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Sample records for cherokee indians william

  1. Podophyllum peltatum and observations on the Creek and Cherokee Indians: William Bartram's preservation of Native American pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Laura E

    2009-03-01

    Historians have examined the significant contributions John and William Bartram made to 18th- and 19th-century knowledge of indigenous North American flora. However, the Bartrams' contribution to medicinal botanical knowledge, particularly William Bartram's compilation of Indians' knowledge on the preparation and use of medicinal botanicals, is not well-known. In addition, while William Bartram's contemporaries relied on his accounts of medicinal botanicals, they rarely acknowledged Bartram or Indians in their own works. Contemporaries plagiarized Bartram's writings and used his exquisite illustrations to ornament their own publications. This paper reconstructs William Bartram's careful collection and recording of medicinal botanical knowledge that became part of late 18th- and early 19th-century American pharmacology, as well as provides evidence for 54 Bartram-identified indigenous species and the pirating of William Bartram's work by contemporaries. PMID:19325943

  2. 77 FR 5265 - Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians-Cherokee Code Chapter 18B, Regulation of Alcoholic Beverages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians--Cherokee Code Chapter 18B, Regulation of... publishes the Amendment to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians--Cherokee Code Chapter 18B, Regulation of... within the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians' Reservation. This Ordinance will increase the ability of...

  3. Cherokees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnow, Pat, Ed.; Chiltoskey, Mary, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    This issue of "Now and Then" focuses on Cherokee Indians in Appalachia. It includes poetry, articles, fiction, book reviews, and photos. Articles include "The Story of My Life as Far Back as I Remember" by Aggie Ross Lossiah and edited by Joan Greene; "Goingback Chiltoskey, Master Carver," by Joan Greene; "Daughter of Tahlequah," a profile of…

  4. A Dictionary of the Cherokee Indian Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, J. T., Comp.

    This dictionary is divided into two main sections, each containing approximately 9,000 entries. In the first section, English to Cherokee, the information is organized in 3 columns. In column 1 are found English words in standard English orthography and in alphabetical order, in column 2 the romanized representation of the Cherokee translation and…

  5. 78 FR 17422 - Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; Major Disaster and Related... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (FEMA-4103-DR), dated... Band of Cherokee Indians resulting from severe storms, flooding, landslides, and mudslides during...

  6. 77 FR 47089 - Land Acquisitions; United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians of Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Land Acquisitions; United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians of Oklahoma AGENCY... trust for the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians of Oklahoma on July 30, 2012. FOR FURTHER... U.S.C. 503. The 2.03 acres are located approximately in Tahlequah, Cherokee County, Oklahoma,...

  7. 78 FR 15797 - Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Disaster #NC-00049

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... ADMINISTRATION Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Disaster NC-00049 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration... Assistance Only for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (FEMA-4103-DR), dated 03/01/2013. Incident: Severe... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Areas: Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and Associated...

  8. Cherokee Choices: a diabetes prevention program for American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachar, Jeffrey J; Lefler, Lisa J; Reed, Lori; McCoy, Tara; Bailey, Robin; Bell, Ronny

    2006-07-01

    In 1999, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provided Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health 2010 (REACH 2010) funds to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians to develop a community-based intervention to improve the health of this rural, mountainous community in North Carolina. During the first year of the Cherokee Choices program, team members conducted formative research, formed coalitions, and developed a culturally appropriate community action plan for the prevention of type 2 diabetes, particularly among children. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians has higher rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes than the U.S. and North Carolina general populations. The Cherokee Choices program includes three main components: elementary school mentoring, worksite wellness for adults, and church-based health promotion. A social marketing strategy, including television advertisements and a television documentary series, supports the three components. School policy was altered to allow Cherokee Choices to have class time and after-school time devoted to health promotion activities. School staff have shown an interest in improving their health through attendance at fitness sessions. The credibility of the program has been validated through multiple invitations to participate in school events. Participants in the worksite wellness program have met dietary and physical activity goals, had reductions in body fat, and expressed enthusiasm for the program. A subcoalition has been formed to expand the worksite wellness component and link prevention efforts to health care cost reduction. Participants in the church program have walked more than 31,600 miles collectively.

  9. Indian Education in Eastern Oklahoma. A Report of Fieldwork Among the Cherokee. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Murray L.; And Others

    A field study of Cherokee Indians in Eastern Oklahoma revealed the following information: (1) educators were ignorant of and indifferent to the language, values, and cultural traditions of the Tribal (rural) Cherokee; (2) the Tribal Cherokees were an impoverished people; (3) both adults and children were educationally disadvantaged; and (4) Tribal…

  10. Oklahoma Indians and the Cultural Deprivation of an Oklahoma Cherokee Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Lynda Dixon

    This paper summarizes the history of Oklahoma Indians, highlights the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, and relates the story of the family of one Oklahoma Cherokee woman, Lou Jane Morgan Jernigan. Oklahoma is the state with the largest population of Indians, largely due to federal policy in the 19th century, which forced Indians into Oklahoma (or…

  11. Cherokee Choices: a diabetes prevention program for American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachar, Jeffrey J; Lefler, Lisa J; Reed, Lori; McCoy, Tara; Bailey, Robin; Bell, Ronny

    2006-07-01

    In 1999, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provided Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health 2010 (REACH 2010) funds to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians to develop a community-based intervention to improve the health of this rural, mountainous community in North Carolina. During the first year of the Cherokee Choices program, team members conducted formative research, formed coalitions, and developed a culturally appropriate community action plan for the prevention of type 2 diabetes, particularly among children. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians has higher rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes than the U.S. and North Carolina general populations. The Cherokee Choices program includes three main components: elementary school mentoring, worksite wellness for adults, and church-based health promotion. A social marketing strategy, including television advertisements and a television documentary series, supports the three components. School policy was altered to allow Cherokee Choices to have class time and after-school time devoted to health promotion activities. School staff have shown an interest in improving their health through attendance at fitness sessions. The credibility of the program has been validated through multiple invitations to participate in school events. Participants in the worksite wellness program have met dietary and physical activity goals, had reductions in body fat, and expressed enthusiasm for the program. A subcoalition has been formed to expand the worksite wellness component and link prevention efforts to health care cost reduction. Participants in the church program have walked more than 31,600 miles collectively. PMID:16776864

  12. MARKET ORIENTATION AND THE MULTIFACTOR PRODUCTIVITY OF CHEROKEE INDIAN FARMERS BEFORE REMOVAL

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew T. Gregg

    2005-01-01

    The efficiency of Cherokee Indian agriculture before removal has been debated since the early nineteenth century, yet no study has employed quantitative methods to estimate the multifactor productivity of these farmers. For this investigation I employed a unique census collected in 1835 to estimate Cherokee household-level technical efficiency and scale elasticities to determine which group (classified in terms of economic and racial characteristics) within this diverse Nation achieved the hi...

  13. 78 FR 32414 - Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of.... SUMMARY: This notice amends the notice of a major disaster for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (FEMA... follows: I have determined that the damage to the lands associated with the Eastern Band of...

  14. MARKET ORIENTATION AND THE MULTIFACTOR PRODUCTIVITY OF CHEROKEE INDIAN FARMERS BEFORE REMOVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T. Gregg

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of Cherokee Indian agriculture before removal has been debated since the early nineteenth century, yet no study has employed quantitative methods to estimate the multifactor productivity of these farmers. For this investigation I employed a unique census collected in 1835 to estimate Cherokee household-level technical efficiency and scale elasticities to determine which group (classified in terms of economic and racial characteristics within this diverse Nation achieved the highest farm productivity. The analysis reveal that among non-slaveholding Cherokess—the majority of Cherokee households in the Southeast—market-oriented units that were unrelated to any particular household racial composition achieved the highest multifactor productivity.

  15. "At the Head of the Aboriginal Remnant": Cherokee Construction of a "Civilized" Indian Identity during the Lakota Crisis of 1876

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelton, Paul

    2003-01-01

    In 1876 the bilingual Cherokee diplomat and lawyer William Penn Adair expressed great pride in the level of "civilization" that his nation had achieved. Defining civilization as commercial agriculture, literacy, Christianity, and republican government, Adair believed that his society has reached a sophistication that equaled and in certain areas…

  16. Bibliography of the Cherokees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Anne K.

    An extensive bibliography of books, government publications, periodical articles, and theses published between 1832 and 1968 has been collected on all phases of Cherokee Indian life. Although the major portion of the listings are concerned with Cherokee history, the document also presents extensive sections on Cherokee foklore (folkways, arts,…

  17. The Cherokee Perspective: Written by Eastern Cherokees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Laurence, Ed.; Hornbuckle, Jim, Ed.

    Cherokee students at the Qualla Boundary started a student organization in 1973 to improve educational prospects among Native Americans attending non-Indian colleges and universities. Because cultural conflict was perceived as playing a crucial role in the failure of Cherokee students in higher education, a major objective of the group was to…

  18. Indirect Language Assessment Tool for English-Speaking Cherokee Indian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, John M.; Long, Edgarita E.

    1998-01-01

    A parent questionnaire was used to assess cognitive, linguistic, and socio-communicative skills of 48 Cherokee and 37 Caucasian children ages 3-5. Cherokee scores were significantly lower across all three areas, but differences became smaller as age increased. Lower scores may reflect cultural differences in parenting rather than a language delay…

  19. 75 FR 76483 - Land Acquisitions; Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Land Acquisitions; Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs... Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma on November 10, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director... approximately 16.61 acres of land into trust for the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma under the authority of...

  20. Indian Reservations, Published in Not Provided, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Cherokee Co..

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Indian Reservations dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of Not Provided. Data by this...

  1. Interview with Joanna Bigfeather, Cherokee, Director of the Institute of American Indian Arts Museum (IAIA), Santa Fe, NM, USA, October 28, 2000 Entretien avec Joanna Bigfeather, Cherokee, directrice, Institute of American Indian Arts Museum (IAIA), Santa Fe, NM, États-Unis

    OpenAIRE

    Gérard Selbach

    2009-01-01

    Foreword Joanna Bigfeather was appointed director of the Institute of American Indian Arts Museum, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in April 1999. A Western Cherokee brought up in New Mexico, Joanna Osburn Bigfeather graduated from IAIA in 1987 and moved to the University of California at Santa Cruz to study for a Bachelor of Fine Arts. Then she attended the State University of New York in Albany, where she obtained a Master in Fine Arts. While exhibiting extensively prints, ceramics and installatio...

  2. Cherokees and Missionaries, 1789-1839.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, William G.

    This book describes the crucial role missionaries played in the acculturation and "Americanization" of the Cherokee Indians from 1789 to 1839. The book compares the methods, successes, and failures of the Moravians, Presbyterians, Congegrationalists, Baptists, and Methodists in their attempts to Christianize the Cherokees. Each missionary society…

  3. 75 FR 51105 - Proposed Finding Against Federal Acknowledgment of the Central Band of Cherokee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Proposed Finding Against Federal Acknowledgment of the Central Band of Cherokee... group known as the ``Central Band of Cherokee'' (CBC), Petitioner 227, c/o Mr. Joe H. White, 1 Public... members are descendants of Cherokee Indians who had not given up their rights to lands in Tennessee...

  4. Cherokee and the Tourists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Now and Then, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Describes tourist season in Cherokee (North Carolina), near the Qualla Boundary (a small Cherokee reservation). Discusses the appearance and attitudes of the tourists, the endurance and salesmanship of the Cherokees, and possible means of increasing the tourist trade. (SV)

  5. The infant caring process among Cherokee mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Lee Anne

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the social process of infant care among Cherokee mothers. Nineteen informants, who had an infant less than 2 years of age, were interviewed. The data were analyzed using the technique of constant comparative analysis. A social process of Indian infant care among Cherokee mothers was identified. Eight concepts emerged from data analysis. The first and principal concept, being a Cherokee mother, describes the functions of being an Indian mother in Cherokee society. The other seven concepts describe the patterns of cultural care the mothers provided to their infants. These included accommodating everyday infant care, accommodating health perspectives, building a care-providing consortium, living spiritually, merging the infant into Indian culture, using noncoercive discipline techniques, and vigilantly watching for the natural unfolding of the infant. Trustworthiness and credibility of the generated theory were evaluated through multiple measures. PMID:15296577

  6. The Atse Kituwah Academy: An Immersion Model that Holds the Key to the Future of the Cherokee Language and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Mary Lynn; Wiethaus, Ulrike

    2009-01-01

    The Atse Kituwah Academy (New Kituwah Academy) houses the new Cherokee immersion school in Cherokee, North Carolina. Cherokee is located on the Qualla Boundary in the mountains of the western part of the state, the contemporary homeland of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI). In 2005, a comprehensive study of the health of the Cherokee…

  7. Interview with Joanna Bigfeather, Cherokee, Director of the Institute of American Indian Arts Museum (IAIA, Santa Fe, NM, USA, October 28, 2000 Entretien avec Joanna Bigfeather, Cherokee, directrice, Institute of American Indian Arts Museum (IAIA, Santa Fe, NM, États-Unis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard Selbach

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available ForewordJoanna Bigfeather was appointed director of the Institute of American Indian Arts Museum, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in April 1999. A Western Cherokee brought up in New Mexico, Joanna Osburn Bigfeather graduated from IAIA in 1987 and moved to the University of California at Santa Cruz to study for a Bachelor of Fine Arts. Then she attended the State University of New York in Albany, where she obtained a Master in Fine Arts. While exhibiting extensively prints, ceramics and installations...

  8. The Cherokee Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Tom

    1996-01-01

    Describes an adventure program operated on the Qualla Boundary Cherokee reservation that serves Cherokee youth and outside groups interested in Cherokee culture. Aspects of Cherokee culture, such as talking circles and storytelling, are incorporated into the program. A sidebar recounts the story of a bear encounter that is used to begin many…

  9. 77 FR 19315 - Final Determination Against Federal Acknowledgment of the Central Band of Cherokee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Department published a notice of the PF in the Federal Register on August 18, 2010 (75 FR 51105). Publishing... Cherokee AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of final determination. SUMMARY: Notice... petitioner known as the ``Central Band of Cherokee'' (formerly known as the ``Cherokees of Lawrence...

  10. From "Easy Phonetics" to the Syllabary: An Orthographic Division of Labor in Cherokee Language Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Margaret

    2002-01-01

    Draws upon classroom observations and interviews with the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians to describe how literacy practices in Cherokee language education perpetuate and teach local categories of knowledge, behavior, and persons. Examines the semiotic functioning of the native-developed Cherokee syllabary and its place among four Cherokee…

  11. Too Dark to Be Angels: The Class System among the Cherokees at the Female Seminary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihesuah, Devon A.

    1991-01-01

    Cherokee Female Seminary in Indian Territory provided high quality education for Cherokee girls, 1851-1909. However, the school repressed Cherokee traditions and values, glorified White ways and appearance, and fostered a social class system that paralleled tribal tensions between mixed-bloods and full-bloods and between traditionalists and…

  12. Cherokee self-reliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, John

    2002-10-01

    This qualitative study was conducted using ethnography to identify how (a) self-reliance is conceptualized by the Cherokee; (b) the adult male Cherokee perceives, achieves, and demonstrates self-reliance; and (c) nurses can incorporate the Cherokee concept of self-reliance into health care of the Cherokee. The goal of self-reliance was included in the following mission statement of the 1976 Cherokee Nation constitution: "The mission of the government of the Cherokee Nation is to promote and sustain the self-reliance of its members" (Resolution No. 28-85, 1976). The conceptualization and perspective of self-reliance by the Cherokee must be understood to assist effectively in the development and promotion of self-reliance in the Cherokee, especially the male Cherokee. The cultural domain of self-reliance that emerged from the data is a composite of three categories that include being responsible, being disciplined, and being confident. Cutting across all three categories are the two themes of being true to onself and being connected. PMID:12325243

  13. Traditional Cherokee Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Janey B.

    A collection for children and teachers of traditional Cherokee recipes emphasizes the art, rather than the science, of cooking. The hand-printed, illustrated format is designed to communicate the feeling of Cherokee history and culture and to encourage readers to collect and add family recipes. The cookbook could be used as a starting point for…

  14. Re-Imagining Community: Political Ecology and Indigenous State Formation in the Cherokee Nation

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, Clinton Roy

    2011-01-01

    Tribal environmental governance in the Cherokee Nation today is characterized by a complex interplay among community, bureaucracy, and knowledge. The Cherokee Nation is one of the largest American Indian nations by population, and possesses a tripartite government that has operated free of federal oversight since 1971. Although the government has its roots in the historic 1827 Cherokee constitution that in many ways successfully melded "traditional" forms of governance with a state structure,...

  15. Meet Laurie Hand: Cherokee Nation Child Care and Development Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exchange: The Early Childhood Leaders' Magazine Since 1978, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Cherokee Nation, along with 257 grantees, representing more than 500 Indian Tribes, Alaskan Native Villages, and Native Hawaiian Organizations, receives federal block grant funds to improve child care for Indian children. This article discusses child care, service, relationship between programs, initiative, implementation, cooperation, and setting…

  16. Cherokee Culture across the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larch, Lillie

    1993-01-01

    A teacher describes how she integrated Cherokee culture and folklore with the required curriculum at Cherokee Elementary School (Cherokee, North Carolina). Includes an annotated list of 22 Native American cultural resources and a list of 30 books and journal articles on folk games and toys and their uses in education. (LP)

  17. "Showplace of the Cherokee Nation": race and the making of a southern house museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Tiya

    2011-11-01

    This article traces the restoration history of the Chief Vann House State Historic Site, a former Cherokee plantation owned and operated by the state of Georgia. The article explores the make-up of the restoration community in the 1950s and identifies aspects of convergence and divergence among this white, elite group in terms of both their visions for the site and their notions of how best to represent Indians. It argues that restorers used the restoration process as a route for personal and community identity enhancement, identifying with the storied Cherokee Indians and claiming "Indian" characteristics and the historical experience of Indian removal for themselves. PMID:22400483

  18. 76 FR 11494 - List of Recipients of Indian Health Scholarships Under the Indian Health Scholarship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ..., Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Debolt, Nicholas D., University of Oklahoma...., Southwestern Community College, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina Sparks, Aaron D.,...

  19. Cherokee Stickball: A Changing Tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Ted

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the history of Cherokee stickball, a ball game dating back at least to the 1500s that was once used (as an alternative to war) for resolving grievances between tribes and townships. Describes traditional aspects of Cherokee stickball and notes the steady decline of the game and its traditional rules and ceremonies. (LP)

  20. Cherokee Stories of the Supernatural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scancarelli, Janine

    1996-01-01

    Stories of personal experience of supernatural events are a highly-valued form of verbal art for Cherokee speakers. Both the people who tell them and those who listen regard such stories as entertaining and instructional. These stories even reflect some of the tensions that exist between traditional Cherokee culture and modern American social…

  1. Sequoyah and the Cherokee Syllabary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Joy

    Since the early nineteenth century, scholars have marveled at the unlettered Cherokee native named Sequoyah--or Sikwaya--and also known as John Guess--or Guest or Gist--who, unassisted, developed a medium for the written expression of the Cherokee language that was uniquely appropriate to the peculiarities of the spoken language. There is much…

  2. The cultural appropriateness of the WIC Program in Cherokee, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonim, A B; Kolasa, K M; Bass, M A

    1981-08-01

    The data presented in this article illustrate the WIC program's ability to function within the Cherokee Indian culture. The respondents reported that WIC foods are accepted and widely distributed in the Cherokee WIC participant households. In addition, they stated that infant and child feeding practices are affected by the information they receive from advice givers. These factors in combination with the Cherokees' positive attitude toward the WIC program make for effective implementation of the national WIC nutrition goal: to maximize the WIC food package's effect on nutritional status considering all ethnic, cultural, and geographic preferences. PMID:7252027

  3. Ulrike Freitag: Indian Ocean, Migrants and State Formation in Hadhramaut. Reforming the Homeland. Ulrike Freitag & William Clarence-Smith : Hadhrami Traders, Scholars and Statesmen in the Indian Ocean, 1750s-1960s.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Lambert

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Ulrike Freitag Indian Ocean, Migrants and State Formation in Hadhramaut. Reforming the Homeland Leyde / Boston, Brill, 2003 Ulrike Freitag & William Clarence-Smith (directeurs Hadhrami Traders, Scholars and Statesmen in the Indian Ocean, 1750s-1960s Leyde / New-York / Cologne, Brill, 1997 Le livre Indian Ocean, Migrants and State Formation in Hadhramaut nous présente l'histoire moderne du Hadramaout, du début du xixe siècle à la fin de la période britannique (1967, en parallèle avec...

  4. Assimilationist Language in Cherokee Women's Petitions: A Political Call to Reclaim Traditional Cherokee Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Bennion, Jillian Moore

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-one years before the forced-removal of Cherokee people from their native lands east of the Mississippi, Cherokee people fought peacefully to maintain ownership of Cherokee-owned lands and attempted to preserve, at least in part, traditional Cherokee culture. Through the drafting of petitions, specifically written between 1817-19, Cherokee women pushed back against pressure to assimilate to Anglo-American culture and to cede Cherokee land to the United States Government. The five petiti...

  5. Status of Cherokee Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Being influenced: a Cherokee way of mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, John

    2005-01-01

    This article reports research findings related to how the Cherokee male achieves self-reliance and how health care professionals can facilitate and incorporate the Cherokee concept of self-reliance into heath care of the Cherokee. Self-reliance to the Cherokee has been defined as a cultural domain with a composite of the three categories: (a) being responsible, (b) being disciplined, and (c) being confident (Lowe, 2002, 2003). Two sample groups of 12 to 14 Cherokee adults were interviewed and observed. The results reveal that mentor-type relationships influenced the participants in the development of Cherokee self-reliance. PMID:16028448

  7. 77 FR 50460 - Cherokee Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ... Forest Service Cherokee Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Cherokee Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Knoxville, Tennessee. The... Coordinator, Cherokee National Forest, 423-476-9729, twmcdonald@fs.fed.us . Individuals who...

  8. Cherokee History: An Analysis of Recent Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Walter L.

    1979-01-01

    Comments on recent studies on the Cherokee Nation which emphasize the profound differences of traditional Cherokee culture from White society, the deep factionalism that has plagued the Cherokees since the emergence of a mixed-blood group, and the remarkable persistence of native values and social forms despite two centuries of acculturation. (NEC)

  9. Eastern Band of Cherokee Strategic Energy Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souther Carolina Institute of energy Studies-Robert Leitner

    2009-01-30

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians was awarded a grant under the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program (TEP) to develop a Tribal Strategic Energy Plan (SEP). The grant, awarded under the “First Steps” phase of the TEP, supported the development of a SEP that integrates with the Tribe’s plans for economic development, preservation of natural resources and the environment, and perpetuation of Tribal heritage and culture. The Tribe formed an Energy Committee consisting of members from various departments within the Tribal government. This committee, together with its consultant, the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies, performed the following activities: • Develop the Tribe’s energy goals and objectives • Establish the Tribe’s current energy usage • Identify available renewable energy and energy efficiency options • Assess the available options versus the goals and objectives • Create an action plan for the selected options

  10. Cherokee Culture and School Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Anthony D.

    1980-01-01

    Compares the effect of cooperative and competitive behaviors of Cherokee and Anglo American elementary school students on academic achievement. Suggests changes in teaching techniques and lesson organization that might raise academic achievement while taking into consideration tribal traditions that limit scholastic achievement in an…

  11. Cherokee Practice, Missionary Intentions: Literacy Learning among Early Nineteenth-Century Cherokee Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, M. Amanda

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses how archival documents reveal early nineteenth-century Cherokee purposes for English-language literacy. In spite of Euro-American efforts to depoliticize Cherokee women's roles, Cherokee female students adapted the literacy tools of an outsider patriarchal society to retain public, political power. Their writing served…

  12. "Our Beloved Cherokee": A Naturalistic Study of Cherokee Preschool Language Immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Lizette

    2007-01-01

    This article contributes to our knowledge of endangered language revitalization by offering a case study of a Cherokee Nation (CN) preschool immersion program named Tsalagi Ageyui, "Our Beloved Cherokee." A naturalistic inquiry into the micro- and macrosociocultural dimensions of reversing Cherokee language shift reveals that, of all CN language…

  13. Terminus Amnesia: Cherokee Freedmen, Citizenship, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jeremiah; Bustamante, Nicholas; Solyom, Jessica Ann; Brayboy, Bryan McKinley Jones

    2016-01-01

    In 2007, the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma amended its constitution to limit membership to only those who can trace lineal descent to an individual listed as "Cherokee by Blood" on the final Dawes Rolls. This exercise of sovereignty paradoxically ties the Dawes Rolls, the colonial instruments used to divide the lands and peoples of the…

  14. Collaborative Documentation and Revitalization of Cherokee Tone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Dylan; Berardo, Marcellino; Feeling, Durbin; Hirata-Edds, Tracy; Peter, Lizette

    2015-01-01

    Cherokee, the sole member of the southern branch of Iroquoian languages, is a severely endangered language. Unlike other members of the Iroquoian family, Cherokee has lexical tone. Community members are concerned about the potential loss of their language, and both speakers and teachers comment on the difficulty that language learners have with…

  15. Limits of Legal Action: The Cherokee Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgren, Jill L.; Shattuck, Petra T.

    1978-01-01

    The article examines the limits of legal action in light of the experience of the Cherokee Nation in the nineteenth century. Their lawsuits, the cause of national controversy and ultimately detrimental to the Cherokee, raise questions about the effectiveness of litigation in solving divisive political conflict. (Author/NQ)

  16. 2008 South Carolina Lidar: Cherokee County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The project area is composed of 16 counties in the State of South Carolina - Cherokee, Union, Laurens, Greenwood, Newberry, Chester, Fairfield, Lancaster,...

  17. Indians of North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Published by the U.S. Department of the Interior, this brief booklet on the historical development of the Cherokee Nation emphasizes the Tribe's relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and its improved economy. Citing tourism as the major tribal industry, tribal enterprises are named and described (a 61 unit motor court in existence since…

  18. Family and Nation: Cherokee Orphan Care, 1835-1903

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Julie L.

    2010-01-01

    On November 17, 1903, fifteen miles from the nearest railway station and fifty miles northwest of the capital of the Cherokee Nation in Tahlequah, a fire engulfed the Cherokee Orphan Asylum. After the fire the Cherokee Nation relocated the homeless children to the nation's Insane Asylum in Tahlequah, where Sequoyah School stands today. The…

  19. Tone and prosodic organization in Cherokee nouns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith; Haag, Marcia

    2005-04-01

    Preliminary observations in the speech of one speaker of Cherokee led us to postulate three factors affecting tone in Cherokee. (1) Tone may be lexically specified with distinctive low, low fall, low rise, and high tones. (2) There is a metrically determined high fall pattern which may be distributed over not more than 2 syllables from the right edge of a prosodic domain. (3) Intonational domains may be associated with discourse functions, marked by high fall, or by pitch range upstep. This paper tests these observations in recordings of word lists and sentences produced by five additional speakers. The analysis we give, positing both lexical tone and metrical prosodic accent, is not unique in descriptions of language, but is different from the usual description of Cherokee. [Work supported by NSF.

  20. Education "for" American Indians: Threat or Promise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tax, Sol; Thomas, Robert K

    1969-01-01

    Results of this Carnegie Corporation of New York sponsored research project in literacy training among the Cherokee Indians of Eastern Oklahoma indicate that alienation rather than lack of opportunity is the chief difficulty in American Indian education. Appears in "The Florida FL Reporter special anthology issue "Linguistic-Cultural Differences…

  1. 76 FR 54196 - Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Secure Rural Schools Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... Forest Service Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Secure Rural Schools Resource Advisory Committee..., Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest Secure Rural Schools Resource Advisory Committee will meet as indicated below. DATES: The Cherokee National Forest Secure Rural Schools Resource Advisory...

  2. Tone and Accent in Oklahoma Cherokee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchihara, Hiroto

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is a study of the tonal and accentual system of Oklahoma Cherokee, which has six possible pitch patterns occurring on a syllable: low, high, low-high, high-low, lowfall and superhigh. This study attempts to provide a comprehensive description and analyses of these patterns: their distribution, their source, the principles which…

  3. Lionel Larré, Histoire de la nation cherokee

    OpenAIRE

    Berthier-Foglar, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Histoire de la nation cherokee est un ouvrage original qui traite du peuple cherokee depuis son apparition dans le sud-est des États-Unis jusqu’à l’époque contemporaine. L’originalité de cette Histoire vient du choix des documents, en version longue, qui accompagnent chaque chapitre et qui font partie des sources sur lesquelles se base sa rédaction. On y lit la voix des explorateurs en terre cherokee, de l’administration américaine, mais aussi du peuple cherokee lui-même. C’est en effet le pr...

  4. Cultural colonizers : persistence and empire in the Indian antiremoval movement, 1815-1859

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzales, Christian Michael

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates collaboration among missionaries, evangelicals, Quakers, Cherokee, Choctaw, and Seneca that developed in opposition to Indian removal. In 1829, a vigorous national antiremoval movement arose dedicated to the prevention of Cherokee removal. Nearly a decade later, a coalition of Seneca, Quakers, and New York citizens lobbied to prevent Seneca dispossession. Anglo antiremovalists worried removal would interrupt Indian evangelism; while Natives feared forced emigration fro...

  5. Walker Calhoun: Cherokee Song and Dance Man. Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Ted

    1995-01-01

    Born in 1918, the youngest of 12 children, Walker Calhoun describes growing up on the Cherokee Reservation in North Carolina. The schools turned the Cherokee against their old ways, but Walker learned many old songs and dances from his uncle, Will West. Since retirement, Walker has taught the dances and songs to children. His material has been…

  6. Will Rogers's Radio: Race and Technology in the Cherokee Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Amy M.

    2009-01-01

    While radio personality Will Rogers's pioneering role in radio is obvious (he worked in the medium during its earliest years), its connections to Cherokee and other tribal technologies have been neglected. This failure to recognize Rogers's part in this particular strain of Cherokee history is a symptom of a larger cultural illness in the United…

  7. Rural Cherokee Children with Disabilities: Parental Stories of Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandura, Collette

    2013-01-01

    Parents of Cherokee children with disabilities encounter educational agencies from their child's birth to adulthood. Living rurally within the Cherokee Nation's jurisdictional boundaries, these indigenous families engage with a myriad of special education agencies and subsequent policies. This qualitative study explores parental…

  8. The Cherokee Syllabary: A Writing System in Its Own Right

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Informally recognized by the tribal council in 1821, the 86-character Cherokee writing system invented by Sequoyah was learned in manuscript form and became widely used by the Cherokee within the span of a few years. In 1827, Samuel Worcester standardized the arrangement of characters and print designs in ways that differed from Sequoyah's…

  9. Young People Take the Lead: Cherokee Nation's Approach to Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, McClellan; Kielsmeier, James A.

    1985-01-01

    Oklahoma's Cherokee Nation Youth Leadership Program (CNYLP) began in 1982 with the vision of drawing elements of the tribe together through an innovative youth program designed to instill self-confidence, positive regard for Cherokee identity, and a sense of community spirit through service to others. Patterned after the National Youth Leadership…

  10. Cherokee Self-Reliance and Word-Use in Stories of Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Lowe, John; Riggs, Cheryl; Henson, Jim; Liehr, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between Cherokee self-reliance and related values expressed through word-use in stories of stress written by Cherokee adolescents. The overall aim of this pilot study was to test the feasibility of using cultural appropriate measurements for a larger intervention study of substance abuse prevention in Cherokee adolescents. A sample of 50 Cherokee adolescent senior high school students completed the Cherokee Self-Reliance Questionnaire and wrote their story...

  11. 75 FR 52014 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Cherokee National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ..., Cherokee National Forest, Cleveland, TN AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is... control of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest, Cleveland, TN... with the Cherokee Tribes. The Cherokee are represented by the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Eastern...

  12. "Two People": An American Indian Narrative of Bicultural Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Michael Tlanusta

    1996-01-01

    Discusses effects of acculturation on American Indian youth in terms of bicultural competence and identity development. The narrative or life-story of a Cherokee elder who is both mainstream physician and traditional medicine man elaborates on the traditional Indian approach to "learning the Medicine," and is divided according to five stages of…

  13. American Indian Reference Works of 1986: Some of the Best.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, G. Edward

    1986-01-01

    Favorably reviews six reference works: (1) Klein's encyclopedia; (2) Ancient America atlas, Coe and colleagues; (3) Littlefield and Parins' analysis of America Indian newspaper publishing; (4) Kutsch's guide to Cherokee documents; (5) Malval's guide to Hampton Institute archives; and (6) Clements' guide to Indian folklore in nineteenth century…

  14. 77 FR 48167 - Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact; Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact; Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an approval of the gaming compact between the Eastern Band of Cherokee...

  15. Partnering in Research: A National Research Trial Exemplifying Effective Collaboration With American Indian Nations and the Indian Health Service

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Jennifer Q.; Copeland, Kenneth C; Daniel, Mary R.; Erb-Alvarez, Julie A.; Felton, Beverly A.; Khan, Sohail I.; Saunkeah, Bobby R.; Wharton, David F.; Payan, Marisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that numerous major public health problems have plagued American Indian communities for generations, American Indian participation in health research traditionally has been sporadic in many parts of the United States. In 2002, the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) and 5 Oklahoma American Indian research review boards (Oklahoma City Area Indian Health Service, Absentee Shawnee Tribe, Cherokee Nation, Chickasaw Nation, and Choctaw Nation) a...

  16. Horticulture for Secondary Level Handicapped Adolescents: The Cherokee County Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Greg H.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The Cherokee County (Alabama) horticulture training program provides 40 mildly mentally retarded adolescents with vocational training in a marketable skills. The broad spectrum of vocational skills makes horticulture ideal for the handicapped. (DB)

  17. 77 FR 2717 - Cherokee County Cogeneration Partners, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Cherokee County Cogeneration Partners, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial... notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Cherokee County Cogeneration Partners, LLC's application...

