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Sample records for cherokee indians william

  1. Podophyllum peltatum and observations on the Creek and Cherokee Indians: William Bartram's preservation of Native American pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Laura E

    2009-03-01

    Historians have examined the significant contributions John and William Bartram made to 18th- and 19th-century knowledge of indigenous North American flora. However, the Bartrams' contribution to medicinal botanical knowledge, particularly William Bartram's compilation of Indians' knowledge on the preparation and use of medicinal botanicals, is not well-known. In addition, while William Bartram's contemporaries relied on his accounts of medicinal botanicals, they rarely acknowledged Bartram or Indians in their own works. Contemporaries plagiarized Bartram's writings and used his exquisite illustrations to ornament their own publications. This paper reconstructs William Bartram's careful collection and recording of medicinal botanical knowledge that became part of late 18th- and early 19th-century American pharmacology, as well as provides evidence for 54 Bartram-identified indigenous species and the pirating of William Bartram's work by contemporaries. PMID:19325943

  2. 77 FR 5265 - Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians-Cherokee Code Chapter 18B, Regulation of Alcoholic Beverages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians--Cherokee Code Chapter 18B, Regulation of... publishes the Amendment to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians--Cherokee Code Chapter 18B, Regulation of... within the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians' Reservation. This Ordinance will increase the ability of...

  3. Cherokees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnow, Pat, Ed.; Chiltoskey, Mary, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    This issue of "Now and Then" focuses on Cherokee Indians in Appalachia. It includes poetry, articles, fiction, book reviews, and photos. Articles include "The Story of My Life as Far Back as I Remember" by Aggie Ross Lossiah and edited by Joan Greene; "Goingback Chiltoskey, Master Carver," by Joan Greene; "Daughter of Tahlequah," a profile of…

  4. A Dictionary of the Cherokee Indian Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, J. T., Comp.

    This dictionary is divided into two main sections, each containing approximately 9,000 entries. In the first section, English to Cherokee, the information is organized in 3 columns. In column 1 are found English words in standard English orthography and in alphabetical order, in column 2 the romanized representation of the Cherokee translation and…

  5. 78 FR 17422 - Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; Major Disaster and Related... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (FEMA-4103-DR), dated... Band of Cherokee Indians resulting from severe storms, flooding, landslides, and mudslides during...

  6. 77 FR 47089 - Land Acquisitions; United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians of Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Land Acquisitions; United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians of Oklahoma AGENCY... trust for the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians of Oklahoma on July 30, 2012. FOR FURTHER... U.S.C. 503. The 2.03 acres are located approximately in Tahlequah, Cherokee County, Oklahoma,...

  7. 78 FR 15797 - Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Disaster #NC-00049

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... ADMINISTRATION Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Disaster NC-00049 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration... Assistance Only for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (FEMA-4103-DR), dated 03/01/2013. Incident: Severe... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Areas: Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and Associated...

  8. Indian Education in Eastern Oklahoma. A Report of Fieldwork Among the Cherokee. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Murray L.; And Others

    A field study of Cherokee Indians in Eastern Oklahoma revealed the following information: (1) educators were ignorant of and indifferent to the language, values, and cultural traditions of the Tribal (rural) Cherokee; (2) the Tribal Cherokees were an impoverished people; (3) both adults and children were educationally disadvantaged; and (4) Tribal…

  9. Oklahoma Indians and the Cultural Deprivation of an Oklahoma Cherokee Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Lynda Dixon

    This paper summarizes the history of Oklahoma Indians, highlights the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, and relates the story of the family of one Oklahoma Cherokee woman, Lou Jane Morgan Jernigan. Oklahoma is the state with the largest population of Indians, largely due to federal policy in the 19th century, which forced Indians into Oklahoma (or…

  10. Cherokee Choices: a diabetes prevention program for American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachar, Jeffrey J; Lefler, Lisa J; Reed, Lori; McCoy, Tara; Bailey, Robin; Bell, Ronny

    2006-07-01

    In 1999, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provided Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health 2010 (REACH 2010) funds to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians to develop a community-based intervention to improve the health of this rural, mountainous community in North Carolina. During the first year of the Cherokee Choices program, team members conducted formative research, formed coalitions, and developed a culturally appropriate community action plan for the prevention of type 2 diabetes, particularly among children. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians has higher rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes than the U.S. and North Carolina general populations. The Cherokee Choices program includes three main components: elementary school mentoring, worksite wellness for adults, and church-based health promotion. A social marketing strategy, including television advertisements and a television documentary series, supports the three components. School policy was altered to allow Cherokee Choices to have class time and after-school time devoted to health promotion activities. School staff have shown an interest in improving their health through attendance at fitness sessions. The credibility of the program has been validated through multiple invitations to participate in school events. Participants in the worksite wellness program have met dietary and physical activity goals, had reductions in body fat, and expressed enthusiasm for the program. A subcoalition has been formed to expand the worksite wellness component and link prevention efforts to health care cost reduction. Participants in the church program have walked more than 31,600 miles collectively. PMID:16776864

  11. 78 FR 32414 - Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of.... SUMMARY: This notice amends the notice of a major disaster for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (FEMA... follows: I have determined that the damage to the lands associated with the Eastern Band of...

  12. MARKET ORIENTATION AND THE MULTIFACTOR PRODUCTIVITY OF CHEROKEE INDIAN FARMERS BEFORE REMOVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T. Gregg

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of Cherokee Indian agriculture before removal has been debated since the early nineteenth century, yet no study has employed quantitative methods to estimate the multifactor productivity of these farmers. For this investigation I employed a unique census collected in 1835 to estimate Cherokee household-level technical efficiency and scale elasticities to determine which group (classified in terms of economic and racial characteristics within this diverse Nation achieved the highest farm productivity. The analysis reveal that among non-slaveholding Cherokess—the majority of Cherokee households in the Southeast—market-oriented units that were unrelated to any particular household racial composition achieved the highest multifactor productivity.

  13. "At the Head of the Aboriginal Remnant": Cherokee Construction of a "Civilized" Indian Identity during the Lakota Crisis of 1876

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelton, Paul

    2003-01-01

    In 1876 the bilingual Cherokee diplomat and lawyer William Penn Adair expressed great pride in the level of "civilization" that his nation had achieved. Defining civilization as commercial agriculture, literacy, Christianity, and republican government, Adair believed that his society has reached a sophistication that equaled and in certain areas…

  14. Bibliography of the Cherokees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Anne K.

    An extensive bibliography of books, government publications, periodical articles, and theses published between 1832 and 1968 has been collected on all phases of Cherokee Indian life. Although the major portion of the listings are concerned with Cherokee history, the document also presents extensive sections on Cherokee foklore (folkways, arts,…

  15. The Cherokee Perspective: Written by Eastern Cherokees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Laurence, Ed.; Hornbuckle, Jim, Ed.

    Cherokee students at the Qualla Boundary started a student organization in 1973 to improve educational prospects among Native Americans attending non-Indian colleges and universities. Because cultural conflict was perceived as playing a crucial role in the failure of Cherokee students in higher education, a major objective of the group was to…

  16. Indirect Language Assessment Tool for English-Speaking Cherokee Indian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, John M.; Long, Edgarita E.

    1998-01-01

    A parent questionnaire was used to assess cognitive, linguistic, and socio-communicative skills of 48 Cherokee and 37 Caucasian children ages 3-5. Cherokee scores were significantly lower across all three areas, but differences became smaller as age increased. Lower scores may reflect cultural differences in parenting rather than a language delay…

  17. 75 FR 76483 - Land Acquisitions; Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Land Acquisitions; Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs... Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma on November 10, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director... approximately 16.61 acres of land into trust for the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma under the authority of...

  18. Five Indian Tribes of Eastern Oklahoma: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Seminole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Dorothy; Bland, Anna

    The 18 lessons in this unit of study are intended to promote an awareness of the contribution of the American Indian to the development of Oklahoma and to preserve the culture and heritage of the American Indians of the state. Each lesson includes a concept (one-sentence statement of the main idea), background information, learning activities…

  19. Cherokees and Missionaries, 1789-1839.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, William G.

    This book describes the crucial role missionaries played in the acculturation and "Americanization" of the Cherokee Indians from 1789 to 1839. The book compares the methods, successes, and failures of the Moravians, Presbyterians, Congegrationalists, Baptists, and Methodists in their attempts to Christianize the Cherokees. Each missionary society…

  20. Cherokee and the Tourists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Now and Then, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Describes tourist season in Cherokee (North Carolina), near the Qualla Boundary (a small Cherokee reservation). Discusses the appearance and attitudes of the tourists, the endurance and salesmanship of the Cherokees, and possible means of increasing the tourist trade. (SV)

  1. 75 FR 51105 - Proposed Finding Against Federal Acknowledgment of the Central Band of Cherokee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Proposed Finding Against Federal Acknowledgment of the Central Band of Cherokee... group known as the ``Central Band of Cherokee'' (CBC), Petitioner 227, c/o Mr. Joe H. White, 1 Public... members are descendants of Cherokee Indians who had not given up their rights to lands in Tennessee...

  2. The infant caring process among Cherokee mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Lee Anne

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the social process of infant care among Cherokee mothers. Nineteen informants, who had an infant less than 2 years of age, were interviewed. The data were analyzed using the technique of constant comparative analysis. A social process of Indian infant care among Cherokee mothers was identified. Eight concepts emerged from data analysis. The first and principal concept, being a Cherokee mother, describes the functions of being an Indian mother in Cherokee society. The other seven concepts describe the patterns of cultural care the mothers provided to their infants. These included accommodating everyday infant care, accommodating health perspectives, building a care-providing consortium, living spiritually, merging the infant into Indian culture, using noncoercive discipline techniques, and vigilantly watching for the natural unfolding of the infant. Trustworthiness and credibility of the generated theory were evaluated through multiple measures. PMID:15296577

  3. Interview with Joanna Bigfeather, Cherokee, Director of the Institute of American Indian Arts Museum (IAIA, Santa Fe, NM, USA, October 28, 2000 Entretien avec Joanna Bigfeather, Cherokee, directrice, Institute of American Indian Arts Museum (IAIA, Santa Fe, NM, États-Unis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard Selbach

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available ForewordJoanna Bigfeather was appointed director of the Institute of American Indian Arts Museum, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in April 1999. A Western Cherokee brought up in New Mexico, Joanna Osburn Bigfeather graduated from IAIA in 1987 and moved to the University of California at Santa Cruz to study for a Bachelor of Fine Arts. Then she attended the State University of New York in Albany, where she obtained a Master in Fine Arts. While exhibiting extensively prints, ceramics and installations...

  4. The Atse Kituwah Academy: An Immersion Model that Holds the Key to the Future of the Cherokee Language and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Mary Lynn; Wiethaus, Ulrike

    2009-01-01

    The Atse Kituwah Academy (New Kituwah Academy) houses the new Cherokee immersion school in Cherokee, North Carolina. Cherokee is located on the Qualla Boundary in the mountains of the western part of the state, the contemporary homeland of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI). In 2005, a comprehensive study of the health of the Cherokee…

  5. The Cherokee Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Tom

    1996-01-01

    Describes an adventure program operated on the Qualla Boundary Cherokee reservation that serves Cherokee youth and outside groups interested in Cherokee culture. Aspects of Cherokee culture, such as talking circles and storytelling, are incorporated into the program. A sidebar recounts the story of a bear encounter that is used to begin many…

  6. 77 FR 19315 - Final Determination Against Federal Acknowledgment of the Central Band of Cherokee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Department published a notice of the PF in the Federal Register on August 18, 2010 (75 FR 51105). Publishing... Cherokee AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of final determination. SUMMARY: Notice... petitioner known as the ``Central Band of Cherokee'' (formerly known as the ``Cherokees of Lawrence...

  7. From "Easy Phonetics" to the Syllabary: An Orthographic Division of Labor in Cherokee Language Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Margaret

    2002-01-01

    Draws upon classroom observations and interviews with the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians to describe how literacy practices in Cherokee language education perpetuate and teach local categories of knowledge, behavior, and persons. Examines the semiotic functioning of the native-developed Cherokee syllabary and its place among four Cherokee…

  8. Too Dark to Be Angels: The Class System among the Cherokees at the Female Seminary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihesuah, Devon A.

    1991-01-01

    Cherokee Female Seminary in Indian Territory provided high quality education for Cherokee girls, 1851-1909. However, the school repressed Cherokee traditions and values, glorified White ways and appearance, and fostered a social class system that paralleled tribal tensions between mixed-bloods and full-bloods and between traditionalists and…

  9. Cherokee self-reliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, John

    2002-10-01

    This qualitative study was conducted using ethnography to identify how (a) self-reliance is conceptualized by the Cherokee; (b) the adult male Cherokee perceives, achieves, and demonstrates self-reliance; and (c) nurses can incorporate the Cherokee concept of self-reliance into health care of the Cherokee. The goal of self-reliance was included in the following mission statement of the 1976 Cherokee Nation constitution: "The mission of the government of the Cherokee Nation is to promote and sustain the self-reliance of its members" (Resolution No. 28-85, 1976). The conceptualization and perspective of self-reliance by the Cherokee must be understood to assist effectively in the development and promotion of self-reliance in the Cherokee, especially the male Cherokee. The cultural domain of self-reliance that emerged from the data is a composite of three categories that include being responsible, being disciplined, and being confident. Cutting across all three categories are the two themes of being true to onself and being connected. PMID:12325243

  10. Traditional Cherokee Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Janey B.

    A collection for children and teachers of traditional Cherokee recipes emphasizes the art, rather than the science, of cooking. The hand-printed, illustrated format is designed to communicate the feeling of Cherokee history and culture and to encourage readers to collect and add family recipes. The cookbook could be used as a starting point for…

  11. Re-Imagining Community: Political Ecology and Indigenous State Formation in the Cherokee Nation

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, Clinton Roy

    2011-01-01

    Tribal environmental governance in the Cherokee Nation today is characterized by a complex interplay among community, bureaucracy, and knowledge. The Cherokee Nation is one of the largest American Indian nations by population, and possesses a tripartite government that has operated free of federal oversight since 1971. Although the government has its roots in the historic 1827 Cherokee constitution that in many ways successfully melded "traditional" forms of governance with a state structure,...

  12. Meet Laurie Hand: Cherokee Nation Child Care and Development Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exchange: The Early Childhood Leaders' Magazine Since 1978, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Cherokee Nation, along with 257 grantees, representing more than 500 Indian Tribes, Alaskan Native Villages, and Native Hawaiian Organizations, receives federal block grant funds to improve child care for Indian children. This article discusses child care, service, relationship between programs, initiative, implementation, cooperation, and setting…

  13. Cherokee Culture across the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larch, Lillie

    1993-01-01

    A teacher describes how she integrated Cherokee culture and folklore with the required curriculum at Cherokee Elementary School (Cherokee, North Carolina). Includes an annotated list of 22 Native American cultural resources and a list of 30 books and journal articles on folk games and toys and their uses in education. (LP)

  14. "Showplace of the Cherokee Nation": race and the making of a southern house museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Tiya

    2011-11-01

    This article traces the restoration history of the Chief Vann House State Historic Site, a former Cherokee plantation owned and operated by the state of Georgia. The article explores the make-up of the restoration community in the 1950s and identifies aspects of convergence and divergence among this white, elite group in terms of both their visions for the site and their notions of how best to represent Indians. It argues that restorers used the restoration process as a route for personal and community identity enhancement, identifying with the storied Cherokee Indians and claiming "Indian" characteristics and the historical experience of Indian removal for themselves. PMID:22400483

  15. Cherokee Stickball: A Changing Tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Ted

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the history of Cherokee stickball, a ball game dating back at least to the 1500s that was once used (as an alternative to war) for resolving grievances between tribes and townships. Describes traditional aspects of Cherokee stickball and notes the steady decline of the game and its traditional rules and ceremonies. (LP)

  16. Cherokee Stories of the Supernatural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scancarelli, Janine

    1996-01-01

    Stories of personal experience of supernatural events are a highly-valued form of verbal art for Cherokee speakers. Both the people who tell them and those who listen regard such stories as entertaining and instructional. These stories even reflect some of the tensions that exist between traditional Cherokee culture and modern American social…

  17. Sequoyah and the Cherokee Syllabary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Joy

    Since the early nineteenth century, scholars have marveled at the unlettered Cherokee native named Sequoyah--or Sikwaya--and also known as John Guess--or Guest or Gist--who, unassisted, developed a medium for the written expression of the Cherokee language that was uniquely appropriate to the peculiarities of the spoken language. There is much…

  18. Ulrike Freitag: Indian Ocean, Migrants and State Formation in Hadhramaut. Reforming the Homeland. Ulrike Freitag & William Clarence-Smith : Hadhrami Traders, Scholars and Statesmen in the Indian Ocean, 1750s-1960s.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Lambert

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Ulrike Freitag Indian Ocean, Migrants and State Formation in Hadhramaut. Reforming the Homeland Leyde / Boston, Brill, 2003 Ulrike Freitag & William Clarence-Smith (directeurs Hadhrami Traders, Scholars and Statesmen in the Indian Ocean, 1750s-1960s Leyde / New-York / Cologne, Brill, 1997 Le livre Indian Ocean, Migrants and State Formation in Hadhramaut nous présente l'histoire moderne du Hadramaout, du début du xixe siècle à la fin de la période britannique (1967, en parallèle avec...

  19. The cultural appropriateness of the WIC Program in Cherokee, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonim, A B; Kolasa, K M; Bass, M A

    1981-08-01

    The data presented in this article illustrate the WIC program's ability to function within the Cherokee Indian culture. The respondents reported that WIC foods are accepted and widely distributed in the Cherokee WIC participant households. In addition, they stated that infant and child feeding practices are affected by the information they receive from advice givers. These factors in combination with the Cherokees' positive attitude toward the WIC program make for effective implementation of the national WIC nutrition goal: to maximize the WIC food package's effect on nutritional status considering all ethnic, cultural, and geographic preferences. PMID:7252027

  20. Assimilationist Language in Cherokee Women's Petitions: A Political Call to Reclaim Traditional Cherokee Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Bennion, Jillian Moore

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-one years before the forced-removal of Cherokee people from their native lands east of the Mississippi, Cherokee people fought peacefully to maintain ownership of Cherokee-owned lands and attempted to preserve, at least in part, traditional Cherokee culture. Through the drafting of petitions, specifically written between 1817-19, Cherokee women pushed back against pressure to assimilate to Anglo-American culture and to cede Cherokee land to the United States Government. The five petiti...

  1. Status of Cherokee Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Being influenced: a Cherokee way of mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, John

    2005-01-01

    This article reports research findings related to how the Cherokee male achieves self-reliance and how health care professionals can facilitate and incorporate the Cherokee concept of self-reliance into heath care of the Cherokee. Self-reliance to the Cherokee has been defined as a cultural domain with a composite of the three categories: (a) being responsible, (b) being disciplined, and (c) being confident (Lowe, 2002, 2003). Two sample groups of 12 to 14 Cherokee adults were interviewed and observed. The results reveal that mentor-type relationships influenced the participants in the development of Cherokee self-reliance. PMID:16028448

  3. 77 FR 50460 - Cherokee Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ... Forest Service Cherokee Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Cherokee Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Knoxville, Tennessee. The... Coordinator, Cherokee National Forest, 423-476-9729, twmcdonald@fs.fed.us . Individuals who...

  4. Cherokee History: An Analysis of Recent Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Walter L.

    1979-01-01

    Comments on recent studies on the Cherokee Nation which emphasize the profound differences of traditional Cherokee culture from White society, the deep factionalism that has plagued the Cherokees since the emergence of a mixed-blood group, and the remarkable persistence of native values and social forms despite two centuries of acculturation. (NEC)

  5. Eastern Band of Cherokee Strategic Energy Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souther Carolina Institute of energy Studies-Robert Leitner

    2009-01-30

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians was awarded a grant under the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program (TEP) to develop a Tribal Strategic Energy Plan (SEP). The grant, awarded under the “First Steps” phase of the TEP, supported the development of a SEP that integrates with the Tribe’s plans for economic development, preservation of natural resources and the environment, and perpetuation of Tribal heritage and culture. The Tribe formed an Energy Committee consisting of members from various departments within the Tribal government. This committee, together with its consultant, the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies, performed the following activities: • Develop the Tribe’s energy goals and objectives • Establish the Tribe’s current energy usage • Identify available renewable energy and energy efficiency options • Assess the available options versus the goals and objectives • Create an action plan for the selected options

  6. Cherokee Culture and School Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Anthony D.

    1980-01-01

    Compares the effect of cooperative and competitive behaviors of Cherokee and Anglo American elementary school students on academic achievement. Suggests changes in teaching techniques and lesson organization that might raise academic achievement while taking into consideration tribal traditions that limit scholastic achievement in an…

  7. Cherokee Practice, Missionary Intentions: Literacy Learning among Early Nineteenth-Century Cherokee Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, M. Amanda

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses how archival documents reveal early nineteenth-century Cherokee purposes for English-language literacy. In spite of Euro-American efforts to depoliticize Cherokee women's roles, Cherokee female students adapted the literacy tools of an outsider patriarchal society to retain public, political power. Their writing served…

  8. "Our Beloved Cherokee": A Naturalistic Study of Cherokee Preschool Language Immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Lizette

    2007-01-01

    This article contributes to our knowledge of endangered language revitalization by offering a case study of a Cherokee Nation (CN) preschool immersion program named Tsalagi Ageyui, "Our Beloved Cherokee." A naturalistic inquiry into the micro- and macrosociocultural dimensions of reversing Cherokee language shift reveals that, of all CN language…

  9. Terminus Amnesia: Cherokee Freedmen, Citizenship, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jeremiah; Bustamante, Nicholas; Solyom, Jessica Ann; Brayboy, Bryan McKinley Jones

    2016-01-01

    In 2007, the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma amended its constitution to limit membership to only those who can trace lineal descent to an individual listed as "Cherokee by Blood" on the final Dawes Rolls. This exercise of sovereignty paradoxically ties the Dawes Rolls, the colonial instruments used to divide the lands and peoples of the…

  10. Collaborative Documentation and Revitalization of Cherokee Tone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Dylan; Berardo, Marcellino; Feeling, Durbin; Hirata-Edds, Tracy; Peter, Lizette

    2015-01-01

    Cherokee, the sole member of the southern branch of Iroquoian languages, is a severely endangered language. Unlike other members of the Iroquoian family, Cherokee has lexical tone. Community members are concerned about the potential loss of their language, and both speakers and teachers comment on the difficulty that language learners have with…

  11. Limits of Legal Action: The Cherokee Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgren, Jill L.; Shattuck, Petra T.

    1978-01-01

    The article examines the limits of legal action in light of the experience of the Cherokee Nation in the nineteenth century. Their lawsuits, the cause of national controversy and ultimately detrimental to the Cherokee, raise questions about the effectiveness of litigation in solving divisive political conflict. (Author/NQ)

  12. 76 FR 11494 - List of Recipients of Indian Health Scholarships Under the Indian Health Scholarship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ...., Connors State College, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma Huff, Zachary Wade... University, Seminole Nation of Oklahoma Livingston, Carole Ann, Argosy University, Bad River Band of the...

  13. 2008 South Carolina Lidar: Cherokee County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The project area is composed of 16 counties in the State of South Carolina - Cherokee, Union, Laurens, Greenwood, Newberry, Chester, Fairfield, Lancaster,...

  14. Indians of North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Published by the U.S. Department of the Interior, this brief booklet on the historical development of the Cherokee Nation emphasizes the Tribe's relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and its improved economy. Citing tourism as the major tribal industry, tribal enterprises are named and described (a 61 unit motor court in existence since…

  15. Family and Nation: Cherokee Orphan Care, 1835-1903

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Julie L.

    2010-01-01

    On November 17, 1903, fifteen miles from the nearest railway station and fifty miles northwest of the capital of the Cherokee Nation in Tahlequah, a fire engulfed the Cherokee Orphan Asylum. After the fire the Cherokee Nation relocated the homeless children to the nation's Insane Asylum in Tahlequah, where Sequoyah School stands today. The…

  16. Tone and prosodic organization in Cherokee nouns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith; Haag, Marcia

    2005-04-01

    Preliminary observations in the speech of one speaker of Cherokee led us to postulate three factors affecting tone in Cherokee. (1) Tone may be lexically specified with distinctive low, low fall, low rise, and high tones. (2) There is a metrically determined high fall pattern which may be distributed over not more than 2 syllables from the right edge of a prosodic domain. (3) Intonational domains may be associated with discourse functions, marked by high fall, or by pitch range upstep. This paper tests these observations in recordings of word lists and sentences produced by five additional speakers. The analysis we give, positing both lexical tone and metrical prosodic accent, is not unique in descriptions of language, but is different from the usual description of Cherokee. [Work supported by NSF.

  17. Education "for" American Indians: Threat or Promise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tax, Sol; Thomas, Robert K

    1969-01-01

    Results of this Carnegie Corporation of New York sponsored research project in literacy training among the Cherokee Indians of Eastern Oklahoma indicate that alienation rather than lack of opportunity is the chief difficulty in American Indian education. Appears in "The Florida FL Reporter special anthology issue "Linguistic-Cultural Differences…

  18. Tone and Accent in Oklahoma Cherokee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchihara, Hiroto

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is a study of the tonal and accentual system of Oklahoma Cherokee, which has six possible pitch patterns occurring on a syllable: low, high, low-high, high-low, lowfall and superhigh. This study attempts to provide a comprehensive description and analyses of these patterns: their distribution, their source, the principles which…

  19. 76 FR 54196 - Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Secure Rural Schools Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... Forest Service Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Secure Rural Schools Resource Advisory Committee..., Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest Secure Rural Schools Resource Advisory Committee will meet as indicated below. DATES: The Cherokee National Forest Secure Rural Schools Resource Advisory...

  20. Lionel Larré, Histoire de la nation cherokee

    OpenAIRE

    Berthier-Foglar, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Histoire de la nation cherokee est un ouvrage original qui traite du peuple cherokee depuis son apparition dans le sud-est des États-Unis jusqu’à l’époque contemporaine. L’originalité de cette Histoire vient du choix des documents, en version longue, qui accompagnent chaque chapitre et qui font partie des sources sur lesquelles se base sa rédaction. On y lit la voix des explorateurs en terre cherokee, de l’administration américaine, mais aussi du peuple cherokee lui-même. C’est en effet le pr...

  1. Will Rogers's Radio: Race and Technology in the Cherokee Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Amy M.

    2009-01-01

    While radio personality Will Rogers's pioneering role in radio is obvious (he worked in the medium during its earliest years), its connections to Cherokee and other tribal technologies have been neglected. This failure to recognize Rogers's part in this particular strain of Cherokee history is a symptom of a larger cultural illness in the United…

  2. Rural Cherokee Children with Disabilities: Parental Stories of Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandura, Collette

    2013-01-01

    Parents of Cherokee children with disabilities encounter educational agencies from their child's birth to adulthood. Living rurally within the Cherokee Nation's jurisdictional boundaries, these indigenous families engage with a myriad of special education agencies and subsequent policies. This qualitative study explores parental…

  3. The Cherokee Syllabary: A Writing System in Its Own Right

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Informally recognized by the tribal council in 1821, the 86-character Cherokee writing system invented by Sequoyah was learned in manuscript form and became widely used by the Cherokee within the span of a few years. In 1827, Samuel Worcester standardized the arrangement of characters and print designs in ways that differed from Sequoyah's…

  4. Walker Calhoun: Cherokee Song and Dance Man. Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Ted

    1995-01-01

    Born in 1918, the youngest of 12 children, Walker Calhoun describes growing up on the Cherokee Reservation in North Carolina. The schools turned the Cherokee against their old ways, but Walker learned many old songs and dances from his uncle, Will West. Since retirement, Walker has taught the dances and songs to children. His material has been…

  5. Young People Take the Lead: Cherokee Nation's Approach to Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, McClellan; Kielsmeier, James A.

    1985-01-01

    Oklahoma's Cherokee Nation Youth Leadership Program (CNYLP) began in 1982 with the vision of drawing elements of the tribe together through an innovative youth program designed to instill self-confidence, positive regard for Cherokee identity, and a sense of community spirit through service to others. Patterned after the National Youth Leadership…

  6. Cherokee Self-Reliance and Word-Use in Stories of Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Lowe, John; Riggs, Cheryl; Henson, Jim; Liehr, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between Cherokee self-reliance and related values expressed through word-use in stories of stress written by Cherokee adolescents. The overall aim of this pilot study was to test the feasibility of using cultural appropriate measurements for a larger intervention study of substance abuse prevention in Cherokee adolescents. A sample of 50 Cherokee adolescent senior high school students completed the Cherokee Self-Reliance Questionnaire and wrote their story...

  7. "Two People": An American Indian Narrative of Bicultural Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Michael Tlanusta

    1996-01-01

    Discusses effects of acculturation on American Indian youth in terms of bicultural competence and identity development. The narrative or life-story of a Cherokee elder who is both mainstream physician and traditional medicine man elaborates on the traditional Indian approach to "learning the Medicine," and is divided according to five stages of…

  8. American Indian Reference Works of 1986: Some of the Best.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, G. Edward

    1986-01-01

    Favorably reviews six reference works: (1) Klein's encyclopedia; (2) Ancient America atlas, Coe and colleagues; (3) Littlefield and Parins' analysis of America Indian newspaper publishing; (4) Kutsch's guide to Cherokee documents; (5) Malval's guide to Hampton Institute archives; and (6) Clements' guide to Indian folklore in nineteenth century…

  9. 75 FR 52014 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Cherokee National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ..., Cherokee National Forest, Cleveland, TN AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is... control of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest, Cleveland, TN... with the Cherokee Tribes. The Cherokee are represented by the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Eastern...

  10. 77 FR 48167 - Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact; Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact; Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an approval of the gaming compact between the Eastern Band of Cherokee...

  11. Horticulture for Secondary Level Handicapped Adolescents: The Cherokee County Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Greg H.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The Cherokee County (Alabama) horticulture training program provides 40 mildly mentally retarded adolescents with vocational training in a marketable skills. The broad spectrum of vocational skills makes horticulture ideal for the handicapped. (DB)

  12. 77 FR 39505 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Wesleyan University, Middleton, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina... of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. History and Description of the Remains In the late 1800s, human... associated funerary objects are present. The majority of the material culture from William's Island site...

  13. 77 FR 2717 - Cherokee County Cogeneration Partners, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Cherokee County Cogeneration Partners, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial... notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Cherokee County Cogeneration Partners, LLC's application...

  14. On two reports associated with James Wood-Mason and Alfred William Alcock published by the Indian Museum and the Indian Marine Survey between 1890 and 1891: implications for malacostracan nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huys, Rony; Low, Martyn E Y; De Grave, Sammy; Ng, Peter K L; Clark, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    Two rare documents associated with the Indian Museum and the Indian Marine Survey for the administrative year April 1890 to March 1891 have been examined and found to have nomenclatural consequences for malacostracan crustaceans. Even though they constitute available published works according to the International Code for Zoological Nomenclature, these reports have rarely been cited. Dating these two publications is of importance as they make decapod scientific names available and, in a few instances, describe the same taxa. After searching the collections deposited in the Asian and African Room, British Library, the Administration Report of the Indian Marine for the year April 1890 to March 1891 could be dated with some degree of certainty as 25 August 1891. In contrast, dating the Indian Museum Annual Report proved more difficult because after examination of copies held by the General Library in the Natural History Museum, London, it was evident that not all of these reports were consistently published on time to meet an end of year deadline. However, the publication of volume XXII of the Indian Museum Annual Report for the year April 1890 to March 1891 appeared to be contemporary with the year printed at the bottom of the title page. As no exact date could be established with confidence, the publication date for this volume was fixed as 31 December 1891 in accordance with ICZN Art. 21.3.2. Therefore the Administration Report of the Indian Marine (published 25 August 1891) is considered to take precedence over the Indian Museum Annual Report (published 31 December 1891) and as such the names made available in the former take priority. As original copies of the Administration Report of the Indian Marine are not readily available in most libraries and few scientists have actually had access to these publications, the relevant Appendix No. XIII, in which the names of several malacostracan taxa are made available, is reproduced here. Since the appendix is not

  15. 78 FR 53494 - Dam Safety Modifications at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... Dam Safety Modifications at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams AGENCY: Tennessee... Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams. The notice of availability (NOA) of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for Dam Safety Modifications at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts...

