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Sample records for chemoreceptors

  1. Bacterial chemoreceptors and chemoeffectors.

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    Bi, Shuangyu; Lai, Luhua

    2015-02-01

    Bacteria use chemotaxis signaling pathways to sense environmental changes. Escherichia coli chemotaxis system represents an ideal model that illustrates fundamental principles of biological signaling processes. Chemoreceptors are crucial signaling proteins that mediate taxis toward a wide range of chemoeffectors. Recently, in deep study of the biochemical and structural features of chemoreceptors, the organization of higher-order clusters in native cells, and the signal transduction mechanisms related to the on-off signal output provides us with general insights to understand how chemotaxis performs high sensitivity, precise adaptation, signal amplification, and wide dynamic range. Along with the increasing knowledge, bacterial chemoreceptors can be engineered to sense novel chemoeffectors, which has extensive applications in therapeutics and industry. Here we mainly review recent advances in the E. coli chemotaxis system involving structure and organization of chemoreceptors, discovery, design, and characterization of chemoeffectors, and signal recognition and transduction mechanisms. Possible strategies for changing the specificity of bacterial chemoreceptors to sense novel chemoeffectors are also discussed.

  2. Positioning of bacterial chemoreceptors.

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    Jones, Christopher W; Armitage, Judith P

    2015-05-01

    For optimum growth, bacteria must adapt to their environment, and one way that many species do this is by moving towards favourable conditions. To do so requires mechanisms to both physically drive movement and provide directionality to this movement. The pathways that control this directionality comprise chemoreceptors, which, along with an adaptor protein (CheW) and kinase (CheA), form large hexagonal arrays. These arrays can be formed around transmembrane receptors, resulting in arrays embedded in the inner membrane, or they can comprise soluble receptors, forming arrays in the cytoplasm. Across bacterial species, chemoreceptor arrays (both transmembrane and soluble) are localised to a variety of positions within the cell; some species with multiple arrays demonstrate this variety within individual cells. In many cases, the positioning pattern of the arrays is linked to the need for segregation of arrays between daughter cells on division, ensuring the production of chemotactically competent progeny. Multiple mechanisms have evolved to drive this segregation, including stochastic self-assembly, cellular landmarks, and the utilisation of ParA homologues. The variety of mechanisms highlights the importance of chemotaxis to motile species.

  3. Carotid chemoreceptor "resetting" revisited.

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    Carroll, John L; Kim, Insook

    2013-01-01

    Carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors transduce low arterial O(2) tension into increased action potential activity on the carotid sinus nerves, which contributes to resting ventilatory drive, increased ventilatory drive in response to hypoxia, arousal responses to hypoxia during sleep, upper airway muscle activity, blood pressure control and sympathetic tone. Their sensitivity to O(2) is low in the newborn and increases during the days or weeks after birth to reach adult levels. This postnatal functional maturation of the CB O(2) response has been termed "resetting" and it occurs in every mammalian species studied to date. The O(2) environment appears to play a key role; the fetus develops in a low O(2) environment throughout gestation and initiation of CB "resetting" after birth is modulated by the large increase in arterial oxygen tension occurring at birth. Although numerous studies have reported age-related changes in various components of the O(2) transduction cascade, how the O(2) environment shapes normal CB prenatal development and postnatal "resetting" remains unknown. Viewing CB "resetting" as environment-driven (developmental) phenotypic plasticity raises important mechanistic questions that have received little attention. This review examines what is known (and not known) about mechanisms of CB functional maturation, with a focus on the role of the O(2) environment.

  4. The Caenorhabditis chemoreceptor gene families

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    Robertson Hugh M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemoreceptor proteins mediate the first step in the transduction of environmental chemical stimuli, defining the breadth of detection and conferring stimulus specificity. Animal genomes contain families of genes encoding chemoreceptors that mediate taste, olfaction, and pheromone responses. The size and diversity of these families reflect the biology of chemoperception in specific species. Results Based on manual curation and sequence comparisons among putative G-protein-coupled chemoreceptor genes in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified approximately 1300 genes and 400 pseudogenes in the 19 largest gene families, most of which fall into larger superfamilies. In the related species C. briggsae and C. remanei, we identified most or all genes in each of the 19 families. For most families, C. elegans has the largest number of genes and C. briggsae the smallest number, suggesting changes in the importance of chemoperception among the species. Protein trees reveal family-specific and species-specific patterns of gene duplication and gene loss. The frequency of strict orthologs varies among the families, from just over 50% in two families to less than 5% in three families. Several families include large species-specific expansions, mostly in C. elegans and C. remanei. Conclusion Chemoreceptor gene families in Caenorhabditis species are large and evolutionarily dynamic as a result of gene duplication and gene loss. These dynamics shape the chemoreceptor gene complements in Caenorhabditis species and define the receptor space available for chemosensory responses. To explain these patterns, we propose the gray pawn hypothesis: individual genes are of little significance, but the aggregate of a large number of diverse genes is required to cover a large phenotype space.

  5. Olfactory Receptor Database: a sensory chemoreceptor resource

    OpenAIRE

    Skoufos, Emmanouil; Marenco, Luis; Nadkarni, Prakash M.; Miller, Perry L.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2000-01-01

    The Olfactory Receptor Database (ORDB) is a WWW-accessible database that has been expanded from an olfactory receptor resource to a chemoreceptor resource. It stores data on six classes of G-protein-coupled sensory chemoreceptors: (i) olfactory receptor-like proteins, (ii) vomeronasal receptors, (iii) insect olfactory receptors, (iv) worm chemoreceptors, (v) taste papilla receptors and (vi) fungal pheromone receptors. A complementary database of the ligands of these receptors (OdorDB) has bee...

  6. Carotid chemoreceptor development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirahata, Machiko; Kostuk, Eric W; Pichard, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    Mice are the most suitable species for understanding genetic aspects of postnatal developments of the carotid body due to the availability of many inbred strains and knockout mice. Our study has shown that the carotid body grows differentially in different mouse strains, indicating the involvement of genes. However, the small size hampers investigating functional development of the carotid body. Hypoxic and/or hyperoxic ventilatory responses have been investigated in newborn mice, but these responses are indirect assessment of the carotid body function. Therefore, we need to develop techniques of measuring carotid chemoreceptor neural activity from young mice. Many studies have taken advantage of the knockout mice to understand chemoreceptor function of the carotid body, but they are not always suitable for addressing postnatal development of the carotid body due to lethality during perinatal periods. Various inbred strains with well-designed experiments will provide useful information regarding genetic mechanisms of the postnatal carotid chemoreceptor development. Also, targeted gene deletion is a critical approach.

  7. Directed Evolution of Bacterial Chemoreceptors

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    Goulian, Mark

    2006-03-01

    The methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins are a family of receptors in bacteria that mediate chemotaxis to diverse signals. We have developed a simple method for selecting bacteria that swim towards target attractants, which makes it possible to isolate novel chemoreceptors. The procedure is based on establishing a diffusive gradient in semi-soft agar and does not require that the attractant be metabolized or degraded. We have applied this method to evolve the E. coli aspartate receptor, Tar, to mediate chemotaxis to new attractants. We found that Tar is quite plastic and can be readily mutated to respond to diverse compounds. The overall change in specificity depended on the target attractant. In some cases the mutated receptors still showed significant sensitivity to aspartate, indicating that the receptors had a broadened specificity relative to wild-type Tar. In other cases, however, the Tar variants showed a dramatic decrease in their response to aspartate. This occurred in the absence of any counter-selection steps. For many of the receptors, the maximal sensitivity that was obtained could not be attributed solely to substitutions within the ligand binding pocket. The receptors that we have isolated, together with additional variants that may be obtained with our technique, provide new tools for exploring the molecular mechanisms of signal transduction by chemoreceptors. Our selection method will also be useful for constructing new receptors for the development of biosensors and for engineering bacteria for applications in biotechnology.

  8. Central chemoreceptors: locations and functions.

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    Nattie, Eugene; Li, Aihua

    2012-01-01

    Central chemoreception traditionally refers to a change in ventilation attributable to changes in CO2/H(+) detected within the brain. Interest in central chemoreception has grown substantially since the previous Handbook of Physiology published in 1986. Initially, central chemoreception was localized to areas on the ventral medullary surface, a hypothesis complemented by the recent identification of neurons with specific phenotypes near one of these areas as putative chemoreceptor cells. However, there is substantial evidence that many sites participate in central chemoreception some located at a distance from the ventral medulla. Functionally, central chemoreception, via the sensing of brain interstitial fluid H(+), serves to detect and integrate information on (i) alveolar ventilation (arterial PCO2), (ii) brain blood flow and metabolism, and (iii) acid-base balance, and, in response, can affect breathing, airway resistance, blood pressure (sympathetic tone), and arousal. In addition, central chemoreception provides a tonic "drive" (source of excitation) at the normal, baseline PCO2 level that maintains a degree of functional connectivity among brainstem respiratory neurons necessary to produce eupneic breathing. Central chemoreception responds to small variations in PCO2 to regulate normal gas exchange and to large changes in PCO2 to minimize acid-base changes. Central chemoreceptor sites vary in function with sex and with development. From an evolutionary perspective, central chemoreception grew out of the demands posed by air versus water breathing, homeothermy, sleep, optimization of the work of breathing with the "ideal" arterial PCO2, and the maintenance of the appropriate pH at 37°C for optimal protein structure and function.

  9. Characterization of Leptospiral Chemoreceptors Using a Microscopic Agar Drop Assay.

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    Affroze, Samia; Islam, Md Shafiqul; Takabe, Kyosuke; Kudo, Seishi; Nakamura, Shuichi

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is induced by sensing chemical stimuli via chemoreceptors embedded in the cytoplasmic membrane, enabling the cells to migrate toward nutrients or away from toxins. The chemoreceptors of Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. have been well studied and are functionally classified on the basis of detectable substrates. The spirochete Leptospira possesses more than ten chemoreceptors and shows attractive or repellent responses against some sugars, amino acids, and fatty acids. However, the roles of these chemoreceptors have not been investigated. In this study, we conducted a chemotaxis assay called microscopic agar drop assay in combination with competition experiments, determining whether two kinds of attractants are recognized by the same type of chemoreceptor in the saprophytic Leptospira strain, Leptospira biflexa. Analyzing the competition effect observed between several pairs of chemicals, we found that L. biflexa senses sugars via chemoreceptors different from those that sense amino acids and fatty acids.

  10. Plasticity of the chemoreceptor repertoire in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Shanshan Zhou

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available For most organisms, chemosensation is critical for survival and is mediated by large families of chemoreceptor proteins, whose expression must be tuned appropriately to changes in the chemical environment. We asked whether expression of chemoreceptor genes that are clustered in the genome would be regulated independently; whether expression of certain chemoreceptor genes would be especially sensitive to environmental changes; whether groups of chemoreceptor genes undergo coordinated rexpression; and how plastic the expression of chemoreceptor genes is with regard to sex, development, reproductive state, and social context. To answer these questions we used Drosophila melanogaster, because its chemosensory systems are well characterized and both the genotype and environment can be controlled precisely. Using customized cDNA microarrays, we showed that chemoreceptor genes that are clustered in the genome undergo independent transcriptional regulation at different developmental stages and between sexes. Expression of distinct subgroups of chemoreceptor genes is sensitive to reproductive state and social interactions. Furthermore, exposure of flies only to odor of the opposite sex results in altered transcript abundance of chemoreceptor genes. These genes are distinct from those that show transcriptional plasticity when flies are allowed physical contact with same or opposite sex members. We analyzed covariance in transcript abundance of chemosensory genes across all environmental conditions and found that they segregated into 20 relatively small, biologically relevant modules of highly correlated transcripts. This finely pixilated modular organization of the chemosensory subgenome enables fine tuning of the expression of the chemoreceptor repertoire in response to ecologically relevant environmental and physiological conditions.

  11. Peripheral chemoreceptors in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

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    Perez, Iris A; Keens, Thomas G

    2013-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome is a rare disorder caused by a mutation in the PHOX2B gene resulting in hypoventilation that is worse during sleep. Human physiologic studies show that patients with CCHS have absent or decreased rebreathing ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and hypoxemia during sleep as well as during wakefulness. Some ventilatory responses to hypoxia and hyperoxia can be demonstrated using a step change in inspired oxygen. However, these suggest that both central and peripheral chemoreceptor functions are generally defective in all states in children with CCHS. The defect in CCHS may lie in central nervous system pathways regulating ventilation, whose development and function are controlled by PHOX2B. Moreover, the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) may be the major defect in CCHS, where central and peripheral inputs converge. Human physiological studies predicted that the defect in CCHS lies in central integration of the central and peripheral chemoreceptor signals. New evidence suggests the RTN may be the respiratory controller where chemoreceptor inputs are integrated. In this review we present the clinical presentation of CCHS, revisit results of human physiologic studies, and discuss the findings in light of new knowledge about the role of PHOX2B and RTN in CCHS.

  12. Functional and evolutionary aspects of chemoreceptors

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    Dieter eWicher

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The perception and processing of chemical signals from the environment is essential for any living systems and is most probably the first sense developed in life. This perspective discusses the physical limits of chemoreception and gives an overview on the receptor types developed during evolution to detect chemical signals from the outside world of an organism. It discusses the interaction of chemoreceptors with downstream signaling elements, especially the interaction between electrical and chemical signaling. It is further considered how the primary chemosignal is appropriately amplified. Three examples of chemosensory systems illustrate different strategies of such amplification.

  13. Chemotactic Signaling by Single-Chain Chemoreceptors.

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    Patricia Mowery

    Full Text Available Bacterial chemoreceptors of the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP family operate in commingled clusters that enable cells to detect and track environmental chemical gradients with high sensitivity and precision. MCP homodimers of different detection specificities form mixed trimers of dimers that facilitate inter-receptor communication in core signaling complexes, which in turn assemble into a large signaling network. The two subunits of each homodimeric receptor molecule occupy different locations in the core complexes. One subunit participates in trimer-stabilizing interactions at the trimer axis, the other lies on the periphery of the trimer, where it can interact with two cytoplasmic proteins: CheA, a signaling autokinase, and CheW, which couples CheA activity to receptor control. As a possible tool for independently manipulating receptor subunits in these two structural environments, we constructed and characterized fused genes for the E. coli serine chemoreceptor Tsr that encoded single-chain receptor molecules in which the C-terminus of the first Tsr subunit was covalently connected to the N-terminus of the second with a polypeptide linker. We showed with soft agar assays and with a FRET-based in vivo CheA kinase assay that single-chain Tsr~Tsr molecules could promote serine sensing and chemotaxis responses. The length of the connection between the joined subunits was critical. Linkers nine residues or shorter locked the receptor in a kinase-on state, most likely by distorting the native structure of the receptor HAMP domain. Linkers 22 or more residues in length permitted near-normal Tsr function. Few single-chain molecules were found as monomer-sized proteolytic fragments in cells, indicating that covalently joined receptor subunits were responsible for mediating the signaling responses we observed. However, cysteine-directed crosslinking, spoiling by dominant-negative Tsr subunits, and rearrangement of ligand-binding site

  14. A chemoreceptor that detects molecular carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ewan St John; Martinez-Velazquez, Luis; Ringstad, Niels

    2013-12-27

    Animals from diverse phyla possess neurons that are activated by the product of aerobic respiration, CO2. It has long been thought that such neurons primarily detect the CO2 metabolites protons and bicarbonate. We have determined the chemical tuning of isolated CO2 chemosensory BAG neurons of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that BAG neurons are principally tuned to detect molecular CO2, although they can be activated by acid stimuli. One component of the BAG transduction pathway, the receptor-type guanylate cyclase GCY-9, suffices to confer cellular sensitivity to both molecular CO2 and acid, indicating that it is a bifunctional chemoreceptor. We speculate that in other animals, receptors similarly capable of detecting molecular CO2 might mediate effects of CO2 on neural circuits and behavior.

  15. Bacterial chemoreceptors of different length classes signal independently.

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    Herrera Seitz, M Karina; Frank, Vered; Massazza, Diego A; Vaknin, Ady; Studdert, Claudia A

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial chemoreceptors sense environmental stimuli and govern cell movement by transmitting the information to the flagellar motors. The highly conserved cytoplasmic domain of chemoreceptors consists in an alpha-helical hairpin that forms in the homodimer a coiled-coil four-helix bundle. Several classes of chemoreceptors that differ in the length of the coiled-coil structure were characterized. Many bacterial species code for chemoreceptors that belong to different classes, but how these receptors are organized and function in the same cell remains an open question. E. coli cells normally code for single class chemoreceptors that form extended arrays based on trimers of dimers interconnected by the coupling protein CheW and the kinase CheA. This structure promotes effective coupling between the different receptors in the modulation of the kinase activity. In this work, we engineered functional derivatives of the Tsr chemoreceptor of E. coli that mimic receptors whose cytoplasmic domain is longer by two heptads. We found that these long Tsr receptors did not efficiently mix with the native receptors and appeared to function independently. Our results suggest that the assembly of membrane-bound receptors of different specificities into mixed clusters is dictated by the length-class to which the receptors belong, ensuring cooperative function only between receptors of the same class.

  16. Odor and pheromone sensing via chemoreceptors.

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    Ma, Minghong

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionally, chemosensation is an ancient but yet enigmatic sense. All organisms ranging from the simplest unicellular form to the most advanced multicellular creature possess the capability to detect chemicals in the surroundings. Conversely, all living things emit some forms of smells, either as communicating signals or as by-products of metabolism. Many species (from worms, insects to mammals) rely on the olfactory systems which express a large number of chemoreceptors to locate food and mates and to avoid danger. Most chemoreceptors expressed in olfactory organs are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and can be classified into two major categories: odorant receptors (ORs) and pheromone receptors, which principally detect general odors and pheromones, respectively. In vertebrates, these two types of receptors are often expressed in two distinct apparatuses: The main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO), respectively. Each olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) in the MOE typically expresses one type of OR from a large repertoire. General odors activate ORs and their host OSNs (ranging from narrowly- to broadly-tuned) in a combinatorial manner and the information is sent to the brain via the main olfactory system leading to perception of smells. In contrast, pheromones stimulate relatively narrowly-tuned receptors and their host VNO neurons and the information is sent to the brain via the accessory olfactory system leading to behavioral and endocrinological changes. Recent studies indicate that the functional separation between these two systems is blurred in some cases and there are more subsystems serving chemosensory roles. This chapter focuses on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying odor and pheromone sensing in rodents, the best characterized vertebrate models.

  17. Odor and pheromone sensing via chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Minghong

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionally, chemosensation is an ancient but yet enigmatic sense. All organisms ranging from the simplest unicellular form to the most advanced multicellular creature possess the capability to detect chemicals in the surroundings. Conversely, all living things emit some forms of smells, either as communicating signals or as by-products of metabolism. Many species (from worms, insects to mammals) rely on the olfactory systems which express a large number of chemoreceptors to locate food and mates and to avoid danger. Most chemoreceptors expressed in olfactory organs are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and can be classified into two major categories: odorant receptors (ORs) and pheromone receptors, which principally detect general odors and pheromones, respectively. In vertebrates, these two types of receptors are often expressed in two distinct apparatuses: The main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO), respectively. Each olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) in the MOE typically expresses one type of OR from a large repertoire. General odors activate ORs and their host OSNs (ranging from narrowly- to broadly-tuned) in a combinatorial manner and the information is sent to the brain via the main olfactory system leading to perception of smells. In contrast, pheromones stimulate relatively narrowly-tuned receptors and their host VNO neurons and the information is sent to the brain via the accessory olfactory system leading to behavioral and endocrinological changes. Recent studies indicate that the functional separation between these two systems is blurred in some cases and there are more subsystems serving chemosensory roles. This chapter focuses on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying odor and pheromone sensing in rodents, the best characterized vertebrate models. PMID:22399397

  18. Changing the specificity of a bacterial chemoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derr, Paige; Boder, Eric; Goulian, Mark

    2006-02-01

    The methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins are a family of receptors in bacteria that mediate chemotaxis to diverse signals. To explore the plasticity of these proteins, we have developed a simple method for selecting cells that swim to target attractants. The procedure is based on establishing a diffusive gradient in semi-soft agar plates and does not require that the attractant be metabolized or degraded. We have applied this method to select for variants of the Escherichia coli aspartate receptor, Tar, that have a new or improved response to different amino acids. We found that Tar can be readily mutated to respond to new chemical signals. However, the overall change in specificity depended on the target compound. A Tar variant that could detect cysteic acid still showed a strong sensitivity to aspartate, indicating that the new receptor had a broadened specificity relative to wild-type Tar. Tar variants that responded to phenylalanine or N-methyl aspartate, or that had an increased sensitivity to glutamate showed a strong decrease in their response to aspartate. In at least some of the cases, the maximal level of sensitivity that was obtained could not be attributed solely to substitutions within the binding pocket. The new tar alleles and the techniques described here provide a new approach for exploring the relationship between ligand binding and signal transduction by chemoreceptors and for engineering new receptors for applications in biotechnology.

  19. Denervation of carotid baro- and chemoreceptors in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, H.J.L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Carotid baro- and chemoreceptors play an important role in blood pressure and blood gas homeostasis. Inadvertent denervation of these receptors in humans has been reported following surgery and radiotherapy in the area of the carotid bifurcation. The resulting syndrome of baroreflex failure is chara

  20. A family of chemoreceptors in Tribolium castaneum (Tenebrionidae: Coleoptera.

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    Mohatmed Abdel-Latief

    Full Text Available Chemoperception in invertebrates is mediated by a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. To date nothing is known about the molecular mechanisms of chemoperception in coleopteran species. Recently the genome of Tribolium castaneum was sequenced for use as a model species for the Coleoptera. Using blast searches analyses of the T. castaneum genome with previously predicted amino acid sequences of insect chemoreceptor genes, a putative chemoreceptor family consisting of 62 gustatory receptors (Grs and 26 olfactory receptors (Ors was identified. The receptors have seven transmembrane domains (7TMs and all belong to the GPCR receptor family. The expression of the T. castaneum chemoreceptor genes was investigated using quantification real- time RT-PCR and in situ whole mount RT-PCR analysis in the antennae, mouth parts, and prolegs of the adults and larvae. All of the predicted TcasGrs were expressed in the labium, maxillae, and prolegs of the adults but TcasGr13, 19, 28, 47, 62, 98, and 61 were not expressed in the prolegs. The TcasOrs were localized only in the antennae and not in any of the beetles gustatory organs with one exception; the TcasOr16 (like DmelOr83b, which was localized in the antennae, labium, and prolegs of the beetles. A group of six TcasGrs that presents a lineage with the sugar receptors subfamily in Drosophila melanogaster were localized in the lacinia of the Tribolium larvae. TcasGr1, 3, and 39, presented an ortholog to CO(2 receptors in D. melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae was recorded. Low expression of almost all of the predicted chemoreceptor genes was observed in the head tissues that contain the brains and suboesophageal ganglion (SOG. These findings demonstrate the identification of a chemoreceptor family in Tribolium, which is evolutionarily related to other insect species.

  1. Peripheral chemoreceptors determine the respiratory sensitivity of central chemoreceptors to CO2 : role of carotid body CO2.

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    Smith, Curtis A; Blain, Grégory M; Henderson, Kathleen S; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2015-09-15

    We asked if the type of carotid body (CB) chemoreceptor stimulus influenced the ventilatory gain of the central chemoreceptors to CO2 . The effect of CB normoxic hypocapnia, normocapnia and hypercapnia (carotid body PCO2 ≈ 22, 41 and 68 mmHg, respectively) on the ventilatory CO2 sensitivity of central chemoreceptors was studied in seven awake dogs with vascularly-isolated and extracorporeally-perfused CBs. Chemosensitivity with one CB was similar to that in intact dogs. In four CB-denervated dogs, absence of hyper-/hypoventilatory responses to CB perfusion with PCO2 of 19-75 mmHg confirmed separation of the perfused CB circulation from the brain. The group mean central CO2 response slopes were increased 303% for minute ventilation (V̇I)(P ≤ 0.01) and 251% for mean inspiratory flow rate (VT /TI ) (P ≤ 0.05) when the CB was hypercapnic vs. hypocapnic; central CO2 response slopes for tidal volume (VT ), breathing frequency (fb ) and rate of rise of the diaphragm EMG increased in 6 of 7 animals but the group mean changes did not reach statistical significance. Group mean central CO2 response slopes were also increased 237% for V̇I(P ≤ 0.01) and 249% for VT /TI (P ≤ 0.05) when the CB was normocapnic vs. hypocapnic, but no significant differences in any of the central ventilatory response indices were found between CB normocapnia and hypercapnia. These hyperadditive effects of CB hyper-/hypocapnia agree with previous findings using CB hyper-/hypoxia.We propose that hyperaddition is the dominant form of chemoreceptor interaction in quiet wakefulness when the chemosensory control system is intact, response gains physiological, and carotid body chemoreceptors are driven by a wide range of O2 and/or CO2 .

  2. Chemicals and chemoreceptors: ecologically relevant signals driving behavior in Drosophila.

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    Ana eDepetris-Chauvin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Insects encounter a vast repertoire of chemicals in their natural environment, which can signal positive stimuli like the presence of a food source, a potential mate, or a suitable oviposition site as well as negative stimuli such as competitors, predators, or toxic substances reflecting danger. The presence of specialized chemoreceptors like taste and olfactory receptors allow animals to detect chemicals at short and long distances and accordingly, trigger proper behaviors towards these stimuli. Since the first description of olfactory and taste receptors in Drosophila fifteen years ago, our knowledge on the identity, properties, and function of specific chemoreceptors has increased exponentially. In the last years, multidisciplinary approaches combining genetic tools with electrophysiological techniques, behavioral recording, evolutionary analysis, and chemical ecology studies are shedding light on our understanding on the ecological relevance of specific chemoreceptors for the survival of Drosophila in their natural environment. In this review we discuss the current knowledge on chemoreceptors of both the olfactory and taste systems of the fruitfly. We focus on the relevance of particular receptors for the detection of ecologically relevant cues such as pheromones, food sources, and toxic compounds, and we comment on the behavioral changes that the detection of these chemicals induce in the fly. In particular, we give an updated outlook of the chemical communication displayed during one of the most important behaviors for fly survival, the courtship behavior. Finally, the ecological relevance of specific chemicals can vary depending on the niche occupied by the individual. In that regard, in this review we also highlight the contrast between adult and larval systems and we propose that these differences could reflect distinctive requirements depending on the change of ecological niche occupied by Drosophila along its life cycle.

  3. Chemicals and chemoreceptors: ecologically relevant signals driving behavior in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Depetris-Chauvin, Ana; Galagovsky, Diego; Grosjean, Yael

    2015-01-01

    Insects encounter a vast repertoire of chemicals in their natural environment, which can signal positive stimuli like the presence of a food source, a potential mate, or a suitable oviposition site as well as negative stimuli such as competitors, predators, or toxic substances reflecting danger. The presence of specialized chemoreceptors like taste and olfactory receptors allows animals to detect chemicals at short and long distances and accordingly, trigger proper behaviors toward these stim...

  4. Chemicals and chemoreceptors: ecologically relevant signals driving behavior in Drosophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Ana eDepetris-Chauvin; Diego eGalagovsky; Yael eGrosjean

    2015-01-01

    Insects encounter a vast repertoire of chemicals in their natural environment, which can signal positive stimuli like the presence of a food source, a potential mate, or a suitable oviposition site as well as negative stimuli such as competitors, predators, or toxic substances reflecting danger. The presence of specialized chemoreceptors like taste and olfactory receptors allow animals to detect chemicals at short and long distances and accordingly, trigger proper behaviors towards these stim...

  5. Carotid body chemoreceptors, sympathetic neural activation, and cardiometabolic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Idiaquez, Juan; Somers, Virend K.

    2016-01-01

    The carotid body (CB) is the main peripheral chemoreceptor that senses the arterial PO2, PCO2 and pH. In response to hypoxemia, hypercapnia and acidosis, carotid chemosensory discharge elicits reflex respiratory, autonomic and cardiovascular adjustments. The classical construct considers the CB as the main peripheral oxygen sensor, triggering reflex physiological responses to acute hypoxemia and facilitating the ventilatory acclimation to chronic hypoxemia at high altitude. However, a growing...

  6. SOLITARY CHEMORECEPTOR CELL SURVIVAL IS INDEPENDENT OF INTACT TRIGEMINAL INNERVATION

    OpenAIRE

    Gulbransen, Brian; Silver, Wayne; Finger, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Nasal solitary chemoreceptor cells (SCCs) are a population of specialized chemosensory epithelial cells presumed to broaden trigeminal chemoreceptivity in mammals (Finger et al., 2003). SCCs are innervated by peptidergic trigeminal nerve fibers (Finger et al., 2003) but it is currently unknown if intact innervation is necessary for SCC development or survival. We tested the dependence of SCCs on innervation by eliminating trigeminal nerve fibers during development with neurogenin-1 knockout m...

  7. Chronic Interactions Between Carotid Baroreceptors and Chemoreceptors in Obesity Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmeier, Thomas E; Iliescu, Radu; Tudorancea, Ionut; Cazan, Radu; Cates, Adam W; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Irwin, Eric D

    2016-07-01

    Carotid bodies play a critical role in protecting against hypoxemia, and their activation increases sympathetic activity, arterial pressure, and ventilation, responses opposed by acute stimulation of the baroreflex. Although chemoreceptor hypersensitivity is associated with sympathetically mediated hypertension, the mechanisms involved and their significance in the pathogenesis of hypertension remain unclear. We investigated the chronic interactions of these reflexes in dogs with sympathetically mediated, obesity-induced hypertension based on the hypothesis that hypoxemia and tonic activation of carotid chemoreceptors may be associated with obesity. After 5 weeks on a high-fat diet, the animals experienced a 35% to 40% weight gain and increases in arterial pressure from 106±3 to 123±3 mm Hg and respiratory rate from 8±1 to 12±1 breaths/min along with hypoxemia (arterial partial pressure of oxygen=81±3 mm Hg) but eucapnia. During 7 days of carotid baroreflex activation by electric stimulation of the carotid sinus, tachypnea was attenuated, and hypertension was abolished before these variables returned to prestimulation values during a recovery period. After subsequent denervation of the carotid sinus region, respiratory rate decreased transiently in association with further sustained reductions in arterial partial pressure of oxygen (to 65±2 mm Hg) and substantial hypercapnia. Moreover, the severity of hypertension was attenuated from 125±2 to 116±3 mm Hg (45%-50% reduction). These findings suggest that hypoxemia may account for sustained stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors in obesity and that this activation leads to compensatory increases in ventilation and central sympathetic outflow that contributes to neurogenically mediated hypertension. Furthermore, the excitatory effects of chemoreceptor hyperactivity are abolished by chronic activation of the carotid baroreflex. PMID:27160198

  8. Central chemoreceptors and neural mechanisms of cardiorespiratory control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Moreira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The arterial partial pressure (P CO2 of carbon dioxide is virtually constant because of the close match between the metabolic production of this gas and its excretion via breathing. Blood gas homeostasis does not rely solely on changes in lung ventilation, but also to a considerable extent on circulatory adjustments that regulate the transport of CO2 from its sites of production to the lungs. The neural mechanisms that coordinate circulatory and ventilatory changes to achieve blood gas homeostasis are the subject of this review. Emphasis will be placed on the control of sympathetic outflow by central chemoreceptors. High levels of CO2 exert an excitatory effect on sympathetic outflow that is mediated by specialized chemoreceptors such as the neurons located in the retrotrapezoid region. In addition, high CO2 causes an aversive awareness in conscious animals, activating wake-promoting pathways such as the noradrenergic neurons. These neuronal groups, which may also be directly activated by brain acidification, have projections that contribute to the CO2-induced rise in breathing and sympathetic outflow. However, since the level of activity of the retrotrapezoid nucleus is regulated by converging inputs from wake-promoting systems, behavior-specific inputs from higher centers and by chemical drive, the main focus of the present manuscript is to review the contribution of central chemoreceptors to the control of autonomic and respiratory mechanisms.

  9. Tonic arterial chemoreceptor activity contributes to cardiac sympathetic activation in mild ovine heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Daniel T; May, Clive N; Booth, Lindsea C; Ramchandra, Rohit

    2014-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with a large increase in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA), which has detrimental effects on the heart and promotes arrhythmias and sudden death. There is increasing evidence that arterial chemoreceptor activation plays an important role in stimulating renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in HF. Given that sympathetic nerve activity to individual organs is differentially controlled, we investigated whether tonic arterial chemoreceptor activation contributes to the increased CSNA in HF. We recorded CSNA and RSNA in conscious normal sheep and in sheep with mild HF induced by rapid ventricular pacing (ejection fraction chemoreceptor function was evaluated by supplementing room air with 100% intranasal oxygen (2-3 l min(-1)) for 20 min, thereby deactivating chemoreceptors. The effects of hyperoxia on resting levels and baroreflex control of heart rate, CSNA and RSNA were determined. In HF, chemoreceptor deactivation induced by hyperoxia significantly reduced CSNA [90 ± 2 versus 75 ± 5 bursts (100 heart beats)(-1), P chemoreceptor deactivation reduced heart rate without a significant effect on CSNA or RSNA. In summary, deactivation of peripheral chemoreceptors during HF reduced the elevated levels of CSNA, indicating that tonic arterial chemoreceptor activation plays a critical role in stimulating the elevated CSNA in HF.

  10. Narrow-spectrum chemoreceptor cells in the walking legs of the lobster Homarus americanus: taste specialists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derby, C.D.; Atema, J.

    1982-01-01

    The chemoreceptors in the legs of lobsters function in the localization and handling of food. By single-unit extracellular recording techniques, the specificity of single primary chemoreceptor cells is described here in detail. In contrast to what is known in vertebrates, narrow-spectrum chemoreceptors of several different types were found, each type responding with maximal sensitivity to only one of the following compounds: L-glutamate, L-glutamine, L-arginine, taurine, betaine, and ammonium chloride. Ammonium chloride sensitive cells were also highly specific. Other groups of narrow-spectrum cells - L-arginine, L-glutamine, taurine, and betaine sensitive chemoreceptors - showed equally strong specificity. These results indicate that the peripheral coding system in the legs of lobsters is based largely but perhaps not exclusively on narrow-spectrum chemoreceptor cells.

  11. Lead toxicity promotes autonomic dysfunction with increased chemoreceptor sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldes, Vera; Carvalho, Mafalda; Goncalves-Rosa, Nataniel; Tavares, Cristiano; Laranjo, Sérgio; Rocha, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    Mortality and morbidity by toxic metals is an important issue of occupational health. Lead is an ubiquitous heavy metal in our environment despite having no physiological role in biological systems. Being an homeostatic controller is expected that the autonomic nervous system would show a degree of impairment in lead toxicity. In fact, sympathoexcitation associated to high blood pressure and tachypnea has been described together with baroreflex dysfunction. However, the mechanisms underlying the autonomic dysfunction and the interplay between baro- and chemoreflex are not yet fully clarified. The angiotensinogenic PVN-NTS axis (paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus - nucleus tractus solitarius axis) is a particularly important neuronal pathway that could be responsible for the autonomic dysfunction and the cardiorespiratory impairment in lead toxicity. Within the current work, we addressed in vivo, baro- and chemoreceptor reflex behaviour, before and after central angiotensin inhibition, in order to better understand the cardiorespiratory autonomic mechanisms underlying the toxic effects of long-term lead exposure. For that, arterial pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, sympathetic and parasympathetic activity and baro- and chemoreceptor reflex profiles of anaesthetized young adult rats exposed to lead, from foetal period to adulthood, were evaluated. Results showed increased chemosensitivity together with baroreceptor reflex impairment, sympathetic over-excitation, hypertension and tachypnea. Chemosensitivity and sympathetic overexcitation were reversed towards normality values by NTS treatment with A-779, an angiotensin (1-7) antagonist. No parasympathetic changes were observed before and after A-799 treatment. In conclusion, angiotensin (1-7) at NTS level is involved in the autonomic dysfunction observed in lead toxicity. The increased sensitivity of chemoreceptor reflex expresses the clear impairment of autonomic outflow to the cardiovascular and

  12. Chemoreceptors and cardiovascular control in acute and chronic systemic hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Marshall

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the ways in which the primary bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction evoked by selective stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors can be modified by the secondary effects of a chemoreceptor-induced increase in ventilation. The evidence that strong stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors can evoke the behavioural and cardiovascular components of the alerting or defence response which is characteristically evoked by novel or noxious stimuli is considered. The functional significance of all these influences in systemic hypoxia is then discussed with emphasis on the fact that these reflex changes can be overcome by the local effects of hypoxia: central neural hypoxia depresses ventilation, hypoxia acting on the heart causes bradycardia and local hypoxia of skeletal muscle and brain induces vasodilatation. Further, it is proposed that these local influences can become interdependent, so generating a positive feedback loop that may explain sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS. It is also argued that a major contributor to these local influences is adenosine. The role of adenosine in determining the distribution of O2 in skeletal muscle microcirculation in hypoxia is discussed, together with its possible cellular mechanisms of action. Finally, evidence is presented that in chronic systemic hypoxia, the reflex vasoconstrictor influences of the sympathetic nervous system are reduced and/or the local dilator influences of hypoxia are enhanced. In vitro and in vivo findings suggest this is partly explained by upregulation of nitric oxide (NO synthesis by the vascular endothelium which facilitates vasodilatation induced by adenosine and other NO-dependent dilators and attenuates noradrenaline-evoked vasoconstriction.

  13. Regulation of breathing and autonomic outflows by chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyenet, Patrice G

    2014-10-01

    Lung ventilation fluctuates widely with behavior but arterial PCO2 remains stable. Under normal conditions, the chemoreflexes contribute to PaCO2 stability by producing small corrective cardiorespiratory adjustments mediated by lower brainstem circuits. Carotid body (CB) information reaches the respiratory pattern generator (RPG) via nucleus solitarius (NTS) glutamatergic neurons which also target rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) presympathetic neurons thereby raising sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Chemoreceptors also regulate presympathetic neurons and cardiovagal preganglionic neurons indirectly via inputs from the RPG. Secondary effects of chemoreceptors on the autonomic outflows result from changes in lung stretch afferent and baroreceptor activity. Central respiratory chemosensitivity is caused by direct effects of acid on neurons and indirect effects of CO2 via astrocytes. Central respiratory chemoreceptors are not definitively identified but the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) is a particularly strong candidate. The absence of RTN likely causes severe central apneas in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. Like other stressors, intense chemosensory stimuli produce arousal and activate circuits that are wake- or attention-promoting. Such pathways (e.g., locus coeruleus, raphe, and orexin system) modulate the chemoreflexes in a state-dependent manner and their activation by strong chemosensory stimuli intensifies these reflexes. In essential hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea and congestive heart failure, chronically elevated CB afferent activity contributes to raising SNA but breathing is unchanged or becomes periodic (severe CHF). Extreme CNS hypoxia produces a stereotyped cardiorespiratory response (gasping, increased SNA). The effects of these various pathologies on brainstem cardiorespiratory networks are discussed, special consideration being given to the interactions between central and peripheral chemoreflexes. PMID:25428853

  14. An allosteric model for the functional plasticity of olfactory chemoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosimo, Alfredo

    2000-12-01

    A simple allosteric model may describe the relatively (a)specific behaviour of olfactory chemoreceptors (OCs) and their functional plasticity with a minimum number of parameters. Allosteric, heterotropic effectors are suggested as a possible cause of variable responses documented, in particular, in frog OCs. As an immediate spinoff of the continuously increasing amount of structural information available on natural OCs, development of appropriate allosteric models is foreseen to provide plausible molecular mechanisms for their complex functional performance. This may also have implications in the design of artificial olfaction systems.

  15. Analysis of putative chemoreceptor proteins of Campylobacter jejuni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Brøndsted, Lone; Bang, Dang D.;

    Campylobacter jejuni is the primary food borne bacterial pathogen in the developed world. A very important reservoir for C. jejuni is the gut of chickens, which are colonized efficiently and commensally by this organism. Predominantly the mucus filled crypts of the lower gastrointestinal tract...... are found to be colonized by C. jejuni and the bacteria are expected to be attracted to this environment by chemotaxis. In order to explore the role of chemotaxis in C. jejuni colonization and to identify chemoreceptors with matching attractants and/or repellants we have constructed deletion mutants of five...

  16. Synaptic and paracrine mechanisms at carotid body arterial chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurse, Colin A

    2014-08-15

    Mammalian carotid bodies are the main peripheral arterial chemoreceptors, strategically located at the bifurcation of the common carotid artery. When stimulated these receptors initiate compensatory respiratory and cardiovascular reflexes to maintain homeostasis. Thus, in response to low oxygen (hypoxia) or increased CO2/H(+) (acid hypercapnia), chemoreceptor type I cells depolarize and release excitatory neurotransmitters, such as ATP, which stimulate postsynaptic P2X2/3 receptors on afferent nerve terminals. The afferent discharge is shaped by autocrine and paracrine mechanisms involving both excitatory and inhibitory neuromodulators such as adenosine, serotonin (5-HT), GABA and dopamine. Recent evidence suggests that paracrine activation of P2Y2 receptors on adjacent glia-like type II cells may help boost the ATP signal via the opening of pannexin-1 channels. The presence of an inhibitory efferent innervation, mediated by release of nitric oxide, provides additional control of the afferent discharge. The broad array of neuromodulators and their receptors appears to endow the carotid body with a remarkable plasticity, most apparent during natural and pathophysiological conditions associated with chronic sustained and intermittent hypoxia.

  17. Sequences determining the cytoplasmic localization of a chemoreceptor domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, L; Bailey, J; Manoil, C

    1995-01-01

    The Escherichia coli serine chemoreceptor (Tsr) is a protein with a simple topology consisting of two membrane-spanning sequences (TM1 and TM2) separating a large periplasmic domain from N-terminal and C-terminal cytoplasmic regions. We analyzed the contributions of several sequence elements to the cytoplasmic localization of the C-terminal domain by using chemoreceptor-alkaline phosphatase gene fusions. The principal findings were as follows. (i) The cytoplasmic localization of the C-terminal domain depended on TM2 but was quite tolerant of mutations partially deleting or introducing charged residues into the sequence. (ii) The basal level of C-terminal domain export was significantly higher in proteins with the wild-type periplasmic domain than in derivatives with a shortened periplasmic domain, suggesting that the large size of the wild-type domain promotes partial membrane misinsertion. (iii) The membrane insertion of deletion derivatives with a single spanning segment (TM1 or TM2) could be controlled by either an adjacent positively charged sequence or an adjacent amphipathic sequence. The results provide evidence that the generation of the Tsr membrane topology is an overdetermined process directed by an interplay of sequences promoting and opposing establishment of the normal structure. PMID:7730259

  18. The role of carotid chemoreceptors in the sympathetic activation by adenosine in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.; Karemaker, J.M.; Wieling, W.; Marres, H.A.M.; Lenders, J.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    The direct vasodilatory and negative chronotropic effects of adenosine in humans are counterbalanced by a reflex increase in sympathetic nerve traffic. A suggested mechanism for this reflex includes peripheral chemoreceptor activation. We, therefore, assessed the contribution of carotid chemorecepto

  19. Repellent response functions of the Trg and Tap chemoreceptors of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, K.; Macnab, R M; Imae, Y

    1990-01-01

    The chemoreceptors responsible for the repellent response of Escherichia coli to phenol were investigated. In the absence of all four known methyl-accepting chemoreceptors (Tar, Tsr, Trg, and Tap), cells showed no response to phenol. However, when Trg, which mediates the attractant response to ribose and galactose, was introduced via a plasmid, the cells acquired a repellent response to phenol. About 1 mM phenol induced a clear repellent response; this response was suppressed by 1 mM ribose. ...

  20. Functional Gustatory Role of Chemoreceptors in Drosophila Wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raad, Hussein; Ferveur, Jean-François; Ledger, Neil; Capovilla, Maria; Robichon, Alain

    2016-05-17

    Neuroanatomical evidence argues for the presence of taste sensilla in Drosophila wings; however, the taste physiology of insect wings remains hypothetical, and a comprehensive link to mechanical functions, such as flight, wing flapping, and grooming, is lacking. Our data show that the sensilla of the Drosophila anterior wing margin respond to both sweet and bitter molecules through an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. Conversely, genetically modified flies presenting a wing-specific reduction in chemosensory cells show severe defects in both wing taste signaling and the exploratory guidance associated with chemodetection. In Drosophila, the chemodetection machinery includes mechanical grooming, which facilitates the contact between tastants and wing chemoreceptors, and the vibrations of flapping wings that nebulize volatile molecules as carboxylic acids. Together, these data demonstrate that the Drosophila wing chemosensory sensilla are a functional taste organ and that they may have a role in the exploration of ecological niches. PMID:27160896

  1. Cardiorespiratory response to cyanide of arterial chemoreceptors in fetal lambs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itskovitz, J.; Rudolph, A.M.

    1987-05-01

    Cardiorespiratory response to the stimulation of the carotid and aortic receptors by sodium cyanide was examined in fetal lambs in utero at 0.8 (120 days) gestation. Injections of 50-400 ..mu..g cyanide into the inferior vena cava or the carotid artery of intact fetuses elicited bradycardia and respiratory responses that varied from a single gasp to rhythmic respiratory movements but no significant change in arterial blood pressure. Carotid sinus denervation eliminated the cardiorespiratory response to intracarotid injection of cyanide and sinoaortic denervation abolished the response to inferior vena caval injection. It is concluded that in fetal lamb in utero the aortic and carotid bodies are active, and hypoxic stimulation of these chemoreceptors results in cardiorespiratory response characterized by slowing of fetal heart rate, respiratory effort, and no consistent change in arterial blood pressure.

  2. Functional Gustatory Role of Chemoreceptors in Drosophila Wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raad, Hussein; Ferveur, Jean-François; Ledger, Neil; Capovilla, Maria; Robichon, Alain

    2016-05-17

    Neuroanatomical evidence argues for the presence of taste sensilla in Drosophila wings; however, the taste physiology of insect wings remains hypothetical, and a comprehensive link to mechanical functions, such as flight, wing flapping, and grooming, is lacking. Our data show that the sensilla of the Drosophila anterior wing margin respond to both sweet and bitter molecules through an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. Conversely, genetically modified flies presenting a wing-specific reduction in chemosensory cells show severe defects in both wing taste signaling and the exploratory guidance associated with chemodetection. In Drosophila, the chemodetection machinery includes mechanical grooming, which facilitates the contact between tastants and wing chemoreceptors, and the vibrations of flapping wings that nebulize volatile molecules as carboxylic acids. Together, these data demonstrate that the Drosophila wing chemosensory sensilla are a functional taste organ and that they may have a role in the exploration of ecological niches.

  3. Coexpression of Galanin and Nestin in the Chemoreceptor Cells of the Human Carotid Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzatenta, Andrea; Marconi, Guya D; Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Cataldi, Amelia; Di Giulio, Camillo; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw

    2016-01-01

    The carotid body is a highly specialized chemoreceptive organ of neural crest origin whose role is to detect changes in arterial oxygen content. The sensory units are the chemoreceptor cells, which are neuronal-like cells, surrounded by sustentacular or glial-like cells. It is suggested that the carotid body contains self-renewing multipotent stem cells, which are putatively represented by glial-like sustentacular cells. The mechanisms of renewal of neuronal-like cells are unclear. Recently, we have demonstrated the expression of galanin, a peptide promoting neurogenesis, in chemoreceptor cells in the human CB. Thus, in the present study we seek to determine whether galanin expression in chemoreceptor cells could be matched with that of nestin, a peptide that is a marker of multipotent neural stem cells, or rather with the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker for glial cells. The latter would underscore the pluasibly essential role of sustentacular cells in the self-renewal capability of chemorecetors. We found that galanin expression is matched with nestin in chemoreceptor cells of the human carotid body, but not with that of GFAP. Thus, galanin expression in chemoreceptor cells could provide a signal for neurogenesis and chemoreceptor cell differentiation in the carotid body.

  4. Polar Location of the Chemoreceptor Complex in the Escherichia coli Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddock, Janine R.; Shapiro, Lucille

    1993-03-01

    The eukaryotic cell exhibits compartmentalization of functions to various membrane-bound organelles and to specific domains within each membrane. The spatial distribution of the membrane chemoreceptors and associated cytoplasmic chemotaxis proteins in Escherichia coli were examined as a prototypic functional aggregate in bacterial cells. Bacterial chemotaxis involves a phospho-relay system brought about by ligand association with a membrane receptor, culminating in a switch in the direction of flagellar rotation. The transduction of the chemotaxis signal is initiated by a chemoreceptor-CheW-CheA ternary complex at the inner membrane. These ternary complexes aggregate predominantly at the cell poles. Polar localization of the cytoplasmic CheA and CheW proteins is dependent on membrane-bound chemoreceptor. Chemoreceptors are not confined to the cell poles in strains lacking both CheA and CheW. The chemoreceptor-CheW binary complex is polarly localized in the absence of CheA, whereas the chemoreceptor-CheA binary complex is not confined to the cell poles in strains lacking CheW. The subcellular localization of the chemotaxis proteins may reflect a general mechanism by which the bacterial cell sequesters different regions of the cell for specialized functions.

  5. Role of the carotid body chemoreceptors in baroreflex control of blood pressure during hypoglycaemia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberg, Jacqueline K; Taylor, Jennifer L; Dube, Simmi; Basu, Rita; Basu, Ananda; Joyner, Michael J; Wehrwein, Erica A

    2014-04-01

    Activation of the carotid body chemoreceptors with hypoxia alters baroreceptor-mediated responses. We aimed to examine whether this relationship can be translated to other chemoreceptor stimuli (i.e. hypoglycaemia) by testing the following hypotheses: (i) activation of the carotid body chemoreceptors with hypoglycaemia would reduce spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (sCBRS) in healthy humans; and (ii) desensitization of the carotid chemoreceptors with hyperoxia would restore sCBRS to baseline levels during hypoglycaemia. Ten young healthy adults completed two 180 min hyperinsulinaemic [2 mU (kg fat-free mass)(-1) min(-1)], hypoglycaemic (∼ 3.2 μmol ml(-1)) clamps, separated by at least 1 week and randomized to normoxia (arterial partial pressure of O2, 122 ± 10 mmHg) or hyperoxia (arterial partial pressure of O2, 424 ± 123 mmHg; to blunt activation of the carotid body glomus cells). Changes in heart rate, blood pressure, plasma catecholamines, heart rate variability (HRV) and sCBRS were assessed. During hypoglycaemia, HRV and sCBRS were reduced (P 0.05). In summary, hypoglycaemia-mediated changes in HRV and sCBRS cannot be attributed exclusively to the carotid chemoreceptors; however, the chemoreceptors appear to play a role in resetting the baroreflex working range during hypoglycaemia.

  6. Fernando De Castro and the discovery of the arterial chemoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constancio eGonzalez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When De Castro entered the carotid body (CB field, the organ was considered to be a small autonomic ganglion, a gland, a glomus or glomerulus, or a paraganglion. In his 1928 paper, De Castro concluded: In sum, the Glomus caroticum is innervated by centripetal fibers, whose trophic centers are located in the sensory ganglia of the glossopharyngeal, and not by centrifugal [efferent] or secretomotor fibers as is the case for glands; these are precisely the facts which lead to suppose that the Glomus caroticum is a sensory organ. A few pages down, De Castro wrote: The Glomus represents an organ with multiple receptors furnished with specialized receptor cells like those of other sensory organs [taste buds?]…As a plausible hypothesis we propose that the Glomus caroticum represents a sensory organ, at present the only one in its kind, dedicated to capture certain qualitative variations in the composition of blood, a function that, possibly by a reflex mechanism would have an effect on the functional activity of other organs… Therefore, the sensory fiber would not be directly stimulated by blood, but via the intermediation of the epithelial cells of the organ, which, as their structure suggests, possess a secretory function which would participate in the stimulation of the centripetal fibers. In our article we will recreate the experiments that allowed Fernando de Castro to reach this first conclusion. Also, we will scrutinize the natural endowments and the scientific knowledge that drove De Castro to make the triple hypotheses: the CB as chemoreceptor [variations in blood composition], as a secondary sensory receptor which functioning involves a chemical synapse, and as a centre, origin of systemic reflexes. After a brief account of the systemic reflex effects resulting from the CB stimulation, we will complete our article with a general view of the cellular-molecular mechanisms currently thought to be involved in the functioning of this arterial

  7. Role of Chemoreceptor Activation in Hemodynamic Responses to Electrical Stimulation of the Carotid Sinus in Conscious Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Pedro L; Castania, Jaci A; Dias, Daniel P M; Patel, Kaushik P; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Helio C

    2015-09-01

    Electric carotid baroreflex activation has been used to treat patients with resistant hypertension. It is hypothesized that, in conscious rats, combined activation of carotid baro- and chemoreceptors afferences attenuates the reflex hypotension. Rats were divided into 4 groups: (1) control group, with unilateral denervation of the right carotid chemoreceptors; (2) chemoreceptor denervation group, with bilateral ligation of the carotid body artery; (3) baroreceptor denervation group, with unilateral denervation of the left carotid baroreceptors and right carotid chemoreceptors; and (4) carotid bifurcation denervation group, with denervation of the left carotid baroreceptors and chemoreceptors, plus denervation of the right carotid chemoreceptors. Animals were subjected to 4 rounds of electric stimulation (5 V, 1 ms), with 15, 30, 60, and 90 Hz applied randomly for 20 s. Electric stimulation caused greater hypotensive responses in the chemoreceptor denervation group than in the control group, at 60 Hz (-37 versus -19 mm Hg) and 90 Hz (-33 versus -19 mm Hg). The baroreceptor denervation group showed hypertensive responses at all frequencies of stimulation. In contrast, the carotid sinus denervation group showed no hemodynamic responses. The control group presented no changes in heart rate, whereas the chemoreceptor denervation group and the baroreceptor denervation group showed bradycardic responses. These data demonstrate that carotid chemoreceptor activation attenuates the reflex hypotension caused by combined electric stimulation of the carotid sinus and the carotid sinus nerve in conscious rats. These findings may provide useful insight for clinical studies using baroreflex activation therapy in resistant hypertension and heart failure.

  8. Oxygen-sensing by arterial chemoreceptors: Mechanisms and medical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barneo, José; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Fernández-Agüera, M Carmen; Macías, David; Pardal, Ricardo; Gao, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Acute O2 sensing is necessary for the activation of cardiorespiratory reflexes (hyperventilation and sympathetic activation), which permit the survival of individuals under hypoxic environments (e.g. high altitude) or medical conditions presenting with reduced capacity for gas exchange between the lung alveoli and the blood. Changes in blood O2 tension are detected by the arterial chemoreceptors, in particular the carotid body (CB), which act in concert with the adrenal medulla (AM) to facilitate rapid adaptations to hypoxia. The field of arterial chemoreception has undergone a considerable expansion in recent years, with many of the fundamental observations made at the molecular and cellular levels serving to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of numerous medical disorders, and even to propose advances in the treatment strategies. In this review, after a short historical preface, we describe the current model of chemosensory transduction based on the modulation of membrane K(+) channels by O2 in specialized chemoreceptor cells. Recent progress in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation of ion channels by O2 tension, which involves mitochondrial complex I, is also discussed. The discovery in the last few years of a specific population of neural crest-derived stem cells in the CB explains the reversible growth of this organ, an intriguing and unusual property of this type of neuronal tissue that contributes to acclimatization under chronic hypoxia. The essential homeostatic role of the CB-AM axis is clearly evident in newly generated mouse models that reach adulthood, albeit with CB and AM atrophy. These animals exhibit a marked intolerance to even mild hypoxia. CB inhibition or over-activation can have important medical consequences. Respiratory depression by general anesthetics or by opioid use is a common clinical condition that frequently causes death in susceptible individuals. An exaggerated sympathetic outflow due to over

  9. Mechanisms of maladaptive responses of peripheral chemoreceptors to intermittent hypoxia in sleep-disordered breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Man Lung; Tipoe, George Lim; Leung, Po Sing

    2014-02-25

    Peripheral chemoreceptors in the carotid body play important roles in the transduction of chemical stimuli in the arterial blood to the central for eliciting the chemoreflex, which mediates the ventilatory and circulatory responses to hypoxia. The activity of carotid chemoreceptor is modulated and significantly contributes to the ventilatory acclimatization at high altitude. In addition, the carotid chemoreceptor activity is augmented in patients with sleep-disordered breathing, notably in central or obstructive sleep apnea, and also in experimental animals. Thus, the carotid body functions to maintain the oxygen homeostasis, whereas anomalous carotid chemoreceptor activities could be both adaptive and pathogenic in sleep apnea. This review aims to summarize the cellular and molecular mechanisms that could mediate the augmented chemoreceptor activity induced by intermittent hypoxia. Our recent findings suggest a pathogenic role of inflammation mediated by an upregulation of renin-angiotensin system in the carotid body in the over-activity of the chemoreflex. These locally regulated mechanisms are proposed to be a significant part of the hypoxia-mediated maladaptive changes of the carotid body function, which could play a role in the pathophysiology of sleep apnea.

  10. Cardiovascular responses induced by obstructive apnea are enhanced in hypertensive rats due to enhanced chemoreceptor responsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angheben, Juliana M M; Schoorlemmer, Guus H M; Rossi, Marcio V; Silva, Thiago A; Cravo, Sergio L

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), like patients with sleep apnea, have hypertension, increased sympathetic activity, and increased chemoreceptor drive. We investigated the role of carotid chemoreceptors in cardiovascular responses induced by obstructive apnea in awake SHR. A tracheal balloon and vascular cannulas were implanted, and a week later, apneas of 15 s each were induced. The effects of apnea were more pronounced in SHR than in control rats (Wistar Kyoto; WKY). Blood pressure increased by 57±3 mmHg during apnea in SHR and by 28±3 mmHg in WKY (pchemoreceptors were then inactivated by the ligation of the carotid body artery, and apneas were induced two days later. The inactivation of chemoreceptors reduced the responses to apnea and abolished the difference between SHR and controls. The apnea-induced hypertension was 11±4 mmHg in SHR and 8±4 mmHg in WKY. The respiratory effort was 15±2 mmHg in SHR and 15±2 mmHg in WKY. The heart rate fell 63±18 bpm in SHR and 52±14 bpm in WKY. Similarly, when the chemoreceptors were unloaded by the administration of 100% oxygen, the responses to apnea were reduced. In conclusion, arterial chemoreceptors contribute to the responses induced by apnea in both strains, but they are more important in SHR and account for the exaggerated responses of this strain to apnea.