  18. On two reports associated with James Wood-Mason and Alfred William Alcock published by the Indian Museum and the Indian Marine Survey between 1890 and 1891: implications for malacostracan nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huys, Rony; Low, Martyn E Y; De Grave, Sammy; Ng, Peter K L; Clark, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    Two rare documents associated with the Indian Museum and the Indian Marine Survey for the administrative year April 1890 to March 1891 have been examined and found to have nomenclatural consequences for malacostracan crustaceans. Even though they constitute available published works according to the International Code for Zoological Nomenclature, these reports have rarely been cited. Dating these two publications is of importance as they make decapod scientific names available and, in a few instances, describe the same taxa. After searching the collections deposited in the Asian and African Room, British Library, the Administration Report of the Indian Marine for the year April 1890 to March 1891 could be dated with some degree of certainty as 25 August 1891. In contrast, dating the Indian Museum Annual Report proved more difficult because after examination of copies held by the General Library in the Natural History Museum, London, it was evident that not all of these reports were consistently published on time to meet an end of year deadline. However, the publication of volume XXII of the Indian Museum Annual Report for the year April 1890 to March 1891 appeared to be contemporary with the year printed at the bottom of the title page. As no exact date could be established with confidence, the publication date for this volume was fixed as 31 December 1891 in accordance with ICZN Art. 21.3.2. Therefore the Administration Report of the Indian Marine (published 25 August 1891) is considered to take precedence over the Indian Museum Annual Report (published 31 December 1891) and as such the names made available in the former take priority. As original copies of the Administration Report of the Indian Marine are not readily available in most libraries and few scientists have actually had access to these publications, the relevant Appendix No. XIII, in which the names of several malacostracan taxa are made available, is reproduced here. Since the appendix is not

  19. 78 FR 53494 - Dam Safety Modifications at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... Dam Safety Modifications at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams AGENCY: Tennessee... Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams. The notice of availability (NOA) of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for Dam Safety Modifications at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts...

  20. Out of the "Graves of the Polluted Debauches": The Boys of the Cherokee Male Seminary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihesuah, Devon

    1991-01-01

    Opened in 1851, the Cherokee Male Seminary was the first nonsectarian secondary school west of the Mississippi River. It fulfilled the goals of the Cherokee national council to prepare students for higher education, promote the Cherokee economy, and expose children to white values and lifestyle. (SV)

  1. 75 FR 53630 - Notice of Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Notice of Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Resource Advisory... of 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest Resource Advisory Committee will meet for the first time as indicated below. DATES: The Cherokee National Forest...

  2. 78 FR 21703 - Environmental Impact Statement: Cherokee and Forsyth Counties, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Cherokee and Forsyth Counties, Georgia... in Cherokee and Forsyth Counties, Georgia. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Chetna P. Dixon... Interstate 575 (I-575) and State Route 400 (SR 400) in Cherokee and Forsyth Counties, Georgia. Current...

  3. Learning to Read and Write Cherokee: Toward a Theory of Literacy Revitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Lizette; Hirata-Edds, Tracy

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to revitalize the Cherokee language, Cherokee Nation launched an immersion program for preschool and elementary children in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Central to the curriculum is literacy in the Cherokee writing system known as "syllabary". This study focuses on sociocultural and sociolinguistic evidence toward an understanding of the…

  4. 78 FR 38311 - Broad River Electric Cooperative and Cherokee Falls Associates; Aquenergy Systems, Inc.; Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Broad River Electric Cooperative and Cherokee Falls Associates; Aquenergy... Intervene On June 18, 2013, Broad River Electric Cooperative and Cherokee Falls Associates (transferors) and Aquenergy Systems, Inc. (transferee) filed an application for transfer of license for the Cherokee...

  5. The Write Way. Book I. The Simple Sentence. Writing and Grammar Instruction for Indian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, Tahlequah.

    This workbook is designed to teach American Indian adults how to write grammatically correct sentences by using mathematical-type formulae for writing and by recognizing the strong visual learning style exhibited by American Indians. It is particularly designed for Cherokee adult basic education students, incorporating their experiences, culture,…

  6. Indian Stress and Violence: A Psycho-Cultural Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Laurence; Hornbuckle, Jim

    1979-01-01

    Discusses high rate of violence and health problems within Cherokee culture. Alcohol plays a major role in Indian health and social problems. As a response to prevalence of alcohol-related problems, a cultural therapy program was developed. Reinforcement of cultural pride was a primary step in solving problems. (CC)

  7. 75 FR 37292 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cherokee, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... Cherokee County Regional Airport (75 FR 17637) Docket No. FAA-2010-0085. Interested parties were invited to...'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant... read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E. O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR,...

  8. State Secret: North Carolina and the Cherokee Trail of Tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, James

    2008-01-01

    This paper is an analytic essay that examines the treatment of the Cherokee Trail of Tears in a North Carolina fourth grade textbook. I begin by offering a satiric look at an imaginary textbook's treatment of the Holocaust that is based closely on the actual narrative of the Trail of Tears written in the fourth grade text. Following this, close…

  9. 78 FR 31397 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Cherokee, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to establish controlled airspace at Cherokee, WY (78 FR 14032). Interested...'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant.... 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in...

  10. "Ayeli": Centering Technique Based on Cherokee Spiritual Traditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Michael Tlanusta; Garrett, J. T.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a centering technique called "Ayeli," based on Cherokee spiritual traditions as a way of incorporating spirituality into counseling by helping clients identify where they are in their journey, where they want to be, and how they can get there. Relevant Native cultural traditions and meanings are explored. (Contains 25 references.) (GCP)

  11. William Carlos Williams, Literacy, and the Imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemak, Francis E.

    1987-01-01

    Argues that the cultivation of the imagination in schools and colleges is largely ignored because of utilitarian biases in the education system, where achievement is determined by quantitative measures of cognitive skills. Discusses Williams' view that acts of the imagination transform reality and applies view to English education. (JG)

  12. Cherokee self-reliance and word-use in stories of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, John; Riggs, Cheryl; Henson, Jim; Elder, Tribal; Liehr, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between Cherokee self-reliance and related values expressed through word-use in stories of stress written by Cherokee adolescents. The overall aim of this pilot study was to test the feasibility of using cultural appropriate measurements for a larger intervention study of substance abuse prevention in Cherokee adolescents. A sample of 50 Cherokee adolescent senior high school students completed the Cherokee Self-Reliance Questionnaire and wrote their story of stress. The Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) program, a word-based computerized text analysis software, was used to report the percentage of words used in the selected word categories in relation to all the words used by a participant. Word-use from the stories of stress were found to correlate with Cherokee self-reliance. PMID:20669397

  13. William Harvey's epitaph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutton, Vivian

    2003-05-01

    This paper gives the first published English translation of William Harvey's epitaph. The translation is based on a re-examination of the stone itself, and is accompanied by an explanatory commentary.

  14. Mössbauer studies of prehistoric Cherokee pottery sherds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, K. M.; McKenzie, K. P.

    1994-12-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy is a very useful tool in the examination and characterization of ancient pottery sherds. In this study, Mössbauer spectra for sherds and clay from the Warren Wilson Site, a prehistoric Native American (Cherokee) settlement in western North Carolina, were measured. Data from one sherd and samples from two clay beds indicate that the sherd was not made from local clays and was originally fired to 350 ‡C.

  15. 76 FR 34799 - Permanent Dam Safety Modification at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams, TN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... Permanent Dam Safety Modification at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams, TN AGENCY... various alternatives for permanent modifications to the existing dam facilities at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun... embankments at four (Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar) dams. These measures included raising...

  16. The Dog's Children: Anishinaabe Texts Told by Angeline Williams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Leonard, Ed.; Nichols, John D., Ed.

    In 1941, Angeline Williams, an Anishinaabe elder taught the Ojibwa (Chippewa) language to a class at the Linguistic Institute at the University of North Carolina. Ojibwa is an American Indian language which was spoken as a chain of dialects in numerous communities from Quebec across the Great Lakes and into the plains of Saskatchewan. This text…

  17. Meeting the Needs of Underserved Populations: Vocational Rehabilitation and the Cherokee Nation 130 Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faubion, Clayton W; Calico, Jorja; Roessler, Richard T.

    1998-01-01

    Based on findings derived from ethnographic interviews with the staff of the 130 Project sponsored by the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, clusters factors affecting the project into administrative considerations and concerns and counselor attitudes and behaviors. Provides recommendations for operating 130 Projects and serving Cherokee Nation members…

  18. 76 FR 8333 - Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of public meeting, Cherokee National Forest Resource... Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,...

  19. A Manual of Cherokee Herbal Remedies: History, Information, Identification, Medicinal Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Patricia D.

    This thesis reports on the research of 25 plants, used as herbal remedies since the 1800s by the author's Native American ancestors (the Day family) and the Cherokee tribe. The plants were identified in four state parks in southwestern Indiana. Information sources included the research literature, articles on Cherokee herbal remedies, and…

  20. Wilma Mankiller, Chief of the Cherokee Nation. The Library of Famous Women. First Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Bruce

    Interspersed with the story of Wilma Mankiller's life is a brief history of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma and comments on unrealistic and negative stereotypes of Native Americans. In addition to recounting her life and achievements leading up to becoming the first woman chief of the Cherokee Nation, the book explores Wilma Mankiller's philosophy…

  1. New Angles of Vision on the Cherokee Ghost Dance Movement of 1811-1812.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, William G.

    1979-01-01

    Assembles all primary accounts of Cherokee Ghost Dance Movement and reassesses them in the light of recent studies, particularly those by A.F.C. Wallace, Peter Worsley, and Kenelm Burridge. Evidence casts doubts on claim of a direct link between the Cherokee movement and the ghost dance religion among the Creek. (NEC)

  2. From Blood Freud to Jury System: The Metamorphosis of Cherokee Law from 1750 to 1840.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Michelle

    1987-01-01

    Examines the Cherokees' deliberate adoption of the laws of the white man, focusing on the blood feud--a retaliation system designed to deal with homicide. Discusses cultural bases of Cherokee law and factors influencing the change to a jury system and noted key events of the adoption period (1797 to 1840). (JHZ)

  3. Indian Policy of John Adams Administration: Treaties with the Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelin Timur V.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author examines the treaties that were concluded with the Native Americans in the period of John Adams presidency. Treaties with the Natives can be a good source for the study of the US Indian policy. They help to understand the character of Indian-white relations, the attitudes of Federal authorities towards certain Indian nation, the actual problems of the Frontier and so on. Unfortunately the policy of the second President of the USA toward the Native Americans is investigated not so good as the policy of other Presidents of Early American Republic. The study of the treaties helps to know more about John Adams Indian policy. In the years of his presidency only few agreements were signed with the Native American tribes. These were the Mohawk, the Seneca, the Oneida of the Iroquois Nation and the Cherokee. The procedure of Indian-white agreements was well developed until 1797 year. And John Adams administration did not explore something new in this question. The second President of the United States adopted the George Washington’s principals of dealing with the Natives. But in fact he had to consider the internal and external situation in the country. The treaties with the Indians, concluded by the administration of John Adams did not become a bright episode of American history. However they helped to reduce tensions in US-Indian relations.

  4. Appreciating William Wordsworth's poem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晨; 袁鸿燕

    2007-01-01

    Through a brief introduction to the basic principles of Romanticism and in-depth analysis of Wordsworth' s representative work "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" in terms of writing style, the object of this poem, language features as well as the theme behind it, this paper seeks to identify the fundamental characteristics of William Wordsworth's Romantic writing.

  5. David Owen WILLIAMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Lidy Williams-Oonk and her children Mark & Marietta, being unable to thank everybody individually, would like to express their sincere thanks to friends and colleagues at CERN and abroad for their great help and support, their messages and flowers, as well as their donations to the Ligue Genevoise contre le Cancer, on the death of their beloved husband and father.

  6. Study of the Cherokee Nuclear Station: projected impacts, monitoring plan, and mitigation options for Cherokee County, South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peelle, E.; Schweitzer, M.; Scharre, P.; Pressman, B.

    1979-07-01

    This report inventories Cherokee County's capabilities and CNS project characteristics, projects expected impacts from the interaction of the two defines four options for Cherokee County decision makers, and presents a range of possible mitigation and monitoring plans for dealing with the problems identified. The four options and general implementation guidelines for each are presented after reviewing pertinent features of other mitigation and monitoring plans. The four options include (1) no action, (2) preventing impacts by preventing growth, (3) selective growth in designated areas as services can be supplied, and (4) maximum growth designed to attract as many in-movers as possible through a major program of capital investiments in public and private services. With the exception of the no action option, all plans deal with impacts according to some strategy determined by how the County wishes to manage growth. Solutions for impact problems depend on which growth strategy is selected and what additional resources are secured during the impact period. A monitoring program deals with the problems of data and projections uncertainty, while direct action is proposed to deal with the institutional problems of delay of the needed access road, timeing and location problems from the tax base mismatch, and lack of local planning capability.

  7. Study of the Cherokee Nuclear Station: projected impacts, monitoring plan, and mitigation options for Cherokee County, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report inventories Cherokee County's capabilities and CNS project characteristics, projects expected impacts from the interaction of the two defines four options for Cherokee County decision makers, and presents a range of possible mitigation and monitoring plans for dealing with the problems identified. The four options and general implementation guidelines for each are presented after reviewing pertinent features of other mitigation and monitoring plans. The four options include (1) no action, (2) preventing impacts by preventing growth, (3) selective growth in designated areas as services can be supplied, and (4) maximum growth designed to attract as many in-movers as possible through a major program of capital investiments in public and private services. With the exception of the no action option, all plans deal with impacts according to some strategy determined by how the County wishes to manage growth. Solutions for impact problems depend on which growth strategy is selected and what additional resources are secured during the impact period. A monitoring program deals with the problems of data and projections uncertainty, while direct action is proposed to deal with the institutional problems of delay of the needed access road, timeing and location problems from the tax base mismatch, and lack of local planning capability

  8. 2008 South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) South Carolina Lidar - Cherokee County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The project area is composed of 16 counties in the State of South Carolina - Cherokee, Union, Laurens, Greenwood, Newberry, Chester, Fairfield, Lancaster,...

  9. Sir William Hingston

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Jack

    1996-01-01

    Sir William Hingston was one of Canada’s most illustrious surgeons in the second half of the 19th century. Not only was he a very innovative surgeon but he was an excellent teacher and wrote many medical articles during a career that spanned over 50 years. Active as he was medically, he found time to serve a term as mayor of Montreal and was on the board of directors of various banks and companies. As recognition of his many talents, he was knighted by Queen Victoria in 1895. He died in 1907 ...

  10. Walter C. Williams

    Science.gov (United States)

    1949-01-01

    Walter C. Williams arrived from the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, Hampton, Virginia, on September 30, 1946, at the Muroc Army Air Field. He had been named the engineer-in-charge of the small group of five that came with him to the Rogers Dry Lakebed to take part in research flights of a joint NACA-Army Air Forces program involving the rocket-powered Bell XS-1. This established the first permanent National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics presence at the Mojave Desert site in California. This small group grew in numbers to 27 and received permanent status as the NACA Muroc Flight Test Unit from Hugh L. Dryden, NACA's Director of Research, on September 27, 1947. Walt was named Head of the Unit. On November 14, 1949, the Unit along with the 100 employees became the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station with Walt Williams as Chief. Next came the move from the South Base site to the new headquarters, Bldg. 4800 on the north-west shore of the Rogers Dry lakebed on the Edwards Air Force Base complex. July 1, 1954 saw another name change to the NACA High-Speed Flight Station with Walt remaining the Chief to a complement of about 225 employees. Williams had received a Bachelor of Science Degree in aeronautical engineering from Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in 1939. After graduation, he was employed by the Glenn L. Martin Company of Baltimore, Maryland, and later that same year joined the staff of the NACA Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, where he worked as an engineer in the Flight Division. During the period from September 1946 to July 1954 Williams supervised the activities of several research projects. These included the first successful rocket-powered flight of the XS-1 made by Bell pilot Chalmers Goodlin on December 9, 1946; the record breaking flight of A.F. Captain Chuck Yeager on October 14, 1947, that exceeded the speed of sound; and the first flight of the jet

  11. Culture, History, and Development on the Qualla Boundary: The Eastern Cherokees and the Blue Ridge Parkway, 1935-40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Anne V.

    1997-01-01

    Examines Eastern Cherokee opposition to the construction of the Blue Ridge Parkway through the Qualla Boundary reservation in the late 1930s. Highlights the role of two teachers in the internal tribal debates over tradition, modernization, and the marketing of Cherokee culture to tourists. Contains many references in notes. (SV)

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do well on tasks that involve spoken language, music, and learning by repetition (rote memorization). Affected individuals ... visual-spatial tasks, unique behavioral characteristics, and other cognitive difficulties seen in people with Williams syndrome . Loss ...

  13. [William Harvey revisited ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Hubert

    2015-07-01

    William Harvey's discovery of the circulation of the blood is often described as a product of the Scientific Revolution of the Seventeenth Century. Modern research has, however, shown thatHarvey followed the Aristotelian research tradition and thus tried to reveal the purpose of the organs through examination of various animals. His publication of 1628 has to be read as an argument of natural philosophy, or, more precisely, as a series of linked observations, experiments and philosophical reasonings from which the existence of circulation has to be deduced as a logical consequence. Harvey did not consider experiments as superior to philosophical reasoning nor intended he to create a new system of medicine. He believed in the vitality of the heart and the blood and rejected Francis Bacon's empirism and the mechanistic rationalism of Descartes. Harvey's contribution and originality lied less in his single observations and experiments but in the manner how he linked them with critical reasoning and how he accepted, presented and defended the ensuing radical findings.

  14. [William Harvey revisited ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Hubert

    2015-07-01

    William Harvey's discovery of the circulation of the blood is often described as a product of the Scientific Revolution of the Seventeenth Century. Modern research has, however, shown thatHarvey followed the Aristotelian research tradition and thus tried to reveal the purpose of the organs through examination of various animals. His publication of 1628 has to be read as an argument of natural philosophy, or, more precisely, as a series of linked observations, experiments and philosophical reasonings from which the existence of circulation has to be deduced as a logical consequence. Harvey did not consider experiments as superior to philosophical reasoning nor intended he to create a new system of medicine. He believed in the vitality of the heart and the blood and rejected Francis Bacon's empirism and the mechanistic rationalism of Descartes. Harvey's contribution and originality lied less in his single observations and experiments but in the manner how he linked them with critical reasoning and how he accepted, presented and defended the ensuing radical findings. PMID:26111837

  15. Fall may be imminent for Kansas Cherokee basin coalbed gas output

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Newell K.

    2010-01-01

    Natural gas production in the Kansas portion of the Cherokee basin, Southeastern Kansas, for 2008 was 49.1 bcf. The great majority of Cherokee basin gas production is now coal-bed methane (CBM). The major producers are Quest Energy LLC, Dart Cherokee Basin Operating Co. LLC, and Layne Energy Operating LLC. Most CBM in Southeastern Kansas is from Middle and Upper Pennsylvanian high-volatile B and A rank bituminous coals at 800 to 1,200 ft depth. Rates of decline for the CBM wells generally decrease the longer a well produces. A gentler collective decline of 13.8% is calculated by averaging the number of new producing wells in a given year with that of the previous year. By the calculations using the gentler overall 13.8% decline rate, if more than 918 successful CBM wells are drilled in 2009, then gas production will increase from 2008 to 2009.

  16. Identification and Clinical Management of Persons with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection - Cherokee Nation, 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera, Jorge; Vellozzi, Claudia; Hariri, Susan; Carabin, Hélène; Drevets, Douglas A; Miller, Anna; Reilley, Brigg; Essex, Whitney; Gahn, David; Lyons, Lisa; Leston, Jessica; Ward, John W

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 3.5 million persons in the United States are living with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, resulting in approximately 20,000 deaths each year, primarily from cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (1,2). American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations have the highest incidence of acute HCV infection among all U.S. racial/ethnic groups and are at greater risk for HCV-related mortality compared with the general population (3). In 2013, new antiviral drugs became available that make possible 8-12 week treatment regimens with fewer adverse events and are able to achieve sustained virologic response (SVR) in >90% of treated patients (4), equivalent to a cure of HCV infection. Also of note, HCV testing recommendations were expanded in 2012 by CDC and in 2013 by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force to include one-time testing of persons born during 1945-1965 (the "baby boomer" cohort) in addition to anyone at increased risk for HCV infection (5,6). Given the availability of new HCV drugs, expanded testing recommendations, and high incidence of HCV infection in AI/AN populations, in October 2012, Cherokee Nation Health Services (CNHS) implemented a tribal HCV testing policy.* As part of the policy, CNHS added a reminder in the electronic health record (EHR) for clinical decision support and provided HCV education to primary care clinicians. From October 2012 to July 2015, among 92,012 persons with at least one CNHS clinic encounter, the cumulative number who received HCV screening for the first time increased from 3,337 (3.6%) to 16,772 (18.2%). The largest percentage of HCV screening was among persons born during 1945-1965. Of 715 persons who tested positive for HCV antibodies, 488 (68.3%) were tested for HCV RNA; among those 488 persons, 388 (79.5%) were RNA positive and were thus confirmed to have chronic HCV infection. Treatment was initiated for 223 (57.5%) of the 388 with chronic infection; 201 (90.1%) completed treatment, of whom 180 (89

  17. 75 FR 17637 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cherokee, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ...; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February.... 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 2. The... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cherokee, IA...

  18. 78 FR 9410 - Ozark Plateau National Wildlife Refuge; Adair, Cherokee, Craig, Delaware, Mayes, Ottawa, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... this process through a notice in the Federal Register on June 19, 1998 (63 FR 33693). The Refuge... the Federal Register on June 19, 1998 (63 FR 33693). The Refuge solicited public comments on issues... Fish and Wildlife Service Ozark Plateau National Wildlife Refuge; Adair, Cherokee, Craig,...

  19. Manifest Destiny and Competing Voices on the Eve of the Cherokee Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Prentice T.

    2011-01-01

    Manifest Destiny, the idea that Providence guided the conquest and settlement of North America, is one of the most contested ideas in American culture and history. One's opinion about this central aspect of American mythology depends heavily on one's point of view. Exploring westward expansion and the Cherokee Trail of Tears with primary sources…

  20. 78 FR 14032 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Cherokee, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does.... 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in 14... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Cherokee,...

  1. Cherokee Adaptation to the Landscape of the West and Overcoming the Loss of Culturally Significant Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, R. Alfred

    2011-01-01

    Plant species utilized by Cherokees have been documented by several authors. However, many of the traditional uses of plants were lost or forgotten in the generations following the Trail of Tears. The pressures of overcoming the physical and psychological impact of the removal, adapting to a new landscape, rebuilding a government, rebuilding…

  2. Devils in Disguise: The Carnegie Project, the Cherokee Nation, and the 1960s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Daniel M.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the experiences of many of the people involved in the Carnegie Project, an effort in the 1960s to establish ties with the "tribal community"--people who spoke Cherokee as their first language and lived in small kin-related settlements spread across five counties in northeastern Oklahoma--and directly involve…

  3. Assessing the Impact of Total Immersion on Cherokee Language Revitalization: A Culturally Responsive, Participatory Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Lizette

    This paper illustrates how the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma is exploring a new paradigm of evaluation that is responsive to the claims, concerns, and issues of stakeholders involved. Known as culturally responsive evaluation, this alternative conceived by the Initiative for Culturally Responsive Evaluation (ICRE) is considered more appropriate than…

  4. Medicine for the Rosebuds: Health Care at the Cherokee Female Seminary, 1876-1909.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Devon Irene

    1988-01-01

    Traces the history of medical care at a residential school for Cherokee girls in the late nineteenth century. Describes the unsanitary conditions of the buildings and efforts by medical superintendents to improve them, prevalent diseases and their treatments, nutrition, and emphasis on physical fitness. Contains 58 references. (SV)

  5. Those First Good Years of Indian Education: 1894-1898.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewes, Dorothy W.

    1981-01-01

    As Superintendent of Indian Schools from 1894 through 1897, William Hailmann incorporated into the curriculum his "New Education," a system based on the philosophy of Friedrich Froebel and similar to modern "open education" and to some current model programs in Indian education. (CM)

  6. Shayla: A Portrait of the Schooling Experiences of an Eastern Band of Cherokee Indian Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Carrie; McLendon, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Native youth have complex schooling experiences. To better understand Indigenous youths' experience in public schools and in order to inform schooling practices and teacher preparation for both Native and non-Native teachers we share this portrait of Shayla. Through this research, particularly in the use of portraiture to document…

  7. Cherokee Nation Enterprises Wind Energy Feasibility Study Final Report to U.S. DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carol E. Wyatt

    2006-04-30

    CNE has conducted a feasibility study on the Chilocco property in north-central Oklahoma since the grant award on July 20, 2003. This study has concluded that there is sufficient wind for a wind farm and that with the Production Tax Credits and Green Tags, there will be sufficient energy to, not only cover the costs of the Nation’s energy needs, but to provide a profit. CNE has developed a wind energy team and is working independently and with industry partners to bring its renewable energy resources to the marketplace. We are continuing with the next phase in conducting avian, cultural and transmission studies, as well as continuing to measure the wind with the SoDAR unit. Cherokee Nation Enterprises, Inc. is a wholly-owned corporation under Cherokee Nation and has managed the Department of Energy grant award since July 20, 2003. In summary, we have determined there is sufficient wind for a wind farm at the Chilocco property where Cherokee Nation owns approximately 4,275 acres. The primary goal would be more of a savings in light of the electricity used by Cherokee Nation and its entities which totals an estimated eight million dollars per year. Cherokee Nation Enterprises (CNE), working independently and with industry partners, plans to bring its renewable energy resources into the marketplace through a well-documented understanding of our undeveloped resource. Our plan is to cultivate this resource in a way that will ensure the development and use for our energy will be in an environmentally and culturally acceptable form.

  8. William Harvey, an Aristotelian anatomist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fara, Patricia

    2007-06-01

    William Harvey has long been celebrated as the founding father of physiology for refuting Galen and demonstrating that blood circulates round the body. Yet after his training at Padua, he became a committed Aristotelian: although strongly influencing the new observational sciences of the seventeenth century, Harvey himself looked back towards the classical past.

  9. Spotlight on William D. Revelli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Reports on an interview with William D. Revelli on the occasion of his inclusion in the Music Educators Hall of Fame. Reviews the history of music education and discusses future issues and trends in the field. Argues for more cooperation among public school music education programs, community music efforts, and college-level music education. (CFR)

  10. Partnering in research: a national research trial exemplifying effective collaboration with American Indian Nations and the Indian Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Jennifer Q; Copeland, Kenneth C; Daniel, Mary R; Erb-Alvarez, Julie A; Felton, Beverly A; Khan, Sohail I; Saunkeah, Bobby R; Wharton, David F; Payan, Marisa L

    2014-12-15

    Despite the fact that numerous major public health problems have plagued American Indian communities for generations, American Indian participation in health research traditionally has been sporadic in many parts of the United States. In 2002, the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) and 5 Oklahoma American Indian research review boards (Oklahoma City Area Indian Health Service, Absentee Shawnee Tribe, Cherokee Nation, Chickasaw Nation, and Choctaw Nation) agreed to participate collectively in a national research trial, the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescence and Youth (TODAY) Study. During that process, numerous lessons were learned and processes developed that strengthened the partnerships and facilitated the research. Formal Memoranda of Agreement addressed issues related to community collaboration, venue, tribal authority, preferential hiring of American Indians, and indemnification. The agreements aided in uniting sovereign nations, the Indian Health Service, academics, and public health officials to conduct responsible and ethical research. For more than 10 years, this unique partnership has functioned effectively in recruiting and retaining American Indian participants, respecting cultural differences, and maintaining tribal autonomy through prereview of all study publications and local institutional review board review of all processes. The lessons learned may be of value to investigators conducting future research with American Indian communities.

  11. Partnering in Research: A National Research Trial Exemplifying Effective Collaboration With American Indian Nations and the Indian Health Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Jennifer Q.; Copeland, Kenneth C.; Daniel, Mary R.; Erb-Alvarez, Julie A.; Felton, Beverly A.; Khan, Sohail I.; Saunkeah, Bobby R.; Wharton, David F.; Payan, Marisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that numerous major public health problems have plagued American Indian communities for generations, American Indian participation in health research traditionally has been sporadic in many parts of the United States. In 2002, the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) and 5 Oklahoma American Indian research review boards (Oklahoma City Area Indian Health Service, Absentee Shawnee Tribe, Cherokee Nation, Chickasaw Nation, and Choctaw Nation) agreed to participate collectively in a national research trial, the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescence and Youth (TODAY) Study. During that process, numerous lessons were learned and processes developed that strengthened the partnerships and facilitated the research. Formal Memoranda of Agreement addressed issues related to community collaboration, venue, tribal authority, preferential hiring of American Indians, and indemnification. The agreements aided in uniting sovereign nations, the Indian Health Service, academics, and public health officials to conduct responsible and ethical research. For more than 10 years, this unique partnership has functioned effectively in recruiting and retaining American Indian participants, respecting cultural differences, and maintaining tribal autonomy through prereview of all study publications and local institutional review board review of all processes. The lessons learned may be of value to investigators conducting future research with American Indian communities. PMID:25389367

  12. William Playfair (1759-1823)

    OpenAIRE

    Costigan-Eaves, Patricia; Macdonald-Ross, Michael

    1990-01-01

    William Playfair is a key figure in the history of quantitative graphics. He was a popularizer and propagandist, a prolific designer of charts, and a developer of economic and business graphics. He established the line graph (especially the simple surface chart) as an important alternative to the table for the nonspecialist reader. Although his charts were not quite so original as some have supposed, they do contain graphic design ideas of great interest and occasional brilliance. His Commerc...

  13. Quantum MacWilliams Identities

    OpenAIRE

    Shor, Peter; Laflamme, Raymond

    1996-01-01

    We derive a relationship between two different notions of fidelity (entanglement fidelity and average fidelity) for a completely depolarizing quantum channel. This relationship gives rise to a quantum analog of the MacWilliams identities in classical coding theory. These identities relate the weight enumerator of a code to the one of its dual and, with linear programming techniques, provided a powerful tool to investigate the possible existence of codes. The same techniques can be adapted to ...

  14. Feminist Motifs in William Faulkner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhen

    2015-01-01

    As we all know, William Faulkner shows really concern for the Southern people, especially the Southern women who suffer the most. In Faulkner’s works women characters play an important role, which is confirmed. After the theories of feminist literary come to understand Faulkner criticism, critics to Faulkner’s novels drafting an encouraging response detect the author himself either as a pro-feminist or a misogynist. On analyzing the woman characters through Addie and Lena Grove—the wom⁃en images in As I Lay Dying and Light in August, we found out that Faulkner is neither simple a pro-feminist nor a misogynist in the patriarchal society.

  15. William Harvey, Aristotle and Astrology

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I argue that William Harvey believed in a form of astrology. It has long been known that Harvey employed a macrocosm–microcosm analogy and used alchemical terminology in describing how the two types of blood change into one another. This paper then seeks to examine a further aspect of Harvey in relation to the magical tradition. There is an important corollary to this line of thought, however. This is that while Harvey does have a belief in astrology, it is strongly related to A...

  16. William Wordsworth and The Daffodils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林雅琴

    2014-01-01

    William Wordsworth is best known for his poem, The Daffodils. This paper traces the origin of daffodils in Greek my-thology, the four important facts in Wordsworth’s life and the poetic theories implied in his poem The Daffodils. The most im-portant part shall be the appreciation and analysis of the poem. During this course, readers may find it difficult to understand Wordsworth’s poetic theories of Romanticism. However this is made easier by asking and answering questions and by comparing Chinese and English Romantic poems.

  17. Tidens Rytmik. Dante Alighieri, William Carlos Williams' Prosodi og Michel Serres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stougaard-Nielsen, Jakob

    2006-01-01

      Artiklen diskuterer William Carlos Williams' poetik og hans lyriske eksperimenter i tilknytning til begreberne 'den variable fod' og 'det triadiske vers'. Den argumenterer for, at Williams' poetik kan opfattes både som et forsøg på at vitalisere et typografisk styret poetisk  sprog og som del a...

  18. Coeliac disease in Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, A.; Tiberio, G.; Castro, M.; Virgilii, F.; Colistro, F.; Ferretti, F.; Digilio, M. C.; Gambarara, M.; Dallapiccola, B.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Coeliac disease (CD) has been reported in several patients affected by chromosomal disorders, including Down syndrome (DS) and Turner syndrome (TS). CD has also been found in sporadic Williams syndrome (WS) patients. In this study, CD was evaluated in a consecutive series of patients with WS, in order to estimate if the prevalence of CD in WS patients is higher than in the general population.
METHODS AND RESULTS—A consecutive series of 63 Italian patients with WS was studied by analysing the dosage of antigliadin antibodies (AGA) IgA and antiendomisium antibodies (AEA). In patients with positive AGA and AEA, small bowel biopsy was performed. The prevalence of CD in our WS population was compared with that estimated in a published series of 17 201 Italian students. Seven WS patients were found to be positive for AGA IgA and AEA. Six of them underwent small bowel biopsy, which invariably disclosed villous atrophy consistent with CD. The prevalence of CD in the present series of WS patients was 9.5% (6/63), compared to 0.54% (1/184) in the Italian students (p<0.001).
CONCLUSION—The present results suggest that the prevalence of CD in WS is higher than in the general population and is comparable to that reported in DS and TS. AGA and AEA screening is recommended in patients with WS.


Keywords: Williams syndrome; coeliac disease PMID:11694549

  19. Language and Communicative Development in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervis, Carolyn B.; Becerra, Angela M.

