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Sample records for chemotherapy

  1. Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nurse can help you balance the risks of chemotherapy against the potential benefits. It is important to note that the information provided here is basic and does not take the place of professional advice. If you have any questions ... Publication Quimioterapia (Chemotherapy) Una publicación de ...

  2. Combined chemotherapy including platinum derivatives for medulloblastoma. The usefulness as maintenance chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hikaru; Otani, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kagami, Hiroshi; Shimazaki, Kenji; Toya, Shigeo; Kawase, Takeshi

    1997-01-01

    The authors reviewed 24 cerebellar medulloblastoma patients treated at Keio University to determine usefulness of combined chemotherapy including platinum derivatives (cisplatin, carboplatin) as the induction and maintenance treatment. All patients underwent radical surgery and craniospinal irradiation. Ten received adjuvant chemotherapy other than platinum derivatives (mainly with nitrosourea compounds), five were treated by induction and maintenance chemotherapy including platinum derivatives, and nine patients did not undergo chemotherapy. The progression-free survival rate of patients treated with platinum derivatives was better than that of patients treated with other modes of chemotherapy and also that of patients who did not receive chemotherapy. The results were especially good in the case of four patients treated with maintenance chemotherapy consisting of carboplatin and etoposide, two of whom had been free from relapse beyond the risk period of Collins. The occurrences of toxicity in maintenance chemotherapy with carboplatin and etoposide were limited to transient leucopenia. The present study indicates combined chemotherapy including platinum derivatives benefits patients with medulloblastoma, and could be useful, especially as maintenance treatment. (author)

  3. Types of chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000910.htm Types of chemotherapy To use the sharing features on this page, ... cancer.org/treatment/treatments-and-side-effects/treatment-types/chemotherapy/how-chemotherapy-drugs-work.html . Updated February 15, ...

  4. Targeting chemotherapy-resistant leukemia by combining DNT cellular therapy with conventional chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Branson; Lee, Jong Bok; Kang, Hyeonjeong; Minden, Mark D; Zhang, Li

    2018-04-24

    While conventional chemotherapy is effective at eliminating the bulk of leukemic cells, chemotherapy resistance in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a prevalent problem that hinders conventional therapies and contributes to disease relapse, and ultimately patient death. We have recently shown that allogeneic double negative T cells (DNTs) are able to target the majority of primary AML blasts in vitro and in patient-derived xenograft models. However, some primary AML blast samples are resistant to DNT cell therapy. Given the differences in the modes of action of DNTs and chemotherapy, we hypothesize that DNT therapy can be used in combination with conventional chemotherapy to further improve their anti-leukemic effects and to target chemotherapy-resistant disease. Drug titration assays and flow-based cytotoxicity assays using ex vivo expanded allogeneic DNTs were performed on multiple AML cell lines to identify therapy-resistance. Primary AML samples were also tested to validate our in vitro findings. Further, a xenograft model was employed to demonstrate the feasibility of combining conventional chemotherapy and adoptive DNT therapy to target therapy-resistant AML. Lastly, blocking assays with neutralizing antibodies were employed to determine the mechanism by which chemotherapy increases the susceptibility of AML to DNT-mediated cytotoxicity. Here, we demonstrate that KG1a, a stem-like AML cell line that is resistant to DNTs and chemotherapy, and chemotherapy-resistant primary AML samples both became more susceptible to DNT-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro following pre-treatment with daunorubicin. Moreover, chemotherapy treatment followed by adoptive DNT cell therapy significantly decreased bone marrow engraftment of KG1a in a xenograft model. Mechanistically, daunorubicin increased the expression of NKG2D and DNAM-1 ligands on KG1a; blocking of these pathways attenuated DNT-mediated cytotoxicity. Our results demonstrate the feasibility and benefit of using DNTs as

  5. Chemotherapy disruption of efficient radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nervi, C.; Friedman, M.

    1974-01-01

    Studies on the use of chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy are reviewed. Some topics discussed are: indications for the use of combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy; improvement of the therapeutic ratio following the use of methotrexate; advantages of preirradiation and postirradiation chemotherapy; side effects following simultaneous chemotherapy and radiotherapy; and effects of chemotherapy on cure rate of radiosensitive and radioresistant tumors. (U.S.)

  6. Chemotherapy alone versus chemotherapy plus radiotherapy for adults with early stage Hodgkin lymphoma (Review)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blank, Oliver; von Tresckow, Bastian; Monsef, Ina

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Combined modality treatment consisting of chemotherapy followed by localised radiotherapy is the standard treatment for patients with early stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). However, due to long- term adverse effects such as secondary malignancies the role of radiotherapy has been questioned...... recently and some clinical study groups advocate chemotherapy only for this indication. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of chemotherapy alone compared to chemotherapy plus radiotherapy in adults with early stage HL . SEARCH METHODS: For the or i ginal version of this review, we searched MEDLINE, Embase......-related mortality (RR 0.99; 95% CI 0.14 to 6.90; P = 0.99; low-quality evidence), there is no evidence for a difference between the use of chemotherapy alone and chemotherapy plus radiotherapy. CRR rate was not reported. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review compared the effects of chemotherapy alone...

  7. Metronomic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutsaers, Anthony J

    2009-08-01

    Chemotherapy drugs are usually administered at doses that are high enough to result in an obligatory break period to allow for the observation of potential side effects and institution of supportive care, if required. In recent years, efforts to administer chemotherapy on a more continuous basis, with a much shorter break period, or none at all, have received increased interest, and the practice has come to be known as metronomic chemotherapy. The basis for success with this currently investigational approach may be rooted in continuous drug exposure to susceptible cancer cells, inhibition of tumor blood vessel growth-a process known as tumor angiogenesis, and/or alterations in tumor immunology. Increased benefit also appears to occur when metronomic chemotherapy is used in combination with newer, targeted antiangiogenic agents, and therefore represents a promising approach to combination therapy, particularly as targeted oncology drugs make their way into veterinary oncology applications. There is still much to be learned in this field, especially with regard to optimization of the proper drugs, dose, schedule, and tumor applications. However, the low cost, ease of administration, and acceptable toxicity profiles potentially associated with this therapeutic strategy make metronomic chemotherapy protocols attractive and suitable to veterinary applications. Preliminary clinical trial results have now been reported in both human and veterinary medicine, including adjuvant treatment of canine splenic hemangiosarcoma and incompletely resected soft tissue sarcoma, and, further, more powerful studies are currently ongoing.

  8. Chemotherapy alone versus chemotherapy plus radiotherapy for early stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Christine; Rehan, Fareed Ahmed; Skoetz, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Combined modality treatment (CMT) consisting of chemotherapy followed by localised radiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with early stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). However, due to long term adverse effects such as secondary malignancies, the role of radiotherapy has been...... chemotherapy regimen plus radiotherapy. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials comparing chemotherapy alone with CMT in patients with early stage HL. Trials in which the chemotherapy differed between treatment arms were excluded. Trials with more than 20% of patients in advanced stage were also...... excluded. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Effect measures used were hazard ratios (HR) for tumour control and OS as well as relative risks for response rates. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed quality of trials. We contacted study authors to obtain missing information. Since none...

  9. The role of adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy in esophagogastric cancer patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, John H; Bowman, Christopher R; Reece-Smith, Alex M; Pang, Vincent; Dorrington, Matthew S; Mumtaz, Errum; Soomro, Irshad; Kaye, Philip; Madhusudan, Srinivasan; Parsons, Simon L

    2017-06-01

    For patients with operable esophagogastric cancer, peri-operative chemotherapy confers a significant overall survival benefit compared to surgery alone, however only 30-40% of patients demonstrate histopathological response. It is unclear whether those with no neoadjuvant chemotherapy response should go onto receive adjuvant chemotherapy, as no further benefit may be conferred. Esophagogastric cancers were prospectively captured with associated histopathological tumor regression grades following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This cohort was then interrogated for clinico-pathological and survival outcomes. Following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery, patients with chemotherapy responsive cancers, who were administered adjuvant chemotherapy gained a significant overall survival benefit. Multivariate Cox analysis, demonstrated a final adjusted hazard ratio for adjuvant therapy of 0.509; (95%CI 0.28-0.93); P = 0.028. In contrast, patients with non-responsive tumors, who underwent adjuvant chemotherapy, did not show any survival benefit. Chemotherapy toxicity was prevalent and contributed to only half of patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. These results suggest the benefit of the adjuvant portion of chemotherapy is limited to those who demonstrate a histopathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The administration of the adjuvant portion of chemotherapy to patients without a response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy may not provide any survival benefit, while potentially causing increased morbidity. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Chemotherapy or radio-chemotherapy for advanced adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus and cardiac orifice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, J.F.; Duffaud, F.; Dahan, L.; Ries, P.; Ville, E.; Laugier, R.

    2001-01-01

    Adenocarcinomas of esophagus and cardia represent in France approximately 20 to 40% of the esophagus cancers. They have a high risk to develop lymph nodes metastases and liver metastases. Currently, only 50 to 70% of patients may benefit from surgical curative resection at diagnosis, but more than 50% of them will recur. The standard of treatment of these metastatic adenocarcinomas is chemotherapy. Three large randomized comparative studies, between chemotherapy and supportive care, showed that chemotherapy significantly extends the median of survival (from 3-4 months to 10-12 months) and improves the quality of life. Currently, the combination of epirubicin-cisplatin-continuous 5FU (ECF) is the most effective regimen but it is difficult to administer and tolerate because of the long continuous 5FU infusion. In France, the most commonly used combination regimen still associates 5FU and cisplatin. New drugs (such as docetaxel, CPT11, oxaliplatin) used alone or in combination, especially with 5U, are very promising. Radio-chemotherapy is the preferred treatment for locoregional recurrences, because it improves dysphagia and enables to obtain complete tumor responses. Current results from concomitant radio-chemotherapy studies for esophagus cancer, based on 5FU alone, 5FU-cisplatin or 5FU-mitomycin, given as preoperative treatment or as exclusive treatment, support to use radio-chemotherapy for the treatment of loco-regional recurrences after surgical resection. Nevertheless, the optimal radio-chemotherapy schedule still remain to be defined (dose, duration, splitting of radiotherapy, choice of anticancer drugs). (authors)

  11. Exercise and chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Katlynn M; Sturgeon, Kathleen M; Winkels, Renate M; Wiskemann, Joachim; Williams, Nancy I; Schmitz, Kathryn

    2018-07-01

    Chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea (CIA) is the temporary or permanent loss of menses experienced by premenopausal women undergoing chemotherapy treatment for cancer. Two possible mechanisms through which chemotherapy induces CIA have been identified: systemic endothelial dysfunction, resulting in decreased blood flow to the ovaries, and increased oxidative stress within the ovaries, both of which are proposed to lead to apoptosis of follicles. Endothelial dysfunction in ovarian arteries in women undergoing or who have undergone chemotherapy treatment is characterized by prothrombotic changes and thickening of the vascular wall. These changes result in occlusion of the blood vessels. Oxidative stress is increased and antioxidants decreased in the ovaries secondary to chemotherapy drugs, specifically cyclophosphamide. It is hypothesized that low to moderate intensity aerobic exercise during chemotherapy may prevent these changes and lessen the risk for developing CIA in premenopausal women. Low to moderate intensity aerobic exercise has been shown to improve endothelial function and blood flow in patients with cardiovascular disease-a disease state characterized by endothelial dysfunction and for which patients who have undergone chemotherapy are at increased risk. In mice, moderate intensity aerobic exercise has been shown to decrease the amount of oxidative stress within the ovaries, and in humans, chronic aerobic exercise has been shown to increase antioxidant production systemically. This hypothesis should be tested in both a mouse model, using sedentary and exercising mice treated with chemotherapy drugs that commonly result in CIA, as well as a human model to determine the effects of low to moderate intensity aerobic exercise on ovarian function in premenopausal women undergoing chemotherapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Long term results of exclusive chemotherapy for glottic squamous cell carcinoma complete clinical responders after induction chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachin, F; Hans, S; Atlan, D; Brasnu, D; Menard, M; Laccourreye, O

    2004-06-01

    To evaluate the long-term results of exclusive chemotherapy for T1-T3N0M0 glottic squamous cell carcinoma complete clinical responders after induction chemotherapy. Between 1985 and 2000, 69 patients with glottic squamous cell carcinoma complete clinical responders after induction chemotherapy were managed with exclusive chemotherapy at our department. Chemotherapy associated platinum and fluorouracil. This retrospective analysis evaluated actuarial survival, treatment morbidity, oncologic events and laryngeal preservation. Various independent factors were tested for potential correlation with survival and local recurrence. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier actuarial survival, local control, lymph node control estimate were 83,6%, 64,8%, 98,6% respectively. Chemotherapy never resulted in death. The 10-year actuarial metachronous second primary tumors estimate was 32%. The overall laryngeal preservation rate was 98,6%. Altogether our data and the review of the literature suggest that in patients achieving a complete clinical response after and induction based chemotherapy regimen, the completion of an exclusive chemotherapy regimen appears to be a valid alternative to the conventional use of radiotherapy or chemo-radiation protocols.

  13. Chemotherapy to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses drugs to kill cancer cells. Learn how chemotherapy works against cancer, why it causes side effects, and how it is used with other cancer treatments.

  14. Chemotherapy-induced Spontaneous Pneumothorax: Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Een Hendarsih

    2016-09-01

    The mechanism of pneumothorax following chemotherapy is not clearly understood yet, however, several hypotheses have been considered: 1 the rupture of a subpleural bulla after chemotherapy; 2 the rupture of an emphysematous bulla in an over expanded portion of the lung which is partially obstructed by a neoplasm; 3 tumor lyses or necrosis due to cytotoxic chemotherapy directly induces the formation of fistula. Dyspnea and chest pain suddenly appear during successful chemotherapy for metastatic chemosensitive tumors should alert the physician to the possibility of SP. The treatment is directed toward lung re-expansion. Chemotherapy induced pneumothorax should be considered as oncologic emergency.

  15. Retinoblastoma: Achieving new standards with methods of chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi Kaliki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of retinoblastoma (RB has dramatically changed over the past two decades from previous radiotherapy methods to current chemotherapy strategies. RB is a remarkably chemotherapy-sensitive tumor. Chemotherapy is currently used as a first-line approach for children with this malignancy and can be delivered by intravenous, intra-arterial, periocular, and intravitreal routes. The choice of route for chemotherapy administration depends upon the tumor laterality and tumor staging. Intravenous chemotherapy (IVC is used most often in bilateral cases, orbital RB, and as an adjuvant treatment in high-risk RB. Intra-arterial chemotherapy (IAC is used in cases with group C or D RB and selected cases of group E tumor. Periocular chemotherapy is used as an adjunct treatment in eyes with group D and E RB and those with persistent/recurrent vitreous seeds. Intravitreal chemotherapy is reserved for eyes with persistent/recurrent vitreous seeds. In this review, we describe the various forms of chemotherapy used in the management of RB. A database search was performed on PubMed, using the terms "RB," and "treatment," "chemotherapy," "systemic chemotherapy," "IVC," "IAC," "periocular chemotherapy," or "intravitreal chemotherapy." Relevant English language articles were extracted, reviewed, and referenced appropriately.

  16. Chemotherapy-associated recurrent pneumothoraces in lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Emer

    2012-02-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis is a rare cause of pneumothorax in women. We present the case of a 48-year-old woman with lymphangioleiomyomatosis, who had never had a pneumothorax prior to commencing chemotherapy for breast cancer. During chemotherapy she developed 3 pneumothoraces and 2 episodes of pneumomediastinum. We suggest that the pneumothoraces were caused by the chemotherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of chemotherapy triggering pneumothoraces in a woman with lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

  17. Chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, David G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The role of chemotherapy in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract is undergoing rapid evolution. Historically, the use of chemotherapy was limited to patients with incurable disease who had exhausted all surgical and radiation therapy options. The results of recent randomized trials, however, suggest an increasing role for chemotherapy as part of primary management in patients with unresectable disease; advanced larynx or hypopharynx cancer with the intent of larynx preservation, or advanced nasopharynx cancer. This refresher course will provide a comprehensive overview of the current indications for chemotherapy in the management of these malignancies, and will highlight areas of controversy and future directions of investigation. More specifically, the following areas will be emphasized. 1. The identification of drugs commonly used in the management of head and neck cancer, their customary dosing and side effects. 2. The impact of induction and/or adjuvant chemotherapy combined with surgery and radiation therapy as defined by randomized trials, including a discussion of the Head and Neck Contracts program and the Intergroup adjuvant trial. 3. The development of larynx/function preservation treatment programs, including a review of the Veterans Administration and EORTC larynx preservation studies. 4. The evolving role of chemotherapy as part of innovative combined modality programs, especially in patients with unresectable disease. The rationale and utility of sequential versus concomitant/alternating chemotherapy-radiation strategies, and relevant randomized clinical trials comparing the different strategies will be discussed. 5. The appropriate application of chemotherapy in the palliative setting, including a discussion of the relative merits of single-agent versus combination chemotherapy

  18. Chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, David G.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The role of chemotherapy in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract is undergoing rapid evolution. Historically, the use of chemotherapy was limited to patients with incurable disease who had exhausted all surgical and radiation therapy options. The results of recent randomized trials, however, suggest an increasing role for chemotherapy as part of primary management in patients seeking to avoid potentially morbid surgical procedures or with unresectable disease. This refresher course will provide a comprehensive overview of the current indications for chemotherapy in the management of these malignancies, and will highlight areas of controversy and future directions of investigation. More specifically, the following areas will be emphasized. 1. The identification of drugs commonly used in the management of head and neck cancer, their customary dosing and side effects. 2. The impact of induction and/or adjuvant chemotherapy combined with surgery and radiation therapy as defined by randomized trials, including a discussion of the Head and Neck Contracts program and the Intergroup adjuvant trial. 3. The development of larynx/function preservation treatment programs, including a review of the Memorial Hospital experience with larynx preservation and the Veterans Administration larynx preservation study. 4. The evolving role of chemotherapy as part of innovative combined modality programs, especially in patients with unresectable disease. The rationale and utility of sequential versus concomitant/alternating chemotherapy-radiation strategies, and relevant randomized clinical trials comparing the different strategies will be discussed. 5. The appropriate application of chemotherapy in the palliative setting, including a discussion of the relative merits of single-agent versus combination chemotherapy

  19. Is neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to radio-chemotherapy beneficial in T4 anal carcinoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moureau-Zabotto, L; Viret, F; Giovaninni, M; Lelong, B; Bories, E; Delpero, J R; Pesenti, C; Caillol, F; de Chaisemartin, C; Minsat, M; Monges, G; Sarran, A; Resbeut, M

    2011-07-01

    This study retrospectively describes the outcome of a series of 38 patients (pts) with T4 anal carcinoma exclusively treated by radio and chemotherapy. From 1992 to 2007, 38 pts with UST4-N0-2-M0 anal carcinoma were treated with exclusive radiotherapy and chemotherapy. All patients received external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (median dose 45 Gy) with a concomitant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil-cisplatin). Eleven patients received neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil-cisplatin). After 2-8 weeks, a 15-20 Gy boost was delivered either with EBRT (20 pts) or interstitial (192)Ir brachytherapy (18 pts). Mean follow-up was 66 months. After chemoradiation therapy (CRT), 13 pts (34%) had a complete response, 23 pts (60%) a response >50% (2 pts were not evaluated). The 5-year-disease-free survival was 79.2 ± 6.5%, and the 5-year overall survival was 83.9 ± 6%. Eight patients developed tumor progression (mean delay 8.8 months), six of them requiring a salvage surgery with definitive colostomy for local relapse. Late severe complication requiring colostomy was observed in 2 pts. The 5-year-colostomy-free survival was 78 ± 6.9%. Patients who received primary chemotherapy had a statistically significant better 5-year colostomy-free survival (100% vs. 38 ± 16.4%, P = 0.0006). T4 anal carcinoma can be treated with a curative intent using a sphincter-sparing approach of CRT, and neo-adjuvant chemotherapy should be considered prior to radiotherapy. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inuyama, Yukio; Fujii, Masato; Tanaka, Juichi; Takaoka, Tetsuro; Hosoda, Hyonosuke; Kawaura, Mitsuhiro; Toji, Masao

    1988-01-01

    There are 4 modalities of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy which include (1) concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy, (2) sequential use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy (pre-radiation chemotherapy), (3) pre-radiation chemotherapy followed by concurrent radiation and chemotherapy, and (4) alternating use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy based upon Looney's hypothesis. We studied concurrent use of radiotherapy and UFT by means of animal experimentation and clinical trials. The results obtained revealed that UFT was a most suitable agent together with 5-fluorouracil for concurrent application of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy including pre-radiation chemotherapy was also studied in cases of maxillary sinus carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. From the results, it seemed desirable to use cisplatin and bleomycin analogs sequentially in combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy should be studied successively to improve local tumor control rates and prevent distant metastases. For future perspectives, new trials of alternating radiotherapy and chemotherapy based upon Looney's hypothesis seem necessary. (author)

  1. Assessment of the Radiation-Equivalent of Chemotherapy Contributions in 1-Phase Radio-chemotherapy Treatment of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plataniotis, George A.; Dale, Roger G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the radiation equivalent of the chemotherapy contribution to observed complete response rates in published results of 1-phase radio-chemotherapy of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: A standard logistic dose–response curve was fitted to data from radiation therapy-alone trials and then used as the platform from which to quantify the chemotherapy contribution in 1-phase radio-chemotherapy trials. Two possible mechanisms of chemotherapy effect were assumed (1) a fixed radiation-independent contribution to local control; or (2) a fixed degree of chemotherapy-induced radiosensitization. A combination of both mechanisms was also considered. Results: The respective best-fit values of the independent chemotherapy-induced complete response (CCR) and radiosensitization (s) coefficients were 0.40 (95% confidence interval −0.07 to 0.87) and 1.30 (95% confidence interval 0.86-1.70). Independent chemotherapy effect was slightly favored by the analysis, and the derived CCR value was consistent with reports of pathologic complete response rates seen in neoadjuvant chemotherapy-alone treatments of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The radiation equivalent of the CCR was 36.3 Gy. Conclusion: Although the data points in the analyzed radio-chemotherapy studies are widely dispersed (largely on account of the diverse range of chemotherapy schedules used), it is nonetheless possible to fit plausible-looking response curves. The methodology used here is based on a standard technique for analyzing dose-response in radiation therapy-alone studies and is capable of application to other mixed-modality treatment combinations involving radiation therapy

  2. Postoperative Chemotherapy for Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The survival rate and cognitive function of 43 children, age <3 years, with medulloblastoma treated with intensive postoperative chemotherapy alone, without radiotherapy, were determined at the University of Wurzburg and other centers in Germany Chemotherapy consisted of three two-month cycles of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, vincristine, carboplatin, and etoposide.

  3. Acute emesis: moderately emetogenic chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrstedt, Jørn; Rapoport, Bernardo; Warr, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a review of the recommendations for the prophylaxis of acute emesis induced by moderately emetogenic chemotherapy as concluded at the third Perugia Consensus Conference, which took place in June 2009. The review will focus on new studies appearing since the Second consensus conference...... receiving multiple cycles of moderately emetogenic chemotherapy will be reviewed. Consensus statements are given, including optimal dose and schedule of serotonin(3) receptor antagonists, dexamethasone, and neurokinin(1) receptor antagonists. The most significant recommendations (and changes since the 2004...... version of the guidelines) are as follows: the best prophylaxis in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (not including a combination of an anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide) is the combination of palonosetron and dexamethasone on the day of chemotherapy, followed by dexamethasone...

  4. Chemotherapy in combined and multimodality treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that chemotherapy of tumors of various localizations developes intensively in the last few years. It is connected with discovery and adoption of new active antitumoral preparations, such as alkylating preparations, antimetabolites, antitumoral antibiotics, hormonal preparations. To create the rational effective conditions of chemotherapy a study was made on kinetics of tumor gowth, molecular mechanisms of interaction of cytostatics and cells of malignant tumor. Main factors of chemotherapy combination with radiotherapy when treating numerous malignant tumors were considered. Effectiveness of using chemotherapy in combination with other methods of treatment was shown

  5. [The Effectiveness of Cooling Packaging Care in Relieving Chemotherapy-Induced Skin Toxicity Reactions in Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy: A Systematic Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ya-Hui; Hung, Hsing-Wei; Chen, Shu-Ching

    2017-08-01

    Anti-cancer chemotherapy may cause skin-toxicity reactions. Different types of cooling packages affect chemotherapy-induced skin toxicity reactions differently. To evaluate the effects of cooling packing care on chemotherapy-induced skin toxicity reactions in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. A systematic review approach was used. Searches were conducted in databases including Cochrane Library, Embase, MEDLINE, PubMed and Airiti Library using the keywords "chemotherapy cutaneous toxicity", "chemotherapy skin reaction", "chemotherapy skin toxicity", "frozen glove", "frozen sock", "cooling packaging care", "ice gloves", "ice socks", "usual care", "severity", "comfort", "satisfaction", "severity", and "comfort". The search focused on articles published before December 2016. Based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 5 articles involving relevant randomized controlled trials were extracted for review. Elasto-Gel ice gloves or ice socks that were chilled to -25°C- -30°C and used for 15 mins during initial chemotherapy, for one hour during chemotherapy infusion, and for 15 mins after chemotherapy were shown to improve the frequency and severity of chemotherapy-induced skin toxicity reactions. Several studies were limited by small sample sizes and different types of cooling packing programs, temperature, timing, and frequency. Thus, further research is recommended to verify the effects of cooling packing care. Cancer patients who were treated with docetaxel or PLD and who used ice gloves or ice socks that were chilled to -25°C- -30°C for 15 mins during initial chemotherapy, for one hour during chemotherapy infusion, and for 15 mins after chemotherapy improved significantly in terms of the frequency and severity of their chemotherapy-induced skin toxicity reactions. Local cooling packing care is a non-pharmacotherapy approach that is low cost and free of side effects. This review is intended to provide a reference for clinical care.

  6. Cancer occurring after radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy can effectively control cancer but can also cause new cancers to develop as long-term complications. Almost all types of cancer have been associated with radiotherapy. The breast, thyroid, and bone marrow are the organs most susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis. The bone marrow is also most frequently involved by chemotherapy and the leukemia risk is much higher than after radiotherapy. The combination of intensive radiotherapy and chemotherapy is particularly leukemogenic. The latent period between radiotherapy/chemotherapy and the appearance of a second primary cancer ranges from a few years to several decades. The risk for a second primary cancer following radiotherapy or chemotherapy emphasizes the need for life long follow-up of patients receiving such treatments. This is particularly the case in individuals with long life expectancy, for example, patients treated for childhood neoplasms. The benefits of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in oncology exceed the risks for second primary cancers. Efforts should be directed towards identifying those patients who will benefit from the treatments so that only they are exposed to the risk. 33 references

  7. Super-selective interventional chemotherapy combined with systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of postoperative gliomas:a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jian; Hu Qinglei; Sun Yanchun; Feng Lei; Liu Yunzhen; Liu Ju; Kong Ruifen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate super-selective interventional chemotherapy combined with systemic chemotherapy in treating postoperative gliomas. Methods: During the period of 2005-2009, a total of 46 patients with glioma were encountered in our hospital. According to the principle of patient's free will the involved patients were divided into two groups. Study group (n = 25): after operation the patients received routine radiotherapy, which was followed by super-selective interventional chemotherapy combined simultaneously with systemic chemotherapy. Control group (n = 21): after operation the patients received routine radiotherapy, which was followed by systemic chemotherapy only. The patients were regularly followed up. Cranial CT checkups were made to determine the tumor size, and the results were evaluated with Karnofsky scores. The clinical data were analyzed and compared between two groups. Results: In the study group, the side-effects and complications included epileptic seizures (n = 3), eye pain (n = 5), headache (n = 9), nausea and vomiting (n = 8) and thrombopenia (n = 1). In the control group,the side-effects and complications were as follows: epileptic seizures (n = 1), headache (n = 7), nausea and vomiting (n = 6) and thrombopenia(n = 3). No death occurred in either of the two groups. The patients were followed up for an average period of 2.3 years. Before chemotherapy no statistically significant difference in tumor size existed between two groups (P > 0.05). One year after the chemotherapy, the tumor volume in study group was reduced by 67.11%, while it was 45.79% in control group. By using independent sample t test analysis, the difference between two groups was of statistical significance (P < 0.05). Wilcoxon rank sum test and Karnofsky prognostic score analysis indicated that the prognosis of study group was much better than that of control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: In comparison with routine radiotherapy plus simple systemic chemotherapy, routine

  8. Chemotherapy-induced hypocalcemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajero, Pia Marie E; Belsky, Joseph L; Prawius, Herbert D; Rella, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    To present a unique case of transient, asymptomatic chemotherapy-induced hypocalcemia not attributable to hypomagnesemia or tumor lysis syndrome and review causes of hypocalcemia related to cancer with and without use of chemotherapy. We present a case detailing the clinical and laboratory findings of a patient who had severe hypocalcemia during chemotherapy and discuss causes of hypocalcemia with an extensive literature review of chemotherapeutic agents associated with this biochemical abnormality. In a 90-year-old man, hypocalcemia developed during 2 courses of chemotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma, with partial recovery between courses and normal serum calcium 10 months after completion of treatment. Magnesium, vitamin D, and parathyroid hormone levels were low normal. There was no evidence of tumor lysis syndrome. Of the various agents administered, vinca alkaloids seemed the most likely cause. Serial testing suggested that the underlying mechanism may have been acquired, reversible hypoparathyroidism. No other similar case was found in the published literature. The severe hypocalcemia in our patient could not be attributed to hypomagnesemia or tumor lysis syndrome, and it was clearly associated with the timing of his chemotherapeutic regimen. Possibilities include direct parathyroid hormone suppression or alteration of calcium sensing by the chemotherapeutic drugs. Serum calcium surveillance before and during chemotherapeutic management of cancer patients may reveal more instances and provide insight into the exact mechanism of this lesser known yet striking complication.

  9. Arterial occlusion precipitated by cisplatinbased chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, D.; Dubashi, B.; Karthikeyan, B.; Jain, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cisplatin-based therapy is curative in testicular cancer. Adverse effects of cisplatin-based chemotherapy include dose-dependent myelosuppression, nephrotoxicity, neurotoxicity, and ototoxicity. By contrast, chemotherapy-associated vascular complications are unpredictable. Few incidents of digital gangrene with cisplatin have been reported. Here, we present a patient who developed arterial occlusion leading to gangrene of the toe after cisplatinbased chemotherapy.

  10. Mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth G Vichaya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available While chemotherapeutic agents have yielded relative success in the treatment of cancer, patients are often plagued with unwanted and even debilitating side-effects from the treatment which can lead to dose reduction or even cessation of treatment. Common side effects (symptoms of chemotherapy include (i cognitive deficiencies such as problems with attention, memory and executive functioning; (ii fatigue and motivational deficit; and (iii neuropathy. These symptoms often develop during treatment but can remain even after cessation of chemotherapy, severely impacting long-term quality of life. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible for the development of these behavioral toxicities, however, neuroinflammation is widely considered to be one of the major mechanisms responsible for chemotherapy-induced symptoms. Here, we critically assess what is known in regards to the role of neuroinflammation in chemotherapy-induced symptoms. We also argue that, based on the available evidence neuroinflammation is unlikely the only mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. We evaluate two other putative candidate mechanisms. To this end we discuss the mediating role of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs activated in response to chemotherapy-induced cellular damage. We also review the literature with respect to possible alternative mechanisms such as a chemotherapy-induced change in the bioenergetic status of the tissue involving changes in mitochondrial function in relation to chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie the emergence of fatigue, neuropathy, and cognitive difficulties is vital to better treatment and long-term survival of cancer patients.

  11. Change of SPARC expression after chemotherapy in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Yong-Yin; Han, Ru-Bing; Wang, Xia; Ge, Shao-Hua; Li, Hong-Li; Deng, Ting; Liu, Rui; Bai, Ming; Zhou, Li-Kun; Zhang, Xin-Yuan; Ba, Yi; Huang, Ding-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    The expression of tumor biomarkers may change after chemotherapy. However, whether secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) expression changes after chemotherapy in gastric cancer (GC) is unclear. This study investigated the influence of chemotherapy on SPARC expression in GC. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze SPARC expression in 132 GC cases (including 54 cases with preoperative chemotherapy and 78 cases without preoperative chemotherapy). SPARC expression of postoperative specimens with and without preoperative chemotherapy was assessed to analyze the influence of chemotherapy on SPARC expression. SPARC was highly expressed in GC compared with the desmoplastic stroma surrounding tumor cells and noncancerous tissues. High SPARC expression was correlated with invasion depth, lymph node, and TNM stage. After chemotherapy, a lower proportion of high SPARC expression was observed in patients with preoperative chemotherapy than in the controls. For 54 patients with preoperative chemotherapy, gross type, histology, depth of invasion, lymph node, TNM stage, and SPARC expression were related to overall survival. Further multivariate analysis showed that lymph node, histology, and SPARC expression after chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors. SPARC expression may change after chemotherapy in GC. SPARC expression should be reassessed for patients with GC after chemotherapy

  12. Comparative analyses of the effect of radiotherapy and chemotherapy or chemotherapy alone on patients' electrocardiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Li; Zhang Shulan; Zhang Zhaohui; Wang Junjie; Jia Tingzhen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the change of breast cancer patients' electrocardiogram during combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy or chemotherapy alone for the sake of predicting the cardiotoxicity of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Methods: From January, 1998 to June, 2004, 47 postoperative breast cancer patients were enrolled. Among them 29 patients received chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy (combinative group), and 18 patients received chemotherapy alone (non combinative group). The changes of electrocardiogram were observed and correlation factors were analyzed. Results: Abnormal electrocardiograms were noted in 11 (37.9%) and 2 patients (11.1%) of the combinative group and the non-combinative group respectively(z=-1.977, P=0.048). In the combinative group, heart events were significantly increased in patients above 60 years old (z=- 2.094 P=0.036). The changes of electrocardiogram were not significantly correlative with hypertension history, tumor site, dose of radiotherapy or chemotherapeutic drugs. But the incidence of abnormal electrocardiogram was higher in patients with a hypertension history than in those without it (54.5% vs 27.8%). Conclusion: The abnormalities of electrocardiogram were are more frequent in patients treated with both radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy. Our results suggest that breast cancer patients should be regularly reexamined with electrocardiography during therapy, especially whose age was those have a hypertension history and above 60 years old. (authors)

  13. Extravasation of chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, Seppo W

    2010-01-01

    Extravasation of chemotherapy is a feared complication of anticancer therapy. The accidental leakage of cytostatic agents into the perivascular tissues may have devastating short-term and long-term consequences for patients. In recent years, the increased focus on chemotherapy extravasation has led...... to the development of international guidelines that have proven useful tools in daily clinical practice. Moreover, the tissue destruction in one of the most dreaded types of extravasation (ie, anthracycline extravasation) now can effectively be prevented with a specific antidote, dexrazoxane....

  14. Prolonged response without prolonged chemotherapy: a lesson from PCV chemotherapy in low-grade gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyre, Matthieu; Cartalat-Carel, Stéphanie; Meyronet, David; Ricard, Damien; Jouvet, Anne; Pallud, Johan; Mokhtari, Karima; Guyotat, Jacques; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Sunyach, Marie-Pierre; Frappaz, Didier; Honnorat, Jérôme; Ducray, François

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies with temozolomide suggest that a prolonged duration of chemotherapy is important for treating low-grade gliomas (LGGs). PCV (procarbazine, CCNU, vincristine) chemotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in treating LGGs, but this therapy cannot be used for a prolonged period because of the cumulative toxicity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of first-line PCV chemotherapy on LGGs growth kinetics. The mean tumor diameter (MTD) of 21 LGGs was measured on serial magnetic resonance images before (n=13), during, and after PCV onset (n=21). During PCV treatment, a decrease in the MTD was observed in all patients. After PCV discontinuation, an ongoing decrease in MTD was observed in 20 of the 21 patients. Median duration of the MTD decrease was 3.4 years (range, 0.8–7.7) after PCV onset and 2.7 years (range, 0–7) after the end of PCV treatment with 60% of LGGs, demonstrating an ongoing and prolonged (>2 years) response despite chemotherapy no longer being administered. According to McDonald's criteria, the rates of partial and minor responses were 5% and 38% at the end of PCV but 38% and 42% at the time of maximal MTD decrease, which occurred after a median period of 3.4 years after PCV onset. These results challenge the idea that a prolonged duration of chemotherapy is necessary for treating LGGs and raise the issue of understanding the mechanisms involved in the persistent tumor volume decrease once chemotherapy is terminated. PMID:20488959

  15. Medical visits for chemotherapy and chemotherapy-induced neutropenia: a survey of the impact on patient time and activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Kelley

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with cancer must make frequent visits to the clinic not only for chemotherapy but also for the management of treatment-related adverse effects. Neutropenia, the most common dose-limiting toxicity of myelosuppressive chemotherapy, has substantial clinical and economic consequences. Colony-stimulating factors such as filgrastim and pegfilgrastim can reduce the incidence of neutropenia, but the clinic visits for these treatments can disrupt patients' routines and activities. Methods We surveyed patients to assess how clinic visits for treatment with chemotherapy and the management of neutropenia affect their time and activities. Results The mean amounts of time affected by these visits ranged from approximately 109 hours (hospitalization for neutropenia and 8 hours (physician and chemotherapy to less than 3 hours (laboratory and treatment with filgrastim or pegfilgrastim. The visits for filgrastim or pegfilgrastim were comparable in length, but treatment with filgrastim requires several visits per chemotherapy cycle and treatment with pegfilgrastim requires only 1 visit. Conclusions This study provides useful information for future modelling of additional factors such as disease status and chemotherapy schedule and provides information that should be considered in managing chemotherapy-induced neutropenia.

  16. Experimental study on combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Juichi

    1986-01-01

    Recently, by applying multidrug therapy using cisplatin and bleomycin to the treatment of head and neck cancer, the response rate of chemotherapy has been markedly increased and thus, chemotherapy has taken an important part in the treatment of head and neck cancer. In this paper a clinical application of chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy was evaluated from the point of the cure rate and also preservation of the structures and the functions of the head and neck region. In order to test the advantage or usefulness of initial chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy (= pre-radiation chemotherapy), the experimental study on combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy was designed by using ICR mice and Ehrlich solid carcinoma. Cisplatin and peplomycin, a newly developed derivative of bleomycin, were used as chemotherapeutic agents. Tumor growth delay rate was chosen as a parameter to indicate the effectiveness. Results obtained are as follows. 1. Combination chemotherapy of cisplatin and peplomycin was more effective than each single agent on Ehrlich solid carcinoma. Synergistic effect was obtained by higher dose. So, the combination of cisplatin and peplomycin was proved to be eligible for pre-radiation chemotherapy. 2. Synergistic effect of chemotherapy and radiotherapy was observed when chemotherapy was used prior to radiotherapy on Ehrlich solid carcinoma. 3. Even their additional effect was not recognized when radiotherapy preceded to chemotherapy on Ehrlich solid carcinoma. 4. No severe toxic effect was seen in the mice. The experimental results made it clear that pre-radiation chemotherapy is beneficial to the treatment of head and neck cancer. (author)

  17. 99mTc-MIBI SPECT in small call lung cancer patients before chemotherapy and after unresponsive chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yuka; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro; Fukunaga, Kotaro; Satoh, Katashi; Fujita, Jiro; Ohkawa, Motoomi

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated the accumulation of 99m Tc-MIBI in small cell lung cancer patients before chemotherapy and after unresponsive chemotherapy. The pre-chemotherapeutic group included 22 newly diagnosed patients. These patients underwent a 99m Tc-MIBI SPECT study before starting chemotherapy. After chemotherapy, based on changes in tumor size, three different patterns of response (complete remission: CR, partial remission: PR and no change: NC) were defined. The post-chemotherapeutic group included 11 patients after chemotherapy who did not respond to chemotherapy. These patients underwent a 99m Tc-MIBI SPECT study after completion of chemotherapy. SPECT images were acquired 15 min (early) and 2 hr (delayed) after injection of 99m Tc-MIBI. With a region of interest technique, the early ratio, delayed ratio and retention index were calculated. Early and delayed ratios in pre-chemotherapeutic patients were significantly higher than those in post-chemotherapeutic patients. There were no significant differences between the pre-chemotherapeutic and post-chemotherapeutic patients in the retention index. In the pre-chemotherapeutic patients, early and delayed ratios for the CR and PR groups were significantly higher than those for the NC group. There were no significant differences in the retention index with respect to the tumor response. 99m Tc-MIBI might be useful for evaluating the tumor chemosensitivity in patients with small cell lung cancer. (author)

  18. Chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zedan, Ahmed; Vilholm, Ole Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy (CIPN) is a common, but underestimated, clinical challenge. Incidence varies depending on many factors that are equally as important as the type of chemotherapeutic agent itself. Moreover, the assessment of CIPN is still uncertain, as several of the most...... frequently used scales do not rely on a formal neurological evaluation and depend on patients' reports and examiners' interpretations. Therefore, the aim of this MiniReview was to introduce the most common chemotherapies that cause neuropathy, and in addition to this, highlight the most significant...

  19. Hyperthermia and chemotherapy agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roizin-Towle, L.; Hall, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer dates back to the late 19th century, but the modern era of chemotherapy drugs was ushered in during the 1940's with the development of the polyfunctional alkylating agent. Since then, numerous classes of drugs have evolved and the combined use of antineoplastic agents with other treatment modalities such as radiation or heat, remains a large relatively unexplored area. This approach, combining local hyperthermia with chemotherapy agents affords a measure of targeting and selective toxicity not previously available for drugs. In this paper, the effects of adriamycin, bleomycin and cis-platinum are examined. The adjuvant use of heat may also reverse the resistance of hypoxic cells noted for some chemotherapy agents

  20. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor priming chemotherapy is more effective than standard chemotherapy as salvage therapy in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying; He, Aili; Wang, Fangxia; Bai, Ju; Wang, Jianli; Zhao, Wanhong; Zhang, Wanggang; Cao, Xingmei; Chen, Yinxia; Liu, Jie; Ma, Xiaorong; Chen, Hongli; Feng, Yuandong; Yang, Yun

    2017-12-29

    To improve the complete remission (CR) rate of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and alleviate the severe side effects of double induction chemotherapy, we combined a standard regimen with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) priming chemotherapy to compose a new double induction regimen for AML patients who failed to achieve CR after the first course. Ninety-seven patients with AML who did not achieve CR after the first course of standard chemotherapy were enrolled. Among them, 45 patients received G-CSF priming combined with low-dose chemotherapy during days 20-22 of the first course of chemotherapy, serving as priming group, 52 patients were administered standard chemotherapy again, serving as control group. Between the two groups there were no differences in the French-American-British (FAB) classification, risk status, the first course of chemotherapy, blood cell count or blasts percentage of bone marrow before the second course. But the CR rate was significantly higher and the adverse effect was much lower in the priming group than the control group. Cox multivariate regression analysis showed that WBC level before the second course and the selection of the second chemotherapy regimen were two independent factors for long survival of patients. These results elucidate that standard chemotherapy followed by G-CSF priming new double induction chemotherapy is an effective method for AML patients to improve CR rate and reduce adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer-Random iced for Adjuvant Chemotherapy vs. Observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Kyung; Chang, Hye Sook; Ahn, Seung Do

    1993-01-01

    Since Jan. 1991 a prospective randomized study for Stage III unresectable non small cell lung cancer(NSCLC) has been conducted to evaluate the response rate and tolerance of induction chemotherapy with MVP followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy and evaluate the efficacy of maintenance chemotherapy in Asan Medical Center. All patients in this study were treated with hypefractionated radiotherapy (120 cGy/fx BID, 0480 cGy/54 fx) following 3 cycles of induction chemotherapy, MVP (Mitomycin C 6 mg/m2, Vinblastin B mg/ m2, Cisplatin 60 Mg/ m2) and then the partial and complete responders from induction chemotherapy were randomized to 3 cycles of adjuvant MVP chemotherapy group and observation group. 48 patients were registered to this study until December 1992; among 48 patients 3 refused further treatment after induction chemotherapy and 6 received incomplete radiation therapy because of patient refusal, 39 completed planned therapy. Twenty-three(58%) patients including 2 complete responders showed response from induction chemotherapy. Among the 21 patients who achieved a partial response after induction chemotherapy, 1 patient rendered complete clearance of disease and 10 patients showed further regression of tumor following hypefractionated radiotherapy. Remaining 10 patients showed stable disease or progression after radiotherapy. Of the sixteen patients judged to have stable disease or progression after induction chemotherapy, seven showed more than partial remission after radiotherapy but nine showed no response in spite of radiotherapy. Of the 35 patients who completed induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy, 25 patients(64%) including 3 complete responders showed more than partial remission. Nineteen patients were randomized after radiotherapy. Nine patients were allocated to adjuvant chemotherapy group and 4/9 shewed further regression of tumor after adjuvant chemotherapy. For the time being, there is no suggestion of a difference between the adjuvant

  2. Olanzapine is effective for refractory chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting irrespective of chemotherapy emetogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vig, Sierra; Seibert, Laurel; Green, Myke R

    2014-01-01

    The role of olanzapine added to a dopamine antagonist and benzodiazepine for the treatment of refractory chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is incompletely characterized in all levels of chemotherapy emetogenicity. This retrospective study evaluated the efficacy of the addition of olanzapine in adults experiencing refractory CINV stratified by chemotherapy emetogenicity. Thirty-three adults who experienced CINV refractory to guideline-recommended prophylaxis and breakthrough antiemetics (dopamine antagonists and benzodiazepines) and received at least one dose of olanzapine 5-10 mg per os were evaluated. Failure was defined as >5 emesis events in 24 h or more than 10 cumulative doses of rescue antiemetics following first olanzapine dose per treatment cycle. Post hoc analyses investigated variables impacting olanzapine efficacy. The addition of olanzapine demonstrated an overall success rate of 70 %. This success rate did not differ between chemotherapy regimens of high versus low-to-moderate emetogenicity (p = 0.79), prophylaxis with serotonin antagonist plus corticosteroid and aprepitant versus serotonin antagonist alone (p = 0.77), or age over 50 versus ≤50 years (p > 0.99). A trend toward greater benefit was seen in women (p = 0.08). The addition of olanzapine to a dopamine antagonist and benzodiazepine demonstrated high efficacy rates for refractory CINV irrespective of chemotherapy emetogenicity. The high success rates among all groups suggests that incomplete resolution of CINV with prophylactic serotonin antagonists and breakthrough dopamine antagonists plus benzodiazepine may benefit from the addition of olanzapine regardless of gender, degree of chemotherapy emetogenicity, number of prophylactic antiemetics, or age. The trend toward greater control of emesis in women merits further investigation.

  3. Physical exercise during adjuvant chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waart, H.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the effect of physical exercise during chemotherapy. In chapter two the study design, rationale and methods of the Physical exercise during Adjuvant Chemotherapy Study (PACES) are described. Chapter three presents the effects of the randomized controlled trial evaluating a

  4. Chemotherapy for intracranial ependymoma in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gramatzki, Dorothee; Roth, Patrick; Felsberg, Jörg; Hofer, Silvia; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Hentschel, Bettina; Westphal, Manfred; Krex, Dietmar; Simon, Matthias; Schnell, Oliver; Wick, Wolfgang; Reifenberger, Guido; Weller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ependymal tumors in adults are rare, accounting for less than 4 % of primary tumors of the central nervous system in this age group. The low prevalence of intracranial ependymoma in adults limits the ability to perform clinical trials. Therefore, treatment decisions are based on small, mostly retrospective studies and the role of chemotherapy has remained unclear. We performed a retrospective study on 17 adult patients diagnosed with intracranial World Health Organisation grade II or III ependymoma, who were treated with chemotherapy at any time during the disease course. Benefit from chemotherapy was estimated by applying Macdonald criteria. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated from start of chemotherapy, using the Kaplan-Meier method. Eleven patients had supratentorial and 6 infratentorial tumors. Ten patients were treated with temozolomide (TMZ), 3 with procarbazine/lomustine/vincristine (PCV), 3 with platinum-based chemotherapy and 1 patient received epirubicin/ifosfamide. Response rates were as follows: TMZ 8/10 stable disease; PCV 3/3 stable disease; platinum-based chemotherapy 1/3 partial response; epirubicin/ifosfamide 1/1 complete response. PFS rates at 6, 12 and 24 months were 52.9, 35.3 and 23.5 %. OS rates at 6, 12 and 24 months were 82.4, 82.4 and 70.1 %. There was no indication for a favourable prognostic role of O 6 -methylguanyl-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation which was detected in 3/12 investigated tumors. Survival outcomes in response to chemotherapy in adult intracranial ependymoma patients vary substantially, but individual patients may respond to any kind of chemotherapy. There were too few patients to compare survival data between chemotherapeutic subgroups. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2323-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  5. Paradox of Prescribing Late Chemotherapy: Oncologists Explain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluhm, Minnie; Connell, Cathleen M; De Vries, Raymond G; Janz, Nancy K; Bickel, Kathleen E; Silveira, Maria J

    2016-12-01

    The value of chemotherapy for patients with cancer in the last weeks of life warrants examination. Late chemotherapy may not improve survival or quality of life but typically precludes hospice enrollment and may result in additional symptoms, increased use of other aggressive treatments, and worsening quality of life. Few studies have explored oncologists' rationales for administering chemotherapy near death. This study examines the self-reported factors that influence oncologists' decisions about late chemotherapy. In-depth individual interviews were conducted with 17 oncologists through a semistructured interview guide. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were coded and analyzed using conventional content analysis, a qualitative method that allows the detection and analysis of patterns in the data. Clinical factors take priority in determining late chemotherapy decisions when clear treatment choices exist. When clinical factors are ambiguous, emotion becomes a highly salient influence. Oncologists view late chemotherapy to be patient driven and use it to palliate emotional distress and maintain patient hope even when physical benefit is unexpected. Oncologists experience unique and difficult challenges when caring for dying patients, including emotionally draining communication, overwhelming responsibility for life/death, limitations of oncology to heal, and prognostic uncertainty. These challenges are also eased by offering late chemotherapy. The findings reveal a nuanced understanding of why oncologists find it difficult to refuse chemotherapy treatment for patients near death. Optimal end-of-life treatment decisions require supportive interventions and system change, both of which must take into account the challenges oncologists face.

  6. [Oral complications of chemotherapy of malignant neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obralić, N; Tahmiscija, H; Kobaslija, S; Beslija, S

    1999-01-01

    Function and integrity disorders of the oral cavity fall into the most frequent complication of the chemotherapy of leucemias, malignant lymphomas and solid tumors. Complications associated with cancer chemotherapy can be direct ones, resulting from the toxic action of antineoplastic agents on the proliferative lining of the mouth, or indirect, as a result of myelosuppression and immunosuppression. The most frequent oral complications associated with cancer chemotherapy are mucositis, infection and bleeding. The principles of prevention and management of oral complications during cancer chemotherapy are considered in this paper.

  7. Combination Chemotherapy for Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Webster

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in April 2009 and the continuous evolution of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses underscore the urgency of novel approaches to chemotherapy for human influenza infection. Anti-influenza drugs are currently limited to the neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir and to M2 ion channel blockers (amantadine and rimantadine, although resistance to the latter class develops rapidly. Potential targets for the development of new anti-influenza agents include the viral polymerase (and endonuclease, the hemagglutinin, and the non-structural protein NS1. The limitations of monotherapy and the emergence of drug-resistant variants make combination chemotherapy the logical therapeutic option. Here we review the experimental data on combination chemotherapy with currently available agents and the development of new agents and therapy targets.

  8. Pre-Irradiation Chemotherapy in High Risk Medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd-El-Aal, H.

    2006-01-01

    Rationale: The present study evaluates the effect of pre-irradiation chemotherapy in pediatric patients with high risk medulloblastoma. Twenty-four (24) pediatric patients attended the pediatric unit of Kasr-EI-Aini Center of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine (NEMROCK) from January 2000 to January 2003. Patients and Methods: Our patients were 13 boys and II girls aged 3-12 years with a median of 6.5 years. According to Chang staging system 6 cases had T2, 14 cases had T3 A and 4 cases had T3 B, 20 cases were M0, 3 cases were M I and I case was M2. All patients were treated by initial surgery, 2 cycles of pre-irradiation chemotherapy followed by craniospinal radiation then by 4 cycles of post-radiation chemotherapy. Results: Fifteen out of the 20 patients with M0 had objective response (10CR + 5PR) and no one had disease progression after pre-irradiation chemotherapy. Among 4 patients with M0 disease, 2 patients had PR and 2 had S.D. There was no disease progression among patients who received pre-irradiation chemotherapy. The 3-year overall survival and 3-year progression-free survival; (PFS) were 50% and 51 %, respectively, Myelosuppression was the main toxic effect observed during pre-irradiation chemotherapy; however, there was no delay or interruption of craniospinal irradiation. Conclusion: Pre-irradiation chemotherapy is effective in high risk medulloblastoma and is associated with acceptable side effects. The delay in craniospinal irradiation (CSI) for about 5 weeks to receive 2 courses of chemotherapy will not significantly increase disease progression. Multiple cycles of post-irradiation chemotherapy can be given safely after C51. A larger number of patients and longer follow-up is needed to confirm the results

  9. Comparing Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy Combined With Intravesical Chemotherapy Versus Intravesical Chemotherapy Alone: A Randomised Prospective Pilot Study for T1G3 Bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma After Bladder-Preserving Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Junxing, E-mail: Junxingchen@hotmail.com; Yao, Zhijun, E-mail: yaozhijun1985@qq.com; Qiu, Shaopeng, E-mail: qiushp@mail.sysu.edu.cn; Chen, Lingwu, E-mail: chenlingwu@hotmail.com [First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Urology (China); Wang, Yu, E-mail: zsyyjr@163.com; Yang, Jianyong, E-mail: yangjianyong_2011@163.com; Li, Jiaping, E-mail: jpli3s@126.com [First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Interventional Oncology (China)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To compare the efficacy of intra-arterial chemotherapy combined with intravesical chemotherapy versus intravesical chemotherapy alone for T1G3 bladder transitional cell carcinoma (BTCC) followed by bladder-preserving surgery. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with T1G3 BTCC were randomly divided into two groups. After bladder-preserving surgery, 29 patients (age 30-80 years, 24 male and 5 female) received intra-arterial chemotherapy in combination with intravesical chemotherapy (group A), whereas 31 patients (age 29-83 years, 26 male and 5 female) were treated with intravesical chemotherapy alone (group B). Twenty-nine patients were treated with intra-arterial epirubicin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) + cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2}) chemotherapy 2-3 weeks after bladder-preserving surgery once every 4-6 weeks. All of the patients received the same intravesical chemotherapy: An immediate prophylactic was administered in the first 6 h. After that, therapy was administered one time per week for 8 weeks and then one time per month for 8 months. The instillation drug was epirubicin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) and lasted for 30-40 min each time. The end points were tumour recurrence (stage Ta, T1), tumour progression (to T2 or greater), and disease-specific survival. During median follow-up of 22 months, the overall survival rate, tumour-specific death rate, recurrence rate, progression rate, time to first recurrence, and adverse reactions were compared between groups. Results: The recurrence rates were 10.3 % (3 of 29) in group A and 45.2 % (14 of 31) in group B, and the progression rates were 0 % (0 of 29) in group A and 22.6 % (7 of 31) in group B. There was a significant difference between the two groups regarding recurrence (p = 0.004) and progression rates (p = 0.011). Median times to first recurrence in the two groups were 15 and 6.5 months, respectively. The overall survival rates were 96.6 and 87.1 %, and the tumour-specific death rates were 0 % (0 of 29) and 13.5 % (4 of 31

  10. Adjuvant chemotherapy for endometrial cancer after hysterectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nick; Bryant, Andrew; Miles, Tracie; Hogberg, Thomas; Cornes, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial adenocarcinoma (womb cancer) is a malignant growth of the lining (endometrium) of the womb (uterus). It is distinct from sarcomas (tumours of the uterine muscle). Survival depends the risk of microscopic metastases after surgery. Adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy improves survival from some other adenocarcinomas, and there is evidence that endometrial cancer is sensitive to cytotoxic therapy. This systematic review examines the effect of chemotherapy on survival after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer. Objectives To assess efficacy of adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy for endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE and EMBASE up to August 2010, registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adjuvant chemotherapy with any other adjuvant treatment or no other treatment. Data collection and analysis We used a random-effects meta-analysis to assess hazard ratios (HR) for overall and progression-free survival and risk ratios (RR) to compare death rates and site of initial relapse. Main results Five RCTs compared no additional treatment with additional chemotherapy after hysterectomy and radiotherapy. Four trials compared platinum based combination chemotherapy directly with radiotherapy. Indiscriminate pooling of survival data from 2197 women shows a significant overall survival advantage from adjuvant chemotherapy (RR (95% CI) = 0.88 (0.79 to 0.99)). Sensitivity analysis focused on trials of modern platinum based chemotherapy regimens and found the relative risk of death to be 0.85 ((0.76 to 0.96); number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT) = 25; absolute risk reduction = 4% (1% to 8%)). The HR for overall survival is 0.74 (0.64 to 0.89), significantly

  11. n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation during cancer chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Morland, Sarah Louise; Martins, Karen J.B.; Mazurak, Vera C.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from several clinical trials suggests that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) supplementation during cancer chemotherapy improves patient outcomes related to chemotherapy tolerability, regardless of the type of chemotherapy used. While the effects of n-3 PUFA supplementation during chemotherapy have been the subject of several reviews, the mechanisms by which n-3 PUFA improve patient responses through improved chemotherapy tolerability are unclear. There are several barriers c...

  12. Nanoscale drug delivery for targeted chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yong; Huang, Qian; Tang, Jian-Qin; Hou, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Pei; Zhang, Long Zhen; Jiang, Guan

    2016-08-28

    Despite significant improvements in diagnostic methods and innovations in therapies for specific cancers, effective treatments for neoplastic diseases still represent major challenges. Nanotechnology as an emerging technology has been widely used in many fields and also provides a new opportunity for the targeted delivery of cancer drugs. Nanoscale delivery of chemotherapy drugs to the tumor site is highly desirable. Recent studies have shown that nanoscale drug delivery systems not only have the ability to destroy cancer cells but may also be carriers for chemotherapy drugs. Some studies have demonstrated that delivery of chemotherapy via nanoscale carriers has greater therapeutic benefit than either treatment modality alone. In this review, novel approaches to nanoscale delivery of chemotherapy are described and recent progress in this field is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Bleeding Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Bleeding Problems “My nurse said that chemotherapy could make ... with a clean cloth. Keep pressing until the bleeding stops. If you bruise: Put ice on the ...

  14. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer: Is it needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinis, Kristijonas; Thornton, Michael; Montazeri, Amir; Rooney, Paul S

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has become a standard treatment of advanced rectal cancer in the West. The benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery alone have been well established. However, controversy surrounds the use adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy, despite it being recommended by a number of international guidelines. Results of recent multicentre randomised control trials showed no benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in terms of survival and rates of distant metastases. However, concerns exist regarding the quality of the studies including inadequate staging modalities, out-dated chemotherapeutic regimens and surgical approaches and small sample sizes. It has become evident that not all the patients respond to adjuvant chemotherapy and more personalised approach should be employed when considering the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy. The present review discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the current evidence-base and suggests improvements for future studies. PMID:26677436

  15. Adjuvant chemotherapy compliance is not superior after thoracoscopic lobectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Peter B; Schytte, Tine; Jakobsen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is generally assumed that patient compliance with adjuvant chemotherapy is superior after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery compared with open lobectomy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The level of evidence for this assumption, however, is limited to single-institution, ......BACKGROUND: It is generally assumed that patient compliance with adjuvant chemotherapy is superior after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery compared with open lobectomy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The level of evidence for this assumption, however, is limited to single...... adjuvant chemotherapy and 121 (38.7%) completed all four cycles. Ordinal logistic regression revealed that chemotherapy compliance (none, partial, and full chemotherapy) was significantly reduced by the patient's age (p....02). No significant difference between video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and thoracotomy was seen regarding chemotherapy compliance (p=0.17), number of chemotherapy cycles (p=0.60), or time from surgery to chemotherapy (p = 0.41). CONCLUSIONS: Complete national data do not support the widespread assumption...

  16. The impacts of a pharmacist-managed outpatient clinic and chemotherapy-directed electronic order sets for monitoring oral chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battis, Brandon; Clifford, Linda; Huq, Mostaqul; Pejoro, Edrick; Mambourg, Scott

    2017-12-01

    Objectives Patients treated with oral chemotherapy appear to have less contact with the treating providers. As a result, safety, adherence, medication therapy monitoring, and timely follow-up may be compromised. The trend of treating cancer with oral chemotherapy agents is on the rise. However, standard clinical guidance is still lacking for prescribing, monitoring, patient education, and follow-up of patients on oral chemotherapy across the healthcare settings. The purpose of this project is to establish an oral chemotherapy monitoring clinic, to create drug and lab specific provider order sets for prescribing and lab monitoring, and ultimately to ensure safe and effective treatment of the veterans we serve. Methods A collaborative agreement was reached among oncology pharmacists, a pharmacy resident, two oncologists, and a physician assistant to establish a pharmacist-managed oral chemotherapy monitoring clinic at the VA Sierra Nevada Healthcare System. Drug-specific electronic order sets for prescribing and lab monitoring were created for initiating new drug therapy and prescription renewal. The order sets were created to be provider-centric, minimizing clicks needed to order necessary medications and lab monitoring. A standard progress note template was developed for documenting interventions made by the clinic. Patients new to an oral chemotherapy regimen were first counseled by an oncology pharmacist. The patients were then enrolled into the oral chemotherapy monitoring clinic for subsequent follow up and pharmacist interventions. Further, patients lacking monitoring or missing provider appointments were captured through a Clinical Dashboard developed by the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Regional Office (VISN21) using SQL Server Reporting Services. Between September 2014 and April 2015, a total of 68 patients on different oral chemotherapy agents were enrolled into the clinic. Results Out of the 68 patients enrolled into the oral chemotherapy

  17. Study on combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy of the microcellular bronchial carcinoma (CCR study): chemo-/radiotherapy opposed to radio-/chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmann, H.P.; Buenemann, H.; Arnal, M.L.; Calavrezos, A.; Engel, J.; Hain, E.; Koschel, G.; Seysen, U.; Allgemeines Krankenhaus Harburg, Hamburg; Franke, H.D.; Juengst, G.; Kohl, F.V.; Wichert, P. v.

    1983-01-01

    The authors studied the effect of a chemo-/radiotherapy or radio-/chemotherapy on 52 cases of microcellular bronchial carcinoma, classification ''limited disease''. The survival curves were slightly better for the patients submitted to primary chemotherapy, but the difference was not statistically significant, and the curves coincided again after 18 months. 60 to 80% of the patients had no complaints or only unimportant complaints during more than half of their survival time. In 23 patients with ''extensive disease'' who received only a symptomatic therapy or a combined palliative chemotherapy, chemotherapy had a slightly better effect, but this was not statistically significant. (orig.) [de

  18. Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in Asian women with breast cancer receiving anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdeanu, Laura; Frankel, Paul; Yu, Wai; Hendrix, Gregory; Pal, Sumanta; Badr, Lina; Somlo, George; Luu, Thehang

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) remain among the most frequently reported distressing side effects associated with anthracycline-based chemotherapy despite significant advances in antiemetic management. The main risk factor for severity of CINV is the emetogenic potential of the chemotherapeutic agents. However, patient-related risk factors have been identified, including genetic makeup. Although studies have noted that ethnicity influences nausea and vomiting in other contexts, there is a paucity of research regarding the impact of ethnicity on CINV. This study was undertaken to evaluate whether Asian women receiving anthracycline-based chemotherapy experience more CINV than non-Asians. A retrospective, comparative, correlational chart review was performed to abstract the relevant variables. Data from a convenience sample of 358 women with breast cancer who received chemotherapy with doxorubicin between 2004 and 2008 at City of Hope in Duarte, California, were evaluated. The sample consisted of Caucasians (45%), Hispanics (27.7%), Asians (19.8%), and African Americans (7.5%). The results indicate that Asian women with breast cancer undergoing anthracycline-based chemotherapy experienced statistically significantly more clinically important CINV than their non-Asian counterparts. The data were collected retrospectively, with a certain population distribution at a specific time. This study provides interesting preliminary evidence that Asian ethnicity plays a role in the development of severe CINV. When managing chemotherapy toxicities in women with breast cancer, health-care providers should tailor therapy to individual risk profiles. Specifically, consideration of antiemetic therapy should accommodate patient characteristics, such as Asian descent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nanotechnology for Cancer Therapy Based on Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yang Zhao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy has been widely applied in clinics. However, the therapeutic potential of chemotherapy against cancer is seriously dissatisfactory due to the nonspecific drug distribution, multidrug resistance (MDR and the heterogeneity of cancer. Therefore, combinational therapy based on chemotherapy mediated by nanotechnology, has been the trend in clinical research at present, which can result in a remarkably increased therapeutic efficiency with few side effects to normal tissues. Moreover, to achieve the accurate pre-diagnosis and real-time monitoring for tumor, the research of nano-theranostics, which integrates diagnosis with treatment process, is a promising field in cancer treatment. In this review, the recent studies on combinational therapy based on chemotherapy will be systematically discussed. Furthermore, as a current trend in cancer treatment, advance in theranostic nanoparticles based on chemotherapy will be exemplified briefly. Finally, the present challenges and improvement tips will be presented in combination therapy and nano-theranostics.

  20. Nanotechnology for Cancer Therapy Based on Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen-Yang Zhao; Rui Cheng; Zhe Yang; Zhong-Min Tian

    2018-01-01

    Chemotherapy has been widely applied in clinics. However, the therapeutic potential of chemotherapy against cancer is seriously dissatisfactory due to the nonspecific drug distribution, multidrug resistance (MDR) and the heterogeneity of cancer. Therefore, combinational therapy based on chemotherapy mediated by nanotechnology, has been the trend in clinical research at present, which can result in a remarkably increased therapeutic efficiency with few side effects to normal tissues. Moreover,...

  1. Overview, prevention and management of chemotherapy extravasation

    OpenAIRE

    Kreidieh, Firas Y; Moukadem, Hiba A; El Saghir, Nagi S

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy extravasation remains an accidental complication of chemotherapy administration and may result in serious damage to patients. We review in this article the clinical aspects of chemotherapy extravasation and latest advances in definitions, classification, prevention, management and guidelines. We review the grading of extravasation and tissue damage according to various chemotherapeutic drugs and present an update on treatment and new antidotes including dexrazoxane for anthracycl...

  2. Pregnancy outcomes after chemotherapy for trophoblastic neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mila Trementosa; Lin, Lawrence Hsu; Fushida, Koji; Francisco, Rossana Pulcineli Vieira; Zugaib, Marcelo

    2016-12-01

    The successful development of chemotherapy enabled a fertilitysparing treatment for patients with trophoblastic neoplasia. After disease remission, the outcome of a subsequent pregnancy becomes a great concern for these women. To analyze existing studies in the literature that describe the reproductive outcomes of patients with trophoblastic neoplasia treated with chemotherapy. Systematic review was performed searching for articles on Medline/ Pubmed, Lilacs and Cochrane Library databases, using the terms "gestational trophoblastic disease" and "pregnancy outcome". A total of 18 articles were included. No evidence of decreased fertility after chemotherapy for trophoblastic neoplasia was observed. The abortion rates in patients who conceived within 6 months after chemotherapy was higher compared to those who waited longer. Some studies showed increased rates of stillbirth and repeat hydatidiform moles. Only one work showed increased congenital abnormalities. The pregnancies conceived after chemotherapy for trophoblastic neoplasia should be followed with clinical surveillance due to higher rates of some pregnancy complications. However, studies in the literature provide reassuring data about reproductive outcomes of these patients.

  3. Ovarian carcinoma: Role of radiation therapy versus chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shehata, W.M.; Meyer, R.L.; Cormier, W.J.; Jazy, F.K.