  11. HAMP domain conformers that propagate opposite signals in bacterial chemoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael V Airola

    Full Text Available HAMP domains are signal relay modules in >26,000 receptors of bacteria, eukaryotes, and archaea that mediate processes involved in chemotaxis, pathogenesis, and biofilm formation. We identify two HAMP conformations distinguished by a four- to two-helix packing transition at the C-termini that send opposing signals in bacterial chemoreceptors. Crystal structures of signal-locked mutants establish the observed structure-to-function relationships. Pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy of spin-labeled soluble receptors active in cells verify that the crystallographically defined HAMP conformers are maintained in the receptors and influence the structure and activity of downstream domains accordingly. Mutation of HR2, a key residue for setting the HAMP conformation and generating an inhibitory signal, shifts HAMP structure and receptor output to an activating state. Another HR2 variant displays an inverted response with respect to ligand and demonstrates the fine energetic balance between "on" and "off" conformers. A DExG motif found in membrane proximal HAMP domains is shown to be critical for responses to extracellular ligand. Our findings directly correlate in vivo signaling with HAMP structure, stability, and dynamics to establish a comprehensive model for HAMP-mediated signal relay that consolidates existing views on how conformational signals propagate in receptors. Moreover, we have developed a rational means to manipulate HAMP structure and function that may prove useful in the engineering of bacterial taxis responses.

  12. Distinct signaling of Drosophila chemoreceptors in olfactory sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li-Hui; Jing, Bi-Yang; Yang, Dong; Zeng, Xiankun; Shen, Ying; Tu, Yuhai; Luo, Dong-Gen

    2016-02-16

    In Drosophila, olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) rely primarily on two types of chemoreceptors, odorant receptors (Ors) and ionotropic receptors (Irs), to convert odor stimuli into neural activity. The cellular signaling of these receptors in their native OSNs remains unclear because of the difficulty of obtaining intracellular recordings from Drosophila OSNs. Here, we developed an antennal preparation that enabled the first recordings (to our knowledge) from targeted Drosophila OSNs through a patch-clamp technique. We found that brief odor pulses triggered graded inward receptor currents with distinct response kinetics and current-voltage relationships between Or- and Ir-driven responses. When stimulated with long-step odors, the receptor current of Ir-expressing OSNs did not adapt. In contrast, Or-expressing OSNs showed a strong Ca(2+)-dependent adaptation. The adaptation-induced changes in odor sensitivity obeyed the Weber-Fechner relation; however, surprisingly, the incremental sensitivity was reduced at low odor backgrounds but increased at high odor backgrounds. Our model for odor adaptation revealed two opposing effects of adaptation, desensitization and prevention of saturation, in dynamically adjusting odor sensitivity and extending the sensory operating range.

  13. HAMP domain conformers that propagate opposite signals in bacterial chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airola, Michael V; Sukomon, Nattakan; Samanta, Dipanjan; Borbat, Peter P; Freed, Jack H; Watts, Kylie J; Crane, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    HAMP domains are signal relay modules in >26,000 receptors of bacteria, eukaryotes, and archaea that mediate processes involved in chemotaxis, pathogenesis, and biofilm formation. We identify two HAMP conformations distinguished by a four- to two-helix packing transition at the C-termini that send opposing signals in bacterial chemoreceptors. Crystal structures of signal-locked mutants establish the observed structure-to-function relationships. Pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy of spin-labeled soluble receptors active in cells verify that the crystallographically defined HAMP conformers are maintained in the receptors and influence the structure and activity of downstream domains accordingly. Mutation of HR2, a key residue for setting the HAMP conformation and generating an inhibitory signal, shifts HAMP structure and receptor output to an activating state. Another HR2 variant displays an inverted response with respect to ligand and demonstrates the fine energetic balance between "on" and "off" conformers. A DExG motif found in membrane proximal HAMP domains is shown to be critical for responses to extracellular ligand. Our findings directly correlate in vivo signaling with HAMP structure, stability, and dynamics to establish a comprehensive model for HAMP-mediated signal relay that consolidates existing views on how conformational signals propagate in receptors. Moreover, we have developed a rational means to manipulate HAMP structure and function that may prove useful in the engineering of bacterial taxis responses.

  14. Directional sensing by cooperative chemoreceptor arrays modeled as Monod-Wyman-Changeux clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin

    2013-03-01

    Most sensory cells use transmembrane chemoreceptors to detect chemical signals in the environment. The biochemical properties and spatial organization of chemoreceptors play important roles in achieving and maintaining sensitivity and accuracy of chemical sensing. Here we investigate the effects of receptor cooperativity and adaptation on the physical limits for sensing a chemical gradient. We study a single cell with aggregated chemoreceptor arrays on the cell surface and derive a general formula to the limits for gradient sensing from the uncertainty of instantaneous receptor activity. In comparison to independent receptors, we find that cooperativity by nonadaptive receptors could significantly lower the sensing limits in a chemical concentration range determined by the biochemical properties of ligand-receptor binding and ligand-induced receptor activity. Cooperativity by adaptive receptors is beneficial to gradient sensing within a broad range of background concentrations. Our results also show that the isotropic receptor aggregate layout on the cell surface represents an optimal configuration for gradient sensing.

  15. Cardiovascular responses induced by obstructive apnea are enhanced in hypertensive rats due to enhanced chemoreceptor responsivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana M M Angheben

    Full Text Available Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, like patients with sleep apnea, have hypertension, increased sympathetic activity, and increased chemoreceptor drive. We investigated the role of carotid chemoreceptors in cardiovascular responses induced by obstructive apnea in awake SHR. A tracheal balloon and vascular cannulas were implanted, and a week later, apneas of 15 s each were induced. The effects of apnea were more pronounced in SHR than in control rats (Wistar Kyoto; WKY. Blood pressure increased by 57±3 mmHg during apnea in SHR and by 28±3 mmHg in WKY (p<0.05, n = 14/13. The respiratory effort increased by 53±6 mmHg in SHR and by 34±5 mmHg in WKY. The heart rate fell by 209±19 bpm in SHR and by 155±16 bpm in WKY. The carotid chemoreceptors were then inactivated by the ligation of the carotid body artery, and apneas were induced two days later. The inactivation of chemoreceptors reduced the responses to apnea and abolished the difference between SHR and controls. The apnea-induced hypertension was 11±4 mmHg in SHR and 8±4 mmHg in WKY. The respiratory effort was 15±2 mmHg in SHR and 15±2 mmHg in WKY. The heart rate fell 63±18 bpm in SHR and 52±14 bpm in WKY. Similarly, when the chemoreceptors were unloaded by the administration of 100% oxygen, the responses to apnea were reduced. In conclusion, arterial chemoreceptors contribute to the responses induced by apnea in both strains, but they are more important in SHR and account for the exaggerated responses of this strain to apnea.

  16. Hydrogen sulfide activates the carotid body chemoreceptors in cat, rabbit and rat ex vivo preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yingfu; Li, Qian; Sun, Biying; Zhang, Guohua; Rong, Weifang

    2015-03-01

    We and others previously reported experimental evidence suggesting an important role for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in oxygen sensing in murine carotid body chemoreceptors. More recent data implicated abnormal H2S-mediated chemoreceptor signaling in pathological conditions such as chronic heart failure and hypertension. However, the idea of H2S as a mediator of oxygen-sensing in chemoreceptors has been challenged. In particular, it was shown that exogenous H2S inhibited the release of neurotransmitters (ACh and ATP) from the cat carotid body, raising the possibility that there exists significant species difference in H2S-mediated signaling in chemoreceptors. This study was designed specifically to determine the effect of H2S on chemoreceptors in different species. We conducted multiunit extracellular recordings of the sinus nerve in the ex vivo carotid body preparation taken from the rat, the cat and the rabbit. As observed in the mouse carotid body, H2S donors (NaHS or Na2S) evoked qualitatively similar excitatory responses of the afferent sinus nerves of the species studied here. The excitatory effects of the H2S donors were concentration-dependent and reversible. The sinus nerve responses to H2S donors were prevented by blockade of the transmission between type I cells and the afferent terminals, as was the response to hypoxia. These results demonstrate that exogenous H2S exerts qualitatively similar excitatory effects on chemoreceptor afferents of different species. The role of endogenous H2S-mediated signaling in carotid body function in different species awaits further investigation.

  17. Requirement of the Carboxyl Terminus of a Bacterial Chemoreceptor for Its Targeted Proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, M. R. K.; Maddock, Janine R.; Shapiro, Lucille

    1993-03-01

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus yields two different progeny at each cell division; a chemotactically competent swarmer cell and a sessile stalked cell. The chemotaxis proteins are synthesized in the predivisional cell and then partition only to the swarmer cell upon division. The chemoreceptors that were newly synthesized were located at the nascent swarmer pole of the predivisional cell, an indication that asymmetry was established prior to cell division. When the swarmer cell differentiated into a stalked cell, the chemoreceptor was specifically degraded by virtue of an amino acid sequence located at its carboxyl terminus. Thus, a temporally and spatially restricted proteolytic event was a component of this differentiation process.

  18. Hypoxia silences retrotrapezoid nucleus respiratory chemoreceptors via alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basting, Tyler M; Burke, Peter G R; Kanbar, Roy; Viar, Kenneth E; Stornetta, Daniel S; Stornetta, Ruth L; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2015-01-14

    In conscious mammals, hypoxia or hypercapnia stimulates breathing while theoretically exerting opposite effects on central respiratory chemoreceptors (CRCs). We tested this theory by examining how hypoxia and hypercapnia change the activity of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a putative CRC and chemoreflex integrator. Archaerhodopsin-(Arch)-transduced RTN neurons were reversibly silenced by light in anesthetized rats. We bilaterally transduced RTN and nearby C1 neurons with Arch (PRSx8-ArchT-EYFP-LVV) and measured the cardiorespiratory consequences of Arch activation (10 s) in conscious rats during normoxia, hypoxia, or hyperoxia. RTN photoinhibition reduced breathing equally during non-REM sleep and quiet wake. Compared with normoxia, the breathing frequency reduction (Δf(R)) was larger in hyperoxia (65% FiO2), smaller in 15% FiO2, and absent in 12% FiO2. Tidal volume changes (ΔV(T)) followed the same trend. The effect of hypoxia on Δf(R) was not arousal-dependent but was reversed by reacidifying the blood (acetazolamide; 3% FiCO2). Δf(R) was highly correlated with arterial pH up to arterial pH (pHa) 7.5 with no frequency inhibition occurring above pHa 7.53. Blood pressure was minimally reduced suggesting that C1 neurons were very modestly inhibited. In conclusion, RTN neurons regulate eupneic breathing about equally during both sleep and wake. RTN neurons are the first putative CRCs demonstrably silenced by hypocapnic hypoxia in conscious mammals. RTN neurons are silent above pHa 7.5 and increasingly active below this value. During hyperoxia, RTN activation maintains breathing despite the inactivity of the carotid bodies. Finally, during hypocapnic hypoxia, carotid body stimulation increases breathing frequency via pathways that bypass RTN.

  19. Oxygen sensitivity of mitochondrial function in rat arterial chemoreceptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckler, Keith J; Turner, Philip J

    2013-07-15

    The mechanism of oxygen sensing in arterial chemoreceptors is unknown but has often been linked to mitochondrial function. A common criticism of this hypothesis is that mitochondrial function is insensitive to physiological levels of hypoxia. Here we investigate the effects of hypoxia (down to 0.5% O2) on mitochondrial function in neonatal rat type-1 cells. The oxygen sensitivity of mitochondrial [NADH] was assessed by monitoring autofluorescence and increased in hypoxia with a P50 of 15 mm Hg (1 mm Hg = 133.3 Pa) in normal Tyrode or 46 mm Hg in Ca(2+)-free Tyrode. Hypoxia also depolarised mitochondrial membrane potential (m, measured using rhodamine 123) with a P50 of 3.1, 3.3 and 2.8 mm Hg in normal Tyrode, Ca(2+)-free Tyrode and Tyrode containing the Ca(2+) channel antagonist Ni(2+), respectively. In the presence of oligomycin and low carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP; 75 nm) m is maintained by electron transport working against an artificial proton leak. Under these conditions hypoxia depolarised m/inhibited electron transport with a P50 of 5.4 mm Hg. The effects of hypoxia upon cytochrome oxidase activity were investigated using rotenone, myxothiazol, antimycin A, oligomycin, ascorbate and the electron donor tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine. Under these conditions m is maintained by complex IV activity alone. Hypoxia inhibited cytochrome oxidase activity (depolarised m) with a P50 of 2.6 mm Hg. In contrast hypoxia had little or no effect upon NADH (P50 = 0.3 mm Hg), electron transport or cytochrome oxidase activity in sympathetic neurons. In summary, type-1 cell mitochondria display extraordinary oxygen sensitivity commensurate with a role in oxygen sensing. The reasons for this highly unusual behaviour are as yet unexplained.

  20. Role of central and peripheral chemoreceptors in vasopressin secretion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovino, Michele; Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Giagulli, Vito Angelo; Fiore, Giorgio; Licchelli, Brunella; Iovino, Emanuela; Triggiani, Vincenzo

    2013-09-01

    In this review, we analyzed the role played by central and peripheral chemoreceptors (CHRs) in vasopressin (AVP) secretion control. Central neural pathways subserving osmotic and non-osmotic control of AVP secretion are strictly correlated to brain areas participating in chemoreception mechanisms. Among the different brain areas involved in central chemoreception, the most important site has been localized in the retrotrapezoid nucleus of the rostral ventrolateral medulla. These central CHRs are able to detect very small pH/CO2 fluctuations, participating in brain blood flow regulation, acid-base balance and blood pressure control. Decreases in arterial pH and increases in arterial pCO2 stimulate AVP release by the Supraoptic and Paraventricular Nuclei. Carotid CHRs transduce low arterial O2 tension into increased action potential activity, leading to bradycardia and coronary vasodilatation via vagal stimulation, and systemic vasoconstriction via catecholaminergic stimulation. Stimulation of carotid CHRs by hypoxia increases neurohypophyseal blood flow and AVP release, an effect inhibited by CHRs denervation. Two renal CHRs have been identified: Type R1 CHRs do not have a resting discharge but are activated by renal ischemia and hypotension; Type R2 CHRs have a resting discharge and respond to backflow of urine into the renal pelvis. Signals arising from renal CHRs modulate the activity of hypothalamic AVPergic neurons: activation of R1 and R2 CHRs, following increased intrapelvic pressure with solutions of mannitol, NaCl and KCl, produces a significant increase of AVP secretion and the same effect has been obtained by the intrarenal infusion of bradykinin, which excites afferent renal nerves, as well as by the electrical stimulation of these nerves.

  1. Effects of low glucose on carotid body chemoreceptor cell activity studied in cultures of intact organs and in dissociated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Martin, Teresa; Fernandez-Martinez, Silvia; Rigual, Ricardo; Obeso, Ana; Gonzalez, Constancio

    2012-04-15

    The participation of the carotid body (CB) in glucose homeostasis and evidence obtained in simplified cultured CB slices or dissociated cells have led to the proposal that CB chemoreceptor cells are glucoreceptors. However, data generated in intact, freshly excised organs deny CB chemoreceptor cells' glucosensing properties. The physiological significance of the contention has prompted the present study, performed in a newly developed preparation of the intact CB organ in culture that maintains chemoreceptor cells' microenvironment. Chemoreceptor cells of intact CBs in culture retained their capacity to store, synthesize, and secrete catecholamine in response to hypoxia for at least 6 days. Aglycemia did not elicit neurosecretion in dissociated chemoreceptor cells or in intact CB in culture, but potentiated hypoxia-elicited neurosecretion, exclusively, in 1-day-old intact CB cultures and dissociated chemoreceptor cells cultured for 24 h. In fura 2-loaded cells, aglycemia (but not 1 mM) caused a slow Ca(2+)-dependent and nifedipine-insensitive increase in fluorescence at 340- to 380-nm wavelength emission ratio and augmented the fluorescent signal elicited by hypoxia. Association of nifedipine and KBR7943 (a Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger inhibitor) completely abolished the aglycemic Ca(2+) response. We conclude that chemoreceptor cells are not sensitive to hypoglycemia. We hypothesize that cultured chemoreceptor cells become transiently more dependent on glycolysis. Consequently, aglycemia would partially inhibit the Na(+)/K(+) pump, causing an increase in intracellular Na(+) concentration, and a reversal of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. This would slowly increase intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and cause the potentiation of the hypoxic responses. We discuss the nature of the signals detected by chemoreceptor cells for the CB to achieve its glycemic homeostatic role.

  2. Tonic activity of carotid body chemoreceptors contributes to the increased sympathetic drive in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siński, Maciej; Lewandowski, Jacek; Przybylski, Jacek; Bidiuk, Joanna; Abramczyk, Piotr; Ciarka, Agnieszka; Gaciong, Zbigniew

    2012-05-01

    Carotid chemoreceptors provoke an increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activation (MSNA) in response to hypoxia; they are also tonically active during normoxic breathing. The contribution of peripheral chemoreceptors to sympathetic activation in hypertension is incompletely understood. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of chemoreceptor deactivation on sympathetic activity in untreated patients with hypertension. A total of 12 untreated hypertensive males and 11 male controls participated in this randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled study. MSNA, systolic blood pressure(BP), diastolic BP, heart rate (HR), electrocardiogram, hemoglobin oxygen saturation (Sat%) and respiratory movements were measured during repeated 10-min periods of respiration with 100% oxygen or 21% oxygen in a blinded fashion. Compared with controls, hypertensives had higher resting MSNA (38 ± 10 vs. 29 ± 0.9 burst per min, Pchemoreceptor deactivation with hyperoxia. HR decreased and Sat% increased in both the study groups. These results confirm the role of tonic chemoreceptor drive in the development of sympathetic overactivity in hypertension.

  3. Chemoreceptors of Escherichia coli CFT073 play redundant roles in chemotaxis toward urine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Raterman

    Full Text Available Community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs are commonly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC. We hypothesize that chemotaxis toward ligands present in urine could direct UPEC into and up the urinary tract. Wild-type E. coli CFT073 and chemoreceptor mutants with tsr, tar, or aer deletions were tested for chemotaxis toward human urine in the capillary tube assay. Wild-type CFT073 was attracted toward urine, and Tsr and Tar were the chemoreceptors mainly responsible for mediating this response. The individual components of urine including L-amino acids, D-amino acids and various organic compounds were also tested in the capillary assay with wild-type CFT073. Our results indicate that CFT073 is attracted toward some L- amino acids and possibly toward some D-amino acids but not other common compounds found in urine such as urea, creatinine and glucuronic acid. In the murine model of UTI, the loss of any two chemoreceptors did not affect the ability of the bacteria to compete with the wild-type strain. Our data suggest that the presence of any strong attractant and its associated chemoreceptor might be sufficient for colonization of the urinary tract and that amino acids are the main chemoattractants for E. coli strain CFT073 in this niche.

  4. Role of Dickeya dadantii 3937 chemoreceptors in the entry to Arabidopsis leaves through wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Río-Álvarez, Isabel; Muñoz-Gómez, Cristina; Navas-Vásquez, Mariela; Martínez-García, Pedro M; Antúnez-Lamas, María; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; López-Solanilla, Emilia

    2015-09-01

    Chemotaxis enables bacteria to move towards an optimal environment in response to chemical signals. In the case of plant-pathogenic bacteria, chemotaxis allows pathogens to explore the plant surface for potential entry sites with the ultimate aim to prosper inside plant tissues and to cause disease. Chemoreceptors, which constitute the sensory core of the chemotaxis system, are usually transmembrane proteins which change their conformation when sensing chemicals in the periplasm and transduce the signal through a kinase pathway to the flagellar motor. In the particular case of the soft-rot pathogen Dickeya dadantii 3937, jasmonic acid released in a plant wound has been found to be a strong chemoattractant which drives pathogen entry into the plant apoplast. In order to identify candidate chemoreceptors sensing wound-derived plant compounds, we carried out a bioinformatics search of candidate chemoreceptors in the genome of Dickeya dadantii 3937. The study of the chemotactic response to several compounds and the analysis of the entry process to Arabidopsis leaves of 10 selected mutants in chemoreceptors allowed us to determine the implications of at least two of them (ABF-0020167 and ABF-0046680) in the chemotaxis-driven entry process through plant wounds. Our data suggest that ABF-0020167 and ABF-0046680 may be candidate receptors of jasmonic acid and xylose, respectively.

  5. Positive selection in extra cellular domains in the diversification of Strigamia maritima chemoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca C Almeida

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent publication of a centipede (Strigamia maritima genome has revealed that most members of the chemosensory gene families of ionotropic (IR and gustatory (GR receptors do not have identifiable orthologs in insect species. In other words, the diversity of these chemoreceptors in centipedes appears to have evolved after its split from other arthropod lineages. Here we investigate the role of adaptive evolution in S. maritima chemoreceptor diversification using an approach that allows us to discuss functional aspects of such diversification. We applied codon substitution models in a phylogenetic framework to obtain the distribution of selective constraints across the different domains in the IR and GR proteins, and to assess the impact of positive selection in the evolution of these chemoreceptors. We found low selective constraints in most IR and GR duplicates and significant evidence for the presence of positively selected amino acids in 2 of the 4 IR, and in 6 of the GR recent specific expansions. Mapping the sites with high posterior probability of positive selection in protein structure revealed a remarkable uneven distribution of fast-evolving sites across protein domains. Most of these sites are located in extracellular fragments of these receptors, which likely participate in ligand recognition. We hypothesize that adaptive evolution in ligand-binding domains was a major force driving the functional diversification of centipede chemoreceptors.

  6. Structure of bacterial cytoplasmic chemoreceptor arrays and implications for chemotactic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briegel, Ariane; Ladinsky, Mark S; Oikonomou, Catherine; Jones, Christopher W; Harris, Michael J; Fowler, Daniel J; Chang, Yi-Wei; Thompson, Lynmarie K; Armitage, Judith P; Jensen, Grant J

    2014-01-01

    Most motile bacteria sense and respond to their environment through a transmembrane chemoreceptor array whose structure and function have been well-studied, but many species also contain an additional cluster of chemoreceptors in their cytoplasm. Although the cytoplasmic cluster is essential for normal chemotaxis in some organisms, its structure and function remain unknown. Here we use electron cryotomography to image the cytoplasmic chemoreceptor cluster in Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Vibrio cholerae. We show that just like transmembrane arrays, cytoplasmic clusters contain trimers-of-receptor-dimers organized in 12-nm hexagonal arrays. In contrast to transmembrane arrays, however, cytoplasmic clusters comprise two CheA/CheW baseplates sandwiching two opposed receptor arrays. We further show that cytoplasmic fragments of normally transmembrane E. coli chemoreceptors form similar sandwiched structures in the presence of molecular crowding agents. Together these results suggest that the 12-nm hexagonal architecture is fundamentally important and that sandwiching and crowding can replace the stabilizing effect of the membrane. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02151.001.

  7. RNA-Seq Analysis of Human Trigeminal and Dorsal Root Ganglia with a Focus on Chemoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Flegel

    Full Text Available The chemosensory capacity of the somatosensory system relies on the appropriate expression of chemoreceptors, which detect chemical stimuli and transduce sensory information into cellular signals. Knowledge of the complete repertoire of the chemoreceptors expressed in human sensory ganglia is lacking. This study employed the next-generation sequencing technique (RNA-Seq to conduct the first expression analysis of human trigeminal ganglia (TG and dorsal root ganglia (DRG. We analyzed the data with a focus on G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs and ion channels, which are (potentially involved in chemosensation by somatosensory neurons in the human TG and DRG. For years, transient receptor potential (TRP channels have been considered the main group of receptors for chemosensation in the trigeminal system. Interestingly, we could show that sensory ganglia also express a panel of different olfactory receptors (ORs with putative chemosensory function. To characterize OR expression in more detail, we performed microarray, semi-quantitative RT-PCR experiments, and immunohistochemical staining. Additionally, we analyzed the expression data to identify further known or putative classes of chemoreceptors in the human TG and DRG. Our results give an overview of the major classes of chemoreceptors expressed in the human TG and DRG and provide the basis for a broader understanding of the reception of chemical cues.

  8. Oesophageal chemoreceptors of blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, sense chemical deterrents and can block ingestion of food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggio, Juan F; Tieu, Ryan; Wei, Amy; Derby, Charles D

    2012-05-15

    Decapod crustaceans such as blue crabs possess a variety of chemoreceptors that control different stages of the feeding process. All these chemoreceptors are putative targets for feeding deterrents that cause animals to avoid or reject otherwise palatable food. As a first step towards characterizing the chemoreceptors that mediate the effect of deterrents, we used a behavioral approach to investigate their precise location. Data presented here demonstrate that chemoreceptors located on the antennules, pereiopods and mouthparts do not mediate the food-rejection effects of a variety of deterrents, both natural and artificial to crabs. Crabs always searched for deterrent-laced food and took it to their oral region. The deterrent effect was manifested as either rejection or extensive manipulation, but in both cases crabs bit the food. The biting behavior is relevant because the introduction of food into the oral cavity ensured that the deterrents gained access to the oesophageal taste receptors, and so we conclude that they are the ones mediating rejection. Additional support comes from the fact that a variety of deterrent compounds evoked oesophageal dilatation, which is mediated by oesophageal receptors and has been linked to food rejection. Further, there is a positive correlation between a compound's ability to elicit rejection and its ability to evoke oesophageal dilatation. The fact that deterrents do not act at a distance is in accordance with the limited solubility of most known feeding deterrents, and likely influences predator-prey interactions and their outcome: prey organisms will be attacked and bitten before deterrents become relevant.

  9. Chemoreceptors of Escherichia coli CFT073 play redundant roles in chemotaxis toward urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raterman, Erica L; Welch, Rodney A

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs) are commonly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). We hypothesize that chemotaxis toward ligands present in urine could direct UPEC into and up the urinary tract. Wild-type E. coli CFT073 and chemoreceptor mutants with tsr, tar, or aer deletions were tested for chemotaxis toward human urine in the capillary tube assay. Wild-type CFT073 was attracted toward urine, and Tsr and Tar were the chemoreceptors mainly responsible for mediating this response. The individual components of urine including L-amino acids, D-amino acids and various organic compounds were also tested in the capillary assay with wild-type CFT073. Our results indicate that CFT073 is attracted toward some L- amino acids and possibly toward some D-amino acids but not other common compounds found in urine such as urea, creatinine and glucuronic acid. In the murine model of UTI, the loss of any two chemoreceptors did not affect the ability of the bacteria to compete with the wild-type strain. Our data suggest that the presence of any strong attractant and its associated chemoreceptor might be sufficient for colonization of the urinary tract and that amino acids are the main chemoattractants for E. coli strain CFT073 in this niche.

  10. The chemoreceptor genes of the waterflea Daphnia pulex: many Grs but no Ors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Hugh M

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemoreception is vitally important for all animals, yet little is known about the genetics of chemoreception in aquatic organisms. The keystone species Daphnia pulex, a well known crustacean, is the first aquatic invertebrate to have its genome sequenced. This has allowed us the initial investigation of chemoreceptor genes in an aquatic invertebrate, and to begin the study of chemoreceptor evolution across the arthropod phylum. Results We describe 58 Grs (gustatory receptors, belonging to the insect chemoreceptor superfamily, which were identified bioinformatically in the draft genome of the crustacean waterflea Daphnia pulex. No genes encoding proteins similar to the insect odorant receptors (Ors were identified. These 58 Grs form 3 distinctive subfamilies of 37, 12, and 5 genes, as well as a highly divergent singleton (Gr58. In addition, Grs55–57 share distinctive amino acid motifs and cluster with the sugar receptors of insects, and may illuminate the origin of this distinctive subfamily. ESTs, tiling array, and PCR amplification results support 34 predicted gene models, and preliminary expression data comparing the sexes indicates potential female-biased expression for some genes. Conclusion This repertoire of 58 chemoreceptors presumably mediates the many chemoperception abilities of waterfleas. While it is always possible that the entire Or gene lineage was lost at some point in the history of Daphnia pulex, we think it more likely that the insect Or lineage is indeed a relatively recently expanded gene lineage concomitant with the evolution of terrestriality in the insects or their hexapod ancestors.

  11. Both piston-like and rotational motions are present in bacterial chemoreceptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Daqi; Ma, Xiaomin; Tu, Yuhai; Lai, Luhua

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis signaling is triggered by binding of chemo-effectors to the membrane-bound chemoreceptor dimers. Though much is known about the structure of the chemoreceptors, details of the receptor dynamics and their effects on signaling are still unclear. Here, by using molecular dynamics simulations and principle component analysis, we study the dynamics of the periplasmic domain of aspartate chemoreceptor Tar dimer and its conformational changes when binding to different ligands (attractant, antagonist, and two attractant molecules). We found two dominant components (modes) in the receptor dynamics: a relative rotation of the two Tar monomers and a piston-like up-and-down sliding movement of the α4 helix. These two modes are highly correlated. Binding of one attractant molecule to the Tar dimer induced both significant piston-like downward movements of the α4 helix and strong relative rotations of the two Tar monomers, while binding of an antagonist or the symmetric binding of two attractant molecules to a Tar dimer suppresses both modes. The anti-symmetric effects of the relative rotation mode also explained the negative cooperativity between the two binding pockets. Our results suggest a mechanism of coupled rotation and piston-like motion for bacterial chemoreceptor signaling.

  12. Is central chemoreceptor sensitive to intracellular rather than extracellular pH?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A

    1990-01-01

    , however, that the elegant studies by Loeschcke & Ahmad have demonstrated that [pH]e and [pH]i are normally tightly and rapidly coupled (Loeschcke & Ahmad, 1980). For this reason, the stimulus might just as well be the intracellular hydrogen ion concentration in the chemoreceptor area. The administration...

  13. RNA-Seq Analysis of Human Trigeminal and Dorsal Root Ganglia with a Focus on Chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Caroline; Schöbel, Nicole; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Tannapfel, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    The chemosensory capacity of the somatosensory system relies on the appropriate expression of chemoreceptors, which detect chemical stimuli and transduce sensory information into cellular signals. Knowledge of the complete repertoire of the chemoreceptors expressed in human sensory ganglia is lacking. This study employed the next-generation sequencing technique (RNA-Seq) to conduct the first expression analysis of human trigeminal ganglia (TG) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We analyzed the data with a focus on G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and ion channels, which are (potentially) involved in chemosensation by somatosensory neurons in the human TG and DRG. For years, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been considered the main group of receptors for chemosensation in the trigeminal system. Interestingly, we could show that sensory ganglia also express a panel of different olfactory receptors (ORs) with putative chemosensory function. To characterize OR expression in more detail, we performed microarray, semi-quantitative RT-PCR experiments, and immunohistochemical staining. Additionally, we analyzed the expression data to identify further known or putative classes of chemoreceptors in the human TG and DRG. Our results give an overview of the major classes of chemoreceptors expressed in the human TG and DRG and provide the basis for a broader understanding of the reception of chemical cues. PMID:26070209

  14. Plasticity of central chemoreceptors: effect of bilateral carotid body resection on central CO2 sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Dahan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human breathing is regulated by feedback and feed-forward control mechanisms, allowing a strict matching between metabolic needs and the uptake of oxygen in the lungs. The most important control mechanism, the metabolic ventilatory control system, is fine-tuned by two sets of chemoreceptors, the peripheral chemoreceptors in the carotid bodies (located in the bifurcation of the common carotid arteries and the central CO2 chemoreceptors in the ventral medulla. Animal data indicate that resection of the carotid bodies results, apart from the loss of the peripheral chemoreceptors, in reduced activity of the central CO2 sensors. We assessed the acute and chronic effect of carotid body resection in three humans who underwent bilateral carotid body resection (bCBR after developing carotid body tumors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The three patients (two men, one woman were suffering from a hereditary form of carotid body tumors. They were studied prior to surgery and at regular intervals for 2-4 y following bCBR. We obtained inspired minute ventilation (Vi responses to hypoxia and CO2. The Vi-CO2 responses were separated into a peripheral (fast response and a central (slow response with a two-compartment model of the ventilatory control system. Following surgery the ventilatory CO2 sensitivity of the peripheral chemoreceptors and the hypoxic responses were not different from zero or below 10% of preoperative values. The ventilatory CO2 sensitivity of the central chemoreceptors decreased by about 75% after surgery, with peak reduction occurring between 3 and 6 mo postoperatively. This was followed by a slow return to values close to preoperative values within 2 y. During this slow return, the Vi-CO2 response shifted slowly to the right by about 8 mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: The reduction in central Vi-CO2 sensitivity after the loss of the carotid bodies suggests that the carotid bodies exert a tonic drive or tonic facilitation on the output of the central

  15. Central chemoreceptor modulation of breathing via multipath tuning in medullary ventrolateral respiratory column circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Mackenzie M; Nuding, Sarah C; Segers, Lauren S; O'Connor, Russell; Morris, Kendall F; Lindsey, Bruce G

    2012-01-01

    Ventrolateral respiratory column (VRC) circuits that modulate breathing in response to changes in central chemoreceptor drive are incompletely understood. We employed multielectrode arrays and spike train correlation methods to test predictions of the hypothesis that pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC) and retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial (RTN-pF) circuits cooperate in chemoreceptor-evoked tuning of ventral respiratory group (VRG) inspiratory neurons. Central chemoreceptors were selectively stimulated by injections of CO(2)-saturated saline into the vertebral artery in seven decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly blocked, and artificially ventilated cats. Among sampled neurons in the Bötzinger complex (BötC)-to-VRG region, 70% (161 of 231) had a significant change in firing rate after chemoreceptor stimulation, as did 70% (101 of 144) of the RTN-pF neurons. Other responsive neurons (24 BötC-VRG; 11 RTN-pF) had a change in the depth of respiratory modulation without a significant change in average firing rate. Seventy BötC-VRG chemoresponsive neurons triggered 189 offset-feature correlograms (96 peaks; 93 troughs) with at least one responsive BötC-VRG cell. Functional input from at least one RTN-pF cell could be inferred for 45 BötC-VRG neurons (19%). Eleven RTN-pF cells were correlated with more than one BötC-VRG target neuron, providing evidence for divergent connectivity. Thirty-seven RTN-pF neurons, 24 of which were chemoresponsive, were correlated with at least one chemoresponsive BötC-VRG neuron. Correlation linkage maps and spike-triggered averages of phrenic nerve signals suggest transmission of chemoreceptor drive via a multipath network architecture: RTN-pF modulation of pre-BötC-VRG rostral-to-caudal excitatory inspiratory neuron chains is tuned by feedforward and recurrent inhibition from other inspiratory neurons and from "tonic" expiratory neurons.

  16. Peripheral chemoreceptor control of cardiovascular function at rest and during exercise in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgell, Heather; McMurtry, M Sean; Haykowsky, Mark J; Paterson, Ian; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Dyck, Jason R B; Stickland, Michael K

    2015-04-01

    Peripheral chemoreceptor activity/sensitivity is enhanced in chronic heart failure (HF), and sensitivity is linked to greater mortality. This study aimed to determine the role of the peripheral chemoreceptor in cardiovascular control at rest and during exercise in HF patients and controls. Clinically stable HF patients (n = 11; ejection fraction: 39 ± 5%) and risk-matched controls (n = 10; ejection fraction: 65 ± 2%) performed randomized trials with or without dopamine infusion (2 μg·min(-1)·kg(-1)) at rest and during 40% maximal voluntary contraction handgrip (HG) exercise, and a resting trial of 2 min of inspired 100% oxygen. Both dopamine and hyperoxia were used to inhibit the peripheral chemoreceptor. At rest in HF patients, dopamine decreased ventilation (P = 0.02), decreased total peripheral resistance index (P = 0.003), and increased cardiac and stroke indexes (P ≤ 0.01), yet there was no effect of dopamine on these variables in controls (P ≥ 0.7). Hyperoxia lowered ventilation in HF (P = 0.01), but not in controls (P = 0.9), indicating suppression of the peripheral chemoreceptors in HF. However, no decrease of total peripheral resistance index was observed in HF. As expected, HG increased heart rate, ventilation, and brachial conductance of the nonexercising arm in controls and HF patients. During dopamine infusion, there were no changes in mean arterial pressure, heart rate, or ventilation responses to HG in either group (P ≥ 0.26); however, brachial conductance increased with dopamine in the control group (P = 0.004), but decreased in HF (P = 0.02). Our findings indicate that the peripheral chemoreceptor contributes to cardiovascular control at rest in HF patients and during exercise in risk-matched controls.

  17. TASK channels in arterial chemoreceptors and their role in oxygen and acid sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckler, Keith J

    2015-05-01

    Arterial chemoreceptors play a vital role in cardiorespiratory control by providing the brain with information regarding blood oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH. The main chemoreceptor, the carotid body, is composed of sensory (type 1) cells which respond to hypoxia or acidosis with a depolarising receptor potential which in turn activates voltage-gated calcium entry, neurosecretion and excitation of adjacent afferent nerves. The receptor potential is generated by inhibition of Twik-related acid-sensitive K(+) channel 1 and 3 (TASK1/TASK3) heterodimeric channels which normally maintain the cells' resting membrane potential. These channels are thought to be directly inhibited by acidosis. Oxygen sensitivity, however, probably derives from a metabolic signalling pathway. The carotid body, isolated type 1 cells, and all forms of TASK channel found in the type 1 cell, are highly sensitive to inhibitors of mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, type1 cell TASK channels are activated by millimolar levels of MgATP. In addition to their role in the transduction of chemostimuli, type 1 cell TASK channels have also been implicated in the modulation of chemoreceptor function by a number of neurocrine/paracrine signalling molecules including adenosine, GABA, and serotonin. They may also be instrumental in mediating the depression of the acute hypoxic ventilatory response that occurs with some general anaesthetics. Modulation of TASK channel activity is therefore a key mechanism by which the excitability of chemoreceptors can be controlled. This is not only of physiological importance but may also offer a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiorespiratory disorders that are associated with chemoreceptor dysfunction.

  18. Oxygen Sensing by Arterial Chemoreceptors Depends on Mitochondrial Complex I Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Agüera, M Carmen; Gao, Lin; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Pintado, C Oscar; Arias-Mayenco, Ignacio; García-Flores, Paula; García-Pergañeda, Antonio; Pascual, Alberto; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia; López-Barneo, José

    2015-11-01

    O2 sensing is essential for mammalian homeostasis. Peripheral chemoreceptors such as the carotid body (CB) contain cells with O2-sensitive K(+) channels, which are inhibited by hypoxia to trigger fast adaptive cardiorespiratory reflexes. How variations of O2 tension (PO2) are detected and the mechanisms whereby these changes are conveyed to membrane ion channels have remained elusive. We have studied acute O2 sensing in conditional knockout mice lacking mitochondrial complex I (MCI) genes. We inactivated Ndufs2, which encodes a protein that participates in ubiquinone binding. Ndufs2-null mice lose the hyperventilatory response to hypoxia, although they respond to hypercapnia. Ndufs2-deficient CB cells have normal functions and ATP content but are insensitive to changes in PO2. Our data suggest that chemoreceptor cells have a specialized succinate-dependent metabolism that induces an MCI state during hypoxia, characterized by the production of reactive oxygen species and accumulation of reduced pyridine nucleotides, which signal neighboring K(+) channels.

  19. A phenylalanine rotameric switch for signal-state control in bacterial chemoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Davi R.; Yang, Chen; Ames, Peter; Baudry, Jerome; Parkinson, John S.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial chemoreceptors are widely used as a model system for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of transmembrane signalling and have provided a detailed understanding of how ligand binding by the receptor modulates the activity of its associated kinase CheA. However, the mechanisms by which conformational signals move between signalling elements within a receptor dimer and how they control kinase activity remain unknown. Here, using long molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the kinase-activating cytoplasmic tip of the chemoreceptor fluctuates between two stable conformations in a signal-dependent manner. A highly conserved residue, Phe396, appears to serve as the conformational switch, because flipping of the stacked aromatic rings of an interacting F396-F396‧ pair in the receptor homodimer takes place concomitantly with the signal-related conformational changes. We suggest that interacting aromatic residues, which are common stabilizers of protein tertiary structure, might serve as rotameric molecular switches in other biological processes as well.

  20. Transmembrane Signaling Characterized in Bacterial Chemoreceptors by Using Sulfhydryl Cross-Linking in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geoffrey F.; Lebert, Michael R.; Lilly, Angela A.; Hazelbauer, Gerald L.

    1995-04-01

    Transmembrane signaling by bacterial chemoreceptors is thought to involve conformational changes within a stable homodimer. We investigated the functional consequences of constraining movement between pairs of helices in the four-helix structure of the transmembrane domain of chemoreceptor Trg. Using a family of cysteine-containing receptors, we identified oxidation treatments for intact cells that catalyzed essentially complete sulfhydryl cross-linking at selected positions and yet left flagellar and sensory functions largely unperturbed. Constraining movement by cross-links between subunits had little effect on tactic response, but constraining movement between transmembrane segments of the monomer drastically reduced function. We deduce that transmembrane signaling requires substantial movement between transmembrane helices of a monomer but not between interacting helices across the interface between subunits.

  1. Differential Evolutionary Constraints in the Evolution of Chemoreceptors: A Murine and Human Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo D’Oliveira Albanus; Rodrigo Juliani Siqueira Dalmolin; José Luiz Rybarczyk-Filho; Mauro Antônio Alves Castro; José Cláudio Fonseca Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Chemoreception is among the most important sensory modalities in animals. Organisms use the ability to perceive chemical compounds in all major ecological activities. Recent studies have allowed the characterization of chemoreceptor gene families. These genes present strikingly high variability in copy numbers and pseudogenization degrees among different species, but the mechanisms underlying their evolution are not fully understood. We have analyzed the functional networks of these genes, th...

  2. Caste-Specific and Sex-Specific Expression of Chemoreceptor Genes in a Termite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitaka, Yuki; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Mikheyev, Alexander; Tin, Mandy M Y; Watanabe, Yutaka; Matsuura, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The sophisticated colony organization of eusocial insects is primarily maintained through the utilization of pheromones. The regulation of these complex social interactions requires intricate chemoreception systems. The recent publication of the genome of Zootermopsis nevadensis opened a new avenue to study molecular basis of termite caste systems. Although there has been a growing interest in the termite chemoreception system that regulates their sophisticated caste system, the relationship between division of labor and expression of chemoreceptor genes remains to be explored. Using high-throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we found several chemoreceptors that are differentially expressed among castes and between sexes in a subterranean termite Reticulitermes speratus. In total, 53 chemoreception-related genes were annotated, including 22 odorant receptors, 7 gustatory receptors, 12 ionotropic receptors, 9 odorant-binding proteins, and 3 chemosensory proteins. Most of the chemoreception-related genes had caste-related and sex-related expression patterns; in particular, some chemoreception genes showed king-biased or queen-biased expression patterns. Moreover, more than half of the genes showed significant age-dependent differences in their expression in female and/or male reproductives. These results reveal a strong relationship between the evolution of the division of labor and the regulation of chemoreceptor gene expression, thereby demonstrating the chemical communication and underlining chemoreception mechanism in social insects. PMID:26760975

  3. Carotid chemoreceptors do not mediate hypoxic-induced gasping and autoresuscitation in newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Rongzhi; Zhang, Chunfen; Fewell, James E

    2015-07-01

    Experiments were carried out on 48, 5-6-day-old rat pups to investigate the influence of carotid denervation on their time to last gasp during a single period of hypoxia, and on their ability to autoresuscitate from primary apnea during repeated hypoxic challenge. One group of pups was studied with intact carotid chemoreceptors and one group was studied following surgical denervation of the carotid chemoreceptors. Carotid denervation eliminated the early tachypneic phase during exposure to hypoxia and delayed the time to arousal/excitement but did not alter the time to primary apnea, the time to last gasp or the total number of gasps during exposure to a single period of unrelenting hypoxia. Furthermore, carotid denervation did not alter the number of successful autoresuscitations from primary apnea during repeated hypoxic exposure. Thus, the carotid chemoreceptors are not essential for the initiation or maintenance of gasping nor are they are integral to gasping effecting successful autoresuscitation from hypoxic-induced apnea in newborn rats.

  4. Functional coupling of a nematode chemoreceptor to the yeast pheromone response pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehseen, Muhammad; Dumancic, Mira; Briggs, Lyndall; Wang, Jian; Berna, Amalia; Anderson, Alisha; Trowell, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome revealed sequences encoding more than 1,000 G-protein coupled receptors, hundreds of which may respond to volatile organic ligands. To understand how the worm's simple olfactory system can sense its chemical environment there is a need to characterise a representative selection of these receptors but only very few receptors have been linked to a specific volatile ligand. We therefore set out to design a yeast expression system for assigning ligands to nematode chemoreceptors. We showed that while a model receptor ODR-10 binds to C. elegans Gα subunits ODR-3 and GPA-3 it cannot bind to yeast Gα. However, chimaeras between the nematode and yeast Gα subunits bound to both ODR-10 and the yeast Gβγ subunits. FIG2 was shown to be a superior MAP-dependent promoter for reporter expression. We replaced the endogenous Gα subunit (GPA1) of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ste2Δ sst2Δ far1Δ) triple mutant ("Cyb") with a Gpa1/ODR-3 chimaera and introduced ODR-10 as a model nematode GPCR. This strain showed concentration-dependent activation of the yeast MAP kinase pathway in the presence of diacetyl, the first time that the native form of a nematode chemoreceptor has been functionally expressed in yeast. This is an important step towards en masse de-orphaning of C. elegans chemoreceptors.

  5. Expanding role of ATP as a versatile messenger at carotid and aortic body chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskuric, Nikol A; Nurse, Colin A

    2013-01-15

    In mammals, peripheral arterial chemoreceptors monitor blood chemicals (e.g. O(2), CO(2), H(+), glucose) and maintain homeostasis via initiation of respiratory and cardiovascular reflexes. Whereas chemoreceptors in the carotid bodies (CBs), located bilaterally at the carotid bifurcation, control primarily respiratory functions, those in the more diffusely distributed aortic bodies (ABs) are thought to regulate mainly cardiovascular functions. Functionally, CBs sense partial pressure of O(2) ( ), whereas ABs are considered sensors of O(2) content. How these organs, with essentially a similar complement of chemoreceptor cells, differentially process these two different types of signals remains enigmatic. Here, we review evidence that implicates ATP as a central mediator during information processing in the CB. Recent data allow an integrative view concerning its interactions at purinergic P2X and P2Y receptors within the chemosensory complex that contains elements of a 'quadripartite synapse'. We also discuss recent studies on the cellular physiology of ABs located near the aortic arch, as well as immunohistochemical evidence suggesting the presence of pathways for P2X receptor signalling. Finally, we present a hypothetical 'quadripartite model' to explain how ATP, released from red blood cells during hypoxia, could contribute to the ability of ABs to sense O(2) content.

  6. Tsr Chemoreceptor Interacts With IL-8 Provoking E. coli Transmigration Across Human Lung Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Li, Manshu; Xu, Yonghao; Islam, Diana; Khang, Julie; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Lee, Warren; Szaszi, Katalin; Zhong, Nanshan; Slutsky, Arthur S; Li, Yimin; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial colonization of epithelial surfaces and subsequent transmigration across the mucosal barrier are essential for the development of infection. We hypothesized that the methyl-accepting proteins (MCPs), known as chemoreceptors expressed on Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterial surface, play an important role in mediating bacterial transmigration. We demonstrated a direct interaction between human interleukin-8 (IL-8) and Tsr receptor, a major MCP chemoreceptor. Stimulation of human lung epithelial cell monolayer with IL-8 resulted in increased E. coli adhesion and transmigration of the native strain (RP437) and a strain expressing only Tsr (UU2373), as compared to a strain (UU2599) with Tsr truncation. The augmented E. coli adhesion and migration was associated with a higher expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 and production of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, and a lower expression of the tight junction protein claudin-1 and the plasma membrane protein caveolin-1 in lung epithelial cells. An increased E. coli colonization and pulmonary cytokine production induced by the RP437 and UU2373 strains was attenuated in mice challenged with the UU2599 strain. Our results suggest a critical role of the E. coli Tsr chemoreceptor in mediating bacterial colonization and transmigration across human lung epithelium during development of pulmonary infections.

  7. Caste-Specific and Sex-Specific Expression of Chemoreceptor Genes in a Termite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Mitaka

    Full Text Available The sophisticated colony organization of eusocial insects is primarily maintained through the utilization of pheromones. The regulation of these complex social interactions requires intricate chemoreception systems. The recent publication of the genome of Zootermopsis nevadensis opened a new avenue to study molecular basis of termite caste systems. Although there has been a growing interest in the termite chemoreception system that regulates their sophisticated caste system, the relationship between division of labor and expression of chemoreceptor genes remains to be explored. Using high-throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq, we found several chemoreceptors that are differentially expressed among castes and between sexes in a subterranean termite Reticulitermes speratus. In total, 53 chemoreception-related genes were annotated, including 22 odorant receptors, 7 gustatory receptors, 12 ionotropic receptors, 9 odorant-binding proteins, and 3 chemosensory proteins. Most of the chemoreception-related genes had caste-related and sex-related expression patterns; in particular, some chemoreception genes showed king-biased or queen-biased expression patterns. Moreover, more than half of the genes showed significant age-dependent differences in their expression in female and/or male reproductives. These results reveal a strong relationship between the evolution of the division of labor and the regulation of chemoreceptor gene expression, thereby demonstrating the chemical communication and underlining chemoreception mechanism in social insects.

  8. Molecular underpinnings of ventral surface chemoreceptor function: focus on KCNQ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkey, Daniel K; Hawkins, Virginia E; Hawryluk, Joanna M; Takakura, Ana C; Moreira, Thiago S; Tzingounis, Anastasios V

    2015-03-01

    Central chemoreception is the mechanism by which CO₂/H(+) -sensitive neurons (i.e. chemoreceptors) regulate breathing in response to changes in tissue CO₂/H(+) . Neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) directly regulate breathing in response to changes in tissue CO₂/H(+) and function as a key locus of respiratory control by integrating information from several respiratory centres, including the medullary raphe. Therefore, chemosensitive RTN neurons appear to be critically important for maintaining breathing, thus understanding molecular mechanisms that regulate RTN chemoreceptor function may identify therapeutic targets for the treatment of respiratory control disorders. We have recently shown that KCNQ (Kv7) channels in the RTN are essential determinants of spontaneous activity ex vivo, and downstream effectors for serotonergic modulation of breathing. Considering that loss of function mutations in KCNQ channels can cause certain types of epilepsy including those associated with sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), we propose that dysfunctions of KCNQ channels may be one cause for epilepsy and respiratory problems associated with SUDEP. In this review, we will summarize the role of KCNQ channels in the regulation of RTN chemoreceptor function, and suggest that these channels represent useful therapeutic targets for the treatment of respiratory control disorders.

  9. High density and ligand affinity confer ultrasensitive signal detection by a guanylyl cyclase chemoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichlo, Magdalena; Bungert-Plümke, Stefanie; Weyand, Ingo; Seifert, Reinhard; Bönigk, Wolfgang; Strünker, Timo; Kashikar, Nachiket Dilip; Goodwin, Normann; Müller, Astrid; Pelzer, Patric; Van, Qui; Enderlein, Jörg; Klemm, Clementine; Krause, Eberhard; Trötschel, Christian; Poetsch, Ansgar; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Körschen, Heinz G; Collienne, Ursel

    2014-08-18

    Guanylyl cyclases (GCs), which synthesize the messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate, control several sensory functions, such as phototransduction, chemosensation, and thermosensation, in many species from worms to mammals. The GC chemoreceptor in sea urchin sperm can decode chemoattractant concentrations with single-molecule sensitivity. The molecular and cellular underpinnings of such ultrasensitivity are not known for any eukaryotic chemoreceptor. In this paper, we show that an exquisitely high density of 3 × 10(5) GC chemoreceptors and subnanomolar ligand affinity provide a high ligand-capture efficacy and render sperm perfect absorbers. The GC activity is terminated within 150 ms by dephosphorylation steps of the receptor, which provides a means for precise control of the GC lifetime and which reduces "molecule noise." Compared with other ultrasensitive sensory systems, the 10-fold signal amplification by the GC receptor is surprisingly low. The hallmarks of this signaling mechanism provide a blueprint for chemical sensing in small compartments, such as olfactory cilia, insect antennae, or even synaptic boutons.

  10. Voltage-gated Na(+) channels in chemoreceptor afferent neurons--potential roles and changes with development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, David F

    2013-01-01

    Carotid body chemoreceptors increase their action potential (AP) activity in response to a decrease in arterial oxygen tension and this response increases in the post-natal period. The initial transduction site is likely the glomus cell which responds to hypoxia with an increase in intracellular calcium and secretion of multiple neurotransmitters. Translation of this secretion to AP spiking levels is determined by the excitability of the afferent nerve terminals that is largely determined by the voltage-dependence of activation of Na(+) channels. In this review, we examine the biophysical characteristics of Na(+) channels present at the soma of chemoreceptor afferent neurons with the assumption that similar channels are present at nerve terminals. The voltage dependence of this current is consistent with a single Na(+) channel isoform with activation around the resting potential and with about 60-70% of channels in the inactive state around the resting potential. Channel openings, due to transitions from inactive/open or closed/open states, may serve to amplify external depolarizing events or generate, by themselves, APs. Over the first two post-natal weeks, the Na(+) channel activation voltage shifts to more negative potentials, thus enhancing the amplifying action of Na(+) channels on depolarization events and increasing membrane noise generated by channel transitions. This may be a significant contributor to maturation of chemoreceptor activity in the post-natal period.

  11. Functional coupling of a nematode chemoreceptor to the yeast pheromone response pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tehseen

    Full Text Available Sequencing of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome revealed sequences encoding more than 1,000 G-protein coupled receptors, hundreds of which may respond to volatile organic ligands. To understand how the worm's simple olfactory system can sense its chemical environment there is a need to characterise a representative selection of these receptors but only very few receptors have been linked to a specific volatile ligand. We therefore set out to design a yeast expression system for assigning ligands to nematode chemoreceptors. We showed that while a model receptor ODR-10 binds to C. elegans Gα subunits ODR-3 and GPA-3 it cannot bind to yeast Gα. However, chimaeras between the nematode and yeast Gα subunits bound to both ODR-10 and the yeast Gβγ subunits. FIG2 was shown to be a superior MAP-dependent promoter for reporter expression. We replaced the endogenous Gα subunit (GPA1 of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ste2Δ sst2Δ far1Δ triple mutant ("Cyb" with a Gpa1/ODR-3 chimaera and introduced ODR-10 as a model nematode GPCR. This strain showed concentration-dependent activation of the yeast MAP kinase pathway in the presence of diacetyl, the first time that the native form of a nematode chemoreceptor has been functionally expressed in yeast. This is an important step towards en masse de-orphaning of C. elegans chemoreceptors.

  12. High density and ligand affinity confer ultrasensitive signal detection by a guanylyl cyclase chemoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichlo, Magdalena; Bungert-Plümke, Stefanie; Weyand, Ingo; Seifert, Reinhard; Bönigk, Wolfgang; Strünker, Timo; Kashikar, Nachiket Dilip; Goodwin, Normann; Müller, Astrid; Pelzer, Patric; Van, Qui; Enderlein, Jörg; Klemm, Clementine; Krause, Eberhard; Trötschel, Christian; Poetsch, Ansgar; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Körschen, Heinz G; Collienne, Ursel

    2014-08-18

    Guanylyl cyclases (GCs), which synthesize the messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate, control several sensory functions, such as phototransduction, chemosensation, and thermosensation, in many species from worms to mammals. The GC chemoreceptor in sea urchin sperm can decode chemoattractant concentrations with single-molecule sensitivity. The molecular and cellular underpinnings of such ultrasensitivity are not known for any eukaryotic chemoreceptor. In this paper, we show that an exquisitely high density of 3 × 10(5) GC chemoreceptors and subnanomolar ligand affinity provide a high ligand-capture efficacy and render sperm perfect absorbers. The GC activity is terminated within 150 ms by dephosphorylation steps of the receptor, which provides a means for precise control of the GC lifetime and which reduces "molecule noise." Compared with other ultrasensitive sensory systems, the 10-fold signal amplification by the GC receptor is surprisingly low. The hallmarks of this signaling mechanism provide a blueprint for chemical sensing in small compartments, such as olfactory cilia, insect antennae, or even synaptic boutons. PMID:25135936

  13. Synaptic transmission of baro- and chemoreceptors afferents in the NTS second order neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accorsi-Mendonça, Daniela; Machado, Benedito H

    2013-04-01

    Second order neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) process and integrate the afferent information from arterial baroreceptors with high fidelity and precise timing synaptic transmission. Since 2nd-order NTS neurons receiving baroreceptors inputs are relatively well characterized, their electrophysiological profile has been accepted as a general characteristic for all 2nd-order NTS neurons involved with the processing of different sensorial inputs. On the other hand, the synaptic properties of other afferent systems in NTS, such as the peripheral chemoreceptors, are not yet well understood. In this context, in previous studies we demonstrated that in response to repetitive afferents stimulation, the chemoreceptors 2nd-order NTS neurons also presented high fidelity of synaptic transmission, but with a large variability in the latency of evoked responses. This finding is different in relation to the precise timing transmission for baroreceptor 2nd-order NTS neurons, which was accepted as a general characteristic profile for all 2nd order neurons in the NTS. In this brief review we discuss this new concept as an index of complexity of the sensorial inputs to NTS with focus on the synaptic processing of baro- and chemoreceptor afferents.

  14. Evolutionary Genomics Suggests That CheV Is an Additional Adaptor for Accommodating Specific Chemoreceptors within the Chemotaxis Signaling Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi R Ortega

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are models for many experiments in molecular biology including chemotaxis, and most of the results obtained with one organism have been generalized to another. While most components of the chemotaxis pathway are strongly conserved between the two species, Salmonella genomes contain some chemoreceptors and an additional protein, CheV, that are not found in E. coli. The role of CheV was examined in distantly related species Bacillus subtilis and Helicobacter pylori, but its role in bacterial chemotaxis is still not well understood. We tested a hypothesis that in enterobacteria CheV functions as an additional adaptor linking the CheA kinase to certain types of chemoreceptors that cannot be effectively accommodated by the universal adaptor CheW. Phylogenetic profiling, genomic context and comparative protein sequence analyses suggested that CheV interacts with specific domains of CheA and chemoreceptors from an orthologous group exemplified by the Salmonella McpC protein. Structural consideration of the conservation patterns suggests that CheV and CheW share the same binding spot on the chemoreceptor structure, but have some affinity bias towards chemoreceptors from different orthologous groups. Finally, published experimental results and data newly obtained via comparative genomics support the idea that CheV functions as a "phosphate sink" possibly to off-set the over-stimulation of the kinase by certain types of chemoreceptors. Overall, our results strongly suggest that CheV is an additional adaptor for accommodating specific chemoreceptors within the chemotaxis signaling complex.