    2007-01-01

    Williams syndrome, a genetic disorder caused by a microdeletion of approximately 25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23, is associated with mild to moderate intellectual disability or learning difficulties. Most individuals with Williams syndrome evidence a cognitive profile including relative strengths in verbal short-term memory and language, and…

  20. Europe's Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feest, Christian F.

    1990-01-01

    American Indians are regularly cited as models by and for Europeans. On closer examination, these "Indians" turn out to be a fictional assemblage fabricated over the past five centuries to serve specific cultural and emotional needs of its inventors. Studies changing representations of the Indian as used by European cultures. (AF)

  1. Prevention trial in the Cherokee Nation: design of a randomized community trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komro, Kelli A; Wagenaar, Alexander C; Boyd, Misty; Boyd, B J; Kominsky, Terrence; Pettigrew, Dallas; Tobler, Amy L; Lynne-Landsman, Sarah D; Livingston, Melvin D; Livingston, Bethany; Molina, Mildred M Maldonado

    2015-02-01

    Despite advances in prevention science and practice in recent decades, the U.S. continues to struggle with significant alcohol-related risks and consequences among youth, especially among vulnerable rural and Native American youth. The Prevention Trial in the Cherokee Nation is a partnership between prevention scientists and Cherokee Nation Behavioral Health to create, implement, and evaluate a new, integrated community-level intervention designed to prevent underage drinking and associated negative consequences among Native American and other youth living in rural high-risk underserved communities. The intervention builds directly on results of multiple previous trials of two conceptually distinct approaches. The first is an updated version of CMCA, an established community environmental change intervention, and the second is CONNECT, our newly developed population-wide intervention based on screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) research. CMCA direct-action community organizing is used to engage local citizens to address community norms and practices related to alcohol use and commercial and social access to alcohol among adolescents. The new CONNECT intervention expands traditional SBIRT to be implemented universally within schools. Six key research design elements optimize causal inference and experimental evaluation of intervention effects, including a controlled interrupted time-series design, purposive selection of towns, random assignment to study condition, nested cohorts as well as repeated cross-sectional observations, a factorial design crossing two conceptually distinct interventions, and multiple comparison groups. The purpose of this paper is to describe the strong partnership between prevention scientists and behavioral health leaders within the Cherokee Nation, and the intervention and research design of this new community trial. PMID:24615546

  2. Approaching to Grand Cherokee%走近大切诺基

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘大鹏

    2001-01-01

    @@ 戴姆勒-克莱斯勒吉普车系列(JEEP)中的顶级产品--大切诺基(GRAND CHEROKEE),在2001年1月份正式登陆中国市场,并率先在北京、成都、广州三地批量销售.北京吉普汽车有限公司将在今年7月份自行生产这一新车型.

  3. Characterization of the metabolic syndrome by apolipoproteins in the Oklahoma Cherokee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaupovic, Petar; Blackett, Piers; Wang, Wenyu; Lee, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    Native Americans are susceptible to type 2 diabetes and associated cardiovascular risk that precedes the diabetes. Nondiabetic Cherokee adolescents and young adults were studied for association of apolipoproteins A-I, B, and C-III with the metabolic syndrome, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and body mass index. Apolipoproteins, lipids, selected ratios, and HOMA-IR changed adversely according to the number of metabolic syndrome criteria present (PCherokee have a high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, which is associated with atherosclerotic lipoprotein particles containing apolipoprotein C-III and B. PMID:19040586

  4. Case report: Williams-Campbell syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Williams-Campbell syndrome is a rare type of bronchiectasis that is due to deficiency or absence of cartilage in the fourth- to sixth-order bronchi. Case Report: The paper presents the case of a patient with large, bilateral bronchiectasis caused by defect of cartilage in the fourth- to sixth-order bronchi referred to as Williams-Campbell syndrome. Conclusions: Williams-Campbell syndrome should be taken into consideration in differential diagnosis of bronchiectasis. Both inspiratory and expiratory high-resolution computed tomography should be performed to establish the diagnosis

  5. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the Cherokee Platform Province area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake II, Ronald M.; Hatch, Joseph R.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Le, Phuong A.; Leathers, Heidi M.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Marra, Kristen R.; Pitman, Janet K.; Potter, Christopher J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean volumes of undiscovered, technically recoverable resources of 463 million barrels of oil, 11.2 trillion cubic feet of gas, and 35 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Cherokee Platform Province area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri.

  6. Influence of Second Language Cherokee Immersion on Children's Development of Past Tense in Their First Language, English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata-Edds, Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Metalinguistic skills may develop differently in multilingual and monolingual children. This study investigated effects of immersion in Cherokee as a second language on young children's (4;5-6;1) skills of noticing morphological forms/patterns in English, their first language, by comparing English past tense skills on two nonword and two real-word…

  7. 硬汉家族的怪咖——JEEP CHEROKEE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟平

    2015-01-01

    眼前这个造型新潮、前卫,甚至还有些怪异的家伙名叫自由光,来自JEEP家族。虽然大多数人对"自由光"这三个字还很陌生,但要说到它的英文名字CHEROKEE,那就亲切多了!卖点1、颠覆性的外观设计,少了几分硬朗,多了几分个性;2、采用9速手自一体变速器无疑是它的最大亮点;3、强将手下无弱兵,配备了Active Drive智能四驱系统。大名鼎鼎的CHEROKEE,相信国人对它已经非常熟悉了,也就是我们常说的切诺基,俗称小切。其实引入国内生产的切诺基是CHEROKEE的第二代车型,而最新的第五代车型就是自由光了。

  8. AMS DAYs 2015 - Interview William H. Gerstenmaier

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    William H. Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for the Human Exploration and Operations Directorate at NASA, tells about the science aat the International Space Station and the tasks to be performed to make sure the AMS detector, installed on the main

  9. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: HYDRO (Hydrology)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...

  10. David Owen Williams (1944 - 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Many people, not only at CERN but also throughout the world, were saddened to learn that their friend and colleague David Williams had passed away in the early hours of Tuesday 24 October. His death came after a year of fighting cancer with all of his usual determination and optimism. Even days before the end he was still welcoming to visitors, and was alert and interested in all their news. Born in 1944, David came to CERN from the University of Cambridge in 1966, with a degree in Physics and Computer Science. Joining what at the time was called the Documents and Data (DD) Division, in the earlier part his career he worked first on software for analysis of bubble chamber photographs, subsequently leading the group that supported experiments with 'hybrids' of bubble chambers and electronic detectors and then the group supporting online computing in experiments. He thus witnessed all of the enormous changes that took place in particle physics as the era of bubble chambers came to an end and the availability ...

  11. William Harvey, Aristotle and astrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    In this paper I argue that William Harvey believed in a form of astrology. It has long been known that Harvey employed a macrocosm-microcosm analogy and used alchemical terminology in describing how the two types of blood change into one another. This paper then seeks to examine a further aspect of Harvey in relation to the magical tradition. There is an important corollary to this line of thought, however. This is that while Harvey does have a belief in astrology, it is strongly related to Aristotle's views in this area and is quite restricted and attenuated relative to some contemporary beliefs in astrology. This suggests a more general thesis. While Harvey was amenable to ideas which we associate with the natural magic tradition, those ideas had a very broad range of formulation and there was a limit to how far he would accept them. This limit was largely determined by Harvey's adherence to Aristotle's natural philosophy and his Christian beliefs. I argue that this is also the case in relation to Harvey's use of the macrocosm-microcosm analogy and of alchemical terminology, and, as far as we can rely on the evidence, this informs his attitudes towards witches as well. Understanding Harvey's influences and motives here is important in placing him properly in the context of early seventeenth-century thought.

  12. William Harvey, Aristotle and astrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    In this paper I argue that William Harvey believed in a form of astrology. It has long been known that Harvey employed a macrocosm-microcosm analogy and used alchemical terminology in describing how the two types of blood change into one another. This paper then seeks to examine a further aspect of Harvey in relation to the magical tradition. There is an important corollary to this line of thought, however. This is that while Harvey does have a belief in astrology, it is strongly related to Aristotle's views in this area and is quite restricted and attenuated relative to some contemporary beliefs in astrology. This suggests a more general thesis. While Harvey was amenable to ideas which we associate with the natural magic tradition, those ideas had a very broad range of formulation and there was a limit to how far he would accept them. This limit was largely determined by Harvey's adherence to Aristotle's natural philosophy and his Christian beliefs. I argue that this is also the case in relation to Harvey's use of the macrocosm-microcosm analogy and of alchemical terminology, and, as far as we can rely on the evidence, this informs his attitudes towards witches as well. Understanding Harvey's influences and motives here is important in placing him properly in the context of early seventeenth-century thought. PMID:24941731

  13. William Blake and His Great Poetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢琳琳

    2009-01-01

    William Blake is the first greatest romantic poet in the 18th century. His poems have a number of features. The Most important poems reflect the social ills, unique conception of childhood and plain direct language, lyric rhyme with immense compression of meaning. And the great poems London and The Chimney Sweeper are the best examples of these features. This paper will present detailed analysis of these three well-known poems by William Blake.

  14. John Ross--The Story of an American Indian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Sara Gordon

    First elected Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation in 1828, John Ross served his people with courage and honor through a difficult and tragic period in their history. Born in 1790, he grew up when the Cherokees' world was rapidly changing and treaties with federal and state governments ended in broken promises and the loss of Cherokee lands. He…

  15. Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Face Tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Marina A.; Heiz, Julie; Sokolov, Alexander N.; Barisnikov, Koviljka

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological, neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and psychosomatic disorders are characterized by impairments in visual social cognition, body language reading, and facial assessment of a social counterpart. Yet a wealth of research indicates that individuals with Williams syndrome exhibit remarkable concern for social stimuli and face fascination. Here individuals with Williams syndrome were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images composed of food ingredients and in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). The primary advantage of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face-specific processing, whereas in face images commonly used for investigating face perception (such as photographs or depictions), the mere occurrence of typical cues already implicates face presence. In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Strikingly, individuals with Williams syndrome exhibited profound deficits in recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which typically developing controls effortlessly recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This suggests atypical face tuning in Williams syndrome. The outcome is discussed in the light of a general pattern of social cognition in Williams syndrome and brain mechanisms underpinning face processing. PMID:27531986

  16. Social cognition in Williams syndrome: face tuning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina A Pavlova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many neurological, neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric and psychosomatic disorders are characterized by impairments in visual social cognition, body language reading, and facial assessment of a social counterpart. Yet a wealth of research indicates that individuals with Williams syndrome exhibit remarkable concern for social stimuli and face fascination. Here individuals with Williams syndrome were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images composed of food ingredients and in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style. The primary advantage of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face-specific processing, whereas in face images commonly used for investigating face perception (such as photographs or depictions, the mere occurrence of typical cues already implicates face presence. In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Strikingly, individuals with Williams syndrome exhibited profound deficits in recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which typically developing controls effortlessly recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This suggests atypical face tuning in Williams syndrome. The outcome is discussed in the light of a general pattern of social cognition in Williams syndrome and brain mechanisms underpinning face processing.

  17. Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Face Tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Marina A; Heiz, Julie; Sokolov, Alexander N; Barisnikov, Koviljka

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological, neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and psychosomatic disorders are characterized by impairments in visual social cognition, body language reading, and facial assessment of a social counterpart. Yet a wealth of research indicates that individuals with Williams syndrome exhibit remarkable concern for social stimuli and face fascination. Here individuals with Williams syndrome were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images composed of food ingredients and in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). The primary advantage of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face-specific processing, whereas in face images commonly used for investigating face perception (such as photographs or depictions), the mere occurrence of typical cues already implicates face presence. In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Strikingly, individuals with Williams syndrome exhibited profound deficits in recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which typically developing controls effortlessly recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This suggests atypical face tuning in Williams syndrome. The outcome is discussed in the light of a general pattern of social cognition in Williams syndrome and brain mechanisms underpinning face processing. PMID:27531986

  18. Cherokee International高性能80A 1/4砖器件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Cherokee International公司推出其Apollo 5 1/4砖DC/DC变换器系列。该封装为1.45英寸×2.28英寸的变换器据称可以发出比原来高60%的功率。此外,其集成预偏置功能可保证单调启动过程,以实现启动时多个变换器、多种输出电压间的同步。这些变换器提供业界标准功能,如ON/OFF、遥感、输出电压调节引脚、过

  19. 就这样被大切诺基征服%Grand Cherokee

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    美眉

    2001-01-01

    @@ 一说起大切诺基,人们首先联想到的就是切诺基.而严格地说,大切诺基与切诺基没有多少直接联系,不仅仅是多一个"大"字那么简单.大切诺基(Grand Cherokee)是美国克莱斯勒汽车公司于1993年元月全新设计推出的一款全时四轮驱动越野车,它将当今最先进的豪华轿车技术与最高超的越野车科技集于一身,成为美国乃至世界最豪华的越野车.

  20. A Brief Analysis on William Blake's London

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莉; 尚彦飞

    2014-01-01

    William Blake (1757-1827) is a renowned British poet in the 18th century. His lyric poems display the characteristics of romantic spirit, and he is regarded as the forefather of the British Romanticism. His London is a well-known lyric poetry, which is thought to be the best vesicle in the West. This paper will analyse this poem in terms of its form, theme, and im-age and then draw a brief conclusion for the characteristics of William Blake's poem.

  1. Dr. William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Dr William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland (left) with R. Cashmore. Photos 02, 03: Dr William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland signing the CERN guest book with R. Cashmore.

  2. Syntax and Morphology in Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clahsen, Harald; Almazan, Mayella

    1998-01-01

    Investigated four cases of English-speaking children with Williams Syndrome (WS), a neuro-developmental disorder characterized by an unusual fractionation of language abilities. Found that, despite low IQ, subjects performance on syntactic tasks and on regular inflection is not impaired, suggesting a distinction between a computation system and an…

  3. Executive Function in Williams and Down Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Daniel P. J.; Brown, Janice H.; Henry, Lucy A.

    2013-01-01

    Williams (WS) and Down (DS) syndromes are characterised by roughly opposing ability profiles. Relative verbal strengths and visuospatial difficulties have been reported in those with WS, while expressive language difficulties have been observed in individuals with DS. Few investigations into the executive function (EF) skills of these groups have…

  4. Stranger Danger Awareness in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, D. M.; Kirk, H.; Hanley, M.; Riby, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) is characterised by a distinctive cognitive profile and an intriguing social phenotype. Individuals with the disorder are often highly social engaging with familiar and unfamiliar people and once in an interaction they often show subtle abnormalities of social behaviour. Atypically…

  5. Dr. Caleb Williams Saleeby: The Complete Eugenicist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwell, Grant

    1997-01-01

    Profiles the work of Dr. Caleb Williams Saleeby, a late 19th-century propagandist for eugenics. Eugenics is a science that deals with the transmission of hereditary racial traits, coupled with a desire to use this for the elimination of social ills. Discusses Saleeby's work with the Eugenics Education Society. (MJP)

  6. Executive Functions in Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menghini, D.; Addona, F.; Costanzo, F.; Vicari, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The present study was aimed at investigating working memory (WM) and executive functions capacities in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) as compared with mental-age matched typically developing (TD) children. Method: In order to serve the study goal, a sizeable battery of tasks tapping WM as well as attention, memory, planning,…

  7. Attention to Faces in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Deborah M.; Jones, Nicola; Brown, Philippa H.; Robinson, Lucy J.; Langton, Stephen R. H.; Bruce, Vicki; Riby, Leigh M.

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with distinct social behaviours. One component of the WS social phenotype is atypically prolonged face fixation. This behaviour co-exists with attention difficulties. Attention is multi-faceted and may impact on gaze behaviour in several ways. Four experiments assessed (i) attention capture by faces, (ii)…

  8. Denigrating Carl Rogers: William Coulson's Last Crusade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Howard

    1991-01-01

    Reviews William Coulson's assertions that Carl Rogers, Abraham Maslow, and he initiated the humanistic education field, that Rogers repudiated his philosophy late in life, and that they owe the nation's parents an apology. Argues that these charges are groundless and provides examples and quotations from Rogers' later writings to show how Rogers…

  9. Nature and Nurture: Williams Syndrome across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzer-Comfort, Carol; Doyle, Teresa; Masataka, Nobuo; Korenberg, Julie; Bellugi, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    This study is concerned with ways in which children with Williams syndrome (WS), a rare neurodevelopmental disorder arising from a hemizygous deletion in chromosome band 7q11.23 including the gene for elastin (ELN) and approximately 20 surrounding genes, are affected by social mores of vastly differing cultures: the United States and Japan. WS…

  10. Patient satisfaction and ethnic identity among American Indian older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Kunovich, Robert M; Jacobsen, Clemma; Goldberg, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Work in the field of culturally competent medical care draws on studies showing that minority Americans often report lower satisfaction with care than White Americans and recommends that providers should adapt care to patients' cultural needs. However, empirical evidence in support of cultural competence models is limited by reliance upon measurements of racial rather than ethnic identity and also by a near-total neglect of American Indians. This project explored the relationship between ethnic identity and satisfaction using survey data collected from 115 chronically ill American Indian patients >or=50 years at a Cherokee Nation clinic. Satisfaction scores were high overall and comparable to those found in the general population. Nevertheless, analysis using hierarchical linear modeling showed that patients' self-rated American Indian ethnic identity was significantly associated with satisfaction. Specifically, patients who rated themselves high on the measure of American Indian ethnic identity reported reduced scores on satisfaction with health care providers' social skill and attentiveness, as compared to those who rated themselves lower. Significant associations remained after controlling for patients' sex, age, education, marital status, self-reported health, wait time, and number of previous visits. There were no significant associations between patients' American Indian ethnic identity and satisfaction with provider's technical skill and shared decision-making. Likewise, there were no significant associations between satisfaction and a separate measure of White American ethnic identity, although a suggestive trend was observed for satisfaction with provider's social skill. Our findings demonstrate the importance of including measures of ethnic identity in studies of medical satisfaction in racial minority populations. They support the importance of adapting care to patient's cultural needs, and they highlight the particular significance of interpersonal

  11. Patient satisfaction and ethnic identity among American Indian older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Kunovich, Robert M; Jacobsen, Clemma; Goldberg, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Work in the field of culturally competent medical care draws on studies showing that minority Americans often report lower satisfaction with care than White Americans and recommends that providers should adapt care to patients' cultural needs. However, empirical evidence in support of cultural competence models is limited by reliance upon measurements of racial rather than ethnic identity and also by a near-total neglect of American Indians. This project explored the relationship between ethnic identity and satisfaction using survey data collected from 115 chronically ill American Indian patients >or=50 years at a Cherokee Nation clinic. Satisfaction scores were high overall and comparable to those found in the general population. Nevertheless, analysis using hierarchical linear modeling showed that patients' self-rated American Indian ethnic identity was significantly associated with satisfaction. Specifically, patients who rated themselves high on the measure of American Indian ethnic identity reported reduced scores on satisfaction with health care providers' social skill and attentiveness, as compared to those who rated themselves lower. Significant associations remained after controlling for patients' sex, age, education, marital status, self-reported health, wait time, and number of previous visits. There were no significant associations between patients' American Indian ethnic identity and satisfaction with provider's technical skill and shared decision-making. Likewise, there were no significant associations between satisfaction and a separate measure of White American ethnic identity, although a suggestive trend was observed for satisfaction with provider's social skill. Our findings demonstrate the importance of including measures of ethnic identity in studies of medical satisfaction in racial minority populations. They support the importance of adapting care to patient's cultural needs, and they highlight the particular significance of interpersonal

  12. Indian Summer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, E. [Sho-Ban High School, Fort Hall, ID (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This paper focuses on preserving and strengthening two resources culturally and socially important to the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribe on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho; their young people and the Pacific-Northwest Salmon. After learning that salmon were not returning in significant numbers to ancestral fishing waters at headwater spawning sites, tribal youth wanted to know why. As a result, the Indian Summer project was conceived to give Shoshone-Bannock High School students the opportunity to develop hands-on, workable solutions to improve future Indian fishing and help make the river healthy again. The project goals were to increase the number of fry introduced into the streams, teach the Shoshone-Bannock students how to use scientific methodologies, and get students, parents, community members, and Indian and non-Indian mentors excited about learning. The students chose an egg incubation experiment to help increase self-sustaining, natural production of steelhead trout, and formulated and carried out a three step plan to increase the hatch-rate of steelhead trout in Idaho waters. With the help of local companies, governmental agencies, scientists, and mentors students have been able to meet their project goals, and at the same time, have learned how to use scientific methods to solve real life problems, how to return what they have used to the water and land, and how to have fun and enjoy life while learning.

  13. Rorty, Williams, and Davidson: Skepticism and Metaepistemology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ranalli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We revisit an important exchange on the problem of radical skepticism between Richard Rorty and Michael Williams. In his contribution to this exchange, Rorty defended the kind of transcendental approach to radical skepticism that is offered by Donald Davidson, in contrast to Williams’s Wittgenstein-inspired view. It is argued that the key to evaluating this debate is to understand the particular conception of the radical skeptical problem that is offered in influential work by Barry Stroud, a conception of the skeptical problem which generates metaepistemological ramifications for anti-skeptical theories. In particular, we argue that, contra Williams, Rorty’s view that Davidson was offering a theoretical diagnosis of radical skepticism can be consistently maintained with his transcendental approach.

  14. William Harvey, Peter Lauremberg and cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, G

    1992-11-01

    In 1636, the Rostock professor of medicine and the art of poetry, Peter Lauremberg (1585-1639), was one of the earliest to mention circulation which had been discovered by William Harvey and documented in his anatomical manual. In 1628 William Harvey proved the existence of the blood circulation by calculating the "cardiac output in a half an hour (semihora)". The answer to the question why Harvey chose half an hour as the time range can be found in the way of measuring time usual at that period. The sandglasses were turned half-hourly in maritime navigation and the wheel-clocks on shore had only the hour-hand. Improved chronometry was one of the prerequisites for measuring cardiac output. The minute-hand became usual after 1700 and the second-hand later on. Taking into consideration the alterations of cardiac output made the latter one of the most important circulation parameters in diagnostics, prognostication and therapeutics.

  15. CALPUFF modelling for the Williams Lake airshed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schutte, A.; Jain, R.; Walsh, C. [Levelton Consultants Ltd., Richmond, BC (Canada)

    2005-06-21

    Th air quality dispersion model CALPUFF was described and evaluated. CALPUFF is a suite of 3 numerical models used in series to determine predicted pollution concentrations. Details of the simulation program were presented, and its performance was evaluated through an analysis of the Williams Lake airshed in British Columbia. CALMET is a diagnostic computer model that produces a detailed 3-D field of meteorological parameters based on surface and upper air measurements, digital land use data, and terrain data. The 3-D fields produced by CALMET are then used by CALPUFF to calculate the dispersion of emissions over distances of a few metres to hundreds of kilometres. CALPOST is a statistical processing program used to summarize and tabulate the concentrations calculated by CALPUFF. The dispersion of emissions from point, area, and mobile sources in the Williams Lake airshed was simulated using data collected between June 2003 to June 2004 to establish a baseline. Baseline modelling was then compared with ambient monitoring data in the airshed to determine sources of error and model accuracy. Airshed boundaries were defined by UTM grid coordinates. Modelling domain boundaries were defined by the map of the Williams Lake region, which also showed the locations of industrial sources and air quality monitors used in the comparison with the model. The ambient concentrations that were predicted by the dispersion model were compared with the ambient air quality objectives and guidelines applicable to the Williams Lake Airshed and regulated by both provincial and federal governments. Modelling results showed that CALPUFF results were within a reasonable amount of error and could be considered conservative. It was concluded that steps should be taken to reduce levels of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}); carbon monoxide (CO); nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}); nitric oxide (NO{sub 2}); volatile organic compounds (VOC); and particulate matter (PM). 23 refs., 6 tabs., 6 figs.

  16. Learning by observation: insights from Williams syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Foti

    Full Text Available Observing another person performing a complex action accelerates the observer's acquisition of the same action and limits the time-consuming process of learning by trial and error. Observational learning makes an interesting and potentially important topic in the developmental domain, especially when disorders are considered. The implications of studies aimed at clarifying whether and how this form of learning is spared by pathology are manifold. We focused on a specific population with learning and intellectual disabilities, the individuals with Williams syndrome. The performance of twenty-eight individuals with Williams syndrome was compared with that of mental age- and gender-matched thirty-two typically developing children on tasks of learning of a visuo-motor sequence by observation or by trial and error. Regardless of the learning modality, acquiring the correct sequence involved three main phases: a detection phase, in which participants discovered the correct sequence and learned how to perform the task; an exercise phase, in which they reproduced the sequence until performance was error-free; an automatization phase, in which by repeating the error-free sequence they became accurate and speedy. Participants with Williams syndrome beneficiated of observational training (in which they observed an actor detecting the visuo-motor sequence in the detection phase, while they performed worse than typically developing children in the exercise and automatization phases. Thus, by exploiting competencies learned by observation, individuals with Williams syndrome detected the visuo-motor sequence, putting into action the appropriate procedural strategies. Conversely, their impaired performances in the exercise phases appeared linked to impaired spatial working memory, while their deficits in automatization phases to deficits in processes increasing efficiency and speed of the response. Overall, observational experience was advantageous for

  17. William Wilde in the West of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, D

    2016-05-01

    It is widely believed that Sir William Wilde's forebears were in Ireland for just two or three generations. This belief stems from a number of short biographies of Wilde which were published during his lifetime. These biographies gave different versions of the origin of the Wilde family and appear to have been generated by the creative imagination of Lady Jane Wilde or, as she was better known by her nom de plume, Speranza. She was equally imaginative in creating narratives about her own family background and in one she claimed descent from the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. So it was not a great challenge for her to invent biographies of her husband which she deemed suitable for a knight living at the prestigious address of 1 Merrion Square, leading many to believe that William and his son Oscar were more English than Irish. It was also important for Speranza to distance Sir William from any connection which the Wilde family might have had with trade. In this paper published and unpublished material are used, together with a careful examination of family deeds in the Registry of Deeds office, to elucidate the real roots of the Wilde family in Dublin and in the West of Ireland.

  18. William Wilde in the West of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, D

    2016-05-01

    It is widely believed that Sir William Wilde's forebears were in Ireland for just two or three generations. This belief stems from a number of short biographies of Wilde which were published during his lifetime. These biographies gave different versions of the origin of the Wilde family and appear to have been generated by the creative imagination of Lady Jane Wilde or, as she was better known by her nom de plume, Speranza. She was equally imaginative in creating narratives about her own family background and in one she claimed descent from the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. So it was not a great challenge for her to invent biographies of her husband which she deemed suitable for a knight living at the prestigious address of 1 Merrion Square, leading many to believe that William and his son Oscar were more English than Irish. It was also important for Speranza to distance Sir William from any connection which the Wilde family might have had with trade. In this paper published and unpublished material are used, together with a careful examination of family deeds in the Registry of Deeds office, to elucidate the real roots of the Wilde family in Dublin and in the West of Ireland. PMID:27083456

  19. Summer habitat selection by striped bass, Morone Saxatilis, in Cherokee Reservoir, Tennessee, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddle, H.R.; Coutant, C.C.; Wilson, J.L.

    1980-02-01

    Summer habitat selection patterns of 18 adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in Cherokee Reservoir were monitored with externally attached temperature-sensing acoustic or radio transmitters from June through September 1977. Mortalities of adult striped bass in this reservoir were hypothesized to be related to high summer temperatures and low dissolved oxygen (DO). The inhabited areas or refuges differed from noninhabited areas by maintaining temperatures less than or equal to 22 C and DO concentrations greater than 5 mg/liter. Total water hardness, pH, and water transparency were not significantly different among refuges and noninhabited areas. Movement of fish outside refuges occurred more frequently and for longer periods during June when the summer pattern of high temperatures and low DO was less severe. Fish experienced temperatures between 15 and 27 C with mean temperatures of individuals ranging from 18.5 to 22.0 C. Several tagged fish migrated outside the refuges and selected the lowest available temperature, generally near 21 C, even though DO concentrations at these temperatures were 3 mg/liter or less. Long-term survival of tagged and nontagged fish outside refuges was undetermined because no fish were tracked outside a refuge for more than 12 days without being lost. This study indicates that temperature strongly influences the behavior of striped bass and that adults of this species may have a thermal preferendum of approximately 21 C.

  20. The importance of subsurface geology for water source and vegetation communities in Cherokee Marsh, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, A.M.; Bahr, J.M.; Carpenter, Q.J.; Hunt, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Restoration of disturbed wetland systems is an important component of wetland mitigation, yet uncertainty remains about how hydrologic processes affect biologic processes and wetlands patterns. To design more effective restoration strategies and re-establish native plant communities in disturbed wetlands, it is imperative to understand undisturbed systems. A site within Cherokee Marsh located in Madison, Wisconsin, USA, contains a relatively undisturbed area of wetland consisting of plant communities common within the prairie landscape including a fen, sedge meadow, and shallow marsh. These distinct communities are found within an area of minimal topographic relief, yet transitions from one community to the next occur over short distances. This study sought to characterize the geologic, hydrologic, and chemical gradients associated with these shifts in vegetation to gain insight into the factors controlling the spatial differences in dominant plant species, which could be critical for restoration success. Vegetation analyses revealed a transition of dominant sedge species, which appeared to correspond to changes in hydrology from a ground-water dominated to a surface-water dominated system (as determined by water isotopes). Along the same vegetation transect, subsurface coring results show a heterogeneous composition of peat and till with lateral and vertical variations in stratigraphy, which relates to variability in ground-water discharge as evidenced by hydroperiods and stable isotope composition. Applications of this type of approach throughout the glaciated terrains of the midwestern and northeastern United States and Canada can improve future wetland restoration and management. ?? 2007, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  1. Alcohol Sales to Youth: Data from Rural Communities Within the Cherokee Nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynne-Landsman, Sarah D; Kominsky, Terrence K; Livingston, Melvin D; Wagenaar, Alexander C; Komro, Kelli A

    2016-01-01

    Access to alcohol among individuals under 21 years of age continues to be a public health concern with approximately 5000 youth deaths attributable to alcohol each year (US Department of Health and Human Services 2007). To date, there is no research on youth access to alcohol from commercial sources within rural communities with large populations of Native American families. We evaluated commercial access to alcohol by underage-appearing female confederates in 4 rural towns within the Cherokee Nation, a non-reservation tribal jurisdiction that includes a high proportion of Native Americans embedded within a predominately White population. Alcohol purchase attempts were conducted approximately every 4 weeks on 10 occasions for a total of 997 alcohol purchase attempts. In addition to purchase attempt outcome, we collected data on characteristics of the outlets and clerks. Alcohol was sold to confederates without use of age identification on 23 % of all purchase attempts. Across repeated attempts, 76 % of outlets sold alcohol to a confederate at least once. Males and younger clerks were more likely to sell alcohol to the confederates. Grocery stores and gas stations were more likely to sell alcohol to the confederate than liquor stores, but this effect was no longer significant once seller age was accounted for in a multivariable model. Three out of 4 outlets sold alcohol to young-appearing buyers at least once across repeated attempts. Results reinforce the continuing need for regular enforcement of laws against selling alcohol to minors. PMID:26228479

  2. Differential alcohol-related mortality among American Indian tribes in Oklahoma, 1968-1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, C M; Dufour, M; Bertolucci, D

    1989-01-01

    Tribal differences in alcohol-related mortality were examined among 11 Indian tribes living in Oklahoma. Data on alcohol-related deaths from 1968 to 1978 were compiled and assigned to various tribes on the basis of population distributions by county. Results showed significant differences in alcohol-related mortality among the various tribes. Of the 267,238 total deaths in Oklahoma during the study period, 9.3% of Indian deaths were alcohol-related while only 3.2% of those among blacks and 2.4% of those among whites were classified as such. Indian males and females are far more likely to die of alcohol-related deaths than their black and white counterparts. Cheyenne-Arapaho, Comanche and Kiowa areas (located in the western++ part of the state) have higher alcohol-related deaths than Cherokee, Choctaw, Creek, Seminole and Pawnee areas (located in eastern Oklahoma). Indian residents of the Seminole area have the lowest percentage of deaths identified as alcohol-related. The patterns which emerge may be due to different cultural and historical factors among the Indian tribes. PMID:2784011

  3. Enough room for Williams and IMF? / Paul Beckman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Beckman, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Lõppesid Leedu ja USA energeetikakompanii Williams International läbirääkimised Leedu naftakompleksis osaluse omandamise asjus. IMF uurib Leedu majanduslikku arengut, mida tehing Williamsiga komplitseerib

  4. William Herschel, the First Observational Cosmologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemonick, Michael (Princeton University and Time Magazine)

    2008-11-12

    In the late 1700s, a composer, orchestra director and soloist named William Herschel became fascinated with astronomy, and, having built his own reflecting telescope, went out in his garden in Bath, England, one night and discovered Uranus - the first planet in human history ever found by an individual. The feat earned him a lifetime pension from King George III. But Herschel considered the discovery to be relatively unimportant in comparison to his real work: understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the universe. In pursuing that work, he became the first observational cosmologist.