    1986-01-01

    The authors evaluated 83 patients with ovarian cancer who were irradiated or treated by a combination of cytoxan, adriamycin, and cisplatin. According to FIGO stage, eight patients had stage I disease, 12 had stage II disease, 61 had stage II disease and two has stage IV disease. Fifty patients had bulky disease and 33 had minimal disease of 2 cm or less. Sixty patients were irradiated to an open abdominopelvic field (30 Gy delivered over 4 weeks), with or without a pelvic boost. Fifty-five patients received combination chemotherapy and 30 received a single agent as initial therapy. The patients were divided into three groups. The 26 patients in group I received primary radiation therapy with or with out adjuvant single-agent chemotherapy, then combination chemotherapy to salvage. The 34 patients in group II were irradiated after chemotherapy, mainly combination chemotherapy, failed. The 23 patients in group III received, mainly combination chemotherapy with second-line drugs for salvage

  4. Evaluation of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Li; Deng Zhiyong

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy has become the standardized treatment for patients with locally advanced breast cancer. With the wide application of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in clinic, evaluation of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy seems increasingly important. How to evaluate the curative effect of chemotherapy timely, accurately, effectively and noninvasively has become the focus of clinical research. At present, clinical palpation,radiographic measurement and pathological examination are usually used in clinic, and the study of breast cancer biology factor is also rapidly spread. The application status of different evaluation methods of neoadjuvant chemotherapy were reviewed in this article. (authors)

  5. Liposome-encapsulated chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børresen, B.; Hansen, A. E.; Kjær, A.

    2018-01-01

    Cytotoxic drugs encapsulated into liposomes were originally designed to increase the anticancer response, while minimizing off-target adverse effects. The first liposomal chemotherapeutic drug was approved for use in humans more than 20years ago, and the first publication regarding its use...... to inherent issues with the enhanced permeability and retention effect, the tumour phenomenon which liposomal drugs exploit. This effect seems very heterogeneously distributed in the tumour. Also, it is potentially not as ubiquitously occurring as once thought, and it may prove important to select patients...... not resolve the other challenges that liposomal chemotherapy faces, and more work still needs to be done to determine which veterinary patients may benefit the most from liposomal chemotherapy....

  6. Combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the clinically confirmed benefits of combined chemotherapy-radiotherapy. They have been found in a small group of diseases that respond to chemotherapy alone. According to the author, only when a drug or drug combination has the ability to eradicate occult disease or substantially to reduce the size of objectively measurable disease is there likely to be an demonstrable benefit from its use in conjunction with radiotherapy. It is the author's belief that the immediate future lies in selecting drugs and patients in which a good chemotherapeutic response can be expected, avoiding drugs that seriously enhance radiation damage to normal tissues and keeping drug and radiation treatments far enough apart in time to minimize interactions

  7. Photon buildup factors of some chemotherapy drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaz, Esra; Ahmadishadbad, Nader; Özdemir, Yüksel

    2015-02-01

    Everyday more and more people are diagnosed with some form of cancer. Some are treatable with chemotherapy alone, while others need radiotherapy and occasionally surgery. Recently, concurrent administration of chemotherapy and radiotherapy has been increasingly used in cancer treatment, leading to improvements in survival as well as quality of life. Accordingly, interaction of chemotherapy drugs with radiation will be meaningful to examine. In the present study, gamma ray energy absorption and exposure of buildup factors were computed using the five-parameter geometric progression (G-P) fitting formula for some chemotherapy drugs in the energy range 0.015-15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mean free path (mfp). The generated energy absorption (EABF) and exposure buildup factors (EBF) of chemotherapy drugs have been studied as a function of penetration depth and incident photon energy. The significant variations in EABF and EBF for chemotherapy drugs have been observed at the moderate energy region. It has been concluded that the buildup of photons is less in azathioprine and is more in vinblastine compared with other drugs. Buildup factors investigated in the present work could be useful in radiation dosimetry and therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Modelling of tumour repopulation after chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, Loredana; Bezak, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Full text: While repopulation is a clinically observed phe nomenon after radiotherapy, repopulation of tumour cells between cycles of chemotherapy is usually a neglected factor in cancer treatment. As the effect of both radiotherapy and chemotherapy on tumour cells is the same (attack on cancer cells), the response of the tumour to injury and cell loss from the two treatment methods should be similar, including repopulation. Cell recruitment is known to be a possible mechanism responsible for tumour regrowth after radio therapy. The literature data regarding mechanisms of repopulation after chemotherapy is very limited. The current paper employs a Monte Carlo modelling approach to implement the pharmacokinetics of a widely used drug (cisplatin) into a previously developed vit1ual head and neck tumour and to study the effect of cisplatin on tumour regres sion and regrowth during treatment. The mechanism of cell recruitment was modelled by releasing various percentages (5-50%) of quiescent cells into the mitotic cycle after each chemotherapy cell kill. The onset of repopulation was also simulated, with both immediate onset and late onset of cell recruitment. Repopulation during chemotherapy, if occu ring, is a highly potent phenomenon, similar to drug resis tance, therefore it should not be neglected during treatment.

  9. Effectiveness of gabapentin pharmacotherapy in chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnowska, Magdalena; Iżycka, Natalia; Kapoła-Czyż, Joanna; Romała, Anna; Lorek, Jakub; Spaczyński, Marek; Nowak-Markwitz, Ewa

    2018-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common chemotherapy side effect, but its prevention and treatment remains a challenge. Neurotoxicity may lead to dose limitation or even treatment discontinuation, and therefore potentially affect the efficacy of anticancer treatment and long term outcomes. The practice to administer gabapentin for neuropathy may be applicable, but is limited by insufficient studies. The aim of our study was to assess the presence of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in ovarian cancer patients treated with first-line paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy and evaluate the effectiveness of gabapentin in treatment of this condition. 61 ovarian cancer patients treated with first line chemotherapy were included in the study. The first phase of the study was to assess neurological condition of each patient by: neuropathy symptoms scale, McGill's scale, neurological deficit and quality of life, during the chemotherapy. In the second phase of the study we evaluated the response to gabapentin treatment in a group of patients who developed neuropathy. 78.7% of the patients developed chemotherapy related neuropathy. During the course of chemotherapy these patients experienced significant exacerbation of neuropathy symptoms (p peripheral neuropathy.

  10. Chemotherapy in thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.; Shah, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Chemotherapy alone, either as a single drug or a combination of drugs with or without external radiation (ER) is useful for treatment of locally advanced disease and non iodine concentrating metastasis in differentiated thyroid cancers (DTC). The reported response is not encouraging, but the absence of better alternatives leave no choice for the treatment of such cases. However, for treatment of anaplastic thyroid cancers (ANC), chemotherapy (CT) in combination with ER results in local control. In medullary thyroid cancers (MTC), the results obtained with multimodal treatment are encouraging

  11. Long-term chemotherapy-related cardiovascular morbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinardi, MT; Gietema, JA; van Veldhuisen, DJ; van der Graaf, WTA; de Vries, EGE; Sleijfer, DT

    2000-01-01

    As a consequence of-the successful use of chemotherapy in the treatment of curable neoplasms such as germ cell tumours and malignant lymphomas, and the increasing application of primary and adjuvant chemotherapy for various tumour types. the number of patients with a prolonged life expectancy after

  12. Adjuvant chemotherapy and cancer cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertino, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    The use of chemotherapy as an adjuvant to surgery and/or radiotherapy is well founded in experimental tumor systems and appears to be effective in patients in some circumstances. It is clear from both clinical and experimental studies that (1) the dose is important, (2) the earlier chemotherapy is started after primary therapy the better, and (3) combination chemotherapy may be more effective than single-agent treatment. The better the estimation of risk of recurrence, the better the assessment of the risk-benefit ratio with adjuvant therapy. Salvage therapy as well as relative risk of recurrence are considerations in the choice of patients to be treated. Finally, some evidence is presented to indicate that alkylating agents may not be necessary in combination regimens for adjuvant therapy if effective antimetabolite combinations are available

  13. WE-D-BRE-04: Modeling Optimal Concurrent Chemotherapy Schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, J; Deasy, J O

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Concurrent chemo-radiation therapy (CCRT) has become a more common cancer treatment option with a better tumor control rate for several tumor sites, including head and neck and lung cancer. In this work, possible optimal chemotherapy schedules were investigated by implementing chemotherapy cell-kill into a tumor response model of RT. Methods: The chemotherapy effect has been added into a published model (Jeong et al., PMB (2013) 58:4897), in which the tumor response to RT can be simulated with the effects of hypoxia and proliferation. Based on the two-compartment pharmacokinetic model, the temporal concentration of chemotherapy agent was estimated. Log cell-kill was assumed and the cell-kill constant was estimated from the observed increase in local control due to concurrent chemotherapy. For a simplified two cycle CCRT regime, several different starting times and intervals were simulated with conventional RT regime (2Gy/fx, 5fx/wk). The effectiveness of CCRT was evaluated in terms of reduction in radiation dose required for 50% of control to find the optimal chemotherapy schedule. Results: Assuming the typical slope of dose response curve (γ50=2), the observed 10% increase in local control rate was evaluated to be equivalent to an extra RT dose of about 4 Gy, from which the cell-kill rate of chemotherapy was derived to be about 0.35. Best response was obtained when chemotherapy was started at about 3 weeks after RT began. As the interval between two cycles decreases, the efficacy of chemotherapy increases with broader range of optimal starting times. Conclusion: The effect of chemotherapy has been implemented into the resource-conservation tumor response model to investigate CCRT. The results suggest that the concurrent chemotherapy might be more effective when delayed for about 3 weeks, due to lower tumor burden and a larger fraction of proliferating cells after reoxygenation

  14. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Su Zy; Wu, Hong Gyun; Heo, Dae Seog; Park, Cham II

    2000-01-01

    To see the relationship between the response to chemotherapy and the final outcome of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer. A retrospective analysis was done for thirty-two patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer treated in the Seoul National University Hospital with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy from August 1979 to July 1997. The patients were treated with Co-60 teletherapy unit or 4MV or 6MV photon beam produced by linear accelerator. Daily fractionation was 1.75 to 2 Gy, delivered five times a week. Total dose ranged from 60.8 Gy to 73.8 Gy. Twenty-nine patients received continuous infusion of cisplatin and 5-FU. Other patients were treated with cisplatin combined with bleomycin or vinblastin. Twenty-four (75%) patients received all three prescribed cycles of chemotherapy delivered three weeks apart. Six patients received two cycles, and two patients received only one cycle. The overall 2-year and 5-year survival rates are 65.6% and 43.0, respectively. 5-year local control rate is 34%. Organ preservation for more than five years is achieved in 12 patients (38%). After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 24 patients achieved more than partial remission (PR); the response rate was 75% (24/32). Five patients had complete remission (CR), 19 patients PR, and 8 patients no response (NR). Among the 19 patients who had PR to chemotherapy, 8 patients achieved CR after radiotherapy. Among the 8 non-responders to chemotherapy, 2 patients achieved CR, and 6 patients achieved PR after radiotherapy, There was no non-responder after radiotherapy. The overall survival rates were 60% for CR to chemotherapy group, 35.1 % for PR to chemotherapy group, and 50% for NR to chemotherapy group. respectively (p=0.93). There were significant difference in five-year overall survival rates between the patients with CR and PR after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy (73.3% vs. 14.7%, p< 0.01). The prognostic

  15. Non-medical prescribing of chemotherapy: engaging stakeholders to maximise success?

    OpenAIRE

    Lennan, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Aim This study report examines the views and experiences of professional stakeholders about non-medical prescribing (NMP) of chemotherapy. Background The introduction of open formulary NMP has created opportunities to radically change health-care delivery. For chemotherapy services, the most recent advice from the National Chemotherapy Advisory Group [Department of Health (2009) Chemotherapy Services in England, ensuring quality and safety: a report from the National Chemotherapy Advisory Gro...

  16. Combination radiotherapy and chemotherapy for primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Koga, Kenji; Kusuhara, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Takao; Takeuchi, Midori; Watanabe, Katsushi

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-six patients with carcinoma of the lung treated with radiotherapy alone or combination of chemotherapy were reviewed. Radiation was given with a 10MV photon beam by a linear accelerator. A fraction dose of 2Gy (200 rad) was given routinely 5 times a week. Combined durgs consist of 5FU or FT-207 in monochemotherapy and METT, MFC, or METVFC in combination chemotherapy. 5 year survival rate of all patients was 3.8%. As for the stage classification, 5 year survival rate is 30% in Stage I and II cancer, but there was no 3 year survivor in Stage III cancer and 2 year survivor in Stage IV cancer. As for the cell types, cases of adenocarcinoma had worse prognosis than them of squamous cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma. The prognosis of patients treated with combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy was similar to that of patients treated with radiotherapy alone. These results suggest that combined chemotherapy did not influence tumor control. Some discussion on the treatment modality of chemotherapy are made, emphasizing untoward effect of chemotherapy on immunopotency. (author)

  17. MRI of cervical carcinoma: before and after chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Sik; Suh, Soo Jhi; Choi, Tae Jin; Lee, Tae Sung; Suh, Young Wook

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate usefulness of MR in assessment of tumor response to the chemotherapy, we prospectively studied cases of cervical carcinoma with more than 2.5cm in diameter or stage IIb or more. Three courses of chemotherapy were performed with cisplatin and 5 F-U. MR images were obtained both before and after chemotherapy. Nine of 13 patients were undertaken radical hysterectomy after chemotherapy and MR amination. MR volumetry, stage and depth of stromal invasion were compared before and after chemotherapy. And in 9 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy, comparison of pathologic and MR imaging findings were also done. The results were following. 1) All tumors dectrased in volume (m = 80.5%). 2) Five tumors (38.5%) reduced in stage, IB → CIS (1); IIA → CIS (1), IIA → IB (2), IIB → IB (1). 3) Depth of stromal invasion in MRI correlated well with that of histopathologic specimen in 7 of the 9 patients. Conclusively MR imaging is useful in assessment of tumor response to chemotherapy

  18. Pregnancy outcomes after chemotherapy for trophoblastic neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILA TREMENTOSA GARCIA

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Introduction The successful development of chemotherapy enabled a fertilitysparing treatment for patients with trophoblastic neoplasia. After disease remission, the outcome of a subsequent pregnancy becomes a great concern for these women. Objective To analyze existing studies in the literature that describe the reproductive outcomes of patients with trophoblastic neoplasia treated with chemotherapy. Method Systematic review was performed searching for articles on Medline/ Pubmed, Lilacs and Cochrane Library databases, using the terms “gestational trophoblastic disease” and “pregnancy outcome”. Results A total of 18 articles were included. No evidence of decreased fertility after chemotherapy for trophoblastic neoplasia was observed. The abortion rates in patients who conceived within 6 months after chemotherapy was higher compared to those who waited longer. Some studies showed increased rates of stillbirth and repeat hydatidiform moles. Only one work showed increased congenital abnormalities. Conclusion The pregnancies conceived after chemotherapy for trophoblastic neoplasia should be followed with clinical surveillance due to higher rates of some pregnancy complications. However, studies in the literature provide reassuring data about reproductive outcomes of these patients.

  19. Metallic taste in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    IJpma, I; Renken, R J; Ter Horst, G J; Reyners, A K L

    2015-02-01

    Metallic taste is a taste alteration frequently reported by cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Attention to this side effect of chemotherapy is limited. This review addresses the definition, assessment methods, prevalence, duration, etiology, and management strategies of metallic taste in chemotherapy treated cancer patients. Literature search for metallic taste and chemotherapy was performed in PubMed up to September 2014, resulting in 184 articles of which 13 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria: English publications addressing metallic taste in cancer patients treated with FDA-approved chemotherapy. An additional search in Google Scholar, in related articles of both search engines, and subsequent in the reference lists, resulted in 13 additional articles included in this review. Cancer patient forums were visited to explore management strategies. Prevalence of metallic taste ranged from 9.7% to 78% among patients with various cancers, chemotherapy treatments, and treatment phases. No studies have been performed to investigate the influence of metallic taste on dietary intake, body weight, and quality of life. Several management strategies can be recommended for cancer patients: using plastic utensils, eating cold or frozen foods, adding strong herbs, spices, sweetener or acid to foods, eating sweet and sour foods, using 'miracle fruit' supplements, and rinsing with chelating agents. Although metallic taste is a frequent side effect of chemotherapy and a much discussed topic on cancer patient forums, literature regarding metallic taste among chemotherapy treated cancer patients is scarce. More awareness for this side effect can improve the support for these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Advanced Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avendano Juan; Buitrago, Giancarlo; Ramos, Pedro; Suescun Oscar

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To describe the experience at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) on the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy as primary treatment for epithelial ovarian cancer among patients in stages IIIC and IV. Methods: We conducted a descriptive retrospective study (case series type) of patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer in stages IIIC and IV, treated at the NCI from January 1, 2003 to December 31,2006, who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy as primary treatment. Demographic characteristics and clinical outcomes are described. Results: Seventeen patients who fulfilled the above mentioned criteria were selected. Once neoadjuvant chemotherapy ended, 5 patients (29.4%) achieved complete or partial clinical response; 4 (23.8%) remained in stable condition, and 8 (47.6%) showed signs of progressive illness. Interval debulking surgery was performed on objective response patients. Maximum cytoreduction was achieved in 5 patients (100%); first relapse was reported at month 18 of follow-up; 2 disease-free survivors were identified in December, 2007; 8 (49%) reported some degree of non-severe chemotherapy-related toxicity. No mortality was related to chemotherapy, no post surgical complications were observed and no patient required advanced support management. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by optimal interval debulking surgery among selected patients, can be an alternative treatment for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer among women with irresecability or the critically ill. Further studies with improved design are required to confirm these findings.

  1. Quality of life of lung cancer patients receiving outpatient chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    MATSUDA, AYAKO; KOBAYASHI, MIKA; SAKAKIBARA, YUMI; TAMAOKA, MEIYO; FURUIYE, MASASHI; INASE, NAOHIKO; MATSUSHIMA, EISUKE

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of cancer patients receive outpatient chemotherapy as an alternative to inpatient chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether quality of life (QOL) during outpatient chemotherapy was better than QOL prior to hospital discharge, and to explore possible related factors prior to hospital discharge that affected the QOL of lung cancer patients who received outpatient chemotherapy. Lung cancer inpatients who were scheduled for outpatient chemotherapy were as...

  2. Full dose CHOP chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, Shinichi; Kondo, Makoto; Ando, Yutaka; Yamashita, Shoji; Uematsu, Minoru; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Nishiguchi, Iku; Hashimoto, Shozo

    1985-01-01

    Since 1982, we have performed 125 courses of CHOP chemotherapy for 27 patients of malignancy, adhering to the original regimen as strictly as possible. CHOP chemotherapy consisted of Cyclophosphamide 750 mg/m 2 , iv, on day 1; Adriamycin 50 mg/m 2 , iv, on day 1; Vincristine 1.4 mg/m 2 , iv, on day 1 (maximum single dose 2.0 mg) and Prednisolone 50 mg/m 2 , po, day 1 through 5. The cycle was repeated every 21 days. As side effects, myelosuppression, hair loss, fever, nausea, vomiting, liver dysfunction, stomatitis, neuropathy, herpes zoster, arrhythmia and hemorrhagic cystitis were seen. Due to myelosuppression, twenty patients experienced febrile episodes at each nadir of WBC counts on 40 courses. However, any febrile patient did not have life threatening infection. Other side effects were also reversible. The radiotherapy of most patients was carried out as initially scheduled, except for 3 patients in whom irradiation was interrupted due to severe stomatitis or herpes zoster. We consider that CHOP chemotherapy is excellent in feasibility even when combined with radiotherapy. (author)

  3. Chemotherapy for bladder cancer: treatment guidelines for neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and metastatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Donat, S Machele; Bellmunt, Joaquim

    2007-01-01

    To determine the optimal use of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and metastatic setting in patients with advanced urothelial cell carcinoma, a consensus conference was convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Société Internationale d'Urologie (SIU) to critically review...

  4. Chemotherapy response as a prognosticator for survival in patients with limited squamous cell lung cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eagan, R.T.; Fleming, T.R.; Lee, R.E.; Ingle, J.N.; Frytak, S.; Creagan, E.T.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with limited unresectable squamous cell lung cancer were treated with 6 courses of combination chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, cisplatin, and bleomycin (CAP-Bleo) and short-course thoracic irradiation started after the first 4 weeks of chemotherapy. Of 20 patients with visible tumor who were treated with 4 weeks of chemotherapy alone, 10 (50%) had a tumor regression in that 4 week period and 10 did not. Those patients with tumor regression had significantly better progression free and overall survivals than did patients with no chemotherapy regressions (medians of 258 days vs. 136 days and 356 days vs. 150 days respectively). The original bleomycin dose had to be reduced by 50% primarily because of excessive radiation esophagitis that has not been reported with use of either the CAP regimen or bleomycin along in conjunction with thoracic irradiation. An initial chemotherapy regression seems to be a good prognosticator for progression-free and overall survival in patients with limited squamous cell lung cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy

  5. Chemotherapy versus chemoradiotherapy after surgery and preoperative chemotherapy for resectable gastric cancer (CRITICS): an international, open-label, randomised phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cats, Annemieke; Jansen, Edwin P M; van Grieken, Nicole C T; Sikorska, Karolina; Lind, Pehr; Nordsmark, Marianne; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, Elma; Boot, Henk; Trip, Anouk K; Swellengrebel, H A Maurits; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Putter, Hein; van Sandick, Johanna W; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I; Hartgrink, Henk H; van Tinteren, Harm; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Verheij, Marcel

    2018-05-01

    Both perioperative chemotherapy and postoperative chemoradiotherapy improve survival in patients with resectable gastric cancer from Europe and North America. To our knowledge, these treatment strategies have not been investigated in a head to head comparison. We aimed to compare perioperative chemotherapy with preoperative chemotherapy and postoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with resectable gastric adenocarcinoma. In this investigator-initiated, open-label, randomised phase 3 trial, we enrolled patients aged 18 years or older who had stage IB- IVA resectable gastric or gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma (as defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, sixth edition), with a WHO performance status of 0 or 1, and adequate cardiac, bone marrow, liver, and kidney function. Patients were enrolled from 56 hospitals in the Netherlands, Sweden, and Denmark, and were randomly assigned (1:1) with a computerised minimisation programme with a random element to either perioperative chemotherapy (chemotherapy group) or preoperative chemotherapy with postoperative chemoradiotherapy (chemoradiotherapy group). Randomisation was done before patients were given any preoperative chemotherapy treatment and was stratified by histological subtype, tumour localisation, and hospital. Patients and investigators were not masked to treatment allocation. Surgery consisted of a radical resection of the primary tumour and at least a D1+ lymph node dissection. Postoperative treatment started within 4-12 weeks after surgery. Chemotherapy consisted of three preoperative 21-day cycles and three postoperative cycles of intravenous epirubicin (50 mg/m 2 on day 1), cisplatin (60 mg/m 2 on day 1) or oxaliplatin (130 mg/m 2 on day 1), and capecitabine (1000 mg/m 2 orally as tablets twice daily for 14 days in combination with epirubicin and cisplatin, or 625 mg/m 2 orally as tablets twice daily for 21 days in combination with epirubicin and oxaliplatin), received once every three weeks

  6. The interplay of immunotherapy and chemotherapy: harnessing potential synergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emens, Leisha A; Middleton, Gary

    2015-05-01

    Although cancer chemotherapy has historically been considered immune suppressive, it is now accepted that certain chemotherapies can augment tumor immunity. The recent success of immune checkpoint inhibitors has renewed interest in immunotherapies, and in combining them with chemotherapy to achieve additive or synergistic clinical activity. Two major ways that chemotherapy promotes tumor immunity are by inducing immunogenic cell death as part of its intended therapeutic effect and by disrupting strategies that tumors use to evade immune recognition. This second strategy, in particular, is dependent on the drug, its dose, and the schedule of chemotherapy administration in relation to antigen exposure or release. In this Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads article, we focus on cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint blockade as a forum for reviewing preclinical and clinical data demonstrating the interplay between immunotherapy and chemotherapy. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zubairi, Ishtiaq H

    2006-08-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting are symptoms that cause major concern to oncology patients. This article explores the types of nausea and vomiting in the context of chemotherapy, and discusses their pathogenesis and management.

  8. The role of chemotherapy in brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohori, Hisatsugu; Takahashi, Shin; Ishioka, Chikashi

    2007-01-01

    Brain metastases are the most common intracranial tumors and their incidence is increasing. Untreated brain metastases have a very poor prognosis with a median survival of 1-2 months. Despite the use of surgery and radiotherapy including whole-brain radiation and stereotactic radiosurgery to locally control brain metastases, survival times for those patients has not improved. Although chemotherapy plays a limited role in the treatment of brain metastases, metastases from lung or breast cancer are often well-controlled by chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence suggest that brain metastases are equally sensitive to chemotherapy as are metastases elsewhere in the body in particular chemotherapy-naive cases. Finally, since nearly a half of patients with brain metastases die from progression of systemic disease, control of systemic disease as well as intracranial disease are both important. (author)

  9. Chemotherapy Agents: A Primer for the Interventional Radiologist

    OpenAIRE

    Mihlon, Frank; Ray, Charles E.; Messersmith, Wells

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors review the basic principles of cancer chemotherapy and provide an overview of each of the general classes of chemotherapeutic agents with a target audience of interventional radiologists in mind. Special attention is paid to agents used in regional chemotherapy as well as agents commonly included in systemic chemotherapeutic regimens for patients who also require regional chemotherapy.

  10. Efficacy of S-1 plus nedaplatin compared to standard second-line chemotherapy in EGFR-negative lung adenocarcinoma after failure of first-line chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yu; Wang, Wei; Teng, Xiu-Zhi; Shi, Lin

    2014-09-01

    For patients with advanced non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma that fail to respond to first-line chemotherapy and that do not involve epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, previous empirical analysis showed that a single second-line chemotherapy agent may be inadequate for the control of further tumor development. This study examines the combination of S-1 drugs and nedaplatin that has no cross-resistance to first-line treatments; 179 cases of IIIb-IV stage non-small-cell lung adenocarcinoma that failed to respond to first-line chemotherapy were included, and these subjects did not have mutated EGFRs. In the present study, S-1 plus nedaplatin chemotherapy was better than standard second-line chemotherapy options in the treatment of advanced lung adenocarcinoma that did not involve EGFR mutations and that failed to respond to first-line chemotherapy. Additionally, the combination of S-1 and nedaplatin seemed to be well tolerated, making this chemotherapy technique a potentially strong candidate for the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung adenocarcinoma.

  11. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy : Impact on quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheel, A.; Beijers, A.J.M.; Mols, F.; Faber, C.G.; Vreugdenhil, G.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a frequently occurring side-effect of chemotherapy as a cancer treatment. The incidence of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is increasing as a consequence of better treatment of cancer becoming available and increasing use of chemotherapy, and because CIPN

  12. Intravenous Lidocaine Infusion to Treat Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papapetrou, Peter; Kumar, Aashish J; Muppuri, Rudram; Chakrabortty, Shushovan

    2015-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a debilitating side effect of chemotherapy, which manifests as paresthesias, dysesthesias, and numbness in the hands and feet. Numerous chemoprotective agents and treatments have been used with limited success to treat chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. We report a case in which a patient presenting with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy received an IV lidocaine infusion over the course of 60 minutes with complete symptomatic pain relief for a prolonged period of 2 weeks.

  13. Fertility preservation after chemotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kaaij, Marleen A. E.; van Echten-Arends, Jannie; Simons, Arnold H. M.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma can negatively affect fertility. This review summarizes data on fertility after chemotherapy in adult patients. Alkylating chemotherapy, especially if containing procarbazine and/or cyclophosphamide, is most harmful to gonadal functioning. Alkylating regimens cause

  14. Coping strategies used by hospitalized children with cancer undergoing chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposito, Amanda Mota Pacciulio; Silva-Rodrigues, Fernanda Machado; Sparapani, Valéria de Cássia; Pfeifer, Luzia Iara; de Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira

    2015-03-01

    To analyze coping strategies used by children with cancer undergoing chemotherapy during hospitalization. This was an exploratory study to analyze qualitative data using an inductive thematic analysis. Semistructured interviews using puppets were conducted with 10 children with cancer, between 7 and 12 years old, who were hospitalized and undergoing chemotherapy. The coping strategies to deal with chemotherapy were: understanding the need for chemotherapy; finding relief for the chemotherapy's side effects and pain; seeking pleasure in nourishment; engaging in entertaining activities and having fun; keeping the hope of cure alive; and finding support in religion. Children with cancer undergoing chemotherapy need to cope with hospitalizations, pain, medication side effects, idle time, and uncertainty regarding the success of treatment. These challenges motivated children to develop their own coping strategies, which were effective while undergoing chemotherapy. By gaining knowledge and further understanding about valid coping strategies during chemotherapy treatment, health professionals can mobilize personal and material resources from the children, health teams, and institutions aiming to potentiate the use of these strategies to make treatments the least traumatic. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  15. Adapting immunisation schedules for children undergoing chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Prada, María; Rodríguez-Martínez, María; García-García, Rebeca; García-Corte, María Dolores; Martínez-Ortega, Carmen

    2018-02-01

    Children undergoing chemotherapy for cancer have special vaccination needs after completion of the treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adaptation of post-chemotherapy vaccination schedules. An observational study was performed on a retrospective cohort that included all children aged from 0 to 14 years, who completed chemotherapy in a tertiary hospital between 2009 and 2015. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. Immunisation was administered in accordance with the guidelines of the Vaccine Advisory Committee of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics. Primary Care immunisation and clinical records of the Preventive Medicine and Public Health Department were reviewed. Of the 99 children who had received chemotherapy, 51 (70.6% males) were included in the study. As regards the type of tumour, 54.9% had a solid organ tumour, and 45.1% had a haematological tumour. Post-chemotherapy immunisation was administered to 70.6%. The most common vaccines received were: diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis or diphtheria-tetanus (54.9%), meningococcus C (41.2%), and seasonal influenza (39.2%). The rate of adaptation of the immunisation schedule after chemotherapy was 9.8%. The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine against 7v or 13v was administered to 21.6% of study subjects. However, only 17.6% received polysaccharide 23v. None received vaccination against hepatitis A. No statistically significant differences were observed between adherence to immunisation schedules and type of tumour (P=.066), gender (P=.304), or age (P=.342). Post-chemotherapy immunisation of children with cancer is poor. The participation of health professionals in training programs and referral of paediatric cancer patients to Vaccine Units could improve the rate of schedule adaptation and proper immunisation of this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Cancer cell adaptation to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Johnson, Penny; Somers, Shaw S; Toh, Simon; Higgins, Bernie; Lamont, Alan; Gulliford, Tim; Hurren, Jeremy; Yiangou, Constantinos; Cree, Ian A; Mercer, Stuart J; Knight, Louise A; Gabriel, Francis G; Whitehouse, Pauline A; Sharma, Sanjay; Fernando, Augusta; Glaysher, Sharon; Di Palma, Silvana

    2005-01-01

    Tumor resistance to chemotherapy may be present at the beginning of treatment, develop during treatment, or become apparent on re-treatment of the patient. The mechanisms involved are usually inferred from experiments with cell lines, as studies in tumor-derived cells are difficult. Studies of human tumors show that cells adapt to chemotherapy, but it has been largely assumed that clonal selection leads to the resistance of recurrent tumors. Cells derived from 47 tumors of breast, ovarian, esophageal, and colorectal origin and 16 paired esophageal biopsies were exposed to anticancer agents (cisplatin; 5-fluorouracil; epirubicin; doxorubicin; paclitaxel; irinotecan and topotecan) in short-term cell culture (6 days). Real-time quantitative PCR was used to measure up- or down-regulation of 16 different resistance/target genes, and when tissue was available, immunohistochemistry was used to assess the protein levels. In 8/16 paired esophageal biopsies, there was an increase in the expression of multi-drug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) following epirubicin + cisplatin + 5-fluorouracil (ECF) chemotherapy and this was accompanied by increased expression of the MDR-1 encoded protein, P-gp. Following exposure to doxorubicin in vitro, 13/14 breast carcinomas and 9/12 ovarian carcinomas showed >2-fold down-regulation of topoisomerase IIα (TOPOIIα). Exposure to topotecan in vitro, resulted in >4-fold down-regulation of TOPOIIα in 6/7 colorectal tumors and 8/10 ovarian tumors. This study suggests that up-regulation of resistance genes or down-regulation in target genes may occur rapidly in human solid tumors, within days of the start of treatment, and that similar changes are present in pre- and post-chemotherapy biopsy material. The molecular processes used by each tumor appear to be linked to the drug used, but there is also heterogeneity between individual tumors, even those with the same histological type, in the pattern and magnitude of response to the same drugs. Adaptation

  17. Impact of adjuvant chemotherapy for gliomatosis cerebri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Doo-Sik; Nam, Do-Hyun; Kim, Sung Tae; Lee, Jung-Il; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Lim, Do Hoon; Kim, Won Seog; Kwon, Ki-Hoon; Park, Kwan; Kim, Jong Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Gliomatosis cerebri (GC) is characterized by a diffuse infiltration of tumor cells throughout CNS, however, few details are available about the chemotherapeutic effect on GC. The aim of this study was to investigate its clinical course and to determine the efficacy of chemotherapy for GC. Between Jan. 1999 and Dec. 2004, 37 GC patients were diagnosed by biopsy and treated with radiotherapy in a single institution. To determine the efficacy of chemotherapy for GC, we retrospectively reviewed their clinical courses. The study cohort was divided into 2 groups, those with and without receiving post-radiotherapy adjuvant chemotherapy such as temozolomide or nitrosourea-based chemotherapy. Nineteen patients with adjuvant chemotherapy were assigned to the chemotreatment group and 18 with radiotherapy alone were assigned to the control group. Mean survival for chemotreatment group and control group were 24.2 and 13.1 months, respectively (p = 0.045). Time to progression for these groups were 16.0 and 6.0 months, respectively (p = 0.007). Overall review of the clinical course of patients with GC provided that early appearance of new contrast-enhancing lesions within 6 months from the initial diagnosis and higher histological grade were closely associated with poor survival (p < 0.001 and p = 0.008). Adjuvant chemotherapy following radiotherapy could prolong the survival in patients with GC. In addition, newly developed contrast-enhanced lesions on the follow-up MR images indicate the progression of GC

  18. Delayed emesis: moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (single-day chemotherapy regimens only)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roila, Fausto; Warr, David; Aapro, Matti

    2011-01-01

    An update of the recommendations for the prophylaxis of delayed emesis induced by moderately emetogenic chemotherapy discussed during the third Perugia Consensus Conference (June 2009) sponsored by MASCC-ESMO was presented. The review considered new studies published since the second consensus...

  19. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anders; Andersen, Fahimeh; Fischer, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has proven valuable in several tumors, but it has not been elucidated in colon cancer. The present phase II trial addressed the issue in high-risk patients selected by computed tomography (CT) scan. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with resectable colon cancer...... 32% (p = 0.005) translating into a three-year DFS of 94% versus 63% (p = 0.005). CONCLUSION: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer is feasible and the results suggest that a major part of the patients can be spared adjuvant chemotherapy. Validation in a randomized trial is warranted....

  20. Concurrent image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy and chemotherapy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shueng, Pei-Wei; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi; Shen, Bing-Jie; Wu, Le-Jung; Liao, Li-Jen; Hsiao, Chi-Huang; Lin, Yu-Chin; Cheng, Po-Wen; Lo, Wu-Chia; Jen, Yee-Min

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the experience of induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiationwith helical tomotherapy (HT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Between August 2006 and December 2009, 28 patients with pathological proven nonmetastatic NPC were enrolled. All patients were staged as IIB-IVB. Patients were first treated with 2 to 3 cycles of induction chemotherapy with EP-HDFL (Epirubicin, Cisplatin, 5-FU, and Leucovorin). After induction chemotherapy, weekly based PFL was administered concurrent with HT. Radiation consisted of 70 Gy to the planning target volumes of the primary tumor plus any positive nodal disease using 2 Gy per fraction. After completion of induction chemotherapy, the response rates for primary and nodal disease were 96.4% and 80.8%, respectively. With a median follow-up after 33 months (Range, 13-53 months), there have been 2 primary and 1 nodal relapse after completion of radiotherapy. The estimated 3-year progression-free rates for local, regional, locoregional and distant metastasis survival rate were 92.4%, 95.7%, 88.4%, and 78.0%, respectively. The estimated 3-year overall survival was 83.5%. Acute grade 3, 4 toxicities for xerostomia and dermatitis were only 3.6% and 10.7%, respectively. HT for locoregionally advanced NPC is feasible and effective in regard to locoregional control with high compliance, even after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. None of out-field or marginal failure noted in the current study confirms the potential benefits of treating NPC patients by image-guided radiation modality. A long-term follow-up study is needed to confirm these preliminary findings

  1. Quality Function Deployment: Application to Chemotherapy Unit Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Hashemi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today’s healthcare organizations are challenged by pressures to meet growing population demands and enhance community health through improving service quality. Quality function deployment is one of the widely-used customerdriven approaches for health services development. In the current study, quality function deployment is used to improve the quality of chemotherapy unit services. Methods: First, we identified chemotherapy outpatient unit patients as chemotherapy unit customers. Then, the Delphi technique and component factor analysis with orthogonal rotation was employed to determine their expectations. Thereafter, data envelopment analysis was performed to specify user priorities. We determined the relationships between patients’ expectations and service elements through expert group consensus using the Delphi method and the relationships between service elements by Pearson correlation. Finally, simple and compound priorities of the service elements were derived by matrix calculation. Results: Chemotherapy unit patients had four main expectations: access, suitable hotel services, satisfactory and effective relationships, and clinical services. The chemotherapy unit has six key service elements of equipment, materials, human resources, physical space, basic facilities, and communication and training. There were four-level relationships between the patients’ expectations and service elements, with mostly significant correlations between service elements. According to the findings, the functional group of basic facilities was the most critical factor, followed by materials. Conclusion: The findings of the current study can be a general guideline as well as a scientific, structured framework for chemotherapy unit decision makers in order to improve chemotherapy unit services.

  2. Intravenous chemotherapy combined with intravesical chemotherapy to treat T1G3 bladder urothelial carcinoma after transurethral resection of bladder tumor: results of a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Yu Zhang,1,* Linguo Xie,1,* Tao Chen,1,* Wanqin Xie,2 Zhouliang Wu,1 Hao Xu,1 Chen Xing,1 Nan Sha,1 Zhonghua Shen,1 Yunkai Qie,1 Xiaoteng Liu,1 Hailong Hu,1 Changli Wu1 1Department of Urology, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin Institute of Urology, Tianjin, 2Key Laboratory of Genetics and Birth Health of Hunan Province, The Family Planning Research Institute of Hunan Province, Changsha, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The management of stage 1 and grade 3 (T1G3 bladder cancer continues to be controversial. Although the transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT followed by intravesical chemotherapy is a conservative strategy for treatment of T1G3 bladder cancer, a relatively high risk of tumor recurrence and progression remains regarding the therapy. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of intravenous chemotherapy combined with intravesical chemotherapy versus intravesical chemotherapy alone for T1G3 bladder cancer after TURBT surgery. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 457 patients who were newly diagnosed with T1G3 bladder urothelial carcinoma between January 2009 and March 2014. After TURBT, 281 patients received intravesical chemotherapy alone, whereas 176 patients underwent intravesical chemotherapy in combination with intravenous chemotherapy. Tumor recurrence and progression were monitored periodically by urine cytology and cystoscopy in follow-up. Recurrence-free survival and progression-free survival of the two chemotherapy strategies following TURBT were analyzed. Univariable and multivariable Cox hazards analyses were performed to predict the prognostic factors for tumor recurrence and progression. Results: The tumor recurrence rate was 36.7% for patients who received intravesical chemotherapy alone after TURBT, compared with 19.9% for patients who received intravenous chemotherapy combined with intravesical chemotherapy after

  3. Practical aspects of the use of intrathecal chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Olmos-Jiménez, Raquel; Espuny-Miró, Alberto; Cárceles-Rodríguez, Carlos; Díaz-Carrasco, María Sacramento

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Intrathecal chemotherapy is frequently used in clinical practice for treatment and prevention of neoplastic meningitis. Despite its widespread use, there is little information about practical aspects such as the volume of drug to be administered or its preparation and administration. Objective: To conduct a literature review about practical aspects of the use of intrathecal chemotherapy. Materials: Search in PubMed/ Medline using the terms “chemotherapy AND intrat...

  4. Chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Anna Dorothea; Syn, Nicholas Lx; Moehler, Markus; Grothe, Wilfried; Yong, Wei Peng; Tai, Bee-Choo; Ho, Jingshan; Unverzagt, Susanne

    2017-08-29

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. In "Western" countries, most people are either diagnosed at an advanced stage, or develop a relapse after surgery with curative intent. In people with advanced disease, significant benefits from targeted therapies are currently limited to HER-2 positive disease treated with trastuzumab, in combination with chemotherapy, in first-line. In second-line, ramucirumab, alone or in combination with paclitaxel, demonstrated significant survival benefits. Thus, systemic chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Uncertainty remains regarding the choice of the regimen. To assess the efficacy of chemotherapy versus best supportive care (BSC), combination versus single-agent chemotherapy and different chemotherapy combinations in advanced gastric cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and Embase up to June 2016, reference lists of studies, and contacted pharmaceutical companies and experts to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We considered only RCTs on systemic, intravenous or oral chemotherapy versus BSC, combination versus single-agent chemotherapy and different chemotherapy regimens in advanced gastric cancer. Two review authors independently identified studies and extracted data. A third investigator was consulted in case of disagreements. We contacted study authors to obtain missing information. We included 64 RCTs, of which 60 RCTs (11,698 participants) provided data for the meta-analysis of overall survival. We found chemotherapy extends overall survival (OS) by approximately 6.7 months more than BSC (hazard ratio (HR) 0.3, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.24 to 0.55, 184 participants, three studies, moderate-quality evidence). Combination chemotherapy extends OS slightly (by an additional month) versus single-agent chemotherapy (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.79 to 0.89, 4447 participants, 23 studies, moderate-quality evidence), which is

  5. Comparison of chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: Chemotherapy is frequently used as a conditioning regimen to destroy malignant marrow cells before transplantation. Xerostomia, dysphagia, altered taste perception, mucositis, soft‑tissue ulceration, and infection are common adverse oral effects of chemotherapy. The study was aimed to compare decayed, missing, ...

  6. Race is associated with completion of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knisely, Anne T; Michaels, Alex D; Mehaffey, J Hunter; Hassinger, Taryn E; Krebs, Elizabeth D; Brenin, David R; Schroen, Anneke T; Showalter, Shayna L

    2018-05-03

    Completion of prescribed neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer is paramount to patients obtaining full benefit from the treatment; however, factors affecting neoadjuvant chemotherapy completion are not known. We hypothesized that race is a predictor of completion of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer. All patients with breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy 2009-2016 at a single institution were stratified by completion of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and by race. Univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify patient and tumor characteristics that affected the rate of neoadjuvant chemotherapy completion. A total of 92 (74%) of 124 patients completed their prescribed neoadjuvant chemotherapy. On univariate analysis, white patients were more likely to complete neoadjuvant chemotherapy than non-white patients (76% vs 50%, P = .006). Non-white patients were more likely to have government insurance and larger prechemotherapy tumors (both, P < .05), but these factors were not associated with rates of neoadjuvant chemotherapy completion. After controlling for age, insurance status, tumor size, and estrogen receptor status, whites remained associated with completion of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (OR 3.65, P = .014). At our institution, white patients with breast cancer were more likely than non-white patients to complete neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Further investigation into the underlying factors impacting this disparity is needed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Radio-chemotherapy in advanced tumors of the oral cavity, oro- and hypopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, G.; Schnabel, T.

    1992-01-01

    Among combined radio-chemotherapy regimens of advanced head and neck tumors four modalities can be discriminated: 1. Induction chemotherapy, 2. simultaneous radio-chemotherapy, 3. adjuvant chemotherapy, 4. accelerated-hyperfractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The results of the presently available randomized trials are as follows: 1. Induction chemotherapy has no influence on long-term recurrence-free survival. 2. With respect to simultaneous radio-chemotherapy, recurrence-free survival has been unproved with 5-FU and Mitomycin C. 3. There is evidence that adjuvant cis-platin therapy improves recurrence-free survival. 4. No results are available to date using hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy regimens in combination with chemotherapy. (orig.) [de

  8. Chemotherapy-Induced Fatigue Correlates With Higher Fatigue Scores Before Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, José Klerton Luz; Giglio, Adriana Del; Munhoz, Bruna Antenusse; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso; Cruz, Felipe Melo; Giglio, Auro Del

    2017-06-01

    Cancer chemotherapy can induce fatigue in about 20% to 30% of patients. So far, there is very little information as to the predictors of chemotherapy-induced fatigue (CIF). We evaluated potential predictors of CIF in a sample of patients with cancer with several types of solid tumors scheduled to receive chemotherapy according to institutional protocols. Before their first and second chemotherapy cycles, patients answered to the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), Chalder, Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Stress thermometer, and HADS questionnaires as well as provided blood samples for inflammatory markers. We evaluated 52 patients, 37 (71%) were female and mean age was 53 years. The most common tumors were breast cancer 21 (40%) and gastrointestinal tumors 12 (23%). Although 14 (25.2%) patients had an increase in their fatigue BFI scores equal or above 3 points from baseline, we observed no significant overall differences between BFI scores before and after chemotherapy. The only 2 factors associated with an increase of 3 points in the BFI scores after chemotherapy were race and higher baseline BFI levels. By multivariate analysis, overall BFI and Chalder scores after chemotherapy also correlated significantly with their respective baseline scores before treatment. HADS scores before treatment correlated with overall BFI scores postchemotherapy, whereas MNA scores before chemotherapy and female sex correlated with higher Chalder scores after treatment. We conclude that fatigue induced by chemotherapy is common and consistently associated with higher fatigue scores before treatment. Screening for fatigue before chemotherapy may help to identify patients who are prone to develop CIF.

  9. Chemotherapy for carcinoma of stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salek, T.

    2011-01-01

    Of all patients with gastric cancer 80 % to 90 % are either diagnosed at an advanced stage when the tumour is inoperable, or develop a recurrence within five years after surgery. Chemotherapy clearly improves survival in comparison to best supportive care only. No chemotherapy regimen showed a survival benefit better than 5-fluorouracil alone in a phase III trial for advanced gastric cancer in 1990s, and several new cytotoxic agents became available in late 1990s. Thereafter, a couple of phase III trials supported the substitution of infusional 5-fluorouracil by orally administered agents and the replacement of cisplatin by oxaliplatin in early 2000s. Trastuzumab has succeeded in showing a survival benefit for patients with Her-2 positive gastric cancer which accounts for about 10 - 20 % of the cancer. This means that the door is opened to the new era of chemotherapy with molecular target agents and with individualization for advanced gastric cancer. (author)

  10. Intra-arterial chemotherapy for locally advanced bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aota, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Kazuhiko

    1999-01-01

    A total of 83 patients with locally advanced bladder cancer (T1, n=5; T2, n=28; T3a, n=21; T3b, n=21; T4, n=8) were treated with intra-arterial (i.a.) cisplatin and adriamycin (or epirubicin) chemotherapy. In 51 of the 83 cases, we combined this treatment with radiotherapy. The pathological complete response (CR) rate was 68% for all patients, 84% for i.a. chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy and only 41% for i.a. chemotherapy. The 5-year survival rate was 57% for all patients, 71% for i.a. chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy and only 44% for i.a. chemotherapy. The 5-year survival as a function of the clinical stage was 82% for T1+T2, 66% for T3a, 28% for T3b, 25% for T4 (T1+T2 vs. T3b: p<0.001, T1+T2 vs. T4: p<0.0001, T3a vs. T3b: p<0.0263, T3a vs. T4: p<0.0214, T3b vs. T4: p<0.029). In 46% of all patients, we succeeded in preserving the bladder; especially noteworthy, is that in 65% of the patients undergoing i.a. chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy, we succeeded in preserving the bladder. These results demonstrate that i.a. chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy is a useful method for locally advanced bladder cancer which may make preservation of the bladder function feasible. (author)

  11. Update on Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy for Retinoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Zanaty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The tools for managing retinoblastoma have been increasing in the past decade. While globe-salvage still relies heavily on intravenous chemotherapy, tumors in advanced stage that failed chemotherapy are now referred for intra-arterial chemotherapy (IAC to avoid enucleation. However, IAC still has many obstacles to overcome. We present an update on the indications, complications, limitations, success, and technical aspects of IAC. Given its safety and high efficacy, it is expected that IAC will replace conventional strategies and will become a first-line option even for tumors that are amenable for other strategies.

  12. Side Effects of Chemotherapy and Radiation (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Side Effects of Chemotherapy and Radiation KidsHealth / For Parents / Side Effects of Chemotherapy and Radiation What's in this article? What to ...

  13. Impact of obesity and exercise on chemotherapy-related fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Kanchana; Peswani, Namrata; Chitambar, Christopher R

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy often develop fatigue from their treatment that may persist for months. While the positive effects of physical activity in cancer patients are increasingly recognized, the impact of obesity on chemotherapy-induced fatigue has not been well studied. Female age 35-75 years with stage I-III breast cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled in an IRB-approved study. Patient fatigue was self-reported using a 14-question fatigue symptom inventory. Patients were queried about fatigue and their level of exercise before, during, and after completion of chemotherapy. BMI was measured prior to their first cycle of chemotherapy. Of the 47 evaluable patients, 37 reported performing exercise on a regular basis. Following chemotherapy, 53 % of the exercise group and 80 % of the non-exercise group displayed a worsening of their FS. In patients with a BMI exercise group versus 40.5 in the non-exercise group. In patients with a BMI > 25, the FS after chemotherapy was 25.96 in the exercise group versus 32.6 in the non-exercise group. Our study indicates a trend towards fatigue reduction with exercise even in patients who are overweight. Thus, an elevated BMI at diagnosis does not preclude a breast cancer patient from experiencing the same positive effects from exercise on chemotherapy-related fatigue as patients with normal BMIs. This indicates an important role of physicians in the primary care setting to encourage patients to initiate physical activity when offering cancer-screening services.

  14. The role of cisplatin in chemotherapy of advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurga, L; Misurova, E; Kovac, V [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Teaching Hospital, 04190 Kosice (Slovak Republic); Sevcikova, L [Department of Radiotherapy, Postgraduate School of Medicine, 81259 Bratislava (Slovak Republic)

    1994-12-31

    Cisplatin containing regimes as first-time, second-time or as third-line chemotherapy were administered in 26 and 36 patients, respectively. The overall response rate in patients on first-line chemotherapy was 53.9 %, in patients on on second or third-line chemotherapy 30.6 %. The differences both in overall and disease-free survival between patients on first-line and on second/third-line chemotherapy were statistically significant in favor of women treated with first-line chemotherapy (p = 0.05). Hematologic and non-hematologic toxicities were mild to moderate and were more pronounced in patients on second and third-line chemotherapy. The overall response date, disease-free survival and overall survival were significantly better and longer in the group of patients treated with `bolus` cisplatin in comparison to the group of patients treated with continuous venous infusion cisplatin. Our results confirm the activity of cisplatin-containing regimes (mainly CAP schedules) in patients with advanced breast cancer not only as first-line therapy but also in heavily pretreated patients by chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy and endocrine manipulation. (author) 10 tabs., 21 refs.

  15. Antiemetic therapy for non-anthracycline and cyclophosphamide moderately emetogenic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Naoki

    2017-05-01

    Although antiemetic management in cancer therapy has improved, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting remain common and troubling adverse events. Chemotherapeutic agents are classified based on their emetogenic effects, and appropriate antiemetics are recommended according to this categorization. Chemotherapy categorized as moderately emetogenic is associated with a wide spectrum of emetic risks. Combined anthracycline and cyclophosphamide regimens have been recently reclassified as highly emetogenic chemotherapy regimen. This review focuses on antiemetic pharmacotherapy in patients receiving non-anthracycline and cyclophosphamide-based moderately emetogenic chemotherapy regimens. Combination therapy with a 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor agonist, preferably palonosetron, and dexamethasone is the standard therapy in moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, although triple therapy with add-on neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist is used as an alternative treatment strategy. Among moderately emetogenic chemotherapy regimens, carboplatin-containing chemotherapy has considerable emetic potential, particularly during the delayed phase. However, the additional of a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist to the standard antiemetic therapy prevents carboplatin-induced nausea and vomiting. For regimens including oxaliplatin, the benefit of adding neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist requires further clarification.

  16. Children receiving chemotherapy at home: perceptions of children and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Bonnie; McKeever, Patricia; Law, Madelyn P; Booth, Marilyn; Greenberg, Mark; Daub, Stacey; Gafni, Amiram; Gammon, Janet; Yamada, Janet; Epstein, Iris

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this descriptive exploratory study was to determine the perspectives of parents and children with cancer on a home chemotherapy program. Qualitative analyses were used to organize data from 24 parents and 14 children into emerging themes. Themes included (1) financial and time costs, (2) disruption to daily routines, (3) psychological and physical effects, (4) recommendations and caveats, and (5) preference for home chemotherapy. When home chemotherapy was compared with hospital clinic-based chemotherapy, parents reported fewer financial and time costs and less disruption to their work and family schedules, and children reported more time to play/study, improved school attendance, and engagement in normal activities. Although some parents felt more secure with hospital chemotherapy, most found it more exhausting and stressful. At home, children selected places for their treatment and some experienced fewer side effects. Although some coordination/communication problems existed, the majority of parents and children preferred home chemo-therapy. Home chemotherapy treatment is a viable, acceptable, and positive health care delivery alternative from the perspective of parents and children with cancer.

  17. Benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy in high-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Lisa M

    2003-12-01

    The current standard of care for patients with high-grade glioma is resection followed by radiotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not widely accepted because of the low sensitivity of gliomas to traditional antineoplastic agents, the poor penetration of most drugs across the blood-brain barrier, and the significant systemic toxicity associated with current agents. However, nitrosoureas and, subsequently, temozolomide (Temodar [US], Temodal [international]; Schering-Plough Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ), a novel alkylating agent, cross the blood-brain barrier and have activity against gliomas. Nitrosoureas have been studied in phase III trials in the adjuvant setting. In individual trials, chemotherapy did not increase median survival but did increase the proportion of patients surviving >/=18 months by 15%. Only with large meta-analyses did the addition of chemotherapy achieve a statistically significant improvement in median survival. Currently there is no means of identifying which patients will benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, but nitrosoureas and temozolomide are well tolerated in most patients, justifying the administration of adjuvant chemotherapy to all newly diagnosed patients with malignant glioma.

  18. Chemotherapy increases long-term survival in patients with adult medulloblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kocakaya, Selin; Beier, Christoph Patrick; Beier, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    chemotherapy first-line survived significantly longer (mOS: 108 mo, 95% CI: 68.6-148.4) than patients treated with radiation alone (mOS: 57 mo, 95% CI: 39.6-74.4) or patients who received chemotherapy at tumor recurrence. This effect was not biased by tumor stage or decade of treatment. Importantly, (neo...... parts of treatment regimes; however, established prognostic factors and data clarifying the role of chemotherapy are missing. METHODS: We investigated 227 publications from 1969-2013, with 907 identifiable, individual patients being available for meta-analysis. Demographic data, risk stratification......)adjuvant chemotherapy also significantly increased the chance for long-term survival (>5 y) compared with radiotherapy alone or chemotherapy at tumor recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis clarifies relevant prognostic factors and suggests that chemotherapy as part of first-line therapy improves overall survival...

  19. Retrospective analysis of chronomodulated chemotherapy versus conventional chemotherapy with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and 5-fluorouracil in patients with recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen D

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Dan Chen, Jue Cheng, Kai Yang, Yue Ma, Fang Yang Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China Background: Chronomodulated chemotherapy has emerged as a new therapy as a result of recent studies focusing on the biological clock. It has been demonstrated that combination chronomodulated chemotherapy of platinum-based drugs and 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu can significantly improve efficacy and reduce the incidence of adverse events in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, as compared with conventional chemotherapy. However, the results may be different in different tumors. Recurrent and metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is very difficult to treat, with an extremely unfavorable prognosis. So far, no report is available on chronomodulated chemotherapy for HNSCC. Methods: Retrospective analyses were made on 49 patients with local recurrent and/or metastatic HNSCC who underwent palliative treatments with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and 5-Fu. The patients were divided into a chronomodulated chemotherapy group (28 patients and a conventional chemotherapy group (21 patients according to their administration times. The two groups were compared for tumor objective response rate, overall survival (OS, progression-free survival (PFS, and the incidence of adverse events. Results: The tumor objective response rate and patients' OS were significantly higher and longer in the chronomodulated chemotherapy group than in the conventional chemotherapy group (71.43% versus 42.86%, respectively, P0.05. The global incidence of adverse events in the chronomodulated chemotherapy group was significantly lower than that in the conventional chemotherapy group (46.43% versus 76.19%, P<0.05, with significantly lower incidence of grade 3–4 adverse events (7.14% versus 33.33%, P<0.05. Conclusion: Chronomodulated chemotherapy with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and

  20. [Supportive care during chemotherapy for lung cancer in daily practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Veronika; Tamási, Lilla; Gálffy, Gabriella; Losonczy, György

    2012-09-01

    Active oncotherapy, combination chemotherapy of lung cancer is accompanied with many side effects which may impair patients' quality of life and compromise the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Most side effects of chemotherapy are preventable or treatable with optimal supportive care which enhances success in patient care and treatment. The aim of this review is to summarize the most important conditions that may be associated with combined chemotherapy of lung cancer from the practical point of view.

  1. Efficacy of Ginger in Control of Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mansour; Porouhan, Pezhman; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Omidvari, Shapour; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Nasrollahi, Hamid; Hamedi, Seyed Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are among the most serious side effects of chemotherapy, in some cases leading to treatment interruption or chemotherapy dose reduction. Ginger has long been known as an antiemetic drug, used for conditions such as motion sickness, nausea-vomiting in pregnancy, and post-operation side effects. One hundred and fifty female patients with breast cancer entered this prospective study and were randomized to receive ginger (500 mg ginger powder, twice a day for 3 days) or placebo. One hundred and nineteen patients completed the study: 57 of them received ginger and 62 received ginger for the frst 3 chemotherapy cycles. Mean age in all patients was 48.6 (25-79) years. After 1st chemotherapy, mean nausea in the ginger and control arms were 1.36 (±1.31) and 1.46 (±1.28) with no statistically significant difference. After the 2nd chemotherapy session, nausea score was slightly more in the ginger group (1.36 versus 1.32). After 3rd chemotherapy, mean nausea severity in control group was less than ginger group [1.37 (±1.14), versus 1.42 (±1.30)]. Considering all patients, nausea was slightly more severe in ginger arm. In ginger arm mean nausea score was 1.42 (±0.96) and in control arm it was 1.40 (±0.92). Mean vomiting scores after chemotherapy in ginger arm were 0.719 (±1.03), 0.68 (±1.00) and 0.77 (±1.18). In control arm, mean vomiting was 0.983 (±1.23), 1.03 (±1.22) and 1.15 (±1.27). In all sessions, ginger decreased vomiting severity from 1.4 (±1.04) to 0.71 (±0.86). None of the differences were significant. In those patients who received the AC regimen, vomiting was less severe (0.64±0.87) compared to those who received placebo (1.13±1.12), which was statistically significant (p-value <0.05). Further and larger studies are needed to draw conclusions.

  2. Concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, K.K.

    1985-01-01

    The principal objective of combining chemotherapy with radiotherapy (XRT) for the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer is to improve the therapeutic ratio through the enhancement of local control and reduction of distant metastases without excessively enhancing normal tissue effects. Improved tumour control can result from sole additivity of either therapy or direct interactions between drug and radiation leading to increased tumour cell kill. Chemotherapy may sensitize the cells to radiation, interfere with repair of sublethal or potentially lethal radiation damage, induce cell synchrony, and reduce tumour mass leading to reoxygenation and decreased fraction of resistant hypoxic cells. Radiation may improve drug accessibility to tumour cells and reduce tumour volume leading to increased cell proliferation and chemosensitivity. If the enhanced effects of combined therapy are purely additive, then the two modalities can be administered either sequentially or concurrently with the same results. However, if the enhanced effects result from the direct interaction between drug and radiation, it is necessary that the two modalities be administered concurrently and in close temporal proximity. This review summarizes the results of clinical studies in which chemotherapy was administered concurrently during the course of radiotherapy for patients with previously untreated advanced squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck

  3. Use of maintenance endocrine therapy after chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, S; Miles, D; Makris, A

    2016-12-01

    For women with oestrogen receptor+ metastatic breast cancer (MBC), the options for systemic treatment include endocrine therapy (ET) and chemotherapy. For women whose disease is also HER2+, anti-HER2 therapies are also routinely used either with chemotherapy or less commonly with ET. Where chemotherapy is used as initial therapy, treatment is often discontinued due to cumulative toxicity in the absence of disease progression. In this setting, there is the option of introducing ET with the aim of prolonging response and delaying relapse. Literature review revealed four trials addressing the question of whether there is a benefit from introducing ET following chemotherapy for MBC. We also sought evidence for alternative approaches, including concurrent chemotherapy and ET and continuing chemotherapy until disease progression. The evidence for the use of ET after chemotherapy in MBC is limited, and the trials done were small. Furthermore, they were performed at a time when both the chemotherapy regimens and ET were different from those used currently. Despite these limitations, there is probably a modest improvement in time to progression for the sequential use of ET after chemotherapy but with no overall survival benefit. An alternative approach, particularly considering agents with relatively low toxicity, such as orally bioavailable fluoropyrimidines, is to continue chemotherapy until disease progression. Where chemotherapy for MBC is discontinued due to toxicity, in the absence of progression, the use of ET, with its relatively low toxicity, is a reasonable approach with the aim of delaying relapse. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Non-medical prescribing of chemotherapy: engaging stakeholders to maximise success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennan, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This study report examines the views and experiences of professional stakeholders about non-medical prescribing (NMP) of chemotherapy. The introduction of open formulary NMP has created opportunities to radically change health-care delivery. For chemotherapy services, the most recent advice from the National Chemotherapy Advisory Group [Department of Health (2009) Chemotherapy Services in England, ensuring quality and safety: a report from the National Chemotherapy Advisory Group, London Her Majesty's Stationary Office] clearly endorses the development of nurse- or pharmacist-led chemotherapy clinics. This is very much welcomed but is based on very limited evidence as to their effectiveness. A fourth-generation evaluation study. A purposeful sample of 23 stakeholders connected with the chemotherapy service was used. A serial data collection technique with individual interviews followed by uni-professional focus groups was adopted. Finally, a multi-professional focus group was held to determine the strategic way forward. Data were collected in 2009-2010. The study illuminated the key features necessary to maximise success of NMP in chemotherapy clinics and captures the importance of good working relationships. Whilst different practice models will emerge, fundamental and core to services is the need for good team working, established and effective communication strategies, and most importantly avoiding isolation in practice. This study additionally reinforced any evaluation takes place within preexisting political contexts and in particular medical dominance. Not all medical colleagues agreed with or wanted NMP for their patients, highlighting difficulties of developing new models of working within a resisting culture. No objections to NMP of chemotherapy were found, but, clearly, the context of practice needs to be agreed and supportedby all professional stakeholders. What is already known about this topicOpen formulary non-medical prescribing has been rapidly

  5. Intercalated radio-chemotherapy in small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskin, P.J.; Parton, D.; Yarnold, J.R.; Cherryman, G.; Smith, I.E.

    1991-01-01

    36 patients with small cell lung cancer have been treated using chemotherapy comprising carboplatin, ifosphamide and etoposide. A total of 6 cycles of chemotherapy was given. In 15 patients with limited disease intercalated radio-chemotherapy was used in which two 5-day courses of hyperfractionated radiotherapy were given to the thorax after the 1st and 2nd cycles of chemotherapy. Each course of thoracic radiotherapy delivered 15 Gy in 15 fractions over 5 days. Oesophagitis occurred in 7 patients (40 percent), in 5 of whom this was severe (WHO grade 3). Radiological pneumonitis developed in 6 patients (40 percent) with subsequent fibrosis in 2 patients. These effects are greater than would be expected with this dose of radiation alone and reflect marked enhancement of normal tissue toxicity. (author). 11 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  6. Effect of S-1 chemotherapy and FP chemotherapy on prognosis, imaging characteristics and serum marker levels after operation for gastric carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Hao Gong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of S-1 chemotherapy and FP chemotherapy on prognosis, imaging characteristics and serum marker levels after operation for gastric carcinoma. Methods: A total of 68 patients with gastric cancer who underwent radical surgery were included in the study and divided into observation group and control group patients (n=34 according to random number table. Control group received FP chemotherapy, observation group received S-1 chemotherapy, and then differences in serum tumor markers, illnessrelated factors, nutrition indexes and T cell immune function values were compared between two groups. Results: After observation group received systematic chemotherapy, serum tumor markers such as MMP-9, MMP-2, MG7-Ag, TSGF, CA72-4, CA19-9, TP and DpD as well as illness-related factors such as DKK1, MK, Leptin, Exosome and OPN were all lower than those of control group (P<0.05; nutrition and cellular immune function indexes such as TP, ALB, PA, CD4+ T and CD4+ T/ CD8+ T values were higher than those of control group and CD8+ T value was lower than that of control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: S-1 chemotherapy after operation for gastric carcinoma can inhibit the tumor activity and optimize patients’ overall condition, and it has positive clinical significance.

  7. Induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouillet, T.; MOrere, J.F.; Piperno-Neuman, S.; Boaziz, C.; Breau, J.L.; Mazeron, J.J.; Haddad, E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose was to determine the efficacy and safety of induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer and whether the response to induction chemotherapy can predict the response to subsequent chemoradiotherapy and survival. In conclusion, there is a statistically significant relationship not only between the response to ICT and the response to CCrt, but also between the response to ICT and the local outcome and survival. (authors)

  8. Timing of chemotherapy and survival in patients with resectable gastric adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrington, Amanda K; Nelson, Rebecca; Patel, Supriya S; Luu, Carrie; Ko, Michelle; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Kim, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the timing of chemotherapy in gastric cancer by comparing survival outcomes in treatment groups. METHODS: Patients with surgically resected gastric adenocarcinoma from 1988 to 2006 were identified from the Los Angeles County Cancer Surveillance Program. To evaluate the population most likely to receive and/or benefit from adjunct chemotherapy, inclusion criteria consisted of Stage II or III gastric cancer patients > 18 years of age who underwent curative-intent surgical resection. Patients were categorized into three groups according to the receipt of chemotherapy: (1) no chemotherapy; (2) preoperative chemotherapy; or (3) postoperative chemotherapy. Clinical and pathologic characteristics were compared across the different treatment arms. RESULTS: Of 1518 patients with surgically resected gastric cancer, 327 (21.5%) received perioperative chemotherapy. The majority of these 327 patients were male (68%) with a mean age of 61.5 years; and they were significantly younger than non-chemotherapy patients (mean age, 70.7; P advanced gastric cancer. CONCLUSION: This study supports the implementation of a randomized trial comparing the timing of perioperative therapy in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. PMID:24392183

  9. Chemotherapy Side Effects: A Cause of Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can chemotherapy side effects increase the risk of heart disease? Answers from Timothy J. Moynihan, M.D. Chemotherapy side effects may increase the risk of heart disease, including weakening of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy) and ...

  10. Routine surgery in addition to chemotherapy for treating spinal tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jutte, PC; Van Loenhout-Rooyackers, JH; Loenhout-Rooyackers, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is generally curable with chemotherapy, but there is controversy in the literature about the need for surgical intervention in the one to two per cent of people with tuberculosis of the spine. Objectives To compare chemotherapy plus surgery with chemotherapy alone for

  11. After chemotherapy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    You had chemotherapy treatment for your cancer. Your risk of infection, bleeding, and skin problems may be high. You may have mouth sores, an upset stomach, and diarrhea. You will probably get tired easily. Your appetite may be poor, but you should be able ...

