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Sample records for chernobyl forum expert

  1. Health effects of the Chernobyl accident and special health care programmes. Report of the UN Chernobyl Forum Expert Group 'Health'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty years have passed since the worst nuclear reactor accident in the world occurred at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine. The radioactive contamination which resulted from the explosion and fire in the first few days spread over large areas of neighbouring Belarus and the Russian Federation, with most of the fallout in Belarus. While national and local authorities did not immediately disclose the scale of the accident, the mitigation measures, such as distribution of potassium iodine pills, food restriction, and mass evacuation from areas where the radioactive contamination was greatest, undoubtedly reduced the health impact of the radiation exposure and saved many lives. The accident caused severe social and economic disruption and had significant environmental and health impact. This was aggravated by the political and economical changes in the three affected states related to the break-down of the Soviet Union. In the aftermath of the accident the international scientific and medical community collaborated closely with national experts dealing with health effects of the accident in the affected countries. There is a substantial body of international collaborative projects on the situation, which should lead to advancement in radiation sciences. However, considerable speculation and disinformation remains about the possible health impact of the accident for the millions of affected people. To address the health, environmental and socioeconomic consequences of the Chernobyl accident, the United Nations in 2003 launched an Inter-Agency initiative, the Chernobyl Forum. The Forum's Secretariat, led by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and several other international organizations collaborated with the governments of the affected countries. The purpose of the Chernobyl Forum was to review the consequences of the accident, issue technical reports and, based

  2. Environmental consequences of the Chernobyl accident and their remediation: Twenty years of experience. Report of the UN Chernobyl Forum Expert Group 'Environment' (EGE). Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to provide an up-to-date evaluation of the environmental effects of the 26 April 1986 accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Even though it is now nearly 20 years after the accident and substantial monies have been spent on such evaluations, there are still many conflicting reports and rumours. This joint report has been developed with the full cooperation of the United Nations (UN) family of relevant organisations and with political representatives from the three more affected countries: Ukraine, Belarus, and the Russian Federation. In addition, recognised scientific experts from the three countries and additional international experts provided the basis for the preparation of reports for review by the actual members of the Chernobyl Forum. The - Chernobyl Forum - is a high-level political forum whose suggestion for existence was initiated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in cooperation with the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), the United Nations Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the World Health Organisation (WHO), and the World Bank, as well as the competent authorities of Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine. The organisational meeting of the Chernobyl Forum was held on 3-5 February 2003, at which time the decision was reached to establish the Forum as an ongoing entity of the above named organisations. Thus, the organisational meeting of the Forum decided to establish the Chernobyl Forum as a series of managerial, expert and public meetings in order to generate authoritative consensual statements on the health effects attributable to radiation exposure arising from the accident and the environmental consequences induced by the released radioactive materials, to provide advice on

  3. Health effects of the Chernobyl accident and special health care programmes. Report of the UN Chernobyl Forum Expert Group 'Health' (EGH). Working draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report has been prepared by three WHO expert committees convened under auspices of the Chernobyl Forum's Expert Group 'Health' (EGH), and by WHO staff. It provides an updated assessment of the health consequences of the Chernobyl accident, and follows a detailed report on this topic published by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation in 2000 (UNSCEAR, 2000). The accident occurred at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in northern Ukraine on April 26, 1986 and released large amounts of radioactivity, primarily radioactive isotopes of caesium and iodine. These releases contaminated large areas of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine and other countries to a lesser extent, These releases exposed sizable populations to internal and external radiation doses. The Chernobyl accident caused the deaths of 30 power plant employees and firemen within a few days or weeks (including 28 deaths that were due to radiation exposure). In addition, about 240,000 recovery operation workers (also called 'liquidators' or 'clean-up workers') were called upon in 1986 and 1987 to take part in major mitigation activities at the reactor and within the 30-km zone surrounding the reactor. Residual mitigation activities continued on a relatively large scale until 1990. All together, about 600,000 persons (civilian and military) have received special certificates confirming their status as liquidators, according to laws promulgated in Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine (UNSCEAR, 2000). In addition, massive releases of radioactive materials into the atmosphere brought about the evacuation of about 116,000 people from areas surrounding the reactor during 1986, and the relocation, after 1986, of about 220,000 people from what are at this time three independent republics of the former Soviet Union: Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine. Vast territories of those three republics were contaminated to a substantial level. The population of

  4. The Chernobyl Forum: major findings and recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balonov, M.I. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramerstrasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: m.balonov@iaea.org

    2007-07-15

    The accident at the Chernobyl NPP in 1986 was the most severe in the history of the nuclear industry, causing a huge release of radionuclides over large areas of Europe. The recently completed Chernobyl Forum concluded that after a number of years, along with reduction of radiation levels and accumulation of humanitarian consequences, severe social and economic depression of the affected regions and associated psychological problems of the general public and the workers had become the most significant problem to be addressed by the authorities. The majority of the affected land is now safe for life and economic activities. However, in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and in some limited areas of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine some restrictions on land-use should be retained for decades to come. Most of the 600,000 emergency and recovery operation workers and five million residents of the contaminated areas in Belarus, Russia and Ukraine received relatively minor radiation doses which are comparable with the natural background levels. Apart from the dramatic increase in thyroid cancer incidence among those exposed at a young age and some increase of leukaemia and solid cancer in most exposed workers, there is no clearly demonstrated increase in the somatic diseases due to radiation.

  5. Chernobyl's legacy: Health, environmental and socio-economic impacts and recommendations to the Governments of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine. The Chernobyl Forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearly 20 years after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) accident, many questions remained unanswered regarding the health, environmental, and socio-economic consequences of the disaster. The individuals and countries most affected had yet to obtain a clear scientific consensus on the impact of the accident and authoritative answers to outstanding questions. To fill this void and to promote better understanding and improved measures to deal with the impacts of the accident, the Chernobyl Forum was established in 2003. The Chernobyl Forum is an initiative of the IAEA, in cooperation with the WHO, UNDP, FAO, UNEP, UN-OCHA, UNSCEAR, the World Bank and the governments of Belarus, the Russian Federation and the Ukraine. The Forum was created as a contribution to the United Nations' ten-year strategy for Chernobyl, launched in 2002 with the publication of Human Consequences of the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident - A Strategy for Recovery. To provide a basis for achieving the goal of the Forum, the IAEA convened an expert working group of scientists to summarize the environmental effects, and the WHO convened an expert group to summarize the health effects and medical care programmes in the three most affected countries. The information presented in this document and in the two full expert group reports has been drawn from scientific studies undertaken by the IAEA, WHO, UNSCEAR and numerous other authoritative bodies. In addition, UNDP has drawn on the work of eminent economists and policy specialists to assess the socio-economic impact of the Chernobyl accident, based largely on the 2002 UN study as above

  6. Papers submitted to the international forum ''one decade after Chernobyl: nuclear safety aspects''. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the forum is to review the remedial measures taken since the Chernobyl accident for improving the safety of RBMK reactors and the Chernobyl containment structure (sarcophagus). The forum will also serve to exchange information on national, bilateral and multilateral efforts for the enhancement of RBMK safety. The conclusions and recommendations will serve as a basis for a background paper to be prepared for presentation, by the forum chairman, at the International Conference ''One decade after Chernobyl'' to held in Vienna from 8-12 April 1996. Refs, figs, tabs

  7. The enduring lessons of Chernobyl. International conference of the Chernobyl Forum, 6 September 2005, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The April 1986 accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant remains a defining moment in the history of nuclear energy. The lessons of this tragedy are interwoven with a recurrent theme: namely, the importance of international cooperation. With its recently released document - entitled 'Chernobyl's Legacy' - the Chernobyl Forum has solidly reinforced that theme. The major impacts of Chernobyl fall into three categories: the physical impacts, in terms of health and environmental effects; the psychological and social impacts on the affected populations; and the influence of the accident on the nuclear industry worldwide. The physical impacts mark Chernobyl as the site of the most serious nuclear accident in history. The explosions that destroyed the Unit 4 reactor core released a cloud of radionuclides that contaminated large areas of Europe and, in particular, Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine. Hundreds of thousands of people were exposed to substantial radiation doses, including workers from all three of these countries who participated in efforts to mitigate the consequences of the accident. The definitive numbers compiled in the Chernobyl Forum report are sobering: the 50 emergency rescue workers who died from acute radiation syndrome and related illnesses; the 4000 children and adolescents who contracted thyroid cancer - 9 of whom also died; and the hundreds of thousands of hectares of cropland, forests, rivers and urban centres that were contaminated by environmental fallout. But as severe as these impacts were, the situation was made even worse by conflicting information and vast exaggerations - in press coverage and pseudo-scientific accounts of the accident - reporting, for example, fatalities in the tens or hundreds of thousands. The psychological and social impacts were also devastating. Over 100 000 people were immediately evacuated, and the total number of evacuees from contaminated areas eventually reached 350 000. While some of these

  8. Chernobyl's legacy: Health, environmental and socio-economic impacts and recommendations to the Governments of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine. The Chernobyl Forum 2003-2005. Second revised version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearly 20 years after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) accident, many questions remained unanswered regarding the health, environmental, and socio-economic consequences of the disaster. The individuals and countries most affected had yet to obtain a clear scientific consensus on the impact of the accident and authoritative answers to outstanding questions. To fill this void and to promote better understanding and improved measures to deal with the impacts of the accident, the Chernobyl Forum was established in 2003. The Chernobyl Forum is an initiative of the IAEA, in cooperation with the WHO, UNDP, FAO, UNEP, UN-OCHA, UNSCEAR, the World Bank and the governments of Belarus, the Russian Federation and the Ukraine. The Forum was created as a contribution to the United Nations' ten-year strategy for Chernobyl, launched in 2002 with the publication of Human Consequences of the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident - A Strategy for Recovery. To provide a basis for achieving the goal of the Forum, the IAEA convened an expert working group of scientists to summarize the environmental effects, and the WHO convened an expert group to summarize the health effects and medical care programmes in the three most affected countries. The information presented in this document and in the two full expert group reports has been drawn from scientific studies undertaken by the IAEA, WHO, UNSCEAR and numerous other authoritative bodies. In addition, UNDP has drawn on the work of eminent economists and policy specialists to assess the socio-economic impact of the Chernobyl accident, based largely on the 2002 UN study as above

  9. Chernobyl's legacy: Health, environmental and socio-economic impacts and recommendations to the Governments of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine. The Chernobyl Forum: 2003-2005. Second revised version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearly 20 years after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) accident, many questions remained unanswered regarding the health, environmental, and socio-economic consequences of the disaster. The individuals and countries most affected had yet to obtain a clear scientific consensus on the impact of the accident and authoritative answers to outstanding questions. To fill this void and to promote better understanding and improved measures to deal with the impacts of the accident, the Chernobyl Forum was established in 2003. The Chernobyl Forum is an initiative of the IAEA, in cooperation with the WHO, UNDP, FAO, UNEP, UN-OCHA, UNSCEAR, the World Bank and the governments of Belarus, the Russian Federation and the Ukraine. The Forum was created as a contribution to the United Nations' ten-year strategy for Chernobyl, launched in 2002 with the publication of Human Consequences of the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident - A Strategy for Recovery. To provide a basis for achieving the goal of the Forum, the IAEA convened an expert working group of scientists to summarize the environmental effects, and the WHO convened an expert group to summarize the health effects and medical care programmes in the three most affected countries. The information presented in this document and in the two full expert group reports has been drawn from scientific studies undertaken by the IAEA, WHO, UNSCEAR and numerous other authoritative bodies. In addition, UNDP has drawn on the work of eminent economists and policy specialists to assess the socio-economic impact of the Chernobyl accident, based largely on the 2002 UN study as above

  10. Doses to members of the general public and observed effects on biota: Chernobyl Forum update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anspaugh, Lynn R. [Division of Radiobiology, Department of Radiology, University of Utah, 729 Arapeen Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)]. E-mail: lanspaugh@aol.com

    2007-07-15

    The Chernobyl Forum was organized by the United Nations to examine the health and environmental effects of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station. This paper is concerned with the environmental effects, as determined by Expert Group Environment. The accident resulted in release of a large amount of radioactive materials over a period of 10 days. These materials were deposited throughout Europe with the three more affected countries being Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine. More than 5 million persons lived on territories in these countries judged to be contaminated at >37 kBq m{sup -2}. Many countermeasures were employed to mitigate the effects of the accident. The collective effective dose to the residents of the contaminated territories is estimated to be about 55 000 person-Sv. Effects on non-human biota were observed that ranged from minor to lethal; the current increase in the number and diversity of species in the most contaminated area is due to absence of human pressure.

  11. INTERNATIONAL ASSESSMENTS OF IMPACTS OF THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT: THE CHERNOBYL FORUM (2003–2005 AND UNSCEAR (2005–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Balonov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiological consequences of the accident at the Chernobyl NPP were recently revisited by the UN Chernobyl Forum (2003-2005 and UNSCEAR (2005-2008. For the first time environmental impacts were considered in detail, including radioactive contamination of terrestrial and aquatic environments, application and effectiveness of countermeasures and effects on biota. Updated dosimetric data were presented for more than half a million of emergency and recovery operation workers, about 100 million inhabitants of the three most affected countries, Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine, and for 500 million inhabitants of other European countries. Several hundred of the emergency workers received high radiation doses; of whom 28 persons died in 1986 due to acute radiation sickness. Children at the time of the accident, who drank milk with high levels of radioactive iodine, received high doses to the thyroid. Since early 1990s there was the dramatic increase in thyroid cancer incidence among them. Also in 1990s there was some increase of leukaemia in most exposed workers. The UN Chernobyl Forum concluded that severe social and economic depression of the affected regions and associated psychological problems of the general public and the workers had become the most significant problem. The vast majority of the population need not live in fear of serious health consequences from the Chernobyl accident.

  12. Large-scale research experts voice opinion on Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In mid-September 1986 the Work Study Group for Large-Scale Research, which comprises the 13 German, publicly funded research institutes, invited experts to the Science Centre at Bonn-Bad Godesberg to discuss the inter-relationship between the Ukrainian reactor accident and the future energy supply in the Federal Republic of Germany. The event was attended predominantly by scientists belonging to the AGF and from the media, representatives of colleges, of scientific organisations, ministries and authorities, associations, embassies of various countries, of the German Government and the German Atomic Forum. The general atmosphere at the discussions differed pleasantly from the politically or election motivated statements uttered during recent months due to the objectivity which prevailed. (orig.)

  13. Text Mining and Natural Language Processing Approaches for Automatic Categorization of Lay Requests to Web-Based Expert Forums

    OpenAIRE

    Himmel, Wolfgang; Reincke, Ulrich; Michelmann, Hans Wilhelm

    2009-01-01

    Background Both healthy and sick people increasingly use electronic media to obtain medical information and advice. For example, Internet users may send requests to Web-based expert forums, or so-called “ask the doctor” services. Objective To automatically classify lay requests to an Internet medical expert forum using a combination of different text-mining strategies. Methods We first manually classified a sample of 988 requests directed to a involuntary childlessness forum on the German web...

  14. Thyroid cancer in children living near Chernobyl. Expert panel report on the consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In January 1992, the Radiation Protection Research Action formed a panel of thyroid experts in order to evaluate the current situation concerning reported increased rates of thyroid cancer in children living in the neighbourhood of Chernobyl, where the reactor accident occurred on April 26 1986 and resulted in widespread radioactive contamination over large areas of Belarus, Russia, Ukraine. Studies of the Atom Bomb survivors in Japan have revealed that the incidence of leukemia starts to increase some five years after exposure. For Chernobyl accident health consequences are now becoming evident. Thyroid cancer has already been observed in children. Iodine 131 was seen to pose a specific hazard because it is taken up by the body and concentrated in the thyroid gland. At a dose of 5 Gy to the childhood thyroid about 4000 thyroid cancers per 100000 children exposed can be anticipated. An essential component of the verification of this observation is the study of the pathology of the lesions, which derived from four cell types: follicular cells, C cells, lymphoid cells and connective tumor cells. All distant metastases are lung metastases. Measures to be considered for the prevention of the development of thyroid cancer in a radiation-exposed population include correction of iodine deficiency by iodine prophylaxis and suppression of TSH. There are three methods of diagnosis: ultrasound imaging, thyroid scanning, fine needle aspiration performed by skilled personnel. For the therapy total or near-total thyroidectomy is regarded as the treatment of choice. Radioactive iodine can be used to treat lymph node and distant metastases which take up iodine after a total thyroidectomy. Thyroid hormone replacement should be carried out with TSH suppressive doses of L-Thyroxine. 45 refs., 1 annexe

  15. Toward Bridging a Gap Between Experts and Local Community Through Repetitive Dialogue Forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Establishment of mutual trust between experts and public is an issue of critical importance for better nuclear policy design in Japan. A research project named Facilitation of Risk-based Decision-Making on Technical Systems (FRIDMATS) bas been launched in 2002 to meet the need. In the first phase of the project, efforts have been focused on developing a risk perception model of public to be employed as a reference for improved risk communication. A series of dialogue forums have been held in municipalities where nuclear facilities are sited to obtain guidelines for the model development. Current status of the forum and summary of the acquired information are described in this paper

  16. Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to southeasterly wind and rainfall during the critical days after the Chernobyl accident, Norway got a substantial part of the cesium isotopes released. The radioactive fallout followed closely the rainfall and was mainly concentrated to some thin populated areas in the central parts of the country. This report summerize the results from a post-Chernobyl research program on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems in contaminated areas. Pathways, processes and factors determining the Cs-137 concentration in soil, plant, water, fish and wild animal were investigated. 84 refs., 40 figs., 20 tabs

  17. Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl reactor accident provoked a wave of public discussion about the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, and particularly so in the Federal Republic of Germany. The article in hand discusses some consequences as can be assessed so far, although information on the causes and the course of the accident still is very incomplete. From the information available so far, the possible sequence of events is described. The safety engineering and design of Federal German reactor types is compared with the reactor type installed at Chernobyl, with the result that the Soviet type never would have been licensed in the FRG. The fallout, i.e. the resulting radiation exposure of the population, is expected to remain within the limits of the natural radioactivity; the political effects and possible consequences with regard to further commitments for the advancement of the fast breeder reactor line and the reprocessing of spent fuel are discussed. (orig./RB)

  18. Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor accident in Chernobyl also had a memorable 1986 Spring for the region of Lake Constance. Salad had to be ploughed up in the vegetable fields, the feeding of cows with fresh grass was forbidden, and becquerel values played a decisive role in food purchases. Along with the measurement of radioactivity in rainwater, the authors began to take food and soil samples; hundreds of samples were tested in the laboratories of the University of Constance. They provided, in cooperation with public authorities, for the protection of the population against radiation, and explained, in numerous lectures, the significance of this incident to everyday life. Besides, they recorded recent scientific findings about the behaviour of radioactive substances in the environment. The book gives a summary of the findings. It also includes, besides a description of the events of May 1986 at Lake Constance, a presentation of the results of scientific investigations into Chernobyl's radioactivity. This is thus the first detailed account of the diverse effects of the reactor accident with respect to one particular region which, though more than 1500 km away, was surprisingly seriously affected, and which, owing to its special features - Lake Constance is Europe's most important drinking water reservoir -, is particularly endangered, in case of radioactive release. (orig./HP) With 2 separate tabs

  19. Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book brings together a comprehensive history of the first 18 months of the accident at Chernobyl and the complete pictorial record of the disaster, including many photographs never seen in the West. It also gives a unique record of subsequent events in the USSR involving the evacuation and re-housing of a population of 135,000, the building of the 400,000 tonne concrete sarcophagus over the damaged reactor and the decontamination of the environment which may take years to complete. The human dimension of radiation injuries is recreated in the cast histories and hospital photographs of the firemen who brought the blaze under control. The problems of contamination of the food chain for various countries is included, and recommendations for safe levels of activity in milk are described

  20. Chernobyl: The true scale of the accident. 20 years later a UN report provides definitive answers and ways to repair lives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authoritative figures regarding the effect of the Chernobyl accident presented in a landmark digest report, 'Chernobyl's Legacy: Health, Environmental and Socio-Economic Impacts', just released by the Chernobyl Forum. The digest, based on a three-volume, 600-page report and incorporating the work of hundreds of scientists, economists and health experts, assesses the 20-year impact of the largest nuclear accident in history. The Forum is made up of 8 UN specialized agencies, including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UN-OCHA), United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), and the World Bank, as well as the governments of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine. The Forum's report aims to help the affected countries understand the true scale of the accident consequences and also suggest ways the governments of Belarus, Ukraine and Russia might address major economic and social problems stemming from the accident. Members of the Forum, including representatives of the three governments, will meet September 6 and 7 in Vienna at an unprecedented gathering of the world's experts on Chernobyl, radiation effects and protection, to consider these findings and recommendations

  1. On protecting the inexperienced reader from Chernobyl myths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The health and environmental consequences of the Chernobyl accident continue to attract the attention of experts, decision-makers and the general public, and now these consequences have been given added relevance by the similar accident in 2011 at the Fukushima-1 nuclear power plant (NPP) in Japan. Expert analysis of radiation levels and effects has been conducted by international bodies—UNSCEAR in 2008 and the Chernobyl Forum during 2003–5. At the same time, three Russian and Belarusian scientists, Yablokov, Nesterenko and Nesterenko (2009 Chernobyl. Consequences of the Catastrophe for People and the Environment (New York: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences)) published both in Russian and English a substantial review of the consequences of Chernobyl based mostly on Russian-language papers. In this book, they suggested a departure from analytical epidemiological studies in favour of ecological ones. This erroneous approach resulted in the overestimation of the number of accident victims by more than 800 000 deaths during 1987–2004. This paper investigates the mistakes in methodology made by Yablokov et al and concludes that these errors led to a clear exaggeration of radiation-induced health effects. Should similar mistakes be made following the 2011 accident at Fukushima-1 NPP this could lead quite unnecessarily to a panic reaction by the public about possible health effects and to erroneous decisions by the authorities in Japan. (opinion)

  2. On protecting the inexperienced reader from Chernobyl myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balonov, M I

    2012-06-01

    The health and environmental consequences of the Chernobyl accident continue to attract the attention of experts, decision-makers and the general public, and now these consequences have been given added relevance by the similar accident in 2011 at the Fukushima-1 nuclear power plant (NPP) in Japan. Expert analysis of radiation levels and effects has been conducted by international bodies--UNSCEAR in 2008 and the Chernobyl Forum during 2003-5. At the same time, three Russian and Belarusian scientists, Yablokov, Nesterenko and Nesterenko (2009 Chernobyl. Consequences of the Catastrophe for People and the Environment (New York: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences)) published both in Russian and English a substantial review of the consequences of Chernobyl based mostly on Russian-language papers. In this book, they suggested a departure from analytical epidemiological studies in favour of ecological ones. This erroneous approach resulted in the overestimation of the number of accident victims by more than 800 000 deaths during 1987-2004. This paper investigates the mistakes in methodology made by Yablokov et al and concludes that these errors led to a clear exaggeration of radiation-induced health effects. Should similar mistakes be made following the 2011 accident at Fukushima-1 NPP this could lead quite unnecessarily to a panic reaction by the public about possible health effects and to erroneous decisions by the authorities in Japan. PMID:22569279

  3. Environmental consequences of the Chernobyl accident and their remediation: Twenty years of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The explosion on 26 April 1986 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant located just 100 km from the city of Kyiv in what was then the Soviet Union and now is Ukraine, and consequent ten days' reactor fire resulted in an unprecedented release of radiation and unpredicted adverse consequences both for the public and the environment. Indeed, the IAEA has characterized the event as the 'foremost nuclear catastrophe in human history' and the largest regional release of radionuclides into the atmosphere. Massive radioactive contamination forced the evacuation of more than 100,000 people from the affected region during 1986, and the relocation, after 1986, of another 200,000 from Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine. Some five million people continue to live in areas contaminated by the accident and have to deal with its environmental, health, social and economic consequences. The national governments of the three affected countries, supported by international organizations, have undertaken costly efforts to remedy contamination, provide medical services and restore the region's social and economic well-being. The accident's consequences were not limited to the territories of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine but resulted in substantial transboundary atmospheric transfer and subsequent contamination of numerous European countries that also encountered problems of radiation protection of their populations, although to less extent than the three more affected countries. Although the accident occurred nearly two decades ago, controversy still surrounds the impact of the nuclear disaster. Therefore the IAEA, in cooperation with FAO, UNDP, UNEP, UNOCHA, UNSCEAR, WHO and The World Bank, as well as the competent authorities of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine, established the Chernobyl Forum in 2003. The mission of the Forum was - through a series of managerial and expert meetings to generate 'authoritative consensual statements' on the environmental consequences and

  4. Problems of Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection comprises the materials of working meeting 'The Development of Technologies of the 'Ukrytie' Radioactive Waste Management', held on May 20-21, 1997 in Chernobyl. The results of research work of the experts of Ukraine and other countries directed on solving problems, concerning removal of fuel containing materials and other radioactive waste from destroyed Unit 4 of Chernobyl NPP are given. The data on waste quantities, their location and classification, strategy of waste management and some technologies are described

  5. Chernobyl - Ten years after

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A decade later, in April 1996, more than 800 experts from 71 countries and 20 organizations, observed by over 200 journalists, met to review the Chernobyl accident's actual and possible future consequences, and to put these into proper perspective. They came together at the international conference on One Decade after Chernobyl: Summing up the Consequences of the Accident, held at the Austria Center in Vienna. The Chernobyl Conference was a model of international co-operation: six organizations of the UN family, including the IAEA, and two important regional agencies were involved in its organization

  6. Introductory remarks by the Chairman. [Session 1: Environmental and health consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many scientists as well as representatives from UN organizations and governments of affected regions participated in the work of the Chernobyl Forum. Several meetings of the Forum were necessary to initiate the work and monitor the progress of the expert groups. Two expert groups formulated comprehensive reports - one on environmental issues, organized by the IAEA, and one on health issues, organized by the WHO. Experts from throughout the world were invited to contribute to these evaluations. The representatives of governments and the staff of international organizations then reviewed the results of these groups to be sure that the reviews were complete and the evaluations reasonable, so that they could serve as the basis for consensus agreements and effective recommendations for further dealing with the consequences of the accident

  7. Chernobyl: Looking back to go forward. Proceedings of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UN-OCHA), the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), WHO and the World Bank, as well as the competent authorities of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine, established the Chernobyl Forum early in 2003. The mission of the Forum was to generate, through a series of managerial and expert meetings, 'authoritative consensual statements' on the environmental consequences and health effects attributable to radiation exposure arising from the accident, as well as to provide advice on environmental remediation and special health care programmes, and to suggest areas in which further research was required. The Forum was established as a contribution to the United Nations' ten year strategy for Chernobyl, launched in 2002 with the publication of 'Human Consequences of the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident: A Strategy for Recovery'. Over a two year period, two groups of experts from 12 countries, including Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine, and from relevant international organizations, assessed the accident's environmental and health consequences. Early in 2005, the Expert Group on 'Environment', coordinated by the IAEA, and the Expert Group on 'Health', coordinated by the WHO, presented their reports for the consideration of the Chernobyl Forum. At a meeting held in April 2005, the Forum approved both reports and decided, among other things: 'to consider the approved reports...- as a common position of the Forum members, i.e., of the eight United Nations organizations and the three most affected countries, regarding the environmental and health consequences of the Chernobyl accident, as well as recommended future actions, i.e., as a consensus within the United Nations system.' In addition, UNDP has drawn on the work of eminent economists and policy specialists to assess the

  8. Chernobyl and our health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The health impacts in Sweden of the Chernobyl accident are discussed in this booklet. Five experts of different relevant fields (biology, radioecology, nuclear physics and psychology) give their views on probable radiation doses and health effects from these doses, contamination of food chains etc. (L.E.)

  9. The IAEA and the debate on the health effects of Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the very beginning of the reporting about the accident in the Ukrainian power plant Lenin in late April 1986, the IAEA has played a central role in the evaluation of 'Chernobyl': Hans Blix and Morris Rosen were the first Westerners to visit the site of the accident in May 1986. Some months later, in August 1986, the IAEA organized the 'Post-Accident Review Meeting on the Chernobyl Accident', a meeting in which Eastern and Western nuclear experts worked out the first (at least from the pro-atomic side) 'universally accepted' narrative of the causes and course of the accident. Furthermore, in the following years, the IAEA acted as a key player in the inter-national and inter-institutional experts groups, the 'International Chernobyl Project' and the 'Chernobyl Forum'. These groups had as their aim to evaluate the environmental and health consequences of the Chernobyl accident. The reports published and the suggestions provided by these expert groups caused uproar within anti-nuclear activists. They especially criticized the low number of victims calculated in these reports and the recommendation to resettle evacuated areas. The reasoning behind this recommendation consists of the belief that life in these regions has to be brought back to normal, as it were more the fear of the radiation and the stress of the resettlement that made people ill than the radiation itself. The struggle about the validity of this concept of 'radiophobia' stands at the centre of the debate on the health effects of Chernobyl. In connection to this debate, we find more and more critical voices that question the independence of the WHO and bring forward the argument that the institutional agreement between the IAEA and the WHO dating back from 1959 has kept the WHO from conducting research and publishing information about health effects of low level radiation. (author)

  10. Chernobyl: The true scale of the accident. 20 years later a UN report provides definitive answers and ways to repair lives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of up to four thousand people could eventually die of radiation exposure from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) accident nearly 20 years ago, an international team of more than 100 scientists has concluded. As of mid-2005, however, fewer than 50 deaths had been directly attributed to radiation from the disaster, almost all being highly exposed rescue workers, many who died within months of the accident but others who died as late as 2004. The new numbers are presented in a landmark digest report, 'Chernobyl's Legacy: Health, Environmental and Socio-Economic Impacts', just released by the Chernobyl Forum. The digest, based on a three-volume, 600-page report and incorporating the work of hundreds of scientists, economists and health experts, assesses the 20-year impact of the largest nuclear accident in history. The Forum is made up of 8 UN specialized agencies, including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UN-OCHA), United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), and the World Bank, as well as the governments of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine. The Forum's report aims to help the affected countries understand the true scale of the accident consequences and also suggest ways the governments of Belarus, Ukraine and Russia might address major economic and social problems stemming from the accident. Members of the Forum, including representatives of the three governments, will meet September 6 and 7 in Vienna at an unprecedented gathering of the world's experts on Chernobyl, radiation effects and protection, to consider these findings and recommendations

  11. Twenty years after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    nuclear power to meet increasing energy demands in many parts of the world. In 2001, after taking note of the conflicting views on the results of the accident, I called for the creation of a Chernobyl Forum, inviting the world's foremost scientific experts to conduct an exhaustive assessment of the health, environmental and social impacts of the accident. As with all IAEA programmes, we emphasized an impartial, fact based approach to the analysis of this difficult and highly charged topic. I was pleased that, after a long period of careful analysis, the parties involved - including the World Health Organization and seven other specialized United Nations agencies, as well as the Governments of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine - were able to achieve consensus on the set of authoritative reports that were issued last September. But the Chernobyl Forum had another purpose as well. My hope was that, by giving clear, impartial answers about the accident and its effects, we would be able to focus more effectively on present and future needs. Better international cooperation on assistance to the people and regions affected by the accident. Smarter approaches to safe food production and effective health care. Enhanced investments in the people concerned, in ways that would give them control over their own livelihoods. In short, it was my hope that, by answering questions about the past, we could restore a vision of a brighter future for the regions concerned. And that remains my hope. We will not soon forget the Chernobyl accident. We will not forget the emergency workers who gave their lives. We will not forget the health and environmental consequences. And we should never forget the lessons we learned regarding nuclear safety and international cooperation. In remembering the Chernobyl accident, we should renew our determination to ensure that such a tragedy will not happen again. But we must also remember the survivors, the individuals and communities who seek to move forward with

  12. After Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl accident mobilized profound anxieties in many people, which subsequently were repressed again and played down with the aid of the known psychological mechanisms. The authors trace the anxiety, and the resistance against it, and pose the question of whether we are at all capable of learning to think along new lines. From the contents: 10 theses on Chernobyl 1986 (Anders, G.); Anxiety, apathy and new thinking (Richter, H.-E.); On the Germans' particular way of dealing with existential threats (Wirth, H.-J.); Appeasement and delusion - small and big flights from powerlessness (Leithaeuser, T.); Socio-psychological theses on the consequences of nuclear energy (Clemenz, M.); Psychological arguments in the discussion about Chernobyl (Kettner, M.); Relationship between fear and technology (Brede, K.); Inhumanity of technology (Spangenberg, N.); Psychology of nuclear addiction (Bauriedl, T.); Nature or technology - search of the wizard's apprentice for lost salvation (Bastian, T./Hilger, M.); Living under a nuclear threat - significance of existential fear experienced during childhood (Boehnke, K., et al.); Survey of, and psychoanalytical reflections on, poisoned childhood (Petri, H.); On knowing, feeling, and experience after Chernobyl (Thiel, W.); Sociopsychological aspects of the staging of politics as a state spectacle fit for the media (Fuechner, H.). (orig./HP)

  13. Project Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the follow-up after the Chernobyl fallout is to obtain the best possible information about the environmental and dose commitment consequences in Sweden. The essential part of the work by the institute to improve the state of readiness is described. (G.B.)

  14. Chernobyl fantasy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several versions of technical reasons of Chernobyl accident, which have received a wide resonance in mass-media, and are seemed as reasonable for most public without any special education in reactor's physics, are discussed. Probable reasons of its origination are analysed, and its scientific groundlessness is shown

  15. Problems of Chernobyl exclusion zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection reflects the results of researches and test-design activities in the exclusion area of the Chernobyl NPP, directed to elaborate the equipment and devices for scientific researches and elimination of the accident aftereffects at Chernobyl NPP and to study composition and structure of solid-phase bearers of the activity in the soil of the exclusion area, form transformation of decay products, radionuclide composition of the fuel precipitation in the nearest zone of Chernobyl NPP. Special attention is paid to medical-biological problems of the accident aftereffects influence on flora, fauna and human health, labour conditions and sick rate state of people working in the exclusion area. For scientists, experts working in the field of ecology, radioecology, atom energetics, radiology, radiochemistry, radiobiology and related fields. It may be useful for postgraduates and students

  16. Cancer consequences of the Chernobyl accident: 20 years on

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardis, Elisabeth [International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon CEDEX 08 (France); Howe, Geoffrey [Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 722 W. 168th Street, Room 1104, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Ron, Elaine [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Building EPS, MS 7238, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)] (and others)

    2006-06-15

    26 April 2006 marks the 20th anniversary of the Chernobyl accident. On this occasion, the World Health Organization (WHO), within the UN Chernobyl Forum initiative, convened an Expert Group to evaluate the health impacts of Chernobyl. This paper summarises the findings relating to cancer. A dramatic increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer has been observed among those exposed to radioactive iodines in childhood and adolescence in the most contaminated territories. Iodine deficiency may have increased the risk of developing thyroid cancer following exposure to radioactive iodines, while prolonged stable iodine supplementation in the years after exposure may reduce this risk. Although increases in rates of other cancers have been reported, much of these increases appear to be due to other factors, including improvements in registration, reporting and diagnosis. Studies are few, however, and have methodological limitations. Further, because most radiation-related solid cancers continue to occur decades after exposure and because only 20 years have passed since the accident, it is too early to evaluate the full radiological impact of the accident. Apart from the large increase in thyroid cancer incidence in young people, there are at present no clearly demonstrated radiation-related increases in cancer risk. This should not, however, be interpreted to mean that no increase has in fact occurred: based on the experience of other populations exposed to ionising radiation, a small increase in the relative risk of cancer is expected, even at the low to moderate doses received. Although it is expected that epidemiological studies will have difficulty identifying such a risk, it may nevertheless translate into a substantial number of radiation-related cancer cases in the future, given the very large number of individuals exposed. (rev0009i.

  17. Fright from Chernobyl; Skremselet fra Tsjernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    Research on nuclear power be defined through catastrophes, said Norwegian experts. The worst of them throwing after 25 years still an equally long and dark shadow. 25 years since the Chernobyl accident. The article has fact boxes on the three major reactor accidents, Chernobyl with RBMK reactor; Three Mile Island with PWR and BWR reactor at Fukushima. Points out the danger by untrained personnel deal with risky situations. (AG)

  18. The International Technical Safety Forum

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The International Technical Safety Forum is a meeting of safety experts from several physics labs in Europe and the US. Since 1998 participants have been meeting every couple of years to discuss common challenges in safety matters. The Forum helps them define best practices and learn from the important lessons learned by others.   The Forum's participants in front of building 40. This year, the meeting took place at CERN from 12 to 16 April. “This year's meeting covered subjects ranging from communication and training in matters of safety, to cryogenic safety, emergency preparedness and risk analysis”, explains Ralf Trant, head of the CERN Safety Commission and organiser of this year’s Forum. Radiation protection issues are not discussed at the meeting since they involve different expertise. The goal of the Forum is to allow participants to share experience, learn lessons and acquire specific knowledge in a very open way. Round-table discussions, dedicated time for ...

  19. Chernobyl, 14 years later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report draws an account of the consequences of Chernobyl accident 14 years after the disaster. It is made up of 8 chapters whose titles are: 1) Some figures about Chernobyl accident, 2) Chernobyl nuclear power plant, 3)Sanitary consequences of Chernobyl accident, 4) The management of contaminated lands, 5) The impact in France of Chernobyl fallout, 6) International cooperation, 7) More information about Chernobyl and 8) Glossary

  20. Chernobyl bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the DOE/OHER Chernobyl Database project is to create and maintain an information system to provide usable information for research studies related to the nuclear accident. The system is the official United States repository for information about the Chernobyl accident and its consequences, and currently includes an extensive bibliography and diverse radiological measurements with supporting information. PNL has established two resources: original (not summarized) measurement data, currently about 80,000 measurements, with ancillary information; and about 2,200 bibliographic citations, some including abstracts. Major organizations that have contributed radiological measurement data include the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services; United States Environmental Protection Agency (domestic and foreign data); United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Stone ampersand Webster; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Commissariat A L'energie Atomique in France; Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Food in the United Kingdom; Japan National Institute of Radiological Sciences; and the Finnish Centre For Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). Scientists in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, China, Denmark, England, Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Romania, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United States, Wales, and Yugoslavia have made contributions. Bibliographic materials have been obtained from scientists in the above countries that have replied to requests. In addition, literature searches have been conducted, including a search of the DOE Energy Database. The last search was conducted in January, 1989. This document lists the bibliographic information in the DOE/OHER Chernobyl Database at the current time

  1. Chernobyl bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, F. Jr.; Mahaffey, J.A.

    1989-09-01

    The purpose of the DOE/OHER Chernobyl Database project is to create and maintain an information system to provide usable information for research studies related to the nuclear accident. The system is the official United States repository for information about the Chernobyl accident and its consequences, and currently includes an extensive bibliography and diverse radiological measurements with supporting information. PNL has established two resources: original (not summarized) measurement data, currently about 80,000 measurements, with ancillary information; and about 2,200 bibliographic citations, some including abstracts. Major organizations that have contributed radiological measurement data include the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services; United States Environmental Protection Agency (domestic and foreign data); United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Stone Webster; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Commissariat A L'energie Atomique in France; Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Food in the United Kingdom; Japan National Institute of Radiological Sciences; and the Finnish Centre For Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). Scientists in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, China, Denmark, England, Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Romania, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United States, Wales, and Yugoslavia have made contributions. Bibliographic materials have been obtained from scientists in the above countries that have replied to requests. In addition, literature searches have been conducted, including a search of the DOE Energy Database. The last search was conducted in January, 1989. This document lists the bibliographic information in the DOE/OHER Chernobyl Database at the current time.

  2. After Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses a number of effects of the Chernobyl-accident on public opinion about nuclear power. The analysis is based on a comparison of a survey conducted shortly after Chernobyl and a number of measurements in the Netherlands between 1982 and 1986. The conclusions can be summarized as follows: Attitudes towards nuclear power and especially towards building new stations have become much more negative after the disaster in Chernobyl. Although a majority of the population now wants to close existing nuclear power stations, there appears strong support for continuation of nuclear research. The structure of the nuclear debate has not changed fundamentally. Supporters and opponents have kept the same demographic characteristics. The arguments which distinguish them have not changed, except that the expectation of a serious accident has an increased impact on attitudes. A majority of the population felt the information after the accident not sufficient. Since 1982 attitudes towards coal also have become more negative, mainly as a consequence of the higher visibility of effects of acid rain. (Auth.)

  3. Overcoming of abstracts to rational energy use in residential and administrative buildings. Report on a forum of experts; Hemmnisabbau bei der rationellen Energieverwendung - Wohn- und Verwaltungsgebaeude. Bericht zum Experten-Forun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boede, U.; Gruber, E.; Jochem, E. [eds.

    1999-02-01

    In ten lectures delivered by outstanding experts, the state of knowledge in different sectors of research and practical experience was reported and the need for research and action with a view to possibilities for eliminating implementation deficits in energy conservation and climate protection policy was put up for debate from the various angles. The attendants comprised, beside representatives of science, also important multipliers and selected practitioners in order to confront theoretical approaches by practical observations. On the basis of the lecture manuscripts, talks and discussion contributions, a preliminary documentation was compiled which was submitted to the attendants for comments. The present final report contains their amendments; it moreover comprises summaries and conclusions on the part of the ISI regarding future research and action requirement to overcome obstacles in the sector of rational energy use. In 1999 the forum 'overcoming of obstacles' is to be continued with analyses and discussions of measures in the sectors industry and trade, possibly as a jointly organized meeting of experts within the framework of the compilation of the third assessment report of IPCC. (orig.)

  4. Monstrosities - an outcome of Chernobyl?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the western parts of Turkey, which have been particularly hard hidden by the radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident, an extremely high number of malformations in newborns have been recorded. There is reason to attribute this to the high radioactivity level measured in this region after the accident. But most radiation experts refuse to accept any connection between the miscarriages or malformation and the reactor accident. (orig./HP)

  5. Chernobyl, 12 years later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report draws an account of the consequences of Chernobyl accident 12 years after the disaster. It is made up of 7 chapters whose titles are: 1) Some figures about Chernobyl accident, 2) The Chernobyl nuclear power plant, 3)Sanitary consequences of Chernobyl accident, 4) The management of contaminated lands, 5) The impact in France of Chernobyl fallout, 6) The Franco-German cooperation, and 7) Glossary

  6. China Textile Round Table Forum Fabrics: International Trend and Marketing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Yuan

    2007-01-01

    @@ On April 8,2007,China Textile Round Table Forum:Profesional Market Forum(Guangzhou 2007)was held in China Fabrics & Accessories Center.Representatives from many countries and regions,leaderships from Chinese textile and garment industry,as well as experts and corporated executives gathered together on the forum,sharing their views on international trend and marketing of fabric.

  7. Chernobyl health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 26 April 1986, a few short minutes were not enough to destroy one of the four nuclear reactors at Chernobyl and cause, over the next few weeks, the deaths of 31 people from among the staff, rescuers and firefighters who had dealt with the accident and prevented the spread of the catastrophe to the other three reactors on the site. The experts and the authorities soon recognized that the consequences of this event for the environment and for the surrounding populations would last several decades. Forecast estimates from very diverse sources of the nature and extent of these consequences came thick and fast, particularly in the years 1986 and 1987. Unfortunately, they differed so greatly in both time and space that they lacked all credibility. As the news spread through the public, it could only worsen a social climate which was already seriously upset by the effects of the catastrophe itself. 55 refs

  8. Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The examination of the radioelements in macromicetae taken in the area of Como's Groane and in other areas near Lakes of Como and Maggiore and a few samples in Pine' di Trento are reported. A number of samples has been collected and analyzed at Joint Research Center, Ispra. A sampling of many pieces has been picked up by the Circolo Micologico Plinio il Vecchio and by the Unita' Sanitarie of Como and Varese. The various samples are subdivided for specie and the denomination for each one of them is given. The foundamental sampling is dated atumn 1986, a second sampling is made in autumn 1987. Gamma spectrometry has revealed the presence of many radiosotopes due to the Chernobyl fall-out. as Cs137, Cs134 and Ag110 (metastable); levels of Potassium 40, a natural radioactive element have been also measured. A discussion of results is presented and the comparison among data of the 1986 season and the 1987 one

  9. Chernobyl 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having recalled the Chernobyl accident process and consequences for the power station buildings, and also the emergency interventions to cover the reactor and avoid that the molten core reaches underground waters, the author proposes a brief overview of the consequences at the international level in the field of nuclear safety with the emergence of a culture of safety which has been applied in other industrial sectors, with the improvement of the quality of transmitted information, and with the lessons learned about the efficiency of early ingestion of iodine pills. The author evokes the construction of a containment arch to dismantle the whole installation, comments the various results published on health consequences and gives some explanations about their discrepancy

  10. The Chernobyl catastrophe: Consequences on human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yablokov, A.; Labunska, I.; Blokov, I.; Santillo, D.; Johnston, P.; Stringer, R.; Sadownichik, T. (eds.); Antipkin, Yu.G. [Institute of Paediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Academy of Medical Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine); Arabskaya, L.P. [Institute of Paediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Academy of Medical Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine); Bazyka, D.A. [Research Centre for Radiation Medicine, Academy of Medical Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine)] (and others)

    2006-04-15

    This new Greenpeace report estimates that the full consequences of the Chernobyl disaster could top a quarter of a million cancers cases and nearly 100,000 fatal cancers. It reports that the report involved 52 respected scientists and includes information never before published in English. It challenges the International Atomic Energy Agency Chernobyl Forum report, which predicted 4,000 additional deaths attributable to the accident as a gross simplification of the real breadth of human suffering. Their data, based on Belarus national cancer statistics, predicts approximately 270,000 cancers and 93,000 fatal cancer cases caused by Chernobyl. The report also concludes that on the basis of demographic data, during the last 15 years, 60,000 people have additionally died in Russia because of the Chernobyl accident, and estimates of the total death toll for the Ukraine and Belarus could reach another 140,000. The report also looks into the ongoing health impacts of Chernobyl and concludes that radiation from the disaster has had a devastating effect on survivors; damaging immune and endocrine systems, leading to accelerated ageing, cardiovascular and blood illnesses, psychological illnesses, chromosomal aberrations and an increase in foetal deformations.