  5. Solute concentrations influence microbial methanogenesis in coal-bearing strata of the Cherokee basin, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew F Kirk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms have contributed significantly to subsurface energy resources by converting organic matter in hydrocarbon reservoirs into methane, the main component of natural gas. In this study, we consider environmental controls on microbial populations in coal-bearing strata of the Cherokee basin, an unconventional natural gas resource in southeast Kansas, USA. Pennsylvanian-age strata in the basin contain numerous thin (0.4-1.1 m coalbeds with marginal thermal maturities (0.5-0.7 %Ro that are interbedded with shale and sandstone. We collected gas, water, and microbe samples from 16 commercial coalbed methane wells for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The water samples were Na-Cl type with total dissolved solids (TDS content ranging from 34.9 to 91.3 g L-1. Gas dryness values [C1/(C2+C3] averaged 2640 and carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of methane differed from those of carbon dioxide and water, respectively, by an average of 65‰ and 183‰. These values are thought to be consistent with gas that formed primarily by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Results from cultivation assays and taxonomic analysis of 16S rRNA genes agree with the geochemical results. Cultivable methanogens were present in every sample tested, methanogen sequences dominate the archaeal community in each sample (avg 91%, and few archaeal sequences (avg 4.2% were classified within Methanosarcinales, an order of methanogens known to contain methylotrophic methanogens. Although hydrogenotrophs appear dominant, geochemical and microbial analyses both indicate that the proportion of methane generated by acetoclastic methanogens increases with the solute content of formation water, a trend that is contrary to existing conceptual models. Consistent with this trend, beta diversity analyses show that archaeal diversity significantly correlates with formation water solute content. In contrast, bacterial diversity more strongly correlates with location than solute

  6. Solute Concentrations Influence Microbial Methanogenesis in Coal-bearing Strata of the Cherokee Basin, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Matthew F; Wilson, Brien H; Marquart, Kyle A; Zeglin, Lydia H; Vinson, David S; Flynn, Theodore M

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms have contributed significantly to subsurface energy resources by converting organic matter in hydrocarbon reservoirs into methane, the main component of natural gas. In this study, we consider environmental controls on microbial populations in coal-bearing strata of the Cherokee basin, an unconventional natural gas resource in southeast Kansas, USA. Pennsylvanian-age strata in the basin contain numerous thin (0.4-1.1 m) coalbeds with marginal thermal maturities (0.5-0.7% R o ) that are interbedded with shale and sandstone. We collected gas, water, and microbe samples from 16 commercial coalbed methane wells for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The water samples were Na-Cl type with total dissolved solids (TDS) content ranging from 34.9 to 91.3 g L(-1). Gas dryness values [C1/(C2 + C3)] averaged 2640 and carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of methane differed from those of carbon dioxide and water, respectively, by an average of 65 and 183‰. These values are thought to be consistent with gas that formed primarily by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Results from cultivation assays and taxonomic analysis of 16S rRNA genes agree with the geochemical results. Cultivable methanogens were present in every sample tested, methanogen sequences dominate the archaeal community in each sample (avg 91%), and few archaeal sequences (avg 4.2%) were classified within Methanosarcinales, an order of methanogens known to contain methylotrophic methanogens. Although hydrogenotrophs appear dominant, geochemical and microbial analyses both indicate that the proportion of methane generated by acetoclastic methanogens increases with the solute content of formation water, a trend that is contrary to existing conceptual models. Consistent with this trend, beta diversity analyses show that archaeal diversity significantly correlates with formation water solute content. In contrast, bacterial diversity more strongly correlates with location than solute content

  7. Sedimentology and Sedimentary Dynamics of the Desmoinesian Cherokee Group, Deep Anadarko Basin, Texas Panhandle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, N.; Loucks, R.; Frebourg, G.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the spatial variability of deep-water facies is critical to deep-water research because of its revealing information about the relationship between desity flow processes and their resultant sedimentary sequences. The Cherokee Group in the Anadarko Basin, northeastern Texas Panhandle, provides an opportunity to investigate an icehouse-greenhouse Pennsylvanian hybrid system that well demonstrates the intricacies of vertical and lateral facies relationships in an unconfined fan-delta fed deep-water slope to basinal setting. The stratigraphic section ranges in thickness from 150 to 460 m. The cyclic sedimentation and foreland basin tectonics resulted in a complex stratal architecture that was sourced by multiple areas of sediment input. This investigation consists of wireline-log and core data. Five-thousand wireline logs were correlated in an area of over 9500 sq km to map out six depositional sequences that are separated by major flooding events. These events are correlative over the whole area of study. Six cores, that sample nearly the complete section, were described for lithofacies. Lithofacies are recognized based on depositional features and mineralogy:(1) Subarkose, (2) Lithicarkoses, (3) Sandy siliciclastic conglomerate, (4) Muddy calcareous conglomerate, (5) Crinoidal packstone, (6) Oodic grainstone, (7)Pelodic grainstone, (8) Ripple laminated mudrock, (9) faint laminated mudrock. The integration of isopachs of depositional sequences with the lithofacies has allowed the delineation of the spatial and temporal evolution of the slope to basin-floor system. Thin-to-thick bedded turbidites, hyperconcentrated density flow deposits (slurry beds), and debris and mud flow deposits were observed and can be used to better predicte lithofacies distributions in areas that have less data control. These mixed siliciclastic and carbonate deposits can be carrier beds for the hydrocarbons generated from the enclosing organic-rich (TOC ranges from 0.55 to 6.77wt

  8. Mailability v. the Crusader: Williams v. O'Brien.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Charles E.

    The issues of prior restraint and press censorship are examined in this paper, which focuses on the 1970 Williams v. O'Brien court case. The paper discusses the litigation, in which Robert F. Williams, as an American citizen living in Peking, China, sued the United States Postmaster General over the banning of the May 1967 issue of "The Crusader,"…

  9. Pursuing the Panderer: An Analysis of "United States v. Williams"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrain, Patrick N.; Moore, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    In May 2008, the Supreme Court addressed whether the government can regulate the ownership and distribution of virtual child pornography. "U.S. v. Williams" marked the first time the Court directly addressed the concept of pandering virtual child pornography. This article examines the Court's decision in "U.S. v. Williams" and the relative…

  10. 美国切诺基文化传播对淮河流域弱势文化外宣的启示%The enlightenment of Cherokee culture communication on university-based publicity of weak culture in Huai River Valley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊继群

    2015-01-01

    As a sect of aboriginal Indian culture, Cherokee culture has been staying at an inferior position for a long History. Northeastern State University has been an important player in the protection and inheritance of Cherokee culture. The culture in the Huai River Valley is also weak, and its preservation is facing severe challenges. Universities along the Huai River are also expected to shoulder their due responsibilities of preserving and publicizing the Huai River culture. The practice and experience of Northeastern State University on cultural communication will be of great inspiration for universities concerned to the preservation and publicity of weak culture in the Huai River Valley.%切诺基文化是美国印第安族裔文化,在美国属于弱势文化。美国东北州立大学是切诺基语言文化传播的重要阵地,在切诺基文化传播方面做出了大量卓有成效的工作。淮河流域文化也属于弱势文化,其在本地区的传播与发展也面临着严峻的挑战。沿淮高校在保护、传播淮河流域文化方面有义不容辞的责任。东北州立大学在弘扬切诺基弱势文化中的经验做法值得借鉴,对相关高校保护、传播淮河流域文化具有积极的启示意义。

  11. The Indian Wars Again?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipp, C. Matthew

    1991-01-01

    Explains history of federal-Indian relationship and changing tribal sovereignty rights. Describes treaty disputes and Indian-non-Indian conflicts in Washington, Wisconsin, and Oklahoma. Describes general nature of Indian alliances and support networks. Discusses possible roles for social scientists and social-science studies to mitigate Indian…

  12. KNOW YOUR NEVADA INDIANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    POEHLMAN, CHARLES H.; AND OTHERS

    THIS PUBLICATION PRESENTS THE RESULTS OF A STUDY OF THE SOCIOCULTURAL BACKGROUNDS OF THE PAIUTE, WASHOE, AND SHOSHONE INDIANS OF NEVADA. INCLUDED ARE AN OUTLINE OF GENERAL PROBLEMS PERTAINING TO INDIAN EDUCATION, SOME DISTINCT CULTURAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE DOMINANT NON-INDIAN SOCIETY AND THE INDIAN SOCIETY, AND THE PREHISTORIC ASPECTS OF THE…

  13. A Mystic in English Literature: William Blake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fahri DOĞAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human beings have never been satisfied with this ephemeral world. Perhaps, yearning and desire of rejoining −stemming from the descent from the heaven to the earth− are the emotions felt by the members of both celestial and non-celestial religions. Mysticism, having started with the zeal of people who weren‘t satisfied with this ephemeral world towards the eternal world, aimed at the love of God in the religions where there is a belief of single God. In this article, glancing at the life of a Christian mystic William Blake, we will try to shed light into his mystic thoughts. While studying Blake‘s mystic thoughts, there will be common points with Sufism. Nevertheless, analysis of these common points has been assigned to other studies.

  14. William Keit and the Durban Botanic Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. McCracken

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available William Keit was born in Saxony in 1841 and in early life travelled across Europe working in many famous nurseries and gardens. In 1872 on the recommendation of the director of Kew Gardens, Keit emigrated to Natal to become curator of the Durban Botanic Garden. So dilapidated was this garden that Keit was faced with the task of virtually re-establishing it.Though he was largely successful in this endeavour, as he was in fortifying the link between Natal and Kew, Keit could not solve the problems of a severe drought,a labour shortage and a scarcity of funds. In 1881 he resigned his position leaving a solid foundation on which the renowned botanist, John Medley Wood was to build. Keit in later Ufe ran a successful nursery in Durban and for 30 years was curator of the Parks and Gardens Department,in which capacity he did more than anyone else to beautify Durban.

  15. [Vaughan Williams class IV antiarrhythmic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, M; Washizuka, T; Ikeguchi, S; Sasayama, S

    1996-08-01

    Vaughan Williams class IV antiarrhythmic drugs have Ca-channel blocking actions. Since L-type Ca-channels play key roles in regulating pulse conduction in atrioventricular node as well as in pathologically-depolarized myocardium, Ca-channel blockers known to modulate this type of Ca-channel (ICa,L) are used as antiarrhythmic agents. ICa,L channels have relatively high threshold potential (-40 mV) to activate and long-opening properties, and are enhanced by beta-adrenergic stimulation. Among three major ICa,L blockers, dihydropyridines such as nifedipine were found to bind to the channel from extracellular side. In contrast, verapamil and diltiazem interact with the channel from the cytoplasmic side, thereby causing rate-dependent block of ICa,L channels. This sideness of pharmacological action of the Ca-channel blockers determines an important therapeutic modality and their indication for tachyarrhythmias.

  16. William Whiston, suur veeuputus ja kohutav spektaakel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roomet Jakapi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available William Whiston (1667-1752 was an English divine, mathematician and astronomer. His works nicely reveal the close relationship between science and religion in the early modern period. The paper aims to characterize Whiston's way of thinking in the light of his Astronomical Principles of Religion, Natural and Reveal'd (1717. In the 17th and early 18th century cosmologies, the location of Hell in the universe was a major issue. This horrible place of punishment could be located beneath the earth or on the sun. Whiston's view on this issue relies on the juxtaposition of biblical descriptions of Hell and scientific evidence regarding comets. Research for this paper was supported by Estonian Science Foundation grant no. 6099.

  17. [William Harvey, discoverer of the blood circulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    v Mühlendahl, K E

    2007-06-01

    William Harvey (1578-1657), living at the turn to modern times, scientifically speaking, was an eminent physician and scientist. He developed the concept of the circulation of the blood and his findings have proved to be correct in nearly all details to this day. He published his physiological findings and interpretations in a small, albeit epoch-making, volume: Exercitatio anatomica de motu cordis et sanguinis in animalibus, published in Frankfurt in 1628. On the occasion of the 350th anniversary of his death on June 3, 2007, this essay commemorates the work of this important physician, illustrating his brilliant conception of the blood circulation by quoting passages from De motu cordis et sanguinis.

  18. William Pendry Bidelman (1918-2011)

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, Howard E

    2016-01-01

    William P. Bidelman--Editor of Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific from 1956 to 1961--passed away on 2011 May 3, at the age of 92. He was one of the last of the masters of visual stellar spectral classification and the identification of peculiar stars. I review his contributions to these subjects, including the discoveries of barium stars, hydrogen-deficient stars, high-galactic-latitude supergiants, stars with anomalous carbon content, and exotic chemical abundances in peculiar A and B stars. Bidelman was legendary for his encyclopedic knowledge of the stellar literature. He had a profound and inspirational influence on many colleagues and students. Some of the bizarre stellar phenomena he discovered remain unexplained to the present day.

  19. A Comparative Study of William Golding'S Four Novels%Comparative Study of William Golding'S Four Novels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔晓强

    2008-01-01

    With his keen insight,William Golding becomes very conscious of the human heart and the necessity that we become aware of this darkness we are to save ourselves.All his novels,attempt to deal with the essential human condition.All Golding 's novels, products of his peculiar literary temperament and habit,are reactive experiments.Each of them represents a response to a specific book by an early writer.

  20. History of diagenetic fluids in a distant foreland area, Middle and Upper Pennsylvanian, Cherokee basin, Kansas, USA: Fluid inclusion evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Krzysztof M.; Goldstein, Robert H.; Walton, Anthony W.

    1994-02-01

    Analysis of fluid inclusion data in diagenetic cements from Pennsylvanian limestones and sandstones of the Cherokee basin in southeastern Kansas reveals the succession of diagenetic fluids in a distant foreland of the Arkoma-Ouachita system. This succession includes early low-salinity (0.0-2.4 wt% NaCl eq.) fluids of meteoric affinity (Fluid I) followed by low-temperature Na-Ca-Cl brines (Fluid II with salinities between 8.4 and 24.1 wt% NaCl eq.). Fluids I and II were present in the system during precipitation of early-stage calcite cements at temperatures less than about 50°C. Another Na-Ca-Cl brine (Fluid III with salinity up to 25 wt% NaCl eq.) was present in the system later, at temperatures of maximum burial (at least 80-85°C) and higher. Fluid III is followed by a Na-Cl brine (Fluid IV, with salinities about 19-21 wt% NaCl eq.) characterized by temperatures distinctly higher than maximum burial, up to 150°C. Fluid III and Fluid IV were entrapped during precipitation of late-stage baroque dolomite and Fe-dolomite in Pennsylvanian limestones, and late-stage Fe-dolomite and ankerite in Pennsylvanian sandstones. The record of progression from Fluid III to Fluid IV may have been partially obscured by thermal re-equilibriation of some inclusions during migration of Fluid IV. Fluids with Na-Ca-Cl chemistry (Fluid II and III) were either indigenous subsurface fluids of the Cherokee and Arkoma basins, or might have originated as reflux fluids in a Permian evaporitic basin of Central Kansas. Later Na-Cl brine (Fluid IV) originated in deeper parts of the Arkoma-Ouachita system and might have acquired their salinity by dissolution of hypothetical salts buried beneath the Ouachitas. Temperatures recorded by fluid inclusions in late-diagenetic carbonates are 20-60°C higher than those calculated for the maximum burial of the studied section. This thermal anomaly suggests an advective heat transfer from the Arkoma-Ouachita system onto the shelf of the Cherokee basin

  1. A case of William's syndrome associated peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    William's syndrome, in order to more completely delineate the total spectrum of the disorder, indicates that 'infantile hypercalcemia', 'peculiar facies' and 'supravalvular aortic stenosis.' In has other many vascular anomalies, such as peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, coronary arterial stenosis, celiac arterial stenosis, and renal aterial stenosis. Only 32% of the patients have evidence of supravalvular aortic stenosis. And it is very rare disease entity that has been reported rarely in Korea. Recently authors experienced a case that was questioned William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, clinically and preliminary radiologically and this case was confirmed by operation. Here we report a case of William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis and reviewed literatures

  2. Salmon stream reconnaissance Prince William Sound and Afognak Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In April of 1963, salmon stream improvement projects in Prince William Sound were visited. Objectives of the trip, from a fisheries standpoint, were as follows: (1)...

  3. The Trail Inventory of William L. Finley NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  4. The Trail Inventory of Bill Williams River NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all nonmotorized trails on Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory...

  5. The Trail Inventory of William L. Finley NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all nonmotorized trails on William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  6. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...

  7. William L Finley - Slender False-brome Eradication

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — William L. Finley NWR contains some of the largest and best examples of remaining Oregon white oak woodland, oak savanna, and prairie habitats remaining in the...

  8. Sir William Mitchell (1925-2002)

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Sir William (Bill) Mitchell, former President of the CERN Council, died on 30th October 2002 at the age of 77. Mitchell was professor of Physics at Oxford University from 1978 to 1989, having previously been Professor of Physics, Dean of Science and Deputy Vice-Chancellor at Reading University. From 1985 to 1990 he was Chairman of the UK's Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC), which at the time was the funding agency for the UK's participation in the CERN programme. As Chairman, Mitchell was one of the UK representatives on the CERN Council, and in 1991 he was elected President, a position he held for three years. This was a difficult period for CERN. Financial problems were being faced in many member states, notably in Germany as a result of unification. This led to calls for reductions in the CERN budget and, more significantly, to requests for delays in consderation of future programmes. On the other hand for the future of CERN and the progress of elementary particle physics, it was necessary...

  9. Neural Correlates of Amusia in Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam D. Lense

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital amusia is defined by marked deficits in pitch perception and production. Though historically examined only in otherwise typically developing (TD populations, amusia has recently been documented in Williams syndrome (WS, a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder with a unique auditory phenotype including auditory sensitivities and increased emotional responsiveness to music but variable musical skill. The current study used structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging to examine neural correlates of amusia in 17 individuals with WS (4 of whom met criteria for amusia. Consistent with findings from TD amusics, amusia in WS was associated with decreased fractional anisotropy (FA in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF. The relationship between amusia and FA in the inferior component of the SLF was particularly robust, withstanding corrections for cognitive functioning, auditory sensitivities, or musical training. Though the number of individuals with amusia in the study is small, results add to evidence for the role of fronto-temporal disconnectivity in congenital amusia and suggest that novel populations with developmental differences can provide a window into understanding gene-brain-behavior relationships that underlie musical behaviors.

  10. Introducing william stern (1871-1938).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamiell, James T

    2012-11-01

    This article discusses the events and considerations, both 'distal' and 'proximal,' behind the production of the author's recent book, William Stern (1871-1938): A Brief Introduction to His Life and Works (Pabst Science Publishers, Germany, March, 2010). The 'distal' roots of the work lie in the advice given to the author by German and other European colleagues in the mid-1980s that examining Stern's writing in some detail would likely prove fruitful. The more proximal roots lie in a series of public lectures that the author prepared and delivered in the capacity of Ernst Cassirer Guest Professor in the Institute for Philosophy at the University of Hamburg in 2004. It is explained that the primary intent of the book is to provide readers with a preliminary sense of the breadth of Stern's contributions to psychology, and to suggest that his works might well deserve closer attention in the 21st century than they ever gained during the 20th. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. The epileptology of William Aldren Turner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadie, M J

    2006-01-01

    William Aldren Turner (1864-1945), in his day Physician to the National Hospital, Queen Square, and to King's College Hospital, London, was one of the major figures in the world of epileptology in the period between Hughlings Jackson in the latter part of the 19th century and the advent of electroencephalography in the 1930s. Although he also made contributions to knowledge in other areas of neurology, and with Grainger Stewart wrote a competent textbook on that subject, Turner's main professional interest throughout his career seems to have been epilepsy. On the basis of a series of earlier, rather heavily statistical, personal publications dealing with various aspects of the disorder, he authored what became a well-accepted monograph entitled Epilepsy - a study of the idiopathic disorder, which appeared in 1907, and he also gave the 1910 Morison lectures in Edinburgh on the topic. His writings on epilepsy over a period of three decades consolidated knowledge rather than led to significant advances, but helped maintain interest in the disorder during a rather long fallow phase in the development of the understanding of its nature.

  12. Slovene reactions to William Faulkner's writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Intihar Klančar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with Slovene reactions to William Faulkner's writing: a lot of critical attention was given to the author twice, namely after he won the Nobel Prize for Literature  in 1949 and after his death in 1962. The articles and reviews published  in Slovene magazines  and newspapers focused on themes, characterization, style and structure of his novels. Thus the Slovene reading public got the chance to get to know one of the greatest novelists of 20th century, his troubled, decaying, socially, racially, religiously and historically challenged American South and through it themselves and their attitude toward the world and its problems. Faulkner also had a strong influence on some of the Slovene writers of 1950s and 1960s: they adopted his themes and writing techniques, namely a cyclic structure of the novel and stream-of-consciousness technique,  thus forging the new Slovene modernist fiction that started to emerge from the late 1960s onwards.

  13. William L. Donn 1918-1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedzelman, Stanley David

    William L. Donn, Professor Emeritus of the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, City College of New York, and Special Research Scientist at Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory (LDGO) of Columbia University (Palisades, N.Y.), died at his home on June 30, 1987, at the age of 69. Bill demonstrated expertise in a wide range of fields, with a highly productive and creative research and writing career that included geology, oceanography, climatology, atmospheric physics, and meteorology.Donn was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., on March 2, 1918. At the tender age of 10 years, he demonstrated his love and talent for science by building a telescope with his brother, Bertram. During his undergraduate years at Brooklyn College, he switched his major from astronomy to geology. He was largely selftrained in both meteorology and oceanography, serving as head of the Meteorology Section, U.S. Merchant Marine Academy during World War II . One by-product of these years was the textbook Meteorology—With Marine Applications, first published in 1946. This widely adopted text became a standard for a generation of mariners and college students.

  14. Textual Form and Cultural Affect: William Empson's Double-Plot and Raymond Williams's Structure of Feeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pamela McCallum

    2005-01-01

    By insisting on the primacy of double-plot, Empson brackets the sometimes deceptive appearances of a text's content to uncover and disengage the more fundamental double-plot system at work within the defining structure of the text. Empson's thinking about the reception of double-plot structures enables Raymond Williams's early formulations of structure of feeling, in particular the gesturing this perplexing, underdeveloped, but persistent concept makes towards understanding collective response to cultural forms. This article explores the implications of the reception of double-plot structures, drawing out the assumptions inscribed in Empson's claims about processes at work as an audience engages with these dramatic structures.

  15. Geology and ground water resources, Williams County, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freers, Theodore F.; Armstrong, C.A.

    1970-01-01

    Williams County, in northwestern North Dakota, is located near the center of the structural and sedimentary Williston basin. The preglacial sedimentary formations beneath the county are as much as 14,828 feet thick. Their beds dip generally to the south except along the flanks of the north-south striking Nesson anticline in the eastern part of the county. Late Wisconsinan glacial deposits cover all of Williams County except along the Missouri River and other scattered small areas.

  16. Retinotopically defined primary visual cortex in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Rosanna K.; Kippenhan, J. Shane; Japee, Shruti; Kohn, Philip; Mervis, Carolyn B.; Saad, Ziad S.; Morris, Colleen A.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Berman, Karen Faith

    2009-01-01

    Williams syndrome, caused by a hemizygous microdeletion on chromosome 7q11.23, is characterized by severe impairment in visuospatial construction. To examine potential contributions of early visual processing to this cognitive problem, we functionally mapped the size and neuroanatomical variability of primary visual cortex (V1) in high-functioning adults with Williams syndrome and age- and IQ-matched control participants from the general population by using fMRI-based retinotopic mapping and ...

  17. Making Contact: William Carlos William’s American Literary Aesthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Metzler Sawin, Mark

    2016-01-01

    With the publication of Contact magazine in 1920–1921, American poet William Carlos Williams promoted a distinctive avant-garde literary aesthetic that was centered on “contact”—a concrete connection between literature and the vocabulary, cadence and feel of the everyday language of people. Though initially well received by expatriate authors representing the American avant-garde, Williams’ contact aesthetic was soon eclipsed by T. S. Eliot’s poetry, his magazine Criterion, and its New Cri...

  18. Recurrent Achalasia in a Child with Williams-Beuren Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pereza, Nina; Barbarić, Irena; Ostojić, Saša; Čače, Neven; Kapović, Miljenko

    2011-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a multysistem genetic disorder caused by the 1.6Mb hemizygous deletion involving the elastin gene in the region q11.23 of chromosome 7. The phenotype of Williams-Beuren syndrome is extremelly variable but the most common findings include cardiovascular disease, distinctive facies, mental retardation, a specific congitive profile, endocrine abnormalities, growth retardation and connective tissue abnormalities. Although gastrointestinal difficulties are o...

  19. Epistemologia pragmatyczna Michaela Williamsa (PRAGMATIST EPISTEMOLOGY BY MICHAEL WILLIAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Ziemińska

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents three main elements of Williams' epistemology: the concept of knowledge, the problem of skepticism and the concept of truth. Williams takes knowledge not as pure descriptive but partly normative concept (to know is to be engaged and entitled. He rejects the demonstrative conception of knowledge (knowledge is infallible and prefers the fallibilist conception of knowledge (knowledge is uncertain and fallible. Williams is good at bringing skeptical presuppositions to light: the demonstrative conception of knowledge and the conception of justification with Prior Grounding Requirement, epistemological realism and priority for internal knowledge. He rightly observes that when we change that presuppositions (skeptic's context, knowledge does exist. However, Williams-fallibilist is close to a skeptic: they both agree that our beliefs are uncertain. The difference is only whether some of our beliefs deserve to be called knowledge. The most important worries concern Williams' concept of truth (deflationary pragmatism. According to Williams truth has no nature and it is not a goal of inquiry. However, if truth is not a goal, we can hardly understand the previous discussion with skepticism and the defense of rationality.

  20. Perceptions of medical interactions between healthcare providers and American Indian older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Sarkisian, Natalia; Goldberg, Jack; Buchwald, Dedra; Beals, Janette

    2008-08-01

    Cultural competence models assume that culture affects medical encounters, yet little research uses objective measures to examine how this may be true. Do providers and racial/ethnic minority patients interpret the same interactions similarly or differently? How might patterns of provider-patient concordance and discordance vary for patients with different cultural characteristics? We collected survey data from 115 medical visits with American Indian older adults at a clinic operated by the Cherokee Nation (in Northeastern Oklahoma, USA), asking providers and patients to evaluate nine affective and instrumental interactions. Examining data from the full sample, we found that provider and patient ratings were significantly discordant for all interactions (Wilcoxon signed-rank test pcultural subgroups of patients, comparing magnitude of provider-patient discordance on specific interactions for patients at different levels of American Indian and White American cultural identity. Patients who affiliated strongly with American Indian cultural identity more closely shared providers' reduced evaluation for several variables related to information exchange, as compared to patients who identified weakly. These results flag interactions that providers and their most culturally distinctive patients both experience as challenging. PMID:18524443

  1. William James, Gustav Fechner, and Early Psychophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L. Hawkins

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available American psychologist and philosopher William James devoted the entirety of his career to exploring the nature of volition, as expressed by such phenomena as will, attention, and belief. As part of that endeavor, James's unorthodox scientific pursuits, from his experiments with nitrous oxide and hallucinogenic drugs to his investigation of spiritualist mediums, represent his attempt to address the "hard problems" of consciousness for which his training in brain physiology and experimental psychology could not entirely account. As a student, James's reading in chemistry and physics had sparked his interest in the concepts of energy and force, terms that he later deployed in his writing about consciousness and in his arguments against philosophical monism and scientific materialism, as he developed his radically empiricist ideas privileging discontinuity and plurality. Despite James's long campaign against scientific materialism, he was, however, convinced of the existence of a naturalistic explanation for the more "wayward and fitful" aspects of mind, including transcendent experiences associated with hysteria, genius, and religious ecstasy. In this paper, I examine aspects of James's thought that are still important for contemporary debates in psychology and neuroscience: his "transmission theory" of consciousness, his ideas on the "knowing of things together," and, finally, the related concept of "the compounding of consciousness," which postulates the theoretical possibility for individual entities within a conscious system of thought to "know" the thoughts of others within the system. Taken together, these ideas suggest that James, in spite of, or perhaps because of, his forays into metaphysics, was working toward a naturalistic understanding of consciousness, what I will term a "distributive model," based on his understanding of consciousness as an "awareness" that interacts dynamically within, and in relation to, its environment.

  2. Obituary: William A. Rense (1914-2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Glen

    2009-12-01

    On March 28, 2008, the space research community lost another of its pioneers. William A. Rense, professor emeritus of physics at the University of Colorado in Boulder, who died in Estes Park, Colorado, following complications from cancer. He was 94. Bill, as he was widely known, was born in 1914 in Massillon, Ohio, the son of German immigrants. His was a large family - five brothers and one sister. His father, Joseph Rense, worked for the city of Cleveland while his mother, Rosalia (Luther) Rense was a housewife. As a child, Bill developed a love of astronomy which led him to earn a bachelor's degree in physics and astronomy from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, followed by master's and PhD degrees in physics at Ohio State University. He held teaching positions at Rutgers, University of Miami (Florida), Texas A & M, and Louisiana State University before taking his final appointment at CU in 1949. While teaching at LSU, he met and in 1942 married Wanda (Childs) Rense. In addition to teaching physics at CU, Bill did research in CU's Upper Air Laboratory. His early work there included studies of polarized light and its implications for the analysis of zodiacal light. He and his co-workers also began developing instrumentation to be flown above the Earth's atmosphere in sounding rockets. In 1952 he obtained the first photographic spectrogram of the solar Lyman-alpha line of hydrogen (121.6nm). This work was followed in 1956 by the first full disk spectroheliogram in Lyman-alpha. These results could not have been possible without the use of pointing control systems for sounding rockets. These "sun trackers" kept the payloads pointed at the sun long enough for the measurements to be made, and CU was a pioneer in their development. The expanding research venue led the Upper Air Laboratory to be renamed the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), and Bill Rense was its first director. He continued his research into the properties of the solar

  3. Unity and diversity – the Williams subjects’ message Unity and diversity – the Williams subjects’ message

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans W. Dechert

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Williams subjects, due to a genetically based neuro-developmental disorder from birth, besides various medical problems, demonstrate a dissociation between cognitive and special linguistic processing, and a dissociation within language modules, language domains, and language mini-domains with reference to different languages. This ichotomous profile results from a deletion on one hromosome. What other genes on the same chromosome, not yet identified, or other genes on other chromosomes of the human genome, may be responsible for the same or similar or any other cognitive deficits and/or interactions of cognitive and linguistic deficits, and as such may reveal the specific processes located within specific modules, domains, and/or mini-domains across different languages and cultures, we do not know. What we need, however, is a unified consilient approach engaging the sciences and the humanities to integrate knowledge from various sources of investigation. Williams subjects, due to a genetically based neuro-developmental disorder from birth, besides various medical problems, demonstrate a dissociation between cognitive and special linguistic processing, and a dissociation within language modules, language domains, and language mini-domains with reference to different languages. This ichotomous profile results from a deletion on one hromosome. What other genes on the same chromosome, not yet identified, or other genes on other chromosomes of the human genome, may be responsible for the same or similar or any other cognitive deficits and/or interactions of cognitive and linguistic deficits, and as such may reveal the specific processes located within specific modules, domains, and/or mini-domains across different languages and cultures, we do not know. What we need, however, is a unified consilient approach engaging the sciences and the humanities to integrate knowledge from various sources of investigation.

  4. Obituary: William K. Rose (1935-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2011-12-01

    Stellar astrophysicist William Kenneth Rose died near his home in Potomac, Maryland, on September 30, 2010, after an extended illness. Rose was the son of pharmacist Kenneth William Rose and Shirley Near Rose and was born in Ossining, New York, on August 10, 1935. He received an AB from Columbia College in 1957 and a PhD in physics from Columbia University in 1963, with a thesis on "measurements of linear polarization in discrete radio sources using a 9.4 cm maser," under the direction of Charles H. Townes. Rose played a major role in designing and constructing the maser and used it at a radio telescope at Maryland Point that belonged to the Naval Research Lab. He observed Jupiter and Saturn and a number of extra-solar-system sources, and also diffuse centimeter emission (see appendix). The thesis was not published in an archival journal, but can be found under Library of Congress code QB 475.R67. While in graduate School, Bill married Sheila Tuchman, whose primary scientific interests were biological. None of their three children chose to be scientists, but two are CPAs. Bill moved successfully through the academic hurdles) from a research position at Princeton (1963-67), where a collaboration with Nick Woolf and Martin Schwarzchild on the infrared spectra of giant stars became one of his most-cited papers, to assistant and associate professorships at MIT (1967-71), and then associate and full professorships at the University of Maryland (1971 to retirement in 2005). His most innovative work was probably that on nova explosions arising from degenerate ignition of hydrogen accreted on white dwarfs in close binary systems, published in 1968. The same idea occurred to others at about the same time, and Bill did not, perhaps, get quite his fair share of the credit. I first met Sheila and Bill in summer 1969 at the Stony Brook summer school on stellar evolution (not published until 1972). He lectured on the nature of nova explosions and on nuclear burning in thin

  5. Indianization of psychiatry utilizing Indian mental concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient Indian system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, Indian traditions and Indian systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these Indian concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry. PMID:23858244

  6. 78 FR 62649 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... activities on Indian lands. The Compact between the State of California and the North Fork Rancheria of Mono... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... Compact between the North Fork Rancheria of Mono Indians and the State of California taking effect....

  7. 76 FR 42722 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Assistant... of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 (IGRA), Public Law 100-497, 25 U.S.C. 2710, the...

  8. 75 FR 61511 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary... section 11 of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 (IGRA), Public Law 100-497, 25 U.S.C. 2710,...

  9. 75 FR 38834 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...: Under Section 11 of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 (IGRA), Public Law 100-497, 25 U.S.C....

  10. 76 FR 165 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin (``Tribe'') and the State of Wisconsin Gaming Compact of 1992... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...

  11. Recurrent achalasia in a child with Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereza, Nina; Barbarić, Irena; Ostojić, Sasa; Cace, Neven; Kapović, Miljenko

    2011-09-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a multysistem genetic disorder caused by the 1.6Mb hemizygous deletion involving the elastin gene in the region q11.23 of chromosome 7. The phenotype of Williams-Beuren syndrome is extremelly variable but the most common findings include cardiovascular disease, distinctive facies, mental retardation, a specific congitive profile, endocrine abnormalities, growth retardation and connective tissue abnormalities. Although gastrointestinal difficulties are one of the most constant and prominent finding of the syndrome, including gastro-esophageal reflux (GER), poor suckling, vomiting, constipation, prolonged colic, rectal prolapse, inguinal, umbilical and hiatal hernia, there have been no reports of achalasia in association with Williams-Beuren syndrome in the literature. We present the case of a boy with Williams-Beuren syndrome, achalasia and recurrent postoperative stenosis of the cardia. After Heller myotomy, the boy developed severe restenosis of the cardia with abundant adhesions which repeated after every treatment, five times in periods shorter than one month. Eventually, he developed GER, errosive gastritis and hiatal hernia which led to severe malnutrition and failure to thrive. Although the genetic defect causing Williams-Beuren syndrome might not be the direct cause of achalasia we suggest that the frequent development of severe restenosis of cardia due to tight adhesions could be the consequence of elastin gene haploinsufficiency and altered structure and function of elastic fibers in esophageal connective tissue. This case highlights the importance of early diagnosis of esophageal motor disorders in childhood which should be included in the differential diagnosis when a child with Williams-Beuren syndrome presents with dysphagia and/or regurgitation. PMID:22053584

  12. Obituary: William L. Kraushaar, 1920-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, George W.

    2009-01-01

    Professor William L. Kraushaar, a former MIT physics professor and a pioneer in the field of high-energy astronomy, died 21 March 2008 of complications from Parkinson's disease. He was 87. Kraushaar received his bachelor's degree from Lafayette College in 1942. During World War II he worked at the National Bureau of Standards on projects that included development of the proximity fuse for artillery shells. After the war he earned his doctorate at Cornell University. In 1949 Kraushaar was appointed research associate at MIT, where he made the first measurements of the mean life of the pi meson at the MIT electron synchrotron. Over the next fifteen years he rose through the faculty ranks, becoming a full professor before leaving MIT for the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1965. In 1957 Kraushaar began a decade-long effort to map the sky in the "light" of cosmic gamma rays. Their detection promised to open new ways to investigate high-energy processes in the universe. Initial balloon-borne experiments failed due to background gamma rays generated in the residual atmosphere above the highest attainable altitudes. In 1958, Kraushaar seized a new opportunity for experiments above the atmosphere. Working with Professor George Clark, he directed the development in the MIT Laboratory for Nuclear Science of a gamma-ray detector for a satellite experiment that was launched in April 1961 as Explorer 11. It registered 31 events with the electronic signatures of cosmic gamma rays with energies greater than 50 MeV. Kraushaar then initiated a second and more refined experiment to be carried on OSO 3. In this project Kraushaar and Clark were joined by Gordon Garmire, a former student of Kraushaar. The OSO 3 experiment, launched in March of 1967, registered 621 cosmic gamma-ray events. It yielded the first all-sky map of high-energy cosmic gamma rays showing a concentration of gamma rays from directions in the Milky Way where gamma-ray producing interactions of charged cosmic

  13. The oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeGrange A.R.

    1990-02-01

    Full Text Available Following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound Alaska, on March 24, 1989, treatment centres for sea otters were set up at Valdez, Seward and Homer. Otter survival rates were lower at Valdez than at Seward, probably because the animals collected were closer to the spill in time and space, and oil toxicity was at a maximum. Otters collected in Prince William Sound were predominantly female and pregnant or lactating. Weathered oil persists in otter habitats throughout the spill zone - long term studies are underway to assess the effects of this.