  12. Progress in treatment of head and neck cancer. Pt. 1. Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupp, R.; Vokes, E.E.; Chicago Univ., IL

    1995-01-01

    Cancer of the head and neck is commonly diagnosed in an advanced stage with a poor prognosis. New active agents and combinations have recently been identified. By adding chemotherapy to a multimodality approach with surgery and radiation therapy the outcome may be altered. We reviewed the more recently published literature on induction and adjuvant chemotherapy. No survival advantage has been shown for adjuvant chemotherapy. Organ preservation can be achieved with induction chemotherapy followed by limited surgery and radiation in approximately two thirds of the patients with laryngeal carcinoma. Patients achieving a complete response after induction chemotherapy have a better prognosis. Chemotherpy has consistently shown to reduce the frequency of distant metastases. Chemotherapy is indicated only in recurrent or metastatic disease. Induction chemotherapy is limited to laryngeal carcinoma with organ preservation as intent. Local recurrences and intercurrent morbidity are the main reasons for treatment failures. (orig.) [de

  13. Radiation recall supraglottitis. A hazard in head and neck chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallenborn, P.A.; Postma, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    The enhanced effects of chemotherapy on previously irradiated tissue have been well demonstrated. When chemotherapy is given some time after irradiation and elicits a tissue reaction in the radiation field, the reaction is termed radiation recall. We review known interactions between chemotherapy and radiotherapy and report, to our knowledge, the first case of a supraglottitis radiation recall reaction. Familiarity with this phenomenon and potential complications of chemotherapy following head and neck irradiation may expedite early diagnosis and appropriate lifesaving treatment

  14. Extended exposure to alkylator chemotherapy: delayed appearance of myelodysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Marc C; Raizer, Jeffrey

    2009-06-01

    A case series of gliomas treated with alkylator-based chemotherapy who subsequently developed myelodysplastic syndrome (tMDS) or acute myelocytic leukemia (AML). Alkylator-based chemotherapy is recognized to be leukemogenic; however, it is infrequently described as a delayed consequence of anti-glioma treatment. Seven patients (4 men; 3 women) ages 34-69 years (median 44), with gliomas (3 Grade 2; 4 Grade 3) were treated with surgery, all but one with involved-field radiotherapy and all with alkylator-based chemotherapy (temozolomide; 6 patients, nitrosoureas; 5 patients, both agents; 5 patients). Exposure to alkylator-based chemotherapy ranged from 8 to 30 months (median 24). The diagnosis of tMDS was determined by bone marrow biopsy in 7 patients. Seven patients showed chromosomal abnormalities consistent with chemotherapy induced MDS. Three patients were diagnosed with AML as well (in two determined by bone marrow and one at autopsy). Interval from last chemotherapy exposure to diagnosis of tMDS/AML ranged from 3 to 31 months (median 24 months). Two patients were treated with bone marrow transplantation and 5 received supportive care only. Five patients have died, 2 as a consequence of recurrent brain tumor, 1 as a complication of transplantation, and 2 due to AML. Although rare, induction of tMDS/AML following extended use of alkylator-based chemotherapy may become more relevant with the evolving practice to treat gliomas for protracted periods. Future work to determine at risk patients would be important.

  15. Haemorheological changes in cancer patients on chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoti, C.E.; Osime, E.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the rheological changes in haematological and non-haematological cancer patients pre and post chemotherapy. It is a prospective study of 50 patients comprising 16(32%) haematological and 34(68%) non-haematological cancers of various types from March to December 2005 at University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Rheologic parameters estimated by the various specific diagnostic methods were determined in cancer patient's pre and post chemotherapy. The rheological tests estimated were relative plasma viscosity (RPV) measured by means of a capillary viscometer, whole blood viscosity (WBV), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and plasma fibrinogen concentration (PFC) estimated by the Ingram's Clot weight method. The RPV in pre chemotherapy (p=0.006) and WBV in post chemotherapy (p=0.0231) patients measured revealed a significant difference when compared to controls. The fibrinogen concentration (P<0.0001) and ESR values (P<0.0001) were significantly increased in cancer patients when compared to controls. We conclude that total reduction of hyperviscosity and hyperfibrinogenaemia may contribute to effective treatment strategies in cancer patients. (author)

  16. Abiraterone in metastatic prostate cancer without previous chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryan, Charles J.; Smith, Matthew R.; de Bono, Johann S.; Molina, Arturo; Logothetis, Christopher J.; de Souza, Paul; Fizazi, Karim; Mainwaring, Paul; Piulats, Josep M.; Ng, Siobhan; Carles, Joan; Mulders, Peter F. A.; Basch, Ethan; Small, Eric J.; Saad, Fred; Schrijvers, Dirk; van Poppel, Hendrik; Mukherjee, Som D.; Suttmann, Henrik; Gerritsen, Winald R.; Flaig, Thomas W.; George, Daniel J.; Yu, Evan Y.; Efstathiou, Eleni; Pantuck, Allan; Winquist, Eric; Higano, Celestia S.; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Park, Youn; Kheoh, Thian; Griffin, Thomas; Scher, Howard I.; Rathkopf, Dana E.; Boyce, A.; Costello, A.; Davis, I.; Ganju, V.; Horvath, L.; Lynch, R.; Marx, G.; Parnis, F.; Shapiro, J.; Singhal, N.; Slancar, M.; van Hazel, G.; Wong, S.; Yip, D.; Carpentier, P.; Luyten, D.; de Reijke, T.

    2013-01-01

    Abiraterone acetate, an androgen biosynthesis inhibitor, improves overall survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer after chemotherapy. We evaluated this agent in patients who had not received previous chemotherapy. In this double-blind study, we randomly assigned

  17. Prevent Infections During Chemotherapy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast discusses the importance of preventing infections in cancer patients who are undergoing chemotherapy. Dr. Lisa Richardson, CDC oncologist, talks about a new Web site for cancer patients and their caregivers.

  18. Are nurse-led chemotherapy clinics really nurse-led? An ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Carole; Walshe, Catherine; Molassiotis, Alex

    2017-04-01

    The number of patients requiring ambulatory chemotherapy is increasing year on year, creating problems with capacity in outpatient clinics and chemotherapy units. Although nurse-led chemotherapy clinics have been set up to address this, there is a lack of evaluation of their effectiveness. Despite a rapid expansion in the development of nursing roles and responsibilities in oncology, there is little understanding of the operational aspects of nurses' roles in nurse-led clinics. To explore nurses' roles within nurse-led chemotherapy clinics. A focused ethnographic study of nurses' roles in nurse-led chemotherapy clinics, including semi-structured interviews with nurses. Four chemotherapy units/cancer centres in the UK PARTICIPANTS: Purposive sampling was used to select four cancer centres/units in different geographical areas within the UK operating nurse-led chemotherapy clinics. Participants were 13 nurses working within nurse-led chemotherapy clinics at the chosen locations. Non-participant observation of nurse-led chemotherapy clinics, semi-structured interviews with nurse participants, review of clinic protocols and associated documentation. 61 nurse-patient consultations were observed with 13 nurses; of these 13, interviews were conducted with 11 nurses. Despite similarities in clinical skills training and prescribing, there were great disparities between clinics run by chemotherapy nurses and those run by advanced nurse practitioners. This included the number of patients seen within each clinic, operational aspects, nurses' autonomy, scope of practice and clinical decision-making abilities. The differences highlighted four different levels of nurse-led chemotherapy clinics, based on nurses' autonomy and scope of clinical practice. However, this was heavily influenced by medical consultants. Several nurses perceived they were undertaking holistic assessments, however they were using medical models/consultation styles, indicating medicalization of nurses' roles

  19. Impact of Dose Reductions, Delays Between Chemotherapy Cycles, and/or Shorter Courses of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II and III Colorectal Cancer Patients: a Single-Center Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouros, Joseph; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Kouvatseas, George; Rapti, Anna; Stamoulis, George; Bisvikis, Anastasios; Res, Helen; Samantas, Epameinondas

    2015-12-01

    Most stage II or III colorectal cancer patients are receiving nowadays a 4 to 6-month course of adjuvant chemotherapy. However, delays between cycles, reductions in the doses of chemotherapy drugs, or even permanent omissions of chemotherapy cycles might take place due to side effects or patient's preference. We examined the impact of these treatment modifications on recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). We retrospectively collected data from colorectal cancer patients who had received adjuvant chemotherapy in our Department. Patients were categorized in five groups based on whether they had or not delays between chemotherapy cycles, dose reductions, and permanent omissions of chemotherapy cycles. Three-year RFS and OS of the five different groups were compared using the log-rank test and the Sidak approach. Five hundred and eight patients received treatment. Twenty seven percent of the patients had the full course of chemotherapy; the others had delays, dose reductions, or early termination of the treatment. No statistically significant differences were observed in 3-year RFS and OS between the five groups. A trend for worse RFS was noticed with early termination of treatment. A similar trend was also noticed for OS but only for stage II patients. In colorectal cancer patients, receiving adjuvant chemotherapy, delays between chemotherapy cycles, dose reductions of chemotherapy drugs, or even early termination of the treatment course do not seem to have a negative impact in 3-year RFS and OS; however, due to the trend of worse RFS in patients receiving shorter courses of chemotherapy, further studies are needed.

  20. Effects of Listening to Music on the Comfort of Chemotherapy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgiç, Şebnem; Acaroğlu, Rengin

    2017-06-01

    The symptoms of an illness that requires chemotherapy and the corresponding effects of such treatment exacerbate the pain and discomfort that patients typically experience. Listening to music may help patients cope with chemotherapy symptoms, thereby contributing to their physical ease and well-being. Seventy patients who were receiving treatment at the outpatient chemotherapy unit were invited to participate in this work. During chemotherapy sessions and the week after the sessions, the patients listened to music with headphones. The occurrence of chemotherapy symptoms such as pain, tiredness, nausea, depression, anxiety, drowsiness, lack of appetite, not feeling well, and shortness of breath in the intervention group was statistically significant after listening to music ( p listening to music effectively reduces the severity of chemotherapy symptoms and enhances the comfort of patients receiving the treatment.

  1. Acute toxicity of postoperative IMRT and chemotherapy for endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tierney, R.M.; Powell, M.A.; Mutch, D.G.; Gibb, R.K.; Rader, J.S.; Grigsby, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the acute toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with and without chemotherapy in patients with endometrial cancer. A total of 19 patients with stages IB-IVB endometrial cancer who underwent surgery and postoperative IMRT were reviewed. The treatment planning goal was to cover the tissue at risk and minimize the dose to the bladder, bowel, and bone marrow. Median dose was 50.4 Gy (range 49.6-51.2 Gy). Altogether, 14 patients underwent chemotherapy; most were given carboplatin and paclitaxel. Toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 (CTCAE). The prescribed radiation treatment was completed in all patients. The prescribed cycles of chemotherapy were completed in all 14 patients, except one who received five of six cycles limited by prolonged thrombocytopenia. Chemotherapy was delayed in two patients (14%). Three patients required growth factor support during chemotherapy, and one patient required a blood transfusion. Acute grades 3-4 hematological toxicity occurred in 9 of the 14 patients (64%) who underwent chemotherapy. None experienced acute grade 3 or 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity. Adjuvant IMRT and chemotherapy following surgery in patients with endometrial cancer is well tolerated and did not lead to treatment modification in most patients. (author)

  2. Prospective randomized trail on chrono-chemotherapy + late course three dimensional conformal radio-therapy and conventional chemotherapy plus radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Feng; Ouyang Jinling; Dong Hongmin; Wu Weili; Chen Haixia; He Zhihui

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the therapeutic effects, toxic side effects of late-course three dimensional conformal radiotherapy plus chrono-chemotherapy (DDP + 5-FU/CF) and conventional radiotherapy plus chemotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: Eighty -six NPC patients admitted from Feb. 2001 to Jan. 2002 were divided randomly into two groups: 1. Chrono-chemotherapy + late course three dimensional conformal radiotherapy(CCR) group-44 patients were treated by late course three dimensional conformal radio-therapy plus chrono-chemotherapy, and 2. Routine-chemotherapy-radiotherapy (RCR) group-42 patients were treated by routine chemotherapy plus radiotherapy. The patients in CCR and RCR group were comparable in age, KPS, stage and pathology. All patients were treated by combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy, with chemotherapy stared 2 weeks ahead of radiotherapy. Chemotherapy: Braun pump was used in all drug infusions; 1. CCR group-DDP 80 mg/ m 2 starting from 10:00 until 22:00, 5-Fu 750 mg/d/m 2 starting from 22:00 until 10:00 next day, CF 200 mg/d/m 2 starting from 10:00 every day, infused at normal speed. These drugs were given for 3 days, 14 days as one cycle, totally 2 cycle, and 2. RCR group-with the same drugs at the same total dose, only with the difference being DDP and CF given QD, starting from 10:00 but at the normal speed. 5-Fu was given through-out the day and continuously for 3 days, totally for 2 cycles. Radiotherapy: linear accelerator irradiation was given to either group. Composite facio-cervical field + anterior cervical tangential field to D T 40 Gy/4w, followed by the coned down per-auricular field plus anterior tangential field or β beam irradiation. In CCR group, after D T 40gy/4w, late course 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) was used to add D T 30Gy/3w. In RCR group, routine radiotherapy of 40 Gy/w was supplemented with 30 Gy/3w. The total dose in either group was 70 Gy/7w at the nasopharynx, D T 60-70 Gy/6-7w at the

  3. The Risk of Amenorrhea Is Related to Chemotherapy-Induced Leucopenia in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Epirubicin and Taxane Based Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiuqing; He, Zhongyuan; Zha, Xiaoming; Liu, Xiaoan; Wang, Shui

    2012-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea (CIA) is common in young breast cancer patients. The incidence of CIA associated with regimens involving epirubicin and taxane was not well known. Furthermore, previous studies suggested leucopenia and amenorrhea may reflect inter-individual variations in pharmacokinetics. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between leucopenia after first cycle of chemotherapy and CIA in young breast cancer patients receiving epirubicin and taxane based chemotherapy. Furthermore, the incidence of CIA was also assessed. Methodology and Principal Findings Between October 2008 and March 2010, 186 consecutive premenopausal patients, treated with epirubicin and taxane based chemotherapy, were recruited. Information about CIA was collected by telephone and out-patient clinic. Of these 186 patients, data from 165 patients were included and analyzed. Of all 165 patients, CIA occurred in 72 patients (43.64%). In multivariate analysis, age older than 40 y (OR: 16.10, 95% CI: 6.34–40.88, P0.05). The rate of CIA in leucopenia group (52.56%) was significantly higher than that in normal leukocyte group (34.62%) (P = 0.024). In patients treated with a FEC regimen (cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil), the rate of CIA in leucopenia group (59.57%) was significantly higher than that in normal leukocyte group (36.84%) (P = 0.037). Conclusions Age at diagnosis and previous childbearing were both found to significantly increase the risk of CIA, whereas additional taxane was not associated with increased rate of CIA. Importantly, leucopenia after first cycle of chemotherapy was associated with increased risk of CIA, which suggested that leucopenia may be an early predictor of chemotherapy-induced infertility. PMID:22615953

  4. The risk of amenorrhea is related to chemotherapy-induced leucopenia in breast cancer patients receiving epirubicin and taxane based chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea (CIA is common in young breast cancer patients. The incidence of CIA associated with regimens involving epirubicin and taxane was not well known. Furthermore, previous studies suggested leucopenia and amenorrhea may reflect inter-individual variations in pharmacokinetics. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between leucopenia after first cycle of chemotherapy and CIA in young breast cancer patients receiving epirubicin and taxane based chemotherapy. Furthermore, the incidence of CIA was also assessed. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Between October 2008 and March 2010, 186 consecutive premenopausal patients, treated with epirubicin and taxane based chemotherapy, were recruited. Information about CIA was collected by telephone and out-patient clinic. Of these 186 patients, data from 165 patients were included and analyzed. Of all 165 patients, CIA occurred in 72 patients (43.64%. In multivariate analysis, age older than 40 y (OR: 16.10, 95% CI: 6.34-40.88, P0.05. The rate of CIA in leucopenia group (52.56% was significantly higher than that in normal leukocyte group (34.62% (P = 0.024. In patients treated with a FEC regimen (cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil, the rate of CIA in leucopenia group (59.57% was significantly higher than that in normal leukocyte group (36.84% (P = 0.037. CONCLUSIONS: Age at diagnosis and previous childbearing were both found to significantly increase the risk of CIA, whereas additional taxane was not associated with increased rate of CIA. Importantly, leucopenia after first cycle of chemotherapy was associated with increased risk of CIA, which suggested that leucopenia may be an early predictor of chemotherapy-induced infertility.

  5. Safety and feasibility of pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy (PIPAC) associated with systemic chemotherapy: an innovative approach to treat peritoneal carcinomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robella, Manuela; Vaira, Marco; De Simone, Michele

    2016-04-29

    Pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy (PIPAC) is a new treatment that applies chemotherapeutic drugs into the peritoneal cavity as an aerosol under pressure. It improves local bioavailability of chemotherapeutic drugs as compared with conventional intraperitoneal chemotherapy. It has been proved to be safe and feasible if performed as an exclusive treatment in patients affected by peritoneal carcinomatosis. The first results in patients treated with PIPAC associated with systemic chemotherapy are presented. Between June 2015 and February 2016, 57 PIPAC applications with oxaliplatin or cisplatin + doxorubicin every 6 weeks at 37 °C and 12 mmHg for 30 min were performed. Forty PIPAC procedures performed in 14 patients were included in this study; thirteen patients were undergoing systemic chemotherapy with a wash-out interval of at least 2 weeks before and 1 week after each PIPAC. Safety, tolerability, and postoperative complications were assessed by collection of adverse events according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) 2. Forty PIPAC administrations were performed in 14 patients with no major perioperative complications. CTCAE grades 1 and 2 were observed after six and eight procedures, respectively, for abdominal pain and nausea. Renal and hepatic functions were not impaired; no cumulative renal toxicity was observed after repeated PIPAC procedures in association with systemic chemotherapy. These preliminary data show that the association of PIPAC and systemic chemotherapy does not induce significant hepatic and renal toxicity. It allows inclusion of patients with extraperitoneal disease or at a high risk of developing it. Further studies are needed to assess whether this combination therapy could become part of the standard treatment for peritoneal carcinomatosis.

  6. Induction chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukaemia: origins and emerging directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Vivek A; Fathi, Amir T

    2018-03-01

    This review summarizes the hallmark developments in induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukaemia and further describes future directions in its evolution. We describe the origin of induction chemotherapy. We also describe notable modifications and adjustments to 7+3 induction chemotherapy since its development. Finally, we describe new efforts to modify and add new agents to induction therapy, including '7+3 Plus' combinations. Induction chemotherapy remains the standard of care for the majority of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia. However, its success is limited in a subset of patients by toxicity, failure to achieve remission and potential for subsequent relapse. Novel agents such as mutant fms like tyrosine kinase 3 inhibitors, mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase inhibitors, CD33-antibody drug conjugates and liposomal formulations have demonstrated significant potential as modifications to traditional induction chemotherapy.

  7. Tolerance of radiotherapy combined with adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrafnkelsson, J.; Nilsson, K.; Soederberg, M.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-three postmenopausal breast cancer patients with axillary lymph node metastasis were randomized to receive postoperative radiotherapy (45 Gy) or the combination of radiotherapy and 6 months of chemotherapy. Forty-three premenopausal patients had postoperative radiotherapy and were randomized to receive one of two different chemotherapy combinations. Pulmonary fibrosis was roentgenologically registered in approximately 70% of the total patient population six months after initiation of therapy. Addition of chemotherapy with doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide significantly increased the proportion of patients with pulmonary fibrosis compared with patients treated with radiotherapy only or radiotherapy combined with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil. Premenopausal patients tolerated the combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy better than postmenopausal patients of whom approximately 30% did not tolerate 65% or more of prescribed total dose of chemotherapy. (orig.)

  8. Post-chemotherapy arthralgia and arthritis in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aref H Amiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the characteristics of arthritis, arthralgia and musculoskeletal pain after chemotherapy in patients with lung cancer. Materials and Methods: In this study, we evaluate the characteristics of 17 patients with joint symptoms following receiving chemotherapy for lung cancer. Demographic information of patients including sex, age, time of rheumatologic findings after starting of chemotherapy, time of improvement after starting of medication, and relevant laboratory findings for each patient. Results: A total of seventeen patients (six women with mean age 41.2 ± 5.2 years and 11 men with mean age 42.5 ± 8.2 that received standard chemotherapy for lung cancer according to stage of disease. Joint symptoms usually began about seven months after the first session of chemotherapy. Patients had an average of two tender joints and 1 hr of morning stiffness. Four patients were positive for anti-nuclear antibody, and none of patient was positive for rheumatoid factor. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD, corticosteroids, and venlafaxine were prescribed. Four patients did not show an improvement. Follow-up was available for all patients. 11 patients showed favorable responses, characterized by a significant decrease (more than 50% in morning stiffness, pain, and tender joint counts after a mean of three months′ treatment. Two patients had complete resolution of symptoms and did not required further medications for arthritis, arthralgia or musculoskeletal pain. Conclusion: Chemotherapy-related arthropathy in lung cancer is not uncommon. Early treatment with NSAID, DMARD, and corticosteroids is effective in the majority of patients.

  9. Simultaneous radiochemotherapy in cervical cancer: recommendations for chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunst, J.; Haensgen, G.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Simultaneous radiochemotherapy has recently been demonstrated to be superior to radiation alone in the treatment of cervical cancer. The objective of this article is to summarize the data of major randomized trials and to derive recommendations for daily clinical practice. Materials and Methods: We have analyzed the data from seven randomized trials in the recent literature in which radiotherapy alone as standard treatment has been compared to simultaneous radiochemotherapy. Four trials used cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimens, 5-FU, mitomycin C and epirubicin were used each in one trial. Results: All trials demonstrated some improvement in survival which was significant in the studies with cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimens. The survival benefit resulted mainly from an improvement in local control whereas chemotherapy had only a small and insignificant effect on distant metastases. Thus, the main action of chemotherapy is ''radiosensitization''. Cisplatin as single drug yielded comparable results as compared to combined regimens although the cisplatin dose was lower in the studies with combination chemotherapy. For the definitive treatment of locally advanced cancers, monotherapy with cisplatin can be recommended. Mitomycin C offers an attractive alternative to cisplatin in patients with contraindications for cisplatin. For postoperative radiochemotherapy, a combination of cisplatin/5-FU should be used because data with cisplatin alone are lacking so far. Simultaneous radiochemotherapy should also be considered for the curative treatment of local recurrences. Conclusions: The addition of simultaneous chemotherapy to radiotherapy is indicated in the vast majority of patients with cervical cancers who are treated with curative intent. (orig.) [de

  10. The effect of chemotherapy on rat brain PET: preliminary study

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    Kim, Jin Su; Kim, Il Han; Yu, A Ram; Park, Ji Ae; Woo, Sang Keun; Kim, Jong Guk; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Byeong Il; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Hee Joung; Kim, Kyeong Min [Korea Institute Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Chemotherapy was widely used for the therapy of cancer patients. When chemotherapy was performed, transient cognitive memory problem was occurred. This cognitive problem in brain was called as chemobrain. In this study, we have developed rat model for chemobrain. Cerebral glucose metabolism after chemotherapy was assessed using animal PET and voxel based statistical analysis method

  11. The effect of chemotherapy on rat brain PET: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Su; Kim, Il Han; Yu, A Ram; Park, Ji Ae; Woo, Sang Keun; Kim, Jong Guk; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Byeong Il; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Hee Joung; Kim, Kyeong Min

    2010-01-01

    Chemotherapy was widely used for the therapy of cancer patients. When chemotherapy was performed, transient cognitive memory problem was occurred. This cognitive problem in brain was called as chemobrain. In this study, we have developed rat model for chemobrain. Cerebral glucose metabolism after chemotherapy was assessed using animal PET and voxel based statistical analysis method

  12. Evaluation of recent curative effect of chemotherapy on hepatocellular carcinoma with MSCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jing; Zheng Keguo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the value of MSCT in evaluating the recent curative effect of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after the chemotherapy with Oxaliplatin combined with 5-FU and Folinic Acid. Methods: 6 cases with HCC or post hepatectomy metastasis HCC confirmed by pathohistology underwent chemotherapy with Oxaliplatin combined with 5-FU and Folinic Acid. MultiSpiral Computed Tomography was used to determine the target lesions before and after the chemotherapy. The size of the target lesions before the chemotherapy was refer as the basic value (x0), and that after the chemotherapy was regarded as the observed value (y1). The theoretic value was obtained based on tumor growth dynamics mathematic model y2(x)=X 0 2 t/3td . Results: Before and after the first chemotherapy or between the consecutive chemotherapy cycles, the target lesions could be follow-up one by one with MSCT. There was significant statistical difference between observed increase size and theoretical increase size, P=0.0442. Conclusion: Tumor growth velocity can be effectively controlled with this chemotherapy plan, and MSCT may used to be an objective tool to evaluate the recent curative effect of chemotherapy on hepatocellular carcinoma. (authors)

  13. Uterine/Endometrial Cancer: Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Your Treatment Team Treatment Surgery Surgical Staging Pathology of Ovarian Cancer Chemotherapy Radiation Therapy Hormone Therapy ... 20, 2016 January 17, 2017 February 21, 2017 March 22, 2017 April 18, 2017 May 16, 2017 ...

  14. Radiotherapy of esophageal cancer in combination with chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinnouchi, Shoshi; Koga, Kenji; Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Kihara, Yasushi; Kusuhara, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Katuji

    1983-01-01

    The significance of combination of chemotherapy in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer was evaluated in 32 patients. They were irradiated routinely in 5 times a weeks with a fraction dose of 200 rad by 10MV-X-ray linear accelerator. Combined drugs consist of Bleomycin or Pepleomycin in two-third and 5FU or FT-207 in one-third. There was statistically no significance between the results of radiation alone and combined chemotherapy, and the improvement of survival rate could not be obtained by combining chemotherapy. Some discussion on the causes of this unimprovement were made. (author)

  15. WITHDRAWN: Chemoimmunotherapy versus chemotherapy for metastatic malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasse, Andre D; Sasse, Emma C; Clark, Luciana Go; Clark, Otavio Augusto Camara

    2018-02-06

    Malignant melanoma, one of the most aggressive of all skin cancers, is increasing in incidence throughout the world. Surgery remains the cornerstone of curative treatment in earlier stages. Metastatic disease is incurable in most affected people, because melanoma does not respond to most systemic treatments. A number of novel approaches are under evaluation and have shown promising results, but they are usually associated with increased toxicity and cost. The combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy has been reported to improve treatment results, but it is still unclear whether evidence exists to support this choice, compared with chemotherapy alone. No language restrictions were imposed. To compare the effects of therapy with chemotherapy and immunotherapy (chemoimmunotherapy) versus chemotherapy alone in people with metastatic malignant melanoma. We searched the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register (14 February 2006), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library Issue 3, 2005), MEDLINE (2003 to 30 January 2006 ), EMBASE (2003 to 20 July 2005) and LILACS (1982 to 20 February 2006). References, conference proceedings, and databases of ongoing trials were also used to locate trials. All randomised controlled trials that compared the use of chemotherapy versus chemoimmunotherapy on people of any age, diagnosed with metastatic melanoma. Two authors independently assessed each study to determine whether it met the pre-defined selection criteria, with differences being resolved through discussion with the review team. Two authors independently extracted the data from the articles using data extraction forms. Quality assessment included an evaluation of various components associated with biased estimates of treatment effect. Whenever possible, a meta-analysis was performed on the extracted data, in order to calculate a weighed treatment effect across trials. Eighteen studies met our criteria and were included in the meta

  16. Exploring patient experiences of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Kinta; Williamson, Susan; Briggs, Jean

    2016-02-01

    Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy is recommended for 'inoperable' locally advanced and inflammatory breast cancers. For operable breast cancers, trials indicate no survival differences between chemotherapy given pre or post-surgery. Communicating evidence based information to patients is complex and studies examining patient experiences of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy are lacking. This study aims to explore the experiences of women who received neo-adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. A qualitative approach using in-depth interviews with 20 women who had completed neo-adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Interview data were analysed using thematic analysis. The sample included a relatively young group of women, with caring responsibilities. Five main themes emerged: coping with the rapid transition from 'well' to 'ill', information needs and decision making, needing support and empathy, impact on family, and creating a new 'normal'. More support was needed towards the end of chemotherapy, when side effects were at their most toxic, and decisions about forthcoming surgery were being made. Some women were referred to psychological services, but usually when a crisis point had been reached. Information and support would have been beneficial at key time points. This information is vital in developing services and interventions to meet the complex needs of these patients and potentially prevent late referral to psychological services. Specialist oncology nurses are able to develop empathetic relationships with patients and have the experience, knowledge and skills to inform and support women experiencing neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Targeting key time points and maintaining relationship throughout neo-adjuvant chemotherapy would be highly beneficial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cognitive effects of chemotherapy and/or cranial irradiation in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welzel, G.; Wenz, F.; Steinvorth, S.

    2005-01-01

    Background: cognitive effects after cranial radiotherapy are widely discussed, but there is growing evidence that chemotherapy may also induce changes in neuropsychological functioning. This review summarizes the published literature regarding cognitive functioning after cancer therapy in adult patients. Material and methods: 63 reports from January 1980 to July 2003 assessing objective cognitive effects of irradiation and/or chemotherapy by neuropsychologic evaluation were analyzed. 57 studies with 3,424 patients were included for evaluation. Results: the results of this review confirm that both chemotherapy and irradiation can result in cognitive deficits. No clinically relevant differences are found for cognitive deficits, cognitive impairment rate, and single cognitive domains, when chemotherapy, cranial irradiation and combined radio- and chemotherapy were compared. Only 28 trials with 1,000 patients report quantitative data on patients with cognitive deficits after therapy. There are 44.1% (range 18-75%) of 451 patients in the chemotherapy group, 44.0% (range 29-83%) of 320 patients in the radiotherapy group, and 64.5% (range 30-100%) of 229 patients in the combined irradiation and chemotherapy group with cognitive deficits. Furthermore, cognitive functioning below average before chemo- or radiotherapy is found in subgroups of cancer patients. Conclusion: there is evidence of cognitive impairment in adult tumor patients after chemotherapy similar to effects after cranial irradiation. Cognitive functioning below average before therapy may be due to paraneoplastic effects. More prospective studies with a long-term follow-up using standardized neuropsychometric testing, assessment of premorbid intelligence, and suited control groups are needed. (orig.)

  18. High-risk bladder cancer: improving outcomes with perioperative chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Y.C. Heng

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite treatment with radical cystectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection, muscle invasive bladder cancer has a relapse rate of 50%. Patients can develop regionally advanced or metastatic disease that ultimately leads to death. The addition of neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy to reduce the risk of relapse and death has been extensively studied over the past two decades. Two contemporary trials coupled with a recent meta-analysis evaluating neoadjuvant chemotherapy demonstrated a modest but real improvement in overall survival. This has made neoadjuvant chemotherapy a standard of care. Clinical trials evaluating adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with high-risk disease have been plagued with statistical flaws and have, therefore, been unable to define the survival impact of this approach. It is hoped that ongoing adjuvant trials that are powered to detect small but meaningful clinical differences will clarify the benefit of chemotherapy after cystectomy. Since there are theoretical advantages and disadvantages to each of these approaches, both are widely used in North America. The evidence behind each approach and potential future developments in this field will be described.

  19. Chemotherapy and Hair Loss: What to Expect during Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemotherapy and hair loss: What to expect during treatment Your doctor can tell you whether your particular chemotherapy treatment is likely to cause hair loss. This allows you to plan ahead for head ...

  20. Symptom Cluster Trajectories During Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsin-Tien; Lin, Kuan-Chia; Wu, Li-Min; Juan, Chiung-Hui; Hou, Ming-Feng; Hwang, Shiow-Li; Liu, Yi; Dodd, Marylin J

    2017-06-01

    Breast cancer patients often experience multiple symptoms and substantial discomfort. Some symptoms may occur simultaneously and throughout the duration of chemotherapy treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate symptom severity and symptom cluster trajectories during chemotherapy in outpatients with breast cancer in Taiwan. This prospective, longitudinal, repeated measures study administered a standardized questionnaire (M. D. Anderson Symptom Inventory Taiwan version) to 103 breast cancer patients during each day of the third 21-day cycle of chemotherapy. Latent class growth analysis was performed to examine symptom cluster trajectories. Three symptom clusters were identified within the first 14 days of the 21-day chemotherapy cycle: the neurocognition cluster (pain, shortness of breath, vomiting, memory problems, and numbness/tingling) with a trajectory of Y = 2.09 - 0.11 (days), the emotion-nausea cluster (nausea, disturbed sleep, distress/upset, drowsiness, and sadness) with a trajectory ofY = 3.57 - 0.20 (days), and the fatigue-anorexia cluster (fatigue, lack of appetite, and dry mouth) with a trajectory of Y = 4.22 - 0.21 (days). The "fatigue-anorexia cluster" and "emotion-nausea cluster" peaked at moderate levels on chemotherapy days 3-5, and then gradually decreased to mild levels within the first 14 days of the 21-day chemotherapy cycle. Distinct symptom clusters were observed during the third cycle of chemotherapy. Systematic and ongoing evaluation of symptom cluster trajectories during cancer treatment is essential. Healthcare providers can use these findings to enhance communication with their breast cancer patients and to prioritize symptoms that require attention and intervention. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Biomaterial-based regional chemotherapy: Local anticancer drug delivery to enhance chemotherapy and minimize its side-effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukiewicz, Katarzyna; Zak, Jerzy K

    2016-05-01

    Since the majority of anticancer pharmacological agents affect not only cancer tissue but also normal cells, chemotherapy is usually accompanied with severe side effects. Regional chemotherapy, as the alternative version of conventional treatment, leads to the enhancement of the therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drugs and, simultaneously, reduction of toxic effects to healthy tissues. This paper provides an insight into different approaches of local delivery of chemotherapeutics, such as the injection of anticancer agents directly into tumor tissue, the use of injectable in situ forming drug carriers or injectable platforms in a form of implants. The wide range of biomaterials used as reservoirs of anticancer drugs is described, i.e. poly(ethylene glycol) and its copolymers, polyurethanes, poly(lactic acid) and its copolymers, poly(ɛ-caprolactone), polyanhydrides, chitosan, cellulose, cyclodextrins, silk, conducting polymers, modified titanium surfaces, calcium phosphate based biomaterials, silicone and silica implants, as well as carbon nanotubes and graphene. To emphasize the applicability of regional chemotherapy in cancer treatment, the commercially available products approved by the relevant health agencies are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical efficacy of local targeted chemotherapy for triple-negative breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Jinsong; Wang, Xianming; Guan, Hong; Chen, Weicai; Wang, Ming; Wu, Huisheng; Wang, Zun; Zhou, Ruming; Qiu, Shuibo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of superselective intra-arterial targeted neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative (triple-negative) breast cancer. A total of 47 triple-negative breast cancer patients (29 at stage II, 13 at stage III and 5 at stage IV) were randomly assigned to two groups: targeted chemotherapy group (n=24) and control group (n=23). Patients in the targeted chemotherapy group received preoperative superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy with CEF regimen (C: cyclophosphamide [600 mg/m 2 ]; E: epirubicin [90 mg/m 2 ]; F: 5-fluorouracil [600 mg/m 2 ]), and those in the control group received routine neoadjuvant chemotherapy with CEF. The duration of the treatment, changes in lesions and the prognosis were determined. The average course of the treatment was 15 days in the targeted chemotherapy group which was significantly shorter than that in the control group (31 days) (P<0.01). The remission rate of lesions was 91.6% in the targeted chemotherapy group and 60.9% in the control group, respectively. Among these patients, 9 died within two years, including 2 (both at IV stage) in the targeted chemotherapy group and 7 (2 at stage II, 4 at stage III and 1 at stage IV) in the control group. As an neoadjuvant therapy, the superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy is effective for triple-negative breast cancer, with advantages of the short treatment course and favourable remission rates as well as prognoses

  3. Chemotherapy and Sex: Is Sexual Activity OK during Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OK during treatment? Is it safe to have sex with my husband while undergoing chemotherapy? Answers from ... best to discuss any concerns about chemotherapy and sex with your doctor, who's familiar with your individual ...

  4. Treatment of cancer chemotherapy-induced toxicity with the pineal hormone melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissoni, P; Tancini, G; Barni, S; Paolorossi, F; Ardizzoia, A; Conti, A; Maestroni, G

    1997-03-01

    Experimental data have suggested that the pineal hormone melatonin (MLT) may counteract chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression and immunosuppression. In addition, MLT has been shown to inhibit the production of free radicals, which play a part in mediating the toxicity of chemotherapy. A study was therefore performed in an attempt to evaluate the influence of MLT on chemotherapy toxicity. The study involved 80 patients with metastatic solid tumors who were in poor clinical condition (lung cancer: 35; breast cancer: 31; gastrointestinal tract tumors: 14). Lung cancer patients were treated with cisplatin and etoposide, breast cancer patients with mitoxantrone, and gastrointestinal tract tumor patients with 5-fluorouracil plus folates. Patients were randomised to receive chemotherapy alone or chemotherapy plus MLT (20 mg/day p.o. in the evening). Thrombocytopenia was significantly less frequent in patients concomitantly treated with MLT. Malaise and asthenia were also significantly less frequent in patients receiving MLT. Finally, stomatitis and neuropathy were less frequent in the MLT group, albeit without statistically significant differences. Alopecia and vomiting were not influenced by MLT. This pilot study seems to suggest that the concomitant administration of the pineal hormone MLT during chemotherapy may prevent some chemotherapy-induced side-effects, particularly myelosuppression and neuropathy. Evaluation of the impact of MLT on chemotherapy efficacy will be the aim of future clinical investigations.

  5. Effect of Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Perfusion Chemotherapy in Combination with Intravenous Chemotherapy as Postoperative Adjuvant Therapy for Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhibing; Ma, Shenglin; Jing, Saisai; Deng, Qinghua; Zheng, Zhishuang; Wu, Kan; Li, Juan; Chen, Sumei; Tang, Rongjun; Li, Xiadong

    2014-06-01

    The aim is to evaluate the preliminary efficacy and side effects of paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil, and leucovorin intravenous chemotherapy in combination with cisplatin hyperthermic intraperitoneal perfusion chemotherapy (HIPEC) as postoperative adjuvant therapy for patients of locally advanced gastric cancer (GC) at high risk for recurrence after curative resection. Four GC patients who underwent radical gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy were enrolled. All patients received paclitaxel 135 mg/m2 on day 1, 5-FU 500 mg/m2 on days 1-5, LV 200 mg/m2 on days 1-5 intravenous chemotherapy, cisplatin 75 mg/m2 on day 5, and HIPEC one month after surgery. It was repeated at 3 weeks intervals and at least two cycles administered. A total of 181 cycles of chemotherapy were administered (median, 4 cycles). The median disease free survival time of patients was 40.8 months. The median overall survival time was 48.0 months. The one-, two-, and three-year recurrence rates were 14.6%, 26.8%, and 46.3%, respectively. The main relapse patterns were remnant GC and metastases of retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The morbidity of grade 3 and 4 toxicities of myelosuppression, nausea/ vomiting were less than 10%. The side effects of grade 1 and 2 of hematologic toxicity, nausea and vomiting, abnormal function of liver, kidney or cardiac, fatigue and neurotoxicity were well tolerated. Cisplatin HIPEC combined with paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil, and leucovorin intravenous chemotherapy regimen could improve the survival rate and decrease the postoperative recurrence of locally advanced GC.

  6. Survival benefit needed to undergo chemotherapy: Patient and physician preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz-Luis, Ines; O'Neill, Anne; Sepucha, Karen; Miller, Kathy D; Baker, Emily; Dang, Chau T; Northfelt, Donald W; Winer, Eric P; Sledge, George W; Schneider, Bryan; Partridge, Ann H

    2017-08-01

    Published studies have suggested that most patients with early stage breast cancer are willing, for modest survival benefits, to receive 6 months of adjuvant cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil, an older regimen that is used infrequently today. We examined preferences regarding the survival benefit needed to justify 6 months of a contemporary chemotherapy regimen. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Protocol 5103 was a phase 3 trial that randomized breast cancer patients to receive standard adjuvant doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel with either bevacizumab or placebo. Serial surveys to assess quality of life were administered to patients enrolled between January 1, 2010, and June 8, 2010. Survival benefit needed to justify 6 months of chemotherapy by patients was collected at the 18-month assessment. A parallel survey was sent to physicians who had enrolled patients in the study. Of 519 patients who had not withdrawn at a time point earlier than 18 months, 87.8% responded to this survey. A total of 175 physicians participated. We found considerable variation in patient preferences, particularly for modest survival benefits: for 2 months of benefit, 57% would consider 6 months of chemotherapy, whereas 96% of patients would consider 6 months of chemotherapy for 24 months. Race and education were associated with the choices. Physicians who responded were less likely to accept chemotherapy for modest benefit. Among patients who received contemporary adjuvant chemotherapy in a randomized controlled trial, we found substantial variation in preferences regarding benefits that justified undergoing chemotherapy. Differences between patients' and physicians' choices were also apparent. Eliciting preferences regarding risks and benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy is critical. Cancer 2017;123:2821-28. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  7. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer operated for cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Sune Høirup; Harling, Henrik; Kirkeby, Lene Tschemerinsky; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer; Mocellin, Simone

    2012-03-14

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the Western world. Apart from surgery - which remains the mainstay of treatment for resectable primary tumours - postoperative (i.e., adjuvant) chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based regimens is now the standard treatment in Dukes' C (TNM stage III) colon tumours i.e. tumours with metastases in the regional lymph nodes but no distant metastases. In contrast, the evidence for recommendations of adjuvant therapy in rectal cancer is sparse. In Europe it is generally acknowledged that locally advanced rectal tumours receive preoperative (i.e., neoadjuvant) downstaging by radiotherapy (or chemoradiotion), whereas in the US postoperative chemoradiotion is considered the treatment of choice in all Dukes' C rectal cancers. Overall, no universal consensus exists on the adjuvant treatment of surgically resectable rectal carcinoma; moreover, no formal systematic review and meta-analysis has been so far performed on this subject. We undertook a systematic review of the scientific literature from 1975 until March 2011 in order to quantitatively summarize the available evidence regarding the impact of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy on the survival of patients with surgically resectable rectal cancer. The outcomes of interest were overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). CCCG standard search strategy in defined databases with the following supplementary search. 1. Rect* or colorect* - 2. Cancer or carcinom* or adenocarc* or neoplasm* or tumour - 3. Adjuv* - 4. Chemother* - 5. Postoper* Randomised controlled trials (RCT) comparing patients undergoing surgery for rectal cancer who received no adjuvant chemotherapy with those receiving any postoperative chemotherapy regimen. Two authors extracted data and a third author performed an independent search for verification. The main outcome measure was the hazard ratio (HR) between the risk of event between the treatment arm (adjuvant chemotherapy

  8. Second neoplasms following radiotherapy or chemotherapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penn, I.

    1982-01-01

    While radiotherapy and antineoplastic chemotherapy often control malignancies they may, paradoxically, cause new cancers to develop as long-term complications. Although almost any type of neoplasm can occur, radiation-induced malignancies are most likely to affect the myelopoietic tissues and the thyroid gland. The former tissues are also most frequently involved by chemotherapy. The combination of intensive radiotherapy and intensive chemotherapy is particularly leukemogenic. Acute myeloid leukemia has occurred with increased frequency following treatment of Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, ovarian cancer, polycythemia vera, carcinoma of the thyroid gland, and carcinoma of the breast. Radiation-induced malignancies usually occur in the field of irradiation. Tumors developing in an irradiated field include a substantial number of soft tissue sarcomas or osteosarcomas. There is a 20-fold increase of second cancers following treatment of childhood malignancies, mostly sarcomas of bone and soft tissues, but including leukemia, and carcinomas of the thyroid gland, skin, and breast. The latent period between radiotherapy and the appearance of a second cancer ranges from 2 years to several decades, often being 10-15 years. With chemotherapy the mean latent period is shorter, approximately 4 years. The mechanism of oncogenesis by radiotherapy or chemotherapy is poorly understood and probably involves a complex interplay of somatic mutation, co-oncogenic effects, depression of host immunity, stimulation of cellular proliferation, and genetic susceptibility

  9. Novel formulations and new mechanisms of delivering chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    The identification of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangements and the development of targeted therapy for patients with these molecular alterations has been a tremendous advance in the treatment of advanced stage or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the majority of patients with advanced stage NSCLC will not have one of these molecular alterations and will receive chemotherapy as their primary therapy. Chemotherapy remains a critical component of therapy for resected and locally advanced NSCLC, as well as for patients with limited-stage and extensive stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). A significant unmet need exists to develop novel chemotherapy agents and to improve the efficacy and toxicity of currently available agents. Several novel formulations of currently available chemotherapy agents are in development for NSCLC and SCLC. Antibody conjugates are therapeutic agents that employ a tumor-specific monoclonal antibody conjugated to a cytotoxic or radionuclide agent. After the monoclonal antibody binds to the tumor antigen, these agents are internalized, and the link between the antibody and the therapeutic agent is dissolved and the cytotoxic agent is release intracellularly. This enhanced delivery of chemotherapy to malignant tissues has the potential to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity. Antibody conjugates to therapeutic agents are currently available for other malignancies and are in development for NSCLC and SCLC.

  10. Chemotherapy in eye cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is a drug used in a wide range of cancers, which produces ... lesions. In a 10-year retrospective review of .... disease and focal chemotherapy for selected high-risk ... of focal drug delivery methods to reduce recurrence .... the protein tubulin.

  11. [Combination Chemotherapy Including Intraperitoneal(IP)Administration of Paclitaxel(PTX)followed by PTX, CDDP and S-1Triplet Chemotherapy for CY1P0 Gastric Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, Masayuki; Imano, Motohiro; Hiraki, Yoko; Kato, Hiroaki; Iwama, Mitsuru; Shiraishi, Osamu; Yasuda, Atsushi; Kimura, Yutaka; Imamoto, Haruhiko; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Takushi

    2017-11-01

    We evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of combination chemotherapy including single intraperitoneal( IP)administration of paclitaxel(PTX), followed by triplet chemotherapy(PTX, cisplatin[CDDP]and S-1: PCS)for CY1P0 gastric cancer. First of all, we performed staging laparoscopy and confirmed CY1P0, and secondary, administrated PTX intraperitoneally. Thirdly, patients received PCS chemotherapy for 2 courses. After antitumor effect had been confirmed, we performed second look laparoscopy. In the case of CY0P0, we performed gastrectomy with D2 lymph nodes dissection. Total 4 patients were enrolled. Grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia were observed in one patient while intraperitoneal and systemic-chemotherapy. One patients showed PR and 3 patients showed SD. All patients underwent second look laparoscopy. CY0P0 was observed in all patients and gastrectomy with D2 dissection was performed for all patients. Postoperative complications were observed in 2 patients. Two patients were still alive without recurrence, while the remaining 2 had died of liver metastasis and #16 LN metastasis. Combination chemotherapy including single IP PTX followed by PCS systemic-chemotherapy for CY1P0 gastric cancer is feasible and efficient.

  12. Efficacy of Systemic Chemotherapy Plus Radical Nephroureterectomy for Metastatic Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seisen, Thomas; Jindal, Tarun; Karabon, Patrick; Sood, Akshay; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Rouprêt, Morgan; Leow, Jeffrey J; Vetterlein, Malte W; Sun, Maxine; Alanee, Shaheen; Choueiri, Toni K; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Menon, Mani; Abdollah, Firas

    2017-05-01

    Given the growing body of evidence supporting the benefit of primary tumor control for a wide range of metastatic malignancies, we hypothesized that chemotherapy plus radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) is associated with an overall survival (OS) benefit compared to chemotherapy alone for metastatic upper tract urothelial carcinoma (mUTUC). Within the National Cancer Data Base (2004-2012), we identified 398 (38.4%) and 637 (61.6%) patients who received chemotherapy plus RNU and chemotherapy alone, respectively. Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW)-adjusted Kaplan-Meier curves showed that 3-yr OS was 16.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.1-20.3) for chemotherapy plus RNU and 6.4% (95%CI 4.1-8.7) for chemotherapy alone (pchemotherapy plus RNU was associated with a significant OS benefit (hazard ratio 0.70, 95% CI 0.61-0.80; pbenefit for fit patients who received chemotherapy plus RNU for mUTUC relative to their counterparts treated with chemotherapy alone. We examined the role of radical nephroureterectomy in addition to systemic chemotherapy for metastatic upper tract urothelial carcinoma. We found that such treatment may be associated with an overall survival benefit compared to chemotherapy alone in fit patients. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cystic craniopharyngioma: intratumoral chemotherapy with alpha interferon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Alessandra Dastoli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the cystic craniopharyngiomas can be controlled with the use of intratumoral applications of interferon alpha. METHOD: Nineteen patients with the diagnosis of cystic craniopharyngioma were treated with intratumoral chemotherapy with interferon alpha from January 2002 to April 2006. All patients underwent placement of an intracystic catheter connected to an Ommaya reservoir. Through this reservoir were made applications during chemotherapy cycles. Each cycle corresponded to application of 3,000,000 units of interferon alpha three times per week on alternate days totalizing 36,000,000 units. Response to treatment was evaluated by calculating the tumor volume on MRI control after one, three and six months after the end of each cycle. Patients who developed worsening of symptoms or who had insignificant reduction in tumor volume during follow-up underwent repeat cycle chemotherapy. RESULTS: Four patients received four cycles of chemotherapy, three patients received three cycles, six patients received two cycles and six patients received one. The lower percentage of reduction in tumor volume was 60% and the bigger reduction was 98.37%. Eleven patients had a reduction greater than 90%. Five patients had a tumor reduction between 75 and 90% and in three patients the tumors were reduced by less than 75%. No deaths occurred during treatment and side effects of interferon alpha were well tolerated. No treatment was discontinued. Follow-up after the last application ranged from one year and five months to three years and nine months. CONCLUSION: The intratumoral chemotherapy with interferon alpha decreases the volume of cystic craniopharyngiomas and so far can be considered a new therapeutic alternative.

  14. Chemotherapy curable malignancies and cancer stem cells: a biological review and hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Philip

    2016-11-21

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy brings routine cures to only a small select group of metastatic malignancies comprising gestational trophoblast tumours, germ cell tumours, acute leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, high grade lymphomas and some of the rare childhood malignancies. We have previously postulated that the extreme sensitivity to chemotherapy for these malignancies is linked to the on-going high levels of apoptotic sensitivity that is naturally linked with the unique genetic events of nuclear fusion, meiosis, VDJ recombination, somatic hypermutation, and gastrulation that have occurred within the cells of origin of these malignancies. In this review we will examine the cancer stem cell/cancer cell relationship of each of the chemotherapy curable malignancies and how this relationship impacts on the resultant biology and pro-apoptotic sensitivity of the varying cancer cell types. In contrast to the common epithelial cancers, in each of the chemotherapy curable malignancies there are no conventional hierarchical cancer stem cells. However cells with cancer stem like qualities can arise stochastically from within the general tumour cell population. These stochastic stem cells acquire a degree of resistance to DNA damaging agents but also retain much of the key characteristics of the cancer cells from which they develop. We would argue that the balance between the acquired resistance of the stochastic cancer stem cell and the inherent chemotherapy sensitivity of parent tumour cell determines the overall chemotherapy curability of each diagnosis. The cancer stem cells in the chemotherapy curable malignancies appear to have two key biological differences from those of the more common chemotherapy incurable malignancies. The first difference is that the conventional hierarchical pattern of cancer stem cells is absent in each of the chemotherapy curable malignancies. The other key difference, we suggest, is that the stochastic stem cells in the chemotherapy curable malignancies

  15. Breast Cancer Patients’ Cognitive Functioning Before and After Chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christina Maar; Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Mehlsen, Mimi Yung

    chemotherapy which interfere with their abilities to fulfill social and work-related responsibilities. However, since the cause of the cognitive problems is unknown, it is difficult for GPs to offer appropriate counseling on this issue. Aim: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available...... as far back as the databases allowed. Seven studies were selected based on three inclusion criteria: prospective studies, use of neuropsychological tests and inclusion of two patient groups: one receiving chemotherapy and one not receiving chemotherapy (control group). Results: At baseline, breast cancer...... patients who were to receive chemotherapy scored higher on executive function than the controls (effect size (ES)=-0.202, p=0.011), but significantly lower on overall cognitive functioning as well as on the specific domains of attention, working memory, verbal learning and memory, motor function, visual...

  16. Is serum albumin an independent predictor of post chemotherapy febrile neutropenia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, L.; Zahid, N.A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the association between serum albumin and risk of post chemotherapy febrile neutropenia. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of oncology, Liaquat National Hospital, from 1st Jan 2015 to 31st Dec 2016. Material and Method: One hundred and sixty-six biopsy proven cancer patients with Eastern cooperative oncology group (ECOG) performance status <2 and without significant co-morbidities received first cycle of chemotherapy during two years study period. Different chemotherapies with moderate to severe risk of FN were used. Patient's pre-treatment serum albumin was measured and patients followed for occurrence of FN. Association between serum albumin and post chemotherapy FN was analyzed. Results: Data of 166 patients was available for final analysis. Post chemotherapy FN was observed in 19.9% (33/166) patients. Pre-chemotherapy serum albumin level was <3.5 mg/dl in (35/166) 21.1% of patients, out of which (15/35) 42.9% developed FN. Serum albumin (p=0.0005) was highly significantly associated with a risk of FN. On analysis of other factors age, gender, body surface area (BSA) and pre-chemotherapy hemoglobin level were not significantly associated with a risk of FN while body mass index (p=0.0005) was found to be associated with risk of FN. Conclusion: Pre-chemotherapy serum albumin levels were found to be statistically significant predictor of postchemotherapy febrile neutropenia.

  17. High reinfection rate after preventive chemotherapy for fishborne zoonotic trematodes in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lier, Tore; Do, Dung Trung; Johansen, Maria Vang

    2014-01-01

    . The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of preventive chemotherapy to control FZT in an endemic area in Northern Vietnam. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: We followed a cohort of 396 people who fulfilled the criteria for receiving preventive chemotherapy. Stool samples were examined....... CONCLUSIONS: The effectiveness of preventive chemotherapy as a main component in control of FZT is not well documented in most endemic areas. We found a high reinfection rate within the first year after preventive chemotherapy. Since these trematodes are zoonoses, preventive chemotherapy may not have......BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization aims for complete morbidity control of fishborne zoonotic trematodes (FZT) in endemic areas by 2020. The main intervention tool for achieving this goal is regular use of preventive chemotherapy by offering praziquantel to those at risk in endemic areas...

  18. Induction Chemotherapy for p16 Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Yuki; Ando, Mizuo; Omura, Go; Yasuhara, Kazuo; Yoshida, Masafumi; Takahashi, Wataru; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis We aimed to determine the effectiveness of induction chemotherapy for treating p16?positive oropharyngeal cancer in our department. Study Design This was a retrospective case series to assess treatment effectiveness. Methods We administered induction chemotherapy to patients with stage III to IV oropharyngeal p16?positive squamous cell carcinoma between 2008 and 2013. Induction chemotherapy was administered using combinations of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5?fluorouracil. ...

  19. Management of hepatitis B reactivation in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yi-Wen; Chung, Raymond T.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation is well documented in previously resolved or inactive HBV carriers who receive cancer chemotherapy. The consequences of HBV reactivation range from self-limited conditions to fulminant hepatic failure and death. HBV reactivation also leads to premature termination of chemotherapy or delay in treatment schedules. This review summarizes current knowledge of management of HBV reactivation in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) ...

  20. Genes of cell-cell interactions, chemotherapy detoxification and apoptosis are induced during chemotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Øyan, Anne Margrete; Ånensen, Nina; Bø, Trond Hellem; Stordrange, Laila; Jonassen, Inge; Bruserud, Øystein; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore

    2009-01-01

    The molecular changes in vivo in acute myeloid leukemia cells early after start of conventional genotoxic chemotherapy are incompletely understood, and it is not known if early molecular modulations reflect clinical response. The gene expression was examined by whole genome 44 k oligo microarrays and 12 k cDNA microarrays in peripheral blood leukocytes collected from seven leukemia patients before treatment, 2–4 h and 18–24 h after start of chemotherapy and validated by real-time quantitative PCR. Statistically significantly upregulated genes were classified using gene ontology (GO) terms. Parallel samples were examined by flow cytometry for apoptosis by annexin V-binding and the expression of selected proteins were confirmed by immunoblotting. Significant differential modulation of 151 genes were found at 4 h after start of induction therapy with cytarabine and anthracycline, including significant overexpression of 31 genes associated with p53 regulation. Within 4 h of chemotherapy the BCL2/BAX and BCL2/PUMA ratio were attenuated in proapoptotic direction. FLT3 mutations indicated that non-responders (5/7 patients, 8 versus 49 months survival) are characterized by a unique gene response profile before and at 4 h. At 18–24 h after chemotherapy, the gene expression of p53 target genes was attenuated, while genes involved in chemoresistance, cytarabine detoxification, chemokine networks and T cell receptor were prominent. No signs of apoptosis were observed in the collected cells, suggesting the treated patients as a physiological source of pre-apoptotic cells. Pre-apoptotic gene expression can be monitored within hours after start of chemotherapy in patients with acute myeloid leukemia, and may be useful in future determination of therapy responders. The low number of patients and the heterogeneity of acute myeloid leukemia limited the identification of gene expression predictive of therapy response. Therapy-induced gene expression reflects the complex

  1. Incidence of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in HIV-infected and uninfected patients with breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sithembile Ngidi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN can result in poor tolerance of chemotherapy, leading to dose reductions, delays in therapy schedules, morbidity and mortality. Actively identifying predisposing risk factors before treatment is of paramount importance. We hypothesised that chemotherapy is associated with a greater increase in CIN and its complications in HIV-infected patients than in those who are not infected. Objective. To establish the incidence of CIN in HIV-infected and uninfected patients undergoing chemotherapy. Methods. A retrospective chart review and analysis was conducted in the oncology departments at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital and Addington Hospital, Durban, South Africa. The study population consisted of 65 previously untreated women of all ages with stage II - IV breast cancer and known HIV status treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy from January 2012 to December 2015. Results. HIV-infected patients formed 32.3% of the group, and 95.2% of them were on antiretroviral therapy. The mean age (standard deviation (SD of the cohort was 48.5 (13.2 years (40.6 (9.6 years for the HIV-infected group v. 52.0 (13.1 years for the uninfected group; p<0.001. Ninety-five neutropenia episodes were observed (rate 0.85 per 1 year of follow-up time. Following multivariate adjustment, patients with HIV infection were almost two times more likely to develop CIN (hazard ratio (HR 1.76, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.06 - 2.92; p=0.029. A high baseline absolute neutrophil count (ANC (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.68 - 0.95; p=0.005 remained significantly associated with protection against CIN. Conclusions. HIV-infected patients were younger than those who were not infected, and presented at a more locally advanced stage of disease. HIV infection was an independent predictor for CIN. HIV-infected patients had an almost two-fold increased risk of developing CIN and developed neutropenia at a much faster rate. A high baseline white cell

  2. Pathophysiology of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Starobova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy is a common, dose-dependent adverse effect of several antineoplastics. It can lead to detrimental dose reductions and discontinuation of treatment, and severely affects the quality of life of cancer survivors. Clinically, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy presents as deficits in sensory, motor, and autonomic function which develop in a glove and stocking distribution due to preferential effects on longer axons. The pathophysiological processes are multi-factorial and involve oxidative stress, apoptotic mechanisms, altered calcium homeostasis, axon degeneration and membrane remodeling as well as immune processes and neuroinflammation. This review focusses on the commonly used antineoplastic substances oxaliplatin, cisplatin, vincristine, docetaxel, and paclitaxel which interfere with the cancer cell cycle—leading to cell death and tumor degradation—and cause severe acute and chronic peripheral neuropathies. We discuss drug mechanism of action and pharmacokinetic disposition relevant to the development of peripheral neuropathy, the epidemiology and clinical presentation of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, emerging insight into genetic susceptibilities as well as current understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment approaches.

  3. Optimizing antiemetic therapy in multiple-day and multiple cycles of chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebaek, E.; Herrstedt, J.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Only a few studies have investigated the effect of antiemetic therapy in patients treated with multiple-day or multiple cycles of chemotherapy. The present review will assess the available data, highlight the current recommendations and draw attention towards the remaining...... of chemotherapy the addition of a NK1-receptor antagonist aprepitant to standard antiemetic therapy has increased the antiemetic effect, and multiple cycle extension studies have demonstrated that this increment in effect is sustained during multiple cycles of chemotherapy. A recent study indicated...... that the dopamine D2-receptor antagonist metopimazine has some additive effect on delayed symptoms induced by multiple-day chemotherapy. SUMMARY: The development of the NK1-receptor antagonist aprepitant has significantly improved the antiemetic control in patients treated with multiple cycles of chemotherapy. Far...

  4. Intrathecal chemotherapy for refractory disseminated medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Junichi; Nishiyama, Kenichi; Mori, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hideaki; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2008-05-01

    To analyze the effect of intrathecal (IT) chemotherapy for disseminated medulloblastoma. Twenty-one patients received IT chemotherapy using the chemotherapeutic agents of methotrexate (MTX) and nitrosoureas (ACNU, MCNU) including nine patients for residual leptomeningeal lesions after initial surgery and radiation, and 12 for a recurrence with leptomeningeal dissemination. Of these 21 patients, 12 received a lumbar and/or ventricular bolus injection of the chemotherapeutic agents, one received the ventriculolumbar perfusion of the agents, and eight received both the perfusion and bolus injection. The doses ranged from 6-7 mg/m(2) of ACNU for perfusion and 3-3.5 mg/m(2) of ACNU, MCNU, or MTX for the bolus injection, and the cycles were administered from 3 to 12 times for perfusion and from 5 to 54 times for the bolus injection. The effects of chemotherapy were assessed by both radiological and cytological examinations, and the clinical symptoms were also assessed. Radiological and/or cytological responses were observed in 10 of 21 patients (47.6%), including seven cases demonstrating a complete remission. The 5-year overall survival rate and 5-year survival rate after dissemination were 61.5 and 46.4%, respectively. Five patients who received a lumbar bolus injection of nitrosoureas experienced paraplegia and double incontinence. One patient who received a ventricular injection of nitrosoureas experienced truncal ataxia. IT chemotherapy was found to be effective in some cases with refractory disseminated medulloblastoma and it seems to be an appropriate treatment choice for leptomeningeal recurrence. However, the frequent bolus injections of nitrosoureas should be avoided to prevent the side effects.

  5. Randomized study of the clinical effects of ω-3 fatty acid-containing enteral nutrition support during neoadjuvant chemotherapy on chemotherapy-related toxicity in patients with esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Hiroshi; Yano, Masahiko; Yasuda, Takushi; Yamasaki, Makoto; Murakami, Kohei; Makino, Tomoki; Nishiki, Kohei; Sugimura, Keijiro; Motoori, Masaaki; Shiraishi, Osamu; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2017-01-01

    Omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids have potential positive effects during chemotherapy, such as body weight maintenance and muscle mass preservation. However, little is known about the effect this supplement might have on reducing chemotherapy-induced toxicities. The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of ω-3 fatty acid supplementation in the reduction of chemotherapy-related toxicities. Sixty-one patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy for esophageal cancer randomly received ω-3-rich enteral nutrition (EN; n = 31) or ω-3-poor EN support (n = 30) for 15 d during chemotherapy. The daily dosage of ω-3 fatty acids was 900 mg in the ω-3-rich group and 250 mg in the ω-3-poor group. The primary endpoint was the frequency of grade 3/4 neutropenia, and secondary endpoints included other chemotherapy-related adverse events, body weight, and inflammatory markers. The total and dietary intake calories during chemotherapy were equal in both groups. There was no significant difference in the body weight change after chemotherapy between the two groups. There was no significant difference in the incidence of grade 3/4 leukopenia and neutropenia (P > 0.05). However, stomatitis was significantly less frequent in the ω-3-rich group, than in the ω-3-poor group (P = 0.018). Grade 3/4 diarrhea occurred relatively less frequently in the ω-3-rich group than in the ω-3-poor group; however, this difference was not significant (16.1% versus 36.7%, respectively, P = 0.068). Increases in the aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels were seen significantly less frequently in the ω-3-rich group than in the ω-3-poor group (P = 0.012 and P = 0.015, respectively). ω-3-rich EN support decreased the frequency of chemotherapy-induced mucosal toxicities, such as stomatitis and diarrhea, and exhibited a hepatoprotective effect during chemotherapy, compared with the ω-3-poor EN support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  6. Effect of YH0618 soup on chemotherapy-induced toxicity in patients with cancer who have completed chemotherapy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jie-Shu; Chen, Jian-Ping; Chan, Jessie S M; Lee, Ho-Fun; Wong, Mei-Kuen; Yeung, Wing-Fai; Lao, Li-Xing

    2016-07-26

    The incidence of cancer has been staying at a high level worldwide in recent years. With advances in cancer diagnosis and therapy strategy, the survival rate of patients with cancer has been increasing, but the side effects of these treatments, especially chemotherapy, are obvious even when the chemotherapy ceases. YH0618, a prescription, has showed efficacy in reducing chemotherapy-induced toxicity through long clinical practice. However, there is no scientific research exploring the effects of YH0618 in patients with cancer. Therefore, using a randomized controlled trial, this study will explore the efficacy of YH0618 on ameliorating chemotherapy-induced toxicity including dermatologic toxicity, myelosuppression, hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity and improving fatigue in cancer patients who have completed chemotherapy. This is a prospective assessor-blinded, parallel, randomized controlled trial. Patients with cancer at any stage who have completed chemotherapy within two weeks will be randomly divided into group A (YH0618) and group B (wait-list) using a 1:1 allocation ratio. The chemotherapeutic agents include taxanes or anthracyclines. Subjects assigned to group A will receive YH0618 soup 6 days a week for 6 weeks and uncontrolled follow-up for 6 weeks, while group B are required to wait for 6 weeks before receiving YH0618 intervention. The primary outcome of this study is the incidence of protocol-specified grade ≥2 dermatologic toxicities graded by NCI CTCAE Chinese version 4.0 and changes of fingernail color, face skin color and tongue color evaluated by the L*a*b system within 6 weeks. There are some secondary outcomes associated with dermatologic toxicity including fatigue and clinical objective examination. There are few scientific and safe methods in ameliorating chemotherapy-induced toxicity. The proposed study may provide direct and convincing evidence to support YH0618 as an adjuvant treatment for reducing chemotherapy-induced toxicity, which

  7. Analysis of Perioperative Chemotherapy in Resected Pancreatic Cancer: Identifying the Number and Sequence of Chemotherapy Cycles Needed to Optimize Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelboym, Irene; Zenati, Mazen S; Hamad, Ahmad; Steve, Jennifer; Lee, Kenneth K; Bahary, Nathan; Hogg, Melissa E; Zeh, Herbert J; Zureikat, Amer H

    2017-09-01

    Receipt of 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) is standard of care in pancreatic cancer (PC). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is increasingly utilized; however, optimal number of cycles needed alone or in combination with AC remains unknown. We sought to determine the optimal number and sequence of perioperative chemotherapy cycles in PC. Single institutional review of all resected PCs from 2008 to 2015. The impact of cumulative number of chemotherapy cycles received (0, 1-5, and ≥6 cycles) and their sequence (NAC, AC, or NAC + AC) on overall survival was evaluated Cox-proportional hazard modeling, using 6 cycles of AC as reference. A total of 522 patients were analyzed. Based on sample size distribution, four combinations were evaluated: 0 cycles = 12.1%, 1-5 cycles of combined NAC + AC = 29%, 6 cycles of AC = 25%, and ≥6 cycles of combined NAC + AC = 34%, with corresponding survival. 13.1, 18.5, 37, and 36.8 months. On MVA (P cycles AC, receipt of 0 cycles [HR 3.57, confidence interval (CI) 2.47-5.18] or 1-5 cycles in any combination (HR 2.37, CI 1.73-3.23) was associated with increased hazard of death, whereas receipt of ≥6 cycles in any sequence was associated with optimal and comparable survival (HR 1.07, CI 0.78-1.47). Receipt of 6 or more perioperative cycles of chemotherapy either as combined neoadjuvant and adjuvant or adjuvant alone may be associated with optimal and comparable survival in resected PC.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of Hyperthermic Intrathoracic Chemotherapy following Pleurectomy and Decortication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul H. Sugarbaker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients with pseudomyxoma peritonei or peritoneal mesothelioma, direct extension of disease through the hemidiaphragm may result in an isolated progression of tumor within the pleural space. We monitored the intrapleural and plasma levels of mitomycin C and doxorubicin by HPLC assay in order to determine the pharmacokinetic behavior of this intracavitary use of chemotherapy. Our results showed a persistent high concentration of intrapleural drug as compared to plasma concentrations. The increased exposure for mitomycin C was 96, and the increased exposure for doxorubicin was 241. When the clearance of chemotherapy from the thoracic cavity was compared to clearance from the abdomen and pelvis, there was a considerably more rapid clearance from the abdomen as compared to the thorax. The pharmacologic study of intrapleural chemotherapy in these patients provides a strong pharmacologic rationale for regional chemotherapy in this group of patients.