  16. Out of the "Graves of the Polluted Debauches": The Boys of the Cherokee Male Seminary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihesuah, Devon

    1991-01-01

    Opened in 1851, the Cherokee Male Seminary was the first nonsectarian secondary school west of the Mississippi River. It fulfilled the goals of the Cherokee national council to prepare students for higher education, promote the Cherokee economy, and expose children to white values and lifestyle. (SV)

  17. 75 FR 53630 - Notice of Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Notice of Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Resource Advisory... of 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Cherokee National Forest Resource Advisory Committee will meet for the first time as indicated below. DATES: The Cherokee National Forest...

  18. 78 FR 21703 - Environmental Impact Statement: Cherokee and Forsyth Counties, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Cherokee and Forsyth Counties, Georgia... in Cherokee and Forsyth Counties, Georgia. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Chetna P. Dixon... Interstate 575 (I-575) and State Route 400 (SR 400) in Cherokee and Forsyth Counties, Georgia. Current...

  19. Learning to Read and Write Cherokee: Toward a Theory of Literacy Revitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Lizette; Hirata-Edds, Tracy

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to revitalize the Cherokee language, Cherokee Nation launched an immersion program for preschool and elementary children in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Central to the curriculum is literacy in the Cherokee writing system known as "syllabary". This study focuses on sociocultural and sociolinguistic evidence toward an understanding of the…

  20. 78 FR 38311 - Broad River Electric Cooperative and Cherokee Falls Associates; Aquenergy Systems, Inc.; Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Broad River Electric Cooperative and Cherokee Falls Associates; Aquenergy... Intervene On June 18, 2013, Broad River Electric Cooperative and Cherokee Falls Associates (transferors) and Aquenergy Systems, Inc. (transferee) filed an application for transfer of license for the Cherokee...

  1. The Write Way. Book I. The Simple Sentence. Writing and Grammar Instruction for Indian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, Tahlequah.

    This workbook is designed to teach American Indian adults how to write grammatically correct sentences by using mathematical-type formulae for writing and by recognizing the strong visual learning style exhibited by American Indians. It is particularly designed for Cherokee adult basic education students, incorporating their experiences, culture,…

  2. Indian Stress and Violence: A Psycho-Cultural Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Laurence; Hornbuckle, Jim

    1979-01-01

    Discusses high rate of violence and health problems within Cherokee culture. Alcohol plays a major role in Indian health and social problems. As a response to prevalence of alcohol-related problems, a cultural therapy program was developed. Reinforcement of cultural pride was a primary step in solving problems. (CC)

  3. Will Rogers: The Story of an American Indian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, C. W.

    Although Will Rogers often described himself as "just a cowboy with a lot of luck," he was more than that. At one time or another he was a vaudeville entertainer, film star, world traveler, author, columnist, and after-dinner speaker. The most beloved figure of his time, this famous humorist was also part Cherokee Indian. Rogers was born in 1879…

  4. 75 FR 37292 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cherokee, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... Cherokee County Regional Airport (75 FR 17637) Docket No. FAA-2010-0085. Interested parties were invited to...'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant... read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E. O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR,...

  5. State Secret: North Carolina and the Cherokee Trail of Tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, James

    2008-01-01

    This paper is an analytic essay that examines the treatment of the Cherokee Trail of Tears in a North Carolina fourth grade textbook. I begin by offering a satiric look at an imaginary textbook's treatment of the Holocaust that is based closely on the actual narrative of the Trail of Tears written in the fourth grade text. Following this, close…

  6. 78 FR 31397 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Cherokee, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to establish controlled airspace at Cherokee, WY (78 FR 14032). Interested...'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant.... 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in...

  7. "Ayeli": Centering Technique Based on Cherokee Spiritual Traditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Michael Tlanusta; Garrett, J. T.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a centering technique called "Ayeli," based on Cherokee spiritual traditions as a way of incorporating spirituality into counseling by helping clients identify where they are in their journey, where they want to be, and how they can get there. Relevant Native cultural traditions and meanings are explored. (Contains 25 references.) (GCP)

  8. Cherokee self-reliance and word-use in stories of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, John; Riggs, Cheryl; Henson, Jim; Elder, Tribal; Liehr, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between Cherokee self-reliance and related values expressed through word-use in stories of stress written by Cherokee adolescents. The overall aim of this pilot study was to test the feasibility of using cultural appropriate measurements for a larger intervention study of substance abuse prevention in Cherokee adolescents. A sample of 50 Cherokee adolescent senior high school students completed the Cherokee Self-Reliance Questionnaire and wrote their story of stress. The Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) program, a word-based computerized text analysis software, was used to report the percentage of words used in the selected word categories in relation to all the words used by a participant. Word-use from the stories of stress were found to correlate with Cherokee self-reliance. PMID:20669397

  9. William Carlos Williams, Literacy, and the Imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemak, Francis E.

    1987-01-01

    Argues that the cultivation of the imagination in schools and colleges is largely ignored because of utilitarian biases in the education system, where achievement is determined by quantitative measures of cognitive skills. Discusses Williams' view that acts of the imagination transform reality and applies view to English education. (JG)

  10. Mössbauer studies of prehistoric Cherokee pottery sherds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, K. M.; McKenzie, K. P.

    1994-12-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy is a very useful tool in the examination and characterization of ancient pottery sherds. In this study, Mössbauer spectra for sherds and clay from the Warren Wilson Site, a prehistoric Native American (Cherokee) settlement in western North Carolina, were measured. Data from one sherd and samples from two clay beds indicate that the sherd was not made from local clays and was originally fired to 350 ‡C.

  11. Introduction: Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    In the nearly 50 years since the description of Williams syndrome by Williams et al. in 1961, the focus of scientific inquiry has shifted from identification, definition, and description of the syndrome in small series to genotype-phenotype correlation, pathophysiologic investigation in both humans and in animal models, and therapeutic outcomes in large cohorts. Study of this rare syndrome has provided insight into the structure and function of the extracellular matrix, has contributed to und...

  12. 76 FR 34799 - Permanent Dam Safety Modification at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams, TN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... Permanent Dam Safety Modification at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams, TN AGENCY... various alternatives for permanent modifications to the existing dam facilities at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun... embankments at four (Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar) dams. These measures included raising...

  13. The Dog's Children: Anishinaabe Texts Told by Angeline Williams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Leonard, Ed.; Nichols, John D., Ed.

    In 1941, Angeline Williams, an Anishinaabe elder taught the Ojibwa (Chippewa) language to a class at the Linguistic Institute at the University of North Carolina. Ojibwa is an American Indian language which was spoken as a chain of dialects in numerous communities from Quebec across the Great Lakes and into the plains of Saskatchewan. This text…

  14. Meeting the Needs of Underserved Populations: Vocational Rehabilitation and the Cherokee Nation 130 Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faubion, Clayton W; Calico, Jorja; Roessler, Richard T.

    1998-01-01

    Based on findings derived from ethnographic interviews with the staff of the 130 Project sponsored by the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, clusters factors affecting the project into administrative considerations and concerns and counselor attitudes and behaviors. Provides recommendations for operating 130 Projects and serving Cherokee Nation members…

  15. 76 FR 8333 - Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Public Meeting, Cherokee National Forest Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of public meeting, Cherokee National Forest Resource... Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,...

  16. A Manual of Cherokee Herbal Remedies: History, Information, Identification, Medicinal Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Patricia D.

    This thesis reports on the research of 25 plants, used as herbal remedies since the 1800s by the author's Native American ancestors (the Day family) and the Cherokee tribe. The plants were identified in four state parks in southwestern Indiana. Information sources included the research literature, articles on Cherokee herbal remedies, and…

  17. Wilma Mankiller, Chief of the Cherokee Nation. The Library of Famous Women. First Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Bruce

    Interspersed with the story of Wilma Mankiller's life is a brief history of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma and comments on unrealistic and negative stereotypes of Native Americans. In addition to recounting her life and achievements leading up to becoming the first woman chief of the Cherokee Nation, the book explores Wilma Mankiller's philosophy…

  18. New Angles of Vision on the Cherokee Ghost Dance Movement of 1811-1812.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, William G.

    1979-01-01

    Assembles all primary accounts of Cherokee Ghost Dance Movement and reassesses them in the light of recent studies, particularly those by A.F.C. Wallace, Peter Worsley, and Kenelm Burridge. Evidence casts doubts on claim of a direct link between the Cherokee movement and the ghost dance religion among the Creek. (NEC)

  19. From Blood Freud to Jury System: The Metamorphosis of Cherokee Law from 1750 to 1840.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Michelle

    1987-01-01

    Examines the Cherokees' deliberate adoption of the laws of the white man, focusing on the blood feud--a retaliation system designed to deal with homicide. Discusses cultural bases of Cherokee law and factors influencing the change to a jury system and noted key events of the adoption period (1797 to 1840). (JHZ)

  20. Biliary hypoplasia in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    O'Reilly, K; Ahmed, S F; Murday, V.; McGrogan, P

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal hepatitis and biliary hypoplasia are not recognised features of Williams syndrome. A case of Williams syndrome, presenting with neonatal conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia leading to an initial misdiagnosis is reported.

  1. Skin Findings in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kozel, Beth A; Bayliss, Susan J.; Berk, David R; Waxler, Jessica L.; Knutsen, Russell H.; Danback, Joshua R.; Pober, Barbara R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-5...

  2. David Owen WILLIAMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Lidy Williams-Oonk and her children Mark & Marietta, being unable to thank everybody individually, would like to express their sincere thanks to friends and colleagues at CERN and abroad for their great help and support, their messages and flowers, as well as their donations to the Ligue Genevoise contre le Cancer, on the death of their beloved husband and father.

  3. Appreciating William Wordsworth's poem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晨; 袁鸿燕

    2007-01-01

    Through a brief introduction to the basic principles of Romanticism and in-depth analysis of Wordsworth' s representative work "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" in terms of writing style, the object of this poem, language features as well as the theme behind it, this paper seeks to identify the fundamental characteristics of William Wordsworth's Romantic writing.

  4. Study of the Cherokee Nuclear Station: projected impacts, monitoring plan, and mitigation options for Cherokee County, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report inventories Cherokee County's capabilities and CNS project characteristics, projects expected impacts from the interaction of the two defines four options for Cherokee County decision makers, and presents a range of possible mitigation and monitoring plans for dealing with the problems identified. The four options and general implementation guidelines for each are presented after reviewing pertinent features of other mitigation and monitoring plans. The four options include (1) no action, (2) preventing impacts by preventing growth, (3) selective growth in designated areas as services can be supplied, and (4) maximum growth designed to attract as many in-movers as possible through a major program of capital investiments in public and private services. With the exception of the no action option, all plans deal with impacts according to some strategy determined by how the County wishes to manage growth. Solutions for impact problems depend on which growth strategy is selected and what additional resources are secured during the impact period. A monitoring program deals with the problems of data and projections uncertainty, while direct action is proposed to deal with the institutional problems of delay of the needed access road, timeing and location problems from the tax base mismatch, and lack of local planning capability

  5. Hypersociability in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Wendy; Bellugi, Ursula; Lai, Zona; Chiles, Michael; Reilly, Judy; Lincoln, Alan; Adolphs, Ralph

    2000-01-01

    Studies of abnormal populations provide a rare opportunity for examining relationships between cognition, genotype and brain neurobiology, permitting comparisons across these different levels of analysis. In our studies, we investigate individuals with a rare, genetically based disorder called Williams syndrome (WMS) to draw links among these levels. A critical component of such a cross-domain undertaking is the clear delineation of the phenotype of the disorder in question. Of special intere...

  6. 2008 South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) South Carolina Lidar - Cherokee County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The project area is composed of 16 counties in the State of South Carolina - Cherokee, Union, Laurens, Greenwood, Newberry, Chester, Fairfield, Lancaster,...

  7. Sir William Hingston

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Jack

    1996-01-01

    Sir William Hingston was one of Canada’s most illustrious surgeons in the second half of the 19th century. Not only was he a very innovative surgeon but he was an excellent teacher and wrote many medical articles during a career that spanned over 50 years. Active as he was medically, he found time to serve a term as mayor of Montreal and was on the board of directors of various banks and companies. As recognition of his many talents, he was knighted by Queen Victoria in 1895. He died in 1907 ...

  8. Culture, History, and Development on the Qualla Boundary: The Eastern Cherokees and the Blue Ridge Parkway, 1935-40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Anne V.

    1997-01-01

    Examines Eastern Cherokee opposition to the construction of the Blue Ridge Parkway through the Qualla Boundary reservation in the late 1930s. Highlights the role of two teachers in the internal tribal debates over tradition, modernization, and the marketing of Cherokee culture to tourists. Contains many references in notes. (SV)

  9. Oklahoma Cherokee formation study shows benefits of gas tax credits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To no one's surprise, the administration's recently released energy initiative package does not advocate the use of tax incentives such as the Internal Revenue Code Sec. 29 (tight sand gas) credit that expired Dec. 31, 1992. This is unfortunate since tax credits do stimulate drilling, as the authors' recent study of Oklahoma's Pennsylvanian age Cherokee formation demonstrates. Within this 783,000 acre study area, more than 130 additional wells were drilled between 1991--92 because of tax credit incentives. And such tax credits also increase total federal tax revenues by causing wells to be drilled that would not have been drilled or accelerating the drilling of wells, thereby increasing taxable revenue. In short, tax credits create a win-win situation: they stimulate commerce, increase tax revenues, reduce the outflow of capital to foreign petroleum projects, and add to the nation's natural gas reserve, which is beneficial for national security, balance of payments, the environment, and gas market development. The paper discusses the study assumptions, study results, and the tax credit policy

  10. Fall may be imminent for Kansas Cherokee basin coalbed gas output

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Newell K.

    2010-01-01

    Natural gas production in the Kansas portion of the Cherokee basin, Southeastern Kansas, for 2008 was 49.1 bcf. The great majority of Cherokee basin gas production is now coal-bed methane (CBM). The major producers are Quest Energy LLC, Dart Cherokee Basin Operating Co. LLC, and Layne Energy Operating LLC. Most CBM in Southeastern Kansas is from Middle and Upper Pennsylvanian high-volatile B and A rank bituminous coals at 800 to 1,200 ft depth. Rates of decline for the CBM wells generally decrease the longer a well produces. A gentler collective decline of 13.8% is calculated by averaging the number of new producing wells in a given year with that of the previous year. By the calculations using the gentler overall 13.8% decline rate, if more than 918 successful CBM wells are drilled in 2009, then gas production will increase from 2008 to 2009.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do well on tasks that involve spoken language, music, and learning by repetition (rote memorization). Affected individuals ... visual-spatial tasks, unique behavioral characteristics, and other cognitive difficulties seen in people with Williams syndrome . Loss ...

  12. Neurologic Abnormalities in Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The neurologic features of 47 cases of Williams syndrome were determined and a follow-up study was performed on a subgroup of 27 subjects at the Neurorehabilitation Unit, IRCCS Eugenio Medea, Bosisio Parini, Italy.

  13. Neurologic Abnormalities in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    The neurologic features of 47 cases of Williams syndrome were determined and a follow-up study was performed on a subgroup of 27 subjects at the Neurorehabilitation Unit, IRCCS Eugenio Medea, Bosisio Parini, Italy.

  14. The iris in Williams syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Holmström, G; Almond, G; Temple, K; Taylor, D.; Baraitser, M

    1990-01-01

    Forty three children with Williams syndrome and 124 control subjects had their eyes photographed. The photographs were examined by three ophthalmologists and four geneticists of varying experience. A stellate pattern was noted more often in the irides of patients with Williams syndrome (51%) than in those of the control subjects (12%), and was more difficult to detect, or was absent, in heavily pigmented irides. We conclude that the stellate pattern is of diagnostic importance, particularly i...

  15. [William Harvey revisited ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Hubert

    2015-07-01

    William Harvey's discovery of the circulation of the blood is often described as a product of the Scientific Revolution of the Seventeenth Century. Modern research has, however, shown thatHarvey followed the Aristotelian research tradition and thus tried to reveal the purpose of the organs through examination of various animals. His publication of 1628 has to be read as an argument of natural philosophy, or, more precisely, as a series of linked observations, experiments and philosophical reasonings from which the existence of circulation has to be deduced as a logical consequence. Harvey did not consider experiments as superior to philosophical reasoning nor intended he to create a new system of medicine. He believed in the vitality of the heart and the blood and rejected Francis Bacon's empirism and the mechanistic rationalism of Descartes. Harvey's contribution and originality lied less in his single observations and experiments but in the manner how he linked them with critical reasoning and how he accepted, presented and defended the ensuing radical findings. PMID:26111837

  16. Identification and Clinical Management of Persons with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection - Cherokee Nation, 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera, Jorge; Vellozzi, Claudia; Hariri, Susan; Carabin, Hélène; Drevets, Douglas A; Miller, Anna; Reilley, Brigg; Essex, Whitney; Gahn, David; Lyons, Lisa; Leston, Jessica; Ward, John W

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 3.5 million persons in the United States are living with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, resulting in approximately 20,000 deaths each year, primarily from cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (1,2). American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations have the highest incidence of acute HCV infection among all U.S. racial/ethnic groups and are at greater risk for HCV-related mortality compared with the general population (3). In 2013, new antiviral drugs became available that make possible 8-12 week treatment regimens with fewer adverse events and are able to achieve sustained virologic response (SVR) in >90% of treated patients (4), equivalent to a cure of HCV infection. Also of note, HCV testing recommendations were expanded in 2012 by CDC and in 2013 by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force to include one-time testing of persons born during 1945-1965 (the "baby boomer" cohort) in addition to anyone at increased risk for HCV infection (5,6). Given the availability of new HCV drugs, expanded testing recommendations, and high incidence of HCV infection in AI/AN populations, in October 2012, Cherokee Nation Health Services (CNHS) implemented a tribal HCV testing policy.* As part of the policy, CNHS added a reminder in the electronic health record (EHR) for clinical decision support and provided HCV education to primary care clinicians. From October 2012 to July 2015, among 92,012 persons with at least one CNHS clinic encounter, the cumulative number who received HCV screening for the first time increased from 3,337 (3.6%) to 16,772 (18.2%). The largest percentage of HCV screening was among persons born during 1945-1965. Of 715 persons who tested positive for HCV antibodies, 488 (68.3%) were tested for HCV RNA; among those 488 persons, 388 (79.5%) were RNA positive and were thus confirmed to have chronic HCV infection. Treatment was initiated for 223 (57.5%) of the 388 with chronic infection; 201 (90.1%) completed treatment, of whom 180 (89

  17. Shayla: A Portrait of the Schooling Experiences of an Eastern Band of Cherokee Indian Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Carrie; McLendon, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Native youth have complex schooling experiences. To better understand Indigenous youths' experience in public schools and in order to inform schooling practices and teacher preparation for both Native and non-Native teachers we share this portrait of Shayla. Through this research, particularly in the use of portraiture to document…

  18. 78 FR 9410 - Ozark Plateau National Wildlife Refuge; Adair, Cherokee, Craig, Delaware, Mayes, Ottawa, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... this process through a notice in the Federal Register on June 19, 1998 (63 FR 33693). The Refuge... the Federal Register on June 19, 1998 (63 FR 33693). The Refuge solicited public comments on issues... Fish and Wildlife Service Ozark Plateau National Wildlife Refuge; Adair, Cherokee, Craig,...

  19. Manifest Destiny and Competing Voices on the Eve of the Cherokee Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Prentice T.

    2011-01-01

    Manifest Destiny, the idea that Providence guided the conquest and settlement of North America, is one of the most contested ideas in American culture and history. One's opinion about this central aspect of American mythology depends heavily on one's point of view. Exploring westward expansion and the Cherokee Trail of Tears with primary sources…

  20. 75 FR 17637 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cherokee, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ...; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February.... 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 2. The... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cherokee, IA...

  1. 78 FR 14032 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Cherokee, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does.... 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in 14... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Cherokee,...

  2. Cherokee Adaptation to the Landscape of the West and Overcoming the Loss of Culturally Significant Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, R. Alfred

    2011-01-01

    Plant species utilized by Cherokees have been documented by several authors. However, many of the traditional uses of plants were lost or forgotten in the generations following the Trail of Tears. The pressures of overcoming the physical and psychological impact of the removal, adapting to a new landscape, rebuilding a government, rebuilding…

  3. Devils in Disguise: The Carnegie Project, the Cherokee Nation, and the 1960s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Daniel M.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the experiences of many of the people involved in the Carnegie Project, an effort in the 1960s to establish ties with the "tribal community"--people who spoke Cherokee as their first language and lived in small kin-related settlements spread across five counties in northeastern Oklahoma--and directly involve…

  4. Assessing the Impact of Total Immersion on Cherokee Language Revitalization: A Culturally Responsive, Participatory Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Lizette

    This paper illustrates how the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma is exploring a new paradigm of evaluation that is responsive to the claims, concerns, and issues of stakeholders involved. Known as culturally responsive evaluation, this alternative conceived by the Initiative for Culturally Responsive Evaluation (ICRE) is considered more appropriate than…

  5. Medicine for the Rosebuds: Health Care at the Cherokee Female Seminary, 1876-1909.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Devon Irene

    1988-01-01

    Traces the history of medical care at a residential school for Cherokee girls in the late nineteenth century. Describes the unsanitary conditions of the buildings and efforts by medical superintendents to improve them, prevalent diseases and their treatments, nutrition, and emphasis on physical fitness. Contains 58 references. (SV)

  6. Cherokee Nation Enterprises Wind Energy Feasibility Study Final Report to U.S. DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carol E. Wyatt

    2006-04-30

    CNE has conducted a feasibility study on the Chilocco property in north-central Oklahoma since the grant award on July 20, 2003. This study has concluded that there is sufficient wind for a wind farm and that with the Production Tax Credits and Green Tags, there will be sufficient energy to, not only cover the costs of the Nation’s energy needs, but to provide a profit. CNE has developed a wind energy team and is working independently and with industry partners to bring its renewable energy resources to the marketplace. We are continuing with the next phase in conducting avian, cultural and transmission studies, as well as continuing to measure the wind with the SoDAR unit. Cherokee Nation Enterprises, Inc. is a wholly-owned corporation under Cherokee Nation and has managed the Department of Energy grant award since July 20, 2003. In summary, we have determined there is sufficient wind for a wind farm at the Chilocco property where Cherokee Nation owns approximately 4,275 acres. The primary goal would be more of a savings in light of the electricity used by Cherokee Nation and its entities which totals an estimated eight million dollars per year. Cherokee Nation Enterprises (CNE), working independently and with industry partners, plans to bring its renewable energy resources into the marketplace through a well-documented understanding of our undeveloped resource. Our plan is to cultivate this resource in a way that will ensure the development and use for our energy will be in an environmentally and culturally acceptable form.

  7. Cleft palate in Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenico, Scopelliti; Orlando, Cipriani; Graziana, Fatone Flavia Maria; Papi, Piero; Giulia, Amodeo

    2013-01-01

    Williams–Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a genomic neurodevelopmental disorder, estimated to occur in approximately 1 in 10,000 persons. It is caused by a deletion of the “elastin” gene on chromosome 7q11.23 and was described officially in 1961 by Williams, Barrat-Boyes, and Lowe. Cleft palate is not considered in the medical literature as a part of the multisystem disorders of the Williams syndrome but it was yet described. We present our experience of a patient who presents cleft palate among other congenital malformations. PMID:23662266

  8. Cleft palate in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Domenico, Scopelliti; Orlando, Cipriani; Graziana, Fatone Flavia Maria; Papi, Piero; Giulia, Amodeo

    2013-01-01

    Williams–Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a genomic neurodevelopmental disorder, estimated to occur in approximately 1 in 10,000 persons. It is caused by a deletion of the “elastin” gene on chromosome 7q11.23 and was described officially in 1961 by Williams, Barrat-Boyes, and Lowe. Cleft palate is not considered in the medical literature as a part of the multisystem disorders of the Williams syndrome but it was yet described. We present our experience of a patient who presents cleft palate among othe...

  9. Partnering in Research: A National Research Trial Exemplifying Effective Collaboration With American Indian Nations and the Indian Health Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Jennifer Q.; Copeland, Kenneth C.; Daniel, Mary R.; Erb-Alvarez, Julie A.; Felton, Beverly A.; Khan, Sohail I.; Saunkeah, Bobby R.; Wharton, David F.; Payan, Marisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that numerous major public health problems have plagued American Indian communities for generations, American Indian participation in health research traditionally has been sporadic in many parts of the United States. In 2002, the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) and 5 Oklahoma American Indian research review boards (Oklahoma City Area Indian Health Service, Absentee Shawnee Tribe, Cherokee Nation, Chickasaw Nation, and Choctaw Nation) agreed to participate collectively in a national research trial, the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescence and Youth (TODAY) Study. During that process, numerous lessons were learned and processes developed that strengthened the partnerships and facilitated the research. Formal Memoranda of Agreement addressed issues related to community collaboration, venue, tribal authority, preferential hiring of American Indians, and indemnification. The agreements aided in uniting sovereign nations, the Indian Health Service, academics, and public health officials to conduct responsible and ethical research. For more than 10 years, this unique partnership has functioned effectively in recruiting and retaining American Indian participants, respecting cultural differences, and maintaining tribal autonomy through prereview of all study publications and local institutional review board review of all processes. The lessons learned may be of value to investigators conducting future research with American Indian communities. PMID:25389367

  10. William Playfair (1759-1823)

    OpenAIRE

    Costigan-Eaves, Patricia; Macdonald-Ross, Michael

    1990-01-01

    William Playfair is a key figure in the history of quantitative graphics. He was a popularizer and propagandist, a prolific designer of charts, and a developer of economic and business graphics. He established the line graph (especially the simple surface chart) as an important alternative to the table for the nonspecialist reader. Although his charts were not quite so original as some have supposed, they do contain graphic design ideas of great interest and occasional brilliance. His Commerc...

  11. Quantum MacWilliams Identities

    OpenAIRE

    Shor, Peter; Laflamme, Raymond

    1996-01-01

    We derive a relationship between two different notions of fidelity (entanglement fidelity and average fidelity) for a completely depolarizing quantum channel. This relationship gives rise to a quantum analog of the MacWilliams identities in classical coding theory. These identities relate the weight enumerator of a code to the one of its dual and, with linear programming techniques, provided a powerful tool to investigate the possible existence of codes. The same techniques can be adapted to ...

  12. Animal Models of Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Osborne, Lucy R.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have generated a variety of mouse models in an attempt to dissect the contribution of individual genes to the complex phenotype associated with Williams syndrome (WS). The mouse genome is easily manipulated to produce animals that are copies of humans with genetic conditions, be it with null mutations, hypomorphic mutations, point mutations, or even large deletions encompassing many genes. The existing mouse models certainly seem to implicate hemizygosity for ELN,...

  13. Skin Findings in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, Beth A.; Bayliss, Susan J.; Berk, David R.; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H.; Danback, Joshua R.; Pober, Barbara R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-50 years were recruited as part of the Skin and Vascular Elasticity (WS-SAVE) study. They underwent either a clinical dermatologic assessment by trained dermatologists (2010 WSA family meeting) or measurement of biomechanical properties of the skin with the DermaLab™ suction cup (2012 WSA family meeting). Clinical assessment confirmed that soft skin is common in this population (83%), as is premature graying of the hair (80% of those 20 years or older), while wrinkles (92%) and abnormal scarring (33%) were detected in larger than expected proportions. Biomechanical studies detected statistically significant differences in dP (the pressure required to lift the skin), dT (the time required to raise the skin through a prescribed gradient), VE (viscoelasticity) and E (Young’s modulus) relative to matched controls. The RT (retraction time) also trended longer but was not significant. The biomechanical differences noted in these patients did not correlate with the presence of vascular defects also attributable to elastin insufficiency (vascular stiffness, hypertension, and arterial stenosis) suggesting the presence of tissue specific modifiers that modulate the impact of elastin insufficiency in each tissue. PMID:24920525

  14. Feeding Disorders in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    S. M Greis

    2009-01-01

    Statement of Purpose: Children with Williams Syndrome are at risk for a myriad of developmental disabilities because of the complicated medical and neurological conditions. Little has been written about the specific types of feeding problems in these children. A better understanding of how this syndrome affects a child’s ability to manipulate increasingly complex food textures and advance oral motor function could provide improved outcomes for feeding and swallowing developme...

  15. Williams syndrome and psychosis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Salgado, Henrique; Martins-Correia, Luís

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mental comorbidities, such as phobia, obsessive compulsive symptoms and anxiety disorders, are common in Williams syndrome. However, psychotic symptoms are rare in these patients. We report a case of psychosis in a patient with Williams syndrome. Case presentation A 23-year-old Caucasian woman with Williams syndrome arrived at the emergency room with persecutory delusions, auditory and verbal hallucinations, soliloquies and psychomotor agitation. These symptoms were consistently ...

  16. William Harvey, Aristotle and Astrology

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I argue that William Harvey believed in a form of astrology. It has long been known that Harvey employed a macrocosm–microcosm analogy and used alchemical terminology in describing how the two types of blood change into one another. This paper then seeks to examine a further aspect of Harvey in relation to the magical tradition. There is an important corollary to this line of thought, however. This is that while Harvey does have a belief in astrology, it is strongly related to A...

  17. William Wordsworth and The Daffodils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林雅琴

    2014-01-01

    William Wordsworth is best known for his poem, The Daffodils. This paper traces the origin of daffodils in Greek my-thology, the four important facts in Wordsworth’s life and the poetic theories implied in his poem The Daffodils. The most im-portant part shall be the appreciation and analysis of the poem. During this course, readers may find it difficult to understand Wordsworth’s poetic theories of Romanticism. However this is made easier by asking and answering questions and by comparing Chinese and English Romantic poems.

  18. Coeliac disease in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Giannotti, A; G. Tiberio; Castro, M.; Virgilii, F.; Colistro, F.; F. Ferretti; Digilio, M C; Gambarara, M.; Dallapiccola, B

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Coeliac disease (CD) has been reported in several patients affected by chromosomal disorders, including Down syndrome (DS) and Turner syndrome (TS). CD has also been found in sporadic Williams syndrome (WS) patients. In this study, CD was evaluated in a consecutive series of patients with WS, in order to estimate if the prevalence of CD in WS patients is higher than in the general population.
METHODS AND RESULTS—A consecutive series of 63 Italian patients with WS was studied by ana...

  19. Tidens Rytmik. Dante Alighieri, William Carlos Williams' Prosodi og Michel Serres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stougaard-Nielsen, Jakob

    2006-01-01

      Artiklen diskuterer William Carlos Williams' poetik og hans lyriske eksperimenter i tilknytning til begreberne 'den variable fod' og 'det triadiske vers'. Den argumenterer for, at Williams' poetik kan opfattes både som et forsøg på at vitalisere et typografisk styret poetisk  sprog og som del a...

  20. Language and Communicative Development in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervis, Carolyn B.; Becerra, Angela M.