  14. Indian concepts on sexuality

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Thakurata, Rajarshi Guha

    2013-01-01

    India is a vast country depicting wide social, cultural and sexual variations. Indian concept of sexuality has evolved over time and has been immensely influenced by various rulers and religions. Indian sexuality is manifested in our attire, behavior, recreation, literature, sculptures, scriptures, religion and sports. It has influenced the way we perceive our health, disease and device remedies for the same. In modern era, with rapid globalization the unique Indian sexuality is getting diffu...

  15. Anti-inflammatory Effect of Cherokee Rose Root and Its Effect on NO Release of Macrophage%金樱根的抗炎作用及对巨噬细胞释放NO的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹堂斌; 解庆林

    2011-01-01

    为探索金樱根的抗炎作用及对炎症因子一氧化氮(NO)的调控作用,建立小鼠二甲苯耳廓肿胀模型、琼脂肉芽组织增生模型,并通过测定金樱根对脂多糖诱导小鼠腹腔巨噬细胞释放NO的影响观察金樱根的抗炎作用及其与NO的关系.结果表明,金樱根能抑制二甲苯引起的小鼠耳廓肿胀、琼脂肉芽组织增生,能抑制炎症因子NO的释放.认为,金樱根具有较好的抗炎作用,这种作用与抑制NO等炎症因子释放有关.%The anti-inflammatory effect of cherokee rose root was observed by building mice dimethylbenzene auricle swelling model and agar granulation hyperblastosis model and the effect of cherokee rose root on NO release of mice coeliac macrophage was determined to study the antiinflammatory effect of cherokee rose root and adjusting effect of cherokee rose root on NO release (inflammatory factor). The results showed that cherokee rose root could inhibit mice auricle swelling caused by dimethylbenzene, agar granulation hyperblastosis and NO release. cherokee rose root is of good anti-inflammatory effect and its anti-inflammatory effect may be related to inhibition of NO release.

  16. Shepard Award Winners, Part 2: Dr. Tracie Williams

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-07-29

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Tracie Williams, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 7/29/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/29/2009.

  17. William Shakespeare’s“Hamlet”and Oedipus Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    迪丽努尔

    2014-01-01

    “Hamlet”is one of the great dramas of William Shakespeare. This paper by describing the relationship between Hamlet and his mother, the Ghost and his uncle, tries to approve that Oedipus complex is the main reason of Hamlet’s kil ing his uncle.

  18. In Profound Memory of American Friend WILLIAM H. HINTON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RenZhichang

    2004-01-01

    William H. Hinton, an old friend of the Chinese peopie, died of illness in Boston, the United States on May 15, 2004 at the age of 85. I was filled with deep sorrow for losing a good friend of the Chinese people.

  19. Great Alaska Earthquake, Prince William Sound, March 28, 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Prince William Sound magnitude 8.4 earthquake at 03:36 UT on March 28, 1964, was one of the largest shocks ever recorded on the North American Continent. The...

  20. The life and legacy of William T. Bovie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Preston L

    2013-05-01

    This Historian's Address, presented at the North Pacific Surgical Association 2012 meeting, held in Spokane, Washington, on November 9, 2012, briefly reviews the life and surgical contributions of the inventor William T. Bovie and his collaboration with Dr Harvey Cushing, which led to the widespread acceptance of surgical electrocautery for dissection and hemostasis.

  1. Atypical Sleep Architecture and Altered EEG Spectra in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombos, F.; Bodizs, R.; Kovacs, I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder characterised by physical abnormalities and a distinctive cognitive profile with intellectual disabilities (IDs) and learning difficulties. Methods: In our study, nine adolescents and young adults with WS and 9 age- and sex-matched typically developing (TD) participants…

  2. Comprehension of Metaphor and Metonymy in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Van Herwegen, Jo; Thomas, Michael; Fishman, Roza; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Rundblad, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    Background: Figurative language, such as metaphor and metonymy, is very common in daily language use. Its underlying cognitive processes are sometimes viewed as lying at the interface of language and thought. Williams syndrome, which is a rare genetic developmental disorder, provides an opportunity to study this interface because individuals with…

  3. William Knocke receives 2008 Virginia Outstanding Civil Engineer Award

    OpenAIRE

    Daniilidi, Christina

    2008-01-01

    William R. Knocke, W.C. English Professor and head of the Charles E. Via, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech, was awarded the 2008 Virginia Outstanding Civil Engineer Award at the Virginia Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers' (ASCE) banquet, held recently in Williamsburg, Va.

  4. William Butler Yeats, George Antheil, Ezra Pound Friends and Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Saddlemyer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available William Butler Yeats was throughout his life determined to relate his words to music, and involved many writers and musicians in his search for the key. While in Rapallo staying near Ezra Pound, he met the young composer George Antheil, who became one of his converts. Others followed, with Yeats continuing to expound and clarify his ambition.

  5. Best Practices Case Study: Tommy Williams Homes -Gainesville, FL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-04-01

    Case study of Tommy Williams Homes who has continued to outsell the competition with sales increasing despite the recession thanks to a systems-engineering approach developed with DOE’s Building America that yields high energy efficiency, comfort, and indoor air quality. The company offers to pay buyers’ energy bills for the first year.

  6. In Profound Memory of American Friend WILLIAM H. HINTON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>William H. Hinton, an old friend of the Chinese people, died of illness in Boston, the United States on May 15, 2004 at the age of 85.I was filled with deep sorrow for losing a good friend of the Chinese people.

  7. Musicality Correlates with Sociability and Emotionality in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Rowena; Lai, Philip; Levitin, Daniel J.; Bellugi, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic developmental disorder characterized by peaks and valleys of cognitive abilities. One peak that has been understudied is the affinity that many individuals with WS have with music. It remains unknown whether their high levels of musical interest, skill, and expressivity are related to their sociable…

  8. Social Criticism in The Chimney Sweeper by William Blake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晓芸

    2008-01-01

    This paper mainly focuses on social criticism in William Blake's poems,both entitled"The Chimnet SWeeper"by analy-zing social background at that time and different Views in these two poems.It also tries to embody a fuller effect in thesc two separate poems.

  9. The Darwinian Center to the Vision of William James.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredo, Eric

    The essence of William James's vision can sometimes be hard to discover due to emotional volatility and exploratory impulsiveness. On the other hand, beneath James's apparent inconsistency was a constancy of purpose that can be easily underestimated. This paper argues that the center of James's vision lay in an interpretation of Darwinism. By…

  10. Benjamin Franklin, William Hewson and the Craven Street bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Hillson

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available Renovation of the house in London where Benjamin Franklin lived has led to the discovery of the remains of a late eighteenth-century anatomy school. Investigations by bioarchaeologists from the Institute are revealing William Hewson's remarkable contribution to the development of anatomical science.

  11. EUTROPHICATION ANALYSIS OF EMBAYMENTS IN PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertilizers were used in the summer of 1989 to accelerate bacterial growth in a bioremediation effort to clean up the beaches following the EXXON Valdez oil spill. athematical models were used to quantify the eutrophication potential in two selected embayments in Prince William S...

  12. Joseph Mallord William Turner: Burning of the Houses of Parliament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solender, Katherine; Buchanan, Penelope D.

    1989-01-01

    Provides a lesson plan that introduces students in grades seven-nine to artistic depiction of a specific time and place. Explores Joseph Mallord William Turner's "Burning of the Houses of Parliament" as both visual record and emotional interpretation. Lists instructional strategies for description, analysis, interpretation, and judgment. Suggests…

  13. Perceptual Speech and Paralinguistic Skills of Adolescents with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Patricia M.; Pittelko, Stephen; Fillingane, Evan; Rustman, Emily; Lund, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare selected speech and paralinguistic skills of speakers with Williams syndrome (WS) and typically developing peers and to demonstrate the feasibility of providing preexisting databases to students to facilitate graduate research. In a series of three studies, conversational samples of 12 adolescents with…

  14. Intonation Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovik, Vesna; Setter, Jane; van Ewijk, Lizet

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated expressive and receptive intonation abilities in children with Williams syndrome (WS) and the relation of these abilities to other linguistic abilities. Method: Fourteen children with WS, 14 typically developing children matched to the WS group for receptive language (LA), and 15 typically developing children…

  15. The Interplay between Anxiety and Social Functioning in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Deborah M.; Hanley, Mary; Kirk, Hannah; Clark, Fiona; Little, Katie; Fleck, Ruth; Janes, Emily; Kelso, Linzi; O'Kane, Fionnuala; Cole-Fletcher, Rachel; Allday, Marianne Hvistendahl; Hocking, Darren; Cornish, Kim; Rodgers, Jacqui

    2014-01-01

    The developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) has been associated with an atypical social profile of hyper-sociability and heightened social sensitivity across the developmental spectrum. In addition, previous research suggests that both children and adults with WS have a predisposition towards anxiety. The current research aimed to explore…

  16. Williams Syndrome: Daily Challenges and Positive Impact on the Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scallan, Susan; Senior, Joyce; Reilly, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the distinctive physical, cognitive, personality and behavioural characteristics associated with Williams syndrome, few studies to date have examined parental experiences of raising a child with this genetic syndrome. Methods: This explorative pilot study employed predominantly qualitative methodologies via face-to-face…

  17. Electrophysiological Correlates of Semantic Processing in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Ana P.; Galdo-Alvarez, Santaigo; Sampaio, Adriana; Niznikiewicz, Margaret; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2010-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder due to microdeletion in chromosome 7, has been described as a syndrome with an intriguing socio-cognitive phenotype. Cognitively, the relative preservation of language and face processing abilities coexists with severe deficits in visual-spatial tasks, as well as in tasks involving…

  18. The Poetics of "Pattern Recognition": William Gibson's Shifting Technological Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetmore, Alex

    2007-01-01

    William Gibson's 1984 cyberpunk novel "Neuromancer" continues to be a touchstone in cultural representations of the impact of new information and communication technologies on the self. As critics have noted, the posthumanist, capital-driven, urban landscape of "Neuromancer" resembles a Foucaultian vision of a panoptically engineered social space…

  19. How Executive Functions Are Related to Intelligence in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Ana; Cruz, Raquel; Sampaio, Adriana; Garayzabal, Elena; Martinez-Regueiro, Rocio; Goncalves, Oscar F.; Carracedo, Angel; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse

    2012-01-01

    Williams syndrome is characterized by impairments in executive functions (EFs). However, it remains unknown how distinct types of EFs relate to intelligence in this syndrome. The present study analyzed performance on working memory, inhibiting and shifting, and its links to IQ in a sample of 17 individuals with WS, and compared them with a group…

  20. William and Mary's President Exits on His Own Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The president and governing board at the College of William and Mary have parted ways in an unusually public split with a deeply partisan undercurrent. Gene R. Nichol says that the Board of Visitors forced him out for defending free speech and diversity on the campus, and that he turned down a generous severance package to go quietly. Board…

  1. Judicial Management: The Achievements of Chief Justice William Howard Taft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Illuminates the importance of Chief Justice William Howard Taft in creating the modern administrative role of the Chief Justice of the United States. Specifically, the article examines the Act of 14 September 1922 that Taft championed in Congress to give the Chief Justice better tools for managing the judiciary. (DSK)

  2. Reaching beyond Uncle William: a century of William James in theory and in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, Paul J

    2010-11-01

    During the hundred years since his death, James's works have developed a reputation for literary flair and personal appeal, but also for inconsistency and lack of rigor; this has contributed to more admiration than influence. He had a talent rare among intellectuals for popularization of complex ideas. Meanwhile, his difficult coming of age and his compelling personality have contributed to an iconic status as a kind of uncle figure in philosophy, psychology, religious studies, and more fields that he influenced, and in American intellectual life in general, rather than as a major philosopher and scholar. Often reflecting these ways of depicting James, his biographies have gone through three phases: in the early-to-middle twentieth century, emphasis on his development of theories as solutions to personal problems; since the 1960s, increased scrutiny of deep troubles in his private life; and recently renewed attention to intellectual factors especially as amplified by greater appreciation of James's theories in the last generation. Now, with so much knowledge and insight achieved for understanding his personal life and his contributions to many fields, a next frontier for biographical work will be in synthesis of these strands of the life of William James. Recent and prospective work offers the promise of finding deeper meaning and implications in his work beyond, and even through, his informal style, and with integration of his apparent inconsistencies. PMID:21688731

  3. Biogeochemistry of mercury in a river-reservoir system: impact of an inactive chloralkali plant on the Holston River-Cherokee Reservoir, Virginia and Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrand, S. G.; Lindberg, S. E.; Turner, R. R.; Huckabee, J. W.; Strand, R. H.; Lund, J. R.; Andren, A. W.

    1980-08-01

    Elevated mercury concentrations in fish species from the North Fork of the Holston River were observed in the early 1970's. The source of the mercury was a chloralkali plant which had ceased operation in 1972. Mercury continues to be released to the river from two large (approx. 40-ha) waste disposal ponds at the plant site. This report presents results of a study of the emission of mercury to the environment from the abandoned waste ponds and of the distribution of mercury in water, sediment, and biota of the Holston River-Cherokee Reservoir System in Virginia and eastern Tennessee.

  4. The Tarascan Indian House.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Joyce

    1989-01-01

    This lesson plan introduces K-grade three students to Mexican Indian architecture. Students will become familiar with the cultural context of the Indian treasure house; discuss the use of wood as the sole building material; compare the treasure house with present day structures; and create miniature treasure houses using wood materials. (GEA)

  5. Pima Indian Legends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Anna Moore

    The stated purpose of this book is to preserve in writing some of the Pima Indian legends that had been verbally passed from generation to generation in the past. This collection of 23 legends, which were originally used to instruct the young people of the tribe, presents in story form various aspects of American Indian life--including…

  6. Indians of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A brief historical review of the American Indian in California from prehistoric to modern times indicates the hardships and economic disadvantages which the Indians have suffered in the acculturation process. Discussion of the treaties which were negotiated and the Federal legislation which was passed indicates an attempt on the part of modern day…

  7. Indian Ocean Rim Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wippel, Steffen

    Since the mid-1990s, the Indian Ocean has been experiencing increasing economic cooperation among its rim states. Middle Eastern countries, too, participate in the work of the Indian Ocean Rim Association, which received new impetus in the course of the current decade. Notably Oman is a very active...

  8. Indian Inuit Pottery '73

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawow, 1974

    1974-01-01

    A unique exhibit of Canadian Native Ceramics which began touring various art galleries in September 1973 is described both verbally and photographically. The Indian Inuit Pottery '73 display, part of the 1973 International Ceramics Exhibition, includes 110 samples of craftsmanship from Indian and Inuit artists across Canada. (KM)

  9. 33 CFR 161.60 - Vessel Traffic Service Prince William Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... vessel as defined in 33 CFR part 168. (e) Reporting Points. Table 161.60(d)—VTS Prince William Sound... William Sound. 161.60 Section 161.60 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Movement Reporting System Areas and Reporting Points § 161.60 Vessel Traffic Service Prince William...

  10. 77 FR 41200 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... of an extension to the Class III Gaming Compact between the State of California and the Federated... L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy...

  11. 77 FR 76514 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... publishes the Deemed Approved Amendment to the Tribal-State Compact between the State of California and the... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...

  12. 78 FR 44146 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... State of California taking effect. DATES: Effective Date: July 23, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy...

  13. 78 FR 54908 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... activities on Indian lands. The Compact between the State of California and the Wiyot Tribe provides for... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... III Tribal- State Gaming Compact between the Wiyot Tribe and the State of California. DATES:...

  14. Indian Teachers and School Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavers, Dean

    2000-01-01

    Past failures in American Indian education are linked to lingering assimilationist practices, outdated curricula, and low expectations of Indian youth. A key to improving Indian education is changing school culture and increasing the numbers of Indian teachers and administrators. Elements of a model teacher education program are presented, and…

  15. New Indian Tribalism. Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Kathleen

    The purposes of this paper are to identify the problems Washington State Indians face and to provide considerations that might assist in promoting the welfare and well-being of American Indians. It is stated that the major barrier to the Indian's success in American society is the attitude of the Anglo towards the Indian. Thus, the programs and…

  16. 76 FR 33341 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the...

  17. 78 FR 10203 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Approval of the Class III Tribal- State Gaming Compact between the Chippewa-Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy's Indian...

  18. 77 FR 59641 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  19. 76 FR 65208 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an Approval of the Gaming..., Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy and Economic...

  20. 77 FR 45371 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the...

  1. 75 FR 8108 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of the Tribal-State Compact between the Pyramid Lake Paiute Indian Tribe and the State of Nevada Governing Class III...

  2. 75 FR 68618 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewas (``Tribe'') and the State of Wisconsin Gaming Compact of... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...

  3. 76 FR 56466 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an approval of the gaming...: September 13, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian...

  4. 76 FR 52968 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the...

  5. 77 FR 43110 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the...

  6. 78 FR 15738 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of the gaming..., 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  7. 75 FR 55823 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  8. 78 FR 26801 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of an amendment to the Class III Tribal-State Gaming Compact between the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin and...

  9. 78 FR 11221 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of the gaming..., 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  10. 75 FR 38833 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Approved Compact between... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy...

  11. 77 FR 76513 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Amended Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact taking effect. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...

  12. 76 FR 8375 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of the Gaming..., 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  13. 75 FR 68823 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Amendment. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of the Amendments to the Class III Gaming Compact (Amendment) between the State of Oregon and the Siletz Indians...

  14. Rasam Indian Restaurant: Menu

    OpenAIRE

    Rasam Indian Restaurant

    2013-01-01

    Rasam Indian Restaurant is located in the Glasthule, a suburb of Dublin and opened in 2003. The objective is to serve high quality, authentic Indian cuisine. "We blend, roast and grind our own spices daily to provide a flavour that is unique to Rasam. Cooking Indian food is founded upon long held family traditions. The secret is in the varying elements of heat and spices, the tandoor clay oven is a hugely important fixture in our kitchen. Marinated meats are lowered into the oven on long m...

  15. [Indian workers in Oman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longuenesse, E

    1985-01-01

    Until recently Oman was a country of emigration, but by 1980 an estimated 200,000 foreign workers were in the country due to the petroleum boom. Almost 1/3 of the estimated 300,000 Indian workers in the Gulf states were in Oman, a country whose colonial heritage was closely tied to that of India and many of whose inhabitants still speak Urdu. The number of work permits granted to Indians working in the private sector in Oman increased from 47,928 in 1976 to 80,787 in 1980. An estimated 110,000 Indians were working in Oman in 1982, the great majority in the construction and public works sector. A few hundred Indian women were employed by the government of Oman, as domestics, or in other capacities. No accurate data is available on the qualifications of Indian workers in Oman, but a 1979 survey suggested a relatively low illiteracy rate among them. 60-75% of Indians in Oman are from the state of Kerala, followed by workers from the Punjab and the southern states of Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh and Bombay. Indian workers are recruited by specialized agencies or by friends or relatives already employed in Oman. Employers in Oman prefer to recruit through agencies because the preselection process minimizes hiring of workers unqualified for their posts. Officially, expenses of transportation, visas, and other needs are shared by the worker and the employer, but the demand for jobs is so strong that the workers are obliged to pay commissions which amount to considerable sums for stable and well paying jobs. Wages in Oman are however 2 to 5 times the level in India. Numerous abuses have been reported in recruitment practices and in failure of employers in Oman to pay the promised wages, but Indian workers have little recourse. At the same level of qualifications, Indians are paid less then non-Omani Arabs, who in turn receive less than Oman nationals. Indians who remain in Oman long enough nevertheless are able to support families at home and to accumulate considerable

  16. The sub-peritoneal arterial plexus of Sir William Turner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marious; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Ghabili, Kamyar; Agutter, Paul S

    2010-08-20

    Sir William Turner (1832-1916) was Professor of Anatomy at the University of Edinburgh. His classic paper of 1863 on the anastomoses between the parietal and visceral branches of the abdominal aorta, later known as the sub-peritoneal arterial plexus of Turner, has mostly been forgotten. Located in the retroperitoneum and surrounding the kidneys and other adjacent structures, this plexus is an important route of collateral circulation. In the current paper, we discuss the sub-peritoneal arterial plexus as described by Turner in 1863 and review the literature concerning its potential clinical significance in the kidney, emphasizing its probable role in the metastatic spread of various tumors of abdominal organs and in the continuing viability of the kidney after renal artery occlusion. A biographical sketch of Sir William Turner is also presented.

  17. Structural controls on ground-water conditions and estimated aquifer properties near Bill Williams Mountain, Williams, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Herbert A.

    2001-01-01

    As of 1999, surface water collected and stored in reservoirs is the sole source of municipal water for the city of Williams. During 1996 and 1999, reservoirs reached historically low levels. Understanding the ground-water flow system is critical to managing the ground-water resources in this part of the Coconino Plateau. The nearly 1,000-meter-deep regional aquifer in the Redwall and Muav Limestones, however, makes studying or utilizing the resource difficult. Near-vertical faults and complex geologic structures control the ground-water flow system on the southwest side of the Kaibab Uplift near Williams, Arizona. To address the hydrogeologic complexities in the study area, a suite of techniques, which included aeromagnetic, gravity, square-array resistivity, and audiomagnetotelluric surveys, were applied as part of a regional study near Bill Williams Mountain. Existing well data and interpreted geophysical data were compiled and used to estimate depths to the water table and to prepare a potentiometric map. Geologic characteristics, such as secondary porosity, coefficient of anisotropy, and fracture-strike direction, were calculated at several sites to examine how these characteristics change with depth. The 14-kilometer-wide, seismically active northwestward-trending Cataract Creek and the northeastward-trending Mesa Butte Fault systems intersect near Bill Williams Mountain. Several north-south-trending faults may provide additional block faulting north and west of Bill Williams Mountain. Because of the extensive block faulting and regional folding, the volcanic and sedimentary rocks are tilted toward one or more of these faults. These faults provide near-vertical flow paths to the regional water table. The nearly radial fractures allow water that reaches the regional aquifer to move away from the Bill Williams Mountain area. Depth to the regional aquifer is highly variable and depends on location and local structures. On the basis of interpreted

  18. Morphological differences in the mirror neuron system in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Rowena; Brown, Timothy T.; Erhart, Matthew; Järvinen, Anna M.; Korenberg, Julie R; Bellugi, Ursula; Halgren, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic condition characterized by an overly gregarious personality, including high empathetic concern for others. Although seemingly disparate from the profile of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), both are associated with deficits in social communication/cognition. Notably, the mirror neuron system (MNS) has been implicated in social dysfunction for ASD; yet, the integrity of this network and its association with social functioning in WS remains unknown. Magnetic re...

  19. Mission impossible: William Scott and the first Sydney Observatory directorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchiston, Wayne

    1998-06-01

    The Reverend William Scott (1825-1917) was the founding Director of the Sydney Observatory, and succeeded in acquiring state-of-the art astronomical instruments, establishing a network of country meteorological stations, and conducting a range of astronomical observations. He also worked to promote popular interest in astronomy, and immersed himself in the scientific culture of New South Wales. This paper examines Scott's achievements in astronomy and meteorology, the reasons for his premature resignation in 1862, and the search for his successor.

  20. William Gaddis’s Immortality: Celebration, Cartoon, or Corruption?

    OpenAIRE

    Crystal Alberts

    2013-01-01

    Although ostensibly a review of 'The Letters of William Gaddis' edited by Steven Moore (Champaign: Dalkey Archive, 2013), this article evaluates Moore’s volume in light of generally accepted practices of scholarly editions and the handling of historical documents. In particular, Alberts compares some of Moore’s edited letters to the originals housed either at Washington University in St. Louis or the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas, Austin and reveals issues involving the repre...

  1. Fissured and geographic tongue in Williams-Beuren syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeta Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS is a rare, most often sporadic, genetic disease caused by a chromosomal microdeletion at locus 7q11.23 involving 28 genes. It is characterized by congenital heart defects, neonatal hypercalcemia, skeletal and renal abnormalities, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder, and dysmorphic facies. A number of clinical findings has been reported, but none of the studies evaluated this syndrome considering oral cavity. We here report a fissured and geographic tongue in association with WBS.

  2. Clinical usefulness of the Vaughan Williams classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbe, S M

    1987-03-01

    The clinical usefulness of the Vaughan Williams classification scheme is limited by the complexity of the mechanisms of arrhythmia formation in man, which offer multiple potential sites for intervention. The properties of antiarrhythmic drugs may be considerably altered in abnormal myocardium. Despite these limitations, however, the classification provides a valuable conceptual framework for the understanding of the clinical electrophysiological properties of antiarrhythmic drugs and for their use.

  3. Eccentric neurosurgical virtuoso: the life and times of William Sharpe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, Roberta; Cohen, Alan R

    2015-07-01

    William Sharpe was an intriguing figure in the history of American neurosurgery. He was an extraordinarily bright and gifted man who led a flamboyant, colorful, and unconventional life. He had an international impact on the field of neurosurgery during the first half of the 20th century, yet few practicing neurosurgeons know his name. In this report, the authors discuss Sharpe's contributions to neurosurgery along with the remarkable quirkiness that came to define his professional and personal life.

  4. Retinotopically defined primary visual cortex in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Rosanna K; Kippenhan, J Shane; Japee, Shruti; Kohn, Philip; Mervis, Carolyn B; Saad, Ziad S; Morris, Colleen A; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Berman, Karen Faith

    2009-03-01

    Williams syndrome, caused by a hemizygous microdeletion on chromosome 7q11.23, is characterized by severe impairment in visuospatial construction. To examine potential contributions of early visual processing to this cognitive problem, we functionally mapped the size and neuroanatomical variability of primary visual cortex (V1) in high-functioning adults with Williams syndrome and age- and IQ-matched control participants from the general population by using fMRI-based retinotopic mapping and cortical surface models generated from high-resolution structural MRI. Visual stimulation, consisting of rotating hemicircles and expanding rings, was used to retinotopically define early visual processing areas. V1 boundaries based on computed phase and field sign maps were used to calculate the functional area of V1. Neuroanatomical variability was assessed by computing overlap maps of V1 location for each group on standardized cortical surfaces, and non-parametric permutation test methods were used for statistical inference. V1 did not differ in size between groups, although its anatomical boundaries were more variable in the group with Williams syndrome. V1 overlap maps showed that the average centres of gravity for the two groups were similarly located near the fundus of the calcarine fissure, approximately 25 mm away from the most posterior aspect of the occipital lobe. In summary, our functional definition of V1 size and location indicates that recruitment of primary visual cortex is grossly normal in Williams syndrome, consistent with the notion that neural abnormalities underlying visuospatial construction arise at later stages in the visual processing hierarchy. PMID:19255058

  5. The interplay between anxiety and social functioning in Williams syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Riby, D. M.; Hanley, M.; Kirk, H.; Clark, F.; Little, K.; Fleck, R; Janes, E.; Kelso, L.; O’Kane, F.; Cole-Fletcher, R.; Allday, M.H.; Hocking, D.; Cornish, K.; Rodgers, J

    2014-01-01

    The developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) has been associated with an atypical social profile of hyper-sociability and heightened social sensitivity across the developmental spectrum. In addition, previous research suggests that both children and adults with WS have a predisposition towards anxiety. The current research aimed to explore the profiles of social behaviour and anxiety across a broad age range of individuals with the disorder (n = 59, ages 6–36 years). We used insights fro...

  6. Sir William Rowan Hamilton: Life, Achievements, Stature in Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-06-01

    Against the background of the development ofphysics, and in particular of mechanics, over thecenturies since Galileo and Newton, we describethe life and work of William Rowan Hamilton inthe 19th century. The depth of his ideas whichbrought together the understanding of ray opticsand classical mechanics, and the remarkableways in which his work paved the way to theconstruction of quantum mechanics in the 20thcentury, are emphasized.

  7. William H. Sheldon and the culture of the somatotype

    OpenAIRE

    Gatlin, Stephen H.

    1997-01-01

    The burden of this dissertation is to show that William Sheldon's somatotype project should be seen as an integral aspect of modernist culture. Sheldon engaged the same problems with modernity and the "Second Industrial Revolution" (urbanization, overpopulation, industrialization, alienation) that confronted modernist poets, novelists, and philosophers. In this I am elaborating Dorothy Ross's recent metaphor, "modernist impulses in the human sciences" (1994). Both scientists and artists were ...

  8. OBITUARY: Sir William Mitchell Physicist and enthusiast for science

    CERN Multimedia

    Cowley, R

    2002-01-01

    "William Mitchell was successively head of Physics at Reading and Oxford universities, and Chairman of the Science and Engineering Research Council from 1985 to 1990. He is largely responsible for the excellent neutron and X-ray facilities that are available for research by scientists in the UK. He was one of the first to realise that these uniquely powerful facilities would be essential tools not only for physicists but also for chemists, biologists, materials scientists and engineers" (1 page).

  9. Musicality Correlates With Sociability and Emotionality in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Rowena; Lai, Philip; Levitin, Daniel J.; Bellugi, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic developmental disorder characterized by peaks and valleys of cognitive abilities. One peak that has been understudied is the affinity that many individuals with WS have toward music. It remains unknown whether their high levels of musical interest, skill and expressivity are related to their sociable personality or their verbal intelligence. We examined the relationships between musicality (musical interest, creativity and expressivity), sociability (s...

  10. Pulmonary Function and Emphysema in Williams-Beuren Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Emily S.; Pober, Barbara R; Washko, George; Raby, Benjamin A.; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2010-01-01

    Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS) is caused by a submicroscopic deletion on chromosome 7q11.23 that encompasses the entire elastin (ELN) gene. Elastin, a key component of elastic fibers within the lung, is progressively destroyed in emphysema. Defects in the elastin gene have been associated with increased susceptibility towards developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and emphysema in both humans and mice. We postulate that hemizygosity at the elastin gene locus may increase susc...

  11. Environmental sound recognition by timbre in children with Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Castilla, P.; García Nogales, Mª Ángeles; Campos García, Ruth; Rodríguez, M

    2014-01-01

    Statement: "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in [JOURNAL TITLE] on [date of publication], available online at:http://www.tandfonline.com/[Article DOI]." Anecdotal reports have described children with Williams syndrome (WS) as presenting outstanding skills for recognizing environmental sounds by their timbre. This has led to suggest that the skills for environmental sound recognition by timbre are highly developed in WS. Furthermore, the term ...

  12. Beyond behaviour: Is social anxiety low in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Dodd, Helen; Schniering, Carolyn; Porter, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) exhibit striking social behaviour that may be indicative of abnormally low social anxiety. The present research aimed to determine whether social anxiety is unusually low in WS and to replicate previous findings of increased generalised anxiety in WS using both parent and self report. Fifteen individuals with WS aged 12-28 years completed the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale (SCAS) and the Children’s Automatic Thoughts Scale (CATS). Their responses were ...

  13. Kaleidoscope of Vistas : Identity Destabilization in William S. Burroughs' Novels

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    William S. Burroughs’ work is generally regarded as narratives of opposition and revolt. However, in this thesis, I will examine how his socially deviant characters are not exempt from discourses that rely on binary hierarchies, and promote coherence. The dissemination of identity shows the limits of essentialist rhetoric, and the impossibility of pure self-representation. For Burroughs, the liability of our ability to create truths is the ignorance of its multiplicity and unavoidability. The...

  14. Ishi: A Yahi Indian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003

    The Yahi Indians were part of a larger tribal group called the Yana. The Yahi way of life, along with the lives of many other California Indian groups, changed when European and U.S. settlers came to California. In 1872 Ishi and his family were the last of the Yahi living in the Deer Creek (California) area. By 1911 Ishi was the last surviving…

  15. Dreamers in dialogue: evolution, sex and gender in the utopian visions of William Morris and William Henry Hudson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Novák

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to explore the parallels between two late-nineteenth-century utopias,William Henry Hudsons A Crystal Age (1882 and William Morriss News from Nowhere (1891. Itaims to explore how these two works respond to the transition from a kinetic to a static conception ofutopia that under pressure from evolutionary and feminist discourses took place during the period.Particular focus lies on the way in which this is negotiated through the depiction of evolution, sexuality,and gender roles in the respective novels, and how the depiction of these disruptive elements may workas a means of ensuring the readers active engagement in political, intellectual and emotional terms.

  16. Toxicity of Sediments and Pore-waters and their Potential Impact on Neosho Madtom, Noturus Placidus, in the Spring River System Affected by Historic Zinc-Lead Mining and Related Activities in Jasper and Newtown Counties, Missouri; and Cherokee County, Kan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Tri-State Mining District, comprising portions of Jasper and Newton Counties, Missouri; Cherokee County, Kansas; and Ottawa County, Oklahoma, was mined...

  17. Profile: American Indian/Alaska Native

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native Profile: American Indian/Alaska Native Spotlight ACA Infographic for American Indians/ ... Program Circle of Life multimedia youth education program American Indian/Alaska Native Profile Great Plains Area Alaska Area ...

  18. Modeling Soil Loss to Determine Water Erosion Risk at Camp Williams National Guard Base, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Bartsch, Kevin P.

    1998-01-01

    Soil erosion was assessed at Camp Williams National Guard Base by creating an erosion risk classification map and comparing the erosion impact of disturbance regimes on different hillslopes. Soil erosion does not appear to be a problem for most of Camp Williams. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation was applied using GIS to create a soil erosion risk map for the entire Camp Williams facility. The map indicated where problem areas occurred and showed relative erosion risk, but its lack o...