  9. Chemotherapy for neuroendocrine tumors: the Beatson Oncology Centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, M Q; Reed, N S

    1997-01-01

    The role of chemotherapy in malignant neuroendocrine tumours is difficult to assess because of their rarity and variation in biological behaviour. We present a retrospective review of chemotherapy given to 18 patients with metastatic and one with locally advanced neuroendocrine tumours. There were eight poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumours, six thyroid medullary carcinomas, two phaeochromocytomas, two pancreatic islet cell tumours and one undifferentiated neuroblastoma. Four patients were given 3-weekly dacarbazine, vincristine and cyclophosphamide (DOC) chemotherapy. In eight patients, this regimen was modified by substituting the dacarbazine and cisplatin and etoposide (OPEC). A further six patients were treated with dacarbazine reintroduced into the 3-weekly regimen (DOPEC). The remaining patient received cisplatin and etoposide. There were two complete responses (both with OPEC) and eight partial responses (two with DOC, three with OPEC and three with DOPEC). Five patients had stable disease and four progressed. Four received further chemotherapy on relapse, producing one complete and one partial response. The median response duration to initial chemotherapy was 10 months (range 3-34). The median survival was 12 months (range 1-42). The main toxicity was haematological, with grade 3-4 neutropenia in 12 patients; eight suffered episodes of sepsis. One death was treatment related. Other toxicity was mild although three patients discontinued vincristine with grade 2 neurotoxicity. The response rate and side effects of these three regimens appear comparable. We conclude that, although these patient numbers are small, combination chemotherapy produces an encouraging response rate (53%; 95% CI 30-75) in malignant neuroendocrine tumours, with acceptable toxicity.

  10. [Chemotherapy and women fertility preservation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Tristan; Piver, Pascal; Durand, Lise-Marie; Donadel, Lorène; Pech, Jean-Christophe; Roux, Christophe; Aubard, Yves

    2010-01-01

    Agressive chemotherapy can lead to premature ovarian failure and loss of fertility in women and children. Embryo cryopreservation is an established clinical procedure of fertility preservation but with several limitations. Others options are available. Cryopreservation ovarian cortex tissu have to be suggested in case of high gonadotoxic treatment. It doesn't require puberty and delay in initiation of chemotherapy. The first birth in France after orthotopic graft of ovarian tissu thawed have been recently described with a promising process. Oocyte cryopreservation is available for women without partner but the experience is limited. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist therapy as ovarian protectants seem interesting. Follicular growth and maturation in vitro are still experimental. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Targeted overexpression of mitochondrial catalase protects against cancer chemotherapy-induced skeletal muscle dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Laura A A; Lark, Daniel S; Reese, Lauren R; Torres, Maria J; Ryan, Terence E; Lin, Chien-Te; Cathey, Brook L; Neufer, P Darrell

    2016-08-01

    The loss of strength in combination with constant fatigue is a burden on cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Doxorubicin, a standard chemotherapy drug used in the clinic, causes skeletal muscle dysfunction and increases mitochondrial H2O2 We hypothesized that the combined effect of cancer and chemotherapy in an immunocompetent breast cancer mouse model (E0771) would compromise skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function, leading to an increase in H2O2-emitting potential and impaired muscle function. Here, we demonstrate that cancer chemotherapy decreases mitochondrial respiratory capacity supported with complex I (pyruvate/glutamate/malate) and complex II (succinate) substrates. Mitochondrial H2O2-emitting potential was altered in skeletal muscle, and global protein oxidation was elevated with cancer chemotherapy. Muscle contractile function was impaired following exposure to cancer chemotherapy. Genetically engineering the overexpression of catalase in mitochondria of muscle attenuated mitochondrial H2O2 emission and protein oxidation, preserving mitochondrial and whole muscle function despite cancer chemotherapy. These findings suggest mitochondrial oxidants as a mediator of cancer chemotherapy-induced skeletal muscle dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Rebound Thymic Hyperplasia after Chemotherapy in Children with Lymphoma

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    Chih-Ho Chen

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: RTH developed in 67.7% of pediatric patients with lymphoma in CR after chemotherapy. The association of RTH development and lowered relapse rates has yet to be determined. Awareness of this phenomenon is important in the prevention of unnecessary surgical intervention or chemotherapy.

  13. Electronic Chemotherapy Order Entry: A Major Cancer Center's Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklarin, Nancy T; Granovsky, Svetlana; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Zelenetz, Andrew D

    2011-07-01

    Implementation of a computerized provider order entry system for complex chemotherapy regimens at a large cancer center required intense effort from a multidisciplinary team of clinical and systems experts with experience in all facets of the chemotherapy process. The online tools had to resemble the paper forms used at the time and parallel the successful established process as well as add new functionality. Close collaboration between the institution and the vendor was necessary. This article summarizes the institutional efforts, challenges, and collaborative processes that facilitated universal chemotherapy computerized electronic order entry across multiple sites during a period of several years.

  14. Targeting chemotherapy via arterial infusion for advanced gastric cancer

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    Zhi-yu CAO

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the clinical effects of chemotherapy via arterial infusion in treatment of advanced gastric cancer.Methods Forty-seven patients with advanced gastric cancer were given chemotherapy via arterial infusion.Chemotherapy plan was as follows: 5-Fluorouracil(Fu 500mg/m2,cyclophosphamide(MMX 10mg/m2,Hydroxycamptothecin(HPT 20mg/m2,once per week,2 weeks as a course,a total of 2-3 courses.Results After chemotherapy via arterial infusion,complete remission(CR was achieved in 1 case,partial remission(PR in 28 cases,stabilization of disease(SD in 16 cases,progression of disease(PD was found in 2 cases,and rate with response(CR+PR was 61.7%.Four of 28 PR patients underwent tumorectomy,the pathology revealed the presence of cancer cells around the vascular vessels,manifesting karyopyknosis,karyorrhexis,coagulation and necrosis of cytoplasm,intercellular edema,hyperplasia of fibroblasts,inflammatory cell infiltration,thickening of endothelium,and thrombosis.One,two and three-year survival rates were 70.2%,14.9% and 2.1%,respectively.The average survival period was 17.2 months.Conclusion Targeting chemotherapy via arterial infusion,as a part of the combined treatment,is beneficial to the patients with unresectable advanced gastric cancer.

  15. Thalidomide for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting following highly emetogenic chemotherapy

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    Geng Song

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Antiemetic guidelines recommend co-administration of agents to maximize the prevention of chemotherapyinduced nausea and vomiting (CINV, however, the control of delayed CINV is still not satisfactory. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of thalidomide in the prevention of CINV. Methods Of 89 patients enrolled, 83 chemotherapy-naïve patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy (cisplatin 70mg/m2 were randomized into two groups: standard therapy group (ondansetron on day 1, metoclopramide and dexamethasone on days one to five and thalidomide group (in addition to standard emesis prevention, patients received oral 100mg thalidomide on days one to five. Patients recorded nausea and vomiting episodes in a diary. The primary end point was the efficacy of thalidomide in controlling vomiting and nausea on days one to five post cisplatin, and the secondary end point was the safety of the thalidomide. Results No significant differences of complete response rates (no emesis, no use of rescue therapy and no nausea were observed between the two groups, while the percentages of patients with complete response of delayed vomiting on day four and day five were higher in the thalidomide group, furthermore, the complete response rate of delayed nausea for thalidomide group and standard therapy group showed significant differences. Thalidomide group showed a similar safety profile as standard emesis prevention group. Conclusion Addition of thalidomide was generally well tolerated and improved prevention of CINV in patients receiving cisplatinbased chemotherapy to some degree, especially for delayed nausea.

  16. Chemotherapy for resistant or recurrent gestational trophoblastic neoplasia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alazzam, Mo'iad

    2012-12-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is a highly curable group of pregnancy-related tumours; however, approximately 25% of GTN tumours will be resistant to, or will relapse after, initial chemotherapy. These resistant and relapsed lesions will require salvage chemotherapy with or without surgery. Various salvage regimens are used worldwide. It is unclear which regimens are the most effective and the least toxic.

  17. Outcome of Resection and Chemotherapy versus Chemotherapy Alone for Retroperitoneal Recurrence of Testicular Cancer Involving the Inferior Vena Cava: A Retrospective Cohort Study of 22 Consecutive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calio, Francesco G; Angelici, Alberto M; Pizzardi, Giulia; Pasqua, Rocco; Masci, Federica; Vietri, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Optimal treatment strategy for retroperitoneal recurrence of testicular cancer involving the inferior vena cava (IVC) is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to validate the hypothesis that surgical resection, en-bloc with the involved segment of IVC and its subsequent reconstruction followed by chemotherapy, would yield better oncologic results than chemotherapy alone. Two consecutive series of patients with retroperitoneal recurrence of testicular cancer involving the IVC, treated with surgical resection plus chemotherapy (group A, n=14) or chemotherapy alone (group B, n=8) were retrospectively reviewed. The mean duration of follow-up was was 65 months (range=8-184). Operative mortality and morbidity in group A, response to chemotherapy in group B, disease-specific survival and quality adjusted life-years (QALY) for both groups, were primary end-points of the study. Postoperative mortality and morbidity (group A) were, respectively, nil and 14%. In group B, two patients (25%) fully responded to chemotherapy and remained free from disease progression. Disease-specific survival at 3 and 5 years was 81% and 54% in group A and 36% in group B both at 3 and 5 years, respectively (p=0.02). QALY was 3.92 in group A and 0.77 for both 3 and 5 years in group B, respectively, (p=0.031). En bloc resection of retroperitoneal recurrence of testicular tumors invading the IVC, followed by chemotherapy, allows a better survival rate compared to chemotherapy alone. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  18. Effectiveness of antiemetics in control of antineoplastic chemotherapy-induced emesis at home

    OpenAIRE

    Castro,Marielly Cunha; Araújo,Suely Amorim de; Mendes,Thaís Rezende; Vilarinho,Glauciane Silva; Mendonça,Maria Angélica Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Objective Evaluating if antiemetics are effective in the prevention or treatment at home, of chemotherapy-induced emesis. Methods In total, were included 42 women with breast cancer in moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, using dexamethasone/ondansetron before each cycle. The frequency of nausea and vomiting was obtained by applying the instrument in the pre-chemotherapy period, and 24h, 48h, 72h and 96h after chemotherapy. The use of antiemetics was considered in accordance with adherence...

  19. Intra-arterial chemotherapy for the management of retinoblastoma: four-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobin, Y Pierre; Dunkel, Ira J; Marr, Brian P; Brodie, Scott E; Abramson, David H

    2011-06-01

    To determine whether intra-arterial chemotherapy is safe and effective in advanced intraocular retinoblastoma. Retinoblastoma often presents with advanced intraocular disease and, despite conventional treatment with intravenous chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy, may still require enucleation. Single-arm, prospective registry from May 30, 2006, to May 30, 2010, at an ophthalmic oncology referral center with ambulatory care. A total of 95 eyes of 78 patients with unilateral or bilateral retinoblastoma were treated. The intervention was selective catheterization of the ophthalmic artery and injection of chemotherapy, usually melphalan with or without topotecan. Drug dosage was determined by age and angioanatomy. The main outcome measures were procedural success, event-free (enucleation or radiotherapy) ocular survival, and ocular and extraocular complications. Catheterization succeeded in 98.5% of procedures. There were 289 chemotherapy injections (median, 3 per eye). The Kaplan-Meier estimates of ocular event-free survival rates at 2 years were 70.0% (95% confidence interval, 57.9%-82.2%) for all eyes, 81.7% (95% confidence interval, 66.8%-96.6%) for eyes that received intra-arterial chemotherapy as primary treatment, and 58.4% (95% confidence interval, 39.5%-77.2%) for eyes that had previous treatment failure with intravenous chemotherapy and/or external beam radiation therapy. There were no permanent extraocular complications. Our experience suggests that intra-arterial chemotherapy is safe and effective in the treatment of advanced intraocular retinoblastoma.

  20. Adjuvant chemotherapy in soft tissue sarcomas…Conflicts, consensus, and controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Bajpai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue sarcomas (STSs are an uncommon and diverse group of more than 50 mesenchymal malignancies. Each of these histologic subtypes represents a unique disease with distinct biologic behavior and varying sensitivity to chemotherapy. The judicious use of adjuvant/neoadjuvant chemotherapy along with surgery and radiation in the treatment of localized STS has a role in improving patient outcomes by decreasing local and distant recurrences. There is evidence that the use of adjuvant chemotherapy to a mixed cohort of chemo sensitive and insensitive sarcoma subtypes results in limited benefit. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to identify the subpopulation with high metastatic potential and to identify effective histology-specific treatment options to these patients. Present perspective, will focus on the rationale for adjuvant chemotherapy in sarcoma, with emphasis on the histology driven chemotherapy. It will outline key therapeutic opportunities and hurdles in adjuvant medical treatment of sarcoma, focusing on specific subtypes that are on the verge of new breakthroughs, as well as those in which promise has not lived up to expectations.

  1. High-dose chemotherapy and auto-SCT for relapsed and refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma patients refractory to first-line salvage chemotherapy but responsive to second-line salvage chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Muhammad Shahzad; Maghfoor, Irfan; Elhassan, Tusneem Ahmed M; Akhtar, Saad

    2015-01-01

    Relapsed or primary refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients refractory to first-line salvage chemotherapy (first salvage) and unable to undergo high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous stem cell transplant (auto-SCT) have very poor outcome. Some patients are offered second-line salvage chemotherapy (second salvage), if they are responsive and may receive HDC auto-SCT. We identified 31 patients (18 males, 13 females) from 1996-2012 who received second salvage prior to auto-SCT. Median age at auto-SCT is 22 years. Patients were grouped as (1) relapsed-refractory (Rel:Ref): patients with prior complete response (CR) and on relapse found refractory to first salvage and received second salvage and (2) refractory-refractory (Ref:Ref): patients refractory to both primary treatment and first salvage and received second salvage. Median follow-up is 63 months (18-170). Disease status after second salvage prior to HDC was CR 16 %, partial response (PR) 71 % and stable disease 13 %. After HDC auto-SCT, CR:PR: progressive disease was observed in 18 (58 %): four (12 %): nine (29 %) patients, respectively. Five-year overall survival (OS) for whole group is 57 % (Rel:Ref vs. Ref:Ref, 73 % vs. 48 %, p = 0.48). Progression-free survival (PFS) for whole group is 52 % (Rel:Ref vs. Ref:Ref, 73 % vs. 40 % respectively, p = 0.11). Second-line salvage is a valid approach with no long-term side effects for those HL patients who do not respond to first-line salvage chemotherapy and they can be candidate of HDC and stem cell transplant with a high ORR, the PFS and OS in relapse-refractory and refractory-refractory group of patients.

  2. Adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer: Current evidence and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, Rosalba; Tomasello, Gianluca; Bregni, Giacomo; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Pietrantonio, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer still represents one of the major causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Patients survival is mainly related to stage, with a high proportion of patients with metastatic disease at presentation. Thus, the cure rate largely depend upon surgical resection. Despite the additional, albeit small, benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy has been clearly demonstrated, no general consensus has been reached on the best treatment option. Moreover, the narrow therapeutic index of adjuvant chemotherapy (i.e., limited survival benefit with considerable toxicity) requires a careful assessment of expected risks and benefits for individual patients. Treatment choices vary widely based on the different geographic areas, with chemotherapy alone more often preferred in Europe or Asia and chemoradiotherapy in the United States. In the present review we discuss the current evidence and future challenges regarding adjuvant chemotherapy in curatively resected gastric cancer with particular emphasis on the recently completed landmark studies and meta-analyses. The most recent patient-level meta-analysis demonstrated the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy over curative surgery; the same Authors also showed that disease-free survival may be used as a surrogate end-point for overall survival. We finally discuss future research issues such as the need of economic evaluations, development of prognostic or predictive biomarkers, and the unmet clinical need of trials comparing perioperative chemotherapy with adjuvant treatment. PMID:24782604

  3. Serum Survivin Levels and Outcome of Chemotherapy in Patients with Malignant Mesothelioma

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    Katja Goričar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Survivin is an inhibitor of apoptosis protein involved in the regulation of cell proliferation that could be used as a marker for cancer diagnosis or prognosis. Our aim was to evaluate whether serum survivin levels influence the outcome of cisplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with malignant mesothelioma (MM. Methods. Serum survivin levels were determined using human survivin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 78 MM patients before chemotherapy, after chemotherapy, and at disease progression. The influence on tumor response and survival was evaluated using nonparametric tests and Cox regression. Results. A median serum survivin level at diagnosis was 4.1 (0–217.5 pg/mL. Patients with a progressive disease had significantly higher survivin levels before chemotherapy (p = 0.041. A median serum survivin level after chemotherapy was 73.1 (0–346.2 pg/mL. If survivin levels increased after chemotherapy, patients had, conversely, better response (p = 0.001, OR = 5.40, 95% CI = 1.98–14.72. Unexpectedly, patients with increased survivin levels after chemotherapy also had longer progression-free (p < 0.001, HR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.20–0.57 and overall survival (p = 0.001, HR = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.14–0.58. Conclusions. These results suggest that serum survivin levels before and during chemotherapy could serve as a biomarker predicting MM treatment response.

  4. Handling chemotherapy drugs-Do medical gloves really protect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeck, Lilla; Gonzalez, Ernesto; Koch, Olaf Manfred

    2015-10-15

    Due to their potential mutagenic, carcinogenic and teratogenic effects occupational exposure to chemotherapy drugs should be kept to a minimum. Utilization of personnel protective devices, especially the use of protective medical gloves, is a mainstay to avoid skin contact. The choice of appropriate gloves is of outstanding importance. For optimal protection in the oncology setting it is essential to establish general guidelines evaluating appropriate materials and defining quality standards. Establishing these guidelines can facilitate better handling and avoid potential hazards and late sequelae. In Europe there are no specific requirements or test methodologies for medical gloves used in the oncology environment. The implementation of uniform standards for gloves used while handling chemotherapy drugs would be desirable. In contrast, in the US medical gloves used to handle chemotherapy drugs have to fulfill requirements according to the ASTM International (American Society of Testing and Materials) standard D 6978-05. Nitrile or natural rubber latex is a preferred basic glove material, while vinyl is considered inappropriate because of its generally increased permeability. For extended exposure to chemotherapy drugs, double gloving, the use of thicker gloves and the frequent change of gloves increases their protective power. © 2014 UICC.

  5. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Sexual and Fertility Changes in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    N ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Sexual and Fertility Changes in Women “Talk with your doctor before you start treatment. Ask how chemotherapy could affect your ability to have ...

  6. Clinical Practice of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Patients with Early-Stage Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frielink, Lindy M J; Pijlman, Brenda M; Ezendam, Nicole P M; Pijnenborg, Johanna M A

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy improves survival in women with early-stage epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Yet, there is a wide variety in clinical practice. All patients diagnosed with FIGO I and IIa EOC (2006-2010) in the south of the Netherlands were analyzed. The percentage of patients that received adjuvant chemotherapy was determined as well as the comprehensiveness of staging and outcome. Forty percent (54/135) of the patients with early-stage EOC received adjuvant chemotherapy. Treatment with adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with FIGO stage, clear-cell histology and nonoptimal staging. Optimal staging was achieved in 50%, and nonoptimal staging was associated with advanced age, comorbidity and treatment in a non-referral hospital. Overall, there was no difference in outcome between patients with and without adjuvant chemotherapy. Yet, in grade 3 tumors, adjuvant chemotherapy seems beneficial. Selective treatment of patients with early-stage EOC might reduce adjuvant chemotherapy without compromising outcome. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Androgen Receptor Splice Variants and Resistance to Taxane Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    resistant prostate cancer ; docetaxel; cabazitaxel; chemotherapy; androgen receptor splice variants; microtubule; ligand-binding domain; microtubule... receptor splice variants (AR-Vs) are associated with resistance to taxane chemotherapy in castration- resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, this...androgen receptor inhibitors in prostate cancer . Nat Rev Cancer . 2015;15:701–11.

  8. Is this the end of cytotoxic chemotherapy in Merkel cell carcinoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabinowits G

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Guilherme Rabinowits Department of Medical Oncology, Center for Head and Neck Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Although cytotoxic chemotherapy has been used often in the management of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC, its benefit remains uncertain. Despite being considered a chemosensitive disease, the duration of response is generally short, and the survival benefit is unclear. With the recent FDA approval of the anti-programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1 antibody avelumab for patients with advanced MCC and the limited and controversial data on chemotherapy, it is important to put in perspective whether conventional chemotherapy should remain an option for these patients. Here, we review the evidence and controversies around chemotherapy in MCC as well as two recent studies on immunotherapy that changed the treatment paradigm for this disease. Keywords: Merkel cell carcinoma, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, review, future

  9. Therapeutic Outcome of Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma Initially Treated with Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung Su; Kim, Tae-you; Kim, Chul Woo; Kim, Ji Yeun; Heo, Dae Seog; Bang, Yung-jue; Kim, Noe Kyeong [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Cancer Research Inst.

    2003-11-01

    The therapeutic outcome of chemotherapy in NK/T cell lymphoma (NTCL) has not been well documented until now. The aims of this study were to investigate the outcome of chemotherapy and to evaluate the clinical factors influencing the responsiveness to chemotherapy. Between 1995 and 2000, 59 patients received anthracycline-based chemotherapy as an initial treatment. Forty-five patients had nasal NTCL, whereas 14 had extranasal NTCL. Forty-one patients had stage I/II and 18 had stage III/IV disease. Epstein-Barr virus status was positive in 67.6% of cases. The results of initial chemotherapy were complete remission in 35.6% of the patients, 2-year disease-free survival in 22.9% and 2-year overall survival in 44.2%. Adjuvant radiotherapy after chemotherapy did not improve outcome in stage I/II nasal NTCL. The International Prognostic Index was a significant prognostic factor of complete remission rate, and stage was also significant for disease-free survival.

  10. Therapeutic Outcome of Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma Initially Treated with Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Su; Kim, Tae-you; Kim, Chul Woo; Kim, Ji Yeun; Heo, Dae Seog; Bang, Yung-jue; Kim, Noe Kyeong

    2003-01-01

    The therapeutic outcome of chemotherapy in NK/T cell lymphoma (NTCL) has not been well documented until now. The aims of this study were to investigate the outcome of chemotherapy and to evaluate the clinical factors influencing the responsiveness to chemotherapy. Between 1995 and 2000, 59 patients received anthracycline-based chemotherapy as an initial treatment. Forty-five patients had nasal NTCL, whereas 14 had extranasal NTCL. Forty-one patients had stage I/II and 18 had stage III/IV disease. Epstein-Barr virus status was positive in 67.6% of cases. The results of initial chemotherapy were complete remission in 35.6% of the patients, 2-year disease-free survival in 22.9% and 2-year overall survival in 44.2%. Adjuvant radiotherapy after chemotherapy did not improve outcome in stage I/II nasal NTCL. The International Prognostic Index was a significant prognostic factor of complete remission rate, and stage was also significant for disease-free survival

  11. [Two Cases of Fournier's Gangrene That Occurred during Chemotherapy for Rectal Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Makoto; Kitazawa, Masato; Ehara, Takehito; Yamamoto, Yuta; Suzuki, Akira; Miyagawa, Yusuke; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2017-02-01

    Two cases of Fournier's gangrene occurred during chemotherapy for advanced rectal cancer. Patients were treated using surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy. Case 1: A 66-year-old man had advanced rectal cancer with para-aortic and inguinal lymph node metastases. He received a sigmoid colostomy and chemotherapy(capecitabine, oxaliplatin, bevacizumab). Due to progression of the rectal mass, we performed radiotherapy(30 Gy)and chemotherapy(irinotecan, S-1, bevacizumab). After 14 days, he was hospitalized with a diagnosis of Fournier's gangrene with anal pain and fever. Case 2: A 63-year-old man had mucinous rectal carcinoma with sacrum invasion. He received a sigmoid colostomy and chemotherapy. Sixteen days after regorafenib therapy, as a fifth-line of chemotherapy, he was hospitalized with a diagnosis of Fournier's gangrene with hip pain, swollen perineum, and fever. There have been no reports of Fournier's gangrene occurring during chemotherapy for rectal cancer. We report 2 cases with a review of literature.

  12. The impact of recent chemotherapy innovation on the longevity of myeloma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostenkamp, Gisela; Lichtenberg, Frank R.

    2015-01-01

    patients using both time-series US data and longitudinal data on 38 countries.We estimate that almost two-thirds (0.99 years) of the 1997-2005 increase in the life expectancy of American myeloma patients was due to an increase in the number of chemotherapy regimens now preferred by specialists. Based...... on a back-of-the-envelope calculation, this means that the cost per US life-year gained from post-1997 chemotherapy innovation is unlikely to have exceeded $46,000.We also investigate the impact of chemotherapy innovation on the myeloma mortality rate using longitudinal country-level data on 38 countries...... chemotherapy regimen is similar in other countries to its effect in the US. Non-US prices of two of the three new drugs were lower than US prices, so recent myeloma chemotherapy innovation may have been more cost-effective in other countries than it was in the US.Recent chemotherapy innovation has had...

  13. Radio chemotherapy for uterine cervix carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resbeut, M.; Alzieu, C.; Gonzague-Casabianca, L.; Haie-Meder, C.

    2000-01-01

    Low-stage uterine cervix carcinoma can be treated by either surgery, radiation therapy or combined treatments with high cure rates ranging from 90 to 95 % for stage IB1 tumors. However, the standard treatment, combining external beam plus intracavitary radiation, fails to control the progression of the disease in 35 to 90 % of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. No substantial improvements have been made in the treatment of these tumors in the past two decades. The addition of concurrent 5-FU in a phase III study failed to improve the results in the overall patient population, but the five-year DFS was significantly better in a subset of patients (tumor > 5 cm and IB/IIA or medial parametrial IIB disease). Concurrent chemo-radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy with epirubicin showed, in a phase III study, a significant longer DFS in patients treated with chemotherapy despite the same long-term local tumor control. After many phase II studies, five phase III studies have recently demonstrated a 40 to 60 % reduction in the relative risk of recurrence with cisplatin containing chemo-radiation. Across these studies, the risk of death was reduced by 30 to 50 %. The benefit was less clear in patients with stages III-IV tumors than in patients with lower stages associated with poor prognostic factors. Hematologic and gastrointestinal toxicity of chemo-radiation was greater than that of radiotherapy alone. However, late side effects were similar in the different treatment groups. These results must be confirmed with a longer follow-up. The importance of concurrent chemotherapy during the brachytherapy procedure should be analyzed. It has yet to be determined which chemotherapy regimen achieves the most favorable therapeutic ratio. (authors)

  14. Analysis of Dietary Intake during Consecutive-Day Chemotherapy for Bone and Soft-Tissue Sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Hori

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBone and soft tissue sarcomas are commonly treated with consecutive-day chemotherapy regimens consisting of multiple anticancer agents. Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV is a serious adverse effect of these regimens and may result in decreased energy intake during chemotherapy. Decreased energy intake may lead to undernutrition and may cause adverse effects on patient quality of life and survival.MethodsPatients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas who received consecutive-day chemotherapy were retrospectively evaluated. CINV and dietary energy intake were assessed, as well as the occurrences of hiccups and constipation during chemotherapy.ResultsA total of 13 patients, 10 males and 3 females, with a total 16 chemotherapy courses were included in the study. All patients received antiemetic prophylaxis. The CINV control rate, defined as no emesis and no rescue therapy, gradually decreased from chemotherapy day 1 (94% to day 5 (75%. Four patients experienced emesis, two of whom had been treated with a cisplatin-containing regimen. Decreased dietary energy intake was possibly associated with CINV during chemotherapy. Anorexia was grade 2 except for one case of grade 3. The incidences of hiccups and constipation were high on days 3–5.ConclusionAntiemetic prophylaxis treatment did not prevent emesis due to consecutive-day chemotherapy, especially with cisplatin-containing regimens, in patients with bone and soft-tissue tumors. Dietary energy intake decreased during chemotherapy, and this appeared to be associated with CINV. In addition, the incidence of hiccups and constipation increased during the course of consecutive-day chemotherapy regimens. Although these results are based on a small number of patients, it may be important to observe nutritional status during chemotherapy, as this may reflect a patient’s general condition. Nutritional counseling might be useful in supporting nutritional status in patients undergoing

  15. A randomized, controlled, multicenter study comparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone in gastric cancer patients with D2 resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Weiguo; Xua Dafu; Pu, Jun; Zong, Cheng-dong; Li, Tao; Tao, Guang-zhou; Ji, Fu-zhi; Zhou, Xi-lei; Han, Ji-hua; Wang, Cheng-shi; Yu, Chang-hua; Yi, Jiang-guo; Su, Xi-long; Ding, Jin-xia

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: The role of postoperative chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of patients with gastric cancer with D2 lymph node curative dissection is not well established. In this study, we compared postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy plus chemotherapy (IMRT-C) with chemotherapy-only in this patient population. Materials and methods: We randomly assigned patients with D2 lymph node dissection in gastric cancer to IMRT-C or chemotherapy-only groups. The adjuvant IMRT-C consisted of 400 mg of fluorouracil per square meter of body-surface area per day plus 20 mg of leucovorin per square meter of body-surface area per day for 5 days, followed by 45 Gy of IMRT for 5 weeks, with fluorouracil and leucovorin on the first 4 and the last 3 days of radiotherapy. Two 5-day cycles of fluorouracil and leucovorin were given 4 weeks after the completion of IMRT. Chemotherapy-only group was given the same chemotherapy regimens as IMRT-C group. Results: The median overall survival (OS) in the chemotherapy-only group was 48 months, as compared with 58 months in the IMRT-C group; the hazard ratio for death was 1.24 (95% confidence interval, 0.94–1.65; P = 0.122). IMRT-C was associated with increases in the median duration of recurrence-free survival (RFS) (36 months vs. 50 months), the hazard ratio for recurrence was 1.35 (95% confidence interval, 1.03–1.78; P = 0.029). COX multivariate regression analysis showed that lymph node metastasis and TNM stage were both the independent prognostic factors. Rates of all grade adverse events were similar in the two treatment groups. Conclusions: IMRT-C improved RFS, but did not significantly improve OS among patients with D2 lymph node dissection in gastric cancer. Using IMRT plus chemotherapy was feasible and well tolerated in patients with gastric cancer after D2 resection.

  16. Coil Embolization of an Arteriobiliary Fistula Caused by Hepatic Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takao, Hidemasa; Doi, Ippei; Makita, Kohzoh; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2005-01-01

    Arteriobiliary fistula is a rare complication of hepatic intra-arterial chemotherapy. We report successful coil embolization of an arteriobiliary fistula. An 80-year-old woman underwent percutaneous placement of an indwelling catheter into the replaced right hepatic artery for intra-arterial chemotherapy of liver metastases. Coil embolization of the left hepatic artery was not performed. The patient complained of abdominal pain during intra-arterial chemotherapy. Angiography revealed a fistula between the replaced right hepatic artery and the common bile duct. The fistula was successfully treated by coil embolization via the indwelling catheter, and the indwelling catheter was removed. Although such complications usually herald the termination of intra-arterial chemotherapy, the patient underwent percutaneous implantation of a new catheter-port system, and intra-arterial chemotherapy was restarted

  17. Nail changes secondary to docetaxel chemotherapy : a case report

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    Ghafoor Qamar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Docetaxel is a chemotherapy agent used in the management of many neoplastic conditions. Various side effects are known. Nail changes are often under-recognised or attributed to other causes. Case presentation We report the case of a 66 year old gentleman who received docetaxel chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. He had nail changes as a complication of the treatment. Conclusion Nail toxicity is a recognised side-effect of taxane chemotherapy agents and can often persist for many months after finishing the treatment. We would like to highlight this problem, so it can be considered as a differential diagnosis in the appropriate population.

  18. Chemotherapy for isolated locoregional recurrence of breast cancer (CALOR): a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebi, Stefan; Gelber, Shari; Anderson, Stewart J; Láng, István; Robidoux, André; Martín, Miguel; Nortier, Johan W R; Paterson, Alexander H G; Rimawi, Mothaffar F; Cañada, José Manuel Baena; Thürlimann, Beat; Murray, Elizabeth; Mamounas, Eleftherios P; Geyer, Charles E; Price, Karen N; Coates, Alan S; Gelber, Richard D; Rastogi, Priya; Wolmark, Norman; Wapnir, Irene L

    2014-02-01

    Patients with isolated locoregional recurrences (ILRR) of breast cancer have a high risk of distant metastasis and death from breast cancer. We aimed to establish whether adjuvant chemotherapy improves the outcome of such patients. The CALOR trial was a pragmatic, open-label, randomised trial that accrued patients with histologically proven and completely excised ILRR after unilateral breast cancer who had undergone a mastectomy or lumpectomy with clear surgical margins. Eligible patients were enrolled from hospitals worldwide and were centrally randomised (1:1) to chemotherapy (type selected by the investigator; multidrug for at least four courses recommended) or no chemotherapy, using permuted blocks, and stratified by previous chemotherapy, oestrogen-receptor and progesterone-receptor status, and location of ILRR. Patients with oestrogen-receptor-positive ILRR received adjuvant endocrine therapy, radiation therapy was mandated for patients with microscopically involved surgical margins, and anti-HER2 therapy was optional. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival. All analyses were by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00074152. From Aug 22, 2003, to Jan 31, 2010, 85 patients were randomly assigned to receive chemotherapy and 77 were assigned to no chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 4·9 years (IQR 3·6-6 ·0), 24 (28%) patients had disease-free survival events in the chemotherapy group compared with 34 (44%) in the no chemotherapy group. 5-year disease-free survival was 69% (95% CI 56-79) with chemotherapy versus 57% (44-67) without chemotherapy (hazard ratio 0·59 [95% CI 0·35-0·99]; p=0·046). Adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly more effective for women with oestrogen-receptor-negative ILRR (pinteraction=0·046), but analyses of disease-free survival according to the oestrogen-receptor status of the primary tumour were not statistically significant (pinteraction=0·43). Of the 81 patients who

  19. Graphene coatings for chemotherapy: avoiding silver-mediated degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzola, Federico; Cooil, Simon; Skjønsfjell, Eirik Torbjørn Bakken; Breiby, Dag W; Wells, Justin W; Trinh, Thuat; Kjelstrup, Signe; Østli, Elise Ramleth; Høydalsvik, Kristin; Preobrajenski, Alexei; Cafolla, Attilio A; Evans, D Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy treatment usually involves the delivery of fluorouracil (5-Fu) together with other drugs through central venous catheters. Catheters and their connectors are increasingly treated with silver or argentic alloys/compounds. Complications arising from broken catheters are common, leading to additional suffering for patients and increased medical costs. Here, we uncover a likely cause of such failure through a study of the surface chemistry relevant to chemotherapy drug delivery, i.e. between 5-Fu and silver. We show that silver catalytically decomposes 5-Fu, compromising the efficacy of the chemotherapy treatment. Furthermore, HF is released as a product, which will be damaging to both patient and catheter. We demonstrate that graphene surfaces inhibit this undesirable reaction and would offer superior performance as nanoscale coatings in cancer treatment applications. (paper)

  20. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stages III/IV breast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine disease response, recurrence and development of distant metastasis with the use of chemotherapy in the form of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and methods: This was a prospective study that had enrolled a total of 57 patients with locally advanced breast cancer disease ...

  1. Chemotherapy related toxicity in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahl Amit

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: For inoperable non-small cell lung cancer combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy plays an important role as a therapeutic modality. The aim of the present study was to analyze neoadjuvant chemotherapy related acute toxicity in locally advanced lung cancer (stage IIIA and IIIB in Indian patients using Cisplatin and Etoposide combination chemotherapy. Material and methods: Forty patients of locally advanced Non small cell lung cancer received three cycles neoadjuvant chemotherapy using Injection Cisplatin and Etoposide. The patients were taken for Radical radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gray over 30 fractions in conventional fractionation after completing chemotherapy. Chemotherapy associated toxicity was assessed using common toxicity criteria (CTC v2.0 Results: Forty patients were available for final evaluation. Median age of presentation of patients was fifty-six years. Thirteen patients had Non small cell lung cancer stage IIIA while twenty-seven patients had Stage IIIB disease. Anemia was the most common hematological toxicity observed (seen in 81% of patients. Nausea and vomiting were the most common non -hematological toxicity seen. Sensory neuropathy was seen in 38%of patients. 88% patients developed alopecia. Seven patients developed febrile neutropenias. Conclusion: Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy using Cisplatin and Etoposide continues to be a basic regimen in the Indian set up despite availability of higher molecules, since it is cost effective, well tolerated and therapeutically effective. Blood transfusions, growth factors and supportive care can be used effectively to over come toxicity associated with this regimen.

  2. Impaired B cell immunity in acute myeloid leukemia patients after chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Meghali; Prince, Gabrielle; Biancotto, Angelique; Moir, Susan; Kardava, Lela; Santich, Brian H; Cheung, Foo; Kotliarov, Yuri; Chen, Jinguo; Shi, Rongye; Zhou, Huizhi; Golding, Hana; Manischewitz, Jody; King, Lisa; Kunz, Lauren M; Noonan, Kimberly; Borrello, Ivan M; Smith, B Douglas; Hourigan, Christopher S

    2017-07-10

    Changes in adaptive immune cells after chemotherapy in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may have implications for the success of immunotherapy. This study was designed to determine the functional capacity of the immune system in adult patients with AML who have completed chemotherapy and are potential candidates for immunotherapy. We used the response to seasonal influenza vaccination as a surrogate for the robustness of the immune system in 10 AML patients in a complete remission post-chemotherapy and performed genetic, phenotypic, and functional characterization of adaptive immune cell subsets. Only 2 patients generated protective titers in response to vaccination, and a majority of patients had abnormal frequencies of transitional and memory B-cells. B-cell receptor sequencing showed a B-cell repertoire with little evidence of somatic hypermutation in most patients. Conversely, frequencies of T-cell populations were similar to those seen in healthy controls, and cytotoxic T-cells demonstrated antigen-specific activity after vaccination. Effector T-cells had increased PD-1 expression in AML patients least removed from chemotherapy. Our results suggest that while some aspects of cellular immunity recover quickly, humoral immunity is incompletely reconstituted in the year following intensive cytotoxic chemotherapy for AML. The observed B-cell abnormalities may explain the poor response to vaccination often seen in AML patients after chemotherapy. Furthermore, the uncoupled recovery of B-cell and T-cell immunity and increased PD-1 expression shortly after chemotherapy might have implications for the success of several modalities of immunotherapy.

  3. Metaplastic carcinoma. Breast. Relapse. Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, A.; Terrasa, J.; Garcia, J.M.; Rifa, J.

    1996-01-01

    Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor. The appearance of unexpected mesenchymal elements within the epithelial tumors is the squamous metaplasia. These tumors have a different clinical behaviour that classical breast carcinoma. We present a case of metaplastic mammary carcinoma with multiple relapses treated with a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The use of chemotherapy after local treatment has enhanced the relapse-free survival. The combined treatment modality seems to produce some benefit in the management of the local relapses of this neoplasms

  4. Adjuvant chemotherapy for osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilber, F R; Rosen, G

    1989-08-01

    From this review of chemotherapy trials, several observations can be made. Osteosarcoma is a complex disease involving multiple histologies, each with a different prognosis. Prognostic factors that have been shown to be important include anatomic location of the primary tumor, stage at presentation (patients with metastatic or local recurrent disease fair far worse than those with primary disease), age at onset (children fair worse than the teenager with osteosarcoma), and location within the extremity (patients with more distal tumors fairing better than patients with more proximal tumors). There is convincing evidence for the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents such as methotrexate in high doses (at least 8 g/m2 for adults, 12 g/m2 for children), Adriamycin, and cisplatin. The combination of Adriamycin and cisplatin appears to be more beneficial relative to either one of these agents alone. The efficacy of the combination of BCD as a triple-drug regimen, although useful in several different trials, has not been convincingly shown. Finally, from several of the recent randomized trials, it appears, that chemotherapeutic regimens containing an Adriamycin and cisplatin combination appear to be superior to those that do not include this combination. However, these observations are made from a historical perspective and have not been conclusively proven by randomized prospective investigations. The observations concerning the natural history of the disease and the activity of various chemotherapeutic agents suggest certain clinical practice algorithms. Essential staging procedures would include a bone scan looking for multifocal or metastatic disease, and CT scans of the chest looking for metastases to the lung. From all studies, it is apparent that surgery is mandatory for the primary tumor and should be an integral portion of all treatment methods. Chemotherapy should be considered for all patients with osteosarcoma, and the essential drugs in the regimen appear at

  5. Neutropenia: occurrence and management in women with breast cancer receiving chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Garcia do Nascimento

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to identify the prevalence, and describe the management of, neutropenia throughout the chemotherapy treatment among women with breast cancer.METHODS: observational study, cycles of chemotherapy. 116 neutropenic events were recorded, and 63.3% of the patients presented neutropenia at some point of their treatment, 46.5% of these presenting grade II. The management used was temporary suspension between the cycles and the mean number of delays was 6 days. The study was prospective and longitudinal, where the evaluation of the hematological toxicities was undertaken at each cycle of chemotherapy, whether neoadjuvant or adjuvant.RESULTS: 79 women were included, who received 572 cycles. However, the reasons for the suspensions were the lack of a space in the chemotherapy center, followed by neutropenia.CONCLUSION: neutropenia is one of the most common and serious adverse events observed during the chemotherapy. Nursing must invest in research regarding this adverse event and in management strategies for organizing the public health system, so as to offer quality care.

  6. Modeling Chemotherapy-Induced Hair Loss: From Experimental Propositions toward Clinical Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botchkarev, Vladimir A; Sharov, Andrey A

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced hair loss is one of the most devastating side effects of cancer treatment. To study the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on the hair follicle, a number of experimental models have been proposed. Yoon et al. report that transplantation of human scalp hair follicles onto chemotherapy-treated immunodeficient mice serves as an excellent in vivo model for chemotherapy-induced hair loss. Yoon et al. demonstrate that (i) the response of human hair follicles grafted onto immunodeficient mice to cyclophosphamide resembles the key features of the chemotherapy-induced hair loss seen in patients with cancer and (ii) this human in vivo model for chemotherapy-induced hair loss is closer to clinical reality than to any earlier models. Undoubtedly, this model will serve as a valuable tool for analyses of the mechanisms that underlie this devastating side effect of anti-cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Epoetin beta for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galli L

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Luca Galli,1 Clara Ricci,2 Colin Gerard Egan2 1Oncology Unit 2, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 2Primula Multimedia SRL, Pisa, Italy Abstract: Epoetin beta belongs to the class of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs that are currently available to treat anemic patients receiving chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-induced anemia affects a high percentage of cancer patients and, due to its negative effects on disease outcome and the patient’s quality of life, should be treated when first diagnosed. Initial trials with ESAs have shown efficacy in improving quality of life and reducing the need for blood transfusions in patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia. However, recent meta-analyses have provided conflicting data on the impact of ESAs on survival and tumor progression. Here we provide an overview of these recent data and review the role of epoetin beta in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia over the past 20 years. Keywords: epoetin beta, erythropoietin, chemotherapy, cancer, anemia, treatment

  8. MVP Chemotherapy and Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Stage III Unresectable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer - Randomized for maintenance Chemotherapy vs. Observation; Preliminary Report-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Euk Kyung; Chang, Hye Sook; Suh, Cheol Won

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of MVP chemotherapy and hyperfractionated radiotherapy in Stage III unresectable non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), authors have conducted a prospective randomized study since January 1991. Stage IIIa or IIIb unresectable NSCLC patients were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (120 cGy/fx BID) up to 6500 cGY following 3 cycles of induction MVP (Mitomycin C 6 mg/m 2 , vinblastine 6 mg/m 2 , Cisplatin 60 mg/m 2 ) and randomized for either observation or 3 cycles of maintenance MVP chemotherapy. Until August 1991, 18 patients were registered to this study. 4 cases were stage IIIa and 14 were stage IIIb. Among 18 cases 2 were lost after 2 cycles of chemotherapy, and 16 were analyzed for this preliminary report. The response rate of induction chemotherapy was 62.5%; partial response, 50% and minimal response, 12.5%. Residual tumor of the one partial responder was completely disappeared after radiotherapy. Among 6 cases who were progressed during induction chemotherapy, 4 of them were also progressed after radiotherapy. All patients were tolerated BID radiotherapy without definite increase of acute complications, compared with conventional radiotherapy group. But at the time of this report, one patient expired in two month after the completion of the radiotherapy because of treatment related complication. Although the longer follow up is needed, authors are encouraged with higher response rate and acceptable toxicity of this treatment. Authors believe that this study is worthwhile to continue

  9. The success of primary chemotherapy for group D heritable retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, V M L; Kingston, J; Hungerford, J L

    2009-07-01

    To report the ocular survival and event-free survival following primary multiagent chemotherapy for group D, heritable bilateral retinoblastoma (RB). The RB database was used to identify children with heritable, bilateral RB treated with primary chemotherapy (six cycles of vincristine, etoposide and carboplatin). Only Group D eyes with more than 12 months' follow-up were analysed. The timing, number and type of salvage treatments were recorded. Kaplan-Meier estimates for the ocular survival and event-free survival (percentage of eyes that avoided external beam radiotherapy and/or enucleation) were performed as a function of time. Of 18 group D eyes, two (11%) were treated successfully with chemotherapy alone, nine (50%) underwent successful salvage treatment, and seven (39%) were enucleated. The median time from completing chemotherapy to enucleation was 9 months (range 4 to 25 months). Ocular survival was 67% at 2 years. External beam radiotherapy proved successful salvage treatment in five of nine eyes, so the event-free survival was 34% at 2 years. Multiagent chemotherapy alone is rarely sufficient for the preservation of group D eyes. External beam radiotherapy and plaque radiotherapy remain important salvage treatments for advanced, heritable retinoblastoma.

  10. Radiation and chemotherapy from the viewpoint of radiochemist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moebius, S.

    1989-01-01

    Fundamentals of radiation and chemotherapy in cancer treatment are presented from the viewpoint of radiochemistry. Properties and mechanism of chemotherapy, especially of platinum compounds are explained. The present state of radiation therapy is shown and possibilities for future reduction of the patients dose burden are discussed. Promising ways are the radiation sensitization of tumor cells by oxygen or the use of particle radiation instead of γ-quants. (orig.) [de

  11. Peri-operative chemotherapy in the management of resectable colorectal cancer pulmonary metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawkes Eliza A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgery is often advocated in patients with resectable pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC. Our study aims to evaluate peri-operative chemotherapy in patients with metastastic CRC undergoing pulmonary metastasectomy. Methods Patients treated for CRC who underwent pulmonary metastasectomy by a single surgeon were identified. Outcome measures included survival, peri-operative complications, radiological and histological evidence of chemotherapy-induced lung toxicities. Results Between 1997 and 2009, 51 eligible patients were identified undergoing a total of 72 pulmonary resections. Thirty-eight patients received peri-operative chemotherapy, of whom 9 received an additional biological agent. Five-year overall survival rate was 72% in the whole cohort - 74% and 68% in those who received peri-operative chemotherapy (CS and those who underwent surgery alone (S respectively. Five-year relapse free survival rate was 31% in the whole cohort - 38% and ≤18% in CS and S groups respectively. Only 8% had disease progression during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. There were no post-operative deaths. Surgical complications occurred in only 4% of patients who received pre-operative chemotherapy. There was neither radiological nor histological evidence of lung toxicity in resected surgical specimens. Conclusions Peri-operative chemotherapy can be safely delivered to CRC patients undergoing pulmonary metastasectomy. Survival in this selected group of patients was favourable.

  12. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: an update on the current understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addington, James; Freimer, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a common side effect of selected chemotherapeutic agents. Previous work has suggested that patients often under report the symptoms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and physicians fail to recognize the presence of such symptoms in a timely fashion. The precise pathophysiology that underlies chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, in both the acute and the chronic phase, remains complex and appears to be medication specific. Recent work has begun to demonstrate and further clarify potential pathophysiological processes that predispose and, ultimately, lead to the development of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. There is increasing evidence that the pathway to neuropathy varies with each agent. With a clearer understanding of how these agents affect the peripheral nervous system, more targeted treatments can be developed in order to optimize treatment and prevent long-term side effects.

  13. Results of radiotherapy with and without chemotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hada, Yoshihiro

    1986-01-01

    From 1975 to 1983, a total of 51 cases of esophageal cancer with T2 ∼ T3 in TNM classification, were treated by radiotherapy alone or combined chemotherapy. All 51 patients received total dose of 60 ∼ 70 GY for 6 ∼ 8 weeks and 20 out of 51 were treated by radiotherapy plus chemotherapy (5FU or UFT and/or bleomycin or pepleomycin). The 2-year-survival rate was slightly better in patients treated by radiotherapy plus chemotherapy than in patients treated by radiotherapy alone, but this difference was not significant. (author)

  14. Differential pharmacology and clinical utility of rolapitant in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapoport BL

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bernardo Leon Rapoport The Medical Oncology Centre of Rosebank, Johannesburg, South Africa Abstract: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV is a debilitating side effect of many cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens. CINV typically manifests during two well-defined time periods (acute and delayed phases. The acute phase is the first 24 hours after chemotherapy and is largely managed with 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonists. The delayed phase, a 5-day at-risk period during which patients are not often in direct contact with their health care provider, remains a significant unmet medical need. Neurokinin-1 (NK-1 receptor antagonists have demonstrated protection against acute and delayed CINV in patients treated with highly emetogenic chemotherapy and moderately emetogenic chemotherapy when used in combination with a 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonist and dexamethasone. Furthermore, recent data indicate that this protection is maintained over multiple treatment cycles. Rolapitant, a selective and long-acting NK-1 receptor antagonist, is approved as oral formulation for the prevention of delayed CINV in adults. This review discusses the differential pharmacology and clinical utility of rolapitant in preventing CINV compared with other NK-1 receptor antagonists. Keywords: antiemetics, highly emetogenic chemotherapy, moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, emesis, neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists

  15. Inhibitory effect of sequential combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy on growth of implanted tumor in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Kouji

    1983-01-01

    Sequential chemotherapy using FT-207, adriamycin and mitomycin C followed by radiotherapy was attempted to achieve effective inhibition against implanted tumor in C57BL/6 black mice bearing YM-12 tumors. Sequential combined chemotherapy was more effective than single drug chemotherapy or combined chemotherapy of other drugs. Addition of radiotherapy to the sequential combined chemotherapy was successful for enhancing therapeutic effect. (author)

  16. Administration of Concurrent Vaginal Brachytherapy During Chemotherapy for Treatment of Endometrial Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagar, Himanshu; Boothe, Dustin; Parikh, Amar; Yondorf, Menachem; Parashar, Bhupesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Gupta, Divya; Holcomb, Kevin; Caputo, Thomas [Division of Gynecological Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nori, Dattatreyudu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Wernicke, A. Gabriella, E-mail: gaw9006@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability and toxicity of administering vaginal brachytherapy (VB) concurrently during chemotherapy compared with the sequential approach for patients with endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 372 surgically staged patients with endometrial cancer American Joint Committee on Cancer 2009 stages I to IV treated with adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy (RT) at our institution from 2001 to 2012 was conducted. All patients received VB + external beam RT (EBRT) + 6 cycles of adjuvant carboplatin- and paclitaxel-based chemotherapy. The VB mean dose was 15.08 Gy (range, 15-20 Gy), with 3 to 4 weekly applications, and the EBRT mean dose was 45 Gy delivered with 3-dimensional or intensity modulated RT techniques. Hematologic, gastrointestinal (GI), and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were assessed by Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and compared between sequential and concurrent chemotherapy and VB schedules. Results: Among patients who received RT and adjuvant chemotherapy, 180 of 372 patients (48%) received RT sandwiched between cycles 3 and 4 of chemotherapy. A separate group of 192 patients (52%) were treated with VB during the first 3 cycles of chemotherapy, with a weekly application on nonchemotherapy days, and received the EBRT portion in a sandwiched fashion. Patients treated with VB during chemotherapy had a decreased overall treatment time by 4 weeks (P<.001; 95% confidence interval: 3.99-4.02) and sustained no difference in CTC-graded acute hematologic, GI, or GU toxicities in comparison with the patients treated with VB and chemotherapy in a sequential manner (P>.05). CTC grade 3 or 4 hematologic, GI, and GU toxicities were zero. Conclusions: VB during chemotherapy is well tolerated, decreases overall treatment time, and does not render more toxicity than the sequential regimen.

  17. Breakthrough therapy for peritoneal carcinomatosis of gastric cancer: Intraperitoneal chemotherapy with taxanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hironori; Kitayama, Joji; Ishigami, Hironori; Kazama, Shinsuke; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Hata, Keisuke; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Junichiro; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-11-15

    The effect of chemotherapy on peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) of gastric cancer remains unclear. Recently, the intraperitoneal (IP) administration of taxanes [e.g., paclitaxel (PTX) and docetaxel (DOC)] during the perioperative period has shown promising results. Herein, we summarized the rationale and methodology for using IP chemotherapy with taxanes and reviewed the clinical results. IP administered taxanes remain in the IP space at an extremely high concentration for 48-72 h. The drug directly infiltrates peritoneal metastatic nodules from the surface and then produces antitumor effects, making it ideal for IP chemotherapy. There are two types of perioperative IP chemotherapy with taxanes: neoadjuvant intraperitoneal and systemic chemotherapy and sequential perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (SPIC). In SPIC, patients receive neoadjuvant IP chemotherapy and the same regimen of IP chemotherapy after cytoreductive surgery (CRS) until disease progression. Usually, a taxane dissolved in 500-1000 mL of saline at ordinary temperature is administered through an IP access port on an outpatient basis. According to phase I studies, the recommended doses (RD) are as follows: IP DOC, 45-60 mg/m(2); IP PTX [without intravenous (IV) PTX], 80 mg/m(2); and IP PTX (with IV PTX), 20 mg/m(2). Phase II studies have reported a median survival time of 14.4-24.6 mo with a 1-year overall survival of 67%-78%. A phase III study comparing S-1 in combination with IP and IV PTX to S-1 with IV cisplatin started in 2011. The prognosis of patients who underwent CRS was better than that of those who did not; however, this was partly due to selection bias. Although several phase II studies have shown promising results, a randomized controlled study is needed to validate the effectiveness of IP chemotherapy with taxanes for PC of gastric cancer.

  18. Chemotherapy does not influence intestinal amino acid uptake in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, Barbara A.; van der Schoor, Sophie R.; Wattimena, Darcos L.; de Laat, Peter C.; Pieters, Rob; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2007-01-01

    Chemotherapy will frequently induce intestinal damage (mucositis). Enteral nutrition is then often withheld for fear of impaired intestinal absorption as shown in animal models. There is no clinical evidence, however, that absorption is indeed compromised during chemotherapy-induced mucositis. The

  19. Are nurse-led chemotherapy clinics really nurse-led? : an ethnographic study

    OpenAIRE

    Farrell, Carole; Walshe, Catherine Elizabeth; Molassiotis, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Background: The number of patients requiring ambulatory chemotherapy is increasing year on year, creating problems with capacity in outpatient clinics and chemotherapy units. Although nurse-led chemotherapy clinics have been set up to address this, there is a lack of evaluation of their effectiveness. Despite a rapid expansion in the development of nursing roles and responsibilities in oncology, there is little understanding of the operational aspects of nurses’ roles in nurse-led clinics. Ob...

  20. Experimental studies on cancer chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    The further development of the chemotherapy of cancer in the experimental and clinical fields necessitates a profound knowledge of its chemical, biochemical and pharmacological fundamentals and the mechanism of physiological and pathological growth processes. The 'Arbeitsgemeinschaft Zytostatika' includes chemists, biochemists, pharmacologists, molecular biologists, physicians and immunologists of various scientific institutes and clinics in the Federal Republic of Germany and in West Berlin. It is their aim to carry out basic research as well as clinical-orientated research in the field of the chemotherapy of cancer. In the 15 years of cooperation, fundamental knowledge was gained, especially in the field of the cytotoxic specificity and cancerotoxic selectivity of alkylating cytostatics. New cytostatics with a greater oncostatic selectivity and an altered spectrum of activity were tested and greater knowledge was won on the molecular-biological prerequisites of a rational drug design. (orig.) [de

  1. Geographic Variation in Oxaliplatin Chemotherapy and Survival in Patients With Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Janki M; Lairson, David R; Chan, Wenyaw; Du, Xianglin L

    2016-01-01

    Geographic disparity in colon cancer survival has received less attention, despite the fact that health care delivery varied across regions. To examine geographic variation in colon cancer survival and explore factors affecting this variation, including the use of oxaliplatin chemotherapy, we studied cases with resected stage-III colon cancer in 2004-2009, identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare linked database. Cox proportional hazard model was used to estimate the effect of oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy on survival across regions. Propensity score adjustments were made to control for potential selection bias and confounding. Rural regions showed lowest 3-year survival, whereas big metro regions showed better 3-year survival rate than any other region (67.3% in rural regions vs. 69.5% in big metro regions). Hazard ratio for patients residing in metro region was comparable with those residing in big metro region (1.27, 95% confidence interval: 0.90-1.80). However, patients residing in urban area were exhibiting lower mortality than those in other regions, although not statistically significant. Patients who received oxaliplatin chemotherapy were 23% significantly less likely to die of cancer than those received 5-fluorouracil only chemotherapy (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.63-0.95). In conclusion, there were some differences in survival across geographic regions, which were not statistically significant after adjusting for sociodemographic, tumor, chemotherapy, and other treatment characteristics. Oxaliplatin chemotherapy was associated with improved survival outcomes compared with 5-fluorouracil only chemotherapy across regions. Further studies may evaluate other factors and newer chemotherapy regimens on mortality/survival of older patients.

  2. Administration of Concurrent Vaginal Brachytherapy During Chemotherapy for Treatment of Endometrial Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagar, Himanshu; Boothe, Dustin; Parikh, Amar; Yondorf, Menachem; Parashar, Bhupesh; Gupta, Divya; Holcomb, Kevin; Caputo, Thomas; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability and toxicity of administering vaginal brachytherapy (VB) concurrently during chemotherapy compared with the sequential approach for patients with endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 372 surgically staged patients with endometrial cancer American Joint Committee on Cancer 2009 stages I to IV treated with adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy (RT) at our institution from 2001 to 2012 was conducted. All patients received VB + external beam RT (EBRT) + 6 cycles of adjuvant carboplatin- and paclitaxel-based chemotherapy. The VB mean dose was 15.08 Gy (range, 15-20 Gy), with 3 to 4 weekly applications, and the EBRT mean dose was 45 Gy delivered with 3-dimensional or intensity modulated RT techniques. Hematologic, gastrointestinal (GI), and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were assessed by Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and compared between sequential and concurrent chemotherapy and VB schedules. Results: Among patients who received RT and adjuvant chemotherapy, 180 of 372 patients (48%) received RT sandwiched between cycles 3 and 4 of chemotherapy. A separate group of 192 patients (52%) were treated with VB during the first 3 cycles of chemotherapy, with a weekly application on nonchemotherapy days, and received the EBRT portion in a sandwiched fashion. Patients treated with VB during chemotherapy had a decreased overall treatment time by 4 weeks (P .05). CTC grade 3 or 4 hematologic, GI, and GU toxicities were zero. Conclusions: VB during chemotherapy is well tolerated, decreases overall treatment time, and does not render more toxicity than the sequential regimen

  3. Retrospective Analysis of the Survival Benefit of Induction Chemotherapy in Stage IVa-b Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xiao-Wen; Zou, Xue-Bin; Xiao, Yao; Tang, Jie; OuYang, Pu-Yun; Su, Zhen; Xie, Fang-Yun

    2016-01-01

    The value of adding induction chemotherapy to chemoradiotherapy in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (LA-NPC) remains controversial, yet high-risk patients with LA-NPC have poor outcomes after chemoradiotherapy. We aimed to assess the survival benefits of induction chemotherapy in stage IVa-b NPC. A total of 602 patients with stage IVa-b NPC treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy with or without induction chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Overall survival (OS), locoregional relapse-free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test and Cox regression analysis. In univariate analysis, 5-year OS was 83.2% for induction chemotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy and 74.8% for concurrent chemotherapy alone, corresponding to an absolute risk reduction of 8.4% (P = 0.022). Compared to concurrent chemotherapy alone, addition of induction chemotherapy improved 5-year DMFS (83.2% vs. 74.4%, P = 0.018) but not 5-year LRFS (83.7% vs. 83.0%, P = 0.848) or PFS (71.9% vs. 66.0%, P = 0.12). Age, T category, N category, chemotherapy strategy and clinical stage were associated with 5-year OS (P = 0.017, P = 0.031, P = 0.007, P = 0.022, P = 0.001, respectively). In multivariate analysis, induction chemotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy was an independent favorable prognostic factor for OS (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.43-0.90, P = 0.012) and DMFS (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.38-0.83, P = 0.004). In subgroup analysis, induction chemotherapy significantly improved 5-year DMFS in stage IVa (86.8% vs. 77.3%, P = 0.008), but provided no significant benefit in stage IVb. In patients with stage IVa-b NPC treated with IMRT, addition of induction chemotherapy to concurrent chemotherapy significantly improved 5-year OS and 5-year DMFS. This study provides a basis for selection of high risk patients in future clinical therapeutic

  4. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Constipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    N ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Constipation Take these steps: Eat high-fiber foods such as: ● ● Whole-grain breads and cereals ● ● Fruits and vegetables ● ● Nuts and seeds Turn this ...

  5. Prebiotics: A Potential Treatment Strategy for the Chemotherapy-damaged Gut?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanru; Geier, Mark S; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-01-01

    Mucositis, characterized by ulcerative lesions along the alimentary tract, is a common consequence of many chemotherapy regimens. Chemotherapy negatively disrupts the intestinal microbiota, resulting in increased numbers of potentially pathogenic bacteria, such as Clostridia and Enterobacteriaceae, and decreased numbers of "beneficial" bacteria, such as Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria. Agents capable of restoring homeostasis in the bowel microbiota could, therefore, be applicable to mucositis. Prebiotics are indigestible compounds, commonly oligosaccharides, that seek to reverse chemotherapy-induced intestinal dysbiosis through selective colonization of the intestinal microbiota by probiotic bacteria. In addition, evidence is emerging that certain prebiotics contribute to nutrient digestibility and absorption, modulate intestinal barrier function through effects on mucin expression, and also modify mucosal immune responses, possibly via inflammasome-mediated processes. This review examines the known mechanisms of prebiotic action, and explores their potential for reducing the severity of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in the intestine.

  6. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin and methotrexate in patients with muscle-invasive bladder tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sengeløv, Lisa; von der Maase, Hans; Lundbeck, Finn

    2002-01-01

    This prospective, randomized study based on two associated trials was designed to evaluate the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin and methotrexate with folinic acid rescue or no chemotherapy prior to local treatment in patients with T2-T4b, NX-3, MO transitional cell carcinoma...... was 12.9 months. Median time to progression was 14.2 months with chemotherapy and 11.4 months without chemotherapy. The actuarial 5-year overall survival rate for all 153 patients was 29%, and 29% for both treatment groups. Multivariate analyses showed that T-stage, tumour size and serum creatinine were...... independent prognostic factors for survival. The cystectomy trial included 33 patients. Median survival was 78.9 months, 82.5 months with chemotherapy and 45.8 months without chemotherapy (p = 0.76). The radiotherapy trial included 120 patients. The median survival was 17.6 months. Median survival was 19...

  7. Combined radio- and chemotherapy from the point of view of the internist-oncologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelhardt, R.

    1979-01-01

    The indications for a combined radio- and chemotherapy can be summarized from three points of view: 1) Intensifying local radiotherapy by chemotherapy. 2) Extending local radiotherapy by systematical chemotherapy. 3) Supporting chemotherapy by radiotherapy. The side effects of the combination are discussed, classified as immediate type and long-term type. It is indicated that in all combinations the drug-specific and/or organ-specific side effects of the cytostatics must be taken into consideration. The substantial therapeutical aspect lies in prophylaxis. Exact data concerning the reduction of the dosage of the radiotherapy and/or the chemotherapy must be found after exact observation of the complications. Knowing the side effects of the immediate-type and taking into consideration the long-term damage which can be expected, there are today clear indications for a combined radio- and chemotherapy. (orig./MG) 891 MG/orig.- 892 RDG [de

  8. Adjuvant endocrine and chemotherapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, I. Craig

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Present the results of the 1995 World Overview which will be held in Oxford England two weeks before ASTRO. Discuss the interpretation and application of these results. Review current research topics on the use of adjuvant endocrine and chemotherapy for early breast cancer. The survival benefits from adjuvant chemotherapy in premenopausal women and adjuvant tamoxifen in postmenopausal women are well established. Each will reduce the annual odds of death by about 25% resulting in a 10 year survival difference of 8-10%. By the time of this presentation, the results of the 1995 Adjuvant Therapy Overview should be with 10+ years of follow-up, and if possible these will be summarized. Current efforts to improve on previous results are focused on the following areas: Optimal chemotherapy dose. Decreasing dose will compromise patient survival. It is not as certain that increasing dose will have as much impact in improving survival. The NSABP was unable to demonstrate an improvement in survival by modestly increasing the dose of cyclophosphamide alone. However, recent results of a Canadian study of CEF (cyclophosphamide, epidoxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil) and an Intergroup trial of an intense 16 week polychemotherapy program keep alive the possibility that dose escalation is still a very important question. An NSABP trial evaluating even greater cyclophosphamide dose escalation, an Intergroup evaluation of different doxorubicin doses, and two Intergroup trials evaluating very high dose chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation should provide definitive evidence regarding the importance of dose. Drug sequence. A study from Milan suggests that initial treatment with single agent doxorubicin followed by CMF will be superior to alternating doxorubicin and CMF. This has not been confirmed yet, and the reason for increased benefit from such a sequence is not entirely clear. This concept is being explored further in an Intergroup trial comparing four cycles of

  9. [A Case of Pathological Complete Response after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy(S-1 plus Oxaliplatin)and Laparoscopic Low Anterior Resection for Rectal Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinohe, Daichi; Morohashi, Hajime; Umetsu, Satoko; Yoshida, Tatsuya; Wakasa, Yusuke; Odagiri, Tadashi; Kimura, Toshirou; Suto, Akiko; Saito, Takeshi; Yoshida, Eri; Akasaka, Harue; Jin, Hiroyuki; Miura, Takuya; Sakamoto, Yoshiyuki; Hakamada, Kenichi

    2016-11-01

    We report a case of pathological complete response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy(NAC)(S-1 plus oxaliplatin)for rectal cancer. The patient was a 50-year-old man who had type 3 circumferential rectal cancer. An abdominal CT scan revealed locally advanced rectal cancer(cT3N2H0P0M0, cStage III b)with severe stenosis and oral-side intestinal dilatation. The patient was treated with NAC after loop-ileostomy. After 3 courses of chemotherapy, a CT scan revealed significant tumor reduction. Laparoscopic low anterior resection and bilateral lymph node dissection were performed 5 weeks after the last course of chemotherapy. The pathological diagnosis was a pathological complete response(no residual cancer cells). This case suggests that laparoscopic low anterior resection after NAC with S-1 plus oxaliplatin for locally advanced rectal cancer is a potentially effective procedure.