    2007-01-01

    Williams syndrome, a genetic disorder caused by a microdeletion of approximately 25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23, is associated with mild to moderate intellectual disability or learning difficulties. Most individuals with Williams syndrome evidence a cognitive profile including relative strengths in verbal short-term memory and language, and…

  1. Williams Syndrome with a “Twist”

    OpenAIRE

    George Vartzelis; Lydia Kossiva; Despoina Maritsi

    2010-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a rare genetic condition with multisystemic involvement, caused by a microscopic deletion in the chromosome band 7q11.23. We describe the first case of a toddler with Williams syndrome who developed Benign Paroxysmal Torticollis (BPT), a benign dystonic disorder of unknown aetiology.

  2. Prevention trial in the Cherokee Nation: design of a randomized community trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komro, Kelli A; Wagenaar, Alexander C; Boyd, Misty; Boyd, B J; Kominsky, Terrence; Pettigrew, Dallas; Tobler, Amy L; Lynne-Landsman, Sarah D; Livingston, Melvin D; Livingston, Bethany; Molina, Mildred M Maldonado

    2015-02-01

    Despite advances in prevention science and practice in recent decades, the U.S. continues to struggle with significant alcohol-related risks and consequences among youth, especially among vulnerable rural and Native American youth. The Prevention Trial in the Cherokee Nation is a partnership between prevention scientists and Cherokee Nation Behavioral Health to create, implement, and evaluate a new, integrated community-level intervention designed to prevent underage drinking and associated negative consequences among Native American and other youth living in rural high-risk underserved communities. The intervention builds directly on results of multiple previous trials of two conceptually distinct approaches. The first is an updated version of CMCA, an established community environmental change intervention, and the second is CONNECT, our newly developed population-wide intervention based on screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) research. CMCA direct-action community organizing is used to engage local citizens to address community norms and practices related to alcohol use and commercial and social access to alcohol among adolescents. The new CONNECT intervention expands traditional SBIRT to be implemented universally within schools. Six key research design elements optimize causal inference and experimental evaluation of intervention effects, including a controlled interrupted time-series design, purposive selection of towns, random assignment to study condition, nested cohorts as well as repeated cross-sectional observations, a factorial design crossing two conceptually distinct interventions, and multiple comparison groups. The purpose of this paper is to describe the strong partnership between prevention scientists and behavioral health leaders within the Cherokee Nation, and the intervention and research design of this new community trial. PMID:24615546

  3. Characterization of the metabolic syndrome by apolipoproteins in the Oklahoma Cherokee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaupovic, Petar; Blackett, Piers; Wang, Wenyu; Lee, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    Native Americans are susceptible to type 2 diabetes and associated cardiovascular risk that precedes the diabetes. Nondiabetic Cherokee adolescents and young adults were studied for association of apolipoproteins A-I, B, and C-III with the metabolic syndrome, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and body mass index. Apolipoproteins, lipids, selected ratios, and HOMA-IR changed adversely according to the number of metabolic syndrome criteria present (PCherokee have a high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, which is associated with atherosclerotic lipoprotein particles containing apolipoprotein C-III and B. PMID:19040586

  4. Approaching to Grand Cherokee%走近大切诺基

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘大鹏

    2001-01-01

    @@ 戴姆勒-克莱斯勒吉普车系列(JEEP)中的顶级产品--大切诺基(GRAND CHEROKEE),在2001年1月份正式登陆中国市场,并率先在北京、成都、广州三地批量销售.北京吉普汽车有限公司将在今年7月份自行生产这一新车型.

  5. Williams syndrome starts making sense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashkenas, J.

    1996-10-01

    1996 may be marked as a transitional year in the study of Williams syndrome (WS), when the causes of this complex condition and a practical way to investigate began to come into focus. WS presents a remarkable collection of symptoms that affect blood vessels, growth, intelligence, and behavior. WS commonly leads to infantile hypercalcemia, retardation of growth, prematurely wrinkled skin, supraventricular aortic stenosis (SVAS), and sensitivity to loud noise. Children with this condition are often mentally retarded, with distinctive {open_quotes}elfin{close_quotes} facial features, a hoarse voice, and an {open_quotes}engaging{close_quotes} personality. Their cognitive deficits may be minimal or profound but typically involve a specific pattern of strengths and weaknesses, with better-than-average face recognition but little ability to recognize how parts of patterns that they see fit into a whole. 36 refs.

  6. 硬汉家族的怪咖——JEEP CHEROKEE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟平

    2015-01-01

    眼前这个造型新潮、前卫,甚至还有些怪异的家伙名叫自由光,来自JEEP家族。虽然大多数人对"自由光"这三个字还很陌生,但要说到它的英文名字CHEROKEE,那就亲切多了!卖点1、颠覆性的外观设计,少了几分硬朗,多了几分个性;2、采用9速手自一体变速器无疑是它的最大亮点;3、强将手下无弱兵,配备了Active Drive智能四驱系统。大名鼎鼎的CHEROKEE,相信国人对它已经非常熟悉了,也就是我们常说的切诺基,俗称小切。其实引入国内生产的切诺基是CHEROKEE的第二代车型,而最新的第五代车型就是自由光了。

  7. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the Cherokee Platform Province area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake II, Ronald M.; Hatch, Joseph R.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Le, Phuong A.; Leathers, Heidi M.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Marra, Kristen R.; Pitman, Janet K.; Potter, Christopher J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean volumes of undiscovered, technically recoverable resources of 463 million barrels of oil, 11.2 trillion cubic feet of gas, and 35 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Cherokee Platform Province area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri.

  8. Influence of Second Language Cherokee Immersion on Children's Development of Past Tense in Their First Language, English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata-Edds, Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Metalinguistic skills may develop differently in multilingual and monolingual children. This study investigated effects of immersion in Cherokee as a second language on young children's (4;5-6;1) skills of noticing morphological forms/patterns in English, their first language, by comparing English past tense skills on two nonword and two real-word…

  9. Case report: Williams-Campbell syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Williams-Campbell syndrome is a rare type of bronchiectasis that is due to deficiency or absence of cartilage in the fourth- to sixth-order bronchi. Case Report: The paper presents the case of a patient with large, bilateral bronchiectasis caused by defect of cartilage in the fourth- to sixth-order bronchi referred to as Williams-Campbell syndrome. Conclusions: Williams-Campbell syndrome should be taken into consideration in differential diagnosis of bronchiectasis. Both inspiratory and expiratory high-resolution computed tomography should be performed to establish the diagnosis

  10. AMS DAYs 2015 - Interview William H. Gerstenmaier

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    William H. Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for the Human Exploration and Operations Directorate at NASA, tells about the science aat the International Space Station and the tasks to be performed to make sure the AMS detector, installed on the main

  11. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: INDEX

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...

  12. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: HYDRO (Hydrology)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...

  13. Williams syndrome and psychosis: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mental comorbidities, such as phobia, obsessive compulsive symptoms and anxiety disorders, are common in Williams syndrome. However, psychotic symptoms are rare in these patients. We report a case of psychosis in a patient with Williams syndrome. Case presentation A 23-year-old Caucasian woman with Williams syndrome arrived at the emergency room with persecutory delusions, auditory and verbal hallucinations, soliloquies and psychomotor agitation. These symptoms were consistently present for 2 months. No evidence of other medical illnesses or psychoactive substances was found. There was no evidence of prior psychiatric symptoms or family history of psychiatric or neurological disorders. She was treated with antipsychotics and her symptoms were resolved. Conclusion We describe a rare case of a patient with Williams syndrome who experienced a nonorganic psychotic episode. Literature on this topic is scarce and, therefore, this case report intends to add further data about this comorbidity. PMID:24520861

  14. Williams-Beuren Syndrome with Brain Dysplasia

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-01-01

    Investigators from Jichi and Yokohama City Universities, Japan, report a patient with the common Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) deletion in 7q11.23 who presented with severe cerebral and cerebellar dysplasia and progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  15. Overview of American Indian/Alaska Native Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... residing in the Cherokee Nation’s 14-county tribal jurisdictional service area who are eligible for health care ... CDC to establish the Cherokee Nation Comprehensive Cancer Control Program. http: / / surveillance. cancer. gov . September 2011 Northwest ...

  16. William Blake and His Great Poetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢琳琳

    2009-01-01

    William Blake is the first greatest romantic poet in the 18th century. His poems have a number of features. The Most important poems reflect the social ills, unique conception of childhood and plain direct language, lyric rhyme with immense compression of meaning. And the great poems London and The Chimney Sweeper are the best examples of these features. This paper will present detailed analysis of these three well-known poems by William Blake.

  17. William Sadler Franks and the Brockhurst Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Shears, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    William Sadler Franks (1851-1935) was astronomer-in-charge at F.J. Hanbury's private observatory at Brockhurst, near East Grinstead, Sussex, from 1909 until his death in 1935. This paper reviews the observational projects Franks undertook at Brockhurst, including his work on double stars, red stars, diffuse nebulae and dark nebulae, as well as his involvement with the commissioning of a 24-inch reflector built by Thomas William Bush (1839-1928).

  18. Updates on Cognition in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    B. Klein Tasman

    2009-01-01

    Foundational research about cognition in Williams syndrome has examined cognitive strengths and weaknesses to hone in on a distinct phenotype to Williams syndrome (e.g., Bellugi, Bihrle, Jernigan, Trauner, & Doherty, 1990; Bellugi, Lichtenberger, Mills, Galaburda, & Korenberg, 1999; Klein & Mervis, 1999; Mervis et al., 2000). Research had indicated that language abilities generally fall at the level of overall intellectual functioning, with some specific areas of relative strength ...

  19. Colour discrimination and categorisation in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Farran, E.K.; Cranwell, M. B.; Alvarez, J.; Franklin, A

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) present with impaired functioning of the dorsal visual stream relative to the ventral visual stream. As such, little attention has been given to ventral stream functions in WS. We investigated colour processing, a predominantly ventral stream function, for the first time in nineteen individuals with Williams syndrome. Colour discrimination was assessed using the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test. Colour categorisation was assessed using a match-to-sample ...

  20. William Harvey, Aristotle and astrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    In this paper I argue that William Harvey believed in a form of astrology. It has long been known that Harvey employed a macrocosm-microcosm analogy and used alchemical terminology in describing how the two types of blood change into one another. This paper then seeks to examine a further aspect of Harvey in relation to the magical tradition. There is an important corollary to this line of thought, however. This is that while Harvey does have a belief in astrology, it is strongly related to Aristotle's views in this area and is quite restricted and attenuated relative to some contemporary beliefs in astrology. This suggests a more general thesis. While Harvey was amenable to ideas which we associate with the natural magic tradition, those ideas had a very broad range of formulation and there was a limit to how far he would accept them. This limit was largely determined by Harvey's adherence to Aristotle's natural philosophy and his Christian beliefs. I argue that this is also the case in relation to Harvey's use of the macrocosm-microcosm analogy and of alchemical terminology, and, as far as we can rely on the evidence, this informs his attitudes towards witches as well. Understanding Harvey's influences and motives here is important in placing him properly in the context of early seventeenth-century thought. PMID:24941731

  1. David Owen Williams (1944 - 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Many people, not only at CERN but also throughout the world, were saddened to learn that their friend and colleague David Williams had passed away in the early hours of Tuesday 24 October. His death came after a year of fighting cancer with all of his usual determination and optimism. Even days before the end he was still welcoming to visitors, and was alert and interested in all their news. Born in 1944, David came to CERN from the University of Cambridge in 1966, with a degree in Physics and Computer Science. Joining what at the time was called the Documents and Data (DD) Division, in the earlier part his career he worked first on software for analysis of bubble chamber photographs, subsequently leading the group that supported experiments with 'hybrids' of bubble chambers and electronic detectors and then the group supporting online computing in experiments. He thus witnessed all of the enormous changes that took place in particle physics as the era of bubble chambers came to an end and the availability ...

  2. John Ross--The Story of an American Indian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Sara Gordon

    First elected Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation in 1828, John Ross served his people with courage and honor through a difficult and tragic period in their history. Born in 1790, he grew up when the Cherokees' world was rapidly changing and treaties with federal and state governments ended in broken promises and the loss of Cherokee lands. He…

  3. Cherokee International高性能80A 1/4砖器件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Cherokee International公司推出其Apollo 5 1/4砖DC/DC变换器系列。该封装为1.45英寸×2.28英寸的变换器据称可以发出比原来高60%的功率。此外,其集成预偏置功能可保证单调启动过程,以实现启动时多个变换器、多种输出电压间的同步。这些变换器提供业界标准功能,如ON/OFF、遥感、输出电压调节引脚、过

  4. 就这样被大切诺基征服%Grand Cherokee

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    美眉

    2001-01-01

    @@ 一说起大切诺基,人们首先联想到的就是切诺基.而严格地说,大切诺基与切诺基没有多少直接联系,不仅仅是多一个"大"字那么简单.大切诺基(Grand Cherokee)是美国克莱斯勒汽车公司于1993年元月全新设计推出的一款全时四轮驱动越野车,它将当今最先进的豪华轿车技术与最高超的越野车科技集于一身,成为美国乃至世界最豪华的越野车.

  5. Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Face Tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Marina A.; Heiz, Julie; Sokolov, Alexander N.; Barisnikov, Koviljka

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological, neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and psychosomatic disorders are characterized by impairments in visual social cognition, body language reading, and facial assessment of a social counterpart. Yet a wealth of research indicates that individuals with Williams syndrome exhibit remarkable concern for social stimuli and face fascination. Here individuals with Williams syndrome were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images composed of food ingredients and in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). The primary advantage of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face-specific processing, whereas in face images commonly used for investigating face perception (such as photographs or depictions), the mere occurrence of typical cues already implicates face presence. In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Strikingly, individuals with Williams syndrome exhibited profound deficits in recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which typically developing controls effortlessly recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This suggests atypical face tuning in Williams syndrome. The outcome is discussed in the light of a general pattern of social cognition in Williams syndrome and brain mechanisms underpinning face processing. PMID:27531986

  6. Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Face Tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Marina A; Heiz, Julie; Sokolov, Alexander N; Barisnikov, Koviljka

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological, neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and psychosomatic disorders are characterized by impairments in visual social cognition, body language reading, and facial assessment of a social counterpart. Yet a wealth of research indicates that individuals with Williams syndrome exhibit remarkable concern for social stimuli and face fascination. Here individuals with Williams syndrome were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images composed of food ingredients and in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). The primary advantage of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face-specific processing, whereas in face images commonly used for investigating face perception (such as photographs or depictions), the mere occurrence of typical cues already implicates face presence. In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Strikingly, individuals with Williams syndrome exhibited profound deficits in recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which typically developing controls effortlessly recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This suggests atypical face tuning in Williams syndrome. The outcome is discussed in the light of a general pattern of social cognition in Williams syndrome and brain mechanisms underpinning face processing. PMID:27531986

  7. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Hassan; Babazadeh, Kazem; Fattahi, Saeid; Mokhtari-Esbuie, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD), skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6) in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2) (ELN X1) (7q22 X2) ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem. PMID:22927862

  8. College Fjord, Prince Williams Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The College Fjord with its glaciers was imaged by ASTER on June 24, 2000.This image covers an area 20 kilometers (13 miles) wide and 24 kilometers (15 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. College Fjord is located in Prince Williams Sound, east of Seward, Alaska. Vegetation is in red, and snow and ice are white and blue. Ice bergs calved off of the glaciers can be seen as white dots in the water. At the head of the fjord, Harvard Glacier (left) is one of the few advancing glaciers in the area; dark streaks on the glacier are medial moraines: rock and dirt that indicate the incorporated margins of merging glaciers. Yale Glacier to the right is retreating, exposing (now vegetated) bedrock where once there was ice. On the west edge of the fjord, several small glaciers enter the water. This fjord is a favorite stop for cruise ships plying Alaska's inland passage.This image is located at 61.2 degrees north latitude and 147.7 degrees west longitude. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with

  9. Investigating the ''social brain'' through Williams syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in social cognitive neuroscience have led to the concept of the ''social brain''. The social brain includes neural processes specialized for processing social information necessary for the recognition of self and others, and interpersonal relationships. Because of its unique behavioral phenotypic features which includes 'hypersociability', Williams syndrome has gained popularity among social cognitive neuroscientists. Individuals with Williams syndrome share the same genetic risk factor for cognitive-behavioral dysfunction utilizing brain imaging to elucidate endophenotype provides us with an unprecendented opportunity to study gene, brain and behavior relationships especially those related to social cognition. In this review, we provide an overview of neuroimaging studies on social cognition in Williams syndrome and discuss the neural basis of the social brain. (author)

  10. Indian Summer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, E. [Sho-Ban High School, Fort Hall, ID (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This paper focuses on preserving and strengthening two resources culturally and socially important to the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribe on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho; their young people and the Pacific-Northwest Salmon. After learning that salmon were not returning in significant numbers to ancestral fishing waters at headwater spawning sites, tribal youth wanted to know why. As a result, the Indian Summer project was conceived to give Shoshone-Bannock High School students the opportunity to develop hands-on, workable solutions to improve future Indian fishing and help make the river healthy again. The project goals were to increase the number of fry introduced into the streams, teach the Shoshone-Bannock students how to use scientific methodologies, and get students, parents, community members, and Indian and non-Indian mentors excited about learning. The students chose an egg incubation experiment to help increase self-sustaining, natural production of steelhead trout, and formulated and carried out a three step plan to increase the hatch-rate of steelhead trout in Idaho waters. With the help of local companies, governmental agencies, scientists, and mentors students have been able to meet their project goals, and at the same time, have learned how to use scientific methods to solve real life problems, how to return what they have used to the water and land, and how to have fun and enjoy life while learning.

  11. A Brief Analysis on William Blake's London

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莉; 尚彦飞

    2014-01-01

    William Blake (1757-1827) is a renowned British poet in the 18th century. His lyric poems display the characteristics of romantic spirit, and he is regarded as the forefather of the British Romanticism. His London is a well-known lyric poetry, which is thought to be the best vesicle in the West. This paper will analyse this poem in terms of its form, theme, and im-age and then draw a brief conclusion for the characteristics of William Blake's poem.

  12. The Williams-Beuren syndrome. Case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Santos Perez, ME

    2011-01-01

    The Williams-Beuren syndrome,that we are going to describe, attends with language disorders andhearing problems, reason why we consider interesting study basing on a case rated at Phoniatrics area.This is a prospective study originated since a girl of 18 months arrived to us referred by the ChildNeurology Service of Salamanca to her language and development and followed until today.This Syndrome was first described in 1961 by a New Zealand doctor called Dr. Williams, who reported aclinically ...

  13. Patient satisfaction and ethnic identity among American Indian older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Kunovich, Robert M; Jacobsen, Clemma; Goldberg, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Work in the field of culturally competent medical care draws on studies showing that minority Americans often report lower satisfaction with care than White Americans and recommends that providers should adapt care to patients' cultural needs. However, empirical evidence in support of cultural competence models is limited by reliance upon measurements of racial rather than ethnic identity and also by a near-total neglect of American Indians. This project explored the relationship between ethnic identity and satisfaction using survey data collected from 115 chronically ill American Indian patients >or=50 years at a Cherokee Nation clinic. Satisfaction scores were high overall and comparable to those found in the general population. Nevertheless, analysis using hierarchical linear modeling showed that patients' self-rated American Indian ethnic identity was significantly associated with satisfaction. Specifically, patients who rated themselves high on the measure of American Indian ethnic identity reported reduced scores on satisfaction with health care providers' social skill and attentiveness, as compared to those who rated themselves lower. Significant associations remained after controlling for patients' sex, age, education, marital status, self-reported health, wait time, and number of previous visits. There were no significant associations between patients' American Indian ethnic identity and satisfaction with provider's technical skill and shared decision-making. Likewise, there were no significant associations between satisfaction and a separate measure of White American ethnic identity, although a suggestive trend was observed for satisfaction with provider's social skill. Our findings demonstrate the importance of including measures of ethnic identity in studies of medical satisfaction in racial minority populations. They support the importance of adapting care to patient's cultural needs, and they highlight the particular significance of interpersonal

  14. Syntax and Morphology in Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clahsen, Harald; Almazan, Mayella

    1998-01-01

    Investigated four cases of English-speaking children with Williams Syndrome (WS), a neuro-developmental disorder characterized by an unusual fractionation of language abilities. Found that, despite low IQ, subjects performance on syntactic tasks and on regular inflection is not impaired, suggesting a distinction between a computation system and an…

  15. Dr. Caleb Williams Saleeby: The Complete Eugenicist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwell, Grant

    1997-01-01

    Profiles the work of Dr. Caleb Williams Saleeby, a late 19th-century propagandist for eugenics. Eugenics is a science that deals with the transmission of hereditary racial traits, coupled with a desire to use this for the elimination of social ills. Discusses Saleeby's work with the Eugenics Education Society. (MJP)

  16. William James en Eugenio d'Ors

    OpenAIRE

    González, A.; Nubiola, J. (Jaime)

    2007-01-01

    This article tries to show William James’s presence in the works of Eugenio d’Ors by offering key textual evidence. Both the agreement and disagreement between these two philosophers can help to understand the intellectual itinerary of the Spanish philosopher.

  17. William Worrell named forestry extension agent

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources recently named William Worrell the forestry and natural resources extension agent for the southwestern Virginia district. Worrell's new position involves educating forest landowners about sound management practices through a variety of programs including Sustainable Harvesting and Resource Professional (SHARP) logger education programs.

  18. Executive Functions in Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menghini, D.; Addona, F.; Costanzo, F.; Vicari, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The present study was aimed at investigating working memory (WM) and executive functions capacities in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) as compared with mental-age matched typically developing (TD) children. Method: In order to serve the study goal, a sizeable battery of tasks tapping WM as well as attention, memory, planning,…

  19. Attention to Faces in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Deborah M.; Jones, Nicola; Brown, Philippa H.; Robinson, Lucy J.; Langton, Stephen R. H.; Bruce, Vicki; Riby, Leigh M.

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with distinct social behaviours. One component of the WS social phenotype is atypically prolonged face fixation. This behaviour co-exists with attention difficulties. Attention is multi-faceted and may impact on gaze behaviour in several ways. Four experiments assessed (i) attention capture by faces, (ii)…

  20. Denigrating Carl Rogers: William Coulson's Last Crusade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Howard

    1991-01-01

    Reviews William Coulson's assertions that Carl Rogers, Abraham Maslow, and he initiated the humanistic education field, that Rogers repudiated his philosophy late in life, and that they owe the nation's parents an apology. Argues that these charges are groundless and provides examples and quotations from Rogers' later writings to show how Rogers…

  1. Executive Function in Williams and Down Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Daniel P. J.; Brown, Janice H.; Henry, Lucy A.

    2013-01-01

    Williams (WS) and Down (DS) syndromes are characterised by roughly opposing ability profiles. Relative verbal strengths and visuospatial difficulties have been reported in those with WS, while expressive language difficulties have been observed in individuals with DS. Few investigations into the executive function (EF) skills of these groups have…

  2. Development of Verbal Passive in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovic, Alexandra; Wexler, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To experimentally investigate knowledge of passives of actional ("hold") and psychological ("love") verbs in children with Williams syndrome (WS). Passives are usually reported to be in line with mental age in WS. However, studies usually focus on passives of actional verbs only. Method: Twenty-six children with WS, ages 6-16, and 3…

  3. Psycholinguistic Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Natalia F.; Heinze, Elena Garayzabal; Giacheti, Celia M.; Goncalves, Oscar F.; Sampaio, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the psycholinguistic abilities of children with Williams syndrome (WS) and typically developing children using the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities (ITPA). Performance on the ITPA was analysed in a group with WS (N=20, mean age=8.5 years, SD=1.62) and two typically developing groups,…

  4. Attentional Disengagement in Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D.; Key, Alexandra P.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a distinctive behavioral and cognitive profile, including widespread problems with attention. However, the specific nature of their attentional difficulties, such as inappropriate attentional allocation and/or poor attentional disengagement abilities, has yet to be…

  5. Analysis of Speech Fluency in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Natalia Freitas; Sampaio, Adriana; Goncalves, Oscar F.; Giacheti, Celia Maria

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder, often referred as being characterized by dissociation between verbal and non-verbal abilities, although the number of studies disputing this proposal is emerging. Indeed, although they have been traditionally reported as displaying increased speech fluency, this topic has not been…

  6. Attribution of Negative Intention in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbee, Kali; Porter, Melanie A.

    2013-01-01

    People with Williams syndrome (WS) are said to have sociable and extremely trusting personalities, approaching strangers without hesitation. This study investigated whether people with WS are less likely than controls to attribute negative intent to others when interpreting a series of ambiguous pictures. This may, at least partially, explain…

  7. Stranger Danger Awareness in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, D. M.; Kirk, H.; Hanley, M.; Riby, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) is characterised by a distinctive cognitive profile and an intriguing social phenotype. Individuals with the disorder are often highly social engaging with familiar and unfamiliar people and once in an interaction they often show subtle abnormalities of social behaviour. Atypically…

  8. MRI Amygdala Volume in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitao, Liliana; Sampaio, Adriana; Sampaio, Cassandra; Vasconcelos, Cristiana; Fernandez, Montse; Garayzabal, Elena; Shenton, Martha E.; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most intriguing characteristics of Williams Syndrome individuals is their hypersociability. The amygdala has been consistently implicated in the etiology of this social profile, particularly given its role in emotional and social behavior. This study examined amygdala volume and symmetry in WS individuals and in age and sex matched…

  9. Fading-Figure Tracing in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Chiyoko; Inui, Toshio; Iwata, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe impairment of visuospatial abilities. Figure-drawing abilities, which are thought to reflect visuospatial abilities, have yet to be fully investigated in WS. The purpose of the present study was to clarify whether drawing abilities differ between WS individuals and…

  10. Williams-Beuren Syndrome with Brain Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Jichi and Yokohama City Universities, Japan, report a patient with the common Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS deletion in 7q11.23 who presented with severe cerebral and cerebellar dysplasia and progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  11. The importance of subsurface geology for water source and vegetation communities in Cherokee Marsh, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, A.M.; Bahr, J.M.; Carpenter, Q.J.; Hunt, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Restoration of disturbed wetland systems is an important component of wetland mitigation, yet uncertainty remains about how hydrologic processes affect biologic processes and wetlands patterns. To design more effective restoration strategies and re-establish native plant communities in disturbed wetlands, it is imperative to understand undisturbed systems. A site within Cherokee Marsh located in Madison, Wisconsin, USA, contains a relatively undisturbed area of wetland consisting of plant communities common within the prairie landscape including a fen, sedge meadow, and shallow marsh. These distinct communities are found within an area of minimal topographic relief, yet transitions from one community to the next occur over short distances. This study sought to characterize the geologic, hydrologic, and chemical gradients associated with these shifts in vegetation to gain insight into the factors controlling the spatial differences in dominant plant species, which could be critical for restoration success. Vegetation analyses revealed a transition of dominant sedge species, which appeared to correspond to changes in hydrology from a ground-water dominated to a surface-water dominated system (as determined by water isotopes). Along the same vegetation transect, subsurface coring results show a heterogeneous composition of peat and till with lateral and vertical variations in stratigraphy, which relates to variability in ground-water discharge as evidenced by hydroperiods and stable isotope composition. Applications of this type of approach throughout the glaciated terrains of the midwestern and northeastern United States and Canada can improve future wetland restoration and management. ?? 2007, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  12. Alcohol Sales to Youth: Data from Rural Communities Within the Cherokee Nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynne-Landsman, Sarah D; Kominsky, Terrence K; Livingston, Melvin D; Wagenaar, Alexander C; Komro, Kelli A

    2016-01-01

    Access to alcohol among individuals under 21 years of age continues to be a public health concern with approximately 5000 youth deaths attributable to alcohol each year (US Department of Health and Human Services 2007). To date, there is no research on youth access to alcohol from commercial sources within rural communities with large populations of Native American families. We evaluated commercial access to alcohol by underage-appearing female confederates in 4 rural towns within the Cherokee Nation, a non-reservation tribal jurisdiction that includes a high proportion of Native Americans embedded within a predominately White population. Alcohol purchase attempts were conducted approximately every 4 weeks on 10 occasions for a total of 997 alcohol purchase attempts. In addition to purchase attempt outcome, we collected data on characteristics of the outlets and clerks. Alcohol was sold to confederates without use of age identification on 23 % of all purchase attempts. Across repeated attempts, 76 % of outlets sold alcohol to a confederate at least once. Males and younger clerks were more likely to sell alcohol to the confederates. Grocery stores and gas stations were more likely to sell alcohol to the confederate than liquor stores, but this effect was no longer significant once seller age was accounted for in a multivariable model. Three out of 4 outlets sold alcohol to young-appearing buyers at least once across repeated attempts. Results reinforce the continuing need for regular enforcement of laws against selling alcohol to minors. PMID:26228479

  13. Summer habitat selection by striped bass, Morone Saxatilis, in Cherokee Reservoir, Tennessee, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddle, H.R.; Coutant, C.C.; Wilson, J.L.

    1980-02-01

    Summer habitat selection patterns of 18 adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in Cherokee Reservoir were monitored with externally attached temperature-sensing acoustic or radio transmitters from June through September 1977. Mortalities of adult striped bass in this reservoir were hypothesized to be related to high summer temperatures and low dissolved oxygen (DO). The inhabited areas or refuges differed from noninhabited areas by maintaining temperatures less than or equal to 22 C and DO concentrations greater than 5 mg/liter. Total water hardness, pH, and water transparency were not significantly different among refuges and noninhabited areas. Movement of fish outside refuges occurred more frequently and for longer periods during June when the summer pattern of high temperatures and low DO was less severe. Fish experienced temperatures between 15 and 27 C with mean temperatures of individuals ranging from 18.5 to 22.0 C. Several tagged fish migrated outside the refuges and selected the lowest available temperature, generally near 21 C, even though DO concentrations at these temperatures were 3 mg/liter or less. Long-term survival of tagged and nontagged fish outside refuges was undetermined because no fish were tracked outside a refuge for more than 12 days without being lost. This study indicates that temperature strongly influences the behavior of striped bass and that adults of this species may have a thermal preferendum of approximately 21 C.

  14. Rorty, Williams, and Davidson: Skepticism and Metaepistemology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ranalli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We revisit an important exchange on the problem of radical skepticism between Richard Rorty and Michael Williams. In his contribution to this exchange, Rorty defended the kind of transcendental approach to radical skepticism that is offered by Donald Davidson, in contrast to Williams’s Wittgenstein-inspired view. It is argued that the key to evaluating this debate is to understand the particular conception of the radical skeptical problem that is offered in influential work by Barry Stroud, a conception of the skeptical problem which generates metaepistemological ramifications for anti-skeptical theories. In particular, we argue that, contra Williams, Rorty’s view that Davidson was offering a theoretical diagnosis of radical skepticism can be consistently maintained with his transcendental approach.