  15. Graded hypoxia acts through a network of distributed peripheral oxygen chemoreceptors to produce changes in respiratory behaviour and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Tara A; Xu, Fenglian; Syed, Naweed I

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory behaviour relies critically upon sensory feedback from peripheral oxygen chemoreceptors. During environmental or systemic hypoxia, chemoreceptor input modulates respiratory central pattern generator activity to produce reflex-based increases in respiration and also shapes respiratory plasticity over longer timescales. The best-studied oxygen chemoreceptors are undoubtedly the mammalian carotid bodies; however, questions remain regarding this complex organ's role in shaping respiration in response to varying oxygen levels. Furthermore, many taxa possess distinct oxygen chemoreceptors located within the lungs, airways and cardiovasculature, but the functional advantage of multiple chemoreceptor sites is unclear. In this study, it is demonstrated that a distributed network of peripheral oxygen chemoreceptors exists in Lymnaea stagnalis and significantly modulates aerial respiration. Specifically, Lymnaea breath frequency and duration represent parameters that are shaped by interactions between hypoxic severity and its time-course. Using a combination of behaviour and electrophysiology approaches, the chemosensory pathways underlying hypoxia-induced changes in breath frequency/duration were explored. The current findings demonstrate that breath frequency is uniquely modulated by the known osphradial ganglion oxygen chemoreceptors during moderate hypoxia, while a newly discovered area of pneumostome oxygen chemoreception serves a similar function specifically during more severe hypoxia. Together, these findings suggest that multiple oxygen chemosensory sites, each with their own sensory and modulatory properties, act synergistically to form a functionally distributed network that dynamically shapes respiration in response to changing systemic or environmental oxygen levels. These distributed networks may represent an evolutionarily conserved strategy vis-à-vis respiratory adaptability and have significant implications for the understanding of fundamental

  16. Evolutionary Genomics Suggests That CheV Is an Additional Adaptor for Accommodating Specific Chemoreceptors within the Chemotaxis Signaling Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Davi R; Zhulin, Igor B

    2016-02-01

    Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are models for many experiments in molecular biology including chemotaxis, and most of the results obtained with one organism have been generalized to another. While most components of the chemotaxis pathway are strongly conserved between the two species, Salmonella genomes contain some chemoreceptors and an additional protein, CheV, that are not found in E. coli. The role of CheV was examined in distantly related species Bacillus subtilis and Helicobacter pylori, but its role in bacterial chemotaxis is still not well understood. We tested a hypothesis that in enterobacteria CheV functions as an additional adaptor linking the CheA kinase to certain types of chemoreceptors that cannot be effectively accommodated by the universal adaptor CheW. Phylogenetic profiling, genomic context and comparative protein sequence analyses suggested that CheV interacts with specific domains of CheA and chemoreceptors from an orthologous group exemplified by the Salmonella McpC protein. Structural consideration of the conservation patterns suggests that CheV and CheW share the same binding spot on the chemoreceptor structure, but have some affinity bias towards chemoreceptors from different orthologous groups. Finally, published experimental results and data newly obtained via comparative genomics support the idea that CheV functions as a "phosphate sink" possibly to off-set the over-stimulation of the kinase by certain types of chemoreceptors. Overall, our results strongly suggest that CheV is an additional adaptor for accommodating specific chemoreceptors within the chemotaxis signaling complex.

  17. Signalling-dependent interactions between the kinase-coupling protein CheW and chemoreceptors in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedetta, Andrea; Parkinson, John S; Studdert, Claudia A

    2014-09-01

    Chemical signals sensed on the periplasmic side of bacterial cells by transmembrane chemoreceptors are transmitted to the flagellar motors via the histidine kinase CheA, which controls the phosphorylation level of the effector protein CheY. Chemoreceptor arrays comprise remarkably stable supramolecular structures in which thousands of chemoreceptors are networked through interactions between their cytoplasmic tips, CheA, and the small coupling protein CheW. To explore the conformational changes that occur within this protein assembly during signalling, we used in vivo cross-linking methods to detect close interactions between the coupling protein CheW and the serine receptor Tsr in intact Escherichia coli cells. We identified two signal-sensitive contacts between CheW and the cytoplasmic tip of Tsr. Our results suggest that ligand binding triggers changes in the receptor that alter its signalling contacts with CheW (and/or CheA).

  18. Transmembrane helix dynamics of bacterial chemoreceptors supports a piston model of signalling.

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    Benjamin A Hall

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Transmembrane α-helices play a key role in many receptors, transmitting a signal from one side to the other of the lipid bilayer membrane. Bacterial chemoreceptors are one of the best studied such systems, with a wealth of biophysical and mutational data indicating a key role for the TM2 helix in signalling. In particular, aromatic (Trp and Tyr and basic (Arg residues help to lock α-helices into a membrane. Mutants in TM2 of E. coli Tar and related chemoreceptors involving these residues implicate changes in helix location and/or orientation in signalling. We have investigated the detailed structural basis of this via high throughput coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD of Tar TM2 and its mutants in lipid bilayers. We focus on the position (shift and orientation (tilt, rotation of TM2 relative to the bilayer and how these are perturbed in mutants relative to the wildtype. The simulations reveal a clear correlation between small (ca. 1.5 Å shift in position of TM2 along the bilayer normal and downstream changes in signalling activity. Weaker correlations are seen with helix tilt, and little/none between signalling and helix twist. This analysis of relatively subtle changes was only possible because the high throughput simulation method allowed us to run large (n = 100 ensembles for substantial numbers of different helix sequences, amounting to ca. 2000 simulations in total. Overall, this analysis supports a swinging-piston model of transmembrane signalling by Tar and related chemoreceptors.

  19. Do the carotid body chemoreceptors mediate cardiovascular and sympathetic adjustments induced by sodium overload in rats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrino, Gustavo R; Mourão, Aline A; Moreira, Marina C S; da Silva, Elaine F; Lopes, Paulo R; Fajemiroye, James O; Schoorlemmer, Guss H M; Sato, Mônica A; Reis, Ângela A S; Rebelo, Ana C S; Cravo, Sergio L

    2016-05-15

    Acute plasma hypernatremia induces several cardiovascular and sympathetic responses. It is conceivable that these responses contribute to rapid sodium excretion and restoration of normal conditions. Afferent pathways mediating these responses are not entirely understood. The present study analyses the effects of acute carotid chemoreceptor inactivation on cardiovascular and sympathetic responses induced by infusion of hypertonic saline (HS). All experiments were performed on anesthetized male Wistar rats instrumented for recording of arterial blood pressure (ABP), renal blood flow (RBF) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Animals were subjected to sham surgery or carotid chemoreceptor inactivation by bilateral ligation of the carotid body artery (CBA). In sham rats (n=8), intravenous infusion of HS (3 M NaCl, 1.8 ml/kg b.wt.) elicited a transient increase (9±2mmHg) in ABP, and long lasting (30 min) increases in RBF (138±5%) and renal vascular conductance (RVC) (128±5%) with concurrent decrease in RSNA (-19±4%). In rats submitted to CBA ligation (n=8), the pressor response to HS was higher (24±2mmHg; p<0.05). However, RBF and RVC responses to HS infusion were significantly reduced (113±5% and 93±4%, respectively) while RSNA was increased (13±2%). When HS (3M NaCl, 200μl) was administrated into internal carotid artery (ICA), distinct sympathetic and cardiovascular responses were observed. In sham-group, HS infusion (3M NaCl, 200μl) into ICA promoted an increase in ABP (26±8mmHg) and RSNA (29±13%). In CBA rats, ABP (-3±5.6mmHg) remained unaltered despite sympathoinhibition (-37.6±5.4%). These results demonstrate that carotid body chemoreceptors play a role in the development of hemodynamic and sympathetic responses to acute HS infusion. PMID:27060222

  20. Neural respiratory and circulatory interaction during chemoreceptor stimulation and cooling of ventral medulla in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millhorn, D E

    1986-01-01

    The effects on respiratory and sympathetic neural activity, measured as integrated phrenic and cervical nerve activities respectively, during changing input from the central chemoreceptors was studied in anaesthetized, paralysed cats whose carotid sinus nerves and vagus nerves had been cut. Central respiratory drive was altered either by graded cold block of the intermediate areas, located bilaterally near the ventral surface of the medulla oblongata, or by step increases in end-tidal PCO2. Cervical nerve activity showed both a tonic (or mean) level of activity and a prominent cyclic discharge that was in phase with phrenic nerve activity. Graded focal cooling of the intermediate areas to 20 degrees C when end-tidal PCO2 was kept constant caused progressive decreases in phrenic activity, the amplitude of the inspiratory related discharge and mean arterial pressure, but only a small decrease in mean cervical nerve activity. Cooling the intermediate areas in the absence of the inspiratory related discharge (i.e. when phrenic activity was below the apnoeic threshold) led to a much smaller decrease in arterial pressure. Step increases of end-tidal PCO2 caused progressive increases of both cervical and phrenic nerve activities. The increase in cervical activity was due primarily, if not wholly, to a progressive increase in the amplitude of the inspiratory related discharge. These findings show that the predominant effect on sympathetic activity during stimulation of the central chemoreceptor and graded cold block of the intermediate areas is a change in the amplitude of the inspiratory related discharge and suggest that the change in arterial pressure that accompanies central chemoreceptor stimulation and graded cold block of the intermediate areas is mediated by the inspiratory related discharge rather than by an increase in the mean level of sympathetic activity. When phrenic activity was lowered to below apnoeic threshold by cooling the intermediate areas, step

  1. The role of local renin-angiotensin system in arterial chemoreceptors in sleep-breathing disorders

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    Man Lung eFung

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The renin-angiotensin system (RAS plays pivotal roles in the regulation of cardiovascular and renal functions to maintain the fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. Experimental studies have demonstrated a locally expressed RAS in the carotid body, which is functional significant in the effect of angiotensin peptides on the regulation of the activity of peripheral chemoreceptors and the chemoreflex. The physiological and pathophysiological implications of the RAS in the carotid body have been proposed upon recent studies showing a significant upregulation of the RAS expression under hypoxic conditions relevant to altitude acclimation and sleep apnea and also in animal model of heart failure. Specifically, the increased expression of angiotensinogen, angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin AT1 receptors plays significant roles in the augmented carotid chemoreceptor activity and inflammation of the carotid body. This review aims to summarize these results with highlights on the pathophysiological function of the RAS under hypoxic conditions. It is concluded that the maladaptive changes of the RAS in the carotid body plays a pathogenic role in sleep apnea and heart failure, which could potentially be a therapeutic target for the treatment of the pathophysiological consequence of sleep apnea.

  2. Same same but different. Different trigeminal chemoreceptors share the same central pathway.

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    Kathrin Kollndorfer

    Full Text Available Intranasal trigeminal sensations are important in everyday life of human beings, as they play a governing role in protecting the airways from harm. Trigeminal sensations arise from the binding of a ligand to various sub-types of transient receptor potential (TRP channels located on mucosal branches of the trigeminal nerve. Which underlying neural networks are involved in the processing of various trigeminal inputs is still unknown. To target this unresolved question fourteen healthy human subjects were investigated by completing three functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI scanning sessions during which three trigeminal substances, activating varying sub-types of chemoreceptors and evoking different sensations in the nose were presented: CO2, menthol and cinnamaldehyde. We identified similar functional networks responding to all stimuli: an olfactory network, a somatosensory network and an integrative network. The processing pathway of all three stimulants was represented by the same functional networks, although CO2 evokes painful but virtually odorless sensations, and the two other stimulants, menthol and cinnamaldehyde are perceived as mostly non painful with a clear olfactory percept. Therefore, our results suggest a common central processing pathway for trigeminal information regardless of the trigeminal chemoreceptor and sensation type.

  3. Differential Evolutionary Constraints in the Evolution of Chemoreceptors: A Murine and Human Case Study

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    Ricardo D’Oliveira Albanus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemoreception is among the most important sensory modalities in animals. Organisms use the ability to perceive chemical compounds in all major ecological activities. Recent studies have allowed the characterization of chemoreceptor gene families. These genes present strikingly high variability in copy numbers and pseudogenization degrees among different species, but the mechanisms underlying their evolution are not fully understood. We have analyzed the functional networks of these genes, their orthologs distribution, and performed phylogenetic analyses in order to investigate their evolutionary dynamics. We have modeled the chemosensory networks and compared the evolutionary constraints of their genes in Mus musculus, Homo sapiens, and Rattus norvegicus. We have observed significant differences regarding the constraints on the orthologous groups and network topologies of chemoreceptors and signal transduction machinery. Our findings suggest that chemosensory receptor genes are less constrained than their signal transducing machinery, resulting in greater receptor diversity and conservation of information processing pathways. More importantly, we have observed significant differences among the receptors themselves, suggesting that olfactory and bitter taste receptors are more conserved than vomeronasal receptors.

  4. Same same but different. Different trigeminal chemoreceptors share the same central pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollndorfer, Kathrin; Kowalczyk, Ksenia; Frasnelli, Johannes; Hoche, Elisabeth; Unger, Ewald; Mueller, Christian A; Krajnik, Jacqueline; Trattnig, Siegfried; Schöpf, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal trigeminal sensations are important in everyday life of human beings, as they play a governing role in protecting the airways from harm. Trigeminal sensations arise from the binding of a ligand to various sub-types of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels located on mucosal branches of the trigeminal nerve. Which underlying neural networks are involved in the processing of various trigeminal inputs is still unknown. To target this unresolved question fourteen healthy human subjects were investigated by completing three functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning sessions during which three trigeminal substances, activating varying sub-types of chemoreceptors and evoking different sensations in the nose were presented: CO2, menthol and cinnamaldehyde. We identified similar functional networks responding to all stimuli: an olfactory network, a somatosensory network and an integrative network. The processing pathway of all three stimulants was represented by the same functional networks, although CO2 evokes painful but virtually odorless sensations, and the two other stimulants, menthol and cinnamaldehyde are perceived as mostly non painful with a clear olfactory percept. Therefore, our results suggest a common central processing pathway for trigeminal information regardless of the trigeminal chemoreceptor and sensation type.

  5. Peripheral chemoreceptors in fish: A brief history and a look ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonz, Michael G; Zachar, Peter C; Da Fonte, Dillon F; Mierzwa, Anna S

    2015-08-01

    The story of control of cardiorespiratory reflexes by peripheral chemoreceptors includes a chapter on evolution in large part because of the work of Prof. William K. Milsom. Bill has reminded us to think comparatively about O2 and CO2/H(+) sensing. We present a brief review of the fish gill and O2 chemoreceptors, as well as recent results from our laboratory, that were discussed at a symposium in honour of Prof. Milsom's extensive career. In a series of papers from the Milsom laboratory from 1986 to 1995, it was demonstrated that the fish gill is a major site of chemosensory discharge during hypoxia, and that this response is sensitive to multiple neurochemicals involved in chemosensing. These and other more recent studies by Bill et al. are now fundamental and have helped to shape the field as it is today. At the cellular level, we have shown that chemosensitive neuroepithelial cells (NECs) of the gills may possess unique adaptations compared to their mammalian homologues. In addition, we used injection of the styryl dye, FM1-43, to identify gill NECs in zebrafish and demonstrate increased vesicular activity in NECs in vitro during acute stimulation. In vivo, we have identified 5-HT2, 5-HT3, dopaminergic and nicotinic receptor activity involved in the hyperventilatory response in developing zebrafish. With this model we have also traced the fate of mitotic cells in the gills, and demonstrated the regeneration of resected gill filaments and replacement of O2-sensitive NECs.

  6. Differential evolutionary constraints in the evolution of chemoreceptors: a murine and human case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Oliveira Albanus, Ricardo; Siqueira Dalmolin, Rodrigo Juliani; Rybarczyk-Filho, José Luiz; Alves Castro, Mauro Antônio; Fonseca Moreira, José Cláudio

    2014-01-01

    Chemoreception is among the most important sensory modalities in animals. Organisms use the ability to perceive chemical compounds in all major ecological activities. Recent studies have allowed the characterization of chemoreceptor gene families. These genes present strikingly high variability in copy numbers and pseudogenization degrees among different species, but the mechanisms underlying their evolution are not fully understood. We have analyzed the functional networks of these genes, their orthologs distribution, and performed phylogenetic analyses in order to investigate their evolutionary dynamics. We have modeled the chemosensory networks and compared the evolutionary constraints of their genes in Mus musculus, Homo sapiens, and Rattus norvegicus. We have observed significant differences regarding the constraints on the orthologous groups and network topologies of chemoreceptors and signal transduction machinery. Our findings suggest that chemosensory receptor genes are less constrained than their signal transducing machinery, resulting in greater receptor diversity and conservation of information processing pathways. More importantly, we have observed significant differences among the receptors themselves, suggesting that olfactory and bitter taste receptors are more conserved than vomeronasal receptors.

  7. SOS System Induction Inhibits the Assembly of Chemoreceptor Signaling Clusters in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazoki, Oihane; Mayola, Albert; Campoy, Susana; Barbé, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Swarming, a flagellar-driven multicellular form of motility, is associated with bacterial virulence and increased antibiotic resistance. In this work we demonstrate that activation of the SOS response reversibly inhibits swarming motility by preventing the assembly of chemoreceptor-signaling polar arrays. We also show that an increase in the concentration of the RecA protein, generated by SOS system activation, rather than another function of this genetic network impairs chemoreceptor polar cluster formation. Our data provide evidence that the molecular balance between RecA and CheW proteins is crucial to allow polar cluster formation in Salmonella enterica cells. Thus, activation of the SOS response by the presence of a DNA-injuring compound increases the RecA concentration, thereby disturbing the equilibrium between RecA and CheW and resulting in the cessation of swarming. Nevertheless, when the DNA-damage decreases and the SOS response is no longer activated, basal RecA levels and thus polar cluster assembly are reestablished. These results clearly show that bacterial populations moving over surfaces make use of specific mechanisms to avoid contact with DNA-damaging compounds.

  8. Reductions in carotid chemoreceptor activity with low-dose dopamine improves baroreflex control of heart rate during hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozer, Michael T; Holbein, Walter W; Joyner, Michael J; Curry, Timothy B; Limberg, Jacqueline K

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the contribution of the carotid body chemoreceptors to changes in baroreflex control of heart rate with exposure to hypoxia. We hypothesized spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (scBRS) would be reduced with hypoxia and this effect would be blunted when carotid chemoreceptor activity was reduced with low-dose dopamine. Fifteen healthy adults (11 M/4 F) completed two visits randomized to intravenous dopamine or placebo (saline). On each visit, subjects were exposed to 5-min normoxia (~99% SpO2), followed by 5-min hypoxia (~84% SpO2). Blood pressure (intra-arterial catheter) and heart rate (ECG) were measured continuously and scBRS was assessed by spectrum and sequence methodologies. scBRS was reduced with hypoxia (P  0.05). Present findings are consistent with a reduction in scBRS with systemic hypoxia. Furthermore, we show this effect is partially mediated by the carotid body chemoreceptors, given the fall in scBRS is attenuated when activity of the chemoreceptors is reduced with low-dose dopamine. However, the improvement in scBRS with dopamine appears to be specific to rising blood pressures. These results may have important implications for impairments in baroreflex function common in disease states of acute and/or chronic hypoxemia, as well as the experimental use of dopamine to assess such changes.

  9. An Insight into the Interaction Mode Between CheB and Chemoreceptor from Two Crystal Structures of CheB Methylesterase Catalytic Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K Cho; B Crane; S Park

    2011-12-31

    We have determined 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima CheB methylesterase domain to provide insight into the interaction mode between CheB and chemoreceptors. T. maritima CheB methylesterase domain has identical topology of a modified doubly-wound {alpha}/{beta} fold that was observed from the previously reported Salmonella typhimurium counterpart, but the analysis of the electrostatic potential surface near the catalytic triad indicated considerable charge distribution difference. As the CheB demethylation consensus sites of the chemoreceptors, the CheB substrate, are not uniquely conserved between T. maritima and S. typhimurium, such surfaces with differing electrostatic properties may reflect CheB regions that mediate protein-protein interaction. Via the computational docking of the two T. maritima and S. typhimurium CheB structures to the respective T. maritima and Escherichia coli chemoreceptors, we propose a CheB:chemoreceptor interaction mode.

  10. Chemoreceptors, baroreceptors, and autonomic deregulation in children with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozal, David; Hakim, Fahed; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent sleep disorder of breathing in both adults and children that is fraught with substantial cardiovascular morbidities, the latter being attributable to a complex interplay between intermittent hypoxia (IH), episodic hypercapnia, recurrent large intra-thoracic pressure swings, and sleep disruption. Alterations in autonomic nervous system function could underlie the perturbations in cardiovascular, neurocognitive, immune, endocrine and metabolic functions that affect many of the patients suffering from OSA. Although these issues have received substantial attention in adults, the same has thus far failed to occur in children, creating a quasi misperception that children are protected. Here, we provide a critical overview of the evidence supporting the presence of autonomic nervous system (ANS) perturbations in children with OSA, draw some parallel assessments to known mechanisms in rodents and adult humans, particularly, peripheral and central chemoreceptor and baroreceptor pathways, and suggest future research directions.

  11. Chemotransduction in the Carotid Body: K+ Current Modulated by Po2 in Type I Chemoreceptor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Barneo, Jose; Lopez-Lopez, Jose R.; Urena, Juan; Gonzalez, Constancio

    1988-07-01

    The ionic currents of carotid body type I cells and their possible involvement in the detection of oxygen tension (Po2) in arterial blood are unknown. The electrical properties of these cells were studied with the whole-cell patch clamp technique, and the hypothesis that ionic conductances can be altered by changes in Po2 was tested. The results show that type I cells have voltage-dependent sodium, calcium, and potassium channels. Sodium and calcium currents were unaffected by a decrease in Po2 from 150 to 10 millimeters of mercury, whereas, with the same experimental protocol, potassium currents were reversibly reduced by 25 to 50 percent. The effect of hypoxia was independent of internal adenosine triphosphate and calcium. Thus, ionic conductances, and particularly the O2-sensitive potassium current, play a key role in the transduction mechanism of arterial chemoreceptors.

  12. Expression of D2 dopamine receptor mRNA in the arterial chemoreceptor afferent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Lawson, E E; Millhorn, D E

    1992-11-01

    Dopamine is a major neurotransmitter in the arterial chemoreceptor pathway. In the present study we wished to determine if messenger RNAs for dopamine D1 and D2 receptor are expressed in carotid body (type I cells), in sensory neurons of the petrosal ganglion which innervate the carotid body and in sympathetic neurons of the superior cervical ganglion. We failed to detect D1 receptor mRNA in any of these tissues. However, we found that D2 receptor mRNA was expressed by dopaminergic carotid body type I cells. D2 receptor mRNA was also found in petrosal ganglion neurons that innervated the carotid sinus and carotid body. In addition, a large number of sympathetic postganglionic neurons in the superior cervical ganglion expressed D2 receptor mRNA. PMID:1362730

  13. Deactivation of carotid body chemoreceptors by hyperoxia decreases blood pressure in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinski, Maciej; Lewandowski, Jacek; Przybylski, Jacek; Zalewski, Paweł; Symonides, Bartosz; Abramczyk, Piotr; Gaciong, Zbigniew

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that hyperoxia-induced deactivation of carotid body chemoreceptors reduces sympathetic activity in hypertensive patients but it does not affect blood pressure. The maintenance of blood pressure can be explained by the direct, vasoconstrictive effect of hyperoxia, which offsets diminished sympathetic activity. This study compares the effect of acute hyperoxia on hemodynamic parameters between hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Twelve males with hypertension (age 39.4±2.4 years; body mass index 27.4±1.1 kg m(-2)) and 11 normotensive males (age 39.9±2.7 years; body mass index 25.4±0.7 kg m(-2)) received, via non-rebreathing mask ventilation, ambient air, followed by 100% oxygen for 20 min. The stroke volume, heart rate, cardiac output, blood pressure, total peripheral resistance, respiratory rate, baroreceptor control of heart rate and oxygen saturation were recorded continuously. Several 30 s periods were analyzed before, during and after inducing hyperoxia. At baseline, the hypertensive subject's blood pressure was higher and their baroreflex control of heart rate was lower when compared with the normotensive control group. After the first 30 s of hyperoxia, systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressures, as well as the total peripheral resistance, decreased significantly in hypertensives but not in normotensives. After 20 min of 100% oxygen ventilation, systolic and mean blood pressures and total peripheral resistance was increased in hypertensive patients, and the cardiac output and stroke volume had decreased in both groups. The results of this study confirm that deactivation of carotid body chemoreceptors can acutely decrease blood pressure in humans.

  14. Arterial chemoreceptor activation reduces the activity of parapyramidal serotonergic neurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, A C; Moreira, T S

    2013-05-01

    The parapyramidal (ppy) region targets primarily the intermediolateral cell column and is probably involved in breathing and thermoregulation. In the present study, we tested whether ppy serotonergic neurons respond to activation of central and peripheral chemoreceptors. Bulbospinal ppy neurons (n=30) were recorded extracellularly along with the phrenic nerve activity in urethane/α-chloralose-anesthetized, paralyzed, intact (n=7) or carotid body denervated (n=6) male Wistar rats. In intact animals, most of the ppy neurons were inhibited by hypoxia (n=14 of 19) (8% O2, 30s) (1.5 ± 0.03 vs. control: 2.4 ± 0.2 Hz) or hypercapnia (n=15 of 19) (10% CO2) (1.7 ± 0.1 vs. control: 2.2 ± 0.2 Hz), although some neurons were insensitive to hypoxia (n=3 of 19) or hypercapnia (n=4 of 19). Very few neurons (n=2 of 19) were activated after hypoxia, but not after hypercapnia. In carotid body denervated rats, all the 5HT-ppy neurons (n=11) were insensitive to hypercapnia (2.1 ± 0.1 vs. control: 2.3 ± 0.09 Hz). Biotinamide-labeled cells that were recovered after histochemistry were located in the ppy region. Most labeled cells (90%) showed strong tryptophan hydroxylase immunocytochemical reactivity, indicating that they were serotonergic. The present data reveal that peripheral chemoreceptors reduce the activity of the serotonergic premotor neurons located in the ppy region. It is plausible that the serotonergic neurons of the ppy region could conceivably regulate breathing automaticity and be involved in autonomic regulation.

  15. Arterial chemoreceptor activation reduces the activity of parapyramidal serotonergic neurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, A C; Moreira, T S

    2013-05-01

    The parapyramidal (ppy) region targets primarily the intermediolateral cell column and is probably involved in breathing and thermoregulation. In the present study, we tested whether ppy serotonergic neurons respond to activation of central and peripheral chemoreceptors. Bulbospinal ppy neurons (n=30) were recorded extracellularly along with the phrenic nerve activity in urethane/α-chloralose-anesthetized, paralyzed, intact (n=7) or carotid body denervated (n=6) male Wistar rats. In intact animals, most of the ppy neurons were inhibited by hypoxia (n=14 of 19) (8% O2, 30s) (1.5 ± 0.03 vs. control: 2.4 ± 0.2 Hz) or hypercapnia (n=15 of 19) (10% CO2) (1.7 ± 0.1 vs. control: 2.2 ± 0.2 Hz), although some neurons were insensitive to hypoxia (n=3 of 19) or hypercapnia (n=4 of 19). Very few neurons (n=2 of 19) were activated after hypoxia, but not after hypercapnia. In carotid body denervated rats, all the 5HT-ppy neurons (n=11) were insensitive to hypercapnia (2.1 ± 0.1 vs. control: 2.3 ± 0.09 Hz). Biotinamide-labeled cells that were recovered after histochemistry were located in the ppy region. Most labeled cells (90%) showed strong tryptophan hydroxylase immunocytochemical reactivity, indicating that they were serotonergic. The present data reveal that peripheral chemoreceptors reduce the activity of the serotonergic premotor neurons located in the ppy region. It is plausible that the serotonergic neurons of the ppy region could conceivably regulate breathing automaticity and be involved in autonomic regulation. PMID:23403178

  16. Inter-specific and developmental differences on the array of antennal chemoreceptors in four species of triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae

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    M Gracco

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to investigate the pattern of chemoreceptor sensilla in adults and fifth stage nymphs of Rhodnius prolixus, R. neglectus, Triatoma infestans and T. sordida in order to study differences and similarities between genera and species. Three types of sensilla were analyzed by light microscopy: thin-walled trichoidea, thick-walled trichoidea and basiconica. The number of sensilla of each three types were counted. The length of the antennal segments were also used as a variable for the analysis. The statistical analysis showed that the number of these antennal chemoreceptors had significant differences between species and between adults and nymphs of each species. Discriminant analysis separates incompletely the fifth stage nymphs of the four species and showed similarity between them. Discriminant analysis performed with 12 variables of the antennae, allowed a complete separation of the adults of the four species.

  17. Expression of messenger RNAs for peptides and tyrosine hydroxylase in primary sensory neurons that innervate arterial baroreceptors and chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Bayliss, D A; Lawson, E E; Millhorn, D E

    1991-08-01

    Retrograde fiber tracing and in situ hybridization were used to determine expression of mRNAs for preprotachykinin A (ppTA), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), preproenkephalin A (ENK), neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY) and somatostatin (SOM) as well as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the petrosal ganglia primary sensory neurons which innervate carotid sinus baroreceptors and carotid body chemoreceptors. Perfusion of the carotid sinus with the retrogradely transported dye (Fluoro-Gold) labeled primary sensory neurons in petrosal ganglion. Numerous somata in the petrosal ganglion labeled with dye contained mRNAs for all the above peptides, except SOM. Moreover, TH mRNA was found in a substantial number of retrogradely labeled cells in the petrosal ganglion. This study provides information concerning which of the numerous peptides identified in sensory neurons of petrosal ganglion may be involved in modulation of the arterial baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes. PMID:1681484

  18. Peripheral chemoreceptors tune inspiratory drive via tonic expiratory neuron hubs in the medullary ventral respiratory column network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, L S; Nuding, S C; Ott, M M; Dean, J B; Bolser, D C; O'Connor, R; Morris, K F; Lindsey, B G

    2015-01-01

    Models of brain stem ventral respiratory column (VRC) circuits typically emphasize populations of neurons, each active during a particular phase of the respiratory cycle. We have proposed that "tonic" pericolumnar expiratory (t-E) neurons tune breathing during baroreceptor-evoked reductions and central chemoreceptor-evoked enhancements of inspiratory (I) drive. The aims of this study were to further characterize the coordinated activity of t-E neurons and test the hypothesis that peripheral chemoreceptors also modulate drive via inhibition of t-E neurons and disinhibition of their inspiratory neuron targets. Spike trains of 828 VRC neurons were acquired by multielectrode arrays along with phrenic nerve signals from 22 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly blocked, artificially ventilated adult cats. Forty-eight of 191 t-E neurons fired synchronously with another t-E neuron as indicated by cross-correlogram central peaks; 32 of the 39 synchronous pairs were elements of groups with mutual pairwise correlations. Gravitational clustering identified fluctuations in t-E neuron synchrony. A network model supported the prediction that inhibitory populations with spike synchrony reduce target neuron firing probabilities, resulting in offset or central correlogram troughs. In five animals, stimulation of carotid chemoreceptors evoked changes in the firing rates of 179 of 240 neurons. Thirty-two neuron pairs had correlogram troughs consistent with convergent and divergent t-E inhibition of I cells and disinhibitory enhancement of drive. Four of 10 t-E neurons that responded to sequential stimulation of peripheral and central chemoreceptors triggered 25 cross-correlograms with offset features. The results support the hypothesis that multiple afferent systems dynamically tune inspiratory drive in part via coordinated t-E neurons.

  19. Reductions in carotid chemoreceptor activity with low-dose dopamine improves baroreflex control of heart rate during hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozer, Michael T; Holbein, Walter W; Joyner, Michael J; Curry, Timothy B; Limberg, Jacqueline K

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the contribution of the carotid body chemoreceptors to changes in baroreflex control of heart rate with exposure to hypoxia. We hypothesized spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (scBRS) would be reduced with hypoxia and this effect would be blunted when carotid chemoreceptor activity was reduced with low-dose dopamine. Fifteen healthy adults (11 M/4 F) completed two visits randomized to intravenous dopamine or placebo (saline). On each visit, subjects were exposed to 5-min normoxia (~99% SpO2), followed by 5-min hypoxia (~84% SpO2). Blood pressure (intra-arterial catheter) and heart rate (ECG) were measured continuously and scBRS was assessed by spectrum and sequence methodologies. scBRS was reduced with hypoxia (P dopamine (P dopamine (P dopamine did not attenuate the decrease in baroreflex sensitivity to falling pressures (scBRS "down-down"; P > 0.05). Present findings are consistent with a reduction in scBRS with systemic hypoxia. Furthermore, we show this effect is partially mediated by the carotid body chemoreceptors, given the fall in scBRS is attenuated when activity of the chemoreceptors is reduced with low-dose dopamine. However, the improvement in scBRS with dopamine appears to be specific to rising blood pressures. These results may have important implications for impairments in baroreflex function common in disease states of acute and/or chronic hypoxemia, as well as the experimental use of dopamine to assess such changes. PMID:27418545

  20. Comamonas testosteroni uses a chemoreceptor for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates to trigger chemotactic responses towards aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bin; Huang, Zhou; Fan, Zheng; Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis towards aromatic compounds has been frequently observed; however, knowledge of how bacteria sense aromatic compounds is limited. Comamonas testosteroni CNB-1 is able to grow on a range of aromatic compounds. This study investigated the chemotactic responses of CNB-1 to 10 aromatic compounds. We constructed a chemoreceptor-free, non-chemotactic mutant, CNB-1Δ20, by disruption of all 19 putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) and the atypical chemoreceptor in strain CNB-1. Individual complementation revealed that a putative MCP (tagged MCP2201) was involved in triggering chemotaxis towards all 10 aromatic compounds. The recombinant sensory domain of MCP2201 did not bind to 3- or 4-hydroxybenzoate, protocatechuate, catechol, benzoate, vanillate and gentisate, but bound oxaloacetate, citrate, cis-aconitate, isocitrate, α-ketoglutarate, succinate, fumarate and malate. The mutant CNB-1ΔpmdF that lost the ability to metabolize 4-hydroxybenzoate and protocatechuate also lost its chemotactic response to these compounds, suggesting that taxis towards aromatic compounds is metabolism-dependent. Based on the ligand profile, we proposed that MCP2201 triggers taxis towards aromatic compounds by sensing TCA cycle intermediates. Our hypothesis was further supported by the finding that introduction of the previously characterized pseudomonad chemoreceptor (McpS) for TCA cycle intermediates into CNB-1Δ20 likewise triggered chemotaxis towards aromatic compounds.

  1. Contribution of Individual Chemoreceptors to Sinorhizobium meliloti Chemotaxis Towards Amino Acids of Host and Nonhost Seed Exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Benjamin A; Helm, Richard F; Scharf, Birgit E

    2016-03-01

    Plant seeds and roots exude a spectrum of molecules into the soil that attract bacteria to the spermosphere and rhizosphere, respectively. The alfalfa symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti utilizes eight chemoreceptors (McpT to McpZ and IcpA) to mediate chemotaxis. Using a modified hydrogel capillary chemotaxis assay that allows data quantification and larger throughput screening, we defined the role of S. meliloti chemoreceptors in sensing its host, Medicago sativa, and a closely related nonhost, Medicago arabica. S. meliloti wild type and most single-deletion strains displayed comparable chemotaxis responses to host or nonhost seed exudate. However, while the mcpZ mutant responded like wild type to M. sativa exudate, its reaction to M. arabica exudate was reduced by 80%. Even though the amino acid (AA) amounts released by both plant species were similar, synthetic AA mixtures that matched exudate profiles contributed differentially to the S. meliloti wild-type response to M. sativa (23%) and M. arabica (37%) exudates, with McpU identified as the most important chemoreceptor for AA. Our results show that S. meliloti is equally attracted to host and nonhost legumes; however, AA play a greater role in attraction to M. arabica than to M. sativa, with McpZ being specifically important in sensing M. arabica. PMID:26713349

  2. P2Y1 receptors expressed by C1 neurons determine peripheral chemoreceptor modulation of breathing, sympathetic activity, and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenker, Ian C; Sobrinho, Cleyton R; Takakura, Ana C; Mulkey, Daniel K; Moreira, Thiago S

    2013-08-01

    Catecholaminergic C1 cells of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) are key determinants of the sympathoexcitatory response to peripheral chemoreceptor activation. Overactivation of this reflex is thought to contribute to increased sympathetic activity and hypertension; however, molecular mechanisms linking peripheral chemoreceptor drive to hypertension remain poorly understood. We have recently determined that activation of P2Y1 receptors in the RVLM mimicked effects of peripheral chemoreceptor activation. Therefore, we hypothesize that P2Y1 receptors regulate peripheral chemoreceptor drive in this region. Here, we determine whether P2Y1 receptors are expressed by C1 neurons in the RVLM and contribute to peripheral chemoreceptor control of breathing, sympathetic activity, and blood pressure. We found that injection of a specific P2Y1 receptor agonist (MRS2365) into the RVLM of anesthetized adult rats increased phrenic nerve activity (≈55%), sympathetic nerve activity (38 ± 6%), and blood pressure (23 ± 1 mm Hg), whereas application of a specific P2Y1 receptor antagonist (MRS2179) decreased peripheral chemoreceptor-mediated activation of phrenic nerve activity, sympathetic nerve activity, and blood pressure. To establish that P2Y1 receptors are expressed by C1 cells, we determine in the brain slice preparation using cell-attached recording techniques that cells responsive to MRS2365 are immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (a marker of C1 cells), and we determine in vivo that C1-lesioned animals do not respond to RVLM injection of MRS2365. These data identify P2Y1 receptors as key determinants of peripheral chemoreceptor regulation of breathing, sympathetic nerve activity, and blood pressure.

  3. Function of chemoreceptor organs in spatial orientation of the lobster, Homarus americanus: differences and overlap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devine, D.V.; Atema, J.

    1982-08-01

    Three of the lobster's main chemoreceptor organs, the lateral and medial antennules (representing smell) and the dactylus-propodus segments of the walking legs (representing taste), are physiologically quite similar. The authors examined their role in spatial orientation in a food-odor stimulus field. Control animals almost always oriented correctly and immediately to an odor plume. Lobsters with unilateral ablations of lateral antennules lost this ability, but did not show preferential turning toward the intact side. Unilateral medial antennule ablation did not affect orientation. Removal of all aesthetasc hairs from one lateral antennule caused loss of orientation ability less severe than unilateral ablation of the entire lateral antennule. Lobsters with unilaterally ablated lateral antennules and blocked walking leg receptors turned preferentially toward the side of the intact antennule. Thus, it appears that intact lobsters orient in odor space by tropotaxis principally using aesthetasc receptor input. Since loss of appendages is relatively common in lobsters, this partial overlap of organ function may serve the animal well in nature.

  4. Oxygen-related chemoreceptor drive to breathe during H₂S infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haouzi, Philippe; Sonobe, Takashi; Chenuel, Bruno

    2014-09-15

    This study addresses the following question: Could the acute depression in breathing produced by hyperoxia, a reflection of the tonic drive to breathe from the arterial chemoreceptors, be accounted for by a background level of endogenous H2S? To address this question, we produced a stable but moderate increase in breathing (24±11%) via continuous infusion of low levels of H2S, in 10 spontaneously breathing urethane-sedated rats. We found that acute exposure to 100% O2 (20 tests) decreased minute ventilation (V˙(I)) from 301±51 to 210±43 ml/min within 15s in control conditions, but no additional significant drop in V˙(I) was observed during H2S induced hyperpnea. In addition, no decrease in the estimated concentrations of gaseous H2S in the arterial blood was observed during the hyperoxic tests. It is concluded that the ventilatory depression induced by high O2 appears to be limited to the tonic background peripheral chemosensory drive to breathe, but has little or no impact on the CB stimulation produced by low levels of H2S.

  5. The Structure of a Soluble Chemoreceptor Suggests a Mechanism for Propagating Conformational Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollard, Abiola M.; Bilwes, Alexandrine M.; Crane, Brian R.; Cornell

    2009-09-02

    Transmembrane chemoreceptors, also known as methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs), translate extracellular signals into intracellular responses in the bacterial chemotaxis system. MCP ligand binding domains control the activity of the CheA kinase, situated {approx}200 {angstrom} away, across the cytoplasmic membrane. The 2.17 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a Thermotoga maritima soluble receptor (Tm14) reveals distortions in its dimeric four-helix bundle that provide insight into the conformational states available to MCPs for propagating signals. A bulge in one helix generates asymmetry between subunits that displaces the kinase-interacting tip, which resides more than 100 {angstrom} away. The maximum bundle distortion maps to the adaptation region of transmembrane MCPs where reversible methylation of acidic residues tunes receptor activity. Minor alterations in coiled-coil packing geometry translate the bulge distortion to a >25 {angstrom} movement of the tip relative to the bundle stalks. The Tm14 structure discloses how alterations in local helical structure, which could be induced by changes in methylation state and/or by conformational signals from membrane proximal regions, can reposition a remote domain that interacts with the CheA kinase.

  6. Silk secretion from tarantula feet revisited: alleged spigots are probably chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foelix, Rainer F; Rast, Bastian; Peattie, Anne M

    2012-04-01

    Controversial views have been expressed about whether tarantula feet can secrete fine silk threads that could prevent them from falling off smooth vertical surfaces. Two studies have claimed that 'ribbed hairs' on the tarsi of tarantulas produce silk. We examined these ribbed hairs in several tarantula species using light and scanning electron microscopy, and compared them with the silk-producing spigots on the abdominal spinnerets. We found that, morphologically, these ribbed hairs correspond very closely to known chemosensitive hairs in spiders; they have a distinct socket, a bent hair shaft with fine cuticular ridges, an eccentric double lumen within the hair shaft, and a blunt tip with a subterminal pore. Spigots on the spinnerets have a large bulbous base instead of a socket, a long shaft with a scaly surface and a central terminal pore. We never observed any silk threads coming out of these ribbed hairs under the electron microscope. By contrast, silk threads exiting the spigots on the spinnerets were common. Interestingly, ribbed hairs also occur on the spinnerets, often side by side with the silk-producing spigots. Our conclusion is that the ribbed hairs are chemoreceptors, not spigots. Observations of live tarantulas clinging inverted to glass coverslips confirmed that some substance is produced by the ribbed hairs, but it remains unclear whether this secretion is actually silk. In any case, the thousands of adhesive setae on the tarsi of legs and pedipalps almost certainly far outweigh any potential contribution from the sparsely distributed trails secreted by the ribbed hairs.

  7. Bicarbonate-sensitive soluble and transmembrane adenylyl cyclases in peripheral chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Ana R; Holmes, Andrew P S; Sample, Vedangi; Kumar, Prem; Cann, Martin J; Monteiro, Emília C; Zhang, Jin; Gauda, Estelle B

    2013-08-15

    Stimulation of the carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors by hypercapnia triggers a reflex ventilatory response via a cascade of cellular events, which includes generation of cAMP. However, it is not known if molecular CO2/HCO3(-) and/or H(+) mediate this effect and how these molecules contribute to cAMP production. We previously reported that the CB highly expresses HCO3(-)-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). In the present study we systematically characterize the role of sAC in the CB, comparing the effect of isohydric hypercapnia (IH) in cAMP generation through activation of sAC or transmembrane-adenylyl cyclase (tmAC). Pharmacological deactivation of sAC and tmAC decreased the CB cAMP content in normocapnia and IH with no differences between these two conditions. Changes from normocapnia to IH did not effect the degree of PKA activation and the carotid sinus nerve discharge frequency. sAC and tmAC are functional in CB but intracellular elevations in CO2/HCO3(-) in IH conditions on their own are insufficient to further activate these enzymes, suggesting that the hypercapnic response is dependent on secondary acidosis.

  8. Distribution and innervation of putative arterial chemoreceptors in the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Catalina; Fong, Angelina Y; Brink, Dee L; Milsom, William K

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral arterial chemoreceptors have been located previously in the carotid labyrinth, the aortic arch, and the pulmocutaneous artery of frogs. In the present study we used cholera toxin B neuronal tract tracing and immunohistochemical markers for cholinergic cells (vesicular acetylcholine transporter [VAChT]), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and serotonin (5HT) to identify putative O2-sensing cells in Rana catesbeiana. We found potential O2-sensing cells in all three vascular areas innervated by branches of the vagus nerve, whereas only cells in the carotid labyrinth were innervated by the glossopharyngeal nerve. Cells containing either 5HT or TH were found in all three sites, whereas cells containing both neurotransmitters were found only in the carotid labyrinth. Cell bodies containing VAChT were not found at any site. The morphology and innervation of putative O2-sensing cells were similar to those of glomus cells found in other vertebrates. The presence of 5HT- and TH-immunoreactive cells in the aorta, pulmocutaneous artery, and carotid labyrinth appears to reflect a phylogenetic transition between the major neurotransmitter seen in the putative O2-sensing cells of fish (5HT) and those found in the glomus cells of mammals (acetylcholine, adenosine, and catecholamines).

  9. Enzyme-linked acute oxygen sensing in airway and arterial chemoreceptors--invited article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, J Paul; Peers, C

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have speculated as to the molecular basis of O(2) sensing for decades. In more recent years, since the discovery of ion channels as identified effectors for O(2) sensing pathways, research has focussed on possible pathways coupling a reduction in hypoxia to altered ion channel activity. The most extensively studied systems are the K(+) channels which are inhibited by hypoxia in chemoreceptor tissues (carotid and neuroepithelial bodies). In this review, we consider the evidence supporting the involvement of well defined enzymes in mediating the regulation of K(+) channels by hypoxia. Specifically, we focus on the roles proposed for three enzyme systems; NADPH oxidase, heme oxygenase and AMP activated protein kinase. These systems differ in that the former two utilise O(2) directly (to form superoxide in the case of NADPH oxidase, and as a co-factor in the degradation of heme to carbon monoxide, bilirubin and ferrous iron in the case of heme oxygenase), but the third responds to shifts in the AMP:ATP ratio, so responds to changes in O(2) levels more indirectly. We consider the evidence in favour of each of these systems, and highlight their differential importance in different systems and species. Whilst the evidence for each playing an important role in different tissues is strong, there is a clear need for further study, and current awareness indicates that no one specific cell type may rely on a single mechanism for O(2) sensing. PMID:19536463

  10. Inhibition of the pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus reduces genioglossal activity elicited by stimulation of the retrotrapezoid chemoreceptor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Josiane N; Lucena, Elvis V; Silva, Talita M; Damasceno, Rosélia S; Takakura, Ana C; Moreira, Thiago S

    2016-07-22

    The Kölliker-Fuse (KF) region, located in the dorsolateral pons, projects to several brainstem areas involved in respiratory regulation, including the chemoreceptor neurons within the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN). Several lines of evidence indicate that the pontine KF region plays an important role in the control of the upper airways for the maintenance of appropriate airflow to and from the lungs. Specifically, we hypothesized that the KF region is involved in mediating the response of the hypoglossal motor activity to central respiratory chemoreflex activation and to stimulation of the chemoreceptor neurons within the RTN region. To test this hypothesis, we combined immunohistochemistry and physiological experiments. We found that in the KF, the majority of biotinylated dextran amine (BDA)-labeled axonal varicosities contained detectable levels of vesicular glutamate transporter-2 (VGLUT2), but few contained glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD67). The majority of the RTN neurons that were FluorGold (FG)-immunoreactive (i.e., projected to the KF) contained hypercapnia-induced Fos, but did not express tyrosine hydroxylase. In urethane-anesthetized sino-aortic denervated and vagotomized male Wistar rats, hypercapnia (10% CO2) or N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) injection (0.1mM) in the RTN increased diaphragm (DiaEMG) and genioglossus muscle (GGEMG) activities and elicited abdominal (AbdEMG) activity. Bilateral injection of muscimol (GABA-A agonist; 2mM) into the KF region reduced the increase in DiaEMG and GGEMG produced by hypercapnia or NMDA into the RTN. Our data suggest that activation of chemoreceptor neurons in the RTN produces a significant increase in the genioglossus muscle activity and the excitatory pathway is dependent on the neurons located in the dorsolateral pontine KF region. PMID:27126558

  11. Leptin signaling in the nucleus of the solitary tract alters the cardiovascular responses to activation of the chemoreceptor reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriello, John; Moreau, Jason M

    2012-10-01

    Circulating levels of leptin are elevated in individuals suffering from chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). Systemic and central administration of leptin elicits increases in sympathetic nervous activity (SNA), arterial pressure (AP), and heart rate (HR), and it attenuates the baroreceptor reflex, cardiovascular responses that are similar to those observed during CIH as a result of activation of chemoreceptors by the systemic hypoxia. Therefore, experiments were done in anesthetized Wistar rats to investigate the effects of leptin in nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) on AP and HR responses, and renal SNA (RSNA) responses during activation of NTS neurons and the chemoreceptor reflex. Microinjection of leptin (5-100 ng; 20 nl) into caudal NTS pressor sites (l-glutamate; l-Glu; 0.25 M; 10 nl) elicited dose-related increases in AP, HR, and RSNA. Leptin microinjections (5 ng; 20 nl) into these sites potentiated the increase in AP and HR elicited by l-Glu. Additionally, bilateral injections of leptin (5 ng; 100 nl) into NTS potentiated the increase in AP and attenuated the bradycardia to systemic activation of the chemoreflex. In the Zucker obese rat, leptin injections into NTS neither elicited cardiovascular responses nor altered the cardiovascular responses to activation of the chemoreflex. Taken together, these data indicate that leptin exerts a modulatory effect on neuronal circuits within NTS that control cardiovascular responses elicited during the reflex activation of arterial chemoreceptors and suggest that increased AP and SNA observed in individuals with CIH may be due, in part, by leptin's effects on the chemoreflex at the level of NTS.

  12. Distribution and innervation of putative peripheral arterial chemoreceptors in the red-eared slider (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Catalina; Fong, Angelina Y; Milsom, William K

    2015-06-15

    Peripheral arterial chemoreceptors have been isolated to the common carotid artery, aorta, and pulmonary artery of turtles. However, the putative neurotransmitters associated with these chemoreceptors have not yet been described. The goal of the present study was to determine the neurochemical content, innervations, and distribution of putative oxygen-sensing cells in the central vasculature of turtles and to derive homologies with peripheral arterial chemoreceptors of other vertebrates. We used tract tracing together with immunohistochemical markers for cholinergic cells (vesicular acetylcholine transporter [VAChT]), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine synthesis), and serotonin (5HT) to identify putative oxygen-sensing cells and to determine their anatomical relation to branches of the vagus nerve (Xth cranial nerve). We found potential oxygen-sensing cells in all three chemosensory areas innervated by branches of the Xth cranial nerve. Cells containing either 5HT or VAChT were found in all three sites. The morphology and size of these cells resemble glomus cells found in amphibians, mammals, tortoises, and lizards. Furthermore, we found populations of cholinergic cells located at the base of the aorta and pulmonary artery that are likely involved in efferent regulation of vessel resistance. Catecholamine-containing cells were not found in any of the putative chemosensitive areas. The presence of 5HT- and VAChT-immunoreactive cells in segments of the common carotid artery, aorta, and pulmonary artery appears to reflect a transition between cells containing the major neurotransmitters seen in fish (5HT) and mammals (ACh and adenosine).

  13. Candidate chemoreceptor subfamilies differentially expressed in the chemosensory organs of the mollusc Aplysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cummins Scott F

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marine molluscs, as is the case with most aquatic animals, rely heavily on olfactory cues for survival. In the mollusc Aplysia californica, mate-attraction is mediated by a blend of water-borne protein pheromones that are detected by sensory structures called rhinophores. The expression of G protein and phospholipase C signaling molecules in this organ is consistent with chemosensory detection being via a G-protein-coupled signaling mechanism. Results Here we show that novel multi-transmembrane proteins with similarity to rhodopsin G-protein coupled receptors are expressed in sensory epithelia microdissected from the Aplysia rhinophore. Analysis of the A. californica genome reveals that these are part of larger multigene families that possess features found in metazoan chemosensory receptor families (that is, these families chiefly consist of single exon genes that are clustered in the genome. Phylogenetic analyses show that the novel Aplysia G-protein coupled receptor-like proteins represent three distinct monophyletic subfamilies. Representatives of each subfamily are restricted to or differentially expressed in the rhinophore and oral tentacles, suggesting that they encode functional chemoreceptors and that these olfactory organs sense different chemicals. Those expressed in rhinophores may sense water-borne pheromones. Secondary signaling component proteins Gαq, Gαi, and Gαo are also expressed in the rhinophore sensory epithelium. Conclusion The novel rhodopsin G-protein coupled receptor-like gene subfamilies identified here do not have closely related identifiable orthologs in other metazoans, suggesting that they arose by a lineage-specific expansion as has been observed in chemosensory receptor families in other bilaterians. These candidate chemosensory receptors are expressed and often restricted to rhinophores and oral tentacles, lending support to the notion that water-borne chemical detection in Aplysia involves

  14. Extracellular H+ induces Ca2+ signals in respiratory chemoreceptors of zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Sara J; Jonz, Michael G; Perry, Steve F

    2015-02-01

    Neuroepithelial cells (NECs) of the fish gill are respiratory chemoreceptors that detect changes in O2 and CO2/H(+) and are homologous to type I cells of the mammalian carotid body. In zebrafish (Danio rerio), stimulation of NECs by hypoxia or hypercapnia initiates inhibition of K(+) channels and subsequent membrane depolarisation. The goal of the present study was to further elucidate, in zebrafish NECs, the signalling pathways that underlie CO2/H(+) sensing and generate intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) signals. Breathing frequency was elevated maximally in fish exposed to 5 % CO2 (~37.5 mmHg). Measurement of [Ca(2+)]i in isolated NECs using Fura-2 imaging indicated that [Ca(2+)]i increased in response to acidic hypercapnia (5 % CO2, pH 6.6) and isocapnic acidosis (normocapnia, pH 6.6), but not to isohydric hypercapnia (5 % CO2, pH 7.6). Measurement of intracellular pH (pHi) using BCECF demonstrated a rapid decrease in pHi in response to acidic and isohydric hypercapnia, while isocapnic acidosis produced a smaller change in pHi. Intracellular acidification was reduced by the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide, without affecting [Ca(2+)]i responses. Moreover, intracellular acidification using acetate (at constant extracellular pH) was without effect on [Ca(2+)]i. The acid-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i persisted in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) and was unaffected by Ca(2+) channel blockers (Cd(2+), Ni(2+) or nifedipine). The results of this study demonstrate that, unlike type I cells, extracellular H(+) is critical to the hypercapnia-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in NECs. The increase in [Ca(2+)]i occurs independently of pHi and appears to originate primarily from Ca(2+) derived from intracellular stores.

  15. TASK-2 channels contribute to pH sensitivity of retrotrapezoid nucleus chemoreceptor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Benamer, Najate; Zanella, Sébastien; Kumar, Natasha N; Shi, Yingtang; Bévengut, Michelle; Penton, David; Guyenet, Patrice G; Lesage, Florian; Gestreau, Christian; Barhanin, Jacques; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2013-10-01

    Phox2b-expressing glutamatergic neurons of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) display properties expected of central respiratory chemoreceptors; they are directly activated by CO2/H(+) via an unidentified pH-sensitive background K(+) channel and, in turn, facilitate brainstem networks that control breathing. Here, we used a knock-out mouse model to examine whether TASK-2 (K2P5), an alkaline-activated background K(+) channel, contributes to RTN neuronal pH sensitivity. We made patch-clamp recordings in brainstem slices from RTN neurons that were identified by expression of GFP (directed by the Phox2b promoter) or β-galactosidase (from the gene trap used for TASK-2 knock-out). Whereas nearly all RTN cells from control mice were pH sensitive (95%, n = 58 of 61), only 56% of GFP-expressing RTN neurons from TASK-2(-/-) mice (n = 49 of 88) could be classified as pH sensitive (>30% reduction in firing rate from pH 7.0 to pH 7.8); the remaining cells were pH insensitive (44%). Moreover, none of the recorded RTN neurons from TASK-2(-/-) mice selected based on β-galactosidase activity (a subpopulation of GFP-expressing neurons) were pH sensitive. The alkaline-activated background K(+) currents were reduced in amplitude in RTN neurons from TASK-2(-/-) mice that retained some pH sensitivity but were absent from pH-insensitive cells. Finally, using a working heart-brainstem preparation, we found diminished inhibition of phrenic burst amplitude by alkalization in TASK-2(-/-) mice, with apneic threshold shifted to higher pH levels. In conclusion, alkaline-activated TASK-2 channels contribute to pH sensitivity in RTN neurons, with effects on respiration in situ that are particularly prominent near apneic threshold.

  16. KCNQ channels determine serotonergic modulation of ventral surface chemoreceptors and respiratory drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawryluk, Joanna M; Moreira, Thiago S; Takakura, Ana C; Wenker, Ian C; Tzingounis, Anastasios V; Mulkey, Daniel K

    2012-11-21

    Chemosensitive neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) regulate breathing in response to CO(2)/H(+) changes. Their activity is also sensitive to neuromodulatory inputs from multiple respiratory centers, and thus they serve as a key nexus of respiratory control. However, molecular mechanisms that control their activity and susceptibility to neuromodulation are unknown. Here, we show in vitro and in vivo that KCNQ channels are critical determinants of RTN neural activity. In particular, we find that pharmacological block of KCNQ channels (XE991, 10 μm) increased basal activity and CO(2) responsiveness of RTN neurons in rat brain slices, whereas KCNQ channel activation (retigabine, 2-40 μm) silenced these neurons. Interestingly, we also find that KCNQ and apamin-sensitive SK channels act synergistically to regulate firing rate of RTN chemoreceptors; simultaneous blockade of both channels led to a increase in CO(2) responsiveness. Furthermore, we also show that KCNQ channels but not SK channels are downstream effectors of serotonin modulation of RTN activity in vitro. In contrast, inhibition of KCNQ channel did not prevent modulation of RTN activity by Substance P or thyrotropin-releasing hormone, previously identified neuromodulators of RTN chemoreception. Importantly, we also show that KCNQ channels are critical for RTN activity in vivo. Inhibition of KCNQ channels lowered the CO(2) threshold for phrenic nerve discharge in anesthetized rats and decreased the ventilatory response to serotonin in awake and anesthetized animals. Given that serotonergic dysfunction may contribute to respiratory failure, our findings suggest KCNQ channels as a new therapeutic avenue for respiratory complications associated with multiple neurological disorders.