  10. Lin28 Mediates Cancer Chemotherapy Resistance via Regulation of miRNA Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chaoyang; Xie, Shuduo; Song, Chunjiao; Huang, Liming; Jiang, Zhinong

    2014-06-01

    Chemotherapy resistance is one of the major obstacles limiting the success of cancer drug treatment. Among the mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy treatment, there are those closely related to P-Glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-related protein, glutathione S-transferase pi and topoisomerase-II. Lin28 is a highly conserved RNA-binding protein, it consists of a cold shock domain and retroviral-type (CCHC) zinc finger motifs. In previous preclinical and clinical studies, positive Lin28 expression in cancer cells was correlated with decreased sensitivity to chemotherapy. And Lin28 could mediate cancer chemotherapy resistance via regulation of miR107 and Let-7 MiRNA. This article reviews current knowledge on predictive value of Lin28 in response to chemotherapy. Better understanding of its role may facilitate patient's selection of therapeutic regimen and lead to optimal clinical outcome.

  11. Chemotherapy resistance mechanisms in advanced skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuvanesh Sukhlal Kalal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is a most dangerous and deadly type of skin cancer, and considered intrinsically resistant to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. It has become a major public health concern as the incidence of melanoma has been rising steadily over recent decades with a 5-year survival remaining less than 5%. Detection of the disease in early stage may be curable, but late stage metastatic disease that has spread to other organs has an extremely poor prognosis with a median survival of less than 10 months. Since metastatic melanoma is unresponsive to therapy that is currently available, research is now focused on different treatment strategies such as combinations of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The molecular basis of resistance to chemotherapy seen in melanoma is multifactorial; defective drug transport system, altered apoptotic pathway, deregulation of apoptosis and/or changes in enzymatic systems that mediate cellular metabolic machinery. Understanding of alterations in molecular processes involved in drug resistance may help in developing new therapeutic approaches to treatment of malignant melanoma.

  12. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Facilitating Surgical Resection of Infantile Massive Intracranial Immature Teratoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Takahiro; Tsuji, Yoshihito; Shirase, Tomoyuki; Yukawa, Hiroyuki; Takeichi, Yasuhiro; Yamazoe, Naohiro

    2016-04-01

    Immature teratoma (IMT) is the most frequent histological subtype of infantile intracranial teratoma, the most common congenital brain tumor. IMT contains incompletely differentiated components resembling fetal tissues. Infantile intracranial IMT has a dismal prognosis, because it is often inoperable due to its massive size and high vascularity. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to be effective in decreasing tumor volume and vascularity to facilitate surgical resection in other types of infantile brain tumors. However, only one recent case report described the effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for infantile intracranial IMT in the literature, even though it is common entity with a poor prognosis in infants. Here, we describe the case of a 2-month-old male infant with a very large intracranial IMT. Maximal surgical resection was first attempted but was unsuccessful because of severe intraoperative hemorrhage. Neoadjuvant carboplatin and etoposide (CARE) chemotherapy was then administered with the aim of shrinking and devascularizing the tumor. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, tumor size did not decrease, but intraoperative blood loss significantly decreased and near-total resection was achieved by the second and third surgery. The patient underwent adjuvant CARE chemotherapy and has been alive for 3 years after surgery without tumor regrowth. Even when neoadjuvant chemotherapy does not decrease tumor volume of infantile intracranial IMT, surgical resection should be tried because chemotherapy can facilitate surgical resection and improve clinical outcome by reducing tumor vascularity.

  13. Long-term effects of chemotherapy in patients with testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osanto, S.; Bukman, A.; van Hoek, F.; Sterk, P. J.; de Laat, J. A.; Hermans, J.

    1992-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy regimens that include cisplatin (CDDP) and bleomycin (BLE) result in the cure of the majority of patients with malignant germ cell tumors of the testis. We investigated the long-term damage of such chemotherapy to renal, pulmonary, and hearing function. Forty-three patients

  14. Dynamics of circulating endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells in breast cancer patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Yu-Hsuan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The abundance of circulating endothelial cells (CECs and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEPs, which serve as surrogate markers for angiogenesis, may be affected by chemotherapy. We studied their dynamic change during consecutive cycles of chemotherapy. Methods We collected blood samples from 15 breast cancer patients, who received a total of 56 courses of systemic chemotherapy, and measured the CECs, viable CECs (V-CECs, and CEPs by six-color flow cytometry within the seven days prior to chemotherapy, twice a week during the first and second cycles of chemotherapy, and then once a week during the subsequent cycles. Results The CEC, V-CEC, and CEP levels all significantly decreased from day 1 of treatment to the first week of chemotherapy. After one week of chemotherapy, the CEC and V-CEC levels returned to a level similar to day 1. The CEP level remained significantly reduced after the first week of chemotherapy, but gradually rebounded until the next course of chemotherapy. After six cycles of chemotherapy, the total number of CEC and V-CEC cells trended toward a decrease and the CEP cells toward an increase. Clinical factors, including the existence of a tumor, chemotherapy regimens, and the use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor, did not significantly affect these results. Conclusions The CEC and CEP counts change dynamically during each course of chemotherapy and after the chemotherapy cycles, providing background data for any future study planning to use CECs and CEPs as surrogate markers of angiogenesis in antiangiogenesis treatments combined with chemotherapy.

  15. Prostatic stromal sarcoma in an adolescent: the role of chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Cavaliere

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostatic stromal sarcoma (PSS is a rare tumor that normally occurs in adult age. Its management relies mainly on surgery. We report the first case of PSS occurring in an adolescent. There was evidence of a good response to chemotherapy including ifosfamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and actinomycin-D, although the final outcome was dismal. A review of the English literature revealed 14 additional patients with PSS treated with chemotherapy: tumor shrinkage was reported in 4 of the 6 evaluable patients. Patients with PSS may benefit from the use of chemotherapy in combination with early aggressive local treatment.

  16. Open-label observational study to assess the efficacy and safety of aprepitant for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting prophylaxis in Indian patients receiving chemotherapy with highly emetogenic chemotherapy/moderately emetogenic chemotherapy regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hingmire Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Currently, there is limited data on the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV in Indian population with aprepitant containing regimens. Aims: The aim was to assess the Efficacy and Safety of Aprepitant for the prevention of nausea and vomiting associated with highly emetogenic chemotherapy/moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC/MEC regimens. Settings and Design: Investigator initiated, multicentric, open-label, prospective, noncomparative, observational trial. Subjects and Methods: Triple drug regimen with aprepitant, palonosetron, and dexamethasaone administration was assessed for the prevention of CINV during acute, delayed, and the overall phase (OP for HEC/MEC Regimens. The primary endpoint was complete response (CR; no emesis and no use of rescue medication and the key secondary endpoint was the complete control (CC; no emesis, no rescue medication and no more than mild nausea during the OP. Statistical Analysis Used: Perprotocol efficacy was analyzed for the first cycle with results represented in terms of CR/CC rates using descriptive statistics. Results: Seventy-five patients were included in the study with median age of 49.7 years and 89.7% being females. The CR rate (OP for patients administered HEC or MEC regimens during the first cycle were 92% and 90.9%, respectively. Similarly, the CC rates (OP were 75% and 90% for these regimens, respectively. 7 (9.2% patients reported adverse drug reactions that were mild and transient with no reports of any serious adverse events. Conclusions: Use of aprepitant containing regimen for patients receiving HEC/MEC regimen resulted in significantly high CR and CC response rates, which further consolidate its potential role to improve patient quality of life and compliance to disease management.

  17. Retroperitoneal abscess shortly after chemotherapy for lung cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Gen; Kondo, Tadashi; Kagohashi, Katsunori; Watanabe, Hiroko; Kawaguchi, Mio; Kurishima, Koichi; Satoh, Hiroaki; Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-03-01

    To the best of our knowledge, the formation of a retroperitoneal abscess due to acute appendicitis shortly after administration of chemotherapy for lung cancer has not been previously reported. This is the case report of a 59-year-old male who was admitted to the Mito Medical Center (Mito, Japan) and diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma with pleuritis carcinomatosis. Although no distant metastasis was identified, combination chemotherapy with cisplatin and pemetrexed was administered. Nine days after initiating chemotherapy, the patient developed right lower quadrant abdominal pain and high fever. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis revealed the collection of gas and fluid in the retroperitoneum adjacent to the cecum. The abscess was locally drained; however, the infection continued to spread, with subsequent development of a scrotal abscess. Consequently, appendectomy was performed. The patient recovered well and the lung adenocarcinoma was treated with additional courses of chemotherapy following the remission of the local inflammation. Retroperitoneal abscess due to acute appendicitis is an unusual finding; however, this rare complication should be considered during or shortly after chemotherapy in patients with lung cancer.

  18. Immune Modulation by Chemotherapy or Immunotherapy to Enhance Cancer Vaccines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, Genevieve M. [Suite 411, 1344 Summer St., Immunovaccine Inc., Halifax, NS, B3H 0A8 (Canada); Room 11-L1, Sir Charles Tupper Building, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Dalhousie University, 5850 College St, Halifax, NS, B3H 1X5 (Canada); Liwski, Robert S. [Room 11-L1, Sir Charles Tupper Building, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Dalhousie University, 5850 College St, Halifax, NS, B3H 1X5 (Canada); Room 206E, Dr. D. J. Mackenzie Building, Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, 5788 University Avenue, Halifax, NS, B3H 2Y9 (Canada); Mansour, Marc [Suite 411, 1344 Summer St., Immunovaccine Inc., Halifax, NS, B3H 0A8 (Canada)

    2011-08-05

    Chemotherapy has been a mainstay in cancer treatment for many years. Despite some success, the cure rate with chemotherapy remains unsatisfactory in some types of cancers, and severe side effects from these treatments are a concern. Recently, understanding of the dynamic interplay between the tumor and immune system has led to the development of novel immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines. Cancer vaccines have many advantageous features, but their use has been hampered by poor immunogenicity. Many developments have increased their potency in pre-clinical models, but cancer vaccines continue to have a poor clinical track record. In part, this could be due to an inability to effectively overcome tumor-induced immune suppression. It had been generally assumed that immune-stimulatory cancer vaccines could not be used in combination with immunosuppressive chemotherapies, but recent evidence has challenged this dogma. Chemotherapies could be used to condition the immune system and tumor to create an environment where cancer vaccines have a better chance of success. Other types of immunotherapies could also be used to modulate the immune system. This review will discuss how immune modulation by chemotherapy or immunotherapy could be used to bolster the effects of cancer vaccines and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these treatments.

  19. Immune Modulation by Chemotherapy or Immunotherapy to Enhance Cancer Vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir, Genevieve M.; Liwski, Robert S.; Mansour, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapy has been a mainstay in cancer treatment for many years. Despite some success, the cure rate with chemotherapy remains unsatisfactory in some types of cancers, and severe side effects from these treatments are a concern. Recently, understanding of the dynamic interplay between the tumor and immune system has led to the development of novel immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines. Cancer vaccines have many advantageous features, but their use has been hampered by poor immunogenicity. Many developments have increased their potency in pre-clinical models, but cancer vaccines continue to have a poor clinical track record. In part, this could be due to an inability to effectively overcome tumor-induced immune suppression. It had been generally assumed that immune-stimulatory cancer vaccines could not be used in combination with immunosuppressive chemotherapies, but recent evidence has challenged this dogma. Chemotherapies could be used to condition the immune system and tumor to create an environment where cancer vaccines have a better chance of success. Other types of immunotherapies could also be used to modulate the immune system. This review will discuss how immune modulation by chemotherapy or immunotherapy could be used to bolster the effects of cancer vaccines and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these treatments

  20. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy for elderly head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Among head and neck cancers, cases affecting elderly people are increasing. Radical treatment is sometimes difficult in advanced cases of elderly patients. With progressive cancer, because radical surgery is often difficult, radiotherapy is chosen and may be used together with chemotherapy when overall status is good. However, according to the meta-analysis of Pignon et al., the chemoradiotherapy for elderly patients 71 years old or older, the hazard ratio becomes approximately 0.95, and there is little chemotherapy combined effect. In terms of 5-year survival rate, chemotherapy combined effect is -0.7%. Chemotherapy effect in elderly patients is not clear in past clinical trials. We examined 50 cases 75 years or older treated mainly by radiotherapy at Tokyo Medical Center between February, 2003 and August, 2011. In all, 21 of the 50 patients died, including four who died due to other cancers, while pneumonia accounted for five other deaths. These results suggested that various complications are often present and multiple primary cancers often occur in elderly people. With chemotherapy for elderly people, the effect of radiotherapy treatment and quality of life of the patients should be considered fully based on characteristics of elderly people, and a treatment plan devised accordingly. It is also necessary to undertake care after treatment. (author)

  1. Nimotuzumab plus chemotherapy versus chemotherapy alone in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a multicenter, randomized, open-label Phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu KG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available K Govind Babu,1 Kumar Prabhash,2 Ashok K Vaid,3 Bhawna Sirohi,3 Ravi B Diwakar,4 Raghunadha Rao,5 Madhuchanda Kar,6 Hemant Malhotra,7 Shona Nag,8 Chanchal Goswami,9 Vinod Raina,10 Ravi Mohan111Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore, 2Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, 3Artemis Health Institute, Delhi, 4Bangalore Institute of Oncology, Bangalore, 5Nizam Institute of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad, 6B R Singh Hospital, Kolkata, 7Birla Cancer Centre, Jaipur, 8Jehangir Hospital, Pune, 9B P Poddar Hospital and Medical Research Ltd, Kolkata, 10Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, New Delhi, 11King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam, IndiaBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab in combination with chemotherapy (docetaxel and carboplatin versus chemotherapy alone in patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer.Methods: This multicenter, open-label, Phase II study randomized 110 patients to receive nimotuzumab plus chemotherapy (nimotuzumab group or chemotherapy alone (control group, and comprised concomitant, maintenance, and follow-up phases. Nimotuzumab 200 mg was administered once weekly for 13 weeks during the first two phases with four cycles of chemotherapy and docetaxel 75 mg/m2 and carboplatin (area under the curve 5 mg/mL*min every 3 weeks for a maximum of four cycles during the concomitant phase. The primary endpoint was objective response rate (sum of complete response and partial response. Secondary endpoints, ie, overall survival and progression-free survival, were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Efficacy was evaluated on the intent-to-treat and efficacy-evaluable sets. Safety was assessed from adverse event and serious adverse event data.Results: The objective response rate was significantly higher in the nimotuzumab group than in the control group in the intent-to-treat population (54% versus 34.5%; P=0.04. A complete response and partial response were achieved in 3

  2. More Chemotherapy May Help after Initial Treatment for Childhood Leukemia Fails

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study suggests that at least some children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who respond poorly to initial chemotherapy may do better if they receive additional chemotherapy rather than a stem cell transplant.

  3. CT findings of hepatoblastoma before and after chemotherapy : correlation with pathologic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Joon Beom; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In One; Jang, Ja June; Kim, Chong Jai; Ahn, Hyo Seop; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the CT findings of hepatoblastoma before and after chemotherapy, and to compare them with surgical and pathologic features. Twelve hepatoblastoma patients underwent chemotherapy prior to surgery; in all cases, CT scanning was performed before and after chemotherapy. We reviewed the findings with special attention to changes in tumor volume, the extent and pattern of contrast enhancement, the extent of low-attenuation area in the tumor, the presence of a septum, and calcification or ossification or ossification within the mass before and after chemotherapy. Post-chemotherapy CT findings were compared with operative and pathologic findings. After chemotheapy, the volume of the tumor mass decreased in all patients, and the extent of involved segments decreased in nine (75%), the non-enhancing area within the mass, on the other hand, increased in nine (75 %). On pre-chemotherapy CT, calcifications were detected in seven patients (58%), and on post-chemotherapy CT, in nine (75%); the extent of calcification were detected in seven patients. On the basis of CT findings, viable tumor and necrosis areas could not be distinguished. Massive calcification or osteoid mixed with loose connective tissue was noted in the mesenchymal component of the tumor; the whirling pattern of enhancement within the area of low density seen on CT scanning corresponded to osteoid mixed with loose connective tissue, which contained rich blood vessels. We describe the CT findings of hepatoblastoma both before and after chemotherapy, highlighting the changes which occurred. An understanding of these changes is helpful for the proper management of this condition. (author). 18 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  4. Chemotherapie bij gebruik van clozapine; een verhoogde kans op agranulocytose?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gool, A.R.; Van Der Velden, M.T.; Oosten, A.W.; Van Meerten, E.; Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Loonen, A.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    In a 37-year-old female, a combined treatment consisting of chemotherapy and radiation was considered for cervical cancer. However, she was using clozapine for the treatment of schizophrenia. As both clozapine and chemotherapy can induce decrease of white blood cell counts, we had to decide if

  5. Dynamics and mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced ovarian follicular depletion in women of fertile age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Mikkel; Andersen, Claus Yding; la Cour Freiesleben, Nina

    2010-01-01

    To study ovarian follicular dynamics during chemotherapy to understand the mechanisms behind chemotherapy-induced ovarian follicular depletion and to evaluate whether pretreatment levels of ovarian reserve markers were predictive of the posttreatment levels.......To study ovarian follicular dynamics during chemotherapy to understand the mechanisms behind chemotherapy-induced ovarian follicular depletion and to evaluate whether pretreatment levels of ovarian reserve markers were predictive of the posttreatment levels....

  6. Duration of chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Maintenance chemotherapy is widely provided to patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC. However, the benefits of maintenance chemotherapy compared with observation are a subject of debate. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify relevant literature, we systematically searched the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. Eligible trials included patients with SCLC who either received maintenance chemotherapy (administered according to a continuous or switch strategy or underwent observation. The primary outcome was 1-year mortality, and secondary outcomes were 2-year mortality, overall survival (OS, and progression-free survival (PFS. Of the 665 studies found in our search, we identified 14 relevant trials, which together reported data on 1806 patients with SCLC. When compared with observation, maintenance chemotherapy had no effect on 1-year mortality (odds ratio [OR]: 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.66-1.19; P = 0.414, 2-year mortality (OR: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.57-1.19; P = 0.302, OS (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.71-1.06; P = 0.172, or PFS (HR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.62-1.22; P = 0.432. However, subgroup analyses indicated that maintenance chemotherapy was associated with significantly longer PFS than observation in patients with extensive SCLC (HR, 0.72; 95% CI: 0.58-0.89; P = 0.003. Additionally, patients who were managed using the continuous strategy of maintenance chemotherapy appeared to be at a disadvantage in terms of PFS compared with patients who only underwent observation (HR, 1.27; 95% CI: 1.04-1.54; P = 0.018. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Maintenance chemotherapy failed to improve survival outcomes in patients with SCLC. However, a significant advantage in terms of PFS was observed for maintenance chemotherapy in patients with extensive disease. Additionally, our results suggest that the continuous strategy is inferior to observation; its clinical

  7. Stress perception among patients in pre-colonoscopy period and those undergoing chemotherapy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela de Souza Alves da Silva

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: comparing the perception of stress among patients with colorectal cancer undergoing chemotherapy with those in pre-colonoscopy period. Methods: a comparative descriptive study developed with 144 people receiving chemotherapy and 100 patients in the pre-colonoscopy period, using biosocial and clinical data, Stress Assessment Tool and Perceived Stress Scale. Results: a predominance of females (73%, aged over 65 (50% were predominant for the pre-colonoscopy period patients. In patients receiving chemotherapy, gender parity with ages ranging from 40-64 years (68.1% was observed. Pre-colonoscopy patients showed higher perceived stress compared to those receiving chemotherapy (p <0.001. Conclusion: the phase of diagnostic definition represents greater stress to patients in comparison to period of treatment, even despite the characteristic manifestations of chemotherapy.

  8. Oncoplastic breast surgery does not delay the onset of adjuvant chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Anders; Tvedskov, Tove Filtenborg; Kroman, Niels

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Only a few studies of limited size have examined whether oncoplastic breast surgery delays the onset of adjuvant chemotherapy as compared to conventional breast surgery. We investigated whether oncoplastic breast surgery causes a delay in the onset of adjuvant chemotherapy in comparison...... to lumpectomy and mastectomy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study is a population-based cohort study. Within the nationwide registry of the Danish Breast Cancer Group (DBCG), we identified 1798 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy following mastectomy, lumpectomy or oncoplastic breast surgery for early...... and unilateral invasive breast cancer. Women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. RESULTS: We found no significant difference between the three groups (mastectomy, lumpectomy, oncoplastic breast surgery) in the time from biopsy to surgery (mean time 17.9, 17.0 and 18.3 days, respectively...

  9. Liver dysfunction after chemotherapy in lymphoma patients infected with hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizdar, Omer; Tapan, Umit; Aksoy, Sercan; Harputluoglu, Hakan; Kilickap, Saadettin; Barista, Ibrahim

    2008-05-01

    Reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in asymptomatic hepatitis B surface antigen carriers undergoing chemotherapy or immunosuppressive therapy is a well-documented complication. However, data on the consequence of chemotherapy on the course of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in HCV+ patients have been controversial. Here, we review the current knowledge about the complications related to HCV in lymphoma patients receiving chemotherapy/immunosuppressive therapy. Although less frequent than HBV, these complications occur in a subset of patients with mortality rates up to 45%. Therefore, baseline screening for HBV and HCV before initiation of chemotherapy is crucial. High-risk patients having chronic active hepatitis, high baseline HCV viral load, HBV co-infection and receiving cytotoxic drugs, corticosteroids and rituximab (particularly if combined) should be closely monitored for serum transaminase, bilirubin and HCV RNA levels.

  10. Prognostic value of tumor suppressors in osteosarcoma before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robl, Bernhard; Pauli, Chantal; Botter, Sander Martijn; Bode-Lesniewska, Beata; Fuchs, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Primary bone cancers are among the deadliest cancer types in adolescents, with osteosarcomas being the most prevalent form. Osteosarcomas are commonly treated with multi-drug neoadjuvant chemotherapy and therapy success as well as patient survival is affected by the presence of tumor suppressors. In order to assess the prognostic value of tumor-suppressive biomarkers, primary osteosarcoma tissues were analyzed prior to and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We constructed a tissue microarray from high grade osteosarcoma samples, consisting of 48 chemotherapy naïve biopsies (BXs) and 47 tumor resections (RXs) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We performed immunohistochemical stainings of P53, P16, maspin, PTEN, BMI1 and Ki67, characterized the subcellular localization and related staining outcome with chemotherapy response and overall survival. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to analyze chemotherapy response and Kaplan-Meier-analysis as well as the Cox proportional hazards model was applied for analysis of patient survival. No significant associations between biomarker expression in BXs and patient survival or chemotherapy response were detected. In univariate analysis, positive immunohistochemistry of P53 (P = 0.008) and P16 (P16; P = 0.033) in RXs was significantly associated with poor survival prognosis. In addition, presence of P16 in RXs was associated with poor survival in multivariate regression analysis (P = 0.003; HR = 0.067) while absence of P16 was associated with good chemotherapy response (P = 0.004; OR = 74.076). Presence of PTEN on tumor RXs was significantly associated with an improved survival prognosis (P = 0.022). Positive immunohistochemistry (IHC) of P16 and P53 in RXs was indicative for poor overall patient survival whereas positive IHC of PTEN was prognostic for good overall patient survival. In addition, we found that P16 might be a marker of osteosarcoma chemotherapy resistance. Therefore, our study supports the use of tumor RXs to

  11. Prognostic value of tumor suppressors in osteosarcoma before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robl, Bernhard; Pauli, Chantal; Botter, Sander Martijn; Bode-Lesniewska, Beata; Fuchs, Bruno

    2015-05-09

    Primary bone cancers are among the deadliest cancer types in adolescents, with osteosarcomas being the most prevalent form. Osteosarcomas are commonly treated with multi-drug neoadjuvant chemotherapy and therapy success as well as patient survival is affected by the presence of tumor suppressors. In order to assess the prognostic value of tumor-suppressive biomarkers, primary osteosarcoma tissues were analyzed prior to and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We constructed a tissue microarray from high grade osteosarcoma samples, consisting of 48 chemotherapy naïve biopsies (BXs) and 47 tumor resections (RXs) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We performed immunohistochemical stainings of P53, P16, maspin, PTEN, BMI1 and Ki67, characterized the subcellular localization and related staining outcome with chemotherapy response and overall survival. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to analyze chemotherapy response and Kaplan-Meier-analysis as well as the Cox proportional hazards model was applied for analysis of patient survival. No significant associations between biomarker expression in BXs and patient survival or chemotherapy response were detected. In univariate analysis, positive immunohistochemistry of P53 (P = 0.008) and P16 (P16; P = 0.033) in RXs was significantly associated with poor survival prognosis. In addition, presence of P16 in RXs was associated with poor survival in multivariate regression analysis (P = 0.003; HR = 0.067) while absence of P16 was associated with good chemotherapy response (P = 0.004; OR = 74.076). Presence of PTEN on tumor RXs was significantly associated with an improved survival prognosis (P = 0.022). Positive immunohistochemistry (IHC) of P16 and P53 in RXs was indicative for poor overall patient survival whereas positive IHC of PTEN was prognostic for good overall patient survival. In addition, we found that P16 might be a marker of osteosarcoma chemotherapy resistance. Therefore, our study supports the use of tumor RXs to

  12. CMEA cooperative trials in chemotherapy of lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiseleva, E.S.; Pitskhelauri, V.G.; Trakhtenberg, A.Kh.

    1984-01-01

    TA comparative analysis of the immediate and short-term results of chemo- and radiotherapy of 174 patients with well differentiated inoperable lung cancer has been performed. The data were presented by the participants of the CMEA cooperative trial (the Hungarian People's Reg public, the USSR and the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic over the period of 1976-1980). Comparative analysis has shown that the use of adjuvant chemotherapy tends to improve an immediate therapeutic effect. In well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, a marked positive effect was obtained in 48.6% of the patients as compared to 31.2% in radiotherapy alone. However, judging by the survival rates such differences in favor of chemotherapy were not revealed. After conservative treatment (radio- and chemotherapy) of patients with differentiated lung cancer in the inoperable stage 55.7% survived for 1, 17.27% for 2, 8.55% for 3 yrs. Direct correlation between the immediate effect of radio- and chemotherapy and the survival of the patients was revealed. Of 67 patients with a marked immediate effect 49 (73.1%) lived over 1 year, 8 out of 9 patients lived for 3 yrs

  13. Numerical simulation of scalp cooling to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, F.E.M.; Leeuwen, van G.M.J.; Steenhoven, van A.A.

    2005-01-01

    One way of treating cancer' is by chemotherapy. Side-effects of chemotherapy include hair loss. Cooling the scalp during trearment can reduce hair loss. For this cooling, a cap containing a cold tluid (cold cap) is used. However, the rate of success of this method varies strongly, because precise

  14. Teratoid Wilms tumour with chemotherapy resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renuka Gahine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of Teratoid Wilms tumour (a rare histologic variant in a 4 year old male who presented with an abdominal lump. Wilms Tumour with paracaval lymphadenopathy and tumour thrombi in right renal vein and inferior vena cava was made radiologically. FNAC report was suggestive of Wilms tumour and patient was subjected to 6 cycles of chemotherapy with not much reduction in size. Post nephrectomy histological diagnosis of Teratoid Wilms tumour was established. Resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy is thought to be due to presence of well differentiated histologic appearance. Teratoid Wilms tumour is usually not an aggressive neoplasm and prognosis is comparatively neoplasm and prognosis is comparatively good if the tumour is excised completely thus surgery being the best treatment.

  15. Benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with T4 UICC II colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, Andreas; Gerken, Michael; Hartl, Janine; Itzel, Timo; Fichtner-Feigl, Stefan; Stroszczynski, Christian; Schlitt, Hans Jürgen; Hofstädter, Ferdinand; Klinkhammer-Schalke, Monika

    2015-05-20

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Adjuvant chemotherapy is considered the standard of care in patients with UICC stage III colon cancer after R0 resection. Adjuvant therapy was not shown to be beneficial in patients with UICC stage II colon cancer. However, there is an ongoing discussion as to whether adjuvant chemotherapy may be beneficial for a subgroup of UICC II patients in a "high-risk situation" (such as T4). We investigated a Bavarian population-based (2.1 million inhabitants) cohort of 1937 patients with UICC II CRC treated between 2002 and 2012 in regard of the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy for large (T4) tumors. Patients older than 80 years of age were excluded. Of 1937 patients, 240 had a T4 tumor (12%); 77 of all T4 patients received postoperative chemotherapy (33%). Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression models were used for survival analyses. Patients with a T4 tumor who received postoperative chemotherapy had a highly significant survival benefit in respect of overall survival (pbenefit from adjuvant treatment. Chemotherapy, age at diagnosis, and tumor grading remained independent risk factors in the multivariate cox regression analysis. Our retrospective study demonstrated the significant benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in the T4 subgroup of patients with UICC II colon cancer. Our data suggest that adjuvant chemotherapy should be seriously considered in these patients.

  16. Predictive Factors for Developing Venous Thrombosis during Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy in Testicular Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Isabel; Porres, Daniel; Veek, Nica; Heidenreich, Axel; Pfister, David

    2017-01-01

    Malignancies and cisplatin-based chemotherapy are both known to correlate with a high risk of venous thrombotic events (VTT). In testicular cancer, the information regarding the incidence and reason of VTT in patients undergoing cisplatin-based chemotherapy is still discussed controversially. Moreover, no risk factors for developing a VTT during cisplatin-based chemotherapy have been elucidated so far. We retrospectively analyzed 153 patients with testicular cancer undergoing cisplatin-based chemotherapy at our institution for the development of a VTT during or after chemotherapy. Clinical and pathological parameters for identifying possible risk factors for VTT were analyzed. The Khorana risk score was used to calculate the risk of VTT. Student t test was applied for calculating the statistical significance of differences between the treatment groups. Twenty-six out of 153 patients (17%) developed a VTT during chemotherapy. When we analyzed the risk factors for developing a VTT, we found that Lugano stage ≥IIc was significantly (p = 0.0006) correlated with the risk of developing a VTT during chemotherapy. On calculating the VTT risk using the Khorana risk score model, we found that only 2 out of 26 patients (7.7%) were in the high-risk Khorana group (≥3). Patients with testicular cancer with a high tumor volume have a significant risk of developing a VTT with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The Khorana risk score is not an accurate tool for predicting VTT in testicular cancer. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. From the Bottom-Up: Chemotherapy and Gut-Brain Axis Dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajic, Juliana E; Johnston, Ian N; Howarth, Gordon S; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2018-01-01

    The central nervous system and gastrointestinal tract form the primary targets of chemotherapy-induced toxicities. Symptoms associated with damage to these regions have been clinically termed chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment and mucositis. Whilst extensive literature outlines the complex etiology of each pathology, to date neither chemotherapy-induced side-effect has considered the potential impact of one on the pathogenesis of the other disorder. This is surprising considering the close bidirectional relationship shared between each organ; the gut-brain axis. There are complex multiple pathways linking the gut to the brain and vice versa in both normal physiological function and disease. For instance, psychological and social factors influence motility and digestive function, symptom perception, and behaviors associated with illness and pathological outcomes. On the other hand, visceral pain affects central nociception pathways, mood and behavior. Recent interest highlights the influence of functional gut disorders, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome in the development of central comorbidities. Gut-brain axis dysfunction and microbiota dysbiosis have served as key portals in understanding the potential mechanisms associated with these functional gut disorders and their effects on cognition. In this review we will present the role gut-brain axis dysregulation plays in the chemotherapy setting, highlighting peripheral-to-central immune signaling mechanisms and their contribution to neuroimmunological changes associated with chemotherapy exposure. Here, we hypothesize that dysregulation of the gut-brain axis plays a major role in the intestinal, psychological and neurological complications following chemotherapy. We pay particular attention to evidence surrounding microbiota dysbiosis, the role of intestinal permeability, damage to nerves of the enteric and peripheral nervous systems and vagal and humoral mediated changes.

  18. Link between diet and chemotherapy related gastrointestinal side effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Mardas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study : To evaluate an association between food products consumption, dietary intake and the incidence of selected gastrointestinal symptoms (nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and constipation in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Material and methods : Fifty six women receiving chemotherapy for ovarian cancer were eligible for the study. Anthropometrical measurements were assessed. The dietary intake was evaluated by 24-hours food records. The association between the consumption of selected food products and gastrointestinal symptoms incidences was assessed by modified semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire including 77-different food items that was developed and applied in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Results : BMI values indicated 9%, 45%, 30% and 16% of patients as underweight, normal weight, overweight and obese respectively. Only 23% and 32% of patients never experienced nausea and constipation when 43% and 45% never experienced vomiting and diarrhea. Nausea was promoted by oils, constipation by chocolate and chocolate products and diarrhea by dairy products, stone fruit and apple. Significant inverse correlations were found between vomiting and the intake of energy, fat, protein, carbohydrates, B groups vitamins, vitamin D, phosphorus and zinc. The difference in energy intake between marginal values of vomiting incidence exceeded 400 kcal. Conclusions : Dietary intake as well as specific food products influence on gastrointestinal side effect of chemotherapy in cancer patients. The dietary approach based on either exclusion or limited intake of selected food products and improvement of diet could reduce and prevent chemotherapy induced gastrointestinal symptoms therefore should be taken under consideration in clinical practice.

  19. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy after partial synchronization of cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, H.J.; Ammon, J.; Nuevemann, M.; Zum Winkel, K.; Technische Hochschule Aachen

    1977-01-01

    Apart from densely ionising radiations, radiotherapy and chemotherapy after partial synchronisation of the cell cycle are, at the moment, the only way to improve the efficiency of a treatment of malignant tumours. The new principle is based on the finding that tumour cells are more sensitive to radiation or chemotherapy in a certain metabolic situation. Partial synchronisation of the cell cycle makes it possible to enrich tumour cells in a certain metabolic state. In order to show the efficiency of such a measure, several methods can be used. Recently, impulse cytophotometry has been replacing these methods, since it permits a quick, simple, and individual control of the synchronisation effect. However, there has not been any clinical experiment yet to prove that tumour cells show a maximum sensitivity to radio- and chemotherapy in the G 2 -M-phase. This is why a number of patients with malignant tumours which could not be operated or treated with the usual radiotherapy or polychemotherapy were treated according to this new therapeutic principle. The results obtained in 233 cases encourage the specialists to continue the experiments. The indication of a treatment after partial synchronisation of the cell cycle should be based on the tumour spread as documented according to the TNM-system. Only when these guidelines are followed will it be possible to explain the problems still unsolved in the principle of radiotherapy and chemotherapy after partial synchronisation of the cell cycle and to carry out radio- and chemotherapy with improved efficiency in the future. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Prevention of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: the role of palonosetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajetta, Emilio; Pusceddu, Sara; Guadalupi, Valentina; Ducceschi, Monika; Celio, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    Prevention of nausea and vomiting is the main goal of antiemetic treatment in cancer patients scheduled to receive chemotherapy. To prevent acute emesis, antiemetics should be administered just before chemotherapy and patients should be protected for up to 24 hours after chemotherapy initiation. The emetogenic potential of chemotherapeutic agents guides clinicians towards the most appropriate antiemetic prophylaxis. Current guidelines recommend the use of 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist (RA) either alone or in combination with dexamethasone and/or a neurokinin-1 RA both in the acute and delayed phases. The second-generation 5-HT 3 RA palonosetron exhibits a longer half-life and a higher binding affinity than older antagonists. Palonosetron has been approved by the FDA for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in patients scheduled to receive either moderately (MEC) or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) and for the prevention of delayed CINV in patients receiving MEC. The present review will discuss the role of palonosetron in the prevention of acute CINV

  1. Induction chemotherapy for locoregional lung cancer using paclitaxel combination. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takita, H.; Pitoniak, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    Induction chemotherapy has been reported to be effective in treatment of locally advanced, borderline resectable, (Stage III), non small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). A logical extension of the indication for the induction chemotherapy may be to treat earlier stage resectable lung cancers (stages I and II) because the cure rate of the resectable lung cancers still remains poor and is below 60% except for stage I A. Thirty eight patients with a diagnosis of loco-regional NSCLC were treated with paclitaxel combination chemotherapy. Following two courses of induction chemotherapy, patients underwent surgical therapy whenever possible. There ten patients with stage I disease, four patients with stage II, 13 with stage IIIA, nine had stage IIIB, and two with stage IV. An overall response rate of 74% was observed. The response rate for 14 resectable patients (stage I and II) was 86%. The chemotherapy regimen was well tolerated and apart from one instance of anaphylaxis, no serious side effects were observed

  2. Prevent Infections During Chemotherapy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-10-24

    This podcast discusses the importance of preventing infections in cancer patients who are undergoing chemotherapy. Dr. Lisa Richardson, CDC oncologist, talks about a new Web site for cancer patients and their caregivers.  Created: 10/24/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 10/24/2011.

  3. Efficacy of chemotherapy after hormone therapy for hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Ryutaro; Nagao, Yasuko

    2014-01-01

    According to the guidelines for metastatic breast cancer, hormone therapy for hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer without life-threatening metastasis should be received prior to chemotherapy. Previous trials have investigated the sensitivity of chemotherapy for preoperative breast cancer based on the efficacy of neoadjuvant hormone therapy. In this retrospective study, we investigated the efficacy of chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer in hormone therapy-effective and hormone therapy-ineffective cases. Patients who received chemotherapy after hormone therapy for metastatic breast cancer between 2006 and 2013 at our institution were investigated. A total of 32 patients received chemotherapy after hormone therapy for metastatic breast cancer. The median patient age was 59 years, and most of the primary tumors exhibited a T2 status. A total of 26 patients had an N(+) status, while 7 patients had human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive tumors. A total of 13 patients received clinical benefits from hormone therapy, with a rate of clinical benefit of subsequent chemotherapy of 30.8%, which was not significantly different from that observed in the hormone therapy-ineffective patients (52.6%). A total of 13 patients were able to continue the hormone therapy for more than 1 year, with a rate of clinical benefit of chemotherapy of 38.5%, which was not significantly different from that observed in the short-term hormone therapy patients (47.4%). The luminal A patients were able to continue hormone therapy for a significantly longer period than the non-luminal A patients (median survival time: 17.8 months vs 6.35 months, p = 0.0085). However, there were no significant differences in the response to or duration of chemotherapy. The efficacy of chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer cannot be predicted based on the efficacy of prior hormone therapy or tumor subtype, and clinicians should administer chemotherapy in all cases of

  4. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy with simultaneous chemotherapy in Ewing's sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunst, J.; Sauer, R.; Burgers, J.M.V.; Hawlicek, R.; Trott, K.R.; Juergens, H.

    1988-01-01

    In 1981, the German Society of Pediatric Oncology initiated a multi-institutional study for the treatment of Ewing's sarcoma. The protocol (Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study, CESS 81) consisted of four courses of a four-drug-regimen (VACA), each course taking nine weeks. Local therapy (radical surgery or resection plus irradiation or radiotherapy alone) was performed after the second course. The results of CESS 81 can be summarized as follows: VACA-chemotherapy is effective in controlling systemic disease. Initial tumor mass and response to initial chemotherapy are of major prognostic value for local control and survival. Permanent local control is a problem, especially in irradiated patients. The high local failure rate in irradiated patients in CESS 81 could be attributable to the following reasons: Late start of local therapy (after 18 weeks of chemotherapy), uneven distribution of prognostic parameters: Large tumors were more often irradiated than operated, protocol deviations in irradiated patients. (orig.)

  5. [Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on nutritional status of locally advanced gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Guopeng; Qu, Jianjun; Zhai, Shengyong; Shi, Yiran; Wang, Xinbo

    2018-03-25

    To study the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on nutritional status in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer. Cases inclusion criteria: (1)18-65 years old; (2) Gastric cancer confirmed by gastroscopic biopsy; (3) Preoperative TNM stage III( according to the AJCC stage 2000 standard; (4) Kamosfsky functional status score> 60 points; (5)Receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy voluntarily and signing the informed consent form. Case exclusion criteria: (1)Having contraindications of chemotherapy and surgery; (2) Suffering from heart, liver and kidney and other underlying diseases; (3) Concurrent with malignant diseases, wasting disease or other digestive diseases. According to the above criteria, clinical data of 73 patients of stage III( gastric cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy at Weifang People's Hospital from May 2015 to March 2017 were prospectively collected. The cohort study was adopted. After removing 3 patients who did not complete the chemotherapy, a total of 70 patients who completed the chemotherapy were included in the study. All the patients received SOX chemotherapy without nutritional support during chemotherapy. Changes of body composition and nutritional indicators were analyzed before and after chemotherapy, and according to the tumor regression after chemotherapy, patients were divided into response group (complete or sub-total tumor regression) and non-response group (tumor part, with or without a small amount of retreat) for stratified analysis. Of 70 gastric cancer patients, 40 were male and 30 were female with a age of (53.8±6.4) (28 to 64) years. There were 26 cases (37.1%) of stage III(a, 35 cases (50.0%) of stage III(b and 9 cases (12.9%) of stage III(c. There were 41 cases in response group and 29 cases in non-response group. Three patients (4.3%) were complete remission (CR) and 38 patients (54.3%) were partial remission (PR) in response group, while 23 cases (32.9%) were stable disease (SD) and 6 cases (8.6%) were progressive

  6. Sentinel node biopsy before neoadjuvant chemotherapy spares breast cancer patients axillary lymph node dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijk, Maartje C.; Nieweg, Omgo E.; Rutgers, Emiel J. T.; Oldenburg, Hester S. A.; Valdés Olmos, Renato; Hoefnagel, Cornelis A.; Kroon, Bin B. R.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients is a valuable method to determine the efficacy of chemotherapy and potentially downsize the primary tumor, which facilitates breast-conserving therapy. In 18 studies published about sentinel node biopsy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy,

  7. Model-based optimization of G-CSF treatment during cytotoxic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirm, Sibylle; Engel, Christoph; Loibl, Sibylle; Loeffler, Markus; Scholz, Markus

    2018-02-01

    Although G-CSF is widely used to prevent or ameliorate leukopenia during cytotoxic chemotherapies, its optimal use is still under debate and depends on many therapy parameters such as dosing and timing of cytotoxic drugs and G-CSF, G-CSF pharmaceuticals used and individual risk factors of patients. We integrate available biological knowledge and clinical data regarding cell kinetics of bone marrow granulopoiesis, the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy and pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of G-CSF applications (filgrastim or pegfilgrastim) into a comprehensive model. The model explains leukocyte time courses of more than 70 therapy scenarios comprising 10 different cytotoxic drugs. It is applied to develop optimized G-CSF schedules for a variety of clinical scenarios. Clinical trial results showed validity of model predictions regarding alternative G-CSF schedules. We propose modifications of G-CSF treatment for the chemotherapies 'BEACOPP escalated' (Hodgkin's disease), 'ETC' (breast cancer), and risk-adapted schedules for 'CHOP-14' (aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in elderly patients). We conclude that we established a model of human granulopoiesis under chemotherapy which allows predictions of yet untested G-CSF schedules, comparisons between them, and optimization of filgrastim and pegfilgrastim treatment. As a general rule of thumb, G-CSF treatment should not be started too early and patients could profit from filgrastim treatment continued until the end of the chemotherapy cycle.

  8. chemotherapy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Augustyniuk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background . Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM practices for cancer have become popular among oncology patients. An increasing interest in alternative medicine can be explained by the inefficiency of conventional treatment, dissatisfaction with treating patients like objects, and the will to use all available treatment methods. Objectives . The authors assessed how often patients use CAM methods, and which of them are most popular. Material and methods . The study was conducted in Military Hospital no. 109 and the Independent Public Clinical Hospital no. 1 in Szczecin among 100 chemotherapy patients. This survey-based study was performed using an original questionnaire. Results. Most respondents (68% did not use alternative methods to fight the disease. The most popular treatment methods were: herbal medicine (50%, alternative medicine preparations (38% and diet (25%, and the least common: hypnosis (3% and aromatherapy (3%. Analyzed sociodemographic factors had no effects on a choice of a CAM method. Patients obtained information about CAM methods mainly from the Internet (40%, medical staff (37% and literature (31%. Conclusions . 1. Using CAM by patients receiving chemotherapy for neoplasms is quite a common phenomenon. 2. CAM were more often chosen by women. Neither the duration of the disease nor sociodemographic data had effects on making the decision to use CAM methods. 3. The most popular CAM were: herbal medicine, alternative medicine preparations, and diet. 4. Cancer patients should receive special support from nurses and doctors as well as other members of the therapeutic team. Oncology patients should never be left on their own so that they were forced to seek help and support in therapies unconfirmed by scientific investigation.

  9. Prevention of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia with pegfilgrastim: pharmacokinetics and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing-Bing; Savin, Michael A; Green, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy are at risk for developing chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN). Filgrastim, a recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) that stimulates the proliferation, differentiation and function of neutrophils, is approved for the prevention of CIN. To eliminate the burden of daily filgrastim injection, pegfilgrastim, a long-acting form of filgrastim, was developed by covalently attaching a 20-kDa polyethylene glycol molecule to filgrastim to increase molecular size and thus reduce renal elimination. Consequently, neutrophil-mediated clearance is the primary mechanism for pegfilgrastim elimination. Therefore, after a single pegfilgrastim injection following chemotherapy treatment, pegfilgrastim concentration is sustained during neutropenia and decreases with neutrophil recovery. Pegfilgrastim has received marketing authorization approval from many regions to reduce the incidence of CIN based on the similar efficacy and safety of a single injection of 6 mg of pegfilgrastim administered once per chemotherapy cycle and 10 to 11 daily injections of filgrastim at 5 µg/kg. The efficient self-regulating clearance of pegfilgrastim allows administration once per chemotherapy cycle, thereby providing a more convenient treatment regimen than filgrastim. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy with chemotherapy for advanced laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Kumiko; Okawa, Tomohiko

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with advanced laryngeal cancer were treated with twice-a-day fractionated radiotherapy (TDFR) to a total dose of 65 Gy to 82 Gy combined with chemotherapy of CDDP and 5-FU between 1994 and 1997. Twenty-two cases (88%) became complete response and 9 cases recurred. The relapse-free rate at 2 years was 49.8%. The laryngeal conserving rate at 2 years was 71.0%, the actuarial 2-year survival rate was 89.9%. In induction chemotherapy (12 cases) no severe toxicity has been observed. In TDFR with concurrent chemotherapy (22 cases), grade 3 hematological toxicity was observed in 4 cases and grade 4 mucosal toxicity in 16 cases. Based on this investigation, it is concluded that TDFR with chemotherapy is a promising modality for advanced laryngeal cancer and toxicity is acceptable. (author)

  11. Impact of Pretreatment Neutrophil Count on Chemotherapy Administration and Toxicity in Dogs with Lymphoma Treated with CHOP Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Q; Serra, J-C; Handel, I; Lawrence, J

    2018-01-01

    Prechemotherapy absolute neutrophil count (ANC) cutoffs are arbitrary and vary across institutions and clinicians. Similarly, subjective guidelines are utilized for the administration of prophylactic antibiotics in neutropenic dogs. To evaluate the impact of various ANC cutoffs on chemotherapy administration in dogs with lymphoma treated with CHOP chemotherapy and to determine whether an association between prechemotherapy ANC and subsequent toxicity exists. The secondary objective was to evaluate a currently used ANC cutoff to indicate prescription of prophylactic antibiotics. Dogs diagnosed with lymphoma treated with CHOP chemotherapy (n = 64). Six hundred and fifteen ANCs were stratified into 6 classes. The 3 ANC cutoffs 1.5 × 10 3 /μL, 2.0 × 10 3 /μL, and 2.5 × 10 3 /μL were assessed. The presence of an association between prechemotherapy ANC class and toxicity was determined. Afebrile neutropenic dogs with ANC ANC cutoff of 1.5 × 10 3 /μL; chemotherapy would not have been administered in 10% and 16% of visits with an ANC cutoff of 2.0 × 10 3 /μL or 2.5 × 10 3 /μL, respectively. There was no association among the 3 lower prechemotherapy ANC classes and toxicity. All dogs with ANC 0.75-1.5 × 10 3 /μL recovered spontaneously without medical intervention. The number of dose delays was minimized with a prechemotherapy ANC cutoff of 1.5 × 10 3 /μL, and the prechemotherapy ANC class 1.5-1.99 × 10 3 /μL was not associated with an increased toxicity. Further investigation of an ANC cutoff near 0.75 × 10 3 /μL in which to prescribe prophylactic antibiotics is indicated. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. Aprepitant: a promising antiemetic for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aseeri, Mohamad A.

    2006-01-01

    Most patients who undergo chemotherapy have noted that nausea and vomiting are the most feared and distressing side-effects of cancer treatment (1). Nausea and vomiting from chemotherapy can be classified as acute, delayed, or anticipatory. Acute emesis generally occurs within 24 hours of chemotherapy administration; while delayed nausea and vomiting begin 24 hours after chemotherapy and may continue for up to one week. Anticipatory emesis occurs prior to chemotherapy in patients who anticipate another episode by sight, odors or memory of the place where acute nausea and vomiting occurred (2, 3). Different neurotransmitters found in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and central nervous system (CNS) mediate the pathophysiology of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). These include dopamine, histamine, acetycholine, serotonin, and substance P; which act directly and indirectly on the vomiting center located in the lateral reticular formation of the medulla (1, 4). Substance P is a member of the tachykinins family of neuropeptides. The biological activity of this substance is to induce vomiting mediated by neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors located primarily in the GIT and the CNS (5). Both Nk1 receptors and substance P play a significant role in the pathogenesis of acute and delayed CINV. (author)

  13. Prevention of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: the role of palonosetron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Bajetta

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Emilio Bajetta, Sara Pusceddu, Valentina Guadalupi, Monika Ducceschi, Luigi CelioMedical Oncology Unit 2, Fondazione IRCCS “Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori”, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Prevention of nausea and vomiting is the main goal of antiemetic treatment in cancer patients scheduled to receive chemotherapy. To prevent acute emesis, antiemetics should be administered just before chemotherapy and patients should be protected for up to 24 hours after chemotherapy initiation. The emetogenic potential of chemotherapeutic agents guides clinicians towards the most appropriate antiemetic prophylaxis. Current guidelines recommend the use of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist (RA either alone or in combination with dexamethasone and/or a neurokinin-1 RA both in the acute and delayed phases. The second-generation 5-HT3RA palonosetron exhibits a longer half-life and a higher binding affinity than older antagonists. Palonosetron has been approved by the FDA for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV in patients scheduled to receive either moderately (MEC or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC and for the prevention of delayed CINV in patients receiving MEC. The present review will discuss the role of palonosetron in the prevention of acute CINV.Keywords: antiemetics, chemotherapy, nausea, vomiting, serotonin-receptor antagonists, palonosetron

  14. Benefit of Adjuvant Chemotherapy After Curative Resection of Lung Metastasis in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Soon; Jung, Minkyu; Shin, Sang Joon; Heo, Su Jin; Kim, Chang Gon; Lee, Min Goo; Beom, Seung Hoon; Lee, Chang Young; Lee, Jin Gu; Kim, Dae Joon; Ahn, Joong Bae

    2016-03-01

    The survival benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy after colorectal cancer (CRC) lung metastasectomy is uncertain. We enrolled 221 CRC patients who underwent pulmonary metastasectomy between October 2002 and July 2013, including those with previous liver metastasis that had been curatively resected. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated from the day of lung metastasectomy. Among all patients, 176 (79.6%) received adjuvant chemotherapy after lung metastasectomy. Median follow-up was 34.7 months from the time of lung metastasectomy [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 7.4-90.9 months]. Patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy had longer DFS compared with surgery alone (median 32.7 vs 11.2 months respectively, P = 0.076). Multivariate analysis revealed previous liver metastasis, preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen ≥5 ng/mL, disease-free interval chemotherapy as independent risk factors for recurrence. Low-risk patients who had 0-1 risk factors received a significant survival benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy [hazard ratio (HR) 0.54; 95% CI 0.32-0.91, P = 0.020]; however, high-risk patients with ≥2 risk factors did not (HR 1.02; 95% CI 0.48-2.14, P = 0.964). Patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy showed no OS benefit compared with patients who received surgery alone (median 89.6 vs 86.8 months respectively, P = 0.833). CRC patients received lung metastasectomy could have a DFS benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, especially in low-risk patients. Larger, prospective studies are needed to evaluate the role of adjuvant chemotherapy after CRC lung metastasectomy.

  15. Awareness of dysgeusia and gustatory tests in patients undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuba, Sayaka; Fujiyama, Rie; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Morita, Michi; Sakimura, Chika; Hatachi, Toshiko; Matsumoto, Megumi; Yano, Hiroshi; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Hayashida, Naomi; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Eguchi, Susumu

    2018-05-12

    We analyzed the prevalence of gustatory test abnormalities in breast cancer (BC) patients undergoing chemotherapy. We enrolled 43 BC patients undergoing chemotherapy and 38 BC patients who had never undergone chemotherapy (control group). Two gustatory tests were conducted: an instillation method examining the threshold for four basic taste stimuli and an electrogustometry method measuring the threshold for perception with electric stimulation at the front two-thirds of the tongue (cranial nerve VII) and at the back third of the tongue (cranial nerve IX). The results of the two gustatory tests and clinicopathological factors were compared between the chemotherapy and control groups and between patients with and without awareness of dysgeusia in the chemotherapy group. In the chemotherapy group, 19 (44%) patients were aware of dysgeusia and 8 (19%) had hypogeusia using the instillation method. Although more patients had parageusia in the chemotherapy than control group, no significant differences in the results of the two gustatory tests were observed. Patients with dysgeusia awareness had a higher threshold at cranial nerve IX using the electrogustometry method than those without dysgeusia awareness; no significant differences in hypogeusia were observed using the instillation method. In fact, 74% (14/19) of patients with dysgeusia awareness could identify the four tastes accurately using the instillation method. Similar results were observed for the instillation and electrogustometry methods at cranial nerve VII. While approximately half of the chemotherapy patients were aware of dysgeusia, 81% (35/43) of them could accurately identify the four basic tastes using the instillation method.

  16. [Effects of prophylactic chemotherapy on outcomes and prognosis of patients older than 40 years with invasive mole].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S Y; Li, L; Zhao, J; Xiang, Y; Wan, X R; Feng, F Z; Ren, T; Yang, J J

    2017-06-25

    Objective: To discuss the effects of prophylactic chemotherapy on the outcomes and prognosis of invasive mole patients. Methods: One hundred and fifteen invasive mole (IM) patients older than 40 years were registered in Peking Union Medical Collage Hospital.Eleven of them were treated with prophylactic chemotherapy before diagnosed as IM prophylactic chemotherapy group, while the other 104 cases received therapeutic chemotherapy after diagnosed as IM (non-prophylactic chemotherapy group). The general clinical data (including age, clinical stage, risk factor score), treatment, outcomes and relapse of patients were retrospectively compared between two groups. Results: (1) The age of prophylactic chemotherapy group and non-prophylactic chemotherapy group were (47±5) versus (46±4) years old. Ratio of clinical stageⅠ-Ⅱ were 3/11 versus 29.8% (31/104), clinical stage Ⅲ-Ⅳ were 8/11 versus 70.2% (73/104). Ratio of risk factor score 0-6 were 11/11 versus 84.6% (88/104), risk factor score >6 were 0 versus 15.4% (16/104). There were no significant statistical differences between two groups in age, clinical stage or risk factor score (all P> 0.05). (2) Treatment: the total chemotherapy courses between prophylactic chemotherapy group and non-prophylactic chemotherapy group (median 7 versus 5) were significantly different ( Z= 3.071, P= 0.002). There were no significant statistical differences between two groups in the chemotherapy courses until negative conversion of β-hCG, consolidation chemotherapy courses, total therapeutic chemotherapy courses or ratio of hysterectomy (all P> 0.05). (3) Outcomes and relapse: between the prophylactic chemotherapy group and the non-prophylactic chemotherapy group, the complete remission rate were 11/11 versus 98.1%(102/104), the relapse rate were 0 versus 1.0%(1/102). There were no significant difference between the two groups in outcomes or relapse rate ( P> 0.05). Conclusions: Prophylactic chemotherapy does not substantially

  17. Bevacizumab with or after chemotherapy for platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bamias, A; Gibbs, E; Khoon Lee, C

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the open-label randomized phase III AURELIA trial, adding bevacizumab to chemotherapy for platinum-resistant ovarian cancer (PROC) significantly improved progression-free survival and response rate versus chemotherapy alone, but not overall survival (OS). We explored the effect of ...

  18. Long-term cognitive function following chemotherapy in patients with testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Degn; Rossen, Philip; Mehlsen, Mimi Yung

    2009-01-01

    Cancer patients frequently report cognitive complaints following chemotherapy, but the results from the available studies, mainly of women with breast cancer, are inconsistent. Our aim was to compare cognitive function of men with testicular cancer (TC) who had orchiectomy and chemotherapy...

  19. Nursing Care of Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy Desensitization: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakel, Patricia; Carsten, Cynthia; Carino, Arvie; Braskett, Melinda

    2016-04-01

    Chemotherapy desensitization protocols are safe, but labor-intensive, processes that allow patients with cancer to receive medications even if they initially experienced severe hypersensitivity reactions. Part I of this column discussed the pathophysiology of hypersensitivity reactions and described the development of desensitization protocols in oncology settings. Part II incorporates the experiences of an academic medical center and provides a practical guide for the nursing care of patients undergoing chemotherapy desensitization.
.

  20. Adoptive cell transfer after chemotherapy enhances survival in patients with resectable HNSCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pan; Zhang, Yan; J Archibald, Steve; Wang, Hua

    2015-09-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and to determine the immune factors for treatment success in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with chemotherapy followed by adoptive cell transfer (ACT). A total of 43 HNSCC patients who received radical resection and chemotherapy were analysed in this study. Twenty-one of the patients were repeatedly treated with ACT after chemotherapy (ACT group), and the other twenty-two patients without ACT treatment were included as part of the control group. To investigate the immunological differences underlying these observations, we expanded and profiled improving cytokine-induced killer cells (iCIK) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with the timed addition of RetroNectin, OKT3 mAb, IFN γ and IL-2. The median of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in the ACT group were significantly higher as compared to the control group (56 vs. 40; 58 vs. 45 months). In iCIK culture, there was a significant reduction in CD3+CD4+ T-cell proliferation and cytokines (IL-2, TNF) production from patients who received chemotherapy compared to patients without chemotherapy. Intra-arterial infusion of iCIK, in coordination with chemotherapy, considerably rescued iCIK culture from the suppression of systemic immunity induced by chemotherapy and induced tumour regression. Altogether, these findings suggest that ACT is an effective neo-adjuvant therapy for rescuing systemic immune suppression and improving survival time in patients with HNSCC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Incidence and Timing of Thromboembolic Events in Patients With Ovarian Cancer Undergoing Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Patricia S; Bazzi, Ali A; McLean, Karen; Reynolds, R Kevin; Spencer, Ryan J; Johnston, Carolyn M; Liu, J Rebecca; Uppal, Shitanshu

    2017-06-01

    To identify the incidence and timing of venous thromboembolism as well as any associated risk factors in patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients diagnosed with ovarian, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal cancer and receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy from January 2009 to May 2014 at a single academic institution. The timing and number of venous thromboembolic events for the entire cohort were categorized as follows: presenting symptom, during neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment, after debulking surgery, and during adjuvant chemotherapy. Of the 125 total patients with ovarian cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 13 of 125 patients (10.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.1-17.2%) had a venous thromboembolism as a presenting symptom and were excluded from further analysis. Of the 112 total patients at risk, 30 (26.8%, 95% CI 19.3-35.9%) experienced a venous thromboembolism. Based on the phase of care, 13 (11.6%, 95% CI 6.8-19.1%) experienced a venous thromboembolism during neoadjuvant chemotherapy, six (5.4%, 95% CI 2.4-11.5%) developed a postoperative venous thromboembolism, and 11 (9.9%, 95% CI 5.5-17%) developed a venous thromboembolism during adjuvant chemotherapy. Two of the four patients with clear cell histology developed a venous thromboembolism in this cohort. Overall new diagnosis of venous thromboembolism was associated with one fourth of the patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy for ovarian cancer with nearly half of these diagnosed during chemotherapy cycles before interval debulking surgery. Efforts to reduce venous thromboembolism so far have largely focused on the postoperative period. Additional attention to venous thromboembolic prophylaxis during chemotherapy (neoadjuvant and adjuvant) in this patient population is warranted in an effort to decrease the rates of venous thromboembolism.

  2. Acute myelogenous leukemia following chemotherapy and radiation for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aso, Teijiro; Hirota, Yuichi; Kondou, Seiji; Matsumoto, Isao; Matsuzaka, Toshimitsu; Iwashita, Akinori

    1989-03-01

    In August 1982, a 44-year-old man was diagnosed as having rectal cancer, histologically diagnosed as well differentiated adenocarcinoma, and abdominoperineal resection and colostomy were performed. Postoperatively, he received chemotherapy with mitomycin C up to a total dose of 100 mg. In September 1986, lung metastasis occurred and he was treated with a combination chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin, pirarubicin and 5-fluorouracil. In the following year, radiation treatment (total: 6900 rad) was given for a recurrent pelvic lesion. Peripheral blood on April 30, 1988, showed anemia, thrombocytopenia and appearance of myeloblasts, and a diagnosis of acute myelogenous leukemia (FAB: M1) was made. Combination chemotherapy (including aclarubicin, vincristine, behenoyl ara-C, daunorubicin, 6-mercaptopurine, cytarabine, etoposide and prednisolone) failed to induce remission and the patient died in June 1988. This case was thought to be one of secondary leukemia occurring after chemotherapy and radiation treatment for rectal cancer. This case clearly indicates the need for a careful follow-up of long-term survivors who have received cancer therapy. (author).

  3. Alternating radiotherapy and chemotherapy schedules in small cell lung cancer, limited disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arriagada, R.; Le Chevalier, T.; Baldeyrou, P.

    1985-01-01

    Sixty-three evaluable patients with limited small cell lung carcinoma were entered into two pilot studies alternating 6 cycles of combination chemotherapy with 3 courses of mediastinal radiotherapy as induction treatment. The first course of radiotherapy started 10 days after the second cycle of chemotherapy; there was a 7 day rest between chemotherapy and radiotherapy courses. This 6 month induction treatment was followed by a maintenance chemotherapy. The total mediastinal radiation dose was increased from 4500 rad in the first study to 5500 rad in the second. Both protocols obtained a complete response (CR) rate of greater than 85%. Local control at 2 years was 61% in the first study and 82% in the second. Acute and delayed toxicity effects are discussed

  4. Scalp cooling successfully prevents alopecia in breast cancer patients undergoing anthracycline/taxane-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Ines; Wiesske, Alexandra; Schoenegg, Winfried

    2018-04-13

    Chemotherapy for breast cancer induces alopecia, representing a major source of patient distress. This study assesses whether a scalp-cooling device is effective in reducing chemotherapy-induced alopecia, and assesses adverse treatment effects. A prospective observational study including women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy and scalp cooling using a Paxman device. The primary efficacy end points were: successful hair preservation (no hair loss; <30% hair loss not requiring a wig; or <50% hair loss not requiring a wig) at the completion of chemotherapy. Secondary end points included adverse effects such as headache, pain, nausea or dizziness. The study enrolled 131 participants. Mean patient age was 49.8 years; 74% received anthracycline/taxane-based chemotherapy and 26% received taxane-monotherapy based chemotherapy. Hair preservation was successful in 102 women who underwent scalp cooling (71.0%; 95% CI = 63-79%). Only adverse events related to device use were collected, representing 7% (95% CI = 3-11%) of cases. Scalp cooling is effective in preventing hair loss among breast cancer patients undergoing standard chemotherapy treatment, and has minimal adverse effects. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Randomized study: small cell anaplastic lung cancer treated by combination chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, R.M.; Woods, R.L.; Brodie, G.N.; Tattersall, M.H.N.

    1980-01-01

    Chemotherapy and primary site radiation therapy were compared to chemotherapy alone in a randomized study of 125 patients with small cell cancer of the lung. The sites of initial relapse, as well as disease free and overall survival were analyzed. Radiotherapy to the primary site reduced the rate of local relapse, but median survival was not prolonged in patients with either limited or extensive disease, when the radiation therapy-chemotherapy group was compared to the group that received chemotherapy alone

  6. How breast cancer chemotherapy increases the risk of leukemia: Thoughts about a case of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and leukemia after breast cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Xia; Li, Minghuan; Kong, Li; Deng, Xiaoqin; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    The latest studies suggest that prophylactic chemotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer may increase the leukemia risk in patients. For patients with a low risk for breast cancer recurrence, physicians who make the choice for adjuvant therapy should consider the risk of its long-term side effects. Is the occurrence of lymphatic system cancer and leukemia after breast cancer treatment associated with chemotherapy? Can these types of leukemia be classified as therapy-related leukaemias? We believe that there may be correlations between any diseases, butwe cannot rush to conclusions or dismiss a correlation because we understand little about the diseases themselves.In this paper, we present a case of secondary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and leukemia in patients after breast cancer chemotherapy, it is undeniable that this is a special event. For two distinct tumouroccurrences at different times, we cannot give a clear explanation because of thechanges in the genes that might link them together and we hope to attract the attention of other clinicians.

  7. Safety and benefits of self-expandable metallic stents with chemotherapy for malignant gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyabe, Katsuyuki; Hayashi, Kazuki; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Sano, Hitoshi; Yamada, Tomonori; Takada, Hiroki; Naitoh, Itaru; Shimizu, Shuya; Kondo, Hiromu; Nishi, Yuji; Yoshida, Michihiro; Umemura, Shuichiro; Hori, Yasuki; Kato, Akihisa; Ohara, Hirotaka; Joh, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    The influence of chemotherapy on placement of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (MGOO) has not been evaluated extensively. We investigated the influence of chemotherapy on the clinical outcomes of SEMS placement for MGOO. A total of 152 cancer patients with MGOO from a university hospital and affiliate hospitals were included. The patients were classified according to chemotherapy status and evaluated for palliative efficacy and safety of SEMS placement. Technical success rate, time to oral intake, and parameters indicating improvement of physical condition did not differ between the with- and without-chemotherapy groups after stent placement. Re-intervention and stent migration were significantly more frequent in the with-chemotherapy group than in the without-chemotherapy group after stent placement (re-intervention, 32.4% vs 7.8%, P = 0.0005; stent migration, 13.5% vs 1.7%, P = 0.0097). The frequency of adverse events did not differ between the with- and without-chemotherapy groups. Although chemotherapy after stent placement was an independent predictive factor for shortening the stent patency period (hazard ratio [HR], 3.10; P = 0.0264), the use of additional stents facilitated uneventful recovery and further prolonged survival time (HR, 0.60; P = 0.0132). Various cancer patients with MGOO can undergo SEMS placement safely regardless of chemotherapy, and concurrent chemotherapy after stent placement can prolong survival time, although re-intervention and stent migration may be increased. © 2015 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  8. Differences in dietary intake during chemotherapy in breast cancer patients compared to women without cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Y C; van den Berg, M M G A; de Vries, J H M; Boesveldt, S; de Kruif, J Th C M; Buist, N; Haringhuizen, A; Los, M; Sommeijer, D W; Timmer-Bonte, J H N; van Laarhoven, H W M; Visser, M; Kampman, E; Winkels, R M

    2017-08-01

    Breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy often experience symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and loss of appetite that potentially affect dietary habits. This study assessed the intake of energy, macronutrients and food groups before and during chemotherapy in breast cancer patients compared with women without cancer, and determined the association between symptoms and energy and macronutrient intake. This study included 117 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients scheduled for chemotherapy and 88 women without cancer. Habitual intake before chemotherapy was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. Two 24-h dietary recalls were completed on random days for each participant during the whole chemotherapy treatment for patients and within 6 months after recruitment for women without cancer. Shortly, after the dietary recall, participants filled out questionnaires on symptoms. Before chemotherapy, habitual energy and macronutrient intake was similar for breast cancer patients and women without cancer. During chemotherapy, breast cancer patients reported a significantly lower total energy, fat, protein and alcohol intake than women without cancer, as shown by a lower intake of pastry and biscuits, cheese, legumes and meat products. A decline in subjective taste perception, appetite and hunger and experiencing a dry mouth, difficulty chewing, lack of energy and nausea were associated with a lower energy intake. Symptoms induced by chemotherapy are associated with lower dietary intake and manifested by a lower intake of specific food groups. To ensure an optimal dietary intake during chemotherapy, it is important to monitor nutritional status and symptom burden during chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.