  15. Differential alcohol-related mortality among American Indian tribes in Oklahoma, 1968-1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, C M; Dufour, M; Bertolucci, D

    1989-01-01

    Tribal differences in alcohol-related mortality were examined among 11 Indian tribes living in Oklahoma. Data on alcohol-related deaths from 1968 to 1978 were compiled and assigned to various tribes on the basis of population distributions by county. Results showed significant differences in alcohol-related mortality among the various tribes. Of the 267,238 total deaths in Oklahoma during the study period, 9.3% of Indian deaths were alcohol-related while only 3.2% of those among blacks and 2.4% of those among whites were classified as such. Indian males and females are far more likely to die of alcohol-related deaths than their black and white counterparts. Cheyenne-Arapaho, Comanche and Kiowa areas (located in the western++ part of the state) have higher alcohol-related deaths than Cherokee, Choctaw, Creek, Seminole and Pawnee areas (located in eastern Oklahoma). Indian residents of the Seminole area have the lowest percentage of deaths identified as alcohol-related. The patterns which emerge may be due to different cultural and historical factors among the Indian tribes. PMID:2784011

  16. William James and the Evolution of Consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Mark; R. H. Day

    1999-01-01

    Despite having been relegated to the realm of superstition during the dominant years of behaviourism, the investigation and discussion of consciousness has again become scientifically defensible. However, attempts at describing animal consciousness continue to be criticised for lacking independent criteria that identify the presence or absence of the phenomenon. Over one hundred years ago William James recognised that mental traits are subject to the same evolutionary processes as are physica...

  17. Sustainable socialism: William Morris on waste

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, EC

    2011-01-01

    While William Morris has long been recognized for his radical approach to the problem of labor, which built on the ideas of John Ruskin and informed his contributions to the Arts and Crafts philosophy, his ideas about waste have received much less attention. This article suggests that the Kelmscott Press, which Morris founded in 1891, was designed to embody the values of durability and sustainability in sharp contrast to the neophilia, disposability, and planned obsolescence of capitalist pro...

  18. CALPUFF modelling for the Williams Lake airshed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schutte, A.; Jain, R.; Walsh, C. [Levelton Consultants Ltd., Richmond, BC (Canada)

    2005-06-21

    Th air quality dispersion model CALPUFF was described and evaluated. CALPUFF is a suite of 3 numerical models used in series to determine predicted pollution concentrations. Details of the simulation program were presented, and its performance was evaluated through an analysis of the Williams Lake airshed in British Columbia. CALMET is a diagnostic computer model that produces a detailed 3-D field of meteorological parameters based on surface and upper air measurements, digital land use data, and terrain data. The 3-D fields produced by CALMET are then used by CALPUFF to calculate the dispersion of emissions over distances of a few metres to hundreds of kilometres. CALPOST is a statistical processing program used to summarize and tabulate the concentrations calculated by CALPUFF. The dispersion of emissions from point, area, and mobile sources in the Williams Lake airshed was simulated using data collected between June 2003 to June 2004 to establish a baseline. Baseline modelling was then compared with ambient monitoring data in the airshed to determine sources of error and model accuracy. Airshed boundaries were defined by UTM grid coordinates. Modelling domain boundaries were defined by the map of the Williams Lake region, which also showed the locations of industrial sources and air quality monitors used in the comparison with the model. The ambient concentrations that were predicted by the dispersion model were compared with the ambient air quality objectives and guidelines applicable to the Williams Lake Airshed and regulated by both provincial and federal governments. Modelling results showed that CALPUFF results were within a reasonable amount of error and could be considered conservative. It was concluded that steps should be taken to reduce levels of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}); carbon monoxide (CO); nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}); nitric oxide (NO{sub 2}); volatile organic compounds (VOC); and particulate matter (PM). 23 refs., 6 tabs., 6 figs.

  19. Attentional Disengagement in Adults with Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lense, Miriam D.; Key, Alexandra P.; Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a distinctive behavioral and cognitive profile, including widespread problems with attention. However, the specific nature of their attentional difficulties, such as inappropriate attentional allocation and/or poor attentional disengagement abilities, has yet to be elucidated. Furthermore, it is unknown if there is an underlying difficulty with the temporal dynamics of attention in WS or if their attentional difficulties...

  20. Language and sociability: insights from Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Fishman, Inna; Yam, Anna; Bellugi, Ursula; Mills, Debra

    2011-01-01

    One of the most compelling features of Williams syndrome (WS) is the widely reported excessive sociability, accompanied by a relative proficiency in expressive language, which stands in stark contrast with significant intellectual and nonverbal impairments. It has been proposed that the unique language skills observed in WS are implicated in the strong drive to interact and communicate with others, which has been widely documented in WS. Nevertheless, this proposition has yet to be empiricall...

  1. Learning by observation: insights from Williams syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Foti

    Full Text Available Observing another person performing a complex action accelerates the observer's acquisition of the same action and limits the time-consuming process of learning by trial and error. Observational learning makes an interesting and potentially important topic in the developmental domain, especially when disorders are considered. The implications of studies aimed at clarifying whether and how this form of learning is spared by pathology are manifold. We focused on a specific population with learning and intellectual disabilities, the individuals with Williams syndrome. The performance of twenty-eight individuals with Williams syndrome was compared with that of mental age- and gender-matched thirty-two typically developing children on tasks of learning of a visuo-motor sequence by observation or by trial and error. Regardless of the learning modality, acquiring the correct sequence involved three main phases: a detection phase, in which participants discovered the correct sequence and learned how to perform the task; an exercise phase, in which they reproduced the sequence until performance was error-free; an automatization phase, in which by repeating the error-free sequence they became accurate and speedy. Participants with Williams syndrome beneficiated of observational training (in which they observed an actor detecting the visuo-motor sequence in the detection phase, while they performed worse than typically developing children in the exercise and automatization phases. Thus, by exploiting competencies learned by observation, individuals with Williams syndrome detected the visuo-motor sequence, putting into action the appropriate procedural strategies. Conversely, their impaired performances in the exercise phases appeared linked to impaired spatial working memory, while their deficits in automatization phases to deficits in processes increasing efficiency and speed of the response. Overall, observational experience was advantageous for

  2. Stranger danger awareness in Williams syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Riby, D. M.; H. Kirk; Hanley, M.; Riby, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) is characterised by a distinctive cognitive profile and an intriguing social phenotype. Individuals with the disorder are often highly social engaging with familiar and unfamiliar people and once in an interaction they often show subtle abnormalities of social behaviour. Atypically increased approach to unfamiliar people is widely reported in the existing literature for both children and adults. Parents frequently report interac...

  3. The Social Phenotype of Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Järvinen, Anna; Korenberg, Julie R; Bellugi, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) offers an exciting model for social neuroscience because its genetic basis is well-defined, and the unique phenotype reflects dimensions of prosocial behaviors. WS is associated with a strong drive to approach strangers, a gregarious personality, heightened social engagement yet difficult peer interactions, high non-social anxiety, unusual bias toward positive affect, and diminished sensitivity to fear. New neurobiological evidence points toward alterations in structure...

  4. Hyperacusis and Phonophobia in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    O. Zarchi; D. Gothelf

    2009-01-01

    Hyperacusis and phonophobia are among the most salient features of Williams syndrome (WS) and affect the life of most children carrying the syndrome. We have investigated the clinical characteristics and neuroaudiological pathways mediating the hyperacusis in 49 children and adolescents with WS. Compared to controls, subjects with WS showed 20dB lower discomfort level thresholds, high-frequency cochlear hearing, distortion products otoacoustic emission, higher prevalence of ipsilat...

  5. Sensory Modulation in Children with Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    A. E John

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Recently there has been interest in understanding the similarities and differences between the phenotypes associated with autism and Williams syndrome (WS). Although the popular press and some researchers have argued that the phenotypes associated with these developmental disorders are opposites of one another, careful examination of the WS phenotype has yielded several similarities (e.g., difficulties with pragmatics and with socio-communicative behaviors)....

  6. Cardiac anomalies in Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Hallidie-Smith, K A; Karas, S

    1988-01-01

    We have described some of the cardiological findings in 66 patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome and analysed the two dimensional cross sectional echocardiograms in 61 of them in comparison with normal controls. Supravalvar aortic narrowing was shown in all patients examined echocardiographically and may be a useful diagnostic sign. We documented a 7.8% incidence of systemic hypertension, a 15% clinical and echocardiographic incidence of mitral valve prolapse, and a 11.6% incidence of bicusp...

  7. Neural Correlates of Amusia in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lense, Miriam D.; Nathan Dankner; Jennifer R. Pryweller; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital amusia is defined by marked deficits in pitch perception and production. Though historically examined only in otherwise typically developing (TD) populations, amusia has recently been documented in Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder with a unique auditory phenotype including auditory sensitivities and increased emotional responsiveness to music but variable musical skill. The current study used structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffus...

  8. Mouse Models of Williams-Beuren Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Osborne, L.R.

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to dissect the contribution of individual genes to the complex and varied phenotype associated with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), researchers have turned to mouse models. The mouse genome is easily manipulated to produce animals that are genetic copies of humans with genetic conditions, be it with null mutations, hypomorphic mutations, point mutations or even large deletions encompassing many genes. Over the past few years, several mouse models knocking out genes f...

  9. Metabolic abnormalities in Williams-Beuren syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Palacios Verd??, Mar??a Gabriela, 1983-; Segura Puimedon, Maria, 1985-; Borralleras, Cristina; Flores, Raquel; Campo Casanelles, Miguel del, 1966-; Campuzano Uceda, Mar??a Victoria; P??rez Jurado, Luis Alberto

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS, OMIM-194050) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with multisystemic manifestations caused by a 1.55-1.83???Mb deletion at 7q11.23 including 26-28 genes. Reported endocrine and metabolic abnormalities include transient hypercalcaemia of infancy, subclinical hypothyroidism in ???30% of children and impaired glucose tolerance in ???75% of adult individuals. The purpose of this study was to further study metabolic alterations in patients with WBS, as well a...

  10. Analysis of speech fluency in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Natalia F.; Sampaio, Adriana; Gonçalves, Óscar F.; Giacheti, Célia Maria

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder, often referred as being characterized by dissociation between verbal and non-verbal abilities, although the number of studies disputing this proposal is emerging. Indeed, although they have been traditionally reported as displaying increased speech fluency, this topic has not been fully addressed in research. In previous studies carried out with a small group of individuals with WS, we reported speech breakdowns d...

  11. Anomalous Neurofunctional Lateralization in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Roe, K.

    2009-01-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS), a rare disorder caused by hemizygous microdeletion of approximately 1.6 megabases on chromosomal band 7q11.23, is associated with a distinct clinical profile of strengths and weaknesses within and across different cognitive domains, including marked visual-spatial constructional deficits, hypersociability, and relatively spared language processes. With non-invasive multimodal imaging -including structural MRI, functional MRI (fMRI), and oxygen-15 water Posit...

  12. MRI amygdala volume in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Capitão, Liliana; Sampaio, Adriana; Sampaio, Cassandra; Vasconcelos, Cristiana; Férnandez, Montse; Garayzábal Heinze, Elena; Shenton, Martha E.; Gonçalves, Óscar F.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most intriguing characteristics of Williams Syndrome individuals is their hypersociability. The amygdala has been consistently implicated in the etiology of this social profile, particularly given its role in emotional and social behavior. This study examined amygdala volume and symmetry in WS individuals and in age and sex matched controls. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained on a GE 1.5-T magnet with 1.5- mm contiguous slices and were used to measure who...

  13. Cross-Cultural Studies of Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    C. Zitzer Comfort; U. Bellugi; Reilly, J.

    2009-01-01

    This work is concerned with ways in which children with Williams syndrome (WS), a rare neurodevelopmental disorder arising from a hemizygous deletion in chromosome band 7q11.23, are affected by social experiences of markedly differing cultures: the United States and Japan in one study, and France, Italy as well as the United States in another study. WS presents a compelling model for this investigation because its genetic phenotype is well defined and results in an uneven cognitive...

  14. Learning by Observation: Insights from Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandolesi, Laura; Federico, Francesca; Vicari, Stefano; Petrosini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Observing another person performing a complex action accelerates the observer’s acquisition of the same action and limits the time-consuming process of learning by trial and error. Observational learning makes an interesting and potentially important topic in the developmental domain, especially when disorders are considered. The implications of studies aimed at clarifying whether and how this form of learning is spared by pathology are manifold. We focused on a specific population with learning and intellectual disabilities, the individuals with Williams syndrome. The performance of twenty-eight individuals with Williams syndrome was compared with that of mental age- and gender-matched thirty-two typically developing children on tasks of learning of a visuo-motor sequence by observation or by trial and error. Regardless of the learning modality, acquiring the correct sequence involved three main phases: a detection phase, in which participants discovered the correct sequence and learned how to perform the task; an exercise phase, in which they reproduced the sequence until performance was error-free; an automatization phase, in which by repeating the error-free sequence they became accurate and speedy. Participants with Williams syndrome beneficiated of observational training (in which they observed an actor detecting the visuo-motor sequence) in the detection phase, while they performed worse than typically developing children in the exercise and automatization phases. Thus, by exploiting competencies learned by observation, individuals with Williams syndrome detected the visuo-motor sequence, putting into action the appropriate procedural strategies. Conversely, their impaired performances in the exercise phases appeared linked to impaired spatial working memory, while their deficits in automatization phases to deficits in processes increasing efficiency and speed of the response. Overall, observational experience was advantageous for acquiring competencies

  15. William Wilde in the West of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, D

    2016-05-01

    It is widely believed that Sir William Wilde's forebears were in Ireland for just two or three generations. This belief stems from a number of short biographies of Wilde which were published during his lifetime. These biographies gave different versions of the origin of the Wilde family and appear to have been generated by the creative imagination of Lady Jane Wilde or, as she was better known by her nom de plume, Speranza. She was equally imaginative in creating narratives about her own family background and in one she claimed descent from the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. So it was not a great challenge for her to invent biographies of her husband which she deemed suitable for a knight living at the prestigious address of 1 Merrion Square, leading many to believe that William and his son Oscar were more English than Irish. It was also important for Speranza to distance Sir William from any connection which the Wilde family might have had with trade. In this paper published and unpublished material are used, together with a careful examination of family deeds in the Registry of Deeds office, to elucidate the real roots of the Wilde family in Dublin and in the West of Ireland. PMID:27083456

  16. Solute Concentrations Influence Microbial Methanogenesis in Coal-bearing Strata of the Cherokee Basin, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Matthew F; Wilson, Brien H; Marquart, Kyle A; Zeglin, Lydia H; Vinson, David S; Flynn, Theodore M

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms have contributed significantly to subsurface energy resources by converting organic matter in hydrocarbon reservoirs into methane, the main component of natural gas. In this study, we consider environmental controls on microbial populations in coal-bearing strata of the Cherokee basin, an unconventional natural gas resource in southeast Kansas, USA. Pennsylvanian-age strata in the basin contain numerous thin (0.4-1.1 m) coalbeds with marginal thermal maturities (0.5-0.7% R o ) that are interbedded with shale and sandstone. We collected gas, water, and microbe samples from 16 commercial coalbed methane wells for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The water samples were Na-Cl type with total dissolved solids (TDS) content ranging from 34.9 to 91.3 g L(-1). Gas dryness values [C1/(C2 + C3)] averaged 2640 and carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of methane differed from those of carbon dioxide and water, respectively, by an average of 65 and 183‰. These values are thought to be consistent with gas that formed primarily by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Results from cultivation assays and taxonomic analysis of 16S rRNA genes agree with the geochemical results. Cultivable methanogens were present in every sample tested, methanogen sequences dominate the archaeal community in each sample (avg 91%), and few archaeal sequences (avg 4.2%) were classified within Methanosarcinales, an order of methanogens known to contain methylotrophic methanogens. Although hydrogenotrophs appear dominant, geochemical and microbial analyses both indicate that the proportion of methane generated by acetoclastic methanogens increases with the solute content of formation water, a trend that is contrary to existing conceptual models. Consistent with this trend, beta diversity analyses show that archaeal diversity significantly correlates with formation water solute content. In contrast, bacterial diversity more strongly correlates with location than solute content

  17. Sedimentology and Sedimentary Dynamics of the Desmoinesian Cherokee Group, Deep Anadarko Basin, Texas Panhandle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, N.; Loucks, R.; Frebourg, G.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the spatial variability of deep-water facies is critical to deep-water research because of its revealing information about the relationship between desity flow processes and their resultant sedimentary sequences. The Cherokee Group in the Anadarko Basin, northeastern Texas Panhandle, provides an opportunity to investigate an icehouse-greenhouse Pennsylvanian hybrid system that well demonstrates the intricacies of vertical and lateral facies relationships in an unconfined fan-delta fed deep-water slope to basinal setting. The stratigraphic section ranges in thickness from 150 to 460 m. The cyclic sedimentation and foreland basin tectonics resulted in a complex stratal architecture that was sourced by multiple areas of sediment input. This investigation consists of wireline-log and core data. Five-thousand wireline logs were correlated in an area of over 9500 sq km to map out six depositional sequences that are separated by major flooding events. These events are correlative over the whole area of study. Six cores, that sample nearly the complete section, were described for lithofacies. Lithofacies are recognized based on depositional features and mineralogy:(1) Subarkose, (2) Lithicarkoses, (3) Sandy siliciclastic conglomerate, (4) Muddy calcareous conglomerate, (5) Crinoidal packstone, (6) Oodic grainstone, (7)Pelodic grainstone, (8) Ripple laminated mudrock, (9) faint laminated mudrock. The integration of isopachs of depositional sequences with the lithofacies has allowed the delineation of the spatial and temporal evolution of the slope to basin-floor system. Thin-to-thick bedded turbidites, hyperconcentrated density flow deposits (slurry beds), and debris and mud flow deposits were observed and can be used to better predicte lithofacies distributions in areas that have less data control. These mixed siliciclastic and carbonate deposits can be carrier beds for the hydrocarbons generated from the enclosing organic-rich (TOC ranges from 0.55 to 6.77wt

  18. Solute concentrations influence microbial methanogenesis in coal-bearing strata of the Cherokee basin, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew F Kirk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms have contributed significantly to subsurface energy resources by converting organic matter in hydrocarbon reservoirs into methane, the main component of natural gas. In this study, we consider environmental controls on microbial populations in coal-bearing strata of the Cherokee basin, an unconventional natural gas resource in southeast Kansas, USA. Pennsylvanian-age strata in the basin contain numerous thin (0.4-1.1 m coalbeds with marginal thermal maturities (0.5-0.7 %Ro that are interbedded with shale and sandstone. We collected gas, water, and microbe samples from 16 commercial coalbed methane wells for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The water samples were Na-Cl type with total dissolved solids (TDS content ranging from 34.9 to 91.3 g L-1. Gas dryness values [C1/(C2+C3] averaged 2640 and carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of methane differed from those of carbon dioxide and water, respectively, by an average of 65‰ and 183‰. These values are thought to be consistent with gas that formed primarily by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Results from cultivation assays and taxonomic analysis of 16S rRNA genes agree with the geochemical results. Cultivable methanogens were present in every sample tested, methanogen sequences dominate the archaeal community in each sample (avg 91%, and few archaeal sequences (avg 4.2% were classified within Methanosarcinales, an order of methanogens known to contain methylotrophic methanogens. Although hydrogenotrophs appear dominant, geochemical and microbial analyses both indicate that the proportion of methane generated by acetoclastic methanogens increases with the solute content of formation water, a trend that is contrary to existing conceptual models. Consistent with this trend, beta diversity analyses show that archaeal diversity significantly correlates with formation water solute content. In contrast, bacterial diversity more strongly correlates with location than solute

  19. Emotional Responsivity in Young Children With Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Fidler, Debbie J.; Hepburn, Susan L.; Most, David E.; Philofsky, Amy; Rogers, Sally J.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that young children with Williams syndrome show higher rates of emotional responsivity relative to other children with developmental disabilities was explored. Performance of 23 young children with Williams syndrome and 30 MA-matched children with developmental disabilities of nonspecific etiologies was compared on an adaptation of Repacholi and Gopnik’s (1997) “Yummy-Yucky” task. Results show that children with Williams syndrome were more likely to mimic and/or imitate facial ...

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Gray and White Matter in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, Andreia Vasconcellos; Landau, Barbara; O’Hearn, Kirsten M.; Li, Xin; Jiang, Hangyi; Oishi, Kenichi; Zhang, Jiangyang; Mori, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    Williams Syndrome is a developmental disorder with a genetic basis, which results in an uneven cognitive profile with relatively strong language skills and severely impaired visuospatial abilities. To better understand the brain structure underlying this profile, we compared individuals with Williams Syndrome to controls using multimodal neuroimaging data and new analytic methods (diffeomorphic mapping and atlas-based analysis). People with Williams Syndrome had basal ganglia atrophy, while t...

  1. Enough room for Williams and IMF? / Paul Beckman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Beckman, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Lõppesid Leedu ja USA energeetikakompanii Williams International läbirääkimised Leedu naftakompleksis osaluse omandamise asjus. IMF uurib Leedu majanduslikku arengut, mida tehing Williamsiga komplitseerib

  2. Early development of children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarimski, K

    1999-01-01

    Developmental observations in ten young children with Williams syndrome (1-6 years old) are presented from developmental tests, symbolic play sessions and play sessions with a special educator following the non-directive Montessori approach. There is a considerable individual variability in performance. Overall, the children are engaged in goal-directed activities for more than 35% of the time during play sessions. Overactivity and distractability seem to be more age-dependent and situation-specific than thought before. Developmental interventions may include play sessions following the Montessori approach. PMID:10422007

  3. William Herschel, the First Observational Cosmologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemonick, Michael (Princeton University and Time Magazine)

    2008-11-12

    In the late 1700s, a composer, orchestra director and soloist named William Herschel became fascinated with astronomy, and, having built his own reflecting telescope, went out in his garden in Bath, England, one night and discovered Uranus - the first planet in human history ever found by an individual. The feat earned him a lifetime pension from King George III. But Herschel considered the discovery to be relatively unimportant in comparison to his real work: understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the universe. In pursuing that work, he became the first observational cosmologist.

  4. Williams Syndrome: from genes to clinical features

    OpenAIRE

    Hagen, Johanna

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIt all started with the discovery of a narrowing of the ascending aorta, beginning at the superior margin of the sinus of Valsalva in 1842 by N. Chevers (Burn, 1986;Chevers, 1842). This narrowing was named supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) in 1930 by L. Mencarelli (Burn, 1986;Beuren, 1972;Mencarelli, 1930). It can vary from slight to severe concentric constriction to hypoplasia of the entire aorta (Beuren, 1972). In 1961 J.C. Williams and colleagues from New Zealand were the fi...

  5. Polysomnography Findings in Children with Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Arens, R.; J. Sharman; Pack, A

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Parents of children with Williams Syndrome (WS) often report that their children have sleep difficulties. A prior study of 7 WS subjects at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) supported an association between WS and periodic limb movements in sleep, as well as increased wake time, less time in sleep stages 1 and 2, and more time in sleep stages 3 and 4 than control subjects (Arens et al. 1998). We wanted to expand the analysis of sleep in children with WS w...

  6. Psycholinguistic abilities of children with Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Natalia F.; Heinze, Elena Garayzábal; Giacheti, Célia M.; Gonçalves, Óscar F.; Sampaio, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the psycholinguistic abilities of children with Williams syndrome (WS) and typically developing children using the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities (ITPA). Performance on the ITPA was analysed in a group with WS (N = 20, mean age = 8.5 years, SD = 1.62) and two typically developing groups, matched in mental (MA, N = 20, mean age = 4.92 years, SD = 1.14) and chronological age (CA, N = 19, mean age = 8.35 years, SD = 3.07)...

  7. William Butler Yeats’s ‘The Symbolic System’ of William Blake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Antonielli

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The theosophical systems formulated by great poets, such as William Blake and William Butler Yeats, represent a personal idiosyncratic actualization of an ancient repertoire of magical symbols and occult visions. This study wants to focus the attention on the philosophical, mythical, and esoteric syncretism that W. B. Yeats drew from William Blake’s symbolical system. A fundamental step of Yeats’s deep investigation into the Blakean ‘vision’ was given by his monumental work, written together with Edwin John Ellis, on Blake’s poetic and pictorial production, completed in 1893 with a three-volume edition entitled The Works of William Blake, Poetic, Symbolic, and Critical. This work, published in London by Bernard Quaritch, deeply influenced Yeats’s symbolical and imaginary system, determining its subsequent development up to its codification in the volume of A Vision. With WWB, Yeats was able to systematize for the first time his own thought, giving unity to his Weltanschauung and his poetry. Following this hypothesis, I concentrated on Yeats’s and Ellis’s numerous analyses dedicated to Blake’s mythological and symbolical corpus and, in particular, I examined the last chapter of the first volume of the Quaritch edition. This chapter, entitled “The Symbolic System”, constitutes an unquestionable link between Yeats the reader and scholar of Blake, and Yeats the poet and follower of Blake.

  8. KNOW YOUR NEVADA INDIANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    POEHLMAN, CHARLES H.; AND OTHERS

    THIS PUBLICATION PRESENTS THE RESULTS OF A STUDY OF THE SOCIOCULTURAL BACKGROUNDS OF THE PAIUTE, WASHOE, AND SHOSHONE INDIANS OF NEVADA. INCLUDED ARE AN OUTLINE OF GENERAL PROBLEMS PERTAINING TO INDIAN EDUCATION, SOME DISTINCT CULTURAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE DOMINANT NON-INDIAN SOCIETY AND THE INDIAN SOCIETY, AND THE PREHISTORIC ASPECTS OF THE…

  9. The Williams-Beuren syndrome. Case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Perez, ME

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Williams-Beuren syndrome,that we are going to describe, attends with language disorders andhearing problems, reason why we consider interesting study basing on a case rated at Phoniatrics area.This is a prospective study originated since a girl of 18 months arrived to us referred by the ChildNeurology Service of Salamanca to her language and development and followed until today.This Syndrome was first described in 1961 by a New Zealand doctor called Dr. Williams, who reported aclinically complex report showing up the most marked symptoms consisted of a characteristic expressionof the face, the existence of mental disabilities and a flaw cardiac since birth. Three years later, ProfessorBeuren, would demostrated that apart from the characteristics mentioned before , sometimes we couldfind pulmonary stenosis too. This affection is also known as idiopathic hypercalcemia due to increasedblood calcium levels usually in the early years of life.The proportion of cases reported is around one by 20,000 births and is caused by a “de novo” geneticalteration in chromosome 7.

  10. 美国切诺基文化传播对淮河流域弱势文化外宣的启示%The enlightenment of Cherokee culture communication on university-based publicity of weak culture in Huai River Valley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊继群

    2015-01-01

    As a sect of aboriginal Indian culture, Cherokee culture has been staying at an inferior position for a long History. Northeastern State University has been an important player in the protection and inheritance of Cherokee culture. The culture in the Huai River Valley is also weak, and its preservation is facing severe challenges. Universities along the Huai River are also expected to shoulder their due responsibilities of preserving and publicizing the Huai River culture. The practice and experience of Northeastern State University on cultural communication will be of great inspiration for universities concerned to the preservation and publicity of weak culture in the Huai River Valley.%切诺基文化是美国印第安族裔文化,在美国属于弱势文化。美国东北州立大学是切诺基语言文化传播的重要阵地,在切诺基文化传播方面做出了大量卓有成效的工作。淮河流域文化也属于弱势文化,其在本地区的传播与发展也面临着严峻的挑战。沿淮高校在保护、传播淮河流域文化方面有义不容辞的责任。东北州立大学在弘扬切诺基弱势文化中的经验做法值得借鉴,对相关高校保护、传播淮河流域文化具有积极的启示意义。

  11. Pursuing the Panderer: An Analysis of "United States v. Williams"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrain, Patrick N.; Moore, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    In May 2008, the Supreme Court addressed whether the government can regulate the ownership and distribution of virtual child pornography. "U.S. v. Williams" marked the first time the Court directly addressed the concept of pandering virtual child pornography. This article examines the Court's decision in "U.S. v. Williams" and the relative…

  12. Mental Health Problems in Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, Chris; Elison, Sarah; Howlin, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Although many researchers have investigated emotional and behavioral difficulties in individuals with Williams syndrome, few have used standardized diagnostic assessments. We examined mental health problems in 92 adults with Williams syndrome using the Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adults with Developmental Disabilities--PAS-ADD (Moss,…

  13. Discovering Structure in Auditory Input: Evidence from Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsabbagh, Mayada; Cohen, Henri; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2010-01-01

    We examined auditory perception in Williams syndrome by investigating strategies used in organizing sound patterns into coherent units. In Experiment 1, we investigated the streaming of sound sequences into perceptual units, on the basis of pitch cues, in a group of children and adults with Williams syndrome compared to typical controls. We showed…

  14. Emotional Responsivity in Young Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Debbie J.; Hepburn, Susan L.; Most, David E.; Philofsky, Amy; Rogers, Sally J.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that young children with Williams syndrome show higher rates of emotional responsivity relative to other children with developmental disabilities was explored. Performance of 23 young children with Williams syndrome and 30 MA-matched children with developmental disabilities of nonspecific etiologies was compared on an adaptation of…

  15. A Mystic in English Literature: William Blake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fahri DOĞAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human beings have never been satisfied with this ephemeral world. Perhaps, yearning and desire of rejoining −stemming from the descent from the heaven to the earth− are the emotions felt by the members of both celestial and non-celestial religions. Mysticism, having started with the zeal of people who weren‘t satisfied with this ephemeral world towards the eternal world, aimed at the love of God in the religions where there is a belief of single God. In this article, glancing at the life of a Christian mystic William Blake, we will try to shed light into his mystic thoughts. While studying Blake‘s mystic thoughts, there will be common points with Sufism. Nevertheless, analysis of these common points has been assigned to other studies.

  16. Robert Williams Wood: pioneer of invisible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shruti; Sharma, Amit

    2016-03-01

    The Wood's lamp aids in the diagnosis of multiple infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic dermatologic conditions. Although the Wood's lamp has many applications, which have improved both the diagnosis and management of disease, the man credited for its invention is relatively unknown in medicine. Robert Williams Wood, a prominent physicist of the early 20th century, is credited for the invention of the Wood's lamp. Wood was the father of infrared and ultraviolet photography and made significant contributions to other areas in optics and spectroscopy. Wood's work encompassed the formative years of American Physics; he published over 200 original papers over his lifetime. A few years after the invention of the Wood's lamp for ultraviolet photography, physicians in Europe adopted the Wood's lamp for dermatologic applications. Wood's lamp remains popular in clinics globally, given its ease of use and ability to improve diagnostic precision. PMID:26752503

  17. The Social Phenotype of Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, Anna; Korenberg, Julie R.; Bellugi, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) offers an exciting model for social neuroscience because its genetic basis is well-defined, and the unique phenotype reflects dimensions of prosocial behaviors. WS is associated with a strong drive to approach strangers, a gregarious personality, heightened social engagement yet difficult peer interactions, high non-social anxiety, unusual bias toward positive affect, and diminished sensitivity to fear. New neurobiological evidence points toward alterations in structure, function, and connectivity of the social brain (amygdala, fusiform face area, orbital-frontal regions). Recent genetic studies implicate gene networks in the WS region with the dysregulation of prosocial neuropeptides. The study of WS has implications for understanding human social development, and may provide insight for translating genetic and neuroendocrine evidence into treatments for disorders of social behavior. PMID:23332975

  18. Unity and diversity – the Williams subjects’ message Unity and diversity – the Williams subjects’ message

    OpenAIRE

    Hans W. Dechert

    2008-01-01

    Williams subjects, due to a genetically based neuro-developmental disorder from birth, besides various medical problems, demonstrate a dissociation between cognitive and special linguistic processing, and a dissociation within language modules, language domains, and language mini-domains with reference to different languages. This ichotomous profile results from a deletion on one hromosome. What other genes on the same chromosome, not yet identified, or other genes on other chromosomes of the...

  19. A Comparative Study of William Golding'S Four Novels%Comparative Study of William Golding'S Four Novels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔晓强

    2008-01-01

    With his keen insight,William Golding becomes very conscious of the human heart and the necessity that we become aware of this darkness we are to save ourselves.All his novels,attempt to deal with the essential human condition.All Golding 's novels, products of his peculiar literary temperament and habit,are reactive experiments.Each of them represents a response to a specific book by an early writer.

