49A.M. UTC. The flyby nature of the mission, distance to the system, and multiple planetary bodies to observe with a diverse instrument set required a complex imaging campaign marked by numerous trade-offs; these lead to a more complicated crater population mapping than a basic orbital mission. The Pluto and Charon imaging campaigns were full-disk or mosaics of the full disk until ≈3.5 hrs before closest approach when the pixel scale was 0.9 km/px. After this, several LORRI-specific imaging campaigns were conducted of the partial disk and later the full crescent, while additional strips were ride-alongs with other instruments. These should supply partial coverage at up to 70-80 m/px for Pluto and 160 m/px for Charon. The LORRI coverage at ≈0.4 km/px does not cover the entire encounter hemisphere, but the MVIC instrument provided comparable full-disk coverage (0.5 km/px) and partial disk at 0.3 km/px. The best images of the non-encounter hemispheres of Pluto and Charon are ≈21 km/px (taken midnight July 10-11). As with any single flyby mission, we are constrained by the best pixel scales and incidence angles at which images were taken during the flyby. While most high-resolution imaging by quantity has been done over areas of variable solar incidence as the spacecraft passed by Pluto and Charon, these cover a relatively small fraction of the bodies and most coverage has been at near-noon sun which makes crater identification difficult. Numerous team members are independently using a variety of crater mapping tools and image products, which will be reconciled and merged to make a more robust final database. We will present our consensus crater database to-date of both plutonian and charonian impact craters as well as correlations with preliminary geologic units. We will also discuss how the crater population compares with predictions and modeled Kuiper Belt

  5. Analyses of Primary and Secondary Ion Contributions to LET Spectra for the CRaTER Instrument on LRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, J. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Golightly, M. J.; Case, A. W.; Kasper, J. C.; Mazur, J. E.; Blake, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    The Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER), an instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft, measures the energy depositions by solar and galactic cosmic radiations in its silicon detectors. These energy depositions are converted to linear energy transfer (LET) spectra, which forms the basis for the derivation of biological impact through calculation of quality factors, and dose equivalents based on observed charge distributions. In this work the Monte Carlo transport code HETC-HEDS (High Energy Transport Code - Human Exploration and Development in Space) and the NASA space radiation transport code HZETRN2010 are used to estimate LET contributions from the incident primary ions and their charged secondaries produced in nuclear collisions within the components of the CRaTER instrument. Comparisons of the calculated spectra with measurements of LET from the CRaTER instrument are made. Contributions of the primary ions and their charged secondaries to the LET are separately analyzed using the HETC-HEDS results. Energetic delta rays escaping from the instrument will lower the measured LET values below estimates using Bethe-Bloch theory. Estimates of LET contributions from primaries will be corrected for the delta ray escapes using methods developed by Badhwar (Christie et al, Nuclear Instruments and Methods A, 1987). The resulting predictions for LET spectra are compared to CRaTER observations to validate the model and for use in deriving biological impact factors.

  6. Numerical Modelling and Ejecta Distribution Analysis of a Martian Fresh Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, A.; Cremonese, G.; Cambianica, P.; Daubar, I.; McEwen, A. S.; Re, C.

    2015-12-01

    Images taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveal fresh craters on Mars that are known to be recent as they are constrained by before and after images (Daubar et al., 2013). In particular, on Nov. 19, 2013 an image acquired by HiRISE, ESP_034285_1835, observed a 25 m diameter fresh crater located at 3.7° N, 53.4° E. This impact occurred between July 2010 and May 2012, as constrained by Context camera (CTX) images. Because the terrain where the crater formed is dusty, the fresh crater appears blue in the enhanced color of the HiRISE image, due to removal of the reddish dust in that area. We analyze this crater using the iSALE shock physics code (Amsden et al., 1980, Collins et al., 2004, Ivanov et al., 1997, Melosh et al., 1992, Wünnemann et al., 2006) to model the formation of this impact structure which is ~25 m in diameter and ~ 2.5 - 3 m in depth. These values are obtained from the DTM profile we have generated. We model the Martian surface considering different target compositions as regolith and fractured basalt rock and we based our simulations on a basalt projectile with a porosity of 10% (which is derived from the average of the meteorite types proposed by Britt et al., 2002) that hits the Martian surface with a beginning velocity equal to 7 km/s (Le Feuvre & Wieczorek, 2011) and an impact angle of 90°. The projectile size is around 1 m and it is estimated from the comparison between the DTM profile and the profiles obtained by numerical modelling. The primary objective of this analysis is the detailed study of the ejecta, in fact we will track the ejecta coming from the simulation and compare them to the ejecta distribution computed on the image (the ejecta reached a distance of more than 15 km). From the matching of the simulated ejecta with their real distribution, we will be able to understand the goodness of the simulation and also put constraints on the target material.

  7. Diatremes and craters attributed to natural explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Eugene Merle

    1956-01-01

    Diatremes - volcanic pipes attributed to explosion - and craters have been studied to infer the ultimate causes and physical conditions attending natural explosive processes. Initial piercement of diatremes on the Navajo reservation, Arizona was probably along a fracture propagated by a high-pressure aqueous fluid. Gas rising at high velocity along the fracture would become converted to a gas-solid fluidized system by entrainment of wall- rock fragments. The first stages of widening of the vent are probably accomplished mainly by simple abrasion of the high-velocity fluidized system on the walls of the fracture. As the vent widens, its enlargement may be accelerated by inward spalling of the walls. The inferred mechanics of the Navajo-Hopi diatremes is used to illustrate the possibility of diatreme formation over a molten salt mass.

  8. Flyover Animation of Becquerel Crater on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] View the Movie Click on image to view the movie This simulated flyover shows rhythmic layers of sedimentary rock inside Becquerel crater on Mars. The animation uses three-dimensional modeling based on a stereo pair of images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project and built the spacecraft. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment is operated by the University of Arizona, Tucson, and the instrument was built by Ball Aerospace &