  17. Branchial O(2) chemoreceptors in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus: Control of cardiorespiratory function in response to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeraik, Vivian M; Belão, Thiago C; Florindo, Luiz Henrique; Kalinin, Ana L; Rantin, F Tadeu

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the distribution and orientation of gill O(2) chemoreceptors in Oreochromis niloticus and their role in cardiorespiratory responses to graded hypoxia. Intact fish, and a group with the first gill arch excised (operated), were submitted to graded hypoxia and their cardiorespiratory responses (oxygen uptake - V˙O(2) , breathing frequency - fR, ventilatory stroke volume - VT, gill ventilation - V˙G, O(2) extraction from the ventilatory current - EO(2) , and heart rate - fH) were compared. Their responses to bolus injections of NaCN into the bloodstream (internal) or ventilatory water stream (external) were also determined. The V˙O(2) of operated fish was significantly lower at the deepest levels of hypoxia. Neither reflex bradycardia nor ventilatory responses were completely abolished by bilateral excision of the first gill arch. EO(2) of the operated group was consistently lower than the intact group. The responses to internal and external NaCN included transient decreases in fH and increases in fR and Vamp (ventilation amplitude). These cardiorespiratory responses were attenuated but not abolished in the operated group, indicating that chemoreceptors are not restricted to the first gill arch, and are sensitive to oxygen levels in both blood and water.

  18. Rho participates in chemoreceptor-induced changes in morphology to hair bundle mechanoreceptors of the sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire, Kathryn M; Watson, Glen M

    2013-06-01

    Adjustable hair bundle mechanoreceptors located on anemone tentacles detect movements of nearby, swimming prey. The hair bundles are formed by numerous actin-based stereocilia that converge onto a single, central kinocilium. Interestingly, morphological and functional changes to the hair bundles are induced by activating chemoreceptors that bind prey-derived N-acetylated sugars and proline, respectively. Morphological changes to the hair bundles involve alterations to the actin cytoskeleton of stereocilia. A pharmacological activation of Rho induces hair bundles to elongate to lengths comparable to those normally induced by exposure to N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) and prevents shortening of hair bundles normally induced by proline. Rho inhibition prevents NANA-induced elongation, but does not prevent proline-induced shortening of hair bundles. Western blots feature a band similar in mass to that predicted for a Rho homolog in the genome of Nematostella. Immunocytochemistry localizes Rho in stereocilia of the hair bundle. Anemone hair bundles arise from multicellular complexes. Data from experiments using heptanol, a gap junction uncoupler, indicate that cell-cell communication is required in order for activated chemoreceptors to induce morphological changes to the hair bundles.

  19. A mechanism for the polarity formation of chemoreceptors at the growth cone membrane for gradient amplification during directional sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Bouzigues

    Full Text Available Accurate response to external directional signals is essential for many physiological functions such as chemotaxis or axonal guidance. It relies on the detection and amplification of gradients of chemical cues, which, in eukaryotic cells, involves the asymmetric relocalization of signaling molecules. How molecular events coordinate to induce a polarity at the cell level remains however poorly understood, particularly for nerve chemotaxis. Here, we propose a model, inspired by single-molecule experiments, for the membrane dynamics of GABA chemoreceptors in nerve growth cones (GCs during directional sensing. In our model, transient interactions between the receptors and the microtubules, coupled to GABA-induced signaling, provide a positive-feedback loop that leads to redistribution of the receptors towards the gradient source. Using numerical simulations with parameters derived from experiments, we find that the kinetics of polarization and the steady-state polarized distribution of GABA receptors are in remarkable agreement with experimental observations. Furthermore, we make predictions on the properties of the GC seen as a sensing, amplification and filtering module. In particular, the growth cone acts as a low-pass filter with a time constant approximately 10 minutes determined by the Brownian diffusion of chemoreceptors in the membrane. This filtering makes the gradient amplification resistant to rapid fluctuations of the external signals, a beneficial feature to enhance the accuracy of neuronal wiring. Since the model is based on minimal assumptions on the receptor/cytoskeleton interactions, its validity extends to polarity formation beyond the case of GABA gradient sensing. Altogether, it constitutes an original positive-feedback mechanism by which cells can dynamically adapt their internal organization to external signals.

  20. Tetrodotoxin as a Tool to Elucidate Sensory Transduction Mechanisms: The Case for the Arterial Chemoreceptors of the Carotid Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constancio Gonzalez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Carotid bodies (CBs are secondary sensory receptors in which the sensing elements, chemoreceptor cells, are activated by decreases in arterial PO2 (hypoxic hypoxia. Upon activation, chemoreceptor cells (also known as Type I and glomus cells increase their rate of release of neurotransmitters that drive the sensory activity in the carotid sinus nerve (CSN which ends in the brain stem where reflex responses are coordinated. When challenged with hypoxic hypoxia, the physiopathologically most relevant stimulus to the CBs, they are activated and initiate ventilatory and cardiocirculatory reflexes. Reflex increase in minute volume ventilation promotes CO2 removal from alveoli and a decrease in alveolar PCO2 ensues. Reduced alveolar PCO2 makes possible alveolar and arterial PO2 to increase minimizing the intensity of hypoxia. The ventilatory effect, in conjunction the cardiocirculatory components of the CB chemoreflex, tend to maintain an adequate supply of oxygen to the tissues. The CB has been the focus of attention since the discovery of its nature as a sensory organ by de Castro (1928 and the discovery of its function as the origin of ventilatory reflexes by Heymans group (1930. A great deal of effort has been focused on the study of the mechanisms involved in O2 detection. This review is devoted to this topic, mechanisms of oxygen sensing. Starting from a summary of the main theories evolving through the years, we will emphasize the nature and significance of the findings obtained with veratridine and tetrodotoxin (TTX in the genesis of current models of O2-sensing.

  1. Chemotaxis to the Quorum-Sensing Signal AI-2 Requires the Tsr Chemoreceptor and the Periplasmic LsrB AI-2-Binding Protein▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hegde, Manjunath; Englert, Derek L.; Schrock, Shanna; Cohn, William B.; Vogt, Christian; Wood, Thomas K.; Manson, Michael D.; Jayaraman, Arul

    2010-01-01

    AI-2 is an autoinducer made by many bacteria. LsrB binds AI-2 in the periplasm, and Tsr is the l-serine chemoreceptor. We show that AI-2 strongly attracts Escherichia coli. Both LsrB and Tsr are necessary for sensing AI-2, but AI-2 uptake is not, suggesting that LsrB and Tsr interact directly in the periplasm.

  2. Genetic tracing of the gustatory and trigeminal neural pathways originating from T1R3-expressing taste receptor cells and solitary chemoreceptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmoto, Makoto; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Yasuoka, Akihito; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro; Abe, Keiko

    2008-08-01

    We established transgenic mouse lines expressing a transneuronal tracer, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), under the control of mouse T1R3 gene promoter/enhancer. In the taste buds, WGA transgene was faithfully expressed in T1R3-positive sweet/umami taste receptor cells. WGA protein was transferred not laterally to the synapse-bearing, sour-responsive type III cells in the taste buds but directly to a subset of neurons in the geniculate and nodose/petrosal ganglia, and further conveyed to a rostro-central region of the nucleus of solitary tract. In addition, WGA was expressed in solitary chemoreceptor cells in the nasal epithelium and transferred along the trigeminal sensory pathway to the brainstem neurons. The solitary chemoreceptor cells endogenously expressed T1R3 together with bitter taste receptors T2Rs. This result shows an exceptional signature of receptor expression. Thus, the t1r3-WGA transgenic mice revealed the sweet/umami gustatory pathways from taste receptor cells and the trigeminal neural pathway from solitary chemoreceptor cells.

  3. Expression, refolding, purification and crystallization of the sensory domain of the TlpC chemoreceptor from Helicobacter pylori for structural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu Chih; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections are associated with gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma. Bacterial chemotaxis, mediated by four different chemoreceptors (also termed transducer-like proteins (Tlp)), plays an important role in initial colonization and development of disease. Chemoreceptor sensory domains of H. pylori share no significant sequence similarity with those of Escherichia coli or any other non-Epsilonproteobacteria. The structural basis of how chemical signals are recognized by chemoreceptors of H. pylori is poorly understood mainly due to the lack of a robust procedure to purify their sensory domains in a soluble form. This study reports a method for extraction of the periplasmic sensory domain of transducer-like protein C (TlpC) from inclusion bodies and refolding to yield 5mg pure crystallizable protein per 1l of bacterial culture. Purified protein was monomeric in solution by size-exclusion chromatography and folded according to the circular dichroism spectrum. Crystals have been grown by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method using PEG 4000 as a precipitating agent. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a=189.3, b=103.2, c=61.8Å, β=98.3. A complete X-ray diffraction data set has been collected to 2.2 Å resolution using cryocooling conditions and synchrotron radiation. Self-rotation function and Matthews coefficient calculations suggest that the asymmetric unit contains three monomers.

  4. Chemoreceptor Sensitivity ‘in Women Mountaineering Trainees of Different Altitudes Inducted by Trekking to 4350 m

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bhaumik

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted on women mountaineering trainees to evaluate the hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses, and the precise nature of changes in the sensitivity of chemoreceptors on induction by trekking to 4350 m. Two groups of women belonging to different ethnic origins and residents of different altitudes, ie, moderate-altitude women (MAWMongolians and low-altitude women (LAW-Caucasians were the subjects in this study. Tests of sensitivity to hypoxia and hypercapnia were carried out initially at 2100 m, then during 4 to7 days of sojourn at 4350 m following induction by trekking, and re-tested on return to 2 100 m. The results indicate that there is a significant difference (P c 0.05 of hypoxic ventilatory response in women of two different ethnic groups: Both hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses increased significantly (P < 0.05 on induction to high altitude. On descent, hypoxic values reverted back to pre-induction levels, whereas hypercapnic ventilatory response showed relatively higher values (P < 0.05.

  5. Systemic administration of leptin potentiates the response of neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract to chemoreceptor activation in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriello, J; Moreau, J M

    2013-01-15

    Leptin microinjections into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) have been shown to elicit sympathoexcitatory responses, and potentiate the cardiovascular responses to activation of the chemoreflex. In this study, experiments were done in Sprague-Dawley rats initially to provide a detailed mapping within the NTS complex of cells containing immunoreactivity to the long form of the leptin receptor (Ob-Rb). In a second series, this NTS region containing Ob-Rb immunoreactive cells was explored for single units antidromically activated by stimulation of pressor sites in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). These antidromically identified neurons were then tested for their response to intra-carotid injections of leptin (50-100 ng/0.1 ml), and to activation of peripheral chemoreceptors following an injection of potassium cyanide (KCN) (80 μg/0.1 ml) into the carotid artery. Cells containing Ob-Rb-like immunoreactivity were found predominantly in the caudal NTS: within the medial, commissural and gelatinous (sub-postremal area) subnuclei of the NTS complex. Of 73 single units tested in these NTS regions, 48 were antidromically activated by stimulation of RVLM pressor sites and 25 of these single units responded with an increase in discharge rate after intra-carotid injections of leptin. In addition, 17 of these leptin responsive neurons were excited by the intra-carotid injections of KCN (80 μg/0.1 ml). Furthermore, the excitatory response of these single units to KCN was potentiated (59-83%) immediately following the leptin injection. These data indicate that leptin responsive neurons in NTS mediate chemoreceptor afferent information to pressor sites in the RVLM, and suggest that leptin may act as a facilitator on neuronal circuits within the NTS that potentiates the sympathoexcitatory responses elicited during the reflex activation of arterial chemoreceptors.

  6. Cell-Autonomous and Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of a Feeding State-Dependent Chemoreceptor Gene via MEF-2 and bHLH Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winbush, Ari; van der Linden, Alexander M.

    2016-01-01

    Food and feeding-state dependent changes in chemoreceptor gene expression may allow Caenorhabditis elegans to modify their chemosensory behavior, but the mechanisms essential for these expression changes remain poorly characterized. We had previously shown that expression of a feeding state-dependent chemoreceptor gene, srh-234, in the ADL sensory neuron of C. elegans is regulated via the MEF-2 transcription factor. Here, we show that MEF-2 acts together with basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors to regulate srh-234 expression as a function of feeding state. We identify a cis-regulatory MEF2 binding site that is necessary and sufficient for the starvation-induced down regulation of srh-234 expression, while an E-box site known to bind bHLH factors is required to drive srh-234 expression in ADL. We show that HLH-2 (E/Daughterless), HLH-3 and HLH-4 (Achaete-scute homologs) act in ADL neurons to regulate srh-234 expression. We further demonstrate that the expression levels of srh-234 in ADL neurons are regulated remotely by MXL-3 (Max-like 3 homolog) and HLH-30 (TFEB ortholog) acting in the intestine, which is dependent on insulin signaling functioning specifically in ADL neurons. We also show that this intestine-to-neuron feeding-state regulation of srh-234 involves a subset of insulin-like peptides. These results combined suggest that chemoreceptor gene expression is regulated by both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous transcriptional mechanisms mediated by MEF2 and bHLH factors, which may allow animals to fine-tune their chemosensory responses in response to changes in their feeding state. PMID:27487365

  7. Effects of exogenous hydrogen sulphide on calcium signalling, background (TASK) K channel activity and mitochondrial function in chemoreceptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckler, Keith J

    2012-04-01

    It has been proposed that endogenous H(2)S mediates oxygen sensing in chemoreceptors; this study investigates the mechanisms by which H(2)S excites carotid body type 1 cells. H(2)S caused a rapid reversible increase in intracellular calcium with EC(50) ≈ 6 μM. This [Ca(2+)](i) response was abolished in Ca-free Tyrode. In perforated patch current clamp recordings, H(2)S depolarised type 1 cells from -59 to -35 mV; this was accompanied by a robust increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Voltage clamping at the resting membrane potential abolished the H(2)S-induced rise in [Ca(2+)](i). H(2)S inhibited background K(+) current in whole cell perforated patch and reduced background K(+) channel activity in cell-attached patch recordings. It is concluded that H(2)S excites type 1 cells through the inhibition of background (TASK) potassium channels leading to membrane depolarisation and voltage-gated Ca(2+) entry. These effects mimic those of hypoxia. H(2)S also inhibited mitochondrial function over a similar concentration range as assessed by NADH autofluorescence and measurement of intracellular magnesium (an index of decline in MgATP). Cyanide inhibited background K channels to a similar extent to H(2)S and prevented H(2)S exerting any further influence over channel activity. These data indicate that the effects of H(2)S on background K channels are a consequence of inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. Whilst this does not preclude a role for endogenous H(2)S in oxygen sensing via the inhibition of cytochrome oxidase, the levels of H(2)S required raise questions as to the viability of such a mechanism.

  8. Crystallization and crystallographic analysis of the ligand-binding domain of the Pseudomonas putida chemoreceptor McpS in complex with malate and succinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallization of the ligand-binding domain of the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein chemoreceptor McpS (McpS-LBD) is reported. Methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) are transmembrane proteins that sense changes in environmental signals, generating a chemotactic response and regulating other cellular processes. MCPs are composed of two main domains: a ligand-binding domain (LBD) and a cytosolic signalling domain (CSD). Here, the crystallization of the LBD of the chemoreceptor McpS (McpS-LBD) is reported. McpS-LBD is responsible for sensing most of the TCA-cycle intermediates in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440. McpS-LBD was expressed, purified and crystallized in complex with two of its natural ligands (malate and succinate). Crystals were obtained by both the counter-diffusion and the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion techniques after pre-incubation of McpS-LBD with the ligands. The crystals were isomorphous and belonged to space group C2, with two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected at the ESRF synchrotron X-ray source to resolutions of 1.8 and 1.9 Å for the malate and succinate complexes, respectively

  9. 细菌化学趋向性受体聚集体的相互作用%Molecular Interactions of Bacterial Chemoreceptor Assemblies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余大启; 涂豫海; 来鲁华

    2014-01-01

    细菌化学趋向性受体的最小结构单元为二聚体,在细胞膜上这些二聚体会聚集成大团簇.X射线晶体结构和低分辨电镜结构测定表明,这些团簇有两类不同的形式,一种是在晶体结构中观察到的倒金字塔式二聚体的三聚体重复形成的聚集,另一种为由二聚体尾部相互盘绕形成的拉链状聚集.有关拉链状聚集的详细分子模型目前尚不清楚.本文使用蛋白质-蛋白质对接的方法研究了大肠杆菌丝氨酸化学趋向性受体Tsr二聚体之间的相互作用.分子对接计算表明,倒金字塔式聚集和拉链状聚集的基本复合物都是可以出现的,相应复合物的分子动力学模拟表明这些结构都具有一定的稳定性.对于所获得的拉链状聚集体的基本复合物结构模型进行了详细的二聚体作用界面分析,发现二聚体间主要通过静电和疏水作用形成复合物,其中Arg388、Phe373和Ile377是形成拉链状聚集的关键作用残基.所建立的Tsr拉链状聚集的结构模型有助于揭示细菌化学趋向性受体在细胞膜上聚集的分子机制,为进一步的聚集理论及模拟研究提供了基础.%Bacterial chemoreceptors form homodimers that assemble into large clusters on cellmembranes to respond to external signals. These clusters have been found to have two different types of patterns:one is composed of inverted pyramid like trimers-of-dimers observed in the X-ray crystal structures, and the other is formed by the zipper like overlap of tips of dimers, as revealed by low-resolution electron microscopy. The detailed molecular model of the zipper like assemblies has remained unknown until now. Using protein-protein docking method, we studied the interactions between serine chemoreceptor Tsr dimers in Escherichia coli. The basic complexes for the two types of clustering patterns were both found in the docking complexes. Molecular dynamics simulations confirmed that these

  10. Observation on the head and chemoreceptors of Maruca vitrata(Lepidoptera:Crambidae)larvae%豇豆荚螟幼虫头部形态及化学感受器观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王攀; 郑霞林; 雷朝亮; 王小平

    2011-01-01

    [目的]了解豇豆英螟(Maruca vitrata)幼虫头部感受器的形态、数量和分布,为探讨其功能和感应机制提供依据.[方法]利用扫描电镜对豇豆英螟5龄幼虫的头部以及触角和口器上的化学感受器进行扫描观察并描述.[结果]豇豆英螟幼虫的头式为下口式;头上具有单眼、触角、感觉刚毛、上唇、上颚、下颚、下唇、吐丝器;幼虫的触角上存在检形、锥形和毛形3种感受器;口器附肢下颚须上有8个锥形感受器;下唇须在第2、3节上各着生有1个锥形感受器.[结论]豇豆英螟幼虫头部共有4种类型的感受器:毛形感受器(Str)、锥形感受器(Sb)、小锥形感受器(Sbs)和栓形感受器(Ss),各自担负着不同的功能.%[Objective]The morphology, amount and distribution of chemoreceptors on the head of Maruca vitrata (Fabricius) were observed, which will provide a basis for its functional and mechanical research.[Method]The chemoreceptors on antennae and mouthparts of the 5th instar larvae of M.vitrata were observed with scanning electron microscopy.[Result]The head structure type of the larvae was hypognathous.Three kinds of chemoreceptors were found on antennae of the larvae, namely sensilla styloconicum, sensilla basiconica and sensilla trichodea.The mouthparts bears plenty of hemoreceptors, especially on gelea and maxillary palpus of maxilla.The maxillary palpus of mouthparts appendages had eight kinds of sensilla basiconica, and one kind of sensilla basiconica was also observed on the second and third segments of labial palpus respectively.[Conclusion]There are four types of chemoreceptors on the head of M.vitrata larvae, named sensilla trichodea, sensilla basiconica, small sensilla basiconica and sensilla styloconicum with different functions.

  11. Increase in cytosolic Ca2+ produced by hypoxia and other depolarizing stimuli activates a non-selective cation channel in chemoreceptor cells of rat carotid body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dawon; Wang, Jiaju; Hogan, James O; Vennekens, Rudi; Freichel, Marc; White, Carl; Kim, Donghee

    2014-05-01

    The current model of O2 sensing by carotid body chemoreceptor (glomus) cells is that hypoxia inhibits the outward K(+) current and causes cell depolarization, Ca(2+) influx via voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels and a rise in intracellular [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)]i). Here we show that hypoxia (<5% O2), in addition to inhibiting the two-pore domain K(+) channels TASK-1/3 (TASK), indirectly activates an ∼20 pS channel in isolated glomus cells. The 20 pS channel was permeable to K(+), Na(+) and Cs(+) but not to Cl(-) or Ca(2+). The 20 pS channel was not sensitive to voltage. Inhibition of TASK by external acid, depolarization of glomus cells with high external KCl (20 mm) or opening of the Ca(2+) channel with FPL64176 activated the 20 pS channel when 1 mm Ca(2+) was present in the external solution. Ca(2+) (10 μm) applied to the cytosolic side of inside-out patches activated the 20 pS channel. The threshold [Ca(2+)]i for activation of the 20 pS channel in cell-attached patches was ∼200 nm. The reversal potential of the 20 pS channel was estimated to be -28 mV. Our results reveal a sequential mechanism in which hypoxia (<5% O2) first inhibits the K(+) conductance and then activates a Na(+)-permeable, non-selective cation channel via depolarization-induced rise in [Ca(2+)]i. Our results suggest that inhibition of K(+) efflux and stimulation of Na(+) influx both contribute to the depolarization of glomus cells during moderate to severe hypoxia.

  12. Sensitivity to chemical stimuli plays a fundamental role in the food preferences. Examples in the evolutionary scale: 1. Role of the walking leg chemoreceptors in the red swamp crayfish Procambarus Clarkii 2. PROP bitter taste sensitivity and its nutritional implications in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Melis, Melania

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, we studied two examples of the sensitivity to chemical stimuli and its role in the food preferences in two models of the evolutionary scale. The red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard, 1852) (Crustacea: Decapoda) is an invasive species of freshwater habitats that has spread worldwide. In crayfish, like in other decapod crustaceans, reception of chemical cues occurs by way of peripheral chemoreceptors grouped within sensory hairs and typically located on the cuticle ...

  13. Effect of acid sensing ion channels on respiratory regulation by central chemoreceptors%酸敏感离子通道在中枢化学感受器呼吸调节中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽; 刘文彦; 高波

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨脑室内注射酸化人工脑脊液(artificialcerebrospinalfluid,aCSF)引起的呼吸效应及酸敏感离子通道( acid sensing ion channels , ASICs )在此过程中的作用。方法:健康成年SD大鼠30只,随机分为aCSF(pH 7.4)对照组、aCSF(pH 6.5)组、ASICs阻断剂阿米洛利(amiloride)对照组、amiloride+aCSF(pH 6.5)组、ASIC1a阻断剂psalmotoxin 1(PcTx1)对照组及PcTx1+aCSF(pH 6.5)组。通过膈肌肌电记录脑室内注射酸化aCSF后呼吸的变化;通过脑室内先注射阿米洛利和PcTx1再注射酸化aCSF的方法,观察酸敏感离子通道在中枢化学感受器呼吸调节中的作用。结果:脑室内注射酸化aCSF后,呼吸较注射前明显兴奋(P<0.05);脑室内注射阿米洛利能完全阻断脑室内注射酸化aCSF引起的呼吸兴奋;脑室内注射PcTx1能部分阻断脑室内注射酸化aCSF引起的呼吸兴奋。结论:ASICs是参与中枢化学感受器呼吸调节的关键离子通道,ASIC1a则发挥了部分作用。%[ABSTRACT]AIM:Toinvestigatetheeffectofintracerebroventricular(icv)injectionofacidulatedartificialce-rebrospinal fluid ( aCSF ) on the respiratory reactions and the functions of acid sensing ion channels ( ASICs ) in this process.METHODS:Healthy adult SD rats (n=30) were divided into aCSF with pH 7.4 control group, aCSF with pH 6.5 group, amiloride control group, amiloride plus aCSF with pH 6.5 group, psalmotoxin 1 (PcTx1) control group and PcTx1 plus aCSF with pH 6.5 group.The electromyogram (EMG) of the diaphragm was monitored to observe the respirato-ry responses induced by icv injection of acidulated aCSF .The ASICs blockers were also injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle firstly and acidulated aCSF was injected following the ASICs blockers to observe the effect of ASICs on the respira -tory regulation by the central chemoreceptor .RESULTS:After icv injection of acidulated aCSF , the

  14. Adaptation dynamics in densely clustered chemoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Pontius

    Full Text Available In many sensory systems, transmembrane receptors are spatially organized in large clusters. Such arrangement may facilitate signal amplification and the integration of multiple stimuli. However, this organization likely also affects the kinetics of signaling since the cytoplasmic enzymes that modulate the activity of the receptors must localize to the cluster prior to receptor modification. Here we examine how these spatial considerations shape signaling dynamics at rest and in response to stimuli. As a model system, we use the chemotaxis pathway of Escherichia coli, a canonical system for the study of how organisms sense, respond, and adapt to environmental stimuli. In bacterial chemotaxis, adaptation is mediated by two enzymes that localize to the clustered receptors and modulate their activity through methylation-demethylation. Using a novel stochastic simulation, we show that distributive receptor methylation is necessary for successful adaptation to stimulus and also leads to large fluctuations in receptor activity in the steady state. These fluctuations arise from noise in the number of localized enzymes combined with saturated modification kinetics between the localized enzymes and the receptor substrate. An analytical model explains how saturated enzyme kinetics and large fluctuations can coexist with an adapted state robust to variation in the expression levels of the pathway constituents, a key requirement to ensure the functionality of individual cells within a population. This contrasts with the well-mixed covalent modification system studied by Goldbeter and Koshland in which mean activity becomes ultrasensitive to protein abundances when the enzymes operate at saturation. Large fluctuations in receptor activity have been quantified experimentally and may benefit the cell by enhancing its ability to explore empty environments and track shallow nutrient gradients. Here we clarify the mechanistic relationship of these large fluctuations to well-studied aspects of the chemotaxis system, precise adaptation and functional robustness.

  15. Adaptation dynamics in densely clustered chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontius, William; Sneddon, Michael W; Emonet, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    In many sensory systems, transmembrane receptors are spatially organized in large clusters. Such arrangement may facilitate signal amplification and the integration of multiple stimuli. However, this organization likely also affects the kinetics of signaling since the cytoplasmic enzymes that modulate the activity of the receptors must localize to the cluster prior to receptor modification. Here we examine how these spatial considerations shape signaling dynamics at rest and in response to stimuli. As a model system, we use the chemotaxis pathway of Escherichia coli, a canonical system for the study of how organisms sense, respond, and adapt to environmental stimuli. In bacterial chemotaxis, adaptation is mediated by two enzymes that localize to the clustered receptors and modulate their activity through methylation-demethylation. Using a novel stochastic simulation, we show that distributive receptor methylation is necessary for successful adaptation to stimulus and also leads to large fluctuations in receptor activity in the steady state. These fluctuations arise from noise in the number of localized enzymes combined with saturated modification kinetics between the localized enzymes and the receptor substrate. An analytical model explains how saturated enzyme kinetics and large fluctuations can coexist with an adapted state robust to variation in the expression levels of the pathway constituents, a key requirement to ensure the functionality of individual cells within a population. This contrasts with the well-mixed covalent modification system studied by Goldbeter and Koshland in which mean activity becomes ultrasensitive to protein abundances when the enzymes operate at saturation. Large fluctuations in receptor activity have been quantified experimentally and may benefit the cell by enhancing its ability to explore empty environments and track shallow nutrient gradients. Here we clarify the mechanistic relationship of these large fluctuations to well-studied aspects of the chemotaxis system, precise adaptation and functional robustness.

  16. Signal processing at mammalian carotid body chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurse, Colin A; Piskuric, Nikol A

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian carotid bodies are richly vascularized chemosensory organs that sense blood levels of O(2), CO(2)/H(+), and glucose and maintain homeostatic regulation of these levels via the reflex control of ventilation. Carotid bodies consist of innervated clusters of type I (or glomus) cells in intimate association with glial-like type II cells. Carotid bodies make afferent connections with fibers from sensory neurons in the petrosal ganglia and receive efferent inhibitory innervation from parasympathetic neurons located in the carotid sinus and glossopharyngeal nerves. There are synapses between type I (chemosensory) cells and petrosal afferent terminals, as well as between neighboring type I cells. There is a broad array of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and their ionotropic and metabotropic receptors in the carotid body. This allows for complex processing of sensory stimuli (e.g., hypoxia and acid hypercapnia) involving both autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. This review summarizes and evaluates current knowledge of these pathways and presents an integrated working model on information processing in carotid bodies. Included in this model is a novel hypothesis for a potential role of type II cells as an amplifier for the release of a key excitatory carotid body neurotransmitter, ATP, via P2Y purinoceptors and pannexin-1 channels.

  17. Characterisation of putative oxygen chemoreceptors in bowfin (Amia calva).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteus, Cosima S; Wright, Patricia A; Milsom, William K

    2014-04-15

    Serotonin containing neuroepithelial cells (NECs) are putative oxygen sensing cells found in different locations within the gills of fish. In this study we wished to determine the effect of sustained internal (blood) hypoxaemia versus external (aquatic) hypoxia on the size and density of NECs in the first gill arch of bowfin (Amia calva), a facultative air breather. We identified five different populations of serotonergic NECs in this species (Types I-V) based on location, presence of synaptic vesicles (SV) that stain for the antibody SV2, innervation and labelling with the neural crest marker HNK-1. Cell Types I-III were innervated, and these cells, which participate in central O2 chemoreflexes, were studied further. Although there was no change in the density of any cell type in bowfin after exposure to sustained hypoxia (6.0 kPa for 7 days) without access to air, all three of these cell types increased in size. In contrast, only Type II and III cells increased in size in bowfin exposed to sustained hypoxia with access to air. These data support the suggestion that NECs are putative oxygen-sensing cells, that they occur in several locations, and that Type I cells monitor only hypoxaemia, whereas both other cell types monitor hypoxia and hypoxaemia.

  18. Functional gustatory role of chemoreceptors in drosophila wings

    OpenAIRE

    Raad, Hussein; Ferveur, Jean-François; Ledger, Neil; Capovilla, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Neuroanatomical evidence argues for the presence of taste sensilla in Drosophila wings; however, the taste physiology of insect wings remains hypothetical, and a comprehensive link to mechanical functions, such as flight, wing flapping, and grooming, is lacking. Our data show that the sensilla of the Drosophila anterior wing margin respond to both sweet and bitter molecules through an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ levels. Conversely, genetically modified flies presenting a wing-specific reductio...

  19. Tasting Arterial Blood: What do the Carotid Chemoreceptors Sense?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanduri R. Prabakhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The carotid bodies are sensory organs that detect the chemical composition of the arterial blood. The carotid body sensory activity increases in response to arterial hypoxemia and the ensuing chemoreflex regulates vital homeostatic functions. Recent studies suggest that the carotid bodies might also sense arterial blood glucose and circulating insulin levels. This review focuses on how the carotid bodies sense O2, glucose and insulin and some potential implications of these sensory functions on physiological regulation and in pathophysiological conditions. Emerging evidence suggests that carbon monoxide (CO-regulated hydrogen sulfide (H2S, stemming from hypoxia, depolarizes type I cells by inhibiting certain K+ channels, facilitates voltage-gated Ca2+ influx leading to sensory excitation of the carotid body. Elevated CO and decreased H2S renders the carotid bodies insensitive to hypoxia resulting in attenuated ventilatory adaptations to high altitude hypoxia, whereas reduced CO and high H2S result in hypersensitivity of the carotid bodies to hypoxia and hypertension. Acute hypoglycemia augments the carotid body responses to hypoxia but that a prolonged lack of glucose in the carotid bodies can lead to a failure to sense hypoxia. Emerging evidence also indicates that carotid bodies might sense insulin directly independent of its effect on glucose, linking the carotid bodies to the pathophysiological consequences of the metabolic syndrome. How glucose and insulin interact with the CO-H2S signalling is an area of ongoing study.KEY WORDS: Glomus cells, K+ channels, Carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide, hypoglycemia, diabetes.

  20. A novel naphthalene-based receptor: Colorimetric and fluorescent PET chemoreceptor for anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Weiwei; Su Hongyan; Yao Sikai; Yang Zhongyue [Department of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Lin Hai [Key Laboratory of Functional Polymer Materials of Ministry of Education, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Lin Huakuan, E-mail: hklin@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2011-09-15

    A novel artificial anion receptor based on phenylhydrazone structure was designed, synthesized and characterized. The binding behavior of the receptor to various anions was investigated by UV-vis fluorescence analyses. In addition, {sup 1}H NMR experiments were carried out to explore the nature of interaction between receptor 1 and acetate. The processes of sensing can literally be seen through the 'naked-eye' for the sharp color changes from yellow to purple. - Highlights: > The synthesis process of receptor 1 (1-hydroxynaphthalene-2-carbaldehyde-4'-nitrophenylhydrazone) is simple and easy. Thus, it made practical use of receptor 1 possible. > Receptor 1 displays distinct color changes from yellow to purple, which could be observed by the naked eye. In addition, the sensing process is fast and efficient. > Receptor 1 can recognize acetates which is of great importance since acetates are important biological molecules.

  1. Evolutionary genomics reveals conserved structural determinants of signaling and adaptation in microbial chemoreceptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Roger P [ORNL; Jouline, Igor B [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    As an important model for transmembrane signaling, methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) have been extensively studied by using genetic, biochemical, and structural techniques. However, details of the molecular mechanism of signaling are still not well understood. The availability of genomic information for hundreds of species enables the identification of features in protein sequences that are conserved over long evolutionary distances and thus are critically important for function. We carried out a large-scale comparative genomic analysis of the MCP signaling and adaptation domain family and identified features that appear to be critical for receptor structure and function. Based on domain length and sequence conservation, we identified seven major MCP classes and three distinct structural regions within the cytoplasmic domain: signaling, methylation, and flexible bundle subdomains. The flexible bundle subdomain, not previously recognized in MCPs, is a conserved element that appears to be important for signal transduction. Remarkably, the N- and C-terminal helical arms of the cytoplasmic domain maintain symmetry in length and register despite dramatic variation, from 24 to 64 7-aa heptads in overall domain length. Loss of symmetry is observed in some MCPs, where it is concomitant with specific changes in the sensory module. Each major MCP class has a distinct pattern of predicted methylation sites that is well supported by experimental data. Our findings indicate that signaling and adaptation functions within the MCP cytoplasmic domain are tightly coupled, and that their coevolution has contributed to the significant diversity in chemotaxis mechanisms among different organisms.

  2. Acute oxygen sensing: diverse but convergent mechanisms in airway and arterial chemoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peers Chris

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Airway neuroepithelial bodies sense changes in inspired O2, whereas arterial O2 levels are monitored primarily by the carotid body. Both respond to hypoxia by initiating corrective cardiorespiratory reflexes, thereby optimising gas exchange in the face of a potentially deleterious O2 supply. One unifying theme underpinning chemotransduction in these tissues is K+ channel inhibition. However, the transduction components, from O2 sensor to K+ channel, display considerable tissue specificity yet result in analogous end points. Here we highlight how emerging data are contributing to a more complete understanding of O2 chemosensing at the molecular level.

  3. Interindividual variability in the dose-specific effect of dopamine on carotid chemoreceptor sensitivity to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberg, Jacqueline K; Johnson, Blair D; Holbein, Walter W; Ranadive, Sushant M; Mozer, Michael T; Joyner, Michael J

    2016-01-15

    Human studies use varying levels of low-dose (1-4 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) dopamine to examine peripheral chemosensitivity, based on its known ability to blunt carotid body responsiveness to hypoxia. However, the effect of dopamine on the ventilatory responses to hypoxia is highly variable between individuals. Thus we sought to determine 1) the dose response relationship between dopamine and peripheral chemosensitivity as assessed by the ventilatory response to hypoxia in a cohort of healthy adults, and 2) potential confounding cardiovascular responses at variable low doses of dopamine. Young, healthy adults (n = 30, age = 32 ± 1, 24 male/6 female) were given intravenous (iv) saline and a range of iv dopamine doses (1-4 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) prior to and throughout five hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) tests. Subjects initially received iv saline, and after each HVR the dopamine infusion rate was increased by 1 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1). Tidal volume, respiratory rate, heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were continuously measured. Dopamine significantly reduced HVR at all doses (P dopamine infusion (when assessed by dose) reduced HVR in the high group only (P dopamine on HVR in the low group (P > 0.05). Dopamine infusion also resulted in a reduction in blood pressure (3 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) and total peripheral resistance (1-4 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)), driven primarily by subjects with low baseline chemosensitivity. In conclusion, we did not find a single dose of dopamine that elicited a nadir HVR in all subjects. Additionally, potential confounding cardiovascular responses occur with dopamine infusion, which may limit its usage. PMID:26586909

  4. Contact chemoreceptors mediate male-male repulsion and male-female attraction during Drosophila courtship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thistle, Robert; Cameron, Peter; Ghorayshi, Azeen; Dennison, Lisa; Scott, Kristin

    2012-05-25

    The elaborate courtship ritual of Drosophila males is dictated by neural circuitry established by the transcription factor Fruitless and triggered by sex-specific sensory cues. Deciphering the role of different stimuli in driving courtship behavior has been limited by the inability to selectively target appropriate sensory classes. Here, we identify two ion channel genes belonging to the degenerin/epithelial sodium channel/pickpocket (ppk) family, ppk23 and ppk29, which are expressed in fruitless-positive neurons on the legs and are essential for courtship. Gene loss-of-function, cell-inactivation, and cell-activation experiments demonstrate that these genes and neurons are necessary and sufficient to inhibit courtship toward males and promote courtship toward females. Moreover, these cells respond to cuticular hydrocarbons, with different cells selectively responding to male or female pheromones. These studies identify a large population of pheromone-sensing neurons and demonstrate the essential role of contact chemosensation in the early courtship steps of mate selection and courtship initiation. PMID:22632976

  5. Functional genomics reveals dysregulation of cortical olfactory receptors in Parkinson disease: novel putative chemoreceptors in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Schlüter, Agatha; Carmona, Margarita; Moreno, Jesús; Ansoleaga, Belen; Torrejón-Escribano, Benjamín; Gustincich, Stefano; Pujol, Aurora; Ferrer, Isidre

    2013-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is no longer considered a complex motor disorder but rather a systemic disease with variable nonmotor deficits that may include impaired olfaction, depression, mood and sleep disorders, and altered cortical function. Increasing evidence indicates that multiple metabolic defects occur in regions outside the substantia nigra, including the cerebral cortex, even at premotor stages of the disease. We investigated changes in gene expression in the frontal cortex in PD patient brains using a transcriptomics approach. Functional genomics analysis indicated that cortical olfactory receptors (ORs) and taste receptors (TASRs) are altered in PD patients. Olfactory receptors OR2L13, OR1E1, OR2J3, OR52L1, and OR11H1 and taste receptors TAS2R5 and TAS2R50 were downregulated, but TAS2R10 and TAS2R13 were upregulated at premotor and parkinsonian stages in the frontal cortex area 8 in PD patient brains. Furthermore, we present novel evidence that, in addition to the ORs, obligate downstream components of OR function adenylyl cyclase 3 and olfactory G protein (Gαolf), OR transporters, receptor transporter proteins 1 and 2 and receptor expression enhancing protein 1, and OR xenobiotic removing UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1 family polypeptide A6 are widely expressed in neurons of the cerebral cortex and other regions of the adult human brain. Together, these findings support the concept that ORs and TASRs in the cerebral cortex may have novel physiologic functions that are affected in PD patients.

  6. Heavy metal (Hg, Cd) effects on the ultrastructure of the chemoreceptor organs of the fish Alburnus alburnus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernadi, L.; Pevzner, R.; Salanki, J.

    1986-01-01

    The ultrastructural alterations of the olfactory organs and taste buds of the bleak were studied with scanning electron microscopy following treatment with different concentrations of mercury and cadmium. The metals were administered to the lake-water in the forms of HgCl/sub 2/ and CdCl/sub 2/. The concentrations (100 ug/1 Hg/sup + +/ and Cd/sup + +/, as well as 300 ug/1 Hg/sup + +/ and Cd/sup + +/) were kept constant. Samples were taken after exposures of 1 day, 2 days, 1 week, 2 weeks. The olfactory organs proved to be more sensitive than the taste buds to both metals upon any applied concentration and exposure times. The receptor cells of the olfactory organ showed different alterations to the different metals. The mercury treatment evoked dramatic decreases in the number of receptor cells and ciliated epithelial cells, while cadmium only brought forth unusual deformation and destruction of the receptor cells, without affecting the ciliated epithelial cells. On the taste buds mercury treatment affected the microridge system on the epithelial cells as well as the microvilliar system of the supporting and receptor cells. The effects showed duration and concentration dependency. Cadmium effects on the taste buds showed no structural alteration, only the mucous secretion increased over the surface of the taste buds.

  7. Deletion of the von Hippel-Lindau gene causes sympathoadrenal cell death and impairs chemoreceptor-mediated adaptation to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, David; Fernández-Agüera, Mary Carmen; Bonilla-Henao, Victoria; López-Barneo, José

    2014-12-01

    Mutations of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene are associated with pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas, but the role of VHL in sympathoadrenal homeostasis is unknown. We generated mice lacking Vhl in catecholaminergic cells. They exhibited atrophy of the carotid body (CB), adrenal medulla, and sympathetic ganglia. Vhl-null animals had an increased number of adult CB stem cells, although the survival of newly generated neuron-like glomus cells was severely compromised. The effects of Vhl deficiency were neither prevented by pharmacological inhibition of prolyl hydroxylases or selective genetic down-regulation of prolyl hydroxylase-3, nor phenocopied by hypoxia inducible factor overexpression. Vhl-deficient animals appeared normal in normoxia but survived for only a few days in hypoxia, presenting with pronounced erythrocytosis, pulmonary edema, and right cardiac hypertrophy. Therefore, in the normal sympathoadrenal setting, Vhl deletion does not give rise to tumors but impairs development and plasticity of the peripheral O₂-sensing system required for survival in hypoxic conditions.

  8. Signal balancing by the CetABC and CetZ chemoreceptors controls energy taxis in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Reuter

    Full Text Available The coupling of environmental sensing to flagella-mediated directed motility allows bacteria to move to optimum environments for growth and survival, either by sensing external stimuli (chemotaxis or monitoring internal metabolic status (energy taxis. Sensing is mediated by transducer-like proteins (Tlp, either located in the membrane or in the cytoplasm, which commonly influence motility via the CheA-CheY chemotaxis pathway. In this study we have investigated the role of PAS-domain-containing intracellular Tlp-sensors in energy taxis of the food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, using plate- and tube-based assays utilising the conversion of the redox indicator dyes triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC and resazurin. Inactivation of the genes encoding the Campylobacter Energy Taxis system (CetA (Tlp9 and CetB (Aer2 in C. jejuni strain NCTC 11168 resulted in reduced taxis. Inactivation of the cj1191c gene, encoding the CetB homolog CetC (Aer1, did not affect taxis per se, but the cetC gene complemented a cetB mutant in trans, indicating that CetC can form a functional signal transduction complex with CetA in the absence of CetB. Inactivation of both CetB and CetC resulted in greatly reduced taxis confirming the role of CetC in energy taxis. Inactivation of the cj1110c gene, encoding Tlp8 (CetZ, a cytoplasmic sensor with two PAS-domains, resulted in increased taxis, a phenotype opposite to that of CetAB. Inactivation of the cheA gene resulted in the same overall phenotype as the cetAB mutant in both wild-type and cetZ backgrounds, suggesting that both systems use the CheA system for signal transduction. Absence of both CetAB and CetZ resulted in the cetAB taxis phenotype, suggesting that CetZ is subordinate to CetAB. In conclusion, we present evidence that C. jejuni balances the input from two counteracting PAS-domain-containing sensory systems to position itself for optimal usage of energy resources.

  9. Signal Balancing by the CetABC and CetZ Chemoreceptors Controls Energy Taxis in Campylobacter jejuni

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Reuter; van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.

    2013-01-01

    The coupling of environmental sensing to flagella-mediated directed motility allows bacteria to move to optimum environments for growth and survival, either by sensing external stimuli (chemotaxis) or monitoring internal metabolic status (energy taxis). Sensing is mediated by transducer-like proteins (Tlp), either located in the membrane or in the cytoplasm, which commonly influence motility via the CheA-CheY chemotaxis pathway. In this study we have investigated the role of PAS-domain-contai...

  10. Diagnosis of retroperitoneal chemoreceptor tumors (report of 3 cases)%腹膜后化学感受器瘤的诊断(附3例报告)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱学江; 卢春汕; 邹萍

    2007-01-01

    病侧1 患者,男.44岁。主诉:反复腹痛半年。缘于半年前无明显诱因出现腹痛,呈阵发性,无发热,畏寒,无恶心,呕吐,无腹胀,腹泻,黑便,当时未诊治,2005年8月1日确诊为脑胶质瘤,B超检查进发现左腹膜后实性占位.

  11. 吸血水蛭化学感受器的特异性%The specificity of chemoreceptors in blood-sucking leeches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨潼

    2001-01-01

    通过取食行为实验和扫描电镜观察,验证了我国两种吸血水蛭的化学感受器分布在头部背唇和口的内侧皮肤上,它们对血液中固有成分的选择性识别是专一的,这对引起取食反应起决定作用.

  12. The importance of the interaction of CheD with CheC and the chemoreceptors compared to its enzymatic activity during chemotaxis in Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yuan

    Full Text Available Bacillus subtilis use three systems for adaptation during chemotaxis. One of these systems involves two interacting proteins, CheC and CheD. CheD binds to the receptors and increases their ability to activate the CheA kinase. CheD also binds CheC, and the strength of this interaction is increased by phosphorylated CheY. CheC is believed to control the binding of CheD to the receptors in response to the levels of phosphorylated CheY. In addition to their role in adaptation, CheC and CheD also have separate enzymatic functions. CheC is a CheY phosphatase and CheD is a receptor deamidase. Previously, we demonstrated that CheC's phosphatase activity plays a minor role in chemotaxis whereas its ability to bind CheD plays a major one. In the present study, we demonstrate that CheD's deamidase activity also plays a minor role in chemotaxis whereas its ability to bind CheC plays a major one. In addition, we quantified the interaction between CheC and CheD using surface plasmon resonance. These results suggest that the most important features of CheC and CheD are not their enzymatic activities but rather their roles in adaptation.

  13. Advances on chemoreceptor and chemodectoma%化学感受器与化学感受器瘤的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张维新

    2010-01-01

    @@ 1 感受器(receptor) 化学感受器属人体感受器的一种,在认识化学感受器与化学感受器瘤之前,首先应对感受器的研究现状有一基本了解,以便进一步分析、掌握其对人体的各种作用与影响.

  14. Advances in the research of insect chemoreceptor superfamily%昆虫化学感受受体的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵慧婷; 高鹏飞; 张桂贤; 姜玉锁

    2012-01-01

    化学感受这一重要的生化过程对于昆虫的生存来说是十分必要的,昆虫的化学感受受体家族由气味(嗅觉)受体和味觉受体组成.嗅觉可以识别挥发性的化学物质,使昆虫发现食物、寻找配偶和逃避敌害;而味觉能识别可溶性刺激物,以引起觅食、交配和产卵等行为.文章主要介绍了昆虫气味受体及味觉受体家族的特性,以及目前对多种昆虫化学感受受体超家族的研究进展.

  15. 麻点豹天牛成虫感器的扫描电镜研究%Scanning electron microscopic observation on the chemoreceptors of Cosinesthes salicis Gressitt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡江; 李义龙; 刘剑虹; 郑润兰; 陈树琼; 杨富

    2001-01-01

    @@ 麻点豹天牛(Cosinesthes salicis Gressitt)是危害杨(Populus spp.)柳(Salix spp.)等多种树木枝干的钻蛀性害虫,受其危害的树木往往千疮百孔,轻则造成断枝,重则折干甚至枯死,严重影响树木的正常生长和自然景观.感器是昆虫感受外界信息的接收器,是在昆虫感觉器官(如触角)上的一个特化区域,由毛原细胞、感觉神经细胞所形成的一种表皮特化的薄壁构造.为了探索利用信息素防治的新途径,对该虫的主要感觉器官--触角、下唇须、下颚须表面的感器类型进行扫描观察,以期通过对感器微观结构和功能的研究,利用某些物质具调节和改变感觉细胞的特点来影响昆虫的行为,从而达到防治害虫的目的.

  16. 外周化学感受器活动对心率变异性的影响%The influence of peripheral chemoreceptors a ctivities on heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓杰; 唐晓伟; 李莉; 曹银祥

    2002-01-01

    采用给健康、麻醉的豚鼠吸入纯氮气(N2)和纯氧气(O2)的方法,以兴奋或抑制外周化学感受器,观察外周化学感受器兴奋对心率变异性的影响.吸入N2引起TV、VLF、VLF/HF和LF/HF比值显著增加(p<0.05~0.001).吸入纯氧后VLF和LF显著减少(p<0.05).实验表明:VLF随外周化学感受器的不同活动状态而改变,外周化学感受器兴奋对VLF的形成起了重要作用.

  17. Acute response of peripheral CCr5 chemoreceptor and NK cells in individuals submitted to a single session of low-intensity strength exercise with blood flow restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorneles, Gilson Pires; Colato, Alana Schraiber; Galvão, Simone Lunelli; Ramis, Thiago Rozales; Ribeiro, Jerri Luiz; Romão, Pedro Roosevelt; Peres, Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the peripheral expression of natural killers and CCR5 in a session of low-intensity strength training with vascular occlusion and in high-intensity training. Young males were randomized into session groups of a high-intensity strength training (HI) and a session group of low-intensity strength training with vascular occlusion (LI-BFR). The exercise session consisted in knee extension and bicep curl in 80% 1RM (HI) and 30% 1RM (LI-BFR) with equalized volumes. Blood collection was made before, immediately after and 24 h after each training session. Immunophenotyping was carried out through CD195+ (CCR5) e CD3-CD16+CD56+ (NK) in peripheral blood and analysed by flow cytometry and presented in frequency (%). Peripheral frequency of NK cells showed no significant difference in LI-BFR group in time effect, while a gradual reduction of NK cells was identified in HI group in before-24 h postexercise and after-24 h postexercise comparison. However, significant differences have been found in relative change of NK cells immediately after exercise between sessions. In addition, HI and LI-BFR groups showed a significant reduction in the cells expressed CCR5 during 24 h postsession compared to the postsession, but CCR5 also differed when comparing before-24 h after session in the HI group. No differences were observed amongst the groups. LIO induced CCR5 response similar to the HI session, while the NK cells remained in similar frequency during the studied moments in LI-BFR, but not in HI group, suggesting that local hypoxia created by the blood flow restriction was able to prevent a change in the frequency of peripheral cells and a possible immunosuppression. PMID:25643617

  18. The crystal structure of the tandem-PAS sensing domain of Campylobacter jejuni chemoreceptor Tlp1 suggests indirect mechanism of ligand recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machuca, Mayra A; Liu, Yu C; Beckham, Simone A; Gunzburg, Menachem J; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2016-05-01

    Chemotaxis and motility play an important role in the colonisation of avian and human hosts by Campylobacter jejuni. Chemotactic recognition of extracellular signals is mediated by the periplasmic sensing domain of methyl-accepting chemotactic proteins (membrane-embedded receptors). In this work, we report a high-resolution structure of the periplasmic sensing domain of transducer-like protein 1 (Tlp1), an aspartate receptor of C. jejuni. Crystallographic analysis revealed that it contains two Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) subdomains. An acetate and chloride ions (both from the crystallisation buffer) were observed bound to the membrane-proximal and membrane-distal PAS subdomains, respectively. Surprisingly, despite being crystallised in the presence of aspartate, the structure did not show any electron density corresponding to this amino acid. Furthermore, no binding between the sensing domain of Tlp1 and aspartate was detected by microcalorimetric experiments. These structural and biophysical data suggest that Tlp1 does not sense aspartate directly; instead, ligand recognition is likely to occur indirectly via an as yet unidentified periplasmic binding protein. PMID:26923153

  19. Transcriptomics and identification of the chemoreceptor superfamily of the pupal parasitoid of the oriental fruit fly, Spalangia endius Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuping Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel, causes serious losses to fruit production and is one of the most economically important pests in many countries, including China, Spalangia endius Walker is a pupal parasitoid of various dipteran hosts, and may be considered a potentially important ectoparasitic pupal parasitoid of B. dorsalis. However, lack of genetic information on this organism is an obstacle to understanding the mechanisms behind its interaction with this host. Analysis of the S. endius transcriptome is essential to extend the resources of genetic information on this species and, to support studies on S. endius on the host B. dorsalis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed de novo assembly RNA-seq of S. endius. We obtained nearly 10 Gbp of data using a HiSeq platform, and 36319 high-quality transcripts using Trinity software. A total of 22443 (61.79% unigenes were aligned to homologous sequences in the jewel wasp and honeybee (Apis florae protein set from public databases. A total of 10037 protein domains were identified in 7892 S. endius transcripts using HMMER3 software. We identified expression of six gustatory receptor and 21 odorant receptor genes in the sample, with only one gene having a high expression level in each family. The other genes had a low expression level, including two genes regulated by splicing. This result may be due to the wasps being kept under laboratory conditions. Additionally, a total of 3727 SSR markers were predicted, which could facilitate the identification of polymorphisms and functional genes within wasp populations. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This transcriptome greatly improves our genetic understanding of S. endius and provides a large number of gene sequences for further study.

  20. Acute response of peripheral CCr5 chemoreceptor and NK cells in individuals submitted to a single session of low-intensity strength exercise with blood flow restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorneles, Gilson Pires; Colato, Alana Schraiber; Galvão, Simone Lunelli; Ramis, Thiago Rozales; Ribeiro, Jerri Luiz; Romão, Pedro Roosevelt; Peres, Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the peripheral expression of natural killers and CCR5 in a session of low-intensity strength training with vascular occlusion and in high-intensity training. Young males were randomized into session groups of a high-intensity strength training (HI) and a session group of low-intensity strength training with vascular occlusion (LI-BFR). The exercise session consisted in knee extension and bicep curl in 80% 1RM (HI) and 30% 1RM (LI-BFR) with equalized volumes. Blood collection was made before, immediately after and 24 h after each training session. Immunophenotyping was carried out through CD195+ (CCR5) e CD3-CD16+CD56+ (NK) in peripheral blood and analysed by flow cytometry and presented in frequency (%). Peripheral frequency of NK cells showed no significant difference in LI-BFR group in time effect, while a gradual reduction of NK cells was identified in HI group in before-24 h postexercise and after-24 h postexercise comparison. However, significant differences have been found in relative change of NK cells immediately after exercise between sessions. In addition, HI and LI-BFR groups showed a significant reduction in the cells expressed CCR5 during 24 h postsession compared to the postsession, but CCR5 also differed when comparing before-24 h after session in the HI group. No differences were observed amongst the groups. LIO induced CCR5 response similar to the HI session, while the NK cells remained in similar frequency during the studied moments in LI-BFR, but not in HI group, suggesting that local hypoxia created by the blood flow restriction was able to prevent a change in the frequency of peripheral cells and a possible immunosuppression.

  1. The Response of Pardosa pseudoannulata's Chemoreceptor in Locating the Prey%狼蛛的化学感受器在寻觅定位猎物中的作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪波; 黄婷; 韩梦; 汪昕蕾; 常玉婷; 黄欣怡; 李妍钰; 颜亨梅

    2014-01-01

    为探明蜘蛛的化学感受器在寻觅定位猎物中的作用,本研究以拟环纹豹蛛Pardosa pseudoannulata为捕食者、以果蝇为猎物,将蜘蛛饲养在室温23℃±1℃下,使其适应于当前的生长环境.以果蝇成虫饲养狼蛛,使其熟悉猎物气味.实验前,停止供给猎物,使狼蛛处于饥饿状态.一个星期后进行实验,采用Y型嗅觉仪法在黑暗条件下研究了狼蛛对猎物体液气味和体表气味的灵敏度反应.结果表明在实验距离内,狼蛛均能够正确选择有果蝇体液气味端,选择指数显著高于无果蝇体液气味端(P<0.05),停留时间显著高于无果蝇体液气味端(P<0.05),但当狼蛛与有果蝇体液气味端距离增大后,狼蛛对气味敏感程度下降,当狼蛛与气味源距离达到11 cm后,虽然狼蛛仍然能够正确选择有果蝇体液气味端,但选择指数显著下降(P<0.05),回归分析显示,狼蛛对有果蝇体液气味端选择指数与狼蛛和气味源间距离呈高度负相关.同时,研究结果发现狼蛛对果蝇体液气味比果蝇体表气味的反应更敏感.

  2. Acetylcholine mediates hypoxic chemotransmission at carotid body chemoreceptors in the rat%乙酰胆碱介导缺氧所致颈动脉体化学感受器兴奋传递

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高建新; 张敏

    2000-01-01

    哺乳动物缺氧主要通过颈动脉体(CB)化学感受性反射导致肺通气量增加,但感受器细胞释放何种神经递质介导兴奋性化学传递仍存在争议.本工作利用鼠离体灌流颈动脉体-窦神经标本及鼠颈动脉体化学感受器细胞(I型细胞,球型细胞)与岩神经节细胞(PNs)共培养建立的功能性化学突触模型,研究了乙酰胆碱(ACh)在介导缺氧刺激CB化学感受器兴奋传递中的作用.结果发现胆碱能N受体(nAChR)阻断剂mecamylamine和hexamethonium抑制离体颈动脉体-窦神经标本细胞自发放电及缺氧诱发电位.穿孔膜片(perforated-patch)钳记录证明mecamylamine(2μmol/L)能部分地抑制共培养PNs自发性突触后电位和缺氧诱发的去极化.应用乙酰胆碱酯酶(AChE)抑制剂毒扁豆碱(eserine,100μmol/L)加强缺氧诱发的PNs去极化活动.提示鼠颈动脉体化学感受器及传入神经节细胞都表达nAChR,缺氧时颈动脉体化学感受器细胞可通过释放ACh,发挥其兴奋性化学传递作用.