  9. Mathematical Modelling and Analysis of the Tumor Treatment Regimens with Pulsed Immunotherapy and Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Liuyong; Shen, Lin; Zhao, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    To begin with, in this paper, single immunotherapy, single chemotherapy, and mixed treatment are discussed, and sufficient conditions under which tumor cells will be eliminated ultimately are obtained. We analyze the impacts of the least effective concentration and the half-life of the drug on therapeutic results and then find that increasing the least effective concentration or extending the half-life of the drug can achieve better therapeutic effects. In addition, since most types of tumors are resistant to common chemotherapy drugs, we consider the impact of drug resistance on therapeutic results and propose a new mathematical model to explain the cause of the chemotherapeutic failure using single drug. Based on this, in the end, we explore the therapeutic effects of two-drug combination chemotherapy, as well as mixed immunotherapy with combination chemotherapy. Numerical simulations indicate that combination chemotherapy is very effective in controlling tumor growth. In comparison, mixed immunotherapy with combination chemotherapy can achieve a better treatment effect.

  10. Thrombosis of abdominal aorta during cisplatin-based chemotherapy of testicular seminoma - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehrckens Ralf

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular complications occurring during cisplatin-based chemotherapy of germ cell tumours are inadequately recognized to date. Case Presentation A 49 year old man with advanced seminoma underwent two courses of chemotherapy according to the PEB regimen. Upon restaging, two thrombotic deposits were noted in the descending part of the thoracic aorta and in the infrarenal abdominal aorta, respectively. Although thrombotic plaques caused aortic occlusion of about 30%, no clinical signs of malperfusion of limbs were registered. The patient was placed on anticoagulant therapy. Six months after completion of chemotherapy, thrombotic deposits had completely resolved. In the absence of other predisposing factors, it must be assumed that cisplatin-based chemotherapy represented a strong stimulus for arterial thrombosis in the aorta. Conclusions This is the first case of endo-aortic thrombosis during chemotherapy for testicular germ cell cancer. Providers of chemotherapy must be aware of arterial thrombosis even in young patients with testicular cancer.

  11. First-line chemotherapy in low-risk gestational trophoblastic neoplasia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alazzam, Mo'iad

    2012-01-01

    This is an update of a Cochrane review that was first published in Issue 1, 2009. Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is a rare but curable disease arising in the fetal chorion during pregnancy. Most women with low-risk GTN will be cured by evacuation of the uterus with or without single-agent chemotherapy. However, chemotherapy regimens vary between treatment centres worldwide and the comparable benefits and risks of these different regimens are unclear.

  12. Improving Patient Safety With Error Identification in Chemotherapy Orders by Verification Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Abigail; Rodriguez, Elizabeth S

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of medication errors associated with chemotherapy administration is not precisely known. Little evidence exists concerning the extent or nature of errors; however, some evidence demonstrates that errors are related to prescribing. This article demonstrates how the review of chemotherapy orders by a designated nurse known as a verification nurse (VN) at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center helps to identify prescribing errors that may prevent chemotherapy administration mistakes and improve patient safety in outpatient infusion units. This article will describe the role of the VN and details of the verification process. To identify benefits of the VN role, a retrospective review and analysis of chemotherapy near-miss events from 2009-2014 was performed. A total of 4,282 events related to chemotherapy were entered into the Reporting to Improve Safety and Quality system. A majority of the events were categorized as near-miss events, or those that, because of chance, did not result in patient injury, and were identified at the point of prescribing.

  13. Palliative chemotherapy: The perspectives and experiences of south african nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Elizabeth Maree

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the perspectives and experiences of South African nurses caring for patients receiving palliative chemotherapy. Methods: A qualitative descriptive design was used and purposive sampling allowed us to select 11 nurses practising in a private ambulatory cancer care center in Port Elizabeth. In-depth interviews, guided by three broad themes were conducted and analyzed using qualitative content analyses. Data saturation determined the sample size. Results: Two themes emerged from the data – the patients cling to hope and the positive influence of palliative chemotherapy. The participants believed that patients consenting to palliative chemotherapy were clinging to false hope. They were also of the opinion that family members pressurize patients to consent to treatment. The participants experienced palliative chemotherapy positively, especially when an improvement in the patients' quality of life or pain relief was evident. Fatigue was highlighted as the major side effect, but it did not temper the participants' positive attitudes toward the treatment. Conclusions: Although the participants believed that patients cling to hope and consent to palliative chemotherapy because they hope to be cured, they experienced the treatment as positive. For them, the improvement in pain and quality of life outweighed the side effects the patients experienced. The positive attitude patients upheld while receiving this treatment encouraged them. Nurses should gain more knowledge about the meaning, people living with advanced cancer, attach to hope to prevent them from interpreting patients' hope as denial and false.

  14. Patient-reported outcome assessment and objective evaluation of chemotherapy-induced alopecia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komen, M.M.; Hurk, C.J. van den; Nortier, J.W.; Ploeg, T. van der; Smorenburg, C.H.; Hoeven, J.J.M. van der

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Alopecia is one of the most distressing side effects of chemotherapy. Evaluating and comparing the efficacy of potential therapies to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) has been complicated by the lack of a standardized measurement for hair loss. In this study we investigated the

  15. Patients' experiences with decisions on timing of chemotherapy for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ligt, K. M.; Spronk, Pauline E.R.; van Bommel, A.C.M.; Vrancken Peeters, M.T.F.D.; Siesling, S.; Smorenburg, Carolien H.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Despite potential advantages, application of chemotherapy in the neo-adjuvant (NAC) instead of adjuvant (AC) setting for breast cancer (BC) patients varies among hospitals. The aim of this study was to gain insight in patients' experiences with decisions on the timing of chemotherapy

  16. Guide to intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for pancreatic cancers (draft text)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of most malignant solid tumors. Trans-arterial infusion chemotherapy has been used for the inoperable pancreatic cancers. The local drug concentration in intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy is much higher than that in intravenous chemotherapy. Thus, a better therapeutic effect can be surely achieved, the disease-related symptoms can be well improved, the patient's survival time can be markedly prolonged, and the liver metastases can be effectively reduced. This paper aims to suggest a more detailed and standardized therapeutic scheme to perform intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for inoperable pancreatic cancers, focusing on the relevant concept, contraindications, indications, preoperative preparation, methods of operation, postoperative treatment, the prevention and treatment of complications, etc. The scheme will help domestic interventional physicians to make reasonable decisions in their clinical practice. Of course, the scheme proposed here is not a mandatory standard, and it can not resolve all the problems which might be encountered in employing intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer. Therefore, the interventional physicians should fully understand the most useful medical evidence of a given patient and sincerely take the patient's own will into consideration before an individualized and reasonable therapeutic plan is able to be worked out. (authors)

  17. Ginger augmented chemotherapy: A novel multitarget nontoxic approach for cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Roopali; Rida, Padmashree C G; Kucuk, Omer; Aneja, Ritu

    2016-06-01

    Cancer, referred to as the 'disease of civilization', continues to haunt humanity due to its dreadful manifestations and limited success of therapeutic interventions such as chemotherapy in curing the disease. Although effective, chemotherapy has repeatedly demonstrated inadequacy in disease management due to its debilitating side effects arising from its deleterious nonspecific effects on normal healthy cells. In addition, development of chemoresistance due to mono-targeting often results in cessation of chemotherapy. This urgently demands development and implementation of multitargeted alternative therapies with mild or no side effects. One extremely promising strategy that yet remains untapped in the clinic is augmenting chemotherapy with dietary phytochemicals or extracts. Ginger, depository of numerous bioactive molecules, not only targets cancer cells but can also mitigate chemotherapy-associated side effects. Consequently, combination therapy involving ginger extract and chemotherapeutic agents may offer the advantage of being efficacious with reduced toxicity. Here we discuss the remarkable and often overlooked potential of ginger extract to manage cancer, the possibility of developing ginger-based combinational therapies, and the major roadblocks along with strategies to overcome them in clinical translation of such inventions. We are optimistic that clinical implementation of such combination regimens would be a much sought after modality in cancer management. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Apoptosis and histological response of preoperative intraarterial chemotherapy infusion for colorectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jianhua; Hu Tingyang; Yu Wenqiang; Chen Fanghong; Luo Zuyan; Mao Yinmin; Zhao Zhongsheng; Ru Guoqing; Deng Gaoli; Dong Quanjin; Tu Shiliang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate apoptosis and histological response of preoperative intraarterial chemotherapy infusion for colorectal carcinoma. Methods: Fifty patients with colorectal carcinoma were treated by intraarterial infusion of anti-cancer drugs. Surgical resection of the tumor was performed 5-30 days after the intraarterial infusion (mean 12 days). The histological response was evaluated. The density and distribution of the apoptosis cells were observed by DNA nick end labelling technique. 22 biopsy specimens before the intraarterial chemotherapy and 25 normal mucosa (obtained from surgery specimen) were used as controls. Results: The total histological response rate was 100% with grade I in 20 cases, grade II in 21 cases, and grade III in 9 cases. The density of the apoptosis cells was 31.47±5.58 before and 76.69±17.12 after the intraarterial chemotherapy infusion, and 8.01±3.39 in normal mucosa, respectively. The density of the apoptosis cells after the intraarterial chemotherapy was significantly higher than that before the intraarterial chemotherapy (t=13.701, P 2 =4.696, P>0.30). The apoptosis of adenocarcinoma was significantly different with different histological response (F=7.73, P 0.05) and for adenocarcinoma with different pathological stages (F=0.001376, P>0.05). Conclusion: As an effective and safe procedure, preoperative transcatheter intraarterial chemotherapy infusion achieves a significant histological response and apoptosis in colorectal adenocarcinoma

  19. Malignant cliomas treated after surgery by combination chemotherapy and delayed irradiation. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poisson, M.; Mashaly, R.; Pertuiset, B.F.; Metzger, J.

    1979-01-01

    Forty-six patients with gliomas were introduced after surgery into a therapeutic programme of six cycles of combination chemotherapy with VM 26 and CCNU, followed by delayed irradiation six months after surgery with an average dose of 5,800 rads. After irradiation the same preradiation chemotherapy was readministered for an average of four cycles. The results were compared to those from another group of 28 patients treated only by the same chemotherapy (CRC and C groups successively). Twelve patients (26%) died before irradiation in the CRC groups, six patients (13%) had recurrences at the time of irradiation, and 28 patients (61%) had no clinical or radiological signs of recurrence at the time of irradiation. For the total of treated patients the median survival after surgery was 17 months, and 46% of the patients were surviving at 18 months. The percentage of survivors at 18 months was significantly more elevated in the group treated by combination chemotherapy and delayed irradiation than in a control group treated by the same combination chemotherapy alone. This result suggests that in approximately 50% of cases combination chemotherapy after surgery, and delayed irradiation six months after surgery, cumulated their effects on survival time. (author)

  20. Circulating tumor cells predict survival benefit from chemotherapy in patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhuo-Xuan; Liu, Zhen; Jiang, Han-Ling; Pan, Hong-Ming; Han, Wei-Dong

    2016-10-11

    This meta-analysis was to explore the clinical significance of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in predicting the tumor response to chemotherapy and prognosis of patients with lung cancer. We searched PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Database, Web of Science and reference lists of relevant articles. Our meta-analysis was performed by Stata software, version 12.0, with a random effects model. Risk ratio (RR), hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used as effect measures. 8 studies, including 453 patients, were eligible for analyses. We showed that the disease control rate (DCR) in CTCs-negative patients was significantly higher than CTCs-positive patients at baseline (RR = 2.56, 95%CI [1.36, 4.82], p chemotherapy (RR = 9.08, CI [3.44, 23.98], p chemotherapy had a worse disease progression than those with CTC-positive to negative or persistently negative (RR = 8.52, CI [1.66, 43.83], p chemotherapy also indicated poor overall survival (OS) (baseline: HR = 3.43, CI [2.21, 5.33], pchemotherapy: HR = 3.16, CI [2.23, 4.48], p chemotherapy: HR = 3.78, CI [2.33, 6.13], p chemotherapy and poor prognosis in patients with lung cancer.

  1. Long term survival with the combination of interferon and chemotherapy in metastatic melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karagoz, B.; Bilgi, O.; Ozgun, A.; Emirzeoglu, L.; Celika, S.; Ozet, A.

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of metastatic melanoma is poor. Pre-targeted treatment era, the combination of interferon-α (IF-α) plus chemotherapy had been used and have generally short response duration. Herein, we present a metastatic melanoma case that achieved long-term durable complete response (CR) IF-α plus chemotherapy and IF-α maintenance therapy and had lower Regulatory T (Treg) cells. A fifty-year old woman was admitted to the hospital with metastatic melanoma. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level was 660 U/L. The percentage of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells was 2.4% in CD4+ lymphocytes. The IF-α plus chemotherapy and IF-α maintenance were administered. After six courses of chemotherapy, CR was achieved. Vitiligo and hypothyroidism occurred. The patient has remained in CR for approximately 7 years until second pleural metastases were detected and death. The patient has positive prognostic factors such as induction of auto immunity, small tumor volume, mild elevated LDH level, and lower Treg cell percentage. She survived long term with CR after IF-α treatment with concurrent chemotherapy and maintenance. IF-α plus chemotherapy may be a treatment option for metastatic melanoma in selected cases who cannot reach new targeted drugs

  2. Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart Christine Unitt , Kamaneh Montazeri , ... Disclosures Footnotes Figures & Tables Info & Metrics eLetters Introduction Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. ...

  3. Multidisciplinary Optimization of Oral Chemotherapy Delivery at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkerin, Daniel L; Bergsbaken, Jason J; Fischer, Jessica A; Mulkerin, Mary J; Bohler, Aaron M; Mably, Mary S

    2016-10-01

    Use of oral chemotherapy is expanding and offers advantages while posing unique safety challenges. ASCO and the Oncology Nursing Society jointly published safety standards for administering chemotherapy that offer a framework for improving oral chemotherapy practice at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center. With the goal of improving safety, quality, and uniformity within our oral chemotherapy practice, we conducted a gap analysis comparing our practice against ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society guidelines. Areas for improvement were addressed by multidisciplinary workgroups that focused on education, workflows, and information technology. Recommendations and process changes included defining chemotherapy, standardizing patient and caregiver education, mandating the use of comprehensive electronic order sets, and standardizing documentation for dose modification. Revised processes allow pharmacists to review all orders for oral chemotherapy, and they support monitoring adherence and toxicity by using a library of scripted materials. Between August 2015 and January 2016, revised processes were implemented across the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center clinics. The following are key performance indicators: 92.5% of oral chemotherapy orders (n = 1,216) were initiated within comprehensive electronic order sets (N = 1,315), 89.2% compliance with informed consent was achieved, 14.7% of orders (n = 193) required an average of 4.4 minutes review time by the pharmacist, and 100% compliance with first-cycle monitoring of adherence and toxicity was achieved. We closed significant gaps between institutional practice and published standards for our oral chemotherapy practice and experienced steady improvement and sustainable performance in key metrics. We created an electronic definition of oral chemotherapies that allowed us to leverage our electronic health records. We believe our tools are broadly applicable.

  4. In situ immune response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer predicts survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladoire, Sylvain; Mignot, Grégoire; Dabakuyo, Sandrine; Arnould, Laurent; Apetoh, Lionel; Rébé, Cedric; Coudert, Bruno; Martin, Francois; Bizollon, Marie Hélène; Vanoli, André; Coutant, Charles; Fumoleau, Pierre; Bonnetain, Franck; Ghiringhelli, François

    2011-07-01

    Accumulating preclinical evidence suggests that anticancer immune responses contribute to the success of chemotherapy. However, the predictive value of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer remains unknown. We hypothesized that the nature of the immune infiltrate following neoadjuvant chemotherapy would predict patient survival. In a series of 111 consecutive HER2- and a series of 51 non-HER2-overexpressing breast cancer patients treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy, we studied by immunohistochemistry tumour infiltration by FOXP3 and CD8 T lymphocytes before and after chemotherapy. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox modelling were used to assess relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). A predictive scoring system using American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) pathological staging and immunological markers was created. Association of high CD8 and low FOXP3 cell infiltrates after chemotherapy was significantly associated with improved RFS (p = 0.02) and OS (p = 0.002), and outperformed classical predictive factors in multivariate analysis. A combined score associating CD8/FOXP3 ratio and pathological AJCC staging isolated a subgroup of patients with a long-term overall survival of 100%. Importantly, this score also identified patients with a favourable prognosis in an independent cohort of HER2-negative breast cancer patients. These results suggest that immunological CD8 and FOXP3 cell infiltrate after treatment is an independent predictive factor of survival in breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and provides new insights into the role of the immune milieu and cancer. Copyright © 2011 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Management of chemotherapy induced diarrhea (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Diarrhoea is seen with many tumors and following several chemotherapy regimen esp. those containing 5-fluorouracil and high dose folinic acid it causes debility even death, delays cancer treatment, reduces compliance increases cost. It causes dehydration, renal failure volume depletion. Quality of life is worsened and hospitalization may be needed in multifactorial, with secretion; absorption imbalance due to mucosal damage, necrosis or inflammation. Local infection is set up by opportunistic organism and cell necrosis. The large volume of fluid and electrolytes overwhelms colonic absorptive capacity. Agent usually used for treatment is opioids (such as Diphenoxylate / Loperamide]. Bismuth (for inflammatory diarrhea). NSAIDs or alpha 2-agonists. For optimal management, the cause and severity should be assessed and treatment planned. Advice is given about certain dietary restraints and avoidance of some drugs. Fever, infection, dehydration and electrolyte losses are treated, pain relieved. Diphenoxylate / Loperamide (later is more effective; 4 mg, STAT, then 2mg every 4 hours or even 2 hourly) may be used. It is moderately effective in CID. Octreotide is useful in carcinoid. VIPoma, AIDS idiopathic secretary diarrhea, ileostomy, dumping syndrome. It acts directly on epithelial cells to reduce secretin, motilin pancreatic polypeptide. It slows transit time, reduces fluid and electrolyte secretin, increases absorption of electrolytes. It is effective in 5 FU and high dose chemotherapy with a 90% response rates seen after 3 days treatment. High Dose Chemotherapy and total body irradiation - induced diarrhea usually resolves within 72 hours. (author)

  6. Nail toxicity induced by cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbar, Peter; Hain, Alice; Peereboom, Veta-Marie

    2009-09-01

    To provide a comprehensive literature review of chemotherapy-induced nail toxicity, including clinical presentation, implicated drugs and approaches for prevention and management. A search of MEDLINE and EMBASE (1966-2008) databases was conducted using the terms (and variations of the terms) antineoplastic agents, nails, nail toxicity, onycholysis, and paronychia. Bibliographies from selected articles were reviewed for appropriate references. The retrieved literature was reviewed to include all articles relevant to the clinical presentation, diagnosis, incidence, prevention, and treatment of chemotherapy-induced nail toxicity. Nail toxicity is a relatively uncommon adverse effect linked to a number of chemotherapeutic agents. Clinical presentation varies, depending on which nail structure is affected and the severity of the insult. Nail changes may involve all or some nails. Toxicity may be asymptomatic and limited to cosmetic concerns, however, more severe effects, involving pain and discomfort can occur. Taxanes and anthracyclines are the antineoplastic drug groups most commonly implicated. It is suggested that the administration schedule may influence the incidence of nail abnormalities, for example reported cases linked to the weekly administration of paclitaxel.Before instituting chemotherapy, patients should be educated regarding potential nail toxicities and strategies for prevention implemented. Management includes appropriate nail cutting, avoiding potential irritants, topical, or oral antimicrobials, and possibly cessation or dose reduction of the offending agent. Cryotherapy, through the application of frozen gloves or socks, has been beneficial in reducing docetaxel-induced nail toxicity and may be effective for other drugs.

  7. Control of Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Anthracycline/Cyclophosphamide Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa-Nishigaki, Minako; Kobayashi, Ryo; Suzuki, Akio; Hirose, Chiemi; Matsuoka, Rie; Mori, Ryutaro; Futamura, Manabu; Sugiyama, Tadashi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Yoshinori

    2018-02-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is one of most distressing adverse events during cancer chemotherapy. In breast cancer patients receiving anthracycline and cyclophosphamide (AC) chemotherapy, CINV is poorly controlled. The prevalence of guideline-consistent antiemetic medication and control of CINV were investigated retrospectively in breast cancer patients receiving the first cycle of AC chemotherapy. Risks for CINV were analyzed by the multivariate logistic regression analysis. The effect of olanzapine added to the standard antiemetic medication on the incidence of CINV was subsequently evaluated in separate patients who received the first cycle of AC chemotherapy. Although the guideline-consistent antiemetic medication was performed in all subjects, the control rate of nausea (32%), but not vomiting (78%) was low. Risk analysis indicated that age younger than 55-year-old was a significant factor that reduces the control of both nausea and vomiting. Olanzapine (5 mg/day for 5 days), when added to the standard three-drug antiemetic medication, significantly improved the control of nausea and complete response. CINV was poorly controlled in breast cancer patients receiving AC chemotherapy, in which age younger than 55-year-old was a significant risk for both nausea and vomiting. Olanzapine was effective for improvement of the control of CINV associated with AC chemotherapy. Therefore, care should be taken to prevent CINV in young patients receiving AC chemotherapy by adding olanzapine to the standard three-drug antiemetic medication. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  8. [Effect of Supportan on nutritional status and immune function of late-staged gastric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hai-jun; Ying, Jie-er; Ma, Sheng-lin

    2006-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of Supportan, an enteral nutrition (EN) specific for tumor patients, on the nutritional status and immune function of late-staged gastric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Sixty-six late-staged gastric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy were randomly divided into EN group (n=33) and control group (n=33). During chemotherapy, the patients in EN group received Supportan and the patients in the control group received basic diet. On the 14th day before chemotherapy and after chemotherapy, nutritional status and cell immune indicators were evaluated. As for nutrition indicators, there were no significant differences in EN group before and after chemotherapy (P > 0.05). Total protein, hemoglobin, prealbumin and transferrin significantly decreased after chemotherapy compared with those before chemotherapy in the control group (Pnutrition in EN group were superior to that in the control group, however, the differences were not statistically significant. The incidences of nausea, vomiting and marrow inhibition in Supportan group was lower compared with those in the control group, but with no significant difference. Supportan can prevent malnutrition of the late-staged gastric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, and improve immune function and alleviate adverse effects of chemotherapy.

  9. Conventional-Dose versus High-Dose Chemotherapy for Relapsed Germ Cell Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deaglan J. McHugh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of metastatic germ cell tumors (GCTs are cured with cisplatin-based chemotherapy, but 20–30% of patients will relapse after first-line chemotherapy and require additional salvage strategies. The two major salvage approaches in this scenario are high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT with autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT or conventional-dose chemotherapy (CDCT. Both CDCT and HDCT have curative potential in the management of relapsed/refractory GCT. However, due to a lack of conclusive randomized trials, it remains unknown whether sequential HDCT or CDCT represents the optimal initial salvage approach, with practice varying between tertiary institutions. This represents the most pressing question remaining for defining GCT treatment standards and optimizing outcomes. The authors review prognostic factors in the initial salvage setting as well as the major studies assessing the efficacy of CDCT, HDCT, or both, describing the strengths and weaknesses that formed the rationale behind the ongoing international phase III “TIGER” trial.

  10. Melatonin and Fertoprotective Adjuvants: Prevention against Premature Ovarian Failure during Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hoon; Hong, Kwonho; Choi, Youngsok

    2017-06-07

    Premature ovarian failure is one of the side effects of chemotherapy in pre-menopausal cancer patients. Preservation of fertility has become increasingly important in improving the quality of life of completely recovered cancer patients. Among the possible strategies for preserving fertility such as ovarian tissue cryopreservation, co-treatment with a pharmacological adjuvant is highly effective and poses less of a burden on the human body. Melatonin is generally produced in various tissues and acts as a universally acting antioxidant in cells. Melatonin is now more widely used in various biological processes including treating insomnia and an adjuvant during chemotherapy. In this review, we summarize the information indicating that melatonin may be useful for reducing and preventing premature ovarian failure in chemotherapy-treated female patients. We also mention that many adjuvants other than melatonin are developed and used to inhibit chemotherapy-induced infertility. This information will give us novel insights on the clinical use of melatonin and other agents as fertoprotective adjuvants for female cancer patients.

  11. Women with breast cancer taking chemotherapy: depression symptoms and treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Fresche de Souza

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective to verify depressive symptoms and adherence to chemotherapy among women with breast cancer who are served by the Pharmacy of the Chemotherapy Center of a university hospital.METHOD: cross-sectional study with quantitative approach conducted with 112 women receiving chemotherapy. Structured interviews guided by a script addressing socio-demographic, clinical and therapeutic information, the Morisky Test, and the Beck Depression Inventory were used to collect data.RESULTS: 12.50% and 1.78% of the patients experienced "moderate" and "severe" depression, respectively, while 10.59% did not use antidepressant medication. A statistically significant association was found between levels of depression and the use of antidepressants. Lack of adherence was identified in 46.43% of the participants.CONCLUSION: these findings show the need to regularly screen for depressive symptoms and for adherence to chemotherapy treatment among women with breast cancer, in order to provide early detection and appropriate treatment centered on patients, and to improve their quality of life.

  12. Chemotherapy synergizes with radioimmunotherapy targeting La autoantigen in tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Al-Ejeh

    Full Text Available To date, inefficient delivery of therapeutic doses of radionuclides to solid tumors limits the clinical utility of radioimmunotherapy. We aim to test the therapeutic utility of Yttrium-90 ((90Y-radio-conjugates of a monoclonal antibody, which we showed previously to bind specifically to the abundant intracellular La ribonucleoprotein revealed in dead tumor cells after DNA-damaging treatment.Immunoconjugates of the DAB4 clone of the La-specific monoclonal antibody, APOMAB, were prepared using the metal chelator, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA, and then radiolabeled with (90Y. Mice bearing established subcutaneous tumors were treated with (90Y-DOTA-DAB4 alone or after chemotherapy. Non-radiosensitizing cyclophosphamide/etoposide chemotherapy was used for the syngeneic EL4 lymphoma model. Radiosensitizing cisplatin/gemcitabine chemotherapy was used for the syngeneic Lewis Lung carcinoma (LL2 model, and for the xenograft models of LNCaP prostatic carcinoma and Panc-1 pancreatic carcinoma. We demonstrate the safety, specificity, and efficacy of (90Y-DOTA-DAB4-radioimmunotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. EL4 lymphoma-bearing mice either were cured at higher doses of radioimmunotherapy alone or lower doses of radioimmunotherapy in synergy with chemotherapy. Radioimmunotherapy alone was less effective in chemo- and radio-resistant carcinoma models. However, radioimmunotherapy synergized with radiosensitizing chemotherapy to retard significantly tumor regrowth and so prolong the survival of mice bearing LL2, LNCaP, or Panc-1 subcutaneous tumor implants.We report proof-of-concept data supporting a unique form of radioimmunotherapy, which delivers bystander killing to viable cancer cells after targeting the universal cancer antigen, La, created by DNA-damaging treatment in neighboring dead cancer cells. Subsequently we propose that DAB4-targeted ionizing radiation induces additional cycles of tumor cell death

  13. Sequential response patterns to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, W.K.; O'Donoghue, G.M.; Sheetz, S.

    1985-01-01

    Surgery and/or radiotherapy have been the standard therapies for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. Despite major improvement in these therapeutic techniques, the control rate in cases of advanced cancer remains poor. More recently, induction chemotherapy as initial treatment has been used in previously untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. For the last 6 years at the Boston Veterans Administration (V.A.) Medical Center, initial induction chemotherapy followed by surgery and/or radiotherapy has been employed in the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer. The use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy has allowed the authors to monitor and correlate sequential response patterns produced by each modality of treatment. The authors have observed that responders to chemotherapy can be predicted to have further response to subsequent radiotherapy

  14. [Effectiveness of scalp cooling in chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Thomas G; He, Jie; Lemieux, Renald

    2011-10-01

    The main objectives of this literature review are to determine if scalp cooling is efficient and safe, if there are side effects and if the patients' quality of life improves. In terms of effectiveness, scalp cooling seems to get good performance in its aim to prevent hair loss in patients receiving chemotherapy. The weighted average results of all identified studies indicate that this technology allows for 63.5% of patients to have a good preservation of their hair. In studies with a group of control, the weighted rates of good preservation of the hair are 50.6% with scalp cooling and 16.3% without. From the standpoint of safety technology, the main risk is that of scalp metastases. However, no study has successfully demonstrated a statistically significant difference between groups of patients receiving chemotherapy with or without scalp cooling.

  15. Head and neck cancer: metronomic chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Felice, Francesca; Musio, Daniela; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) represents a critical oncologic topic. Conventional chemotherapy regimens consist of drugs administration in cycles near or at the maximum tolerated dose (MDT), followed by a long drug-free period to permit the patient to recover from acute toxicities. Despite this strategy is successful in controlling the cancer process at the beginning, a significant number of HNSCC patients tend to recurred or progress, especially those patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease. The repertoire of drugs directed against tumor cells has greatly increased and metronomic chemotherapy (MC) could be an effective treatment option. It is the purpose of this article to review the concept of MC and describe its potential use in HNSCC. We provide an update of ongoing progress and current challenges related to this issue

  16. Improved local control with neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal carcinoma: Long-term analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakfoor, Bruce M.; Willett, Christopher G.; Kaufman, S. Donald; Shellito, Paul C.; Daly, William J.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Since 1979, our institution has treated locally advanced rectal cancer with preoperative irradiation followed by resection with or without intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). In 1986, our preoperative treatment policy was changed to include bolus 5-FU chemotherapy concurrent with irradiation in hopes of improving resectability, downstaging and/or local control rates. We report the long-term results with the addition of 5-FU chemotherapy to preoperative irradiation. Materials and Methods: From 1979 - 1994, 200 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma (primary or recurrent) received preoperative irradiation, resection and IORT if indicated. Bolus 5-FU (500mg/m 2 /day) chemotherapy was administered for three days during weeks one and five of irradiation. The change in treatment policy was limited to the addition of 5-FU chemotherapy: the radiation techniques (four-field), doses (50.4 Gy), and indications for intraoperative radiation (microscopic residual, gross residual, tumor adherence) remained constant. The median follow-up for the entire group of patients was 33 months (.95 months - 199 months), and the minimum follow-up was 1.5 years. Tabular results are 5-year actuarial calculations. Results: One hundred and five patients received preoperative 5-FU chemotherapy and irradiation whereas 95 patients underwent preoperative irradiation alone. Sixty-five percent of the patients were able to undergo complete resections, and 53% had transmural disease upon pathologic examination. The addition of chemotherapy did not affect the rates of resectability or tumor downstaging. However, the 10-year local control rate was significantly improved for those patients who received preoperative chemotherapy: 77% vs. 44% (p<0.01) (see figure). When stratified by extent of resection and stage, those patients who underwent complete resections or had transmural disease had significantly improved local control rates when compared to the non-chemotherapy group: No

  17. Impact of obesity on chemotherapy management and outcomes in women with gynecologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Neil S; Wright, Alexi A

    2015-07-01

    To describe the effects of obesity on the pharmacokinetics and dosing of chemotherapies and provide recommendations for chemotherapy management in obese women with gynecologic malignancies. PubMEd and MEDLINE databases were searched for articles published before June 2014. Only English-language articles were considered. 84 manuscripts were reviewed and 66 were included. Search terms included: obesity, overweight, body mass index, body surface area, glomerular filtration rate, chemotherapy, ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer, inflammation, and pharmacokinetics, Obese cancer patients have worse clinical outcomes, compared with non-obese patients. This may be because of differences in pharmacokinetics, metabolic dysregulation, or physicians' decisions to reduce chemotherapy dose-intensity during treatment to minimize toxicities. A 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline recommends using actual body weight for chemotherapy dosing in all patients treated with curative intent, irrespective of obesity, to avoid compromising clinical outcomes, including progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). In women with gynecologic cancers most studies demonstrate no difference in PFS or OS when obese patients receive the same chemotherapy dose intensity as non-obese patients, except perhaps with bevacizumab. Chemotherapy dose-intensity is a critical determinant of cancer outcomes and should be maintained in all patients, irrespective of obesity. Future studies should prospectively examine the impact of obesity on clinical outcomes (adverse events, survival) to improve the care of this growing population of patients who are at risk for inferior clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical evaluation of preoperative arterial infusion chemotherapy and surgical operation for colorectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jianhua; Zhao Zhongsheng; Deng Gaoli; Hu Tingyang; Yu Wenqiang; Chen Fanghong; Luo Zuyan; Ru Guoqing; Dong Quanjin; Tu Shiliang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical values of preoperative arterial infusion chemotherapy and surgical operation for colorectal carcinoma. Methods: 66 patients with colorectal carcinoma were subjected to percutaneous femoral artery catheterization by Seldinger's technique with infusion of anti-cancer drugs. The resection was performed 5-30 days after the arterial infusion (mean 12 days). In 50 surgical specimens of the 66 cases, histological findings were evaluated including the density and distribution of the apoptosis cells under the observation by DNA nick end labelling technique. Of which 22 specimens before arterial infusion chemotherapy (got from biopsy of preoperation) and 25 normal mucosa (got from normal surgical specimens) were used as controls. Results: The total histological response rate was 100% with grade I in 20 cases, grade II in 21 cases, grade III in 9 cases. The densities of the apoptosis cells were 31.47 ± 5.58 before arterial infusion chemotherapy, 76.69 ± 17.12 after arterial infusion chemotherapy and 8.01 ± 3.39 in normal mucosa. The density of the apoptosis cells after arterial infusion chemotherapy was significantly higher than that before arterial infusion chemotherapy (P 2 =4.696, P>0.30). There were no significant differences in the apoptosis of adenocarcinoma during different pathological stages (F=0.001376, P>0.05). Conclusions: Peroperative transcatheter arterial infusion chemotherapy resulting in apoptosis of adenocarcinoma, can raise the radical operation rate, and prolong survival rate for colorectal carcinoma patients

  19. Fertility status of Hodgkin lymphoma patients treated with chemotherapy and adjuvant gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, M; Smardova, L; Janku, P; Crha, I; Zakova, J; Stourac, P; Jarkovsky, J; Mayer, J; Ventruba, P

    2015-08-01

    Aim of this prospective observational study was to analyze fertility status of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients treated with different types of chemotherapy while receiving GnRH analogues to preserve ovarian function. Fertility status was assessed among 108 females in reproductive age treated by curative chemotherapy for freshly diagnosed HL between 2005 and 2010 in university-based tertiary fertility and oncology center. All patients received GnRH analogues during chemotherapy to preserve their ovarian function. Their reproductive functions were assessed by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) measurement and pregnancy achievement. Ovarian function was determined separately in three groups with increasing gonadotoxicity of chemotherapy. One year following the treatment, normal ovarian function was found in 89 (82.4%) of patients. Two years after chemotherapy, 98 (90.7%) of patients retained their ovarian function, and 23 (21.3%) achieved clinical pregnancy during the follow-up period. Average FSH after chemotherapy was 11.6 ± 17.9 IU/l 1 year after the treatment resp. 9.0 ± 13.8 at the 2 years interval. There were significantly more patients with chemotherapy induced diminished ovarian reserve (chDOR) among the group receiving escalated BEACOPP chemotherapy in comparison with the other types of treatment (58.1% vs. 87.9% resp. 95.5%). The rate of chDOR is significantly higher after EB poly-chemotherapy and there is no tendency for improvement in time. The 2 + 2 chemotherapy with GnRH-a required for more advanced HL retained ovarian function significantly better after 2 years. Another important advantage of GnRH-a co-treatment is the excellent control of patient's menstrual cycle.

  20. Estimation of an optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate for cancer: setting an evidence-based benchmark for quality cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, S A; Ng, W L; Do, V

    2015-02-01

    There is wide variation in the proportion of newly diagnosed cancer patients who receive chemotherapy, indicating the need for a benchmark rate of chemotherapy utilisation. This study describes an evidence-based model that estimates the proportion of new cancer patients in whom chemotherapy is indicated at least once (defined as the optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate). The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate can act as a benchmark for measuring and improving the quality of care. Models of optimal chemotherapy utilisation were constructed for each cancer site based on indications for chemotherapy identified from evidence-based treatment guidelines. Data on the proportion of patient- and tumour-related attributes for which chemotherapy was indicated were obtained, using population-based data where possible. Treatment indications and epidemiological data were merged to calculate the optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate. Monte Carlo simulations and sensitivity analyses were used to assess the effect of controversial chemotherapy indications and variations in epidemiological data on our model. Chemotherapy is indicated at least once in 49.1% (95% confidence interval 48.8-49.6%) of all new cancer patients in Australia. The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rates for individual tumour sites ranged from a low of 13% in thyroid cancers to a high of 94% in myeloma. The optimal chemotherapy utilisation rate can serve as a benchmark for planning chemotherapy services on a population basis. The model can be used to evaluate service delivery by comparing the benchmark rate with patterns of care data. The overall estimate for other countries can be obtained by substituting the relevant distribution of cancer types. It can also be used to predict future chemotherapy workload and can be easily modified to take into account future changes in cancer incidence, presentation stage or chemotherapy indications. Copyright © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by

  1. [Buccal manifestations in patients submitted to chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hespanhol, Fernando Luiz; Tinoco, Eduardo Muniz Barretto; Teixeira, Henrique Guilherme de Castro; Falabella, Márcio Eduardo Vieira; Assis, Neuza Maria de Souza Picorelli

    2010-06-01

    Several changes in the oral cavity due to chemotherapy can be observed and can lead to important systemic complications, increasing the time of the patient in hospital and the costs of the treatment as well as affect the quality of life of the patients. The aim of this study was to assess the oral manifestation in patients treated with chemotherapy according to sex, age and tumor type. Data was collected in an oncology hospital in Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais State, from patients' records that were submitted to oncologic treatment. It was possible to verify that mucositis, associated or not to other type of lesions, was the most common lesion in both sex of all ages (15.5%). Xerostomia and other lesions, such as Candida infection and aphthous lesions, were also present. It is possible to improve the quality of life of the patient during and after anti-neoplastic therapies through a protocol of odontological assistance that includes changes of the oral environment previous to chemotherapy such as profilaxis, caries removal, treatment of periodontal and periapical lesions, oral hygiene instructions, diet orientation and laser therapy. It is very important the insertion of the dentist in the oncologic medical team for the early diagnosis of the oral manifestation and follow-up during treatment time.

  2. A combined radiation and platinum chemotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, Akio; Saito, Hiroya; Sakurai, Yasuo; Horio, Keiji; Mizoe, Junetsu.

    1993-01-01

    The prognosis of the patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy is still dismal with a reported 5-year survival rate of 5-10% in most series. Since 1986, combined radiotherapy with chemotherapy using platinum analogue was initiated at Asahikawa and Obihiro Kosei Hospitals in order to improve local-regional control and the survival of the patients. From 1980 to 1992, 81 patients with unresectable esophageal carcinoma were treated with radiotherapy. Since April 1986, 37 out of the 81 patients received both radiotherapy and chemotherapy with platinum. Platinum was used during the course of radiotherapy. The method of administration of platinum was as follows; Cisplatin intravenously (50 mg, weekly, total 200 mg) in 9 patients, Carboplatin intravenously (100-150 mg, weekly, total 400-900 mg) in 11 patients and Cisplatin intraarterially (100 mg, at a 3-4 week interval, total 100-300 mg) in 17 patients. These 37 patients (Group A) were compared to 44 patients treated by radiotherapy alone (Group B) with respect to initial response and survival rate. Response was defined according to the guidelines recommended by Japanese Society for Esophageal Diseases. Response rates were 59.1% (19 CR and 7 PR) in Group B and 70.3% (7 CR and 19 PR) in Group A. Primary relapse-free rates were 36.4% in Group B and 37.8% in Group A. The cumulative survival at 3 years were 11.7% in Group B and 10.6% in Group A. Enhancement of side effects by chemotherapy was minimal and acceptable. Improvement of local-regional control and survival was not obvious by adding a concomitant platinum-chemotherapy. A definite conclusion, however, could not be drawn because of the retrospective, non-controlled nature of this study. Introduction of more intensive, multiple agents chemotherapy seems necessary if one aims at improving the results. (author)

  3. Chemotherapy Toxicity Risk Score for Treatment Decisions in Older Adults with Advanced Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Tomohiro F; Deal, Allison M; Williams, Grant R; Sanoff, Hanna K; Nyrop, Kirsten A; Muss, Hyman B

    2018-05-01

    The decision whether to treat older adults with advanced cancer with standard therapy (ST) or reduced therapy (RT) is complicated by heterogeneity in aging. We assessed the potential utility of the chemotherapy toxicity risk score (CTRS) [J Clin Oncol 2011;29:3457-3465] for treatment decisions in older adults. This was a prospective observational study of patients aged ≥65 years receiving first-line chemotherapy for advanced cancer for which combination chemotherapy is the standard of care. Patients were categorized as high risk (CTRS ≥10), for whom RT (dose-reduced combination or single-agent chemotherapy) is deemed appropriate, or nonhigh risk (CTRS statistic. Fifty-eight patients (median age, 71 years) were enrolled. Thirty-eight patients received ST (21 had CTRS advanced solid tumors receiving first-line chemotherapy was assessed. Little agreement was found between chemotherapy treatment decisions based on the clinical impression versus what was recommended based on the CTRS. Among patients treated with standard-dose combination chemotherapy, patients with CTRS ≥10 had a very high incidence of grade 3-4 toxicities and hospitalization, which was significantly greater than that of patients with a low CTRS (<10). These findings suggest that the addition of CTRS to the clinical impression has a potential to improve treatment decisions. © AlphaMed Press 2018.

  4. Effects of KRAS, BRAF, NRAS, and PIK3CA mutations on the efficacy of cetuximab plus chemotherapy in chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer: a retrospective consortium analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Roock, Wendy; Claes, Bart; Bernasconi, David

    2010-01-01

    with KRAS wild-type tumours still do not respond. We studied the effect of other downstream mutations on the efficacy of cetuximab in, to our knowledge, the largest cohort to date of patients with chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer treated with cetuximab plus chemotherapy in the pre...

  5. The incidence of anticipatory nausea and vomiting after repeat cycle chemotherapy: the effect of granisetron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aapro, M. S.; Kirchner, V.; Terrey, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Anticipatory nausea and vomiting (ANV) after repeated cycles of cytotoxic chemotherapy is thought to be a conditioned response to a conditioning stimulus. Good control of acute and delayed emesis may result in a lower incidence of ANV. We have analysed data from 574 chemotherapy patients who received granisetron as their antiemetic treatment during repeat cycle chemotherapy. Per treatment cycle, less than 10% of patients displayed symptoms of anticipatory nausea and 2% or less had symptoms of anticipatory vomiting. It is concluded that the use of granisetron as an antiemetic during the acute phase of chemotherapy may result in a lower incidence of ANV in patients undergoing repeat cycle chemotherapy. PMID:8180031

  6. The interplay between the immune system and chemotherapy: emerging methods for optimizing therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiringhelli, François; Apetoh, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical studies have revealed an unexpected ability of the immune system to contribute to the success of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Anticancer therapies can trigger immune system activation by promoting the release of danger signals from dying tumor cells and/or the elimination of immunosuppressive cells. We have, however, recently discovered that some chemotherapies, such as 5-fluorouracil and gemcitabine, exert conflicting effects on anticancer immune responses. Although 5-fluorouracil and Gem selectively eliminated myeloid-derived suppressive cells in tumor-bearing rodents, these chemotherapies promoted the release of IL-1β and the development of pro-angiogenic IL-17-producing CD4 T cells. The ambivalent effects of chemotherapy on immune responses should thus be carefully considered to design effective combination therapies based on chemotherapy and immune modulators. Herein, we discuss how the initial findings underscoring the key role of the immune system in mediating the antitumor efficacy of anticancer agents could begin to translate into effective therapies in humans.

  7. Benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with T4 UICC II colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teufel, Andreas; Gerken, Michael; Hartl, Janine; Itzel, Timo; Fichtner-Feigl, Stefan; Stroszczynski, Christian; Schlitt, Hans Jürgen; Hofstädter, Ferdinand; Klinkhammer-Schalke, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Adjuvant chemotherapy is considered the standard of care in patients with UICC stage III colon cancer after R0 resection. Adjuvant therapy was not shown to be beneficial in patients with UICC stage II colon cancer. However, there is an ongoing discussion as to whether adjuvant chemotherapy may be beneficial for a subgroup of UICC II patients in a “high-risk situation” (such as T4). We investigated a Bavarian population-based (2.1 million inhabitants) cohort of 1937 patients with UICC II CRC treated between 2002 and 2012 in regard of the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy for large (T4) tumors. Patients older than 80 years of age were excluded. Of 1937 patients, 240 had a T4 tumor (12 %); 77 of all T4 patients received postoperative chemotherapy (33 %). Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression models were used for survival analyses. Patients with a T4 tumor who received postoperative chemotherapy had a highly significant survival benefit in respect of overall survival (p < 0.001) and recurrence-free survival (p = 0.008). However, no difference was observed between oxaliplatin-containing and non-oxaliplatin-containing treatment regimens. G2 and G3 tumors were found to particularly benefit from adjuvant treatment. Chemotherapy, age at diagnosis, and tumor grading remained independent risk factors in the multivariate cox regression analysis. Our retrospective study demonstrated the significant benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in the T4 subgroup of patients with UICC II colon cancer. Our data suggest that adjuvant chemotherapy should be seriously considered in these patients. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1404-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  8. A sleeping phantom leg awakened following hemicolectomy, thrombosis, and chemotherapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiou-Karistianis Nellie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We describe the case of a patient who experienced phantom pain that began 42 years after right above-the-knee amputation. Immediately prior to phantom pain onset, this long-term amputee had experienced, in rapid succession, cancer, hemicolectomy, chemotherapy, and thrombotic occlusion. Very little has been published to date on the association between chemotherapy and exacerbation of neuropathic pain in amputees, let alone the phenomenon of bringing about pain in amputees who have been pain-free for many decades. While this patient presented with a unique profile following a rare sequence of medical events, his case should be recognized considering the frequent co-occurrence of osteomyelitis, chemotherapy, and amputation. Case presentation A 68-year-old Australian Caucasian man presented 42 years after right above-the-knee amputation with phantom pain immediately following hemicolectomy, thrombotic occlusion in the amputated leg, and chemotherapy treatment with leucovorin and 5-fluorouracil. He exhibited probable hyperalgesia with a reduced pinprick threshold and increased stump sensitivity, indicating likely peripheral and central sensitization. Conclusion Our patient, who had long-term nerve injury due to amputation, together with recent ischemic nerve and tissue injury due to thrombosis, exhibited likely chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. While he presented with unique treatment needs, cases such as this one may actually be quite common considering that osteosarcoma can frequently lead to amputation and be followed by chemotherapy. The increased susceptibility of amputees to developing potentially intractable chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain should be taken into consideration throughout the course of chemotherapy treatment. Patients in whom chronic phantom pain then develops, perhaps together with mobility issues, inevitably place greater demands on healthcare service providers that require treatment by various

  9. A sleeping phantom leg awakened following hemicolectomy, thrombosis, and chemotherapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giummarra, Melita J; Bradshaw, John L; Nicholls, Michael Er; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Gibson, Stephen J

    2011-05-25

    We describe the case of a patient who experienced phantom pain that began 42 years after right above-the-knee amputation. Immediately prior to phantom pain onset, this long-term amputee had experienced, in rapid succession, cancer, hemicolectomy, chemotherapy, and thrombotic occlusion. Very little has been published to date on the association between chemotherapy and exacerbation of neuropathic pain in amputees, let alone the phenomenon of bringing about pain in amputees who have been pain-free for many decades. While this patient presented with a unique profile following a rare sequence of medical events, his case should be recognized considering the frequent co-occurrence of osteomyelitis, chemotherapy, and amputation. A 68-year-old Australian Caucasian man presented 42 years after right above-the-knee amputation with phantom pain immediately following hemicolectomy, thrombotic occlusion in the amputated leg, and chemotherapy treatment with leucovorin and 5-fluorouracil. He exhibited probable hyperalgesia with a reduced pinprick threshold and increased stump sensitivity, indicating likely peripheral and central sensitization. Our patient, who had long-term nerve injury due to amputation, together with recent ischemic nerve and tissue injury due to thrombosis, exhibited likely chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. While he presented with unique treatment needs, cases such as this one may actually be quite common considering that osteosarcoma can frequently lead to amputation and be followed by chemotherapy. The increased susceptibility of amputees to developing potentially intractable chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain should be taken into consideration throughout the course of chemotherapy treatment. Patients in whom chronic phantom pain then develops, perhaps together with mobility issues, inevitably place greater demands on healthcare service providers that require treatment by various clinical specialists, including oncologists, neurologists, prosthetists, and

  10. Alterations of nutritional status: impact of chemotherapy and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, S.S.; Lenon, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The nutritional status of a cancer patient may be affected by the tumor, the chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy directed against the tumor, and by complications associated with that therapy. Chemotherpay-radiotherapy is not confined exclusively to malignant cell populations; thus, normal tissues may also be affected by the therapy and may contribute to specific nutritional problems. Impaired nutrition due to anorexia, mucositis, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea may be dependent upon the specific chemotherapeutic agent, dose, or schedule utilized. Similar side effects from radiation therapy depend upon the dose, fractionation, and volume irradiated. When combined modality treatment is given the nutritional consequences may be magnified. Prospective, randomized clinical trials are underway to investigate the efficacy of nutritional support during chemotherapy-radiotherapy on tolerance to treatment, complications from treatment, and response rates to treatment. Preliminary results demonstrate that the administration of total parenteral nutrition is successful in maintaining weight during radiation therapy and chemotherapy, but that weight loss occurs after discontinuation of nutritional support. Thus, longterm evaluation is mandatory to learn the impact of nutritional support on survival, diease-free survival, and complication rates, as well as on the possible prevention of morbidity associated with aggressive chemotherapy-radiation therapy

  11. Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Stage II Colon Cancer: A Clinical Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannarkatt, Joseph; Joseph, Joe; Kurniali, Peter C; Al-Janadi, Anas; Hrinczenko, Borys

    2017-04-01

    The decision to treat a patient with stage II colon cancer with adjuvant chemotherapy can be challenging. Although the benefit of treatment is clear in most patients with stage III disease, the decision to provide chemotherapy after surgical resection in stage II disease must be made on an individual basis. Several trials have demonstrated the small but absolute benefits of receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer for disease-free survival and overall survival. In an attempt to better understand the role of chemotherapy, several studies were performed that identified high-risk characteristics that can be used prognostically and predictively to aid in the clinical decision making process. ASCO, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and the European Society of Medical Oncology have published guidelines describing these high-risk characteristics. Since then, several other molecular markers have emerged that may offer more information on a given patient's risk for recurrence. The decision to treat a patient with stage II colon cancer must be made on an individual basis, considering the risks and benefits of treatment. In this short review, we will present the available evidence and offer possible directions for future study.

  12. Resistance to antitumor chemotherapy due to bounded-noise-induced transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, Alberto; Gandolfi, Alberto

    2010-12-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is a landmark of solid tumor development, but it is also directly relevant to chemotherapy. Indeed, the density and quality of neovessels may influence the effectiveness of therapies based on blood-born agents. In this paper, first we define a deterministic model of antiproliferative chemotherapy in which the drug efficacy is a unimodal function of vessel density, and then we show that under constant continuous infusion therapy the tumor-vessel system may be multistable. However, the actual drug concentration profiles are affected by bounded even if possibly large fluctuations. Through numerical simulations, we show that the tumor volume may undergo transitions to the higher equilibrium value induced by the bounded noise. In case of periodically delivered boli-based chemotherapy, we model the fluctuations due to time variability of both the drug clearance rate and the distribution volume, as well as those due to irregularities in drug delivery. We observed noise-induced transitions also in case of periodic delivering. By applying a time dense scheduling with constant average delivered drug (metronomic scheduling), we observed an easier suppression of the transitions. Finally, we propose to interpret the above phenomena as an unexpected non-genetic kind of resistance to chemotherapy.

  13. Subcutaneous testosterone-letrozole therapy before and concurrent with neoadjuvant breast chemotherapy: clinical response and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Rebecca L; York, Anne E; Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2017-07-01

    Hormone receptor-positive breast cancers respond favorably to subcutaneous testosterone combined with an aromatase inhibitor. However, the effect of testosterone combined with an aromatase inhibitor on tumor response to chemotherapy was unknown. This study investigated the effect of testosterone-letrozole implants on breast cancer tumor response before and during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A 51-year-old woman on testosterone replacement therapy was diagnosed with hormone receptor-positive invasive breast cancer. Six weeks before starting neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the patient was treated with subcutaneous testosterone-letrozole implants and instructed to follow a low-glycemic diet. Clinical status was followed. Tumor response to "testosterone-letrozole" and subsequently, "testosterone-letrozole with chemotherapy" was monitored using serial ultrasounds and calculating tumor volume. Response to therapy was determined by change in tumor volume. Cost of therapy was evaluated. There was a 43% reduction in tumor volume 41 days after the insertion of testosterone-letrozole implants, before starting chemotherapy. After the initiation of concurrent chemotherapy, the tumor responded at an increased rate, resulting in a complete pathologic response. Chemotherapy was tolerated. Blood counts and weight remained stable. There were no neurologic or cardiac complications from the chemotherapy. Cost of therapy is reported. Subcutaneous testosterone-letrozole was an effective treatment for this patient's breast cancer and did not interfere with chemotherapy. This novel combination implant has the potential to prevent side effects from chemotherapy, improve quality of life, and warrants further investigation.

  14. Adjuvant chemotherapy followed by conformal chemoradiotherapy in gastric carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchbika, Z.; Quero, L.; Kouto, H.; Hennequin-Baruch, V.; Sergent, G.; Maylin, C.; Hennequin, C.; Gornet, J.M.; Munoz, N.; Cojean-Zelek, I.; Houdart, R.; Panis, Y.; Valleur, P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of the feasibility and results of adjuvant chemotherapy followed by conformal chemoradiotherapy after surgery for gastric carcinoma. Patients and methods Twenty-six patients (R0 or R1) were treated postoperatively by three cycles of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin, followed by a concomitant association of LV5FU2 chemotherapy with a conformal radiotherapy of 45 Gy. Results: The tumor was classified pT3-T4 in 77% of the patients and 92.5% had a nodal involvement (pN1: 54%; pN2: 31%). Feasibility (1) Adjuvant chemotherapy: nausea/vomiting grade II/III: 12 patients (48%); neutropenia grade III/IV: two patients; completed in all patients, except one. (2) Chemoradiotherapy: nausea/vomiting grade II/III: 10 patients; diarrhea grade II/3: two patients; oesophagitis grade II/III: two patients; myocardial infarction/pulmonary embolism: two patients. All patients except one received the planned dose of 45 Gy. Radiotherapy was interrupted in six cases, with a median duration of 14 days. Survival: with a median follow-up of 30 months, 65% of the patients were alive without disease; median survival was 32 months. Conclusion: This postoperative schedule was judged feasible. It allowed the deliverance of a more intensified chemotherapy than the classical schedule. Its clinical benefit must be evaluated in a phase III trial. (authors)

  15. Adenosine triphosphate-based chemotherapy response assay (ATP-CRA)-guided versus empirical chemotherapy in unresectable non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yong Wha; Sohn, Joo Hyuk; Kim, Yong Tai; Chang, Hyun; Jeong, Jae Heon; Lee, Young Joo; Chang, Joon; Kim, Se Kyu; Jung, Minkyu; Hong, Soojung; Choi, Sung Ho; Kim, Joo-Hang

    2009-10-01

    We retrospectively compared adenosine triphosphate-based chemotherapy response assay (ATP-CRA)-guided and empirical chemotherapies for unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in this case-control study. Unresectable NSCLC patients receiving ATP-CRA-guided platinum-based doublets as first-line therapy were enrolled as cases (n=27; 14 platinum-sensitive and 13 platinum-resistant patients). Performance status, stage, and chemotherapeutic regimen-matched patients receiving empirical chemotherapy were selected from the retrospective database as controls (n=93) in a case to control ratio of approximately 1:3. Response rate and survival (progression-free; overall) in both groups were not significantly different. However, the platinum-sensitive subgroup by ATP-CRA showed a higher response rate than the empirical group (71 versus 38%; p=0.023) with a trend toward longer progression-free survival (8.7 versus 4.8 months for platinum-sensitive versus empirical; p=0.223) and overall survival (not reached versus 12.6 months for platinum-sensitive versus empirical for p=0.134). ATP-CRA may be helpful in selecting platinum-responsive patients in unresectable NSCLC. We consider that nonplatinum doublets in platinum-resistant patients by ATP-CRA may be a more adapted approach than platinum-based doublets in future clinical trials.

  16. Herbal medicines for the treatment of cancer chemotherapy-induced side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Shunsuke; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Japanese herbal medicines, called Kampo, have beneficial effects on cancer chemotherapy-induced side effects. Rikkunshito ameliorates cisplatin-induced anorexia through an antagonistic effect on the 5-HT receptors and by increasing the serum ghrelin levels. Hangeshashinto improves irinotecan-induced diarrhea and chemotherapy-induced mucositis by inhibiting the activity of β-glucuronidase as well as the synthesis of prostaglandin E2. Goshajinkigan prevents oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity, possibly through suppressing functional alterations of the transient receptor potential channels. In this review, we will summarize the currently available literature regarding the clinical efficacy and potential mechanisms of Kampo medicines in the treatment of cancer chemotherapy-induced side effects.

  17. [Strategy of liver resection during chemotherapy for otherwise unresectable colorectal metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kuniya; Kumamoto, Takafumi; Takeda, Kazuhisa; Nojiri, Kazunori; Endo, Itaru

    2013-07-01

    With multidisciplinary management of patients with effective chemotherapy that can downstage metastases, more patients with previously inoperable disease can benefit from surgery. Surgery in isolation may be approaching technical limits, but now is likely to help more patients because of success of complementary strategies, particularly newer chemotherapy and targeted therapy. Leaving behind disappearing metastases after chemotherapy, margin-positive resection, staged liver resection, and liver-first reversed management permit potentially curative surgery for patients previously unable to survive resection. Further, survival benefit from maximum debulking surgery, like ovarian cancer, for colorectal liver metastases is uncertain at present, but likely. Individualized multidisciplinary treatment planning using such strategies is essential.

  18. Is adjuvant chemotherapy necessary for patients with microinvasive breast cancer after surgery?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Fei Niu; Li-Juan Wei; Jin-Pu Yu; Zhen Lian; Jing Zhao; Zi-Zheng Wu; Jun-Tian Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:Survival and treatment of patients with microinvasive breast cancer (MIBC) remain controversial. In this paper, we evaluated whether adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary for patients with MIBC to identify risk factors influencing its prognosis and decide the indication for adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods:In this retrospective study, 108 patients with MIBC were recruited according to seventh edition of the staging manual of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC). The subjects were divided into chemotherapy and non-chemotherapy groups. We compared the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates between groups. Furthermore, we analyzed the factors related to prognosis for patients with MIBC using univariate and multivariate analyses. We also evaluated the impact of adjuvant chemotherapy on the prognostic factors by subgroup analysis after median follow-up time of 33 months (13-104 months). Results:The 5-year DFS and OS rates for the chemotherapy group were 93.7% and 97.5%, whereas those for the non-chemotherapy group were 89.7% and 100%. Results indicate that 5-year DFS was superior, but OS was inferior, in the former group compared with the latter group. However, no statistical significance was observed in the 5-year DFS (P=0.223) or OS (P=0.530) rate of the two groups. Most relevant poor-prognostic factors were Ki-67 overexpression and negative hormonal receptors. Cumulative survival was 98.2%vs. 86.5% between low Ki-67 (≤20%) and high Ki-67 (>20%). The hazard ratio of patients with high Ki-67 was 16.585 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.969-139.724;P=0.010]. Meanwhile, ER(-)/PR(-) patients with MIBC had cumulative survival of 79.3% compared with 97.5% for ER(+) or PR(+) patients with MIBC. The hazard ratio for ER(-)/PR(-) patients with MIBC was 19.149 (95% CI, 3.702-99.057;P<0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that chemotherapy could improve the outcomes of ER(-)/PR(-) patients (P=0.014), but not those who overexpress Ki-67 (P=0

  19. Nicotine induces resistance to chemotherapy by modulating mitochondrial signaling in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingmei; Kamdar, Opal; Le, Wei; Rosen, Glenn D; Upadhyay, Daya

    2009-02-01

    Continued smoking causes tumor progression and resistance to therapy in lung cancer. Carcinogens possess the ability to block apoptosis, and thus may induce development of cancers and resistance to therapy. Tobacco carcinogens have been studied widely; however, little is known about the agents that inhibit apoptosis, such as nicotine. We determine whether mitochondrial signaling mediates antiapoptotic effects of nicotine in lung cancer. A549 cells were exposed to nicotine (1 muM) followed by cisplatin (35 muM) plus etoposide (20 muM) for 24 hours. We found that nicotine prevented chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, improved cell survival, and caused modest increases in DNA synthesis. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt prevented the antiapoptotic effects of nicotine and decreased chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. Small interfering RNA MAPK kinase-1 blocked antiapoptotic effects of nicotine, whereas small interfering RNA MAPK kinase-2 blocked chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. Nicotine prevented chemotherapy-induced reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and caspase-9 activation. Antiapoptotic effects of nicotine were blocked by mitochondrial anion channel inhibitor, 4,4'diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'disulfonic acid. Chemotherapy enhanced translocation of proapoptotic Bax to the mitochondria, whereas nicotine blocked these effects. Nicotine up-regulated Akt-mediated antiapoptotic X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein and phosphorylated proapoptotic Bcl2-antagonist of cell death. The A549-rho0 cells, which lack mitochondrial DNA, demonstrated partial resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, but blocked the antiapoptotic effects of nicotine. Accordingly, we provide evidence that nicotine modulates mitochondrial signaling and inhibits chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in lung cancer. The mitochondrial regulation of nicotine imposes an important mechanism that can critically impair the treatment of lung cancer, because many cancer

  20. Postoperative Chemotherapy Followed by Conformal Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy in High-Risk Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quero, Laurent; Bouchbika, Zineb; Kouto, Honorine; Baruch-Hennequin, Valerie; Gornet, Jean-Marc; Munoz, Nicolas; Cojean-Zelek, Isabelle; Houdart, Remi; Panis, Yves; Valleur, Patrice; Aparicio, Thomas; Maylin, Claude; Hennequin, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the efficacy, toxicity, and pattern of relapse after adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by three-dimensional irradiation and concomitant LV5FU2 chemotherapy (high-dose leucovorin and 5-fluorouracil bolus plus continuous infusion) in the treatment of completely resected high-risk gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of 52 patients with high-risk gastric cancer initially treated by total/partial gastrectomy and lymphadenectomy between January 2002 and June 2007. Median age was 54 years (range, 36–75 years). Postoperative treatment consisted of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy was followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in the tumor bed and regional lymph nodes at 4500 cGy/25 fractions in association with concomitant chemotherapy. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of a 2-h infusion of leucovorin (200 mg/m²) followed by a bolus of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m²) and then a 44-h continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (2400–3600 mg/m²) given every 14 days, for three cycles (LV5FU2 protocol). Results: Five-year overall and disease-free survival were 50% and 48%, respectively. Distant metastases and peritoneal spread were the most frequent sites of relapse (37% each). After multivariate analysis, only pathologic nodal status was significantly associated with disease-free and overall survival. Acute toxicities were essentially gastrointestinal and hematologic. One myocardial infarction and one pulmonary embolism were also reported. Eighteen patients had a radiotherapy program interruption because of acute toxicity. All patients but 2 have completed radiotherapy. Conclusion: Postoperative cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by conformal radiotherapy in association with concurrent 5-fluorouracil seemed to be feasible and resulted in successful locoregional control.

  1. Chemotherapy-induced Fatigue among Jordanian Cancer Patients: What are the Contributing Factors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kholoud Abu Obead

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purposes of this study were to examine the impact of chemotherapy treatment on Jordanian cancer patients’ fatigue and to correlate their fatigue with selected sociodemographic variables at the beginning of treatment and after four weeks of treatment. Methods: This was a single group quasi-experimental correlational design study that enrolled 43 patients diagnosed with cancer who required chemotherapy treatment. Fatigue was measured according to the Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS before starting chemotherapy treatment and after four weeks of receiving the first dose of chemotherapy. Data were collected over a period of four weeks and analyzed with descriptive statistics, the paired-sample t-test, and Pearson product-moment correlation. Results: The study included 17 (39.5% males and 26 (60.5% females with a mean age of 45.98 years. Most (n=17 were diagnosed with breast cancer. Obesity was present in about 64.4% of patients. The majority (46% received an anthracycline-based regimen. There were statistically significant differences between respondents’ total mean scores of fatigue pre-treatment and four weeks following chemotherapy treatment (t= -2.31, df=42, P<0.05. In addition, significant differences were found in the scores for behavioral, affective, sensory, and cognitive dimensions subscales (t= -2.24, -2.19, - 2.4, -2.4, df=42, P<0.05 between pre-treatment and four weeks after receiving the first dose of chemotherapy treatment. We observed a significant negative relationship between fatigue scores and hemoglobin levels (r= -0.04, P<0.01. Conclusion: Cancer-related fatigue is common among cancer patients who received chemotherapy and result in substantial adverse physical, behavioral, cognitive and affective consequences for patient. Given the impact of fatigue, treatment options should be routinely considered in the care of patients with cancer.

  2. Postoperative adjuvant MVP Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Eun Kyung; Chang, Hye Sook

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : Since February 1991, a prospective study for non-small cell lung cancer patients who underwent radical resection and had a risk factor of positive resection margin or regional lymph node metastasis has been conducted to evaluated the effect of MVP chemotherapy and radiotherapy on the pattern of failure, disease free and overall survival, and tolerance of combined treatment. Materials and Methods : Twenty nine patients were registered to this study until Sep. 1993 ; of these 26 received planned therapy. Within 3 weeks after radical resection, two cycles of MVP(Motomycin C 6 mg/m 2 , Vinblastin 6 mg/m 2 , Cisplatin 6 mg/m 2 ) chemotherapy was given with 4 weeks intervals. Radiotherapy (5040 cGy tumor bed dose and 900 cGy boost to high risk area) was started 3 to 4 weeks after chemotherapy. Results : One and two year overall survival rates were 76.5% and 8.6% respectively. Locoregional failure developed in 6 patients (23.1%) and distant failure in 9 patients(34.6%). Number of involved lymph nodes, resection margin positivity showed some correlation with failure pattern but T-stage and N-stage showed no statistical significance. The group of patients who received chemotherapy within 2 weeks postoperatively and radiotherapy within 70 days showed lower incidence of distant metastasis. Postoperative combined therapy were well tolerated without definite increase of complication rate, and compliance rate in this study was 90%. Conclusion : 1) MVP chemotherapy showed no effect on locoregional recurrence, ut appeared to decrease the distant metastasis rate and 2) combined treatments were well tolerated in all patients. 3) The group of patients who received chemotherapy within 2 weeks postoperatively and radiotherapy within 70 days showed lower incidence of distant metastasis. 4) Addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy failed to increase the overall or disease free survival

  3. Induction Chemotherapy for p16 Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuki; Ando, Mizuo; Omura, Go; Yasuhara, Kazuo; Yoshida, Masafumi; Takahashi, Wataru; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to determine the effectiveness of induction chemotherapy for treating p16-positive oropharyngeal cancer in our department. This was a retrospective case series to assess treatment effectiveness. We administered induction chemotherapy to patients with stage III to IV oropharyngeal p16-positive squamous cell carcinoma between 2008 and 2013. Induction chemotherapy was administered using combinations of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil. We measured the survival rates using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. We reviewed 23 patients (18 men and 5 women; age, 42-79 years). Induction chemotherapy resulted in partial or complete remission (20 patients) and in stable (2 patients) or progressive (1 patient) disease. In partial or complete remission, subsequent radiotherapy was performed in 16 patients, chemoradiotherapy in two, and transoral resection in two. In stable or progressive disease, subsequent open surgery was performed. Overall, one patient died of cervical lymph node metastasis, one died of kidney cancer, and one died of myocardial infarction. Event-free, distant-metastasis-free survival was present for 20 patients. The 3-year disease-specific survival was 95%; the overall survival was 87%. Two patients required gastrostomies during chemoradiotherapy and three required tracheotomies, but these were closed in all patients. The therapeutic response to induction chemotherapy for p16-positive oropharyngeal cancer was good. Partial or complete remission was achieved in almost 90% patients, and control of local and distant metastases was possible when it was followed by radiotherapy alone or with transoral resection of the primary tumor. A multicenter study is required to confirm these findings. 4.