  11. The Chernobyl catastrophe: Consequences on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This new Greenpeace report estimates that the full consequences of the Chernobyl disaster could top a quarter of a million cancers cases and nearly 100,000 fatal cancers. It reports that the report involved 52 respected scientists and includes information never before published in English. It challenges the International Atomic Energy Agency Chernobyl Forum report, which predicted 4,000 additional deaths attributable to the accident as a gross simplification of the real breadth of human suffering. Their data, based on Belarus national cancer statistics, predicts approximately 270,000 cancers and 93,000 fatal cancer cases caused by Chernobyl. The report also concludes that on the basis of demographic data, during the last 15 years, 60,000 people have additionally died in Russia because of the Chernobyl accident, and estimates of the total death toll for the Ukraine and Belarus could reach another 140,000. The report also looks into the ongoing health impacts of Chernobyl and concludes that radiation from the disaster has had a devastating effect on survivors; damaging immune and endocrine systems, leading to accelerated ageing, cardiovascular and blood illnesses, psychological illnesses, chromosomal aberrations and an increase in foetal deformations

  12. Forum Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Yasuko

    2014-01-01

    Social class has been underresearched in the field of applied linguistics. The central goal of this forum was to stimulate more conversation about social class as it impacts language learning and teaching. In this article, I comment on 3 salient themes that have emerged in the 5 articles: (1) agency and structure in language learning and teaching,…

  13. Impressions of Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three years on from the nuclear power plant accident, an inaugural meeting of the Wano (World Association of Nuclear Operators) discusses impressions of the Chernobyl incident on a technical tour through the Chernobyl exclusion zone. (author)

  14. Chernobyl, 17 after

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This information document takes stock on the Chernobyl accident effects, 17 years after the reactor accident. The domains concerned are: the Chernobyl power plant, the sanitary consequences of the accident in the most exposed countries, the Chernobyl environment and the polluted regions management, the Chernobyl accident consequences in France; Some data and technical sheets on the RBMK reactors and the international cooperation are also provided. (A.L.B.)

  15. Chernobyl revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations made on a visit to the Chernobyl area in July 1990 are reported. Although the main purpose of the visit was to try out thermoluminescence techniques on materials exposed to radiation during the accident, the observations reported here are of a more general nature covering the variations in dose rate and contamination of surfaces within the 30 km exclusion zone and in the deserted tow of Pripyat, and plant, animal and bird life. The most ubiquitous contamination in Pripyat is caesium, which has penetrated all porous surfaces and would probably be very difficult to remove from brick structures if rehabitation were ever contemplated. Recorded dose-rates varied considerably on and in different parts of buildings. Radiation measurements of external surfaces were typically in the range 1-10 μSv/h and an order of magnitude less within buildings. Grass verges were particularly badly contaminated; measurements up to 110 μSv/h were noted in the most polluted area of Pripyat. Ecologically, the area seems to have benefited from having been allowed to return to nature. Many birds and a wide variety of plants and trees were flourishing; some older pine trees showed evidence of damage, however. The only insects observed were peacock butterflies. (Author)

  16. The never ending burden: Germany in the year 1 past Chernobyl: Confused experts, distressed mothers, contaminated milk. Radiation doses went down, but the cancer risk and genetic hazards remain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becquerel values in milk and meat are due to rise again during the next few weeks. The Federal Republic of Germany continues to live with the radioactive burden brought by the Chernobyl clouds. It is true that the radiation doses are lower than expected, but low-dose exposure, too, can have evil effects; the cancer risk and genetic hazards still remain incalculable. The article presents a survey of the radiation exposure in the country as a function of geographic data, and a rough assessment of possible consequences emanating from ingestion of contaminated food. (orig./GL)

  17. Chernobyl information: The ALARA backlash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk information to the public failed after the Chernobyl accident, also in countries where radiation protection authorities and experts initially enjoyed public confidence. In contrast to many other large accidents, the responsibility for the information failure stays mainly with the authorities and experts themselves, not with the mass media. Many factors together caused the radiation risk information from SSI (Swedish Radiation Protection Institute), and its sister authorities in many other countries, to be confusing and inadequate, despite the best of intentions. The two major malefactors were the handling of food contamination restrictions and the short-sighted risk optimisation by applying the ALARA principle. In addition, the assurance that the Chernobyl contamination was fairly harmless made no sense to the layman, as a massive array of controlling procedures was enforced simultaneously. The food regulations became unfortunately focused on becquerel per kilogram limits instead of the primary goal, a dose reduction per year, corresponding to an yearly intake of Cs-137. The lesson learned is that the risk significant long-term intake ambition must be understood and digested by laymen and media, before any secondary limits, e.g. the activity concentration of foodstuffs expressed as becquerel per kg, for controlling or trading purposes, are introduced. As it were, the experts and authorities lost credibility, due to what people considered as ambiguities. The concept of ALARA (As Low As Readily Achievable) is in the backbone of every ionising radiation expert, and a useful strategy for optimising dose burdens during controlled situations. In connection to the Chernobyl accident many advices to the public was given based on the ALARA principle. 'Rinse leafy vegetables' sounds at first very reasonable, cheap and innocent, but if the averted dose is low, such an advice should not be given. The individual dose-reduction should be weighted against all negative

  18. Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the accident at Chernobyl nuclear reactor, WHO organized on 6 May 1986 in Copenhagen a one day consultation of experts with knowledge in the fields of meteorology, radiation protection, biological effects, reactor technology, emergency procedures, public health and psychology in order to analyse the development of events and their consequences and to provide guidance as to the needs for immediate public health action. The present report provides detailed information on the transportation and dispersion of the radioactive material in the atmosphere, especially volatile elements, during the release period 26 April - 5 May. Presented are the calculated directions and locations of the radioactive plume over Europe in the first 5 days after the accident, submitted by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute. The calculations have been made for two heights, 1500m and 750m and the plume directions are grouped into five periods, covering five European areas. The consequences of the accident inside the USSR and the radiological consequences outside the USSR are presented including the exposure routes and the biological effects, paying particular attention to iodine-131 effects. Summarized are the first reported measured exposure rates above background, iodine-131 deposition and concentrations in milk and the remedial actions taken in various European countries. Concerning the cesium-137 problem, based on the UNSCEAR assessment of the consequences of the nuclear fallout, one concludes that the cesium contamination outside the USSR is not likely to cause any serious problems. Finally, the conclusions and the recommendations of the meeting, taking into account both the short-term and longer term considerations are presented

  19. 10th anniversary of Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Every issue has its defining event. There is no doubt that the single word which now embodies that difficult-to express unease felt by many people about nuclear power is Chernobyl. In this sense, April 26 1996 will be far more than an anniversary, just as Chernobyl was far more than a very serious accident which was nonetheless largely localised in its effects. It will be used by those who wish to the industry - the professional campaigners in the Green movement - and those who see an opportunity to sell newspapers or TV programmes - the professional exaggerators - to spread that unease as far as possible. The British Nuclear Industry Forum, which consists of seventy member companies at the heart of nuclear power in the UK, has convened a Task Force, with an international membership, in an attempt to make sure that we are ready for the anniversary, and to respond to the tactics of the opposition in as effective a way as possible. This paper outlines the general principles which have so far emerged from our discussions. There are two guiding principles to our approach. The first is that no matter how good a story is about Chernobyl, it is still a bad story. But secondly, this anniversary will be big news whether we like it or not, so we must make the best of it. In this sense the event brings with it opportunities to remind people of positive messages, on fuel diversity, on environment, and on Western efforts to help to improve the safety standards of the nuclear industry in the region, and the health of the people near Chernobyl. This leads to a position for the campaign which might appear paradoxical. We must be proactive but low-profile. We simply cannot afford to keep quiet and let the wildest claims about the effects of Chernobyl be spouted unchallenged. This does not simply mean generating responses to stories once they have been published. It means analysing press coverage of previous anniversaries to understand how the media are likely to treat it; it means

  20. Chernobyl: fourteen years on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current situation around Chernobyl is observed, special attention being paid to the status of SARCOPHAGUS and consequences for human health. The problem of low doses is reviewed, with an impact to what the hormesis is

  1. Chernobyl: a documentary story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This account of the Chernobyl disaster of April 1986 is based on interviews with many of the participants. Realising that the Chernobyl accident was to have a massive impact on the USSR and the world, the author felt impelled to travel to the designated danger zone around the reactor, to live there and to interview firemen, first-aid workers, party and government officials and local media representatives. The result is a variety of vivid eyewitness accounts that are unprecedented in their detail and frankness. These accounts show why the author considers the Chernobyl accident to be the most important event in the Soviet Union since World War II. The book, itself a product of glasnost, reveals how the Chernobyl accident was viewed from inside the Soviet Union. (author)

  2. Chernobyl 25 years later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation authors describe the field trip to the territory of Chernobyl NPP. They obtained samples from contaminated territory which were analysed on the presence of plutonium-238 and plutonium-239.

  3. Chernobyl 25 years later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper authors describe the field trip to the territory of Chernobyl NPP. They obtained samples from contaminated territory which were analysed on the presence of plutonium-238 and plutonium-239.

  4. Lighting detectives forum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Katja; Skindbjerg Kristensen, Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    Belysning for boligområder var emnet for lighting detectives forum, der blev afholdt i Stockholm i august 2003.......Belysning for boligområder var emnet for lighting detectives forum, der blev afholdt i Stockholm i august 2003....

  5. Chernobyl and the media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The way the media reported the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident was discussed at a day seminar in Birmingham in July. Contributors were from the Forsmark nuclear power station in Sweden where the disaster was first noticed, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Russian film industry, French TV and SCRAM. Personal experiences and opinions of Chernobyl and the media were discussed. The approach in West Germany, France, Finland and the United Kingdom is compared. (UK)

  6. Chernobyl, 16 years later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document on the Chernobyl site evolution is constituted around four main questions. What about the future of the Chernobyl site, the damaged reactor and the ''sarcophagus'' constructed around the reactor? What about the sanitary consequences of the accident on the liquidators asked to blot out the radiation and the around people exposed to radiation? What about the contaminated land around the power plant and their management? Concerning the France, what were the ''radioactive cloud'' sanitary consequences? (A.L.B.)

  7. Chernobyl, 13 years after

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is an annual report, regularly issued by IPSN, that presents the ecological and health consequences of the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident. The present status of the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant, which Ukraine engaged to stop definitively in year 2000, is summarized. The only reactor unit now in operation is Chernobylsk-3 Reactor which poses two safety questions: evolution of cracks in part of the tubing and behaviour of the pressure tubes. Although, some improvements in the RBMK reactor types were introduced, problems remain that make IPSN to stress the requirement of stopping this NPP completely. In the contaminated territories surrounding Chernobyl incidence rate of infant thyroid cancers continues to grow, reaching values 10 to 100 times higher than the natural rate. In France the IPSN analyzed 60,000 records carried out in 17 sites during May 1986 and April 1989. It was estimated that the individual dose received during 60 years (1986-2046) by the inhabitants of the most affected zone (eastern France) is lower than 1.5 mSv, a value lower than 1% of the natural cosmic and telluric radioactivity exposure for the same period. For the persons assumed to live in the most attacked forests (from eastern France) and nourishing daily with venison and mushrooms the highest estimate is 1 mSv a year. Concerning the 'hot spots', identified in mountains by IPSN and CRIIRAD, the doses received by excursionists are around 0.015 mSv. For an average inhabitant of the country the dose piled up in the thyroid due to iodine-131 fallout is estimated to 0.5-2 mSv for an adult and 6.5-16 mSv for an infant. These doses are 100 to 1000 times lower than the ones to which the infants living in the neighbourhood of Chernobyl are exposed to. The contents of the report is displayed in the following six chapters: 1. Chernobyl in some figures; 2. The 'sarcophagus' and the reactors of the Chernobyl NPP; 3. Health consequences of the Chernobyl accident;. 4. The impact of Chernobyl fallout in France

  8. Non-cancer health effects of the Chernobyl accident and special health care programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In September 2004, the Expert Group on Health of the Chernobyl Forum specifically focused on non-cancer diseases and mortality associated with the Chernobyl accident as well as on medical follow-up. The group considered the following topics: cataracts, cardiovascular disease, cytogenetic markers, immunological effects, reproductive effects and children's health, psychological and mental effects, mortality due to the accident, and medical programmes and medical monitoring. The issues of potential cataracts at low doses as well as follow-up of liquidators disease incidence and mortality should be continued. Cytogenetic effects may be used to assess doses above 0.2 Gy but are unlikely to be useful at lower doses. There is no clear evidence of radiation-related adverse clinical effects on the immune system of the general public or on hereditary or reproductive outcomes (particularly congenital malformations). Lifespan reduction and death rates of the general public are higher in both contaminated and clean areas than in other countries as is infant mortality, but these are not felt to be radiation related. Although the major potential radiation-related health effect is felt to be the cancer risk, screening programmes are not felt to be useful when absorbed doses are in the range of tens of mGy or lower. Psychological effects are real and represent the biggest public health impact of the accident. These will need continuing attention for the foreseeable future. While the paper is focused entirely on potential adverse effects of the accident, one should recognize the efforts of the Governments of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine to protect and take care of the affected populations. (author)

  9. CERN Apps meet in a forum

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    In the fast-evolving world of mobile apps, creativity and usability are key words. For the time being, the number of CERN apps is quite limited but the situation could quickly change. An information-sharing forum set up by the IT Department is a starting point to channel your creativity with the help of experts, best practices and useful guidelines.   The CAPPS (CERN Apps) Forum was set up about a year ago. Its members come from various departments and meet every two or three months to update each other on the apps that are in preparation, share the latest news on the available software, discuss best practices and so on. “The Forum is open to anybody wanting to develop apps at CERN,” explains David Foster, Deputy Department Head and initiator of the CAPPS Forum. “Developers, communication experts and IT infrastructure experts meet and discuss various topics, from branding-related issues to coding and implementation solutions. The aim is to go forward in a coherent way...

  10. Medical aspects of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 11 to 13 May 1988, the All-Union Scientific Centre of Radiation Medicine convened a Conference on Medical Aspects of the Chernobyl Accident in Kiev. This was the first conference on this subject with international participation held in the Soviet Union. There were 310 specialists representing Soviet scientific establishments and over 60 experts from 23 other countries and international organizations participated in the Conference. Participants at the Conference discussed medical aspects of accident mitigation, including therapeutic, psychological, demographic, epidemiological and dosimetric problems. These proceedings include 29 reports presented by Soviet scientists during the four sessions as well as summaries of discussions and opening addresses. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Healthy living after Chernobyl?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our food today is endangered not only through environmental poisons and the machinations of profit-hungry manufacturers but also, after the reactor disaster of Chernobyl, by radioactive materials. There is great uncertainty amongst consumers: Whan can I still eat? How can I best protect my children from food products contaminated by radioactivity or enriched with pollutants? Does it still make sense to buy organically produced foodstuffs? Which food products are low in pollutants? With this book the authors want to counteract general helplessness and help the reader with comprehensible and sound information as well as practical tips for eating and living healthily after Chernobyl. (orig.)

  12. Chernobyl - the government reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Farmers' Union of Wales submitted this memorandum to the Agriculture Committee of the House of Commons giving its interpretation of the Government's reaction to the Chernobyl disaster. The primary aim of the paper is to provide an objective assessment of the impact of the disaster and the Government's handling of it, for future reference. The subject is dealt with under the following headings:- Chernobyl nuclear fallout in Wales, monitoring of milk and fresh vegetables, silage contamination, the North Wales Sheep Sector, soil, herbage and genetic implications, recommendations for the future. (UK)

  13. LLW Forum meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) meeting on May 29 through May 31, 1996.The LLW Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  14. Wildlife in Chernobyl forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article is a review of a book addressed Wormwood Forest: a natural history of Chernobyl which describes life in Europe's largest wildlife sanctuary in the region surrounding the Chernobyl station. Since the accident, the area has largely been a safe haven from hunters and farmers, allowing the wildlife to live in an undisturbed environment. Against this backdrop, the book describes in detail, a highly controversial programme that released an endangered species of horse into the zone. Lack of funding for such programmes makes it nearly impossible to administer them. The book blends reportage, popular science and encounters with the zone's few residents. The result is an account of a remarkable land, its people and animals seen through the eyes of the locals, the author and the zoologists, botanists and radiologists who travelled with her around the zone. The radiation is the book's ever-present protagonist, as the author describes in detail how it works itself through the entire food chain and environment. Along the author's journey through the affected regions of Belarus and Ukraine she debunks several myths surrounding Chernobyl and the nuclear industry in general. In fact, while there have been a small number of cases of mutations observed in some species, these are not as dramatic as the Chernobyl mythology.

  15. Nuclear energy after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper on fundamental questions by a representative of the Federal German Government focuses on the following subjects: Nuclear energy as a part of the energy policy of the Federal German Government, the justifiability of nuclear energy, lessons from Chernobyl, nuclear phase-out, safety concepts for the future, supply of nuclear power plants, and nuclear waste disposal. (UA)

  16. Chernobyl accident and Danmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the Chernobyl accident and its consequences for Denmark in particular. It was commissioned by the Secretary of State for the Environment. Volume 1 contains copies of original documents issued by Danish authorities during the first accident phase and afterwards. Evaluations, monitoring data, press releases, legislation acts etc. are included. (author)

  17. Chernobyl: The WHO helps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This booklet addresses concerns of the populations of the areas of Belarus, Ukraine and Russia affected by the Chernobyl accident. Answers to commonly asked questions comprise the bulk of the information, but the booklet also describes the WHO's work to study and mitigate the effects on the exposed populations

  18. Science. Chernobyl-96. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection contains the results of Chernobyl accident investigation on the territory of Ukraine. The conference was devoted to the following problems: -equipment and dosimetry; - agriculture and forestry radioecology and environmental monitoring; - medical, biological and social consequences; - waste management; - 'Shelter' problems; - information and simulation technologies

  19. The Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The documentation abstracted contains a complete survey of the broadcasts transmitted by the Russian wire service of the Deutsche Welle radio station between April 28 and Mai 15, 1986 on the occasion of the Chernobyl reactor accident. Access is given to extracts of the remarkable eastern and western echoes on the broadcasts of the Deutsche Welle. (HP)

  20. Chernobyl accident and Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the Chernobyl accident and its consequences for Denmark in particular. It was commissioned by The Secretary of State for the Environment. Volume 2 contains copies of original documents issued by Danish authorities during the first accident phase and afterwards. Evaluations, monitoring data, press releases, legislation acts etc. are included. (author)

  1. The Chernobyl effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In what way and to what extent does an event like the Chernobyl reactor accident influence the citizen's attitudes and political commitment. This book evolves a number of theses on these questions dealing above all with the determinants of political protest. Two investigations are presented in order to verify those theses: in 1982 and 1987 (some nine months after the Chernobyl reactor accident), the same persons were interviewed. In addition, representative surveys in the Federal Republic of Germany are analysed, in order to assess in general the impact of Chernobyl. From the contents: explanation model for political protest; Chernobyl effect: effect of critical events on the mobilization of political protest; discontent with nuclear energy use, political alienation and protest; internal incentives for protest: norms, readiness for aggression, and entertainment quality of protest; resources as determinants of political protest; sanctions and protest; social nets and political protest; verification of a central model of political protest, and problems encountered by research. Appendix: investigation plan and random sampling of the panel of nuclear power opponents. (orig./HP)

  2. Chernobyl tenth anniversary: strategy for response, organisation, examples and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each anniversary of the nuclear accident at Chernobyl, Ukraine, in April 1986, is accompanied by considerable activity on the part of the press and the anti-nuclear industry. In the course of such activity, many distortions of the true situation in the area are promulgated. It was clear to the nuclear industry that the tenth anniversary would be especially difficult. Hence the international nuclear community, under the leadership of the British Nuclear Industry Forum, constituted a Task Force to consider responses to the anniversary. This paper describes the essential steps in setting up the Task Force; discusses the main elements of the strategy which emerged, including the Chernobyl Fact Sheets, the identification of credible third parties who could explain key issues with the media, and the secondment of a British press officer to the plant to coordinate international visits; and evaluate press response to the anniversary in comparison with previous anniversaries. (author)

  3. Expert Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, P.J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Expert systems mimic the problem-solving activity of human experts in specialized domains by capturing and representing expert knowledge. Expert systems include a knowledge base, an inference engine that derives conclusions from the knowledge, and a user interface. Knowledge may be stored as if-then rules, orusing other formalisms such as frames and predicate logic. Uncertain knowledge may be represented using certainty factors, Bayesian networks, Dempster-Shafer belief functions, or fuzzy se...

  4. Chernobyl accident: lessons learned for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    implementation of good known effective countermeasures at early stage could have substantially reduced the number of thyroid cancer cases after accident. U N Chernobyl Forum recommended long-term activity for mitigation Chernobyl's consequences - A Strategy for Recovery. For improvement this strategy must be create the modern system of the radiation protection based on the new international and national recommendations. The key issues of the Belarusian experience is discussed. (author)

  5. Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On April 26, 1986, an explosion occurred at the newest of four operating nuclear reactors at the Chernobyl site in the USSR. The accident initiated an international technical exchange of almost unprecedented magnitude; this exchange was climaxed with a meeting at the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna during the week of August 25, 1986. The meeting was attended by more than 540 official representatives from 51 countries and 20 international organizations. Information gleaned from that technical exchange is presented in this report. A description of the Chernobyl reactor, which differs significantly from commercial US reactors, is presented, the accident scenario advanced by the Russian delegation is discussed, and observations that have been made concerning fission product release are described

  6. Chernobyl: The aftermath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear accident in Chernobyl prompted vehement and sometimes controversial public and political reaction in the Federal Republic of Germany, as it did elsewhere. What remained after the initial concern subsided? We at the IIUG feel obligated to make a contribution to the preservation and the improvement of our environmental quality, both in basic and specialized research aimed at environmental problems. It is time to take stock of the findings of our own work; we must access the feedback to and implementation of this research; the candidness and integrity of the scientific-economic-political community; superfluous knowledge or information gaps; structural obstacles and possible alternatives. This paper presents, in condensed form, the results of the 'post-Chernobyl' discussions at the IIUG, based on our work in various projects. (orig.)

  7. Accidents - Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This file is devoted to the Chernobyl accident. It is divided in four parts. The first part concerns the accident itself and its technical management. The second part is relative to the radiation doses and the different contaminations. The third part reports the sanitary effects, the determinists ones and the stochastic ones. The fourth and last part relates the consequences for the other European countries with the case of France. Through the different parts a point is tackled with the measures taken after the accident by the other countries to manage an accident, the cooperation between the different countries and the groups of research and studies about the reactors safety, and also with the international medical cooperation, specially for the children, everything in relation with the Chernobyl accident. (N.C.)

  8. Byelorussia's Chernobyl legacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the Chernobyl nuclear accident on 26 April 1986 radioactive fall-out was widely distributed over the eastern territories of the Soviet Union and over Europe. While the effects in Europe have been well documented and have received widespread media attention, less is known about the effects within the Soviet Union. The general picture that has been painted is that while the accident was serious, it wasn't that bad and the resulting contamination is something that can be lived with. In reality many people are living in contaminated zones which would be regarded as completely unacceptable in the United Kingdom. However, the USSR Ministry of Public Health has argued that relocation is not necessary. The Ministry and other agencies including the Red Cross do not recognize the contamination as serious and feel the main side effect of Chernobyl is psychological. In Byelorussia however, 100,000 people are still living in areas of major contamination. (author)

  9. Reflections on Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl and Three Mile Island reactor accidents are revealing some of the social costs of such failures, widespread opposition to nuclear power. As far as mortality and morbidity go, Chernobyl was probably a smaller incident than the chemical disaster at Bhopal. But nuclear people must accept the idea that a nuclear hazard is perceived as somehow different. Since nuclear energy will be needed to replace oil eventually, and the environmental impacts of properly operating nuclear power plants are far less than those of fossil fuelled power plants, this appears to be an appropriate time for the United States and other interested countries to start developing inherently safe nuclear power plants which will be acceptable to the public

  10. Chernobyl: Geographic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the geographic considerations that could effect the long range consequences of the Chernobyl accident. First, the explosion and fire lofted the radionuclides that were released, so the areas that should have been most severely effected were the areas that were downwind of the accident. Curiously, the Soviets have not mentioned the number of casualties from these areas. A second consideration is that Chernobyl is located upstream from the Dnieper River which is the source for six major reservoirs. These reservoirs provide drinking water, industrial and irrigation water, and recreational and commercial fishing for over six million people. The Soviets say that they have taken measures to prevent the radioactive contamination of the Dnieper but they neglected to explain the methods used to accomplish this feat

  11. The Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In connection with the Chernobyl accident the report gives a description of the technical features of importance to the accident, the course of events, and the estimated health hazards in the local environment. Dissimilarities in western and Sovjet reactor safety philosophy are dealt with, as well as conceivable concequences in relation to technology and research in western nuclear power programmes. Results of activity level measurements of air and foodstuff, made in Norway by Institute for Energy Technology, are given

  12. Chernobyl: a year after

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactivity measurements in the year after the Chernobyl accident, carried out by the Radioprotection Division of the Joint Research Centre of Ispra, are reported. Air at ground level and in grass, milk, wheat, meat, fishes and man have been measured. The evaluation of the 1987 individual dose equivalent due to the exposure of the population living in N.W. Italy is compared with the dose equivalent absorbed in the year following the accident

  13. Chernobyl 25 years on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a brief recall on radioactivity measurement units and on radioactivity itself, this report describes and comments the Chernobyl accident, its consequent releases, the scattering of the radioactive plume over Europe, the formation of radioactive deposits in Europe, the contamination of the different environments and of the food chain, the health impact in the most contaminated areas, the doses received in France and their associated risks. It finally draws some lessons from this accident

  14. Fallout over Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friends of the Earth Ltd set up a mobile radiation monitoring unit between October and November 1988 which surveyed grass, silage, vegetables, meat in areas in Cumbria, North Wales, the Isle of Man and Scotland affected by the restrictions on the slaughter and movement of sheep following the accident at Chernobyl in 1986. This report contains the results of 357 sample analyses for CS 134 and Cs 137 examined during the survey and discusses discrepancies with official data. (U.K.)

  15. Chernobyl: radiation and disinformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review is presented of the accident at Chernobyl and the delay in reporting it. A hypothesis is suggested for the cause of the accident and subsequent increase in intensity as resulting from decomposition of water and release of hydrogen at the high temperatures reached. Comments are also made on radiation levels compared with those from natural background radiation and from mass-radiography. (V.J.H.)

  16. 8 years after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl accident is the largest radiation catastrophe in its scale and prolonged consequences. Nearly 70% of radioactive materials released into the atmosphere as a result of the reactor accident have deposited at the territory of Belarus. 23% of the territory republic turned out to be contaminated with cesium 137 with radiation density 1 Ci/sq.km. 2.1 millions of people inhabited these areas in Belarus (about 20% population). More than 18000 sq.km of agricultural land (22%) and more than 20000 sq.km of forests (30% of the entire tract) have been contaminated with radionuclides. There is not a single branch of production which is not damaged by the accident at the Chernobyl NPP. After-effects of the accident tell on health of people. The increase of diseases of cardiovascular, alimentary, nervous, musculoskeletal systems, mental and lung diseases is observed in the area of radioactive contamination. Lately, the rise of thyroid cancer rates in children (from 1986 until 1994 more than 250 cases) causes particular anxiety. Nowadays, thyroid cancer is precisely considered as the direct after-effect of the Chernobyl catastrophe. Frequency of children birth with defects is nearly twice as large in the areas with density of contamination with cesium 137 radionuclides exceeding 15 Ci/sq.km. The creation of the system of radiation control is one of the main problems in elimination of the consequences of the accident at the Chernobyl NPP. Radiometers with the ability to control over Republican permissible levels of radionuclide content in food product and water have been created in the Republic. The radiation situation have been studied and the contaminated areas have been mapped. The control over radioactive contamination of air, water, sediments in carried out. (author)

  17. The chernobyl experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschki, Wolfgang

    Numerous articles have been published about the events which occurred at Chernobyl and the radiological impact on the environment and the public. This article tries to find out which experience can be, should be or has already been gained from that accident. The fields which have been studied are: nuclear safety; radiation protection of rescue workers; medical treatment of overexposed persons; decontamination of agricultural land, buildings and cities; behaviour of radionuclides in ecosystems; effects of low doses on human beings.

  18. Return to Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the catastrophic accident at the Chernobylsk 4 reactor in 1986, the Ukraine is currently expanding its nuclear industry. The government is committed to increasing the share of nuclear output to 40% of the country's electric power and the Chernobyl plant is included in this plan. All the Chernobyl reactors were closed down at the time of the accident, but units 1, 2 and 3 had all been restarted after safety modifications by December 1987. A fire in the turbine hall of unit 2 in 1991 resulted in the closure of that reactor and precipitated a political decision to close the entire plant by 1993. The economic consequences of such action and the safe operation of the remaining two reactors led, however, to the reversal of that decision. Work is now far advanced on unit 2 for a restart in 1996 and the management wants to upgrade all three reactors according to IAEA guidelines. Nevertheless, the question of closure of the Chernobyl plant remains in the air. A conditional acceptance of closure by 2000 has been made by the Ukraine provided the shortfall in power is taken up by a new gas-fired station. International finance is being sought for decommissioning, for urgent action on the decaying sarcophagus of unit 4, and for the gas-fired plant. Closure of the plant, given the social upheaval of the accident and recent political events, could contribute to the health of the Ukrainian national psyche. (UK)

  19. Standardization and Innovation The 2nd Shenzhen Hi-tech Standardization Forum Held

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Manxue; Huang Li

    2006-01-01

    @@ "The 2nd Shenzhen Hi-tech Standardization Forum"was fulfilled in Shenzhen Civil Center on November 25th,2005. The forum lasted for two days. There were around 400 delegates from enterprises and standardization organizations participating in this forum. Nine experts from standardization, intellectual property organizations and enterprises made their excellent speeches focusing on the topic "Standardardization and Innovation". All participates agreed that standardization improves innovation efficiently.

  20. Forum on Organizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Janet Ruth; Jenkins, Trish; Mechenbier, Mahli Xuan; Moeller, Marie

    2011-01-01

    The forum contributors draw on their personal experiences and insights to put forth ideas about how contingent faculty might improve their working conditions through various kinds of alliances. (Contains 1 note.)

  1. China Textile Round Table Forum Fabrics:International Trend and Marketing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    On April 8,2007,China Textile Round Table Forum: Profesional Market Forum (Guangzhou 2007) was held in China Fabrics & Accessories Center.Representatives from many countries and regions,leaderships from Chinese textile and garment industry,as well as experts and corporated

  2. National Forum: How Schools and Parents Can Work Together to Address Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, 2012

    2012-01-01

    On 31 July 2012 the Minister for School Education, Early Childhood and Youth, Peter Garrett convened the "National Forum: How schools and parents can work together to address bullying" at Parliament House. The Forum brought together principals, parents groups, young people, as well as experts in education, child welfare, psychology and marketing…

  3. Chernobyl - 20 years and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In commemoration of the Chernobyl accident 20 years ago, the French society for radiation protection (S.F.R.P.) and the Belgian society for radiation protection (B.V.S.A.B.R.) organise jointly a one day colloquium in Brussels. This colloquium is divided in two parts: the first one concerns the technical and organisational aspects of the accident with the scenario and its global impact, the international environmental radioactivity information exchange through the Chernobyl experience, the European Union (E.U.) assistance to mitigate the Chernobyl accident consequences, the crisis communication and management and the lessons learned from them; the second part is devoted to the medical and humanitarian aspects through the thyroid cancers after Chernobyl accident, the health effects in the European Union (E.U.) and the psychological factors affecting health after the Chernobyl disaster. (N.C.)

  4. Chernobyl - 20 years and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacronique, J.F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Deconinck, F.; Govaerts, P.; Eggermont, C. [SCK-CEN - Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium); Cort, M. de [Institute for Environment and Sustainability, DG JRC EC (Italy); Joulia, J.P. [EuropeAid Co-operation Office, EC, Brussels (Belgium); Dal, A.H.; Balonov, M. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria); Kenigsberg, J. [Commission on Radiation protection, council of ministry (Belarus); Hindie, E. [Universites Paris, 75 (France); Havenaar, M. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands)

    2006-07-01

    In commemoration of the Chernobyl accident 20 years ago, the French society for radiation protection (S.F.R.P.) and the Belgian society for radiation protection (B.V.S.A.B.R.) organise jointly a one day colloquium in Brussels. This colloquium is divided in two parts: the first one concerns the technical and organisational aspects of the accident with the scenario and its global impact, the international environmental radioactivity information exchange through the Chernobyl experience, the European Union (E.U.) assistance to mitigate the Chernobyl accident consequences, the crisis communication and management and the lessons learned from them; the second part is devoted to the medical and humanitarian aspects through the thyroid cancers after Chernobyl accident, the health effects in the European Union (E.U.) and the psychological factors affecting health after the Chernobyl disaster. (N.C.)

  5. Reconstruction of the Chernobyl emergency and accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: on April 26, 1986 the most serious civil technological accident in the history of mankind occurred of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) in the former Soviet Union. As a direct result of the accident, the reactor was severely destroyed and large quantities of radionuclides were released. Some 800000 persons, also called 'liquidators' - including plant operators, fire-fighters, scientists, technicians, construction workers, emergency managers, volunteers, as well as medical and military personnel - were part of emergency measurements and accident management efforts. Activities included measures to prevent the escalation of the accident, mitigation actions, help for victims as well as activities in order to provide a basic infrastructure for this unprecedented and overwhelming task. The overall goal of the 'Project Chernobyl' of the Institute of Risk Research of the University of Vienna was to preserve for mankind the experience and knowledge of the experts among the 'liquidators' before it is lost forever. One method used to reconstruct the emergency measures of Chernobyl was the direct cooperation with liquidators. Simple questionnaires were distributed among liquidators and a database of leading accident managers, engineers, medical experts etc. was established. During an initial struggle with a number of difficulties, the response was sparse. However, after an official permit had been issued, the questionnaires delivered a wealth of data. Furthermore a documentary archive was established, which provided additional information. The multidimensional problem in connection with the severe accident of Chernobyl, the clarification of the causes of the accident, as well as failures and successes and lessons to be learned from the Chernobyl emergency measures and accident management are discussed. (authors)

  6. Statements and presentations from the international conference 'Chernobyl: Looking back to go forwards'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl Forum has involved representatives of the governments of the affected region, who have been dealing with the social and economic aspects of the accident, and scientists who have experience in evaluating the health and environmental aspects of the accident. There has been a great desire to look back at the experience of the past two decades and then to continue forward in positive and effective ways to improve the health and economic well being of the residents of the three countries. We desperately need to reach consensus on this to make useful and sensible progress in dealing with the issues of the accident that still remain and that require and demand continued attention. It is hoped that the Chernobyl Forum can contribute in a positive way to achieve consensus on disputed issues, to promote public understanding and to make realistic suggestions to help alleviate the lingering consequences of the accident

  7. Chernobyl - and then?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes how the different parties of the nuclear debate react to, and deal with, the information that arises on the issue, i.e. the process that leads to decision making. After the Chernobyl accident, a public enquiry was made, to form a base for decisions regarding the future energy policy of Sweden, including the phasing-out of nuclear power. The differing interpretations and uses of the results of this enquiry are studied, in the hope to clarify and separate factual and value-based appreciations of different energy policy alternatives

  8. Chernobyl: an early report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview and assessment of the nuclear accident at Chernobyl is presented. The authors have assembled data from throughout Europe to estimate upper bounds for the possible radiation releases from the accident, the exposures these may produce in humans, and the health consequences that may follow. Measurements of radioactivity in air, fallout, and milk and other food are included. Doses from the accident are compared with those from other sources of radiation exposure and a comparison is made of the annual risk of cancer from this and other causes

  9. The accident of Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RBMK reactors (reactor control, protection systems, containment) and the nuclear power plant of Chernobyl are first presented. The scenario of the accident is given with a detailed chronology. The actions and consequences on the site are reviewed. This report then give the results of the source term estimation (fision product release, core inventory, trajectories, meteorological data...), the radioactivity measurements obtained in France. Health consequences for the French population are evoked. The medical consequences for the population who have received a high level of doses are reviewed

  10. Chernobyl' 94. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains materials of the 4th International Scientific and Technical Conference devoted to the results of 8-years work on Chernobyl accident consequences mitigation. Main results of research in radiation monitoring, applied radioecology, effect of radionuclides on biological objects in contaminated territories are presented. Information about waste management and medical consequences of the accident is given. Methodology and strategic of further research on radionuclides in environment and their influence on living organisms is determined. Large factual materials and its generalization may be usefull for scientists and practical workers in the field of radiation monitoring, radiology and medicine

  11. Evaluation investigation 'Chernobyl'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is an evaluation of the attitude of the Dutch government in response to the Chernobyl accident. It deals with measures taken by the government in order to minimize the (possible) effects, apparent shortcomings and how one has dealt with them, measures which can be taken at least by the Netherlands in case of a reactor accident given the presence of dozens of nuclear power plants in Europe. Good and less good aspects of the temporary organization are noted and some general recommendations are given. (Auth.)

  12. US perspective on Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Soviet medical response to the Chernobyl catastrophe was impressive and demonstrated an enviable level of radiobiologic competence. It also afforded the first opportunity to test the usefulness of bone marrow transplantation as life saving therapy for heavily irradiated patients under emergency conditions. More than 135,000 persons were at risk of exposure to life-threatening levels of radiation. A remarkably engineered evacuation of this population prevented the medical consequences from becoming worse than they were. Our medical perspective is based on the 40-year history of radiation incidents worldwide and especially in the United States

  13. Chernobyl, fifteen years after

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work has been constituted around four questions: the future of the Chernobyl site, the damaged reactor, and the sarcophagus around it; the health consequences of the accident on the persons that have worked on the damaged reactor and on the population in the countries the most exposed to fallout,; the situation of contaminated territories around the power plant and their management today; the last question concerns especially the France with the consequences of the radioactive cloud and what we know about the health risks induced by this event. (N.C.)

  14. Mental health consequences of the Chernobyl disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The psychosocial consequences of disasters have been studied for more than 100 years. The most common mental health consequences are depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, medically unexplained somatic symptoms, and stigma. The excess morbidity rate of psychiatric disorders in the first year after a disaster is in the order of 20%. Disasters involving radiation are particularly pernicious because the exposure is invisible and universally dreaded, and can pose a long-term threat to health. After the Chernobyl disaster, studies of clean-up workers (liquidators) and adults from contaminated areas found a two-fold increase in post-traumatic stress and other mood and anxiety disorders and significantly poorer subjective ratings of health. Among liquidators, the most important risk factor was severity of exposure. In general population samples, the major risk factor was perceived exposure to harmful levels of radiation. These findings are consistent with results from A-bomb survivors and populations studied after the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident. With regard to children, apart from findings from ecological studies that lack direct data on radiation or other teratologic exposures and local studies in Kiev, the epidemiologic evidence suggests that neither radiation exposure nor the stress of growing up in the shadow of the accident was associated with emotional disorders, cognitive dysfunction, or impaired academic performance. Thus, based on the studies of adults, the Chernobyl Forum concluded that mental health was the largest public health problem unleashed by the accident. Since mental health is a leading cause of disability, physical morbidity, and mortality, health monitoring after radiation accidents like Fukushima should include standard measures of well-being. Moreover, given the comorbidity of mental and physical health, the findings support the value of training non-psychiatrist physicians in recognizing and treating common mental

  15. Mental health consequences of the Chernobyl disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromet, Evelyn J

    2012-03-01

    The psychosocial consequences of disasters have been studied for more than 100 years. The most common mental health consequences are depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, medically unexplained somatic symptoms, and stigma. The excess morbidity rate of psychiatric disorders in the first year after a disaster is in the order of 20%. Disasters involving radiation are particularly pernicious because the exposure is invisible and universally dreaded, and can pose a long-term threat to health. After the Chernobyl disaster, studies of clean-up workers (liquidators) and adults from contaminated areas found a two-fold increase in post-traumatic stress and other mood and anxiety disorders and significantly poorer subjective ratings of health. Among liquidators, the most important risk factor was severity of exposure. In general population samples, the major risk factor was perceived exposure to harmful levels of radiation. These findings are consistent with results from A-bomb survivors and populations studied after the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident. With regard to children, apart from findings from ecological studies that lack direct data on radiation or other teratologic exposures and local studies in Kiev, the epidemiologic evidence suggests that neither radiation exposure nor the stress of growing up in the shadow of the accident was associated with emotional disorders, cognitive dysfunction, or impaired academic performance. Thus, based on the studies of adults, the Chernobyl Forum concluded that mental health was the largest public health problem unleashed by the accident. Since mental health is a leading cause of disability, physical morbidity, and mortality, health monitoring after radiation accidents like Fukushima should include standard measures of well-being. Moreover, given the comorbidity of mental and physical health, the findings support the value of training non-psychiatrist physicians in recognizing and treating common mental

  16. Chernobyl: the long shadow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernobyl: the Long Shadow offers a balanced review of what happened there, why and how it happened, and what the main lessons and implications of the accident are. It looks back on events during and after the disaster, in particular reviewing how it and the radiation fallout were dealt with in different countries, and looks forward to how the incident might affect the nuclear power industry around the world. The book explores the significance of the accident within the Soviet Union, considers its impact on public confidence in nuclear power, and reviews what improvements are necessary in emergency planning throughout the rest of the world. It is written from an inter-disciplinary perspective; based on detailed scientific research, which is described in non-specialist terms, it considers themes like attitudes to nuclear power and political reactions to the accident itself. It sets the Chernobyl accident into a proper context, and will appeal to students and teachers of geography, environmental science, international politics, nuclear physics, and to anyone interested in current affairs and environmental problems. (author)

  17. Chernobyl, an opinion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having recalled the circumstances of the Chernobyl accident, and given some indications of associated releases (iodine 131, caesium 134 and 137), the authors gives an overview of biological effects of radiations: generalities (doses, biological effects), results of epidemiological studies in terms of stochastic effects of radiations (for survivals of atomic explosions, in other epidemiological studies, in epidemiological studies related to thyroid), of relationship between dose and effect in the case of low doses (generalities, risk coefficients), and of extrapolation. In the next part, the authors discuss the health consequences of the accident in the former USSR and in the world: consequences noticed by the end of 2000 (non stochastic effects, stochastic effects like occurrence of thyroid cancers or of leukaemia, exposed populations, occurrence of other cancers), predictions of impacts and death on a long term due to stochastic effects (for thyroid cancers, leukaemia and other cancers), global assessment. Then, they discuss the impact of the Chernobyl accident: generalities, doses delivered to the whole body, thyroid cancers

  18. Dispersion modelling after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the time of the Chernobyl accident, little was known about the magnitude and time pattern of the release from the damaged reactor. This paper describes the detective work done in the weeks following the accident to assess the release and its dispersal across Europe; also new calculations done since the USSR presentations in Vienna at the end of August 1986 and some estimates of longer term collective dose commitment are given. The MESOS computer model developed at Imperial College to simulate the dispersal of hypothetical accidental releases of important radionuclides, out to distances of several hundred kilometers, and estimate levels of contamination in the air and deposited on the ground, was adapted for real time use. Combined with meteorological data and measurements of radionuclides collected from miscellaneous sources across Europe, it was possible to estimate how much had been released. To conclude, some general remarks are made about the implications of the Chernobyl accident for technical support in emergency procedures for any future nuclear accident. (UK)

  19. The international Chernobyl project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article summarizes the official report of the International Advisory Committee at the conference of the International Chernobyl Project held in Vienna, May 1991. More details will be found in the actual report, ''The International Chernobyl Project: An Overview'' (INI22:066284/5). Measurements and assessments carried out under the project provided general corroboration of the levels of surface cesium-137 contamination reported in the official maps. The project also concluded that the official procedures for estimating radiation doses to the population were scientifically sound, although they generally resulted in overestimates of two- to threefold. The project could find no marked increase in the incidence of leukemia or cancer, but reported absorbed thyroid doses in children might lead to a statistically detectable rise in the incidence of thyroid tumors. Significant non-radiation-related health disorders were found, and the accident had substantial psychological consequences in terms of anxiety and stress. The project concluded that the protective measures taken were too extreme, and that population relocation and foodstuff restrictions should have been less extensive

  20. "Readers Forum" in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    On 23 April in Shanghai, a "Readers Forum" was held by Women of China to promote contact and exchangewith our readers and improve our work. It was a great honor that some of our foreign women readers, who areliving in Shanghai with their families on business at present, joined us, and nine of them made speeches at theforum. Moreover, two readers who couldn’t attend the forum in person, accepted a telephone interview. Shown hereare their kind comments and suggestions for our magazine.