  19. Using novel control groups to dissect the amygdala’s role in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Avery, Suzanne N; Blackford, Jennifer Urbano

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder with an intriguing behavioral phenotype—hypersociability combined with significant non-social fears. Previous studies have demonstrated abnormalities in amygdala function in individuals with Williams syndrome compared to typically-developing controls. However, it remains unclear whether the findings are related to the atypical neurodevelopment of Williams syndrome, or are also associated with behavioral traits at the extreme end of a normal c...

  20. Mission Indians and Indians of California Land Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipek, Florence C.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses California Indian Claims Cases, focussing on the Indians of California Case. Presents a background sketch of the major claims and the nature of influences determining the wording of petitions, particularly in the Missions Indian Claims Case in which anthropological misunderstanding of socio-political-territorial organizations created…

  1. Hamlin Garland and the Indian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Lonnie E.

    1974-01-01

    Written to stimulate interest in an evaluation of Hamlin Garland's total production of work on the American Indian, this article suggests a reevaluation of some of Garland's work in light of the current interest in American Indian studies. (JC)

  2. Indian Ocean Traffic: Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola Sharon Davidson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Like the Mediterranean, the Indian Ocean has been a privileged site of cross-cultural contact since ancient times. In this special issue, our contributors track disparate movements of people and ideas around the Indian Ocean region and explore the cultural implications of these contacts and their role in processes that we would come to call transnationalization and globalisation. The nation is a relatively recent phenomenon anywhere on the globe, and in many countries around the Indian Ocean it was a product of colonisation and independence. So the processes of exchange, migration and cultural influence going on there for many centuries were mostly based on the economics of goods and trade routes, rather than on national identity and state policy.

  3. Indian Development vs Sino-Indian Relations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ A deep, lasting, great friendship can be traced back to over two millennia ago between two close neighbors, the initiators of the world-famous Five Principles of Peaceful Co-existence with its 50th anniversary just commemorated this year. Historically, China benefited much from learning the brilliant Indian culture. Today, the two major Asian countries are learning from each other in their rapid economic growth. The rise of China and India, closer ties between the two, will definitely exert a significant impact on the Asia-Pacific region and the broader world in the days ahead.

  4. Differential Equations Related to the Williams-Bjerknes Tumour Model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F Martinez; A R Villena

    2000-08-01

    We investigate an initial value problem which is closely related to the Williams-Bjerknes tumour model for a cancer which spreads through an epithelial basal layer modeled on ⊂ 2. The solution of this problem is a family =(()), where each () could be considered as an approximation to the probability that the cell situated at is cancerous at time . We prove that this problem has a unique solution, it is defined on [0, + ∞], and, for some relevant situations, lim → ∞ ()=1 for all ∈ . Moreover, we study the expected number of cancerous cells at time .

  5. Experiencia y verdad: lectura sartreana de William James

    OpenAIRE

    Di Berardino, María Aurelia; Vidal, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    En Verdad y Existencia, obra editada póstumamente, Jean-Paul Sartre desafía la tesis heideggeriana de la verdad como esencia a partir de la lectura crítica de la noción de verdad desarrollada por el pragmatista William James. Desafío que entre otras cosas, se resume en la consideración de la verdad como existencia y cuyo marco general está constituido por la acción: operación necesaria para dotar de sentido o simplemente, para comprender. De modo tal que esta primera aproximación nos muestr...

  6. Stylistic Analysis of William Blake’s Poem London

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈杨波

    2014-01-01

    William Blake utilized ingenious language in his creation of the poem London. Foregrounding and deviation are well practised in this poem. In rhyme pattern, the poem takes end rhyme, consonance, alliteration and internal rhyme. In rhythm pat-tern, the poem mainly uses iambic tetrameter along with the variation of three troches and one single stress at the end of lines which produces a shocking atmosphere. Among syntax features, emphatic pattern and anticipatory structure are used. Among lexi-cal features, the reiteration of specific words makes neat euphonious parallelism while the subtle pun word create a far-reaching artistry.

  7. Inconsistency of Carnot's theorem's proof by William Thomson

    CERN Document Server

    Ihnatovych, V

    2013-01-01

    William Thomson proved Carnot's theorem basing on postulate: "It is impossible, by means of inanimate material agency, to derive mechanical effect from any portion of matter by cooling it below the temperature of the coldest of the surrounding objects". The present paper demonstrates that Carnot's theorem can be proved based on the contrary Thomson's postulate: "It is impossible to use the mechanical effect to the heating the coldest of surrounding objects". A conclusion that Carnot's theorem does not follow from the Thomson's postulate has been drawn.

  8. Marcus Williams 危机与转机

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    近半年来持续"修理"阵容的网队,在今年夏天签下了前魔术队后卫杜林(Keyon Dooling)当作球队第六人。这个动作让上季因为受伤而表现并不怎么理想的M.威廉姆斯(Marcus Williams)在当时备感压力。当时还在网队的M.威廉姆斯说:"我一直认为谁比较强就谁上场,我会努力拿

  9. Constructing a geomechanical model of the Woodford Shale, Cherokee Platform, Oklahoma, USA effects of confining stress and rock strength on fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hair, Tyler J.

    A micro-indentation tool is used to estimate the strength of the Woodford Shale from whole core samples through the geometrical attributes (diameter and depth) of a 'dimple' produced by the tool on the rock's surface. The measured dimples are correlated graphically with the unconfined compressive strength and internal friction angle of the Woodford and integrated with contemporary stress data from earthquake focal mechanisms and mapped active faults. Right-lateral strike-slip motion on a deep, unnamed potential splay of the Wilzetta fault (Cherokee Platform, Lincoln County, Oklahoma) is representative of the contemporary stress state of the region. Vertical or near-vertical factures striking ˜ 030° from SHaz (˜ 077°) are the mechanical discontinuities most likely to be reactivated and allow fluids to flow along their surfaces. This reactivation will occur if the magnitude of pressure sources such as pore pressure or fluid pressure exceeds the reactivation pressure for that fracture surface.

  10. Indian Womanhood: Some Psychological Concepts*

    OpenAIRE

    Dhanalakshmi De Sousa; Avinash De Sousa

    2015-01-01

    Indian womanhood today is at crossroads. The present paper discusses the status of Indian womanhood and its psychological underpinnings. It discusses how Indian women have suffered at the hands of their families and society leaving no path but to succumb to psychiatric illness. The role of mental health professionals and family members in supporting and promoting growth and development of the Indian woman is outlined.

  11. Indian Womanhood: Some Psychological Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanalakshmi De Sousa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Indian womanhood today is at crossroads. The present paper discusses the status of Indian womanhood and its psychological underpinnings. It discusses how Indian women have suffered at the hands of their families and society leaving no path but to succumb to psychiatric illness. The role of mental health professionals and family members in supporting and promoting growth and development of the Indian woman is outlined.

  12. Indian womanhood: some psychological concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa, Dhanalakshmi; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Indian womanhood today is at crossroads. The present paper discusses the status of Indian womanhood and its psychological underpinnings. It discusses how Indian women have suffered at the hands of their families and society leaving no path but to succumb to psychiatric illness. The role of mental health professionals and family members in supporting and promoting growth and development of the Indian woman is outlined. PMID:25838719

  13. Global Trade and Indian Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubinski, Christina

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes the German dye business in India before 1947 as an example of expanding German-Indian commercial relationships. German dye manufacturers showed great interest in India's economic potential in the absence of discriminatory tariffs, while Indian elites were interested in non...... the political boundaries of formal empire and offers an alternative perspective on Indian business history, which reveals more competition between multinationals of different origins and more strategic choices available to Indians....

  14. Working Women: Indian Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Dharmendra MEHTA; Naveen K. MEHTA; MEHTA Rajesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In India, due to unprecedented rise in the cost of living, ris-ing prices of commodities, growing expenses on children ed-ucation, huge rate of unemployment, and increasing cost of housing properties compel every Indian family to explore all the possible ways and means to increase the household income. It is also witnessed that after globalization Indian women are able to get more jobs but the work they get is more casual in nature or is the one that men do not prefer to do or is left by them...

  15. 75 FR 61513 - Receipt of Applications for Endangered Species Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... salamander (Ambystoma bishop) for the purpose of conducting presence/absence surveys. This work will be..., Highlands, and Polk Counties, Florida .Applicant: Michael LaVoie, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, Cherokee... lands of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee, North Carolina. Applicant: Michael LaVoie, Cherokee,...

  16. Title IV: Improving Indian Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Kipp A.

    The Indian Education Act of 1972, Title IV, has improved Native American education by emphasizing Native American control; it comes after 400 years of Euro-American involvement in Indian education during which assimilation was the primary goal. In 1568 Jesuit priests began "civilizing" and Christianizing the "savage" Indians; in 1794 the first…

  17. Alcohol and American Indian Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, George A.

    The growing problem of teenage drinking and alcoholism in the United States, especially among Indian segments of society, increases the necessity for adequate education concerning alcoholism. This document is prepared for the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) schools to acquaint Indian students with social concepts of alcohol outside their cultural…

  18. 76 FR 49505 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... Compact between the State of California and the Habematolel Pomo of Upper Lake taking effect. DATES: Effective Date: August 10, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of...

  19. 77 FR 5566 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... Compact between the State of California and the Pinoleville Pomo Nation Taking Effect. DATES: Effective Date: February 3, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of...

  20. 78 FR 54670 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of extension of Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the Extension of the Class III gaming compact between the Yankton Sioux Tribe and the State of South Dakota. DATES:...

  1. 78 FR 17428 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of the Class III Tribal- State Gaming Compact between the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe and the State of...

  2. 77 FR 30550 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... of Approval in the Federal Register on February 23, 2010 (47 FR 44678). This agreement allows for the... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval by the...

  3. 78 FR 62650 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of extension of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the extension of the Class III gaming compact between the Rosebud Sioux Tribe and the State of South Dakota. DATES:...

  4. 78 FR 78377 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ] ACTION: Notice of extension of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the extension of the Class III gaming compact between the Yankton Sioux Tribe and the State of South Dakota. DATES:...

  5. 78 FR 17427 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of the agreement between the Northern Cheyenne Tribe and the State of Montana concerning Class III Gaming (Compact)....

  6. 78 FR 33435 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Amendments. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of an Agreement to Amend the Class III Tribal-State Gaming Compact between the Salt River Pima- Maricopa...

  7. Resisting the Script of Indian Education: Zitkala Sa and the Carlisle Indian School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoch, Jessica

    2002-01-01

    Offers a "definition" of Zitkala Sa as an Indian teacher who, at the turn of the 20th century, challenged and countered educational norms that silenced Indian voices and erased Indian culture. Examines her autobiographical essays, "Impressions of an Indian Childhood,""The School Days of an Indian Girl," and "An Indian Teacher among Indians," in…

  8. Sex differences in HDL ApoC-III in American Indian youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackett Piers R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since American Indians are predisposed to type 2 diabetes (DM2 and associated cardiovascular risk, Cherokee boys and girls (n = 917 were studied to determine whether BMI Z (body mass index Z score is associated with the apoC-III (apolipoprotein C-III content of HDL (high density lipoprotein, a previously reported predictor of DM2. Methods An ad hoc cross-sectional analysis was conducted on a previously studied cohort. Participants were grouped by gender-specific age groups (5 to 9, 10 to 14 and 15 to 19 years. ApoA-I (apolipoprotein A-I and HDL apoC-III were assayed by electroimmunoassay. ApoC-III was measured in whole plasma, and in HDL to determine the molar proportion to apoA-I. General linear models were used to assess association. Results The HDL apoC-III to apoA-I molar ratio increased by BMI Z quartile in girls aged 10–14 years (p  Conclusions ApoC-III showed an obesity-related increase relative to apoA-I during adolescence beginning in girls aged 10 to 14 years and in boys aged 15 to 19 years. The earlier changes in girls may alter HDL’s protective properties on the β-cell and contribute to their increased risk for DM2.

  9. Hydrologic setting of Williams Lake, Hubbard County, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Donald I.; Winter, Thomas C.

    1980-01-01

    The hydrology and geology of Williams Lake watershed was studied to evaluate the accuracy of various methods used to determine precipitation and evaporation in lake water-balance studies and to define a lake and ground-water system according to approaches suggested by theoretical modeling studies. Regression analysis between estimated and measured precipitation at the lake showed that the accuracy of regionalization techniques is dependent on the closeness of the data network to the lake. For individual storms, the average-value method was found to be better than either the weighted average or isohyetal methods of determining precipitation, but it was least accurate in estimating 14-day average precipitation. The amount of evaporation calculated by the mass-transfer method ranged from 2 to 7 inches per month from July to October 1978, depending on the method used to determine the mass-transfer coefficient. Test drilling indicated that 30 to 150 feet of sand and gravel overlies till in the Williams Lake watershed. A sand lens about 50 feet thick occurs within the till.

  10. Pre-spill shoreline mapping in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A long-term shoreline mapping program has been initiated in Prince William Sound, Alaska, to generate pre-spill data to assist in the planning activities for oil spill response in the area. Low-altitude aerial videotape surveys and video images form the basis for the mapping effort. The coast was initially divided into alongshore segments. The physical shore-zone is relatively homogeneous within each segment. A pre-spill Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Team (SCAT) database, using the ShoreData software, was created based on this initial detailed mapping. The SCAT field teams are therefore equipped with a detailed analysis of the shore-zone character. The same information was also used to develop a separate database for use by planning and response operations groups. The data is entered into the Graphical Resource Database (GRD), and a Geographic Information System (GIS). A simplified characterization of the primary features of each segment is then made available through interpretation of the data. In the event of an oil spill, the SCAT data in the ShoreData files can be combined with field data on shoreline oiling conditions using a second software package called ShoreAccessR which provides summaries of the main parameters required by the planning group. It can also be used as a data storage and management tool. As part of this program, more than 1700 kilometres of shoreline in Prince William Sound have already been mapped. 24 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs

  11. William Osler and Seymour Thomas, "the boy artist of Texas".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Charles S

    2016-07-01

    Critics consider the 1908-1909 portrait of William Osler by S. Seymour Thomas the best of six oil-on-canvas portraits of Osler done from life, including those by the more acclaimed US artists John Singer Sargent and William Merritt Chase. Osler called it "the best pictorial diagnosis I have ever seen" and told Thomas "I am at your service." A reappraisal of Seymour Thomas explains why his portrait makes us feel much as the artist did in Osler's presence, which is the original English-language definition of "empathy." Thomas told his subject that "I feel that you can look clear through me and see the wall on the other side." The intensity of Osler's gaze affects us similarly. The portrait satisfied Osler, but his wife, Grace Revere Osler, never warmed to it, perhaps because it depicts so clearly a highly focused, agenda-driven man. Helen Thomas used the portrait to promote her husband's business, and, after a tortuous history, the portrait eventually returned to Oxford University, where it now hangs inconspicuously in the Radcliffe Science Library. PMID:27365894

  12. CALIFORNIA INDIAN EDUCATION, REPORT OF THE FIRST ALL-INDIAN STATEWIDE CONFERENCE ON CALIFORNIA INDIAN EDUCATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FORBES, JACK D.

    A CONFERENCE ON CALIFORNIA INDIAN EDUCATION WAS HELD IN MARCH, 1967, AT STANISLAUS STATE COLLEGE. THE CONFERENCE PARTICIPANTS INCLUDE ADMINISTRATORS AND TEACHERS FROM REPRESENTATIVE SCHOOLS WITH A HIGH PROPORTION OF INDIAN STUDENTS IN CALIFORNIA, ANTHROPOLOGISTS AND SOCIAL SCIENTISTS FROM VARIOUS COLLEGES, AND INDIANS FROM REPRESENTATIVE AREAS…

  13. Indian School Days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Basil H.

    This autobiography relates the experiences of a young Ojibway boy who was taken from his family in 1939 at age 10 and placed in a Jesuit boarding school in northern Ontario, Canada. St. Peter Claver (later Garnier) or "Spanish," as the Indian school was known, was home to approximately 135 boys. Most of the students, who ranged in age from 4 to…

  14. Radiocarbon and Indian archaeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing use of radiocarbon (C14) dating techniques in Indian archaeology has been described in detail. Work done in Microlithic cultures, Neolithic period, Indus civilization and Iron age cultures have been reported. C14 dates of various archaeological sites are listed. (K.B.)

  15. American Indian Authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momaday, Natachee Scott

    Twenty-six selections by 15 contemporary American Indian authors are given in this book. The selections--legends, ceremonial chants and prayers, poems, and stories--are accompanied by topics for discussion. Some of the selections deal with the supernatural, and some tell an actual story about the author. Pictures and short biographies of each…

  16. Caregiving in Indian Country

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-12-23

    This podcast discusses the role of caregivers in Indian County and the importance of protecting their health. It is primarily targeted to public health and aging services professionals.  Created: 12/23/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/23/2009.

  17. The Urban Indian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Winona DuBray

    The document presents six articles that provide a glimpse of the uniqueness of American Indian cultural conflict, focusing on aspects of the culture which warrant special attention. Since there are over 100 tribes, an effort was made to enumerate commonalities amongst the tribal cultures in looking at issues raised in the urban areas throughout…

  18. American Indian Recipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.

    Presenting some 60 to 70 Native American recipes, this document includes a brief introduction and a suggested reading list (15 citations related to American Indian foods). The introduction identifies five regional Native American cuisines as follows: in the Southwest, peppers and beans were made into chili, soups, guacamole, and barbecue sauces by…

  19. Indian Astronomy: History of

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, R.; Murdin, P.

    2002-01-01

    From the time of A macronryabhat under dota (ca AD 500) there appeared in India a series of Sanskrit treatises on astronomy. Written always in verse, and normally accompanied by prose commentaries, these served to create an Indian tradition of mathematical astronomy which continued into the 18th century. There are as well texts from earlier centuries, grouped under the name Jyotishaveda macronn d...

  20. Diverticulite em adolescente com Síndrome de Williams: relato de caso Diverticulitis in adolescent with Williams Syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josemberg Marins Campos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A Síndrome de Williams é uma doença genética rara, atribuída a deleção do gene da elastina no cromossomo 7. É caracterizada por estenose de aorta, divertículos de bexiga, constipação, retardo mental leve, fácies dismórfica, fraqueza da parede da bexiga e do cólon que levam ao surgimento de divertículos. Relata-se um caso de diverticulite aguda em paciente de 18 anos, o resultado do tratamento clínico durante 5 anos e o diagnóstico diferencial de abdome agudo nesta doença. A indicação de colectomia eletiva é discutida, considerando o pouco conhecimento da história natural da diverticulite nesta síndrome.The Syndrome of Williams is a rare genetic illness, attributed the deletion of the gene of the elastin in chromosome 7. It is characterized by aortic stenosis, bladder diverticula's, constipation, light mental retardation, dysmorphic facies, weakness of the wall of the bladder and colon that they lead to the sprouting of diverticula. A case of acute diverticulitis in patient of 18 years is told, the result of the clinical treatment during 5 years and the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen in this illness. The indication of elective colectomy is argued, considering the unfamiliarity of the natural history of the diverticulitis in the syndrome.

  1. Buchmann-Williams Authenticated Key Agreement Protocol With Pre-shared Password

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soufiane Mezroui

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on Buchmann-Williams key exchange protocol, a Buchmann-Williams Authenticated Key Agreement (BWAKA protocol with pre-shared password is proposed. Its security relies on the Discrete Logarithm Problem over class groups of number fields. It provides identity authentication, perfect forward secrecy and key validation.

  2. Jane Ann Williams named director of education and training for multicultural affairs

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Sally L.

    2005-01-01

    Jane Ann Williams, former director of professional programs at Mercer University, has been named director of education and training for multicultural affairs at Virginia Tech. In this capacity, Williams will provide ongoing leadership and management of the diversity-related educational and training programs for the university community.

  3. 77 FR 65623 - Security Zones; USCGC WILLIAM FLORES Commissioning Ceremony, Ybor Channel; Tampa, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    ... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; USCGC WILLIAM FLORES Commissioning... around the USCGC WILLIAM FLORES immediately before and during its Commissioning Ceremony that will...

  4. 77 FR 63308 - J. William Foley Incorporated v. United Illuminating Company; Notice of Complaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission J. William Foley Incorporated v. United Illuminating Company; Notice of... Federal Power Act, 16 U.S.C. 824(e) and 825(e), J. William Foley Incorporated (Complainant) filed a...

  5. William Whewell's philosophy of architecture and the historicization of biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Aleta

    2016-10-01

    William Whewell's work on historical science has received some attention from historians and philosophers of science. Whewell's own work on the history of German Gothic church architecture has been touched on within the context of the history of architecture. To a large extent these discussions have been conducted separately. I argue that Whewell intended his work on Gothic architecture as an attempt to (help) found a science of historical architecture, as an exemplar of historical science. I proceed by analyzing the key features of Whewell's philosophy of historical science. I then show how his architectural history exemplifies this philosophy. Finally, I show how Whewell's philosophy of historical science matches some developments in a science (biological systematics) that, in the mid-to late-nineteenth century, came to be reinterpreted as a historical science. I comment briefly on Whewell as a potential influence on nineteenth century biology and in particular on Darwin.

  6. Lord Byron's physician: John William Polidori on somnambulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Stanley; Stiles, Anne

    2013-01-01

    John William Polidori (1795-1821) was the Edinburgh-trained physician hired by Lord Byron to accompany him to Switzerland, where he participated in the story-telling event proposed by Byron that led, with Polidori's help, to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Although those interested in English literature might also remember Polidori as the author of The Vampyre, one of the first extended works of fiction about vampires, his earlier interest in somnambulism and trance states is only beginning to be appreciated. Even more than students of Romantic literature, historians of science and medicine seem little aware of what Polidori had written about oneirodynia, a synonym for somnambulism, and how his thoughts from 1815 about such activities reflected the changing medical zeitgeist at this time. This chapter examines Polidori's medical thesis in a neuroscience context and compares what he wrote to the writings of several other physicians who were fascinated by nocturnal wanderings, their causes, their manifestations, and their possible treatments. PMID:24290263

  7. 25 Mo Williams 大帝新配角

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Husky

    2008-01-01

    骑士队·控球后卫·185厘米·25岁上季成绩·17.2分·48.0%投篮·6.3助攻自从詹姆斯(LeBron James)进入NBA以来,骑士队就一直想找个能搭配他的控球后卫,经过这五年无数位球员的实验之后,今年夏天骑士队又找了一个新的试验人选:M.威廉姆斯(Mo Williams)。

  8. Beat Perception and Sociability: Evidence from Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Beat perception in music has been proposed to be a human universal that may have its origins in adaptive processes involving temporal entrainment such as social communication and interaction. We examined beat perception skills in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder. Musical interest and hypersociability are two prominent aspects of the WS phenotype although actual musical and social skills are variable. On a group level, beat and meter perception skills were poorer in WS than in age-matched peers though there was significant individual variability. Cognitive ability, sound processing style, and musical training predicted beat and meter perception performance in WS. Moreover, we found significant relationships between beat and meter perception and adaptive communication and socialization skills in WS. Results have implications for understanding the role of predictive timing in both music and social interactions in the general population, and suggest music as a promising avenue for addressing social communication difficulties in WS. PMID:27378982

  9. "Aequanimitas" Redux: William Osler on detached concern versus humanistic empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Charles S

    2006-01-01

    Recent critics make William Osler "the father of cool detachment" in medicine, largely because of his "Aequanimitas" address emphasizing objectivity and imperturbability. Closer analysis suggests that Osler's aequanimitas resembles more nearly the metriopatheia of later Stoic philosophy than the apatheia of the early Stoics. A previously unpublished memoir clarifies at least in part Osler's motive for teaching control of the "medullary centres" to minimize facial expression: he did not want to frighten patients, who typically had serious illnesses for which he lacked effective therapy. Twenty-first century challenges to medicine as a profession differ substantially from those of Osler's era. Physicians and educators must focus more closely on the tension between detached concern ("competence") and humanistic empathy ("caring") if medicine is to thrive as a learned profession as opposed to a technical service, a commodity to be bought and sold like any other.

  10. Ariel Williams, el escriturador magnánimo

    OpenAIRE

    Domine, Marcela

    2015-01-01

    Este artículo propone una lectura crítica de la producción de Ariel Williams, escritor patagónico contemporáneo. Reflexiona sobre el trabajo con el lenguaje presente en sus textos, y la creación de una lengua literaria propia. Se detiene en una nueva relación con los géneros que implica un vínculo entre géneros discursivos y literarios y la teoría de géneros, ya que rompe las referencias genéricas de la lengua para la representación de lo femenino y masculino. Finalmente analiza una represent...

  11. Beat Perception and Sociability: Evidence from Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D; Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Beat perception in music has been proposed to be a human universal that may have its origins in adaptive processes involving temporal entrainment such as social communication and interaction. We examined beat perception skills in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder. Musical interest and hypersociability are two prominent aspects of the WS phenotype although actual musical and social skills are variable. On a group level, beat and meter perception skills were poorer in WS than in age-matched peers though there was significant individual variability. Cognitive ability, sound processing style, and musical training predicted beat and meter perception performance in WS. Moreover, we found significant relationships between beat and meter perception and adaptive communication and socialization skills in WS. Results have implications for understanding the role of predictive timing in both music and social interactions in the general population, and suggest music as a promising avenue for addressing social communication difficulties in WS. PMID:27378982

  12. William E. Edmonston, Jr.: Editor, 1968-1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihlstrom, John F; Frischholz, Edward J

    2010-10-01

    This article is part of an occasional series profiling editors of the American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis (AJCH). William E. Edmonston was the second editor, succeeding Milton H. Erickson. His research focused on the use of conditioning paradigms and psychophysiological measures to explore a wide variety of hypnotic phenomena, leading to a "neo-Pavlovian" theory of neutral hypnosis as physiological relaxation (anesis). A longtime professor of psychology at Colgate University, he created an interdisciplinary undergraduate major in neuroscience, and was named New York State College Professor of the Year in 1988. He gave the Journal a new look, and a greater balance of clinical and experimental papers. The article also provides background on George Barton Cutten, George H. Estabrooks, and Frank A. Pattie, pioneers of hypnosis who were linked to Edmonston.

  13. Sir William Arbuthnot Lane and His Contributions to Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breakey, Richard William F; Mulliken, John B

    2015-07-01

    Surgical subspecialties were just emerging at the turn of the 20th Century, before this time, general surgeons had to adjust their operative skills to address disorders throughout the body. Sir William Arbuthnot Lane was a British surgeon, whose restless mind led him to wander throughout the field of general surgery and beyond. Although controversial, he advanced in the repair of cleft lip and palate, introduced the "no touch" operative technique, internal fixation of fractures, and is credited as the first surgeon to perform open massage of the heart. During The Great War, he established the British Plastic Surgery unit at Sidcup and delegated the care of facial and jaw injuries to young Major Harold Gillies. Lane later founded The New Health Society, an organization that stimulated the natural food movement. Sadly, in his latter years Lane's thinking drifted further away from with the times and his professional credibility waned. Nevertheless, Lane's variegated life is of sufficient interest to deserve reassessment.

  14. Phenomenology of certainty and belief. Reading William James

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Stara

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay studies the analysis that the psychologist and philosopher WilliamJames applies to the function of belief in relation to his concepts of the stream ofthought and process of knowledge. Furthermore, it pays attention to James’s phenomenologyof certainty within experience and to the explanation of the foundationalplace of feelings in experience. In James’s thought we may call certainty onlywhat can provide a knowledge which stands in immediate relation to the innerstate: the images provided by individual depths are both the locus of perplexityand the spring of certainty. The truth of beliefs is in this sense provisional uponthe outcome of the continuing experience of understanding and of the continuingprocess of critical scrutiny.

  15. William Hewson (1739-74): the father of haematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Derek

    2006-05-01

    William Hewson has been called the father of haematology. Initially working alongside the Hunter brothers in London in the mid-18th century, he advanced our knowledge of red and white cells (but mistakenly thought some red cells started as white cells and could not recognise different varieties of white corpuscles), showed that it was fibrinogen and not the cells that led to coagulation, greatly advanced our knowledge of the lymphatic system in humans, fishes and amphibians, explored the functions of the thymus and spleen and, investigated pneumothorax and surgical emphysema. His life, cut short at 35 years, was often intertwined with those of the Hunters, Alexander Monro secundus and Benjamin Franklin. This paper reviews his work, his relationships and his impact on a nascent science.

  16. Sir William Turner and his studies on the mammalian placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Reginald

    2003-06-01

    William Turner was appointed Professor of Anatomy at the University of Edinburgh in 1867, and from 1903 until his death in 1916, he was Principal and Vice-Chancellor. He was an outstanding teacher and many of those he taught went on to occupy chairs of anatomy. He published widely on anatomical subjects and one of his interests was comparative anatomy and physiology of the placenta. This paper takes a brief look at Turner's studies on the anatomical structure of the placenta, its comparative anatomy, his thoughts about its physiology and its place in the evolutionary process. At the time, these lectures constituted an anatomical and physiological classic. At the time Turner prepared his lectures, which were delivered in 1875 and 1876, little was known about the gestatory process in marsupials or monotremes. These mammals have a very brief period of intrauterine gestation and placentation and mention is made of studies that have been done in recent times on this subject.

  17. Indian President visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    On 1 October, her Excellency Mrs Pratibha Devisingh Patil, President of India, picked CERN as the first stop on her official state visit to Switzerland. Accompanied by a host of Indian journalists, a security team, and a group of presidential delegates, the president left quite an impression when she visited CERN’s Point 2!   Upon arrival, Pratibha Patil was greeted by CERN Director General Rolf Heuer, as well as senior Indian scientists working at CERN, and various department directors. After a quick overview of the Organization, Rolf Heuer and the President addressed India’s future collaboration with CERN. India is currently an Observer State of the Organization, and is considering becoming an Associate Member State. A short stop in LHC operations gave Steve Myers and the Accelerator team the opportunity to take the President on a tour through the LHC tunnel. From there, ALICE’s Tapan Nayak and Spokesperson Paolo Giubellino took Pratibha Patil to the experiment&am...

  18. Language and Williams syndrome: how intact is "intact"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmiloff-Smith, A; Grant, J; Berthoud, I; Davies, M; Howlin, P; Udwin, O

    1997-04-01

    It has been claimed that Williams syndrome (WS), a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, is characterized by serious cognitive deficits alongside intact language. The syndrome is often used as a prime example of the modularity of an innate faculty for morphosyntactic rules. We challenge this claim and hypothesize that morphosyntax, although surprisingly good given WS level of mental retardation, is by no means intact. We make an initial test of this hypothesis through an analysis of the receptive language of a group of English-speaking WS individuals on a standardized morphosyntactic test. We then present an experimental study of expressive language that examines grammatical gender assignment in French-speaking WS patients. Despite a Verbal Mental Age selected to be higher than the chronological age of the young control group, these people with WS continue even in adulthood to show clear-cut deficits in their production of an aspect of morphosyntax that normal children acquire effortlessly very early. The results of the 2 studies, one focusing on receptive language and the other on expressive language, challenge the notion that comprehension and use of morphosyntactic rules in WS individuals are intact. The Within-domain dissociations regarding the use of grammatical gender assignment across several sentence clements and their difficulties in understanding embedded sentences-two quintessentially linguistic skills-suggest that we must rethink the notion of spared, modular, language capacities in Williams syndrome. We conclude that WS language follows a different path to normal acquisition and may turn out to be more like second language learning. PMID:9180000

  19. Historicizing Indian psychiatry

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, Amit Ranjan

    2005-01-01

    Our historical endeavour to map Indian psychiatry has largely remained linear, positivistic and evolutionary. Whether it starts from the ancient times or modern, it shows our past as a tale of victory for the western science, without questioning the borrowed paradigm. The use of historical methods for serious enquiry of psychiatry has been ignored. Emergence of a new genre of historicism that is critical of both colonialism and psychiatry as a universal science, has raised hopes to critically...

  20. Indian scales and inventories

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesan, S

    2010-01-01

    This conceptual, perspective and review paper on Indian scales and inventories begins with clarification on the historical and contemporary meanings of psychometry before linking itself to the burgeoning field of clinimetrics in their applications to the practice of clinical psychology and psychiatry. Clinimetrics is explained as a changing paradigm in the design, administration, and interpretation of quantitative tests, techniques or procedures applied to measurement of clinical variables, t...

  1. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  2. Indian Women: An Historical and Personal Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Rosemary Ackley

    1975-01-01

    Several issues relating to Indian women are discussed. These include (1) the three types of people to whom we owe our historical perceptions of Indian women, (2) role delineation in Indian society; (3) differences between Indian women and white women, and (4) literary role models of Indian women. (Author/BW)

  3. Will the "Real" Indians Please Stand Up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pewewardy, Cornel

    1998-01-01

    Explores what it means to be an American Indian in an era in which nearly half of the identifiable Indians live off the reservations and in urban areas. As the principal definition of "Indian-ness" today, the issue of blood quantum leads to misunderstandings. Being an Indian, to the author, is being a person connected to a tribe. (SLD)

  4. Working Women: Indian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmendra MEHTA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In India, due to unprecedented rise in the cost of living, ris-ing prices of commodities, growing expenses on children ed-ucation, huge rate of unemployment, and increasing cost of housing properties compel every Indian family to explore all the possible ways and means to increase the household income. It is also witnessed that after globalization Indian women are able to get more jobs but the work they get is more casual in nature or is the one that men do not prefer to do or is left by them to move to higher or better jobs. Working women refers to those in paid employment. They work as lawyers, nurses, doctors, teachers and secretaries etc. There is no profession today where women are not employed. University of Oxford’s Professor Linda Scott recently coined the term the Double X Economy to describe the global economy of women. The present paper makes an attempt to discuss issues and challenges that are being faced by Indian working women at their respective workstations.

  5. Indian cosmogonies and cosmologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajin Dušan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Various ideas on how the universe appeared and develops, were in Indian tradition related to mythic, religious, or philosophical ideas and contexts, and developed during some 3.000 years - from the time of Vedas, to Puranas. Conserning its appeareance, two main ideas were presented. In one concept it appeared out of itself (auto-generated, and gods were among the first to appear in the cosmic sequences. In the other, it was a kind of divine creation, with hard work (like the dismembering of the primal Purusha, or as emanation of divine dance. Indian tradition had also various critiques of mythic and religious concepts (from the 8th c. BC, to the 6c., who favoured naturalistic and materialistic explanations, and concepts, in their cosmogony and cosmology. One the peculiarities was that indian cosmogony and cosmology includes great time spans, since they used a digit system which was later (in the 13th c. introduced to Europe by Fibonacci (Leonardo of Pisa, 1170-1240.