  20. A case of William's syndrome associated peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    William's syndrome, in order to more completely delineate the total spectrum of the disorder, indicates that 'infantile hypercalcemia', 'peculiar facies' and 'supravalvular aortic stenosis.' In has other many vascular anomalies, such as peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, coronary arterial stenosis, celiac arterial stenosis, and renal aterial stenosis. Only 32% of the patients have evidence of supravalvular aortic stenosis. And it is very rare disease entity that has been reported rarely in Korea. Recently authors experienced a case that was questioned William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, clinically and preliminary radiologically and this case was confirmed by operation. Here we report a case of William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis and reviewed literatures

  1. MacWilliams Identity for Codes with the Rank Metric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadouleau Maximilien

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The MacWilliams identity, which relates the weight distribution of a code to the weight distribution of its dual code, is useful in determining the weight distribution of codes. In this paper, we derive the MacWilliams identity for linear codes with the rank metric, and our identity has a different form than that by Delsarte. Using our MacWilliams identity, we also derive related identities for rank metric codes. These identities parallel the binomial and power moment identities derived for codes with the Hamming metric.

  2. Perceptions of medical interactions between healthcare providers and American Indian older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Sarkisian, Natalia; Goldberg, Jack; Buchwald, Dedra; Beals, Janette

    2008-08-01

    Cultural competence models assume that culture affects medical encounters, yet little research uses objective measures to examine how this may be true. Do providers and racial/ethnic minority patients interpret the same interactions similarly or differently? How might patterns of provider-patient concordance and discordance vary for patients with different cultural characteristics? We collected survey data from 115 medical visits with American Indian older adults at a clinic operated by the Cherokee Nation (in Northeastern Oklahoma, USA), asking providers and patients to evaluate nine affective and instrumental interactions. Examining data from the full sample, we found that provider and patient ratings were significantly discordant for all interactions (Wilcoxon signed-rank test pcultural subgroups of patients, comparing magnitude of provider-patient discordance on specific interactions for patients at different levels of American Indian and White American cultural identity. Patients who affiliated strongly with American Indian cultural identity more closely shared providers' reduced evaluation for several variables related to information exchange, as compared to patients who identified weakly. These results flag interactions that providers and their most culturally distinctive patients both experience as challenging. PMID:18524443

  3. Speculation on Curriculum from the Perspective of William James.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubert, William H; Zissis, Georgiana

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses the implications for curriculum theory, research, and practice of William James' thought. Also considered is the question of what curriculum theory and research might be like if James had garnered greater influence than Thorndike. (IAH)

  4. Engineering Staff Association Honors Snider And Williams For Outstanding Contributions

    OpenAIRE

    Crumbley, Liz

    2003-01-01

    Jeff Snider of Christiansburg and Beverly Williams of Pembroke have received 2003 Employee Recognition Awards from the College Association for Staff in Engineering (CASE) for their outstanding contributions and service to the college.

  5. The Trail Inventory of William L. Finley NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  6. The Trail Inventory of Bill Williams River NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all nonmotorized trails on Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory...

  7. The Trail Inventory of William L. Finley NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all nonmotorized trails on William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  8. William L Finley - Slender False-brome Eradication

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — William L. Finley NWR contains some of the largest and best examples of remaining Oregon white oak woodland, oak savanna, and prairie habitats remaining in the...

  9. Dental management of patient with Williams Syndrome - A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome is a multisystemic rare genetic disorder caused by deletion of 26-28 genes in the long arm of chromosome 7. It is characterized by developmental and physical abnormalities including congenital cardiovascular abnormalities, mental retardation, neurological features, growth deficiency, genitourinary manifestations, gastrointestinal problems, musculoskeletal problems, unique behavioral characteristics, and dental problems. Dental abnormalities include malocclusion, hypodontia, malformed teeth, taurodontism, pulp stones, increased space between teeth, enamel hypoplasia, and high prevalence of dental caries. Authors report a 17-year-old female patient with underlying Williams syndrome. Oral features and problems seen in the patient are listed. Malocclusion and screwdriver shaped teeth were noticed. Generalized widening of the periodontal ligament space with vital teeth was seen. This finding has not been reported in cases of Williams syndrome earlier. Precautions taken during dental treatment in patients with Williams syndrome are also discussed.

  10. Geology and ground water resources, Williams County, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freers, Theodore F.; Armstrong, C.A.

    1970-01-01

    Williams County, in northwestern North Dakota, is located near the center of the structural and sedimentary Williston basin. The preglacial sedimentary formations beneath the county are as much as 14,828 feet thick. Their beds dip generally to the south except along the flanks of the north-south striking Nesson anticline in the eastern part of the county. Late Wisconsinan glacial deposits cover all of Williams County except along the Missouri River and other scattered small areas.

  11. Retinotopically defined primary visual cortex in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Rosanna K.; Kippenhan, J. Shane; Japee, Shruti; Kohn, Philip; Mervis, Carolyn B.; Saad, Ziad S.; Morris, Colleen A.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Berman, Karen Faith

    2009-01-01

    Williams syndrome, caused by a hemizygous microdeletion on chromosome 7q11.23, is characterized by severe impairment in visuospatial construction. To examine potential contributions of early visual processing to this cognitive problem, we functionally mapped the size and neuroanatomical variability of primary visual cortex (V1) in high-functioning adults with Williams syndrome and age- and IQ-matched control participants from the general population by using fMRI-based retinotopic mapping and ...

  12. Making Contact: William Carlos William’s American Literary Aesthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Metzler Sawin, Mark

    2016-01-01

    With the publication of Contact magazine in 1920–1921, American poet William Carlos Williams promoted a distinctive avant-garde literary aesthetic that was centered on “contact”—a concrete connection between literature and the vocabulary, cadence and feel of the everyday language of people. Though initially well received by expatriate authors representing the American avant-garde, Williams’ contact aesthetic was soon eclipsed by T. S. Eliot’s poetry, his magazine Criterion, and its New Cri...

  13. Recurrent Achalasia in a Child with Williams-Beuren Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pereza, Nina; Barbarić, Irena; Ostojić, Saša; Čače, Neven; Kapović, Miljenko

    2011-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a multysistem genetic disorder caused by the 1.6Mb hemizygous deletion involving the elastin gene in the region q11.23 of chromosome 7. The phenotype of Williams-Beuren syndrome is extremelly variable but the most common findings include cardiovascular disease, distinctive facies, mental retardation, a specific congitive profile, endocrine abnormalities, growth retardation and connective tissue abnormalities. Although gastrointestinal difficulties are o...

  14. Clinical and molecular cytogenetic (FISH) diagnosis of Williams syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Brewer, C. M.; Morrison, N; Tolmie, J L

    1996-01-01

    Sixteen children and adolescents with a firm clinical diagnosis of Williams syndrome were investigated with the chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) technique employing the elastin gene probe. In each case there was a fluorescent signal on one chromosome 7 homologue only, indicating elastin gene deletion. No deletion was demonstrated in another child in whom an earlier diagnosis of Williams syndrome was judged doubtful at review. Firm clinical diagnosis correlates with elastin...

  15. Molecular Genetics of Williams Syndrome: Windows into Human Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Julie Korenberg

    2009-01-01

    Genetics is my favorite way of thinking: Williams syndrome seen through the eyes of a geneticist. Williams syndrome (WS) is the most compelling model in which to link the basis of human emotion and behavior to their biological origins. The explanatory power of human genetics in WS rests on the recent revolution in understanding the human genome but more specifically on the ability to link genetic with behavioral variation at high resolution. WS is due to the deletion of about 25 g...

  16. Unbalanced 13;18 translocation and Williams syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    COLLEY, A.; Thakker, Y; Ward, H.; Donnai, D

    1992-01-01

    A 2 1/2 year old girl is reported with a de novo 13;18 unbalanced translocation and the facial features of Williams syndrome, subaortic stenosis, failure to thrive, and developmental delay. This case provides two candidate locations for the underlying molecular pathology of this sporadic syndrome. Williams syndrome is associated with intellectual and growth retardation, infantile feeding problems which may be associated with hypercalcaemia, cardiovascular abnormalities, a friendly, loquacious...

  17. Analysis of speech fluency in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Natalia Freitas; Sampaio, Adriana; Gonçalves, Oscar F; Giacheti, Célia Maria

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder, often referred as being characterized by dissociation between verbal and non-verbal abilities, although the number of studies disputing this proposal is emerging. Indeed, although they have been traditionally reported as displaying increased speech fluency, this topic has not been fully addressed in research. In previous studies carried out with a small group of individuals with WS, we reported speech breakdowns during conversational and autobiographical narratives suggestive of language difficulties. In the current study, we characterized the speech fluency profile using an ecologically based measure--a narrative task (story generation) was collected from a group of individuals with WS (n = 30) and typically developing group (n = 39) matched in mental age. Oral narratives were elicited using a picture stimulus--the cookie theft picture from Boston Diagnosis Aphasia Test. All narratives were analyzed according to typology and frequency of fluency breakdowns (non-stuttered and stuttered disfluencies). Oral narratives in WS group differed from typically developing group, mainly due to a significant increase in the frequency of disfluencies, particularly in terms of hesitations, repetitions and pauses. This is the first evidence of disfluencies in WS using an ecologically based task (oral narrative task), suggesting that these speech disfluencies may represent a significant marker of language problems in WS. PMID:21624815

  18. Sir William Mitchell (1925-2002)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Sir William (Bill) Mitchell, former President of the CERN Council, died on 30th October 2002 at the age of 77. Mitchell was professor of Physics at Oxford University from 1978 to 1989, having previously been Professor of Physics, Dean of Science and Deputy Vice-Chancellor at Reading University. From 1985 to 1990 he was Chairman of the UK's Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC), which at the time was the funding agency for the UK's participation in the CERN programme. As Chairman, Mitchell was one of the UK representatives on the CERN Council, and in 1991 he was elected President, a position he held for three years. This was a difficult period for CERN. Financial problems were being faced in many member states, notably in Germany as a result of unification. This led to calls for reductions in the CERN budget and, more significantly, to requests for delays in consderation of future programmes. On the other hand for the future of CERN and the progress of elementary particle physics, it was necessary...

  19. William L. Donn 1918-1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedzelman, Stanley David

    William L. Donn, Professor Emeritus of the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, City College of New York, and Special Research Scientist at Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory (LDGO) of Columbia University (Palisades, N.Y.), died at his home on June 30, 1987, at the age of 69. Bill demonstrated expertise in a wide range of fields, with a highly productive and creative research and writing career that included geology, oceanography, climatology, atmospheric physics, and meteorology.Donn was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., on March 2, 1918. At the tender age of 10 years, he demonstrated his love and talent for science by building a telescope with his brother, Bertram. During his undergraduate years at Brooklyn College, he switched his major from astronomy to geology. He was largely selftrained in both meteorology and oceanography, serving as head of the Meteorology Section, U.S. Merchant Marine Academy during World War II . One by-product of these years was the textbook Meteorology—With Marine Applications, first published in 1946. This widely adopted text became a standard for a generation of mariners and college students.

  20. Imaging of cardiovascular malformations in Williams syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the imaging methods for cardiovascular malformations in Williams syndrome(WS). Methods: Thirteen cases of WS (7 males and 6 females) aged 10 months to 13 years were involved in this study. All patients underwent chest X-ray radiography, electrocardiography, echocardiography and physical examination. 3 cases underwent electronic beam computed tomography (EBCT), cardiac catheterization and angiography were performed in 8 cases. Results: Twelve patients were referred to our hospital for cardiac murmur and 1 case for cyanosis after birth. 7 patients were found with 'elfin-like' facial features, 6 patients with pulmonary arterial stenosis, 2 cases with patent ductus arteriosus, 2 cases with severe pulmonary hypertension and 1 case with total endocardial cushion defect. Sudden death occurred in 2 patients during and after catheterization, respectively. Conclusions: Conventional angiography is the golden standard for the diagnosis of cardiovascular malformations in WS. Noninvasive methods such as MSCT and MRI should be suggested because of the risk of sudden death in conventional angiography. (authors)

  1. Neural Correlates of Amusia in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D.; Dankner, Nathan; Pryweller, Jennifer R.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital amusia is defined by marked deficits in pitch perception and production. Though historically examined only in otherwise typically developing (TD) populations, amusia has recently been documented in Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder with a unique auditory phenotype including auditory sensitivities and increased emotional responsiveness to music but variable musical skill. The current study used structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging to examine neural correlates of amusia in 17 individuals with WS (4 of whom met criteria for amusia). Consistent with findings from TD amusics, amusia in WS was associated with decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). The relationship between amusia and FA in the inferior component of the SLF was particularly robust, withstanding corrections for cognitive functioning, auditory sensitivities, or musical training. Though the number of individuals with amusia in the study is small, results add to evidence for the role of fronto-temporal disconnectivity in congenital amusia and suggest that novel populations with developmental differences can provide a window into understanding gene-brain-behavior relationships that underlie musical behaviors. PMID:25422929

  2. Molecular cytogenetic diagnosis of Williams syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirota, Hamao; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Kimura, Misa [Heart Institute of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-08-23

    Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by distinct facial changes, growth deficiency, mental retardation, and congenital heart defect (particularly supravalvular aortic stenosis), associated at times with infantile hypercalcemia. Molecular genetic studies have indicated that hemizygosity at the elastin locus (7q11.23) causes WS. The purpose of this study was to confirm that this regional deletion, involving the elastin locus, is the cause of WS in Japan, and to clarify the correlation between the phenotype and the elastin locus. Thirty-two patients with WS and thirty of their relatives were examined by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), using the WS chromosome region (WSCR) probe. All patients had cardiovascular disease (100%), 30 had typical WS facial changes (94%), 31 had mental retardation or developmental delay (97%), 16 were small-for-date at birth (50%), 14 had short stature (44%), and 13 had dental anomalies (41%). No relatives showed any manifestation of WS. Hemizygosity for a region of 7q11.23, involving the elastin locus, was found in all WS patients, but was not found in the 30 relatives. 22 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Neural Correlates of Amusia in Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam D. Lense

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital amusia is defined by marked deficits in pitch perception and production. Though historically examined only in otherwise typically developing (TD populations, amusia has recently been documented in Williams syndrome (WS, a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder with a unique auditory phenotype including auditory sensitivities and increased emotional responsiveness to music but variable musical skill. The current study used structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging to examine neural correlates of amusia in 17 individuals with WS (4 of whom met criteria for amusia. Consistent with findings from TD amusics, amusia in WS was associated with decreased fractional anisotropy (FA in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF. The relationship between amusia and FA in the inferior component of the SLF was particularly robust, withstanding corrections for cognitive functioning, auditory sensitivities, or musical training. Though the number of individuals with amusia in the study is small, results add to evidence for the role of fronto-temporal disconnectivity in congenital amusia and suggest that novel populations with developmental differences can provide a window into understanding gene-brain-behavior relationships that underlie musical behaviors.

  4. Textual Form and Cultural Affect: William Empson's Double-Plot and Raymond Williams's Structure of Feeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pamela McCallum

    2005-01-01

    By insisting on the primacy of double-plot, Empson brackets the sometimes deceptive appearances of a text's content to uncover and disengage the more fundamental double-plot system at work within the defining structure of the text. Empson's thinking about the reception of double-plot structures enables Raymond Williams's early formulations of structure of feeling, in particular the gesturing this perplexing, underdeveloped, but persistent concept makes towards understanding collective response to cultural forms. This article explores the implications of the reception of double-plot structures, drawing out the assumptions inscribed in Empson's claims about processes at work as an audience engages with these dramatic structures.

  5. Epistemologia pragmatyczna Michaela Williamsa (PRAGMATIST EPISTEMOLOGY BY MICHAEL WILLIAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Ziemińska

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents three main elements of Williams' epistemology: the concept of knowledge, the problem of skepticism and the concept of truth. Williams takes knowledge not as pure descriptive but partly normative concept (to know is to be engaged and entitled. He rejects the demonstrative conception of knowledge (knowledge is infallible and prefers the fallibilist conception of knowledge (knowledge is uncertain and fallible. Williams is good at bringing skeptical presuppositions to light: the demonstrative conception of knowledge and the conception of justification with Prior Grounding Requirement, epistemological realism and priority for internal knowledge. He rightly observes that when we change that presuppositions (skeptic's context, knowledge does exist. However, Williams-fallibilist is close to a skeptic: they both agree that our beliefs are uncertain. The difference is only whether some of our beliefs deserve to be called knowledge. The most important worries concern Williams' concept of truth (deflationary pragmatism. According to Williams truth has no nature and it is not a goal of inquiry. However, if truth is not a goal, we can hardly understand the previous discussion with skepticism and the defense of rationality.

  6. Anxiety, fears, and phobias in persons with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2003-01-01

    Although much research has focused on the cognitive-linguistic profile associated with Williams syndrome, studies have yet to follow up on preliminary observations suggesting increased anxiety and fears in persons with this disorder. To this aim, Study 1 compared fears in 120 participants with Williams syndrome to 70 appropriately matched persons with mental retardation of mixed etiologies. Study 2 assessed differences in parent versus child reports of fears in 36 Williams syndrome and 24 comparison group parent-child dyads. In Study 3, rates of phobia and other anxiety disorders were assessed in standardized psychiatric interviews with the parents of 51 individuals with Williams syndrome. Relative to their counterparts, persons with Williams syndrome had significantly more fears as well as a wider range of frequently occurring fears, as reported by either parents or participants themselves. Children in both groups reported more fears than their parents. Whereas generalized and anticipatory anxiety were found in 51% to 60% of the sample with Williams syndrome, specific phobia was more prevalent, with 96% showing persistent and marked fears and 84% avoiding their fears or enduring them with distress. The feasibility of cognitive-behavioral treatments for phobia is discussed, as are implications for future research. PMID:12730029

  7. William James, Gustav Fechner, and Early Psychophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L. Hawkins

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available American psychologist and philosopher William James devoted the entirety of his career to exploring the nature of volition, as expressed by such phenomena as will, attention, and belief. As part of that endeavor, James's unorthodox scientific pursuits, from his experiments with nitrous oxide and hallucinogenic drugs to his investigation of spiritualist mediums, represent his attempt to address the "hard problems" of consciousness for which his training in brain physiology and experimental psychology could not entirely account. As a student, James's reading in chemistry and physics had sparked his interest in the concepts of energy and force, terms that he later deployed in his writing about consciousness and in his arguments against philosophical monism and scientific materialism, as he developed his radically empiricist ideas privileging discontinuity and plurality. Despite James's long campaign against scientific materialism, he was, however, convinced of the existence of a naturalistic explanation for the more "wayward and fitful" aspects of mind, including transcendent experiences associated with hysteria, genius, and religious ecstasy. In this paper, I examine aspects of James's thought that are still important for contemporary debates in psychology and neuroscience: his "transmission theory" of consciousness, his ideas on the "knowing of things together," and, finally, the related concept of "the compounding of consciousness," which postulates the theoretical possibility for individual entities within a conscious system of thought to "know" the thoughts of others within the system. Taken together, these ideas suggest that James, in spite of, or perhaps because of, his forays into metaphysics, was working toward a naturalistic understanding of consciousness, what I will term a "distributive model," based on his understanding of consciousness as an "awareness" that interacts dynamically within, and in relation to, its environment.

  8. Obituary: William A. Rense (1914-2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Glen

    2009-12-01

    On March 28, 2008, the space research community lost another of its pioneers. William A. Rense, professor emeritus of physics at the University of Colorado in Boulder, who died in Estes Park, Colorado, following complications from cancer. He was 94. Bill, as he was widely known, was born in 1914 in Massillon, Ohio, the son of German immigrants. His was a large family - five brothers and one sister. His father, Joseph Rense, worked for the city of Cleveland while his mother, Rosalia (Luther) Rense was a housewife. As a child, Bill developed a love of astronomy which led him to earn a bachelor's degree in physics and astronomy from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, followed by master's and PhD degrees in physics at Ohio State University. He held teaching positions at Rutgers, University of Miami (Florida), Texas A & M, and Louisiana State University before taking his final appointment at CU in 1949. While teaching at LSU, he met and in 1942 married Wanda (Childs) Rense. In addition to teaching physics at CU, Bill did research in CU's Upper Air Laboratory. His early work there included studies of polarized light and its implications for the analysis of zodiacal light. He and his co-workers also began developing instrumentation to be flown above the Earth's atmosphere in sounding rockets. In 1952 he obtained the first photographic spectrogram of the solar Lyman-alpha line of hydrogen (121.6nm). This work was followed in 1956 by the first full disk spectroheliogram in Lyman-alpha. These results could not have been possible without the use of pointing control systems for sounding rockets. These "sun trackers" kept the payloads pointed at the sun long enough for the measurements to be made, and CU was a pioneer in their development. The expanding research venue led the Upper Air Laboratory to be renamed the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), and Bill Rense was its first director. He continued his research into the properties of the solar

  9. 76 FR 42722 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Assistant... of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 (IGRA), Public Law 100-497, 25 U.S.C. 2710, the...

  10. 75 FR 61511 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary... section 11 of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 (IGRA), Public Law 100-497, 25 U.S.C. 2710,...

  11. 75 FR 38834 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...: Under Section 11 of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 (IGRA), Public Law 100-497, 25 U.S.C....

  12. 76 FR 165 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin (``Tribe'') and the State of Wisconsin Gaming Compact of 1992... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...

  13. Indian concepts on sexuality

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Thakurata, Rajarshi Guha

    2013-01-01

    India is a vast country depicting wide social, cultural and sexual variations. Indian concept of sexuality has evolved over time and has been immensely influenced by various rulers and religions. Indian sexuality is manifested in our attire, behavior, recreation, literature, sculptures, scriptures, religion and sports. It has influenced the way we perceive our health, disease and device remedies for the same. In modern era, with rapid globalization the unique Indian sexuality is getting diffu...

  14. Deletions and candidate genes in Williams syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Jurado, L.A.; Peoples, R.; Francke, U. [Stanford Univ. CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemizygosity at the elastin locus (ELN) on chromosome 7q11.23 has recently been reported in several familial and sporadic cases of the developmental disorder, Williams syndrome (WS). Because the deletion is greater than the span of the ELN gene, a contiguous gene deletion syndrome has been suggested as the probable molecular basis for this condition. Thus far, neither the size of the deletion(s), nor other genes within it are known. We have analyzed samples from 27 sporadic WS patients by genotyping two multiallelic ELN intragenic polymorphisms, detectable by PCR amplification, and by Southern blotting for ELN gene dosage. Twenty four patients were hemizygous at the ELN locus while 3 showed no deletion or detectable rearrangement. Genotype studies on parental DNA were informative in 12 of the deletions. All 12 were due to de novo events, 8 in the maternal and 4 in the paternal chromosome. In an attempt to identify genes involved in WS we are also using a candidate gene approach. Delayed clearance of an exogenous calcium load with normal or slightly increased calcitonin levels in serum has been documented in WS patients suggesting a defective calcitonin action or calcium sensing function. The calcitonin receptor (CTR) gene is, therefore, a good candidate since CTR has a dual role as a hormonal receptor for calcitonin and an extracellular calcium sensor. We have mapped the CTR gene to chromosome 7q21.1 by PCR-SSCA of somatic cell hybrids and FISH analysis. Using two color FISH with probes for ELN and CTR, both loci are located on 7q at a distance of {approximately}10 Mb, CTR being telomeric. Our CTR probe does not detect any genomic abnormality by FISH or Southern blot in the patients` samples analyzed. We have identified a diallelic polymorphism in the CTR cDNA and are currently testing the hypothesis of an impaired CTR expression as responsible for some of the clinical features of WS by analysing the CTR transcripts by RT-PCR.

  15. Unity and diversity – the Williams subjects’ message Unity and diversity – the Williams subjects’ message

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans W. Dechert

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Williams subjects, due to a genetically based neuro-developmental disorder from birth, besides various medical problems, demonstrate a dissociation between cognitive and special linguistic processing, and a dissociation within language modules, language domains, and language mini-domains with reference to different languages. This ichotomous profile results from a deletion on one hromosome. What other genes on the same chromosome, not yet identified, or other genes on other chromosomes of the human genome, may be responsible for the same or similar or any other cognitive deficits and/or interactions of cognitive and linguistic deficits, and as such may reveal the specific processes located within specific modules, domains, and/or mini-domains across different languages and cultures, we do not know. What we need, however, is a unified consilient approach engaging the sciences and the humanities to integrate knowledge from various sources of investigation. Williams subjects, due to a genetically based neuro-developmental disorder from birth, besides various medical problems, demonstrate a dissociation between cognitive and special linguistic processing, and a dissociation within language modules, language domains, and language mini-domains with reference to different languages. This ichotomous profile results from a deletion on one hromosome. What other genes on the same chromosome, not yet identified, or other genes on other chromosomes of the human genome, may be responsible for the same or similar or any other cognitive deficits and/or interactions of cognitive and linguistic deficits, and as such may reveal the specific processes located within specific modules, domains, and/or mini-domains across different languages and cultures, we do not know. What we need, however, is a unified consilient approach engaging the sciences and the humanities to integrate knowledge from various sources of investigation.

  16. Obituary: William K. Rose (1935-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2011-12-01

    Stellar astrophysicist William Kenneth Rose died near his home in Potomac, Maryland, on September 30, 2010, after an extended illness. Rose was the son of pharmacist Kenneth William Rose and Shirley Near Rose and was born in Ossining, New York, on August 10, 1935. He received an AB from Columbia College in 1957 and a PhD in physics from Columbia University in 1963, with a thesis on "measurements of linear polarization in discrete radio sources using a 9.4 cm maser," under the direction of Charles H. Townes. Rose played a major role in designing and constructing the maser and used it at a radio telescope at Maryland Point that belonged to the Naval Research Lab. He observed Jupiter and Saturn and a number of extra-solar-system sources, and also diffuse centimeter emission (see appendix). The thesis was not published in an archival journal, but can be found under Library of Congress code QB 475.R67. While in graduate School, Bill married Sheila Tuchman, whose primary scientific interests were biological. None of their three children chose to be scientists, but two are CPAs. Bill moved successfully through the academic hurdles) from a research position at Princeton (1963-67), where a collaboration with Nick Woolf and Martin Schwarzchild on the infrared spectra of giant stars became one of his most-cited papers, to assistant and associate professorships at MIT (1967-71), and then associate and full professorships at the University of Maryland (1971 to retirement in 2005). His most innovative work was probably that on nova explosions arising from degenerate ignition of hydrogen accreted on white dwarfs in close binary systems, published in 1968. The same idea occurred to others at about the same time, and Bill did not, perhaps, get quite his fair share of the credit. I first met Sheila and Bill in summer 1969 at the Stony Brook summer school on stellar evolution (not published until 1972). He lectured on the nature of nova explosions and on nuclear burning in thin

  17. Anti-inflammatory Effect of Cherokee Rose Root and Its Effect on NO Release of Macrophage%金樱根的抗炎作用及对巨噬细胞释放NO的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹堂斌; 解庆林

    2011-01-01

    为探索金樱根的抗炎作用及对炎症因子一氧化氮(NO)的调控作用,建立小鼠二甲苯耳廓肿胀模型、琼脂肉芽组织增生模型,并通过测定金樱根对脂多糖诱导小鼠腹腔巨噬细胞释放NO的影响观察金樱根的抗炎作用及其与NO的关系.结果表明,金樱根能抑制二甲苯引起的小鼠耳廓肿胀、琼脂肉芽组织增生,能抑制炎症因子NO的释放.认为,金樱根具有较好的抗炎作用,这种作用与抑制NO等炎症因子释放有关.%The anti-inflammatory effect of cherokee rose root was observed by building mice dimethylbenzene auricle swelling model and agar granulation hyperblastosis model and the effect of cherokee rose root on NO release of mice coeliac macrophage was determined to study the antiinflammatory effect of cherokee rose root and adjusting effect of cherokee rose root on NO release (inflammatory factor). The results showed that cherokee rose root could inhibit mice auricle swelling caused by dimethylbenzene, agar granulation hyperblastosis and NO release. cherokee rose root is of good anti-inflammatory effect and its anti-inflammatory effect may be related to inhibition of NO release.

  18. Recurrent achalasia in a child with Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereza, Nina; Barbarić, Irena; Ostojić, Sasa; Cace, Neven; Kapović, Miljenko

    2011-09-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a multysistem genetic disorder caused by the 1.6Mb hemizygous deletion involving the elastin gene in the region q11.23 of chromosome 7. The phenotype of Williams-Beuren syndrome is extremelly variable but the most common findings include cardiovascular disease, distinctive facies, mental retardation, a specific congitive profile, endocrine abnormalities, growth retardation and connective tissue abnormalities. Although gastrointestinal difficulties are one of the most constant and prominent finding of the syndrome, including gastro-esophageal reflux (GER), poor suckling, vomiting, constipation, prolonged colic, rectal prolapse, inguinal, umbilical and hiatal hernia, there have been no reports of achalasia in association with Williams-Beuren syndrome in the literature. We present the case of a boy with Williams-Beuren syndrome, achalasia and recurrent postoperative stenosis of the cardia. After Heller myotomy, the boy developed severe restenosis of the cardia with abundant adhesions which repeated after every treatment, five times in periods shorter than one month. Eventually, he developed GER, errosive gastritis and hiatal hernia which led to severe malnutrition and failure to thrive. Although the genetic defect causing Williams-Beuren syndrome might not be the direct cause of achalasia we suggest that the frequent development of severe restenosis of cardia due to tight adhesions could be the consequence of elastin gene haploinsufficiency and altered structure and function of elastic fibers in esophageal connective tissue. This case highlights the importance of early diagnosis of esophageal motor disorders in childhood which should be included in the differential diagnosis when a child with Williams-Beuren syndrome presents with dysphagia and/or regurgitation. PMID:22053584

  19. The Tarascan Indian House.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Joyce

    1989-01-01

    This lesson plan introduces K-grade three students to Mexican Indian architecture. Students will become familiar with the cultural context of the Indian treasure house; discuss the use of wood as the sole building material; compare the treasure house with present day structures; and create miniature treasure houses using wood materials. (GEA)

  20. Pima Indian Legends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Anna Moore

    The stated purpose of this book is to preserve in writing some of the Pima Indian legends that had been verbally passed from generation to generation in the past. This collection of 23 legends, which were originally used to instruct the young people of the tribe, presents in story form various aspects of American Indian life--including…

  1. Indian Ocean Rim Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wippel, Steffen

    Since the mid-1990s, the Indian Ocean has been experiencing increasing economic cooperation among its rim states. Middle Eastern countries, too, participate in the work of the Indian Ocean Rim Association, which received new impetus in the course of the current decade. Notably Oman is a very active...

  2. Indian Inuit Pottery '73

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawow, 1974

    1974-01-01

    A unique exhibit of Canadian Native Ceramics which began touring various art galleries in September 1973 is described both verbally and photographically. The Indian Inuit Pottery '73 display, part of the 1973 International Ceramics Exhibition, includes 110 samples of craftsmanship from Indian and Inuit artists across Canada. (KM)

  3. America's Indian Statues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridley, Marion E., Comp.

    A comprehensive compilation of facts and photographs of statues honoring or memorializing the American Indians is presented in this paperback. The vignettes accompanying the photographs are the result of extensive research. Examples of the American Indian statues include "The Signal of Peace,""The Protest,"" The Medicine Man,""Appeal to the Great…

  4. The oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeGrange A.R.

    1990-02-01

    Full Text Available Following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound Alaska, on March 24, 1989, treatment centres for sea otters were set up at Valdez, Seward and Homer. Otter survival rates were lower at Valdez than at Seward, probably because the animals collected were closer to the spill in time and space, and oil toxicity was at a maximum. Otters collected in Prince William Sound were predominantly female and pregnant or lactating. Weathered oil persists in otter habitats throughout the spill zone - long term studies are underway to assess the effects of this.