  1. The Accelerator Reliability Forum

    CERN Document Server

    Lüdeke, Andreas; Giachino, R

    2014-01-01

    A high reliability is a very important goal for most particle accelerators. The biennial Accelerator Reliability Workshop covers topics related to the design and operation of particle accelerators with a high reliability. In order to optimize the over-all reliability of an accelerator one needs to gather information on the reliability of many different subsystems. While a biennial workshop can serve as a platform for the exchange of such information, the authors aimed to provide a further channel to allow for a more timely communication: the Particle Accelerator Reliability Forum [1]. This contribution will describe the forum and advertise it’s usage in the community.

  2. Environmental consequences of the Chernobyl accident and their remediation: 20 years of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl Forum was organized by the United Nations to examine the health and environmental effects of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station Unit Number 4. This paper is concerned with the environmental effects, including human exposure, as determined by the Expert Group on Environment. The accident on 26 April 1986 resulted in the release of a large amount of radioactive materials over a period of ten days. These materials were deposited throughout Europe (and to a minor extent throughout the remainder of the northern hemisphere) with the three more affected countries being Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine. The more important radionuclides from a human dosimetric standpoint were 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs, with half-lives of 8 d, 2 a and 30 a, respectively. More than five million persons lived on territories in these three countries judged to be contaminated at >37 kBq/m2. Many countermeasures were employed to mitigate the effects of the accident, with the main focus being on urban and agricultural areas. The collective effective dose to the residents of the contaminated territories is estimated to be about 55 000 man Sv; the collective thyroid dose is estimated to be 1.6 x 106 man Gy. Effects on non-human biota were observed that ranged from minor to lethal; a notable effect was the killing of a pine forest near the accident site. The current increase in the number and diversity of species in the most contaminated area is due to the absence of human pressure. The current shelter over the damaged reactor was constructed under time pressure, and it has significant leakage or airborne radionuclides and inflow of rainwater. The immediate waste management practices were chaotic and remediation is needed. It is planned to build an NSC structure over the top of the existing structure and to eventually dismantle the damaged reactor. This will put additional pressure on waste management, including the need for a new site for geologic disposal of

  3. The Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant was the most severe in the nuclear industry. The accident caused the rapid death of 31 power plant employees and firemen, mainly from acute radiation exposures and burns, and brought about the evacuation of 116,000 people within a few weeks. In addition, about half a million workers and four million members of the public have been exposed, to some extent, to radiation doses resulting from the Chernobyl accident. A large number of radiation measurements have been made since the accident in order to reconstruct the doses received by the most exposed populations. On the basis of currently available information, it appears that: (1) average doses received by clean-up workers from external irradiation decreased with time, being about 300 mGy for the persons who worked in the first three months after the accident, about 170 mGy for the remainder of 1986, 130 mGy in 1987, 30 mGy in 1988, and 15 mGy in 1989; (2) the evacuees received, before evacuation, effective doses averaging 11 mSv for the population of Pripyat, and 18 mSv for the remainder of the population of the 30 km zone, with maximum effective doses ranging up to 380 mSv; and (3) among the populations living in contaminated areas, the highest doses were those delivered to the thyroids of children. Thyroid doses derived from thyroid measurements among Belarussian and Ukrainian children indicate median thyroid doses of about 300 mGy, and more than 1% of the children with thyroid doses in excess of 5000 mGy. A description is provided of the epidemiological studies that the National Cancer Institute has, since 1990, at the request of the Department of Energy, endeavoured to undertake, in cooperation with Belarus and Ukraine, on two possible health effects resulting from the Chernobyl accident: (1, thyroid cancer in children living in contaminated areas during the first few weeks following the accident, and (2) leukaemia among workers involved in clean

  4. The Chernobyl Trace in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is described the radiation contamination of territory of the Republic of Belarus in 1996 as result of the Chernobyl NPP accident. The maps and diagrams showing a radiation situation in the republic are given. 24 figs

  5. Chernobyl. Answers to your questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifteen years after the Chernobyl accident, this document takes stock on the existing information and enhance the elements which can be set with certainty. The accident is recalled and the environmental and biological effects are presented. (A.L.B.)

  6. About Chernobyl - Twenty Years Later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses the reactor accident of Chernobyl, the information on its consequences so contradictory in the former USSR countries, the status of the effects observed, the forecasting concerning the onset of cancers in the coming years among the populations that were exposed to radiations, the public opinion facing the pessimists. He concludes on the lessons which can be drawn from Chernobyl. (A.L.B.)

  7. Bhopal and Chernobyl: some comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to compare some aspects of the accidents at Bhopal and Chernobyl, their causes and consequences. There were design and management inadequacies in both cases, Maintenance inadequacies were plenty in Bhopal but not in Chernobyl. Written instructions were unsatisfactory in Bhopal. In Chernobyl the operators deliberately violated the instructions repeatedly; this compounded by the unsatisfactory nature of reactor design, led to the accident. Disaster management preparedness and emergency response were excellent at Chernobyl. At Bhopal the plant management was absolutely unprepared and contributed practically nothing to the emergency management; however, civil and military authorities did a splendid job. Immediate deaths in Bhopal are estimated to be 2,500 to 10,000 and the number affected 200,000. None of the plant staff were affected and all the casualties were in non-plant personnel living nearby. All the 31 deaths in Chernobyl were among the plant personnel. Although 135,000 persons living in a 30 Km zone round the reactor were evacuated and medically examined, none had to be hospitalised. The world scientific community seems to have forgotten Bhopal within a year or so after the accident, while Chernobyl continues to excite intense interest. Extensive knowledge of the biological effects of radiation helps to estimate the likely number of cancer and genetic effects from Chernobyl. Knowledge of Methyl iso cyanate (MIC) toxicology is woefully inadequate; recent evidence indicates the possibility of carcinogenic and mutagenic effects of MIC. Both at Bhopal and Chernobyl there are elaborate plans for detailed followup of the populations for several decades. (author). 17 refs., 3 tabs

  8. Some problems of invalids of Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consequences of the Chernobyl catastrophe caused health disorders of the liquidators, and as a result many of them became handicapped. The rate of health disorders among the invalids of Chernobyl is a few times higher than that of other citizens of the country. The invalids of Chernobyl need constant support, social help, medical rehabilitation and qualified medical care. Invalids of Chernobyl suffered from the consequences of the Chernobyl Catastrophe most of all. We are turning to foreign charity organizations for help in creating the Center of Psychological Support and organizing working places with flexible hours for Invalids of Chernobyl. (Authors)

  9. Engineers' Forum, November 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Student Engineers' Council

    2012-01-01

    Published since 1981, Engineers' Forum is Virginia Tech's interdisciplinary student-staffed engineering magazine. It covers the latest updates and articles regarding the achievements and initiatives of the Virginia Tech engineering community and the engineering world beyond. Issues are published four times per year.

  10. 2012 National Leadership Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Two key themes emerged from the 2012 National Leadership Forum: Taking Business to School, which was hosted by the Career and Technical Education Foundation at the end of May. The first was that employers are looking for a workforce that is technologically savvy while having leadership and employability skills. The second is that the business…

  11. Forestry: Forum summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, R.

    1981-01-01

    A synopsis of a forum addressing the use of LANDSAT data in forestry is given. Broad inventory studies, clear-cut monitoring, and insect and disease detection were among the subject areas discussed. Concerns regarding the vailability of data, cloud cover, resolution and classification accuracy, and product format were expressed by foresters.

  12. International Foundry Forum 2006

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The International Foundry Forum is a "Summit"of the Foundry World. It is the convention of the CEO world wide, of important casting users, ferrous and non-ferrous foundries as well as foundry equipment and consumable suppliers. Their overall goal is to increase the market opportunities for metal castings in competition with other processes and products in a global business environment.

  13. Health effects from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are many misconceptions of the effects on health from the accident at Chernobyl. The 1996 conference in Vienna held one decade after the event, and more recent material being examined by UNSCEAR, provide a more soundly-based view. Apart from an increase in thyroid cancer in some of those people exposed as children, there is no evidence of a major public health impact to date from radiation exposures caused by the accident. There is no increase in leukemia attributable to radiation exposure, the most likely indicator, even in the group of radiation workers. Definitive studies of the health status of the various groups involved have been difficult to carry out because of the socio-economic conditions. Clearly, their continuation is going to need further international cooperation. (author)

  14. Environmental radioactivity from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A broadly based programme of environmental measurements following the Chernobyl accident is summarised and discussed. Levels of radionuclides in air and atmospheric deposition were increased substantially for a period of some weeks following the accident. The quantity of 137Cs in surface soils was doubled in some regions of the North and West of the UK. Observations of the rates of deposition and resuspension, and weathering from grass, a river catchment and buildings, provided confirmation of several aspects of the environmental behaviour of 137Cs, and extended understanding of these processes. Levels of 137Cs in imported crops and in individuals in S. England, and the brief increase in external radiation, were generally low, confirming that the dose to the regional population was small. (author)

  15. The Chernobyl disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl disaster is examined in chronological order from the experiment that led to the explosions, to the firefighting efforts, the release of radioactivity, its fallout, the evacuations from the contaminated zone and the long-term medical, ecological, economic and political repercussions. The sources of information are nearly all Soviet - the Ukranian and Russian press, Moscow and Kiev radio broadcasts, Soviet television documentaries and the report of the Soviet government commission to the International Atomic Energy Agency in August 1986. Reports by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, the Central Electricity Generating Board and the International Atomic Energy Agency have also been used. The latter chapters look at who was to blame for the accident, what impact the accident has had on Soviet society and why the Soviet government continues to expand its nuclear power programme. (author)

  16. Problems of Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This collection includes the materials, in which are, from one hand, the results of previous years works aimed at mitigation of Chernobyl accident aftermath and decrease of 'Ukryttia' object impact to surrounding environment are generalized and summed up, and from another hand, decisions and technologies are seen that are aimed at decrease of nuclear and radiation safety during the works of converting 'Ukryttia' object into an ecologically safe system. over fifteen years passed from the accident moment a rich experience in overcoming the accident aftermath has been accumulated and a great volume of experimental and theoretical data was gained, that is becoming as a base for further developments and testing of new technologies of 'Ukryttia' object rad waste management, lowering of risks during the works of 'Ukryttia' object conversion, improvement of its nuclear and radiation safety

  17. Ten years after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As was amply demonstrated during the EU/IAEA/WHO Summing-up-Conference in Vienna, Austria, April 8-12, 1996, the radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident were, fortunately, not as serious as frequently presented in the media: 28 people died from acute radiation syndrome in 1986, 14 more of possibly radiation-related causes since. Of the <1000 thyroid cancers in children, 90 to 95% are curable. There have so far been no other demonstrable increases in the former Soviet Union, as well as in Western Europe, of leukemias, solid cancers, or genetic defects, nor are any to be expected in the future. Even among the open-quotes liquidatorsclose quotes with doses ∼100 mSv, of the ∼150 additional expected leukemias during the 10 yr after the accident, none have been observed. The economical, social, and political consequences, however, both in the former Soviet Union and in Western Europe, have been very substantial. Whole countries developed an hysterical 'radiation sickness.' As A. Merkel, the German Minister of Environment and Reactor Safety, who chaired the conference, pointed out, 'the radiation sensitivity of societies far exceeds that of individuals.' It is obvious that important groups in Ukraine, Belaurus, and Russia try to blame a large fraction of all economic, social, and health problems during the last decade, which are substantial (∼ 6 yr less life expectancy, twice the homicides and traffic deaths, increased alcoholism, and so forth), on radiation of the Chernobyl accident in an effort to attract more support. Western scientists refute such claims but admit large non-radiation-related problems caused by the accident

  18. Foro con experto. Aplicación de las nuevas tecnologías de la información y comunicación en la formación farmacéutica / Forum with expert. Application of the new technologies in pharmaceutical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badilla Baltodano, Beatriz

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Se presenta la primera experiencia de la Facultad de Farmacia de la Universidad de Costa Rica en la temática de las TIC`s. El proyecto Foro con experto tiene como finalidad poner en contacto al estudiantado avanzado de la carrera de Licenciatura en Farmacia, con profesionales destacados, conocedores y especializados en una temática particular, mediante un foro asincrónico, que ha permitido el desarrollo de pensamiento crítico, la confrontación de ideas y el aprendizaje significativo, incorporando a los y las estudiantes a la realidad clínica de los procesos patológicos más prevalentes en Costa Rica y la farmacoterapia moderna, todo dentro de una metodología constructivista que permite al y la estudiante crear su propio conocimiento, con la guía de una persona experta por medio de una plataforma virtual.Abstract: The first experience of the Faculty of Pharmacy of the Universidad de Costa Rica, in TIC´s, is now presented. The Foro con experto project’s primary goal is to put into contact advanced pharmacy students with highly specialized professionals in a particular area of knowledge. This can be achieved by a non simultaneous forum that works out critical thinking and significant learning, by familiarizing and integrating the students into the clinical environment of the most prevalent pathologies in Costa Rica and their most actualized pharmacotherapy. This can be attained by immersing the students in a constructivist methodology that allows them to create their own knowledge, with the guidance of a field expert, within a virtual platform.

  19. Popularizing biomedical information on an online health forum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Anesa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Given the increasing importance assumed by online health forums as a form of doctor-patient communication, this study describes the types of dialogic and polylogic interactions that develop in this type of communicative event, focusing on a corpus of threads drawn from an “Ask a Doctor” forum in the area of cardiology. Adopting a discourse analytical approach, the investigation illustrates how these forums may popularize biomedical knowledge. After describing the shifting conceptualization of popularization, we present a new conceptualization of Web 2.0 popularization which we call “oblique popularization”, as it is indirect, user-generated, dialogic and polylogic, and targeted. In particular, this study characterizes the online health forum as a Web 2.0-style popularization tool. It does so not only because biomedical information communicated to a single inquirer is also available to the whole population, but also because the function of the online forum as a medium of popularization is discursively acknowledged by the participants. The study also explores what explanatory tools (such as definitions, analogies, exemplifications, and generalizations are used by the experts to present complex or technical information. The analysis shows that biomedical information is circulated on a health forum by a complex network of participants, and that e-patients’ posts may also serve as prompters of popularization

  20. Forum Discos y Libros

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    En este documento se encuentra el caso de la compañía Forum Discos y Libros. El aumento de la piratería y los dinámicos avances tecnológicos, impulsan a los empresarios del sector musical y librero a realizar cambios continuos en sus modelos de negocio y diversificar su portafolio de productos y/o servicios.

  1. Radiation protection forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Director of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority and Radiation Protection of Uruguay in the first forum for radiation protection set out the following themes: activity of regulatory body, radiation safety, physical security, safeguards, legal framework, committed substantive program, use of radiation, risks and benefits, major sources of radiation, the national regulatory framework, national inventory of sources, inspections, licensing, import and export of sources control , radioactive transport, materials safety, agreements, information and teaching, radiological emergencies and prompt response.

  2. The Scholar's Forum Debuts

    OpenAIRE

    Buck, Anne M.; Flagan, Richard C.

    2002-01-01

    The emergence of network technology and the growing accessibility of the Internet provide the basis for considering new approaches to scholarly publishing. A model for de-coupling peer review from publishing and managing the entire process electronically as described by the Scholar's Forum (1999) was tested by the Caltech Library System with the online publication of the proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2001). In collaboration with Caltech faculty members, l...

  3. Chernobyl NPP accident. Overcoming experience. Acquired lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is devoted to the 20 anniversary of accident on the Chernobyl NPP unit 4. History of construction, causes of the accident and its consequences, actions for its mitigation are described. Modern situation with Chernobyl NPP decommissioning and transferring of 'Ukryttya' shelter into ecologically safe system are mentioned. The future of Chernobyl site and exclusion zone was discussed

  4. Psychological state of the Chernobyl invalids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have conducted an extensive research studying the impact of the consequences of the Chernobyl catastrophe upon the psychological state of the liquidators, evacuees and invalids of Chernobyl. More than 600 people who suffered from the tragedy in Chernobyl have been interviewed face to face. This report presents the unique findings of the survey conducted

  5. ExpertFOAF recommends experts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iofcu, Tereza; Diederich, Joerg; Dolog, Peter;

    2007-01-01

    GrowBag approach [1]. The main assumption is that such user profiles can provide good hints about users' expertise. Such extended FOAF files (called ExpertFOAF) can be published on a user's home page, on web pages of institutions or conferences to characterize them. They can be crawled by distributed...

  6. Chernobyl the health consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses initially on selected aspects of the health impact of the Chernobyl accident, and then goes on to discuss some of the pitfalls involved in trying to assess the health detriment in isolation and without regard for the context in which it occurs. The accident on 26 April 1986 was unique. Two explosions, followed by a graphite fire in the destroyed reactor, not only dispersed radionuclides high into the atmosphere, but the fire was instrumental in ensuring the continued dispersion for about ten days. This prolonged discharge into the atmosphere combined with changes in wind direction ensured that radionuclides were widely distributed over Europe and were even detected throughout the Northern Hemisphere. The actual ground deposition was very variable, depending on may factors such as coincident rainfall during the passage of the plume, wind speed and direction, and the topography of the terrain. The mosaic distribution of the ground deposition became much more variable with distance from the site, and is responsible for the wide range of individual doses that characterises this accident. The paper details the health effects of the accident on those immediately involved, and also the delayed health effects, including increased incidence of thyroid cancer, among the populations of surrounding areas of Ukraine, Belarus and Russia. It also discusses the widespread psychosocial detriment which resulted from the accident. Finally, the paper evaluated the efficacy of decontamination measures which were adopted in the affected areas in the years following the accident

  7. Expert reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, R G

    2000-10-01

    In 1996, article 4590i of the Texas Revised Civil Statutes Annotated, the statutory provision that governs health care liability claims in Texas, was amended to require claimants to file expert reports within 180 days as part of the prosecution of their claims. Sufficient expert reports include explanations of the standard of care, the deviation from that standard, and how the deviation caused the claimant's damages. Two provisions allow courts to grant a 30-day extension for filing expert reports. A good cause extension can be used to extend the filing deadline to 210 days; however, case law has not clearly defined what constitutes good cause. An accident or mistake grace period can be used to justify reports filed >210 days after the suit has been filed; judges determine whether the failure is due to a mistake or intentional indifference. As with any statute, the language is not as important as how the courts (judges) interpret that language. The statute may appear strict but room for interpretation exists. PMID:16389359

  8. Chernobyl - what can natural scientists or physicians say to that accident?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The public discussion meeting was intended to offer to the general public a platform for discussion of questions evoked by the Chernobyl reactor accident, and scientific information on what has happened there. The brief lectures therefore deal with the accident scenario as far as assessable at the time, and with the consequences to be expected for the Federal Republic of Germany, with the fallout situation in the Mainz area, and the atmospheric dispersion and transfer of air masses from Chernobyl to the FRG. The medical experts presented information on the radiation exposure of the population and the possible genetic risk. (DG)

  9. Problems of Chernobyl exclusion zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection reflects the results of researches and test-design activities in the exclusion area of the Chernobyl NPP directed to elaborate the equipment and devices for scientific researches and elimination of the accident after effects at the Chernobyl NPP and to study composition and structure of solid-phase bearers of the activity in the soil of the exclusion area, form transformation of decay products, radionuclide composition of the fuel precipitation in the nearest zone of the Chernobyl NPP. Special attention is paid to medical-biological problems of the accident after effects influence on flora, fauna and human health, labour conditions and sick rate of people working in the exclusion area

  10. Chernobyl - a Canadian technical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we present the design review done to date in Canada by AECL. From the Canadian point of view it covers: 1) relevant information on the Chernobyl design and the accident, both as presented by the Soviets at the Post-Accident Review Meeting (PARM) held in Vienna from August 25-29, 1986, and as deduced from publicly available Soviet documentation; and 2) details of AECL's technical review of the CANDU PHWR (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor) against the background of the Chernobyl accident, and implications of the Chernobyl accident. Reviews of operational aspects are underway by the Canadian electrical utilities and a review by the Canadian regulatory agency (the Atomic Energy Control Board) is near completion

  11. Emergency preparedness lessons from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emergency preparedness at nuclear power plants in the U.S has been considerably enhanced since the Three Mile Island accident, The Chernobyl accident has provided valuable data that can be used to evaluate the merit of some of these enhancements and to determine the need for additional improvements, for example, the USSR intervention levels of 25 rem and 75 rem for evacuation are contrasted with U.S Environmental Protection agency protective action guides. The manner in which 135,000 persons were evacuated from the 30-km zone around Chernobyl is contrasted with typical U.S. evacuation plans. Meteorological conditions and particulate deposition patterns were studied to infer characteristics of the radioactive plume from Chernobyl. Typical plume monitoring techniques are examined in light of lessons learned by the Soviets about plume behavior. This review has indicated a need for additional improvements in utility and government emergency plans, procedures, equipment, and training

  12. 76 FR 17658 - National Forum for State and Territorial Chief Executives (National Forum) Program Cooperative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Forum for State and Territorial Chief Executives (National Forum) Program Cooperative Agreement AGENCY: Health Resources and Services... Forum for State and Territorial Chief Executives (National Forum) Program Cooperative Agreement....

  13. Consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques currently used in off-site consequence modelling are applied to the Chernobyl accident. Firstly, the time dependent spread of radioactive material across the European continent is considered, followed by a preliminary assessment of the dosimetric impact (in terms of collective and mean individual doses) on the various countries of Eastern and Western Europe. The consequences of the accident in the USSR are also discussed. Finally, the likely implications of the Chernobyl event on research in the field of environmental consequence assessment are outlined. (author)

  14. Chernobyl - considerations of an insurer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author underlines the insurers' reactions after the Chernobyl accident. Firstly, their reactions as providers of security for loss and destruction in power plants and for third party liability: offers of financial cover have not been affected - quite the contrary - since 26 April 1986. He then refers to their consideration of the detrimental consequences: Chernobyl has revealed a new aspect of nuclear incidents - the addition of various types of expenditure quite apart from compensation of personal injury or property may considerably increase their economic impact (NEA)

  15. Post-Chernobyl emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the result of a study ordered by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate and the National Swedish Institute of Radiation Protection to evaluate the measurements taken in Sweden in response to the Chernobyl accident. The enquiry was also given the task of suggesting improvements of the nuclear accidents emergency planning and other activities relevant to nuclear accidents. Detailed accounts are given of the course of events in Sweden at the Chernobyl accident and the steps taken by central or local authorities are discussed. Several alterations of the emergency planning are proposed and a better coordination of the affected organizations is suggested. (L.E.)

  16. Chernobyl catastrophe: An unexpected result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six years ago, the Chernobyl-4 reactor has exploded. During 10 days , an important part of radioactive products of reactor heart has been ejected in the atmosphere, shaping a radioactive cloud whose the trajectories and fall-outs on all Europe have worried the public opinion. The author, J.C. Nenot and R. Coulon, 6 years after, take stock of the ecological, agricultural and sanitary consequences and if the ecological effects are in a good issue of regression, even near to Chernobyl, on the other hand in medical and sanitary scopes stay uncertainties. 8 refs., 4 figs

  17. LLW Forum meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reports the details of the Quarterly Meeting of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Forum held in San Diego, California during January 23-25, 1991. Topics discussed include: State and Compact Progress Reports; Legal Updates; Update on Technical Assistance; Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Regarding Surcharge Rebates; Update on TCC Activities; NRC Update; Disposal of Commercial Mixed Waste; Update on EPA Activities; ACNW Working Group on Mixed Waste; National Profile on Mixed Waste; Commercial Perspective on Mixed Waste; Update on DOT Activities; Source Terms; Materials and Waste; Storage: and Waste Acceptance Criteria and Packaging

  18. LLW Forum meeting report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    This document reports the details of the Quarterly Meeting of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Forum held in San Diego, California during January 23-25, 1991. Topics discussed include: State and Compact Progress Reports; Legal Updates; Update on Technical Assistance; Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Regarding Surcharge Rebates; Update on TCC Activities; NRC Update; Disposal of Commercial Mixed Waste; Update on EPA Activities; ACNW Working Group on Mixed Waste; National Profile on Mixed Waste; Commercial Perspective on Mixed Waste; Update on DOT Activities; Source Terms; Materials and Waste; Storage: and Waste Acceptance Criteria and Packaging.

  19. Summary of "Expert Forum on the Evaluation of Teachers of English Language Learners." Forum Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Comprehensive Center for Teacher Quality, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In response to federal initiatives such as Race to the Top (RTTT), Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) flexibility waiver requests, and the Teacher Incentive Fund competition, states have made dramatic changes in their policies related to teacher evaluation during the past three years. Historically, teacher evaluation systems have been…

  20. Expert systems for protective monitoring of facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In complex plants, the possibility of serious operator error always exists to some extent, but, this can be especially true during an experiment or some other unusual exercise. Possible contributing factors to operational error include personnel fatigue, misunderstanding in communication, mistakes in executing orders, uncertainty about the delegated authority, pressure to meet a demanding schedule, and a lack of understanding of the possible consequences of deliberate violations of the facility's established operating procedures. Authoritative reports indicate that most of these factors were involved in the disastrous Russian Chernobyl-4 nuclear reactor accident in April 1986, which, ironically, occurred when a safety experiment was being conducted. Given the computer hardware and software now available for implementing expert systems together with integrated signal monitoring and communications, plant protection could be enhanced by an expert system with extended features to monitor the plant. The system could require information from the operators on a rigidly enforced schedule and automatically log in and report on a scheduled time basis to authorities at a central remote site during periods of safe operation. Additionally, the system could warn an operator or automatically shut down the plant in case of dangerous conditions, while simultaneously notifying independent, responsible, off-site personnel of the action taken. This approach would provide protection beyond that provided by typical facility scram circuits. This paper presents such an approach to implementing an expert system for plant protection, together with specific hardware and software configurations. The Chernobyl accident is used as the basis of discussion

  1. The 2~(nd) Guangzhou International Forum on the Frontier of Stem Cell and Regeneration Biology Invitations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ The forum will focus on the following topics: reprogramming of stem cell, chemical biology researchin stem cell, applied research in embryonic and somatic stem cells, stem cell and drug R&D, developmentand mode animal research, stem cell biology and cloning. The Forum will invite members of the CASOverseas Innovation Team on stem cells and cloning, expert panel members of the national key projecton Development and Procreation, the nation's 973 Project chief scientists and other professionals of thearea from all over the world.

  2. Chernobyl assessed (Report of NEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern state of knowledge about Chernobyl accident effect on men's health as well as radiological and social-economic impacts for population of Belarus, Ukraine and Russian Federation is presented in the report of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). Accepted estimations of absorbed radiation dose of population suggest that except the thyroid disease it is improbable that irradiation causes radiation effects among population

  3. Miners take stock after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australia's uranium producers, already facing a tough market have been plunged further into the unknown following the accident at Chernobyl. The production of uranium in Australia is reviewed with emphasis on the three uranium miners -Queensland Mines, Energy Resources of Australia and Western Mining Corporation

  4. Chernobyl - a Canadian technical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On April 26, 1986, the Number 4 reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station in the Soviet Union suffered a severe accident which destroyed the reactor core and led to a loss of life. The four reactors at this station are of the RBMK-1000 type - boiling-light-water cooled, graphite moderated, vertical pressure-tube reactors, each generating 1000 MW of electricity through two turbines. AECL has carefully studied the accident, and the design of Chernobyl, to see if anything has been overlooked in the CANDU design. This report reviews the results of that study, in particular the relevant features of the Chernobyl design which exacerbated the accident, and compares them to the CANDU 600 design. A number of issues (the sign of the void coefficent and the pressure-tube design) have also been given some international prominence in the post-Chernobyl analysis; these are discussed in this report and shown to be irrelevant to the CANDU design. Finally this report describes the subjects identified for further design follow-up in Canada

  5. Chernobyl its effect on Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the results of the measurements made during the first six months after the Chernobyl accident to determine the extent of the resultant environmental contamination. Estimates are presented of the individual and collective doses received by the public during the first six months and the first year after the accident

  6. The Chernobyl accident. Appendix B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In appendix B, the models introduced in chapter 6 are applied to the study of the Chernobyl accident. This event is very important in the teaching of nuclear engineering, and I have included in this Appendix a relatively detailed description of the accident. However, the analysis is limited to the physics of the relevant phenomena. (author)

  7. Cell damage seen from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 30 kilometer radius forbidden zone around the Chernobyl atomic plant serves as a sobering reminder of the world's worst nuclear accident. But for former Soviet biologists, it's also a unique natural laboratory. And one scientist, Nadejda Gulaya of Kiev's Pallaguine Institute of Biochemistry, has been doing studies that she claims offer surprising evidence of Chernobyl's after-effects. Prolonged exposure to radioactive fallout from the 1986 accident, she says, has caused damage to cell membranes in both animals and humans. For the past year, Gulaya has been comparing tissues from animals such as mink, pigs, and rodents inhabiting the Chernobyl area with those from other parts of Ukraine. Her conclusion: Exposure to radiation has, in many cases, caused alterations to membrane phospholipids. These changes, are similar to those that disrupt cellular metabolism following exposure to oxidizing free radicals. Gulaya also has preliminary data from human studies. She claims to have found similar alterations in the neurons of people who have died since being exposed to Chernobyl radiation. That leads her to speculate that the frequent psychiatric disorders may not just be from mental stress or radiophobia, but might reflect actual damage to the central nervous system

  8. Consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A collection of three papers about the fallout in Austria from the 1986 Chernobyl reactor accident is given: 1. An overview of the research projects in Austria; 2. On the transfer into and uptake by crops and animal fodder; 3. On the reduction of cesium concentration in food. 18 tabs., 21 figs., 69 refs

  9. Standby after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is an investigation concerning strandby and actions by SKI (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate) and SSI (National Institute of Radiation Protection) due to the Chernobyl reactor accident. It consists of a final report and two appendices. The final report is divided into two parts: 'I: Facts' and 'II: Analyzes'. 'Facts': The Swedish model for information: radio, press. Basic knowledge about ionizing radiation in the society. Resources for information. Need for information. Message forms for information. Announcements from the authorities in TV, radio, press, meeting, advertisements. Statements concerning the reactor accident and its consequences in Swedish mass media. How did the public recieve the information? 'Analyzis': Information responsibilities and policies. SSI information activities concerning radiologic accidents, conditions, methods and resources. Ditto for SKI, Swedish National Food Administration and the National Board of Agriculture. Appendix I: Information from authorities in the press three weeks after the Chernobyl accident: The material and the methods. The acute phase, the adoptation phase, the extension of the persective. What is said about the authorities in connection with Chernobyl? Appendix II: The fallout from Chernobyl, the authorities and the media coverage: The nationwide, regional and local coverage from radio and television. Ditto from the press. Topic and problem areas in reporting. Instructions from the authorities in media. Contribution in the media from people representing the authorities. Fallout in a chronologic perspective. (L.F.)

  10. Fourth China-South Asia International Cultural Forum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>The Fourth China-South Asia International Cultural Forum on "revitalizing people-to-people cultural exchanges for peace and prosperity",co-sponsored by the CPAFFC and Shenzhen University,was held in Shenzhen from November 14 to 17,2012. More than 60 experts and scholars from over 40 Chinese research institutes and their colleagues from India,the United States and Singapore engaged in in-depth discussions on economic cooperation and cultural development,the present condi-

  11. First International Forum on Management of Air Transport & Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyne Napoli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Paul Sabatier University is the only French University that offers a Master’s Degree in both Air Transport and International Tourism Management and in January 21-23, 2016 launched the first "business-research" Forum to capitalize on the combination of international professional and academic experts and to confirm its role as a major player in two inseparable areas: research and study development within Air Transport and Tourism.

  12. First International Forum on Management of Air Transport & Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Jocelyne Napoli

    2016-01-01

    The Paul Sabatier University is the only French University that offers a Master’s Degree in both Air Transport and International Tourism Management and in January 21-23, 2016 launched the first "business-research" Forum to capitalize on the combination of international professional and academic experts and to confirm its role as a major player in two inseparable areas: research and study development within Air Transport and Tourism.

  13. Chernobyl: Its lessons: Actions for the next decade. Report on a donor meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the WHO International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA) and Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network (REMPAN), the WHO Regional Office for Europe is responsible for following up the increased thyroid disease after Chernobyl and mitigating the public health effects of any future accidents. At a meeting in Helsinki, the Regional Office proposed activities to Member States and sought support for their implementation. The participants - representatives of health ministries and experts from European research institutions - evaluated and approved the WHO proposals. Funds were sought for the opening of a project office in Helsinki from which WHO would provide an effective response to nuclear accidents and for assisting in the mitigation of thyroid diseases attributable to the Chernobyl accident in four priority areas: screening, treatment, mitigation of iodine deficiency and construction of an integrated thyroid disease registry. It was agreed that the report of the Meeting would be used in future fund-raising activities. (author)

  14. ECNS '99 - Young scientists forum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceretti, M.; Janssen, S.; McMorrow, D.F.;

    2000-01-01

    The Young Scientists Forum is a new venture for ECNS and follows the established tradition of an active participation by young scientists in these conferences. At ECNS '99 the Young Scientists Forum brought together 30 young scientists from 13 European countries. In four working groups, they...

  15. Developers@CERN Forums: Python

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The Developers@CERN Forums second edition took place at the end of May on the topic of Python. How do developers at CERN interact with Python? Which cutting-edge projects are using Python? What were the highlights of this most recent forum?

  16. Forum, Dedicated to Inclusive Education

    OpenAIRE

    Vachkov I.V.

    2015-01-01

    26 – 27 of February 2015 in Kazan, in the University of Management “TISBI” been held National (All-Russian) forum of promotion of ideas and principles of inclusive education (with international participants) “Study and live together: open space of inclusion”. During the work of Forum the most topical questions of inclusive education implement in Russian Federation been discussed.

  17. Clarification of nuclear risk recognition scheme through dialogue forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design framework and operational guidelines for conducting repetitive dialogue between public and nuclear engineers are described in this paper. An action research project named repetitive dialogue forum has been conducted in two municipalities where nuclear facilities were sited. The qualitative evaluation by public participants indicated that the public trust in the nuclear experts, known as the crucial factor for meaningful communication, was successfully established through the dialogue forum. In addition, the expert showed a marked psychological change from distrust to trust in public. Through a detailed analysis of the comments of the participants raised during the forums, the nuclear risk recognition scheme of the public was clarified. The constituents of the risk recognition scheme about nuclear facilities were identified as follows. The first is related to the technical risk recognition factor including purely technical risk, organizational elements and regulatory elements. The second is the social risk recognition factor including economical and mental elements. The last is the communication factor including the influence of mass media, difficulty in frank communication in local community etc. It became clear that the information provision activities conducted by the government and the nuclear industry were lack of in-depth understanding of actual information needs in the public. Provision of information contents consistent with our observations is recommended for reestablishment of public trust in expert and for more informative dialogical interactions. (author)

  18. The Chernobyl reactor accident and how it changed the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After expressing his sympathy for the Chernobyl victims the author points out that in particular the Germans are tending to show emotions of a preponderantly negative character, that is emotions hampering a logical way of thinking and nourishing ideologies. He adds that the majority of the Western German population has not succeeded in seizing the real implications of radioactivity. Their ignorance results in a growing disbelief in the competent experts. Politicians therefore cannot but act as go-betweens between expert knowledge and the population. The reactor accident has made nuclear power a central topical subject of discussion in the election campaign. The author expresses his view on the need of giving a new direction to the safety debate by elucidating and illustrating the economic and ecological advantages as well as the safety of nuclear energy. (HSCH)

  19. Thyroid Nodularity and cancer in Chernobyl clean-up workers from Latvia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident on April 26, 1986, resulted in massive radioactive contamination of the surrounding area. Radiation exposure was from rapidly decaying radioactive iodines, as well as from 137CS and other long-lived radioisotopes. About 6000 clean-up workers of the Chernobyl Power Plant accident were from Latvia. External radiation exposure was defined for 40% of them and the doses were 0.01-0.5 Grey (Gy). Although according to conclusions of authoritative experts of different countries, the actual doses of radiation might be at least 3-4 times higher. Because the thyroid is highly susceptible to cancer induction by ionizing radiation, our examination was conducted in 2001 to determine the prevalence of thyroid tumors in 1990-2000 and other nodular thyroid disease 14 years after the accident in Latvia's Chernobyl clean-up workers. The Latvian State Register for persons who have received ionising radiation in Chernobyl and Latvia's Cancer Register were used in this work as well as 1000 Chernobyl accident clean-up workers medical ambulatory cards were analysed. We have received that occurrence of thyroid cancer in Chernobyl clean-up workers was 10,6 times higher than in Latvia's population (men) in 1990-2000 and also it occurs at earlier age in comparison with population data (40-50 and 55-65 accordingly). This can be explained in two ways: either due to effect of the short-term or long-term external and internal radiation exposure (including, from the incorporated 131I) on the thyroid tissue, or due to a better dispensarisation (obligatory thyroid ultrasound examination once per year) of the examined group. The first thyroid cancer was discovered in 1996 -after ten years of latent period. The relative risk of thyroid cancer in Chernobyl clean-up workers in 1996 was 33.27, and in 1997 -42.64. Then, the morbidity of the thyroid cancer exhibits tendency to decrease (RR 18.27 in 1998, and 9.42 in 1999). The presence of thyroid benign nodules was

  20. Chernobyl, 14 years later; Tchernobyl, 14 ans apres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This report draws an account of the consequences of Chernobyl accident 14 years after the disaster. It is made up of 8 chapters whose titles are: (1) Some figures about Chernobyl accident, (2) Chernobyl nuclear power plant, (3)Sanitary consequences of Chernobyl accident, (4) The management of contaminated lands, (5) The impact in France of Chernobyl fallout, (6) International cooperation, (7) More information about Chernobyl and (8) Glossary.

  1. Chernobyl victims: realistic evaluation of medical consequences of Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective assessment of early and delayed medical consequence of the Chernobyl accident is presented. Mortality of people due to acute radiation disease, burns and mechanical injuries are attributed to the early effects. Oncological and genetic diseases are considered as the delayed effects. Delayed radiation effects on the residents of contaminated territories were estimated by epidemiologic examination taking into account the dose due to radioactive fallout. Certain regions of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine were mostly exposed to contamination. Contamination density by 137Cs is considered and radiation doses due to natural sources and Chernobyl accident are compared. Disease incidence is analysed for carcinoma and genetic diseases. Health hazard caused by non-radiation accidental factors (psychological stress, victim psychology thrusting, groundless evacuation) is assessed

  2. Social Chernobyl participants condition in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full texts: At the moment in Lithuania live almost 6 600 Chernobyl participants (persons witch were in attendance Chernobyl nuclear power station emergency ravage liquidation works and executing another works in 30 kilometers zone). About 770 died and 170 went to other nations. Thievery other fixed illnesses coherence with being in 30 kilometers zone. According 26 October, 1990 Republic of Lithuania government's resolution No. 325 intended that Chernobyl participants credit accomplishes Ministry of Social care but until now in the Republic there is not undivided database, consequently we use different institution's and social investigations information which is not circumstantial. Chernobyl participants social condition and medicine service control certificates, government's resolutions and Ministry of health care and work and Ministry's of health care requisitions. There is not a law which guarantees Chernobyl participants social rights. Supposedly that for in Lithuania there is not the logistics which could vouch medical facilities provision for Chernobyl participants. Until 2005 sanatorium treating of Chernobyl participants was pursuance through invalids till but this treatment was not available to everyone Chernobyl participant for two reasons: 1 - Vicinities doctors and GPs not all the time contemprorize illnesses with being in The nuclear power station of the Chernobyl zone. 2 - Invalids till was not fixing the number of the permissions to the sanatoriums for the Chernobyl participants. Since 13 September, 2005 by Republic of Lithuania government's resolution No. 998 municipal governments budget bankrolls once a year may offset eighteen-days sanatorium treatment for persons which were liquidating The nuclear power-station of the Chernobyl emergency ravage but Chernobyl participants should give Specialists committee inference. Another problem social security. Chernobyl participant's requirement supply if they ill or died according Government's 18 February

  3. Five years after Chernobyl: 1986 - 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident to the fourth nuclear reactor at Chernobyl on 26th April 1986 had major impacts not only on the nuclear industries in the Soviet Union and elsewhere in the world but also on the daily life of those in the station and further afield. Some of the actions taken to safeguard the population outside the Soviet Union such as banning the sale of lamb from upland areas in the United Kingdom and the effects on the reindeer herds in Scandinavia inevitably received considerable publicity and interest. Material published by the popular media often fails to separate clearly opinion from fact or to give due weight to the important as compared to the trivial. The Watt Committee on Energy with a membership drawn from over 60 professional bodies covering a wide spectrum of technologies seemed to be ideally qualified to sift through the material and record what is known with reasonable certainty, indicate facts which have a general consensus of agreement among disinterested experts, and draw attention to areas where information is still not confirmed. (author)

  4. Mod\\'elisation d'une analyse pragma-linguistique d'un forum de discussion

    CERN Document Server

    Matta, Nada; Ninova, Goritsa; Atifi, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    We present in this paper, a modelling of an expertise in pragmatics. We follow knowledge engineering techniques and observe the expert when he analyses a social discussion forum. Then a number of models are defined. These models emphasises the process followed by the expert and a number of criteria used in his analysis. Results can be used as guides that help to understand and annotate discussion forum. We aim at modelling other pragmatics analysis in order to complete the base of guides; criteria, process, etc. of discussion analysis

  5. Tracking the cloud from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the aftermath of the accident at Chernobul nuclear power station, many scientists are studying how the radionuclides from the reactor's core dispersed across Europe and became deposited on the ground. A group in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Imperial College have developed a computer model, MESOS, specifically to study the transport of pollutants in the atmosphere over very large distances. In the past, this model has been used to study the potential consequences of hypothetical accidents at nuclear power plants in neighbouring countries. Now it has been used to estimate where the radioactivity from Chernobyl went. The Chernobyl model is explained and some estimates from the MESOS model are presented. By comparing the model estimates with observations a full assessment of the environmental consequences of the accident will be possible. It should be possible to find out the way in which pollutants travel long distances, how they are deposited on the ground and their transport through food chains. (U.K.)

  6. Chernobyl: Insight from the inside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author dispenses with the usual detachment of historical analysis and tells what happened in Chernobyl in April through the unshielded and horrified perceptions and largely unedited language of those who were there. A common thread running through the book is the duplicity of Soviet officials, particularly in reference to the 650,000 emergency workers. The author maintains that the accident would have been avoided if the reactor design had not been inherently flawed, unadmitted by Soviet officials

  7. The reactor accident of Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contamination, caused by the radioactivity released during the reactor accident of Chernobyl was measured in samples taken in the environment of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. The radioactivity was determined in air, fodder, milk, vegetables, other plants, foodstuffs, soil, precipitations, drinking water, sludge and other samples. Results of measurements are reported which were received with considerably more than 1000 samples. The evaluation of the data will be presented in KfK 4140. (orig.)

  8. Chernobyl reactor transient simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the Chernobyl nuclear power station transient simulation study. The Chernobyl (RBMK) reactor is a graphite moderated pressure tube type reactor. It is cooled by circulating light water that boils in the upper parts of vertical pressure tubes to produce steam. At equilibrium fuel irradiation, the RBMK reactor has a positive void reactivity coefficient. However, the fuel temperature coefficient is negative and the net effect of a power change depends upon the power level. Under normal operating conditions the net effect (power coefficient) is negative at full power and becomes positive under certain transient conditions. A series of dynamic performance transient analysis for RBMK reactor, pressurized water reactor (PWR) and fast breeder reactor (FBR) have been performed using digital simulator codes, the purpose of this transient study is to show that an accident of Chernobyl's severity does not occur in PWR or FBR nuclear power reactors. This appears from the study of the inherent, stability of RBMK, PWR and FBR under certain transient conditions. This inherent stability is related to the effect of the feed back reactivity. The power distribution stability in the graphite RBMK reactor is difficult to maintain throughout its entire life, so the reactor has an inherent instability. PWR has larger negative temperature coefficient of reactivity, therefore, the PWR by itself has a large amount of natural stability, so PWR is inherently safe. FBR has positive sodium expansion coefficient, therefore it has insufficient stability it has been concluded that PWR has safe operation than FBR and RBMK reactors

  9. Expert games: means to acquire expert knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ginkul

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the idea and use of non-traditional technique designed to acquire Expert's knowledge for Expert Systems. The procedures, called "Expert Games", look outwardly as well-known computer "playthings" and at the same time are strong means for Knowledge Acquisition. If Expert wants to succeed, he must to use his professional knowledge. After analyzing game operations of an Expert it is possible to resolve reverse problem - to define which what kind of knowledge have been used for making Expert's decision during the game.