  6. BIA Indian Lands Dataset (Indian Lands of the United States)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Geographic Data Committee — The American Indian Reservations / Federally Recognized Tribal Entities dataset depicts feature location, selected demographics and other associated data for the...

  7. Diverticulite em adolescente com Síndrome de Williams: relato de caso Diverticulitis in adolescent with Williams Syndrome: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Josemberg Marins Campos; Francisco Eduardo Bezerra de Albuquerque Lima; Luis Fernando Evangelista; Luciana Teixeira de Siqueira; Carolina de Souza Vasconcelos; Álvaro Antonio Bandeira Ferraz; Edmundo Machado Ferraz

    2009-01-01

    A Síndrome de Williams é uma doença genética rara, atribuída a deleção do gene da elastina no cromossomo 7. É caracterizada por estenose de aorta, divertículos de bexiga, constipação, retardo mental leve, fácies dismórfica, fraqueza da parede da bexiga e do cólon que levam ao surgimento de divertículos. Relata-se um caso de diverticulite aguda em paciente de 18 anos, o resultado do tratamento clínico durante 5 anos e o diagnóstico diferencial de abdome agudo nesta doença. A indicação de colec...

  8. Performing Indian Dance in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Thiagarajan, Premalatha

    2012-01-01

    "Performing Indian Dance" is an interdisciplinary project that reveals the dynamics of ethnicity, gender, and sexuality in Malaysian Indian dance. I demonstrate that the emergence of prominent multi-ethnic male dancers in Malaysia is enabled by a unique configuration of "bumiputera" ("son of soil") ethnic-based state discourse, cosmopolitanism (ability to move fluently across multiple spaces), Indian dance institutional structures, global capitalism, and gender mobility, which simultaneously ...

  9. チェロキー族の女性と「文明化」 (リンダ・ギルバート先生追悼号)

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 円

    2001-01-01

    From the late 18th century to the 1820s, the Cherokee Indians experienced a profound cultural transformation following the introduction of white culture. Although many studies have already been carried out on this so-called "civilization" of the Cherokees, most have focused on the changes undergone by Cherokee men. However, in order to evaluate the cultural transformation of Cherokee society as a whole, it is necessary to also consider the changes that occurred for Cherokee women. In this pap...

  10. 34 CFR 300.21 - Indian and Indian tribe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Indian and Indian tribe. 300.21 Section 300.21 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION...

  11. Indians as Resources: The Changing Relationship between Indians and Anthropologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Michael M.

    1986-01-01

    Traditional academic or curatorial associations with North American Indians--treating them as informants, subjects, students, or specimens--is no longer sufficient because these associations imply unequal relations with anthropologists and curators in the superior position. Indians now want, expect, and demand equality; and new relationships are…

  12. Indians Repulse British With Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    During the early introduction of rockets to Europe, they were used only as weapons. Enemy troops in India repulsed the British with rockets. Later, in Britain, Sir William Congreve developed a rocket that could fire to about 9,000 feet. The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812.

  13. Zika virus: Indian perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourya, Devendra T; Shil, Pratip; Sapkal, Gajanan N; Yadav, Pragya D

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of Zika virus (ZiV), a mosquito borne Flavivirus like dengue (DEN) and chikungunya (CHIK), in Brazil in 2014 and its spread to various countries have led to a global health emergency. Aedes aegypti is the major vector for ZiV. Fast dissemination of this virus in different geographical areas posses a major threat especially to regions where the population lacks herd immunity against the ZiV and there is abundance of Aedes mosquitoes. In this review, we focus on current global scenario, epidemiology, biology, diagnostic challenges and remedial measures for ZiVconsidering the Indian perspective. PMID:27487998

  14. Historicizing Indian psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Amit Ranjan

    2005-04-01

    Our historical endeavour to map Indian psychiatry has largely remained linear, positivistic and evolutionary. Whether it starts from the ancient times or modern, it shows our past as a tale of victory for the western science, without questioning the borrowed paradigm. The use of historical methods for serious enquiry of psychiatry has been ignored. Emergence of a new genre of historicism that is critical of both colonialism and psychiatry as a universal science, has raised hopes to critically review the emergence of psychiatric knowledge. PMID:20711299

  15. Zika virus: Indian perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra T Mourya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of Zika virus (ZiV, a mosquito borne Flavivirus like dengue (DEN and chikungunya (CHIK, in Brazil in 2014 and its spread to various countries have led to a global health emergency. Aedes aegypti is the major vector for ZiV. Fast dissemination of this virus in different geographical areas posses a major threat especially to regions where the population lacks herd immunity against the ZiV and there is abundance of Aedes mosquitoes. In this review, we focus on current global scenario, epidemiology, biology, diagnostic challenges and remedial measures for ZiVconsidering the Indian perspective.

  16. Zika virus: Indian perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourya, Devendra T.; Shil, Pratip; Sapkal, Gajanan N.; Yadav, Pragya D.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Zika virus (ZiV), a mosquito borne Flavivirus like dengue (DEN) and chikungunya (CHIK), in Brazil in 2014 and its spread to various countries have led to a global health emergency. Aedes aegypti is the major vector for ZiV. Fast dissemination of this virus in different geographical areas posses a major threat especially to regions where the population lacks herd immunity against the ZiV and there is abundance of Aedes mosquitoes. In this review, we focus on current global scenario, epidemiology, biology, diagnostic challenges and remedial measures for ZiVconsidering the Indian perspective. PMID:27487998

  17. Women Leaders in Indian Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Marjane

    1992-01-01

    Draws from interviews with women serving as tribal college presidents in discussing the current and traditional roles of women in Indian society, why women lead 10 of the 28 member colleges of the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, the need for balanced leadership, and women's future role. (DMM)

  18. California Indian Food and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    This learning kit begins with a glossary of terms to help students learn about California Indians and their food. The kit explains that California Indians were the first people to live in the area now known as California, and that these tribes differed in the languages they spoke, the regions they lived in, and the foods that they ate. It explains…

  19. Education and the Urban Indian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Joann Sebastian

    Due to the Federal relocation programs, American Indian migration to urban areas has intensified over the past 20 years. The Indian who moves from the reservation to the city encounters an alien culture and, consequently, experiences immense difficulties in securing employment, housing, health services, and fair, unprejudiced treatment from law…

  20. Cherokee International推出超高功率密度CAR1248前端电源/整流器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Cherokee International(圣诺技电源),全球电源顶级制造商,延续其在功率密度方面的一贯创新,正式对外宣布其最新CAR1248前端电源/整流器。该产品设计小巧,高度仅1U(1.65×3.44×11.2英寸)×功率密度高达19瓦每立方英寸,为同类产品之最,定位于需求外形小巧、分布式电源结构的应用领域。CAR1248在25A时输出单路直流48V,作为调节总线,5V直流备用输出满足电源外部管理和监控。凭借领先的功率密度.该电源可在同一电源架上实现五台并联,提供高达4800瓦N+1冗余或6000瓦。

  1. The Grand Cherokee Show in China%刚柔相济——全新大切诺基国内亮相

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    长青; 耀东

    2001-01-01

    @@ 一提起4驱越野车,许多人首先就要想到"Jeep".这个经典的越野车品牌,凭借其卓越的性能、极具个性化的外形而长期笑傲世界车坛,成为越野车的代名词.但是随着人们购车理念的改变,许多轿车生产厂家都推出了相应的SUV、RV等车型,使越野车与轿车之间的定位越来越模糊.生产"Jeep"的戴姆勒-克莱斯勒公司自然不会坐视市场的变化,因此,集越野性和舒适性于一身的大切诺基(Grand Cherokee)应运而生了.

  2. Methodology for understanding Indian culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinha, Jai; Kumar, Rajesh

    2004-01-01

    Methods of understanding cultures, including Indian culture, are embedded in a broad spectrum of sociocultural approaches to human behavior in general. The approaches examined in this paper reflect evolving perspectives on Indian culture, ranging from the starkly ethnocentric to the largely...... eclectic and integrative. Most of the methods herin discussed were developed in the West and were subsequently taken up with or without adaptations to fit the Indian context. The paper begins by briefly reviewing the intrinsic concept of culture. It then adopts a historical view of the different ways...... and means by which scholars have construed the particular facets of Indian culture, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of each. The final section concludes with some proposals about the best ways of understnding the complexity that constitutes the Indian cultural reality....

  3. Läbi legendide William Shakespeare'i poole / Maris Peters

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Peters, Maris

    2010-01-01

    Tutvustus: Wells, Stanley. Kas on tõsi, et Shakespeare ...? / tõlkinud Maris Peters. Tallinn : Argo, 2010. Raamat William Shakespeare kohta käivatest legendidest, kuuldustest ja teooriatest ning tema teoste autorsusest

  4. Lähtugem ehitistest! / William J. R. Curtis ; interv. Andres Kurg, Karin Hallas, Triin Ojari

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Curtis, William J. R.

    1998-01-01

    24. apr. pidas Rotermanni soolalaos loengu arhitektuuriajaloolane William J. R. Curtis. Katkeid jutuajamisest W. Curtisega. Arhitektuurikriitikast, oma raamatust "Modern Architecture since 1900", millest W. Curtis praegu kriitikuna kirjutab, Lille'i projektist jm

  5. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...

  6. Leo Piilonen appointed William E. Hassinger, Jr. Senior Faculty Fellow in Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Leo Piilonen, professor of physics in the College of Science at Virginia Tech, was recently appointed the William E. Hassinger, Jr., Senior Faculty Fellow in Physics by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  7. Results of a shoreline waterbird survey in Passage Canal, Prince William Sound, Alaska, 1 September 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers findings from shoreline water birds surveys of Passage Canal, Prince William Sound in Alaska. Methods, results and discussion are included,...

  8. Summary of initial reconnaissance of salmon streams in Prince William Sound, Cordova Ranger District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In August of 1962, nine streams were visited in Prince William Sound. The purpose of this trip was to find out if any of these streams was suitable for improvement...

  9. William Harvey and the discovery of the circulation of the blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribatti Domenico

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This Commentary emphasizes the fundamental contribution of William Harvey to the discovery of the circulation of the blood and his scientific and experimental approach to this matter.

  10. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: ESI (Environmental Sensitivity Index Shoreline Types)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...

  11. Sea otter distribution and abundance in western Prince William Sound, Alaska: Progress report 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sea otters recently recolonized Prince William sound (PWS), Alaska after being extirpated in the 18th and 19th centuries. Twenty-five years ago a few otters...

  12. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: M_MAMPT (Marine Mammal Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...

  13. Salmon habitat improvement reconnaissance, Prince William Sound, Cordova and Anchorage districts, September 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the salmon habitat improvement reconnaissance in the Prince William sound, Alaska. The purpose of the trip was to discover new habitat improvement...

  14. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment - Flow Map Poster: William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This flow map depicts the flow and control of water on William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge. It was produced as part of the Water Resource Inventory and...

  15. Critical wildlife areas in Port Etches and Constantine Harbor, Hinchinbrook Island, Prince William Sound

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report documents critical wildlife areas in Port Etches and Constantine Harbor, Hinchinbrook Islands, and Prince William Sound during the 1976 and 1977....

  16. Perceptual learning in Williams syndrome: looking beyond averages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Gervan

    Full Text Available Williams Syndrome is a genetically determined neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by an uneven cognitive profile and surprisingly large neurobehavioral differences among individuals. Previous studies have already shown different forms of memory deficiencies and learning difficulties in WS. Here we studied the capacity of WS subjects to improve their performance in a basic visual task. We employed a contour integration paradigm that addresses occipital visual function, and analyzed the initial (i.e. baseline and after-learning performance of WS individuals. Instead of pooling the very inhomogeneous results of WS subjects together, we evaluated individual performance by expressing it in terms of the deviation from the average performance of the group of typically developing subjects of similar age. This approach helped us to reveal information about the possible origins of poor performance of WS subjects in contour integration. Although the majority of WS individuals showed both reduced baseline and reduced learning performance, individual analysis also revealed a dissociation between baseline and learning capacity in several WS subjects. In spite of impaired initial contour integration performance, some WS individuals presented learning capacity comparable to learning in the typically developing population, and vice versa, poor learning was also observed in subjects with high initial performance levels. These data indicate a dissociation between factors determining initial performance and perceptual learning.

  17. Signs and Stage Props in Tennessee Williams' Camino Real

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Ghasemi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans from the early times have used signs to facilitate the communication in the early societies. Semiotics is an approach wherein howness is dominant; it is the investigation of how meaning is created and communicated through systems of signs. In the dramatic texts meanings are conveyed by two different forms of language, stage direction and dialogue. Stage direction and dialogue are complementary and interdependent signifying systems. Stage directions are integral to the structure of dramatic texts and have important functions in their semantic construction. Tennessee Williams is one of the dramatists who use notes or stage directions in his plays. Through such stage devices as lighting, music and sound effects, colors, objects as symbols, transparent walls, the fluctuation of time, etc., he is after the representation of an abstract or spiritual meaning through concrete or material form. This study aims at analysis and examination of Williams’ Camino Real’s stage props and devices as signs and their relationships in the play with regard to semiotics as the theoretical framework and approach

  18. THE SYNTACTICAL ABILITY OF A YOUNG GIRL WITH WILLIAMS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana ARAPOVIKJ

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out on a young girl with Williams syndrome, whose syntactical ability was tested longitudinally over a period of 22 months, from age 9 years and 3 months to 11 years and 1 month. The assumption was that the girl with Wil­liams syndrome would have poorer syntactical ability than children with regular development, but similar to children with specific language impair­ment (SLI and that in all tasks she would achieve better results in the final testing. Syntax was ana­lyzed on the basis of the fundamental variable of repeating sentences, which consisted of five sub-variables: literal repetition of sentences, sentences repeated with omissions, ungrammatical repetition of sentences, sentences with altered content, sen­tences not repeated. A statistical difference was found between the syntactical ability of the girl with Williams’ syndrome and children with normal development in all tested sub-variables, and her results were the same as in children with specific language impairment. Moreover, in the final test­ing the girl achieved better results than in the ini­tial test.

  19. [William Harvey and the beginnings of modern medical science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    Modern medical science was born in the post-Renaissance age and began to consolidate towards the middle of the XVII century thanks to physicists, physiologists, and biologists, most of whom were direct or indirect pupils, of Galilei. The discovery of blood circulation by Harvey is now considered the only progress in physiology at the beginning of the XVII century, comparable to the current advances seen in physical sciences. The history of this achievement could be written from the view point of the progressive advance in knowledge. In his experiments, Harvey referred to the authentic, not the imaginary experiments, and put forward irrefutable quantitative arguments. We can therefore claim that his discovery of blood circulation was the first proper explanation of an organic process and the starting point leading to experimental physiology. Nevertheless, the second monograph of the English researcher, dealing with the generation of animals, published in 1651, has some passages that correspond to modern scientific reasoning yet in others he includes confused, vague and capricious assertions compatible with the prescientific era that the author was not able to escape completely. In conclusion, it seems justified to assert that modern medical science did not all rise suddenly, but was gradually structured starting from the middle of the XVII century following the path traced by William Harvey in light of Galilei's thought.

  20. Discovery of the cardiovascular system: from Galen to William Harvey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, W C

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this review is to examine the events that led to discovery of blood circulation. The Ancient Greeks, including Hippocrates and Galen viewed the cardiovascular system as comprising two distinct networks of arteries and veins. Galen claimed that the liver produced blood that was then distributed to the body in a centrifugal manner, whereas air or pneuma was absorbed from the lung into the pulmonary veins and carried by arteries to the various tissues of the body. Arteries also contained blood, which passed from the venous side via invisible pores in the interventricular septum and peripheral anastomoses. This was an open-ended system in which blood and air simply dissipated at the ends of veins and arteries according to the needs of the local tissue. Blood was not seen to circulate but rather to slowly ebb and flow. This view would hold sway for 15 centuries until 1628 when William Harvey published his momentous 72-page book, On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals. Harvey employed experiment and deductive logic to show that arteries and veins are functionally, if not structurally, connected in the lung and the peripheral tissues, and that blood circulates. The mechanical force of the heart replaced Galen's elusive attractive powers. Ultimately, Galenism would collapse under the weight of Harvey's evidence, and a new paradigm of blood circulation would prevail.

  1. Understanding motor acts and motor intentions in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparaci, Laura; Stefanini, Silvia; Marotta, Luigi; Vicari, Stefano; Rizzolatti, Giacomo

    2012-06-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare genetic disorder associated with unusually hyper-social demeanor and ease with strangers. These personality traits are accompanied by difficulties in social interactions, possibly related, at least in part, to a difficulty in understanding others' mental states. Studies on mentalizing capacities in individuals with WS have often led to contrasting results, some studies revealing specific impairments, others highlighting spared mentalizing capacities. So far, however, no study investigated the performance of individuals with WS in non-inferential understanding of others' motor intentions. In the present study we investigated this capacity by using a computer-based behavioral task using pictures of hand-object interactions. We asked individuals with WS first to describe what the other was doing (i.e. a task implying no kind of intention reading), and secondly, if successful in answering the first question, to describe the motor intention underlying the observed motor acts (i.e. why an act was being done, a task requiring non-inferential motor intention understanding). Results showed that individuals with WS made more errors in understanding what the other was doing (i.e. understanding a motor act) compared to both mental-age matched controls and chronological-age matched peers with typical development, while showing mental-age appropriate performance in understanding why an individual was acting (i.e. understanding a motor intention). These findings suggest novel perspectives for understanding impairments in social behavior in WS.

  2. Morphological differences in the mirror neuron system in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Rowena; Brown, Timothy T; Erhart, Matthew; Järvinen, Anna M; Korenberg, Julie R; Bellugi, Ursula; Halgren, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic condition characterized by an overly gregarious personality, including high empathetic concern for others. Although seemingly disparate from the profile of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), both are associated with deficits in social communication/cognition. Notably, the mirror neuron system (MNS) has been implicated in social dysfunction for ASD; yet, the integrity of this network and its association with social functioning in WS remains unknown. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods were used to examine the structural integrity of the MNS of adults with WS versus typically developing (TD) individuals. The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), a tool typically used to screen for social features of ASD, was also employed to assess the relationships between social functioning with the MNS morphology in WS participants. WS individuals showed reduced cortical surface area of MNS substrates yet relatively preserved cortical thickness as compared to TD adults. Increased cortical thickness of the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) was associated with increased deficits in social communication, social awareness, social cognition, and autistic mannerisms. However, social motivation was not related to anatomical features of the MNS. Our findings indicate that social deficits typical to both ASD and WS may be attributed to an aberrant MNS, whereas the unusual social drive marked in WS is subserved by substrates distinct from this network. PMID:26230578

  3. Social Reality as Reflected In the Poetry of William Blake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏林

    2013-01-01

    As one of the most outstanding representatives of the Pre-Romanticism poet in 18th century English literature, Wil⁃liam Blake lived through and witnessed an era of great political and social upheaval and transitional period: the American War of Independence, the French Revolution, the Napoleonic Wars and the Industrial Revolution which brought about significant and essential impact on social and historical progress in England. Coming from the social injustices and the full of the dark-side of the industrial England, Blake caught the pulse of his times through his sharp and deep insight, and employed his symbolism, satiric and allegorical device to condemn and criticize the oppression and exploitation derived from the class inequality, privilege and tyr⁃anny. Through his painting and poetry, Blake lashed the dark and indifferent church and authority, and exposed the hypocrisy and falsehood of the religion and humanity, and also called on the oppressed to shatter mental and physical restriction“The mind-forged manacles”come from the ruling class. In this paper, I want to introduce and interpret the social reality as reflected in the poetry of William Blake through concrete analyzing some of Blake’s poems in terms of main ideas, historical settings, rhe⁃torical device and language character which underlay and concealed in his poetry deeply.

  4. CCD guidance system for the William Herschel Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, D. J.; Waltham, N. R.; Newton, G. M.; van Breda, I. G.; Fisher, M.

    1990-07-01

    The CCD autoguider detector system for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) comprises a Peltier cooled, slow-scan CCD camera supported by an MC68020-based VME computer for image processing. The detector is a fluorescent dye coated EEV P8603 CCD chip operated in frame transfer mode. The CCD controller enables a full image to be read out during acquisition, but with windowed readout during guiding so as to permit an increased frame rate. The windowing is controlled by the VME computer, which is also used to calculate the centroid of the guide star and provides a local user interface, displaying images and guider status information. Special attention has been paid to the CCD drive clocks and bias voltages, enabling a very low dark current to be achieved (2 electrons per pixel per second at -35 C) without the need for extreme cooling. Guiding to magnitude 19 on the WHT has been demonstrated during dark time, with an integration time of one second.

  5. Infants with Williams syndrome detect statistical regularities in continuous speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashon, Cara H; Ha, Oh-Ryeong; Graf Estes, Katharine; Saffran, Jenny R; Mervis, Carolyn B

    2016-09-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare genetic disorder associated with delays in language and cognitive development. The reasons for the language delay are unknown. Statistical learning is a domain-general mechanism recruited for early language acquisition. In the present study, we investigated whether infants with WS were able to detect the statistical structure in continuous speech. Eighteen 8- to 20-month-olds with WS were familiarized with 2min of a continuous stream of synthesized nonsense words; the statistical structure of the speech was the only cue to word boundaries. They were tested on their ability to discriminate statistically-defined "words" and "part-words" (which crossed word boundaries) in the artificial language. Despite significant cognitive and language delays, infants with WS were able to detect the statistical regularities in the speech stream. These findings suggest that an inability to track the statistical properties of speech is unlikely to be the primary basis for the delays in the onset of language observed in infants with WS. These results provide the first evidence of statistical learning by infants with developmental delays. PMID:27299804

  6. Environmental sound recognition by timbre in children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Castilla, Pastora; García-Nogales, Ma Ángeles; Campos, Ruth; Rodríguez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotal reports have described children with Williams syndrome (WS) as presenting outstanding skills for recognizing environmental sounds by their timbre. This has led to suggest that the skills for environmental sound recognition by timbre are highly developed in WS. Furthermore, the term hypertimbria has been proposed to refer to this feature. However, no academic research has assessed these skills in WS. This study therefore aimed to contrast the reports on the highly developed skills for environmental sound recognition by timbre in children with WS. An environmental sound recognition task was administered to children with WS, children with Down syndrome of the same chronological age and cognitive level, and chronological age-matched typically developing children. Participants with WS performed significantly lower than their typically developing peers and no significant differences were found between the WS and Down syndrome groups. Unlike previous reports, this study points out that in WS environmental sound recognition by timbre does not constitute a phenotypic strength either in absolute or relative terms. Results suggest that children with WS do not present hypertimbria or preserved skills for timbre recognition. We discuss the implications of these results for theories of cognitive modularity. PMID:24428369

  7. William Basse’s Polyhymnia and the Poetry of Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Crabstick

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The career of the little-known seventeenth-century poet William Basse (c. 1583-1653? combined two distinctive elements. He served, in the first instance, as a ‘retainer’ to the Wenman family of Thame Park in Oxfordshire for a period of more than forty years. He was also, however, a published poet who produced a substantial body of verse which reflected and intertwined with his career in service. The article aims to stimulate interest in Basse by drawing attention to a manuscript collection of his poems which remains unpublished and has until now been considered ‘lost’ in scholarly accounts of the poet. The Polyhymnia, held at Chetham’s Library in Manchester, was prepared as a gift in the late 1640s or early 1650s for relations of the Wenmans who lived on the nearby Rycote estate. It brought together poems from across the course of Basse’s career, and displayed him writing in a wide variety of forms and genres. The article summarises current knowledge of Basse’s life in service, sets out the context of the Polyhymnia as a manuscript apparently designed to fortify the links between Thame Park and Rycote, and explores the importance of Basse’s perspective as a servant to some of the more intriguing poems in the collection. It concludes by suggesting some of the ways in which a renewed focus upon Basse might contribute to study of the links between service and literature in the future.

  8. Introduction to William Stephenson's quest for a science of subjectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, James M M

    2010-01-01

    In this introduction to the life and work of William Stephenson my aim is to provide a general overview of the development of his thinking and, more specifically, to highlight the importance he attached to the study of single cases. I also attempt to provide a context for an understanding of the significance of his "Tribute to Melanie Klein." Some of the principal reasons for Stephenson's marginal status in the discipline of psychology will also emerge in the course of the article. I begin by outlining some of the central notions in Q-methodology. The early sections of the article trace his roots in the north of England - the setting for his schooling and university training in physics - and then outline his encounters with Charles Spearman and Cyril Burt at University College London. The subsequent section deals with his time at the University of Oxford Institute of Experimental Psychology and the wartime interruption to his career. The next few sections take us across the Atlantic and describe some of the most significant features of his work on Q-methodology. these sections also record the difficulties Stephenson experienced before he eventually secured a tenured position at the University of Missouri School of Journalism in Columbia. In the final section I attempt to situate Q-methodology in relation to some of the principal theoretical orientations in the human sciences.

  9. THE HISTORY OF DESIGN EDUCATION AND WILLIAM MORRIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguz DILMAC

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Industrial revolution had an impact on art as well as other fields of society in the years 1760-1860. The machines came to the front in together with bringing out production line to supply growing demand, and so the importance the art had diminished. The machines having some features like standard production, scales based on rules and geometric form having unnatural appearance caused the artists such as William Morris and John Ruskin to believe that the machine harmed the art. The artists such as Morris and Ruskin took a leading role in development of design idea by resisting the form of machine production devoid of art in the light of this ideas. The problem of design keeps as a current issue nowadays. That’s why, we could create a solution by having different perspectives based on previous experience and problems encountered nowadays. The problem of design keeps on up-to-date issue with the technology developing very fast today. So, this study was made with the aim to help us present right approaches towards today’s problems. This research, review of the literature obtained from architecture, history of art and industrial design on books- magazines the subject of the dissertation thesis Higher Education Center was formed with descriptive narratives. Another aim of the research carried out in this context the handmade, machine design is to examine the emerging issues in the transition to production.

  10. William Butler Yeats in the Slovene cultural space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Gorenc

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available William Butler Yeats, Irish poet, dramatist and essayist, winner of the Nobel prize in 1923, was also widely known for the active  part he played in Irish politics. Even though he was mostly involved culturally - he wro.te about Irish politics in his works, established several literary clubs, founded theatres - he also activated  himself  as a politician when he was a senator during the years 1923-1928. This article focuses on the mention of his political activities in different English and Slovene texts. It makes a presentation of the vast majority of the texts on Yeats that have appeared in Slovene. It also points out that while the majority of English encyclopaedias and literary histories openly write about Yeats's politics, Slovene texts about Yeats focus mostly on his literary opus and less on his involvement in politics. When they do mention it, however, they usually avoid the details. This article tries to determine some reasons for this fact.

  11. Romantic morality in Mariano Iberico and William James

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Antonio Orozco

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the author offers an analysis of the evolution in Mariano Iberico’s moral philosophy that would have happened between two of his publications in the decade of the twenties. In the first publication, Iberico defends a morality of a dualistic type, giving birth to an ideal on the basis of overcoming the existential self along with its interests, needs and urgencies. A metaphysical type of morality would have been the result of such a claim. Six years later, on the other hand, the author presents a morality more understanding of the human contradiction, which does not demand the overcoming of the self as moral ideal, but rather recognizes the value of the individual. The hypothesis of this work suggests that the above mentioned evolution in Iberico’s thought would have originated from the reading of William James and of other authors whom Iberico named ‘romantics’. Furthermore, in a later section, the author shows that such an interpretationof James’ morality comes much closer to the interpretations made by Ralph B.Perry and recently by Ramon del Castillo.

  12. Exceptional warming in the Western Pacific-Indian Ocean warm pool has contributed to more frequent droughts in eastern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Christopher C.; Peterson, Thomas C.; Stott, Peter A.; Herring, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, East Africa faced a tragic food crisis that led to famine conditions in parts of Somalia and severe food shortages in parts of Ethiopia and Somalia. While many nonclimatic factors contributed to this crisis (high global food prices, political instability, and chronic poverty, among others) failed rains in both the boreal winter of 2010/11 and the boreal spring of 2011 played a critical role. The back-to-back failures of these rains, which were linked to the dominant La Niña climate and warm SSTs in the central and southeastern Indian Ocean, were particularly problematic since they followed poor rainfall during the spring and summer of 2008 and 2009. In fact, in parts of East Africa, in recent years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of below-normal rainy seasons, which may be related to the warming of the western Pacific and Indian Oceans (for more details, see Funk et al. 2008; Williams and Funk 2011; Williams et al. 2011; Lyon and DeWitt 2012). The basic argument of this work is that recent warming in the Indian–Pacific warm pool (IPWP) enhances the export of geopotential height energy from the warm pool, which tends to produce subsidence across eastern Africa and reduce onshore moisture transports. The general pattern of this disruption has been supported by canonical correlation analyzes and numerical experiments with the Community Atmosphere Model (Funk et al. 2008), diagnostic evaluations of reanalysis data (Williams and Funk 2011; Williams et al. 2011), and SST-driven experiments with ECHAM4.5, ECHAM5, and the Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3.6) (Lyon and DeWitt 2012).

  13. Astronomy in Indian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, V. B.

    Tradition of astronomy in India goes back to ancient times. Many festivals and rituals are associated with astronomical phenomena. Indian children start learning rudiments of astronomy from primary classes. But primary teachers are not equipped to handle this subject so not much learning actually takes place. The first serious interface with astronomy occurs when children reach class X when they are 15 years old. Till last year astronomy was there in class XII also but it has now been dropped. This is a serious setback for the study of astronomy. In class X astronomy forms part of general science. Since children at this stage are not proficient in physics and mathematics the subject remains descriptive though there are useful activities for children to do. However the teachers are not equipped to handle this subject and there is no help in the form of visual material. So the subject remains neglected. The Indian astronomical community can help by training teachers and providing visual material. It must also urge authorities to reintroduce astronomy in class XII if astronomy is to flourish in India. Moreover India needs to network with developing countries share experiences with them and evolve a strategy that promotes astronomy.

  14. Bernard Williams, republicanism, and the liberalism of fear : problems and prospects.

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Thom

    2013-01-01

    Bernard Williams speaks approvingly of “the liberalism of fear” (2005). The liberalism of fear is an idea first found in the writings of Judith Shklar (1989). This chapter offers a brief presentation of what is the liberalism of fear and focusses on why Williams finds this idea attractive. My argument will be that the liberalism of fear has a close affinity with the theory of republicanism, challenging the distinctiveness of the liberalism of fear. Furthermore, I will argue that republicanis...

  15. Bringing inorganic chemistry to life with inspiration from R. J. P. Williams

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, H. Allen O.; Sadler, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Our appreciation of the scholarly ideas and thinking of Bob Williams is illustrated here by a few of the areas in which he inspired us. His journey to bring inorganic chemistry to life began with an early interest in analytical chemistry, rationalising the relative stabilities of metal coordination complexes (The Irving-Williams Series), and elucidating the organometallic redox chemistry of vitamin B12. He (and Vallee) recognised that metal ions are in energised (entatic) states in proteins a...

  16. Relación Henry-William James y repercusiones en la obra del novelista

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez Calleja, María Antonia

    1989-01-01

    According to Henry James's biographers, there was a clear sibling rivalry between him and his brother. The young Henry could not compete with William because of his own mild character, nor accompany him in the boys' games, always presided by his eider brother. The novelist could yet remember, at the end of his life, William's insult: "I play with boys who curse and swear," while with a mixture of affection and praise, describes the philosopher in his autobiography as a distant and elusive ...

  17. Trading one Kind of Dogmatism for Another: Comments on Williams Criticism of Agrippan Scepticism

    OpenAIRE

    Armando Cíntora; Jorge Ornelas

    2013-01-01

    M. Williams analysis (1999, 2001 and 2004b) of the Prior Grounding Conception (PGC) of epistemic justification a con- ception allegedly behind the Agrippan trilemma is reviewed and it is contrasted with the Default Challenge Conception of justi- fication (DChC) the alternative conception of epistemic justi- fication championed by Williams. It is argued that the epistemic default entitlements of the DChC are a euphemism for epistemi- cally arbitrary stipulations, it is also argued that while t...

  18. Binding of Visual and Spatial Short-Term Memory in Williams Syndrome and Moderate Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrold, Christopher; Phillips, Caroline; Baddeley, Alan D

    2007-01-01

    A main aim of this study was to test the claim that individuals with Williams syndrome have selectively impaired memory for spatial as opposed to visual information. The performance of 16 individuals with Williams syndrome (six males, 10 females; mean age 18y 7mo [SD 7y 6mo], range 9y 1mo-30y 7mo) on tests of short-term memory for item and…

  19. Hg and As Minerals in Fluid Inclusions from the Williams Mine, Hemlo, and Their Genetic Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU HUANZHANG(卢焕章); JAYANTA. GUHA; DON. C. HARRIS

    2002-01-01

    The Hemlo mineralization is enigmatic compared to general Archean lode gold deposits based on the fact that it is characterized by an exotic mineralogy containing elements such as As, Hg, Sb, Ba, V and Mo. The genetic concepts range from syngenetic to epigenetic types of mineralization. This reconnaissance study was designed to examine the relationship of Hg-As minerals with respect to fluid inclusions in the Williams mine (formerly known as the Page Williams mine) covering the A and C ore zones.

  20. Luibov Popova Untitled Textile Design on William Morris Wallpaper for Historical Materialism

    OpenAIRE

    Mabb, David

    2010-01-01

    The artist David Mabb has created an artwork especially for Historical Materialism. Titled: Luibov Popova Untitled Textile Design on William Morris wallpaper for Historical Materialism, the print is issued in a run of 100. Mabb’s picture is made by screen printing a textile design by Luibov Popova in red and black over a section of William Morris wallpapers including: Fruit, Willow Boughs, Trellis, Brier Rabbit, Medway and Daisy. As a consequence of the different wallpapers employed and the r...

  1. Application of Choi—Williams Reduced Interference Time Frequency Distribution to Machinery Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard A. Gaberson

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses time frequency analysis of machinery diagnostic vibration signals. The short time Fourier transform, the Wigner, and the Choi–Williams distributions are explained and illustrated with test cases. Examples of Choi—Williams analyses of machinery vibration signals are presented. The analyses detect discontinuities in the signals and their timing, amplitude and frequency modulation, and the presence of different components in a vibration signal.