  5. Postcardiotomy Mechanical Circulatory Support in Two Infants with Williams' Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contrafouris, Constantinos A.; Chatzis, Andrew C.; Kanakis, Meletios A.; Azariadis, Prodromos A.; Mitropoulos, Fotios A.

    2014-01-01

    Supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS) in patients with Williams' syndrome is often accompanied by coronary, pulmonary, and even myocardial lesions and therefore associated with increased perioperative morbidity and mortality. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides reliable short-term mechanical circulatory support to patients, especially young, in acute postoperative cardiac failure when conventional means are ineffective. The incorporation of centrifugal pumps in these systems has made their use more efficient and less traumatic. We describe our experience of using the Levitronix CentriMag pump in two patients with Williams' syndrome who underwent surgical correction of supravalvular aortic stenosis. PMID:24741444

  6. William C. Latham awarded the Ruffner Medal, Virginia Tech's most prestigious accolade

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Allan

    2007-01-01

    Virginia Tech has selected William C. Latham to receive the 2007 William H. Ruffner Medal, the university's most prestigious honor. The Ruffner Medal is awarded annually to recognize individuals who have performed notable and distinguished service to the university.

  7. Biogeochemistry of mercury in a river-reservoir system: impact of an inactive chloralkali plant on the Holston River-Cherokee Reservoir, Virginia and Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrand, S. G.; Lindberg, S. E.; Turner, R. R.; Huckabee, J. W.; Strand, R. H.; Lund, J. R.; Andren, A. W.

    1980-08-01

    Elevated mercury concentrations in fish species from the North Fork of the Holston River were observed in the early 1970's. The source of the mercury was a chloralkali plant which had ceased operation in 1972. Mercury continues to be released to the river from two large (approx. 40-ha) waste disposal ponds at the plant site. This report presents results of a study of the emission of mercury to the environment from the abandoned waste ponds and of the distribution of mercury in water, sediment, and biota of the Holston River-Cherokee Reservoir System in Virginia and eastern Tennessee.

  8. OROFACIAL FINDINGS AND DENTAL MANAGEMENT OF WILLIAMS SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogulu, D; Hazan, F; Dindaroglu, F Cagirir

    2015-01-01

    Williams Syndrome is a microdeletion syndrome characterized by a number of developmental and physical abnormalities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the oral abnormalities and dental management of patients with Williams Syndrome. Fifteen patients with Williams Syndrome aged between 3-20 years old were evaluated in this study. Oro-facial findings, dental plaque index and DMFT/dmft scores were recorded in each patient. Panoramic radiographs and extraoral, intraoral photographs were taken from all patients. According to the results of this study, the mean DMFT and dmft scores were 0.39 ± 0.12 and 1.81 ± 0.39, respectively. The most common oro-facial findings were detected as high palate (87%), diastema (60%), failure to thrive (60%), feeding difficulties (60%), vomiting (47%), macroglossi (47%), microdontia (40%) and frenulum hyperplasia (40%). All decayed teeth were restored with compomer and composite restorations. In conclusion, dentists play a significant role for improving the quality of life of the patients with Williams Syndrome to minimize or prevent dental abnormalities. PMID:26852515

  9. I Know! It's Backwards Day! Gender Roles and William's Doll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Kleut, Geraldine

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a case study of an exploration of gender roles in a second-grade classroom. The author discusses some of the discursive identities in which she and her students are positioned, and then uses the picture book William's Doll to introduce a discussion of discursive gender identities with her students. She then asks students to…

  10. William Faulkner: No Friend of Brown v. Board of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsgrove, Carol

    2001-01-01

    In the years following the Supreme Court's Brown v. Board of Education decision to integrate America's public schools, William Faulkner, Norman Mailer, Hannah Arendt, Robert Penn Warren, and, to a lesser extent, C. Vann Woodward, provided intellectual sustenance to southern efforts to resist racial integration. Focuses on Faulkner's political…

  11. William Butler Yeats, George Antheil, Ezra Pound Friends and Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Saddlemyer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available William Butler Yeats was throughout his life determined to relate his words to music, and involved many writers and musicians in his search for the key. While in Rapallo staying near Ezra Pound, he met the young composer George Antheil, who became one of his converts. Others followed, with Yeats continuing to expound and clarify his ambition.

  12. Great Alaska Earthquake, Prince William Sound, March 28, 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Prince William Sound magnitude 8.4 earthquake at 03:36 UT on March 28, 1964, was one of the largest shocks ever recorded on the North American Continent. The...

  13. William Menninger and American psychoanalysis, 1946?48

    OpenAIRE

    Plant, Rebecca Jo

    2005-01-01

    Abstract In the aftermath of World War II, a struggle ensued over the direction of American psychoanalysis. Led by William Menninger, who reluctantly assumed the presidency of the American Psychoanalytic Association in 1946, a cohort of American-born psychoanalysts sought to make their profession more responsive to other medical practitioners and the general public. Insisting that divisive theoretical debat...

  14. The Poetics of "Pattern Recognition": William Gibson's Shifting Technological Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetmore, Alex

    2007-01-01

    William Gibson's 1984 cyberpunk novel "Neuromancer" continues to be a touchstone in cultural representations of the impact of new information and communication technologies on the self. As critics have noted, the posthumanist, capital-driven, urban landscape of "Neuromancer" resembles a Foucaultian vision of a panoptically engineered social space…

  15. Comprehension of Metaphor and Metonymy in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Van Herwegen, Jo; Thomas, Michael; Fishman, Roza; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Rundblad, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    Background: Figurative language, such as metaphor and metonymy, is very common in daily language use. Its underlying cognitive processes are sometimes viewed as lying at the interface of language and thought. Williams syndrome, which is a rare genetic developmental disorder, provides an opportunity to study this interface because individuals with…

  16. William Shakespeare’s“Hamlet”and Oedipus Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    迪丽努尔

    2014-01-01

    “Hamlet”is one of the great dramas of William Shakespeare. This paper by describing the relationship between Hamlet and his mother, the Ghost and his uncle, tries to approve that Oedipus complex is the main reason of Hamlet’s kil ing his uncle.

  17. Mapping the Milky Way: William Herschel's Star Gages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timberlake, Todd

    2013-01-01

    William Herschel (Fig. 1) is rightfully known as one of the greatest astronomers of all time. Born in Hanover (in modern Germany) in 1738, Herschel immigrated to England in 1757 and began a successful career as a professional musician. Later in life Herschel developed a strong interest in astronomy. He began making his own reflecting telescopes in…

  18. Atypical Sleep Architecture and Altered EEG Spectra in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombos, F.; Bodizs, R.; Kovacs, I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder characterised by physical abnormalities and a distinctive cognitive profile with intellectual disabilities (IDs) and learning difficulties. Methods: In our study, nine adolescents and young adults with WS and 9 age- and sex-matched typically developing (TD) participants…

  19. Social Criticism in The Chimney Sweeper by William Blake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晓芸

    2008-01-01

    This paper mainly focuses on social criticism in William Blake's poems,both entitled"The Chimnet SWeeper"by analy-zing social background at that time and different Views in these two poems.It also tries to embody a fuller effect in thesc two separate poems.

  20. William Knocke receives 2008 Virginia Outstanding Civil Engineer Award

    OpenAIRE

    Daniilidi, Christina

    2008-01-01

    William R. Knocke, W.C. English Professor and head of the Charles E. Via, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech, was awarded the 2008 Virginia Outstanding Civil Engineer Award at the Virginia Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers' (ASCE) banquet, held recently in Williamsburg, Va.

  1. Intonation Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovik, Vesna; Setter, Jane; van Ewijk, Lizet

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated expressive and receptive intonation abilities in children with Williams syndrome (WS) and the relation of these abilities to other linguistic abilities. Method: Fourteen children with WS, 14 typically developing children matched to the WS group for receptive language (LA), and 15 typically developing children…

  2. The Interplay between Anxiety and Social Functioning in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Deborah M.; Hanley, Mary; Kirk, Hannah; Clark, Fiona; Little, Katie; Fleck, Ruth; Janes, Emily; Kelso, Linzi; O'Kane, Fionnuala; Cole-Fletcher, Rachel; Allday, Marianne Hvistendahl; Hocking, Darren; Cornish, Kim; Rodgers, Jacqui

    2014-01-01

    The developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) has been associated with an atypical social profile of hyper-sociability and heightened social sensitivity across the developmental spectrum. In addition, previous research suggests that both children and adults with WS have a predisposition towards anxiety. The current research aimed to explore…

  3. Electrophysiological Correlates of Semantic Processing in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Ana P.; Galdo-Alvarez, Santaigo; Sampaio, Adriana; Niznikiewicz, Margaret; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2010-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder due to microdeletion in chromosome 7, has been described as a syndrome with an intriguing socio-cognitive phenotype. Cognitively, the relative preservation of language and face processing abilities coexists with severe deficits in visual-spatial tasks, as well as in tasks involving…

  4. Shepard Award Winners, Part 2: Dr. Tracie Williams

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-07-29

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Tracie Williams, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 7/29/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/29/2009.

  5. William and Mary's President Exits on His Own Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The president and governing board at the College of William and Mary have parted ways in an unusually public split with a deeply partisan undercurrent. Gene R. Nichol says that the Board of Visitors forced him out for defending free speech and diversity on the campus, and that he turned down a generous severance package to go quietly. Board…

  6. William Morris and John Dewey: Imagining Utopian Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman-Moir, John

    2012-01-01

    With strikingly resonance William Morris and John Dewey independently imagined what utopian education might plausibly be. Neither remotely thought of utopia as a perfectly ordered society, but rather as a process. Each understood education functionally in terms of how it fits with art, work, and democracy within a holistic conception of utopia.…

  7. Musicality Correlates with Sociability and Emotionality in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Rowena; Lai, Philip; Levitin, Daniel J.; Bellugi, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic developmental disorder characterized by peaks and valleys of cognitive abilities. One peak that has been understudied is the affinity that many individuals with WS have with music. It remains unknown whether their high levels of musical interest, skill, and expressivity are related to their sociable…

  8. Visually Guided Step Descent in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Dorothy; Braddick, Oliver; Atkinson, Janette

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have impairments in visuospatial tasks and in manual visuomotor control, consistent with parietal and cerebellar abnormalities. Here we examined whether individuals with WS also have difficulties in visually controlling whole-body movements. We investigated visual control of stepping down at a change of…

  9. Perceptual Speech and Paralinguistic Skills of Adolescents with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Patricia M.; Pittelko, Stephen; Fillingane, Evan; Rustman, Emily; Lund, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare selected speech and paralinguistic skills of speakers with Williams syndrome (WS) and typically developing peers and to demonstrate the feasibility of providing preexisting databases to students to facilitate graduate research. In a series of three studies, conversational samples of 12 adolescents with…

  10. Examining Reports of Mental Health in Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, Chris; Tomlinson, Katie; Estes, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Prior research suggests that individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have a disposition towards anxiety. Information regarding this is typically derived from parents and carers. The perspectives of the individuals with WS are rarely included in research of this nature. We examined the mental health of 19 adults with WS using explicit (psychiatric…

  11. Object Recognition in Williams Syndrome: Uneven Ventral Stream Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hearn, Kirsten; Roth, Jennifer K.; Courtney, Susan M.; Luna, Beatriz; Street, Whitney; Terwillinger, Robert; Landau, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder associated with severe visuospatial deficits, relatively strong language skills, heightened social interest, and increased attention to faces. On the basis of the visuospatial deficits, this disorder has been characterized primarily as a deficit of the dorsal stream, the occipitoparietal brain regions…

  12. Advocating for Inclusion of Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and explore the experience of inclusion of students with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition of a microdeletion on chromosome 7 which has medical, behavior, and cognitive issues. The study was conducted by gaining an understanding from the parents' point of view. The study was twofold. First, the…

  13. Williams Syndrome and Memory: A Neuroanatomic and Cognitive Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Adriana; Sousa, Nuno; Fernandez, Montse; Vasconcelos, Cristiana; Shenton, Martha E.; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2010-01-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS) is described as displaying a dissociation within memory systems. As the integrity of hippocampal formation (HF) is determinant for memory performance, we examined HF volumes and its association with memory measures in a group of WS and in a typically development group. A significantly reduced intracranial content was found…

  14. Gender Attribution and Gender Agreement in French Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boloh, Yves; Ibernon, Laure; Royer, Stephanie; Escudier, Frederique; Danillon, Aurelia

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies on grammatical gender in French individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have led to conflicting findings and interpretations regarding keys abilities--gender attribution and gender agreement. New production data from a larger SW sample (N = 24) showed that gender attribution scores in SW participants exactly mirrored those of…

  15. Williams Syndrome: A Relationship between Genetics, Brain Morphology and Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahim, C.; Yoon, U.; Nashaat, N. H.; Khalil, A. K.; El-Belbesy, M.; Mancini-Marie, A.; Evans, A. C.; Meguid, N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Genetically Williams syndrome (WS) promises to provide essential insight into the pathophysiology of cortical development because its ~28 deleted genes are crucial for cortical neuronal migration and maturation. Phenotypically, WS is one of the most puzzling childhood neurodevelopmental disorders affecting most intellectual…

  16. How Executive Functions Are Related to Intelligence in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Ana; Cruz, Raquel; Sampaio, Adriana; Garayzabal, Elena; Martinez-Regueiro, Rocio; Goncalves, Oscar F.; Carracedo, Angel; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse

    2012-01-01

    Williams syndrome is characterized by impairments in executive functions (EFs). However, it remains unknown how distinct types of EFs relate to intelligence in this syndrome. The present study analyzed performance on working memory, inhibiting and shifting, and its links to IQ in a sample of 17 individuals with WS, and compared them with a group…

  17. Williams Syndrome: Daily Challenges and Positive Impact on the Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scallan, Susan; Senior, Joyce; Reilly, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the distinctive physical, cognitive, personality and behavioural characteristics associated with Williams syndrome, few studies to date have examined parental experiences of raising a child with this genetic syndrome. Methods: This explorative pilot study employed predominantly qualitative methodologies via face-to-face…

  18. Characterisation of Sleep Problems in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Hill, Catherine M.; Ashworth, Anna; Holley, Simone; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Sleep is critical to optimal daytime functioning, learning and general health. In children with established developmental disorders sleep difficulties may compound existing learning difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence and syndrome specificity of sleep problems in Williams syndrome (WS), a…

  19. Language and Literacy Development of Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2009-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder caused by deletion of approximately 25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23. Children with the syndrome evidence large individual differences in both broad language and reading abilities. Nevertheless, as a group, children with this syndrome show a consistent pattern characterized by relative…

  20. Strategies and Biases in Location Memory in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farran, Emily K.

    2008-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) demonstrate impaired visuo-spatial abilities in comparison to their level of verbal ability. In particular, visuo-spatial construction is an area of relative weakness. It has been hypothesised that poor or atypical location coding abilities contribute strongly to the impaired abilities observed on…

  1. Comprehension of Sarcasm, Metaphor and Simile in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbee, Kali; Porter, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although people with Williams syndrome (WS) are often characterized as friendly and sociable with relatively good general language abilities, there is emerging evidence of pragmatic difficulties and trouble comprehending aspects of non-literal language. Aims: The main aim was to investigate the comprehension of sarcasm, metaphor and…

  2. EUTROPHICATION ANALYSIS OF EMBAYMENTS IN PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, ALASKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertilizers were used in the summer of 1989 to accelerate bacterial growth in a bioremediation effort to clean up the beaches following the EXXON Valdez oil spill. athematical models were used to quantify the eutrophication potential in two selected embayments in Prince William S...

  3. Williams syndrome presenting with findings consistent with Alagille syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhuja, Pankaj; Whyte, Hilary; Kamath, Binita; Martin, Nicole; Chitayat, David

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Conjugated hyperbilirubinemia, posterior embryotoxon, and vertebral anomalies are not features of William syndrome (WS). We herein report a preterm infant who presented with features suggestive of Alagille syndrome, but microarray showed findings consistent with WS. This further extends the phenotype of WS and emphasizes the need for microarray analysis. PMID:25678968

  4. Williams syndrome presenting with findings consistent with Alagille syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sakhuja, Pankaj; Whyte, Hilary; Kamath, Binita; Martin, Nicole; Chitayat, David

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Conjugated hyperbilirubinemia, posterior embryotoxon, and vertebral anomalies are not features of William syndrome (WS). We herein report a preterm infant who presented with features suggestive of Alagille syndrome, but microarray showed findings consistent with WS. This further extends the phenotype of WS and emphasizes the need for microarray analysis.

  5. 33 CFR 161.60 - Vessel Traffic Service Prince William Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... vessel as defined in 33 CFR part 168. (e) Reporting Points. Table 161.60(d)—VTS Prince William Sound... William Sound. 161.60 Section 161.60 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Movement Reporting System Areas and Reporting Points § 161.60 Vessel Traffic Service Prince William...

  6. Probed Serial Recall in Williams Syndrome: Lexical Influences on Phonological Short-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Jan; McCormack, Teresa; Boucher, Jill

    2005-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a genetic disorder that, it has been claimed, results in an unusual pattern of linguistic strengths and weaknesses. The current study investigated the hypothesis that there is a reduced influence of lexical knowledge on phonological short-term memory in Williams syndrome. Fourteen children with Williams syndrome and 2…

  7. Outcome in Adult Life for People with Williams Syndrome Results from a Survey of 239 Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, P.; Udwin, O.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although there has been considerable research into the genotype and phenotype of Williams syndrome, there have been relatively few studies of long-term prognosis. As a preliminary to a more detailed investigation of adults with Williams syndrome, a parental questionnaire was distributed to members of the UK Williams Syndrome…

  8. New Indian Tribalism. Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Kathleen

    The purposes of this paper are to identify the problems Washington State Indians face and to provide considerations that might assist in promoting the welfare and well-being of American Indians. It is stated that the major barrier to the Indian's success in American society is the attitude of the Anglo towards the Indian. Thus, the programs and…

  9. 76 FR 33341 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the...

  10. 78 FR 10203 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Approval of the Class III Tribal- State Gaming Compact between the Chippewa-Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy's Indian...

  11. 77 FR 59641 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  12. 76 FR 65208 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an Approval of the Gaming..., Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy and Economic...

  13. 77 FR 45371 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the...

  14. 75 FR 8108 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of the Tribal-State Compact between the Pyramid Lake Paiute Indian Tribe and the State of Nevada Governing Class III...

  15. 75 FR 68618 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewas (``Tribe'') and the State of Wisconsin Gaming Compact of... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...

  16. 78 FR 44146 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact taking effect. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Class III Amended and Restated Tribal-State Gaming Compact between the Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians and...

  17. 76 FR 56466 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an approval of the gaming...: September 13, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian...

  18. 76 FR 52968 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the...

  19. 77 FR 43110 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the...

  20. 78 FR 15738 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of the gaming..., 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  1. 75 FR 55823 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  2. 78 FR 26801 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of an amendment to the Class III Tribal-State Gaming Compact between the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin and...

  3. 78 FR 11221 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of the gaming..., 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  4. 75 FR 38833 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Approved Compact between... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy...

  5. 77 FR 76514 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact taking effect. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Approval... L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy...

  6. 77 FR 76513 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Amended Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact taking effect. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...

  7. 76 FR 8375 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of the Gaming..., 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  8. 75 FR 68823 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Amendment. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of the Amendments to the Class III Gaming Compact (Amendment) between the State of Oregon and the Siletz Indians...

  9. Rasam Indian Restaurant: Menu

    OpenAIRE

    Rasam Indian Restaurant

    2013-01-01

    Rasam Indian Restaurant is located in the Glasthule, a suburb of Dublin and opened in 2003. The objective is to serve high quality, authentic Indian cuisine. "We blend, roast and grind our own spices daily to provide a flavour that is unique to Rasam. Cooking Indian food is founded upon long held family traditions. The secret is in the varying elements of heat and spices, the tandoor clay oven is a hugely important fixture in our kitchen. Marinated meats are lowered into the oven on long m...

  10. Indian concepts on sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Thakurata, Rajarshi Guha

    2013-01-01

    India is a vast country depicting wide social, cultural and sexual variations. Indian concept of sexuality has evolved over time and has been immensely influenced by various rulers and religions. Indian sexuality is manifested in our attire, behavior, recreation, literature, sculptures, scriptures, religion and sports. It has influenced the way we perceive our health, disease and device remedies for the same. In modern era, with rapid globalization the unique Indian sexuality is getting diffused. The time has come to rediscover ourselves in terms of sexuality to attain individual freedom and to reinvest our energy to social issues related to sexuality. PMID:23858263

  11. Indian Cosmological Ideas

    CERN Document Server

    Narayan, R

    2007-01-01

    This paper, third in the series on Indian tradition of physics, describes conceptions of the cosmos with ideas that are clearly spelt out in texts such as Yoga Vasishtha.In particular, the conception of multiple universes that occurs often in this text will be examined in the framework of the Indian physics. The other surprising concepts that are discussed include flow of time and its variability with respect to different observers, and the possibility of passage across universes.

  12. Structural controls on ground-water conditions and estimated aquifer properties near Bill Williams Mountain, Williams, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Herbert A.

    2001-01-01

    As of 1999, surface water collected and stored in reservoirs is the sole source of municipal water for the city of Williams. During 1996 and 1999, reservoirs reached historically low levels. Understanding the ground-water flow system is critical to managing the ground-water resources in this part of the Coconino Plateau. The nearly 1,000-meter-deep regional aquifer in the Redwall and Muav Limestones, however, makes studying or utilizing the resource difficult. Near-vertical faults and complex geologic structures control the ground-water flow system on the southwest side of the Kaibab Uplift near Williams, Arizona. To address the hydrogeologic complexities in the study area, a suite of techniques, which included aeromagnetic, gravity, square-array resistivity, and audiomagnetotelluric surveys, were applied as part of a regional study near Bill Williams Mountain. Existing well data and interpreted geophysical data were compiled and used to estimate depths to the water table and to prepare a potentiometric map. Geologic characteristics, such as secondary porosity, coefficient of anisotropy, and fracture-strike direction, were calculated at several sites to examine how these characteristics change with depth. The 14-kilometer-wide, seismically active northwestward-trending Cataract Creek and the northeastward-trending Mesa Butte Fault systems intersect near Bill Williams Mountain. Several north-south-trending faults may provide additional block faulting north and west of Bill Williams Mountain. Because of the extensive block faulting and regional folding, the volcanic and sedimentary rocks are tilted toward one or more of these faults. These faults provide near-vertical flow paths to the regional water table. The nearly radial fractures allow water that reaches the regional aquifer to move away from the Bill Williams Mountain area. Depth to the regional aquifer is highly variable and depends on location and local structures. On the basis of interpreted

  13. Mission impossible: William Scott and the first Sydney Observatory directorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchiston, Wayne

    1998-06-01

    The Reverend William Scott (1825-1917) was the founding Director of the Sydney Observatory, and succeeded in acquiring state-of-the art astronomical instruments, establishing a network of country meteorological stations, and conducting a range of astronomical observations. He also worked to promote popular interest in astronomy, and immersed himself in the scientific culture of New South Wales. This paper examines Scott's achievements in astronomy and meteorology, the reasons for his premature resignation in 1862, and the search for his successor.

  14. William Gaddis’s Immortality: Celebration, Cartoon, or Corruption?

    OpenAIRE

    Crystal Alberts

    2013-01-01

    Although ostensibly a review of 'The Letters of William Gaddis' edited by Steven Moore (Champaign: Dalkey Archive, 2013), this article evaluates Moore’s volume in light of generally accepted practices of scholarly editions and the handling of historical documents. In particular, Alberts compares some of Moore’s edited letters to the originals housed either at Washington University in St. Louis or the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas, Austin and reveals issues involving the repre...

  15. Fissured and geographic tongue in Williams-Beuren syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeta Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS is a rare, most often sporadic, genetic disease caused by a chromosomal microdeletion at locus 7q11.23 involving 28 genes. It is characterized by congenital heart defects, neonatal hypercalcemia, skeletal and renal abnormalities, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder, and dysmorphic facies. A number of clinical findings has been reported, but none of the studies evaluated this syndrome considering oral cavity. We here report a fissured and geographic tongue in association with WBS.

  16. STS-118 Astronaut Dave Williams Trains Using Virtual Reality Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    STS-118 astronaut and mission specialist Dafydd R. 'Dave' Williams, representing the Canadian Space Agency, uses Virtual Reality Hardware in the Space Vehicle Mock Up Facility at the Johnson Space Center to rehearse some of his duties for the upcoming mission. This type of virtual reality training allows the astronauts to wear special gloves and other gear while looking at a computer that displays simulating actual movements around the various locations on the station hardware which with they will be working.

  17. Retinotopically defined primary visual cortex in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Rosanna K; Kippenhan, J Shane; Japee, Shruti; Kohn, Philip; Mervis, Carolyn B; Saad, Ziad S; Morris, Colleen A; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Berman, Karen Faith

    2009-03-01

    Williams syndrome, caused by a hemizygous microdeletion on chromosome 7q11.23, is characterized by severe impairment in visuospatial construction. To examine potential contributions of early visual processing to this cognitive problem, we functionally mapped the size and neuroanatomical variability of primary visual cortex (V1) in high-functioning adults with Williams syndrome and age- and IQ-matched control participants from the general population by using fMRI-based retinotopic mapping and cortical surface models generated from high-resolution structural MRI. Visual stimulation, consisting of rotating hemicircles and expanding rings, was used to retinotopically define early visual processing areas. V1 boundaries based on computed phase and field sign maps were used to calculate the functional area of V1. Neuroanatomical variability was assessed by computing overlap maps of V1 location for each group on standardized cortical surfaces, and non-parametric permutation test methods were used for statistical inference. V1 did not differ in size between groups, although its anatomical boundaries were more variable in the group with Williams syndrome. V1 overlap maps showed that the average centres of gravity for the two groups were similarly located near the fundus of the calcarine fissure, approximately 25 mm away from the most posterior aspect of the occipital lobe. In summary, our functional definition of V1 size and location indicates that recruitment of primary visual cortex is grossly normal in Williams syndrome, consistent with the notion that neural abnormalities underlying visuospatial construction arise at later stages in the visual processing hierarchy. PMID:19255058

  18. Seguridad social, empleo y propiedad privada en William Beveridge

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio Llanos Reyes

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to approach the economic and political notions of William Beveridge, which proposed the construction of the British Welfare State immediately after WWII. A form of State which sought to overcome the crisis of capitalism by proposing control over the system. We attempt to demonstrate the relation that should exist, according to Beveridge, the "father" of this model of capitalist State, between the development of a social security system, employment, and the situation of priva...

  19. Musicality Correlates With Sociability and Emotionality in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Rowena; Lai, Philip; Levitin, Daniel J.; Bellugi, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic developmental disorder characterized by peaks and valleys of cognitive abilities. One peak that has been understudied is the affinity that many individuals with WS have toward music. It remains unknown whether their high levels of musical interest, skill and expressivity are related to their sociable personality or their verbal intelligence. We examined the relationships between musicality (musical interest, creativity and expressivity), sociability (s...

  20. Anamorphose als "Symbolische Form": William Kentridge und der aktivierte Betrachter

    OpenAIRE

    Schweizer, Yvonne

    2009-01-01

    Erwin Panofsky thematisiert, aber marginalisiert zugleich auch den Betrachter in seinem Aufsatz „Perspektive als ‚symbolische Form“. Von dem Versuch, dem Betrachter eine aktive Rolle in der Bildwahrnehmung, gar der Bildproduktion zuzusprechen, zeugen indes anamorphotische Medien, deren besondere Rezeptionsmodi sich William Kentridge in seinem katoptrischen Film "What will come (has already come)" aneignet. Er reflektiert mit der Verwendung anamorphotischer Verfahren die Stellung des wahrnehme...

  1. Considering Bernard Williams\\'s Slogan \\'belief aims at truth\\'

    OpenAIRE

    A Kalantari

    2014-01-01

    There are two rival accounts about belief in the literature of philosophy, one is the teleological account and the other is the normative account. Defenders of the teleological account and most defenders of the normative one typically take the accounts as interpretations of Bernard Williams's slogan. The slogan holds that 'belief aims at truth'. In this paper, I will first clarify the teleological and normative accounts of belief. I will also argue that the teleological account and versions ...

  2. Sir William Rowan Hamilton: Life, Achievements, Stature in Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-06-01

    Against the background of the development ofphysics, and in particular of mechanics, over thecenturies since Galileo and Newton, we describethe life and work of William Rowan Hamilton inthe 19th century. The depth of his ideas whichbrought together the understanding of ray opticsand classical mechanics, and the remarkableways in which his work paved the way to theconstruction of quantum mechanics in the 20thcentury, are emphasized.

  3. William H. Sheldon and the culture of the somatotype

    OpenAIRE

    Gatlin, Stephen H.

    1997-01-01

    The burden of this dissertation is to show that William Sheldon's somatotype project should be seen as an integral aspect of modernist culture. Sheldon engaged the same problems with modernity and the "Second Industrial Revolution" (urbanization, overpopulation, industrialization, alienation) that confronted modernist poets, novelists, and philosophers. In this I am elaborating Dorothy Ross's recent metaphor, "modernist impulses in the human sciences" (1994). Both scientists and artists were ...

  4. Pulmonary Function and Emphysema in Williams-Beuren Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Emily S.; Pober, Barbara R; Washko, George; Raby, Benjamin A.; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2010-01-01

    Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS) is caused by a submicroscopic deletion on chromosome 7q11.23 that encompasses the entire elastin (ELN) gene. Elastin, a key component of elastic fibers within the lung, is progressively destroyed in emphysema. Defects in the elastin gene have been associated with increased susceptibility towards developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and emphysema in both humans and mice. We postulate that hemizygosity at the elastin gene locus may increase susc...

  5. Attentional lapse and inhibition control in adults with Williams Syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Greer, J; Riby, D. M.; Hamiliton, C.; Riby, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Research exploring cognitive processing associated with Williams Syndrome (WS) has suggested that executive functioning deficits exist across the developmental spectrum. Such executive functions include problem solving, planning, dividing attention and inhibiting responses. Within a framework of executive functions, the aim of the current study was to explore attentional lapse and inhibition skills in older adults with WS (n = 20; aged 36–61 yr) and consider the implications of deficits withi...

  6. Beyond behaviour: Is social anxiety low in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Dodd, Helen; Schniering, Carolyn; Porter, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) exhibit striking social behaviour that may be indicative of abnormally low social anxiety. The present research aimed to determine whether social anxiety is unusually low in WS and to replicate previous findings of increased generalised anxiety in WS using both parent and self report. Fifteen individuals with WS aged 12-28 years completed the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale (SCAS) and the Children’s Automatic Thoughts Scale (CATS). Their responses were ...

  7. The interplay between anxiety and social functioning in Williams syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Riby, D. M.; Hanley, M.; Kirk, H.; Clark, F.; Little, K.; Fleck, R; Janes, E.; Kelso, L.; O’Kane, F.; Cole-Fletcher, R.; Allday, M.H.; Hocking, D.; Cornish, K.; Rodgers, J

    2014-01-01

    The developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) has been associated with an atypical social profile of hyper-sociability and heightened social sensitivity across the developmental spectrum. In addition, previous research suggests that both children and adults with WS have a predisposition towards anxiety. The current research aimed to explore the profiles of social behaviour and anxiety across a broad age range of individuals with the disorder (n = 59, ages 6–36 years). We used insights fro...