  10. CEO's Forum on Pioneering Spirit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ When people talk about fortune, they are always recalled of the entrepreneurs. However, in the Fortune Global Forum, some well-known domestic entrepreneurs such as Charles Zhang, Peggy Yu and Jack Ma, they are honored as Pioneers.

  11. Forum outlines top emerging technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extance, Andy

    2015-04-01

    Additive manufacturing, next-generation robotics, "sense and avoid" drones that fly themselves, artificial intelligence and "neuromorphic" computing have all made it into the World Economic Forum's top 10 emerging technologies for 2015.

  12. Effects on environment and humans of accident of Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The USSR experts have reported the results of their works on the effects of the Chernobyl plant's accident at IAEA meeting in August. Plant staffs and fire men with acute radiation syndrome were hospitalized and treated with special care including bone marrow transplantation. Whole population (135,000) within the area of 30 km radius from the plant evacuated during a few days after the accident. Collective dose to this population was estimated as 1.6 x 106 person rem. (author)

  13. Fagligt Forum ved en skillevej

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Claus

    2008-01-01

    Med cvu-bibliotekernes overgang til professionshøjskoler ændres det biblioteksfaglige landskab. Det har Fagligt Forum taget konsekvensen af og nedlægger sig selv i løbet af 2000......Med cvu-bibliotekernes overgang til professionshøjskoler ændres det biblioteksfaglige landskab. Det har Fagligt Forum taget konsekvensen af og nedlægger sig selv i løbet af 2000...

  14. Fallout from Chernobyl [Letters to the editor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six brief letters discuss the possible health effects of fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident including an increase in thyroid cancer in children in Belarus, chromosomal abnormalities in workers from Latvia who cleared up the Chernobyl accident site, an increased trisomy 21 in Berlin but a lack of increased childhood leukaemia incidence in Greece. (UK)

  15. Fallout from Chernobyl [Letters to the editor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, E.D. (Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Abelin, T.; Egger, M. (Bern Univ. (Switzerland)) (and others)

    1994-11-12

    Six brief letters discuss the possible health effects of fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident including an increase in thyroid cancer in children in Belarus, chromosomal abnormalities in workers from Latvia who cleared up the Chernobyl accident site, an increased trisomy 21 in Berlin but a lack of increased childhood leukaemia incidence in Greece. (UK).

  16. A discourse analysis of interactions from an online pro-anorexia forum

    OpenAIRE

    Ascari, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    My research takes a look at the phenomenon of pro-anorexia websites by focusing on conversations from a public pro-anorexia forum. There is pressure on health experts and Internet hosts to oppose this controversial phenomenon because of the concern, shared by experts and lay people alike, that these websites encourage eating disorders and provide a dysfunctional, anti-recovery type of social support to those who are struggling with this problem. However, to conceive of these online spaces as ...

  17. US Department of Energy Chernobyl accident bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research to provide bibliographic information in a usable format for research studies relating to the Chernobyl nuclear accident that occurred in the Ukrainian Republic, USSR in 1986. This report is a product of the Chernobyl Database Management project. The purpose of this project is to produce and maintain an information system that is the official United States repository for information related to the accident. Two related products prepared for this project are the Chernobyl Bibliographic Search System (ChernoLit trademark) and the Chernobyl Radiological Measurements Information System (ChernoDat). This report supersedes the original release of Chernobyl Bibliography (Carr and Mahaffey, 1989). The original report included about 2200 references. Over 4500 references and an index of authors and editors are included in this report

  18. US Department of Energy Chernobyl accident bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, R A; Mahaffey, J A; Carr, F Jr

    1992-04-01

    This bibliography has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research to provide bibliographic information in a usable format for research studies relating to the Chernobyl nuclear accident that occurred in the Ukrainian Republic, USSR in 1986. This report is a product of the Chernobyl Database Management project. The purpose of this project is to produce and maintain an information system that is the official United States repository for information related to the accident. Two related products prepared for this project are the Chernobyl Bibliographic Search System (ChernoLit{trademark}) and the Chernobyl Radiological Measurements Information System (ChernoDat). This report supersedes the original release of Chernobyl Bibliography (Carr and Mahaffey, 1989). The original report included about 2200 references. Over 4500 references and an index of authors and editors are included in this report.

  19. Proceedings of Nova Scotia's 2006 energy research and development forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nova Scotia 2006 energy research and development forum provided a venue for experts from industry, research institutions and government to discuss how research and development will shape the future of energy in the province. The forum was divided into 3 sessions: (1) building knowledge about the marine environment, (2) building knowledge about geoscience, and (3) building knowledge about sustainable energy. A wide ranges of issues related to the Nova Scotia region included whale identification; fisheries mapping; the commercialization of hydrocarbon discoveries; carbon capture and storage and petroleum system analysis and prospect evaluation. Keynote addresses were presented on produced water in Norway; deepwater exploration in Morocco; renewable energy and Canada's role as an energy superpower. The conference featured more than 57 presentations, of which 4 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  20. Korea-France Forum on New Technologies for Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In celebration of the 120th anniversary on Korea-France diplomatic relations, both Korea and France agreed that the New-generation Energy Forum on a VHTR-assisted nuclear hydrogen production, renewable energy, and bio-fuel should be held in Paries, France. In accordance with the agreement, the Korea-France Forum on New Technologies for Energy organized by KAERI and CEA was held at the Mercure Hotel Conference Hall in Paries for a couple of days, November 6 and 7 and a facility visit to the CEA-Saclay was arranged on November 8 by the French side. 19 scientists from both countries presented their R and D status and plans in 4 technical sessions of 'VHTR Nuclear System', 'VHTR-assited Hydrogen Production', 'Renewable Energy', and 'Fuel Cell and Energy Storage'. A contact point in each field was established for the exchange of technological information and dispatch of experts if necessary

  1. The enduring lessons of Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major impacts of the Chernobyl accident fall into three categories: the physical impacts, in terms of health and environmental effects; the psycho-social impacts on the affected populations; and the influence of the accident on the nuclear industry worldwide. The physical impacts mark Chernobyl as the site of the most serious nuclear accident in history. The explosions that destroyed the Unit 4 reactor core released a cloud of radionuclides that contaminated large areas of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine. Hundreds of thousands of workers participated in efforts to mitigate the consequences of the accident, and many of these individuals were exposed to substantial radiation doses. The psycho-social impacts were also devastating. Over 100 000 people were evacuated immediately after the accident, and the total number of evacuees from severely contaminated areas eventually reached 350 000 people. While these resettlements helped to reduce the collective dose of radiation, it was deeply traumatic for those involved. The third impact I mentioned is the enormous influence of the Chernobyl accident on the nuclear industry. A decade earlier, the accident at Three Mile Island had already cast doubt on the ability of nuclear power plant operators to prevent severe accidents. Chernobyl had far greater impact; the accident emblazoned itself on public consciousness as proof positive that nuclear safety was an oxymoron. Some countries decided to reduce or terminate further construction of nuclear facilities, and the expansion of nuclear capacity came to a near standstill. It has taken nearly two decades of strong safety performance to repair the industry's reputation. From the time of the accident, the IAEA has been continuously involved in technical assistance and research projects to mitigate the environmental and health consequences in affected areas. Since 1990, more than $15 million has been disbursed through the IAEA technical cooperation programme on a broad range of these

  2. Chernobyl fallout in Great Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernobyl deposition in the UK was sampled in May and October 1986 and in June of 1987. The sampling concentrated on grassy vegetation but in October 1986 other vegetation, soils and wildlife were included. Deposition patterns have been established and a greater degree of retention and recycling indicated for the organic soils of upland Britain. For wild animals concentration factors varied not only between species but with sex and age. Highest tissue concentrations were recorded in species feeding on heather (Blue hares and Grouse) and the lowest in rabbits feeding on grass over mineral soils. Radiocaesium was found in a carnivore (the fox) at the top of the food chain. (author)

  3. An ill wind from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article discusses the effects that the poisonous dust emanating from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor explosion of 1986 had on human, animal and plant population in the Soviet Union and across Europe. One of the chief criticisms raised is of governments, inside and outside the Soviet Block restricting information about danger to people or, in some cases, denying any consequences. This has led to widespread public opinion against nuclear programmes for power generation, and calls for adequate and appropriate compensation for victims of the accident. (UK)

  4. Scientific Forum: The Blue Planet - Nuclear Applications for a Sustainable Marine Environment. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Forum brought together scientists, experts and policy makers from different fields to initiate dialogue and build new partnerships and cooperation to protect and preserve the ecological balance that is vital for the survival of the coastal regions and marine environment

  5. Building Competitive Advantages CEIBS Holds the 2004 CEIBS China Automotive Industry Forum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Second consecutive CEIBS China Automotive Industry Forum was held in Novermber 22 at the school's Shang hai campus. Following last year's success, this year there are more than 200 local and international participants including: auto manufacturers, component suppliers, government officials, industry experts and researchers, who have gathered today to discuss issues in the country's automotive industry.

  6. Chernobyl, 12 years later; Tchernobyl, douze ans apres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This report draws an account of the consequences of Chernobyl accident 12 years after the disaster. It is made up of 7 chapters whose titles are: (1) Some figures about Chernobyl accident, (2) The Chernobyl nuclear power plant, (3) Sanitary consequences of Chernobyl accident, (4) The management of contaminated lands, (5) The impact in France of Chernobyl fallout, (6) The Franco-German cooperation, and (7) Glossary.

  7. Chernobyl record. The definitive history of the Chernobyl catastrophe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of Chernobyl Record have taken 14 years to compile and this period of time was necessary to enable information to be released from Soviet sources, measurements to be made in the environment, for estimation of radiation doses and for follow-up of the health of population groups which had been exposed. This time frame also includes the 10th anniversary conferences and the completion of joint projects of the European Commission, Ukraine, Belarus and the Russian Federation. It has also enabled me to visit the power plant site, Chernobyl town and Pripyat relatively soon after the accident and also some 10 years later: December 1987 and June 1998. Without such visits some of the photographs in this Record could not have been obtained. Information is also contained in these pages of comparisons of various aspects of the Chernobyl accident with data from the Three Mile Island accident in the USA in 1979, the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs, the highly contaminated Techa river area in the Urals in Russia and the accident in Tokaimura, Japan in 1999. The first two chapters are introductory in that they describe terminology which is necessary for an understanding of the remaining chapters. Chapters 3-6 describes the early events: including those leading up to the explosion and then what followed in the immediate aftermath. Chapters 7-8 describe the Sarcophagus and the past and future of nuclear power for electricity generation, including the future of the Chernobyl power station. Chapters 9-11 consider the radiation doses received by various populations, including liquidators, evacuees and those living on contaminated territories: and the contamination of milk by 131I, and the contamination of other parts of the food chain by 137Cs. Chapters 12-14 describe the environmental impact of the accident, as does chapter 11. Chapters 15-18 detail the long-term effects on health, including not only the incidence of cancer, but also of non-malignant diseases and

  8. Chernobyl record. The definitive history of the Chernobyl catastrophe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mould, R.F

    2000-07-01

    The contents of Chernobyl Record have taken 14 years to compile and this period of time was necessary to enable information to be released from Soviet sources, measurements to be made in the environment, for estimation of radiation doses and for follow-up of the health of population groups which had been exposed. This time frame also includes the 10th anniversary conferences and the completion of joint projects of the European Commission, Ukraine, Belarus and the Russian Federation. It has also enabled me to visit the power plant site, Chernobyl town and Pripyat relatively soon after the accident and also some 10 years later: December 1987 and June 1998. Without such visits some of the photographs in this Record could not have been obtained. Information is also contained in these pages of comparisons of various aspects of the Chernobyl accident with data from the Three Mile Island accident in the USA in 1979, the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs, the highly contaminated Techa river area in the Urals in Russia and the accident in Tokaimura, Japan in 1999. The first two chapters are introductory in that they describe terminology which is necessary for an understanding of the remaining chapters. Chapters 3-6 describes the early events: including those leading up to the explosion and then what followed in the immediate aftermath. Chapters 7-8 describe the Sarcophagus and the past and future of nuclear power for electricity generation, including the future of the Chernobyl power station. Chapters 9-11 consider the radiation doses received by various populations, including liquidators, evacuees and those living on contaminated territories: and the contamination of milk by {sup 131}I, and the contamination of other parts of the food chain by {sup 137}Cs. Chapters 12-14 describe the environmental impact of the accident, as does chapter 11. Chapters 15-18 detail the long-term effects on health, including not only the incidence of cancer, but also of non

  9. Industrial disasters - the expert systems solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six mistakes by the operators led to the accident at the Cherobyl nuclear reactor. These have been studied. It is suggested that an expert systems approach could prevent similar accidents. The expert system is a new approach to software programming where programs are required to perform intelligent analyses of complex situations. It separates the knowledge of a problem from the procedural code that performs the decision. An expert system will evaluate data and indicate a priority on alarms in real time. Now software systems can detect the cause of a problem in a process plant and present their findings to the operators in the control room. This should enable operators to make the correct decisions as they will know which underlying process faults are causing the alarms to operate. The Chernobyl post-mortem meeting made 13 proposals for improving safety. Two in particular are noted as relevant to expert advice systems; international collaboration on man-reactor relationships and a conference to explore the balance of automation and human action to minimise operating errors. (U.K.)

  10. Stakeholders and radiological protection: lessons from Chernobyl 20 years after

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty years after the major accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, the radioactive contamination continues to have an important impact on lives in the vicinity, and to a lesser extent in areas such as Western Europe and beyond. The purpose of this report is not to address clinical or environmental studies, but to look at how people are coping with the difficulties they still face. Commissioned by the Committee for Radiation Protection and Public Health of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the report focuses on the role of radiological protection and how this discipline has been deployed to help people manage their lives. Although the topic of this report concerns radioactivity and nuclear power, it can also be very useful to policy makers and experts dealing with the aftermath of wide-scale disasters, regardless of their causes (natural, accidental or malicious). Whilst we all hope never to see another event causing contamination on the scale that followed Chernobyl, it is prudent to be prepared. Hence this report also describes many of the problems that could need to be faced in the longer term by technical specialists, should such a contamination event occur, and presents ways of dealing with them. This report will provide readers with insights into how to plan better for this type of event, in particular beyond the immediate response phase. (author)

  11. Chernobyl: Anatomy of the explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On Friday, 26 April 1986, it was planned to shut down the fourth unit of the Chernobyl Atomic Power Station, U.S.S.R., for periodic maintenance. The procedure supplied the opportunity to perform a further experiment; operation of the turbine in free rotation regime, which occurs when the steam is cut down while the turbine is still running. It so happened that carrying out this experiment turned out to be the worst accident in the history of nuclear power industry. The first part of the article proceeds to a second by second detailed analysis of the causes of the catastrophe. The analysis uses official data and reports. The author covers the sequence of events, which led up to two explosions in the second hour of that tragic morning. In the second part of the article, the author provides hints and suggestions, so that 'the tragedy of Chernobyl does not become a useless lesson'. With regard to what, so far, has been published, the novelty of the article may be a diagram showing the excessive changes that affected the main parameters (power, water flow through circulating pumps, steam pressure in separators, and length of the immersed part of control rods) in the fourth unit during the last seconds before the explosion. If may be noteworthy to mention that the curves supplied here are based on data stored in the computer 'SCALA'. 2 figs

  12. Impressions of Chelyabinsk and Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international delegation touring Russia and Ukraine was demonstrated the consequences of the accidents at the nuclear installations of Chelvabinsk and Chernobyl. On the site in Russia, an explosion of a tank filled with high level radioactive waste in 1957 released a radioactive cloud of approx. 20 million Ci, of which 90% rained down in the immediate vicinity, while 10% spread over an area of 23,000 square kilometers. 10,200 persons were resettled for this reason within two years. Among the population in the contaminated area, the cancer rate rose, but is still said to be lower than at other industrialized sites. At a distance of 44 km from the Chernobyl nuclear power plants, the new city of Pripyat has been established for 23,000 inhabitants. Planning work on additional nuclear generating units was stopped after the accident of unit 4. The complete loss of unit 4 has been felt by the USSR as a bigger economic disaster than the radioactive contamination of the environment. (orig.)

  13. The results of the research and studies concerning the information about the Chernobyl nuclear disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies conducted by the National Board of Psychological Defence after the Chernobyl nuclear accident concern questions of great importance about crisis information. The Chernobyl fallout created problems for the mass media and the authorities. Both lacked individual preparedness. The knowledge necessary to face strong demands for information from the public was lacking. A sign of this lack of knowledge and experience was shown when individual journalists - contrary to their usual behaviour - uncritically accepted the sometimes ambiguous information coming from the central authorities. For the authorities it was very much the same. The expert authority, the National Institute for Radiation Protection, had quite a lot of know-how, but no resources for such extensive information as the situation required. Significant problems must be solved concerning the cooperation between central and regional authorities. Direct contacts must be established so that both types of authorities do not learn through mass media what has been decided. The wordings of the messages conveyed in such critical situations must be a matter of more concern. Facts known by the authorities must be presented in a way comprehensible to the public. Technical terms and units must be used with great care. Negative information must of course be presented but measures should be taken to countermand the negative effect. A special responsibility should rest with the school system. The difficulties of informing the public after the Chernobyl disaster were still more emphasized by the study of how the brochure After Chernobyl was received

  14. Speech spectrogram expert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannsen, J.; Macallister, J.; Michalek, T.; Ross, S.

    1983-01-01

    Various authors have pointed out that humans can become quite adept at deriving phonetic transcriptions from speech spectrograms (as good as 90percent accuracy at the phoneme level). The authors describe an expert system which attempts to simulate this performance. The speech spectrogram expert (spex) is actually a society made up of three experts: a 2-dimensional vision expert, an acoustic-phonetic expert, and a phonetics expert. The visual reasoning expert finds important visual features of the spectrogram. The acoustic-phonetic expert reasons about how visual features relates to phonemes, and about how phonemes change visually in different contexts. The phonetics expert reasons about allowable phoneme sequences and transformations, and deduces an english spelling for phoneme strings. The speech spectrogram expert is highly interactive, allowing users to investigate hypotheses and edit rules. 10 references.

  15. Genetic effects of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic radiation effects resulted from the Chernobyl accident were considered for the population of Russia, Ukraine and Belarus. Techniques of the assessment of genetic risk of exposure of a man was discussed. Results of cytogenetic examination of the population were presented as well as health state of pregnants and newborns following the Chernobyl accident. Elevated level of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of peripheric blood in participants of the Chernobyl accident response and in population of contaminated zones. This fact testifies on the real genetic injury in cells due to accident. Growth of intrauterine losses in pregnancy, congenital anomalies, hereditary diseases in descendants of exposed parents. 17 figs

  16. Chernobyl, the true, the false and the uncertain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work makes the part between the true and the false information in France about the Chernobyl accident that have been read in different newspapers during the last years. This document is divide in three parts: what is true, what is false, what is uncertain. In each part are noticed extracts from newspapers face to the synthesis of thoughts about them. It is the fourth edition, the first one was in April 1990, the second one was in 1992 after a report from IAEA on the radiological consequences, the third edition was born in 1994 with the emergence of thyroid cancers especially among children, this fourth edition of 1996 takes into account the sanitary report given by the World Health Organisation experts in 1995. It confirms the progression of thyroid cancers and the absence of any other cancer as well leukemia. (N.C.)

  17. Cancer effects of radiation exposure from the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The WHO Expert Groups on Health reviewed a UNSCEAR 2000 report, more recent peer-reviewed scientific literature and scientific meeting presentations, reports and statistics prepared by National authorities. The outcome of this study are scientific consensus on health impact from radiation to date and identification of research gaps. Recommendations for health care programmes 20 years after: No clearly demonstrated increase in the incidence of cancers (other than thyroid) that can be attributed to radiation from the accident. Increases in incidence of cancers have been reported, but no association with radiation dose much of the increase appears to be due to other factors, including improvements in diagnosis, reporting and registration. Recent findings indicate a possible doubling of leukaemia risk among Chernobyl liquidators above 100 mGy and an increase in the incidence of pre-menopausal breast cancer in the very most contaminated districts, which appear to be related to radiation dose. These need to be further investigated

  18. Chernobyl - state of the art; Chernobyl - o estado da arte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Daiane C.B. de; Vicente, Roberto; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Borges, Jessica F.; Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Souza, Carla D.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Benega, Marcos A.G.; Souza, Anderson S. de; Silva, Thais H. da, E-mail: dcsouza@ipen.br, E-mail: rvicente@ipen.br, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br, E-mail: rtiezzi@ipen.br, E-mail: carladdsouza@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: marcosagbenega@ipen.br, E-mail: bteigarodrigues@gmail.com, E-mail: thaishunk@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This article aims to analyze what has been done so far in relation to damage caused by the accident and the state of art in Chernobyl, as well as the impact on radiation protection applied safety nuclear power plants. In the first part of the work a data survey was done through a bibliographic review and the in the second part data was collected during a visit, in June 2013 at the crash site, when was observed dose values in the affected areas and the works of repairs that have been made in the sarcophagus and surroundings as well as in official reports available through active international bodies. The main results indicate significant improvements in radiation protection systems.

  19. Emotional isolation in BBC Forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze emotionally annotated massive data from BBC Forum and examine properties of the isolation phenomenon of negative and positive users. Our results show the existence of a percolation threshold dependent on the average emotional value in the network of negatively charged nodes

  20. Emotional isolation in BBC Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz, J.; Chmiel, A.

    2014-03-01

    We analyze emotionally annotated massive data from BBC Forum and examine properties of the isolation phenomenon of negative and positive users. Our results show the existence of a percolation threshold dependent on the average emotional value in the network of negatively charged nodes.

  1. A Win-Win Forum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ZHONGXIANG

    2010-01-01

    @@ The 10 years since the inauguration of the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation(FOCAC)have witnessed the most rapid growth in the history of China-Africa relations,China unveiled measures to strengthen cooperation at every FOCAC ministerial conference and these measures were effectively implemented.

  2. A Win-Win Forum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A decade later,the FOCAC has generated tangible benefits for both China and Africa The 10 years since the inauguration of the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation(FOCAC) have witnessed the most rapid growth in the history of China-Africa relations.China unveiled measures to strengthen cooperation at every FOCAC ministerial conference and these measures were effectively implemented.

  3. Farmworker Organizations Hold Issue Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Cynthia

    1978-01-01

    The 1977 conference of the National Association of Farmworker Organizations (NAFO) centered on the broad spectrum of administrative and legislative areas affecting farmworkers that need policy decisions and directions: labor, immigration, education, health, data/census, hunger/nutrition, rural development, and energy. The forums formulated…

  4. CEO's Forum on Pioneering Spirit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

      When people talk about fortune, they are always recalled of the entrepreneurs. However, in the Fortune Global Forum, some well-known domestic entrepreneurs such as Charles Zhang, Peggy Yu and Jack Ma, they are honored as Pioneers.……

  5. Chernobyl: The bitter taste of wormwood [videorecording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A vivid account of the nuclear accident at Chernobyl, the far-reaching effects of radioactivity, monitoring radiation, evacuation of victims, etc. The video deals mainly with the impact and consequences of the accident in Sweden and Ukraine

  6. Increased leukemia risk in Chernobyl cleanup workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new study found a significantly elevated risk for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among workers who were engaged in recovery and clean-up activities following the Chernobyl power plant accident in 1986.

  7. Accident assessment for Chernobyl unit 3 from potential collapse of adjacent structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gore, B.F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Simonov, I.M.; Kritsky, A.B. [Ministry for Environmental Protection and Nuclear Safety, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1998-09-01

    This study assessed the likelihood of a serious, explosive accident to be caused at Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) unit 3 by a collapse that might occur in the nearby shelter (Ukrytie) constructed over the destroyed unit 4 or in the intermediate building block V separating the two units. In order to determine quickly and economically the significance of the hazard to unit 3, the analysis was based on existing information and expert judgment. No new structural analysis calculations were performed. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) managed and directed the methodology of the study. The expert judgment assessments of likely scenarios and event probabilities were carried out by Ukrainian experts. Most of the project team was drawn from the State Scientific and Technical Center of the Ministry of Environmental Protection of Ukraine with support from personnel of the Chernobyl NPP, the Interbranch Agency of the Ukrainian Scientific and Technical Center, and the Ukrainian Nuclear Regulatory Administration. It was truly an international project; the PNNL project manager resided in Ukraine during the study and met regularly with the Ukrainian team to review progress and to discuss approach and methodology. Peer reviews were obtained from Ukrainian, US, and Canadian risk analysis and RBMK systems and operations experts. The full report of the study and its results was published by the Ukrainian team.

  8. Alpha emitters in Chernobyl hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alpha radioactive component of hot particles from the Chernobyl fallout was analysed for cases studied previously by gamma spectroscopy. Correlations established from the absolute alpha activity determination and high resolution analysis provided information on actinides release during accident and on some aspects of the Chernobyl reactor fuel composition. Unexpected features revealed during the analysis of one specific particle are presented. 11 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs. (author)

  9. Migration of Chernobyl plutonium in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various geochemically linked landscapes were studied for the distribution of Chernobyl plutonium in soils. Significant behaviour of the Chernobyl plutonium may be observed only in case of its fall out with finely dispersed fuel. Within the areas polluted with the volatile ejection products, the plutonium migration forecast may be based on previous estimations obtained for the forest and forest-steppe zones. (author) 6 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  10. Alpha emitters in Chernobyl hot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broda, R.; Kubica, B.; Szeglowski, Z.; Zuber, K. (Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland))

    1989-01-01

    The alpha radioactive component of hot particles from the Chernobyl fallout was analyzed for cases studied previously by gamma spectroscopy. Correlations established from the absolute alpha activity determination and high resolution analysis provided information on the release of actinides during the accident and on some aspects of the Chernobyl reactor fuel composition. Unexpected features revealed during the analysis of one specific particle are presented. (orig.).

  11. Chernobyl catastrophe: Information for people living in the contaminated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive blow-outs after the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant catastrophe reached many states. The largest amount of them (according to experts' estimations - 70%) fell out on the Belarus territory. The estimation of radioecological, medico-biological, economic and social consequences of the Chernobyl catastrophe has shown that unimaginable damage was incurred on Belarus and its territory became the zone of ecological calamity. More than 14 years have passed since the Chernobyl NPP accident but some of the problems caused by the catastrophe have not been solved. This is bound up, first of all, with a high collective dosage absorbed by the population, with difficulties in forecasting and prophylactics of remote radiological effects, with ecological and economic crisis. The consequences of the disaster greatly affect all the aspects of vital activities of the affected regions and the state as a whole. Destructive tendencies have been revealed in all spheres of the life activity of people who experienced radiation effects. The processes of social adaptation and socio-psychological support of the population inhabiting the contaminated territory and resettled as well, require considerable optimisation. Negative factors of the Chernobyl catastrophe, which are significant for human health can be divided into two groups as follows: radiation-based, directly related to influence of ionising radiation and non radiation based, related to changes in habitat and prolonged psychological stress. The specific peculiarities of psychogenic disorders caused by the catastrophe are determined by the following reasons: insufficient knowledge of radiation effects; constant apprehension for the health and well-being of themselves and their families, especially children; unexpected change of the life stereotype (forced resettlement, the break of the former life, changing the place and the character of work, etc.); the necessity of constant keeping precaution measures and prophylactic

  12. Space Radar Image of Chernobyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and its surroundings, centered at 51.17 north latitude and 30.15 west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 16th orbit on October 1, 1994. The area is located on the northern border of the Ukraine Republic and was produced by using the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) polarization. The differences in the intensity are due to differences in vegetation cover, with brighter areas being indicative of more vegetation. These data were acquired as part of a collaboration between NASA and the National Space Agency of Ukraine in Remote Sensing and Earth Sciences. NASA has included several sites provided by the Ukrainian space agency as targets of opportunity during the second flight of SIR-C/X-SAR. The Ukrainian space agency also plans to conduct airborne surveys of these sites during the mission. The Chernobyl nuclear power plant is located toward the top of the image near the Pripyat River. The 12-kilometer (7.44-mile)-long cooling pond is easily distinguishable as an elongated dark shape in the center near the top of the image. The reactor complex is visible as the bright area to the extreme left of the cooling pond and the city of Chernobyl is the bright area just below the cooling pond next to the Pripyat River. The large dark area in the bottom right of the image is the Kiev Reservoir just north of Kiev. Also visible is the Dnieper River, which feeds into the Kiev Reservoir from the top of the image. The Soviet government evacuated 116,000 people within 30 kilometers (18.6 miles) of the Chernobyl reactor after the explosion and fire on April 26, 1986. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight

  13. Radiation effects blamed on Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strictly speaking, the nature of an epidemiological study would not permit the same causal links to be established as an experimental study does. Instead, it merely provides circumstantial evidence, from which some conclusions can be drawn as to the causative factors in the occurrences recorded. To summarize it may be stated that as fas as the Germans are concerned no scientific evidence has so far been provided to prove health impairments attributable to an added radiation load from the Chernobyl fallout. On the other hand, it can not be denied that there are indications of health damage in a few individuals unreasonably changing their eating habits for fear of radiation injuries. The question as to whether the event instilled a permanent feeling of unease in some population groups still remains largely obscure. (orig.)

  14. Chernobyl - state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article aims to analyze what has been done so far in relation to damage caused by the accident and the state of art in Chernobyl, as well as the impact on radiation protection applied safety nuclear power plants. In the first part of the work a data survey was done through a bibliographic review and the in the second part data was collected during a visit, in June 2013 at the crash site, when was observed dose values in the affected areas and the works of repairs that have been made in the sarcophagus and surroundings as well as in official reports available through active international bodies. The main results indicate significant improvements in radiation protection systems

  15. Summary of Chernobyl followup research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In NUREG-1251, ''Implications of the Accident at Chernobyl for Safety Regulation of Commercial Nuclear Power Plants in the United States,'' April 1989, the NRC staff concluded that no immediate changes in NRC's regulations regarding design or operation of US commercial reactors were needed; however, it recommended that certain issues be considered further. NRC's Chernobyl followup research program consisted of the research tasks undertaken in response to the recommendations in NUREG-1251. It included 23 tasks that addressed potential lessons to be learned from the Chernobyl accident. This report presents summaries of NRC's Chernobyl followup research tasks. For each task, the Chernobyl-related issues are indicated, the work is described, and the staff's findings and conclusions are presented. More detailed reports concerning the work are referenced where applicable. This report closes out NRC's Chernobyl followup research program as such, but additional research will be conducted on some issues as needed. The report includes remarks concerning significant further activity with respect to the issues addressed

  16. Chernobyl reactor accident: medical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernobyl reactor accident on 26th April, 1986 is by far the worst radiation accident in the history of the nuclear industry. Nearly 500 plant personnel and rescue workers received doses varying from 1-16 Gy. Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) was seen only in the plant personnel. 499 individuals were screened for ARS symptoms like nausea, vomitting, diarrhoea and fever. Complete blood examination was done which showed initial granulocytosis followed by granulocytopenia and lymphocytopenia. Cytogenetic examinations were confirmatory in classifying the patients on the basis of the doses received. Two hundred and thirty seven cases of ARS were hospitalised in the first 24-36 hrs. No member of general public suffered from ARS. There were two immediate deaths and subsequently 28 died in hospital and one of the cases died due to myocardial infarction, making a total of 31 deaths. The majority of fatal cases had whole body doses of about 6 Gy, besides extensive skin burns. Two cases of radiation burns had thermal burns also. Treatment of ARS consisted of isolation, barrier nursing, replacement therapy with fluid electrolytes, platelets and RBC transfusions and antibiotic therapy for bacterial, fungal and viral infections. Bone marrow transplantations were given to 13 cases out of which 11 died due to various causes. Radiation burns due to beta, gamma radiations were seen in 56 cases and treated with dressings, surgical excision, skin grafting and amputation. Oropharangeal syndrome, producing extensive mucous in the oropharynx, was first seen in Chernobyl. The patients were treated with saline wash of the mouth. The patients who had radioactive contamination due to radioactive iodine were given stable iodine, following wash with soap, water and monitored. Fourteen survivors died subsequently due to other causes. Late health effects seen so far include excess of thyroid cancer in the children and psychological disorders due to stress. No excess leukemia has been reported so

  17. Chernobyl accident. Exposures and effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl accident that occurred in Ukraine in April 1986 happened during an experimental test of the electrical control system as the reactor was being shut down for routine maintenance. The operators, in violation of safety regulations, had switched off important control systems and allowed the reactor to reach unstable, low-power conditions. A sudden power surge caused a steam explosion that ruptured the reactor vessel and allowed further violent fuel-steam interactions that destroyed the reactor and the reactor building. The Chernobyl accident was the most serious to have ever occurred in the nuclear power industry. The accident caused the early death of 30 power plant employees and fire fighters and resulted in widespread radioactive contamination in areas of Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine inhabited by several million people. Radionuclides released from the reactor that caused exposure of individuals were mainly iodine-131, caesium-134 and caesium-137. Iodine-131 has a short radioactive half-life (8 days), but it can be transferred relatively rapidly through milk and leafy vegetables to humans. Iodine becomes localized in the thyroid gland. For reasons of intake of these foods, size of thyroid gland and metabolism, the thyroid doses are usually greater to infants and children than to adults. The isotopes of caesium have relatively long half-lives (caesium-134: 2 years; caesium-137: 30 years). These radionuclides cause long-term exposures through the ingestion pathway and from external exposure to these radionuclides deposited on the ground. In addition to radiation exposure, the accident caused long-term changes in the lives of people living in the contaminated regions, since measures intended to limit radiation doses included resettlements, changes in food supplies, and restrictions in activities of individuals and families. These changes were accompanied by major economic, social and political changes in the affected countries resulting

  18. Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report relates the Chernobylsk accident, why following a succession of technical malfunctions and human errors, reactor no. 4 of the Chernobylsk nuclear power plant explodes on April 26. 1986. Radioactive dust, aerosols and gases (including caesium and iodine) are ejected into atmosphere. The regions worst hit are in the immediate vicinity of the plant, but deposits are very uneven, producing a leopard spot type of pattern. Propelled by easterly winds, the radioactive cloud disperses increasingly, scattering deposits over the whole of Europe. At the beginning of May, the cloud arrives in France. the eastern portion of the country is most strongly affected. Ground, water and agriculture are contaminated by caesium deposits in Belarus, Ukraine and Russian Federation. About the contamination in France, ground contamination is slight, fourteen years later, however, it is still detectable. Relative to the impact on health in the vicinity of Chernobylsk plant, it is hard to assess this impact. Among children in Southern Belarus, the number of thyroid cancers has risen one hundred-fold. In France, the doses delivered represents generally less than 1% of the average annual dose from radioactivity of natural origin. But some of the doses received were higher. Today, the protective sarcophagus covering the damaged reactor is fragile. Reactor no.3, still in operation, continues to pose a risk but the shutdown is provided for december 2000. (N.C.)

  19. Review on Korea Participation of Generation IV International Forum (GIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jewhan; Jeong, Ji-Young; Hahn, Dohee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Generation IV International Forum (GIF) originates from US proposal of an initiative in 2000. The vision was to leapfrog LWR technology and collaborate with international partners to share R and D on advanced nuclear systems. Nine countries and EU joined the initiative and Gen IV concept was defined via technology goals and legal framework. Two years study with more than 100 experts worldwide has evaluated nearly 100 reactor designs and down selected six most promising concepts. In 2005, the first signatures on Framework Agreement were collected and the first research projects were defined in 2006. Korea is one of the founding members of GIF and actively participating in various areas. In 2013, TD was assigned to Korean expert and Korea is endeavoring to enhance the benefit of participation since this turning point. In this paper, pros and cons of engaging with GIF were briefly introduced and items to maximize the benefit were suggested.

  20. Review on Korea Participation of Generation IV International Forum (GIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generation IV International Forum (GIF) originates from US proposal of an initiative in 2000. The vision was to leapfrog LWR technology and collaborate with international partners to share R and D on advanced nuclear systems. Nine countries and EU joined the initiative and Gen IV concept was defined via technology goals and legal framework. Two years study with more than 100 experts worldwide has evaluated nearly 100 reactor designs and down selected six most promising concepts. In 2005, the first signatures on Framework Agreement were collected and the first research projects were defined in 2006. Korea is one of the founding members of GIF and actively participating in various areas. In 2013, TD was assigned to Korean expert and Korea is endeavoring to enhance the benefit of participation since this turning point. In this paper, pros and cons of engaging with GIF were briefly introduced and items to maximize the benefit were suggested

  1. Chernobyl today. Impressions and informations from a visit to the nuclear power plant in July 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A visit to Chernobyl by Western experts was organized within the 1995 Nuclear Technology Conference. The region, which had been evacuated after the reactor accident in the Chernobyl-4 nuclear generating unit on April 26, 1986, now again offers employment to some 15,000 people. 120 scientific organizations are conducting studies in the protected zone. No indications of any consequences of the accident can be seen in the natural environment. As the manager of the power plant put it: 'This is a good region to live in.' In order to maintain this standard of living, the agencies responsible in Ukraine plan to repair unit 2, which has been down because of a fire in the turbine building since 1991, resynchronize it with the power grid, and run it up until 2002. Unit 1 is to be decommissioned in 1998; unit 3, in 2001. The biggest problem on site is the stability of the sarcophagus around unit 4. (orig./UA)

  2. Children disability in Ukrainian provinces with population survived after the Chernobyl disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical characteristics and nosology structure of child disability of the age under 16 and disability from childhood following the Chernobyl accident was studied. The nosology structure of children disability showed the increased part of the specific diseases subject to causal connection of disability and consequences of the Chernobyl accident: malignant neoplasm of hemopoietic system, congenital malformations, and respiratory diseases. According to data from Ukrainian medical-social expert commissions there were neoplasm (29.4%), endocrine system diseases (19.6%, with thyroid diseases in 60%, mainly postoperative hypothyroidism), diseases of nervous system (11.0%), respiratory diseases (8.0%, with 99% of bronchial asthma), mental and behavioral disorders (5.0%) in the nosology structure of childhood disability in age older than 16

  3. Brainstorming Versus Arguments Structuring in Online Forums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Alqahtani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We characterize electronic discussion forums as being of one of the following two types: Brainstorming Forums and Arguments Structuring Forums. In this work we analyze and classify the types of threading models occurring as a function of the type of forum. For our analysis we study forums attached to the 25 news sources most used by the aggregator Google News, as detected by a 2007 study. Most discussion forums associated with articles on these news sources seem to be designed not with the purpose of structuring arguments but mainly with the purpose of helping readers brainstorm easily their reactions to the corresponding news item. The forums were classified as to what user-supported metadata they gather and use in comment presentation. We compare the features observed for brainstorming forums, as learned via the aforementioned procedure, with the fea-tures of dedicated argument structuring forums. The argument structuring forums that were used as basis of the comparison are: YourView, DebateDecide, and Opinion Space. We notice significant differences in the obtained models for the two types of forums, as well as significant differences with respect to the the structuring of user submitted data in polls associated with major news channels. We believe that this is the first kind of work that deals with the issue above.

  4. Expert auditors’ services classification

    OpenAIRE

    Jolanta Wisniewska

    2013-01-01

    The profession of an expert auditor is a public trust occupation with a distinctive feature of taking responsibility for actions in the public interest. The main responsibility of expert auditors is performing financial auditing; however, expert auditors are prepared to carry out different tasks which encompass a wide plethora of financial and auditing services for different kinds of institutions and companies. The aim of the article is first of all the description of expert auditors’ service...

  5. Expert Status and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Mark A Burgman; McBride, Marissa; Ashton, Raquel; Speirs-Bridge, Andrew; Flander, Louisa; Wintle, Bonnie; Fidler, Fiona; Rumpff, Libby; Twardy, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Expert judgements are essential when time and resources are stretched or we face novel dilemmas requiring fast solutions. Good advice can save lives and large sums of money. Typically, experts are defined by their qualifications, track record and experience [1], [2]. The social expectation hypothesis argues that more highly regarded and more experienced experts will give better advice. We asked experts to predict how they will perform, and how their peers will perform, on sets of questions. T...

  6. Persuasiveness of expert systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, JJ; Liebrand, WBG; Timminga, E; Liebrand, Wim B.G.

    1998-01-01

    Expert system advice is not always evaluated by examining its contents. Users can be persuaded by expert system advice because they have certain beliefs about advice given by a computer. The experiment in this paper shows that subjects (n = 84) thought that, given the same argumentation, expert syst

  7. Nuclear waste disposal educational forum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-10-18

    In keeping with a mandate from the US Congress to provide opportunities for consumer education and information and to seek consumer input on national issues, the Department of Energy's Office of Consumer Affairs held a three-hour educational forum on the proposed nuclear waste disposal legislation. Nearly one hundred representatives of consumer, public interest, civic and environmental organizations were invited to attend. Consumer affairs professionals of utility companies across the country were also invited to attend the forum. The following six papers were presented: historical perspectives; status of legislation (Senate); status of legislation (House of Representatives); impact on the legislation on electric utilities; impact of the legislation on consumers; implementing the legislation. All six papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base.

  8. Nuclear waste disposal educational forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In keeping with a mandate from the US Congress to provide opportunities for consumer education and information and to seek consumer input on national issues, the Department of Energy's Office of Consumer Affairs held a three-hour educational forum on the proposed nuclear waste disposal legislation. Nearly one hundred representatives of consumer, public interest, civic and environmental organizations were invited to attend. Consumer affairs professionals of utility companies across the country were also invited to attend the forum. The following six papers were presented: historical perspectives; status of legislation (Senate); status of legislation (House of Representatives); impact on the legislation on electric utilities; impact of the legislation on consumers; implementing the legislation. All six papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base

  9. Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghel, C. (Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)); Penttilae, S. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland))

    2010-03-15

    A network for material issues for Generation IV nuclear power has been initiated within the Nordic countries. The objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) are to put the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen IV issues, especially focussing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Other issues include reactor physics, dynamics and diagnostics, core and fuel design. The present report summarizes the work performed during the year 2009. The efforts made include identification of organisations involved in Gen IV issues in the Nordic countries, update of the forum website, http://www.studsvik.se/GenerationIV, and investigation of capabilities for research within the area of Gen IV. Within the NOMAGE4 project a seminar on Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems has been organized during 15-16th of October 2009. The aim of the seminar was to provide a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. As an outcome of the NOMAGE4, a few collaboration project proposals have been prepared/planned in 2009. The network was welcomed by the European Commission and was mentioned as an exemplary network with representatives from industries, universities, power companies and research institutes. NOMAGE4 has been invited to participate to the 'European Energy Research Alliance, EERA, workshop for nuclear structural materials' http://www.eera-set.eu/index.php?index=41 as external observers. Future plans include a new Nordic application for continuation of NOMAGE4 network. (author)

  10. Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A network for material issues for Generation IV nuclear power has been initiated within the Nordic countries. The objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) are to put the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen IV issues, especially focussing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Other issues include reactor physics, dynamics and diagnostics, core and fuel design. The present report summarizes the work performed during the year 2009. The efforts made include identification of organisations involved in Gen IV issues in the Nordic countries, update of the forum website, http://www.studsvik.se/GenerationIV, and investigation of capabilities for research within the area of Gen IV. Within the NOMAGE4 project a seminar on Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems has been organized during 15-16th of October 2009. The aim of the seminar was to provide a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. As an outcome of the NOMAGE4, a few collaboration project proposals have been prepared/planned in 2009. The network was welcomed by the European Commission and was mentioned as an exemplary network with representatives from industries, universities, power companies and research institutes. NOMAGE4 has been invited to participate to the 'European Energy Research Alliance, EERA, workshop for nuclear structural materials' http://www.eera-set.eu/index.php?index=41 as external observers. Future plans include a new Nordic application for continuation of NOMAGE4 network. (author)

  11. Chernobyl from the point of view of disaster sociology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some social aspects of the Chernobyl accident for Belarus are considered. The information system of publications on this theme is analyzed. The influence of various factors of the Chernobyl accident on social changes in the areas of radioactive contamination is investigated. The Chernobyl subculture formation process in the contaminated areas is considered. Practical recommendations of sociologists on the elimination of the Chernobyl catastrophe effects are given. 12 refs

  12. Expert status and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgman, Mark A; McBride, Marissa; Ashton, Raquel; Speirs-Bridge, Andrew; Flander, Louisa; Wintle, Bonnie; Fidler, Fiona; Rumpff, Libby; Twardy, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Expert judgements are essential when time and resources are stretched or we face novel dilemmas requiring fast solutions. Good advice can save lives and large sums of money. Typically, experts are defined by their qualifications, track record and experience. The social expectation hypothesis argues that more highly regarded and more experienced experts will give better advice. We asked experts to predict how they will perform, and how their peers will perform, on sets of questions. The results indicate that the way experts regard each other is consistent, but unfortunately, ranks are a poor guide to actual performance. Expert advice will be more accurate if technical decisions routinely use broadly-defined expert groups, structured question protocols and feedback. PMID:21829574

  13. Expert status and performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Burgman

    Full Text Available Expert judgements are essential when time and resources are stretched or we face novel dilemmas requiring fast solutions. Good advice can save lives and large sums of money. Typically, experts are defined by their qualifications, track record and experience. The social expectation hypothesis argues that more highly regarded and more experienced experts will give better advice. We asked experts to predict how they will perform, and how their peers will perform, on sets of questions. The results indicate that the way experts regard each other is consistent, but unfortunately, ranks are a poor guide to actual performance. Expert advice will be more accurate if technical decisions routinely use broadly-defined expert groups, structured question protocols and feedback.