  3. 基于美洲蜚蠊下颚须的整合受体生物传感器测定抗坏血酸%Intact-Chemoreceptor-Based Biosensor: Detection of Ascorbic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪丽; 尹屹梅; 郑赛晶; 段亚楠; 林祥钦

    2002-01-01

    报道了以美洲蜚蠊的下颚须作为分子识别和转换元件研制的一种新型生物组织传感器,发现该传感器对抗坏血酸(AA)有选择性的响应,响应脉冲的发放频率与AA的浓度对数成正比,在5×10-5至5×10-2mol/L范围内呈线性关系,检测下限低于10-6mol/L AA.该传感器响应快,并具有较好的重现性.

  4. Observation on the head and chemoreceptors of Heortia vitessoides Moore larvae%黄野螟幼虫头部化学感器电镜扫描观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蒙; 马涛; 朱雪娇; 温秀军; 李奕震

    2014-01-01

    使用扫描电镜系统观察并描述了黄野螟Heortia vitessoides Moore幼虫触角及口器上的感器.黄野螟幼虫的头式为下口式,头上有触角、单眼、感觉刚毛、上唇、下唇、上颚、下颚、吐丝器.幼虫头部下方有1对3节的触角,触角第2节及端节上有5种感器,即毛形感器、短毛感器、锥形感器、栓锥感器及小锥形感器.口器附肢下颚须上有栓锥感器,外颚叶侧壁和外颚叶端部边缘有栓锥感器和锥形感器.下唇须上有锥形感器和栓锥感器各1个.在吐丝器前方有1对锥形感器.

  5. 金银花尺蠖幼虫头部化学感受器扫描电镜观察%Observation on the larval head chemoreceptors of honeysuckle geometrid Heterolocha jinyinhuaphaga Chu with scanning electron microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向玉勇; 徐莉; 杨茂发; 李子忠

    2016-01-01

    为了解金银花尺蠖Heterolocha jinyinhuaphaga Chu幼虫头部化学感受器的种类、形态、数量和分布,利用扫描电镜技术观察其老熟幼虫头部形态及触角和口器上的化学感受器.结果表明,金银花尺蠖老熟幼虫头部呈椭圆形;触角上着生1个毛形感受器、3个刺形感受器、1个栓锥形感受器和2个锥形感受器;上颚分布有1对毛形感受器;下颚分布有3个毛形感受器、2个刺形感受器、2个栓锥形感受器和8个锥形感受器;下唇须上有1个栓锥形感受器和1个刺形感受器;在吐丝器前方两侧有1对刺形感受器.金银花尺蠖幼虫触角上的化学感受器较少,口器附肢上化学感受器较多.

  6. PH降低和尼古丁对家兔颈动脉体化学感受器活动的影响%EFFECTS OF LOW pH AND NICOTINE ON CAROTID BODY CHEMORECEPTOR ACTIVITY IN THE RABBIT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄甲举; 庞雷; 董力

    1997-01-01

    在29只家兔的颈动脉体-窦神经标本,记录了55个窦神经中化学感受性传入单位的电活动.结果如下:(1)灌流液pH降低时,所有单位的放电均增加,频率由0.86±0.21增至1.75±0.40imp/s(P<0.001).(2)在灌流液中加入尼古丁(1,3,6,10和15μg/ml)后,10个单位的自发放电频率,由0.60±0.21分别增加到0.96±0.21,1.19±0.30,1.24±0.29,1.48±0.41和1.82±0.39 imp/s,呈明显的剂量依赖性(r=0.94,P<0.001).简箭毒可阻断尼古丁的作用,但对自发放电无显著影响.(3)当以酸性Locke氏溶液灌流标本时,19个单位的放电频率由0.95±0.34增至1.84±0.55 imp/s;在酸性灌流液中加入尼古丁后,放电频率由0.96±0.25增至1.53±0.24imp/s;与单纯酸刺激时相比,放电频率增加幅度减小(P<0.05).(4)17个自发放电频率为1.08±0.33imp/s的单位,换以酸性Locke氏液灌流后,放电频率增加到1.64±0.43 imp/s;加筒箭毒后,由对照的1.01±0.34增至1.70±0.43 imp/s;灌流液pH降低时筒箭毒对化学感受性单位放电频率的变化无显著影响.上述结果提示:(1)ACh在颈动脉体化学感受性功能方面可能仅起调质的作用.(2)pH降低时颈动脉体化学感受性功能活动增强与N-型胆碱能受体无关.

  7. 麻楝蛀斑螟幼虫头部及化学感受器结构观察%Structural Observation of Head and Chemoreceptors of Hypsipyla robusta Larval

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马涛; 孙朝辉; 李奕震; 温秀军; 陈晓阳; 曹春雷

    2013-01-01

    通过扫描电镜观察并描述了麻楝蛀斑螟幼虫头部及触角和口器上的化学感受器.结果表明:幼虫头式为下口式;头部下方有1对3节的触角,基节无感器,端节及第2节上有感器,主要为锥状感器和毛型感器;幼虫口器分布着一定数量和不同形态的感器,主要存在于口器附肢下颚须和下唇须上.

  8. Transmembrane protein sorting driven by membrane curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahl, H.; Ronneau, S.; González, B. Solana; Klutsch, D.; Schaffner-Barbero, C.; Hamoen, L. W.

    2015-11-01

    The intricate structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells depends on the ability to target proteins to specific cellular locations. In most cases, we have a poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms. A typical example is the assembly of bacterial chemoreceptors at cell poles. Here we show that the classical chemoreceptor TlpA of Bacillus subtilis does not localize according to the consensus stochastic nucleation mechanism but accumulates at strongly curved membrane areas generated during cell division. This preference was confirmed by accumulation at non-septal curved membranes. Localization appears to be an intrinsic property of the protein complex and does not rely on chemoreceptor clustering, as was previously shown for Escherichia coli. By constructing specific amino-acid substitutions, we demonstrate that the preference for strongly curved membranes arises from the curved shape of chemoreceptor trimer of dimers. These findings demonstrate that the intrinsic shape of transmembrane proteins can determine their cellular localization.

  9. Role of Autonomic Reflex Arcs in Cardiovascular Responses to Air Pollution Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    The body responds to environmental stressors by triggering autonomic reflexes in the pulmonary receptors, baroreceptors, and chemoreceptors to maintain homeostasis. Numerous studies have shown that exposure to various gases and airborne particles can alter the functional outcome ...

  10. Smelling and Tasting Underwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atema, Jelle

    1980-01-01

    Discusses differences between smell and taste, comparing these senses in organisms in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Describes the chemical environment underwater and in air, differences in chemoreceptors to receive stimuli, and the organs, brain, and behavior involved in chemoreception. (CS)

  11. Phosphate taxis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, J.; Ito, A.; Nikata, T; Ohtake, H

    1992-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was shown to be attracted to phosphate. The chemotactic response was induced by phosphate starvation. The specificity of chemoreceptors for phosphate was high so that no other tested phosphorus compounds elicited a chemotactic response as strong as that elicited by phosphate. Competition experiments showed that the chemoreceptors for phosphate appeared to be different from those for the common amino acids. Mutants constitutive for alkaline phosphatase showed the chemota...

  12. カエル味覚性舌反射に及ぼすアルコール,アミノ酸および苦味物質の刺激効果

    OpenAIRE

    野村, 浩道; 鈴木, 宏和

    1985-01-01

    It has been shown that alcohol, amino acids and bitter substances applied to the tongue elicit a phasic discharge in the glossopharyngeal nerve of the frog. Thus, we examined whether or not alcohols, amino acids and bitter substances elicit a linguo-hyglossal reflex in the frog. The results obtained suggest that hydrophobic amino acids and bitter substances stimulate only the chemoreceptor, but acids and alcohols may stimulate the nociceptive receptor as well as the chemoreceptor.

  13. Molecular Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Two cDNA Genes of Two New Lepidoptera OR83b Orthologue Chemoreceptors%2个新的鳞翅目OR83b类化感蛋白基因的克隆和序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    修伟明; 张逸凡; 杨殿林; 董双林; 刘玉升

    2010-01-01

    [目的] 分离和克隆昆虫触角中一类非常保守的嗅觉受体蛋白基因全序列.[方法]采用简并引物反转录多聚酶链式反应(RT-PCR)和cDNA末端快速扩增(RACE)技术克隆基因,用生物信息学方法对获得的cDNA全序列及推导的氨基酸序列进行分析.[结果]从甜菜夜蛾(Sodoptera exigua Hubner)和斜纹夜蛾[Spodopteza litura(Fabricius)]雄蛾触角中扩增得到2个分别为1 906 bp和2 483 bp的OR83类化感蛋白基因的cDNA,开放阅读框(ORF)编码47 3个氨基酸,命名为SexiOR2和slitOR2.通过在GenBank中进行序列的同源性比较,发现这2个鳞翅目化感蛋白新序列与已知蛾类昆虫的OR8 3b类化感蛋白氨基酸序列具较高的同源性.[结论]明确了所获得的2个鳞翅目蛋白新序列属于OR8 3b类化感蛋白.

  14. 亚洲玉米螟Ostrinia furnacalis(Guenée)幼虫化学感受器种类与分布的形态学研究%Morphological studies on the location and classifying of chemoreceptors on the larva of Ostrinia furnacalis Guenée

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢建军; 钟国华; 陈新芳; 陈文团; 徐齐云; 胡美英

    2006-01-01

    摘要:用扫描电镜观察研究亚洲玉米螟幼虫的触角、口器附肢下颚须及其瘤状体、下唇须上的化学感受器的种类、分布与形态特征.亚洲玉米螟幼虫触角分为三节,在第二和第三节上主要有6个丹锥感受器和1个栓锥感受器两种化学感受器.口器附肢下颚须上有8个丹锥感受器,排列为3-2-2-1;下颚须瘤状体上各有一个侧栓锥和中栓锥感受器,另有一个较小的丹锥感受器;下唇须在第二节、第三节上各着生有一个丹锥感受器.亚洲玉米螟幼虫触角上化学感受器数量少,主要分为两种丹锥感受器和栓锥感受器;口器附肢下颚须及其瘤状体、下唇须上化学感受器数量较多,主要为丹锥感受器、侧栓锥和中栓锥感受器.

  15. Mechanisms of maladaptive responses of peripheral chemoreceptors to intermittent hypoxia in sleep-disordered breathing%外周化学感受器在睡眠呼吸障碍时对间歇性低氧适应不良反应的机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯文龙; 郑颜儿; 梁宝成

    2014-01-01

    颈动脉体外周化学感受器在化学刺激从动脉血到中枢的传导及相应的化学反射的诱发过程中起到重要作用,在此过程中介导了低氧条件下的通气及循环反应.颈动脉化学感受器活性的调节对于高海拔地区通气适应性起着显著作用.此外,颈动脉化学感受器的活性在患有睡眠呼吸障碍疾病的患者中显著增强,尤其在患有中枢神经性呼吸暂停综合征或阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停综合征的患者中以及相关的实验动物身上尤为突出.因此,颈动脉体发挥功能以保持氧动态平衡,而异常的颈动脉化学感受器活性可在睡眠呼吸暂停时表现出适应性或者致病性的特性.本文旨在总结间歇性低氧引起化学感受器活性增强过程中的细胞机制和分子机制.我们最近的研究显示颈动脉体中的肾素-血管紧张素系统在过度的化学反射活性时被上调,其所介导的炎症亦具有致病效用.这些调节机制在低氧诱发的颈动脉体功能适应不良变化中发挥重要功能,这会在睡眠呼吸暂停综合征的病理生理机制中发挥显著作用.

  16. [Systems of chemoperception in decapod crayfish].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, V P

    2009-01-01

    The review presents data on some peripheral and central structures in the system of perception of chemical stimuli in crayfish and other Decapoda. The hair receptors on chelipeds, antennas, antennules are innervated by mechano-and chemoreceptor neurons. Antennules are the specialized crayfish chemoreceptor organs, on the surface of which groups of exteroceptors are located. There is an ordered disposition of exteroceptor receptive fields in the form of receptor hair bushes on claws of ambulatory feet (AF), antennas, antennules, and other movable appendages. Behavioral experiments have shown sensitivity of crayfish to odor of individuals of their gender, sex partners as well as the presence in crayfish of pheromones providing connection of female with offspring at the initial stages of the life cycle. Occasional chemosensory cells innervating hair bushes on the crayfish AF respond to amino acids, amines, nucleotides, and sugars. Minimal thresholds of reaction of the studied Decapoda chemoreceptors in response to some chemical compounds correspond to concentrations of 0.1-1 microM. For some chemoreceptors, dose-dependent effects have been shown. Alongside with monomodal chemoreceptors, the crayfish have bimodal receptor perceiving mechanical and chemical stimuli. The efficient response of crayfish chemoreceptors can be obtained to the substance that includes amino group with the hydrogen bridge with carboxyl group, contains no more than 3 carbon atoms in the chain, and is characterized by a certain stereoform. Among chemoreceptors there are fast and slow adapting cells. Efficiency of response of individual chemoreceptors depends on temperature of medium. Chemoreceptors reacting to ecdysterons have been revealed in crayfish. Ecdysterons play a great role in intra- and interspecies communications in Crustacea. Based on the study of efferent responses of interneurons of the first and higher orders in the first thoracic crayfish ganglion to stimulation of the own

  17. HCN channels contribute to serotonergic modulation of ventral surface chemosensitive neurons and respiratory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Virginia E; Hawryluk, Joanna M; Takakura, Ana C; Tzingounis, Anastasios V; Moreira, Thiago S; Mulkey, Daniel K

    2015-02-15

    Chemosensitive neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) provide a CO2/H(+)-dependent drive to breathe and function as an integration center for the respiratory network, including serotonergic raphe neurons. We recently showed that serotonergic modulation of RTN chemoreceptors involved inhibition of KCNQ channels and activation of an unknown inward current. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are the molecular correlate of the hyperpolarization-activated inward current (Ih) and have a high propensity for modulation by serotonin. To investigate whether HCN channels contribute to basal activity and serotonergic modulation of RTN chemoreceptors, we characterize resting activity and the effects of serotonin on RTN chemoreceptors in vitro and on respiratory activity of anesthetized rats in the presence or absence of blockers of KCNQ (XE991) and/or HCN (ZD7288, Cs(+)) channels. We found in vivo that bilateral RTN injections of ZD7288 increased respiratory activity and in vitro HCN channel blockade increased activity of RTN chemoreceptors under control conditions, but this was blunted by KCNQ channel inhibition. Furthermore, in vivo unilateral RTN injection of XE991 plus ZD7288 eliminated the serotonin response, and in vitro serotonin sensitivity was eliminated by application of XE991 and ZD7288 or SQ22536 (adenylate cyclase blocker). Serotonin-mediated activation of RTN chemoreceptors was blocked by a 5-HT7-receptor blocker and mimicked by a 5-HT7-receptor agonist. In addition, serotonin caused a depolarizing shift in the voltage-dependent activation of Ih. These results suggest that HCN channels contribute to resting chemoreceptor activity and that serotonin activates RTN chemoreceptors and breathing in part by a 5-HT7 receptor-dependent mechanism and downstream activation of Ih.

  18. The chemosensitivity of labellar sugar receptor in female Phormia regina is paralleled with ovary maturation: Effects of serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, Paolo; Stoffolano, John G; De Rose, Francescaelena; Barbarossa, Iole Tomassini; Liscia, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Oogenesis in most adult insects is a nutrient-dependent process involving ingestion of both proteins and carbohydrates that ultimately depends on peripheral input from chemoreceptors. The main goal of this study was to characterize, in the female blowfly Phormia regina, the responsive changes of the labellar chemoreceptors to carbohydrates and proteins in relation to four different stages along the ovarian cycle: (1) immature ovaries, (2) mid-mature ovaries, (3) mature ovaries and ready for egg-laying and (4) post egg-laying ovaries. Then, the possible effects exerted by exogenous serotonin on the chemoreceptor sensitivity profiles were investigated. Our results show that ovary length, width and contraction rate progressively increase from stage 1 to 3, when all these parameters reach their maximum values, before declining in the next stage 4. The sensitivity of the labellar "sugar" chemoreceptors to both sucrose and proteins varies during the ovarian maturation stages, reaching a minimum for sucrose in stage 3, while that to proteins begins. Exogenous 5-HT supply specifically increases the chemoreceptor sensitivity to sugar at the stages 3 and 4, while it does not affect that to proteins. In conclusion, our results provide evidence that in female blowflies the cyclic variations in the sensitivity of the labellar chemosensilla to sugars and proteins are time-related to ovarian development and that during the stages 3 and 4 the responsiveness of the sugar cell to sucrose is under serotonergic control.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Reception and Perireception in Crustacean Chemoreception: A Comparative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derby, Charles D; Kozma, Mihika T; Senatore, Adriano; Schmidt, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    This review summarizes our present knowledge of chemoreceptor proteins in crustaceans, using a comparative perspective to review these molecules in crustaceans relative to other metazoan models of chemoreception including mammals, insects, nematodes, and molluscs. Evolution has resulted in unique expansions of specific gene families and repurposing of them for chemosensation in various clades, including crustaceans. A major class of chemoreceptor proteins across crustaceans is the Ionotropic Receptors, which diversified from ionotropic glutamate receptors in ancient protostomes but which are not present in deuterostomes. Representatives of another major class of chemoreceptor proteins-the Grl/GR/OR family of ionotropic 7-transmembrane receptors-are diversified in insects but to date have been reported in only one crustacean species, Daphnia pulex So far, canonic 7-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors, the principal chemoreceptors in vertebrates and reported in a few protostome clades, have not been identified in crustaceans. More types of chemoreceptors are known throughout the metazoans and might well be expected to be discovered in crustaceans. Our review also provides a comparative coverage of perireceptor events in crustacean chemoreception, including molecules involved in stimulus acquisition, stimulus delivery, and stimulus removal, though much less is known about these events in crustaceans, particularly at the molecular level. PMID:27107425

  20. Effects of abrasion and Na/sup +/ on dactyl-mediated chemoreception in mature kelp crabs, Pugettia producta (Randall)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, K.A.; Case, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Extracellular recordings from the mixed sensory nerves innervating the abraded dactylopodites of the kelp crab, Pugettia producta (Randall), indicate that at least some chemoreceptors and mechanoreceptors remain functional. The chemoreceptors of the abraded dactyls are sensitive to both the concentration and chemical nature of the stimulants. The responses of the chemoreceptors, but not of the mechanoreceptors, are reduced when choline is substituted for sodium in the stimulant solutions. Only chemoreception is blocked by the topical application of tetrodotoxin (TTX) to the dactyls; partial reversal of the blockage occurs with time. The differential blockage of receptor activity by low Na/sup +/ and TTX is consistent with the idea that spike initiation occurs more distally in the dendrites of the chemosensory neurons than in the mechanosensory neurons. The relevance of this to the ability of at least some abraded dactyl setae to remain functional in a long-lived, nonmolting crab is considered.

  1. Function of chemo- and mechanoreceptors in lobster (Homarus americanus) feeding behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derby, C.D.; Atema, J.

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of lobsters preying on live mussels (Mytilus edulis) was observed before and after chemosensory-mechanosensory deafferentation of different sensory appendages. Deafferentation of the antennules, leg tips, or maxillipeds (but not the carapace or proximal leg segments) interfered with feeding performance by causing an increase in the time necessary to crush a mussel after search initiation. In addition, deafferentation of the leg tips or the maxillipeds caused a decline in number of mussels crushed but for different reasons. Deafferentation of leg chemoreceptors resulted in the same behavioural deficiencies as deafferentation of leg chemo- and mechanoreceptors, demonstrating that it is the leg chemoreceptors that are essential in releasing this grasping response. Chemoreceptors on different appendages of lobsters therefore fulfill different functional roles in their feeding behavior.

  2. Role of Rhipicephalus microplus cheliceral receptors in gustation and host differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhipicephalus microplus is considered the most economically important ectoparasite of cattle worldwide. It is known that zebuine breeds of cattle are less susceptible to tick infestation than taurine breeds. Contact chemoreceptors in the cheliceral pit sensilla of ticks respond selectively to phagos...

  3. CARDIOVASCULAR ADJUSTMENTS TO ACUTE HYPOXEMIA SUPERIMPOSED ON CHRONIC HYPOXEMIA IN LAMBS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DALINGHAUS, M; GRATAMA, JWC; ZIJLSTRA, WG; KUIPERS, JRG

    1995-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses to acute hyperemia are in part mediated through adrenergic and chemoreceptor stimulation. In chronic hypoxemia the response to these stimuli may be blunted. Therefore, we determined whether the cardiovascular responses to acute hypoxemia superimposed on 3-4 wk of chronic hyp

  4. Transmembrane protein sorting driven by membrane curvature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Strahl; S. Ronneau; B. Solana González; D. Klutsch; C. Schaffner-Barbero; L.W. Hamoen

    2015-01-01

    The intricate structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells depends on the ability to target proteins to specific cellular locations. In most cases, we have a poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms. A typical example is the assembly of bacterial chemoreceptors at cell poles. Here we show th

  5. Functional organization of a multimodular bacterial chemosensory apparatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Moine

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemosensory systems (CSS are complex regulatory pathways capable of perceiving external signals and translating them into different cellular behaviors such as motility and development. In the δ-proteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus, chemosensing allows groups of cells to orient themselves and aggregate into specialized multicellular biofilms termed fruiting bodies. M. xanthus contains eight predicted CSS and 21 chemoreceptors. In this work, we systematically deleted genes encoding components of each CSS and chemoreceptors and determined their effects on M. xanthus social behaviors. Then, to understand how the 21 chemoreceptors are distributed among the eight CSS, we examined their phylogenetic distribution, genomic organization and subcellular localization. We found that, in vivo, receptors belonging to the same phylogenetic group colocalize and interact with CSS components of the respective phylogenetic group. Finally, we identified a large chemosensory module formed by three interconnected CSS and multiple chemoreceptors and showed that complex behaviors such as cell group motility and biofilm formation require regulatory apparatus composed of multiple interconnected Che-like systems.

  6. Using the Pathophysiology of Obstructive Sleep Apnea to Teach Cardiopulmonary Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitzky, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder of upper airway obstruction during sleep. The effects of intermittent upper airway obstruction include alveolar hypoventilation, altered arterial blood gases and acid-base status, and stimulation of the arterial chemoreceptors, which leads to frequent arousals. These arousals disturb sleep…

  7. Carotid body tumors are not associated with an increased risk for sleep-disordered breathing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsteijn, L.T. van; Duinen, N. van; Ninaber, M.K.; Romijn, J.A.; Dijk, J.G. van; Kralingen, K.W. van; Havekes, B.; Smid, L.; Lammers, G.J.; Jansen, J.C.; Smit, J.W.; Thijs, R.D.; Corssmit, E.P.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Tumors in the carotid bodies may interfere with their function as peripheral chemoreceptors. An altered control of ventilation may predispose to sleep-disordered breathing. This study aimed to assess whether patients with unilateral or bilateral carotid body tumors (uCBT or bCBT, respective

  8. Chemosensory neurons in the mouthparts of the spiny lobsters Panulirus argus and Panulirus interruptus (Crustacea : Decapoda)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Anders Lydik; Shabani, Shkelzen; Høeg, Jens Thorvald;

    2005-01-01

    were used to characterize the response specificity, sensitivity, and time course of individual neurons in the endopods of maxilliped 2 and 3. Additional chemoreceptors were found in the mandibular palp and basis of maxilliped 1 but they were not characterized. Neurons were broadly tuned, with the five...

  9. Abolition of reflex bradycardia by cardiac vagotomy has no effect on the regulation of oxygen uptake by Atlantic cod in progressive hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenzie, David; Skov, Peter Vilhelm; Taylor, E.W.T.;

    2009-01-01

    -operated cod (mean +/- s.e.m., n=9). Sham-operated cod exhibited transient profound bradycardia following oxygen chemoreceptor stimulation by bolus injection of sodium cyanide into the buccal cavity (2 mg in 2 ml seawater), but this cardiac chemoreflex was abolished in denervated cod. Both groups, however...

  10. Principles of agonist recognition in Cys-loop receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynagh, Timothy Peter; Pless, Stephan Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Cys-loop receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that are activated by a structurally diverse array of neurotransmitters, including acetylcholine, serotonin, glycine, and GABA. After the term "chemoreceptor" emerged over 100 years ago, there was some wait until affinity labeling, molecular cloning...

  11. Flavonoids from cabbage are feeding stimulants for diamondback moth larvae additional to glucosinolates : chemoreception and behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, van J.J.A.; Wang, C.Z.; Nielsen, J.K.; Gols, R.; Qiu, Y.T.

    2002-01-01

    In caterpillars two styloconic contact chemoreceptors on the maxillary galea are assumed to contain the main taste receptors involved in host plant selection. The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella L. is a specialist feeder of plants in the Brassicaceae, a plant family characterized by the biosyn

  12. Notes on the ultrastructure of the setae on the fourth antennulary segment of the Balanus amphitrite cyprid (Crustacea : Cirripedia : Thoracica)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagersson, Niklas; Garm, Anders Lydik; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2003-01-01

    while one seta (sE) is presumed to be a unimodal mechanoreceptor. We suggest that setae A and B are stimulated by the water flow, seta D is olfactory, seta E detects the topography of the substratum by touch, and the subterminal setae are touch chemoreceptors. No function is suggested for seta C....

  13. The anti-malarial drug Mefloquine disrupts central autonomic and respiratory control in the working heart brainstem preparation of the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lall Varinder K

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mefloquine is an anti-malarial drug that can have neurological side effects. This study examines how mefloquine (MF influences central nervous control of autonomic and respiratory systems using the arterially perfused working heart brainstem preparation (WHBP of the rat. Recordings of nerve activity were made from the thoracic sympathetic chain and phrenic nerve, while heart rate (HR and perfusion pressure were also monitored in the arterially perfused, decerebrate, rat WHBP. MF was added to the perfusate at 1 μM to examine its effects on baseline parameters as well as baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes. Results MF caused a significant, atropine resistant, bradycardia and increased phrenic nerve discharge frequency. Chemoreceptor mediated sympathoexcitation (elicited by addition of 0.1 ml of 0.03% sodium cyanide to the aortic cannula was significantly attenuated by the application of MF to the perfusate. Furthermore MF significantly decreased rate of return to resting HR following chemoreceptor induced bradycardia. An increase in respiratory frequency and attenuated respiratory-related sympathetic nerve discharge during chemoreceptor stimulation was also elicited with MF compared to control. However, MF did not significantly alter baroreceptor reflex sensitivity. Conclusions These studies indicate that in the WHBP, MF causes profound alterations in autonomic and respiratory control. The possibility that these effects may be mediated through actions on connexin 36 containing gap junctions in central neurones controlling sympathetic nervous outflow is discussed.

  14. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0083 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0083 Novel V A Nematode chemoreceptors SRH72_CAEEL 3e-04 20% ref|XP_00...1672783.1| Hypothetical protein CBG22435 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE74640.1| Hypothetical protein CBG22435 [Caenorhabditis br

  15. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0227 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0227 pseudo Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 2e-10 20% r...ef|XP_001672280.1| Hypothetical protein CBG11373 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE66143.1| Hypothetical prot...ein CBG11373 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] 1e-115 59% MLKLCLHLIQYAGFILGQVTNATLLFLVLTRAEKLFGSYRNVMAAFSAYSLGYTWIEV

  16. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0443 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0443 Novel V A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 9e-07 23% ref|XP_00...1675302.1| Hypothetical protein CBG22650 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE74814.1| Hypothetical protein CBG22650 [Caenorhabditis br

  17. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0850 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0850 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 2e-16 21% ref|XP_0...01672801.1| Hypothetical protein CBG10357 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE65405.1| Hypothetical protein CBG10357 [Caenorhabditis br

  18. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0421 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0421 Novel V A Nematode chemoreceptors ALG10_GIBZE 1.7 26% ref|XP_0016...75171.1| Hypothetical protein CBG04925 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE61159.1| Hypothetical protein CBG04925 [Caenorhabditis br

  19. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-1264 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-1264 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRH72_CAEEL 2e-18 26% ref|XP_0...01675203.1| Hypothetical protein CBG04965 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE61191.1| Hypothetical protein CBG04965 [Caenorhabditis br

  20. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0399 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0399 V A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 1e-69 41% ref|XP_00167487...1.1| Hypothetical protein CBG04570 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE60859.1| Hypothetical protein CBG04570 [Caenorhabditis br

  1. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0188 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0188 pseudo Novel V A Nematode chemoreceptors CCR3_CAVPO 0.96 22% ref|...XP_001673145.1| Hypothetical protein CBG01301 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE58206.1| Hypothetical protein... CBG01301 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] 1e-156 85% MKISFETPQWLINIYHIITLISILINSLGIYLIRFQSGKIDNFKYFLLWFITFIMFFMTQP

  2. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0719 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0719 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 4e-15 20% ref|XP_0...01674601.1| Hypothetical protein CBG19238 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE72140.1| Hypothetical protein CBG19238 [Caenorhabditis br

  3. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-1422 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-1422 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 1e-09 23% ref|XP_0...01675266.1| Hypothetical protein CBG22608 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE74778.1| Hypothetical protein CBG22608 [Caenorhabditis br

  4. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0403 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0403 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 7e-08 24% ref|XP_0...01677249.1| Hypothetical protein CBG00072 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE57214.1| Hypothetical protein CBG00072 [Caenorhabditis br

  5. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0465 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0465 Novel V A Nematode chemoreceptors SRD41_CAEEL 0.30 19% ref|XP_001...675491.1| Hypothetical protein CBG18618 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE71647.1| Hypothetical protein CBG18618 [Caenorhabditis br

  6. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0951 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0951 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 2e-12 21% ref|XP_0...01672928.1| Hypothetical protein CBG10509 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE65532.1| Hypothetical protein CBG10509 [Caenorhabditis br

  7. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-02-0039 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-02-0039 II A Nematode chemoreceptors SRH72_CAEEL 2e-14 22% ref|XP_0016800...73.1| Hypothetical protein CBG20810 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE73372.1| Hypothetical protein CBG20810 [Caenorhabditis br

  8. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-1431 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-1431 pseudo Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 4e-07 19% r...ef|XP_001669833.1| Hypothetical protein CBG11636 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE66376.1| Hypothetical prot...ein CBG11636 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] 4e-61 37% MDTFRWMKFFTHFFISLISIVFNSILIYLVYTKSPPKLGSYKHLMCYFAVLSIVYAVFD

  9. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0416 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0416 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRH72_CAEEL 5e-16 26% ref|XP_0...01675390.1| Hypothetical protein CBG22852 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE74961.1| Hypothetical protein CBG22852 [Caenorhabditis br

  10. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0135 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0135 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRH72_CAEEL 2e-12 23% ref|XP_0...01675260.1| Hypothetical protein CBG22601 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE74772.1| Hypothetical protein CBG22601 [Caenorhabditis br

  11. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-04-0048 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-04-0048 Novel IV A Nematode chemoreceptors SRH72_CAEEL 5e-05 27% ref|XP_0...01670503.1| Hypothetical protein CBG05800 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE61830.1| Hypothetical protein CBG05800 [Caenorhabditis br

  12. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-01-0021 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-01-0021 Novel I A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 3e-14 24% ref|XP_00...1669303.1| Hypothetical protein CBG15825 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE69598.1| Hypothetical protein CBG15825 [Caenorhabditis br

  13. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-1268 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-1268 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SCN60_DROME 0.15 25% ref|XP_00...1670368.1| Hypothetical protein CBG05965 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE61965.1| Hypothetical protein CBG05965 [Caenorhabditis br

  14. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-1163 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-1163 pseudo Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 7e-13 21% r...ef|XP_001669832.1| Hypothetical protein CBG11635 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE66375.1| Hypothetical prot...ein CBG11635 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] 1e-132 67% MWFAVIKYTIQLVSFIFSFVFNTILIYLILKKSPKKMGTYKYLLVYFCSFSLFYSILD

  15. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0618 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0618 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 9e-09 21% ref|XP_0...01674700.1| Hypothetical protein CBG19356 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE72239.1| Hypothetical protein CBG19356 [Caenorhabditis br

  16. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0298 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0298 Novel V A Nematode chemoreceptors SRH72_CAEEL 6e-14 26% ref|XP_00...1673912.1| Hypothetical protein CBG09709 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE64895.1| Hypothetical protein CBG09709 [Caenorhabditis br

  17. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-04-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-04-0035 pseudo Novel IV A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 3e-16 20% r...ef|XP_001669865.1| Hypothetical protein CBG11675 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE66408.1| Hypothetical prot...ein CBG11675 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] 1e-163 81% MSWLSVIKPYIQLITLIFSLSVNSVFIILVIYHSPKKLGNYKHLMCYFSVISMIYAVM

  18. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0223 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0223 pseudo Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 9e-04 29% r...ef|XP_001672283.1| Hypothetical protein CBG11368 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE66140.1| Hypothetical prot...ein CBG11368 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] 5e-85 68% XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXGPLLQALRTVHNGSLGLLAST

  19. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0670 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0670 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRD1_CAEEL 1e-135 70% ref|XP_0...01678272.1| Hypothetical protein CBG00843 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE57819.1| Hypothetical protein CBG00843 [Caenorhabditis br

  20. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0982 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0982 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 2e-10 20% ref|XP_0...01669457.1| Hypothetical protein CBG19715 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE72535.1| Hypothetical protein CBG19715 [Caenorhabditis br

  1. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-04-0026 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-04-0026 pseudo Novel IV A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 3e-04 20% r...ef|XP_001669836.1| Hypothetical protein CBG11639 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE66379.1| Hypothetical prot...ein CBG11639 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] 2e-98 77% MGLQTFSQIKNAINLFAFILAVITNCVIVFLVITKSPQKFGNYRHLMVYFSMLSILLAF

  2. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-08-0224 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-08-0224 pseudo Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRH72_CAEEL 1e-41 32% r...ef|XP_001680289.1| Hypothetical protein CBG17775 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE70963.1| Hypothetical prot...ein CBG17775 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] 5e-60 72% MSQQLDEYFKNVYPILCQNSSGNFSKFLESKENFLYTCRLIILIALPFQLFTFFCILKK

  3. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0087 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0087 pseudo Novel V A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 3e-09 19% re...f|XP_001672801.1| Hypothetical protein CBG10357 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE65405.1| Hypothetical prote...in CBG10357 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] 1e-170 91% MISFENWKSMLIYSQWIGGTLGVIFNLFLILLIIYRSPQHLGVYKYLMMYISIVQTVFS

  4. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0430 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0430 Novel V A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 4e-13 21% ref|XP_00...1675205.1| Hypothetical protein CBG04967 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE61193.1| Hypothetical protein CBG04967 [Caenorhabditis br

  5. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0784 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0784 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRH72_CAEEL 2e-24 26% ref|XP_0...01675173.1| Hypothetical protein CBG04927 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE61161.1| Hypothetical protein CBG04927 [Caenorhabditis br

  6. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0250 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0250 Novel V A Nematode chemoreceptors SRH72_CAEEL 2e-40 31% ref|XP_00...1673460.1| Hypothetical protein CBG08553 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE63965.1| Hypothetical protein CBG08553 [Caenorhabditis br

  7. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-04-0013 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-04-0013 Novel IV A Nematode chemoreceptors SRD32_CAEEL 3e-07 33% ref|XP_0...01669594.1| Hypothetical protein CBG13756 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE68113.1| Hypothetical protein CBG13756 [Caenorhabditis br

  8. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0052 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0052 pseudo Novel V A Nematode chemoreceptors NUOJ_RICFE 1.2 25% ref|X...P_001672639.1| Hypothetical protein CBG08867 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE64232.1| Hypothetical protein ...CBG08867 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] 1e-77 50% MPDPAKARQRPGCNIPTYILALISLVLIKSKLFTTYRIFLIWHLVENFFFEIYSAFLVEPVDT

  9. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0386 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0386 Novel V A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 4e-10 21% ref|XP_00...1674778.1| Hypothetical protein CBG11556 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE66306.1| Hypothetical protein CBG11556 [Caenorhabditis br

  10. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-1075 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-1075 pseudo Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 8e-24 23% r...ef|XP_001675262.1| Hypothetical protein CBG22603 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE74774.1| Hypothetical prot...ein CBG22603 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] 2e-78 50% MYINWAHHYVPKFSGTCSVLINSLFIYIVHDNKKIKLGDYRFLLIFFALYNFTSTAVDL

  11. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0126 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0126 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRH72_CAEEL 3e-30 29% ref|XP_0...01672990.1| Hypothetical protein CBG01127 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE58050.1| Hypothetical protein CBG01127 [Caenorhabditis br

  12. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0096 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0096 Novel V A Nematode chemoreceptors SRH72_CAEEL 8e-18 23% ref|XP_00...1672813.1| Hypothetical protein CBG10371 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE65417.1| Hypothetical protein CBG10371 [Caenorhabditis br

  13. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-08-0145 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-08-0145 pseudo Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors OPSV_ORYLA 0.001 22% re...f|XP_001670508.1| Hypothetical protein CBG05796 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE61826.1| Hypothetical prote...in CBG05796 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] 1e-163 87% MTLFYEYSYYFTQCGFVTTSIANTLFIYLTILHIKKITGPYKVMILVFSFVGIFFATWE

  14. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0263 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0263 pseudo Novel V A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 9e-29 28% re...f|XP_001673602.1| Hypothetical protein CBG23395 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE75405.1| Hypothetical prote...in CBG23395 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] 0.0 87% MIYVGFLHHWAPIVFGILSYVCNAIFVFIVLKKTKSSFGAYKYMLMSFGIFDIMYSTVDMFV

  15. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0254 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0254 Novel V A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 5e-11 22% ref|XP_00...1673486.1| Hypothetical protein CBG23540 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE75522.1| Hypothetical protein CBG23540 [Caenorhabditis br

  16. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-1435 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-1435 pseudo Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 2e-37 26% r...ef|XP_001672895.1| Hypothetical protein CBG10469 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE65499.1| Hypothetical prot...ein CBG10469 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] 1e-102 55% MYIDWAHSFVPKFFAFCSFLINPLFIFLILKDTKLNLGNYKYLLFYFSIFIMSCSMCD

  17. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0249 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0249 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 1e-13 23% ref|XP_0...01673279.1| Hypothetical protein CBG12114 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE66760.1| Hypothetical protein CBG12114 [Caenorhabditis br

  18. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0456 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0456 V A Nematode chemoreceptors SRH72_CAEEL 1e-06 24% ref|XP_00167539...0.1| Hypothetical protein CBG22852 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE74961.1| Hypothetical protein CBG22852 [Caenorhabditis br

  19. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0337 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0337 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRH72_CAEEL 2e-20 27% ref|XP_0...01666376.1| Hypothetical protein CBG21163 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE73657.1| Hypothetical protein CBG21163 [Caenorhabditis br

  20. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0829 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0829 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRD7_CAEEL 1e-76 44% ref|XP_00...1670934.1| Hypothetical protein CBG19891 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE72674.1| Hypothetical protein CBG19891 [Caenorhabditis br

  1. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0328 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0328 pseudo Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRJ38_CAEEL 1e-40 31% r...ef|XP_001672776.1| Hypothetical protein CBG22428 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE74633.1| Hypothetical prot...ein CBG22428 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] 1e-146 75% MYIHWSHHYLPKVFGILSFVFNPLFMWLILSEKKASIGKYRYLLIGFAIFDMIYSAVE

  2. Gene : CBRC-CBRE-01-0504 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0504 Novel UN A Nematode chemoreceptors SRH72_CAEEL 1e-10 24% ref|XP_0...01673043.1| Hypothetical protein CBG01189 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE58103.1| Hypothetical protein CBG01189 [Caenorhabditis br

  3. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0355 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0355 Novel V B Nematode chemoreceptors LRGB_STAES 0.11 24% ref|XP_0016...74526.1| Hypothetical protein CBG19151 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE72065.1| Hypothetical protein CBG19151 [Caenorhabditis br

  4. Stylet penetration activities by aphids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjallingii, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The composition of stylet penetration behaviour in aphids and its possible role in food-plant selection is the subject of these studies. Evidence is presented that the labium is devoid of external chemoreceptors (Chapter 1). In addition to other morphological data (Wensler & Filshie, 1969; Wensler,

  5. Regulation of caste differentiation in the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goewie, E.A.

    1978-01-01

    The nutritional environment of honey-bee larvae affects the juvenile hormone (JH) titre of larval haemolymph and tissues. In this investigation the mechanism for the regulation of caste differentiation has been studied.Chemo- and mechanoreceptors are found on larval mouthparts. Chemoreceptors on max

  6. Immunohistochemical and Morphological Changes in Chipmunk Carotid Body during Hibernaiton

    OpenAIRE

    FUKUHARA, Kohko; YOSHIZAKI, Katsuaki; Wu, Yi; Senoo, Haruki; OHTOMO, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    Mammalian hibernators experience drastic changes in vital signs such asbody temperature, respiratory rate, and heart rate during hibernation because of periodicarousals during which vital signs return to non-hibernating levels. The carotid body, anarterial chemoreceptor organ regulating respiration, contains several neuroactive substances.However, little is known about changes of neuroactive substances in the carotidbody during hibernation. Immunohistochemical study using antibodies against n...

  7. In vitro characterization of noradrenergic modulation of chemosensitive neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Fu-Shan; Falquetto, Bárbara; Chen, Dawei; Oliveira, Luiz M; Takakura, Ana C; Mulkey, Daniel K

    2016-09-01

    Chemosensitive neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) regulate breathing in response to CO2/H(+) changes and serve as an integration center for other autonomic centers, including brain stem noradrenergic neurons. Norepinephrine (NE) contributes to respiratory control and chemoreception, and, since disruption of NE signaling may contribute to several breathing disorders, we sought to characterize effects of NE on RTN chemoreception. All neurons included in this study responded similarly to CO2/H(+) but showed differential sensitivity to NE; we found that NE activated (79%), inhibited (7%), or had no effect on activity (14%) of RTN chemoreceptors. The excitatory effect of NE on RTN chemoreceptors was dose dependent, retained in the presence of neurotransmitter receptor blockers, and could be mimicked and blocked by pharmacological manipulation of α1-adrenergic receptors (ARs). In addition, NE-activation was blunted by XE991 (KCNQ channel blocker), and partially occluded the firing response to serotonin, suggesting involvement of KCNQ channels. However, in whole cell voltage clamp, activation of α1-ARs decreased outward current and conductance by what appears to be a mixed effect on multiple channels. The inhibitory effect of NE on RTN chemoreceptors was blunted by an α2-AR antagonist. A third group of RTN chemoreceptors was insensitive to NE. We also found that chemosensitive RTN astrocytes do not respond to NE with a change in voltage or by releasing ATP to enhance activity of chemosensitive neurons. These results indicate NE modulates subsets of RTN chemoreceptors by mechanisms involving α1- and α2-ARs. PMID:27306669

  8. Respiratory and autonomic dysfunction in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Thiago S; Takakura, Ana C; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, Jose J

    2016-08-01

    The developmental lineage of the PHOX2B-expressing neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) has been extensively studied. These cells are thought to function as central respiratory chemoreceptors, i.e., the mechanism by which brain Pco2 regulates breathing. The molecular and cellular basis of central respiratory chemoreception is based on the detection of CO2 via intrinsic proton receptors (TASK-2, GPR4) as well as synaptic input from peripheral chemoreceptors and other brain regions. Murine models of congenital central hypoventilation syndrome designed with PHOX2B mutations have suggested RTN neuron agenesis. In this review, we examine, through human and experimental animal models, how a restricted number of neurons that express the transcription factor PHOX2B play a crucial role in the control of breathing and autonomic regulation. PMID:27226447

  9. Relevance of the Carotid Body Chemoreflex in the Progression of Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic heart failure (CHF is a global health problem affecting millions of people. Autonomic dysfunction and disordered breathing patterns are commonly observed in patients with CHF, and both are strongly related to poor prognosis and high mortality risk. Tonic activation of carotid body (CB chemoreceptors contributes to sympathoexcitation and disordered breathing patterns in experimental models of CHF. Recent studies show that ablation of the CB chemoreceptors improves autonomic function and breathing control in CHF and improves survival. These exciting findings indicate that alterations in CB function are critical to the progression of CHF. Therefore, better understanding of the physiology of the CB chemoreflex in CHF could lead to improvements in current treatments and clinical management of patients with CHF characterized by high chemosensitivity. Accordingly, the main focus of this brief review is to summarize current knowledge of CB chemoreflex function in different experimental models of CHF and to comment on their potential translation to treatment of human CHF.

  10. Precise Adaptation in Bacterial Chemotaxis through ``Assistance Neighborhoods''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The chemotaxis network in Escherichia coli is remarkable for its sensitivity to small relative changes in the concentrations of multiple chemical signals over a broad range of ambient concentrations. Key to this sensitivity is an adaptation system that relies on methylation and demethylation (or deamidation) of specific modification sites of the chemoreceptors by the enzymes CheR and CheB, respectively. It was recently discovered that these enzymes can access five to seven receptors when tethered to a particular receptor. We show that these ``assistance neighborhoods'' (ANs) are necessary for precise and robust adaptation in a model for signaling by clusters of chemoreceptors: (1) ANs suppress fluctuations of the receptor methylation level; (2) ANs lead to robustness with respect to biochemical parameters. We predict two limits of precise adaptation at large attractant concentrations: either receptors reach full methylation and turn off, or receptors become saturated and cease to respond to attractant but retain their adapted activity.

  11. Hypoxia activates nucleus tractus solitarii neurons projecting to the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    King, T. Luise; Heesch, Cheryl M.; Clark, Catharine G.; Kline, David D.; Hasser, Eileen M.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral chemoreceptor afferent information is sent to the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS), integrated, and relayed to other brain regions to alter cardiorespiratory function. The nTS projects to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), but activation and phenotype of these projections during chemoreflex stimulation is unknown. We hypothesized that activation of PVN-projecting nTS neurons occurs primarily at high intensities of hypoxia. We assessed ventilation and cardiovascular para...

  12. ANTIEMETICS: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Kumar* 1 and Anoop Kumar 2

    2013-01-01

    The act of emesis is controlled by the vomiting centre in the medulla, which integrates afferent input from the vestibular system, the chemoreceptor trigger zone (CTZ), the cortex and the gut. Nausea and vomiting induced by several cancer chemotherapy agents is often the most distressing side effect of treatment. The mechanism of action of antiemetic is related to blockage of various type of receptor located in various region of various organ of the body parts. Various drugs are classified un...

  13. Do polymorphisms in chemosensory genes matter for human ingestive behavior?

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, John E.; Feeney, Emma L.; Allen, Alissa L.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, basic research in chemoreceptor genetics and neurobiology have revolutionized our understanding of individual differences in chemosensation. From an evolutionary perspective, chemosensory variations appear to have arisen in response to different living environments, generally in the avoidance of toxins and to better detect vital food sources. Today, it is often assumed that these differences may drive variable food preferences and choices, with downstream effects on health...

  14. Cardiovascular responses to hydrogen peroxide into the nucleus tractus solitarius

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, Leonardo Máximo; Colombari, Débora Simões Almeida; Menani, José V; Toney, Glenn M.; Chianca, Deoclécio Alves; Colombari, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), a major hindbrain area involved in cardiovascular regulation, receives primary afferent fibers from peripheral baroreceptors and chemoreceptors. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a relatively stable and diffusible reactive oxygen species (ROS), which acting centrally, may affect neural mechanisms. In the present study, we investigated effects of H2O2 alone or combined with the glutamatergic antagonist kynurenate into the NTS on mean arterial pressure (MAP) and ...

  15. Hydrogen sulfide activates TRPA1 and releases 5-HT from epithelioid cells of the chicken thoracic aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgermurun, Dugar; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Ichii, Osamu; Kon, Yasuhiro; Ito, Shigeo; Otsuguro, Ken-Ichi

    2016-09-01

    Epithelioid cells in the chicken thoracic aorta are chemoreceptor cells that release 5-HT in response to hypoxia. It is likely that these cells play a role in chemoreception similar to that of glomus cells in the carotid bodies of mammals. Recently, H2S was reported to be a key mediator of carotid glomus cell responses to hypoxia. The aim of the present study was to reveal the mechanism of action of H2S on 5-HT outflow from chemoreceptor cells in the chicken thoracic aorta. The 5-HT outflow induced by NaHS, an H2S donor, and Na2S3, a polysulfide, was measured by using a HPLC equipped with an electrochemical detector. NaHS (0.3-3mM) caused a concentration-dependent increase in 5-HT outflow, which was significantly inhibited by the removal of extracellular Ca(2+). 5-HT outflow induced by NaHS (0.3mM) was also significantly inhibited by voltage-dependent L- and N-type Ca(2+) channel blockers and a selective TRPA1 channel blocker. Cinnamaldehyde, a TRPA1 agonist, mimicked the secretory response to H2S. 5-HT outflow induced by Na2S3 (10μM) was also inhibited by the TRPA1 channel blocker. Furthermore, the expression of TRPA1 was localized to 5-HT-containing chemoreceptor cells in the aortic wall. These findings suggest that the activation of TRPA1 and voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels is involved in H2S-evoked 5-HT release from chemoreceptor cells in the chicken aorta.

  16. Influence of drilling muds on the primary chemosensory neurons in walking legs of the lobster, Homarus americanus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derby, C.D.; Atema, J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of whole drilling muds on the normal activity of walking leg chemosensory neurons of the lobster, Homarus americanus, were examined using extracellular neurophysiological recording techniques. Exposure of legs for 3-5 min to 10 mg/L drilling mud suspended in seawater altered responses to food odors of 29% of the chemoreceptors examined (data pooled for the two drilling muds tested); similar exposure to 100 mg/L drilling mud resulted in interference with 44% of all receptors studied. The effects of both of these concentrations are statistically significant, although they are not different from each other. Interference was usually manifested as a marked reduction in the number of action potentials in a response. In one preparation, the exposure to drilling mud caused a change in the temporal pattern of the spikes without affecting the total number of spikes. Other chemosensory neurons were excited by 10 mg/L drilling mud itself. However, not all chemoreceptors are inhibited by these drilling muds since responses to feeding stimuli were recorded from the legs of lobsters that had been exposed to drilling mud for 4-8 d before the neurophysiological experiments. Antennular and leg chemoreceptors are important in eliciting normal feeding behavior in lobsters. Although behavioral assays have demonstrated that feeding behavior is altered following exposure to drilling muds and petroleum fractions, there is no conclusive proof for a causal relationship between chemoreceptor interference and behavior deficits. The two techniques complement each other as pollution detection assays, perhaps reflecting a common interference mechanism. 42 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Evolution of a Bitter Taste Receptor Gene Cluster in a New World Sparrow

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Jamie K; Lowman, Josh J.; Thomas, Pamela J.; Boudewijn F H ten Hallers; Koriabine, Maxim; Huynh, Lynn Y; Maney, Donna L.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Martin, Christa L.; ,; Thomas, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Bitter taste perception likely evolved as a protective mechanism against the ingestion of harmful compounds in food. The evolution of the taste receptor type 2 (TAS2R) gene family, which encodes the chemoreceptors that are directly responsible for the detection of bitter compounds, has therefore been of considerable interest. Though TAS2R repertoires have been characterized for a number of species, to date the complement of TAS2Rs from just one bird, the chicken, which had a notably small num...

  18. Plasticity in Glutamatergic NTS Neurotransmission

    OpenAIRE

    Kline, David D.

    2008-01-01

    Changes in the physiological state of an animal or human can result in alterations in the cardiovascular and respiratory system in order to maintain homeostasis. Accordingly, the cardiovascular and respiratory systems are not static but readily adapt under a variety of circumstances. The same can be said for the brainstem circuits that control these systems. The nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) is the central integration site of baroreceptor and chemoreceptor sensory afferent fibers. This cen...

  19. Autonomic processing of the cardiovascular reflexes in the nucleus tractus solitarii

    OpenAIRE

    Machado B.H.; Mauad H.; Chianca Jr. D.A.; Haibara A.S.; Colombari E.

    1997-01-01

    The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) receives afferent projections from the arterial baroreceptors, carotid chemoreceptors and cardiopulmonary receptors and as a function of this information produces autonomic adjustments in order to maintain arterial blood pressure within a narrow range of variation. The activation of each of these cardiovascular afferents produces a specific autonomic response by the excitation of neuronal projections from the NTS to the ventrolateral areas of the medulla (n...

  20. Formyl peptide receptors are candidate chemosensory receptors in the vomeronasal organ

    OpenAIRE

    Liberles, Stephen D.; Horowitz, Lisa F.; Kuang, Donghui; Contos, James J.; Wilson, Kathleen L.; Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica; Liberles, David A; Buck, Linda B.

    2009-01-01

    The identification of receptors that detect environmental stimuli lays a foundation for exploring the mechanisms and neural circuits underlying sensation. The mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO), which detects pheromones and other semiochemicals, has 2 known families of chemoreceptors, V1Rs and V2Rs. Here, we report a third family of mouse VNO receptors comprising 5 of 7 members of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) family. Unlike other FPRs, which function in the immune system, these FPRs are selec...

  1. Modulation of reflexly evoked vagal bradycardias by central 5-HT1A receptors in anaesthetized rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Skinner, Matthew R; Ramage, Andrew G; Jordan, David

    2002-01-01

    The role of central 5-HT1A receptors in the control of the bradycardia and changes in central respiratory drive, renal nerve activity and blood pressure evoked by stimulating cardiopulmonary afferents with phenylbiguanide, baroreceptors by electrical stimulation of the aortic nerve and chemoreceptors by injections of sodium cyanide (NaCN) in atenolol-pretreated anaesthetized rabbits were studied.Buspirone (100 μg kg−1; i.c.) potentiated the bradycardia (increase in R-R interval) and the chang...

  2. Variation of chemosensory receptor content of Campylobacter jejuni strains and modulation of receptor gene expression under different in vivo and in vitro growth conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Day Christopher J; Hartley-Tassell Lauren E; Shewell Lucy K; King Rebecca M; Tram Greg; Day Serena K; Semchenko Evgeny A; Korolik Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Chemotaxis is crucial for the colonisation/infection of hosts with Campylobacter jejuni. Central to chemotaxis are the group A chemotaxis genes that are responsible for sensing the external environment. The distribution of group A chemoreceptor genes, as found in the C. jejuni sequenced strains, tlp1-4, 7, 10 and 11 were determined in 33 clinical human and avian isolates. Results Group A tlp gene content varied among the strains with genes encoding tlp1 (aspartate receptor...

  3. Imprecision of Adaptation in Escherichia coli Chemotaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Silke Neumann; Nikita Vladimirov; Krembel, Anna K.; Wingreen, Ned S.; Victor Sourjik

    2014-01-01

    Adaptability is an essential property of many sensory systems, enabling maintenance of a sensitive response over a range of background stimulus levels. In bacterial chemotaxis, adaptation to the preset level of pathway activity is achieved through an integral feedback mechanism based on activity-dependent methylation of chemoreceptors. It has been argued that this architecture ensures precise and robust adaptation regardless of the ambient ligand concentration, making perfect adaptation a cel...

  4. Repellent Taxis in Response to Nickel Ion Requires neither Ni2+ Transport nor the Periplasmic NikA Binding Protein▿

    OpenAIRE

    Englert, Derek L.; Adase, Christopher A.; Jayaraman, Arul; Manson, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Ni2+ and Co2+ are sensed as repellents by the Escherichia coli Tar chemoreceptor. The periplasmic Ni2+ binding protein, NikA, has been suggested to sense Ni2+. We show here that neither NikA nor the membrane-bound NikB and NikC proteins of the Ni2+ transport system are required for repellent taxis in response to Ni2+.

  5. Comparison of almitrine bismesylate and medroxyprogesterone acetate on oxygenation during wakefulness and sleep in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Daskalopoulou, E; Patakas, D.; Tsara, V; Zoglopitis, F; Maniki, E

    1990-01-01

    The effects of almitrine bismesylate and medroxyprogesterone acetate on oxygenation during wakefulness and sleep were compared in six patients with chronic obstructive lung disease and carbon dioxide retention. Patients received 1.5 mg/kg almitrine (a peripheral chemoreceptor stimulant), 100 mg of medroxyprogesterone (a central respiratory stimulant), or matched placebo daily for 15 days in random order in a crossover trial. When subjects were awake almitrine increased the ventilatory respons...

  6. A Short-Term Fasting in Neonates Induces Breathing Instability and Epigenetic Modification in the Carotid Body

    OpenAIRE

    Shirahata, Machiko; Tang, Wan-yee; Kostuk, Eric W

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory control system is not fully developed in newborn, and data suggest that adequate nutrition is important for the development of the respiratory control system. Infants need to be fed every 2–4 h to maintain appropriate energy levels, but a skip of feeding can occur due to social economical reasons or mild sickness of infants. Here, we asked questions if a short-term fasting (1) alters carotid body (CB) chemoreceptor activity and integrated function of the respiratory control sy...

  7. Conformational coupling between receptor and kinase binding sites through a conserved salt bridge in a signaling complex scaffold protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi R Ortega

    Full Text Available Bacterial chemotaxis is one of the best studied signal transduction pathways. CheW is a scaffold protein that mediates the association of the chemoreceptors and the CheA kinase in a ternary signaling complex. The effects of replacing conserved Arg62 of CheW with other residues suggested that the scaffold protein plays a more complex role than simply binding its partner proteins. Although R62A CheW had essentially the same affinity for chemoreceptors and CheA, cells expressing the mutant protein are impaired in chemotaxis. Using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations (MD, NMR spectroscopy, and circular dichroism (CD, we addressed the role of Arg62. Here we show that Arg62 forms a salt bridge with another highly conserved residue, Glu38. Although this interaction is unimportant for overall protein stability, it is essential to maintain the correct alignment of the chemoreceptor and kinase binding sites of CheW. Computational and experimental data suggest that the role of the salt bridge in maintaining the alignment of the two partner binding sites is fundamental to the function of the signaling complex but not to its assembly. We conclude that a key feature of CheW is to maintain the specific geometry between the two interaction sites required for its function as a scaffold.

  8. Optimizing chemotaxis by measuring unbound-bound transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Duncan; Dayan, Peter; Burrage, Kevin; Goodhill, Geoffrey J.