  4. Three-dimensional evaluation of chemotherapy response in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ak, Guntulu [Department of Chest Disease, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Medical Faculty, Eskisehir (Turkey)], E-mail: guntuluak@yahoo.com; Metintas, Muzaffer [Department of Chest Disease, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Medical Faculty, Eskisehir (Turkey); Metintas, Selma [Department of Public Health, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Medical Faculty, Eskisehir (Turkey); Yildirim, Huseyin [Department of Chest Disease, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Medical Faculty, Eskisehir (Turkey); Ozkan, Ragip [Department of Radiology, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Medical Faculty, Eskisehir (Turkey); Ozden, Hilmi [Department of Anatomy, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Medical Faculty, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2010-04-15

    Objectives: Measurement of tumor response to chemotherapy in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is problematic because of non-spherical tumor growth patterns and difficulty in choosing target lesion. In this study, we aimed to determine the effectiveness of tumor volume measurement for evaluating chemotherapy response. Methods: Fifty-seven MPM patients were included. Chemotherapy responses were evaluated by computed tomography (CT) using volumetric method, World Health Organization (WHO), and modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumor (RECIST). The tumor volume was measured using the Cavalieri principle of stereological approaches. Results: According to the volumetric method, median survival was 10.0 months for progressive disease (PD), 14.0 months for stable disease (SD) and 16.0 months for objective response (OR). According to the WHO method, median survival was 11.3, 14.0, and 13.0 months, respectively. For modified RECIST, median survival was 10.0, 14.0, and 14.0 months, respectively. The correspondence between the WHO and modified RECIST methods was substantial (K = 0.66), as was that between the volumetric and WHO methods (K = 0.64); however the correspondence between the volumetric and modified RECIST methods was only moderate (K = 0.52). Conclusions: The most suitable chemotherapy response measurement technique is the volumetric method because of non-spherical tumor growth patterns in MPM. However, larger studies should be performed to better establish the suitability of this method. We recommend our method for determining the chemotherapy response in mesothelioma cases. However, modified RECIST criteria can also be applied due to favourable prediction of survival, ease of application, and moderate correspondence with the volumetric method.

  5. Fosaprepitant for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhlmann, Christina H. B.; Herrstedt, Jørn

    2012-01-01

    For patients receiving cancer chemotherapy, the ongoing development of antiemetic treatment is of significant importance. Patients consider nausea and vomiting among the most distressing symptoms of chemotherapy, and as new antiemetics have been very successful in prevention of vomiting, agents...... intravenous dose of 150 mg can replace the aprepitant 3-day oral regimen. This article focuses on the development and clinical application of fosaprepitant....

  6. Effectiveness of chemotherapy in measurable granulosa cell tumors: a retrospective study and review of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meurs, Hannah S.; Buist, Marrije R.; Westermann, Anneke M.; Sonke, Gabe S.; Kenter, Gemma G.; van der Velden, Jacobus

    2014-01-01

    Patients with irresectable granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) often receive chemotherapy. The effectiveness of this approach, however, is uncertain. The aim of our study was to assess the response rate to chemotherapy for residual and recurrent inoperable GCT. All consecutive chemotherapy-naive patients

  7. Combined radiation therapy and intraarterial chemotherapy for advanced oral or oropharngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okawa, Tomohiko; Kita, Midori; Tanaka, Makiko; Ishii, Tetsuo

    1989-01-01

    During the period 1982-1988, 34 patients with advanced oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma were treated with radical radiation therapy combined with intraarterial chemotherapy. Five patients were clinically staged as Stage II,15 as Stage III, and 14 as Stage IV. For intraarterial chemotherapy, ACNU (25mg/body) or CDDP (20 mg/m 2 ) plus MMC (6 mg/m 2 ) was used. Overall, the complete response rate was 56%: it was independent of the site of carcinoma, clinical stage, and the kind of drugs. The two-year cumulative survival rate was 80% for Stage II, 56% for Stage III, and 61% for Stage IV. Side effects were not so severe as to continue with the withdrawal of chemotherapy. In view of the efficacy and safety, combined radiation therapy and intraarterial chemotherapy should be performed in the treatment of oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma. (N.K.)

  8. Malignant glioma: Should chemotherapy be overthrown by experimental treatments?

    OpenAIRE

    Hösli, P.; Sappino, A. P.; de Tribolet, N.; Dietrich, P. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Despite more than two decades of clinical research with chemotherapy, the outcome of malignant gliomas remains poor. Recent years have seen major advances in elucidation of the biology of these tumors, which in turn have led to the current development of innovative therapeutic strategies. The question confronting us at the end of the 1990s is whether we should continue to use and investigate chemotherapy or whether the time has come for experimental treatments. As a contribution to this debat...

  9. [Benefit of adjuvant 5-fluorouracil based chemotherapy for colon cancer: a retrospective cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondaca, Sebastián; Villalón, Constanza; Leal, José Luis; Zúñiga, Álvaro; Bellolio, Felipe; Padilla, Oslando; Palma, Silvia; Garrido, Marcelo; Nervi, Bruno

    2016-02-01

    Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated the benefits of adjuvant 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy for patients with resectable colon cancer (CC), especially in stage III. To describe the clinical characteristics of a cohort of CC patients treated at a single university hospital in Chile since 2002, and to investigate if chemotherapy had an effect on survival rates. Review of a tumor registry of the hospital. Medical records of patients with CC treated between 2002 and 2012 were reviewed. Death certificates from the National Identification Service were used to determine mortality. Overall survival was described using the Kaplan-Meier method. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression model was also used. A total of 370 patients were treated during the study period (202 in stage II and 168 in stage III). Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 22 and 70% of patients in stage II and III respectively. The median follow-up period was 4.6 years. The 5-year survival rate for stage II patients was 79% and there was no benefit observed with adjuvant chemotherapy. For stage III patients, the 5-year survival rate was 81% for patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy, compared to 56% for those who did not receive chemotherapy (hazard ratio (HR): 0.29; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.15-0.56). The benefit of chemotherapy was found to persist after adjustment for other prognostic variables (HR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.23-0.94). Patients with colon cancer in stage III who received adjuvant chemotherapy had a better overall survival.

  10. Ginger effects on control of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Meisam Ebrahimi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background : Chemotherapy-induced nausea (CIN in the anticipatory and acute phase is the most common side effect in cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of ginger capsules on the alleviation of this problem. Methods : This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed on 80 women with breast cancer between August till December 2009 in Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran. These patients underwent one-day chemotherapy regime and suffering from chemotherapy-induced nausea. After obtaining written consent, samples were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups. Two groups were matched based on the age and emetic effects of chemotherapy drugs used. The intervention group received ginger capsules (250 mg, orally four times a day (1 gr/d and the same samples from the placebo group received starch capsules (250 mg, orally for three days before to three days after chemotherapy. To measure the effect of capsules a three-part questionnaire was used, so the samples filled every night out these tools. After collecting the information, the gathered data were analyzed by statistical tests like Fisher’s exact, Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-square using version 8 of STATA software. Results : The mean ± SD of age in the intervention and placebo groups were 41.8 ± 8.4 and 45.1 ± 10 years, respectively. Results indicated that the severity and number of nausea in the anticipatory phase were significantly lower in the ginger group compared with placebo group (P=0.0008, P=0.0007, respectively. Also, the intensity (P=0.0001 and number (P=0.0001 of nausea in the acute phase were significantly lower in the ginger group. On the other hand, taking ginger capsules compared with placebo did not result in any major complications. Conclusion: Consuming ginger root powder capsules (1 gr/d from three days before chemotherapy till three days after it in combination with the standard anti-emetic regimen can

  11. MRI evaluation of residual breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: influence of patient, tumor and chemotherapy characteristics on the correlation with pathological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diguisto, Caroline; Ouldamer, Lobna; Arbion, Flavie; Vildé, Anne; Body, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the residual tumor measured on magnetic resonance imaging and pathological results and to assess whether this correlation varies according to patient, tumor or chemotherapy characteristics. The study population included women treated for breast cancer with indication of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in our tertiary breast cancer Unit between January 2008 and December 2011. Factors related to patients, tumor and chemotherapy were studied. Pearson's correlation coefficient between the size of the tumor on MRI and pathological response was calculated for the entire population. It was also calculated according to patient, tumor and chemotherapy characteristics. During the study period, 107 consecutive women were included. The size of residual tumor on the MRI significantly correlated with the size on pathological result with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.52 (pcorrelation was stronger for women aged 50 years and older (r=0.64, pcorrelation was stronger for those with triple-negative tumors (r=0.69, p=0.002) but weaker for those with tumors with a ductal carcinoma in situ component (r =0.18, p=0.42). The size of breast cancer obtained by MRI is significantly correlated to the pathological size of the tumor. This correlation was stronger among women aged 50 years and more, among post-menopausal women, and among women who had triple-negative tumors. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  12. Survival predictors for second-line chemotherapy in Caucasian patients with metastatic gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bohanes, Pierre; Courvoisier, Delphine; Perneger, Thomas; Morel, Philippe; Huber, Olivier; Roth, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    There are very limited data suggesting a benefit for second-line chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer. Therefore, the number of patients who receive further treatment after failure of first-line chemotherapy varies considerably, ranging from 14% to 75%. In the absence of a demonstrated survival benefit of second-line chemotherapy, appropriate selection of patients based on survival predictors is essential. However, no clinico-pathologic parameters are currently widely adopted in clinical p...

  13. Multispectral and phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography of breast cancer during neoadjuvant chemotherapy: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Qizhi; Staal, Stephen; Grobmyer, Stephen; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-02-01

    Multispectral and phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography are used to track treatment progress in a patient with locally advanced invasive carcinoma of the breast cancer during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Two types of chemotherapy treatment including four cycles of Adriamycin/Cytoxin (AC cycles) and twelve cycles of Taxol/Herceptin (TH cycles) were applied to patient. A total of eight optical exams were performed before and within the chemotherapy. Images of tissue refractive index, and absorption and scattering coefficients, as well as oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations along with scattering particle volume fraction and mean diameter of cellular components were all obtained. The tumor was identified through absorption and scattering images. Tumor shrinkage was observed during the course of chemotherapy from all the optical images. Our results show that oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin and total hemoglobin in tumor decreased after chemotherapy compared to that of before chemotherapy. Significant changes in tumor refractive index along with tumor cellular morphology during the entire chemotherapy are also observed.

  14. Cancer chemotherapy and biotherapy: principles and practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chabner, Bruce; Longo, Dan L

    2011-01-01

    "Updated to include the newest drugs and those currently in development, Cancer Chemotherapy and Biotherapy, Fifth Edition is a comprehensive reference on the preclinical and clinical pharmacology of anticancer agents...

  15. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer: two randomised studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, L.; Grover, R.; Pokharel, Y.H.; Chander, S.; Kumar, S.; Singh, R.; Rath, G.K.; Kochupillai, V.

    1998-01-01

    The results of two studies looking at the place of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer being treated with radiotherapy are presented. Between August 1990 and January 1992, 184 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, FIGO stage II B IVA were randomised (study 1) to receive either two cycles of bleomycin, ifosfamide-mesna and cisplatin (BIP) chemotherapy (CT) followed by radiotherapy (RT). Three patients died of CT toxicity - two in study 1 and one in study 2. Cystitis, proctitis and local skin reaction after RT occurred equally in the two groups in both the studies. The neo-adjuvant chemotherapy prior to radiotherapy demonstrated a high response rate, but this did not translate into improved overall survival compared to those patients receiving radiotherapy alone

  16. Long-term follow-up of salvage radiotherapy in Hodgkin's lymphoma after chemotherapy failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Belinda; Wirth, Andrew; Milner, Alvin; Di Iulio, Juliana; MacManus, Michael; Ryan, Gail M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term results of salvage radiotherapy (SRT) for Hodgkin's lymphoma after chemotherapy failure. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 81 patients undergoing SRT for persistent or recurrent Hodgkin's lymphoma after chemotherapy; 19 also received conventional-dose salvage chemotherapy. Results: At SRT, the median patient age was 31 years. Of the 81 patients, 81% had Stage I-II, 25.9% had B symptoms, 14.8% had bulky disease, and 7.4% had extranodal disease. A less than a complete response (CR) to the last chemotherapy regimen occurred in 47%. SRT was generally limited to one side of the diaphragm, and the median dose was 36 Gy. After SRT, 75% of patients achieved a CR, with 82% retaining durable in-field control. In-field failure was associated with less than a CR to the last chemotherapy regimen (p = 0.0287). Most failures were at distant sites, with 60% in previously involved sites. The 10-year freedom from treatment failure and overall survival rates were 32.8% and 45.7%, respectively. The adverse prognostic factors for freedom from treatment failure were age >50 years (p 50 years (p < 0.001), B symptoms (p = 0.002), and less than a CR to the last chemotherapy regimen (p = 0.002). Favorable cohorts had a 10-year freedom from treatment failure rate of 51% and overall survival rate of 92%. Conclusions: Salvage radiotherapy is effective for selected patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma after chemotherapy failure and should be considered for incorporation into salvage programs

  17. Chemotherapy effectiveness and mortality prediction in surgically treated osteosarcoma dogs: A validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A F; Nielen, M; Withrow, S J; Selmic, L E; Burton, J H; Klungel, O H; Groenwold, R H H; Kirpensteijn, J

    2016-03-01

    Canine osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer, and an important cause of mortality and morbidity, in large purebred dogs. Previously we constructed two multivariable models to predict a dog's 5-month or 1-year mortality risk after surgical treatment for osteosarcoma. According to the 5-month model, dogs with a relatively low risk of 5-month mortality benefited most from additional chemotherapy treatment. In the present study, we externally validated these results using an independent cohort study of 794 dogs. External performance of our prediction models showed some disagreement between observed and predicted risk, mean difference: -0.11 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]-0.29; 0.08) for 5-month risk and 0.25 (95%CI 0.10; 0.40) for 1-year mortality risk. After updating the intercept, agreement improved: -0.0004 (95%CI-0.16; 0.16) and -0.002 (95%CI-0.15; 0.15). The chemotherapy by predicted mortality risk interaction (P-value=0.01) showed that the chemotherapy compared to no chemotherapy effectiveness was modified by 5-month mortality risk: dogs with a relatively lower risk of mortality benefited most from additional chemotherapy. Chemotherapy effectiveness on 1-year mortality was not significantly modified by predicted risk (P-value=0.28). In conclusion, this external validation study confirmed that our multivariable risk prediction models can predict a patient's mortality risk and that dogs with a relatively lower risk of 5-month mortality seem to benefit most from chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pathological response of locally advanced rectal cancer to preoperative chemotherapy without pelvic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensignor, T; Brouquet, A; Dariane, C; Thirot-Bidault, A; Lazure, T; Julié, C; Nordlinger, B; Penna, C; Benoist, S

    2015-06-01

    Pathological response to chemotherapy without pelvic irradiation is not well defined in rectal cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the objective pathological response to preoperative chemotherapy without pelvic irradiation in middle or low locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Between 2008 and 2013, 22 patients with middle or low LARC (T3/4 and/or N+ and circumferential resection margin rectal resection after preoperative chemotherapy. The pathological response of rectal tumour was analysed according to the Rödel tumour regression grading (TRG) system. Predictive factors of objective pathological response (TRG 2-4) were analysed. All patients underwent rectal surgery after a median of six cycles of preoperative chemotherapy. Of these, 20 (91%) had sphincter saving surgery and an R0 resection. Twelve (55%) patients had an objective pathological response (TRG 2-4), including one complete response. Poor response (TRG 0-1) to chemotherapy was noted in 10 (45%) patients. In univariate analyses, none of the factors examined was found to be predictive of an objective pathological response to chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 37.2 months, none of the 22 patients experienced local recurrence. Of the 19 patients with Stage IV rectal cancer, 15 (79%) had liver surgery with curative intent. Preoperative chemotherapy without pelvic irradiation is associated with objective pathological response and adequate local control in selected patients with LARC. Further prospective controlled studies will address the question of whether it can be used as a valuable alternative to radiochemotherapy in LARC. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. Using lean principles to improve outpatient adult infusion clinic chemotherapy preparation turnaround times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Matthew H; Eckel, Stephen; Daniels, Rowell; Amerine, Lindsey B

    2015-07-01

    The workflow and chemotherapy preparation turnaround times at an adult infusion clinic were evaluated to identify opportunities to optimize workflow and efficiency. A three-phase study using Lean Six Sigma methodology was conducted. In phase 1, chemotherapy turnaround times in the adult infusion clinic were examined one year after the interim goal of a 45-minute turnaround time was established. Phase 2 implemented various experiments including a five-day Kaizen event, using lean principles in an effort to decrease chemotherapy preparation turnaround times in a controlled setting. Phase 3 included the implementation of process-improvement strategies identified during the Kaizen event, coupled with a final refinement of operational processes. In phase 1, the mean turnaround time for all chemotherapy preparations decreased from 60 to 44 minutes, and a mean of 52 orders for adult outpatient chemotherapy infusions was received each day. After installing new processes, the mean turnaround time had improved to 37 minutes for each chemotherapy preparation in phase 2. In phase 3, the mean turnaround time decreased from 37 to 26 minutes. The overall mean turnaround time was reduced by 26 minutes, representing a 57% decrease in turnaround times in 19 months through the elimination of waste and the implementation of lean principles. This reduction was accomplished through increased efficiencies in the workplace, with no addition of human resources. Implementation of Lean Six Sigma principles improved workflow and efficiency at an adult infusion clinic and reduced the overall chemotherapy turnaround times from 60 to 26 minutes. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effect of a Standardized Ginger Extract on Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea-Related Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Moderately or Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy: A Double Blind, Randomized, Placebo Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Wolfgang; McCarthy, Alexandra L; Ried, Karin; McKavanagh, Dan; Vitetta, Luis; Sali, Avni; Lohning, Anna; Isenring, Elisabeth

    2017-08-12

    Ginger supplementation could be an effective adjuvant treatment for chemotherapy-induced nausea (CIN). The aim of this clinical trial was to address significant methodological limitations in previous trials. Patients (N = 51) were randomly allocated to receive either 1.2 g of standardised ginger extract or placebo per day, in addition to standard anti-emetic therapy, during the first three cycles of chemotherapy. The primary outcome was CIN-related quality of life (QoL) measured with the Functional Living Index- Emesis (FLIE) questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included acute and delayed nausea, vomiting, and retching as well as cancer-related fatigue, nutritional status, and CIN and vomiting-specific prognostic factors. Over three consecutive chemotherapy cycles, nausea was more prevalent than vomiting (47% vs. 12%). In chemotherapy Cycle 1, intervention participants reported significantly better QoL related to CIN ( p = 0.029), chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV)-related QoL ( p = 0.043), global QoL ( p = 0.015) and less fatigue ( p = 0.006) than placebo participants. There were no significant results in Cycle 2. In Cycle 3, global QoL ( p = 0.040) and fatigue ( p = 0.013) were significantly better in the intervention group compared to placebo. This trial suggests adjuvant ginger supplementation is associated with better chemotherapy-induced nausea-related quality of life and less cancer-related fatigue, with no difference in adverse effects compared to placebo.

  1. Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting Mitigation With Music Interventions
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Jason M; Conradi Stark, Jody; Vallerand, April H

    2018-01-01

    Despite three decades of studies examining music interventions as a mitigant of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), to date, no systematic review of this literature exists.
. PubMed, Scopus, PsycInfo®, CINAHL®, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar were searched. Keywords for all databases were music, chemotherapy, and nausea.
. All studies were appraised for methodology and results.
. 10 studies met inclusion criteria for review. Sample sizes were generally small and nonrandomized. Locus of control for music selection was more often with the investigator rather than the participant. Few studies controlled for the emetogenicity of the chemotherapy administered, nor for known patient-specific risk factors for CINV.
. The existing data have been largely generated by nurse scientists, and implications for nursing practice are many, because music interventions are low-cost, easily accessible, and without known adverse effects. However, this specific body of knowledge requires additional substantive inquiry to generate clinically relevant data.

  2. Enzalutamide in metastatic prostate cancer before chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide is an oral androgen-receptor inhibitor that prolongs survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in whom the disease has progressed after chemotherapy. New treatment options are needed for patients with metastatic prostate cancer who have...... the most common clinically relevant adverse events associated with enzalutamide treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Enzalutamide significantly decreased the risk of radiographic progression and death and delayed the initiation of chemotherapy in men with metastatic prostate cancer. (Funded by Medivation and Astellas...... skeletal-related event (hazard ratio, 0.72), a complete or partial soft-tissue response (59% vs. 5%), the time until prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression (hazard ratio, 0.17), and a rate of decline of at least 50% in PSA (78% vs. 3%) (P

  3. Chronic Pain and Neuropathy Following Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ventzel, Lise; Madsen, Caspar S; Karlsson, Páll

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine symptoms and characteristics of chronic sensory neuropathy in patients treated with oxaliplatin and docetaxel, including patterns of somatosensory abnormalities, pain descriptors, and psychological functioning. Design: A retrospective cross-sectional study. Setting: A chro...... mechanisms useful for future studies in the tailored treatment of prevention of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and pain.......Objective: To determine symptoms and characteristics of chronic sensory neuropathy in patients treated with oxaliplatin and docetaxel, including patterns of somatosensory abnormalities, pain descriptors, and psychological functioning. Design: A retrospective cross-sectional study. Setting......: A chronic pain research center. Subjects: Thirty-eight patients with chronic peripheral pain and/or dysesthesia following chemotherapy. Methods:  Sensory profiles, psychological functioning, and quality of life were assessed using standardized questionnaires. In addition, standardized quantitative sensory...

  4. Chemotherapy in patients with hepatic failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roldán, G.; Sosa, A.

    2004-01-01

    The toxicity of chemotherapy in the liver may manifest as hepatocyte dysfunction with chemical hepatitis, veno-occlusive disease or chronic fibrosis. The hepatocyte dysfunction is caused by direct effect of the drug or its metabolites evidencing by increased bilirubin and liver enzymes (Sgot, SGPT). Prolonged effect leads to cholestasis and fatty infiltration. This dysfunction is concomitant enhanced by viral infection, liver metastases and other drugs as antiemetics. The vast majority of the indicated drugs in a cancer patient, cytostatics, antiemetics, analgésios, anticonvulsants, etc, are metabolized in the liver. The evidence of abnormal hepatocyte function in a patient in which involves chemotherapy raises the need for dose modification indicated and / or discontinuation. The aim of this paper is to review existing information on the use of cytostatics in cancer patients with hepatic impairment, classifying drugs according to their potential hepato toxicity and recommended dose modification in patients with hepatic dysfunction

  5. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in triple-negative breast carcinoma: A prospective randomized controlled multi-center trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jianhua; Shi, Mei; Ling, Rui; Xia Yuesheng; Luo Shanquan; Fu Xuehai; Xiao Feng; Li Jianping; Long Xiaoli; Wang Jianguo; Hou Zengxia; Chen Yunxia; Zhou Bin; Xu, Man

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) presents a high risk breast cancer that lacks the benefit from hormone treatment, chemotherapy is the main strategy even though it exists in poor prognosis. Use of adjuvant radiation therapy, which significantly decreases breast cancer mortality, has not been well described among poor TNBC women. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy could significantly increase survival outcomes in TNBC women after mastectomy. Patients and methods: A prospective randomized controlled multi-center study was performed between February 2001 and February 2006 and comprised 681 women with triple-negative stage I-II breast cancer received mastectomy, of them, 315 cases received systemic chemotherapy alone, 366 patients received radiation after the course of chemotherapy. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated. Simultaneously local and systemic toxicity were observed. Results: After a median follow-up of 86.5 months, five-year RFS rates were 88.3% and 74.6% for adjuvant chemotherapy plus radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy alone, respectively, with significant difference between the two groups (HR 0.77 [95% CI 0.72, 0.98]; P = 0.02). Five-year OS significantly improved in adjuvant chemotherapy plus radiation group compared with chemotherapy alone (90.4% and 78.7%) (HR 0.79 [95% CI 0.74, 0.97]; P = 0.03). No severe toxicity was reported. Conclusions: Patients received standard adjuvant chemotherapy plus radiation therapy was more effective than chemotherapy alone in women with triple-negative early-stage breast cancer after mastectomy.

  6. Efficacy and safety of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy compared to chemotherapy alone in previously untreated advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botrel, Tobias Engel Ayer; Clark, Luciana Gontijo de Oliveira; Paladini, Luciano; Clark, Otávio Augusto C.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of neoplasm-related death in the United States. Several studies analyzed the efficacy of bevacizumab combined with different chemotherapy regimens consisting on drugs such as 5-FU, capecitabine, irinotecan and oxaliplatin. This systematic review aims to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of chemotherapy plus bevacizumab versus chemotherapy alone in patients with previously untreated advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Several databases were searched, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and CENTRAL. The primary endpoints were overall survival and progression-free survival. Data extracted from the studies were combined by using hazard ratio (HR) or risk ratio (RR) with their corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI). The final analysis included 9 trials comprising 3,914 patients. Patients who received the combined treatment (chemotherapy + bevacizumab) had higher response rates (RR = 0.89; 95 % CI: 0.82 to 0.96; p = 0.003) with heterogeneity, higher progression-free survival (HR = 0.69; 95 % CI: 0.63 to 0.75; p < 0.00001) and also higher overall survival rates (HR = 0.87; 95 % CI: 0.80 to 0.95; p = 0.002) with moderate heterogeneity. Regarding adverse events and severe toxicities (grade ≥ 3), the group receiving the combined therapy had higher rates of hypertension (RR = 3.56 95 % CI: 2.58 to 4.92; p < 0.00001), proteinuria (RR = 1.89; 95 % CI: 1.26 to 2.84; p = 0.002), gastrointestinal perforation (RR = 3.63; 95 % CI: 1.31 to 10.09; p = 0.01), any thromboembolic events (RR = 1.44; 95 % CI: 1.20 to 1.73; p = 0.0001), and bleeding (RR = 1.81; 95 % CI: 1.22 to 2.67; p = 0.003). The combination of chemotherapy with bevacizumab increased the response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival of patients with mCRC without prior chemotherapy. The results of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were comparatively higher

  7. Novel Combination Chemotherapy for Localized Ewing Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this clinical trial, researchers will test whether the addition of the drug combination vincristine, topotecan, and cyclophosphamide to a standard chemotherapy regimen improves overall survival in patients with extracranial Ewing

  8. Hepatic lesions that mimic metastasis on radiological imaging during chemotherapy for gastrointestinal malignancy: Recent updates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Sung Hye; Park, Beom Jin; Kim, Yeul Hong [Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    During chemotherapy in patients with gastrointestinal malignancy, the hepatic lesions may occur as chemotherapy-induced lesions or tumor-associated lesions, with exceptions for infectious conditions and other incidentalomas. Focal hepatic lesions arising from chemotherapy-induced hepatopathies (such as chemotherapy-induced sinusoidal injury and steatosis) and tumor-associated eosinophilic abscess should be considered a mimicker of metastasis in patients with gastrointestinal malignancy. Accumulating evidence suggests that chemotherapy for gastrointestinal malignancy in the liver has roles in both the therapeutic effects for hepatic metastasis and injury to the non-tumor bearing hepatic parenchyma. In this article, we reviewed the updated concept of chemotherapy-induced hepatopathies and tumor-associated eosinophilic abscess in the liver, focusing on the pathological and radiological findings. Awareness of the causative chemo-agent, pathophysiology, and characteristic imaging findings of these mimickers is critical for accurate diagnosis and avoidance of unnecessary exposure of the patient to invasive tissue-based diagnosis and operation.

  9. Benefit of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Siewert type II esophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Kei; Yamashita, Keishi; Katada, Natsuya; Moriya, Hiromitsu; Mieno, Hiroaki; Sakuramoto, Shinichi; Kikuchi, Shiro; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to clarify if preoperative chemotherapy was associated with improved survival in Japanese patients with Siewert type II adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 86 patients with Siewert type II adenocarcinoma who underwent R0 resection at the Kitasato University between 1997 and 2013. Cox regression analysis using a backward stepwise selection method was performed to identify independent prognostic factors for relapse-free survival (RFS). The median age was 67 years. The male:female ratio was 74:12. Right thoracic, left thoracic and transhiatal approaches were performed in 10, 10 and 66 patients, respectively, and perioperative transfusion in 16 patients. Preoperative chemotherapy was administered to 19 patients; out of these, 13 received chemotherapy using the DCS regimen (docetaxel 40 mg/m(2), day 1; cisplatin 60 mg/m(2), day 1; S-1 80-120 mg/body, days 1-14; every 28 days). A median of three cycles of preoperative DCS chemotherapy were used. Histological responses of 1b, 2, 3 and unknown grades were obtained in three, three, four and three patients, respectively. The 5-year RFS rate was 55%, and the median follow-up period was 36 months. Cox regression analysis regarding RFS identified (y)pN1-3 [hazard ratio (HR)=4.44; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.98-11.27], performance of perioperative transfusion (HR=4.71; 95% CI=1.69-11.88) and no preoperative chemotherapy (HR=3.75; 95% CI=1.22-14.26) as significant and independent indicators of poor prognosis. Preoperative chemotherapy using DCS is potentially beneficial for Japanese patients with Siewert type II adenocarcinoma. Further prospective clinical studies are required to confirm our findings. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  10. Outcome Assessments and Cost Avoidance of an Oral Chemotherapy Management Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Siu-Fun; Bounthavong, Mark; Nguyen, Cham P; Chen, Timothy

    2016-03-01

    Increasing use of oral chemotherapy drugs increases the challenges for drug and patient management. An oral chemotherapy management clinic was developed to provide patients with oral chemotherapy management, concurrent medication (CM) education, and symptom management services. This evaluation aims to measure the need and effectiveness of this practice model due to scarce published data. This is a case series report of all patients referred to the oral chemotherapy management clinic. Data collected included patient demographics, depression scores, CMs, and types of intervention, including detection and management outcomes collected at baseline, 3-day, 7-day, and 3-month follow-ups. Persistence rate was monitored. Secondary analysis assessed potential cost avoidance. A total of 86 evaluated patients (32 men and 54 women, mean age of 63.4 years) did not show a high risk for medication nonadherence. The 3 most common cancer diagnoses were rectal, pancreatic, and breast, with capecitabine most prescribed. Patients had an average of 13.7 CMs. A total of 125 interventions (detection and management of adverse drug event detection, compliance, drug interactions, medication error, and symptom management) occurred in 201 visits, with more than 75% of interventions occurring within the first 14 days. A persistence rate was observed in 78% of 41 evaluable patients. The total estimated annual cost avoidance per 1.0 full time employee (FTE) was $125,761.93. This evaluation demonstrated the need for additional support for patients receiving oral chemotherapy within standard of care medical service. A comprehensive oral chemotherapy management referral service can optimize patient care delivery via early interventions for adverse drug events, drug interactions, and medication errors up to 3 months after initiation of treatment. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  11. Efficacy and safety of ifosfamide-based chemotherapy for osteosarcoma: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan XL

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Xiao-Liang Fan,1,* Guo-Ping Cai,2,* Liu-Long Zhu,1 Guo-Ming Ding1 1Department of Orthopaedics, Hangzhou First People’s Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Hangzhou, 2Department of Orthopaedics, Jinshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The efficacy of ifosfamide-based chemotherapy in the treatment of osteosarcoma has been investigated; however, results are inconsistent. Therefore, we reviewed the relevant studies and conducted a meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of ifosfamide-based chemotherapy in patients with osteosarcoma.Methods: A systematic literature search on PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases was performed. Eligible studies were clinical trials of patients with osteosarcoma who received ifosfamide-based chemotherapy. Hazard ratios (HRs were pooled to compare event-free survival (EFS and overall survival (OS. Risk ratios (RRs were pooled to compare good histologic response rates and adverse event incidence. Meta-analysis was performed using a fixed-effects model or a random-effects model according to heterogeneity.Results: A total of seven randomized controlled trials were included in this meta-analysis. Pooled results showed that ifosfamide-based chemotherapy significantly improved EFS (HR=0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.63, 0.82; P=0.000 and OS (HR=0.83, 95% CI: 0.70, 0.99; P=0.034; furthermore, this form of chemotherapy increased good histologic response rate (RR=1.27, 95% CI: 1.10, 1.46; P=0.001. In addition, patients in the ifosfamide group exhibited a significantly higher incidence of fever (RR=2.23, 95% CI: 1.42, 3.50; P=0.000 and required more frequent platelet transfusion (RR=1.92, 95% CI: 1.23, 3.01; P=0.004.Conclusion: This meta-analysis confirmed that ifosfamide-based chemotherapy can significantly improve EFS and OS; this chemotherapy can also increase good histologic response rate in patients with osteosarcoma

  12. Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon Kyung; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil; Lim Do Hoon; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Dae Yong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Kyu Chan; Kwon, O Jung [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    This is a retrospective study to evaluate the response rate, acute toxicity, and survival rate of a combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small cell lung cancer. Forty six patients with limited disease small-cell lung cancer who underwent combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy between October 1994 and April 1998 were evaluated. Six cycles of chemotherapy were planned either using a VIP regimen (etoposide, ifosfamide, and cis-platin) or a EP regimen (etoposide and cis-platin). Thoracic radiation therapy was planned to deliver 44 Gy using 10MV X-ray, starting concurrently with chemotherapy. Response was evaluated 4 weeks after the completion of the planned chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and the prophylactic cranial irradiation was planned only for the patients with complete responses. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the SWOG toxicity criteria, and the overall survival and disease-free survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier Method. The median follow-up period was 16 months (range:2 to 41 months). Complete response was achieved in 30 (65%) patients, of which 22 patients received prophylactic cranial irradiations. Acute toxicities over grade III were granulocytopenia in 23 (50%), anemia in 17 (37%), thrombo-cytopenia in nine (20%), alopecia in nine (20%), nausea/vomiting in five (11%), and peripheral neuropathy in one (2%). Chemotherapy was delayed in one patient, and the chemotherapy doses were reduced in 58 (24%) out of the total 246 cycles. No radiation esophagitis over grade III was observed, while interruption during radiation therapy for a mean of 8.3 days occurred in 21 patients. The local recurrences were observed in 8 patients and local progressions were in 6 patients, and the distant metastases in 17 patients. Among these, four patients had both the local relapse and the distant metastasis. Brain was the most common metastatic site (10 patients), followed by the liver as the next common site (4 patients). The

  13. Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Moon Kyung; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil; Lim Do Hoon; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Dae Yong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Kyu Chan; Kwon, O Jung

    1999-01-01

    This is a retrospective study to evaluate the response rate, acute toxicity, and survival rate of a combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small cell lung cancer. Forty six patients with limited disease small-cell lung cancer who underwent combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy between October 1994 and April 1998 were evaluated. Six cycles of chemotherapy were planned either using a VIP regimen (etoposide, ifosfamide, and cis-platin) or a EP regimen (etoposide and cis-platin). Thoracic radiation therapy was planned to deliver 44 Gy using 10MV X-ray, starting concurrently with chemotherapy. Response was evaluated 4 weeks after the completion of the planned chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and the prophylactic cranial irradiation was planned only for the patients with complete responses. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the SWOG toxicity criteria, and the overall survival and disease-free survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier Method. The median follow-up period was 16 months (range:2 to 41 months). Complete response was achieved in 30 (65%) patients, of which 22 patients received prophylactic cranial irradiations. Acute toxicities over grade III were granulocytopenia in 23 (50%), anemia in 17 (37%), thrombo-cytopenia in nine (20%), alopecia in nine (20%), nausea/vomiting in five (11%), and peripheral neuropathy in one (2%). Chemotherapy was delayed in one patient, and the chemotherapy doses were reduced in 58 (24%) out of the total 246 cycles. No radiation esophagitis over grade III was observed, while interruption during radiation therapy for a mean of 8.3 days occurred in 21 patients. The local recurrences were observed in 8 patients and local progressions were in 6 patients, and the distant metastases in 17 patients. Among these, four patients had both the local relapse and the distant metastasis. Brain was the most common metastatic site (10 patients), followed by the liver as the next common site (4 patients). The

  14. Systemic chemotherapy with doxorubicin, cisplatin and capecitabine for metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang Soo-Mee

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although numerous chemotherapeutic agents have been tested, the role of systemic chemotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has not been clarified. New therapeutic strategies are thus needed to improve outcomes, and we designed this study with new effective drug combination. Methods Twenty-nine patients with histologically-confirmed, metastatic HCC received a combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin 60 mg/m2 and cisplatin 60 mg/m2 on day 1, plus capecitabine 2000 mg/m2/day as an intermittent regimen of 2 weeks of treatment followed by a 1-week rest. Results The median age was 49 years (range, 32–64 and 19 patients were hepatitis B virus seropositive. Child-Pugh class was A in all patients and 4 had Zubrod performance status of 2. The objective response rate was 24% (95% CI 9–40 with 6 stable diseases. The chemotherapy was generally well tolerated despite one treatment-related death. Conclusion Combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin, cisplatin and capecitabine produced modest antitumor activity with tolerable adverse effects in patients with metastatic HCC.

  15. Monstrous cell in malignant gliomas. In relation to radiation and chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogashiwa, M; Takeuchi, K; Akai, K [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1981-06-01

    The pathological effects of irradiation and chemotherapy have been studied in 9 autopsy cases of malignant and low grade gliomas. The brains have been examined by means of the complete study technique. Many histological features have been related to surgery, grading of histological classification of gliomas, irradiation and chemotherapy. Following irradiation and chemotherapy, in addition to increased necrosis and vascular response, a variety of characteristic changes were observed in cell and nuclear morphology with prominent formation of monstrous cells in all of 5 malignant gliomas treated with nitrosourea. These monstrous cells had irregular and hyperchromatic multinuclei and showed cytoplasmic degeneration. These cells which had no direct relationship to vessels distributed both in the periphery of tumor or necrosis and in the white matter remote from the main tumor. These changes were more pronounced in autopsy than in biopsy. The features showed here indicate that the monstrous cells may appear due to the result of inhibition of tumor cell division at the late mitotic phase after irradiation and chemotherapy.

  16. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and pathologic response: a retrospective cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Diocésio Alves Pinto de [Instituto Oncológico de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Zucca-Matthes, Gustavo; Vieira, René Aloísio da Costa [Hospital de Câncer de Barretos, Barretos, SP (Brazil); Andrade, Cristiane Thomaz de Aquino Exel de [Instituto Oncológico de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Costa, Allini Mafra da [Hospital de Câncer de Barretos, Barretos, SP (Brazil); Monteiro, Aurélio Julião de Castro [Instituto Oncológico de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Lago, Lissandra Dal [Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Nunes, João Soares [Hospital de Câncer de Barretos, Barretos, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the complete pathologic response attained by patients diagnosed with locally advanced breast cancer submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on the doxorubicin/ cyclophosphamide regimen followed by paclitaxel. A retrospective cohort of patients with locally advanced breast cancer, admitted to the Hospital de Câncer de Barretos between 2006 and 2008 submitted to the doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide protocol followed by paclitaxel (4 cycles of doxorubicin 60mg/m{sup 2} and cyclophosphamide 600mg/m{sup 2} every 21 days; 4 cycles of paclitaxel 175mg/m{sup 2} every 21 days). The following variables were assessed: age, menopause, performance status, initial clinical staging, anthropometric data, chemotherapy (dose – duration), toxicity profile, post-treatment staging, surgery, pathologic complete response rate, disease-free survival, and pathological characteristics (type and histological degree, hormonal profile and lymph node involvement). Statistical analysis was performed using a 5% level of significance. Of the 434 patients evaluated, 136 were excluded due to error in staging or because they had received another type of chemotherapy. Median age was 50 years, all with performance status 0-1. Median initial clinical size of tumor was 65mm and the median final clinical size of the tumor was 22mm. Fifty-one (17.1%) patients experienced a pathologic complete response. Those with a negative hormonal profile or who were triple-negative (negative Her-2 and hormonal profile) experienced a favorable impact on the pathologic complete response. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with doxorubicin/ cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel provided a pathologic complete response in the population studied in accordance with that observed in the literature. Triple-negative patients had a greater chance of attaining this response.

  17. Patient expectancy and post-chemotherapy nausea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colagiuri, Ben; Zachariae, Robert

    2010-01-01

    to determine the strength of the relationship between expectancy and post-chemotherapy nausea. METHODS: The findings from 17 relevant studies (n = 2,400) identified through systematic searches of Medline, PsycInfo, and Cinhal were analyzed using a combination of meta-analytic techniques. RESULTS: Overall...

  18. Efficacy and toxicity of adjuvant chemotherapy in elderly patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, C M; Nielsen, D; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elderly patients with primary colorectal cancer (CRC) are less frequently treated with adjuvant chemotherapy than younger patients due to concerns regarding toxicity and efficiency. We investigated how age, performance status (PS) and comorbidity influence treatment outcomes. PATIENTS...... AND METHODS: A retrospective single-centre study of 529 patients with stages II-III CRC treated with adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil/capecitabine+/÷oxaliplatin) from 2001 to 2011 at Herlev Hospital, Denmark. Baseline characteristics, chemotherapy and outcome were analysed with respect to age after......-dependent difference in 3-year disease-free survival (DFS; HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.47, p=0.59), in grade 3-5 toxicity (29% vs 28%, p=0.86) or in 10-year CRC mortality (28%, HR 1.07, p=0.71). In elderly patients, a reduction in chemotherapy dose intensity compared with full dose had no impact on DFS or CRC mortality...

  19. Chemotherapy-induced pulmonary hypertension: role of alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Günther, Sven; Quarck, Rozenn; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Dorfmüller, Peter; Antigny, Fabrice; Dumas, Sébastien J; Raymond, Nicolas; Lau, Edmund; Savale, Laurent; Jaïs, Xavier; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Stenmark, Kurt; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Perros, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is an uncommon form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by progressive obstruction of small pulmonary veins and a dismal prognosis. Limited case series have reported a possible association between different chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. We evaluated the relationship between chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. Cases of chemotherapy-induced PVOD from the French PH network and literature were reviewed. Consequences of chemotherapy exposure on the pulmonary vasculature and hemodynamics were investigated in three different animal models (mouse, rat, and rabbit). Thirty-seven cases of chemotherapy-associated PVOD were identified in the French PH network and systematic literature analysis. Exposure to alkylating agents was observed in 83.8% of cases, mostly represented by cyclophosphamide (43.2%). In three different animal models, cyclophosphamide was able to induce PH on the basis of hemodynamic, morphological, and biological parameters. In these models, histopathological assessment confirmed significant pulmonary venous involvement highly suggestive of PVOD. Together, clinical data and animal models demonstrated a plausible cause-effect relationship between alkylating agents and PVOD. Clinicians should be aware of this uncommon, but severe, pulmonary vascular complication of alkylating agents. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tumour chemotherapy strategy based on impulse control theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hai-Peng; Yang, Yan; Baptista, Murilo S; Grebogi, Celso

    2017-03-06

    Chemotherapy is a widely accepted method for tumour treatment. A medical doctor usually treats patients periodically with an amount of drug according to empirical medicine guides. From the point of view of cybernetics, this procedure is an impulse control system, where the amount and frequency of drug used can be determined analytically using the impulse control theory. In this paper, the stability of a chemotherapy treatment of a tumour is analysed applying the impulse control theory. The globally stable condition for prescription of a periodic oscillatory chemotherapeutic agent is derived. The permanence of the solution of the treatment process is verified using the Lyapunov function and the comparison theorem. Finally, we provide the values for the strength and the time interval that the chemotherapeutic agent needs to be applied such that the proposed impulse chemotherapy can eliminate the tumour cells and preserve the immune cells. The results given in the paper provide an analytical formula to guide medical doctors to choose the theoretical minimum amount of drug to treat the cancer and prevent harming the patients because of over-treating.This article is part of the themed issue 'Horizons of cybernetical physics'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Induction chemotherapy with nedaplatin with 5-FU followed by intensity-modulated radiotherapy concurrent with chemotherapy for locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Jijun; Wang Ge; Yang, G.Y.

    2010-01-01

    This Phase II study was conducted to evaluate the activity and feasibility of a regimen of nedaplatin and 5-fluorouracil as induction chemotherapy, followed by intensity-modulated radiotherapy concurrent with chemotherapy in patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy comprised two cycles of 5-fluorouracil at 700 mg/m 2 /day administered on days 1-4 as continuous intravenous infusion and nedaplatin (100 mg/m 2 administered intravenous (i.v.) over 2 h) given after the administration of 5-fluorouracil on day 1, repeated every 3 weeks, followed by intensity-modulated radiotherapy concurrent with nedaplatin. During intensity-modulated radiotherapy, nedaplatin was administered at a dose of 100 mg/m 2 intravenous infusion on days 1, 22 and 43, given -60 min before radiation. Fifty-nine (95.8%) of the 60 patients were assessable for response. Thirty-eight cases of complete response and 14 cases of partial response were confirmed after completion of chemoradiation, with the objective response rate of 86.7% (95% confidence interval (CI), 78.1-95.3%). The median follow-up period was 48 months (range, 30-62 months). The 3-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 75.0% (95% CI, 63.0-87.0%) and 85.5% (95% CI, 75.9-95.1%). No patient showed Grade 3 or higher renal dysfunction. The most commonly observed late effect was xerostomia, but the severity diminished over time, and the detectable xerostomia at 24 months was 10.2%. There were no treatment-related deaths during this study. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with nedaplatin and 5-fluorouracil followed by concomitant nedaplatin and intensity-modulated radiotherapy is an effective and safe treatment for Southern China patients affected by locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. (author)

  2. Adenosine triphosphate-based chemotherapy response assay (ATP-CRA)-guided platinum-based 2-drug chemotherapy for unresectable nonsmall-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yong Wha; Choi, Sung Ho; Kim, Yong Tai; Sohn, Joo Hyuk; Chang, Joon; Kim, Se Kyu; Park, Moo Suk; Chung, Kyung Young; Lee, Hyoun Ju; Kim, Joo-Hang

    2007-05-01

    The study investigated correlations between adenosine triphosphate / chemotherapy response assay (ATP-CRA) and clinical outcomes after ATP-CRA-guided platinum-based chemotherapy for unresectable nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The authors performed an in vitro chemosensitivity test, ATP-CRA, to evaluate the chemosensitivities of anticancer drugs such as cisplatin, carboplatin, paclitaxel, docetaxel, gemcitabine, and vinorelbine for chemonaive, unresectable NSCLC. The cell death rate was determined by measuring the intracellular ATP levels of drug-exposed cells compared with untreated controls. A sensitive drug was defined as a drug producing 30% or more reduction in ATP compared with untreated controls. Assay-guided platinum-based 2-drug chemotherapy was given to patients with pathologically confirmed NSCLC. Thirty-four patients were enrolled. Thirty tumor specimens were obtained by bronchoscopic biopsies and 4 obtained surgically. The median age was 61 years and 27 patients had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0-1. The response rate was 43.8%. At a median follow-up period of 16.9 months, the median progression-free and overall survivals were 3.6 and 11.2 months, respectively. Patients were dichotomized into the platinum-sensitive (S; 20 patients) and resistant (R; 14 patients) groups. The positive/negative predictive values were 61.1% and 78.6% with a predictive accuracy of 68.8%. Although without significant differences in pretreatment parameters, the S-group showed better clinical response (P=.036), longer progression-free survival (P=.060), and longer overall survival (P=.025). Despite using bronchoscopic biopsied specimens, ATP-CRA and clinical outcomes correlated well after assay-guided platinum-based 2-drug chemotherapy for unresectable NSCLC. There was a favorable response and survival in the platinum-sensitive vs resistant groups. Copyright (c) 2007 American Cancer Society

  3. Correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient and histopathology subtypes of osteosarcoma after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jifei; Sun, Meili; Liu, Dawei; Hu, Xiaoshu; Pui, Margaret H; Meng, Quanfei; Gao, Zhenhua

    2017-08-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has made limb-salvage surgery possible for the patients with osteosarcoma. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) has been used to monitor chemotherapy response. Purpose To correlate the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values with histopathology subtypes of osteosarcoma after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Material and Methods Twelve patients with osteoblastic (n = 7), chondroblastic (n = 4), and fibroblastic (n = 1) osteosarcomas underwent post-chemotherapy DWI before limb-salvage surgery. ADCs corresponding to 127 histological tissue samples from the 12 resected specimens were compared to histological features. Results The mean ADC value of non-cartilaginous viable tumor (38/91, ADC = 1.22 ± 0.03 × 10 -3  mm 2 /s) was significantly ( P  0.05) different between viable cartilaginous tumor and cystic/hemorrhagic necrosis. Conclusion DWI allows assessment of tumor necrosis after neoadjuvant chemotherapy by ADC differences between viable tumor and necrosis in fibroblastic and osteoblastic osteosarcomas whereas viable chondroblastic osteosarcoma has high ADC and cannot be distinguished reliably from necrosis.

  4. [MODERN APPROACHES TO THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF CHEMOTHERAPY TOXICITY IN PATIENTS WITH BREAST CANCER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvak, L A; Hubareva, H O; Filonenko, K S; Majdanevych, N M; Aleksyk, O M; Lyalkin, S A; Klimanov, M J; Askolskyi, A V; Kasap, N V

    2015-01-01

    The use of modern chemotherapy (CT) allowed to achieve significant progress in the treatment of many malignant tumors that were previously considered fatal. Improving the efficiency of the treatment was achieved by the intensification of chemotherapy. However, intensification of chemotherapy regimes provoked increase in the number of side effects of anticancer therapy,which often lead to a decrease in the intensity of the selected mode, the additional financial costs of treating the complications and the formation of the negative attitude of the patient to treatment. Thus, the side effects of chemotherapy are the actual problem of modern oncology. The purpose of this literature review was to investigate the frequency, symptoms and ways to prevent and treat various types of toxicity of chemotherapy.

  5. Transarterial Infusion Chemotherapy Using Cisplatin-Lipiodol Suspension With or Without Embolization for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Aikata, Hiroshi; Takaki, Shintaro; Katamura, Yoshio; Hiramatsu, Akira; Waki, Koji; Takahashi, Shoichi; Hieda, Masashi; Toyota, Naoyuki; Ito, Katsuhide; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate the long-term prognosis and prognostic factors in patients treated with transarterial infusion chemotherapy using cisplatin-lipiodol (CDDP/LPD) suspension with or without embolization for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Study subjects were 107 patients with HCC treated with repeated transarterial infusion chemotherapy alone using CDDP/LPD (adjusted as CDDP 10mg/LPD 1ml). The median number of transarterial infusion procedures was two (range, one to nine), the mean dose of CDDP per transarterial infusion chemotherapy session was 30 mg (range, 5.0-67.5 mg), and the median total dose of transarterial infusion chemotherapy per patient was 60 mg (range, 10-390 mg). Survival rates were 86% at 1 year, 40% at 3 years, 20% at 5 years, and 16% at 7 years. For patients with >90% LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy, rates were 98% at 1 year, 60% at 3 years, and 22% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis identified >90% LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy (p = 0.001), absence of portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT; p < 0.001), and Child-Pugh class A (p = 0.012) as independent determinants of survival. Anaphylactic shock was observed in two patients, at the fifth transarterial infusion chemotherapy session in one and the ninth in the other. In conclusion, transarterial infusion chemotherapy with CDDP/LPD appears to be a useful treatment option for patients with unresectable HCC without PVTT and in Child-Pugh class A. LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy is an important prognostic factor. Careful consideration should be given to the possibility of anaphylactic shock upon repeat infusion with CDDP/LPD.

  6. The effects of sequence and type of chemotherapy and radiation therapy on cosmesis and complications after breast conservation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markiewicz, Deborah A.; Schultz, Delray J.; Haas, Jonathan A.; Harris, Eleanor E. R.; Fox, Kevin R.; Glick, John H.; Solin, Lawrence J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Chemotherapy plays an increasingly important role in the treatment of both node-negative and node-positive breast cancer patients, but the optimal sequencing of chemotherapy and radiation therapy is not well established. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the interaction of sequence and type of chemotherapy and hormonal therapy given with radiation therapy on the cosmetic outcome and the incidence of complications of Stage I and II breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 1053 Stage I and II breast cancer patients treated with curative intent with breast-conserving surgery, axillary dissection, and radiation therapy between 1977-1991 were reviewed. Median follow-up after treatment was 6.7 years. Two hundred fourteen patients received chemotherapy alone, 141 patients received hormonal therapy alone, 86 patients received both, and 612 patients received no adjuvant therapy. Patients who received chemotherapy ± hormonal therapy were grouped according to sequence of chemotherapy: (a) concurrent = concurrent chemotherapy with radiation therapy followed by chemotherapy; (b) sequential = radiation followed by chemotherapy or chemotherapy followed by radiation; and (c) sandwich = chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemotherapy and radiation followed by chemotherapy. Compared to node negative patients, node-positive patients more commonly received chemotherapy (77 vs. 9%, p < 0.0001) and/or hormonal therapy (40 vs. 14%, p < 0.0001). Among patients who received chemotherapy, the majority (243 patients) received concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy with two cycles of cytoxan and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) administered during radiation followed by six cycles of chemotherapy with cytoxan, 5-fluorouracil and either methotrexate(CMF) or doxorubicin(CAF). For analysis of cosmesis, patients included were relapse free with 3 years minimum follow-up. Results: The use of chemotherapy had an adverse effect

  7. Clinical predictors of anticipatory emesis in patients treated with chemotherapy at a tertiary care cancer hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Fawad; Shafi, Azhar; Ali, Sheeraz; Siddiqui, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical predictors of anticipatory emesis in patients treated with chemotherapy at a tertiary care cancer hospital. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 200 patients undergoing first line chemotherapy with minimum of two cycles at inpatient department and chemotherapy bay of Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre Pakistan. Anticipatory nausea and vomiting develops before administration of chemotherapy. Clinical signs and symp...

  8. Metronomic chemotherapy – promising therapeutical approach for recurrent/ refractory high risk tumours in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deak, L.; Feketeova, J.; Haluskova, V.; Sencakova, I.; Jenco, I.; Oravkinova, I.

    2011-01-01

    Despite a great progress in the treatment of pediatric malignancies, the outcome of children with high risk refractory or relapsed tumours, as are some types of brain tumours or metastatic sarcomas, remain poor. In contrast to dose – intensified chemotherapy, utilizing „maximal tolerated doses“ of chemotherapy, the metronomic chemotherapy (MC) is based on chronic administration of significantly lower doses of chemotherapy in an uninterrupted manner, for prolonged periods. Because of different mechanism of action against conventional chemotherapy and no cross- resistance, this treatment modality is effective also in refractory and recurrent tumours. The predominant mechanism of action of MC is antiangiogenic. In last decades several studies confirmed the efficacy and low toxicity of this new treatment modality. It can be delivered on outpatient basis and is well tolerated even in heavily pretreated patients. The authors present an overview of studies on MC in pediatric oncology and their own experience. (author)

  9. Thalidomide for control delayed vomiting in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Z.; Sun, X.; Du, X.

    2016-01-01

    To explore the efficacy and safety of thalidomide for the treatment of delayed vomiting, induced by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Study Design: Randomized, double-blind controlled study. Place and Duration of Study: The Oncology Department of Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical University, Jiangsu Xuzhou, China, from January 2012 to January 2014. Methodology: A total of 78 cancer patients, who had delayed vomiting observed from 24 hours to 1 week after chemotherapy, were included in the study. Patients were divided in a treatment group (40 patients, 51.28%) and a control group (38 patients, 48.71%). The treatment group received thalidomide at an oral dose of 100 mg per night; 50 mg was added daily up to a dose of 200 mg per night, if the curative effect was suboptimal and the medicine was tolerated. Both the treatment and the control groups received a drip of 10 mg azasetron 30 minutes before chemotherapy. The control group only proportions of antiemetic effects and adverse reactions were compared using the ?2 test. Antiemetic effects and adverse reactions were assessed from Odds Ratios (OR) with 95% Confidence Intervals(95% CI). Results: The effective control rate of delayed vomiting in the treatment group was significantly higher than that in the control group (?2=5.174, p=0.023). No significant difference was found between the two groups in other adverse effects of chemotherapy. Karnofsky scores or the overall self-evaluation of the patients (p>0.05). Conclusion: Thalidomide can effectively control the delayed vomiting of cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and the adverse reactions of the agent can be tolerated.

  10. Chemotherapy increases caspase-cleaved cytokeratin 18 in the serum of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulukaya, Engin; Karaagac, Esra; Ari, Ferda; Oral, Arzu Y.; Adim, Saduman B.; Tokullugil, Asuman H.; Evrensel, Türkkan

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is thought to be induced by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Therefore, the measurement of its amplitude may be a useful tool to predict the effectiveness of cancer treatment sooner than conventional methods do. In the study presented, apoptosis was assessed with an ELISA-based assay in which caspase-cleaved cytokeratin 18 (M30-antigen), a novel specific biomarker of apoptosis, is measured. Thirty seven patients with malignant (nonmetastatic and metastatic) breast cancer, 35 patients with benign breast disease, and 34 healthy subjects were studied. Cancer patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of either fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC) or epirubicin plus docetaxel (ED). Apoptosis was detected before chemotherapy, 24 and 48 h after chemotherapy in the malignant group. It was found that the baseline apoptosis level in either malignant but nonmetastatic group or benign group was not statistically different from that in the control group (p>0.05). However, it was statistically significantly higher in the metastatic group than that in the control group (p<0.05). Following the drug application, M30-antigen levels significantly increased at 24 h (p<0.05). The baseline M30-antigen levels increased about 3-times in patients showing tumor regression. M30-antigen level is increased after chemotherapy and its measurement may help clinicians to predict the effectiveness of chemotherapy sooner in breast cancer cases although confirmative larger trials are needed

  11. Chemotherapy options for the elderly patient with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennessy, B T

    2012-02-03

    Combination chemotherapy has been shown to improve overall survival compared with best supportive care in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The survival advantage is modest and was initially demonstrated with cisplatin-containing regimens in a large meta-analysis of randomized trials reported in 1995. Newer chemotherapy combinations have been shown to be better tolerated than older cisplatin-based combinations, and some trials have also shown greater efficacy and survival benefits with these newer combinations. Combination chemotherapy is, therefore, the currently accepted standard of care for patients with good performance statuses aged less than 70 years with advanced NSCLC. However, there are limited data from clinical trials to support the use of combination chemotherapy in elderly patients over 70 years of age with advanced NSCLC. Subgroup analyses of large randomized phase III trials suggest that elderly patients with good performance statuses do as well as younger patients treated with combination chemotherapy. There are few randomized trials reported that evaluate chemotherapy in patients aged greater than 70 years only. Based on data from trials performed by an Italian group, single-agent vinorelbine has been shown to have significant activity in elderly patients with advanced NSCLC and to be well tolerated by those patients with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance statuses of two or less, with associated improvements in measures of global health.

  12. Characteristics of breast cancer blood supply before and after chemotherapy with low-dose CT perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Juan; Lu Hong; Sheng Fugeng; Xing Xudong; Li Gongjie; Liu Baosheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the characteristics of breast cancer blood supply before and after chemotherapy with low-dose CT perfusion. Methods: Fifteen patients with breast cancer underwent CT breast perfusion examination, which was performed before and after chemotherapy within 1 week on Siemens Sensation 4 scanner with 120 kV and 50 mAs, 50 ml of nonionic contrast agent (320 mg I/ml) was injected at a flow rate of 4 ml/s with a power injector, Scan started after 8 seconds delay and data acquisition duration was 50 seconds. The blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and mean transfer time (MTT) of lesion and contralateral normal breast gland were calculated using Basama perfusion 3 software package before and after chemotherapy. At the same time, the tumor size before and after chemotherapy were measured and correlated with the BF values. The t test and non-parametric test were used for the statistics. Results: (1) The mean BF, BV and MTT of breast cancer were (33.20±4.17) ml·min -1 ·100 ml -1 , (8.31±2.43) ml· 100 ml -1 and (15.31±4.31) s respectively before chemotherapy, and (13.65±6.04) ml·min -1 · 100 ml -1 (5.04±2.33) ml·100 ml -1 and (25.97±9.07) s respectively after chemotherapy and there were statistically significant (P=0.000). The mean BF, BV and MTT of normal breast were (4.31±2.23) ml -1 , min -1 ·100 ml -1 , (1.38±0.75) ml·100 ml -1 and ( 19.25±3.94) s respectively before chemotherapy, and (4.03±2.35) ml·min -1 ·100 ml -1 , (1.44±0.84) ml·100 ml -1 , (22.56±7.71 ) s respectively after chemotherapy and there were not statistically significant (P>0.05). (2)The BF of breast cancer was higher than the normal breast before chemotherapy (P<0.01). (3)There was a positive correlation between the BF values and tumor size before and after chemotherapy (r=0.902, P=0.000). Conclusion: The BF value has a positive correlation with tumor size after chemotherapy, CT perfusion is more sensitive for the evaluation of chemotherapy response than morphologic

  13. Anxiety, depression in patients receiving chemotherapy for solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansoor, S.; Jehangir, S.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency of anxiety and depression in patients undergoing chemotherapy for solid tumors using Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS). Study Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Out-patient department of Armed Forces Institute of Mental Health, Rawalpindi from June 2011 to December 2011. Methodology: Consecutive non probability sampling technique was used to select patients of age (25-70 years), male or female, who had received atleast 03 cycles of chemotherapy for solid tumors. Those with history of prior psychiatric illness, current use of psychotropic medication or psychoactive substance use, and any major bereavement in past one year were excluded from the study. After taking informed consent, relevant socio- demographic data was collected and HADS was administered. HADS-A cut off score of 7 was taken as significant anxiety while a HADS-D cut off score of 7 was taken as significant depression. Results: The total number of participants was 209. The mean age of patients was 42.9 years, with 55.5% males and 44.5% females. Overall 33/209 (15.8%) patients had anxiety while 56/209 (26.8%) were found to have depression. There was a higher frequency of anxiety and depression in younger patients (less than age 40 years), females, patients who were single or divorced, and patients receiving chemotherapy for pancreatic carcinoma. Conclusion: Patients undergoing chemotherapy suffer from considerable levels of anxiety and depression, thus highlighting the need for specialized interventions. (author)

  14. Hemolytic uremic syndrome after high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lelie, H.; Baars, J. W.; Rodenhuis, S.; Van Dijk, M. A.; de Glas-Vos, C. W.; Thomas, B. L.; van Oers, R. H.; von dem Borne, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy intensification may lead to new forms of toxicity such as hemolytic uremic syndrome. METHODS: Three patients are described who developed this complication 4 to 6 months after high dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell support. The literature on this subject is

  15. Is intraperitoneal chemotherapy still an acceptable option in primary adjuvant chemotherapy for advanced ovarian cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, B J; Chan, J K

    2017-11-01

    The role of intraperitoneal (i.p.) chemotherapy in treating newly diagnosed advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has been the subject of controversy for almost three decades. Three large intergroup phase III trials (GOG 104, 114, 172) have demonstrated a survival benefit associated with i.p. over intravenous (i.v.) therapy in advanced, low-volume EOC. Despite the positive clinical trial results and a subsequent National Cancer Institute alert in 2006, i.p. treatment has not been widely accepted as the standard of care in the United States and is infrequently used in Europe. The hesitancy of clinicians to use i.p. therapy is likely attributed to higher toxicity, inconvenience, catheter complications, and clinical trial design issues. On the other hand, In a long-term follow-up report from these trials, we showed that the effect of i.p. chemotherapy extends beyond 10 years and that the more cycles of i.p. therapy portends for improved survival over similar cycles of i.v. therapy with younger patients having a higher likelihood of completing 6 cycles of i.p. More recently, a fourth randomized phase III trial, GOG 252, failed to show a survival advantage associated with i.p. cisplatin and i.p. carboplatin over dose-dense i.v. paclitaxel and carboplatin. Since the use of bevacizumab was incorporated in all arms of the study, this anti-vascular agent may have equalized or negated the clinical advantage of i.p. chemotherapy and dose-dense weekly as suggested in GOG 262. We are awaiting the results of the Asian iPocc trial comparing dose-dense paclitaxel to i.p. chemotherapy without bevacizumab, though the differences in the tumor histology and pharmacokinetics in Asian versus non-Asian patients may influence the interpretation of the results worldwide. In this review, we review the polarizing opinions on the relevance of i.p. therapy in today's clinical armamentarium. Never before, have oncologists examined the same datasets with divergent conclusions. This topic is

  16. The Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratio May Predict Benefit from Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Liu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the impact of the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR and platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR on overall survival (OS and to explore the value of changes in the NLR and PLR with treatment as a response indicator. Methods: A total of 934 patients were eligible for retrospective analysis between 2008 and 2014. The pretreatment and post-treatment PLR and NLR in all patients were calculated based on complete blood counts. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to determine the associations of the PLR and NLR with OS. Results: The pretreatment NLR and PLR were correlated with different disease status and response to chemotherapy. Patients with lower NLR and PLR had a significantly better complete response (CR rate to chemotherapy versus those with a higher NLR and PLR (p< 0.001. The NLR and PLR were sustained in patients who obtained a CR compared with moderate or poor response patients. The lower NLR of pretreatment was independently associated with a favourable prognosis in whole patients with lung cancer (HR: 0.69, 95% CI, 0.55-0.85, p< 0.001. In the patients under control after chemotherapy, the NLR of post-chemotherapy had a greater impact on survival, and the low NLR level maintained during chemotherapy was identified a predictor for favourable survival. PLR was not an independent prognostic indicator in the whole cohort or any subgroups. Conclusion: Our results suggested that NLR was well-connected with outcomes and response to chemotherapy in patients with lung cancer. As a response indicator, NLR may predict benefit from chemotherapy and improve patient selection.