  14. Chernobyl after five years and over

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On April 26th 1986 the catastrophe occurred at the nuclear electric power generation system. The first inkling of the accident was known through the Swedish monitoring station about the radioactive fallout. It was also in 1986 that the USSR gave an idea of an earlier accident which happened in 1957. The Chernobyl reactor has pressure tubes and is a pressure vessel reactor. Graphite is used as an industrial material. In western reactors in USA with the increase in heat, power generation comes down. The international AEC discussed the Chernobyl comprehensively and came out with conclusion of deficiency in design which was accepted by the Soviet side without any demur. In 1970, in UK an accident has been reported with pressurized reactor. In 1987, Chernobyl was discussed under the chair of Eugene Volkov by USSR. In 1989, another conference was arranged at Sicily. The first annual nuclear safety met at Minsk in 1990 (June); USSR/USA meet on Chernobyl was also held at Solchin in 1989. A future meeting on Chernobyl was held at Paris in July 1991. In all these meetings, it is emphasized that more training and safety culture establishment was necessary by the international nuclear safety advisory group on safety. (author). 2 refs., 1 tab

  15. Radionuclide migration in the Chernobyl contamination zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that the Chernobyl fallout of 137 reaching the land soils with precipitation was rapidly and tightly sorbed to the fine fraction of sediment or soils. The majority of the 137Cs is retained in the top few centimetres of the soil or sediment profiles. In the absence of strong variations in precipitation over a relatively small area the total bomb-derived 137Cs fallout can assumed to be spatial uniform. The Chernobyl 137Cs fallout was mostly connected with one or two rains. So the spatial variability of this 137Cs can be higher. Furthermore because the explosion of the Chernobyl nuclear plant happened together with fire lot of ashes particles with radionuclide were distributed within vast areas. So even microvariability of Chernobyl 137Cs can be very high in some places. The horizontal migration of 137Cs connects with soil erosion processes that dominate on the agricultural lands of the Central Russia. The main goal of this investigation is to evaluate the caesium-137 horizontal and vertical migration within typical landscape of the Central Russia 11 years after the Chernobyl accident. (author). 7 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Introduction: geoscientific knowledgebase of Chernobyl and Fukushima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Voitsekhovych, Oleg; Korobova, Elena; Stohl, Andreas; Wotawa, Gerhard; Kita, Kazuyuki; Aoyama, Michio; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-04-01

    Radioactive contamination after the Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011) accidents is a multi-disciplinary geoscience problem. Just this session (GI1.4) contains presentations of (i) atmospheric transport for both short and long distances, (ii) aerosol physics and chemistry, (ii) geophysical measurement method and logistics, (iv) inversion method to estimate the geophysical source term and decay, (v) transport, migration, and sedimentation in the surface water system, (vi) transport and sedimentation in the ocean, (vii) soil chemistry and physics, (viii) forest ecosystem, (ix) risk assessments, which are inter-related to each other. Because of rareness of a severe accident like Chernobyl and Fukushima, the Chernobyl's 27 years experience is the only knowledgebase that provides a good guidance for the Fukushima case in understanding the physical/chemical processes related to the environmental radioactive contamination and in providing future prospectives, e.g., what we should do next for the observation/remediation. Unfortunately, the multi-disciplinary nature of the radioactive contamination problem makes it very difficult for a single scientist to obtain the overview of all geoscientific aspects of the Chernobyl experience. The aim of this introductory talk is to give a comprehensive knowledge of the wide geoscientific aspects of the Chernobyl contamination to Fukushima-related geoscience community.

  17. Medical consequences of Chernobyl accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galstyan I.A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the long-term effects of acute radiation syndrome (ARS, developed at the victims of the Chernobyl accident. Material and Methods. 237 people were exposed during the accident, 134 of them were diagnosed with ARS. Dynamic observation implies a thorough annual examination in a hospital. Results. In the first 1.5-2 years after the ARS mean group indices of peripheral blood have returned to normal. However, many patients had transient expressed moderate cytopenias. Granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, lymphopenia and erythropenia were the most frequently observed things during the first 5 years after the accident. After 5 years their occurences lowered. In 11 patients the radiation cataract was detected. A threshold dose for its development is a dose of 3.2 Gy Long-term effects of local radiation lesions (LRL range from mild skin figure smoothing to a distinct fibrous scarring, contractures, persistently recurrent late radiation ulcers. During all years of observation we found 8 solid tumors, including 2 thyroid cancers. 5 hematologic diseases were found. During 29 years 26 ARS survivors died of various causes. Conclusion. The health of ones with long-term ARS effects is determined by the evolution of the LRL effects on skin, radiation cataracts, hema-tological diseases and the accession of of various somatic diseases, not caused by radiation.

  18. Leukaemia incidents after Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romania and especially its Eastern territory were among the most heavily affected area after Chernobyl accident. The objective of our study was to investigate whether or not the nuclear accident determined an increased number of leukaemia cases. The specific rates of leukaemia incidents by age group were calculated in 588167 children aged 0-6 years in April 1986 and 99917 children which have been exposed 'in utero'. The rates of 1989-1994 period were compared with the rates of 1980-1985 period. The incidence rates were lower in the exposed group than that in controls for children under 1 year (20.52/105 inh vs 23.11/105 inh), 1-3 years (13.26/105 inh vs 16.11/105 inh) and 4-6 years (9.58/105 inh vs 10.58/105 inh). The cohort of 'in utero' exposed children presented a leukaemia incidences insignificantly higher than that before the accident (23.10/105 inh vs 15.93/105 inh)

  19. Chernobyl - ethical and environmental considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper summarises briefly the main facts of the Chernobyl incident, the reactions to it, and the consequences in terms of global atmospheric pollution. Meteorological conditions determined the pattern of fallout, which over the United Kingdom for Cs137 varied in the ratio 10 : 4000 Bq/m2 (on grass). There has been poor understanding by the media and the public of the quantitative aspects, aggravated by the differing characteristics of the several radionuclides (15 are listed), and the different units used in the USSR and the UK. Very complete information on fallout in the British Isles was obtained from meteorological data and the atmospheric dispersion models operated at Imperial College. Transfer through food chains depended on the variety of circumstances: the monitoring programmes and control measures were found to be in need of improvement, as no criteria existed for the amounts that justify intervention in the supply of foodstuffs to the public. Long-term effects in the UK of the measured radiation from this incident, in terms of deaths per year attributed to cancer are given and compared with other health hazards. The disaster has underlined the responsibilities of top management and of professional engineers, the need to promote a 'safety culture', and the value of effective organisation, the international exchange of experience, and the role of the media in improving public information. (author)

  20. Chernobyl. Disaster and its legacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundreds of thousands of people have been helping to mitigate the consequences of the Chernobyl reactor accident, but there still are many areas in which many people have to live with the risks induced by elevated environmental radioactivity. The authors of the book have been participating in the measuring programme of the Federal Republic of Germany, intended to measure and map the radiation exposure of the population and the environment in the states of the former Soviet Union affected by the disaster. Due to their participation in biophysical and medical measuring programmes, the authors are familiar with the situation on site. Their report is intended to give the general reader a picture of the causes and progress of the reactor accident of April 1986, and of its longlasting effects on human health and the food chain. The information presented is based on authentic material and data and reveals the biologic, medical and social consequences as well as the related scientific and ecologic problems. (orig./HP)

  1. Phytoremediation of Chernobyl Contaminated Land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the land within a 10 km radius of the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant is still heavily contaminated by the 1986 accident. In 1998, a 3 year investigation of the potential of willow vegetation systems to stabilise the contaminated land and thereby reduce the dispersion of radionuclides was initiated under the PHYTOR project. During the first year, a number of screening tests were carried out on the contaminated flood plain of the river Pripyat. Survival of new willow plantations was tested at several locations. Except for the predominantly moist peaty soil in the vicinity of Yanov (where survival was nearly 100%), survival was low (0-30%). Notwithstanding, willows are found everywhere on the Pripyat flood plains: 7-8 year old plantations exist on the upper terraces and 1-2 year old saplings cover the newly deposited alluvial sands. For these willows radiocaesium transfer factors ranged from 10-4 and 10-3 m2.kg-1 and strontium transfer factors from 10-3 and 10-2 m2.kg-1. Biomass production was low: 70-100 kg.ha-1.y-1. Therefore, the radionuclide immobilisation in the biomass was insignificant. Even when based on the exchangeable caesium fraction, less then 0.1% for radiocaesium and less than 1% for radiostrontium became incorporated into the wood. Nevertheless, establishment of willow would reduce resuspension and erosion of soil and sediment. (author)

  2. CERN hosts Physics and Society Forum

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    On 28-29 March, CERN hosted the fifth edition of the European Physical Society's “Physics and Society” forum. The forum addresses the role of physicists in general society – be they in education, politics, industry or communication. This year, attendees looked at how physicists have adapted - and can continue to adapt - to work in the economic marketplace.   “The forums began back in 2006, as a special closing event for the 2005 World Year of Physics,” explains Martial Ducloy, former President of the French Physical Society and Chair of the EPS Forum Physics and Society. “We decided to keep the sessions going, as they gave physicists a venue to discuss the non-scientific issues that influence their daily work. As the world's largest international physics laboratory – and the venue for this year's EPS Council – CERN seemed the ideal place to host this year's forum.” The forum ...

  3. ForAVis : explorative user forum analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wanner, Franz; Ramm, Thomas; Keim, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    User generated textual content on the internet has become increasingly valueable during the past few years. Forums, blogs, twitter and other social media websites are accessible for a huge amount of people all over the world. Hence, methods and tools are needed to handle this vast bulk of textual data. In this paper we present an explorative forum analysis system helping various stakeholders to cope with the task analyzing user generated content in online forums. The used mobile communication...

  4. Chernobyl - Could it happen here? [videorecording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the accident at the Soviet nuclear power station at Chernobyl in April 1986, the CEGB produced this video which has now been updated in the light of the information provided by the Soviets at the International Atomic Energy Agency Conference in Vienna. At this conference it was made clear that the Chernobyl accident would have been impossible in any nuclear reactor operational outside the USSR. This video explains why. It examines the main reasons for the failure of the reactor at Chernobyl and the two fundamental design flaws which resulted in the sequence of events leading up to the accident. It shows how British reactors have built-in protection to compensate for failure in any part of the system, and how the reactors are tolerant to operator error. The programme also explains the safety standards and regulations which are enforced in CEGB nuclear power stations and the rigorous training that reactor operators have to undergo

  5. Scientific and technical aspects of Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection contains the presentations and scientific articles prepared for and discussed during the Conference titled '2001: International Cooperation For Chernobyl'. The materials outline the outcomes achieved while implementing Chernobyl site scientific-technical researches and projects, as well as activities aimed at enhancing the ChNPP safety, decommissioning and radwaste management. It also highlights the issues related to transforming the Unit Shelter into an ecologically safe system, represents the results of ecological researches in the Exclusion Zone, medical effects of the 1986 accident at Chernobyl NPP, together with social and economic problems the city of Slavutich faces now due to the early ChNPP Units decommissioning, and Slavutich business development opportunities under the circumstances of Special Economic Zone 'Slavutich'

  6. Post-Chernobyl scientific perspectives: Thyroid effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The population in the area around Chernobyl, particularly southern Belarus and northern Ukraine, was exposed to high levels of fallout from the Chernobyl accident including large amounts of radioactive iodine. As the thyroid gland concentrates iodine, it was exposed to higher levels of radiation than other body tissues. The radioactive isotope of iodine, iodine-131, has been extensively and safely used in the treatment of thyrotoxicosis. Thus, the report of increased numbers of thyroid carcinoma in children in areas exposed to fallout from Chernobyl was surprising to some, both because of the previous lack of thyroid carcinoma in patients treated with radioactive iodine, and because of the very short time (four years) between exposure and the start of the increase

  7. Abstract Collection of 20th Forum: Third Package and Other Energy Directives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This years' annual Forum is held twentieth year in a row. Numerous of important topics have been discussed during previous years, tracking all the changes in energy sector, from national monopoly utilities towards open markets, from first visions of consideration of renewable sources of energy towards the present realization of this facilities, from first identification of climate changes issues towards today's achievements in climate control. One could enumerate all the things that changed during this timeframe since it is a period when outlines of new energy policy and technological development were recognized. All these years this was an open space for presentation of ideas and discussions. This Forum hosted many remarkable experts which introduced us with global visions and expectations. In a way, Forum has been leader of changes, a kind of school for development of overall relations in energy sector, and around it. Forum was never a place where conclusions were brought. For some, it is a disadvantage, for us that are the basis of Forums' work, foreseen as a place where different ideas and solutions meet, but not a place for decision-making. Decision-making is foreseen for some other places, and from the profession expectation's point of view. It would be advisable to make those decisions based on the serious and thorough researches. Last 20 years have confirmed a need to continue tradition of the Forum. We hope that choice of new topics and experts will continue to bring new knowledge, experiences and reflections. We would like to continue on being an open space for all ideas that are able to contribute to strategic development of energy sector. (author)

  8. Latest report about health effects of the chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After twenty years of Chernobyl accident, the international conference was hold in Kyiv, Ukraine, 24-26, April in 2006. During the conference WHO declares the paper named health effects of the Chernobyl accident. The report look back the nuclear accident in the history, and then recite conclusion about health effects of the Chernobyl accident, which from doses received from the Chernobyl accident, thyroid cancer, non-thyroid solid cancer, leukemia, mortality, cataract and cardiovascular disease. The report is considered as milestone events in the studying of health effects of Chernobyl accident. (authors)

  9. Seiberdorf scientists give answers to questions in connection with the Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a collection of 8 largely non-technical papers written by experts in radiation protection, biology and agriculture from the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf, on the consequences for Austria of the Chernobyl fallout and washout. 5 papers are also published (partly under different titles) in the journals Pflanzenarzt 7-8, 1986, Agrozucker 4, 1986 und Blick ins Land, 1986. From the rest, one paper is treated separately for INIS while two papers are elemtary general introductions to radioactivity, radiation, units and doses. (G.Q.)

  10. Coping with the Chernobyl disaster: a comparison of social effects in two reindeer-herding areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapland reindeer herders in the Vilhelmina and Jokkmokk municipalities of Sweden were interviewed in summer, autumn and winter 1987/88. The great variability in nuclear contamination between these areas has occasioned obvious but also unforeseen differences in the social effects for the Sami. The variability of contamination has also been compounded by the variability of compensation policy, variability of expert statements about risk, and also the change in state limits on Bq. concentrations set for meat marketability. This paper will illustrate the broad spectrum of Chernobyl-related social problems and the methods of coping with them

  11. Database for a systems analytical approach to studying the medical aspects of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main elements of the program data base were the all-Union distribution register and the SDACHA computer system (Chernobyl accident data system) which ensured reliable functioning of the PRIORRA expert system (acronym stands for ''taking of optimum decisions in the event of a radiation accident''). The development of criteria for the optimum selection of countermeasures follows three paths - medical, economic and social - and is based on a regulatory document entitled ''criteria for taking decisions or measures to protect the population in the event of a reactor accident''. (author). 1 ref., 3 figs

  12. Real and mythical consequences of Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation describes the public Unacceptance of Nuclear Power as a consequence of Chernobyl Accident, an accident which was a severest event in the history of the nuclear industry. It was a shock for everybody, who has been involved in nuclear power programs. But nobody could expect that it was also the end romantic page in the nuclear story. The scale of the detriment was a great, and it could be compared with other big technological man-made catastrophes. But immediately after an accident mass media and news agencies started to transmit an information with a great exaggerations of the consequences of the event. In a report on the Seminar The lessons of the Chernobyl - 1' in 1996 examples of such incorrect information, were cited. Particularly, in the mass media it was declared that consequences of the accident could be compared with a results of the second world war, the number of victims were more than hundred thousand people, more than million of children have the serious health detriments. Such and other cases of the misconstruction have been called as myths. The real consequences of Chernobyl disaster have been summed on the International Conference 'One decade after Chernobyl' - 2, in April 1996. A very important result of the Chernobyl accident was a dissemination of stable unacceptance of the everything connected with 'the atom'. A mystic horror from invisible mortal radiation has been inspired in the masses. And from such public attitude the Nuclear Power Programs in many countries have changed dramatically. A new more pragmatic and more careful atomic era started with a slogan: 'Kernkraftwerk ? Nein, danke'. No doubt, a Chernobyl accident was a serious technical catastrophe in atomic industry. The scale of detriment is connected with a number of involved peoples, not with a number of real victims. In comparison with Bhopal case, earthquakes, crashes of the airplanes, floods, traffic accidents and other risky events of our life - the Chernobyl is

  13. The Nordic Chernobyl data base project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernobyl Data Base has been established with the purpose of collecting the large amount of data resulting from measurements made in several laboratories in the period following the Chernobyl accident. All information is stored in the C data base handling system developed especially for this kind of environmental data. The C base data handling system allows for easy input from a variety of sources and easy output to other computer programs for further data treatment. This paper describes the structures, codes and methods used and the present status of the project. (au)

  14. Consequences and problems of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data on epidemic situation in connection with the Chernobyl accident, based on the personal medical and dosimetric information on all the persons, subjected to radiation effect, and included in the Russian state medicodosimetric register, are presented. The consequences of the Chernobyl accident become the cause for origination of serious radiation injures by 134 persons (with lethal outcome by 37 patients) and also remote radiation stochastic effects by children (thyroid gland cancer) and by liquidators (thyroid gland leucosis and cancer). The permanent stress and other unfavorable factors conditioned aggravation of chronical and increase in somatic diseases and psychoneurotic disorders

  15. The Chernobyl disaster - ten years on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large areas of Belarus, Russia and the Ukraine are contaminated with very high levels of radioactivity from the fallout of the Chernobyl reactor accident. The most affected areas are in the vicinity of Chernobyl, and east of Gomel (in Belarus), where much of the radioactive plume came down. The article describes the contamination with cesium 137 and iodine 131, as well as the immediate countermeasures taken after the accident, and the long-term action for decontamination of the polluted soil. Information is given on the radiation dose received by the population, in particular the thyroid doses, and prognostic data on thyroid cancer incidence. (orig.)

  16. Being an expert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This series of short articles are dedicated to the role of the expert in the enterprise. There is an important difference between a scientific counsellor and an expert, the expert, recognized by his peers, can speak publicly in his field of expertise but has a duty of transparency while the job of a scientific counsellor requires confidentiality. The making and the use of an expert in an enterprise requires a dedicated organization. The organization of the expertise in 5 enterprises in nuclear industry are considered: CEA (French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission), IRSN (Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety), AREVA, ANDRA (National Radioactive Waste Management Agency) and EDF (Electricity of France)

  17. Belief in nuclear energy: Attitudes and opinions of Dutch nuclear experts. Het geloof in kernenergie: Houdingen en meningen van Nederlandse kernenergie-experts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arts, F.; Klaassen, R. (Vakgroep Milieukunde, Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)); De Ruiter, W. (Vakgroep Natuurwetenschap en Samenleving, Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1994-01-01

    The public opinion in the Netherlands about nuclear energy has been rather stable during recent years. Since the Chernobyl accident roughly 60% of the Dutch population is opposed to extension of the use of nuclear energy. Nuclear experts play an important role in the formation of public opinion about nuclear energy. In this paper the social and cultural background of 87 Dutch nuclear energy experts is analyzed with respect to religious belief, age, life style, membership of a political party, birth order and career pattern. 2 figs., 2 tabs., 16 refs.

  18. International Chernobyl project [AEA report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA have co-ordinated the first international assessment of the radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident in the affected areas outside the 30km prohibited zone around the reactor. These areas have a total population of about 1 million people, living in approximately 2700 settlements. The main aim of the project was to answer the question 'Is it safe for the population to go on living in the affected areas?'. The project did not investigate radiological health effects among more than 100 000 people evacuated from the 30 km prohibited zone. Nor did it study effects among the emergency personnel temporarily brought into the region for accident management and recovery work (the so-called 'liquidators'). Project teams reviewed official data on environmental contamination from 500 settlements, data collection practices and reporting and also official information on radiation doses received by people living in seven settlements. Other project teams reviewed official data at key medical centres and institutes. Then they examined people both from surveyed contaminated settlement and from surveyed control settlements. The team concluded that there were significant non-radiation related health disorders in populations of both contaminated and control settlements. None of the disorders could be attributed directly to radiation exposure. In particular, no evidence was found for a significant increase in foetal abnormalities; infant and prenatal mortality rates had fallen since the accident. Children were found to be generally healthy with no abnormalities in either thyroid stimulating or thyroid hormones. The accident had created substantial negative psychological consequences, manifesting themselves in terms of anxiety and stress due to continuing high levels of uncertainty. (author)

  19. Chernobyl birds have smaller brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Pape Møller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animals living in areas contaminated by radioactive material from Chernobyl suffer from increased oxidative stress and low levels of antioxidants. Therefore, normal development of the nervous system is jeopardized as reflected by high frequencies of developmental errors, reduced brain size and impaired cognitive abilities in humans. Alternatively, associations between psychological effects and radiation have been attributed to post-traumatic stress in humans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Here we used an extensive sample of 550 birds belonging to 48 species to test the prediction that even in the absence of post-traumatic stress, there is a negative association between relative brain size and level of background radiation. We found a negative association between brain size as reflected by external head volume and level of background radiation, independent of structural body size and body mass. The observed reduction in brain size in relation to background radiation amounted to 5% across the range of almost a factor 5,000 in radiation level. Species differed significantly in reduction in brain size with increasing background radiation, and brain size was the only morphological character that showed a negative relationship with radiation. Brain size was significantly smaller in yearlings than in older individuals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Low dose radiation can have significant effects on normal brain development as reflected by brain size and therefore potentially cognitive ability. The fact that brain size was smaller in yearlings than in older individuals implies that there was significant directional selection on brain size with individuals with larger brains experiencing a viability advantage.

  20. Fallout from Chernobyl and atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. Chernobyl in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some results and experience gained so far in Sweden after the Chernobyl accident are discussed in the light of knowledge obtained from the studies of fallout from the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. Cesium-137, which was an important radionuclide in the bomb fallout, was still more important after Chernobyl. For most Swedes the external irradiation from deposited Cs-137 was the dominating source of irradiation. Studies of Chernobyl fallout have given new information in the fate of contamination in the forest environment, lakes, urban areas, on shielding factors for houses etc. The releases from Chernobyl gave relatively lower dietary doses than expected form the same amount of Cs-137, released through nuclear weapons testing. However lake fish, moose and forest products have shown to be of greater importance than earlier realized. The main reason for the lower dietary doses from Chernobyl was the seasonal distribution of the fallout with deposition just before the start of the growing season. The various actions taken also reduced the intake of Cs-137 and Cs-134. Otherwise, there are no radical differences in the behaviour of cesium in the environment after the bombs and after Chernobyl. Differences may exist, primarily during the first year, due to different fallout conditions, where also the physical-chemical form of the fallout might have been of some importance. The average Swede will have an effective dose commitment of around 1 mSv from Chernobyl, which is about the same as from the bomb fallout. The highest doses due to Chernobyl area received by people living in high deposition areas (>80 kBq/m2 of CS-137) and consuming larger amounts of game animals, lake fish and reindeer. (66 refs.)

  1. IAEA scientific forum to focus on nuclear technology's role in serving human needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Science and technology's critical role in eradicating famine and disease - among the root causes of global instability - was addressed by some of the world's leading experts at an IAEA forum in Vienna, 18-19 September. The meeting underlined the contribution of nuclear science and technology to sustainable development and the betterment of human welfare and stressed the need for the world's wealthiest nations to give it more support

  2. One decade after Chernobyl: Summing up the consequences of the accident. Poster presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consequences attributed to the disastrous accident that occurred at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant on 26 April 1986 have been subjected to extensive scientific examination; however, they are still viewed with widely differing perspectives. It is fitting then that, ten years after the accident, the European Commission (EC), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) should jointly sponsor an international conference to review the consequences of the accident and to seek a common and conclusive understanding of their nature and magnitude. The International Conference on One Decade after Chernobyl: Summing up the Consequences of the Accident was held at the Austria Center, Vienna, on 8-12 April 1996. To facilitate the discussions of the Conference, background papers were prepared for the Technical Symposium by teams of scientists from around the world, who collaborated over a period of months to ascertain, consolidate and present the current state of knowledge in six key areas: clinically observed effects; thyroid effects; long term health effects; other health related effects; consequences for the environment; and the consequences in perspective: prognosis for the future. A background paper on the social, economic, institutional and political impact of the accident was prepared by Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine. The conclusions of the Forum on Nuclear Safety Aspects served as a background paper on this topic

  3. One decade after Chernobyl: Summing up the consequences of the accident. Poster presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consequences attributed to the disastrous accident that occurred at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant on 26 April 1986 have been subjected to extensive scientific examination; however, they are still viewed with widely differing perspectives. It is fitting then that, ten years after the accident, the European commission (EC), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) should jointly sponsor an international conference to review the consequences of the accident and to seek a common and conclusive understanding of their nature and magnitude. The International Conference on One Decade after Chernobyl: Summing up the Consequences of the Accident was held at the Austria Center, Vienna, on 8-12 April 1996. To facilitate the discussions of the Conference, background papers were prepared for the Technical Symposium by teams of scientists from a round the world, who collaborated over a period of months to ascertain, consolidate and present the current state of knowledge in six key areas: clinically observed effects; thyroid effects; long term health effects; other health related effects; consequences for the environment; and the consequences in perspective: prognosis for the future. A background paper on the social, economic, institutional and political impact of the accident was prepared by Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine. The conclusions of the Forum on Nuclear Safety Aspects served as a background paper on this topic. Refs, figs, tabs

  4. Expert systems: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to introduce readers to the basic principles of rule-based expert systems. Four topics are discussed in subsequent sections: (1) Definition; (2) Structure of an expert system; (3) State of the art and (4) Impact and future research. (orig.)

  5. Introducing New Journal Feature: Teachers' Forum

    OpenAIRE

    Kramsch, Claire

    2012-01-01

    We are proud to announce the introduction of a new section in the journal, Teacher’s Forum, to be edited by Rick Kern, specifically geared towards language lecturers and graduate student instructors.The Teacher’s Forum will offer a platform to share brief, refereed reports on second and foreign language pedagogical activities and research.

  6. SENTIMENT ANALYSIS FOR ONLINE FORUMS HOTSPOT DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nirmala Devi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The user generated content on the web grows rapidly in this emergent information age. The evolutionary changes in technology make use of such information to capture only the user’s essence and finally the useful information are exposed to information seekers. Most of the existing research on text information processing, focuses in the factual domain rather than the opinion domain. Text mining plays a vital role in online forum opinion mining. But opinion mining from online forum is much more difficult than pure text process due to their semi structured characteristics. In this paper we detect online hotspot forums by computing sentiment analysis for text data available in each forum. This approach analyzes the forum text data and computes value for each piece of text. The proposed approach combines K-means clustering and Support Vector Machine (SVM classification algorithm that can be used to group the forums into two clusters forming hotspot forums and non-hotspot forums within the current time span. The experiment helps to identify that K-means and SVM together achieve highly consistent results. The prediction result of SVM is also compared with other classifiers such as Naïve Bayes, Decision tree and among them SVM performs the best.

  7. 2006 Chinese Government Auto Purchase Forum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Sponsored by Economic Daily and the China Machinery Enterprises Management Association, the 2006 Chinese Government Auto Purchase Forum will be held in Tianjin on July 11-13. This represents another high-level dialogue and exchange between the government and the auto industry hot on the heels of the 2005 Chinese Government Auto Purchase Forum. This event is launched to promote

  8. Forum to address controversies over antidepressants

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, Jean

    2005-01-01

    Choices and Challenges at Virginia Tech will hold a public forum entitled "On Prozac: Debating the New Technologies of Mind," a day-long series of panels and discussions to be held on Nov. 10 in the Graduate Life Center at Donaldson Brown. This forum is open to the public at no charge.

  9. Optimisation of information influences on problems of consequences of Chernobyl accident and quantitative criteria for estimation of information actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consequences of Chernobyl NPP accident still very important for Belarus. About 2 million Byelorussians live in the districts polluted by Chernobyl radionuclides. Modern approaches to the decision of after Chernobyl problems in Belarus assume more active use of information and educational actions to grow up a new radiological culture. It will allow to reduce internal doze of radiation without spending a lot of money and other resources. Experience of information work with the population affected by Chernobyl since 1986 till 2004 has shown, that information and educational influences not always reach the final aim - application of received knowledge on radiating safety in practice and changing the style of life. If we take into account limited funds and facilities, we should optimize information work. The optimization can be achieved on the basis of quantitative estimations of information actions effectiveness. It is possible to use two parameters for this quantitative estimations: 1) increase in knowledge of the population and experts on the radiating safety, calculated by new method based on applied theory of the information (Mathematical Theory of Communication) by Claude E. Shannon and 2) reduction of internal doze of radiation, calculated on the basis of measurements on human irradiation counter (HIC) before and after an information or educational influence. (author)

  10. Chernobyl - A chronicle of difficult weeks [videorecording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The film demonstrates how authorities and volunteers dealt with the accident at the nuclear power plant at Chernobyl in the Ukraine. The efforts to get the fire under control, to take care of patients with radiation injuries, and to evacuate about 100,000 inhabitants of the area, are shown

  11. Decision conferencing and the International Chernobyl Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the International Chernobyl Project, five decision conferences were held with the Soviet authorities to identify the major factors driving decision making in relation to relocation and other protective measures which are being applied in the affected regions of Byelorussia, Ukraine and the Russian Federation. This report describes the running of those conferences and the conclusions reached from them. (Author)

  12. Chernobyl: A first-hand account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author, living in Moscow at the time, was traveling by night train to visit family in Kiev at the time of the chernobyl accident. He recalls a passenger in his compartment asking if anyone had noticed in the morning press about the explosion in Chernobyl. In Kiev, about 50 mi from Chernobyl by air, he noted on arrival that everyone was calm - the city quiet with no rumors or gossip. He contrasts this with the world being alert, in despair, full of alarm. On failure to reach old friends by phone, he thought they had left the city for at least 4-day vacations - May 1 and 2 holidays plus Saturday and Sunday. He continues to recount the life as usual situation aided and abetted by the governments lack of information and misinformation on the perilously dangerous radioactivity and extent of the disaster. He notes friends showing him a January 1986 copy of Izvestia with an article about the Chernobyl unit, several months before, being named winner in a competition among all nuclear power stations in the USSR

  13. Chernobyl: the actual facts and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a first part, a Power Point presentation explains the technical reasons of the Chernobyl accident and recalls the environmental and health consequences on a short, middle and long term. In a second part, the author analyses the treatment by the media in France and shows how the population has been manipulated by nuclear opponents with the active complicity of some media

  14. Meteorological data related to the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a detailed technical description of the JRC-Ispra comprehensive collection of meteorological information related to the Chernobyl accident and attempts an analysis of the data in order to perform an initial checking of their quality and facilitate a suitable and compact way of display

  15. Consequences in Sweden of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It summarizes the consequences in Sweden of the Chernobyl accident, describes the emergency response, the basis for decisions and countermeasures, the measurement strategies, the activity levels and doses and countermeasures and action levels used. Past and remaining problems are discussed and the major investigations and improvements are given. (author)

  16. Fallout in Sweden from Chernobyl Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fallout from Chernobyl as recorded by the Swedish network of 25 fixed gamma monitoring stations during the three days 27th, 28th and 29th of April 1986. The measurements are made 2.5 metres above the ground. (author)

  17. Sociological and medical aspects of Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sociological survey data, the results of the state of health service in some districts of Gomel and Mogilev regions as well as of the completeness of the fulfillment of state resolutions concerning the liquidation of the Chernobyl accident after effects are given

  18. Radionuclide migration in the Chernobyl contamination zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that fallout of 137Cs reaching the land soils with precipitation was rapidly and tightly sorbed to the fine fraction of sediment or soils. The majority of the 137Cs is retained in the top few centimetres of the soil or sediment profiles (Loughran et al, 1993, Owens et al, 1996). In the absence of strong variations in precipitation over a relatively small area the total bomb-derived 137Cs fallout can assumed to be spatial uniform. The Chernobyl 137Cs fallout was mostly connected with one or two rains. So the spatial variability of this 137Cs can be higher. Furthermore because the explosion on the Chernobyl nuclear plant happen together with fire, a lot of ashes particles with radionuclide were distributed within vast areas. So even microvariability of Chernobyl 137Cs can be very high in some places. The horizontal migration of 137Cs connects with soil erosion processes that dominate on the agricultural lands of the Central Russia. The main goal of this investigation is to evaluate the caesium-137 horizontal and vertical migration within typical landscape of the Central Russia 11 years after the Chernobyl accident

  19. Consequences in Guatemala of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the long distance between Guatemala and Chernobyl, the country did not undergo direct consequences of radioactive contamination in the short term. However, the accident repercussions were evident in the medium and long-term, mainly in two sectors, the economic-political and the environmental sectors

  20. DDG-NS statement at the opening of the international conference 'Chernobyl: Looking back to go forwards'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA, as a specialised nuclear-related technical UN agency, has been involved in the mitigation of the Chernobyl accident consequences since early May 1986 when former Director General Hans Blix had visited Chernobyl in order to observe the physical damage and to discuss further actions. The IAEA took on many projects related to technical assistance, technical co-operation and research - with several immediate and longer term goals: first, to mitigate the accident's radiological, environmental and health consequences; second, to improve the overall safety of other RBMK reactors; and third, to understand and disseminate globally those lessons that could be learned from the Chernobyl experience. The projects executed between 1986 and 2005 covered the full range of topics: radiation, waste and nuclear safety; monitoring human exposure; environmental restoration of contaminated land; treatment of people living in the affected areas; and development of special measures to reduce exposure levels. The largest project took place in 1990. Over a two year period, the Agency coordinated the efforts of some 200 international experts over a two year period to complete an independent assessment of the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. Many missions to the three most affected countries were conducted and many meetings were held. The Agency has also organized or supported numerous international meetings to foster information exchange and to promote further assessment of the accident's radiological consequences. The Agency continues its ongoing activities regarding the mitigation of the accident's radiological consequences as part of the UN strategy 'Human Consequences of the Chernobyl Accident - A Strategy for Recovery' launched in 2002. Further IAEA commitment in continued Chernobyl-related activities, mainly in nuclear and radiation safety fields, may involve the following areas: Safety of Shelter decommissioning, Safety of radioactive waste management in the Chernobyl

  1. WPC 1. Youth forum; WPC 1. Youth forum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2004-12-01

    The WPC 1. Youth Congress has held on October 2004, 17-20 in Pekin. The main topic was: 'Youth and Innovation. The future of Petroleum Industry'. This forum has gathered 800 participants coming from 57 countries mainly Asiatic countries. During these three days, sessions have held on the following subjects: 1)present status and perspective of petroleum exploration and development 2)petroleum refining and petrochemicals 3) Internet technology and other new technology applications in petroleum industry 4)management, human resources and the contribution of youth 5)the development of the alternatives for petroleum energy 6)petroleum industry and environmental (social responsibility). About 180 posters have been presented; among them, cite those presented by Ms Isabelle Zabalza-Mezghani on the following subject: 'quantification of uncertainty for improved recovery production'. The complete text of this communication is given here. (O.M.)

  2. Expert Meeting Report: Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media - An Idea Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, Stacy [Building Media and the Building America Retrofit Alliance (BARA), Wilmington, DE (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This report describes results of a Building America expert meeting on September 13, 2011, in Las Vegas, Nevada, hosted by the Building America Retrofit Alliance (BARA). This meeting provided a forum for presentations and discussions on the use of new media to work with remodelers and retrofit projects to improve energy efficiency and deliver research results from the Building America program to remodelers.

  3. Expert Meeting Report: Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media--An Idea Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, S.

    2012-05-01

    This report describes results of a Building America expert meeting on September 13, 2011, in Las Vegas, Nevada, hosted by the Building America Retrofit Alliance (BARA). This meeting provided a forum for presentations and discussions on the use of new media to work with remodelers and retrofit projects to improve energy efficiency and deliver research results from the Building America program to remodelers.

  4. Lessons learned from post-accident management at Chernobyl: the P.a.r.e.x. project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Return of experience on Chernobyl post-accident management: the PAREX study Belarus is the country the most affected by the Chernobyl fallouts and is among the most significant experiences in the nuclear post-accident field. Despite specificities inherent to the political and social situation in Belarus, the experience of post-accidental management in this country holds a wealth of lessons in the perspective of preparation to a post-accidental situation in the French and European context. Through the PAREX project (2005-2006), the French Nuclear Safety Authority analysed the return of experience of Chernobyl post-accident management from 1986 to 2005 in order to draw its lessons in the perspective of a preparation policy. The study was led by a group of experts and involved the participation of a pluralistic group of about thirty participants (public authorities, local governments, NGOs, experts, operators). PAREX highlighted the complexity of a situation of long-lasting radioactive contamination (diversity of stakeholders and of dimensions at stake: health, environment, economy, society...). Beyond traditional public crisis management tools and frameworks, post-accident strategies also involves in the longer term a territorial and social response, which relies on local capacities of initiative. Preparation to such process requires experimenting new modes of operation that allow a diversity of local actors to take part to the response to a situation of contamination and to the surveillance system, with the support of public authorities. The conclusions of PAREX include a set of recommendations in this perspective. (authors)

  5. Benchmarking expert system tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Gary

    1988-01-01

    As part of its evaluation of new technologies, the Artificial Intelligence Section of the Mission Planning and Analysis Div. at NASA-Johnson has made timing tests of several expert system building tools. Among the production systems tested were Automated Reasoning Tool, several versions of OPS5, and CLIPS (C Language Integrated Production System), an expert system builder developed by the AI section. Also included in the test were a Zetalisp version of the benchmark along with four versions of the benchmark written in Knowledge Engineering Environment, an object oriented, frame based expert system tool. The benchmarks used for testing are studied.

  6. Shoppingturism i Helsingfors : Fallstudie Forum

    OpenAIRE

    Michelsson, Annika

    2010-01-01

    Syftet med detta examensarbete var att ta reda på varför de utländska turisterna kommer till köpcentret Forum och vad de anser är bra i köpcentret under nyårssäsongen 2010. Delsyftet var att ta reda på vad köpcentret kunde utveckla för att bli en mera lockande shoppingdestination för de utländska turisterna. Teoridelen delades i två delar; shoppingturism, tjänsteutveckling och tjänstekvalitet. Med denna teoretiska referensram som bas gjordes en kvantitativ undersökning. Enkäterna delades ...

  7. Phacilitate vaccine forum Barcelona 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silman, Nigel J; Rivera, Liza M; Wheat, Jenifer

    2009-10-01

    The Phacilitate Vaccine Forum comprised numerous plenary sessions and panel discussions. The highlights of the meeting were the discussion of new adjuvant technologies able to specifically target the immune system to drive the response down the required route. Also of topical interest was a session on the challenges of the current influenza pandemic, and strategies for vaccination and control of the disease. Finally, the session covering vaccines for tropical and emerging infectious diseases highlighted some of the niche vaccines that are being developed, in particular those for dengue and West Nile viruses, which show great promise. In addition to scientific promise, the value proposition for vaccine development in a risk-averse economy was outlined, citing expected growth in the worldwide market of more than US$25 billion within 5 years. This proposition was supported by the overviews of disposable and 'flex factory' manufacturing technologies, providing cost and time efficiencies in product development, which are especially critical for the emerging markets. PMID:19803754

  8. Korea-France Forum on New Technologies for Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jong Hwa; Shin, Young Joon; Kim, Yong Wan

    2007-07-15

    In celebration of the 120th anniversary on Korea-France diplomatic relations, both Korea and France agreed that the New-generation Energy Forum on a VHTR-assisted nuclear hydrogen production, renewable energy, and bio-fuel should be held in Paries, France. In accordance with the agreement, the Korea-France Forum on New Technologies for Energy organized by KAERI and CEA was held at the Mercure Hotel Conference Hall in Paries for a couple of days, November 6 and 7 and a facility visit to the CEA-Saclay was arranged on November 8 by the French side. 19 scientists from both countries presented their R and D status and plans in 4 technical sessions of 'VHTR Nuclear System', 'VHTR-assited Hydrogen Production', 'Renewable Energy', and 'Fuel Cell and Energy Storage'. A contact point in each field was established for the exchange of technological information and dispatch of experts if necessary.

  9. 5th Italian Forum on Ambient Assisted Living

    CERN Document Server

    Siciliano, Pietro; Marletta, Vincenzo; Monteriù, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This book documents the state of the art in the field of ambient assisted living (AAL), highlighting the impressive potential of novel methodologies and technologies to enhance well-being and promote active ageing. The coverage is wide ranging, with sections on assistive devices, elderly people monitoring, home rehabilitation, ICT solutions for AAL, living with chronic conditions, robotic assistance for the elderly, sensing technologies for AAL, and smart housing. The book comprises a selection of the best papers presented at the Fifth Italian Forum on Ambient Assisted Living, which was held in Catania, Italy, in September 2014 and brought together end users, technology teams, and policy makers to develop a consensus on how to improve provision for elderly and impaired people. Readers will find that the expert contributions offer clear insights into the ways in which the most recent exciting advances may be expected to assist in addressing the needs of the elderly and those with chronic conditions.

  10. The accident at the Chernobyl' nuclear power plant and its consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The material is taken from the conclusions of the Government Commission on the causes of the accident at the fourth unit of the Chernobyl' nuclear power plant and was prepared by a team of experts appointed by the USSR State Committee on the Utilization of Atomic Energy. It contains general material describing the accident, its causes, the action taken to contain the accident and to alleviate its consequences, the radioactive contamination and health of the population and some recommendations for improving nuclear power safety. 7 annexes are devoted to the following topics: water-graphite channel reactors and operating experience with RBMK reactors, design of the reactor plant, elimination of the consequences of the accident and decontamination, estimate of the amount, composition and dynamics of the discharge of radioactive substances from the damaged reactor, atmospheric transport and radioactive contamination of the atmosphere and of the ground, expert evaluation and prediction of the radioecological state of the environment in the area of the radiation plume from the Chernobyl' nuclear power station, medical-biological problems. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these annexes. The slides presented at the post-accident review meeting are grouped in two separate volumes

  11. Chernobyl - its impact on Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of radiological emergency in Sweden, the Swedish National Institute of Radiation Protection (SSI) has the responsability of organizing a special task force with experts both from SSI and from other authorities. Reports of increased radiation levels reached SSI around 10 am on April 28, 1986, and the task force convened at 1030 am. A large number of measurements were made all over the country, and temporary grazing restrictions were imposed so as to aviod excessive doses from the food chain grass-cow-milk. Attention is now concentrated on regions with high cesium activity and on foodstuffs in general. A very tentative estimate of the collective dose commiment is 10 000 man.Sv. It turned out that the general public was not always satisfied with the information provided by the authorities, in spite of complete openness (Author)

  12. Problems of Chernobyl exclusion zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection comprises the results of researches and design activity in the ChNPP exclusion zone with the aim to develop technology, equipment and instruments for RAW management and accident clean-up, studying of the composition and structure of the activity solid bearers in the soil of the exclusion zone and transformation of the radionuclides in the nearest zone of ChNPP. Much attention is paid to medical and biological problems of the accident influence on the flora, fauna and people's health, labour conditions and incidence of the people involved. The collection comprises the information for scientists, experts, postgraduates and students in gaged in ecology, radioecology, nuclear engineering, radiology, radiochemistry and radiobiology

  13. Experts' meeting: Maintenance '83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brochure presents, in full wording, 20 papers read at the experts' meeting ''Maintenance '83'' in Wiesbaden. Most of the papers discuss reliability data (acquisition, evaluation, processing) of nearly all fields of industry. (RW)

  14. THE PREVENTION PROGRAMS OF PHYSICAL REHABILITATION FOR CHERNOBYL DISASTER SURVIVORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korobeynikov G.V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study: approbation of the prevention program of physical rehabilitation for Chernobyl disaster survivors in lifestyle aspects. Sixty persons who were disaster survivors and workers of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant aged 32-60 have rehabilitation during 21 days. The complex of training prevention programs of physical and psycho-emotional rehabilitation methods was elaborated. The study of efficacy of training prevention programs among Chernobyl disaster survivors. The results showed the improvement of psycho-emotional status and normalization of cardiovascular vegetative regulation after training prevention programs in Chernobyl disasters survivors. The studies show that the preventive programs for Chernobyl disaster survivors in lifestyle aspects had the high effect. This displays the decrease of tempo of aging and the improving of physical and psychological health status of Chernobyl disaster survivors during preventive course.