    2010-05-01

    The development of the nervous system requires nerve fibres to be guided accurately over long distances in order to make correct connections between neurons. Molecular gradients help to direct these growing fibres, by a process known as chemotaxis. However, this requires the accurate measurement of concentration differences by chemoreceptors. Here, we ask how the signals from a set of chemoreceptors interacting with a concentration gradient can best be used to determine the direction of this gradient. Prior models of chemotaxis have typically assumed that the chemoreceptors produce signals reflecting just the time-averaged binding state of those receptors. In this article, we show that in fact the optimal chemotaxis performance can be achieved when, in addition, each receptor also signals the number of unbound-to-bound transitions it experiences within the observation period. Furthermore, we show that this leads to an effective halving of the observation period required for a given level of performance. We also demonstrate that the degradation in performance observed to occur at high concentrations experimentally is likely to result not from noise intrinsic to receptor binding, but rather from noise in subsequent downstream signalling.

  9. Hygienic grooming is induced by contact chemicals in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya eYanagawa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In social insects, grooming is considered as a behavioral defense against pathogen and parasite infections since it contributes to remove microbes from their cuticle. However, stimuli which trigger this behavior are not well characterized yet. We examined if activating contact chemoreceptive sensilla could trigger grooming activities in Drosophila melanogaster. We monitored the grooming responses of decapitated flies to compounds known to activate the immune system e.g. dead Escherichia coli (Ec and lipopolysaccharides (LPS, and to tastants such as quinine, sucrose, and salt. LPS, quinine and Ec were quite effective in triggering grooming movements when touching the distal border of the wings and the legs, while sucrose had no effect. Contact chemoreceptors are necessary and sufficient to elicit such responses, as grooming could not be elicited by LPS in poxn mutants deprived of external taste sensilla, and as grooming was elicited by light when a channel rhodopsin receptor was expressed in bitter-sensitive cells expressing Gr33a. Contact chemoreceptors distributed along the distal border of the wings respond to these tastants by an increased spiking activity, in response to quinine, Ec, LPS, sucrose and KCl. These results demonstrate for the first time that bacterial compounds trigger grooming activities in D. melanogaster, and indicate that contact chemoreceptors located on the wings participate to the detection of such chemicals.

  10. Control of respiration in fish, amphibians and reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, E W; Leite, C A C; McKenzie, D J; Wang, T

    2010-05-01

    Fish and amphibians utilise a suction/force pump to ventilate gills or lungs, with the respiratory muscles innervated by cranial nerves, while reptiles have a thoracic, aspiratory pump innervated by spinal nerves. However, fish can recruit a hypobranchial pump for active jaw occlusion during hypoxia, using feeding muscles innervated by anterior spinal nerves. This same pump is used to ventilate the air-breathing organ in air-breathing fishes. Some reptiles retain a buccal force pump for use during hypoxia or exercise. All vertebrates have respiratory rhythm generators (RRG) located in the brainstem. In cyclostomes and possibly jawed fishes, this may comprise elements of the trigeminal nucleus, though in the latter group RRG neurons have been located in the reticular formation. In air-breathing fishes and amphibians, there may be separate RRG for gill and lung ventilation. There is some evidence for multiple RRG in reptiles. Both amphibians and reptiles show episodic breathing patterns that may be centrally generated, though they do respond to changes in oxygen supply. Fish and larval amphibians have chemoreceptors sensitive to oxygen partial pressure located on the gills. Hypoxia induces increased ventilation and a reflex bradycardia and may trigger aquatic surface respiration or air-breathing, though these latter activities also respond to behavioural cues. Adult amphibians and reptiles have peripheral chemoreceptors located on the carotid arteries and central chemoreceptors sensitive to blood carbon dioxide levels. Lung perfusion may be regulated by cardiac shunting and lung ventilation stimulates lung stretch receptors.

  11. Control of respiration in fish, amphibians and reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.W. Taylor

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fish and amphibians utilise a suction/force pump to ventilate gills or lungs, with the respiratory muscles innervated by cranial nerves, while reptiles have a thoracic, aspiratory pump innervated by spinal nerves. However, fish can recruit a hypobranchial pump for active jaw occlusion during hypoxia, using feeding muscles innervated by anterior spinal nerves. This same pump is used to ventilate the air-breathing organ in air-breathing fishes. Some reptiles retain a buccal force pump for use during hypoxia or exercise. All vertebrates have respiratory rhythm generators (RRG located in the brainstem. In cyclostomes and possibly jawed fishes, this may comprise elements of the trigeminal nucleus, though in the latter group RRG neurons have been located in the reticular formation. In air-breathing fishes and amphibians, there may be separate RRG for gill and lung ventilation. There is some evidence for multiple RRG in reptiles. Both amphibians and reptiles show episodic breathing patterns that may be centrally generated, though they do respond to changes in oxygen supply. Fish and larval amphibians have chemoreceptors sensitive to oxygen partial pressure located on the gills. Hypoxia induces increased ventilation and a reflex bradycardia and may trigger aquatic surface respiration or air-breathing, though these latter activities also respond to behavioural cues. Adult amphibians and reptiles have peripheral chemoreceptors located on the carotid arteries and central chemoreceptors sensitive to blood carbon dioxide levels. Lung perfusion may be regulated by cardiac shunting and lung ventilation stimulates lung stretch receptors.

  12. Towards the sensory nature of the carotid body: Hering, De Castro and Heymans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando De Castro

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The carotid body or glomus caroticum is a chemosensory organ bilaterally located between the external and internal carotid arteries. Although known by anatomists since the report included by Von Haller and Taube in the mid XVIIIth century, its detailed study started the first quarter of the XXth. The Austro-German physiologist Heinrich E. Hering studied the cardio-respiratory reflexes searched for the anatomical basis of this reflex in the carotid sinus, while the Ghent School leaded by the physio-pharmacologists Jean-François Heymans and his son Corneille focussed in the cardio-aortic reflexogenic region. In 1925, Fernando De Castro, one of the youngest and more brilliant disciples of Santiago Ramón y Cajal at the Laboratorio de Investigaciones Biológicas (Madrid, Spain, profited from some original novelties in histological procedures to study the fine structure and innervation of the carotid body. De Castro unravelled them in a series of scientific papers published between 1926 and 1929, which became the basis to consider the carotid body as a sensory receptor (or chemoreceptor to detect the chemical changes in the composition of the blood. Indeed, this was the first description of arterial chemoreceptors. Impressed by the novelty and implications of the work of De Castro, Corneille Heymans invited the Spanish neurologist to visit Ghent on two occasions (1929 and 1932, where both performed experiences together. Shortly after, Heymans visited De Castro at the Instituto Cajal (Madrid. From 1932-33, Corneille Heymans focused all his attention on the carotid body his physiological demonstration of De Castro’s hypothesis regarding chemoreceptors was awarded with the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1938, just when Spain was immersed in its catastrophic Civil War.

  13. Glutamatergic transmission in the nucleus tractus solitarii: from server to peripherals in the cardiovascular information superhighway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talman W.T.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Afferent nerves carrying signals from mechanoreceptors in the aortic arch and carotid sinus terminate predominantly in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS. Signal transduction and neurotransmission in the NTS are critical for central cardiovascular reflex control, but little was known about either until the late 1970's. None of the numerous neuroactive chemicals found in the NTS had met strict criteria as a neurotransmitter in the baroreflex arc until data suggested that the excitatory amino acid L-glutamate (GLU might be released from baroreceptor afferent terminals in the NTS. In anesthetized animals microinjection into the NTS of GLU, which can be demonstrated in terminals in the NTS, produces cardiovascular responses like those seen with activation of the baroreceptor reflex. Similar responses occur in awake animals if the chemoreceptor reflex is eliminated; otherwise, in conscious animals responses mimic those of chemoreceptor reflex activation. GLU is released in the NTS upon selective activation of the baroreceptor, and possibly the chemoreceptor, reflex. Responses to selective agonists as well as baroreflex responses are eliminated by GLU antagonists microinjected into the NTS. Non-NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors seem to predominate at primary baroreceptor synapses in the NTS while NMDA receptors may be involved at later synapses. Although inhibition of soluble guanylate cyclase attenuates responses to ionotropic glutamate agonists in the NTS, nitric oxide does not seem to play a role in glutamate transmission in the NTS. GLU may also participate in transmission at cardiovascular neurons beyond the NTS. For example, a role has been suggested for GLU in the ventrolateral medulla and spinal cord. Work continues concerning GLU signal transduction and mechanisms that modulate that transduction both at the NTS and at other cardiovascular nuclei

  14. Changes associated with laboratory rearing in antennal sensilla patterns of Triatoma infestans, Rhodnius prolixus, and Rhodnius pallescens (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalá SS

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined changes in the array of antennal sensilla of three species of Triatominae (Triatoma infestans, Rhodnius prolixus, and R. pallescens following their establishment for different periods in laboratory culture. In each case, the laboratory colonies were compared with conspecific samples taken directly from the field, by quantitative analysis of the sensilla arrays on the three distal segments of the antenna in terms of the densities of three types of chemoreceptors (basiconics and thick and thin walled trichoids and one type of mechanoreceptor (bristles. Sensilla densities were compared by ANOVA or non-parametric tests, and by multivariate discriminant analysis. Strains of the same species reared in different laboratories showed significant differences in their sensilla arrays, especially when compared to field-collected material from the same geographic origin. A Bolivian strain of T. infestans reared in the laboratory for 15 years and fed at monthly intervals, showed greatest differences from its conspecific wild forms, especially in terms of reductions in the number of chemoreceptors. By contrast, an Argentine strain of T. infestans reared for 25 years in the laboratory and fed weekly, showed a relative increase in the density of mechanoreceptors. A Colombian strain of R. prolixus reared for 20 years and fed weekly or fortnightly, showed only modest differences in the sensilla array when compared to its wild populations from the same area. However, a Colombian strain of R. pallescens reared for 12 years and fed fortnightly, did show highly significant reductions in one form of chemoreceptor compared to its conspecific wild populations. For all populations, multivariate analysis clearly discriminated between laboratory and field collected specimens, suggesting that artificial rearing can lead to modifications in the sensory array. This not only supports the idea of morphological plasticity in these species, but also suggests caution in

  15. Direct sensing and signal transduction during bacterial chemotaxis toward aromatic compounds in Comamonas testosteroni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhou; Ni, Bin; Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Wu, Yu-Fan; He, Yun-Zhe; Parales, Rebecca E; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2016-07-01

    Micro-organisms sense and chemotactically respond to aromatic compounds. Although the existence of chemoreceptors that bind to aromatic attractants and subsequently trigger chemotaxis have long been speculated, such a chemoreceptor has not been demonstrated. In this report, we demonstrated that the chemoreceptor MCP2901 from Comamonas testosteroni CNB-1 binds to aromatic compounds and initiates downstream chemotactic signaling in addition to its ability to trigger chemotaxis via citrate binding. The function of gene MCP2901 was investigated by genetic deletion from CNB-1 and genetic complementation of the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP)-null mutant CNB-1Δ20. Results showed that the expression of MCP2901 in the MCP-null mutant restored chemotaxis toward nine tested aromatic compounds and nine carboxylic acids. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) analyses demonstrated that the ligand-binding domain of MCP2901 (MCP2901LBD) bound to citrate, and weakly to gentisate and 4-hydroxybenzoate. Additionally, ITC assays indicated that MCP2901LBD bound strongly to 2,6-dihydroxybenzoate and 2-hydroxybenzoate, which are isomers of gentisate and 4-hydroxybenzoate respectively that are not metabolized by CNB-1. Agarose-in-plug and capillary assays showed that these two molecules serve as chemoattractants for CNB-1. Through constructing membrane-like MCP2901-inserted Nanodiscs and phosphorelay activity assays, we demonstrated that 2,6-dihydroxybenzoate and 2-hydroxybenzoate altered kinase activity of CheA. This is the first evidence of an MCP binding to an aromatic molecule and triggering signal transduction for bacterial chemotaxis.

  16. Phylogenetic and transcriptomic analysis of chemosensory receptors in a pair of divergent ant species reveals sex-specific signatures of odor coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaofan; Slone, Jesse D; Rokas, Antonis; Berger, Shelley L; Liebig, Jürgen; Ray, Anandasankar; Reinberg, Danny; Zwiebel, Laurence J

    2012-01-01

    Ants are a highly successful family of insects that thrive in a variety of habitats across the world. Perhaps their best-known features are complex social organization and strict division of labor, separating reproduction from the day-to-day maintenance and care of the colony, as well as strict discrimination against foreign individuals. Since these social characteristics in ants are thought to be mediated by semiochemicals, a thorough analysis of these signals, and the receptors that detect them, is critical in revealing mechanisms that lead to stereotypic behaviors. To address these questions, we have defined and characterized the major chemoreceptor families in a pair of behaviorally and evolutionarily distinct ant species, Camponotus floridanus and Harpegnathos saltator. Through comprehensive re-annotation, we show that these ant species harbor some of the largest yet known repertoires of odorant receptors (Ors) among insects, as well as a more modest number of gustatory receptors (Grs) and variant ionotropic glutamate receptors (Irs). Our phylogenetic analyses further demonstrate remarkably rapid gains and losses of ant Ors, while Grs and Irs have also experienced birth-and-death evolution to different degrees. In addition, comparisons of antennal transcriptomes between sexes identify many chemoreceptors that are differentially expressed between males and females and between species. We have also revealed an agonist for a worker-enriched OR from C. floridanus, representing the first case of a heterologously characterized ant tuning Or. Collectively, our analysis reveals a large number of ant chemoreceptors exhibiting patterns of differential expression and evolution consistent with sex/species-specific functions. These differentially expressed genes are likely associated with sex-based differences, as well as the radically different social lifestyles observed between C. floridanus and H. saltator, and thus are targets for further functional characterization

  17. Phylogenetic and transcriptomic analysis of chemosensory receptors in a pair of divergent ant species reveals sex-specific signatures of odor coding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofan Zhou

    Full Text Available Ants are a highly successful family of insects that thrive in a variety of habitats across the world. Perhaps their best-known features are complex social organization and strict division of labor, separating reproduction from the day-to-day maintenance and care of the colony, as well as strict discrimination against foreign individuals. Since these social characteristics in ants are thought to be mediated by semiochemicals, a thorough analysis of these signals, and the receptors that detect them, is critical in revealing mechanisms that lead to stereotypic behaviors. To address these questions, we have defined and characterized the major chemoreceptor families in a pair of behaviorally and evolutionarily distinct ant species, Camponotus floridanus and Harpegnathos saltator. Through comprehensive re-annotation, we show that these ant species harbor some of the largest yet known repertoires of odorant receptors (Ors among insects, as well as a more modest number of gustatory receptors (Grs and variant ionotropic glutamate receptors (Irs. Our phylogenetic analyses further demonstrate remarkably rapid gains and losses of ant Ors, while Grs and Irs have also experienced birth-and-death evolution to different degrees. In addition, comparisons of antennal transcriptomes between sexes identify many chemoreceptors that are differentially expressed between males and females and between species. We have also revealed an agonist for a worker-enriched OR from C. floridanus, representing the first case of a heterologously characterized ant tuning Or. Collectively, our analysis reveals a large number of ant chemoreceptors exhibiting patterns of differential expression and evolution consistent with sex/species-specific functions. These differentially expressed genes are likely associated with sex-based differences, as well as the radically different social lifestyles observed between C. floridanus and H. saltator, and thus are targets for further functional

  18. Divergent and conserved elements comprise the chemoreceptive repertoire of the nonblood-feeding mosquito Toxorhynchites amboinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaofan; Rinker, David C; Pitts, Ronald Jason; Rokas, Antonis; Zwiebel, Laurence J

    2014-10-01

    Many mosquito species serve as vectors of diseases such as malaria and yellow fever, wherein pathogen transmission is tightly associated with the reproductive requirement of taking vertebrate blood meals. Toxorhynchites is one of only three known mosquito genera that does not host-seek and initiates egg development in the absence of a blood-derived protein bolus. These remarkable differences make Toxorhynchites an attractive comparative reference for understanding mosquito chemosensation as it pertains to host-seeking. We performed deep transcriptome profiling of adult female Toxorhynchites amboinensis bodies, antennae and maxillary palps, and identified 25,084 protein-coding "genes" in the de novo assembly. Phylogenomic analysis of 4,266 single-copy "genes" from T. amboinensis, Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, and Culex quinquefasciatus robustly supported Ae. aegypti as the closest relative of T. amboinensis, with the two species diverged approximately 40 Ma. We identified a large number of T. amboinensis chemosensory "genes," the majority of which have orthologs in other mosquitoes. Finally, cross-species expression analyses indicated that patterns of chemoreceptor transcript abundance were very similar for chemoreceptors that are conserved between T. amboinensis and Ae. aegypti, whereas T. amboinensis appeared deficient in the variety of expressed, lineage-specific chemoreceptors. Our transcriptome assembly of T. amboinensis represents the first comprehensive genomic resource for a nonblood-feeding mosquito and establishes a foundation for future comparative studies of blood-feeding and nonblood-feeding mosquitoes. We hypothesize that chemosensory genes that display discrete patterns of evolution and abundance between T. amboinensis and blood-feeding mosquitoes are likely to play critical roles in host-seeking and hence the vectorial capacity. PMID:25326137

  19. Novel concepts for silicon-based biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoening, M.J. [Inst. of Thin Films and Interfaces, Research Centre Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Univ. of Applied Sciences Aachen, Div. Juelich (Germany); Lueth, H. [Inst. of Thin Films and Interfaces, Research Centre Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    2001-05-16

    Microfabricated semiconductor devices are becoming increasingly relevant also for (bio)-chemical sensors. The techniques will have a crucial impact in application fields such as medicine, food technology, environment, chemistry and biotechnology as well as information processing. Therefore, scientists and engineers are interested in the analytical benefits of miniaturised and microfabricated sensors. In this paper, novel concepts for silicon-based sensors are discussed: Fabrication of thin films by means of pulsed laser deposition technique; enzyme immobilisation by means of heterobifunctional cross-linking; three-dimensionally structured silicon-based chemical sensors coupled with biomolecules; and the realisation of biohybrid sensors by immobilising living cells or intact chemoreceptors to silicon transducers. (orig.)

  20. 小剂量氟哌利多复合地塞米松预防腹部手术呕吐的效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何龙江; 杨凌岚; 王淑容

    2010-01-01

    @@ 术后恶心呕吐(post-operative nausea and vomiting,PONV)占全部住院手术患者发生率约20%~37%,大手术发生率达35%~50%,高危PONV患者发生率达70%~80%.治疗PONV应针对其基础原因,选择药物应针对受累的神经递质和受体,而预防PONV的药物应主要作用于呕吐中枢的化学感受器触发区(chemoreceptor trigger zone,CTZ).

  1. Blood pressure long term regulation: A neural network model of the set point development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frías Bruno

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The notion of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS as a comparator evaluating the error signal between its rostral neural structures (RNS and the cardiovascular receptor afferents into it has been recently presented. From this perspective, stress can cause hypertension via set point changes, so offering an answer to an old question. Even though the local blood flow to tissues is influenced by circulating vasoactive hormones and also by local factors, there is yet significant sympathetic control. It is well established that the state of maturation of sympathetic innervation of blood vessels at birth varies across animal species and it takes place mostly during the postnatal period. During ontogeny, chemoreceptors are functional; they discharge when the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the arterial blood are not normal. Methods The model is a simple biological plausible adaptative neural network to simulate the development of the sympathetic nervous control. It is hypothesized that during ontogeny, from the RNS afferents to the NTS, the optimal level of each sympathetic efferent discharge is learned through the chemoreceptors' feedback. Its mean discharge leads to normal oxygen and carbon dioxide levels in each tissue. Thus, the sympathetic efferent discharge sets at the optimal level if, despite maximal drift, the local blood flow is compensated for by autoregulation. Such optimal level produces minimum chemoreceptor output, which must be maintained by the nervous system. Since blood flow is controlled by arterial blood pressure, the long-term mean level is stabilized to regulate oxygen and carbon dioxide levels. After development, the cardiopulmonary reflexes play an important role in controlling efferent sympathetic nerve activity to the kidneys and modulating sodium and water excretion. Results Starting from fixed RNS afferents to the NTS and random synaptic weight values, the sympathetic efferents converged

  2. Paragangliomas of mediastinum: A real case. Paraganglioma de mediastino: a proposito de un caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez de Alarcon, M.; Escribano Fernandez, M.; Azuara Muslera, M.V.; Delgado Mije, ED. (Hospital ' ' Infanta Cristina' ' . Servicio de Radiodiagnostico. Badajoz (Spain))

    1993-05-01

    Paragangliomas are tumors derived from the paraganglia, structures associated with the sympathetic nervous system that are formed by paraganglionic cells that derive embryologically from the neural crest (neuroectoderm). These tumors can secrete catecholamines (chromaffin paragangliomas or extraadrenal pheochromocytomas) or chemoreceptors (chemodectoma). The diagnosis of these tumors is based on clinical features and laboratory tests and they are localized by means of simple radiology and with the aid of CT, MR and ''131I-MIBG scintigraphy. We present a case of chromaffin paraganglioma located atypically in posterior mediastinum. (Author)

  3. Chemosensitivity of walking legs of the lobster Homarus americanus: neurophysiological response spectrum and thresholds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derby, C.D.; Atema, J.

    1982-01-01

    Responses of chemoreceptors in the walking legs of the lobster Homarus americanus to 35 individual compounds and 3 mixtures (prey odours and extracts) were studied using extracellular recording techniques. Compared against a standard mussel (Mytilus edulis) extract, these receptors were most sensitive to the amino acids L-glutamate, hydroxy-L-proline, L-aspartate, L-arginine, glycine, taurine, and L-alanine, as well as such other compounds as ammonium chloride, betaine, and the tripeptide glutathione. Most of these excitants are among those compounds most prevalent in the prey of lobsters.

  4. Types and distribution of the sensilla on the antennae, ovipositor and abdomen of Spalangia endius by environmental scanning electron microscopy%蝇蛹俑小蜂雌虫触角、产卵器及腹部感受器的类型和分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵海燕; 曾玲; 陆永跃; 梁广文

    2013-01-01

    The antenna], ovipositor and abdomen ultrastructures were observed with scanning electron microscopy ( SEM ) for female Spalangia endius Walker. The types, numbers, morphological characteristics and the relative positions of these sensilla were depicted. The results indicate that eight types of sensilla, namely B(o)hm bristles, chaeticum sensilla, trichodea sensilla, placoid sensilla, thick walled chemoreceptor, bristle sensilla, thin walled chemoreceptor and basiconic mastoid sensilla, were found on the surface of antenna. Four types of sensilla, namely trichodea sensilla, chaeticum sensilla, sensilla gemmiformium and coeloconica sensilla were found on the terminal abdomen. Two types of sensilla, namely trichodea sensilla and sensilla campaniformia were found on the ovipositors. Placoid sensilla and thick walled chemoreceptor mainly distributed on second funicle to seventh funicle and the club, basiconic mastoid sensilla and bristle sensilla located in third funicle to seventh funicle, thick walled chemoreceptor distributed on the club, chaeticum sensilla located in scape and pedicel, trichodea sensilla located on every segments except scape.%利用扫描电镜观察了蝇蛹俑小蜂Slalangia endius Walker雌虫触角、产卵器及腹部的超微结构,描述了其感器的形态、类型和分布.触角上共有8种感器,分别为B(o)hm氏鬃毛、毛形感器、刺形感器、板状感器、锥形乳头状感器、薄壁化学感受器、厚壁化学感受器和鬃形感器;腹部上有4种感器:毛形感器、刺形感器、芽孢形感器和腔形感器;产卵器上有两种感器:毛形感器和钟形感器;各主要感器类型在触角上的分布:板形感器和薄壁化学感受器分布在第二索节至第七索节和棒节;锥形乳头状感器和鬃形感器分布在第三索节至第七索节;厚壁化学感受器在棒节;刺形感器分布于柄节和梗节;毛形感器除了柄节外,其它各节均有分布.

  5. A quantitative study of cat epiglottal taste buds during development.

    OpenAIRE

    Stedman, H M; MISTRETTA, C.M.; Bradley, R M

    1983-01-01

    To quantify the development of upper airway chemoreceptors, epiglottal taste buds were counted in cat fetuses, kittens and adults. Taste buds with structural characteristics similar to those in the adult were observed in all fetuses close to term and in kittens from birth. During the first postnatal week a mean of 76 taste buds was present on the kitten epiglottis and by adulthood 800 were observed. The number of taste buds increased as a logarithmic function of both age and weight, but the c...

  6. Exploring the chemotactic attraction of Campylobacter jejuni in chicken colonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    Campylobacter jejuni is the primary food borne bacterial pathogen in the developed world. The most important reservoir for C. jejuni is the gut of chickens, which are colonized commensally and efficiently by this organism. Predominantly the mucus filled crypts of the lower gastrointestinal tract...... are found to be colonized by C. jejuni, and the bacteria are expected to be attracted to this particular environment by chemotaxis. In order to explore the role of chemotaxis in C. jejuni colonization we are construction deletion mutants in the putative chemoreceptors of the sequenced strain NCTC11168...

  7. Contrasted Evolution of the Vomeronasal Receptor Repertoires in Mammals and Squamate Reptiles

    OpenAIRE

    Brykczynska, Urszula; Tzika, Athanasia C.; Rodriguez, Ivan; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2013-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is an olfactory structure that detects pheromones and environmental cues. It consists of sensory neurons that express evolutionary unrelated groups of transmembrane chemoreceptors. The predominant V1R and V2R receptor repertoires are believed to detect airborne and water-soluble molecules, respectively. It has been suggested that the shift in habitat of early tetrapods from water to land is reflected by an increase in the ratio of V1R/V2R genes. Snakes, which have ...

  8. Anaesthetic challenges in carotid body tumour resection: a case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Malliwal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Carotid body tumour (CBT is an extremely rare, non-chromaffin paraganglioma arising from chemoreceptor cells at the carotid bifurcation. Reported incidence is 1-2 per 100,000. Surgical excision of the tumour, the definitive treatment, poses several anaesthetic challenges and a high incidence of perioperative morbidity and mortality (20-40%. Very few cases have been reported so far. We report the anaesthetic management of a case of CBT excision with a review of recent literature on the same. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(12.000: 3897-3900

  9. Signaling and Adaptation Modulate the Dynamics of the Photosensoric Complex of Natronomonas pharaonis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp S Orekhov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Motile bacteria and archaea respond to chemical and physical stimuli seeking optimal conditions for survival. To this end transmembrane chemo- and photoreceptors organized in large arrays initiate signaling cascades and ultimately regulate the rotation of flagellar motors. To unravel the molecular mechanism of signaling in an archaeal phototaxis complex we performed coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of a trimer of receptor/transducer dimers, namely NpSRII/NpHtrII from Natronomonas pharaonis. Signaling is regulated by a reversible methylation mechanism called adaptation, which also influences the level of basal receptor activation. Mimicking two extreme methylation states in our simulations we found conformational changes for the transmembrane region of NpSRII/NpHtrII which resemble experimentally observed light-induced changes. Further downstream in the cytoplasmic domain of the transducer the signal propagates via distinct changes in the dynamics of HAMP1, HAMP2, the adaptation domain and the binding region for the kinase CheA, where conformational rearrangements were found to be subtle. Overall these observations suggest a signaling mechanism based on dynamic allostery resembling models previously proposed for E. coli chemoreceptors, indicating similar properties of signal transduction for archaeal photoreceptors and bacterial chemoreceptors.

  10. Exogenous ecdysteroids elicit low-threshold sensory responses in spiny lobsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, M.; Case, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    Electrophysiological recordings from chemoreceptors in the lateral antennule of Panulirus interruptus reveal low threshold detection of 10/sup -13/ M ..beta..-ecdysone or 10/sup -12/ M ..cap alpha..-ecdysone with a latency of less than 1 second. Responses to either ..cap alpha..- or ..beta..-ecdysone were recorded from juvenile, female (with and without spermatophores or bearing eggs), and male lobsters in intermolt and premolt stages. Receptors responding to ..cap alpha..-ecdysone did not respond to 2.9 X 10/sup -11/ M ..beta..-ecdysone. The behavioral function of this low threshold detection is not known, but ecdysteroids may be important in intra- or interspecific communication. The short latency of this neural response to ecdysteroids strongly implicates interaction with a membrane-associated component. Thus, the chemoreceptors in the lateral antennule of P. interruptus may provide a valuable system for the study of the affinity and specificity of membrane-bound ecdysteroid receptors for comparison to previously described cytoplasmic and nuclear ecdysteroid receptors and membrane-associated receptors specific for other steroid compounds. 25 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  11. Evolutionary dynamics of olfactory receptor genes in chordates: interaction between environments and genomic contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niimura Yoshihito

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Olfaction is essential for the survival of animals. Versatile odour molecules in the environment are received by olfactory receptors (ORs, which form the largest multigene family in vertebrates. Identification of the entire repertories of OR genes using bioinformatics methods from the whole-genome sequences of diverse organisms revealed that the numbers of OR genes vary enormously, ranging from ~1,200 in rats and ~400 in humans to ~150 in zebrafish and ~15 in pufferfish. Most species have a considerable fraction of pseudogenes. Extensive phylogenetic analyses have suggested that the numbers of gene gains and losses are extremely large in the OR gene family, which is a striking example of the birth-and-death evolution. It appears that OR gene repertoires change dynamically, depending on each organism's living environment. For example, higher primates equipped with a well-developed vision system have lost a large number of OR genes. Moreover, two groups of OR genes for detecting airborne odorants greatly expanded after the time of terrestrial adaption in the tetrapod lineage, whereas fishes retain diverse repertoires of genes that were present in aquatic ancestral species. The origin of vertebrate OR genes can be traced back to the common ancestor of all chordate species, but insects, nematodes and echinoderms utilise distinctive families of chemoreceptors, suggesting that chemoreceptor genes have evolved many times independently in animal evolution.

  12. Neural reflex regulation of systemic inflammation: potential new targets for sepsis therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo eFernandez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis progresses to multiple organ dysfunction due to the uncontrolled release of inflammatory mediators, and a growing body of evidence shows that neural signals play a significant role in modulating the immune response. Thus, similar toall other physiological systems, the immune system is both connected to and regulated by the central nervous system. The efferent arc consists of the activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, sympathetic activation, the cholinergic anti-inflammatory reflex, and the local release of physiological neuromodulators. Immunosensory activity is centered on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, signals that are conveyed to the brain through different pathways. The activation of peripheral sensory nerves, i.e., vagal paraganglia by the vagus nerve, and carotid body (CB chemoreceptors by the carotid/sinus nerve are broadly discussed here. Despite cytokine receptor expression in vagal afferent fibers, pro-inflammatory cytokines have no significant effect on vagus nerve activity. Thus, the CB may be the source of immunosensory inputs and incoming neural signals and, in fact, sense inflammatory mediators, playing a protective role during sepsis. Considering that CB stimulation increases sympathetic activity and adrenal glucocorticoids release, the electrical stimulation of arterial chemoreceptors may be suitable therapeutic approach for regulating systemic inflammation.

  13. Reflex changes in breathing pattern evoked by inhalation of wood smoke in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kou, Y.R.; Lai, C.J. (National Yang-Ming Medical College, Taipei (China))

    1994-06-01

    The acute ventilatory response to inhalation of wood smoke was studied in 58 anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Wood smoke ([approximately]6 ml) was inhaled spontaneously via a tracheal cannula. Within the first two breaths of smoke inhalation, either a slowing of respiration (SR) (n=39) or an augmented inspiration (AI) (n=19) was elicited consistently in each rat. The SR was primarily due to a prolongation of expiratory duration, whereas the AI was characterized by a two-step inspiratory flow leading to an exceedingly large tidal volume. Both initial responses, usually accompanied by bradycardia and hypotension, were reduced by inhaling smoke at a decreased concentration. After these initial responses, a delayed tachypnea developed and reached its peak 6-10 breaths after inhalation of smoke. Both the SR and AI were completely abolished by bilateral cervical vagotomy. In contrast, the delayed tachypneic response was not prevented by vagotomy but was significantly attenuated by denervation of peripheral chemoreceptors. The authors conclude that the initial responses to inhalation of several tidal breaths of wood smoke are mediated through vagal bronchopulmonary afferents, whereas the delayed tachypnea may involve nonvagal mechanisms that include a stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors.

  14. Chemotaxis in Escherichia coli: a molecular model for robust precise adaptation.

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    Clinton H Hansen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemotaxis system in the bacterium Escherichia coli is remarkably sensitive to small relative changes in the concentrations of multiple chemical signals over a broad range of ambient concentrations. Interactions among receptors are crucial to this sensitivity as is precise adaptation, the return of chemoreceptor activity to prestimulus levels in a constant chemoeffector environment. Precise adaptation relies on methylation and demethylation of chemoreceptors by the enzymes CheR and CheB, respectively. Experiments indicate that when transiently bound to one receptor, these enzymes act on small assistance neighborhoods (AN of five to seven receptor homodimers. In this paper, we model a strongly coupled complex of receptors including dynamic CheR and CheB acting on ANs. The model yields sensitive response and precise adaptation over several orders of magnitude of attractant concentrations and accounts for different responses to aspartate and serine. Within the model, we explore how the precision of adaptation is limited by small AN size as well as by CheR and CheB kinetics (including dwell times, saturation, and kinetic differences among modification sites and how these kinetics contribute to noise in complex activity. The robustness of our dynamic model for precise adaptation is demonstrated by randomly varying biochemical parameters.

  15. Mapping and ultrastructure of antennal chemosensilla of the wheat bug Eurygaster maura

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto Romani; Marco Valerio Rossi Stacconi

    2009-01-01

    Antennae of the wheat stink bug Eurygaster maura L. (Hemiptera: Scutelleridae) were investigated to elucidate structure and distribution of antennal chemosensilla in females. Five type of sensilla were identified and characterized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Type 1 sensilla are mechanical and contact chemoreceptors with a single apical pore. Types 2 and 3 sensilla are multiporous chemoreceptors both with typical features of olfactory sensilla. Type 4 are multiporous peg-like sensilla, short and with a grooved surface. Type 5 are sensilla coeloconica with a smooth and aporous peg completely inserted in a sub-cuticular chamber. All types are distributed on the two flagellar segments, but we considered only the apical flagellomere in which the largest number of sensilla are located. The most abundant sensilla are type 3, while the less numerous are type 5. All types, except type 2, decreased in number from the tip to the base of the segment. The lower density of sensilla was recorded on the dorsal-internal part of the apical antennomere, while the higher density was recorded on the opposite side (extemal-ventral).

  16. Pathogenic Roles of the Carotid Body Inflammation in Sleep Apnea

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    Man Lung Fung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breathing difficulties in sleep are a hallmark of sleep-disordered breathing commonly observed in patients with sleep disorders. The pathophysiology of sleep apnea is in part due to an augmented activity of the carotid body chemoreflex. Arterial chemoreceptors in the carotid body are sensitive to inflammatory cytokines and immunogenic molecules in the circulation, because cytokine receptors are expressed in the carotid body in experimental animals and human. Intriguingly, proinflammatory cytokines are also locally produced and released in the carotid body. Also, there are significant increases in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, cytokine receptors, and inflammatory mediators in the carotid body under hypoxic conditions, suggesting an inflammatory response of the carotid body. These upregulated cytokine signaling pathways could enhance the carotid chemoreceptor activity, leading to an overactivity of the chemoreflex adversely effecting breathing instability and autonomic imbalance. This review aims to summarize findings of the literature relevant to inflammation in the carotid body, with highlights on the pathophysiological impact in sleep apnea. It is concluded that local inflammation in the carotid body plays a pathogenic role in sleep apnea, which could potentially be a therapeutic target for the treatment of the pathophysiological consequence of sleep apnea.

  17. Neural reflex regulation of systemic inflammation: potential new targets for sepsis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Ricardo; Nardocci, Gino; Navarro, Cristina; Reyes, Edison P; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Cortes, Paula P

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis progresses to multiple organ dysfunction due to the uncontrolled release of inflammatory mediators, and a growing body of evidence shows that neural signals play a significant role in modulating the immune response. Thus, similar toall other physiological systems, the immune system is both connected to and regulated by the central nervous system. The efferent arc consists of the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, sympathetic activation, the cholinergic anti-inflammatory reflex, and the local release of physiological neuromodulators. Immunosensory activity is centered on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, signals that are conveyed to the brain through different pathways. The activation of peripheral sensory nerves, i.e., vagal paraganglia by the vagus nerve, and carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors by the carotid/sinus nerve are broadly discussed here. Despite cytokine receptor expression in vagal afferent fibers, pro-inflammatory cytokines have no significant effect on vagus nerve activity. Thus, the CB may be the source of immunosensory inputs and incoming neural signals and, in fact, sense inflammatory mediators, playing a protective role during sepsis. Considering that CB stimulation increases sympathetic activity and adrenal glucocorticoids release, the electrical stimulation of arterial chemoreceptors may be suitable therapeutic approach for regulating systemic inflammation.

  18. Hypoxia inhibits abdominal expiratory nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregosi, R F; Knuth, S L; Ward, D K; Bartlett, D

    1987-07-01

    Our purpose was to examine the influence of steady-state changes in chemical stimuli, as well as discrete peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation, on abdominal expiratory motor activity. In decerebrate, paralyzed, vagotomized, and ventilated cats that had bilateral pneumothoraces, we recorded efferent activity from a phrenic nerve and from an abdominal nerve (cranial iliohypogastric nerve, L1). All cats showed phasic expiratory abdominal nerve discharge at normocapnia [end-tidal PCO2 38 +/- 2 Torr], but small doses (2-6 mg/kg) of pentobarbital sodium markedly depressed this activity. Hyperoxic hypercapnia consistently enhanced abdominal expiratory activity and shortened the burst duration. Isocapnic hypoxia caused inhibition of abdominal nerve discharge in 11 of 13 cats. Carotid sinus nerve denervation (3 cats) exacerbated the hypoxic depression of abdominal nerve activity and depressed phrenic motor output. Stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors with NaCN increased abdominal nerve discharge in 7 of 10 cats, although 2 cats exhibited marked inhibition. Four cats with intact neuraxis, but anesthetized with ketamine, yielded qualitatively similar results. We conclude that when cats are subjected to steady-state chemical stimuli in isolation (no interference from proprioceptive inputs), hypercapnia potentiates, but hypoxia attenuates, abdominal expiratory nerve activity. Mechanisms to explain the selective inhibition of expiratory motor activity by hypoxia are proposed, and physiological implications are discussed. PMID:3624126

  19. Morphology, Ultrastructure and Possible Functions of Antennal Sensilla of Sitodiplosis mosellana Géhin (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Li, Dan; Liu, Yang; Li, Xue-Jiao; Cheng, Wei-Ning; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the olfactory receptive mechanisms involved in host selection and courtship behavior of Sitodiplosis mosellana (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), one of the most important pests of wheat, scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the external morphology and ultrastructure of the antennal sensilla. The moniliform antennae exhibit obvious sexual dimorphism: antennae of the males are markedly longer than those of the females. Furthermore, each male flagellomere consists of two globular nodes, whereas each female flagellomere is cylindrical. Seven types of sensilla were identified in both sexes. Two types of s. chaetica have a lumen without dendrites and thick walls, suggesting that they are mechanoreceptors. S. trichodea and s. circumfila are typical chemoreceptors, possessing thin multiporous walls encircling a lumen with multiple dendrites. There are significantly more s. trichodea in female than in male, which may be related to host plant localization. In contrast, male s. circumfila are highly elongated compared to those of females, perhaps for pheromone detection. Peg-shaped s. coeloconica are innervated with unbranched dendrites extending from the base to the distal tip. Type 1 s. coeloconica, which have deep longitudinal grooves and finger-like projections on the surface, may serve as olfactory or humidity receptors, whereas type 2 s. coeloconica, smooth with a terminal pore, may be contact chemoreceptors. Also, this is the first report of Böhm’ bristles at proximal scape on antennae of Cecidomyiid species potentially functioning as mechanoreceptors. PMID:27623751

  20. Morphological changes induced by thermal treatment and gamma irradiation on the males' hind legs of Spodoptera littoralis (Noctuidae; Lepidoptera

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    Mai S. EL-Degwi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available External morphology of males' hind legs of Spodoptera littoralis subjected to thermal treatment (33 °C and 37 °C or/and irradiated with substerilizing doses of gamma radiation (75, 100 and 150 Gy were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM in the parental generation. Five types of sensilla have been distinguished; three types of trichoid sensilla (T1,T2 and T3, sensilla basiconica and sensilla auricillica, which are considered as olfactory chemoreceptors. Moreover, sensilla chaetica are contact chemoreceptors, whereas sensilla styloconica are thermo–hygro/gustatory mechanoreceptors. The impact of thermal treatment or/and gamma irradiation reflect a clear morphological change in S. littoralis legs'sensilla, claws, spurs and scales. Otherwise, the degree of deformity was thermal and dose dependent, as it increased with an increase of the degree of temperature and dose of irradiation applied. Substerilizing doses 75 and 100 Gy, either alone or combined with thermal treatment 33 °C, have low undesirable effects on the hind legs with successful mobility or courtship behavior. Consequently, synergistic effect of gamma radiation and thermal stress induced successful application in the integrated pest management program for controlling S. littoralis.

  1. Morphology, Ultrastructure and Possible Functions of Antennal Sensilla of Sitodiplosis mosellana Géhin (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Li, Dan; Liu, Yang; Li, Xue-Jiao; Cheng, Wei-Ning; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the olfactory receptive mechanisms involved in host selection and courtship behavior of Sitodiplosis mosellana (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), one of the most important pests of wheat, scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the external morphology and ultrastructure of the antennal sensilla. The moniliform antennae exhibit obvious sexual dimorphism: antennae of the males are markedly longer than those of the females. Furthermore, each male flagellomere consists of two globular nodes, whereas each female flagellomere is cylindrical. Seven types of sensilla were identified in both sexes. Two types of s. chaetica have a lumen without dendrites and thick walls, suggesting that they are mechanoreceptors. S. trichodea and s. circumfila are typical chemoreceptors, possessing thin multiporous walls encircling a lumen with multiple dendrites. There are significantly more s. trichodea in female than in male, which may be related to host plant localization. In contrast, male s. circumfila are highly elongated compared to those of females, perhaps for pheromone detection. Peg-shaped s. coeloconica are innervated with unbranched dendrites extending from the base to the distal tip. Type 1 s. coeloconica, which have deep longitudinal grooves and finger-like projections on the surface, may serve as olfactory or humidity receptors, whereas type 2 s. coeloconica, smooth with a terminal pore, may be contact chemoreceptors. Also, this is the first report of Böhm' bristles at proximal scape on antennae of Cecidomyiid species potentially functioning as mechanoreceptors. PMID:27623751

  2. Chemotaxis signaling systems in model beneficial plant-bacteria associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Birgit E; Hynes, Michael F; Alexandre, Gladys M

    2016-04-01

    Beneficial plant-microbe associations play critical roles in plant health. Bacterial chemotaxis provides a competitive advantage to motile flagellated bacteria in colonization of plant root surfaces, which is a prerequisite for the establishment of beneficial associations. Chemotaxis signaling enables motile soil bacteria to sense and respond to gradients of chemical compounds released by plant roots. This process allows bacteria to actively swim towards plant roots and is thus critical for competitive root surface colonization. The complete genome sequences of several plant-associated bacterial species indicate the presence of multiple chemotaxis systems and a large number of chemoreceptors. Further, most soil bacteria are motile and capable of chemotaxis, and chemotaxis-encoding genes are enriched in the bacteria found in the rhizosphere compared to the bulk soil. This review compares the architecture and diversity of chemotaxis signaling systems in model beneficial plant-associated bacteria and discusses their relevance to the rhizosphere lifestyle. While it is unclear how controlling chemotaxis via multiple parallel chemotaxis systems provides a competitive advantage to certain bacterial species, the presence of a larger number of chemoreceptors is likely to contribute to the ability of motile bacteria to survive in the soil and to compete for root surface colonization.

  3. LPS-induced c-Fos activation in NTS neurons and plasmatic cortisol increases in septic rats are suppressed by bilateral carotid chemodenervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Edison-Pablo; Abarzúa, Sebastián; Martin, Aldo; Rodríguez, Jorge; Cortés, Paula P; Fernández, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administered I.P. increases significantly the activation of c-Fos in neurons of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), which in turn activates hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. The vagus nerve appears to play a role in conveying cytokines signals to the central nervous system (CNS), since -in rodent models of sepsis- bilateral vagotomy abolishes increases in plasmatic glucocorticoid levels, but does not suppress c-Fos NTS activation. Considering that NTS also receives sensory inputs from carotid body chemoreceptors, we evaluated c-Fos activation and plasmatic cortisol levels 90 min after I.P. administration of 15 mg/kg LPS. Experiments were performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats, in control conditions and after bilateral carotid neurotomy (BCN). LPS administration significantly increases the number of c-Fos positive NTS neurons and plasmatic cortisol levels in animals with intact carotid/sinus nerves. When LPS was injected after BCN, the number of c-Fos positive NTS neurons, and plasmatic cortisol levels were not significantly modified. Our data suggest that carotid body chemoreceptors might mediate CNS activation during sepsis.

  4. Inhibitory modulation of chemoreflex bradycardia by stimulation of the nucleus raphe obscurus is mediated by 5-HT3 receptors in the NTS of awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissheimer, Karin Viana; Machado, Benedito H

    2007-03-30

    Several studies demonstrated the involvement of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and its different receptor subtypes in the modulation of neurotransmission of cardiovascular reflexes in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). Moreover, anatomic evidence suggests that nucleus raphe obscurus (ROb) is a source of 5-HT-containing terminals within the NTS. In the present study we investigated the possible changes in the cardiovascular responses to peripheral chemoreceptor activation by potassium cyanide (KCN, i.v.) following ROb stimulation with L-glutamate (10 nmol/50 nL) and also whether 5-HT3 receptors in the caudal commissural NTS are involved in this neuromodulation. The results showed that stimulation of the ROb with L-glutamate in awake rats (n=15) produced a significant reduction in the bradycardic response 30 s after the microinjection (-182+/-19 vs -236+/-10 bpm; Wilcoxon test) but no changes in the pressor response to peripheral chemoreceptor activation (43+/-4 vs 51+/-3 mmHg; two-way ANOVA) in relation to the control. Microinjection of 5--HT3 receptors antagonist granisetron (500 pmol/50 nL), but not the vehicle, into the caudal commissural NTS bilaterally prevented the reduction of chemoreflex bradycardia in response to microinjection of L-glutamate into ROb. These data indicate that 5-HT-containing projections from ROb to the NTS play an inhibitory neuromodulatory role in the chemoreflex evoked bradycardia by releasing 5-HT and activating 5-HT3 receptors in the caudal NTS.

  5. Cardiovascular responses to microinjection of L-glutamate into the NTS in AV3V-lesioned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre Antonio; Colombari, Eduardo; De Luca, Laurival A; de Almeida Colombari, Débora Simões; Menani, José V

    2004-10-29

    The excitatory amino acid L-glutamate injected into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in unanesthetized rats similar to peripheral chemoreceptor activation increases mean arterial pressure (MAP) and reduces heart rate. In this study, we investigated the effects of acute (1 day) and chronic (15 days) electrolytic lesions of the preoptic-periventricular tissue surrounding the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V region) on the pressor and bradycardic responses induced by injections of L-glutamate into the NTS or peripheral chemoreceptor activation in unanesthetized rats. Male Holtzman rats with sham or electrolytic AV3V lesions and a stainless steel cannula implanted into the NTS were used. Differently from the pressor responses (28+/-3 mm Hg) produced by injections into the NTS of sham-lesioned rats, L-glutamate (5 nmol/100 nl) injected into the NTS reduced MAP (-26+/-8 mm Hg) or produced no effect (2+/-7 mm Hg) in acute and chronic AV3V-lesioned rats, respectively. The bradycardia to l-glutamate into the NTS and the cardiovascular responses to chemoreflex activation with intravenous potassium cyanide or to baroreflex activation with intravenous phenylephrine or sodium nitroprusside were not modified by AV3V lesions. The results show that the integrity of the AV3V region is essential for the pressor responses to L-glutamate into the NTS but not for the pressor responses to chemoreflex activation, suggesting dissociation between the central mechanisms involved in these responses.

  6. Alleged silk spigots on tarantula feet: electron microscopy reveals sensory innervation, no silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foelix, Rainer; Erb, Bruno; Rast, Bastian

    2013-05-01

    Several studies on tarantulas have claimed that their tarsi could secrete fine silk threads which would provide additional safety lines for maintaining a secure foot-hold on smooth vertical surfaces. This interpretation was seriously questioned by behavioral experiments, and more recently morphological evidence indicated that the alleged spigots ("ribbed hairs") were not secretory but most likely sensory hairs (chemoreceptors). However, since fine structural studies were lacking, the sensory nature was not proven convincingly. By using transmission electron microscopy we here present clear evidence that these "ribbed hairs" contain many dendrites inside the hair lumen - as is the case in the well-known contact chemoreceptors of spiders and insects. For comparison, we also studied the fine structure of regular silk spigots on the spinnerets and found them distinctly different from sensory hairs. Finally, histological studies of a tarantula tarsus did not reveal any silk glands, which, by contrast, are easily found within the spinnerets. In conclusion, the alleged presence of silk spigots on tarantula feet is refuted. PMID:23474440

  7. 颈动脉体的生理和病理功能%Carotid body function in health and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯文龙

    2012-01-01

    外周颈动脉体化学感受器在介导低动脉血氧、高碳酸血症和酸中毒等信号过程中发挥着重要作用.它将信号传到中枢引起化学感受性反射,是低氧通气反应以及低氧血症引起循环系统一系列反应的关键.众所周知,外周和中枢化学感受器的交互作用在机体通气反应调节中至关重要,而且,颈动脉体的化学感受器活动在运动时的通气反应和体液调节中及高原地区慢性低氧所致的通气习服反应中起重要作用.在疾病状态下,如高血压、睡眠呼吸障碍(包括阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停)和充血性心力衰竭的患者以及动物疾病模型中,化学感受器的活动及其反射的敏感性都显著提高.颈动脉体在生理状况下维持着机体的血氧稳定,在病理状况下参与了疾病的发展.因此,颈动脉体的细胞和分子调节机制可用来解释许多疾病的病理生理过程.%Peripheral chemoreceptors in the carotid body play a significant role in the transduction of chemical stimuli in the arterial blood notably hypoxia,hypercapnia and acidosis to the central for eliciting the chemoreflex,which is central to the hypoxic ventilatory response and is also important for the circulatory responses to hypoxia.It is known that interactions between the peripheral and central chemoreceptors are crucial to the magnitude of the reflex response for the ventilatory control.In addition,the carotid chemoreceptor activity contributes to the ventilatory and humoral responses to exercise and also significantly to the ventilatory acclimatization to chronic hypoxia at high altitude.Under diseased conditions,there are augmented chemoreceptor activity and chemoreflex sensitivity in patients with hypertension or sleep-disordered breathing including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and congestive heart failure and also in experimental animal models mimicking these diseases.Thus,the carotid body functions to maintain the oxygen homeostasis

  8. Functional Oxygen Sensitivity of Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Plamena R; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Christie, Isabel; Sheikhbahaei, Shahriar; Turovsky, Egor; Marina, Nephtali; Korsak, Alla; Zwicker, Jennifer; Teschemacher, Anja G; Ackland, Gareth L; Funk, Gregory D; Kasparov, Sergey; Abramov, Andrey Y; Gourine, Alexander V

    2015-07-22

    In terrestrial mammals, the oxygen storage capacity of the CNS is limited, and neuronal function is rapidly impaired if oxygen supply is interrupted even for a short period of time. However, oxygen tension monitored by the peripheral (arterial) chemoreceptors is not sensitive to regional CNS differences in partial pressure of oxygen (PO2 ) that reflect variable levels of neuronal activity or local tissue hypoxia, pointing to the necessity of a functional brain oxygen sensor. This experimental animal (rats and mice) study shows that astrocytes, the most numerous brain glial cells, are sensitive to physiological changes in PO2 . Astrocytes respond to decreases in PO2 a few millimeters of mercury below normal brain oxygenation with elevations in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i). The hypoxia sensor of astrocytes resides in the mitochondria in which oxygen is consumed. Physiological decrease in PO2 inhibits astroglial mitochondrial respiration, leading to mitochondrial depolarization, production of free radicals, lipid peroxidation, activation of phospholipase C, IP3 receptors, and release of Ca(2+) from the intracellular stores. Hypoxia-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases in astrocytes trigger fusion of vesicular compartments containing ATP. Blockade of astrocytic signaling by overexpression of ATP-degrading enzymes or targeted astrocyte-specific expression of tetanus toxin light chain (to interfere with vesicular release mechanisms) within the brainstem respiratory rhythm-generating circuits reveals the fundamental physiological role of astroglial oxygen sensitivity; in low-oxygen conditions (environmental hypoxia), this mechanism increases breathing activity even in the absence of peripheral chemoreceptor oxygen sensing. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are functionally specialized CNS oxygen sensors tuned for rapid detection of physiological changes in brain oxygenation. Significance statement: Most, if not all, animal cells possess mechanisms that allow them to

  9. Suppressive effect of carbon dioxide on the activation of cold receptors in the nasal cavity of cats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glebovskii, V.D.; Baev, A.V.

    1986-05-01

    The effect of carbon dioxide concentration in the air passing through the nasal cavity on the afferent fiber impulse activity were studied in decerebrated cats. Passage of air through the nasal cavity in the direction from the nostrils to the choanes effected strong activation of cold receptors in the nasal cavity walls. When air was drawn in the opposite direction (i.e., exhaled), the receptors' activity decreases. When a 1, 3, or 6-percent CO/sub 2/-air mixture was blown through the nasal cavity, the cold receptor activity became depressed in direct proportion to the CO/sub 2/ concentration. Thus, like the receptors in the process that regulates lung distension, the cold thermoreceptors in the nasal cavity possess characteristics of chemoreceptors. 14 references.

  10. Beholding the subcellular world in your PALM: nanometer resolution optical measurements of protein assemblies in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Hari

    2012-02-01

    Key to understanding a protein's biological function is the accurate determination of its spatial distribution inside a cell. Although fluorescent protein markers enable specific targeting with molecular precision, much of this utility is lost when the resultant fusions are imaged with conventional, diffraction-limited optics. In response, several imaging modalities that rely on the stochastic activation and bleaching of single molecules, and that are capable of resolution 10x below the diffraction limit (250 nm for visible wavelengths), have emerged. This talk will cover superresolution imaging of biological structures using photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM). In addition to covering the theory, we will also discuss the use of the technique in understanding biological phenomena on the nanoscale, including the organization of bacterial chemoreceptors, the movement of actin in neuronal spines, and the stratification of focal adhesions.

  11. Directed Migration of Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Cells toward Airway Branches Organizes the Stereotypic Location of Neuroepithelial Bodies

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    Masafumi Noguchi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The airway epithelium consists of diverse cell types, including neuroendocrine (NE cells. These cells are thought to function as chemoreceptors and as a component of the stem cell niche as well as the cells of origin in small-cell lung cancer. NE cells often localize at bifurcation points of airway tubes, forming small clusters called neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs. To investigate NEB development, we established methods for 3D mapping and ex vivo 4D imaging of developing lungs. We found that NEBs localize at stereotypic positions in the bifurcation area irrespective of variations in size. Notch-Hes1 signaling contributes to the differentiation of solitary NE cells, regulating their number but not localization. Live imaging revealed that individual NE cells migrate distally to and cluster at bifurcation points, driving NEB formation. We propose that NEB development is a multistep process involving differentiation of individual NE cells and their directional migration to organize NEBs.

  12. Evidence nitric oxide mediates the vasodepressor response to hypoxia in sino-denervated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Miaokun; Reis, D.J. (Cornell Univ., New York, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Systemic hypoxia, produced in deeply anesthetized, paralyzed rats in which arterial chemoreceptors were denervated, elicited a decrease in arterial pressure (AP) averaging {minus}47 mmHg. Systemic administration of N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine (L-NO{sub 2}Arg), inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, attenuated the hypoxic depressor response by 79% and elevated AP by 21 mmHg. The effects of L-NO{sub 2}Arg on the hypoxic depressor response and arterial pressure were reversed by systemic administration of L- but not D-arginine. Elevation of AP with arginine-vasopressin or reduction of AP with nitroprusside to the pre-L-NO{sub 2}Arg levels did not modify the fall of AP to hypoxia. Endogenous NO synthesized in vivo from L-arginine, mediates most of the hypoxia depressor response.

  13. Structural Insight inot the low Affinity Between Thermotoga maritima CheA and CheB Compared to their Escherichia coli/Salmonella typhimurium Counterparts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Park; B Crane

    2011-12-31

    CheA-mediated CheB phosphorylation and the subsequent CheB-mediated demethylation of the chemoreceptors are important steps required for the bacterial chemotactic adaptation response. Although Escherichia coli CheB has been reported to interact with CheA competitively against CheY, we have observed that Thermotoga maritima CheB has no detectable CheA-binding. By determining the CheY-like domain crystal structure of T. maritima CheB, and comparing against the T. maritima CheY and Salmonella typhimurium CheB structures, we propose that the two consecutive glutamates in the {beta}4/{alpha}4 loop of T. maritima CheB that is absent in T. maritima CheY and in E. coli/S. typhimurium CheB may be one factor contributing to the low CheA affinity.

  14. Existence of a sex pheromone in Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduvidae: II. Electrophysiological correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria G. de Brito Sanchez

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available The stimulus provided by a copulating pair of Triatoma infestans significantly affects the electrical activity of the nervous system of Triatoma infestans. Electrophysiological recordings were perfomed on stationary adult males presented with stimuli of an air current carrying odors from males, females, non-copulating pairs and mating pairs. The electrophysiological response was characterized by the low frequency occurrence of biphasic compound impulses. A significant increase in the frequency of the impulses occurred in stationary males when exposed to air currents of mating pairs, when compared to that evoked by a clean air stream. Analysis of the time course of the assays, showed that the electrophisiological activity during the copula was higher than prior to or after copula. The electrophysiological evidence presented here strongly supports the existence of pheromone(s released by one or both sexes during mating and which is perceived by male chemoreceptors located on the antennae.