  8. Adaptive behavior in Chinese children with Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Chai; Yao, Dan; Chen, Weijun; Li, Mingyan; Zhao, Zhengyan

    2014-01-01

    Background Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disease characterized by compelling psychological phenotypes. The symptoms span multiple cognitive domains and include a distinctive pattern of social behavior. The goal of this study was to explore adaptive behavior in WS patients in China. Methods We conducted a structured interview including the Infants-Junior Middle School Students Social-life Abilities Scale in three participant groups: children with WS (n = 26), normally-developi...

  9. Fissured and geographic tongue in Williams-Beuren syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Neeta Sharma; Reet Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS) is a rare, most often sporadic, genetic disease caused by a chromosomal microdeletion at locus 7q11.23 involving 28 genes. It is characterized by congenital heart defects, neonatal hypercalcemia, skeletal and renal abnormalities, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder, and dysmorphic facies. A number of clinical findings has been reported, but none of the studies evaluated this syndrome considering oral cavity. We here report a fissured and geographic t...

  10. Endocrine and neurophysiological examination of sleep disorders in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sniecinska, Anna Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background: A high rate of sleep disturbances have been reported in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), but the underlying aetiology has yet to be identified. Melatonin and cortisol levels are known to affect and regulate sleep/wake patterns. We investigated the changing levels of these hormones in order to explore any relationship with sleep disturbances in children with WS. Methods: Twenty seven children with WS and 27 typically developing (TD) children were recruited. Sleep was mon...

  11. The fusiform face area is enlarged in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Golarai, Golijeh; Hong, Sungjin; Haas, Brian W.; Galaburda, Albert M.; Mills, Debra L.; Bellugi, Ursula; Grill-Spector, Kalanit; Reiss, Allan L

    2010-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic condition characterized by atypical brain structure, cognitive deficits, and a life-long fascination with faces. Face recognition is relatively spared in WS, despite abnormalities in aspects of face processing, and structural alterations in the fusiform gyrus, part of the ventral visual stream. Thus, face recognition in WS may be subserved by abnormal neural substrates in the ventral stream. To test this hypothesis, we used functional magnetic resonance ima...

  12. Visually guided step descent in children with Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Cowie, Dorothy; Braddick, Oliver; Atkinson, Janette

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have impairments in visuospatial tasks and in manual visuomotor control, consistent with parietal and cerebellar abnormalities. Here we examined whether individuals with WS also have difficulties in visually controlling whole-body movements. We investigated visual control of stepping down at a change of level in children with WS (5–16-year-olds), who descended a single step while their movement was kinematically recorded. On each trial step height was s...

  13. Facilitating complex shape drawing in Williams syndrome and typical development

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, K. D.; Farran, E.K.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) produce drawings that are disorganised, likely due to an inability to replicate numerous spatial relations between parts. This study attempted to circumvent these drawing deficits in WS when copying complex combinations of one, two and three shapes. Drawing decisions were reduced by introducing a number of facilitators, for example, by using distinct colours and including facilitatory cues on the response sheet. Overall, facilitation improved drawing in...

  14. Phosphoserine phosphatase deficiency in a patient with Williams syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeken, J; Detheux, M; Fryns, J P; Collet, J.F.; Alliet, P; Van Schaftingen, E

    1997-01-01

    Decreased serine levels were found in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a boy with pre- and postnatal growth retardation, moderate psychomotor retardation, and facial dysmorphism suggestive of Williams syndrome. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation with an elastin gene probe indicated the presence of a submicroscopic 7q11.23 deletion, confirming this diagnosis. Further investigation showed that the phosphoserine phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.3.) activity in lymphoblasts and fibroblasts amounted t...

  15. Electrophysiological study of local/global processing in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Key, Alexandra P.F.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Persons with Williams syndrome (WS) demonstrate pronounced deficits in visuo-spatial processing. The purpose of the current study was to examine the preferred level of perceptual analysis in young adults with WS (n = 21) and the role of attention in the processing of hierarchical stimuli. Navon-like letter stimuli were presented to adults with WS and age-matched typical controls in an oddball paradigm where local and global targets could appear with equal probability. Participants received no...

  16. Sensory Modulation Impairments in Children with Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    John, Angela E.; Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to organize information detected by our senses (“sensory modulation”) allows us to act or respond effectively to situations encountered, facilitating learning, social behavior, and day to day functioning. We hypothesized that children with Williams syndrome (WS) would demonstrate symptoms of poor sensory modulation and that these sensory modulation abnormalities contribute to the phenotype. Participants were 78 children with WS aged 4.00 – 10.95 years. Based on parent ratings on t...

  17. Alterations in diffusion properties of white matter in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A; Dykens, Elisabeth M.; Anderson, Adam W.

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to investigate the involvement of brain white matter in Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder. Whole-brain DTIs were obtained from 16 young adults with WS and 16 normal controls. A voxel-based analysis was performed to compare fractional anisotropy (FA) values between the two groups. A tract-based analysis was also performed to compare FA values between the two groups along two major white matter tracts that pass through the exte...

  18. Language and Literacy Development of Children with Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2009-01-01

    Children with Williams syndrome, a rare neurodevelopmental disorder caused by deletion of ~25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23, evidence large individual differences in both broad language and reading abilities. Nevertheless, as a group, children with this syndrome show a consistent pattern characterized by relative strengths in concrete vocabulary and phonological processing (language skills strongly related to single-word reading) and relative weaknesses in relational concepts, receptive grammar...

  19. Object recognition in Williams syndrome: Uneven ventral stream activation

    OpenAIRE

    O’Hearn, Kirsten; Roth, Jennifer K; Courtney, Susan M.; Luna, Beatriz; Street, Whitney; Terwillinger, Robert; Landau, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder associated with severe visuospatial deficits, relatively strong language skills, heightened social interest, and increased attention to faces. On the basis of the visuospatial impairments, this disorder has been characterized primarily as a deficit of the dorsal stream, the occipitoparietal brain regions that subserve visuospatial processing. However, some evidence indicates that this disorder may also affect the development of the ventral stream, ...

  20. Cognitive and Behavioral Profile of Australian Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    M. A Martens; Reutens, D. C.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the cognitive and behavioral profile of 29 Australian individuals with Williams syndrome (mean age = 17 years, SD 7.3 years; range 8-41 years) and compared their results with that of 29 typical controls matched for age, sex, and handedness. We used a standardized effect measure, based on Cohen’s “d”, which indicated that the difference in the Full Scale IQ scores between the groups was approximately 5.5 standard deviations. The largest differences betwe...

  1. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome: A Longitudinal Examination

    OpenAIRE

    AngelaE.John

    2012-01-01

    Although prior research has indicated that pragmatics is an area of particular weakness for individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), the relations among different pragmatic abilities and the relations between pragmatic ability and expressive vocabulary ability have yet to be addressed. In addition, analyses of the relations between the same type of pragmatic ability over time have not been reported. The present study was designed to address these questions. We considered the pragmatic languag...

  2. Small Subitizing Range in People with Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    O'Hearn, Kirsten; Hoffman, James E.; Landau, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the rapid apprehension of small numbers of objects-- often called subitizing-- engages a system which allows representation of up to 4 objects but is distinct from other aspects of numerical processing. We examined subitizing by studying people with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic deficit characterized by severe visuospatial impairments, and normally developing children (4–6.5 years old). In Experiment 1, participants first explicitly counted displays of 1 to 8...

  3. Orientation perception in Williams Syndrome: discrimination and integration

    OpenAIRE

    Palomares, Melanie; Landau, Barbara; Egeth, Howard

    2009-01-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, which stems from a genetic deletion on chromosome 7 that causes a profound weakness in visuospatial cognition. Our current study explores how orientation perception may contribute to the visuospatial deficits in WS. In Experiment 1, we found that WS individuals and normal 3-4 year olds had similar orientation discrimination thresholds and had similar prevalence of mirror-reversal errors for diagonal targets (±45 deg). In Experiment...

  4. Williams-Beuren syndrome: Usual face, unusual heart

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo Lapunzina; Natalia Marin Huarte; Luis García-Guereta

    2013-01-01

    Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WB-S) occurs in approximately 1/7500 live births. It is characterized by typical facial features, congenital heart defects and mild mental retardation. Around 75% - 80% of all patients have some kind of cardiovascular disorder being supravalvular aortic stenosis and pulmonary artery stenosis the most frequent. This syndrome is due to a contiguous gene deletion (1- to 2-megabase deletion on the long arm of chromosome 7), including the entire elastin gene and 20 additi...

  5. MRI assessment of superior temporal gyrus in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sampaio, Adriana; Sousa, Nuno; Férnandez, Montse; Vasconcelos, Cristiana; Shenton, Martha E.; Gonçalves, Óscar F.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate volumes and asymmetry of superior temporal gyrus (STG) and correlate these measures with a neurocognitive evaluation of verbal performance in Williams syndrome (WS) and in a typically developing age-matched and sex-matched group. Background: Despite initial claims of language strength in WS, recent studies suggest delayed language milestones. The STG is implicated in linguistic processing and is a highly lateralized brain region. Method: Here, we examined...

  6. Symbolic numerical processing deficit in people with Williams syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Rousselle, Laurence; Noël, Marie-Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that people with Williams syndrome (WS) present specific deficit in processing numerical magnitudes (Krajcsi et al., 2009; O’Hearn et al., 2007; Paterson et al., 2006).As patients with WS were always tested in the visual modality, their deficit could either be specific to the processing of numerical magnitude or result from their basic visuo-spatial impairment (main characteristic of their cognitive phenotype). Supporting the second hypothesis, a first study showed that...

  7. Morphological differences in the mirror neuron system in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Rowena; Brown, Timothy T.; Erhart, Matthew; Järvinen, Anna M.; Korenberg, Julie R; Bellugi, Ursula; Halgren, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic condition characterized by an overly gregarious personality, including high empathetic concern for others. Although seemingly disparate from the profile of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), both are associated with deficits in social communication/cognition. Notably, the mirror neuron system (MNS) has been implicated in social dysfunction for ASD; yet, the integrity of this network and its association with social functioning in WS remains unknown. Magnetic re...

  8. Kaleidoscope of Vistas : Identity Destabilization in William S. Burroughs' Novels

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    William S. Burroughs’ work is generally regarded as narratives of opposition and revolt. However, in this thesis, I will examine how his socially deviant characters are not exempt from discourses that rely on binary hierarchies, and promote coherence. The dissemination of identity shows the limits of essentialist rhetoric, and the impossibility of pure self-representation. For Burroughs, the liability of our ability to create truths is the ignorance of its multiplicity and unavoidability. The...

  9. Profile: American Indian/Alaska Native

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native Profile: American Indian/Alaska Native Spotlight ACA Infographic for American Indians/ ... Program Circle of Life multimedia youth education program American Indian/Alaska Native Profile Great Plains Area Alaska Area ...

  10. Toxicity of Sediments and Pore-waters and their Potential Impact on Neosho Madtom, Noturus Placidus, in the Spring River System Affected by Historic Zinc-Lead Mining and Related Activities in Jasper and Newtown Counties, Missouri; and Cherokee County, Kan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Tri-State Mining District, comprising portions of Jasper and Newton Counties, Missouri; Cherokee County, Kansas; and Ottawa County, Oklahoma, was mined...

  11. Dreamers in dialogue: evolution, sex and gender in the utopian visions of William Morris and William Henry Hudson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Novák

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to explore the parallels between two late-nineteenth-century utopias,William Henry Hudsons A Crystal Age (1882 and William Morriss News from Nowhere (1891. Itaims to explore how these two works respond to the transition from a kinetic to a static conception ofutopia that under pressure from evolutionary and feminist discourses took place during the period.Particular focus lies on the way in which this is negotiated through the depiction of evolution, sexuality,and gender roles in the respective novels, and how the depiction of these disruptive elements may workas a means of ensuring the readers active engagement in political, intellectual and emotional terms.

  12. Indian Development vs Sino-Indian Relations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ A deep, lasting, great friendship can be traced back to over two millennia ago between two close neighbors, the initiators of the world-famous Five Principles of Peaceful Co-existence with its 50th anniversary just commemorated this year. Historically, China benefited much from learning the brilliant Indian culture. Today, the two major Asian countries are learning from each other in their rapid economic growth. The rise of China and India, closer ties between the two, will definitely exert a significant impact on the Asia-Pacific region and the broader world in the days ahead.

  13. Indian Ocean Traffic: Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola Sharon Davidson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Like the Mediterranean, the Indian Ocean has been a privileged site of cross-cultural contact since ancient times. In this special issue, our contributors track disparate movements of people and ideas around the Indian Ocean region and explore the cultural implications of these contacts and their role in processes that we would come to call transnationalization and globalisation. The nation is a relatively recent phenomenon anywhere on the globe, and in many countries around the Indian Ocean it was a product of colonisation and independence. So the processes of exchange, migration and cultural influence going on there for many centuries were mostly based on the economics of goods and trade routes, rather than on national identity and state policy.

  14. Autistic Disorder in Patients with Williams-Beuren Syndrome: A Reconsideration of the Williams-Beuren Syndrome Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Tordjman, Sylvie; Anderson, George M; Botbol, Michel; Toutain, Annick; Sarda, Pierre; Carlier, Michèle; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Baumann, Clarisse; Cohen, David; Lagneaux, Céline; Tabet, Anne-Claude; Verloes, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Background Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), a rare developmental disorder caused by deletion of contiguous genes at 7q11.23, has been characterized by strengths in socialization (overfriendliness) and communication (excessive talkativeness). WBS has been often considered as the polar opposite behavioral phenotype to autism. Our objective was to better understand the range of phenotypic expression in WBS and the relationship between WBS and autistic disorder. Methodology The study was conducted...

  15. Hamlin Garland and the Indian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Lonnie E.

    1974-01-01

    Written to stimulate interest in an evaluation of Hamlin Garland's total production of work on the American Indian, this article suggests a reevaluation of some of Garland's work in light of the current interest in American Indian studies. (JC)

  16. The Indian in American History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Virgil J.

    The treatment of American Indians is discussed historically with reference to the 4 principal methods used to create or perpetuate false impressions: obliteration, defamation, disembodiment, and disparagement. Indian contributions to American civilization are cited in contrast with historical references to Indians in textbooks. The author suggests…

  17. 78 FR 54670 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of extension of Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the Extension of the Class III gaming compact between the Yankton Sioux Tribe and the State of South Dakota. DATES:...

  18. 76 FR 49505 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact taking effect. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the Tribal-State... Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy and Economic Development, Washington, DC...

  19. 78 FR 17428 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of the Class III Tribal- State Gaming Compact between the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe and the State of...

  20. 77 FR 30550 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... of Approval in the Federal Register on February 23, 2010 (47 FR 44678). This agreement allows for the... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval by the...

  1. 77 FR 41200 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval by the Department of an extension to the Class III Gaming Compact between the State of California and the...

  2. 78 FR 62649 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact taking effect. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Class III Gaming... Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy and Economic Development, Washington, DC...

  3. 77 FR 5566 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact Taking Effect. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the Tribal-State... Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy and Economic Development, Washington, DC...

  4. 78 FR 62650 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of extension of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the extension of the Class III gaming compact between the Rosebud Sioux Tribe and the State of South Dakota. DATES:...

  5. 78 FR 78377 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ] ACTION: Notice of extension of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the extension of the Class III gaming compact between the Yankton Sioux Tribe and the State of South Dakota. DATES:...

  6. 78 FR 17427 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of the agreement between the Northern Cheyenne Tribe and the State of Montana concerning Class III Gaming (Compact)....

  7. 78 FR 54908 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of the Class III Tribal- State Gaming Compact between the Wiyot Tribe and the State of California. DATES:...

  8. 78 FR 33435 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Amendments. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of an Agreement to Amend the Class III Tribal-State Gaming Compact between the Salt River Pima- Maricopa...

  9. Title IV: Improving Indian Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Kipp A.

    The Indian Education Act of 1972, Title IV, has improved Native American education by emphasizing Native American control; it comes after 400 years of Euro-American involvement in Indian education during which assimilation was the primary goal. In 1568 Jesuit priests began "civilizing" and Christianizing the "savage" Indians; in 1794 the first…

  10. Constructing a geomechanical model of the Woodford Shale, Cherokee Platform, Oklahoma, USA effects of confining stress and rock strength on fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hair, Tyler J.

    A micro-indentation tool is used to estimate the strength of the Woodford Shale from whole core samples through the geometrical attributes (diameter and depth) of a 'dimple' produced by the tool on the rock's surface. The measured dimples are correlated graphically with the unconfined compressive strength and internal friction angle of the Woodford and integrated with contemporary stress data from earthquake focal mechanisms and mapped active faults. Right-lateral strike-slip motion on a deep, unnamed potential splay of the Wilzetta fault (Cherokee Platform, Lincoln County, Oklahoma) is representative of the contemporary stress state of the region. Vertical or near-vertical factures striking ˜ 030° from SHaz (˜ 077°) are the mechanical discontinuities most likely to be reactivated and allow fluids to flow along their surfaces. This reactivation will occur if the magnitude of pressure sources such as pore pressure or fluid pressure exceeds the reactivation pressure for that fracture surface.

  11. Modeling Soil Loss to Determine Water Erosion Risk at Camp Williams National Guard Base, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Bartsch, Kevin P.

    1998-01-01

    Soil erosion was assessed at Camp Williams National Guard Base by creating an erosion risk classification map and comparing the erosion impact of disturbance regimes on different hillslopes. Soil erosion does not appear to be a problem for most of Camp Williams. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation was applied using GIS to create a soil erosion risk map for the entire Camp Williams facility. The map indicated where problem areas occurred and showed relative erosion risk, but its lack o...

  12. Using novel control groups to dissect the amygdala’s role in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Avery, Suzanne N; Blackford, Jennifer Urbano

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder with an intriguing behavioral phenotype—hypersociability combined with significant non-social fears. Previous studies have demonstrated abnormalities in amygdala function in individuals with Williams syndrome compared to typically-developing controls. However, it remains unclear whether the findings are related to the atypical neurodevelopment of Williams syndrome, or are also associated with behavioral traits at the extreme end of a normal c...

  13. American Indian Authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momaday, Natachee Scott

    Twenty-six selections by 15 contemporary American Indian authors are given in this book. The selections--legends, ceremonial chants and prayers, poems, and stories--are accompanied by topics for discussion. Some of the selections deal with the supernatural, and some tell an actual story about the author. Pictures and short biographies of each…

  14. Indian Astronomy: History of

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, R.; Murdin, P.

    2002-01-01

    From the time of A macronryabhat under dota (ca AD 500) there appeared in India a series of Sanskrit treatises on astronomy. Written always in verse, and normally accompanied by prose commentaries, these served to create an Indian tradition of mathematical astronomy which continued into the 18th century. There are as well texts from earlier centuries, grouped under the name Jyotishaveda macronn d...

  15. Caregiving in Indian Country

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-12-23

    This podcast discusses the role of caregivers in Indian County and the importance of protecting their health. It is primarily targeted to public health and aging services professionals.  Created: 12/23/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/23/2009.

  16. Native Indian Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, Felicity

    1988-01-01

    Identifies valued qualities and behaviors of Indian leaders through a literature review and unstructured interviews with three British Columbian tribal elders. Develops a model of Native leadership emphasizing connection to the people, wisdom, humility, personal integrity, service orientation, and the facilitator role. Contains 22 references. (SV)

  17. American Indian Recipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.

    Presenting some 60 to 70 Native American recipes, this document includes a brief introduction and a suggested reading list (15 citations related to American Indian foods). The introduction identifies five regional Native American cuisines as follows: in the Southwest, peppers and beans were made into chili, soups, guacamole, and barbecue sauces by…

  18. Indian School Days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Basil H.

    This autobiography relates the experiences of a young Ojibway boy who was taken from his family in 1939 at age 10 and placed in a Jesuit boarding school in northern Ontario, Canada. St. Peter Claver (later Garnier) or "Spanish," as the Indian school was known, was home to approximately 135 boys. Most of the students, who ranged in age from 4 to…

  19. Radiocarbon and Indian archaeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing use of radiocarbon (C14) dating techniques in Indian archaeology has been described in detail. Work done in Microlithic cultures, Neolithic period, Indus civilization and Iron age cultures have been reported. C14 dates of various archaeological sites are listed. (K.B.)

  20. Sex differences in HDL ApoC-III in American Indian youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackett Piers R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since American Indians are predisposed to type 2 diabetes (DM2 and associated cardiovascular risk, Cherokee boys and girls (n = 917 were studied to determine whether BMI Z (body mass index Z score is associated with the apoC-III (apolipoprotein C-III content of HDL (high density lipoprotein, a previously reported predictor of DM2. Methods An ad hoc cross-sectional analysis was conducted on a previously studied cohort. Participants were grouped by gender-specific age groups (5 to 9, 10 to 14 and 15 to 19 years. ApoA-I (apolipoprotein A-I and HDL apoC-III were assayed by electroimmunoassay. ApoC-III was measured in whole plasma, and in HDL to determine the molar proportion to apoA-I. General linear models were used to assess association. Results The HDL apoC-III to apoA-I molar ratio increased by BMI Z quartile in girls aged 10–14 years (p  Conclusions ApoC-III showed an obesity-related increase relative to apoA-I during adolescence beginning in girls aged 10 to 14 years and in boys aged 15 to 19 years. The earlier changes in girls may alter HDL’s protective properties on the β-cell and contribute to their increased risk for DM2.

  1. THE SYNTACTICAL ABILITY OF A YOUNG GIRL WITH WILLIAMS SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    ARAPOVIKJ Diana; Vishnja PRANJIKJ

    2015-01-01

    This research was carried out on a young girl with Williams syndrome, whose syntactical ability was tested longitudinally over a period of 22 months, from age 9 years and 3 months to 11 years and 1 month. The assumption was that the girl with Wil­liams syndrome would have poorer syntactical ability than children with regular development, but similar to children with specific language impair­ment (SLI) and that in all tasks she would achieve better results in the final testing. Syntax was ana­...

  2. Seguridad social, empleo y propiedad privada en William Beveridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Llanos Reyes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to approach the economic and political notions of William Beveridge, which proposed the construction of the British Welfare State immediately after WWII. A form of State which sought to overcome the crisis of capitalism by proposing control over the system. We attempt to demonstrate the relation that should exist, according to Beveridge, the "father" of this model of capitalist State, between the development of a social security system, employment, and the situation of private property, while simultaneously pointing out the specifics and complexity of his ideas in the relation observed between full occupation and private property as basic elements for the construction of a Social Security system.

  3. Experiencia y verdad: lectura sartreana de William James

    OpenAIRE

    Di Berardino, María Aurelia; Vidal, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    En Verdad y Existencia, obra editada póstumamente, Jean-Paul Sartre desafía la tesis heideggeriana de la verdad como esencia a partir de la lectura crítica de la noción de verdad desarrollada por el pragmatista William James. Desafío que entre otras cosas, se resume en la consideración de la verdad como existencia y cuyo marco general está constituido por la acción: operación necesaria para dotar de sentido o simplemente, para comprender. De modo tal que esta primera aproximación nos muestr...

  4. Differential Equations Related to the Williams-Bjerknes Tumour Model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F Martinez; A R Villena

    2000-08-01

    We investigate an initial value problem which is closely related to the Williams-Bjerknes tumour model for a cancer which spreads through an epithelial basal layer modeled on ⊂ 2. The solution of this problem is a family =(()), where each () could be considered as an approximation to the probability that the cell situated at is cancerous at time . We prove that this problem has a unique solution, it is defined on [0, + ∞], and, for some relevant situations, lim → ∞ ()=1 for all ∈ . Moreover, we study the expected number of cancerous cells at time .

  5. Neurobiology of social behavior abnormalities in autism and Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Boaz; Feng, Guoping

    2016-04-26

    Social behavior is a basic behavior mediated by multiple brain regions and neural circuits, and is crucial for the survival and development of animals and humans. Two neuropsychiatric disorders that have prominent social behavior abnormalities are autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which is characterized mainly by hyposociability, and Williams syndrome (WS), whose subjects exhibit hypersociability. Here we review the unique properties of social behavior in ASD and WS, and discuss the major theories in social behavior in the context of these disorders. We conclude with a discussion of the research questions needing further exploration to enhance our understanding of social behavior abnormalities. PMID:27116389

  6. Pulmonary Arterial Stent Implantation in an Adult with Williams Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a 38-year-old patient who presented with pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular dysfunction due to pulmonary artery stenoses as a manifestation of Williams syndrome, mimicking chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The patient was treated with balloon angioplasty and stent implantation. Short-term follow-up showed a good clinical result with excellent patency of the stents but early restenosis of the segments in which only balloon angioplasty was performed. These stenoses were subsequently also treated successfully by stent implantation. Stent patency was observed 3 years after the first procedure

  7. Williams-Campbell syndrome presenting in an adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Quentin Christopher; Wathen, Christopher G

    2012-01-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with a 4-year history of productive cough, shortness of breath and wheeze. He had been treated for asthma and given several courses of antibiotics which improved his symptoms. Medical history was unremarkable. There was no history respiratory disease in childhood although he was prone to chest infections in adult life. A high-resolution chest CT showed marked proximal cystic bronchiectasis associated with collapse of distal bronchi on expiration. A diagnosis of cystic bronchiectasis due to undiagnosed adult Williams-Campbell syndrome was made on the basis of these characteristic radiological features and the exclusion of other possible causes. PMID:22989422

  8. Mutational Mechanisms of Williams-Beuren Syndrome Deletions

    OpenAIRE

    Bayés, Mònica; Magano, Luis F.; Rivera, Núria; Flores, Raquel; A. Pérez Jurado, Luis

    2003-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a segmental aneusomy syndrome that results from a heterozygous deletion of contiguous genes at 7q11.23. Three large region-specific low-copy repeat elements (LCRs), composed of different blocks (A, B, and C), flank the WBS deletion interval and are thought to predispose to misalignment and unequal crossing-over, causing the deletions. In this study, we have determined the exact deletion size and LCR copy number in 74 patients with WBS, as well as precisely de...

  9. Reasoning About Trust Among Individuals With Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Rowena; Fillet, Patricia; DeWitt, Michelle; Heyman, Gail D; Bellugi, Ursula

    2015-11-01

    The present study examines whether individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) might indiscriminately trust in others, as is suggested by their strong tendency to approach and interact with strangers. To assess this possibility, adults with WS (N=22) and typical development (N=25) were asked to reason about the trustworthiness of people who lie to avoid getting in trouble versus to avoid hurting others' feelings. Findings indicated that participants with WS distrusted both types of liars and made little distinction between them. These results suggest that the high level of social approach behavior in individuals with WS cannot be explained in terms of indiscriminate trust. PMID:26505873

  10. The genomic basis of the Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Schubert, C

    2009-01-01

    The Williams-Beuren syndrome is a genomic disorder (prevalence: 1/7,500 to 1/20,000), caused by a hemizygous contiguous gene deletion on chromosome 7q11.23. Typical symptoms comprise supravalvular aortic stenosis, mental retardation, overfriendliness and visuospatial impairment. The common deletion sizes range of 1.5-1.8 mega base pairs (Mb), encompassing app. 28 genes. For a few genes, a genotype-phenotype correlation has been established. The best-explored gene within this region is the ela...

  11. From Forger to Author: William Henry Ireland's Shakespeare Papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ridpath

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available It took over one hundred years for William Shakespeare to gain the literary pre-eminence familiar to contemporary readers. A renewed interest in the author’s work during the eighteenth century was marked by theatrical revivals, new editions of the plays and renowned Shakespearean performances by famed actor David Garrick. But with this resurgence in popularity, some readers began to call attention to perceived gaps in the bard’s biography. In the mid- 1790s, these gaps were briefly filled with ‘newly discovered’ letters, deeds and occasional poetry, exhibited to the public and finally published in 1796. Forged by William Henry Ireland, these documents refashioned Shakespeare to the tastes of his age. The forger went on to make larger creative impositions upon the life and work of the dramatist, writing himself into the playwright’s life and adapting his plays to meet eighteenth-century standards of decorum. And by the 1790s, literary forgery itself ‘bordered on a literary genre with its own kinds of rules and aspirations’. Enthralled by the notoriety of other literary forgers, Ireland created his own literature under a Shakespearean guise. Whilst his forgeries were quickly exposed, they ultimately served Ireland in establishing a literary identity of his own.

  12. Pre-spill shoreline mapping in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A long-term shoreline mapping program has been initiated in Prince William Sound, Alaska, to generate pre-spill data to assist in the planning activities for oil spill response in the area. Low-altitude aerial videotape surveys and video images form the basis for the mapping effort. The coast was initially divided into alongshore segments. The physical shore-zone is relatively homogeneous within each segment. A pre-spill Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Team (SCAT) database, using the ShoreData software, was created based on this initial detailed mapping. The SCAT field teams are therefore equipped with a detailed analysis of the shore-zone character. The same information was also used to develop a separate database for use by planning and response operations groups. The data is entered into the Graphical Resource Database (GRD), and a Geographic Information System (GIS). A simplified characterization of the primary features of each segment is then made available through interpretation of the data. In the event of an oil spill, the SCAT data in the ShoreData files can be combined with field data on shoreline oiling conditions using a second software package called ShoreAccessR which provides summaries of the main parameters required by the planning group. It can also be used as a data storage and management tool. As part of this program, more than 1700 kilometres of shoreline in Prince William Sound have already been mapped. 24 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs

  13. William Osler and Seymour Thomas, "the boy artist of Texas".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Charles S

    2016-07-01

    Critics consider the 1908-1909 portrait of William Osler by S. Seymour Thomas the best of six oil-on-canvas portraits of Osler done from life, including those by the more acclaimed US artists John Singer Sargent and William Merritt Chase. Osler called it "the best pictorial diagnosis I have ever seen" and told Thomas "I am at your service." A reappraisal of Seymour Thomas explains why his portrait makes us feel much as the artist did in Osler's presence, which is the original English-language definition of "empathy." Thomas told his subject that "I feel that you can look clear through me and see the wall on the other side." The intensity of Osler's gaze affects us similarly. The portrait satisfied Osler, but his wife, Grace Revere Osler, never warmed to it, perhaps because it depicts so clearly a highly focused, agenda-driven man. Helen Thomas used the portrait to promote her husband's business, and, after a tortuous history, the portrait eventually returned to Oxford University, where it now hangs inconspicuously in the Radcliffe Science Library. PMID:27365894

  14. Indian scales and inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, S

    2010-01-01

    This conceptual, perspective and review paper on Indian scales and inventories begins with clarification on the historical and contemporary meanings of psychometry before linking itself to the burgeoning field of clinimetrics in their applications to the practice of clinical psychology and psychiatry. Clinimetrics is explained as a changing paradigm in the design, administration, and interpretation of quantitative tests, techniques or procedures applied to measurement of clinical variables, traits and processes. As an illustrative sample, this article assembles a bibliographic survey of about 105 out of 2582 research papers (4.07%) scanned through 51 back dated volumes covering 185 issues related to clinimetry as reviewed across a span of over fifty years (1958-2009) in the Indian Journal of Psychiatry. A content analysis of the contributions across distinct categories of mental measurements is explained before linkages are proposed for future directions along these lines. PMID:21836709

  15. Indian President visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    On 1 October, her Excellency Mrs Pratibha Devisingh Patil, President of India, picked CERN as the first stop on her official state visit to Switzerland. Accompanied by a host of Indian journalists, a security team, and a group of presidential delegates, the president left quite an impression when she visited CERN’s Point 2!   Upon arrival, Pratibha Patil was greeted by CERN Director General Rolf Heuer, as well as senior Indian scientists working at CERN, and various department directors. After a quick overview of the Organization, Rolf Heuer and the President addressed India’s future collaboration with CERN. India is currently an Observer State of the Organization, and is considering becoming an Associate Member State. A short stop in LHC operations gave Steve Myers and the Accelerator team the opportunity to take the President on a tour through the LHC tunnel. From there, ALICE’s Tapan Nayak and Spokesperson Paolo Giubellino took Pratibha Patil to the experiment&am...