  15. Belief in nuclear energy: Attitudes and opinions of Dutch nuclear experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The public opinion in the Netherlands about nuclear energy has been rather stable during recent years. Since the Chernobyl accident roughly 60% of the Dutch population is opposed to extension of the use of nuclear energy. Nuclear experts play an important role in the formation of public opinion about nuclear energy. In this paper the social and cultural background of 87 Dutch nuclear energy experts is analyzed with respect to religious belief, age, life style, membership of a political party, birth order and career pattern. 2 figs., 2 tabs., 16 refs

  16. Expert systems in statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Δάμη, Μαρία; Vella, Alfred

    1988-01-01

    The problem of misuse of statistical packages and hence statistical methods has long peen recognised but no real solution has yet appeared, although some useful work has been done in related fields. This problem appears to lend itself to expert system technology. This paper outlines the history of research in statistical expert systems, showing how the demands of data analysis are different from those of other fields. Furthermore, the paper reviews some recent work and discu...

  17. Radioactive fall-out in Norway after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the fall-out from the atmosphere during the fifties and sixties, a system of local control of radioactive contamination of food was built up. (LORACON - LOcal RAdioactivity COntrol). The different Meat and Food Inspection Services were equipped with Geiger Mueller instruments. The system was in operation until late seventies. From 1977 there was no testing and calibration of the instruments. The development towards a reduction of the state of readiness was accelerated when the Norwegian Parliament decided that Norway should not establish any nuclear power plants (1979). Only the universities and special institutions as the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene and the Institute for Energy Technique were still able to analyse on radioactive isotopes. The confusion about how much radioactive fall-out from the Chernobyl reactor accident Norway received lasted for some weeks in Norway. Partially, this was due to the lack of instruments, but also many experts rejected the idea that an accident so far away might cause these amounts of fall-out consisted of Iodine and Cesium. The fall-out followed a very irregular pattern both nationally and locally with the mountain areas in Middle Norway most affected

  18. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. Photo 01: Thérèse Wolf, Secretary of Forum Engelberg; Alain Hervé; Horst Wenninger; and Alexander Höchli, Forum member and former Landammann of the canton of Obwalden, at the CMS detector's assembly site.

  19. Suisse Romande forum meets at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The subject of the «Forum des 100» meeting held at CERN on 9 June was «Suisse Romande: Une région en quête de succès» (a region in search of success). Organised by the magazine l'Hebdo and the Rezonance.ch association, the forum was attended by numerous representatives from politics, industry and education and consisted of a day of lectures and debates. Pascal Couchepin, Head of the Swiss Federal Department of Home Affairs, and Luc Ferry, philosopher and former French Education Minister, were among those who took part in the forum.

  20. Medical Cooperative Projects: from Nagasaki to Chernobyl and Semipalatinsk

    OpenAIRE

    Takamura, Noboru; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2005-01-01

    For many years, Nagasaki University, particularly the Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, has been engaged in research regarding the late health effects of radiation exposure in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. Since 1991, we have participated in several Chernobyl projects including the Chernobyl Sasakawa Medical Cooperation Project which demonstrated a marked increase in the incidence of childhood thyroid cancer around Chernobyl, especially in the Gomel region, Belarus. Furthermore, we have perfor...

  1. 77 FR 15398 - Attentive Driving: Countermeasures for Distraction Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... SAFETY BOARD Attentive Driving: Countermeasures for Distraction Forum The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will convene a forum, Attentive Driving: Countermeasures for Distraction, which will begin... the forum, and all five NTSB Board Members will serve as members of the Board of Inquiry. The forum...

  2. New predictions for Chernobyl childhood thyroid cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New, firmer predictions are presented for the number of childhood thyroid cancers caused by Chernobyl: between 3300 and 7600 over all time, with a central estimate of 4400. The high efficacy of medical treatment suggests that at least 70% of the sufferers should survive the illness, with 95% or better survival a realistic target given early and skilled surgery and treatment. In view of the reported lack of evidence for other long-term health effects and the comparatively small number of early deaths, the total figure for deaths attributable to the Chernobyl accident may currently be estimated as from a few hundreds to a few thousands, with one thousand as a reasonable central estimate. (author)

  3. Chernobyl: the effects on public health?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurengo, A. [Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, Dept. Nucleaire Medecine, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-07-01

    Because of its public health, ecological and industrial consequences, the Chernobyl accident has become a myth which serves as the focus of many fears, justified or not. no one can question the seriousness of the event, but after fifteen years there is still no agreement about the effect it has had or will have on public health. For example, the total number of deaths attributed to Chernobyl varies from less than a hundred to several millions and congenital malformations from negligible to cataclysmic. Effects on public health may be calculated from data on contamination, from the dose received and from the risk, all three of which are likely to be very roughly known; or they may be evaluated on the spot, either by epidemiological studies or by examining medical registers. This report makes an inventory of the different risks and takes stock on them. (N.C.)

  4. Chernobyl: Chronicle of difficult weeks [videorecording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. Chernobyl : chronicle of difficult weeks. Shevchenko's film crew was the first in the disaster zone following the meltdown of the core of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986. They shot continuously for more than three months. Portions of the film are exposed with white blotches - a radiation leakage. The film demonstrates how authorities and volunteers dealt with the accident, shows the efforts to get the fire under control, to take care of patients with radiation injuries, and to evacuate about 100,000 inhabitants of the area. 2. The BAM zone : permanent residents. The Baikal-Amur Mainline (BAM) railroad in Siberia is called the longest monument to the stagnation of the Brezhnev years. The film shows the lives and fates of the people in contrast to the marches and songs praising the project

  5. Franco-German cooperation on Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the franco-german cooperation on Chernobyl. The purpose of this cooperation is to collect and validate all the data available in order to build a reliable and unbiased data-base. This cooperation is based on 3 axis and is funded with 6 million Ecus for 3 years. The 3 programmes are: i) the safety of the sarcophagus, ii) the radio-ecological consequences of the accident, and iii) the impact on health. The Chernobyl accident has had dramatic effects on the environment which were till now more or less under-estimated, the program on radio-ecological consequences will include information about the storage places of the wastes coming from the massive soil decontamination as well as information about the contamination of the artificial lake that was used to drain the low part of the reactor building and about the contamination of underground waters. (A.C.)

  6. Initiative for decommissioning of Chernobyl Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Construction of the New Safety Confinement (NSC) for the Chernobyl unit 4 started 2010, after about 25 years of Chernobyl accident and will complete summer of 2015. This project is being conducted by assistance of EU, USA and other countries including Japan. NSC can cover the whole facility of unit 4, and is installed various components or tools including big bridge crane for decommissioning unit 4 and has durability over 100 years. In addition to construction of NSC, various activities for preparing the decommissioning including developing the technology of monitoring the inside of destructive building and remote access technologies. The spent fuel storage facility and waste proposal facilities are also constructed.. These activities include many valuable information about how to smoothly conduct the decommissioning and it would be important to learn the above activities in conducting the post-processing activities on the Fukushima-Daiichi accident successfully. (author)

  7. Appearing consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Chernobyl is the greatest world's tragedy after Chirosima. Global results of this tragedy is already being seen. They are the people who have received radiation dose. the first type of cancer 5 years after Chernobyl accident was the thyroid gland cancer, the reason of it, large quantities of radioactive iodine in the air, food products, milk of cattle and finally their collection in the thyroid gland cancer entering the human body. Period all of a sudden after 10 years completed the next latent type of cancer was leykoz. Giving rise to this type of cancer more sensitive to radiation of the body - a violation of the spinal brain function. After 20 years passing from the accident in the first generation one ill child must be born cause of undergoing to radiation father or mother from each three days in Belarus, Russia and Ukraine

  8. Information system 'Chernobyl' of EMERCOM of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information system 'Chernobyl' of EMERCOM of Russia included the following: Central bank of generalized data, Bank of models, Information system for federal and local authorities. The analysis of many phenomena demanded retrospective data collection. In that way, banks of primary data were created and experience of analysis of directly accident information was acquired. The main element of the system-analytic support is the administrative information system of the Department for elimination of consequences of radiological and other disaster of EMERCOM of the Russian Federation. Administrative information system is intended for providing specialized program-technical complexes and systematized data related to the Chernobyl accident effects and measures on their elimination for heads and specialists of Central staff and territorial and regional administrative bodies, all other interested ministries, departments and organization

  9. Accidents - Chernobyl accident; Accidents - accident de Tchernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This file is devoted to the Chernobyl accident. It is divided in four parts. The first part concerns the accident itself and its technical management. The second part is relative to the radiation doses and the different contaminations. The third part reports the sanitary effects, the determinists ones and the stochastic ones. The fourth and last part relates the consequences for the other European countries with the case of France. Through the different parts a point is tackled with the measures taken after the accident by the other countries to manage an accident, the cooperation between the different countries and the groups of research and studies about the reactors safety, and also with the international medical cooperation, specially for the children, everything in relation with the Chernobyl accident. (N.C.)

  10. Chernobyl: the effects on public health?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of its public health, ecological and industrial consequences, the Chernobyl accident has become a myth which serves as the focus of many fears, justified or not. no one can question the seriousness of the event, but after fifteen years there is still no agreement about the effect it has had or will have on public health. For example, the total number of deaths attributed to Chernobyl varies from less than a hundred to several millions and congenital malformations from negligible to cataclysmic. Effects on public health may be calculated from data on contamination, from the dose received and from the risk, all three of which are likely to be very roughly known; or they may be evaluated on the spot, either by epidemiological studies or by examining medical registers. This report makes an inventory of the different risks and takes stock on them. (N.C.)

  11. Western reactors: how they compare with Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author explains why western light water reactors are intrinsically more dangerous than the RBMK, Chernobyl design. It is also argued that for the fast breeder reactors (such as the PFR at Dounreay and the Super Phenix at Creys Melville) are more dangerous and could actually explode like an atomic bomb. This is contrary to official assurances that the Western reactors are of a safer design and more safely operated than the Chernobyl reactor, and so a similar accident could not happen here. The PWRs and BWRs are compared with the RBMK as to pressure vessels/no pressure vessel, fuel rods, reactor containment and containment building. The superiority of Western engineering and reactor operation is also disputed, with the Three Mile Island accident used as evidence. (U.K.)

  12. Chernobyl experience of emergency data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of the Chernobyl experience in emergency data management is presented. Information technologies for the generalization of practical experience in the protection of the population after the Chernobyl accident are described. The two main components of this work are the development of the administrative information system (AIS) and the creation of the central data bank. The current state of the AIS, the data bank and the bank of models is described. Data accumulated and models are used to estimate the consequences of radiation accidents and to provide different types of prognosis. Experience of accumulated analysis data allows special software to be developed for large-scale simulation of radiation consequences of major radiation accidents and to organize practical exercises. Some examples of such activity are presented. (orig.)

  13. Chernobyl experience of emergency data management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolshov, L.; Linge, I.; Arutyunyan, R.; Ilushkin, A.; Kanevsky, M.; Kiselev, V.; Melikhova, E.; Ossipiants, I.; Pavlovsky, O. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Nuclear Safety

    1997-10-01

    The use of the Chernobyl experience in emergency data management is presented. Information technologies for the generalization of practical experience in the protection of the population after the Chernobyl accident are described. The two main components of this work are the development of the administrative information system (AIS) and the creation of the central data bank. The current state of the AIS, the data bank and the bank of models is described. Data accumulated and models are used to estimate the consequences of radiation accidents and to provide different types of prognosis. Experience of accumulated analysis data allows special software to be developed for large-scale simulation of radiation consequences of major radiation accidents and to organize practical exercises. Some examples of such activity are presented. (orig.) 7 refs.

  14. The Chernobyl accident — an epidemiological perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Cardis, E; Hatch, M.

    2011-01-01

    Twenty-five years have passed since radioactive releases from the Chernobyl nuclear accident led to exposure of millions of people in Europe. Studies of affected populations have provided important new data on the links between radiation and cancer – particularly the risk of thyroid tumours from exposure to iodine isotopes - that are important not only for a fuller scientific understanding of radiation effects, but also for radiation protection.

  15. Natural Resources Damage from Chernobyl. Further Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This note reports the extent of some components of natural resources damage from the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, primarily losses in producer surplus in the reindeer industry in Lapland, Sweden. The damage suffered by Swedish moose hunters has been estimated earlier. The result is a lower boundary of natural resources damage amounting to SEK 736 million, or about SEK 112 per adult Swede. 6 refs

  16. Natural Resources Damage from Chernobyl. Further Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederqvist, T. [Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-07-01

    This note reports the extent of some components of natural resources damage from the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, primarily losses in producer surplus in the reindeer industry in Lapland, Sweden. The damage suffered by Swedish moose hunters has been estimated earlier. The result is a lower boundary of natural resources damage amounting to SEK 736 million, or about SEK 112 per adult Swede. 6 refs.

  17. Chernobyl -- the fallout and the farmer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the Chernobyl accident an increase in the levels of airborne radioactivity was first detected in Ireland during the period 2nd-4th May, 1986. Heavy rainfall resulted in significant ground deposition of this activity, and the environmental monitoring programme set up by the Nuclear Energy Board ( now the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland) has determined the distribution and level of radionuclides in the major food items consumed by the Irish population

  18. Preliminary dose assessment of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the major accident at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power station, a plume of airborne radioactive fission products was initially carried northwesterly toward Poland, thence toward Scandinavia and into Central Europe. Reports of the levels of radioactivity in a variety of media and of external radiation levels were collected in the Department of Energy's Emergency Operations Center and compiled into a data bank. Portions of these and other data which were obtained directly from published and official reports were utilized to make a preliminary assessment of the extent and magnitude of the external dose to individuals downwind from Chernobyl. Radioactive 131I was the predominant fission product. The time of arrival of the plume and the maximum concentrations of 131I in air, vegetation and milk and the maximum reported depositions and external radiation levels have been tabulated country by country. A large amount of the total activity in the release was apparently carried to a significant elevation. The data suggest that in areas where rainfall occurred, deposition levels were from ten to one-hundred times those observed in nearby ''dry'' locations. Sufficient spectral data were obtained to establish average release fractions and to establish a reference spectra of the other nuclides in the release. Preliminary calculations indicated that the collective dose equivalent to the population in Scandinavia and Central Europe during the first year after the Chernobyl accident would be about 8 x 106 person-rem. From the Soviet report, it appears that a first year population dose of about 2 x 107 person-rem (2 x 105 Sv) will be received by the population who were downwind of Chernobyl within the U.S.S.R. during the accident and its subsequent releases over the following week. 32 refs., 14 figs., 20 tabs

  19. Chernobyl and the consequences for Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an introducing chapter the meteorological situation over Austria in the days after the Chernobyl accident is outlined. The following chapters are on measurement of contamination of environment, foodstuffs and fodder; on measures taken to minimize the radiation burden; a comparison with the fallout from nuclear weapons tests; a dose estimation to the population and finally, a comparison with contamination in some other european countries. 26 tabs., 117 figs. (qui)

  20. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides highlights from the 1992 winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Wastes Forum. Topics of discussion included: legal information; state and compact reports; freedom of information requests; and storage

  1. Titaanide heitlus: Forum Cinemas vs Cinamon

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    Cinamon Group avab Solarise keskuses uue Cinamoni kinoketti kuuluva kino, mis konkureerib Coca-Cola Plazaga (võrdlev tabel, allikad: Cinamoni turundusjuht Evelyn Laar ja Forum Cinemas' levijuhi asetäitja Timo Diener)

  2. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides highlights from the summer meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: responsibility for nonfuel component disposal; state experiences in facility licensing; and volume projections

  3. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrive Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. Photo 01: CERN Director-General Prof. Luciano Maiani (left) speaks to Forum members and public figures from the Geneva area during the visit. In the background is Jean-Claude Landry from the Department of the Interior, Agriculture and Environment, State of Geneva. Photo 02: CERN Director-General Prof. Luciano Maiani (left) speaks to Forum members and public figures from the Geneva area during the visit. In the background is Bernard Ecoffey, Founder of the Forum Engelberg.

  4. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides highlights from the 1992 fall meeting of the Low LEvel Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: disposal options after 1992; interregional agreements; management alternatives; policy; and storage

  5. Asian Employment Forum Held in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ From August 13 through 15,2007,the Asian Employment Forum sponsored by the International Labor Organization (ILO) and hosted by the Ministry of Labor and Social Security of China was held in Beijing.

  6. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternwheeler, W.D.E.

    1992-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the 1992 winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Wastes Forum. Topics of discussion included: legal information; state and compact reports; freedom of information requests; and storage.

  7. The Chernobyl I-131 Release: Model Validation and Assessment of the Countermeasure Effectiveness. Report of the Chernobyl 131I Release Working Group of EMRAS Theme 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl 131I Release Working Group (IWG) which was established within the framework of the EMRAS Programme continues some of the more traditional work of previous international programmes that were aimed at increasing confidence in methods and models for the assessment of radiation exposure related to the environmental releases. There is still very little information regarding the quantitative relationship between radiation dose to the thyroid from Chernobyl and the risk of thyroid cancer. The uncertainty combined with individual estimates of radiation dose constitutes a crucial point in establishing this relationship, since, any release of radioiodine into environment creates wide range of uncertainty for internal dose assessments. The 131I scenarios provide an excellent opportunity to compare a number of modelling approaches to a single assessment problem, in a dose reconstruction context. Nine experts in environmental modelling participated in the Plavsk Scenario dealing with areas of assessment modelling for which the capabilities are not yet well established. One could observes the remarkably improvement in models performance comparing with previous radioiodine scenarios. Predictions of the various models were within a factor of three of the observations, discrepancies between the estimates of average doses to thyroid produced by most participant not exceeded a factor of ten. The process of testing independent model calculations against independent data set also provided useful information to the originators of the test data.

  8. The Chernobyl accident--an epidemiological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardis, E; Hatch, M

    2011-05-01

    Twenty-five years have passed since radioactive releases from the Chernobyl nuclear accident led to the exposure of millions of people in Europe. Studies of affected populations have provided important new data on the links between radiation and cancer-particularly the risk of thyroid tumours from exposure to iodine isotopes-that are important not only for a fuller scientific understanding of radiation effects, but also for radiation protection. It is now well documented that children and adolescents exposed to radioiodines from Chernobyl fallout have a sizeable dose-related increase in thyroid cancer, with the risk greatest in those youngest at exposure and with a suggestion that deficiency in stable iodine may increase the risk. Data on thyroid cancer risks to other age groups are somewhat less definitive. In addition, there have been reported increases in incidence and mortality from non-thyroid cancers and non-cancer end points. Although some studies are difficult to interpret because of methodological limitations, recent investigations of Chernobyl clean-up workers ('liquidators') have provided evidence of increased risks of leukaemia and other haematological malignancies and of cataracts, and suggestions of an increase in the risk of cardiovascular diseases, following low doses and low dose rates of radiation. Further careful follow-up of these populations, including the establishment and long-term support of life-span study cohorts, could provide additional important information for the quantification of radiation risks and the protection of persons exposed to low doses of radiation. PMID:21396807

  9. Trauma management: Chernobyl in Belarus and Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukova, Ekatherina

    2016-06-01

    Although the Chernobyl nuclear disaster happened in the Soviet Union in 1986, we still do not know how the most affected states - Ukraine and Belarus - have managed this tragedy since independence. Drawing on the concept of cultural trauma, this article compares Chernobyl narratives in Belarus and Ukraine over the past 28 years. It shows that national narratives of Chernobyl differ, representing the varying ways in which the state overcomes trauma. Our understanding of post-communist transformations can be improved by analysing trauma management narratives and their importance for new national identity construction. These narratives also bring new insights to our vision of cultural trauma by linking it to ontological insecurity. The article demonstrates how the state can become an arena of trauma process as it commands material and symbolic resources to deal with trauma. In general, it contributes to a better understanding of how the same traumatic event can become a source of solidarity in one community, but a source of hostility in another. PMID:27191056

  10. Consequences of the Chernobyl accident in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the Chernobyl accident of 26 April, 1986, population dose assessment favours the view that the radiation risk of population effected by the early fallout would be different from that in regions contaminated later. Taking into account the short half-time of the most important radioactive iodine isotopes, thyroid disorders would be expected mainly to follow the early fallout distribution. At the time of accident at Unite 4 of the Chernobyl NPP, surface winds were from the Southeast. The initial explosions and heat carried volatile radioactive materials to the 1,5 km height, from where they were transported over the Western part of Belarus, Southern and Western part of Lithuania toward Scandinavian countries. Thus the volatile radioiodine and some other radionuclides were detected in Lithuania on the very first days after the accident. The main task of the work - to conduct short Half-time radioiodine and long half-time radiocesium dose assessment of Lithuanian inhabitants a result of the early Chernobyl accident fallout

  11. Chernobyl: the plant that refuses to die

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the cracking of the Sarcophagus enclosing Reactor 4 and recent observations of increased radiation inside, no decision on the future of the Chernobyl plant has been made. There is pressure from the G7 countries to close it down, but reluctance in Ukraine for a variety of reasons. Closure of the remaining functioning reactors at the plant would require new capacity to be substituted in order to meet the Ukraine's power demand and support its already ailing economy. Controversially, the Ukraine would like the new capacity to come from the completion of two VVER plants at Rovno and Khmelnitsky but it would embarrass the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development to be seen to be financing the replacement of Chernobyl by more nuclear reactors. Opposition to plant closure also comes from those concerned for the future of the town of Slavutich which houses the Chernobyl workforce of 6,000 and their families. The fear is that closure would mean a sudden slide into poverty for the 24,000 inhabitants. Moreover, should the workforce disappear, who would look after the Sarcophagus? It is the future of the Sarcophagus which should be the priority of all parties to the debate. Opinions differ on the consequences of the collapse of the present structure but they could constitute another disaster. (UK)

  12. Health consequences [of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The World Health Organisation Conference on the Health Consequences of the Chernobyl and Other Radiological Accidents, held in Geneva last November, is reported. The lack of representation from the civil nuclear industry led often to one-sided debates instigated by the anti-nuclear lobbies present. Thyroid cancer in children as a result of the Chernobyl accident received particular attention. In Belarus, 400 cases have been noted, 220 in Ukraine and 60 in the Russian Federation. All have been treated with a high degree of success. The incidence of this cancer would be expected to follow the fallout path as the main exposure route was ingestion of contaminated foods and milk products. It was noted that the only way to confirm causality was if those children born since the accident failed to show the same increased incidence. Explanations were offered for the particular susceptibility of children to thyroid cancer following exposure to radiation. Another significant cause of concern was the health consequences to clean-up workers in radiological accidents. The main factor is psychological problems from the stress of knowing that they have received high radiation doses. A dramatic increase in psychological disorders has occurred in the Ukraine over the past ten years and this is attributed to stress generated by the Chernobyl accident, compounded by the inadequacy of the public advice offered at the time and the socio-economic uncertainties accompanying the breakup of the former USSR. (UK)

  13. The Cuban Chernobyl program. realities and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In April of 1990 started the 'Cuban Chernobyl Program'. This program was designed to offers specialised medical attention and to develop a rehabilitation plan with children from areas affected by the Chernobyl accident. Up to the moment more than 21 500 children and adults had been assisted in the program, with a significant set of medical procedures done. Dosimetric, biomedical and psychological research had been also carried out as part of the program. The more significant medical attention activities include the treatment of 289 children with haematological disorders, including 6 bone marrow transplantation, more than 100 important surgical interventions, and the treatment of 117 children with solid tumors. The dosimetric results on more than 7000 children are including in a database with information on internal Cs 137 contamination, internal, external and total doses, children living location, and its contamination by Cs 137, and other significant information for radiological impact evaluation. The behaviour of all the medical information of the program in relation to the contamination of the land and the internal contamination of the children was analysed using this database. The program has accumulated an experience of interest for physicians, psychologists and in general persons interested in Chernobyl consequences

  14. 30 years life with Chernobyl, 5 years life with Fukushima. Health consequences of the nuclear catastrophes of Chernobyl and Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IPPNW report on health consequences of the nuclear catastrophes of Chernobyl and Fukushima covers the following issues: Part.: 30 years life with Chernobyl: Summarized consequences of Chernobyl, the accident progression, basic data of the catastrophe, estimation of health hazards as a consequence of the severe accident of Chernobyl, health consequences for the liquidators, health consequences for the contaminated population, mutagenic and teratogenic effects. Part B: 5 years life with Fukushima: The start of the nuclear catastrophe, emissions and contamination, consequences of the nuclear catastrophe on human health, thyroid surveys in the prefecture Fukushima, consequences of the nuclear catastrophe on the ecosystem, outlook.

  15. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. He is pictured here (right) alongside CERN Director-General Prof. Luciano Maiani during the visit of Forum members to CERN.

  16. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. He is seen here (right) in discussion with Bernard Ecoffey, Founder of the Forum Engelberg.

  17. THE UTILITY OF ECOTOURISM SPECIALIZED DISCUSSION FORUMS

    OpenAIRE

    Beatrice Sion; Cezar Mihălcescu; Alexandra Mărginean

    2011-01-01

    The forum is a site on which one can find answers to some questions that concern him/her. It is a means of promotion of a product/service/company, it can be a site where experience is exchanged, where one can meet other people, a free school in which one can be a teacher and a student at the same time, or even a community. Briefly, the forum can be a way of life on the Internet.

  18. The 1st Asian Lightning Protection Forum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ The First Asian Lightning Protection Forum was held on October 28-29, 2003 in Beijing, China.The forum was sponsored by the China Association for Standardization and was organized by Chinese National Committee for Lightning Protection Technology Standardization, Department of Electrical Engineering Tsinghua University, China Electricity Council, Zhongguang High-tech Industrial Development Co.,Ltd, and Lightning Protection Center of Guangdong Province.

  19. The Virtual Astronomical Observatory Users Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muench, August A.; Emery Bunn, S.; Astronomical Observatory, Virtual

    2013-01-01

    We present the online forum astrobabel.com, which has the goal of being a gathering place for the collective community intelligence about astronomical computing. The audience for this forum is anyone engaged in the analysis of astronomical or planetary data, whether that data be observational or theoretical. It is a free, community driven site where discussions are formulated primarily around the "question and answer" format. Current topics on the forum range from “Is there a photometry package in Python?” to “Where are the support forums for astronomy software packages?” and “Why is my SDSS SkyQuery query missing galaxies?” The poster will detail the full scope of discussions in the forum, and provide some basic guidelines for ensuring high quality forum posts. We will highlight the ways astronomers can discover and participate in discussions. Further, we view this as an excellent opportunity to gather feedback and feature requests from AAS221 attendees. Acknowledgement: The Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) is managed by the VAO, LLC, a non-profit company established as a partnership of the Associated Universities, Inc. and the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. The VAO is sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  20. Thyroid consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, F; Vorontsova, T; Molinaro, E; Shavrova, E; Agate, L; Kuchinskaya, E; Elisei, R; Demidchik, E P; Pinchera, A

    1999-12-01

    It is well recognized that the use of external irradiation of the head and neck to treat patients with various non-thyroid disorders increases their risk of developing papillary thyroid carcinoma years after radiation exposure. An increased risk of thyroid cancer has also been reported in survivors of the atomic bombs in Japan, as well as in Marshall Island residents exposed to radiation during the testing of hydrogen bombs. More recently, exposure to radioactive fallout as a result of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident has clearly caused an enormous increase in the incidence of childhood thyroid carcinoma in Belarus, Ukraine, and, to a lesser extent, in the Russian Federation, starting in 1990. When clinical and epidemiological features of thyroid carcinomas diagnosed in Belarus after the Chernobyl accident are compared with those of naturally occurring thyroid carcinomas in patients of the same age group in Italy and France, it becomes apparent that the post-Chernobyl thyroid carcinomas were much less influenced by gender, virtually always papillary (solid and follicular variants), more aggressive at presentation and more frequently associated with thyroid autoimmunity. Gene mutations involving the RET proto-oncogene, and less frequently TRK, have been shown to be causative events specific for papillary cancer. RET activation was found in nearly 70% of the patients who developed papillary thyroid carcinomas following the Chernobyl accident. In addition to thyroid cancer, radiation-induced thyroid diseases include benign thyroid nodules, hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis, with or without thyroid insufficiency, as observed in populations after environmental exposure to radioisotopes of iodine and in the survivors of atomic bomb explosions. On this basis, the authors evaluated thyroid autoimmune phenomena in normal children exposed to radiation after the Chernobyl accident. The results demonstrated an increased prevalence of circulating thyroid

  1. Progress of the work of the Megascience Forum as of 15 May 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oborne, M.W.

    1993-05-01

    This report gives an account of the activities of the OECD Megascience Forum following its creation in June 1992, in particular the reviews of two areas of megascience: Astronomy and deep drilling (both deep sea and continental). It presents the main policy conclusions reached by the Megascience Forum on these areas. It also give an indication of ongoing and future work. With regard to ongoing and future work, the Forum will review at its next meeting, in July 1993, the area of global change research, and for this purpose an expert meeting was held in late March 1993 in Cambridge, Mass. (USA). Areas to be reviewed later in 1993 include oceanography, and neutron sources and synchrotron radiation sources as multipurpose facilities for the study of condensed matter, as well as for other applications such as element transmutation. The Megascience Forum will also undertake to discuss generic science and technology policy issues related to the development and management of megascience, starting with a discussion, at its next meeting, of national decision-making structure and processes.

  2. Expert Oracle application express

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, John Edward

    2011-01-01

    Expert Oracle Application Express brings you groundbreaking insights into developing with Oracle's enterprise-level, rapid-development tool from some of the best practitioners in the field today. Oracle Application Express (APEX) is an entirely web-based development framework that is built into every edition of Oracle Database. The framework rests upon Oracle's powerful PL/SQL language, enabling power users and developers to rapidly develop applications that easily scale to hundreds, even thousands of concurrent users. The 13 authors of Expert Oracle Application Express build their careers aro

  3. Experts disconnected by media and politicians. Accurate and trustworthy information by experts - an urgent mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweden was one of the first countries outside the Soviet Union to be affected in 1986 by fall-out from the Chernobyl accident, which created an acute demand for correct information about reactor safety and effects of ionising radiation. A precursor to the Swedish Nuclear Training and Safety Centre, KSU, assumed in 1986 an important role in informing the general public, by using established press channels, by issuing newsletters, booklets and videotapes, and by sending mobile measuring units to the contaminated regions in Sweden. What started as an acute effort, has since then continued as a permanent activity, as the Chernobyl accident re-opened the nuclear issue as a subject of political controversy in Sweden. As on previous occasions in the debate about nuclear power, the arguments in the public and political debate were largely of scientific or technical nature, and very often grossly erroneous. Such technical false conceptions have often found their way to leading decisions-makers in politics and mass media. Corrections and refutations of this kind often require considerable expert knowledge, a scientific aitude but also a pedagogic interest. Often time-consuming research into particular issues is needed. The traditional information departments at the utilities are not very well equipped to handle such situations. The Analysis Group on nuclear power, attached to KSU, has therefore, on behalf of the utilities, been given the responsibility to generate factual information on nuclear power issues that might arise in the media or in the political and public debate. The communication mandate of the Analysis Group covers nuclear safety, the effects of ionising radiation, and comparative risk assessments. It does not include economy, energy requirements, nuclear waste or utility policy issues. Within its mandate the Analysis Group has a freedom to operate with independence and on its own merits

  4. Expert Systems Application In Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Pradip; Chitturi, Ramesh; Babu, A. J. G.

    1987-05-01

    Expert system, a special branch of Artificial Intelligence finds its way in the domain of manufacturing. This paper presents the basic ideas and features of the expert systems, problems in manufacturing and application of expert systems in manufacturing. As the process planning is an important phase in manufacturing, the suitability of expert systems for process planning area has been highlighted. Several expert systems, developed to solve manufacturing problems are also discussed in the paper.

  5. Chernobyl and status of nuclear power development in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl accident has seriously affected development of the USSR nuclear power program. But it has not eliminated the basic prerequisites for nuclear power development in the USSR which are: - resources and consumption territorial disproportions; - large share of oil and gas in electricity generation; - negative ecological aspects of coal plants; - high power industry development rate. At the same time it has aggravated the old problems and has given rise to some new-ones of which the most important are: - increased safety requirements; rise in costs; longer construction schedules; public opinion. On the whole for further safe development of nuclear power a detailed analysis of the Chernobyl accident is required, including studies of long-term accident consequences and measures of their mitigation and elimination. A necessary condition for NPP operation to be continued would also be development and rapid implementation of technical approaches which would permit to eliminate the design shortcomings in the RBMK NPPs both operating and those under construction. At the same time we have to ensure their competitiveness with other energy sources and possibility of expansion of their applications. The problem of public opinion should be emphasised. After the Chernobyl accident we have faced a social phenomenon which is quite new in this country. There is almost no site where the population was not opposed to NPP construction. For us these problems are especially difficult as we have had no experience of this kind of interactions with the public. We are planning and begin to realize a program basing on the current world experience. This program includes primarily a wide series of publications on the problems of nuclear energy its ecologic and economic advantages as compared with conventional and alternative energy sources,, using all cur-rent media. Centers of public information discussion clubs, exhibitions etc are being organized. In particular, our Institute has

  6. Ask an Expert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautman, Steve; Klein, Kate

    1993-01-01

    Offers guidelines for determining when and how to recruit subject matter experts (SMEs) and for ensuring that they deliver high quality training. Considers common problems of SMEs, such as giving too much information, conflicts with their job commitments, and stage fright. (JOW)

  7. Chernobyl plume: commentary about a discharge; Nuage de Chernobyl: commentaires sur un non-lieu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2011-07-15

    The Paris appeal court has dismissed the charges against P. Pellerin who was the head of the SCIRP (service of protection against the ionizing radiations) at the time of the Chernobyl accident. The appeal court confirms that P.Pellerin never said that the Chernobyl plume stopped at the French border but instead he said that the Chernobyl plume entered the French territory but the radioactivity level was so low that it was unnecessary to take sanitary steps. P.Pellerin based his decision on the results of 6500 controls performed by the SCIRP in May and June 1986. Seven other European countries recommended not to take sanitary measures. The increase of thyroid cancers that has happened in all industrialized countries and that affect only adults, can not due to Chernobyl contamination because child's thyroid is far more sensitive than adult's. The increase of thyroid cancer is mainly due to a better detection of the tumors. (A.C.)

  8. Consequences of Chernobyl accident in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Among nuclides emitted from the destroyed Chernobyl reactor only radioiodine and radiocesium were of serious health concern. The amount of iodine-131 released in this catastrophe was about 180 times lower than during the total release of this nuclide from 77 nuclear weapon tests performed in remote areas in the record year of 1962, and the release of cesium-137 was only five times lower. However, the bulk of Chernobyl emission was confined in time to only twelve days, and its geographical dispersion was much smaller and closer to populated areas than that of nuclear tests debris. Only a small part of cesium-137 and cesium-134 from the Chernobyl reactor reached the Southern Hemisphere, via stratospheric transport routes. Therefore, radiation doses received by the population from the Chernobyl radionuclides was in the affected areas higher than from the nuclear tests fallout. In part of Europe the doses received by children in the thyroid gland from iodine-131 radiation were high enough to expect an increase in thyroid cancers. In the contaminated regions of Belarus, Ukraine and Russia the estimated thyroid doses in children could reach up to several thousand mSv. In a group of >100,000 persons evacuated during the first few weeks, the average thyroid dose in children under 3 years of age was about 1000 mSv, and in adults about 70 mSv. Between 1986 and 1995 about 700 thyroid cancers in children were reported from Belarus, Ukraine and Russia, most of which may be attributed to Chernobyl radiation. About 95% of these cancers are believed to be curable. The whole body dose from cloud passage, ground deposition and intake of cesium-137 and of other radionuclides was much smaller than thyroid doses, and do not pose a real risk to the population. The average lifetime (70 years) whole body doses in the most contaminated regions of Belarus ranged between 88 and 160 mSv, in Ukraine 84 and 120 mSv and in Russia 78 to 130 mSv. The average doses to 800

  9. Proceeding of the 2-nd International Conference 'Long-term Health Consequences of the Chernobyl Disaster'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the second International conference 'Long-term health consequences of the Chernobyl disaster' in 1-6 June 1998 Kiev (Ukraine) the following problems were discussed: 1.Epidemiological aspects of the Chernobyl disaster; 2.Clinical and biological effects of ionizing radiation; 3.Social and psychological aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster; 4.Rehabilitation of the Chernobyl disaster survivors

  10. The future of imaging screening: proceedings of the Fourth Annual ACR FORUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Bruce J; Amis, E Stephen; Weinreb, Jeffrey C; Neiman, Harvey L

    2005-01-01

    The FORUM is an ACR planning activity focused on a specific topic deemed to be of long-range importance to the college. A select panel of multidisciplinary experts met in 2004 to consider the ramifications of imaging screening from diverse perspectives. Considerations included the nature of screening for disease, its technological issues, and biases associated with the perceived success of screening; potential technologies and target diseases; business and economics; insurance coverage; ethics and the law; how imaging screening could be paired with nonimaging screening; and how the lay public perceives screening. The FORUM participants considered how imaging screening might develop over the next 5 to 10 years and made recommendations to the ACR on actions it might take to benefit both the specialty and patients. PMID:17411759

  11. Nuclear fuel cycle issues and challenges. Scientific forum during the 48th Regular Session of the IAEA General Conference. Session summaries and reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three sessions of the forum focused on: Advanced Fuel Cycles and Reactor Concepts; Waste and Spent Fuel Management Issues; and Research Reactor Fuel Cycle and Related Issues. Twelve detailed presentations were made by leading experts, followed by panellists' comments and discussion with participants

  12. Report of the US Department of Energy's team analyses of the Chernobyl-4 Atomic Energy Station accident sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an effort to better understand the Chernobyl-4 accident of April 26, 1986, the US Department of Energy (DOE) formed a team of experts from the National Laboratories including Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The DOE Team provided the analytical support to the US delegation for the August meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and to subsequent international meetings. The DOE Team has analyzed the accident in detail, assessed the plausibility and completeness of the information provided by the Soviets, and performed studies relevant to understanding the accident. The results of these studies are presented in this report

  13. Risks from radionuclide migration to groundwater in the Chernobyl 30-km zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugai, D A; Waters, R D; Dzhepo, S P; Skal'skij, A S

    1996-07-01

    Remediation of contaminated groundwater in the Chernobyl 30-km evacuation zone is frequently identified as a priority by technical experts and Chernobyl site officials in Ukraine. In order to evaluate the health risk basis for this groundwater remediation, we have estimated both on-site and off-site health risks caused by radionuclide migration to the groundwater and compared these risks with those from exposure to radioactive contamination on the ground surface. A simple and conservative analytical model was developed to assess radionuclide transport to the groundwater from the soil surface contaminated by radioactive fallout. 90Sr, the primary radioactive contaminant of concern for the groundwater-migration exposure pathway, was evaluated in the analysis. The estimated health risk to hypothetical, self-sufficient residents in the 30-km zone is dominated by external and internal irradiation (due primarily to ingestion of agricultural products) from 137Cs, which is present in soils of the 30-km zone in roughly equal proportion with 90Sr. The estimated risk from contaminated groundwater is approximately an order of magnitude lower. Analysis of 90Sr migration via groundwater to surface water and down-river population centers shows that, despite generally unfavorable environmental conditions in the 30-km exclusion zone, radionuclide transport via the groundwater pathway has potential to contribute only marginally to the off-site radiological risk, which is governed by wash-out of radionuclides from the contaminated river flood plain and catchment areas by surface water during spring snowmelt and rains. Health risks due to off-site radionuclide migration via groundwater are below the level requiring application of counter-measures. This analysis implies that, relative to other exposure pathways, there is little current or future health risk basis for the proposed complex and costly groundwater remediation measures in the 30-km zone. Therefore, these activities should

  14. Psychological and perceived health effects of the Chernobyl disaster: a 20-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromet, Evelyn J; Havenaar, Johan M

    2007-11-01

    The mental health impact of Chernobyl is regarded by many experts as the largest public health problem unleashed by the accident to date. This paper reviews findings reported during the 20-y period after the accident regarding stress-related symptoms, effects on the developing brain, and cognitive and psychological impairments among highly exposed cleanup workers. With respect to stress-related symptoms, the rates of depressive, anxiety (especially post-traumatic stress symptoms), and medically unexplained physical symptoms are two to four times higher in Chernobyl-exposed populations compared to controls, although rates of diagnosable psychiatric disorders do not appear to be elevated. The symptom elevations were found as late as 11 y after the accident. Severity of symptomatology is significantly related to risk perceptions and being diagnosed with a Chernobyl-related health problem. In general, the morbidity patterns are consistent with the psychological impairments documented after other toxic events, such as the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Three Mile Island accident, and Bhopal. With respect to the developing brain of exposed children who were in utero or very young when the accident occurred, the World Health Organization as well as American and Israeli researchers have found no significant associations of radiation exposure with cognitive impairments. Cognitive impairments in highly exposed cleanup workers have been reported by Ukrainian researchers, but these findings have not been independently confirmed. A seminal study found a significant excess death rate from suicide in cleanup workers, suggesting a sizable emotional toll. Given the magnitude and persistence of the adverse mental health effects on the general population, long-term educational and psychosocial interventions should be initiated that target primary care physicians, local researchers, and high risk populations, including participants in ongoing cohort studies. PMID

  15. Environmental consequences of Chernobyl in Western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident at Chernobyl in April 1986 spread radioactive contamination throughout Europe. Using measurements of activity concentrations in the air, on the ground and in a range of foods, estimates of the doses received by the populations of western Europe have been made. For the European Community (EC) countries, the average individual effective doses accruing from the first year following the accident are estimated to range from less than a microsievert in Portugal to a few hundred microsieverts in the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy and Greece. Elsewhere in western Europe, similar average individual effective doses have been estimated, up to a value of about 700 μSv for Austria. These values can be compared with the average effective dose of about 2000 μSv which the populations of western Europe receive each year from natural radiation. The restrictions placed on consumption of some foods are estimated to have been effective in reducing doses to the most exposed individuals by a factor of two in some countries. Throughout the EC, however, countermeasures are estimated to have reduced the collective effective dose by about 5%. The health impact on western Europe from the accident at Chernobyl can be assessed from the collective effective doses and the collective thyroid doses estimated together with the appropriate risk factors. For the EC the collective effective dose estimate is about 80,000 man Sv; considering western Europe as a whole the collective dose would be a few tens of percent higher. Using the risk factor recommended by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, the theoretical number of extra cancers predicted in western Europe due to the Chernobyl accident is of the order of 1000. This can be compared with the number of fatalities which would be expected over the next fifty years in western Europe as a result of radiation from natural sources, which is over half a million. (author). 4 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  16. Chernobyl lesson and the nuclear power prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At sixteen years from the disaster which made the commercial power reactor nr. 4 of the Chernobyl NPP known worldwide, the radiation effects and the consequences are still vivid. A basic statement is to be underlined, namely, the Chernobyl event was not an accident in a nuclear power plant being in an industrial, commercial state of operation but an accident following an experiment done on the reactor. Lack of professionalism, of nuclear safety culture, the outrageous violation of basic rules and regulations, established for the unit operation, represent some of the causes originating the Chernobyl disaster. One of the most unfair consequences enhanced by an incorrect mass media information and political manipulation was the ensuing antinuclear media campaign. The paper quotes recent monographs and United Nations Documents showing how the facts were distorted to render arguments and support for various political, economical or humanistic goals. Thus, over more than 15 years due to the hard controversies and irrational campaigns on a global scale the nuclear power was discredited. Practically, all the nuclear power plant constructions were either delayed or cancelled. Moreover, some governments have sustained even closing the existing nuclear stations. The author asks himself rhetorically whether somebody has considered and quantified the immense losses produced by such unmotivated policy or else the additional damage and abuse caused to our home planet by the additional burning of fossil fuels to replace the nuclear fuel burning in nuclear power plants. The paper ends by mentioning the environmental advantages and economic efficiency of that clean energy source which is the nuclear power

  17. Pseuchoneurotic disorders associated with the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This survey relied largely on random selection. As a rule, the attention of the specialists was directed to people with certain specific complaints. Psychogenic disorders observed in the area of the accident at the Chernobyl plant were followed and studied by a team of specialists from the USSR Ministry of Health, beginning on 29 April 1986. According to the nature of the observed stress effects and of the resultant psychic disorders, it was possible to delineate three periods: first the acute period of the disaster from the time of the accident, lasting about 10 days until completion of the evacuation of the population from the danger zone (5 May); second the intermediate delayed period, the period of comparatively early consequences (from 6 May to October 1986); and third, the period of remote consequences. In the course of the year, 1,572 people were examined. The data available indicate that the psychogenic disorders observed after the Chernobyl accident can be regarded as the consequence of a single process, the dynamics of which are determined on the one hand by the characteristics of the emergency situation and on the other by the traits and the degree of preparedness of the people involved. The special nature of the stress situation in all three periods - the threat to health - gave rise to certain characteristic clinical observations, primarily a high degree of somatization and hypochondria. An understanding of the psychological disorders affecting those who lived through the Chernobyl accident, and of their effects on the work capability and pattern of life of people at various stages after the accident, has made it possible to develop and implement a complex and refined system of prophylactic and medical measures. (author)

  18. Thyroid carcinomas induced by Chernobyl nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl nuclear station accident is the unprecedented catastrophic accident in human nuclear industry with a large of quantity of radioactive nucleons resulting in contamination in many countries of the northern Hemisphere. After almost 20 years studying, it is approved that Belarus is the most serious affected country by the accident. Especially thyroid carcinomas in the people exposed to radioactive fall-out is considered to be the only one late radiation effect. RET gene in the happening of thyroid carcinomas is being paid close attention at present

  19. Children thyroid carcinoma and Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Nuclear medicine diagnostic department of Kaunas Medical University Clinics 22 children (6-16 years of age), ill with thyroid carcinoma were examined. Bas ing on the data of Kaunas Medical University Clinic the incidence of children thyroid carcinoma did not increase after Chernobyl accident. Ratio of boys and girls was 4.5:1. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma was detected in 15 (68.2%)children, mixed carcinoma - 4 (18.2%), nondiferenciated -3 (13.6%) children. First stage of cancer was detected only in one patient (4.5%), second -16 (72.7%), third - 3 (13.6%), fourth stage - 2 (9.1%) patients. (author)

  20. ENC86: Under the shadow of Chernobyl?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combined meeting of the European Nuclear Society, the American Nuclear Society and FORATOM in Geneva from 1-6 June had the distinction of being the first major meeting of the nuclear industry after Chernobyl. It was so close that all the papers had been written before the accident. Nothing, in the sense that Chernobyl was not a western reactor, so in detail very little technical information will emerge which will affect western procedures for reactor design or safety assessment given the reviews that have occurred since Three Mile Island. We will expect to learn a great deal about the handling of emergencies, institutional and organisational arrangements, and potentially could learn a great deal of scientific and radiological interest, but these are all matters of detail, not principle, so nothing has changed. Everything, in the sense that the public perception has changed dramatically for the worse. The public has been shocked by the far-reaching effects of the accident. Whether the change is sufficient to challenge the future development of nuclear power is not yet clear, but the matter is certainly open for debate, at least in some countries. This dual view was reflected throughout the conference. The major speakers in the plenary sessions dwelt principally on the effects of Chernobyl. The speakers in the technical and numerous poster sessions did not, in general, have to make any changes to their presentations or to the detailed scientific material. There was an anti-nuclear demonstration at the conference headquarters on the Sunday evening which prevented some participants reaching the opening reception. This was organised by an umbrella anti-nuclear organisation calling itself 'Contratom'. The first social event having been substantially disrupted, it was noticeable that none of the technical sessions of the conference throughout the rest of the week were affected in the slightest. The views of the major speakers can be grouped into three areas. Firstly

  1. The Chernobyl murder. The nuclear Goulag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors of this book are the Chernobyl victims of the 26 April 1986 nuclear accident: millions of poor farmers, contaminated young mothers and children which eat every days radionuclides; ''Liquidators'', sacrificed to stop the fire of the power plants; invalids and also doctors and scientists which refuse the nuclear lobby. This book presents the two Byelorussian scientists which have risk their career and their health to help the contaminated populations. This book takes stock on the today nuclear policy and becomes alarm in seeing the development of the nuclear program in many countries. (A.L.B.)