  15. Almitrine has no effect on gas exchange after bilateral carotid body resection in severe chronic airflow obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, W; Vermeire, P; Bogaert, E; Janssens, E; Van Maele, R

    1985-01-01

    Using a double-blind cross-over design, a single dose of 100 mg almitrine bismesylate and placebo were administered orally to eight patients with chronic airflow obstruction having undergone bilateral carotid body resection (BCBR) up to two years earlier to alleviate their extreme dyspnoea. In an open study, two other patients have been given almitrine before and three weeks after BCBR. In all patients, arterial blood gases, ventilation and breathing patterns, neuromuscular drive and hypoxic responsiveness have been studied before and three hours after drug administration. Almitrine failed to improve gas exchange in the patients with BCBR, nor did it affect ventilation, ventilatory or hypoxic drive. In the patients studied before and after BCBR, almitrine only improved gas exchange significantly before BCBR. It is concluded that in man almitrine acts solely as a peripheral chemoreceptor agonist and that the well-documented improvement in V/Q relationship is mediated through carotid body stimulation. PMID:3904873

  16. Assembly of the transmembrane domain of E. coli PhoQ histidine kinase: implications for signal transduction from molecular simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lemmin

    Full Text Available The PhoQP two-component system is a signaling complex essential for bacterial virulence and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. PhoQ is the histidine kinase chemoreceptor of this tandem machine and assembles in a homodimer conformation spanning the bacterial inner membrane. Currently, a full understanding of the PhoQ signal transduction is hindered by the lack of a complete atomistic structure. In this study, an atomistic model of the key transmembrane (TM domain is assembled by using molecular simulations, guided by experimental cross-linking data. The formation of a polar pocket involving Asn202 in the lumen of the tetrameric TM bundle is crucial for the assembly and solvation of the domain. Moreover, a concerted displacement of the TM helices at the periplasmic side is found to modulate a rotation at the cytoplasmic end, supporting the transduction of the chemical signal through a combination of scissoring and rotational movement of the TM helices.

  17. Fundamental constraints on the abundances of chemotaxis proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence

    2015-01-01

    Flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, perform directed motion in gradients of concentration of attractants and repellents in a process called chemotaxis. The E. coli chemotaxis signaling pathway is a model for signal transduction, but it has unique features. We demonstrate that the need for fast signaling necessitates high abundances of the proteins involved in this pathway. We show that further constraints on the abundances of chemotaxis proteins arise from the requirements of self-assembly, both of flagellar motors and of chemoreceptor arrays. All these constraints are specific to chemotaxis, and published data confirm that chemotaxis proteins tend to be more highly expressed than their homologs in other pathways. Employing a chemotaxis pathway model, we show that the gain of the pathway at the level of the response regulator CheY increases with overall chemotaxis protein abundances. This may explain why, at least in one E. coli strain, the abundance of all chemotaxis proteins is higher in media w...

  18. Low cost of pulmonary ventilation in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) stimulated with doxapram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovgaard, Nini; Crossley, Dane A; Wang, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    To determine the costs of pulmonary ventilation without imposing severe oxygen limitations or acidosis that normally accompany exposures to hypoxia or hypercapnia, we opted to pharmacologically stimulate ventilation with doxapram (5 and 10 mg kg(-1)) in alligators. Doxapram is used clinically to alleviate ventilatory depression in response to anaesthesia and acts primarily on the peripheral oxygen-sensitive chemoreceptors. Using this approach, we investigated the hypothesis that pulmonary ventilation is relatively modest in comparison to resting metabolic rate in crocodilians and equipped seven juvenile alligators with masks for concurrent determination of ventilation and oxygen uptake. Doxapram elicited a dose-dependent and up to fourfold rise in ventilation, primarily by increasing ventilatory frequency. The accompanying rise in oxygen uptake was very small; ventilation in resting animals constitutes no more than 5% of resting metabolic rate. The conclusion that pulmonary ventilation is energetically cheap is consistent with earlier studies on alligators where ventilation was stimulated by hypoxia or hypercapnia. PMID:26896538

  19. Ondine's curse after posterior fossa decompression: report of one case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Lun-shan; XU Min-hui

    2001-01-01

    A case of Ondine's curse after posterior fossa decompression was reported. A 33-year-old woman was admitted complaining 2 years of dizziness and progressive worsening of gait disturbances, and 1year of repetitively ictal nausea. The diagnosis of Arnold-Chiari malformations was established. Results: The patient underwent suboccipital craniectomy and C1-3 laminectomy. In addition to this decompression measure, a fascial graft was sutured between the edges of the dural incision. Postoperatively, the patient lost automatic control of her respiration during sleep and became hypercapnic and hypoxemic. Assisted ventilation was initiated. Conclusion: Ondine's curse is possibly due to insensitivity of central chemoreceptors to carbon dioxide resulting in defective control of minute ventilation.Propofol is not recommended in cases of Ondine's curse, and assisted ventilation until the restoration of automatic control of respiration can be of value. Oxygen inspiration alone is rather harmful than beneficial.

  20. Mathematical modelling of a human external respiratory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A closed system of algebraic and common differential equations solved by computer is investigated. It includes equations which describe the activity pattern of the respiratory center, the phrenic nerve, the thrust produced by the diaphragm as a function of the lung volume and discharge frequency of the phrenic nerve, as well as certain relations of the lung stretch receptors and chemoreceptors on various lung and blood characteristics, equations for lung biomechanics, pulmonary blood flow, alveolar gas exchange and capillary blood composition equations to determine various air and blood flow and gas exchange parameters, and various gas mixing and arterial and venous blood composition equations, to determine other blood, air and gas mixing characteristics. Data are presented by means of graphs and tables, and some advantages of this model over others are demonstrated by test results.

  1. On the correlation of moth flight to characteristics of a turbulent plume

    CERN Document Server

    Hadad, Tal; Liberzon, Alex; Gurka, Roi

    2013-01-01

    Several mechanisms control male moth's navigation towards a female releasing sex pheromone. Optomotor anemotaxis is a visual mechanism for the moth flight direction relative to the ground, mechanoreceptors are used for calculating its speed relative to the air current and chemoreceptors on the antennae for sampling the pheromone concentration in the air. All together result in a zigzagging flight pattern of the male moth that depends on the characteristics of its encounters with the pheromone plume. The zigzagging flight pattern includes constant counter-turnings across the wind line in an angle up to 90 degree (casting). In this paper we address how air turbulence manifests the male flight behavior in respect to the streamwise current that carries the pheromone, emphasizing a relationship between the flight speed and the turbulent plume properties. The interaction between the moth flight and the flow field characteristics was examined in a wind tunnel where moth trajectory was recorded. Particle image veloci...

  2. Analysis of antenal sensilla patterns of Rhodnius prolixus from Colombia and Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyda Esteban

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Antennal sensilla patterns were used to analyze population variation of domestic Rhodnius prolixus from six departments and states representing three biogeographical regions of Colombia and Venezuela. Discriminant analysis of the patterns of mechanoreceptors and of three types of chemoreceptors on the pedicel and flagellar segments showed clear differentiation between R. prolixus populations east and west of the Andean Cordillera. The distribution of thick and thin-walled trichoids on the second flagellar segment also showed correlation with latitude, but this was not seen in the patterns of other sensilla. The results of the sensilla patterns appear to be reflecting biogeographic features or population isolation rather than characters associated with different habitats and lend support to the idea that domestic R. prolixus originated in the eastern region of the Andes.

  3. The Carotid Body Does Not Mediate the Acute Ventilatory Effects of Leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea, E; Ribeiro, M J; Gallego-Martin, T; Yubero, S; Rigual, R; Masa, J F; Obeso, A; Conde, S V; Gonzalez, C

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is a hormone produced mostly in adipose tissue and playing a key role in the control of feeding and energy expenditure aiming to maintain a balance between food intake and metabolic activity. In recent years, it has been described that leptin might also contributes to control ventilation as the administration of the hormone reverses the hypoxia and hypercapnia commonly encountered in ob/ob mice which show absence of the functional hormone. In addition, it has been shown that the carotid body (CB) of the rat expresses leptin as well as the functional leptin-B receptor. Therefore, the possibility exists that the ventilatory effects of leptin are mediated by the CB chemoreceptors. In the experiments described below we confirm the stimulatory effect of leptin on ventilation, finding additionally that the CB does not mediate the instant to instant control of ventilation.

  4. Pathophysiology of Resistant Hypertension: The Role of Sympathetic Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas Tsioufis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistant hypertension (RH is a powerful risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Among the characteristics of patients with RH, obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, and aldosterone excess are covering a great area of the mosaic of RH phenotype. Increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS activity is present in all these underlying conditions, supporting its crucial role in the pathophysiology of antihypertensive treatment resistance. Current clinical and experimental knowledge points towards an impact of several factors on SNS activation, namely, insulin resistance, adipokines, endothelial dysfunction, cyclic intermittent hypoxaemia, aldosterone effects on central nervous system, chemoreceptors, and baroreceptors dysregulation. The further investigation and understanding of the mechanisms leading to SNS activation could reveal novel therapeutic targets and expand our treatment options in the challenging management of RH.

  5. Principles of agonist recognition in Cys-loop receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy eLynagh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cys-loop receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that are activated by a structurally diverse array of neurotransmitters, including acetylcholine, serotonin, glycine and GABA. After the term chemoreceptor emerged over 100 years ago, there was some wait until affinity labeling, molecular cloning, functional studies and X-ray crystallography experiments identified the extracellular interface of adjacent subunits as the principal site of agonist binding. The question of how subtle differences at and around agonist-binding sites of different Cys-loop receptors can accommodate transmitters as chemically diverse as glycine and serotonin has been subject to intense research over the last three decades. This review outlines the functional diversity and current structural understanding of agonist-binding sites, including those of invertebrate Cys-loop receptors. Together, this provides a framework to understand the atomic determinants involved in how these valuable therapeutic targets recognize and bind their ligands.

  6. [The mechanism of the occurrence of vomiting during the primary reaction after exposure of the body to ionizing radiations at large doses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosov, K S; Grigor'ev, Iu G; Zorin, V V; Norkin, I M

    1997-01-01

    In the experiments of dogs exposed to ionizing radiations at doses of 50 and 70 Gy, an essential role of the central mechanism in the origin of early postradiation vomiting has been confirmed. Insufficient efficiency of dimethpramide, a dophamynolytics, in this case may be connected either with initiation of other (non-dophamynosensitive) structures of the chemoreceptor trigger zone of with a growing role of the reflex way of vomiting arising due to a considerable intestinal injury that causes diarrhea. The inhibition of intestinal M-cholinoreceptors by methacine prevented diarrhea but didn't change the intensity of the vomiting reaction which, however, does not eliminate the possibility of afferentation from receptors that respond to others biologically active substances.

  7. Plasticity in glutamatergic NTS neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, David D

    2008-12-10

    Changes in the physiological state of an animal or human can result in alterations in the cardiovascular and respiratory system in order to maintain homeostasis. Accordingly, the cardiovascular and respiratory systems are not static but readily adapt under a variety of circumstances. The same can be said for the brainstem circuits that control these systems. The nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) is the central integration site of baroreceptor and chemoreceptor sensory afferent fibers. This central nucleus, and in particular the synapse between the sensory afferent and second-order NTS cell, possesses a remarkable degree of plasticity in response to a variety of stimuli, both acute and chronic. This brief review is intended to describe the plasticity observed in the NTS as well as the locus and mechanisms as they are currently understood. The functional consequence of NTS plasticity is also discussed.

  8. α1- and α2-adrenergic receptors in the retrotrapezoid nucleus differentially regulate breathing in anesthetized adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Luiz M; Moreira, Thiago S; Kuo, Fu-Shan; Mulkey, Daniel K; Takakura, Ana C

    2016-09-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) is a potent modulator of breathing that can increase/decrease respiratory activity by α1-/α2-adrenergic receptor (AR) activation, respectively. The retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) is known to contribute to central chemoreception, inspiration, and active expiration. Here we investigate the sources of catecholaminergic inputs to the RTN and identify respiratory effects produced by activation of ARs in this region. By injecting the retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold into the RTN, we identified back-labeled catecholaminergic neurons in the A7 region. In urethane-anesthetized, vagotomized, and artificially ventilated male Wistar rats unilateral injection of NE or moxonidine (α2-AR agonist) blunted diaphragm muscle activity (DiaEMG) frequency and amplitude, without changing abdominal muscle activity. Those inhibitory effects were reduced by preapplication of yohimbine (α2-AR antagonist) into the RTN. Conversely, unilateral RTN injection of phenylephrine (α1-AR agonist) increased DiaEMG amplitude and frequency and facilitated active expiration. This response was blocked by prior RTN injection of prazosin (α1-AR antagonist). Interestingly, RTN injection of propranolol (β-AR antagonist) had no effect on respiratory inhibition elicited by applications of NE into the RTN; however, the combined blockade of α2- and β-ARs (coapplication of propranolol and yohimbine) revealed an α1-AR-dependent excitatory response to NE that resulted in increase in DiaEMG frequency and facilitation of active expiration. However, blockade of α1-, α2-, or β-ARs in the RTN had minimal effect on baseline respiratory activity, on central or peripheral chemoreflexes. These results suggest that NE signaling can modulate RTN chemoreceptor function; however, endogenous NE signaling does not contribute to baseline breathing or the ventilatory response to central or peripheral chemoreceptor activity in urethane-anesthetized rats. PMID:27306670

  9. 蝇蛹金小蜂雌虫触角、产卵器及腹部感受器的扫描电镜观察%Scanning Electron Microscopic Observation on Sensilla of the Antennal, Ovipositor and Abdomen in Female of Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵海燕; 陆永跃; 曾玲; 梁广文

    2013-01-01

    应用扫描电镜对蝇蛹金小蜂Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae Rondani雌虫触角、产卵器及腹部末端上的感受器(简称感器)进行了观察。结果表明,雌蜂触角上有8种感受器类型,分别为Böhm氏鬃毛、板形感器、锥形乳头状感器、薄壁化学感器、厚壁化学感器、毛形感器、刺形感器和感觉孔;腹部上发现3种感受器类型:毛形感器、刺形感器和芽孢形感器;产卵器上分布了4种感器类型:毛形感器、刺形感器、芽孢形感器和分泌孔。本研究还对感器的形态、数量及分布进行了描述。%The antennal , ovipositor and abdomen of female wasp Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae were ob-served with scanning electron microscopy ( SEM ) .The results indicated that eight types of sensilla , namely Böhm bristles, chaeticum sensilla,trichodea sensilla, placoid sensilla, basiconic mastoid sensil-la, thick walled chemoreceptor , thin walled chemoreceptor and sensory pore , were found on the surface of the antenna .Three types of sensilla , namely trichodea sensilla , chaeticum sensilla and bud-shaped sensilla were found on the terminal abdomen .Four types of sensilla , namely trichodea sensilla , chaetic-um sensilla, bud-shaped sensilla and sensory pore , were found on the ovipositor.The types, numbers, morphological characteristics and the relative positions of these sensilla were also depicted .

  10. Mechanism of bacterial signal transduction revealed by molecular dynamics of Tsr dimers and trimers of dimers in lipid vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A Hall

    Full Text Available Bacterial chemoreceptors provide an important model for understanding signalling processes. In the serine receptor Tsr from E. coli, a binding event in the periplasmic domain of the receptor dimer causes a shift in a single transmembrane helix of roughly 0.15 nm towards the cytoplasm. This small change is propagated through the ≈ 22 nm length of the receptor, causing downstream inhibition of the kinase CheA. This requires interactions within a trimer of receptor dimers. Additionally, the signal is amplified across a 53,000 nm(2 array of chemoreceptor proteins, including ≈ 5,200 receptor trimers-of-dimers, at the cell pole. Despite a wealth of experimental data on the system, including high resolution structures of individual domains and extensive mutagenesis data, it remains uncertain how information is communicated across the receptor from the binding event to the downstream effectors. We present a molecular model of the entire Tsr dimer, and examine its behaviour using coarse-grained molecular dynamics and elastic network modelling. We observe a large bending in dimer models between the linker domain HAMP and coiled-coil domains, which is supported by experimental data. Models of the trimer of dimers, built from the dimer models, are more constrained and likely represent the signalling state. Simulations of the models in a 70 nm diameter vesicle with a biologically realistic lipid mixture reveal specific lipid interactions and oligomerisation of the trimer of dimers. The results indicate a mechanism whereby small motions of a single helix can be amplified through HAMP domain packing, to initiate large changes in the whole receptor structure.

  11. Developmental control of lateralized neuron size in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockery Shawn

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nervous systems are generally bilaterally symmetric on a gross structural and organizational level but are strongly lateralized (left/right asymmetric on a functional level. It has been previously noted that in vertebrate nervous systems, symmetrically positioned, bilateral groups of neurons in functionally lateralized brain regions differ in the size of their soma. The genetic mechanisms that control these left/right asymmetric soma size differences are unknown. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans offers the opportunity to study this question with single neuron resolution. A pair of chemosensory neurons (ASEL and ASER, which are bilaterally symmetric on several levels (projections, synaptic connectivity, gene expression patterns, are functionally lateralized in that they express distinct chemoreceptors and sense distinct chemosensory cues. Results We describe here that ASEL and ASER also differ substantially in size (soma volume, axonal and dendritic diameter, a feature that is predicted to change the voltage conduction properties of the two sensory neurons. This difference in size is not dependent on sensory input or neuronal activity but developmentally programmed by a pathway of gene regulatory factors that also control left/right asymmetric chemoreceptor expression of the two ASE neurons. This regulatory pathway funnels via the DIE-1 Zn finger transcription factor into the left/right asymmetric distribution of nucleoli that contain the rRNA regulator Fibrillarin/FIB-1, a RNA methyltransferase implicated in the non-hereditary immune disease scleroderma, which we find to be essential to establish the size differences between ASEL and ASER. Conclusions Taken together, our findings reveal a remarkable conservation of the linkage of functional lateralization with size differences across phylogeny and provide the first insights into the developmentally programmed regulatory mechanisms that control neuron size lateralities.

  12. Hemodynamic and ventilatory response to different levels of hypoxia and hypercapnia in carotid body-denervated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo J. Sabino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chemoreceptors play an important role in the autonomic modulation of circulatory and ventilatory responses to changes in arterial O2 and/or CO2. However, studies evaluating hemodynamic responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia in rats have shown inconsistent results. Our aim was to evaluate hemodynamic and respiratory responses to different levels of hypoxia and hypercapnia in conscious intact or carotid body-denervated rats. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were submitted to bilateral ligature of carotid body arteries (or sham-operation and received catheters into the left femoral artery and vein. After two days, each animal was placed into a plethysmographic chamber and, after baseline measurements of respiratory parameters and arterial pressure, each animal was subjected to three levels of hypoxia (15, 10 and 6% O2 and hypercapnia (10% CO2. RESULTS: The results indicated that 15% O2 decreased the mean arterial pressure and increased the heart rate (HR in both intact (n = 8 and carotid body-denervated (n = 7 rats. In contrast, 10% O2did not change the mean arterial pressure but still increased the HR in intact rats, and it decreased the mean arterial pressure and increased the heart rate in carotid body-denervated rats. Furthermore, 6% O2 increased the mean arterial pressure and decreased the HR in intact rats, but it decreased the mean arterial pressure and did not change the HR in carotid body-denervated rats. The 3 levels of hypoxia increased pulmonary ventilation in both groups, with attenuated responses in carotid body-denervated rats. Hypercapnia with 10% CO2 increased the mean arterial pressure and decreased HR similarly in both groups. Hypercapnia also increased pulmonary ventilation in both groups to the same extent. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that the hemodynamic and ventilatory responses varied according to the level of hypoxia. Nevertheless, the hemodynamic and ventilatory responses to hypercapnia did not depend on the

  13. Antifeedant effects of proteinase inhibitors on feeding behaviors of adult western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hak; Mullin, Christopher A

    2003-04-01

    Low-molecular-weight peptidyl proteinase inhibitors (PIs) including leupeptin, calpain inhibitor I, and calpeptin were found to be potent antifeedants for adult western corn rootworm (WCR) against the phagostimulation of cucurbitacin B (Cuc B) or a corn pollen extract (CPE). Leupeptin was the strongest (ED50 = 0.36 and 0.55 nmol/disk for Cuc B and CPE, respectively) among PIs tested with an antifeedant potency much stronger than the steroid progesterone (ED50 = 2.29 and 5.05 nmol/disk for Cuc B and CPE, respectively), but slightly less than the reference alkaloid, strychnine (ED50 = 0.17 and 0.37 nmol/disk for Cuc B and CPE, respectively). All active PIs contain a di- or tripeptidyl aldehyde moiety, indicating that PIs exert their antifeedant effects by covalent interaction with putative sulfhydryl (SH) groups on taste receptors as do these PIs with cysteine proteinases. However, opposite inhibition potency against Cuc B versus CPE by two thiol-group reducing agents, DTT and L-cysteine, and the results with other cysteine-modifying reagents obscure the net functional role of SH groups at WCR taste chemoreceptors. Surprisingly, the model phagostimulant for diabroticites, Cuc B, was more easily counteracted by these feeding deterrents than the stimulants present in CPE. Three-dimensional structure-antifeedant relationships for the PIs suggest that a novel taste chemoreception mechanism exists for these peptidyl aldehydes or that they fit partially into a strychnine binding pocket on protein chemoreceptors. Favorable economic benefit may be achieved if PIs are discovered to be useful in adult WCR control, since both pre- and postingestive sites would be targeted. PMID:12775144

  14. Effects of hypercapnia and hypocapnia on ventilatory variability and the chaotic dynamics of ventilatory flow in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiamma, Marie-Noëlle; Straus, Christian; Thibault, Sylvain; Wysocki, Marc; Baconnier, Pierre; Similowski, Thomas

    2007-05-01

    In humans, lung ventilation exhibits breath-to-breath variability and dynamics that are nonlinear, complex, sensitive to initial conditions, unpredictable in the long-term, and chaotic. Hypercapnia, as produced by the inhalation of a CO(2)-enriched gas mixture, stimulates ventilation. Hypocapnia, as produced by mechanical hyperventilation, depresses ventilation in animals and in humans during sleep, but it does not induce apnea in awake humans. This emphasizes the suprapontine influences on ventilatory control. How cortical and subcortical commands interfere thus depend on the prevailing CO(2) levels. However, CO(2) also influences the variability and complexity of ventilation. This study was designed to describe how this occurs and to test the hypothesis that CO(2) chemoreceptors are important determinants of ventilatory dynamics. Spontaneous ventilatory flow was recorded in eight healthy subjects. Breath-by-breath variability was studied through the coefficient of variation of several ventilatory variables. Chaos was assessed with the noise titration method (noise limit) and characterized with numerical indexes [largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE), sensitivity to initial conditions; Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy (KSE), unpredictability; and correlation dimension (CD), irregularity]. In all subjects, under all conditions, a positive noise limit confirmed chaos. Hypercapnia reduced breathing variability, increased LLE (P = 0.0338 vs. normocapnia; P = 0.0018 vs. hypocapnia), increased KSE, and slightly reduced CD. Hypocapnia increased variability, decreased LLE and KSE, and reduced CD. These results suggest that chemoreceptors exert a strong influence on ventilatory variability and complexity. However, complexity persists in the quasi-absence of automatic drive. Ventilatory variability and complexity could be determined by the interaction between the respiratory central pattern generator and suprapontine structures. PMID:17218438

  15. Hypoxia and electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus nerve induce Fos-like immunoreactivity within catecholaminergic and serotoninergic neurons of the rat brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, J T; Millhorn, D E

    1994-10-01

    A complete understanding of the neural mechanisms responsible for the chemoreceptor and baroreceptor reflexes requires precise knowledge of the locations and chemical phenotypes of higher-order neurons within these reflex pathways. In the present study, the protein product (Fos) of the c-fos protooncogene was used as a metabolic marker to trace central neural pathways following activation of carotid sinus nerve afferent fibers. In addition, immunohistochemical double-labeling techniques were used to define the chemical phenotypes of activated neurons. Both electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus nerve and physiological stimulation of the carotid bodies by hypoxia induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in catecholaminergic neurons containing tyrosine hydroxylase or phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase in the ventrolateral medulla oblongata and, to a lesser degree, in the dorsal vagal complex. Tyrosine hydroxylase/Fos colocalization was also observed in the locus coeruleus and the A5 noradrenergic cell group in pons. Many serotoninergic neurons in nucleus raphe pallidus, nucleus raphe magnus, and along the ventral medullary surface contained Fos-like immunoreactivity. In pons and midbrain, Fos-like immunoreactivity was observed in the lateral parabrachial and Kölliker-Fuse nuclei, the inferior colliculus, the cuneiform nucleus, and in the vicinity of the Edinger-Westphal nucleus, but no catecholaminergic or serotoninergic colocalization was observed in these regions. Although Fos-labeled cells were observed within and lateral to the dorsal raphe nucleus, few were catecholaminergic or serotoninergic. This study further defines a potential central neuroanatomical substrate for the chemoreceptor and/or baroreceptor reflexes. PMID:7814687

  16. Chemosensitivity, Cardiovascular Risk, and the Ventilatory Response to Exercise in COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K Stickland

    Full Text Available COPD is associated with elevated cardiovascular risk and a potentiated ventilatory response to exercise. Enhanced carotid chemoreceptor (CC activity/sensitivity is present in other clinical conditions, has been shown to contribute to sympathetic vasoconstrictor outflow, and is predictive of mortality. CC activity/sensitivity, and the resulting functional significance, has not been well examined in COPD. We hypothesized that CC activity/sensitivity would be elevated in COPD, and related to increased pulse wave velocity (a marker of CV risk and the ventilatory response to exercise.30 COPD patients and 10 healthy age-matched controls were examined. Participants performed baseline cardiopulmonary exercise and pulmonary function testing. CC activity was later evaluated by the drop in ventilation with breathing 100% O2, and CC sensitivity was then assessed by the ventilatory response to hypoxia (ΔVE/ΔSpO2. Peripheral arterial stiffness was subsequently evaluated by measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV using applanation tonometry while the subjects were breathing room air, and then following chemoreceptor inhibition by breathing 100% O2 for 2 minutes.CC activity, CC sensitivity, PWV and the ventilatory response to exercise were all increased in COPD relative to controls. CC sensitivity was related to PWV; however, neither CC activity nor CC sensitivity was related to the ventilatory response to exercise in COPD. CC inhibition by breathing 100% O2 normalized PWV in COPD, while no effect was observed in controls.CC activity and sensitivity are elevated in COPD, and appear related to cardiovascular risk; however, CC activity/sensitivity does not contribute to the potentiated ventilatory response to exercise.

  17. 茸卷象属感受器的扫描电镜观察%Scanning electron microscopic observations on the Sensilla of Genus Euscelophilus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解萌; 李学燕; 侯清柏; 梁醒财

    2013-01-01

    Euscelophilus is a genus of Attelabidae distributed in Asia unique.Leaf-rolling weevils of Euscelophilus are parasitic on Rosaceae obligately.To study how the leaf-rolling weevils identify their hosts,the photoreceptor,mechanoreceptor and chemoreceptor of Euscelophilus were observed by scanning electron microscopy in this research.The results show that a compound eye is composed of hexagonal ommatidia; mechanoreceptor located in the dark areas of abdominal segment,which can be distinguished as sensilla basiconic mastoid and sensilla styloconica.The top of sensilla squamiformia is spiny and there are differences among species;chemoreceptors are distributed in the antennae and mouthparts densely,including sensilla basiconica,sensilla placoclea,sensilla campaniformia,sensilla chaetica and sensilla trichodea.%本文以茸卷象为研究对象,利用扫描电子显微镜对其视觉感受器、化学感受器和物理感受器的亚显微结构进行观察,结果表明:其视觉感受器即复眼由六角形小眼紧密排列构成;物理感受器位于腹节暗区,分为乳突状感受器和栓锥状感受器两种,其中乳突状感受器顶端呈刺状并存在种间差异;化学感受器集中于触角和口器上,主要有板状感受器、刺状感受器、锥状感受器、钟状感受器和毛状感受器.

  18. Role of Rhipicephalus microplus cheliceral receptors in gustation and host differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lorena Lopes; Soares, Sara Fernandes; de Oliveira Filho, Jaires Gomes; Oliveira, Thaynara Tatielly; Pérez de León, Adalberto A; Borges, Lígia Miranda Ferreira

    2015-04-01

    Rhipicephalus microplus is considered the most economically important ectoparasite of cattle worldwide. It is known that zebuine breeds of cattle are less susceptible to tick infestation than taurine breeds. Contact chemoreceptors in the cheliceral pit sensilla of ticks respond selectively to phagostimulant compounds, however their role in blood feeding relative to host susceptibility to infestation remains to be fully understood. We addressed this topic by conducting taste electrophysiology experiments with cheliceral pit sensilla preparations of R. microplus females. Solutions of five known ixodid tick phagostimulants were tested at different concentrations: sodium (NaCl), and potassium chloride (KCl) (10(-3)-10(-1)M); glucose (10(-4)-10(-1)M); adenosine triphosphate (ATP) (10(-6)-10(-2)M); and reduced l-glutathione (GSH) (10(-6)-10(-2)M). Serum samples from six susceptible animals of the Girolando breed (5/8 Bos indicus×3/8 B. taurus) and six resistant Nelore bovines (pure B. indicus) were also tested. A dose-dependent response of gustatory neurons associated with the chelicerae sensillum to NaCl, glucose, GSH, and ATP were observed. Responses by the cheliceral inner digit pit sensilla of R. microplus to KCl and glucose were also observed and they are reported here for the first time. In addition to an electrophysiological response to known phagostimulants, chemoreceptors in the chelicera of R. microplus responded differently to serum from cattle susceptible and resistant to infestation. The cheliceral pit neurons were more responsive to serum of R. microplus resistant bovines with a higher mean spike frequency (53.5±2spikess(-1)) than to serum samples from susceptible cattle (40.3±2spikess(-1)). The implications of chemosensation during tick blood feeding are discussed.

  19. Carotid body, insulin and metabolic diseases: unravelling the links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia V Conde

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The carotid bodies (CB are peripheral chemoreceptors that sense changes in arterial blood O2, CO2 and pH levels. Hypoxia, hypercapnia and acidosis activate the CB, which respond by increasing the action potential frequency in their sensory nerve, the carotid sinus nerve (CSN. CSN activity is integrated in the brain stem to induce a panoply of cardiorespiratory reflexes aimed, primarily, to normalize the altered blood gases, via hyperventilation, and to regulate blood pressure and cardiac performance, via sympathetic nervous system (SNS activation. Besides its role in the cardiorespiratory control the CB has been proposed as a metabolic sensor implicated in the control of energy homeostasis and, more recently, in the regulation of whole body insulin sensitivity. Hypercaloric diets cause CB overactivation in rats, which seems to be at the origin of the development of insulin resistance and hypertension, core features of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Consistent with this notion, CB sensory denervation prevents metabolic and hemodynamic alterations in hypercaloric feed animal. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA is another chronic disorder characterized by increased CB activity and intimately related with several metabolic and cardiovascular abnormalities. In this manuscript we review in a concise manner the putative pathways linking CB chemoreceptors deregulation with the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and arterial hypertension. Also, the link between chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH and insulin resistance is discussed. Then, a final section is devoted to debate strategies to reduce CB activity and its use for prevention and therapeutics of metabolic diseases with an emphasis on new exciting research in the modulation of bioelectronic signals, likely to be central in the future.

  20. The Tp0684 (MglB-2) Lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum: A Glucose-Binding Protein with Divergent Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautigam, Chad A; Deka, Ranjit K; Liu, Wei Z; Norgard, Michael V

    2016-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterium that causes syphilis, is an obligate human parasite. As such, it must acquire energy, in the form of carbon sources, from the host. There is ample evidence that the principal source of energy for this spirochete is D-glucose acquired from its environment, likely via an ABC transporter. Further, there is genetic evidence of a D-glucose chemotaxis system in T. pallidum. Both of these processes may be dependent on a single lipidated chemoreceptor: Tp0684, also called TpMglB-2 for its sequence homology to MglB of Escherichia coli. To broaden our understanding of this potentially vital protein, we determined a 2.05-Å X-ray crystal structure of a soluble form of the recombinant protein. Like its namesake, TpMglB-2 adopts a bilobed fold that is similar to that of the ligand-binding proteins (LBPs) of other ABC transporters. However, the protein has an unusual, circularly permuted topology. This feature prompted a series of biophysical studies that examined whether the protein's topological distinctiveness affected its putative chemoreceptor functions. Differential scanning fluorimetry and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to confirm that the protein bound D-glucose in a cleft between its two lobes. Additionally, analytical ultracentrifugation was employed to reveal that D-glucose binding is accompanied by a significant conformational change. TpMglB-2 thus appears to be fully functional in vitro, and given the probable central importance of the protein to T. pallidum's physiology, our results have implications for the viability and pathogenicity of this obligate human pathogen.

  1. Role of Rhipicephalus microplus cheliceral receptors in gustation and host differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lorena Lopes; Soares, Sara Fernandes; de Oliveira Filho, Jaires Gomes; Oliveira, Thaynara Tatielly; Pérez de León, Adalberto A; Borges, Lígia Miranda Ferreira

    2015-04-01

    Rhipicephalus microplus is considered the most economically important ectoparasite of cattle worldwide. It is known that zebuine breeds of cattle are less susceptible to tick infestation than taurine breeds. Contact chemoreceptors in the cheliceral pit sensilla of ticks respond selectively to phagostimulant compounds, however their role in blood feeding relative to host susceptibility to infestation remains to be fully understood. We addressed this topic by conducting taste electrophysiology experiments with cheliceral pit sensilla preparations of R. microplus females. Solutions of five known ixodid tick phagostimulants were tested at different concentrations: sodium (NaCl), and potassium chloride (KCl) (10(-3)-10(-1)M); glucose (10(-4)-10(-1)M); adenosine triphosphate (ATP) (10(-6)-10(-2)M); and reduced l-glutathione (GSH) (10(-6)-10(-2)M). Serum samples from six susceptible animals of the Girolando breed (5/8 Bos indicus×3/8 B. taurus) and six resistant Nelore bovines (pure B. indicus) were also tested. A dose-dependent response of gustatory neurons associated with the chelicerae sensillum to NaCl, glucose, GSH, and ATP were observed. Responses by the cheliceral inner digit pit sensilla of R. microplus to KCl and glucose were also observed and they are reported here for the first time. In addition to an electrophysiological response to known phagostimulants, chemoreceptors in the chelicera of R. microplus responded differently to serum from cattle susceptible and resistant to infestation. The cheliceral pit neurons were more responsive to serum of R. microplus resistant bovines with a higher mean spike frequency (53.5±2spikess(-1)) than to serum samples from susceptible cattle (40.3±2spikess(-1)). The implications of chemosensation during tick blood feeding are discussed. PMID:25616714

  2. Activation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors inhibits regional sympathetic responses evoked by activation of cardiopulmonary chemoreflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Tomoko K; Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2012-09-01

    Previously we have shown that adenosine operating via the A(1) receptor subtype may inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the baroreflex arc within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and differentially increase renal (RSNA), preganglionic adrenal (pre-ASNA), and lumbar (LSNA) sympathetic nerve activity (ASNA>RSNA≥LSNA). Since the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex and the arterial baroreflex are mediated via similar medullary pathways, and glutamate is a primary transmitter in both pathways, it is likely that adenosine operating via A(1) receptors in the NTS may differentially inhibit regional sympathetic responses evoked by activation of cardiopulmonary chemoreceptors. Therefore, in urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 37) we compared regional sympathoinhibition evoked by the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (activated with right atrial injections of serotonin 5HT(3) receptor agonist phenylbiguanide, PBG, 1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors [microinjections of N(6)-cyclopentyl adenosine (CPA), 0.033-330 pmol/50 nl]. Activation of cardiopulmonary chemoreceptors evoked differential, dose-dependent sympathoinhibition (RSNA>ASNA>LSNA), and decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. These differential sympathetic responses were uniformly attenuated in dose-dependent manner by microinjections of CPA into the NTS. Volume control (n = 11) and blockade of adenosine receptor subtypes in the NTS via 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline (8-SPT, 1 nmol in 100 nl) (n = 9) did not affect the reflex responses. We conclude that activation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors uniformly inhibits neural and cardiovascular cardiopulmonary chemoreflex responses. A(1) adenosine receptors have no tonic modulatory effect on this reflex under normal conditions. However, when adenosine is released into the NTS (i.e., during stress or severe hypotension/ischemia), it may serve as negative feedback regulator for depressor and sympathoinhibitory reflexes

  3. 线虫转型发育和寄主识别的化学通讯研究进展%Research progress on chemical communication of development and host-finding of nematodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宾; 胡春祥; 石进; 蒋丽雅; 汤宗斌; 石敬夫; 赵莉蔺

    2013-01-01

    Nematodes are globally distributed invertebrates, which are often found living in soil or as parasites of animals, insects and plants. They lack vision and hearing systems, so the survival of both free-living and parasitic nematodes depends on well developed chemosensation and chemotaxis systems. Nematodes utilize chemical signals in their environment to detect food sources, potential hosts, noxious compounds, reproductive partners and sometimes to enable them to choose between alternative developmental states. Interest in the mechanisms involved in chemosensing and identification of the discrete components of the chemical signals has steadily increased over the past few decades. Here we have summarized and evaluated recent discoveries and advances in this field, involving the mechanism of developmental regulation, the recognition of hosts, the construction and function of the chemoreceptor system, signal transduction, the prospects for related research and the control of harmful nematodes based on chemical ecology. The pheromonal cues that indicate overcrowding, high temperature, or starvation can trigger the nematodes to enter into diapause and enhance longevity by modulating endocrine signaling and gene expression. The genetic and molecular basis of phenotypic plasticity has been studied extensively in Caenorhabditis elegans, and recently, it was discovered that pheromones called ascarosides secreted by C. elegans themselves induce formation of the dauer stage and the four chemoreceptors of the dauer juveniles. Recognition of hosts by nematodes is very specific and the chemical signals from the hosts, as well as the chemoreceptors of the nematodes play key roles in this process. Both free-living and parasitic nematodes can sense chemical signals comprised of water soluble and/or volatile compounds. The chemotaxis of C. elegans has been studied for over 30 years and inducing substances identified thus far include salt ion ( Na+、Li+、Cl-、OH- ) , amino acid

  4. Paramecium BBS genes are key to presence of channels in Cilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine Megan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in genes coding for ciliary proteins contribute to complex human syndromes called ciliopathies, such as Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS. We used the model organism Paramecium to focus on ciliary ion channels that affect the beat form and sensory function of motile cilia and evaluate the effects of perturbing BBS proteins on these channels. Methods We used immunoprecipitations and mass spectrometry to explore whether Paramecium proteins interact as in mammalian cells. We used RNA interference (RNAi and swimming behavior assays to examine the effects of BBS depletion on ciliary ion channels that control ciliary beating. Combining RNA interference and epitope tagging, we examined the effects of BBS depletion of BBS 7, 8 and 9 on the location of three channels and a chemoreceptor in cilia. Results We found 10 orthologs of 8 BBS genes in P. tetraurelia. BBS1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 9 co-immunoprecipitate. While RNAi reduction of BBS 7 and 9 gene products caused loss and shortening of cilia, RNAi for all BBS genes except BBS2 affected patterns of ciliary motility that are governed by ciliary ion channels. Swimming behavior assays pointed to loss of ciliary K+ channel function. Combining RNAi and epitope tagged ciliary proteins we demonstrated that a calcium activated K+ channel was no longer located in the cilia upon depletion of BBS 7, 8 or 9, consistent with the cells’ swimming behavior. The TRPP channel PKD2 was also lost from the cilia. In contrast, the ciliary voltage gated calcium channel was unaffected by BBS depletion, consistent with behavioral assays. The ciliary location of a chemoreceptor for folate was similarly unperturbed by the depletion of BBS 7, 8 or 9. Conclusions The co-immunoprecipitation of BBS 1,2,4,5,7,8, and 9 suggests a complex of BBS proteins. RNAi for BBS 7, 8 or 9 gene products causes the selective loss of K+ and PKD2 channels from the cilia while the critical voltage gated calcium channel and a

  5. Nuclear molecular imaging of paragangliomas; Imagerie moleculaire nucleaire des paragangliomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taieb, D.; Tessonnier, L.; Mundler, O. [Service central de biophysique et de medecine nucleaire, CHU de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2010-08-15

    Paragangliomas (PGL) are relatively rare neural crest tumors originating in the adrenal medulla (usually called pheochromocytoma), chemoreceptors (i.e., carotid and aortic bodies) or autonomic ganglia. These tumors are highly vascular, usually benign and slow-growing. PGL may occur as sporadic or familial entities, the latter mostly in association with germline mutations of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) B, SDHC, SDHD, SDH5, von Hippel-Lindau (VHL), ret proto-oncogene (RET), neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) (von Recklinghausen's disease), prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2) genes and TMEM127. Molecular nuclear imaging has a central role in characterization of PGL and include: somatostatin receptor imaging ({sup 111}In, {sup 68}Ga), MIBG scintigraphy ({sup 131}I, {sup 123}I), {sup 18}F-dihydroxy-phenylalanine ({sup 18}F-DOPA) positron emission tomography (PET), and {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET. The choice of the tracer is not yet fully established but the work-up of familial forms often require the combination of multiple approaches. (authors)

  6. Cxs and Panx- hemichannels in peripheral and central chemosensing in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison Pablo Reyes

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Connexins (Cxs and Pannexins (Panx form hemichannels at the plasma membrane of animals. Despite their low open probability under physiological conditions, these hemichannels release signaling molecules (i.e. ATP, Glutamate, PGE2 to the extracellular space, thus subserving in several important physiological processes.Oxygen and CO2 sensing are fundamental to the normal functioning of vertebrate organisms. Fluctuations in blood PO2, PCO2 and pH are sensed at the carotid bifurcations of adult mammals by glomus cells of the carotid bodies. Likewise, changes in pH and/or PCO2 of cerebrospinal fluid are sensed by central chemoreceptors, a group of specialized neurones distributed in the ventrolateral medulla, raphe nuclei, and some other brainstem areas.After many years of research, the molecular mechanisms involved in chemosensing process are not completely understood. This manuscript will review data regarding relationships between chemosensitive cells and the expression of channels formed by Cxs and Panx, with special emphasis in hemichannels.

  7. Two different mechanisms mediate chemotaxis to inorganic phosphate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Reyes-Darias, Jose Antonio; Ortega, Álvaro; Díez Peña, Ana Isabel; Morel, Bertrand; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is a central signaling molecule that modulates virulence in various pathogens. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, low Pi concentrations induce transcriptional alterations that increase virulence. Also, under low Pi levels, P. aeruginosa exhibits Pi chemotaxis—a process mediated by the two non-paralogous receptors CtpH and CtpL. Here we show that the two receptors operate via different mechanisms. We demonstrate that the ligand binding domain (LBD) of CtpH but not CtpL binds Pi directly. We identify the periplasmic ligand binding protein PstS as the protein that binds in its Pi loaded state to CtpL, resulting in receptor stimulation. PstS forms part of the Pi transporter and has thus a double function in Pi transport and chemotaxis. The affinity of Pi for CtpH was modest whereas that for PstS very high, which may explain why CtpH and CtpL mediate chemotaxis to high and low Pi concentrations, respectively. The pstS/ctpH double mutant was almost devoid of Pi taxis, indicating that PstS is the only CtpL Pi-shuttle. Chemotaxis mechanisms based on indirect ligand recognition were unambiguously identified in enterobacteria. The discovery of a similar mechanism in a different bacterial order, involving a different chemoreceptor type and chemoeffector suggests that such systems are widespread. PMID:27353565

  8. Central neural control of the cardiovascular system: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dampney, Roger A L

    2016-09-01

    This brief review, which is based on a lecture presented at the American Physiological Society Teaching Refresher Course on the Brain and Systems Control as part of the Experimental Biology meeting in 2015, aims to summarize current concepts of the principal mechanisms in the brain that regulate the autonomic outflow to the cardiovascular system. Such cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms do not operate in isolation but are closely coordinated with respiratory and other regulatory mechanisms to maintain homeostasis. The brain regulates the cardiovascular system by two general means: 1) feedforward regulation, often referred to as "central command," and 2) feedback or reflex regulation. In most situations (e.g., during exercise, defensive behavior, sleep, etc.), both of these general mechanisms contribute to overall cardiovascular homeostasis. The review first describes the mechanisms and central circuitry subserving the baroreceptor, chemoreceptor, and other reflexes that work together to regulate an appropriate level of blood pressure and blood oxygenation and then considers the brain mechanisms that defend the body against more complex environmental challenges, using dehydration and cold and heat stress as examples. The last section of the review considers the central mechanisms regulating cardiovascular function associated with different behaviors, with a specific focus on defensive behavior and exercise. PMID:27445275

  9. SUNCT syndrome: The materialization of a headache syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottar Sjaastad

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Ottar SjaastadDepartment of Neurology, St. Olav´s Hospital, 7006 Trondheim University Hospitals, Trondheim, NorwayAbstract: Shortlasting, unilateral, neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT syndrome is a rare headache, described by our group in 1989. This overview presents our early studies of SUNCT pathogenesis. Due to the conspicuous ictal, ocular phenomena, ie, conjunctival injection and tearing, our studies started out with ocular parameters: intraocular pressure and corneal indentation pulse amplitudes, both of which showed clear ictal increments, symptomatic side. Beat-to-beat, noninvasive blood pressure measurements during attack showed instant, systolic blood pressure rise and corresponding pulse rate decrease. Carotid body, the principal peripheral chemoreceptor, seemed to function normally. The middle cerebral artery was dilated during attacks, particularly on the symptomatic side. Finally, some viewpoints are added regarding terminology. SUNCT is a workable and accepted term. There does not seem to be any need for another, fictitious term to describe the same clinical picture.Keywords: SUNCT syndrome, intraocular blood flow, intraocular pressure, median artery blood flow, carotid body function, hypothalamic stimulation

  10. The G. L. Brown Prize Lecture. Hypoxic regulation of ion channel function and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peers, Chris

    2002-07-01

    Acute hypoxia regulates the activity of specific ion channels in a rapid and reversible manner. Such effects underlie appropriate cellular responses to hypoxia which are designed to initiate cardiorespiratory reflexes and contribute importantly to other tissue responses, all of which are designed to improve tissue O2 supply. These responses include excitation of chemoreceptors as well as pulmonary vasoconstriction and systemic vasodilatation. However, such responses may also contribute to the adverse responses to hypoxia, such as excitotoxicity in the central nervous system. Whilst numerous ion channel types are known to be modulated by acute hypoxia, the nature of the O2 sensor in most tissues remains to be identified. Prolonged (chronic) hypoxia regulates functional expression of ion channels, and so remodels excitability of various cell types. Whilst this may contribute to adaptive responses such as high-altitude acclimatization, such altered channel expression may also contribute to the onset of pathological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. Indeed, evidence is emerging that production of pathological peptides associated with Alzheimer's disease is increased during prolonged hypoxia. Such effects may account for the known increased incidence of this disease in patients who have previously endured hypoxic episodes, such as congestive heart failure and stroke. Identification of the mechanisms coupling hypoxia to the increased production of these peptides is likely to be of therapeutic benefit. PMID:12392105

  11. A mechanism for precision-sensing via a gradient-sensing pathway: a model of Escherichia coli thermotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lili; Ouyang, Qi; Tu, Yuhai

    2009-07-01

    Thermotaxis is the phenomenon where an organism directs its movement toward its preferred temperature. So far, the molecular origin for this precision-sensing behavior remains a puzzle. We propose a model of Escherichia coli thermotaxis and show that the precision-sensing behavior in E. coli thermotaxis can be carried out by the gradient-sensing chemotaxis pathway under two general conditions. First, the thermosensor response to temperature is inverted by its internal adaptation state. For E. coli, chemoreceptor Tar changes from a warm sensor to a cold sensor on increase of its methylation level. Second, temperature directly affects the adaptation kinetics. The adapted activity in E. coli increases with temperature in contrast to the perfect adaptation to chemical stimuli. Given these two conditions, E. coli thermotaxis is achieved by the cryophilic and thermophilic responses for temperature above and below a critical temperature Tc, which is encoded by internal pathway parameters. Our model results are supported by both experiments with adaptation-disabled mutants and the recent temperature impulse response measurements for wild-type cells. Tc is predicted to decrease with the background attractant concentration. This mechanism for precision sensing in an adaptive gradient-sensing system may apply to other organisms, such as Dictyostelium discoideum and Caenorhabditis elegans.

  12. Directed evolution of a bacterial sensor and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derr, Paige

    The methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins are a family of receptors in bacteria that mediate chemotaxis to diverse signals. To explore the plasticity of these proteins, we have developed a simple method for selecting cells that swim towards or away from target compounds. The procedure is based on establishing a diffusive gradient in semi-soft agar plates and does not require that the attractant be metabolized or degraded. We have applied this method to select for variants of the Escherichia coli aspartate receptor, Tar, that have a new or improved response to various chemicals such as amino acids and environmental toxins. We found that Tar can be readily mutated to respond to new chemical signals. We also present potential applications of this selection such as the development of biosensors or novel enzyme activity. The new tar alleles and the techniques described here provide a new approach for exploring the relationship between ligand binding and signal transduction by chemoreceptors and for engineering new receptors for applications in biotechnology.

  13. Imprecision of adaptation in Escherichia coli chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Neumann

    Full Text Available Adaptability is an essential property of many sensory systems, enabling maintenance of a sensitive response over a range of background stimulus levels. In bacterial chemotaxis, adaptation to the preset level of pathway activity is achieved through an integral feedback mechanism based on activity-dependent methylation of chemoreceptors. It has been argued that this architecture ensures precise and robust adaptation regardless of the ambient ligand concentration, making perfect adaptation a celebrated property of the chemotaxis system. However, possible deviations from such ideal adaptive behavior and its consequences for chemotaxis have not been explored in detail. Here we show that the chemotaxis pathway in Escherichia coli shows increasingly imprecise adaptation to higher concentrations of attractants, with a clear correlation between the time of adaptation to a step-like stimulus and the extent of imprecision. Our analysis suggests that this imprecision results from a gradual saturation of receptor methylation sites at high levels of stimulation, which prevents full recovery of the pathway activity by violating the conditions required for precise adaptation. We further use computer simulations to show that limited imprecision of adaptation has little effect on the rate of chemotactic drift of a bacterial population in gradients, but hinders precise accumulation at the peak of the gradient. Finally, we show that for two major chemoeffectors, serine and cysteine, failure of adaptation at concentrations above 1 mM might prevent bacteria from accumulating at toxic concentrations of these amino acids.

  14. Chemotactic response and adaptation dynamics in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Clausznitzer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Adaptation of the chemotaxis sensory pathway of the bacterium Escherichia coli is integral for detecting chemicals over a wide range of background concentrations, ultimately allowing cells to swim towards sources of attractant and away from repellents. Its biochemical mechanism based on methylation and demethylation of chemoreceptors has long been known. Despite the importance of adaptation for cell memory and behavior, the dynamics of adaptation are difficult to reconcile with current models of precise adaptation. Here, we follow time courses of signaling in response to concentration step changes of attractant using in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements. Specifically, we use a condensed representation of adaptation time courses for efficient evaluation of different adaptation models. To quantitatively explain the data, we finally develop a dynamic model for signaling and adaptation based on the attractant flow in the experiment, signaling by cooperative receptor complexes, and multiple layers of feedback regulation for adaptation. We experimentally confirm the predicted effects of changing the enzyme-expression level and bypassing the negative feedback for demethylation. Our data analysis suggests significant imprecision in adaptation for large additions. Furthermore, our model predicts highly regulated, ultrafast adaptation in response to removal of attractant, which may be useful for fast reorientation of the cell and noise reduction in adaptation.

  15. Sympathetic hyperactivity influences chemosensor function in patients with end-stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autonomic neuropathy is common in patients suffering from end-stage renal disease (ESRD. This may in part explain the high cardiovascular mortality in these patients. Chemosensory function is involved in autonomic cardiovascular control and is mechanistically linked to the sympathetic tone. Objective The aim of the present study was to assess whether sympathetic hyperactivity contributes to an altered chemosensory function in ESRD. Materials and methods In a randomized, double-masked, placebo controlled crossover design we studied the impact of chemosensory deactivation on heart rate, blood pressure and oxygen saturation in 10 ESRD patients and 10 age and gender matched controls. The difference in the R-R intervals divided by the difference in the oxygen pressures before and after deactivation of the chemoreceptors by 5-min inhalation of 7 L oxygen was calculated as the hyperoxic chemoreflex sensitivity (CHRS. Placebo consisted of breathing room air. Baseline sympathetic activity was characterized by plasma catecholamine levels and 24-h time-domain heart rate variability (HRV parameters. Results Plasma norepinephrine levels were increased (1.6 ± 0.4 vs. 5.8 ± 0.6; P Conclusion Sympathetic hyperactivity influences chemosensory function in ESRD resulting in an impaired hyperoxic CHRS.

  16. The Nucleus of the Solitary Tract and the coordination of respiratory and sympathetic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B. Zoccal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that breathing introduces rhythmical oscillations in the heart rate and arterial pressure levels. Sympathetic oscillations coupled to the respiratory activity have been suggested as an important homeostatic mechanism optimizing tissue perfusion and blood gas uptake/delivery. This respiratory-sympathetic coupling is strengthened in conditions of blood gas challenges (hypoxia and hypercapnia as a result of the synchronized activation of brainstem respiratory and sympathetic neurons, culminating with the emergence of entrained cardiovascular and respiratory reflex responses. Studies have proposed that the ventrolateral region of the medulla oblongata is a major site of synaptic interaction between respiratory and sympathetic neurons. However, other brainstem regions also play a relevant role in the patterning of respiratory and sympathetic motor outputs. Recent findings suggest that the neurons of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, in the dorsal medulla, are essential for the processing and coordination of respiratory and sympathetic responses to hypoxia. The NTS is the first synaptic station of the cardiorespiratory afferent inputs, including peripheral chemoreceptors, baroreceptors and pulmonary stretch receptors. The synaptic profile of the NTS neurons receiving the excitatory drive from afferent inputs is complex and involves distinct neurotransmitters, including glutamate, ATP and acetylcholine. In the present review we discuss the role of the NTS circuitry in coordinating sympathetic and respiratory reflex responses. We also analyze the neuroplasticity of NTS neurons and their contribution for the development of cardiorespiratory dysfunctions, as observed in neurogenic hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic disorders.

  17. Understanding the link between single cell and population scale responses of Escherichia coli in differing ligand gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Edgington

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We formulate an agent-based population model of Escherichia coli cells which incorporates a description of the chemotaxis signalling cascade at the single cell scale. The model is used to gain insight into the link between the signalling cascade dynamics and the overall population response to differing chemoattractant gradients. Firstly, we consider how the observed variation in total (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated signalling protein concentration affects the ability of cells to accumulate in differing chemoattractant gradients. Results reveal that a variation in total cell protein concentration between cells may be a mechanism for the survival of cell colonies across a wide range of differing environments. We then study the response of cells in the presence of two different chemoattractants. In doing so we demonstrate that the population scale response depends not on the absolute concentration of each chemoattractant but on the sensitivity of the chemoreceptors to their respective concentrations. Our results show the clear link between single cell features and the overall environment in which cells reside.

  18. Cellulose fermentation by nitrogen-fixing anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canale-Parola, E.

    1992-12-13

    In anaerobic natural environments cellulose is degraded to methane, carbon dioxide and other products by the combined activities of many diverse microorganisms. We are simulating processes occurring in natural environments by constructing biologically-defined, stable, heterogeneous bacterial communities (consortia) that we use as in vitro systems for quantitative studies of cellulose degradation under conditions of combined nitrogen deprivation. These studies include the investigation of (i) metabolic interactions among members of cellulose-degrading microbial populations, and (ii) processes that regulate the activity or biosynthesis of cellulolytic enzymes. In addition, we are studying the sensory mechanisms that, in natural environments, may enable motile cellulolytic bacteria to migrate toward cellulose. This part of our work includes biochemical characterization of the cellobiose chemoreceptor of cellulolytic bacteria. Finally, an important aspect of our research is the investigation of the mechanisms by which multienzyme complexes of anaerobic bacteria catalyze the depolymerization of crystalline cellulose and of other plant cell wall polysacchaddes. The research will provide fundamental information on the physiology and ecology of cellulose-fermenting, N{sub 2}-fixing bacteria, and on the intricate processes involved in C and N cycling in anaerobic environments. Furthermore, the information will be valuable for the development of practical applications, such as the conversion of plant biomass (e.g., agricultural, forestry and municipal wastes) to automotive fuels such as ethanol.

  19. Chemotaxis receptor complexes: from signaling to assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G Endres

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Complexes of chemoreceptors in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane allow for the sensing of ligands with remarkable sensitivity. Despite the excellent characterization of the chemotaxis signaling network, very little is known about what controls receptor complex size. Here we use in vitro signaling data to model the distribution of complex sizes. In particular, we model Tar receptors in membranes as an ensemble of different sized oligomer complexes, i.e., receptor dimers, dimers of dimers, and trimers of dimers, where the relative free energies, including receptor modification, ligand binding, and interaction with the kinase CheA determine the size distribution. Our model compares favorably with a variety of signaling data, including dose-response curves of receptor activity and the dependence of activity on receptor density in the membrane. We propose that the kinetics of complex assembly can be measured in vitro from the temporal response to a perturbation of the complex free energies, e.g., by addition of ligand.

  20. 产程中的胎儿监护

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王潇; 李笑天

    2015-01-01

    Fetal heart rate is under the control of autonomic nerves system and chemoreceptors , reflecting the fetus heart and medulla in response to the maternal-fetal blood supply , acidosis and anoxia . Electronic fetal monitoring during delivery is used to check the baby′s health in utero and the results are divided into 3 levels.According to the results of electronic fetal monitoring , level-to-level administration is applied for the patients , which is benefit of recognizing and treating fetus hypoxia and acidosis in utero timely and avoides fetal death .%胎心率受到自主神经系统、化学感受器等多因素影响,是胎儿心脏和延髓对母胎血供、酸中毒和缺氧情况的反映。产时胎心监护用于评估胎儿宫内情况,可分为三级胎心率。根据产时胎心监护对患者进行科学分级管理,将有利于及时识别和处理胎儿宫内缺氧和酸中毒,预防胎儿死亡。

  1. Immunohistochemical analysis of cytochrome P4501A induction in organs and cell types of Rivulus marmoratus exposed to waterborne 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegeman, J.; Smolowitz, R.; Burnett, K.; DiBona, D. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA (United States)]|[Medical College of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Identifying target cells and organs is critical to establishing the sites and mechanisms of toxicity of Ah-receptor agonists. Previous studies have described the localization of CYPLA induced in multiple organs of fish exposed to Ah-receptor agonists. Here the authors compare the responses in multiple cell types and organs of small fish (Rivulus) exposed to waterborne TCDD. Adult fish were exposed to TCDD at concentrations from 0.01 to 10 ng/liter for 48 hours, then prepared and analyzed by immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibody to teleost CYPIAI. At the highest dose profound induction was detected in virtually every organ. Structures staining intensely were: nasal and cephalic chemoreceptors, including sensory and basal cells; superficial cells in skin and pharynx; cartilage cells (chondrocytes) in the head, gills, growth plates and fins; epithelial and endothelial cells of liver, gut, kidney, and gill; pseudobranch vessels and glandular cells; eye lens epithelium; endothelium in vessels of eye, brain, skin, muscle, thymus and gonad. Lesser concentrations of TCDD elicited less strong responses, and control fish showed mild staining only in cartilage structures. The dose-dependent patterns of induction differed between different cell types. Responsive cells identified is these fish indicate sites where toxicity associated with Ah-receptor agonists or with CYPLA function may be expressed.