  17. Smoking may modify the association between neoadjuvant chemotherapy and survival from ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Linda E; Warren, Graham W; Koziak, Jennifer M; Köbel, Martin; Steed, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco smoking by cancer patients is associated with increased mortality. Less is known of the impact of smoking on recurrence risk and interaction with chemotherapy treatment. We examined these associations in ovarian cancer. Patients were identified from the Alberta Cancer Registry between 1978 and 2010 and were oversampled for less-common histologic ovarian tumor types. Medical records were abstracted for 678 eligible patients on lifestyle, medical and cancer treatment, and review of pathology slides was performed for 605 patients. We estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age at diagnosis, race, stage and residual disease. Among patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (N=432), current smoking was significantly associated with shorter duration of overall (OS; HR, 8.56; 95% CI, 1.50-48.7) and progression-free (PFS; HR, 5.74; 95% CI, 1.05-31.4) survival from mucinous ovarian cancer only. There was no significant association between neoadjuvant chemotherapy and survival. However, among patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (N=44), current smokers had shorter PFS (HR, 4.32; 95% CI, 1.36-13.8; N=32 progressed/9 censored events) compared to never smokers, but the HRs were not statistically different across smoking categories (P interaction=0.87). Adverse associations were observed between smoking status and OS or PFS among patients with mucinous ovarian cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. No significant effect was found from neoadjuvant chemotherapy on PFS overall; however, smoking may modify this association. Although needing replication, these findings suggest that patients may benefit from smoking cessation interventions prior to treatment with chemotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Health Resource Utilization in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Receiving Chemotherapy in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the preferred treatment regimen for advanced lung cancer patients. This study investigated the health resources utilized by and medical expenses of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as well as the influence of various chemotherapy regimens on the final medical costs in China. The aim of this study was to provide physicians with a reference to use as the basis for their choice of treatment. Data were collected from the Shanghai Chest Hospital's medical charts and billing database. The collected patient information included the baseline characteristics, medical history, chemotherapy regimens, and medical costs, which were used to estimate the health resources utilized by patients and the cost of treatment. This study included 328 patients, and the average total medical cost was $US14,165. This cost included drugs, which accounted for as much as 78.91% of the total cost, and chemotherapy drugs, which accounted for 51.58% of total drug expenses. The most frequently utilized chemotherapy drug was carboplatin, and the most expensive chemotherapy drug was erlotinib. In drug combinations, gemcitabine was utilized most frequently, the combination of gemcitabine and paclitaxel was the most expensive, and cisplatin was the least expensive drug. Epidermal growth factor receptor-positive patients were treated with targeted drug therapy (icotinib, erlotinib, and gefitinib). The use of recombinant human endostatin was often combined with a vinorelbine plus cisplatin regimen. Traditional Chinese medicines were the most frequently utilized non-chemotherapy drugs, and these drugs were also the most expensive. The final cost significantly depended on the specific chemotherapy regimen; thus, the rationale and cost of the chemotherapy regimen and adjuvant chemotherapy should be considered in patients with advanced NSCLC.

  19. Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Chemotherapy-Induced Myelosuppression and Febrile Neutropenia in Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Title. Chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression lowers the quality of life in breast cancer patients and causes many complications. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM is a widely used complementary and alternative medicine therapies. Objective. To study whether TCM can reduce the incidence of chemotherapy-induced leukopenia, neutropenia, and febrile neutropenia (FN in breast cancer patients. Methods. The data were analyzed retrospectively between patients who received TCM treatment (group 1, n=453 and patients who did not receive TCM treatment (group 2, n=359. Significant risk factors associated with the occurrence of chemotherapy-induced leukopenia, neutropenia, and FN were identified using multivariate analysis. Propensity score-matched patients were analyzed to adjust for any baseline differences. Results. Group 1 patients had a significantly lower rate of chemotherapy-induced severe leukopenia, neutropenia, and FN, compared with group 2 (43% versus 71%, P<0.0001, 72% versus 78%, P=0.005, 6% versus 24%, P<0.0001, resp.. Multivariate analysis revealed that chemotherapy regimens containing anthracyclines combined with paclitaxel or docetaxel were the most significant predictor. Subgroup analysis indicated that TCM treatment showed benefit in relieving chemotherapy-induced leukopenia and FN in most chemotherapy regimens. Conclusions. TCM treatment could lower the risk of severe chemotherapy-induced leukopenia, neutropenia, and FN in breast cancer patients.

  20. Prevalence, putative mechanisms, and current management of sleep problems during chemotherapy for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palesh O

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxana Palesh,1 Luke Peppone,2 Pasquale F Innominato,3–5 Michelle Janelsins,2 Monica Jeong,1 Lisa Sprod,7 Josee Savard,6 Max Rotatori,1 Shelli Kesler,1 Melinda Telli,1 Karen Mustian21Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 2University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA; 3INSERM, UMRS 776, Biological Rhythms and Cancers, Villejuif, France; 4Faculty of Medicine, Universite Paris Sud, le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France; 5APHP, Chronotherapy Unit, Department of Oncology, Paul Brousse Hospital, Villejuif, France; 6Laval University, Quebec, Canada; 7University of North Carolina, Wilmington, NC, USAAbstract: Sleep problems are highly prevalent in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. This article reviews existing evidence on etiology, associated symptoms, and management of sleep problems associated with chemotherapy treatment during cancer. It also discusses limitations and methodological issues of current research. The existing literature suggests that subjectively and objectively measured sleep problems are the highest during the chemotherapy phase of cancer treatments. A possibly involved mechanism reviewed here includes the rise in the circulating proinflammatory cytokines and the associated disruption in circadian rhythm in the development and maintenance of sleep dysregulation in cancer patients during chemotherapy. Various approaches to the management of sleep problems during chemotherapy are discussed with behavioral intervention showing promise. Exercise, including yoga, also appear to be effective and safe at least for subclinical levels of sleep problems in cancer patients. Numerous challenges are associated with conducting research on sleep in cancer patients during chemotherapy treatments and they are discussed in this review. Dedicated intervention trials, methodologically sound and sufficiently powered, are needed to test current and novel treatments of sleep problems in cancer patients

  1. Antimicrobial chemotherapy and Sustainable Development: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial chemotherapy and Sustainable Development: The past, The Current Trend, and the futu. ... Within the past half century, a wide variety of antimicrobial substances have been discovered, designed and synthesized; literally hundreds of drugs have been successfully used in some fashion over the years. Today ...

  2. Efficacy and safety of rolapitant for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting over multiple cycles of moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Bernardo; Schwartzberg, Lee; Chasen, Martin; Powers, Dan; Arora, Sujata; Navari, Rudolph; Schnadig, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Rolapitant, a novel neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist (RA), was shown to protect against delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) during the first cycle of moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC) or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) in randomized, double-blind trials. This analysis explored the efficacy and safety of rolapitant in preventing CINV over multiple cycles of MEC or HEC. Patients in one phase III MEC, one phase II HEC, and two phase III HEC clinical trials were randomized to receive oral rolapitant (180 mg) or placebo in combination with a 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 RA and dexamethasone. Regardless of response in cycle 1, patients could continue the same antiemetic treatment for up to six cycles. On days 6-8 of each subsequent chemotherapy cycle, patients reported the incidence of emesis and/or nausea interfering with normal daily life. Post hoc analyses of pooled safety and efficacy data from the four trials were performed for cycles 2-6. Significantly more patients receiving rolapitant than control reported no emesis or interfering nausea (combined measure) in cycles 2 (p = 0.006), 3 (p cycles 1-6, time-to-first emesis was significantly longer with rolapitant than with control (p cycles 2-6 was similar in rolapitant (5.5%) and control (6.8%) arms. No cumulative toxicity was observed. Over multiple cycles of MEC or HEC, rolapitant provided superior CINV protection and reduced emesis and nausea interfering with daily life compared with control and remained well tolerated. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessing Prediction Performance of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response in Bladder Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cremer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is a treatment routinely prescribed to patients diagnosed with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Unfortunately, not all patients are responsive to this treatment and would greatly benefit from an accurate prediction of their expected response to chemotherapy. In this project, I attempt to develop a model that will predict response using tumour microarray data. I show that using my dataset, every method is insufficient at accurately classifying responders and non-respond...

  4. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid Retention)

    Science.gov (United States)

    N ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Swelling (Fluid retention) “My hands and feet were swollen and puffy. My nurse helped me understand why I had to stop eating salty ...

  5. Treatment of a solid tumor using engineered drug-resistant immunocompetent cells and cytotoxic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Anindya; Shields, Jordan E; Spencer, H Trent

    2012-07-01

    Multimodal therapy approaches, such as combining chemotherapy agents with cellular immunotherapy, suffers from potential drug-mediated toxicity to immune effector cells. Overcoming such toxic effects of anticancer cellular products is a potential critical barrier to the development of combined therapeutic approaches. We are evaluating an anticancer strategy that focuses on overcoming such a barrier by genetically engineering drug-resistant variants of immunocompetent cells, thereby allowing for the coadministration of cellular therapy with cytotoxic chemotherapy, a method we refer to as drug-resistant immunotherapy (DRI). The strategy relies on the use of cDNA sequences that confer drug resistance and recombinant lentiviral vectors to transfer nucleic acid sequences into immunocompetent cells. In the present study, we evaluated a DRI-based strategy that incorporates the immunocompetent cell line NK-92, which has intrinsic antitumor properties, genetically engineered to be resistant to both temozolomide and trimetrexate. These immune effector cells efficiently lysed neuroblastoma cell lines, which we show are also sensitive to both chemotherapy agents. The antitumor efficacy of the DRI strategy was demonstrated in vivo, whereby neuroblastoma-bearing NOD/SCID/γ-chain knockout (NSG) mice treated with dual drug-resistant NK-92 cell therapy followed by dual cytotoxic chemotherapy showed tumor regression and significantly enhanced survival compared with animals receiving either nonengineered cell-based therapy and chemotherapy, immunotherapy alone, or chemotherapy alone. These data show there is a benefit to using drug-resistant cellular therapy when combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy approaches.

  6. Sentinel node biopsy before neoadjuvant chemotherapy spares breast cancer patients axillary lymph node dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijk, Maartje C; Nieweg, Omgo E; Rutgers, Emiel J T; Oldenburg, Hester S A; Olmos, Renato Valdés; Hoefnagel, Cornelis A; Kroon, Bin B R

    2006-04-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients is a valuable method to determine the efficacy of chemotherapy and potentially downsize the primary tumor, which facilitates breast-conserving therapy. In 18 studies published about sentinel node biopsy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the sentinel node was identified in on average 89%, and the false-negative rate was on average 10%. Because of these mediocre results, no author dares to omit axillary clearance just yet. In our institute, sentinel lymph node biopsy is performed before neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate our experience with this approach. Sentinel node biopsy was performed before neoadjuvant chemotherapy in 25 T2N0 patients by using lymphoscintigraphy, a gamma ray detection probe, and patent blue dye. Axillary lymph node dissection was performed after chemotherapy if the sentinel node contained metastases. Ten patients had a tumor-positive axillary sentinel node, and one patient had an involved lateral intramammary node. Four patients had additional involved nodes in the completion lymph node dissection specimen. The other 14 patients (56%) had a tumor-negative sentinel node and did not undergo axillary lymph node dissection. No recurrences have been observed after a median follow-up of 18 months. Fourteen (56%) of the 25 patients were spared axillary lymph node dissection when the sentinel node was found to be disease free. Performing sentinel node biopsy before neoadjuvant chemotherapy seems successful and reliable in patients with T2N0 breast cancer.

  7. Treatment of primary brain lymphoma without immune deficiency, The importance of chemotherapy before radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keihani M

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find a more efficacious treatment for patients with primary central nervous system Lymphoma using chemotherapy. The objective was to determine the optimal time for radiotherapy treatment in relation to chemotherapy. Retrospective evaluation in patients with brain lymphoma was conducted from 1992 to 1998. Twenty-three patients were evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups based on the timing of radiotherapy in relation to the chemotherapy. The first group of patients (n=13 initially received radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy. Five of these patients receied classic CHOP (cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicine, Vincistine and Prednisone, six patients received Cis-platin (60 Megs/M2 and Etoposide (120 Megs/M2 and two patients received Cis-platin (60 Megs/M2, Etoposide (120 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine (600 Megs/M2 every 2 to 3 weeks. The second group of patients (Group II, n=10 received the followeing treatment regimen: a course of BCNU 120 Megs/M2 with Ifosfamide 1200 Megs/M2, Mesna and Etoposide 120 Megs/M2 on the first day of treatment (course A. Two weeks later, treatment was continued with a course of Cis-platin 35 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine 600 Megs/M2 (course B. The treatment was continued 14 days later with a course of Mitoxantron 12 Megs/M2, Ifosfamide 1200 Megs/M2 puls Mesna (course C. After the fourth week of chemotherapy, these patients received radiotherapy to the brain (5000 RADS in 4 weeks. During radiotherapy and at the beginning of course chemotherapy, intrathecal therapy with Methorexate 12 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine 60 Megs/M2 was given. Immediately after radiotherapy, the same chemothotrexate 12 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine 60 Megs/M2 was given. Immediately after radiotherapy, the same chemotherapy treatment was repeated to a total of 3 times. After complete clearance of the tumor determined by MRI and absence of tumor cells in the spinal fluid, the chemotherapeutic regimen was repeated one last time. The

  8. Moxibustion for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced leukopenia: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Tae-Young; Lee, Myeong Soo; Ernst, Edzard

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of moxibustion as a treatment of chemotherapy-induced leukopenia. Twelve databases were searched from their inception through June 2014, without a language restriction. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were included if moxibustion was used as the sole treatment or as a part of a combination therapy with conventional drugs for leukopenia induced by chemotherapy. Cochrane criteria were used to assess the risk of bias. Six RCTs with a total of 681 patients met our inclusion criteria. All of the included RCTs were associated with a high risk of bias. The trials included patients with various types of cancer receiving ongoing chemotherapy or after chemotherapy. The results of two RCTs suggested the effectiveness of moxibustion combined with chemotherapy vs. chemotherapy alone. In four RCTs, moxibustion was more effective than conventional drug therapy. Six RCTs showed that moxibustion was more effective than various types of control interventions in increasing white blood cell counts. There is low level of evidence based on these six trials that demonstrates the superiority of moxibustion over drug therapies in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced leukopenia. However, the number of trials, the total sample size, and the methodological quality are too low to draw firm conclusions. Future RCTs appear to be warranted.

  9. Evaluation of radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment in patients of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannomiya, Eduardo Kazuo; Medici Filho, Edmundo; Moraes, Luiz Cesar de; Castilho, Julio Cezar de Melo; Furukawa, Souhei

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, 1042 cases where reviewed in School Dentistry - Osaka Univ. Seven hundred and fifteen were male and three hundred and twenty-seven were female. Ora cancer was affected more male than female patients, with mean age of 582 years old. The tongue was the most common anatomic localization of oral cancer. In tongue, the use of external radiotherapy y combined with brachytherapy and brachytherapy isolated presented better results than chemotherapy combined with external radiotherapy. In buccal mucosa, there was not differences in the treatment's results using external radiotherapy and combined chemotherapy and external radiotherapy. In tongue's floor and upper and jaw gingiva the combined treatment with chemotherapy and external radiotherapy presented better results than isolated external radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Intratumoral chemotherapy for lung cancer: re-challenge current targeted therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hohenforst-Schmidt W

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang Hohenforst-Schmidt,1 Paul Zarogoulidis,2,3 Kaid Darwiche,3 Thomas Vogl,4 Eugene P Goldberg,5 Haidong Huang,6 Michael Simoff,7 Qiang Li,6 Robert Browning,8 J Francis Turner,9 Patrick Le Pivert,10 Dionysios Spyratos,2 Konstantinos Zarogoulidis,2 Seyhan I Celikoglu,11 Firuz Celikoglu,11 Johannes Brachmann11II Medical Clinic, Coburg Hospital, University of Wuerzburg, Coburg, Germany; 2Pulmonary Department-Oncology Unit, G Papanikolaou General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 3Department of Interventional Pneumology, Ruhrlandklinik, West German Lung Center, University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany; 4Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany; 5Biomaterials Science and Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, FL, USA; 6Department of Respiratory Diseases, Changhai Hospital/First Affiliated Hospital of the Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 7Bronchoscopy and Interventional Pulmonology, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Henry Ford Hospital, Wayne State University, School of Medicine, MI, USA; 8Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Interventional Pulmonology, National Naval Medical Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Bethesda, USA; 9Pulmonary Medicine, University of Nevada School of Medicine, National Supercomputing Center for Energy and the Environment University of Nevada, Las Vegas, USA; 10Interventional Drug Delivery Systems and Strategies (ID2S2, Medical Cryogenics, Jupiter, FL, USA; 11Pulmonary Department, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul, Istanbul, TurkeyAbstract: Strategies to enhance the already established doublet chemotherapy regimen for lung cancer have been investigated for more than 20 years. Initially, the concept was to administer chemotherapy drugs locally to the tumor site for efficient diffusion

  11. Progress in Personalizing Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S. Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum-based chemotherapy is commonly used for the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic bladder cancer. However, there are currently no methods to predict chemotherapy response in this disease setting. A better understanding of the biology of bladder cancer has led to developments of molecular biomarkers that may help guide clinical decision making. These biomarkers, while promising, have not yet been validated in prospective trials and are not ready for clinical applications. As alkylating agents, platinum drugs kill cancer cells mainly through induction of DNA damage. A microdosing approach is currently being tested to determine if chemoresistance can be identified by measuring platinum-induced DNA damage using highly sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry technology. The hope is that these emerging strategies will help pave the road towards personalized therapy in advanced bladder cancer.

  12. Intestinal response to myeloablative chemotherapy in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Peter Erik Lotko; Shen, René Liang; Petersen, Bodil L

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced myeloablation prior to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) may be associated with severe toxicity. The current understanding of the pathophysiology of oral and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity is largely derived from studies in rodents and very little...... is known from humans, especially children. We hypothesized that milk-fed piglets can be used as a clinically relevant model of GI-toxicity related to a standard conditioning chemotherapy (intravenous busulfan, Bu plus cyclophosphamide, Cy) used prior to HSCT. In study 1, dose-response relationships were....../kg) and bone marrow was collected on day 11. Histology of bone marrow samples showed total aplasia after treatment A. Using this treatment in study 2, Bu-Cy pigs showed lowered spleen and intestinal weights and variable clinical signs of dehydration, sepsis, and pneumonia at tissue collection. Oral mucositis...

  13. BNP predicts chemotherapy-related cardiotoxicity and death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Hasbak, Philip; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    ventriculography (MUGA) or echocardiography. However, the plasma cardiac biomarker B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) has been suggested for early identification of cardiac dysfunction. The aim of the study was to compare LVEF obtained by MUGA and plasma BNP as predictors of developing congestive heart failure (CHF...... death. In multivariate Cox analysis both BNP and LVEF were independent predictors of CHF while age remained the only independent predictor of overall death. CONCLUSION: In cancer patients treated with cardiotoxic chemotherapy both BNP and LVEF can significantly predict subsequent hospitalization...... with CHF. In addition, BNP and not LVEF has a prognostic value in detecting overall death. This prospective study based on the hitherto largest study population supports BNP as a clinical relevant method for monitoring chemotherapy-related cardiac failure and death....

  14. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Nausea and Vomiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    N ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Nausea and Vomiting “I take medicine so I won’t feel sick ...

  15. Pathogenesis-based treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting--two new agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navari, Rudolph M

    2003-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is associated with a significant deterioration in quality of life. The emetogenicity of the chemotherapeutic agents, repeated chemotherapy cycles, and patient risk factors (female gender, younger age, alcohol consumption, history of motion sickness) are the major risk factors for CINV. The use of 5-hydroxytryptamine3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists plus dexamethasone has significantly improved the control of acute CINV, but delayed nausea and vomiting remains a significant clinical problem. Although the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, dexamethasone, and metoclopramide have been used to prevent delayed CINV, only dexamethasone appears to have much efficacy with acceptable toxicity. Recent studies have introduced two new agents, palonosetron and aprepitant, for the prevention of both acute and delayed CINV. Palonosetron is a new 5-HT3 receptor antagonist with a longer half life and a higher binding affinity than older 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. It improves the complete response rate (no emesis, no need for rescue) of acute and delayed CINV in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy compared to the older 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. The other agent, aprepitant, is the first agent available in the new drug class of neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists. When added to a standard regimen of a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist and dexamethasone in patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy, it improves the complete response rate of acute CINV. Aprepitant also improves the complete response of delayed CINV when compared to placebo and when used in combination with dexamethasone compared to dexamethasone alone. Acute and delayed nausea may also be improved by aprepitant when used in combination with a 5-HT3 and dexamethasone prechemotherapy or with daily dosing for 3-5 days following chemotherapy. Based on these studies, new guidelines for the prevention of CINV are proposed. Future studies may consider the use of

  16. The effect of weight-based chemotherapy dosing in a cohort of gynecologic oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jean; Stephan, Jean-Marie; Freesmeier, Michele; Bender, David; Button, Anna; Goodheart, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    Many clinicians limit chemotherapy doses based on a maximum body surface area (BSA) of 2m(2). We sought to determine how chemotherapy-related toxicities compared between groups of patients that varied with respect to BSA. We hypothesized that obese patients receiving weight-based (WB) dosing would not have significantly higher chemotherapy-related toxicities than control groups. We performed a retrospective review of patients with BSA≥2m(2) who received WB chemotherapy for a gynecologic cancer between January and August 2013. Subjects were matched with two controls: patients with BSAGynecologic cancer patients with BSA≥2m(2) treated with WB chemotherapy had no increase in hematologic or non-hematologic toxicities when compared to controls. Consideration should be given to using WB dosing in obese patients with gynecologic malignancies. Further investigation is required to determine the effect of WB dosing on progression-free and overall survival in obese gynecologic cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemotherapy in Old Women with Breast Cancer: Is Age Still a Predictor for Under Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meresse, Mégane; Bouhnik, Anne-Déborah; Bendiane, Marc-Karim; Retornaz, Frédérique; Rousseau, Frédérique; Rey, Dominique; Giorgi, Roch

    2017-05-01

    Breast cancer affects mostly older women but there are no guidelines especially devoted to adjuvant chemotherapy for this population. In this context, this study was carried out in a population-based cohort of French elderly women with breast cancer, to check adherence to the existing national guidelines according to the women's age, taking into account the evolution of the situation over time for women requiring chemotherapy. Between October 2006 and December 2008, all consecutive women included in the French Health registry for a biopsy-proven primary nonmetastatic breast cancer, aged 65-80 years at diagnosis, and living in South Eastern France, were asked to participate in a cohort study. Medical information was collected from physicians. The study population was restricted to the 223 women who were recommended adjuvant chemotherapy according to national guidelines. Those who received chemotherapy were compared to those who did not receive this treatment. Among these 223 women 55% had received chemotherapy. Only three women refused the treatment. Less than 8% have had a geriatric assessment before treatment decision and only two were proposed to participate in a clinical trial. After adjustment for comorbidity score, tumor characteristics, socio-demographic characteristics, and year of diagnosis, increasing patient age was independently associated with decreased guideline concordance for adjuvant chemotherapy. Women aged 75-80 years received chemotherapy more than four times less often than women aged 65-74 years. However, the percentage of women who received chemotherapy increased from 33% to 58% between 2006 and 2008, in parallel with the setting up of Onco-Geriatric Coordination Units in the area. In France, chronological age remains a barrier to receive chemotherapy for older breast cancer women but the establishment of a formal collaboration between oncologists and geriatricians seems to be an effective way to improve care delivery in this population.

  18. Efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in early stage uterine leiomyosarcoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Giorgio; Fucà, Giovanni; Maltese, Giuseppa; Ditto, Antonino; Martinelli, Fabio; Signorelli, Mauro; Chiappa, Valentina; Scaffa, Cono; Sabatucci, Ilaria; Lecce, Francesca; Raspagliesi, Francesco; Lorusso, Domenica

    2016-11-01

    We sought to review the current evidence in order to test the efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in improving disease-free survival in patients affected by early stage uterine leiomyosarcoma. On July 2016, literature was searched in order to identify trials comparing different postoperative adjuvant strategies for patients diagnosed with early stage uterine leiomyosarcoma. Our analysis included 360 patients: 145 (40%), 53 (15%), and 155 (43%) had chemotherapy (with or without radiotherapy), radiotherapy, and observation, respectively. Seven (2%) patients who had radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy were excluded from further analysis in order to reduce risk of biases. Administration of chemotherapy (with or without radiotherapy) did not improve outcomes in comparison to observation (OR: 0.79 (95%CI: 0.48, 1.29)), or radiotherapy (OR: 0.90 (95%CI: 0.42, 1.94)). Loco-regional recurrence rate was similar comparing patients undergoing chemotherapy (with or without radiotherapy) with having observation alone (OR: 0.84 (95%CI: 0.44, 1.60)). Similarly, pooled results suggested that chemotherapy administration did not affect distant recurrence rate in comparison to no chemotherapy (OR: 0.80 (95%CI: 0.50, 1.28)), and observation alone (OR: 0.99 (95%CI: 0.60, 1.64)). However, patients undergoing chemotherapy (with or without radiotherapy) experienced a trend towards lower risk of developing distant recurrences (OR: 0.49 (95%CI: 0.24, 1.03)) and a higher risk of developing loco-regional recurrences (OR: 3.45 (95%CI: 1.02, 11.73)) than patients undergoing radiotherapy. In early stage uterine leiomyosarcoma, the role of adjuvant chemotherapy remains unclear. Owing to the high recurrence rate, even in the early stage of disease, further innovative therapeutic strategies have to be tested. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of Nausea and Vomiting on Quality of Life in Cancer Patients During Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roila Fausto

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is commonly claimed that the nausea and vomiting accompanying cytotoxic chemotherapy have a negative impact on health-related quality of life. While this may seem self-evident, until a few years ago there was little empirical data demonstrating that the failure to control postchemotherapy emesis affects aspects of quality of life. In spite of their limitations, several observational studies showed that nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy induced a decrease in health-related quality of life with respect to patients without nausea and vomiting. This has also been demonstrated after the adjustment for health-related quality of life before chemotherapy that is an important prognostic factor of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Furthermore, one study suggests that the optimal time of assessment of quality of life to evaluate the impact of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting is day 4 if a 3-day recall period is used or day 8 when the recall period is 7 days. In double-blind studies the efficacy, tolerability and impact on quality of life of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists was superior with respect to metoclopramide, alizapride and prochlorperazine. Similar results have been achieved with the combination of ondansetron with dexamethasone, the standard treatment for the prevention of acute emesis induced by moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, with respect to the metoclopramide plus dexamethasone combination. Instead, in another double-blind study, in patients submitted to moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, a 5-HT3 antagonist did not seem to significantly increase complete protection from delayed emesis and the patients' quality of life with respect to dexamethasone alone. In conclusion, the evaluation of quality of life in randomized trials comparing different antiemetic drugs for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting can add important information useful for the choice of the optimal antiemetic

  20. Gemcitabine-Based Chemotherapy in Adrenocortical Carcinoma: A Multicenter Study of Efficacy and Predictive Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Judith E K; Deutschbein, Timo; Altieri, Barbara; Steinhauer, Sonja; Kircher, Stefan; Sbiera, Silviu; Wild, Vanessa; Schlötelburg, Wiebke; Kroiss, Matthias; Perotti, Paola; Rosenwald, Andreas; Berruti, Alfredo; Fassnacht, Martin; Ronchi, Cristina L

    2017-11-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is rare and confers an unfavorable prognosis in advanced stages. Other than combination chemotherapy with cisplatin, etoposide, doxorubicin, and mitotane, the second- and third-line regimens are not well-established. Gemcitabine (GEM)-based chemotherapy was suggested in a phase 2 clinical trial with 28 patients. In other solid tumors, human equilibrative nucleoside transporter type 1 (hENT1) and/or ribonucleotide reductase catalytic subunit M1 (RRM1) expression have been associated with resistance to GEM. To assess the efficacy of GEM-based chemotherapy in ACC in a real-world setting and the predictive role of molecular parameters. Retrospective multicenter study. Referral centers of university hospitals. A total of 145 patients with advanced ACC were treated with GEM-based chemotherapy (132 with concomitant capecitabine). Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor material was available for 70 patients for immunohistochemistry. The main outcome measures were progression-free survival (PFS) and an objective response to GEM-based chemotherapy. The secondary objective was the predictive role of hENT1 and RRM1. The median PFS for the patient population was 12 weeks (range, 1 to 94). A partial response or stable disease was achieved in 4.9% and 25.0% of cases, with a median duration of 26.8 weeks. Treatment was generally well tolerated, with adverse events of grade 3 or 4 occurring in 11.0% of cases. No substantial effect of hENT1 and/or RRM1 expression was observed in response to GEM-based chemotherapy. GEM-based chemotherapy is a well-tolerated, but modestly active, regimen against advanced ACC. No reliable molecular predictive factors could be identified. Owing to the scarce alternative therapeutic options, GEM-based chemotherapy remains an important option for salvage treatment for advanced ACC. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  1. [Eleven Patients with Gastric Cancer Who Received Chemotherapy after Stent Placement for Gastric Outlet Obstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Shunji; Nakagawa, Tomo; Konishi, Ken; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Ohta, Katsuya; Nakashima, Shinsuke; Matsumoto, Kenichi; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Ohmori, Takeshi; Yamada, Terumasa

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic placement of self-expandable metallic stents is reportedly effective for gastric outlet obstructions due to advanced gastric cancer, and is less invasive than gastrojejunostomy. For patients who have good performance status, we administer chemotherapy after stent placement, although the safety and feasibility of this chemotherapy have not yet been discussed in full. Between 2011 and 2015, 15 patients at our institution underwent endoscopic gastroduodenal stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction due to gastric cancer. Eleven of these patients were administered chemotherapy after stent placement. In our case series, we did not observe any specific adverse event caused by stent placement plus chemotherapy. Adverse events after chemotherapy included anemia of CTCAE Grade 3 in 7 patients. Stent-in-stent placement was needed in 2 patients. Neither stent migration nor perforation was observed. Therefore, chemotherapy after stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction due to gastric cancer was considered safe and feasible. Stent placement is useful not only as palliative care for patients with terminal-stage disease, but also as one of the multimodal therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer.

  2. Platinum-based chemotherapy with or without thoracic radiation therapy in patients with unresectable thymic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yoichi; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kubota, Kaoru

    2000-01-01

    Thymic carcinoma is a rare mediastinal neoplasm with poor prognosis. Although the clinical benefit of chemotherapy for thymic carcinoma is controversial, cisplatin-based chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy is ordinarily adopted in advanced cases. We evaluated the clinical outcome of platinum-based chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy in unresectable thymic carcinoma patients. Ten patients with unresectable thymic carcinoma were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy in the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1989 and 1998. We reviewed the histological type, treatment, response and survival of these patients. Four of the 10 patients responded to chemotherapy and both the median progression-free survival period and the median response duration were 6.0 months. The median survival time was 11.0 months. There was no relationship between histological classification and prognosis. Platinum-based chemotherapy with or without thoracic radiation is, regardless of tumor histology, marginally effective in advanced thymic carcinoma patients, giving only a modest tumor response rate and short response duration and survival. (author)

  3. [A questionnaire survey about hair loss after chemotherapy for breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Yukiko; Watanabe, Takanori; Nakagawa, Saki; Endo, Ayako; Shiga, Chizuko

    2012-09-01

    Hair loss is one of the most common side effects of chemotherapies such as FEC and taxane, and it greatly affects quality of life. We conducted a questionnaire survey of breast cancer patients who were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy about their hair loss. Eighty-five patients participated. They all had lost their hair and suffered from persistent changes in their hair condition, ranging from thinning to curly. More than 80% of patients had worn wigs until their hair had grown back. Furthermore, a few patients did not remove their wigs for 2 years after treatment. Unfortunately, there is no prevention or medication to combat hair loss due to chemotherapy at present, so cumulative examinations are awaited. We must provide appropriate information and support to the patient.

  4. Liver protein synthesis stays elevated after chemotherapy in tumour-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Sue E; McLaren, Teresa A; Knowles, Andrew L; Stewart, Sarah A; Madelmont, Jean-Claude; Attaix, Didier

    2006-07-28

    We studied the effect of chemotherapy on liver protein synthesis in mice bearing colon 26 adenocarcinoma (C26). Liver protein mass decreased (-32%; Psynthesis increased (20-35%; Psynthesis. Increased protein synthesis in tumour-bearing mice was primarily mediated by increasing ( approximately 15%; Psynthesis (Cs; mg RNA/g protein). Cystemustine, a nitrosourea chemotherapy that cures C26 with 100% efficacy, rapidly restored liver protein mass; protein synthesis however stayed higher than in healthy mice ( approximately 15%) throughout the initial and later stages of recovery. Chemotherapy had no significant effect on liver protein mass and synthesis in healthy mice. Reduced food intake was not a factor in this model. These data suggest a high priority for liver protein synthesis during cancer cachexia and recovery.

  5. Dramatic Response of a Case ofRecurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma toSystemic Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadianpanah

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common cancer among humans, and the standard treatment is surgery. Other modalities are reserved as a second line of treatment. Topical chemotherapy may be used in primary BCC. Systemic chemotherapy has no role in the primary treatment of BCC, although it may be efficacious in metastatic cases. We report the case of a patient with persistent recurrent BCC following multiple surgeries and radiotherapy, who achieved a dramatic response with a cisplatinand 5-flourouracil chemotherapy regimen.

  6. Cytotoxic chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma in the era of targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, E; Molina, A M; Carbonaro, M; Akhtar, N H; Giannakakou, P; Tagawa, S T; Nanus, D M

    2015-12-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a heterogeneous disease with regards to histology, progression, and response to treatment. Cytotoxic chemotherapy has been extensively studied in metastatic RCC (mRCC). Responses in most studies are modest and the mechanisms of resistance remain poorly understood. Targeted therapies have significantly improved outcomes in mRCC; however, most patients eventually relapse and die of their disease. Early clinical data suggest that combinations of chemotherapy and targeted agents are clinically active and are well tolerated. We reviewed the available literature for published clinical trials incorporating traditional chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of mRCC. These papers were identified through a Medline search and were included if they employed at least one chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of mRCC. The literature was also reviewed for information regarding mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance. The data regarding the use of cytotoxic chemotherapy in mRCC consist of small, non-randomized phase I and II studies. The major response proportions with single agent chemotherapies are low but combination regimens either with other cytotoxic agents, cytokines, or targeted agents have demonstrated moderate activity. Disparate trial designs and lack of head to head clinical trials make it difficult to compare the efficacy of chemotherapy with that of immunotherapy or targeted agents. Chemotherapy is particularly useful in patients with collecting duct histology and predominantly sarcomatoid differentiation. Chemotherapy resistance may be mediated by overexpression of p-glycoprotein efflux pumps and the dysregulation of the microtubule-hypoxia inducible factor signaling axis. The role of cytotoxic chemotherapy in the treatment for clear cell RCC remains poorly defined. Cytotoxic chemotherapy is considered a standard of care in patients with mRCC with predominantly sarcomatoid differentiation and collecting duct RCC variants (Motzer et al

  7. [Effects of pamidronate disodium (Bonin) combined with chemotherapy on bone pain in multiple myeloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yun; Chen, Shi-lun; Shi, Hong-zhi

    2002-10-01

    Objective. To evaluate the therapeutic effects of Disodium Pamidronate (Bonin) on bone pain in multiple myeloma. Method. 18 patients received only chemotherapy and 16 patients with addition of Bonin were compared. Result. The bone pain was significantly relieved both in chemotherapy alone group and in the combination group of Bonin with chemotherapy after treatment (P<0.01, as compared with before therapy). However, the effects of combination group were more dramatical than that of the other group (P<0.05). No obvious side-effects were observed except mild fever in one patient in the combination group. Conclusion. Bonin, as a safe and effective Bisphosphonates preparation, could relieve bone pain in multiple myeloma more effectively when combined with chemotherapy.

  8. Chemotherapy-associated paronychia treated with 2% povidone–iodine: a series of cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capriotti K

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Kara Capriotti,1,2 Joseph Capriotti,1,3 Jesse Pelletier,1,3 Kevin Stewart1,3 1Veloce BioPharma LLC, Fort Lauderdale, FL, 2Bryn Mawr Skin and Cancer Institute, Rosemont, PA, 3Plessen Ophthalmology Consultants, Christiansted, VI, USA Background: Nail changes are known to occur during the use of chemotherapy for a variety of malignancies, particularly those treated with taxanes and EGFR inhibitors. There are currently no actively recruiting prospective clinical trials investigating potential treatments. There are also no US Food and Drug Administration-approved medical treatments for chemotherapy-associated paronychia and no consensus on the best way to treat these common chemotherapy-induced events. Methods: A retrospective review of all cases presenting to a single dermatology private practice from June 2016 to January 2017 identified nine patients with chemotherapy-associated paronychia seeking treatment. Each patient was prescribed a topical solution comprised of 2% povidone–iodine in a dimethylsulfoxide vehicle that was prepared by a licensed compounding pharmacy. Patients were seen at 3 week and 6 week follow-up visits. Results: All 9/9 patients demonstrated complete or partial resolution. The number of nails involved for each patient ranged from 4–12. There were a total of 58 nails affected in the case series, and 44/58 (76% resolved overall. The treatment was well tolerated. Conclusion: The topical povidone–iodine/dimethylsufoxide solution described is very effective in alleviating the signs and symptoms of paronychia associated with chemotherapy. This novel combination warrants further investigation in randomized, controlled trials to further elucidate its clinical utility. Keywords: paronychia, chemotherapy, taxanes, epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, povidone–iodine, dimethylsulfoxide

  9. Histotype-tailored neoadjuvant chemotherapy versus standard chemotherapy in patients with high-risk soft-tissue sarcomas (ISG-STS 1001): an international, open-label, randomised, controlled, phase 3, multicentre trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronchi, Alessandro; Ferrari, Stefano; Quagliuolo, Vittorio; Broto, Javier Martin; Pousa, Antonio Lopez; Grignani, Giovanni; Basso, Umberto; Blay, Jean-Yves; Tendero, Oscar; Beveridge, Robert Diaz; Ferraresi, Virginia; Lugowska, Iwona; Merlo, Domenico Franco; Fontana, Valeria; Marchesi, Emanuela; Donati, Davide Maria; Palassini, Elena; Palmerini, Emanuela; De Sanctis, Rita; Morosi, Carlo; Stacchiotti, Silvia; Bagué, Silvia; Coindre, Jean Michelle; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Picci, Piero; Bruzzi, Paolo; Casali, Paolo Giovanni

    2017-06-01

    Previous trials from our group suggested an overall survival benefit with five cycles of adjuvant full-dose epirubicin plus ifosfamide in localised high-risk soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremities or trunk wall, and no difference in overall survival benefit between three cycles versus five cycles of the same neoadjuvant regimen. We aimed to show the superiority of the neoadjuvant administration of histotype-tailored regimen to standard chemotherapy. For this international, open-label, randomised, controlled, phase 3, multicentre trial, patients were enrolled from 32 hospitals in Italy, Spain, France, and Poland. Eligible patients were aged 18 years or older with localised, high-risk (high malignancy grade, 5 cm or longer in diameter, and deeply located according to the investing fascia), soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremities or trunk wall and belonging to one of five histological subtypes: high-grade myxoid liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, synovial sarcoma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour, and undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive three cycles of full-dose standard chemotherapy (epirubicin 60 mg/m 2 per day [short infusion, days 1 and 2] plus ifosfamide 3 g/m 2 per day [days 1, 2, and 3], repeated every 21 days) or histotype-tailored chemotherapy: for high-grade myxoid liposarcoma, trabectedin 1·3 mg/m 2 via 24-h continuous infusion, repeated every 21 days; for leiomyosarcoma, gemcitabine 1800 mg/m 2 on day 1 intravenously over 180 min plus dacarbazine 500 mg/m 2 on day 1 intravenously over 20 min, repeated every 14 days; for synovial sarcoma, high-dose ifosfamide 14 g/m 2 , given over 14 days via an external infusion pump, every 28 days; for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour, intravenous etoposide 150 mg/m 2 per day (days 1, 2, and 3) plus intravenous ifosfamide 3 g/m 2 per day (days 1, 2, and 3), repeated every 21 days; and for undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma, gemcitabine 900 mg/m 2 on days 1 and

  10. Anxiety and coping in women with breast cancer in chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Araceli Vicente da; Zandonade, Eliana; Amorim, Maria Helena Costa

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify the coping strategies used by women with breast cancer in chemotherapy and to verify the association with the anxiety profile presented by them. Method: cross-sectional study of the analytical type. We used a random sample of 307 women with cancer in previous chemotherapy, adjuvant or palliative treatment. The data was collected using an interview technique with form registration, active search in medical records, Scale of Mode of Confronting Problems and Inv...

  11. Multimodality therapy approaches, local and systemic treatment, compared with chemotherapy alone in recurrent glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scorsetti, Marta; Navarria, Pierina; Pessina, Federico; Ascolese, Anna Maria; D’Agostino, Giuseppe; Tomatis, Stefano; De Rose, Fiorenza; Villa, Elisa; Maggi, Giulia; Simonelli, Matteo; Clerici, Elena; Soffietti, Riccardo; Santoro, Armando; Cozzi, Luca; Bello, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Long-term local control in Glioblastoma is rarely achieved and nearly all patients relapse. In this study we evaluated the clinical effect of different treatment approaches in recurrent patients. Forty-three patients, with median age of 51 years were evaluated for salvage treatment: re-resection and/or re-irradiation plus chemotherapy or chemotherapy alone. Response was recorded using the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria. Hematologic and non-hematologic toxicities were graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0. Twenty-one patients underwent chemotherapy combined with local treatment, surgery and/or radiation therapy, and 22 underwent chemotherapy only. The median follow up was 7 months (range 3–28 months). The 1 and 2-years Progression Free Survival was 65 and 10 % for combined treatment and 22 and 0 % for chemotherapy alone (p < 0.01). The 1 and 2-years overall survival was 69 and 29 % for combined and 26 and 0 % for chemotherapy alone (p < 0.01). No toxicity greater than grade 2 was recorded. These data showed that in glioblastoma recurrence the combination of several approaches in a limited group of patients is more effective than a single treatment alone. This stress the importance of multimodality treatment whenever clinically feasible

  12. Germ cell tumors of testis; an update in chemotherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, T.

    2002-01-01

    Prior to the use of cisplatin, durable complete remission of metastatic testicular cancer were rare. In 1977, a chemotherapy treatment program including cisplatin, vinblastine, and bleomycin (PVB) let to high response rates and acceptable toxicity in patients with disseminated testicular cancer. After that, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy regimen was established as a standard therapy for good- and poor-risk disease and further, ifosfamide-based regimens or high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue as the salvage therapy. The results of these prospective, randomized clinical trials that have markedly improved the outlook of patients with this type of cancer have been reviewed in this article. While the present state-of-the-art treatment for metastatic testicular cancer is promising approximately one-third of patients with poor risk disease will not achieve a remission. Trials of new agents and approaches are needed to increase the patient survival. (author)

  13. Clinical research on cancer treatment with combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuwa, Nobukazu; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Eriko; Koyama, Kazuyuki; Morita, Kozo

    1993-01-01

    There are two purposes of using combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of cancers. One is to suppress distant metastasis, especially micrometastasis; the other is to improve localized control. As a trial of the utility of the former, systemic chemotherapy with CDDP and 5 FU was given successively with radiotherapy to treat nasopharyngeal cancer. The survival rate was significantly improved compared with historical control cases. The main reason for this effectiveness was the improvement of localized control. The suppression of distant metastasis is the subject of future research. As a trial of the utility of the latter, a super-selective intraarterial chemotherapy with CBDCA combined with radiotherapy was used to head and neck localized progressive cancers. The control of localized cancer was remarkably effective. This treatment is considered to be especially suitable for locally advanced tongue cancer and cancer of the root of the tongue. (author)

  14. Long-Term Remission of an Aggressive Sebaceous Carcinoma following Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcurto, Angela; Gay, Béatrice E.; Sozzi, Wendy Jeanneret; Gilliet, Michel; Leyvraz, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Sebaceous carcinoma (SC) is an uncommon neoplasm manifesting itself either in the eyelid or extraocularly in the head and neck area. Surgery is the standard of care. Irradiation is rarely proposed as monotherapy but is frequently administered as an adjuvant regimen following surgical resection. There is no known strategy concerning chemotherapeutic treatment in highly aggressive recurrent – or metastatic – forms of the disease. Our patient presented with an aggressive SC of the scalp recurring after multiple excisions and local radiotherapy. Chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin and docetaxel was then initiated; 4 cycles were administered, followed by capecitabine maintenance. Shortly after starting chemotherapy, dermal lesions had completely disappeared and radiological response could be seen. The patient experienced an extended period (>20 months) of complete remission. In this report, we show an excellent response of a highly aggressive SC after a combination of chemotherapy as for head and neck cancers. PMID:24748864

  15. [Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathies: an integrative review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Talita Cassanta; Lopes, Miriam; Anjos, Anna Cláudia Yokoyama Dos; Zago, Marcia Maria Fontão

    2015-04-01

    To identify scientific studies and to deepen the knowledge of peripheral neuropathies induced by chemotherapy antineoplastic, seeking evidence for assistance to cancer patients. Integrative review of the literature conducted in the databases Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences (LILACS), Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO), Medical Literature Analysis (PubMed/MEDLINE), the Cochrane Library and the Spanish Bibliographic Index Health Sciences (IBECS). The sample consisted of 15 studies published between 2005-2014 that met the inclusion criteria. Studies showed aspects related to advanced age, main symptoms of neuropathy and chemotherapy agents as important adverse effect of neuropathy. We identified a small number of studies that addressed the topic, as well as low production of evidence related to interventions with positive results. It is considered important to develop new studies proposed for the prevention and/or treatment, enabling adjustment of the patient's cancer chemotherapy and consequently better service.

  16. Pros and cons of intraperitoneal chemotherapy in the treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeimet, Alain G; Reimer, Daniel; Radl, Alice C; Reinthaller, Alexander; Schauer, Christian; Petru, Edgar; Concin, Nicole; Braun, Stephan; Marth, Christian

    2009-07-01

    Development of the pros and cons of intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy in the treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer based on the most prominent data published on the evolution of IP chemotherapy and on experience with this therapeutic strategy in clinical routine. The literature published on IP chemotherapy in ovarian cancer between 1970 and 2008 was identified systematically by computer-based searches in MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library. Furthermore, a preliminary analysis of data recorded during an observational nationwide multicenter study of the Austrian AGO on IP-IV chemotherapy using the GOG-172 treatment regimen was performed. The literature review unequivocally revealed a significantly greater toxicity for IP than for intravenous (IV) cisplatin-based chemotherapy. However, according to a Cochrane meta-analysis, IP-IV administration of chemotherapy is associated with a 21.6% decrease in the risk for death. In agreement with earlier reports, the most frequently mentioned side-effects in the Austria-wide observational study were long-lasting neurotoxicity, abdominal pain, fatigue, gastrointestinal and metabolic toxicities, and catheter-related complications. Most of these toxicities were identified as mirroring the toxicity profile of high-dose IV cisplatin (>or=100 mg/m(2)). In some patients, the classic IP-IV regimen with cisplatin/paclitaxel was changed to an alternative schedule comprising carboplatin AUC 5 (d1) and weekly paclitaxel 60 mg/m(2) (d1, 8, 15) completely administered via the IP route. This treatment was better tolerated and quality of life was significantly less compromised. However, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were the limiting side-effects of this IP regimen. In cases where optimal cytoreduction with residual disease chemotherapy should be given serious consideration, even at the expense of significantly increased, but manageable toxicity.

  17. Integration of chemotherapy into current treatment strategies for brain metastases from solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamm Reinhard

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with brain metastases represent a heterogeneous group where selection of the most appropriate treatment depends on many patient- and disease-related factors. Eventually, a considerable proportion of patients are treated with palliative approaches such as whole-brain radiotherapy. Whole-brain radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy has recently gained increasing attention and is hoped to augment the palliative effect of whole-brain radiotherapy alone and to extend survival in certain subsets of patients with controlled extracranial disease and good performance status. The randomized trials of whole-brain radiotherapy vs. whole-brain radiotherapy plus chemotherapy suggest that this concept deserves further study, although they failed to improve survival. However, survival might not be the most relevant endpoint in a condition, where most patients die from extracranial progression. Sometimes, the question arises whether patients with newly detected brain metastases and the indication for systemic treatment of extracranial disease can undergo standard systemic chemotherapy with the option of deferred rather than immediate radiotherapy to the brain. The literature contains numerous small reports on this issue, mainly in malignant melanoma, breast cancer, lung cancer and ovarian cancer, but very few sufficiently powered randomized trials. With chemotherapy alone, response rates were mostly in the order of 20–40%. The choice of chemotherapy regimen is often complicated by previous systemic treatment and takes into account the activity of the drugs in extracranial metastatic disease. Because the blood-brain barrier is partially disrupted in most macroscopic metastases, systemically administered agents can gain access to such tumor sites. Our systematic literature review suggests that both chemotherapy and radiochemotherapy for newly diagnosed brain metastases need further critical evaluation before standard clinical

  18. Integration of chemotherapy into current treatment strategies for brain metastases from solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, Carsten; Grosu, Anca L; Astner, Sabrina; Thamm, Reinhard; Molls, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Patients with brain metastases represent a heterogeneous group where selection of the most appropriate treatment depends on many patient- and disease-related factors. Eventually, a considerable proportion of patients are treated with palliative approaches such as whole-brain radiotherapy. Whole-brain radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy has recently gained increasing attention and is hoped to augment the palliative effect of whole-brain radiotherapy alone and to extend survival in certain subsets of patients with controlled extracranial disease and good performance status. The randomized trials of whole-brain radiotherapy vs. whole-brain radiotherapy plus chemotherapy suggest that this concept deserves further study, although they failed to improve survival. However, survival might not be the most relevant endpoint in a condition, where most patients die from extracranial progression. Sometimes, the question arises whether patients with newly detected brain metastases and the indication for systemic treatment of extracranial disease can undergo standard systemic chemotherapy with the option of deferred rather than immediate radiotherapy to the brain. The literature contains numerous small reports on this issue, mainly in malignant melanoma, breast cancer, lung cancer and ovarian cancer, but very few sufficiently powered randomized trials. With chemotherapy alone, response rates were mostly in the order of 20–40%. The choice of chemotherapy regimen is often complicated by previous systemic treatment and takes into account the activity of the drugs in extracranial metastatic disease. Because the blood-brain barrier is partially disrupted in most macroscopic metastases, systemically administered agents can gain access to such tumor sites. Our systematic literature review suggests that both chemotherapy and radiochemotherapy for newly diagnosed brain metastases need further critical evaluation before standard clinical implementation. A potential chemotherapy

  19. Intensive chemotherapy as salvage treatment for solid tumors: focus on germ cell cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selle, F.; Gligorov, J.; Richard, S.; Khalil, A.; Alexandre, I.; Avenin, D.; Provent, S.; Soares, D.G.; Lotz, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Germ cell tumors present contrasting biological and molecular features compared to many solid tumors, which may partially explain their unusual sensitivity to chemotherapy. Reduced DNA repair capacity and enhanced induction of apoptosis appear to be key factors in the sensitivity of germ cell tumors to cisplatin. Despite substantial cure rates, some patients relapse and subsequently die of their disease. Intensive doses of chemotherapy are used to counter mechanisms of drug resistance. So far, high-dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell support for solid tumors is used only in the setting of testicular germ cell tumors. In that indication, high-dose chemotherapy is given as the first or late salvage treatment for patients with either relapsed or progressive tumors after initial conventional salvage chemotherapy. High-dose chemotherapy is usually given as two or three sequential cycles using carboplatin and etoposide with or without ifosfamide. The administration of intensive therapy carries significant side effects and can only be efficiently and safely conducted in specialized referral centers to assure optimum patient care outcomes. In breast and ovarian cancer, most studies have demonstrated improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), but overall survival remained unchanged. Therefore, most of these approaches have been dropped. In germ cell tumors, clinical trials are currently investigating novel therapeutic combinations and active treatments. In particular, the integration of targeted therapies constitutes an important area of research for patients with a poor prognosis

  20. Intensive chemotherapy as salvage treatment for solid tumors: focus on germ cell cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selle, F.; Gligorov, J. [Medical Oncology and Cellular Therapy Department, Hospital Tenon, Public Assistance Hospitals of Paris, Alliance for Cancer Research (APREC), Paris (France); Pierre & Marie Curie University (UPMC Paris VI), Paris (France); Richard, S.; Khalil, A. [Medical Oncology and Cellular Therapy Department, Hospital Tenon, Public Assistance Hospitals of Paris, Alliance for Cancer Research (APREC), Paris (France); Alexandre, I. [Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Centre of Bligny, Briis-sous-Forges (France); Avenin, D.; Provent, S.; Soares, D.G. [Medical Oncology and Cellular Therapy Department, Hospital Tenon, Public Assistance Hospitals of Paris, Alliance for Cancer Research (APREC), Paris (France); Lotz, J.P. [Medical Oncology and Cellular Therapy Department, Hospital Tenon, Public Assistance Hospitals of Paris, Alliance for Cancer Research (APREC), Paris (France); Pierre & Marie Curie University (UPMC Paris VI), Paris (France)

    2014-11-04

    Germ cell tumors present contrasting biological and molecular features compared to many solid tumors, which may partially explain their unusual sensitivity to chemotherapy. Reduced DNA repair capacity and enhanced induction of apoptosis appear to be key factors in the sensitivity of germ cell tumors to cisplatin. Despite substantial cure rates, some patients relapse and subsequently die of their disease. Intensive doses of chemotherapy are used to counter mechanisms of drug resistance. So far, high-dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell support for solid tumors is used only in the setting of testicular germ cell tumors. In that indication, high-dose chemotherapy is given as the first or late salvage treatment for patients with either relapsed or progressive tumors after initial conventional salvage chemotherapy. High-dose chemotherapy is usually given as two or three sequential cycles using carboplatin and etoposide with or without ifosfamide. The administration of intensive therapy carries significant side effects and can only be efficiently and safely conducted in specialized referral centers to assure optimum patient care outcomes. In breast and ovarian cancer, most studies have demonstrated improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), but overall survival remained unchanged. Therefore, most of these approaches have been dropped. In germ cell tumors, clinical trials are currently investigating novel therapeutic combinations and active treatments. In particular, the integration of targeted therapies constitutes an important area of research for patients with a poor prognosis.

  1. Progression following neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy may not be a contraindication to a curative approach for colorectal carcinomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passot, Guillaume; Vaudoyer, Delphine; Cotte, Eddy; You, Benoit; Isaac, Sylvie; Noël Gilly, François; Mohamed, Faheez; Glehen, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the influence of neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy on patients with colorectal carcinomatosis before a curative procedure. Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) from colorectal cancer may be treated with a curative intent by cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). The role of perioperative systemic chemotherapy for this particular metastatic disease remains unclear. One hundred twenty patients with PC from colorectal cancer were consecutively treated by 131 procedures combining CRS with HIPEC. The response to neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy was assessed on data from previous explorative surgery and/or radiological imaging. Ninety patients (75%) were treated with neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy in whom 32 (36%) were considered to have responded, 19 (21%) had stable disease, and 19 (21%) developed diseases progression. Response could not be evaluated in 20 patients (22%). On univariate analysis, the use of neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy had a significant positive prognostic influence (P = 0.042). On multivariate analysis, the completeness of CRS and the use of adjuvant systemic chemotherapy were the only significant prognostic factors (P systemic chemotherapy had no significant prognostic impact with median survival of 31.4 months in patients showing disease progression. In patients with PC from colorectal cancer without extraperitoneal metastases, failure of neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy should not constitute an absolute contraindication to a curative procedure combining CRS and HIPEC.

  2. Recent advances in mechanism-based chemotherapy drug-siRNA pairs in co-delivery systems for cancer: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingfang; Wang, Jinyu; Li, Bingcheng; Meng, Lingxin; Tian, Zhaoxing

    2017-09-01

    Co-delivery of chemotherapy drugs and siRNA for cancer therapy has achieved remarkable results according to synergistic/combined antitumor effects, and is recognized as a promising therapeutic modality. However, little attention has been paid to the extremely complex mechanisms of chemotherapy drug-siRNA pairs during co-delivery process. Proper selection of chemotherapy drug-siRNA pairs is beneficial for achieving desirable cancer therapeutic effects. Exploring the inherent principles during chemotherapy drug-siRNA pair selection for co-delivery would greatly enhanced therapeutic efficiency. To achieve ideal results, this article will systematically review current different mechanism-based chemotherapy drug-siRNA pairs for co-delivery in cancer treatment. Large-scale library screening of recent different chemotherapy drug-siRNA pairs for co-delivery would help to establish the chemotherapy drug-siRNA pair selection principle, which could pave the way for co-delivery of chemotherapy drugs and siRNA for cancer treatment in clinic. Following the inherent principle of chemotherapy drug-siRNA pair, more effective co-delivery vectors can be designed in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A comparison of radiological and historical findings in osteosarcomas following pre-operative chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, H.J.; Riebel, T.; Winkler, K.; Heise, U.; Delling, G.; Hamburg Univ.; Hamburg Univ.

    1985-01-01

    Since the introduction of pre-operative chemotherapy, osteosarcomas have shown a more favourable prognosis. Reaction of the tumour due to chemotherapy is judged pre-operative primarily by radiology (plain films, angiography, CT, scintigraphy). There is little evidence concerning the radiological appearances after pre-operative chemotherapy and morphological changes, particularly in respect of tumour regression. Specific radiological changes were therefore compared with pathological findings following chemotherapy and operation in 17 patients with osteosarcomas. Tumours were examined which showed radiological evidence of intra- and extra-osseous sclerosis or lysis and which still were classified as vital tumour tissue. Tumour planes were reconstructed from large histological sections of the operative specimen and compared with the radiological appearances. Sclerosis was found to be due to reactive new bone formation or to mineralisation of the osteosarcomatous tissue. Lysis correlated with persistent vital tumour, or in connective tissue. Nine out of ten cases, regarded as vital on radiological evidence, showed vital tumour cells on histological section. Lyses and scleroses were not reliable indications of the pre-operative state of the osteosarcoma following chemotherapy. On the other hand, combined qualitative radiological criteria for assesing tumour vitality, proved to be helpful. (orig.) [de

  4. A review of topotecan in combination chemotherapy for advanced cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Robati

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Minoo Robati, David Holtz, Charles J DuntonDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Main Line Gynecologic Oncology, Lankenau Hospital, Wynnewood, PA, USAAbstract: Treatment of advanced, recurrent or persistent cervical cancer includes radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Radiation has been the primary treatment modality for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. Concomitant systemic cisplatin chemotherapy and radiation have shown high response rates with improvements in durable remissions and overall survival. Cisplatin has been the standard medication for the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. Combinations with other chemotherapeutic agents have been the subject of clinical trials with varying results. The toxicity of combination chemotherapy and tolerability of patients are other factors that should be considered in the management of patients with advanced disease. Recently topotecan, in combination with cisplatin, achieved increased response and overall survival rates without further compromising the patients’ quality of life. This review focuses on the mechanism of action and toxicities of topotecan, as well as its role as a radio-sensitizer and chemotherapeutic agent in the management of advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer. Other combination modalities and dosages are also discussed.Keywords: topotecan, combination chemotherapy, advanced cervical cancer

  5. Chemotherapy dosing in achondroplastic dwarfism: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsoueidi, R; Gresham, C; Michael, L; Chaney, D; Mourad, H

    2016-12-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION: A 74-year-old female with achondroplastic dwarfism was diagnosed with ER-, BR- and HER2- breast cancer. No guideline currently exists to direct chemotherapy dosing in this population. She received neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on body surface area utilizing actual height and weight with dose-dense doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel with the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Satisfactory clinical response and remission were achieved, and treatment proceeded without any significant toxicity or delays. In the absence of guideline recommendations, dosing chemotherapy based on actual height and weight in patients with achondroplastic dwarfism may be safe and appropriate. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. NTP Monograph: Developmental Effects and Pregnancy Outcomes Associated With Cancer Chemotherapy Use During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The National Toxicology Program (NTP) Office of Health Assessment and Translation (OHAT) conducted an evaluation of the developmental effects and pregnancy outcomes associated with cancer chemotherapy use during pregnancy in humans. The final NTP monograph was completed in May 2013 (available at http:// ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/36495). The incidence of cancer during pregnancy has been reported to occur from 17 to 100 per 100,000 pregnant women. Chemotherapy is a common treatment for cancer; however, most chemotherapy agents are classified as known or suspected human teratogens. Cancer chemotherapy use during pregnancy was selected for evaluation by the NTP because of the: (1) paucity of comprehensive reviews on the pregnancy outcomes following cancer chemotherapy use during pregnancy in humans, including the integration of the developmental animal toxicology literature with the observational studies in humans, and (2) growing public interest in the developmental effects of chemotherapy on offspring exposed to cancer chemotherapy during gestation due to the expected incidence of cancer diagnosed during pregnancy as women delay pregnancy to later ages. Of the approximately 110 cancer chemotherapeutic agents currently in use, the NTP monograph includes data on 56 agents used during 1,261 pregnancies for which pregnancy outcomes were documented. Overall, the NTP evaluation found that treatment with chemotherapy for cancer appeared to be associated with: (1) a higher rate of major malformations following exposure during the first trimester compared to exposure in the second and/or third trimester; (2) an increase the rate of stillbirth following exposure in the second and/ or third trimester; abnormally low levels of amniotic fluid (primarily attributable to Trastuzumab); and (3), also data are insufficient, impaired fetal growth and myelosuppression. Treatment with chemotherapy for cancer during pregnancy did not appear to increase spontaneous preterm birth, or impair

  7. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Hair Loss (Alopecia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Hair Loss (Alopecia) “Losing my hair was hard at first. ... and anywhere on your body may fall out. Hair loss is called alopecia. When will my hair start ...

  8. Early metabolic response using FDG PET/CT and molecular phenotypes of breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keam, Bhumsuk; Moon, Woo Kyung; Kim, Tae-You; Park, In Ae; Noh, Dong-Young; Chung, June-Key; Bang, Yung-Jue; Im, Seock-Ah; Koh, Youngil; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Cho, Nariya; Kim, Jee Hyun; Han, Wonshik; Kang, Keon Wook

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed 1) to investigate the predictive value of FDG PET/CT (fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography) for histopathologic response and 2) to explore the results of FDG PET/CT by molecular phenotypes of breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Seventy-eight stage II or III breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant docetaxel/doxorubicin chemotherapy were enrolled in this study. FDG PET/CTs were acquired before chemotherapy and after the first cycle of chemotherapy for evaluating early metabolic response. The mean pre- and post-chemotherapy standard uptake value (SUV) were 7.5 and 3.9, respectively. The early metabolic response provided by FDG PET/CT after one cycle of neoadjuvant chemotherapy was correlated with the histopathologic response after completion of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (P = 0.002). Sensitivity and negative predictive value were 85.7% and 95.1%, respectively. The estrogen receptor negative phenotype had a higher pre-chemotherapy SUV (8.6 vs. 6.4, P = 0.047) and percent change in SUV (48% vs. 30%, P = 0.038). In triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), the pre-chemotherapy SUV was higher than in non-TNBC (9.8 vs. 6.4, P = 0.008). The early metabolic response using FDG PET/CT could have a predictive value for the assessment of histopathologic non-response of stage II/III breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Our findings suggest that the initial SUV and the decline in SUV differed based on the molecular phenotype. ClinicalTrials.gov: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01396655

  9. Evidence-based guideline recommendations on treatment strategies for localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone following neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werier, Joel; Yao, Xiaomei; Caudrelier, Jean-Michel; di Primio, Gina; Ghert, Michelle; Gupta, Abha A; Kandel, Rita; Verma, Shailendra

    2016-06-01

    (1) To provide recommendations regarding the choice of surgery, radiation therapy (RT), or the combination of surgery plus RT in patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. (2) To determine the appropriate surgical planning imaging (pre-chemotherapy magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] or post-chemotherapy MRI) to identify optimal resection margins in patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma who undergo surgery following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library (1999 to February 2015), main guideline websites, and relevant annual meeting abstracts (2012 to January 2015) were searched. Internal and external reviews were conducted. 1. Recommendation (1) - In patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone following neoadjuvant chemotherapy: (a) Surgery alone or RT alone are two reasonable treatment options; the combination of surgery plus RT is not recommended as an initial treatment option. (b) The local treatment for an individual patient should be decided by a multidisciplinary tumour board together with the patient after consideration of the following: (1) patient characteristics (e.g., age, tumour location, tumour size, response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and existing comorbidities), (2) the potential benefit weighed against the potential complications from surgery and/or toxicities associated with RT, and (3) patient preferences. 2. Recommendation (2) - In patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma who will undergo surgery: (a) Both pre-chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy MRI scans should be taken into consideration for surgical planning. In certain anatomic locations with good chemotherapy response, the post-chemotherapy MRI may be the appropriate imaging modality to plan surgical resection margins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiotherapy compared to chemotherapy as initial treatment of angiocentric centrofacial lymphoma (polymorphic reticulosis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobrevilla-Calvo, P.; Meneses, A.; Alfaro, P.; Bares, J.P.; Amador, J.; Reynoso, E.E.

    1993-01-01

    Polymorphic reticulosis has recently been characterized as an angiocentric lymphoproliferative disorder of the peripheral T-lymphocytes. However, its treatment is still a matter of controversy. In order to study efficacy and toxicity of the primary treatment, we reviewed clinical features and therapeutic results in 29 patients seen at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia de Mexico. Nineteen patients received primary local irradiation and 10 patients primary combination chemotherapy. In the radiotherapy group, 14 (74%) patients achieved complete response, but only 4 (40%) did so in the primary chemotherapy group. Five patients in the latter group died of treatment-related complications. The 5-year actuarial survival rate was 70% in the irradiation group, while the 1-year survival rate was only 15% in the chemotherapy group. These data strongly suggest that, in polymorphic reticulosis, initial chemotherapy may be very toxic. (orig.)

  11. Association of nutritional status-related indices and chemotherapy-induced adverse events in gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seung Hee; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Ryu, Min-Hee; Jeong, Jae Ho; Kang, Shin Sook; Yang, Mihi; Lee, Jung Eun; Sung, Mi-Kyung

    2016-11-18

    Malnutrition in gastrectomized patients receiving chemotherapy is associated with the susceptibility to chemotherapy-related adverse events. This study evaluated pre-operative nutritional status-related indices associated with adverse events in post-operation gastric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Medical records of 234 gastrectomized patients under adjuvant tegafur/gimeracil/oteracil chemotherapy with extended lymph node dissection were analyzed. Nutritional status assessment included Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA), body weight, body mass index, serum albumin concentration, and Nutrition Risk Index (NRI). Chemotherapy-originated adverse events were determined using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. PG-SGA indicated 59% of the patients were malnourished, and 27.8% of the patients revealed serious malnutrition with PG-SGA score of ≥9. Fifteen % of patients lost ≥10% of the initial body weight, 14.5% of the patients had hypoalbuminemia (cancer patients.

  12. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy as ovarian cancer treatment: ever more used with major regional differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagö-Olsen, Carsten L; Ottesen, Bent; Kehlet, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The traditional first-line treatment for patients with advanced ovarian cancer with primary debulking surgery (PDS) and adjuvant chemotherapy is controversial as some authors report a potential benefit from the alternative treatment with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and interval debulking...

  13. Role of vascular normalization in benefit from metronomic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpekris, Fotios; Baish, James W; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos; Jain, Rakesh K

    2017-02-21

    Metronomic dosing of chemotherapy-defined as frequent administration at lower doses-has been shown to be more efficacious than maximum tolerated dose treatment in preclinical studies, and is currently being tested in the clinic. Although multiple mechanisms of benefit from metronomic chemotherapy have been proposed, how these mechanisms are related to one another and which one is dominant for a given tumor-drug combination is not known. To this end, we have developed a mathematical model that incorporates various proposed mechanisms, and report here that improved function of tumor vessels is a key determinant of benefit from metronomic chemotherapy. In our analysis, we used multiple dosage schedules and incorporated interactions among cancer cells, stem-like cancer cells, immune cells, and the tumor vasculature. We found that metronomic chemotherapy induces functional normalization of tumor blood vessels, resulting in improved tumor perfusion. Improved perfusion alleviates hypoxia, which reprograms the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment toward immunostimulation and improves drug delivery and therapeutic outcomes. Indeed, in our model, improved vessel function enhanced the delivery of oxygen and drugs, increased the number of effector immune cells, and decreased the number of regulatory T cells, which in turn killed a larger number of cancer cells, including cancer stem-like cells. Vessel function was further improved owing to decompression of intratumoral vessels as a result of increased killing of cancer cells, setting up a positive feedback loop. Our model enables evaluation of the relative importance of these mechanisms, and suggests guidelines for the optimal use of metronomic therapy.

  14. Prevention of blood transfusion with intravenous iron in gynecologic cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athibovonsuk, Punnada; Manchana, Tarinee; Sirisabya, Nakarin

    2013-12-01

    To compare the efficacy of intravenous iron and oral iron for prevention of blood transfusions in gynecologic cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy. Sixty-four non anemic gynecologic cancer patients receiving adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy were st