  2. Dr. William Gates, Dean, Graduate School of Business and Public Policy, Biography

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Biography of Dr. William Gates, Dean, Graduate School of Business and Public Policy, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA. Dr. William (Bill) Gates, Associate Professor and Associate Dean of Research, was appointed the Dean of the Graduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP) effective February 1, 2009. A graduate of Yale University (Ph.D.) and UC San Diego, Dr. Gates has been a professor of economics in GSBPP since 1988. Prior to joining NPS he was an economist at the Jet...

  3. 25 CFR 75.18 - Adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adoption. 75.18 Section 75.18 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... OF CHEROKEE INDIANS, NORTH CAROLINA § 75.18 Adoption. The Tribal Council of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians shall be empowered to enact ordinances governing the adoption of new members....

  4. 77 FR 39505 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Wesleyan University, Middleton, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. History and Description of the Remains In the late 1800s, human... Mouse Creek to Overhill Cherokee based on shifts in ceramic styles, settlement characteristics,...

  5. 77 FR 68819 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Ozark-St. Francis...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ...; Cherokee Nation; Chickasaw Nation; Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Eastern Shawnee... Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma; and the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie...- related archeological complexes (e.g. Mulberry River Culture and Limestone Complex). Determinations...

  6. 76 FR 51026 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service List for a Programmatic Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... Band Carolina Department of Cultural of Cherokee Indians, P.O. Box 455, Resources, 4617 Mail Service Cherokee, NC 28719. Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-4610. Dolores Hall, North Carolina Wenonah G. Haire,...

  7. The rhetorical strategy of William Paley's Natural theology (1802): part 1, William Paley's Natural theology in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Niall

    2010-03-01

    This article reconstructs the historical and philosophical contexts of William Paley's Natural theology (1802). In the wake of the French Revolution, widely believed to be the embodiment of an atheistic political credo, the refutation of the transmutational biological theories of Buffon and Erasmus Darwin was naturally high on Paley's agenda. But he was also responding to challenges arising from his own moral philosophy, principally the psychological quandary of how men were to be kept in mind of the Creator. It is argued here that Natural theology was the culmination of a complex rhetorical scheme for instilling religious impressions that would increase both the virtue and happiness of mankind. Philosophy formed an integral part of this strategy, but it did not comprise the whole of it. Equally vital were those purely rhetorical aspects of the discourse which, according to Paley, were more concerned with creating 'impression'. This facet of his writing is explored in part one of this two-part article. Turning to the argumentative side of the scheme, part two examines Paley's responses to David Hume and Erasmus Darwin in the light of the wider strategy of inculcation at work throughout all his writings.

  8. Statistics Concerning Indian Education. Fiscal Year 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Alice S., Comp.

    Statistical facts on the education of American Indian children in 1972 are presented in this booklet. It is noted that many of the treaties between the United States and Indian tribes provided for the establishment of schools for Indian children. The Bureau of Indian Affairs has direct responsibility for the 57,788 children enrolled in Federal…

  9. Washington Irving and the American Indian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlefield, Daniel F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Some modern scholars feel that Washington Irving vacillated between romanticism and realism in his literary treatment of the American Indian. However, a study of all his works dealing with Indians, placed in context with his non-Indian works, reveals that his attitude towards Indians was intelligent and enlightened for his time. (CM)

  10. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome: A Longitudinal Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela E. John

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Although prior research has indicated that pragmatics is an area of particular weakness for individuals with Williams syndrome (WS, the relations among different pragmatic abilities and the relations between pragmatic ability and expressive vocabulary ability have yet to be addressed. In addition, analyses of the relations between the same type of pragmatic ability over time have not been reported. The present study was designed to address these questions. We considered the pragmatic language abilities of 14 children with WS at two time points: as 4-year-olds during a 30-minute play-session with their mothers (Time 1 and an average of 5.87 years later during a one-on-one conversation with a familiar researcher (Time 2. Children’s intellectual and expressive vocabulary abilities were assessed at both time points. Results indicated that the ability to verbally contribute information beyond what was required in response to a question was significantly related to the ability to verbally contribute new information in the absence of a question both at age 4 years and during primary school. At age 4, both the ability to pair verbalizations with eye contact (intersubjectivity and expressive vocabulary ability were related to the ability to verbally contribute information beyond what was expected within a social interaction. Finally, the ability to verbally contribute new information to a social interaction beyond what was required to answer a question and the ability to pair verbalizations with eye contact (intersubjectivity at age 4 years predicted the ability to verbally contribute new information beyond what was required to answer a question at age 9 – 12 years. The theoretical implications of our findings and the importance of early pragmatic language intervention for children who have WS are discussed.

  11. Space and Language in Williams syndrome: Insights from typical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Barbara; Ferrara, Katrina

    2013-01-01

    One of the holy grails of cognitive science is to understand the causal chain that links genes and cognition. Genetic syndromes accompanied by cognitive effects offer natural experiments that can uniquely inform our understanding of this chain. In this article, we discuss the case of Williams syndrome (WS), which is characterized by a set of missing genes on chromosome 7q11.23, and presents with a unique cognitive profile that includes severe spatial impairment along with strikingly fluent and well-structured language. An early inference from this profile was the idea that a small group of genes could directly target one cognitive system while leaving others unaffected. Recent evidence shows that this inference fails. First, the profile within the spatial domain is varied, with relative strength in some aspects of spatial representation but severe impairment in others. Second, some aspects of language may fail to develop fully, raising the question of how to compare the resilience and fragility of the two key cognitive domains in this syndrome. Third, much research on the profile fails to place findings in the context of typical developmental trajectories. We explore these points and propose a new hypothesis that explains the unusual WS cognitive profile by considering normal mechanisms of cognitive development that undergo change on an extremely prolonged timetable. This hypothesis places the elements of the WS cognitive profile in a new light, refocuses the discussion of the gene-cognition causal chain for WS and other disorders, and more generally, underlines the importance of understanding cognitive structure in both typical and atypical development.

  12. Strain accumulation across the Prince William Sound asperity, Southcentral Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, James C.; Svarc, Jerry L.; Lisowski, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The surface velocities predicted by the conventional subduction model are compared to velocities measured in a GPS array (surveyed in 1993, 1995, 1997, 2000, and 2004) spanning the Prince William Sound asperity. The observed velocities in the comparison have been corrected to remove the contributions from postseismic (1964 Alaska earthquake) mantle relaxation. Except at the most seaward monument (located on Middleton Island at the seaward edge of the continental shelf, just 50 km landward of the deformation front in the Aleutian Trench), the corrected velocities qualitatively agree with those predicted by an improved, two-dimensional, back slip, subduction model in which the locked megathrust coincides with the plate interface identified by seismic refraction surveys, and the back slip rate is equal to the plate convergence rate. A better fit to the corrected velocities is furnished by either a back slip rate 20% greater than the plate convergence rate or a 30% shallower megathrust. The shallow megathrust in the latter fit may be an artifact of the uniform half-space Earth model used in the inversion. Backslip at the plate convergence rate on the megathrust mapped by refraction surveys would fit the data as well if the rigidity of the underthrust plate was twice that of the overlying plate, a rigidity contrast higher than expected. The anomalous motion at Middleton Island is attributed to continuous slip at near the plate convergence rate on a postulated, listric fault that splays off the megathrust at depth of about 12 km and outcrops on the continental slope south-southeast of Middleton Island.

  13. 切诺基汽车电子点火系统故障的诊断与排除%Diagnosing and Clearing Fault of Electronic Ignition System on CHEROKEE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谷志杰; 史飞龙; 李荣娴

    2008-01-01

    详细分析切诺基(Cherokee)汽车发动机不能起动、仅在点火开关起动位置运转、高速断火或运转不稳等低压电路、高压电路的故障,阐述电子点火控制器以及其它故障的诊断和排除方法,列出了低压电路故障诊断程序.

  14. 25 CFR 153.5 - Children of competent Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Children of competent Indians. 153.5 Section 153.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER DETERMINATION OF COMPETENCY: CROW INDIANS § 153.5 Children of competent Indians. Children of competent Indians who have attained...

  15. Taxation and the American Indian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, David

    1973-01-01

    The article explores American Indian tribal rights to tax exemptions and self-imposed taxation; general recommendations on possible tribal tax alternatives; and evaluation of the probable economic effect of taxation. (FF)

  16. 76 FR 11258 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... engaging in Class III gaming activities on Indian lands. The compact authorizes up to 2,000 video lottery terminals, up to 70 table games, and establishes the Oregon Benefit Fund to receive payments from...

  17. SENSATION SEEKING SCALE: INDIAN ADAPTATION

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, Debasish; Verma, Vijoy K.; Malhotra, Savita; Malhotra, Anil

    1993-01-01

    SUMMARY Sensation seeking refers to a biologically based personality dimension defined as the need for varied, novel and complex sensations and experiences, and the willingness to take physical and social risks for the sake of such experiences. Although researched worldwide for nearly three decades now, there is to date no published Indian study utilizing the concept of sensation seeking. This paper describes adaptation of the Sensation Seeking Scale for the Indian population. After due modif...

  18. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Shrikant Mishra; Bhavesh Trikamji; Sandeep Singh; Parampreet Singh; Rajasekharan Nair

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C.) during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20 th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian med...

  19. Internationalization Of Indian IT Multinationals

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Abhishek

    2009-01-01

    Indian IT industry has emerged to be a strong and influential player on the world map. The industry which did not existed a few decades ago is now a major exporter of software services to major markets. The Indian IT firms now seem to move beyond exporting and advance further into the international market. With the help of case study approach, this study tends to examine the internationalization of these firms. The dissertation is aimed to see how far the traditional theories o...

  20. Design and implementation of estimation-based monitoring programs for flora and fauna: A case study on the Cherokee National Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimstra, J.D.; O'Connell, A.F., Jr.; Pistrang, M.J.; Lewis, L.M.; Herrig, J.A.; Sauer, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    Science-based monitoring of biological resources is important for a greater understanding of ecological systems and for assessment of the target population using theoretic-based management approaches. When selecting variables to monitor, managers first need to carefully consider their objectives, the geographic and temporal scale at which they will operate, and the effort needed to implement the program. Generally, monitoring can be divided into two categories: index and inferential. Although index monitoring is usually easier to implement, analysis of index data requires strong assumptions about consistency in detection rates over time and space, and parameters are often biasednot accounting for detectability and spatial variation. In most cases, individuals are not always available for detection during sampling periods, and the entire area of interest cannot be sampled. Conversely, inferential monitoring is more rigorous because it is based on nearly unbiased estimators of spatial distribution. Thus, we recommend that detectability and spatial variation be considered for all monitoring programs that intend to make inferences about the target population or the area of interest. Application of these techniques is especially important for the monitoring of Threatened and Endangered (T&E) species because it is critical to determine if population size is increasing or decreasing with some level of certainty. Use of estimation-based methods and probability sampling will reduce many of the biases inherently associated with index data and provide meaningful information with respect to changes that occur in target populations. We incorporated inferential monitoring into protocols for T&E species spanning a wide range of taxa on the Cherokee National Forest in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. We review the various approaches employed for different taxa and discuss design issues, sampling strategies, data analysis, and the details of estimating detectability using site

  1. La influència de John William Waterhouse en l'obra multimèdia

    OpenAIRE

    Giménez Espinosa, Sabrina

    2011-01-01

    Estudi visual comparatiu de la influència estètica de l'obra pictòrica de John William Waterhouse en la creació multimèdia. Estudio visual comparativo de la influencia estética de la obra pictórica de John William Waterhouse en la creación multimedia. Comparative study on the visual aesthetics influence of the paintings of John William Waterhouse in multimedia creations.

  2. Report of Some Comets: The Discovery of Uranus and Comets by William, Caroline, and John Herschel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Olson, R. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the discovery and drawings of comets by William, Caroline, and John Herschel. The first discovery, by William Herschel, in 1781 from Bath, published in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society with the title "Report of a Comet," turned out to be Uranus, the first planet ever discovered, Mercury through Saturn having been known since antiquity. William's sister Caroline was given duties of sweeping the skies and turned out to be a discoverer of 8 comets in her own right, in addition to keeping William's notes. Caroline's comets were discovered from Slough between 1786 and 1797. In the process, we also discuss original documents from the archives of the Royal Society and of the Royal Astronomical Society. We conclude by showing comet drawings that we have recently attributed to John Herschel, including Halley's Comet from 1836, recently located in the Ransom Center of the University of Texas at Austin. Acknowledgments: Planetary astronomy at Williams College is supported in part by grant NNX08AO50G from NASA Planetary Astronomy. We thank Peter Hingley of the Royal Astronomical Society and Richard Oram of the Harry Ransom Center of The University of Texas at Austin for their assistance.

  3. Anatomy of Indian heatwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnam, J. V.; Behera, Swadhin K.; Ratna, Satyaban B.; Rajeevan, M.; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-04-01

    India suffers from major heatwaves during March-June. The rising trend of number of intense heatwaves in recent decades has been vaguely attributed to global warming. Since the heat waves have a serious effect on human mortality, root causes of these heatwaves need to be clarified. Based on the observed patterns and statistical analyses of the maximum temperature variability, we identified two types of heatwaves. The first-type of heatwave over the north-central India is found to be associated with blocking over the North Atlantic. The blocking over North Atlantic results in a cyclonic anomaly west of North Africa at upper levels. The stretching of vorticity generates a Rossby wave source of anomalous Rossby waves near the entrance of the African Jet. The resulting quasi-stationary Rossby wave-train along the Jet has a positive phase over Indian subcontinent causing anomalous sinking motion and thereby heatwave conditions over India. On the other hand, the second-type of heatwave over the coastal eastern India is found to be due to the anomalous Matsuno-Gill response to the anomalous cooling in the Pacific. The Matsuno-Gill response is such that it generates northwesterly anomalies over the landmass reducing the land-sea breeze, resulting in heatwaves.

  4. Indian draught animals power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. L. Phaniraja

    Full Text Available With the modernization of agriculture, the use of mechanical power in agriculture has increased but draught animal power (DAP continues to be used on Indian farms due to small holdings and hill agriculture. More than 55% of the total cultivated area is still being managed by using draught animals as against about 20% by tractors. India possessed the finest breeds of draught animals. Bullocks, buffaloes and camels are the major draught animals for field operations. Horses, mules, donkeys, yak and mithun are the pack animals for transport. The quality of work from the draught animals depends upon the power developed by them. The design of traditional implements is based on long experience and these have served the purpose of the farmers. However there is plenty of scope to improve the design based on animal-machine-environment interaction so as to have more output and increased efficiency without jeopardizing animal health. [Vet World 2009; 2(10.000: 404-407

  5. Obituary: William F. M. Buscombe, 1918-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taam, Ronald Everett; Bahng, John D. R.

    2003-12-01

    William Buscombe, an emeritus professor at Northwestern University, died from a massive stroke on 13 March 2003. He was a stellar spectroscopist and was working on the 16th edition of his catalog, entitled ``MK Spectral Classifications" at the time of his death. Bill was born on 12 February 1918 in Hamilton, Canada to Ethel Minett Buscombe and William Henry Buscombe. His mother was a business woman prior to marriage and his father was an executive secretary to a fire insurance company. His interest in astronomy was stimulated by a mathematics teacher in grade school and this interest carried over to his undergraduate years at the University of Toronto where he worked as a research assistant measuring stellar spectra at the David Dunlop Observatory. He earned a BA degree in Mathematics and Physics in 1940. Upon graduation he entered the graduate program in meteorology under the Department of Transport of the Government of Canada and worked as a meteorologist for the Canadian government until 1945. His studies and service eventually led to a MA degree in Meteorology from the University of Toronto in 1948. From the period 1945 to 1948, Bill was an instructor in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Saskatchewan. During the summer of 1947 Bill resumed his research in astronomy working with Andew McKellar in a study of the intensities of molecular bands in R-type stars at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory. Subsequently, Bill entered into the graduate program in the Department of Astronomy at Princeton University where he worked with Martin Schwarzschild and Lyman Spitzer, Jr. In 1950, he was awarded a PhD in Astronomy for his thesis entitled, ``Spectrophotometry of Early A-Type Stars." Bill joined the staff at the Mt. Wilson and Palomar Observatories as a Fellow of the Carnegie Institution of Washington from 1950--1952. During this period he spent a significant amount of time observing at Mount Wilson studying the variations of atomic absorption lines

  6. Renewable energy in Indian country

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    On June 25--27, 1995, at Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado, the Center for Resource Management (CRM), organized and sponsored a conference in conjunction with the Navajo Nation, EPA, and Bechtel Group, Inc., to deal with issues associated with developing renewable energy resources on Indian lands. Due to the remoteness of many reservation homes and the cost of traditional power line extensions, a large percentage of the Indian population is today without electricity or other energy services. In addition, while they continue to develop energy resources for export, seeing only minimal gain in their own economies, Indian people are also subject to the health and environmental consequences associated with proximity to traditional energy resource development. Renewable energy technologies, on the other hand, are often ideally suited to decentralized, low-density demand. These technologies--especially solar and wind power--have no adverse health impacts associated with generation, are relatively low cost, and can be used in applications as small as a single home, meeting power needs right at a site. Their minimal impact on the environment make them particularly compatible with American Indian philosophies and lifestyles. Unfortunately, the match between renewable energy and Indian tribes has been hampered by the lack of a comprehensive, coordinated effort to identify renewable energy resources located on Indian lands, to develop practical links between Indian people`s needs and energy producers, and to provide the necessary training for tribal leaders and members to plan, implement, and maintain renewable energy systems. Summaries of the presentations are presented.

  7. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by William Floyd High School, New York

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    This ATLAS Virtual Visit features high school students from Mrs. Brazzelli's and Mrs. Meyer's Physics classes of William Floyd High School in Mastic Beach, NY. This experience will further student involvement in STEM disciplines. Students will be introduced to the Standard Model of particles, the ATLAS Experiment, and the Large Hadron Collider. Students will also have the opportunity to analyze and compare data from the ATLAS experiment and summarize the fundamental facts around the Higgs boson discovery. At the end of this activity students will interact with scientists by asking questions about the experiment. William Floyd High School is also involved in the International Physics Masterclass organized by the European Particle Physics Outreach Group. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/WilliamFloyd-NY-2012.html

  8. Williams-Beuren syndrome associated with single kidney and nephrocalcinosis: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Kamel; Jellouli, Manel; Rabeh, Rania Ben; Hammi, Yousra; Gargah, Tahar

    2015-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by congenital heart defects, abnormal facial features, mental retardation with specific cognitive and behavioral profile, growth hormone deficiency, renal and skeletal anomalies, inguinal hernia, infantile hypercalcaemia. We report a case with Williams-Beuren syndrome associated with a single kidney and nephrocalcinosis complicated by hypercalcaemia. A male infant, aged 20 months presented growth retardation associated with a psychomotor impairment, dysmorphic features and nephrocalcinosis. He had also hypercalciuria and hypercalcemia. Echocardiography was normal. DMSA renal scintigraphy showed a single functioning kidney. The FISH generated one ELN signal in 20 metaphases read and found the presence of ELN deletion, with compatible Williams-Beuren syndrome. PMID:26958139

  9. A case of William's syndrome associated peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kyung Hwa; Hwang, Mi Soo; Kim, Sun Yong; Chang, Jae Chun; Park, Bok Hwan [College of Medicine, Yeungam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-06-15

    William's syndrome, in order to more completely delineate the total spectrum of the disorder, indicates that 'infantile hypercalcemia', 'peculiar facies' and 'supravalvular aortic stenosis.' In has other many vascular anomalies, such as peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, coronary arterial stenosis, celiac arterial stenosis, and renal aterial stenosis. Only 32% of the patients have evidence of supravalvular aortic stenosis. And it is very rare disease entity that has been reported rarely in Korea. Recently authors experienced a case that was questioned William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, clinically and preliminary radiologically and this case was confirmed by operation. Here we report a case of William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis and reviewed literatures.

  10. Infrared astronomy seeing the heat : from William Herschel to the Herschel space observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Clements, David L

    2014-01-01

    Uncover the Secrets of the Universe Hidden at Wavelengths beyond Our Optical GazeWilliam Herschel's discovery of infrared light in 1800 led to the development of astronomy at wavelengths other than the optical. Infrared Astronomy - Seeing the Heat: from William Herschel to the Herschel Space Observatory explores the work in astronomy that relies on observations in the infrared. Author David L. Clements, a distinguished academic and science fiction writer, delves into how the universe works, from the planets in our own Solar System to the universe as a whole. The book first presents the major t

  11. William S. Halsted and Harvey W. Cushing: reflections on their complex association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhees, Jennifer R; Tubbs, R Shane; Nahed, Brian; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2009-02-01

    William Stewart Halsted, the father of modern surgery, and Harvey Williams Cushing, the father of neurosurgery, are remembered for their countless innovations and contributions to the discipline of surgery. Between 1896 and 1912, they worked together at Johns Hopkins Hospital making many of their respective achievements possible. In the later years, their complex relationship, somewhat strained during Cushing's residency, grew into a mutual respect and deep appreciation for one another. In this offering, the authors attempt to elucidate the evolution of this complex relationship.

  12. William and Caroline Herschel pioneers in late 18th-century astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hoskin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This beautifully structured book presents the essentials of William and Caroline Herschel's pioneering achievements in late 18th-century astronomy. Michael Hoskin shows that William Herschel was the first observational cosmologist and one of the first observers to attack the sidereal universe beyond the solar system:Herschel built instruments far better than any being used at the royal observatory. Aided by his sister Caroline, he commenced a great systematic survey that led to his discovery of Uranus in 1781.Unlike observers before him, whose telescopes did not reveal them as astronomical obj

  13. Replication of “Experiencing physical warmth promotes interpersonal warmth” by Williams & Bargh (2008)

    OpenAIRE

    Lynott, Dermot; Corker, Katherine; Wortman, Jessica; Connell, Louise; Donnellan, M. Brent; Lucas, Richard; O'Brien, Kerry S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of three high-powered, independent replications of Study 2 from Williams and Bargh (2008). Participants evaluated hot or cold instant therapeutic packs before choosing a reward for participation that was framed as a prosocial (i.e., treat for a friend) or self-interested reward (i.e., treat for the self). Williams and Bargh predicted that evaluating the hot pack would lead to a higher probability of making a prosocial choice compared to evaluating the cold pack. We did n...

  14. The gluon propagator in non-Abelian Weizsaecker-Williams fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors carefully compute the gluon propagator in the background of a non-Abelian Weizsaecker-Williams field. This background field is generated by the valence quarks in very large nuclei. They find contact terms in the small fluctuation equations of motion which induce corrections to a previously incorrect result for the gluon propagator in such a background field. The well known problem of the Hermiticity of certain operators in Light Cone gauge is resolved for the Weizsaecker-Williams background field. This is achieved by working in a gauge where singular terms in the equations of motion are absent and then gauge transforming the small fluctuation fields to Light Cone gauge

  15. Suicidal behavior in Indian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Diana; Sher, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is both a public and mental health problem, and is a leading cause of deaths, especially among adolescents. Two factors that contribute to the decision of adolescents to commit suicide are having a primary mood disorder and/or substance use. In the Indian culture, the family unit has both a positive and negative impact on suicide. The family serves as a protective factor that provides a strong support for the individual, but alternately creates an inseparable individual when seeking mental health care, which often complicates the situation. Due to the stigma, Indians typically perceive having a mental illness as shameful. Religion is integral to the Indian culture so much so that individuals often use herbal remedies, seek help from religious leaders, and attend religious establishments prior to obtaining a mental health evaluation in those that are subsequently deemed as mentally ill. Despite the fact that suicides are underreported and misdiagnosed in India, it is known that the highest rates are among those immigrating, Indians tend to switch the methods they use to commit suicide from ingestion of poison to hanging, which may reflect a lack of available poisonous substances or the influence of the host culture. Considering the high suicide rates in adolescents, the importance of providing psychoeducation, restricting access to lethal means, and promoting social integration in immigrants are various ways by which suicides in Indian adolescents can be avoided. PMID:24006319

  16. 76 FR 58076 - Designation of the Indian Mujahideen, Also Known as Indian Mujahedeen, Also Known as Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE... Known as Islamic Security Force-Indian Mujahideen (ISF-IM), as a Foreign Terrorist Organization Pursuant... known as Indian Mujahidin, also known as Islamic Security Force-Indian Mujahideen (ISF-IM). Therefore,...

  17. 77 FR 32625 - William J. Stevenson, Estate of Lynn E. Stevenson, Black Canyon Bliss, LLC; Notice of Application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission William J. Stevenson, Estate of Lynn E. Stevenson, Black Canyon Bliss, LLC... 23, 2012, William J. Stevenson, Estate of Lynn E. Stevenson (transferor) and Black Canyon Bliss,...

  18. 78 FR 49749 - Williams Olefins Feedstock Pipelines, L.L.C.; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Williams Olefins Feedstock Pipelines, L.L.C.; Notice of Petition for... Practices and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.207(a)(2)(2012), Williams Olefins Feedstock Pipelines, L.L.C., filed...

  19. The Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978: Implications for Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Barbara Brooks

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (ICWA), intended to stabilize Indian families by reducing the number of Indian children placed in non-Indian adoptive or foster homes. The act established minimum federal standards for removal of Indian children and outlined procedures that aid their placement in homes reflecting Indian culture.…

  20. 76 FR 35221 - Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and Urban Indian Communities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... June 8, 2011, in FR Doc. 2011-14131, on page 33318, in the first column, last complete sentence in the... Urban Indian Communities; Correction AGENCY: Indian Health Service, HHS. ACTION: Notice; correction... American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and urban Indian communities. The document contained one...

  1. 75 FR 36414 - American Indians Into Psychology; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service American Indians Into Psychology; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into Psychology Program Announcement Type: New. Funding Opportunity Number... Indians into Psychology Program. This program is authorized under the authority of ``25 U.S.C....

  2. Lean manufacturing in Indian context: A survey

    OpenAIRE

    Rakesh Kumar; Vikas Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to examine the implementation of Lean Manufacturing system in the Indian industries. Predominant elements of Lean Manufacturing, benefits gained after its implementation and obstacles observed by Indian Industry have been recognized. The results of this survey support the opinion that Lean Manufacturing had potential to improve the organizational performance of Indian industries. Nevertheless, Indian industries are required to be passionate to transform their manufact...

  3. Gender Anxiety and Contemporary Indian Popular Fiction

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Elen

    2012-01-01

    In her article "Gender Anxiety and Contemporary Indian Popular Fiction" Elen Turner discusses two examples of Indian "popular literature" which reflect contemporary Indian middle-class anxieties surrounding globalization and social change. The recent proliferation of foreign business process outsourcing companies in India has changed the financial and lifestyle opportunities available to young, urban Indians. While sociological and ethnographic studies have found that workers embrace what the...

  4. A MISCELLANY ON INDIAN TRADITIONAL MUSIC

    OpenAIRE

    Rauf Kerimov

    2013-01-01

    Indian music has a very long, unbroken tradition and is an accumulated heritage of centuries. Music in India was popular among all the sections of society and intertwined in life and culture from birth to death. Indian music was formed with the evolution of ancient religious and secular music. The Indian culture absorbed all the best that was brought by other nations in the process of historical development. The Indian music is quite diverse: there are classical instrumental and vocal works a...

  5. East Indians in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen M. Schnepel

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Transients to Settlers: The Experience of Indians in Jamaica 1845-J950. VERENE SHEPHERD. Leeds, U.K.: Peepal Tree Books, 1993. 281 pp. (Paper £12.95 Survivors of Another Crossing: A History of East Indians in Trinidad, 1880-1946. MARIANNE D. SOARES RAMESAR. St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago: U.W.I. School of Continuing Education, 1994. xiii + 190 pp. (Paper n.p. Les Indes Antillaises: Presence et situation des communautes indiennes en milieu caribeen. ROGER TOUMSON (ed.. Paris: L'Harmattan, 1994. 264 pp. (Paper 140.00 FF Nation and Migration: The Politics of Space in the South Asian Diaspora. PETER VAN DER VEER (ed.. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1995. vi + 256 pp. (Cloth US$ 39.95, Paper US$ 17.95 In the decade since 1988, Caribbean nations with Indian communities have commemorated the 150th anniversary of the arrival of East Indians to the West Indies. These celebrations are part of local revitalization movements of Indian culture and identity stretching from the French departement of Guadeloupe in the Windward Islands to Trinidad and Guyana in the south. Political changes have mirrored the cultural revival in the region. While the debate so often in the past centered on the legitimacy of East Indian claims to local nationality in these societies where African or Creole cultures dominate, in the 1990s leaders of Indian descent were elected heads of government in the two Caribbean nations with the most populous East Indian communities: Cheddi Jagan as President of Guyana in October 1992 (after a 28-year hiatus and Basdeo Panday as Prime Minister of Trinidad in November 1995. Both men have long been associated with their respective countries' struggles for economic, political, and social equality. Outside the region during the summer of 1997, fiftieth-anniversary celebrations marking the independence of India and Pakistan from Britain confirmed that Indo chic — or "Indofrenzy" as anthropologist

  6. Satellite Communications: The Indian Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ranjit Singh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available India has launched as many as 73 Indian satellites as of today since its first attempt in 1975. Besides serving traditional markets of telephony and broadcasting, satellites are on the frontiers of advanced applications as telemedicine, distance learning, environment monitoring, remote sensing, and so on. Satellite systems are optimized for services such as Internet access, virtual private networks and personal access. Costs have been coming down in recent years to the point where satellite broadband is becoming competitive. This article is an attempt to view this important topic from Indian perspective. India’s Project GAGAN, GPS Aided Geo Augmented Navigation is discussed.

  7. Indian Education: Funding Sources for Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockart, Barbetta L.

    Although provisions in countless treaties have mandated Indian educational services, federal and state governments were for many years unenthusiastic about accepting the responsibility for educating the Indian people. Inadequately funded educational services provided by the Bureau of Indian Affairs did little to reflect the realities and needs of…

  8. The Comprehensive View of Indian Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaegi, Gerda

    Relating historical conflicts between Indians and whites, the document explained how education was originally aimed at "civilizing" and domesticating the Canadian Indian. This philosophy, used extensively by church groups that established the original Indian schools, alienated children from both the white society and the educational process.…

  9. Indian Students and Reminiscences of Alcatraz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Steve

    1994-01-01

    A former graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley, at the time of the occupation of Alcatraz Island by American Indians reminisces about the development of a Native American Studies program at Berkeley, a course on Indian liberation given just before the occupation, the role of Indian students in the occupation, and attempts to…

  10. Storytelling: The Heart of American Indian Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Frances

    2006-01-01

    Recently some writers and scholars have complained that the academy, particularly American Indian Studies (AIS) programs, gives too much attention to American Indian literature while ignoring scholarly works that focus on the pressing needs of American Indian communities in the areas of economic development, social justice, and sovereignty, among…

  11. Making Education Work for the American Indian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiago, Robert K.

    1981-01-01

    Education has been used as the primary weapon in the White man's arsenal toward changing Indian tribal cultures. Indians are often treated in the classroom as an almost mythical group of people. Textbooks which contain incorrect or stereotypical information often cause Indian children to develop negative self-perceptions. (JN)

  12. Congressional Social Darwinism and the American Indian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinderman, Abraham

    1978-01-01

    Summarizing a congressional report on civil and military treatment of American Indians, this article asserts that the social Darwinism of the day prevailed among all congressional committee members ("Even friends of the Indian... knew American expansionism, technology, and racial ideology would reduce the Indian to a pitiful remnant...) (JC)

  13. Moral Leadership in Education: An Indian Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapre, Padmakar M.; Ranade, Mridula D.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses reasons for emergence of management concepts in Indian education. Reviews Western literature on leadership and offers an Indian perspective on leadership. Provides overview of the lives of three famous Indian leaders who demonstrated the essence of moral leadership: Swami Vivekananda, Rabindranath Tagore, and Mahatma Gandhi. Draws…

  14. 76 FR 63325 - National Indian Gaming Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... Register on November 18, 2010. 75 FR 70680. The Commission's regulatory review process established a tribal... National Indian Gaming Commission AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION: Notice of no action. SUMMARY: On November 18, 2010, the National Indian Gaming Commission (NIGC) issued a Notice of Inquiry...

  15. 77 FR 43111 - Indian Gaming; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the Federal Register of July 12, 2012, in FR Doc. 2012-17042, make the following... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming; Correction AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact; Correction. SUMMARY: The Bureau of...

  16. Pathways to Language: A Naturalistic Study of Children with Williams Syndrome and Children with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Yonata; Eilam, Ariela

    2013-01-01

    This is a naturalistic study of the development of language in Hebrew-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with Down syndrome (DS), whose MLU extended from 1[multiplied by]0 to 4[multiplied by]4. Developmental curves over the entire span of data collection revealed minor differences between children with WS, children with DS,…

  17. Readings on the Tragedies of William Shakespeare. The Greenhaven Press Literary Companion to British Authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Clarice, Ed.

    Designed for young adults, this book on William Shakespeare's tragedies is one of an anthology series providing accessible resources for students researching great literary lives and works. Contributing writers' essays in the book are taken from a wide variety of sources and are edited to accommodate the reading and comprehension levels of young…

  18. The William Houston Gold Medal of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh 2014, orthodontic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuzian, Mohammed

    2015-09-01

    The William Houston Medal is awarded to the individual achieving the highest mark at, the Membership in Orthodontics (MOrth) examination at the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh. As part of the examination the candidate must submit five clinical cases. Details of two cases treated by the winning candidate are presented in this paper. PMID:26082385

  19. David Cronenberg ja William S. Burroughs kutsuvad teid lantshile / Aare Ermel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ermel, Aare, 1957-2013

    1999-01-01

    Mängufilm "Alasti eine" ("Naked Lunch") William S. Burroughs' teose järgi : režissöör ja stsenarist David Cronenberg : Suurbritannia - Kanada 1991. Lähemalt režissööri kohta. Ka Nädal nr. 35, lk. 29

  20. California's Accountability System and the API. Expert Report. Submitted for: Eliezer Williams vs. State of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Michael

    This paper was presented as expert testimony in the Williams vs. State of California class action lawsuit. That case, filed on behalf of California public schoolchildren, charged the State with denying thousands of students the basic tools for a sound education. This paper addresses whether California's current output-based accountability system…