  2. The Chernobyl nuclear accident and its consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An AAEC Task Group was set up shortly after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant to monitor and evaluate initial reports and to assess the implications for Australia. The Task Group issued a preliminary report on 9 May 1986. On 25-29 August 1986, the USSR released details of the accident and its consequences and further information has become available from the Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD and the World Health Organisation. The Task Group now presents a revised report summarising this information and commenting on the consequences from the Australian viewpoint

  3. Chernobyl health effects: radiation or stress?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration is given to results of wide-scale examination of human population, subjected to the effect of radiation in result of Chernobyl accident. The examined contingents consisted of liquidators, evacuated from 30-km zone, people still living in contamination territories, children of irradiated parents and children, who received large radiation doses. High levels of respiratory system diseases, digestive system diseases, cardiovascular diseases and nervous system diseases were revealed for these people. It was revealed that stress, socio-economic and chemical factors played sufficient role in disease incidence. It is shown that fair of radiation may damage more, than radiation itself

  4. Belarus and Chernobyl: The second decade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popular non-fiction book reflects recent views of the accident happened at Chernobyl 12 years ago. It presents some aspects of the state's huge work aimed at protecting public health and mitigating the consequences of the disaster in the Republic of Belarus. While preparing the publication the authors have used results of scientific studies conducted as per order of the Ministry for Emergencies by different bodies of the National Academy of Sciences, Ministry of Health, Academy of Agrarian Sciences, Ministry of Agriculture and Foodstuffs etc. It is intended for a broad readership

  5. Cesium-137 in grass from Chernobyl fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grass ecosystem was monitored for 137Cs, a relatively long-lived radionuclide, for about 16 years since the Chernobyl reactor accident occurred on April 26, 1986. Cesium-137 in grass gramineae or poaceae the species, ranged from 122.9 Bq kg-1 (September 4, 1986) to 5.8 mBq kg-1 (October 16, 2001) that is a range of five orders of magnitude. It was observed that there was a trend of decreasing 137Cs with time reflecting a removal half-time of 40 months (3 1/3 years), which is the ecological half-life, T ec of 137Cs in grassland

  6. Risk of thyroid cancer among Chernobyl liquidators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: While the increased risk of thyroid cancer is well demonstrated in people exposed to radioactive iodines in childhood and adolescence in the most contaminated areas around the Chernobyl power plant, following the accident which took place on 26 April 1986, the effect of exposure on adults remains unclear. A collaborative case-control study of thyroid cancer was set-up, nested within cohorts of Belarus, Russian and Baltic countries liquidators of the Chernobyl accident, to evaluate the radiation-induced risk of this disease among liquidators, and to assess the roles of screening and of radiation exposures in the observed increased thyroid cancer incidence among liquidators. The study population consisted of the cohorts of approximately 66,000 Belarus, 65,000 Russian and 15,000 Baltic countries liquidators who took part in the clean-up activities on the reactor site and in the 30-km zone around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant between 26 April 1986 and 31 December 1987. The liquidators were mainly exposed to external radiation, although substantial dose to the thyroid from iodine isotopes may have been received by liquidators who worked in May-June 1986 and by those who resided in the most contaminated territories of Belarus. Information was collected on study subjects by use of a standardized questionnaire that was administrated during a face-to-face interview with the study subject and/or a proxy (a relative or a colleague). The interview included questions on demographic factors, time, place and conditions of work as a liquidator and on potential risk and confounding factors for thyroid cancer. A method of analytical dose reconstruction, entitled RADRUE (Realistic Analytical Dose Reconstruction with Uncertainty Estimation) was developed within the study and applied to estimate individual doses to the thyroid from external radiation and related uncertainties for each subject. Approaches to derive individual thyroid dose estimates from inhaled and

  7. Chernobyl and its consequences for Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First there is a short version of 16 pages. Then a detailed account is given mainly on the activities of the Federal Environment Office and the radiation burden to the population. The chapter headings are 1) The Chernobyl reactor accident 2) The meteorological situation 3) Monitoring of the radioactive contamination in Austria 4) Aims of the radiation measurement activities 5) Initial situation in Austria and first measurements 6) Environmental control 7) Food control 8) Fodder 9) Measures taken to minimise the radiation burden - a chronology 10) Comparison with nuclear tests fallout 11) Dose estimation 12) Radioactive contamination in other European countries. (G.Q.)

  8. Expert and novice facilitated modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavella, Elena; Papadopoulos, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an empirical study based on action research in which expert and novice facilitators in facilitated modelling workshops are compared. There is limited empirical research analysing the differences between expert and novice facilitators. Aiming to address this gap we study the...... behaviour of one expert and two novice facilitators during a Viable System Model workshop. The findings suggest common facilitation patterns in the behaviour of experts and novices. This contrasts literature claiming that experts and novices behave and use their available knowledge differently, and...... facilitation strategies in contexts in which external, expert facilitation is not always possible are also discussed, and limitations of this study are provided....

  9. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. Photo 01: Raymond Battistella - Director-General of SIG, Geneva's utilities provider (left) - and Bernard Ecoffey, Founder of the Forum Engelberg. In the background is the CMS magnet system under construction. The red concentric rings are part of the barrel yoke, which returns the magnetic flux generated by the superconducting coil. Supported from the innermost barrel ring is the outer cylinder of the vacuum tank that will house the superconducting coil. Photo 02: Alexander Höchli, member of the Institutional Committee of Forum Engelberg and former Landammann of the canton of Obwalden (left), with Raymond Battistella, Di...

  10. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996.Seated here at a presentation by Peter Jenni, spokesperson for the ATLAS collaboration, during the visit of Forum members and Geneva public figures are Bernard Ecoffey, Founder of the Forum Engelberg (left), and Jean-Claude Landry, Department of the Interior, Agriculture and Environment, state of Geneva. Photo 01: (left to right) Bernard Ecoffey, Jean-Claude Landry and Peter Jenni. Photos 02, 03: (left to right) Jean-Claude Landry, Bernard Ecoffey and Peter Jenni.

  11. FIAP Forum on Entrepreneurship in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    With the changes in science as globalization has taken root, the future role of physicists becoming a part of the industrial physics community is more imperative. When 80% of graduating physicists will not be employed in academic positions, and 50% of all jobs for these physicists will be industrial sector, the importance of bringing our next generation of scientists up to speed on industrial applications is becoming much more important with the rapid, world-wide development of technology. FIAP is initiating a forum on entrepreneurship as a major role for the next generation of scientists. As physicists are problem solvers and the entrepreneurial experience is all about problem solving: whether involving technology, building a team, or financing a business. This forum seeks to link successful entrepreneurial physicists with the upcoming generation, through the dissemination of their global expertise and experience. The forum will consist of a panel discussion and then be open to question and answers from the audience.

  12. American Telemedicine Association: 2014 Fall Forum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordana Bernard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The American Telemedicine Association (ATA will host its annual Fall Forum in Palm Desert, California, Sept. 6-9, 2014. In addition to two full days of programs related to managing and improving chronic conditions, ATA will host a full-day American-Chinese Telemedicine Forum on Sunday, Sept. 7, 2014. The forum, co-sponsored by the American International Telemedicine Council, will deliver the tools and information that are essential to building a successful telemedicine business abroad. Attendees will learn about the existing clinical and business landscape oftelemedicine in China, and how to establish key partnerships to help their respective health system, or business, grow in the international market.

  13. Bioethics for Technical Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Shigetaka

    Along with rapidly expanding applications of life science and technology, technical experts have been implicated more and more often with ethical, social, and legal problems than before. It should be noted that in this background there are scientific and social uncertainty elements which are inevitable during the progress of life science in addition to the historically-established social unreliability to scientists and engineers. In order to solve these problems, therefore, we should establish the social governance with ‘relief’ and ‘reliance’ which enables for both citizens and engineers to share the awareness of the issues, to design social orders and criterions based on hypothetical sense of values for bioethics, to carry out practical use management of each subject carefully, and to improve the sense of values from hypothetical to universal. Concerning these measures, the technical experts can learn many things from the present performance in the medical field.

  14. Expert PLSQL Practices

    CERN Document Server

    Beresniewicz, John

    2011-01-01

    Expert PL/SQL Practices is a book of collected wisdom on PL/SQL programming from some of the best and the brightest in the field. Each chapter is a deep-dive into a specific problem, technology, or feature set that you'll face as a PL/SQL programmer. Each author has chosen their topic out of the strong belief that what they share can make a positive difference in the quality and scalability of code that you write. The path to mastery begins with syntax and the mechanics of writing statements to make things happen. If you've reached that point with PL/SQL, then let the authors of Expert PL/SQL

  15. Make yourself an expert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Dorothy; Barton, Gavin; Barton, Michelle

    2013-04-01

    Almost every organization has people it can't do without--specialists with "deep smarts," who are the go-to experts on critical issues. But because their knowledge is experienced-based, it's often instinctive and unarticulated, and never gets passed on. Capturing it is a challenge for both the organization and for colleagues who wish to become in-house authorities themselves. This article offers a methodical system for acquiring deep smarts from an expert. It involves observing that person extensively to understand what makes him successful, practicing the behaviors he exhibits on your own, partnering with him to solve problems, and ultimately taking responsibility for some of his tasks. Describing the experiences of one executive as she takes this journey with a mentor, the authors show how you too can gain the wisdom that will make you indispensable to your firm. PMID:23593772

  16. NOMAGE4 activities 2011. Part I, Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors: Status and activities in 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A network for materials issues has been initiated in 2009 within the Nordic countries. The original objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) were to form the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen-IV issues, especially focusing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Over the last years, other issues such as reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, safety and waste have gained in importance (within the network) and therefore the scope of the forum has been enlarged and a more appropriate and more general name, NORDIC-GEN4, has been chosen for the forum. Further, the interaction with non-Nordic countries (such as The Netherlands (JRC, NRG) and Czech Republic (CVR)) will be increased. Within the NOMAGE4 project, a seminar was organized by IFE-Halden during 31 October - 1 November 2011. The seminar attracted 65 participants from 12 countries. The seminar provided a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research reactor needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. The participants could also visit the Halden reactor site and the workshop. (Author)

  17. NOMAGE4 activities 2011. Part I, Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors: Status and activities in 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nieuwenhove, R. (Institutt for Energiteknikk, OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway))

    2012-01-15

    A network for materials issues has been initiated in 2009 within the Nordic countries. The original objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) were to form the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen-IV issues, especially focusing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Over the last years, other issues such as reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, safety and waste have gained in importance (within the network) and therefore the scope of the forum has been enlarged and a more appropriate and more general name, NORDIC-GEN4, has been chosen for the forum. Further, the interaction with non-Nordic countries (such as The Netherlands (JRC, NRG) and Czech Republic (CVR)) will be increased. Within the NOMAGE4 project, a seminar was organized by IFE-Halden during 31 October - 1 November 2011. The seminar attracted 65 participants from 12 countries. The seminar provided a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research reactor needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. The participants could also visit the Halden reactor site and the workshop. (Author)

  18. Gamesourcing Expert Painting Annotations

    OpenAIRE

    Traub, Myriam; Ossenbruggen, van, Jacco; He, Jiyin; Hardman, Hazel Lynda; Leeuwen, van, M.; Stappers, P.J.; Lamers, M. H.; Thissen, M.J.M.R.

    2014-01-01

    Online collections provided by museums are increasingly opened for contributions from users outside the museum. These initiatives are mostly targeted at obtaining tags describing aspects of artworks that are common knowledge. This does not require the contributors to have specific skills or knowledge. Museums, however, are also interested in obtaining very specific information about the subject matter of their artworks. We present a game that can help to collect expert knowledge by enabling n...

  19. Evolution of expert systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biancoli, L.

    1984-03-01

    A brief exposition of the nature and functions of expert systems (knowledge based systems) and some remarks upon the way in which they resemble, but fall far short of, the very largely intuitive action of the human brain are given. The remainder of the article consists of summaries of the work being done in this field by organisations in Italy, namely: ISPRA; Delphi Electronic Design Systems, VIAREGGIO; SPL Italia SPA, (VA), Milan; Italservice Srl, Milan; and Artificial Intelligence Software, Rovigo.

  20. Evaluation of the importance of the 39 subjects defined by the global forum for maintenance and asset management

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, Jacobus Krige; Botha, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    The Global Forum on Maintenance and Asset Management (GFMAM) was formed in 2011 to bring together various experts, practitioners, academics, and other professionals who are active in the field of asset and maintenance management. The primary mission of GFMAM is to develop and promote knowledge, standards, and education for the maintenance and asset management professions. To fulfil this mission, GFMAM developed an ‘Asset Management Landscape’ document, which defines 39 subjects on asset manag...

  1. International Forum for the Advancement of Diabetes Research and Care, April 29–30, 2011, Athens, Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Bolli, Geremia B.; Deeb, Larry C.; Garg, Satish K.; Leahy, John L.; Mazze, Roger S.; Owens, David R; Riddle, Matthew C.; Southerland, Phil; Strock, Ellie S.

    2011-01-01

    The International Forum for the Advancement of Diabetes Research and Care brought together distinguished international experts in diabetes to discuss diverse trends and emerging issues in diabetes therapy and management. The plenary sessions on the first day focused on trends in insulin therapy, the role of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists in diabetes treatment, the relationship between diabetes and cardiovascular risk, and the challenges associated with the development of clinically...

  2. ALICE Expert System

    CERN Document Server

    Ionita, C

    2014-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN employs a number of human operators (shifters), who have to make sure that the experiment is always in a state compatible with taking Physics data. Given the complexity of the system and the myriad of errors that can arise, this is not always a trivial task. The aim of this paper is to describe an expert system that is capable of assisting human shifters in the ALICE control room. The system diagnoses potential issues and attempts to make smart recommendations for troubleshooting. At its core, a Prolog engine infers whether a Physics or a technical run can be started based on the current state of the underlying sub-systems. A separate C++ component queries certain SMI objects and stores their state as facts in a Prolog knowledge base. By mining the data stored in dierent system logs, the expert system can also diagnose errors arising during a run. Currently the system is used by the on-call experts for faster response times, but we expect it to be adopted as a standard tool by reg...

  3. Twenty years after accident in Chernobyl atomic power plant. Present and future states of studies on pediatric thyroid cancer induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident in the title occurred in April, 1986 and 20 years after, the international conference of Chernobyl Forum was held in Kiev of Ukraine on details of health problems, of which report is given in World Health Organization (WHO) hp (www.who.int./ionizingradiation/Chernobyl/ern). The purpose of making the report was the scientific, objective evaluation of health problem to provide residents the correct information and to make recommendation to governments of Russia, Belarus and Ukraine. This paper describes the outline of the WHO report and characteristics of pediatric thyroid cancer increased after the accident. The report has the description about the effect of the accident on human beings including thyroid diseases, tumors, death numbers, mental and genetic influences, and cataract. The increased pediatric thyroid cancer is found mostly the papillocaricinoma, of which pathogenesis is considered to be due to DNA break of the region encoding MAP kinase pathways. Analyses of mitochondrial DNA mutations, by micro-array, of chromosome, and of SNPs have been also performed and have given many suggestive findings. Further continuation of the CTB (Chernobyl Tissue Bank, where nucleic acids of the cancer are stored by international cooperation) activity is concluded to be important for release of residents' anxiety and for understanding of radiation carcinogenesis. (R.T.)

  4. One decade after Chernobyl - The review of the results of an International Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 26 April 1986 the most serious accident in the history of the nuclear industry occurred at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the former Soviet Union, near the current borders of Ukraine, Belarus and Russia. The consequences attributed to this accident have been subjected to extensive scientific examination. Ten years after the accident, the European Commission (EC), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) jointly sponsored an International Conference to recapitulate the accident's consequences and to seek a common and conclusive understanding of their nature and magnitude. The Conference 'One decade after Chernobyl: Summing up the Consequences of the accident', took place in the Austria Center Vienna, Austria, from 8 to 12 April 1996. This paper is a review of the Conference based on updating reports and keynote presented, background papers presented by expert panels and discussions of these by the Conference. The clinical observed effects, thyroid effects, long term health effects and psychological consequences are particularly addressed. (author)

  5. Analysis of fluid-structure interaction and structural response of Chernobyl-4 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On April 26, 1986, an accident occurred at the Chernobyl-4 Nuclear Power Plant in the Soviet Union. A post accident meeting was held in Vienna during the week of August 25, 1986. In mid-July 1986, the DOE formed a team to analyze the accident, including experts from the national laboratories such as Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal was to assess the information's plausibility, provided analytical support to the US delegation during the post-accident review meeting and obtain a technical understanding of the accident. Detailed analyses of the team work are given in Ref. 1 (DOE, 1986). The accident at Chernobyl-4 occurred during the running of a test to determine a turbogenerator's ability to provide in-house emergency power after shutting off its steam supply. The accident was the result of a large, destructive power excursion. The major design related factor in the accident was the large positive void coefficient of reactivity. This feature, not present in the US reactors, means that an increase in power is likely to lead to an increase in reactivity which will further increase power, and finally result in the destructive accident. 5 refs., 11 figs

  6. Major economies Forum on energy and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Major Economies Forum is intended to facilitate an open dialogue among major developed and developing economies, help generate the political leadership necessary to achieve a successful outcome at the United Nations climatic change conference in Copenhagen, and advance the exploration of concrete initiatives and joint ventures that increase the supply of clean energy while cutting greenhouse gas emissions. The Forum's second preparatory meeting was held in Paris in May 2009, mainly focused on greenhouse gas emissions reduction actions and objectives, the diffusion of clean technologies, the financing of activities for climate protection and adaptation to climatic change impacts

  7. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Photo 01: Members of the Forum Engelberg and public figures from Geneva visit SM18, the test hall for LHC magnets: (left to right) N. Siegel, Prof. Dr. Med. Bernard Mach, Mr Alexander Höchli, H. Wenninger, Mrs Mireille Quirina, Mme Konrade Von Bremen, Mrs Thérèse Wolf, Prof. Roger Berthouzoz, Mrs Marie-Anne Heimo, Mr Bernard Ecoffey.

  8. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. Horst Wenninger (left) in animated discussion with Alexander Höchli, member of the Institutional Committee of Forum Engelberg and former Landammann of the canton of Obwalden.

  9. GreyGuide Forum and Repository

    OpenAIRE

    Biagioni, Stefania; Farace, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    We present the GreyGuide: an online forum and repository of good practice in the field of grey literature. The launch of the GreyGuide Repository took place in December 2013 at the Fifteenth International Conference on Grey Literature. Since then, the acquisition of both proposed and published good practices are underway. The GreyGuide as an online forum is currently in a developmental stage and is influenced by the changes that have taken place in GreyNet's new infrastructure commencing in J...

  10. Radiation exposure and breast cancer: lessons from Chernobyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrodnik, Aleksandra; Hudon, Tyler W; Nadkarni, Prakash M; Chandawarkar, Rajiv Y

    2013-04-01

    The lessons learned from the Chernobyl disaster have become increasingly important after the second anniversary of the Fukushima, Japan nuclear accident. Historically, data from the Chernobyl reactor accident 27 years ago demonstrated a strong correlation with thyroid cancer, but data on the radiation effects of Chernobyl on breast cancer incidence have remained inconclusive. We reviewed the published literature on the effects of the Chernobyl disaster on breast cancer incidence, using Medline and Scopus from the time of the accident to December of 2010. Our findings indicate limited data and statistical flaws. Other confounding factors, such as discrepancies in data collection, make interpretation of the results from the published literature difficult. Re-analyzing the data reveals that the incidence of breast cancer in Chernobyl-disaster-exposed women could be higher than previously thought. We have learned little of the consequences of radiation exposure at Chernobyl except for its effects on thyroid cancer incidence. Marking the 27th year after the Chernobyl event, this report sheds light on a specific, crucial and understudied aspect of the results of radiation from a gruesome nuclear power plant disaster. PMID:23691737

  11. Expedition to the 30-km Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and the Utilization of its Experience in Education and Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between May 28 - June 4, 2005, under the organization of the Hungarian Nuclear Society (HNS) and the Hungarian Young Generation Network (HYGN) - which operates within the framework of the HNS - a scientific expedition visited the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant and the surrounding exclusion zone. The participants were young Hungarian nuclear professionals supervised by more experienced experts. The main scientific goals of the expedition were the followings: Get personal experiences in a direct way about the current status of the Chernobyl Power Plant and its surroundings, the contamination of the environment and about the doses. Gather information about the state of the shut down power plant and the shelter built above the damaged 4. unit. Training of young nuclear experts by performing on site measurements. The Hungarian expedition successfully achieved its objectives by performing wide-range of environmental and dosimetric measurements and collecting numerous biological and soil samples. Within the 30-km exclusion zone the influence of the accident occurred 20 years ago still could be measured clearly; however the level of the radioactivity is manageable in most places. The dosimetric measurements showed that no considerable exposure occurred among the members of the expedition. The analysis of samples has been started at the International Chernobyl Center in Slavutich. During the expedition not only environmental sampling and in-situ measurements were carried out but it was also well documented with photos and video recordings for educational, training and PR purposes. A documentary TV film was recorded during the expedition. The first-hand knowledge acquired during the expedition helps the authentic communication of the accident and its present-day consequences, which is especially important in 2006, 20 years after the Chernobyl accident. Since Ukraine and Hungary are neighbor countries the media constantly discuss the accident, the consequences and the risks of

  12. Annual China Real Estate Forum 2010 at CEIBS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ The first Annual China Real Estate Forum was held on September 4 on the Beijing Campus of the China Europe International Business School (CEIBS). The forum has invited all stakeholders including government officials, property developers,bankers and investors.

  13. Life Science Forum showcases regional research, new companies

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth Annual Southwest Virginia Life Science Forum on Monday, Oct. 4, will showcase New River Valley biotech companies' research and job opportunities, and be a resource for the ACC Interdisciplinary Forum for Discovery in Life Sciences.

  14. The causes of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the man in the street Chernobyl epitomizes the danger of nuclear energy but when we examine the causes of this accident we see that this drama is not intrinsically linked to the production of electricity from nuclear fission. The author sees 2 components in the Chernobyl event: the accident itself and its sanitary consequences. The author considers 3 main causes to the accident: -) a design that makes the reactor difficult to control, -) a series of 6 humane failures or breaking of operating rules, and -) political reasons: the largest possible budget was dedicated to plutonium production so any improvement for safety was considered as costly and secondary, moreover the religion of secrecy which was well spread in the ancient Soviet Union, prevented any scientific from knowing all the information concerning this type of reactor. As for the sanitary consequences, the author considers direct causes and underlying causes. The lack of information for the local population, the delay taken for iodine distribution or for the interdiction of farm products consumption are included in the direct causes. The slowness of Soviet bureaucracy, tight budgets and politico-scientific disputes are quoted among the underlying causes. (A.C.)

  15. Chernobyl and the 30-km zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The region contaminated as a consequence of the accident in unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power station is subdivided into 4 different zones based on the level of contamination and the additional radiation dose to be expected by the people living there. The 30-km zone, which had been evacuated completely, is currently inhabited by some 100 ''returnees'' on Ukrainian territory, with approximately 3,500 employees of the Chernobyl nuclear power station and some 13,000 persons working there who are involved in studies of scientific problems (approx. 120 projects, most of them international), plus service, maintenance and guard staff, firefighters, forest workers and gamekeepers, etc. Most of these people live in the newly built town of Slavutich. Some concrete measures have already been taken for future use of the 30-km zone (creation of a shallow land burial site for radioactive waste and decommissioning waste at the VECTOR site, construction of an interim store for the fuel elements of the nuclear power plant), but also more extensive concepts have been developed (construction of a central fuel element store for Ukrainian nuclear power plants, shallow land burial of waste with higher contents of longlived radionuclides, perhaps construction of an underground repository), which even consider touristic ambitions. (orig.)

  16. Could the Chernobyl exclusion zone be recovered?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soon after the Chernobyl accident occurred an area of about 3200 km2 around the plant was evacuated and has been kept off limits since, except for people working at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant and/or on some special tasks in the evacuated zone. In spite of the official ban that forbids evacuated persons to return to the exclusion zone, about 1000 people, the so-called 'samosyoly', including some children, have returned and settled back in their old homes. While the authorities are not approving of their return, they are not attempting to force these people out either. Are 'samosyoly' exposing themselves to unreasonable dangers and should they be forcefully removed from the area? Or should more areas in the exclusion zone, possibly even the city of Pripyat, be opened for voluntary (re)settlement? In this paper the present contamination levels in some parts of the exclusion zone are reviewed and problems associated with the potential repopulation (of some parts) of the exclusion zone are discussed. (author). 24 refs., 2 tabs., figs

  17. Environmental stress reactions following the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The widespread public anxiety and pessimism about the Chernobyl accident appears to be out of all proportion to the radiation induced health effects. The concept of stress is invoked to explain the widespread damage to general health and well-being. Stress can be defined as the process by which adverse mental experiences have negative effects on bodily functions. The mechanism is physiological, mediated through the autonomic nervous system and the endocrinological system. The International Chernobyl Project study was conducted by the International Advisory Committee in 1990 and published by the IAEA in 1991. The study found significant differences between 'contaminated' and 'clean' areas for symptoms attributable to stress; 45% (30% in 'clean' areas) of the people believed that they had an illness due to radiation exposure. The level of general health was found to be low and almost all ailments were attributed by the population to radiation. These effects (confirmed by other studies) were compounded by poor public understanding of radiation; initial secrecy; subsequent lack of effective communication; and the collapse of the centralize political and economic systems. Distrust of 'authorities' is widespread. One important study using a regression method has shown that 'economic situation' and 'attitude to the future' are better predictors of stress symptoms than contamination level. 61 refs, 2 tabs

  18. Chernobyl caesium distribution in two forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl nuclear accident on April 26, 1986, affected a considerable part of Europe, including the Romanian territory too. As part of the environment, the forests, covering up to 30 % area of Romania, were contaminated by the radionuclides resulting from Chernobyl nuclear accident. Being a source of radionuclides for intake and habitat for some critical groups and also a secondary source of contamination (resuspension, erosion), forest radioecology is an increasing research topic. The distribution of radiocaesium with depth was analysed in the brown-reddish forest type soil of two forests. The profile with depth and the specific activity of each layer permit the assessment of: total deposition, migration rate and diffusion coefficient for Cs-137 and also Cs-134. The total deposition of Cs-137 is about 47 kBq/m2 for Magurele area and about 14 kBq/m2 for Naipu forest. The migration rate is more than 10 times greater in Naipu forest as in Magurele forest. The diffusion coefficients are similar, about 0.2 cm2/an. (author)

  19. Heat exchanger demonstration expert system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagby, D. G.; Cormier, R. A.

    1988-05-01

    A real-time expert system intended for detecting and diagnosing faults in a 20 kW microwave transmitter heat exchanger is described. The expert system was developed on a LISP machine, Incorporated (LMI), Lambda Plus computer using Process Intelligent Control (PICON) software. The Heat Exhanger Expert System was tested and debugged. Future applications and extensions of the expert system to transmitters, masers, and antenna subassemblies are discussed.

  20. Radioactive iodine-131 over Taiwan after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two weeks after the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, a substantial increase in radioactivity above normal background levels was observed in various samples taken in Taiwan, which is 7600 km from Chernobyl. The 131I concentrations in grass, rainwater, and milk were monitored continuously in succeeding weeks and correlations with weather conditions are discussed. Levels of radiation fallout over Taiwan due to the Chernobyl accident are much lower than the response levels recommended by local authorities and pose no danger to the public. (author)

  1. From Chernobyl to Fukushima: the effect of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Power Point presentation describes the Fukushima's reactors, recalls some data about the earthquake and tsunami, and indicates their consequences for the operation of the power station (notably the loss of cooling means). It identifies some design errors for the Chernobyl's and Fukushima's power stations, outlines differences between these two cases. It gives assessment of doses receives by external irradiation around Fukushima, of the dose rate evolution, of the sea contamination. It gives some data about the Chernobyl accident (radioactivity evolution). After some data about health consequences of Chernobyl, health risks and more particularly biological risks associated to low doses are described. Protection measures are evoked, as well as psycho-social impacts

  2. Sources of Information and Behavioral Patterns in Online Health Forums: Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friede, Tim; Grabowski, Jens; Koschack, Janka; Makedonski, Philip; Himmel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of patients are raising their voice in online forums. This shift is welcome as an act of patient autonomy, reflected in the term “expert patient”. At the same time, there is considerable concern that patients can be easily misguided by pseudoscientific research and debate. Little is known about the sources of information used in health-related online forums, how users apply this information, and how they behave in such forums. Objective The intent of the study was to identify (1) the sources of information used in online health-related forums, and (2) the roles and behavior of active forum visitors in introducing and disseminating this information. Methods This observational study used the largest German multiple sclerosis (MS) online forum as a database, analyzing the user debate about the recently proposed and controversial Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI) hypothesis. After extracting all posts and then filtering relevant CCSVI posts between 01 January 2008 and 17 August 2012, we first identified hyperlinks to scientific publications and other information sources used or referenced in the posts. Employing k-means clustering, we then analyzed the users’ preference for sources of information and their general posting habits. Results Of 139,912 posts from 11,997 threads, 8628 posts discussed or at least mentioned CCSVI. We detected hyperlinks pointing to CCSVI-related scientific publications in 31 posts. In contrast, 2829 different URLs were posted to the forum, most frequently referring to social media, such as YouTube or Facebook. We identified a total of 6 different roles of hyperlink posters including Social Media Fans, Organization Followers, and Balanced Source Users. Apart from the large and nonspecific residual category of the “average user”, several specific behavior patterns were identified, such as the small but relevant groups of CCSVI-Focused Responders or CCSVI Activators. Conclusions The bulk

  3. Creativity World Forum 2007 October 30-31 Qingdao, P. R. China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The 2007 Creativity World Forum is the 4rd gathering of the Districts of Creativity(DC)regions. This network was initiated in Flanders in February 2004 and consists of 12 creative regionsl from 3 continents. The conference will gather 400-650 participants(business leaders, policymakers and knowledge workers). It provides a unique occasion where some of the most creative regions from the world come to exchange experiences, share insights and learn from the world’s foremost experts on creativity and innovation. Coming up with answers to the challenges of a changing environment can only be done in an

  4. DuPont/HFM Forum on carpet in health care facilities. Roundtable discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murph, J; Hemmes, M; Blyth, P L; Plappert, K K; Noell, E; VanStavern, V; Cama, R; Lynn, V; Pollitt, B S; Rainey, P M

    1993-11-01

    DuPont and Health Facilities Management magazine invited 20 national experts to Dalton, GA--the carpet-manufacturing capital of the world--on May 13 to take part in DuPont's first-ever Forum on Carpet in Health Care Facilities. During the two-hour roundtable discussion, moderated by DuPont's C. Jack Murph and HFM's Michael Hemmes, end-users, interior designers and mill representatives talked about the aesthetic, economic and performance aspects of using carpet in health care settings. Here's an edited version of what they said. PMID:10183973

  5. DuPont/HFM forum on carpet in health care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-01

    DuPont and Health Facilities Management magazine invited 20 national experts to Dalton, GA--the carpet-manufacturing capital of the world--last year to take part in Dupont's first-ever Forum on Carpet in Health Care Facilities. During the two-hour roundtable discussion, moderated by DuPont's C. Jack Murph and HFM's Michael Hemmes, ender-users, interior designers and carpet mill representatives talked about the aesthetic, economic and performance aspects of using carpet in health care settings. Here's an edited version of what they said. PMID:10131499

  6. DuPont/HFM Forum on carpet in health care facilities. Third in a series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    DuPont and Health Facilities Management magazine invited 20 national experts to Dalton, GA--the carpet-manufacturing capital of the world--last year to take part in DuPont's first-ever Forum on Carpet in Health Care Facilities. During the two-hour roundtable discussion, moderated by DuPont's C. Jack Murph and HFM's Michael Hemmes, end-users, interior designers and carpet mill representative talked about the aesthetic, economic and performance aspects of using carpet in health care settings. Here's an edited version of what they said. PMID:10184014

  7. Expert Systems - A Natural History

    OpenAIRE

    Shadbolt, N R

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the origins, current state and future prospects for expert systems. The origins are traced from the schism with classic Artificial Intelligence. The characteristics of early expert systems are described and contrasted with more recent developments. A number of influential forces operating on present day systems are reviewed. The future trends in the evolution of expert systems are discussed.

  8. Experiences as an observer of the CTBT on-site-inspection exercise DE07 in Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The directed exercise DE07 took place in the Chernobyl exclusion zone in the Ukraine from 4. June 2007 to 14. June 2007. The aim of the exercise was to train several aspects of an on-site-inspection (OSI) to provide evidence of a forbidden nuclear weapons test in the context of the preparation of the comprehensive test ban treaty (CTBT). I had the opportunity to join the exercise as an observer. 25 experts from 22 state parties took part in the exercise. In addition 4 observers from 4 countries participated. The aim of the directed exercise was to measure radioactivity levels in a simulated inspection area and to identify the nuclides. The following aspects of an OSI were trained: carborne and airborne gamma survey; environmental sampling and analysis in a field laboratory; safety of work, personal protection and decontamination; communication and navigation in the field; data preparation and data handling

  9. The radiological consequences in the USSR from the Chernobyl accident: Description of the scheme of implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After October 1989 the Government of the USSR requested the IAEA to organize an international assessment of the 'concept which the USSR has evolved to enable the population to live safely in areas affected by radioactive contamination following the Chernobyl accident, and an evaluation of the effectiveness of the steps taken in these areas to safeguard the health of the population'. The IAEA responded positively to this request for special assistance. The IAEA is carried out an extensive international project involving over 100 experts who assessed the human health and environmental consequences in the affected areas of Byelorussia, the Ukraine, and the Russian Federation, and evaluate measures taken by Soviet authorities to protect the population and the environment

  10. Systematization of the Chernobyl affected enterprises and the choice of the forms of their economic development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procedure of systematisation of agricultural enterprises with usage of multifactor expert-statistical analysis is offered. Multifactorial classification of 181 facilities of eleven polluted areas of the Gomel region and one area of the Brest region, injured with Chernobyl accident is carried out. The mechanism of the multifactorial statistical analysis of economic activities of the agricultural enterprises which will allow to allocate six groups of classes of facilities is offered, each of which needs development of separate strategy of development in view of specificity of classes of facilities. Directly the business - plan for development of a concrete facilities should be made on the basis of the appropriate strategic circuit and features of ability to live of this facilities. In the long term ordering of facilities by the technique offered above may be used for introduction the approach in state planning and regulation of activity of agrarian and industrial complex

  11. 75 FR 39209 - U.S.-China Environmental Industries Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... International Trade Administration U.S.-China Environmental Industries Forum AGENCY: International Trade... on Commerce and Trade (JCCT) in its formulation of a U.S.-China Environmental Industries Forum... INFORMATION: Background: The biennial U.S.-China Environmental Industries Forum was created by the...

  12. 78 FR 11236 - Positive Train Control Public Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... SAFETY BOARD Positive Train Control Public Forum On Wednesday, February 27, 2013, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will convene a Forum titled, ``Positive Train Control: Is it on Track?'' The Forum will begin at 9:00 a.m. is open to all and the attendance is free (no registration required)....

  13. 76 FR 71081 - Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... SAFETY BOARD Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will convene a Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum which will begin at 9 a.m., Wednesday, November 30, 2011. NTSB Chairman Deborah A.P. Hersman will chair the two-day forum and all five Board Members...

  14. 78 FR 19024 - Lithium Ion Batteries in Transportation Public Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... SAFETY BOARD Lithium Ion Batteries in Transportation Public Forum On Thursday and Friday, April 11-12, 2013, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will convene a forum titled, ``Lithium Ion Batteries in Transportation.'' The forum will begin at 9:00 a.m. on both days and is open to all....

  15. 75 FR 44759 - Department of Commerce Business Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ... Department of Commerce Business Forum AGENCY: U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting... preregister, please send an e-mail to DOCBusinessForumRegistration@doc.gov with attending personnel names... DOCBusinessForumRegistration@doc.gov by August 6, 2010. Please put ``Accommodations'' in the subject line....

  16. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides highlights from the spring meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: state and compact reports; New York's challenge to the constitutionality of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Amendments Act of 1985; DOE technical assistance for 1993; interregional import/export agreements; Department of Transportation requirements; superfund liability; nonfuel bearing components; NRC residual radioactivity criteria

  17. Space Radiation Program Element Tissue Sharing Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.; Mayeaux, B M.; Huff, J. L.; Simonsen, L. C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the years, a large number of animal experiments have been conducted at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory and other facilities under the support of the NASA Space Radiation Program Element (SRPE). Studies using rodents and other animal species to address the space radiation risks will remain a significant portion of the research portfolio of the Element. In order to maximize scientific return of the animal studies, the SRPE has recently released the Space Radiation Tissue Sharing Forum. The Forum provides access to an inventory of investigator-stored tissue samples and enables both NASA SRPE members and NASA-funded investigators to exchange information regarding stored and future radiobiological tissues available for sharing. Registered users may review online data of available tissues, inquire about tissues posted, or request tissues for an upcoming study using an online form. Investigators who have upcoming sacrifices are also encouraged to post the availability of samples using the discussion forum. A brief demo of the forum will be given during the presentation

  18. Forum: Perspectives on From Roosevelt to Truman

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Dijk; A.A. Offner

    2008-01-01

    This forum offers two contrasting perspectives on a new book by Wilson D. Miscamble, From Roosevelt to Truman: Potsdam, Hiroshima, and the Cold War, which reassesses U.S. policy under Franklin Roosevelt and Harry Truman and the origins of the Cold War. Because reactions to the book have been so dive

  19. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards

  20. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards.

  1. Facilitating Learning Spaces in Forum Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the extent to which forum theatre interventions can support non-hierarchical approaches to learning, development and change management initiatives in organisations. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with theatre consultancies, actors/facilitators,…

  2. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides the results of the winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Discussions were held on the following topics: new developments in states and compacts; adjudicatory hearings; information exchange on siting processes, storage surcharge rebates; disposal after 1992; interregional access agreements; and future tracking and management issues

  3. ITU World Youth Forum visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    About 250 students selected by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) to participate in the 2009 Youth Forum made CERN a primary destination for this year’s World Youth Forum event. The 250 students participating in the 2009 Youth Forum attend a presentation in the Globe of Science and Innovation.On Tuesday 6 October, the group visited several sites including the Microcosm exhibition and the ATLAS cavern to get a glimpse of what CERN does and the exciting science that is studied here. Since 2001 and every three years, the ITU World Forum brings together young men and women, aged 18-23, to learn about new technologies and the world around them. This year’s group included participants from one hundred and twenty-five different countries. This was the first time that the event involved a visit to CERN. When asked why CERN was a destination, Pascal Biner, organizer of the visit for ITU, explained that CERN was a necessary stop given the Forum’s base in Gen...

  4. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains highlights from the 1991 fall meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included legal updates; US NRC updates; US EPA updates; mixed waste issues; financial assistance for waste disposal facilities; and a legislative and policy report

  5. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This paper provides the results of the winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Discussions were held on the following topics: new developments in states and compacts; adjudicatory hearings; information exchange on siting processes, storage surcharge rebates; disposal after 1992; interregional access agreements; and future tracking and management issues.

  6. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the October 1990 meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: a special session on liability and financial assurance needs; proposal to dispose of mixed waste at federal facilities; state plans for interim storage; and hazardous materials legislation.

  7. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    This report contains highlights from the 1991 fall meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included legal updates; US NRC updates; US EPA updates; mixed waste issues; financial assistance for waste disposal facilities; and a legislative and policy report.

  8. Proyecto FOMIN - Forum Empresa - OEA: Lecciones aprendidas

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo Frederick S.

    2007-01-01

    Presentación que da a conocer el mapa del proyecto FOMIN - Forum Empresa - OEA, muestra imágenes sobre los productos físicos y los talleres que se dictan, la lógica del proyecto y por último, las lecciones aprendidas.

  9. ANALYSIS OF EXPERT ORDERINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov A. I.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In various applications it is necessary to analyze some expert orderings, ie clustered rankings of examination objects. These areas include technical studies, ecology, management, economics, sociology, forecasting, etc. The objects may make samples of the products, technologies, mathematical models, projects, job applicants and others. We obtain clustered rankings which can be both with the help of experts and objective way, for example, by comparing the mathematical models with experimental data using a particular quality criterion. The method described in this article was developed in connection with the problems of chemical safety and environmental security of the biosphere. We propose a new method for constructing a clustered ranking which can be average (in the sense, discussed in this work for all clustered rankings under our consideration. Then the contradictions between the individual initial rankings are contained within clusters average (coordinated ranking. As a result, ordered clusters reflects the general opinion of the experts, more precisely, the total that is contained simultaneously in all the original rankings. Newly built clustered ranking is often called the matching (coordinated ranking with respect to the original clustered rankings. The clusters are enclosed objects about which some of the initial rankings are contradictory. For these objects is necessary to conduct the new studies. These studies can be formal mathematics (calculation of the Kemeny median, orderings by means of the averages and medians of ranks, etc. or these studies require involvement of new information from the relevant application area, it may be necessary conduct additional scientific research. In this article we introduce the necessary concepts and we formulate the new algorithm of construct the coordinated ranking for some cluster rankings in general terms, and its properties are discussed

  10. Experts on public trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blok, Anders

    2007-01-01

    case study of the May 2003 Danish consensus conference on environmental economics as a policy tool, the article reflects on the politics of expert authority permeating practices of public participation. Adopting concepts from the sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK), the conference is seen as...... opening up the "black box" of environmental economics, forcing economists into attempted justifications of their shared normative and methodological commitments. The failure of environmental economists to reflect on their social value positions is suggested as key to understanding their less...