  16. Indian scales and inventories

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesan, S.

    2010-01-01

    This conceptual, perspective and review paper on Indian scales and inventories begins with clarification on the historical and contemporary meanings of psychometry before linking itself to the burgeoning field of clinimetrics in their applications to the practice of clinical psychology and psychiatry. Clinimetrics is explained as a changing paradigm in the design, administration, and interpretation of quantitative tests, techniques or procedures applied to measurement of clinical variables, t...

  17. Facial melanoses: Indian perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Neena Khanna; Seemab Rasool

    2011-01-01

    Facial melanoses (FM) are a common presentation in Indian patients, causing cosmetic disfigurement with considerable psychological impact. Some of the well defined causes of FM include melasma, Riehl′s melanosis, Lichen planus pigmentosus, erythema dyschromicum perstans (EDP), erythrosis, and poikiloderma of Civatte. But there is considerable overlap in features amongst the clinical entities. Etiology in most of the causes is unknown, but some factors such as UV radiation in melasma, exposure...

  18. Historicizing Indian psychiatry

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, Amit Ranjan

    2005-01-01

    Our historical endeavour to map Indian psychiatry has largely remained linear, positivistic and evolutionary. Whether it starts from the ancient times or modern, it shows our past as a tale of victory for the western science, without questioning the borrowed paradigm. The use of historical methods for serious enquiry of psychiatry has been ignored. Emergence of a new genre of historicism that is critical of both colonialism and psychiatry as a universal science, has raised hopes to critically...

  19. AN INDIAN ENTREPRENEUR ESTABLISHING

    OpenAIRE

    Vaghela, Amit; Wang, Xiaoran

    2008-01-01

    Title: An Indian Entrepreneur Establishing Business in Europe Course: Master Thesis EFO705 in International Business and Entrepreneurship, Swedish credit points (15 ECTS) Authors: Xiaoran Wang and Amit Vaghela Tutor: Leif Linnskog Problem: How did Mr. Deepak Soni establish and develop his company Anora Pvt Ltd in Poland, a company operating in the branch of textile and clothing? From this research problem, the dissertation will be focused on the internationalization. Purpose: The aim of thesi...

  20. Indian cosmogonies and cosmologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajin Dušan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Various ideas on how the universe appeared and develops, were in Indian tradition related to mythic, religious, or philosophical ideas and contexts, and developed during some 3.000 years - from the time of Vedas, to Puranas. Conserning its appeareance, two main ideas were presented. In one concept it appeared out of itself (auto-generated, and gods were among the first to appear in the cosmic sequences. In the other, it was a kind of divine creation, with hard work (like the dismembering of the primal Purusha, or as emanation of divine dance. Indian tradition had also various critiques of mythic and religious concepts (from the 8th c. BC, to the 6c., who favoured naturalistic and materialistic explanations, and concepts, in their cosmogony and cosmology. One the peculiarities was that indian cosmogony and cosmology includes great time spans, since they used a digit system which was later (in the 13th c. introduced to Europe by Fibonacci (Leonardo of Pisa, 1170-1240.

  1. Will the "Real" Indians Please Stand Up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pewewardy, Cornel

    1998-01-01

    Explores what it means to be an American Indian in an era in which nearly half of the identifiable Indians live off the reservations and in urban areas. As the principal definition of "Indian-ness" today, the issue of blood quantum leads to misunderstandings. Being an Indian, to the author, is being a person connected to a tribe. (SLD)

  2. BIA Indian Lands Dataset (Indian Lands of the United States)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Geographic Data Committee — The American Indian Reservations / Federally Recognized Tribal Entities dataset depicts feature location, selected demographics and other associated data for the...

  3. 33 CFR 164.43 - Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound. 164.43 Section 164.43 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment—Prince William Sound. (a) Until December 31, 2004,...

  4. Buchmann-Williams Authenticated Key Agreement Protocol With Pre-shared Password

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soufiane Mezroui

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on Buchmann-Williams key exchange protocol, a Buchmann-Williams Authenticated Key Agreement (BWAKA protocol with pre-shared password is proposed. Its security relies on the Discrete Logarithm Problem over class groups of number fields. It provides identity authentication, perfect forward secrecy and key validation.

  5. 33 CFR 167.1703 - In Prince William Sound: Valdez Arm Traffic Separation Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In Prince William Sound: Valdez Arm Traffic Separation Scheme. 167.1703 Section 167.1703 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... William Sound: Valdez Arm Traffic Separation Scheme. The Valdez Arm Traffic Separation Scheme consists...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 425 - Modified Monier-Williams Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified Monier-Williams Method B Appendix B to Part 425 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Pt. 425, App. B Appendix B to Part 425—Modified Monier-Williams...

  7. Jane Ann Williams named director of education and training for multicultural affairs

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Sally L.

    2005-01-01

    Jane Ann Williams, former director of professional programs at Mercer University, has been named director of education and training for multicultural affairs at Virginia Tech. In this capacity, Williams will provide ongoing leadership and management of the diversity-related educational and training programs for the university community.

  8. Comprehension of Spatial Language in Williams Syndrome: Evidence for Impaired Spatial Representation of Verbal Descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Emma; Jarrold, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Individuals with the rare genetic disorder, Williams syndrome, have an unusual cognitive profile with relatively good language abilities but poor non-verbal and spatial skills. This study explored the interaction between linguistic and spatial functioning in Williams syndrome by investigating individuals' comprehension of spatial language. A group…

  9. Music and Anxiety in Williams Syndrome: A Harmonious or Discordant Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykens, Elisabeth M.; Rosner, Beth A.; Ly, Tran; Sagun, Jaclyn

    2005-01-01

    In this two-part study, we assessed musical involvements in two samples of persons with Williams syndrome compared to others with mental retardation and also related musicality to anxiety and fears in Study 2. Relative to others with mental retardation, those with Williams syndrome were more likely to take music lessons, play an instrument, and…

  10. Brief Report: Developing Spatial Frequency Biases for Face Recognition in Autism and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Hayley C.; Annaz, Dagmara; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Johnson, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated whether contrasting face recognition abilities in autism and Williams syndrome could be explained by different spatial frequency biases over developmental time. Typically-developing children and groups with Williams syndrome and autism were asked to recognise faces in which low, middle and high spatial frequency…

  11. Auditory Attraction: Activation of Visual Cortex by Music and Sound in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Cannistraci, Christopher J.; Anderson, Adam W.; Kim, Chai-Youn; Eapen, Mariam; Gore, John C.; Blake, Randolph; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder with a distinctive phenotype, including cognitive-linguistic features, nonsocial anxiety, and a strong attraction to music. We performed functional MRI studies examining brain responses to musical and other types of auditory stimuli in young adults with Williams syndrome and typically…

  12. Anxiety and Repetitive Behaviours in Autism Spectrum Disorders and Williams Syndrome: A Cross-Syndrome Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Jacqui; Riby, Deborah M.; Janes, Emily; Connolly, Brenda; McConachie, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder or Williams syndrome are vulnerable to anxiety. The factors that contribute to this risk remain unclear. This study compared anxiety in autism spectrum disorder and Williams Syndrome and examined the relationship between repetitive behaviours and anxiety. Thirty-four children with autism and twenty children…

  13. Repetition Priming in Adults with Williams Syndrome: Age-Related Dissociation between Implicit and Explicit Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J.; Kittler, Phyllis; Brown, W. Ted; Jenkins, Edmund C.; Devenny, Darlynne A.

    2005-01-01

    We examined implicit and explicit memory in adults with Williams syndrome. An age-related dissociation was found; repetition priming (reflecting implicit memory) did not show change with age, but free recall (reflecting explicit memory) was markedly reduced. We also compared the performance of adults with Williams syndrome to adults with Down…

  14. 76 FR 33314 - Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and Urban Indian Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and... American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and Urban Indian Communities Announcement Type: New. Funding... Centers serving American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) Tribes and urban Indian communities. This program...

  15. Diverticulite em adolescente com Síndrome de Williams: relato de caso Diverticulitis in adolescent with Williams Syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josemberg Marins Campos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A Síndrome de Williams é uma doença genética rara, atribuída a deleção do gene da elastina no cromossomo 7. É caracterizada por estenose de aorta, divertículos de bexiga, constipação, retardo mental leve, fácies dismórfica, fraqueza da parede da bexiga e do cólon que levam ao surgimento de divertículos. Relata-se um caso de diverticulite aguda em paciente de 18 anos, o resultado do tratamento clínico durante 5 anos e o diagnóstico diferencial de abdome agudo nesta doença. A indicação de colectomia eletiva é discutida, considerando o pouco conhecimento da história natural da diverticulite nesta síndrome.The Syndrome of Williams is a rare genetic illness, attributed the deletion of the gene of the elastin in chromosome 7. It is characterized by aortic stenosis, bladder diverticula's, constipation, light mental retardation, dysmorphic facies, weakness of the wall of the bladder and colon that they lead to the sprouting of diverticula. A case of acute diverticulitis in patient of 18 years is told, the result of the clinical treatment during 5 years and the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen in this illness. The indication of elective colectomy is argued, considering the unfamiliarity of the natural history of the diverticulitis in the syndrome.

  16. Performing Indian Dance in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Thiagarajan, Premalatha

    2012-01-01

    "Performing Indian Dance" is an interdisciplinary project that reveals the dynamics of ethnicity, gender, and sexuality in Malaysian Indian dance. I demonstrate that the emergence of prominent multi-ethnic male dancers in Malaysia is enabled by a unique configuration of "bumiputera" ("son of soil") ethnic-based state discourse, cosmopolitanism (ability to move fluently across multiple spaces), Indian dance institutional structures, global capitalism, and gender mobility, which simultaneously ...

  17. Indians Repulse British With Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    During the early introduction of rockets to Europe, they were used only as weapons. Enemy troops in India repulsed the British with rockets. Later, in Britain, Sir William Congreve developed a rocket that could fire to about 9,000 feet. The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812.

  18. Physiological Studies on the Marketability of Williams Banana Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Tourky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of postharvest treatments with hot water (HW, gibberellic acid (GA3, salicylic acid (SA and potassium permanganate (KMnO4 on enhancing or delaying the ripening quality aspect of mature Williams banana fruits were investigated. Untreated and treated fruit had a normal ripening process and similar good freshness at the ripening time (45 days at ambient temperature. This clearly that the used these materials were relatively in delaying ripening and as, can be arrange the appearance of banana fruits in the market with good quality. Such, color development, peeling condition, loss of firmness, increase of pulp/peel ratio, soluble solids content, titratable acidity, pH, total sugar and total starch were used as a good criterion of assessment the banana fruit ripening.

  19. Phenomenology of certainty and belief. Reading William James

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Stara

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay studies the analysis that the psychologist and philosopher WilliamJames applies to the function of belief in relation to his concepts of the stream ofthought and process of knowledge. Furthermore, it pays attention to James’s phenomenologyof certainty within experience and to the explanation of the foundationalplace of feelings in experience. In James’s thought we may call certainty onlywhat can provide a knowledge which stands in immediate relation to the innerstate: the images provided by individual depths are both the locus of perplexityand the spring of certainty. The truth of beliefs is in this sense provisional uponthe outcome of the continuing experience of understanding and of the continuingprocess of critical scrutiny.

  20. Beat Perception and Sociability: Evidence from Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D; Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Beat perception in music has been proposed to be a human universal that may have its origins in adaptive processes involving temporal entrainment such as social communication and interaction. We examined beat perception skills in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder. Musical interest and hypersociability are two prominent aspects of the WS phenotype although actual musical and social skills are variable. On a group level, beat and meter perception skills were poorer in WS than in age-matched peers though there was significant individual variability. Cognitive ability, sound processing style, and musical training predicted beat and meter perception performance in WS. Moreover, we found significant relationships between beat and meter perception and adaptive communication and socialization skills in WS. Results have implications for understanding the role of predictive timing in both music and social interactions in the general population, and suggest music as a promising avenue for addressing social communication difficulties in WS. PMID:27378982

  1. Lord Byron's physician: John William Polidori on somnambulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Stanley; Stiles, Anne

    2013-01-01

    John William Polidori (1795-1821) was the Edinburgh-trained physician hired by Lord Byron to accompany him to Switzerland, where he participated in the story-telling event proposed by Byron that led, with Polidori's help, to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Although those interested in English literature might also remember Polidori as the author of The Vampyre, one of the first extended works of fiction about vampires, his earlier interest in somnambulism and trance states is only beginning to be appreciated. Even more than students of Romantic literature, historians of science and medicine seem little aware of what Polidori had written about oneirodynia, a synonym for somnambulism, and how his thoughts from 1815 about such activities reflected the changing medical zeitgeist at this time. This chapter examines Polidori's medical thesis in a neuroscience context and compares what he wrote to the writings of several other physicians who were fascinated by nocturnal wanderings, their causes, their manifestations, and their possible treatments. PMID:24290263

  2. Syntax in Spanish-speaking children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Burraco, Antonio; Garayzábal, Elena; Cuetos, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The syntactic skills of Spanish-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS) were assessed in different areas (phrase structure, recursion, and bound anaphora). Children were compared to typically-developing peers matched either in chronological age (CA-TD) or in verbal age (VA-TD). In all tasks children with WS performed significantly worse than CA-TD children, but similarly to VA-TD children. However, significant differences were observed in specific domains, particularly regarding sentences with cross-serial dependencies. At the same time, children with WS were less sensitive to syntactic constraints and exhibited a poorer knowledge of some functional words (specifically, of nonreflexive pronouns). A processing bottleneck or a computational constraint may account for this outcome. PMID:26967348

  3. Ariel Williams, el escriturador magnánimo

    OpenAIRE

    Domine, Marcela

    2015-01-01

    Este artículo propone una lectura crítica de la producción de Ariel Williams, escritor patagónico contemporáneo. Reflexiona sobre el trabajo con el lenguaje presente en sus textos, y la creación de una lengua literaria propia. Se detiene en una nueva relación con los géneros que implica un vínculo entre géneros discursivos y literarios y la teoría de géneros, ya que rompe las referencias genéricas de la lengua para la representación de lo femenino y masculino. Finalmente analiza una represent...

  4. Eutrophication analysis of embayments in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fertilizers were used in the summer of 1989 to accelerate bacterial growth in a bioremediation effort to clean up the beaches following the EXXON Valdez oil spill. Mathematical models were used to quantify the eutrophication potential in two selected embayments in Prince William Sound: Passage Cove and Snug Harbor. First, mass transport in these two embayments was determined. Next, eutrophication models were developed for these two embayments to simulate the seasonal algal concentrations prior to fertilizer application. Finally, a series of nutrient-loading scenarios based on different fertilizer and other chemical application rates were developed to investigate the impact. Model results and the data available indicated that the rapid exchange between embayments and the open water limits algal growth and buildup of concentrations of other chemicals applied to beaches. The exception is the potential for some ammonia toxicity at high application rates. Despite the limited data available it is clear that no significant increased algal growth would be expected following fertilizer application

  5. Beat Perception and Sociability: Evidence from Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Beat perception in music has been proposed to be a human universal that may have its origins in adaptive processes involving temporal entrainment such as social communication and interaction. We examined beat perception skills in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder. Musical interest and hypersociability are two prominent aspects of the WS phenotype although actual musical and social skills are variable. On a group level, beat and meter perception skills were poorer in WS than in age-matched peers though there was significant individual variability. Cognitive ability, sound processing style, and musical training predicted beat and meter perception performance in WS. Moreover, we found significant relationships between beat and meter perception and adaptive communication and socialization skills in WS. Results have implications for understanding the role of predictive timing in both music and social interactions in the general population, and suggest music as a promising avenue for addressing social communication difficulties in WS. PMID:27378982

  6. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  7. Demonstrating the Alaska Ocean Observing System in Prince William Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, G. Carl; McCammon, Molly

    2013-07-01

    The Alaska Ocean Observing System and the Oil Spill Recovery Institute developed a demonstration project over a 5 year period in Prince William Sound. The primary goal was to develop a quasi-operational system that delivers weather and ocean information in near real time to diverse user communities. This observing system now consists of atmospheric and oceanic sensors, and a new generation of computer models to numerically simulate and forecast weather, waves, and ocean circulation. A state of the art data management system provides access to these products from one internet portal at http://www.aoos.org. The project culminated in a 2009 field experiment that evaluated the observing system and performance of the model forecasts. Observations from terrestrial weather stations and weather buoys validated atmospheric circulation forecasts. Observations from wave gages on weather buoys validated forecasts of significant wave heights and periods. There was an emphasis on validation of surface currents forecasted by the ocean circulation model for oil spill response and search and rescue applications. During the 18 day field experiment a radar array mapped surface currents and drifting buoys were deployed. Hydrographic profiles at fixed stations, and by autonomous vehicles along transects, were made to acquire measurements through the water column. Terrestrial weather stations were the most reliable and least costly to operate, and in situ ocean sensors were more costly and considerably less reliable. The radar surface current mappers were the least reliable and most costly but provided the assimilation and validation data that most improved ocean circulation forecasts. We describe the setting of Prince William Sound and the various observational platforms and forecast models of the observing system, and discuss recommendations for future development.

  8. Language and Williams syndrome: how intact is "intact"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmiloff-Smith, A; Grant, J; Berthoud, I; Davies, M; Howlin, P; Udwin, O

    1997-04-01

    It has been claimed that Williams syndrome (WS), a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, is characterized by serious cognitive deficits alongside intact language. The syndrome is often used as a prime example of the modularity of an innate faculty for morphosyntactic rules. We challenge this claim and hypothesize that morphosyntax, although surprisingly good given WS level of mental retardation, is by no means intact. We make an initial test of this hypothesis through an analysis of the receptive language of a group of English-speaking WS individuals on a standardized morphosyntactic test. We then present an experimental study of expressive language that examines grammatical gender assignment in French-speaking WS patients. Despite a Verbal Mental Age selected to be higher than the chronological age of the young control group, these people with WS continue even in adulthood to show clear-cut deficits in their production of an aspect of morphosyntax that normal children acquire effortlessly very early. The results of the 2 studies, one focusing on receptive language and the other on expressive language, challenge the notion that comprehension and use of morphosyntactic rules in WS individuals are intact. The Within-domain dissociations regarding the use of grammatical gender assignment across several sentence clements and their difficulties in understanding embedded sentences-two quintessentially linguistic skills-suggest that we must rethink the notion of spared, modular, language capacities in Williams syndrome. We conclude that WS language follows a different path to normal acquisition and may turn out to be more like second language learning. PMID:9180000

  9. Zika virus: Indian perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourya, Devendra T.; Shil, Pratip; Sapkal, Gajanan N.; Yadav, Pragya D.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Zika virus (ZiV), a mosquito borne Flavivirus like dengue (DEN) and chikungunya (CHIK), in Brazil in 2014 and its spread to various countries have led to a global health emergency. Aedes aegypti is the major vector for ZiV. Fast dissemination of this virus in different geographical areas posses a major threat especially to regions where the population lacks herd immunity against the ZiV and there is abundance of Aedes mosquitoes. In this review, we focus on current global scenario, epidemiology, biology, diagnostic challenges and remedial measures for ZiVconsidering the Indian perspective. PMID:27487998

  10. Zika virus: Indian perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourya, Devendra T; Shil, Pratip; Sapkal, Gajanan N; Yadav, Pragya D

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of Zika virus (ZiV), a mosquito borne Flavivirus like dengue (DEN) and chikungunya (CHIK), in Brazil in 2014 and its spread to various countries have led to a global health emergency. Aedes aegypti is the major vector for ZiV. Fast dissemination of this virus in different geographical areas posses a major threat especially to regions where the population lacks herd immunity against the ZiV and there is abundance of Aedes mosquitoes. In this review, we focus on current global scenario, epidemiology, biology, diagnostic challenges and remedial measures for ZiVconsidering the Indian perspective. PMID:27487998

  11. Historicizing Indian psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Amit Ranjan

    2005-04-01

    Our historical endeavour to map Indian psychiatry has largely remained linear, positivistic and evolutionary. Whether it starts from the ancient times or modern, it shows our past as a tale of victory for the western science, without questioning the borrowed paradigm. The use of historical methods for serious enquiry of psychiatry has been ignored. Emergence of a new genre of historicism that is critical of both colonialism and psychiatry as a universal science, has raised hopes to critically review the emergence of psychiatric knowledge. PMID:20711299

  12. Piracy and Indian Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Edward A. Edward A. Alpers

    2011-01-01

    The current maritime crisis being caused by Somali piracy may be of recent origin, but the phenomenon of piracy in the Indian Ocean has ancient roots. In this paper I seek to place the recent Somali experience in this wider and deeper context, arguing that what is piracy to some, may be legitimate maritime action to others. I suggest that if piracy is often in the eyes of the beholder, for others it is a response to political and economic marginalization. At the same time, in some cases pirac...

  13. Zika virus: Indian perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra T Mourya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of Zika virus (ZiV, a mosquito borne Flavivirus like dengue (DEN and chikungunya (CHIK, in Brazil in 2014 and its spread to various countries have led to a global health emergency. Aedes aegypti is the major vector for ZiV. Fast dissemination of this virus in different geographical areas posses a major threat especially to regions where the population lacks herd immunity against the ZiV and there is abundance of Aedes mosquitoes. In this review, we focus on current global scenario, epidemiology, biology, diagnostic challenges and remedial measures for ZiVconsidering the Indian perspective.

  14. Education and the Urban Indian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Joann Sebastian

    Due to the Federal relocation programs, American Indian migration to urban areas has intensified over the past 20 years. The Indian who moves from the reservation to the city encounters an alien culture and, consequently, experiences immense difficulties in securing employment, housing, health services, and fair, unprejudiced treatment from law…

  15. American Indian Youth Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFromboise, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the prevalence of suicide and suicidal ideation among American Indian adolescents. Unique risk and protective factors, and historical trauma and associated symptoms, are explored in the context of American Indian adolescent suicide. The need for culturally-sensitive interventions are necessary, and an example of a…

  16. Methodology for understanding Indian culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinha, Jai; Kumar, Rajesh

    2004-01-01

    Methods of understanding cultures, including Indian culture, are embedded in a broad spectrum of sociocultural approaches to human behavior in general. The approaches examined in this paper reflect evolving perspectives on Indian culture, ranging from the starkly ethnocentric to the largely...

  17. Global Trade and Indian Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubinski, Christina

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes the German dye business in India before 1947 as an example of expanding German-Indian commercial relationships. German dye manufacturers showed great interest in India's economic potential in the absence of discriminatory tariffs, while Indian elites were interested in non...

  18. California Indian Food and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    This learning kit begins with a glossary of terms to help students learn about California Indians and their food. The kit explains that California Indians were the first people to live in the area now known as California, and that these tribes differed in the languages they spoke, the regions they lived in, and the foods that they ate. It explains…

  19. Mathemagical 2014 - An Indian Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Patrick Das

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical tradition in India is deep rooted. Indian (and of Indian origin) mathematicians have continued to do seminal work till present times, culminating in Manjul Bhargava receiving the Fields Medal last year. In such fabulous times, a non-mathematician ponders about the nature of mathematics, and revisits the question: why are fundamental laws of Nature inherently mathematical?

  20. Diverticulite em adolescente com Síndrome de Williams: relato de caso Diverticulitis in adolescent with Williams Syndrome: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Josemberg Marins Campos; Francisco Eduardo Bezerra de Albuquerque Lima; Luis Fernando Evangelista; Luciana Teixeira de Siqueira; Carolina de Souza Vasconcelos; Álvaro Antonio Bandeira Ferraz; Edmundo Machado Ferraz

    2009-01-01

    A Síndrome de Williams é uma doença genética rara, atribuída a deleção do gene da elastina no cromossomo 7. É caracterizada por estenose de aorta, divertículos de bexiga, constipação, retardo mental leve, fácies dismórfica, fraqueza da parede da bexiga e do cólon que levam ao surgimento de divertículos. Relata-se um caso de diverticulite aguda em paciente de 18 anos, o resultado do tratamento clínico durante 5 anos e o diagnóstico diferencial de abdome agudo nesta doença. A indicação de colec...

  1. チェロキー族の女性と「文明化」 (リンダ・ギルバート先生追悼号)

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 円

    2001-01-01

    From the late 18th century to the 1820s, the Cherokee Indians experienced a profound cultural transformation following the introduction of white culture. Although many studies have already been carried out on this so-called "civilization" of the Cherokees, most have focused on the changes undergone by Cherokee men. However, in order to evaluate the cultural transformation of Cherokee society as a whole, it is necessary to also consider the changes that occurred for Cherokee women. In this pap...

  2. Cherokee International推出超高功率密度CAR1248前端电源/整流器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Cherokee International(圣诺技电源),全球电源顶级制造商,延续其在功率密度方面的一贯创新,正式对外宣布其最新CAR1248前端电源/整流器。该产品设计小巧,高度仅1U(1.65×3.44×11.2英寸)×功率密度高达19瓦每立方英寸,为同类产品之最,定位于需求外形小巧、分布式电源结构的应用领域。CAR1248在25A时输出单路直流48V,作为调节总线,5V直流备用输出满足电源外部管理和监控。凭借领先的功率密度.该电源可在同一电源架上实现五台并联,提供高达4800瓦N+1冗余或6000瓦。

  3. The Grand Cherokee Show in China%刚柔相济——全新大切诺基国内亮相

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    长青; 耀东

    2001-01-01

    @@ 一提起4驱越野车,许多人首先就要想到"Jeep".这个经典的越野车品牌,凭借其卓越的性能、极具个性化的外形而长期笑傲世界车坛,成为越野车的代名词.但是随着人们购车理念的改变,许多轿车生产厂家都推出了相应的SUV、RV等车型,使越野车与轿车之间的定位越来越模糊.生产"Jeep"的戴姆勒-克莱斯勒公司自然不会坐视市场的变化,因此,集越野性和舒适性于一身的大切诺基(Grand Cherokee)应运而生了.

  4. 75 FR 35834 - Receipt of Applications for Endangered Species Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... analysis, to culture for research, and to preserve in herbarium collections. Applicant: International.... Applicant: Michael LaVoie, Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indian Nation, Cherokee, North Carolina, TE237545... Carolina northern flying squirrel on Tribal lands of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indian Nation,...

  5. Washington Irving and the American Indian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlefield, Daniel F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Some modern scholars feel that Washington Irving vacillated between romanticism and realism in his literary treatment of the American Indian. However, a study of all his works dealing with Indians, placed in context with his non-Indian works, reveals that his attitude towards Indians was intelligent and enlightened for his time. (CM)

  6. 25 CFR 273.45 - Indian preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indian preference. 273.45 Section 273.45 Indians BUREAU... preference. (a) Any contract made by the Bureau with a State, school district or Indian corporation shall provide that the contractor shall, to the greatest extent feasible, give preference in and...

  7. Facial melanoses: Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neena Khanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial melanoses (FM are a common presentation in Indian patients, causing cosmetic disfigurement with considerable psychological impact. Some of the well defined causes of FM include melasma, Riehl′s melanosis, Lichen planus pigmentosus, erythema dyschromicum perstans (EDP, erythrosis, and poikiloderma of Civatte. But there is considerable overlap in features amongst the clinical entities. Etiology in most of the causes is unknown, but some factors such as UV radiation in melasma, exposure to chemicals in EDP, exposure to allergens in Riehl′s melanosis are implicated. Diagnosis is generally based on clinical features. The treatment of FM includes removal of aggravating factors, vigorous photoprotection, and some form of active pigment reduction either with topical agents or physical modes of treatment. Topical agents include hydroquinone (HQ, which is the most commonly used agent, often in combination with retinoic acid, corticosteroids, azelaic acid, kojic acid, and glycolic acid. Chemical peels are important modalities of physical therapy, other forms include lasers and dermabrasion.

  8. Läbi legendide William Shakespeare'i poole / Maris Peters

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Peters, Maris

    2010-01-01

    Tutvustus: Wells, Stanley. Kas on tõsi, et Shakespeare ...? / tõlkinud Maris Peters. Tallinn : Argo, 2010. Raamat William Shakespeare kohta käivatest legendidest, kuuldustest ja teooriatest ning tema teoste autorsusest

  9. Leo Piilonen appointed William E. Hassinger, Jr. Senior Faculty Fellow in Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Leo Piilonen, professor of physics in the College of Science at Virginia Tech, was recently appointed the William E. Hassinger, Jr., Senior Faculty Fellow in Physics by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  10. Results of a shoreline waterbird survey in Passage Canal, Prince William Sound, Alaska, 1 September 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers findings from shoreline water birds surveys of Passage Canal, Prince William Sound in Alaska. Methods, results and discussion are included,...

  11. Summary of initial reconnaissance of salmon streams in Prince William Sound, Cordova Ranger District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In August of 1962, nine streams were visited in Prince William Sound. The purpose of this trip was to find out if any of these streams was suitable for improvement...

  12. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...

  13. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: M_MAMPT (Marine Mammal Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...

  14. Salmon habitat improvement reconnaissance, Prince William Sound, Cordova and Anchorage districts, September 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the salmon habitat improvement reconnaissance in the Prince William sound, Alaska. The purpose of the trip was to discover new habitat improvement...

  15. Critical wildlife areas in Port Etches and Constantine Harbor, Hinchinbrook Island, Prince William Sound

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report documents critical wildlife areas in Port Etches and Constantine Harbor, Hinchinbrook Islands, and Prince William Sound during the 1976 and 1977....

  16. The Trail Inventory of William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge [Cycle 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all nonmotorized trails on William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  17. 78 FR 27190 - Williams-Sonoma, Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: It is the policy of the Commission to publish.... Rubel, Counsel to Williams Sonoma, Inc. Arnold & Porter LLP 555 Twelfth Street NW. Washington, DC...

  18. Lähtugem ehitistest! / William J. R. Curtis ; interv. Andres Kurg, Karin Hallas, Triin Ojari

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Curtis, William J. R.

    1998-01-01

    24. apr. pidas Rotermanni soolalaos loengu arhitektuuriajaloolane William J. R. Curtis. Katkeid jutuajamisest W. Curtisega. Arhitektuurikriitikast, oma raamatust "Modern Architecture since 1900", millest W. Curtis praegu kriitikuna kirjutab, Lille'i projektist jm

  19. 250 Years of Physics at the College of William and Mary: 1760-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Baeyer, Hans

    2010-02-01

    The recorded history of physics at William and Mary begins when Thomas Jefferson, the College's most distinguished alumnus, meets his mentor, Dr. William Small of Scotland, who opens his eyes to the wonders of natural philosophy. After the vicissitudes of the Revolution and the Civil War, physics enjoys a revival in the twentieth century, culminating in the creation of a Ph.D. program in the 1960s and the building of the William Small Physical Laboratory in Williamsburg. In the 1980s the modern era is launched by the establishment of the US Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab for nuclear physics in nearby Newport News. Today both Small Hall and Jefferson Lab are in the process of renovation. The legacies of Small and Jefferson for physics at William and Mary are secure! )

  20. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: ESI (Environmental Sensitivity Index Shoreline Types)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...