  11. The naked experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an article critical of experts, the cases argued for and against nuclear power are discussed under the headings: environmental hazards arising from the nuclear fuel cycle; proliferation of nuclear weapons capabilities via expansion of the nuclear power industry; political and social threats and restraints of a nuclear society (terrorism, reduction in civil liberties, centralised political and economic power); economic and employment disadvantages of nuclear power; impact of uranium mining on (Australian) aboriginal culture; inadequacy of nuclear power as a solution to energy problems; advantages of a 'soft energy path' based around conservation and renewable energy technologies. (U.K.)

  12. Expert Oracle Exadata

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Randy

    2011-01-01

    Throughout history, advances in technology have come in spurts. A single great idea can often spur rapid change as the idea takes hold and is propagated, often in totally unexpected directions. Exadata embodies such a change in how we think about and manage relational databases. The key change lies in the concept of offloading SQL processing to the storage layer. That concept is a huge win, and its implementation in the form of Exadata is truly a game changer. Expert Oracle Exadata will give you a look under the covers at how the combination of hardware and software that comprise Exadata actua

  13. Assisting the Return to Normal Life in Chernobyl-Affected Regions: The International Chernobyl Research and Information Network (ICRIN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the International Chernobyl Research and Information Network (ICRIN) project, a programme designed to meet the priority information needs of communities in areas of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine which were affected by the 1986 nuclear accident. Its aim is to empower Chernobyl affected communities through targeted delivery of the most recent scientific information on the accident’s impacts, translated into practical advice, including recommendations on healthy lifestyles. Supported by a United Nations General Assembly resolution, the project is part of a broader effort by all United Nations agencies to help local communities return to normal life, under the United Nations Action Plan on Chernobyl to 2016. (author)

  14. 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. marine energy industry is actively pursuing development of offshore wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems. Experience in the wind energy sector demonstrates that new technology development requires thorough measurement and characterization of the environmental conditions prevalent at installation sites and of technology operating in the field. Presently, there are no turn-key instrumentation system solutions that meet the measurement needs of the marine energy industry. The 1st Advanced Marine Renewable Energy Instrumentation Experts Workshop brought together technical experts from government laboratories, academia, and industry representatives from marine energy, wind, offshore oil and gas, and instrumentation developers to present and discuss the instrumentation needs of the marine energy industry. The goals of the meeting were to: 1. Share the latest relevant knowledge among technical experts; 2. Review relevant state-of-the-art field measurement technologies and methods; 3. Review lessons learned from recent field deployments; 4. Identify synergies across different industries; 5. Identify gaps between existing and needed instrumentation capabilities; 6. Understand who are the leading experts; 7. Provide a forum where stakeholders from the marine energy industry could provide substantive input in the development of new marine energy field deployable instrumentation packages.

  15. Chernobyl: disinformation. 2000 dead in Chernobyl: they were made by journalists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having briefly recalled the scenario which resulted in the Chernobyl accident, the differences between the Chernobyl reactor and the French graphite-based reactors, and that some modifications have been introduced in the alarm system of the Bugey reactor, the author reviews the chronology of events and information after the accident. He recalls the Soviet way to deal with the information, states that the authorities did not immediately understand the severity of the accident. He notably outlines and comments a statement reporting that 2.000 people died just after the accident. Thus, it appears that both sides could be criticized, the Russian side for its slow reaction, and the Western side for disinformation. He also denounces a fake documentary report made by a French journalist (images pretended to have been taken in Chernobyl had been in fact shot in an Italian factory). He also evokes the reactions of people in front of this kind information about risks of exposure. He analyses the content of an article written by a French journalist who denounced some kinds of plots elaborated by oil companies, by the USSR, by anti-nuclear activists

  16. Chernobyl liquidators. The people and the doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyakov, Oleg V. [Gray Laboratory Cancer Research Trust, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (United Kingdom); Steinhaeusler, Friedrich [University of Salzburg, Institute of Physic and Biophysics, Salzburg (Austria); Trott, Klaus-Ruediger [Univ. of London, Queen Mary and Westfield College, St. Bartholomew' s and the Royal London Hospital School of Medicine and Dentistry, London (United Kingdom)

    2000-05-01

    This study is an attempt to evaluate the data available from the scientific literature concerning clean-up workers, or so-called liquidators, of the Chernobyl accident. There are several different definitions of liquidators: Legal definitions of 'liquidators'. Their importance rests on the fact that some state Chernobyl registers are based on these definitions. Definitions from various scientific reports. Definitions for the purpose, which have been published in scientific papers and books. The simplified definition of liquidators would be people who were directly involved in clean-up operations in the exclusion zone in 1986-1991. Estimations of the number of liquidators vary from 100 000 to 800 000 people. Four major cohorts of liquidators are now split among Russia (168,000 people), Belarus (63,500 people), Ukraine (123,536 people) and the Baltic States (about 15,000 people from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania). The definition of liquidator and the formation of cohort are the most critical factor in liquidator-related studies and not enough attention is paid to this matter by researchers. The term 'liquidator' describes a very heterogeneous group of people. Liquidators may be grouped according to work performed in the exclusion zone or affiliation to various organisations. The majority of liquidators in 1986-1987 were conscripts and reservists of the Soviet Union Army. According to data from Russian National Medical and Dosimetric Registry, 76% of liquidators were 25-39 years old at the moment of arrival to the Chernobyl area. Only about 1% of liquidators was women. From the results of biodosimetry we know that the average accumulated dose estimation for the liquidator group is about 0.2 Gy. The official documented average dose from the Russian National Medical Dosimetric Registry is 0.13 Gy. However, the liquidator group contains some overexposed subgroups with a higher accumulated dose. Individual dosimetry is only available for small

  17. Chernobyl liquidators. The people and the doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is an attempt to evaluate the data available from the scientific literature concerning clean-up workers, or so-called liquidators, of the Chernobyl accident. There are several different definitions of liquidators: Legal definitions of 'liquidators'. Their importance rests on the fact that some state Chernobyl registers are based on these definitions. Definitions from various scientific reports. Definitions for the purpose, which have been published in scientific papers and books. The simplified definition of liquidators would be people who were directly involved in clean-up operations in the exclusion zone in 1986-1991. Estimations of the number of liquidators vary from 100 000 to 800 000 people. Four major cohorts of liquidators are now split among Russia (168,000 people), Belarus (63,500 people), Ukraine (123,536 people) and the Baltic States (about 15,000 people from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania). The definition of liquidator and the formation of cohort are the most critical factor in liquidator-related studies and not enough attention is paid to this matter by researchers. The term 'liquidator' describes a very heterogeneous group of people. Liquidators may be grouped according to work performed in the exclusion zone or affiliation to various organisations. The majority of liquidators in 1986-1987 were conscripts and reservists of the Soviet Union Army. According to data from Russian National Medical and Dosimetric Registry, 76% of liquidators were 25-39 years old at the moment of arrival to the Chernobyl area. Only about 1% of liquidators was women. From the results of biodosimetry we know that the average accumulated dose estimation for the liquidator group is about 0.2 Gy. The official documented average dose from the Russian National Medical Dosimetric Registry is 0.13 Gy. However, the liquidator group contains some overexposed subgroups with a higher accumulated dose. Individual dosimetry is only available for small subgroups of liquidators

  18. Studies of Cancer Risk among Chernobyl liquidators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesminiene, A.; Cardis, E.; Tenet, V.; Chekin, S.; Ivanov, V. K.; Kurtinaitis, J.; Malakhova, I.; Polyakov, S.; Stengrevics, A.; Tekkel, M.

    2004-07-01

    Two cae-control studies among Chernobyl liquidators- one of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), the other of thyroid cancer risk were carried out in Belarus, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Russia. These studies were coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The specific objective of these studies was to estimate the radiation induced risk of these diseases among liquidators of the Chernobyl accident, and, in particular, to study the effect of exposure protraction and radiation type on the risk of radiation induced cancer in the low to medium (0-500 mSv) radiation dose range. The study population consisted of the approximately 15.000 Baltic countries, 66 000 Balarus and 65 000 Russian liquidators who worked in the 30 km zone in 1986-1987, and who were registered in the Chernobyl registry of these countries. The studies included cases diagnosed in 1993-1998 for all countries but Belarus, where the study period was extended until 2000. for controls were selected in each country from the national cohort for each case, mateched on age, gender and region of residence. Information on study subjects was obtained through face-to-face interview using a standardised questionnaire with questions on demographic factors, time place and conditions of work as a liquidator and potential risk and confoundinf factors for the tumours of interest. Ocerall 126 cases of leukaemia and NHL, 119 cases of thyroid cancer and 1060 controls were interviewed. Individual estimates of kerma in air and of dose to the bone marrow and related uncertainties were derived for each subject in the leukaemia and NHL study, using a method of analytical dose reconstruction developed whiting the study. Estimates of individual doses to the thyroid from external exposures, I-131 and long-lived isotopes were derived for all subjects in the thyroid case-control study. Dose-response analyses have been carried out. Resulting risk estimates will be presented and compared to risk estimates

  19. Studies of Cancer Risk among Chernobyl liquidators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cae-control studies among Chernobyl liquidators- one of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), the other of thyroid cancer risk were carried out in Belarus, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Russia. These studies were coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The specific objective of these studies was to estimate the radiation induced risk of these diseases among liquidators of the Chernobyl accident, and, in particular, to study the effect of exposure protraction and radiation type on the risk of radiation induced cancer in the low to medium (0-500 mSv) radiation dose range. The study population consisted of the approximately 15.000 Baltic countries, 66 000 Balarus and 65 000 Russian liquidators who worked in the 30 km zone in 1986-1987, and who were registered in the Chernobyl registry of these countries. The studies included cases diagnosed in 1993-1998 for all countries but Belarus, where the study period was extended until 2000. for controls were selected in each country from the national cohort for each case, mateched on age, gender and region of residence. Information on study subjects was obtained through face-to-face interview using a standardised questionnaire with questions on demographic factors, time place and conditions of work as a liquidator and potential risk and confoundinf factors for the tumours of interest. Ocerall 126 cases of leukaemia and NHL, 119 cases of thyroid cancer and 1060 controls were interviewed. Individual estimates of kerma in air and of dose to the bone marrow and related uncertainties were derived for each subject in the leukaemia and NHL study, using a method of analytical dose reconstruction developed whiting the study. Estimates of individual doses to the thyroid from external exposures, I-131 and long-lived isotopes were derived for all subjects in the thyroid case-control study. Dose-response analyses have been carried out. Resulting risk estimates will be presented and compared to risk estimates

  20. Interactions between scientific experts and lay public in implementation of nuclear waste management goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agreement by experts on the risks of a technology is not to be expected, since future results are necessarily uncertain. Access to relevant information and analysis is necessary for effective participation of interested parties. The goal of making good decisions on waste management can be reached if the following are done: open policy discussions, involvement of other institutions, outside reviews of major policy analysis, public forums, continuing regulation/control, institutions outside the government, etc

  1. How experts gain influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikes, Anette; Hall, Matthew; Millo, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    In theory, the risk management groups of two British banks--Saxon and Anglo--had the same influence in their organizations. But in practice, they did not: Saxon's was engaged in critical work throughout the bank, while Anglo's had little visibility outside its areas of expertise. In their study of these two financial institutions, the authors identified four competencies--trailblazing, toolmaking, teamwork, and translation--that help functional leaders or groups compete for top management's limited attention and increase their impact. Anglo's risk managers were strong in only some of the competencies, but Saxon's were strong in all four. They consistently scanned the internal and external environment for important issues to which they could apply a risk management perspective (trailblazing) and then developed tools--such as quarterly risk reports--that spread their expertise (toolmaking). While controlling the tools' design and implementation, the risk managers incorporated business managers' insights (teamwork) and made sure everyone could understand the findings (translation). Ultimately, experts' roles must fit the organization's strategy and structural needs. In some situations, functional experts can raise their profile by cultivating just two of the competencies. But those who are strong in all four are likely to be the most influential. PMID:24730171

  2. Medical cooperative projects. From Nagasaki to Chernobyl and Semipalatinsk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years, Nagasaki University, particularly the Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, has been engaged in research regarding the late health effects of radiation exposure in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. Since 1991, we have participated in several Chernobyl projects including the Chernobyl Sasakawa Medical Cooperation Project which demonstrated a marked increase in the incidence of childhood thyroid cancer around Chernobyl, especially in the Gomel region, Belarus. Furthermore, we have performed both fieldwork and research to clarify the late effects of radiation exposure around Semipalatinsk Nuclear Testing Site and participated in bilateral official medical assistance projects between Japan and Kazakhstan to strengthen the medical infrastructure in this area. Through these humanitarian and scientific projects, we have been collaborating closely with our counterparts in the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) for the past 15 years. Here, we present a brief review of our past activities and future directions of international cooperative radiation research from Nagasaki to Chernobyl and Semipalatinsk. (author)

  3. Chernobyl: four years later: attitudes, risk management and communication

    OpenAIRE

    Pligt, van der, J.; Midden, C.H.J.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the impact that the nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl has had on risk management and risk communication in relation to risk perception; decisions and coping with uncertainty; and public opinion, personal attitudes, and public policy.

  4. A perspective view of industrial disasters: (was Chernobyl the worst?)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper surveys past industrial disasters and answers the question: ''was Chernobyl the worst?''. The disasters with which Chernobyl is compared are: Oppau, Germany (1921), Cleveland, U.S.A. (1944), Lugwigshafen (1948), Aberfan, U.K. (1966), Seveso, Italy (1976), Three Mile Island, U.S.A., (1979), Mississauga, Canada (1979), Mexico City, Mexico (1984), Bhopal, India (1984) and Basle, Switzerland (1986). Immediate fatalities as a measure of disaster, delayed fatalities, physical injuries as a measure, individual and societal shock, long term public anxiety, disruption of way of life, environmental damage, and property damage and other financial loss, are all discussed. The survey shows that if dominant criteria are those of death and injury then Chernobyl was not the worst. However, if environmental damage, financial loss, creation of public anxiety and disruption of way of life were dominant criteria, then Chernobyl could be rated the worst. (UK)

  5. Chernobyl: Endless horror. Late effects of the reactor catastrophe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten years after the accident, the people of Chernobyl are trying to live a normal life, but the problems resulting from the catastrophe have not been solved. Some of them are just starting to emerge. (orig.)

  6. London forum targets Africa's cancer crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Africa stands on the brink of a cancer epidemic, with more than a million new cases a year by 2020. Raising awareness of the threat is one of the biggest challenges facing the global health community today. Finding solutions is an even greater one. The University of Oxford's Africa-Oxford Cancer Consortium (AfrOx), together with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), is assembling some of the world's most prominent cancer experts and policymakers in London, UK, on 10-11 May, 2007, to take up the challenge. Cancer care services in Africa are desperately limited. Life-saving radiotherapy, which is used effectively on more than 50% of cancer patients in the developed world, is available in only 21 of Africa's 53 countries, or to less than 20% of the total population. Lack of resources and basic infrastructure mean that millions of people have no access to cancer screening, early diagnosis, treatment or palliative care. Moreover, nearly 45% of cancer deaths in Africa are due to rampant viral infection, poor nutrition and widespread tobacco use. 'Many lives in Africa could be saved through prevention strategies and investments in comprehensive cancer control,' says Massoud Samiei, Head of the IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT). 'PACT seeks to mobilize new resources and enable African countries to expand radiotherapy and cancer care in a sustainable manner.' The Cancer Control in Africa meeting will focus on Africa's deepening cancer crisis and develop strategies for much-needed national cancer control programmes. It will also act as a forum for cancer experts and health policymakers to evaluate priorities, guided by needs and available resources. By holding the meeting in London, the organizers hope to place the African problem at the forefront of the global health agenda and to enlist support and new funding from European governments to fight cancer in Africa through joint international programmes. 'We have a timely opportunity to

  7. London forum targets Africa's cancer crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Africa stands on the brink of a cancer epidemic, with more than a million new cases a year by 2020. Raising awareness of the threat is one of the biggest challenges facing the global health community today. Finding solutions is an even greater one. The University of Oxford's Africa-Oxford Cancer Consortium (AfrOx), together with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), is assembling some of the world's most prominent cancer experts and policymakers in London, UK, on 10-11 May, 2007, to take up the challenge. Cancer care services in Africa are desperately limited. Life-saving radiotherapy, which is used effectively on more than 50% of cancer patients in the developed world, is available in only 21 of Africa's 53 countries, or to less than 20% of the total population. Lack of resources and basic infrastructure mean that millions of people have no access to cancer screening, early diagnosis, treatment or palliative care. Moreover, nearly 45% of cancer deaths in Africa are due to rampant viral infection, poor nutrition and widespread tobacco use. 'Many lives in Africa could be saved through prevention strategies and investments in comprehensive cancer control,' says Massoud Samiei, Head of the IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT). 'PACT seeks to mobilize new resources and enable African countries to expand radiotherapy and cancer care in a sustainable manner.' The Cancer Control in Africa meeting will focus on Africa's deepening cancer crisis and develop strategies for much-needed national cancer control programmes. It will also act as a forum for cancer experts and health policymakers to evaluate priorities, guided by needs and available resources. By holding the meeting in London, the organizers hope to place the African problem at the forefront of the global health agenda and to enlist support and new funding from European governments to fight cancer in Africa through joint international programmes. 'We have a timely opportunity to

  8. About Chernobyl - Twenty Years Later; Propos sur Tchernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tubiana, M

    2006-07-01

    The author discusses the reactor accident of Chernobyl, the information on its consequences so contradictory in the former USSR countries, the status of the effects observed, the forecasting concerning the onset of cancers in the coming years among the populations that were exposed to radiations, the public opinion facing the pessimists. He concludes on the lessons which can be drawn from Chernobyl. (A.L.B.)

  9. Health consequences of Chernobyl. 25 years after the reactor catastrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is an evaluation of studies indicating health effects as a consequence of the reactor catastrophe in Chernobyl. The most exposed population include the cleaning personnel (liquidators), the population evacuated from the 30 km zone, the populations in highly contaminated regions in Russia, Belarus and Ukraine, the European population in lass contaminated regions. The following issues are discussed: the liquidators, infant mortality, genetic and teratogenic damages, thyroid carcinoma and other thyroid diseases, carcinogenic diseases and leukemia, other diseases following the Chernobyl catastrophe.

  10. The Impact of Chernobyl on Health and Labour Market Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmut Lehmann; Jonathan Wadsworth

    2011-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from Ukraine we examine the extent of any long-lasting effects of radiation exposure from the Chernobyl disaster on the health and labour market performance of the adult workforce. The variation in the local area level of radiation fallout from the Chernobyl accident is considered as a random exogenous shock with which to try to establish its causal impact on poor health, labour force participation, hours worked and wages. There appears to be a significant positive ass...

  11. Chernobyl as viewed from the 90's [videorecording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is admitted in this film that after the Chernobyl accident there was a lot of unnecessary secrecy which created a great deal of confusion among the public. The film shows the investigations within the reactor and the efforts undertaken to put the remnants of the reactor into a safe state, including the construction of the sarcophagus which was built around it. The film also presents the radiological environmental monitoring, as well as the health aspects of Chernobyl

  12. Chernobyl and the safety of nuclear reactors in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report assesses the possible bearing of the Chernobyl accident on the safety of nuclear reactors in OECD countries. It discusses analyses of the accident performed in several countries as well as improvements to the safety of RBMK reactors announced by the USSR. Several remaining questions are identified. The report compares RBMK safety features with those of commercial reactors in OECD countries and evaluates a number of issues raised by the Chernobyl accident

  13. The Chernobyl catastrophe is the most terrible civil nuclear incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The 4th nuclear reactor of the Chernobyl NPP exploded on 26 April 1986, 20 years ago. It's the most terrible nuclear civil accident of all times. The consequences of the Chernobyl accident led to contamination of 3,1 million ha of arable land, 1,5 million ha of natural pasture land, 3,5 million ha of forests and changed the lifestyle for millions of people in Belarus, Ukraine and Russia. It is well known that the mortality in the contaminated areas (infant mortality by cancer) drastically increased. The Chernobyl catastrophe is presented , such as a sad example for humanity, a complex political international, economical, social and, particular, ecological problem according to the traditional and new studies for the development of the nucleotide contaminated territories: 1. Financing of safety of stopped working 4th nuclear reactor (security of covering system) and of work another 3 blocks at the Chernobyl NPP. Detailed control of international financial support for guarantee the safety, security of the Chernobyl NPP and sustainable development for rehabilitation of the affected zones and people. 2. It should be marked increase in medical, demographic analysis and in social, economical protection of the people in the contaminated areas. 3. Analysis and synthesis, monitoring of the long-time data results due to environmental, ecological, social and political consequences of the Chernobyl disaster. 4. Protection from the possible terrorist (extra) actions and (inter) damage or incident function of the Chernobyl plant, such as an old generation nuclear power. 5. Planned budget for future studies in the affected territories and flexibility actually realization of budget (State and International). 6. Nuclear refuse and aria/water protection in the Ukraine, Belarus and Russia contaminated zones. 7. Risk evaluation of not good function of NPPs which are situated in Russia, Ukraine and in another places (always remembering that the Chernobyl catastrophe is the

  14. Mental health of liquidators of the Chernobyl disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of our study was to characterize the clinical and psychological aspects of the Chernobyl disaster-related mental disorders. We evaluated both clinically and psychologically four hundred and fifty patients who were exposed to low doses of radiation resulting from the Chernobyl disaster. They did not suffer from radiation sickness. The investigations started four years after the catastrophe took place in 1990 and continue to the present day. (orig.)

  15. After the Chernobyl reactor accident: Just got away?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feeling of depression and insecurity experienced immediately after the Chernobyl reactor accident has gone by, and people go out for a walk again, and drink their milk. Are we happily aware we got away with it this time, or is it rather a feeling of resignation that makes us return to normal life? The Chernobyl disaster will only after some time be really assessed in its novel, global dimension. (orig.)

  16. The consequences of the Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the decay of the iodine isotopes the measuring campaigns, in addition to the measuring of soil pollution and pollution of products, concentrated on the way of the cesium isotopes through the food chain, especially in crops, milk, meat and mother's milk. A special programme was developed for the analysis of foreign basic substances for teas, essences and tinctures. In connection with the incorporation measurements in the university hospital Eppendorf the measurement campaigns provided the data material in order to calculate with the aid of the computer program ECOSYS of the GSF the effective dose equivalent which the inhabitants of Hamburg additionally take up due to the accident of Chernobyl. Consequences with regard to measuring methods and social consequences are mentioned. (DG)

  17. Impact on London of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation levels in London following the Chernobyl accident have been measured and are reported. The sampling programme of atmospheric dusts, water and milk is detailed. A few other items, eg food and ships arriving at Tilbury and Sheerness were also tested. The counting techniques are given. The results show that at its peak the additional activity contributed by the inhalation of the debris probably increased the radiation dose to an individual in London by about 40% of the natural dose for that period. The increased activity in milk gave rise to an additional dose and may continue to do so. However, the radioactive debris from the fallout was much less in London than other parts of the UK. (U.K.)

  18. Health protection measures after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article describes the nutritional measures introduced to protect health after the Chernobyl accident, and the associated costs. The toal value of the reindeer meat, mutton, lamb and goat meat saved as a result of such measures in 1987 amounted to approx. NOK 250 million. The measures cost approx. NOK 60 million. The resulting reduction in the radiation dose level to which the population was exposed was 450 manSv. In 1988, mutton/lamb and goat meat valued at approx. NOK 310 million was saved from contamination by similar measures, which cost approx. NOK 50 million. The resulting dose level reduction was approx. 200 manSv. The relationship (cost/benefit ratio) between the overall cost of the measures taken to reduce radioactivity levels in food and the dose level reduction achieved was acceptable. 11 refs

  19. Spa treatment of Chernobyl liquidators in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the first experience gained in the use of the unique climate and spa of the Dead Sea for the treatment and rehabilitation of the Chernobyl liquidators at clinic near the city of Arad. Ninety-six patients were treated in Israel, in 40 of these radiation was the etiological factor of the disease: consequences of acute and chronic radiation disease, the astheno-neurotic syndrome, discirculatory encephalopathy, subatrophic laryngopharyngitis, and obstructive bronchitis. Eighty-eight patients had direct indications for treatment at the Dad Sea; locomotory, respiratory, and skin diseases. The course of treatment included the Dad Sea baths, mud applications, sun baths, climatotherapy, physiotherapy, massage, bioenergy therapy, inhalations, moisturizing creams, etc. An appreciable improvement with resolution of the principal symptoms was attained in 82% of patients, in 13% improvement with a significant abatement of the symptoms was achieved, whereas in 5% no apparent results were seen

  20. Global impact of the Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive material was deposited throughout the Northern Hemisphere as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station on 26 April 1986. On the basis of a large amount of environmental data and new integrated dose assessment and risk models, the collective dose commitment to the approximately 3 billion inhabitants is calculated to be 930,000 person-gray, with 97% in the western Soviet Union and Europe. The best estimates for the lifetime expectation of fatal radiogenic cancer would increase the risk from 0 to 0.02% in Europe and 0 to 0.003% in the Northern Hemisphere. By means of an integration of the environmental data, it is estimated that approximately 100 petabecquerels of cesium-137 (1 PBq = 10(15) Bq) were released during and subsequent to the accident

  1. Medical demographic consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A demographic study was made of the population evacuated from the 30-km zone around the nuclear power plant and of the population living in areas over which the radioactive cloud passed and over which the plume was formed. For the farmers evacuated from 11,655 homes in the Chernobyl region, 7,000 new houses, built in the Kiev region, had already been provided within 5 months of the accident, and by the summer of 1987 another 5,000 houses were available. A study of the resettlement of the population carried out a year after the accident showed that more than 60% of those evacuated continued to live in the regions from which the evacuation had taken place; about 5% were resettled in other republics, and 20% within their own republic. (author). 7 figs, 2 tabs

  2. Challenger and Chernobyl: lessons and reflections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary cause of the Challenger accident was the failure of O-ring seals in the solid rocket booster, a subcomponent which had been known to be faulty for some time. When Hans Mark was the most senior engineering member of the NASA management executive team, he had asked for a complete review of these subcomponents; this was not done. The accident to the Chernobyl atomic reactor has not been publicly analyzed to the same extent as the Challenger explosion, and hence there must remain some speculation as to the detailed sequence of events. The lessons from both accidents are clear: faulty human understanding the the equipment and the lack of education, training and discipline were critical. The authors conclude that the Shuttle will fly again soon, and that political problems in the Soviet Union may be great and may force some changes. (author)

  3. Chernobyl: Symptom of a worrying psychological epidemic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl psychological epidemic was already latent well prior to 1986 fully broke out after the accident, and continues to spread. It must be halted. But how can we counter a belief which has taken on the appearance of reality. It is the unknown, linked to alarming symbols, which sustains fear. To get beyond this state, radioactivity, ionizing radiation and nuclear energy have to become as ordinary as air travel and electronic calculators. In a climate of confidence and openness, it should be possible to successfully communicate several solid scientific reference points by first targeting teachers, doctors, and journalists. Thirty years ago, nuclear energy was presented as a universal panacea (clean, safe, and renewable). Now things have swung to the other extreme, and it is presented as diabolical. We have shifted from a symbolically white level to a symbolically black level, and both are misleading. It is high time to rejoin the world of facts, a world full of shades of gray

  4. Public relations and the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1991-1993, a large-scale measuring programme was carried out in Germany to assess the radiation burden of the population in regions polluted due to the Chernobyl accident. The primary goal was to objectively inform the population about their actual radiation exposure, to reduce unjustified fears, and to enable countermeasures to be taken where appropriate. A comprehensive overview of the radiation situation was thus also obtained in the regions examined. Channels were sought and found in order to communicate with the more than 250 000 individuals involved in the programme as well as with scientific institutions and the public. Direct communication of the results to the persons examined by means of a certificate including a short explanation proved to be essential to create an atmosphere of trust. (P.A.)

  5. Radiocaesium from Chernobyl in Swedish moose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 137Cs activity concentrations of muscle samples taken from moose collected from the central part of Sweden were determined. Pre-Chernobyl samples had a mean 137Cs activity concentration of 23 Bq kg−1. Samples collected during the hunting season (mainly October) had, on average, 760 Bq kg−1 in 1986 and 664 Bq kg−1 in 1987. No significant differences between various muscles (neck, thigh and leg) could be seen. The correlation between ground deposition of 137Cs and activity concentration in moose muscle was significant. There seems, however, to be other important parameters. One is the percentage of farmland within the home range of the moose—less farmland gives higher 137Cs activity concentrations

  6. Radiological consequences of the Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor accident at unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine has deeply affected the living conditions of millions of people. Especially the health consequences have been of public concern up to the present and also been the subject of sometimes absurd claims. The current knowledge on the radiological consequences of the accident is reviewed. Though an increased hazard for some risk groups with high radiation exposure, e.g., liquidators, still cannot be totally excluded for the future, the majority of the population shows no statistically significant indication of radiation-induced illnesses. The contribution of the Research Center Juelich to the assessment of the post-accidental situation and psychological relief of the population is reported. The population groups still requiring special attention include, in particular, children growing up in highly contaminated regions and the liquidators of the years 1986 and 1987 deployed immediately after the accident. (author)

  7. Chernobyl and consequences for the Soviet agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The region within a radius of 30 km around the Chernobyl reactor was declared a safety zone, from where people and livestock were evacuated. In this zone agricultural activities were stopped temporarily. The losses to Soviet agriculture are surprinsingly low, the reason being that in the Soviet Union radioactivity hazards are rated differently than in western countries. The Soviet radiation protection standards for man are accordingly. They allow a total body burden of 500 mrem a year, and a thyroid burden for children of 30 mrem. It is obvious that the authorities keep the quantitative losses for agriculture down. Of greater consequence could be the qualitative losses in so far as the soil of a large area will be contaminated on a long-term basis, radioactive contaminated crops have been and will continue to be harvested and fed, and contaminated food is and will be eaten. (orig./HSCH)

  8. Observations on radioactivity from the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary study of radioactivity from the Chernobyl accident for the Department of the Environment was started in June 1986 which involved taking on an opportunistic basis, samples of air, rain, grass and soil in the UK. This study was integrated into a programme of other investigations funded by the Departments of Health and Social Security and of Energy including measurements on people, in air, deposition and soil overseas, on deposition to buildings and the derivation where possible of parameters of interest in accident assessment. This report is a comprehensive account of all these initial investigations and presented in fulfilment of the Preliminary Study under DoE contract PECD 7/9/359. (author)

  9. Fuel particles still dominate the Chernobyl scene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uniqueness of the Chernobyl accident in 1986 from an environmental perspective lay in the fact that so much radioactive material was discharged to atmosphere in the form of solid particles of fuel ('hot particles'). Intact fuel particles can still be found on land in Belarus and Ukraine even ten years after the accident. On undisturbed land, there has been little downward migration and most of the particles and radionuclides leached from them are still within about 5 cm of the soil surface. For a given level of deposition, the soil-to-plant transfer on particle-contaminated land has apparently been less than where the radionuclides came from weapons fallout or were applied in aqueous solutions in controlled experiments. Soon after the accident, it was shown that radioisotopes of cesium and strontium would be leached at similar rates. However, the strontium would become increasingly available for root-uptake, but, on most soils, the cesium would be rapidly 'fixed' and its availability for root-uptake by plants would be limited. This indeed has proved to be the case. 137Cs levels in grass and arable crops have remained roughly constant since about 1990, but 90Sr levels have shown a consistent yearly increase. The presence of fuel particles on land inside a 30 km restriction zone around Chernobyl site will be a major consideration in any planning of land reclamation. Even beyond the 30 km zone, the presence of fuel particles is an important factor to consider in radioecological research, environmental monitoring, and remediation. (author) 2 tabs., 25 refs

  10. Editorial: Thyroid cancer and the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident at the Chernobyl power station nearly 10 years ago was unprecedented in the exposure of a very large population to high levels of fallout including high levels of isotopes of iodine, predominantly 131I. An increase in incidence of childhood thyroid cancer was first observed in 1990 in Belarus and in the Ukraine, and the first reports in the Western literature were published in 1992. At a symposium in Nagasaki in June 1994, the numbers of cases that had occurred between 1990 and 1993 in Belarus, a country with a population of just over 10 million, was reported to be 233, and in the heavily contaminated northern parts of the Ukraine, with a population of about 7 million, 36 cases occurred in the same period. To put these figures into perspective, the number of childhood thyroid cancers registered in England and Wales over a 30-year period was 154, an average of 5 cases per yr in a population of 50 million people, with about 10 million children under 15 yr of age. The initial reports of such a great increase in childhood thyroid cancers in the areas exposed to fallout from Chernobyl were at first greeted in the West with some skepticism. The latent period between exposure and development of thyroid cancer was surprisingly short, based on experience with thyroid carcinomas developing after external radiation to the neck. The reliability of the figures based on the pathological diagnosis was questioned because the cases had not been confirmed by Western pathologists, and because the known high frequency of papillary microcarcinoms in adults raised the possibility that the reported incidence was resulted form increased ascertainment and not a true increase in incidence. 14 refs

  11. The reconstruction of thyroid dose following Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents the overview of several approaches in working out the methods of thyroid internal dose reconstruction following Chernobyl. One of these approaches was developed (IBPh, Moscow; MRRC, Obninsk; IRM, Minsk) using the correlations between the mean dose calculation based on I131 thyroid content measurements and Cs137 contamination of territories. The available data on I131 soil contamination were taken into account. The lack of data on I131 soil contamination was supposed to be compensated by I129 measurements in soil samples from contaminated territories. The semiempiric model was developed for dose reconstruction. The comparison of the results obtained by semiempiric model and empirical values are presented. The estimated values of average dose according semiempiric model were used for individual dose reconstruction. The IRH (St.-Petersburg) has developed the following method for individual dose reconstruction: correlation between the total I131 radioiodine incorporation in thyroid and whole body Cs137 content during first months after accident. The individual dose reconstruction is also mentioned to be performed using the data on individual milk consumption during first weeks after accident. For evaluation of average doses it is suggested to use the linear correlation: thyroid dose values based on radioiodine thyroid measurements vs Cs137 contamination, air kerma rate, mean I131 concentration in the milk. The method for retrospective reconstruction of thyroid dose caused by short-living iodine nuclides released after the Chernobyl accident has been developed by Research Centre, Juelich, Germany. It is based on the constant ratio that these nuclides have with the long-living I129. The contamination of soil samples by this nuclide can be used to assess thyroid doses. First results of I129 contamination values and derived thyroid doses are to be presented

  12. The Chernobyl accident ten years later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On April 26, 1986 at 1:23 AM a fire and explosion occurred at the fourth unit of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Complex, located in the Ukraine, that resulted in the destruction of the reactor core and most of the building in which it was housed. Several environmental impacts resulting from the accident will be discussed in this paper, which will include the effects on plant and wild life, radioactive waste generated and stored or disposed of, effects of evacuations relating to residents within the subsequently established 10km and 30km control zones, impacts of the emergency containment structure (sarcophagus), and potential effects on world opinion and future development of nuclear power. As an immediate result of the fire, 31 people died (2 from the fire ampersand smoke, and 29 from excessive radiation); 237 cases of acute radiation sickness occurred; the total fatalities based upon induced chronic diseases as a result of the accident is unknown: more than 100,000 people were evacuated from within the subsequently established 30 km control zone; in excess of 50 million curies of radionuclides that included finely dispersed nuclear fuel, fragments of graphite, concrete and other building materials were released from the reactor into the environment; an estimated one million cubic meters of radioactive waste were generated (LLW, ILW, HLW); more than 5000 tons of materials (sand, boron, dolomite, cement, and lead) were used to put the fire out by helicopter; shutdown of the adjacent power plants were performed; and other environmental impacts occurred. The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit No 4 is an RBMK-1000. It initiated operations in 1983, it was a 1000 MWe with a power output of 3200 MW(th), the reactor core contained 190 MT of fuel, with 1659 assemblies (plus 211 control rods), the average burnup rate was 10.3 MWd/kg, and the reactor operated on a continuous basis with maintenance and fuel reload performed during operations

  13. Chernobyl caesium distribution in two forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl nuclear accident on April 26, 1986 affected a considerable part of Europe, including the Romanian territory too. The soil acts as an integrator and the main part of the received radionuclides remains here. However, due to diffusion, leaching and runoff, activity of living organisms in soil, human activity and different other factors, the deposited radionuclides on the soil surface can be removed from the original deposition areas. Mainly, the transport of Cs-137 from soil to other environmental factors is intensively studied having in view the natural resource exploitation in radioactive contaminated areas, this radionuclide being one of the most important radioisotopes released by earlier nuclear weapon tests and nuclear accidents. Generally, migration rates of radionuclides in soil are evaluated by column and percolation experiments, in controlled conditions and using well-defined concentrations of the radionuclide. As part of the environment, the forests have been contaminated up to a depth of 30 cm by the radionuclides resulting from Chernobyl nuclear accident. As the forest is a source of radionuclides for intake and habitat for some critical groups and also a secondary source of contamination (resuspension, erosion), its radioecology became an increasing research topic. The depth distribution of radiocaesium was analysed in the brown-reddish forest type soil of two forests. The depth profile and the specific activity of each layer permit the assessment of total deposition, migration rate and diffusion coefficient for Cs-137 and Cs-134. The total deposition of Cs-137 is about 47 kBq/m2 for Magurele area and about 14 kBq/m2 for Naipu forest. The migration rate is more than 10 times higher in Naipu forest as compared to Magurele forest. The diffusion coefficients are similar, namely about 0.2 cm2/year. (authors)

  14. The Eurosafe Forum 2003: Nuclear expertise and challenges of the enlargement of the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EUROSAFE is an international forum for discussions among experts from technical safety organisations, research institutes, safety authorities, utilities, the industry, public authorities and non-governmental organisations concerning the status of and recent achievements in nuclear installation safety, waste management, radiation safety and nuclear material security. The Eurosafe Forum 2003 - the fifth of its kind - was held at the Palais Brongniart in Paris on November 25 and 26, 2003. This year's theme was: 'Nuclear expertise and challenges of the enlargement of the European Union: speakers in the various European countries about the environmental scan before enlargement, development and structuring perspectives within the enlarged Europe'. The event brought together 445 experts and researchers from around the world (including 124 from Germany, 184 from France, 88 from Eastern Europe, as well as representatives from Korea, Japan, the United States, Canada, Cuba, and Armenia. The proceedings of the symposium can now be consulted online. The fifth edition of the forum focused on nuclear expertise and the challenge of EU-enlargement and the latest work carried out by GRS, IRSN and their partners from the European Union, Switzerland and Eastern Europe. Nuclear energy contributes approximately one third of European electricity production. A high level of nuclear safety is a priority for the countries of Europe. The technical safety organisations play an important role in contributing to that objective through appropriate approaches to major safety issues as part of their assessments and research activities. The challenges to nuclear safety are increasingly international. Changes in underlying technologies such as instrumentation and control, the impact of electricity market deregulation, demands for improved safety, the ageing of nuclear facilities, waste management, maintaining and improving scientific and technical knowledge and the need for greater transparency

  15. Let the Experts Decide?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morton, Rebecca; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    We examine abstention when voters in standing committees are asymmetrically informed and there are multiple pure strategy equilibria-swing voter's curse (SVC) equilibria where voters with low quality information abstain and equilibria when all participants vote their information. When the asymmetry...... in information quality is large, we find that voting groups largely coordinate on the SVC equilibrium which is also Pareto Optimal. However, we find that when the asymmetry in information quality is not large and the Pareto Optimal equilibrium is for all to participate, significant numbers of voters...... with low quality information abstain. Furthermore, we find that information asymmetry induces voters with low quality information to coordinate on a non-equilibrium outcome. This suggests that coordination on "letting the experts" decide is a likely voting norm that sometimes validates SVC equilibrium...

  16. Expert system rheometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiul Amin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Inks, drilling fluids, shower gels and drug delivery vehicles are just a few examples of the many industrial and consumer products based on colloidal and nanostructured complex fluids. The successful formulation of these materials is promoted by understanding how rheological behaviour, which typically dictates performance, relates to underlying microstructure. However, this knowledge can be difficult to obtain for those without the necessary expertise. This article shows how recent developments in rheometer technology address this issue. New rheometers, exemplified by the Kinexus from Malvern have expert knowledge embedded within the instrument and are able to guide users through measurement and data analysis to relevant information. Such systems facilitate development of the design rules to optimize formulations and generate novel and high performance materials of the future.

  17. Expert system driven software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using large finite element analysis codes for heat transfer computations and for stresses and displacements under thermal loads computations are not always very simple because of the complexity of the problems and the number of domains involved. Often faulty results from computations are being used until an expert discovers that something was wrong in the simulation. As a result of recent advances in artificial intelligence techniques, solutions to these problems are now possible by making use of knowledge based systems in which expertise in several domains can easily be introduced. In this paper, we present an application of knowledge based systems for a finite element analysis code in heat transfer. The system is fairly general, and we think that application to any well structured numerical code should be straightforward. (orig.)

  18. How best to utilize the experience of the expedition to 30-km Chernobyl exclusion zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The only Hungarian nuclear power plant (Paks NPP) generates about 40 percent of the electrical energy of Hungary. Taking into consideration the designed lifetime, the four units should be shut down between 2012 and 2017. To extend operation of the units with twenty years can be considered as the especially important part of the life-time management. In terms of life-time extension, beside technical issues and nuclear safety, the public acceptance plays a very decisive role. The Chernobyl accident had serious impact on the public; therefore, enhancing the public confidence is a main task in respect of the future of nuclear energy. The Hungarian Nuclear Society (HNS) and the Hungarian Young Generation Network (YGN), which operates within the framework of HNS, has been put already a lot of effort into it. Between 28th of May and 4th of June, 2005, under the organization of the Hungarian Nuclear Society, a scientific expedition visited the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site and the surrounding exclusion zone. Most of the participants were young Hungarian nuclear experts under the leading of more experienced colleagues. The main goals of the expedition were the followings: Getting own experiences in a direct way about the actual condition of the Chernobyl Power Plant and the contamination and the dose level of its surroundings; Gathering information about the condition of the shelter built above the damaged 4th unit; Further education of young nuclear experts by performing field measurements; Communicating to the public on our experience and consequences of the accident by utilizing our authentic measurements. The Hungarian expedition successfully achieved its objectives performing wide-ranged environmental and dosimetric measurements and collecting numerous biological and soil samples. The analysis of samples has been started immediately in the International Chernobyl Center in Slavutich. The dosimetric measurements showed that no considerable exposure of

  19. Expert system in PNC, 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer code system which can evaluate the mass balance and cycle cost in nuclear fuel cycle has been developing a PNC using an artificial intelligence technique. This system is composed of the expert system, data base and analysis codes. The expert system is the most important one in the system and the content of the expert system is explained in this paper. The expert system has the three functions. The first is the function of understanding the meaning of user's questions by natural language, the second is the function of selecting the best way to solve the problem given by the user using the knowledge which is already installed in the system, and the last is the function of answering the questions. The knowledge of the experts installed in the expert system is represented by the frame-type rules. Therefore, the knowledge will be simply added to the system, and consequently the system will be easily extended. (author)

  20. Chernobyl, 13 years after; Tchernobyl, 13 ans apres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regniault-Lacharme, Mireille; Metivier, Henri [Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, CEA Centre d' Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France)

    1999-04-01

    This is an annual report, regularly issued by IPSN, that presents the ecological and health consequences of the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident. The present status of the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant, which Ukraine engaged to stop definitively in year 2000, is summarized. The only reactor unit now in operation is Chernobylsk-3 Reactor which poses two safety questions: evolution of cracks in part of the tubing and behaviour of the pressure tubes. Although, some improvements in the RBMK reactor types were introduced, problems remain that make IPSN to stress the requirement of stopping this NPP completely. In the contaminated territories surrounding Chernobyl incidence rate of infant thyroid cancers continues to grow, reaching values 10 to 100 times higher than the natural rate. In France the IPSN analyzed 60,000 records carried out in 17 sites during May 1986 and April 1989. It was estimated that the individual dose received during 60 years (1986-2046) by the inhabitants of the most affected zone (eastern France) is lower than 1.5 mSv, a value lower than 1% of the natural cosmic and telluric radioactivity exposure for the same period. For the persons assumed to live in the most attacked forests (from eastern France) and nourishing daily with venison and mushrooms the highest estimate is 1 mSv a year. Concerning the 'hot spots', identified in mountains by IPSN and CRIIRAD, the doses received by excursionists are around 0.015 mSv. For an average inhabitant of the country the dose piled up in the thyroid due to iodine-131 fallout is estimated to 0.5-2 mSv for an adult and 6.5-16 mSv for an infant. These doses are 100 to 1000 times lower than the ones to which the infants living in the neighbourhood of Chernobyl are exposed to. The contents of the report is displayed in the following six chapters: 1. Chernobyl in some figures; 2. The 'sarcophagus' and the reactors of the Chernobyl NPP; 3. Health consequences of the Chernobyl accident;. 4. The impact of