  2. Ventilatory response to high inspired carbon dioxide concentrations in anesthetized dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack A Loeppky

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The ventilation ( response to inspired CO 2 has been extensively studied, but rarely with concentrations >10%. Aims : These experiments were performed to determine whether would increase correspondingly to higher concentrations and according to conventional chemoreceptor time delays. Materials and Methods : We exposed anesthetized dogs acutely, with and without vagotomy and electrical stimulation of the right vagus, to 20-100% CO 2 -balance O 2 .and to 0 and 10% O 2 -balance N 2 . Results : The time delays decreased and response magnitude increased with increasing concentrations (p<0.01, but at higher concentrations the time delays were shorter than expected, i.e., 0.5 s to double at 100% CO 2 , with the response to 0% O 2 being ~3 s slower. Right vagotomy significantly reduced baseline breathing frequency (fR, increased tidal volume (VT and increased the time delay by ~3 s. Bilateral vagotomy further reduced baseline fR and , and reduced the response to CO 2 and increased the time delay by ~12 s. Electro-stimulation of the peripheral right vagus while inspiring CO 2 caused a 13 s asystole and further reduced and delayed the response, especially after bilateral vagotomy, shifting the mode from VT to fR. Conclusions : Results indicate that airway or lung receptors responded to the rapid increase in lung H + and that vagal afferents and unimpaired circulation seem necessary for the initial rapid response to high CO 2 concentrations by receptors upstream from the aortic bodies.

  3. The influence of cell crawling onto cell-cell chemical signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffanais, Roland

    2012-11-01

    Chemotactic cells such as amoebae and leukocytes are able to aggregate and self-organize by means of local cell-cell chemical signaling. The chemical cAMP, which is produced by the cell, diffuses through the fluid from the emitting cell's membrane and binds to the neighboring cells' chemoreceptors. Such a purely diffusive view of this chemical signaling process fails to account for the fact that the cell's membrane constantly underges motions in relation with the specific motile behavior of these cells, namely crawling. We investigate the influence of cell motion/crawling onto the effectiveness of short-range chemical signaling. Our model is built on the study of an advection-diffusion process at the microscale of a cell for which diffusion is relatively ``fast,'' and the flow generated by the cell while crawling is an incompressible Stokes flow given the smallness of the Reynolds number. A particular emphasis is placed on the effects of advection onto the generation of a steeper chemical gradient which can have a significant impact onto the chemosensing effectiveness.

  4. Soluble proteins of chemical communication: an overview across arthropods

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    Paolo ePelosi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Detection of chemical signals both in insects and in vertebrates is mediated by soluble proteins, highly concentrated in olfactory organs, which bind semiochemicals and activate, with still largely unknown mechanisms, specific chemoreceptors. The same proteins are often found in structures where pheromones are synthesised and released, where they likely perform a second role in solubilising and delivering chemical messengers in the environment.A single class of soluble polypeptides, called Odorant-Binding Proteins (OBPs is known in vertebrates, while two have been identified in insects, OBPs and CSPs (Chemosensory Proteins. Despite their common name, OBPs of vertebrates bear no structural similarity with those of insects. We observed that in arthropods OBPs are strictly limited to insects, while a few members of the CSP family have been found in crustacean and other arthropods, where however, based on their very limited numbers, a function in chemical communication seems unlikely.The question we address in this review is whether another class of soluble proteins may have been adopted by other arthropods to perform the role of OBPs and CSPs in insects. We propose that lipid-transporter proteins of the Niemann-Pick type C2 family could represent likely candidates and report the results of an analysis of their sequences in representative species of different arthropods.

  5. The dynamics in the bacterial chemosensory arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaknin, Ady

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial chemoreceptors form two-dimensional sensory arrays on the cell membrane. These sensory arrays, which contain thousands of molecules, detect chemical changes in the environment of the bacterial cell and accordingly control its swimming behaviour, allowing these bacteria to track chemical gradients. It was recently demonstrated that stimulus, by ligand binding, alters the physical organization of these arrays, with dynamics that follow an apparent logarithmic time dependence. Such non-exponential dynamics is often observed in glass-like systems in which the internal dynamics slow down exponentially as the system approaches its equilibrium state. In a few of these `glassy' systems it was also demonstrated that after altering the equilibrium state of the system for a certain time tw the ensuing relaxation scales with tw. Here, we examined the relaxation of the receptor arrays in the bacterium E. coli after a perturbation by ligand binding for varying periods of times. We find that changing the time tw, during which the stimulus was present, affects mostly the deviation of the receptor arrays from equilibrium, but the dynamics of the relaxation seem to be independent of tw. A possible interpretation is discussed.

  6. Cross-modal tactile-taste interactions in food evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, B G; Carmichael, D A; Simner, J

    2016-07-29

    Detecting the taste components within a flavoured substance relies on exposing chemoreceptors within the mouth to the chemical components of ingested food. In our paper, we show that the evaluation of taste components can also be influenced by the tactile quality of the food. We first discuss how multisensory factors might influence taste, flavour and smell for both typical and atypical (synaesthetic) populations and we then present two empirical studies showing tactile-taste interactions in the general population. We asked a group of non-synaesthetic adults to evaluate the taste components of flavoured food substances, whilst we presented simultaneous cross-sensory visuo-tactile cues within the eating environment. Specifically, we presented foodstuffs between subjects that were otherwise identical but had a rough versus smooth surface, or were served on a rough versus smooth serving-plate. We found no effect of the serving-plate, but we found the rough/smoothness of the foodstuff itself significantly influenced perception: food was rated as significantly more sour if it had a rough (versus smooth) surface. In modifying taste perception via ostensibly unrelated dimensions, we demonstrate that the detection of tastes within flavours may be influenced by higher level cross-sensory cues. Finally, we suggest that the direction of our cross-sensory associations may speak to the types of hedonic mapping found both in normal multisensory integration, and in the unusual condition of synaesthesia.

  7. Amino acid specificity of fibers of the facial/trigeminal complex innervating the maxillary barbel in the Japanese sea catfish, Plotosus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprio, John; Shimohara, Mami; Marui, Takayuki; Kohbara, Jun; Harada, Shuitsu; Kiyohara, Sadao

    2015-12-01

    The Japanese sea catfish, Plotosus japonicus, possesses taste and solitary chemoreceptor cells (SCCs) located on the external body surface that detect specific water-soluble substances. Here, we identify two major fiber types of the facial/trigeminal complex that transmit amino acid information to the medulla. Both single and few fiber preparations respond to amino acid stimulation in the 0.1 μM to mM range. One fiber type responds best to glycine and l-alanine (i.e. Gly/Ala fibers) whereas the other fiber type is best stimulated by l-proline and glycine betaine (hereafter referred to only as betaine) (i.e. Pro/Bet fibers). We demonstrate that betaine, which does not alter the pH of the seawater and therefore does not activate the animals' highly sensitive pH sensors (Caprio et al., Science 344:1154-1156, 2014), is sufficient to elicit appetitive food search behavior. We further show that the amino acid specificity of fibers of the facial/trigeminal complex in P. japonicus is different from that in Ariopsis felis (Michel and Caprio, J. Neurophysiol. 66:247-260, 1991; Michel et al., J. Comp. Physiol. A. 172:129-138, 1993), a representative member of the only other family (Ariidae) of extant marine catfishes.

  8. The G. L. Brown Prize Lecture. Hypoxic regulation of ion channel function and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peers, Chris

    2002-07-01

    Acute hypoxia regulates the activity of specific ion channels in a rapid and reversible manner. Such effects underlie appropriate cellular responses to hypoxia which are designed to initiate cardiorespiratory reflexes and contribute importantly to other tissue responses, all of which are designed to improve tissue O2 supply. These responses include excitation of chemoreceptors as well as pulmonary vasoconstriction and systemic vasodilatation. However, such responses may also contribute to the adverse responses to hypoxia, such as excitotoxicity in the central nervous system. Whilst numerous ion channel types are known to be modulated by acute hypoxia, the nature of the O2 sensor in most tissues remains to be identified. Prolonged (chronic) hypoxia regulates functional expression of ion channels, and so remodels excitability of various cell types. Whilst this may contribute to adaptive responses such as high-altitude acclimatization, such altered channel expression may also contribute to the onset of pathological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. Indeed, evidence is emerging that production of pathological peptides associated with Alzheimer's disease is increased during prolonged hypoxia. Such effects may account for the known increased incidence of this disease in patients who have previously endured hypoxic episodes, such as congestive heart failure and stroke. Identification of the mechanisms coupling hypoxia to the increased production of these peptides is likely to be of therapeutic benefit.

  9. Oxygen sensing by the carotid body: mechanisms and role in adaptation to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barneo, José; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Gao, Lin; Fernández-Agüera, M Carmen; Pardal, Ricardo; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia

    2016-04-15

    Oxygen (O2) is fundamental for cell and whole-body homeostasis. Our understanding of the adaptive processes that take place in response to a lack of O2(hypoxia) has progressed significantly in recent years. The carotid body (CB) is the main arterial chemoreceptor that mediates the acute cardiorespiratory reflexes (hyperventilation and sympathetic activation) triggered by hypoxia. The CB is composed of clusters of cells (glomeruli) in close contact with blood vessels and nerve fibers. Glomus cells, the O2-sensitive elements in the CB, are neuron-like cells that contain O2-sensitive K(+)channels, which are inhibited by hypoxia. This leads to cell depolarization, Ca(2+)entry, and the release of transmitters to activate sensory fibers terminating at the respiratory center. The mechanism whereby O2modulates K(+)channels has remained elusive, although several appealing hypotheses have been postulated. Recent data suggest that mitochondria complex I signaling to membrane K(+)channels plays a fundamental role in acute O2sensing. CB activation during exposure to low Po2is also necessary for acclimatization to chronic hypoxia. CB growth during sustained hypoxia depends on the activation of a resident population of stem cells, which are also activated by transmitters released from the O2-sensitive glomus cells. These advances should foster further studies on the role of CB dysfunction in the pathogenesis of highly prevalent human diseases.

  10. Formulation development and evaluation of mouth dissolving film of domperidone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratikkumar Joshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was undertaken with the objective of formulating mouth dissolving film(s of the antiemetic drug Domperidone to enhance the convenience and compliance by the elderly and pediatric patients. Domperidone is a drug of choice in case of nausea and vomiting produced by chemotherapy, migraine headaches, food poisoning and viral infections. It causes dopamine (D2 and D3 receptor blockage both at the chemoreceptor trigger zone and at the gastric level. It shows high first pass metabolism which results in poor bioavailability (10-15%. In view of high first pass metabolism and short plasma half-life it is an ideal candidate for rapid release drug delivery system. The solid dispersions of Domperidone were prepared with the use β-cyclodextrin in various ratios (1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and solubility study was performed to determine the ratio in which solubility of Domperidone was highest (1:3. The selected solid dispersions were then utilized for the preparation of film by solvent casting method utilizing HPMC E15 as a film forming agent and PEG-400 as plasticizer. Five formulae were prepared and were evaluated for their in vitro dissolution characteristics, in vitro disintegration time, and their physico-mechanical properties. The promising film (F1 showed the greatest drug dissolution (more than 75% within 15 min, satisfactory in vitro disintegration time (45 sec and physico-mechanical properties that are suitable for mouth dissolving films.

  11. Formulation development and evaluation of mouth dissolving film of domperidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Pratikkumar; Patel, Harsha; Patel, Vishnu; Panchal, Rushi

    2012-03-01

    The present investigation was undertaken with the objective of formulating mouth dissolving film(s) of the antiemetic drug Domperidone to enhance the convenience and compliance by the elderly and pediatric patients. Domperidone is a drug of choice in case of nausea and vomiting produced by chemotherapy, migraine headaches, food poisoning and viral infections. It causes dopamine (D2 and D3) receptor blockage both at the chemoreceptor trigger zone and at the gastric level. It shows high first pass metabolism which results in poor bioavailability (10-15%). In view of high first pass metabolism and short plasma half-life it is an ideal candidate for rapid release drug delivery system. The solid dispersions of Domperidone were prepared with the use β-cyclodextrin in various ratios (1:1, 1:2, 1:3) and solubility study was performed to determine the ratio in which solubility of Domperidone was highest (1:3). The selected solid dispersions were then utilized for the preparation of film by solvent casting method utilizing HPMC E15 as a film forming agent and PEG-400 as plasticizer. Five formulae were prepared and were evaluated for their in vitro dissolution characteristics, in vitro disintegration time, and their physico-mechanical properties. The promising film (F1) showed the greatest drug dissolution (more than 75% within 15 min), satisfactory in vitro disintegration time (45 sec) and physico-mechanical properties that are suitable for mouth dissolving films. PMID:23066181

  12. Cheyne-Stokes respiration revisited: controversies and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, M J; Snyder, J V

    1984-10-01

    Investigation of the periodic crescendo-decrescendo alterations in tidal volume in Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) has provided remarkable insight into the physiology of respiratory control. Many patients with periodic breathing have both cardiac and neurologic disease. Considerable controversy has surrounded determination of the relative importance of cardiac and neurologic mechanisms in the genesis of this breathing abnormality. Several investigators have considered the respiratory center as a chemostat model with three basic components: the controller system (chemoreceptors), the controlled system (gas tensions of O2 and CO2), and the feedback loop (arterial circulation from the lung to the brain). If the relationship between these cardiac and neurologic components is altered, stability of the respiratory control system is lost. Such disturbance in the control system may arise by prolongation of the circulation time, or by the system becoming more dependent on its O2, rather than the CO2 component. Earlier investigators considered periodic breathing as a forewarning of ominous developments. In recent studies, mild degrees of periodic breathing, easily missed on physical examination, are often found in otherwise normal subjects, particularly during sleep. Generally no therapy is required, although aminophylline, O2 or CO2 administration has been shown to abolish periodic breathing. PMID:6435956

  13. P2X receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, R Alan

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) activates cell surface P2X and P2Y receptors. P2X receptors are membrane ion channels preferably permeable to sodium, potassium and calcium that open within milliseconds of the binding of ATP. In molecular architecture, they form a unique structural family. The receptor is a trimer, the binding of ATP between subunits causes them to flex together within the ectodomain and separate in the membrane-spanning region so as to open a central channel. P2X receptors have a widespread tissue distribution. On some smooth muscle cells, P2X receptors mediate the fast excitatory junction potential that leads to depolarization and contraction. In the central nervous system, activation of P2X receptors allows calcium to enter neurons and this can evoke slower neuromodulatory responses such as the trafficking of receptors for the neurotransmitter glutamate. In primary afferent nerves, P2X receptors are critical for the initiation of action potentials when they respond to ATP released from sensory cells such as taste buds, chemoreceptors or urothelium. In immune cells, activation of P2X receptors triggers the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 1β. The development of selective blockers of different P2X receptors has led to clinical trials of their effectiveness in the management of cough, pain, inflammation and certain neurodegenerative diseases.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377721

  14. Sensing and surviving hypoxia in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonz, Michael G; Buck, Leslie T; Perry, Steve F; Schwerte, Thorsten; Zaccone, Giacomo

    2016-02-01

    Surviving hypoxia is one of the most critical challenges faced by vertebrates. Most species have adapted to changing levels of oxygen in their environment with specialized organs that sense hypoxia, while only few have been uniquely adapted to survive prolonged periods of anoxia. The goal of this review is to present the most recent research on oxygen sensing, adaptation to hypoxia, and mechanisms of anoxia tolerance in nonmammalian vertebrates. We discuss the respiratory structures in fish, including the skin, gills, and air-breathing organs, and recent evidence for chemosensory neuroepithelial cells (NECs) in these tissues that initiate reflex responses to hypoxia. The use of the zebrafish as a genetic and developmental model has allowed observation of the ontogenesis of respiratory and chemosensory systems, demonstration of a putative intracellular O2 sensor in chemoreceptors that may initiate transduction of the hypoxia signal, and investigation into the effects of extreme hypoxia on cardiorespiratory development. Other organisms, such as goldfish and freshwater turtles, display a high degree of anoxia tolerance, and these models are revealing important adaptations at the cellular level, such as the regulation of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in defense of homeostasis in central neurons. PMID:25959851

  15. Time Domains of the Hypoxic Ventilatory Response and Their Molecular Basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamenter, Mathhew E; Powell, Frank L

    2016-01-01

    Ventilatory responses to hypoxia vary widely depending on the pattern and length of hypoxic exposure. Acute, prolonged, or intermittent hypoxic episodes can increase or decrease breathing for seconds to years, both during the hypoxic stimulus, and also after its removal. These myriad effects are the result of a complicated web of molecular interactions that underlie plasticity in the respiratory control reflex circuits and ultimately control the physiology of breathing in hypoxia. Since the time domains of the physiological hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) were identified, considerable research effort has gone toward elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms that mediate these varied responses. This research has begun to describe complicated and plastic interactions in the relay circuits between the peripheral chemoreceptors and the ventilatory control circuits within the central nervous system. Intriguingly, many of these molecular pathways seem to share key components between the different time domains, suggesting that varied physiological HVRs are the result of specific modifications to overlapping pathways. This review highlights what has been discovered regarding the cell and molecular level control of the time domains of the HVR, and highlights key areas where further research is required. Understanding the molecular control of ventilation in hypoxia has important implications for basic physiology and is emerging as an important component of several clinical fields. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1345-1385, 2016. PMID:27347896

  16. Respiratory modulation of sympathetic nerve activity is enhanced in male rat offspring following uteroplacental insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menuet, C; Wlodek, M E; Fong, A Y; Allen, A M

    2016-06-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity to the cardiovascular system displays prominent respiratory-related modulation which leads to the generation of rhythmic oscillations in blood pressure called Traube-Hering waves. An amplification of this respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity is observed in hypertension of both genetic, the spontaneously hypertensive rat, and induced, chronic intermittent hypoxia or maternal protein restriction during gestation, origin. Male offspring of mothers with uteroplacental insufficiency, induced by bilateral uterine vessel ligation at 18 days of gestation, are also hypertensive in adulthood. In this study we examined whether these male offspring display altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity at pre-hypertensive ages compared to controls. Respiratory, cardiovascular and sympathetic parameters were examined using the working heart-brainstem preparation in 35 day old male rats that had reduced birth weight due to uteroplacental insufficiency. Whilst all respiratory parameters were not different between groups, we observed an enhanced respiratory-related burst of thoracic sympathetic nerve activity and amplified Traube-Hering waves in the growth-restricted group. This group also showed an increased sympathetic and bradycardic response to activation of peripheral chemoreceptors. The observations add support to the view that altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity represents a common mechanism involved in the development of several forms of hypertension. PMID:26593642

  17. Neural reflex regulation of arterial pressure in pathophysiological conditions: interplay among the baroreflex, the cardiopulmonary reflexes and the chemoreflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.C. Vasquez

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of arterial pressure at levels adequate to perfuse the tissues is a basic requirement for the constancy of the internal environment and survival. The objective of the present review was to provide information about the basic reflex mechanisms that are responsible for the moment-to-moment regulation of the cardiovascular system. We demonstrate that this control is largely provided by the action of arterial and non-arterial reflexes that detect and correct changes in arterial pressure (baroreflex, blood volume or chemical composition (mechano- and chemosensitive cardiopulmonary reflexes, and changes in blood-gas composition (chemoreceptor reflex. The importance of the integration of these cardiovascular reflexes is well understood and it is clear that processing mainly occurs in the nucleus tractus solitarii, although the mechanism is poorly understood. There are several indications that the interactions of baroreflex, chemoreflex and Bezold-Jarisch reflex inputs, and the central nervous system control the activity of autonomic preganglionic neurons through parallel afferent and efferent pathways to achieve cardiovascular homeostasis. It is surprising that so little appears in the literature about the integration of these neural reflexes in cardiovascular function. Thus, our purpose was to review the interplay between peripheral neural reflex mechanisms of arterial blood pressure and blood volume regulation in physiological and pathophysiological states. Special emphasis is placed on the experimental model of arterial hypertension induced by N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME in which the interplay of these three reflexes is demonstrable

  18. ANTIEMETICS: A REVIEW

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    Amit Kumar* 1 and Anoop Kumar 2

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The act of emesis is controlled by the vomiting centre in the medulla, which integrates afferent input from the vestibular system, the chemoreceptor trigger zone (CTZ, the cortex and the gut. Nausea and vomiting induced by several cancer chemotherapy agents is often the most distressing side effect of treatment. The mechanism of action of antiemetic is related to blockage of various type of receptor located in various region of various organ of the body parts. Various drugs are classified under antiemetic like Ondansetron, Granisetron & Metochlopramide etc. A critical review of the studies of aprepitant (a new NK1 receptor antagonist and of palonosetron (a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist with a longer half-life presented in this article. Aprepitant combined with dexamethasone and a 5-HT3 antagonist significantly increase the control of acute emesis with respect to dexamethasone. Palonosetron showed superior or similar efficacy to Ondansetron and dolasetron in patients submitted to moderately emetogenic chemotherapy Certain side effects arise due to excessive use of antiemetic like twitching, flushing of skin, headaches, tiredness, indigestion etc.

  19. Chronic intermittent hypoxia alters ventilatory and metabolic responses to acute hypoxia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Barbara J; Adrian, Russell; Wang, Zun-Yi; Bates, Melissa L; Dopp, John M

    2016-05-15

    We determined the effects of chronic exposure to intermittent hypoxia (CIH) on chemoreflex control of ventilation in conscious animals. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CIH [nadir oxygen saturation (SpO2), 75%; 15 events/h; 10 h/day] or normoxia (NORM) for 21 days. We assessed the following responses to acute, graded hypoxia before and after exposures: ventilation (V̇e, via barometric plethysmography), V̇o2 and V̇co2 (analysis of expired air), heart rate (HR), and SpO2 (pulse oximetry via neck collar). We quantified hypoxia-induced chemoreceptor sensitivity by calculating the stimulus-response relationship between SpO2 and the ventilatory equivalent for V̇co2 (linear regression). An additional aim was to determine whether CIH causes proliferation of carotid body glomus cells (using bromodeoxyuridine). CIH exposure increased the slope of the V̇e/V̇co2/SpO2 relationship and caused hyperventilation in normoxia. Bromodeoxyuridine staining was comparable in CIH and NORM. Thus our CIH paradigm augmented hypoxic chemosensitivity without causing glomus cell proliferation. PMID:26917692

  20. Cross-modal tactile-taste interactions in food evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, B. G.; Carmichael, D.A.; Simner, J.

    2016-01-01

    Detecting the taste components within a flavoured substance relies on exposing chemoreceptors within the mouth to the chemical components of ingested food. In our paper, we show that the evaluation of taste components can also be influenced by the tactile quality of the food. We first discuss how multisensory factors might influence taste, flavour and smell for both typical and atypical (synaesthetic) populations and we then present two empirical studies showing tactile-taste interactions in the general population. We asked a group of average adults to evaluate the taste components of flavoured food substances, whilst we presented simultaneous cross-sensory visuo-tactile cues within the eating environment. Specifically, we presented foodstuffs between subjects that were otherwise identical but had a rough versus smooth surface, or were served on a rough versus smooth serving-plate. We found no effect of the serving-plate, but we found the rough/smoothness of the foodstuff itself significantly influenced perception: food was rated as significantly more sour if it had a rough (vs. smooth) surface. In modifying taste perception via ostensibly unrelated dimensions, we demonstrate that the detection of tastes within flavours may be influenced by higher level cross-sensory cues. Finally, we suggest that the direction of our cross-sensory associations may speak to the types of hedonic mapping found both in normal multisensory integration, and in the unusual condition of synaesthesia. PMID:26169315

  1. Cellular architecture of Treponema pallidum: novel flagellum, periplasmic cone, and cell envelope as revealed by cryo electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Howell, Jerrilyn K; Bradley, Sherille D; Zheng, Yesha; Zhou, Z Hong; Norris, Steven J

    2010-11-01

    High-resolution cryo electron tomography (cryo-ET) was utilized to visualize Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, at the molecular level. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions from 304 infectious organisms revealed unprecedented cellular structures of this unusual member of the spirochetal family. High-resolution cryo-ET reconstructions provided detailed structures of the cell envelope, which is significantly different from that of Gram-negative bacteria. The 4-nm lipid bilayer of both outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane resolved in 3D reconstructions, providing an important marker for interpreting membrane-associated structures. Abundant lipoproteins cover the outer leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane, in contrast to the rare outer membrane proteins visible by scanning probe microscopy. High-resolution cryo-ET images also provided the first observation of T. pallidum chemoreceptor arrays, as well as structural details of the periplasmically located cone-shaped structure at both ends of the bacterium. Furthermore, 3D subvolume averages of periplasmic flagellar motors and flagellar filaments from living organisms revealed the novel flagellar architectures that may facilitate their rotation within the confining periplasmic space. Our findings provide the most detailed structural understanding of periplasmic flagella and the surrounding cell envelope, which enable this enigmatic bacterium to efficiently penetrate tissue and to escape host immune responses.

  2. Diencephalic regulation of respiration and arterial pressure during actual and fictive locomotion in cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millhorn, D E; Eldridge, F L; Waldrop, T G; Kiley, J P

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine by experimentation the hypothesis that the respiratory and circulatory responses during exercise are attributable to command signals that emanate from the suprapontine brain. We studied the relations between locomotion (exercise) and phrenic nerve activity and arterial pressure in cats that walked or ran on a treadmill and in animals during fictive locomotion, i.e., locomotor activity in motor nerves to legs. Anesthetized cats with intact brains and unanesthetized decorticated cats were used. All preparations exhibited spontaneous actual and fictive locomotion. Electrical stimulation or microinjection of picrotoxin, a GABA antagonist, of the subthalamic locomotor areas always caused locomotion to develop. Phrenic nerve activity and arterial pressure increased in proportion to the level of locomotor activity despite control or ablation of feedback signals from chemoreceptors and vagal receptors. Similar relations were measured during fictive locomotion despite the absence of muscular contraction and limb movement and the lack of change in metabolic rate. These findings provide experimental support for the central command hypothesis for the genesis of the respiratory hyperpnea and increased cardiovascular function that occur during exercise. We believe that the command signals emanate from the subthalamic locomotor area of the diencephalon. PMID:3652403

  3. Fos-like protein is induced in neurons of the medulla oblongata after stimulation of the carotid sinus nerve in awake and anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, J T; Millhorn, D E

    1991-12-13

    The protooncogene c-fos is expressed rapidly, transiently and polysynaptically within neurons in response to synaptic activation and voltage-gated calcium entry into the cell. The nuclear protein product of this gene (Fos) is detectable immunohistochemically 20-90 min after cell activation and remains within the nucleus for hours after expression. The present study was undertaken to identify cells within the rat medulla oblongata that express Fos-like protein in response to stimulation of afferent fibers of the carotid sinus nerve (CSN). Direct electrical stimulation of the CSN in anesthetized animals or hypoxic stimulation in either anesthetized or awake animals resulted in a consistent and discrete distribution of Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-LI). Fos-LI was observed bilaterally within nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and the ventrolateral medulla (VLM), within area postrema and nucleus raphe pallidus, and bilaterally along the ventral medullary surface. Unstimulated animals were devoid of Fos-LI within the medulla oblongata. Furthermore, neither the surgical preparations alone nor the effects of anesthesia could account for the extent of Fos-LI observed. We believe these cells represent second- and higher-order neurons within the baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflex pathways. PMID:1815818

  4. Activation of the c-fos gene in prodynorphin- and proenkephalin-expressing cells of nucleus tractus solitarius after seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, R K; Erickson, J T; Millhorn, D E

    1994-10-01

    We performed studies to determine the anatomical regions and chemical phenotypes of neurons within the rat medulla oblongata activated by pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures. Activated cells were identified by their expression of the c-fos gene, detected by in situ hybridization for c-fos mRNA and immunocytochemistry for Fos protein. Activated cells were located predominantly in nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), with c-fos mRNA appearing within 20 min after seizures (peak at 1-2 h), followed by Fos immunoreactivity visible at 1 h (peak at 2-4 h). Neither nonspecific noxious stimulation by intraperitoneal injection of saline nor brief exposure to hypoxic or hypercapnic gas mixtures to stimulate chemoreceptors reproduced this pattern of labeling. Prodynorphin or proenkephalin mRNA, detected by in situ hybridization, was colocalized with Fos immunoreactivity in many NTS cells. Thus, seizures activate neuronal pathways in the medulla oblongata which express genes for endogenous opioids. Potential long-term effects of seizures are suggested by the in situ hybridization finding that NTS prodynorphin mRNA increased 24 h after seizures compared to control levels. PMID:7957742

  5. Ontogeny of the O2-sensitive pathway in medulla oblongata of postnatal rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, L D; Lawson, E E; Millhorn, D E

    1994-10-01

    Fos protein, the product of the immediate early gene c-fos, has been used as a metabolic marker to map the O2 chemosensory pathway activated by hypoxia in the adult rat (Erickson and Millhorn, Brain Res. 567: 11-24, 1991). The current study provides evidence that the O2 chemoreceptor pathway develops during the first postnatal month. Rats at postnatal ages (P) 3, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 days were exposed for 3 h to 21% (control) or 10% (hypoxia) O2. Pups were transcardially fixed, brain stems were frozen, sectioned, then reacted with Fos primary antibody, a secondary antibody, avidin-biotin peroxidase, then Ni-DAB as chromogen. Cells showing Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-LI) under control and hypoxic conditions were counted in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and the ventrolateral medulla (VLM). In both areas there was initially a low basal level of Fos-LI, a peak at P10 and a decline to P28. At all ages there was a significant increase in the number of Fos-LI cells in pups exposed to hypoxia. The high basal level of Fos expression at P10 and the high induced level at P14 may correlate with periods of terminal differentiation and maximum synaptogenesis, respectively. PMID:7817045

  6. The Contributions of Paul Ehrlich to Pharmacology: A Tribute on the Occasion of the Centenary of His Nobel Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Fèlix; Rosich, Laia

    2008-01-01

    On the centenary of Paul Ehrlich's Nobel Prize, this German researcher deserves to be remembered as a pioneer in a large number of scientific disciplines. As a result of his enthusiasm and scientific abilities, dedication, and contacts with other scientists of his time, he was able to make countless contributions in fields as diverse as histology, haematology, immunology, oncology, microbiology and pharmacology, among others. Although the Swedish award was meant to recognize the standardization of the manufacture of antidiphtheria serum, it was the discovery of arsphenamine (Salvarsan) for the treatment of syphilis which won him wider international acclaim. From a pharmacological perspective, Ehrlich's outstanding contributions include dissemination of the ‘magic bullet’ concept for the synthesis of antibacterials, introduction of concepts such as chemoreceptor and chemotherapy, and linking the chemical structure of compounds to their pharmacological activity. These achievements took place within the framework he established for the transition from experimental pharmacology to therapeutic pharmacology. He introduced a modern research system based on the synthesis of multiple chemical structures for pharmacological screening in animal models of disease states. These contributions were undoubtedly decisive in propitiating the wider development of antibiotics decades later. For these reasons, it is fitting to mark the 100th anniversary of the Nobel Prize awarded to this great scientist by commemorating the importance of his contributions to the advance of pharmacology. PMID:18679046

  7. Genome Evolution in the Obligate but Environmentally Active Luminous Symbionts of Flashlight Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Tory A; de Wet, Jeffrey R; Dougan, Katherine E; Dunlap, Paul V

    2016-01-01

    The luminous bacterial symbionts of anomalopid flashlight fish are thought to be obligately dependent on their hosts for growth and share several aspects of genome evolution with unrelated obligate symbionts, including genome reduction. However, in contrast to most obligate bacteria, anomalopid symbionts have an active environmental phase that may be important for symbiont transmission. Here we investigated patterns of evolution between anomalopid symbionts compared with patterns in free-living relatives and unrelated obligate symbionts to determine if trends common to obligate symbionts are also found in anomalopid symbionts. Two symbionts, "Candidatus Photodesmus katoptron" and "Candidatus Photodesmus blepharus," have genomes that are highly similar in gene content and order, suggesting genome stasis similar to ancient obligate symbionts present in insect lineages. This genome stasis exists in spite of the symbiont's inferred ability to recombine, which is frequently lacking in obligate symbionts with stable genomes. Additionally, we used genome comparisons and tests of selection to infer which genes may be particularly important for the symbiont's ecology compared with relatives. In keeping with obligate dependence, substitution patterns suggest that most symbiont genes are experiencing relaxed purifying selection compared with relatives. However, genes involved in motility and carbon storage, which are likely to be used outside the host, appear to be under increased purifying selection. Two chemoreceptor chemotaxis genes are retained by both species and show high conservation with amino acid sensing genes, suggesting that the bacteria may actively seek out hosts using chemotaxis toward amino acids, which the symbionts are not able to synthesize. PMID:27389687

  8. Radiation-induced emesis in cats prevented by 24-hour prior exposure but not by ablation of the area postrema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acute emetic response induced by whole body exposure to cobalt radiation was quantified in cats at doses ranging from 1500 to 9000 rad (100 rad/min). Emesis occurred in a dose-related manner with a maximum incidence of 94% at 4500 rad (11 of 12 cats, mean latency of 98 min). At 6000 rad emesis occurred in 7 of 10 cats (mean latency of 69 min); however, a second exposure to this dose on the following day failed to induce vomiting in all of 5 cats (difference between groups significant at p = .01). After chronic ablation of the area postrema (chemoreceptor trigger zone for vomiting), 4 of 5 cats vomited in response to 4500 rad with a mean latency of 48 min. As was the case with the normal cats, all the postrema-ablated animals failed to vomit in response to a repeated dose of radiation delivered on the next day. The suppression of emesis observed on the second exposure was radiation-specific because 11 of 12 normal cats vomited appropriately in response to xylazine (0.6 mg/kg, im) during the period of refractoriness to radiation

  9. Carotid body chemoreflex: a driver of autonomic abnormalities in sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2016-08-01

    What is the topic of this review? This article presents emerging evidence for heightened carotid body chemoreflex activity as a major driver of sympathetic activation and hypertension in sleep apnoea patients. What advances does it heighlight? This article discusses the recent advances on cellular, molecular and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the exaggerated chemoreflex in experimental models of sleep apnoea. The carotid bodies are the principal peripheral chemoreceptors for detecting changes in arterial blood oxygen concentration, and the resulting chemoreflex is a potent regulator of the sympathetic tone, blood pressure and breathing. Sleep apnoea is a disease of the respiratory system that affects several million adult humans. Apnoeas occur during sleep, often as a result of obstruction of the upper airway (obstructive sleep apnoea) or because of defective respiratory rhythm generation by the CNS (central sleep apnoea). Patients with sleep apnoea exhibit several co-morbidities, with the most notable among them being heightened sympathetic nerve activity and hypertension. Emerging evidence suggests that intermittent hypoxia resulting from periodic apnoea stimulates the carotid body, and the ensuing chemoreflex mediates the increased sympathetic tone and hypertension in sleep apnoea patients. Rodent models of intermittent hypoxia that simulate the O2 saturation profiles encountered during sleep apnoea have provided important insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the heightened carotid body chemoreflex. This article describes how intermittent hypoxia affects the carotid body function and discusses the cellular, molecular and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the exaggerated chemoreflex. PMID:27474260

  10. Respiratory-related hypoglossal nerve activity: influence of anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J C; St John, W M; Bartlett, D

    1983-09-01

    In decerebrate, vagotomized, paralyzed, and ventilated cats, phrenic and respiratory-related hypoglossal discharges were evident at normocapnic normoxia or hyperoxia. Both increased progressively in hypercapnia or hypoxia. With increasing drive, onset of inspiratory hypoglossal activity began earlier relative to phrenic onset; an early expiratory hypoglossal burst was also observed. Following subanesthetic doses of chloralose, halothane, ketamine, or pentobarbital, hypoglossal activity was depressed much more than phrenic discharge. In moderate hypercapnia or hypoxia, phrenic activity increased more than hypoglossal, whereas, at high drive, the latter rose more sharply in some cats. Electromyograms of the diaphragm and genioglossus were recorded in intact awake cats to determine if their responses and those of decerebrates are comparable. Respiratory-related genioglossal discharge was evident in normocapnia. We conclude that anesthesia suppresses hypoglossal motor activities much more than those of the bulbospinal-phrenic system. Data for decerebrate cats and unanesthetized cats or humans provide no evidence of a differential distribution of chemoreceptor afferents on hypoglossal and bulbospinal-phrenic neurons, as suggested by results in anesthetized animals. PMID:6629915

  11. Cross-modal tactile-taste interactions in food evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, B G; Carmichael, D A; Simner, J

    2016-07-29

    Detecting the taste components within a flavoured substance relies on exposing chemoreceptors within the mouth to the chemical components of ingested food. In our paper, we show that the evaluation of taste components can also be influenced by the tactile quality of the food. We first discuss how multisensory factors might influence taste, flavour and smell for both typical and atypical (synaesthetic) populations and we then present two empirical studies showing tactile-taste interactions in the general population. We asked a group of non-synaesthetic adults to evaluate the taste components of flavoured food substances, whilst we presented simultaneous cross-sensory visuo-tactile cues within the eating environment. Specifically, we presented foodstuffs between subjects that were otherwise identical but had a rough versus smooth surface, or were served on a rough versus smooth serving-plate. We found no effect of the serving-plate, but we found the rough/smoothness of the foodstuff itself significantly influenced perception: food was rated as significantly more sour if it had a rough (versus smooth) surface. In modifying taste perception via ostensibly unrelated dimensions, we demonstrate that the detection of tastes within flavours may be influenced by higher level cross-sensory cues. Finally, we suggest that the direction of our cross-sensory associations may speak to the types of hedonic mapping found both in normal multisensory integration, and in the unusual condition of synaesthesia. PMID:26169315

  12. Precision sensing by two opposing gradient sensors: how does Escherichia coli find its preferred pH level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Tu, Yuhai

    2013-07-01

    It is essential for bacteria to find optimal conditions for their growth and survival. The optimal levels of certain environmental factors (such as pH and temperature) often correspond to some intermediate points of the respective gradients. This requires the ability of bacteria to navigate from both directions toward the optimum location and is distinct from the conventional unidirectional chemotactic strategy. Remarkably, Escherichia coli cells can perform such a precision sensing task in pH taxis by using the same chemotaxis machinery, but with opposite pH responses from two different chemoreceptors (Tar and Tsr). To understand bacterial pH sensing, we developed an Ising-type model for a mixed cluster of opposing receptors based on the push-pull mechanism. Our model can quantitatively explain experimental observations in pH taxis for various mutants and wild-type cells. We show how the preferred pH level depends on the relative abundance of the competing sensors and how the sensory activity regulates the behavioral response. Our model allows us to make quantitative predictions on signal integration of pH and chemoattractant stimuli. Our study reveals two general conditions and a robust push-pull scheme for precision sensing, which should be applicable in other adaptive sensory systems with opposing gradient sensors.

  13. Fetal breathing movements and changes at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koos, Brian J; Rajaee, Arezoo

    2014-01-01

    The fetus, which develops within a fluid-filled amniotic sac, relies on the placenta for respiratory gas exchange rather than the lungs. While not involved in fetal oxygenation, fetal breathing movements (FBM) nevertheless have an important role in lung growth and in development of respiratory muscles and neural regulation. FBM are regulated differently in many respects than postnatal respiration, which results from the unique intrauterine environment. Prominent distinctions of FBM include its episodic nature and apnea-sensitivity to hypoxia. The latter characteristic is the basis for using FBM in the assessment of fetuses at risk for hypoxic injury. At birth, the transition to continuous postnatal respiration involves a fall in temperature, gaseous distention of the lungs, activation of the Hering-Breuer reflexes, and functional connectivity of afferent O2 chemoreceptor activity with respiratory motoneurons and arousal centers. Importantly, exposure to drugs or adverse conditions in utero not only can change patterns of FBM but also can lead to epigenetic dysregulation in postnatal respiration. Such changes, can blunt respiratory and arousal defenses against hypoxic challenges in sleep. Thus, fetal hypoxia and/or drug exposure may in later life dispose sleeping infants, children, and adults to hypertension, diabetes mellitus, brain injury, and sudden death. PMID:25015803

  14. Scanning Electron Microscopic Observations on Male Echinolaelaps echidninus (Berlese, 1887 (Dermanyssoidea: Laelapidae with Emphasis on its Gnathosoma, Palpal Organ and Pulvilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Ahmed Montasser

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM study includes morphological observations on male Echinolaelaps echidninus with particular attention to the undescribed details of its gnathosoma, palpal organ and pulvilli that have rarely described in males of superfamily Dermanyssoidea. The holoventral plate had 23 setae, including 5 pairs in sternogenital region, 5 pairs in preanal region and 3 anal setae. The peritreme extended anteriorly behind coxa 2 from an oval pit situated ventro-laterally between coxae 3 and 4. Gnathosoma consisted of long basis capituli carrying median hypostome and 2 lateral pedipalps. Hypostome had median labium terminated with 2 lobulated plates, cheliceral digits forming pincers-like claw and 2 pointed corniculi. Each pedipalp terminated with tarsus that carried 9 sensillae forming the palpal organ. Small conical sensillae assumed to be chemoreceptors while long broad ones were probably mechanoreceptors. Pulvillis 1 had smooth surface and terminated with 2 small claws and integumental folds. Pulvilli 2-4 had smooth dorsal surface, ventral longitudinal ridges and 2 lateral plates, each with minute processes.

  15. Mechanisms of dyspnea in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gigliotti Francesco

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dyspnea is a general term used to characterize a range of different descriptors; it varies in intensity, and is influenced by a wide variety of factors such as cultural expectations and the patient's experiences. Healthy subjects can experience dyspnea in different situations, e.g. at high altitude, after breath-holding, during stressful situations that cause anxiety or panic, and more commonly during strenuous exercise. Discussing the mechanisms of dyspnea we need to briefly take into account the physiological mechanisms underlying the sensation of dyspnea: the functional status of the respiratory muscles, the role of chemoreceptors and mechanoreceptors, and how the sense of respiratory motor output reaches a level of conscious awareness. We also need to take into account theories on the pathophysiological mechanisms of the sensation of dyspnea and the possibility that each pathophysiological mechanism produces a distinct quality of breathing discomfort. The terms used by subjects to identify different characteristics of breathing discomfort - dyspnea descriptors - may contribute to understanding the mechanisms of dyspnea and providing the rationale for a specific diagnosis.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE OLFACTORY RECEPTORS EXPRESSED IN HUMAN SPERMATOZOA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eFlegel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of external cues is fundamental for human spermatozoa to locate the oocyte in the female reproductive tract. This task requires a specific chemoreceptor repertoire that is expressed on the surface of human spermatozoa, which is not fully identified to date. Olfactory receptors (ORs are candidate molecules and have been attributed to be involved in sperm chemotaxis and chemokinesis, indicating an important role in mammalian spermatozoa. An increasing importance has been suggested for spermatozoal RNA, which led us to investigate the expression of all 387 OR genes. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of OR transcripts in human spermatozoa of several individuals by RNA-Seq. We detected 91 different transcripts in the spermatozoa samples that could be aligned to annotated OR genes. Using stranded mRNA-Seq, we detected a class of these putative OR transcripts in an antisense orientation, indicating a different function, rather than coding for a functional OR protein. Nevertheless, we were able to detect OR proteins in various compartments of human spermatozoa, indicating distinct functions in human sperm. A panel of various OR ligands induced Ca2+ signals in human spermatozoa, which could be inhibited by mibefradil. This study indicated that a variety of ORs are expressed at the mRNA and protein level in human spermatozoa and demonstrates that ORs are involved in the physiological processes.

  17. Tinnitus: Network pathophysiology-network pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belen eElgoyhen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus, the phantom perception of sound, is a prevalent disorder. One in 10 adults has clinically significant subjective tinnitus, and for 1 in 100, tinnitus severely affects their quality of life. Despite the significant unmet clinical need for a safe and effective drug targeting tinnitus relief, there is currently not a single FDA-approved drug on the market. The search for drugs that target tinnitus is hampered by the lack of a deep knowledge of the underlying neural substrates of this pathology. Recent studies are increasingly demonstrating that, as described for other central nervous system disorders, tinnitus is a pathology of brain networks. The application of graph theoretical analysis to brain networks has recently provided new information concerning their topology, their robustness and their vulnerability to attacks. Moreover, the philosophy behind drug design and pharmacotherapy in central nervous system pathologies is changing from that of magic bullets that target individual chemoreceptors or disease-causing genes into that of magic shotguns, promiscuous or dirty drugs that target disease-causing networks, also known as network pharmacology. In the present work we provide some insight into how this knowledge could be applied to tinnitus pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy.

  18. The genetic basis for variation in olfactory behavior in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Gunjan H; Magwire, Michael M; Huang, Wen; Serrano-Negron, Yazmin L; Mackay, Trudy F C; Anholt, Robert R H

    2015-05-01

    The genetic underpinnings that contribute to variation in olfactory perception are not fully understood. To explore the genetic basis of variation in olfactory perception, we measured behavioral responses to 14 chemically diverse naturally occurring odorants in 260400 flies from 186 lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel, a population of inbred wild-derived lines with sequenced genomes. We observed variation in olfactory behavior for all odorants. Low to moderate broad-sense heritabilities and the large number of tests for genotype-olfactory phenotype association performed precluded any individual variant from reaching formal significance. However, the top variants (nominal P behavioral trait. Further, pathway enrichment analyses showed that genes tagged by the top variants included components of networks centered on cyclic guanosine monophosphate and inositol triphosphate signaling, growth factor signaling, Rho signaling, axon guidance, and regulation of neural connectivity. Functional validation with RNAi and mutations showed that 15 out of 17 genes tested indeed affect olfactory behavior. Our results show that in addition to chemoreceptors, variation in olfactory perception depends on polymorphisms that can result in subtle variations in synaptic connectivity within the nervous system.

  19. Immunohistochemical localization of dopamine D2 receptor in the rat carotid body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, Jun; Takayama, Anna; Yokoyama, Takuya; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Kusakabe, Tatsumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio

    2015-10-01

    Dopamine modulates the chemosensitivity of arterial chemoreceptors, and dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) is expected to localize in the glomus cells and/or sensory nerve endings of the carotid body. In the present study, the localization of D2R in the rat carotid body was examined using double immunofluorescence for D2R with various cell markers. D2R immunoreactivity was mainly localized in glomus cells immunoreactive to tyrosine hydroxylase or dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), but not in S100B-immunoreactive sustentacular cells. Furthermore, D2R immunoreactivity was observed in petrosal ganglion cells and nerve bundles in the carotid body, but not in the nerve endings with P2X2 immunoreactivity. In the carotid ganglion, a few punctate D2R-immunoreactive products were detected in DBH-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies. These results showed that D2R was mainly distributed in glomus cells, and suggested that D2R plays a role in the inhibitory modulation of chemosensory activity in a paracrine and/or autocrine manner. PMID:26272445

  20. Language of plants:Where is the word?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maja Simpraga; Junji Takabayashi; Jarmo K Holopainen

    2016-01-01

    Plants emit biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) causing transcriptomic, metabolomic and behavioral responses in receiver organisms. Volatiles involved in such responses are often called “plant language”. Arthropods having sensitive chemoreceptors can recognize language released by plants. Insect herbivores, pollinators and natural enemies respond to composition of volatiles from plants with specialized receptors responding to different types of compounds. In contrast, the mechanism of how plants“hear” volatiles has remained obscured. In a plant-plant communication, several individually emitted compounds are known to prime defense response in receiver plants with a specific manner according to the chemical structure of each volatile compound. Further, composition and ratio of volatile compounds in the plant-released plume is important in plant-insect and plant-plant interactions mediated by plant volatiles. Studies on volatile-mediated plant-plant signaling indicate that the signaling distances are rather short, usually not longer than one meter. Volatile communication from plants to insects such as pollinators could be across distances of hundreds of meters. As many of the herbivore induced VOCs have rather short atmospheric life times, we suggest that in long-distant communications with plant volatiles, reaction products in the original emitted compounds may have additional information value of the distance to emission source together with the original plant-emitted compounds.

  1. Tarantulas do not shoot silk from their legs: experimental evidence in four species of New World tarantulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Miles, Fernando; Ortíz-Villatoro, David

    2012-05-15

    Theraphosid tarantulas, like all other spiders, secrete silk from spigots on the abdominal spinnerets. A few years ago, it was proposed that the large tarantula Aphonopelma seemanni could extrude silk from specialized spigots on the tarsi to help adhesion to vertical surfaces. This suggestion was later questioned because silk was not observed after the spinnerets had been sealed. Recently, experiments with the tarantula Grammostola rosea again suggested tarsal silk secretion. All observations of the supposed tarsal silk were made in spiders with functional spinnerets, thus contamination with silk coming from the spinnerets could not be excluded. Recent morphological arguments also questioned putative tarsal spigots and proposed that they are actually contact chemoreceptors. We here test the supposed tarsal silk secretion in Aphonopelma seemanni, Avicularia avicularia, Brachypelma vagans and Grammostola mollicoma using similar experimental conditions as the previous authors, but with sealed spinnerets. Our results clearly demonstrate that when spinnerets are sealed, tarantulas do not show any tarsal silk secretion. We reinterpret those putative tarsal spigots and discuss possible evolutionary implications of these findings. PMID:22539742

  2. The monarch butterfly genome yields insights into long-distance migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuai; Merlin, Christine; Boore, Jeffrey L; Reppert, Steven M

    2011-11-23

    We present the draft 273 Mb genome of the migratory monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) and a set of 16,866 protein-coding genes. Orthology properties suggest that the Lepidoptera are the fastest evolving insect order yet examined. Compared to the silkmoth Bombyx mori, the monarch genome shares prominent similarity in orthology content, microsynteny, and protein family sizes. The monarch genome reveals a vertebrate-like opsin whose existence in insects is widespread; a full repertoire of molecular components for the monarch circadian clockwork; all members of the juvenile hormone biosynthetic pathway whose regulation shows unexpected sexual dimorphism; additional molecular signatures of oriented flight behavior; microRNAs that are differentially expressed between summer and migratory butterflies; monarch-specific expansions of chemoreceptors potentially important for long-distance migration; and a variant of the sodium/potassium pump that underlies a valuable chemical defense mechanism. The monarch genome enhances our ability to better understand the genetic and molecular basis of long-distance migration. PMID:22118469

  3. ULTRASTRUCURAL STUDY OF BEE LOUSE VARROA DESTRUCTOR ANDERSON & TRUEMAN 2000 (ACARI: VARROIDAE) WITH RESISTANCE MODELS FROM APIS MELLIFERA L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Khalaf Nour Abd El-Wahed

    2015-08-01

    The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is the most dangerous pest of honeybee Egyptian race Apis mellifera L., as it causes many losses in apiculture worldwide. Adult female mites are flattened with a dome-shaped dorsal shield. The present SEM study revealed that the flat ventral surface is composed of series of plates. There are 5 rows of small, chemoreceptor papillae posterior to the genito-ventro anal shield, and a unique respiratory structure (peritreme) is located laterally above Coxa III. Peritreme is a chitinized elongated area surrounding stigma opening, provided by a lid that looks like a rose with a curly thick inner membrane which has numerous teeth-like projections. Mite' legs appeared to be modified for parasitism and each is tipped by one distal empodium. The pretarsus of the first pair of legs becomes a concave sucker and the pretarsus of the 3 pairs of the posterior legs consists of membranous amblacral pad (the caruncle). The mouthparts appeared well modified for its diet on bee hernolymph with its' powerful pedipalp for host attachment. High magnification revealed different types of setae distributed on the body, the mechano-receptor pedipalp short. and long anal setae and dorsal shield sensory simple setae.

  4. GPCRs Direct Germline Development and Somatic Gonad Function in Planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Amir; Jamal, Ayana; Beets, Isabel; Schoofs, Liliane; Newmark, Phillip A

    2016-05-01

    Planarians display remarkable plasticity in maintenance of their germline, with the ability to develop or dismantle reproductive tissues in response to systemic and environmental cues. Here, we investigated the role of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in this dynamic germline regulation. By genome-enabled receptor mining, we identified 566 putative planarian GPCRs and classified them into conserved and phylum-specific subfamilies. We performed a functional screen to identify NPYR-1 as the cognate receptor for NPY-8, a neuropeptide required for sexual maturation and germ cell differentiation. Similar to NPY-8, knockdown of this receptor results in loss of differentiated germ cells and sexual maturity. NPYR-1 is expressed in neuroendocrine cells of the central nervous system and can be activated specifically by NPY-8 in cell-based assays. Additionally, we screened the complement of GPCRs with expression enriched in sexually reproducing planarians, and identified an orphan chemoreceptor family member, ophis, that controls differentiation of germline stem cells (GSCs). ophis is expressed in somatic cells of male and female gonads, as well as in accessory reproductive tissues. We have previously shown that somatic gonadal cells are required for male GSC specification and maintenance in planarians. However, ophis is not essential for GSC specification or maintenance and, therefore, defines a secondary role for planarian gonadal niche cells in promoting GSC differentiation. Our studies uncover the complement of planarian GPCRs and reveal previously unappreciated roles for these receptors in systemic and local (i.e., niche) regulation of germ cell development. PMID:27163480

  5. A would-be nervous system made from a slime mold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The slime mold Physarum polycephalum is a huge single cell that has proved to be a fruitful material for designing novel computing architectures. The slime mold is capable of sensing tactile, chemical, and optical stimuli and converting them to characteristic patterns of its electrical potential oscillations. The electrical responses to stimuli may propagate along protoplasmic tubes for distances exceeding tens of centimeters, as impulses in neural pathways do. A slime mold makes decisions about its propagation direction based on information fusion from thousands of spatially extended protoplasmic loci, similarly to a neuron collecting information from its dendritic tree. The analogy is distant yet inspiring. We speculate on whether alternative-would-be-nervous systems can be developed and practically implemented from the slime mold. We uncover analogies between the slime mold and neurons, and demonstrate that the slime mold can play the roles of primitive mechanoreceptors, photoreceptors, and chemoreceptors; we also show how the Physarum neural pathways develop. The results constituted the first step towards experimental laboratory studies of nervous system implementation in slime molds. PMID:25514435

  6. Engineering Hybrid Chemotaxis Receptors in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Shuangyu; Pollard, Abiola M; Yang, Yiling; Jin, Fan; Sourjik, Victor

    2016-09-16

    Most bacteria use transmembrane sensors to detect a wide range of environmental stimuli. A large class of such sensors are the chemotaxis receptors used by motile bacteria to follow environmental chemical gradients. In Escherichia coli, chemotaxis receptors are known to mediate highly sensitive responses to ligands, making them potentially useful for biosensory applications. However, with only four ligand-binding chemotaxis receptors, the natural ligand spectrum of E. coli is limited. The design of novel chemoreceptors to extend the sensing capabilities of E. coli is therefore a critical aspect of chemotaxis-based biosensor development. One path for novel sensor design is to harvest the large natural diversity of chemosensory functions found in bacteria by creating hybrids that have the signaling domain from E. coli chemotaxis receptors and sensory domains from other species. In this work, we demonstrate that the E. coli receptor Tar can be successfully combined with most typical sensory domains found in chemotaxis receptors and in evolutionary-related two-component histidine kinases. We show that such functional hybrids can be generated using several different fusion points. Our work further illustrates how hybrid receptors could be used to quantitatively characterize ligand specificity of chemotaxis receptors and histidine kinases using standardized assays in E. coli.

  7. Enhanced carotid body chemosensory activity and the cardiovascular alterations induced by intermittent hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo eIturriaga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The carotid body (CB plays a main role in the maintenance of the oxygen homeostasis. The hypoxic stimulation of the CB increases the chemosensory discharge, which in turn elicits reflex sympathetic, cardiovascular and ventilatory adjustments. An exacerbate carotid chemosensory activity has been associated with human sympathetic-mediated diseases such as hypertension, insulin resistance, heart failure and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Indeed, the CB chemosensory discharge becomes tonically hypereactive in experimental models of OSA and heart failure. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH, a main feature of OSA, enhances CB chemosensory baseline discharges in normoxia and in response to hypoxia, inducing sympathetic overactivity and hypertension. Oxidative stress, increased levels of ET-1, Angiotensin II and pro-inflammatory cytokines, along with a reduced production of NO in the CB, have been associated with the enhanced carotid chemosensory activity. In this review, we will discuss new evidence supporting a main role for the CB chemoreceptor in the autonomic and cardiorespiratory alterations induced by intermittent hypoxia, as well as the molecular mechanisms involved in the CB chemosensory potentiation.

  8. Chronic exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate induces behavior defects and neurotoxicity through oxidative damages, in vivo and in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Chen

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS is an emerging persistent pollutant which shows multiple adverse health effects. However, the neurotoxicity of PFOS and its mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro methods, the present study provides a detailed description of PFOS-induced neurotoxicity. Results showed that the median lethal concentration of PFOS was 2.03 mM in Caenorhabditis elegans for 48 h exposure. 20 µM PFOS caused decrease of locomotor behaviors including forward movement, body bend and head thrash. Additionally, PFOS exposure reduced chemotaxis index of C. elegans, which indicates the decline of chemotaxis learning ability. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP labelled transgenic strains, we found that PFOS caused down-regulated expression of a chemoreceptor gene, gcy-5, in ASE chemosensory neurons, but did not affect cholinergic neurons and dopaminergic neurons. In SH-SY5Y cells, 48 h exposure to 25 µM and 50 µM PFOS induced cell damage, apoptosis and the reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. PFOS caused significant increases of lipid peroxidation and superoxide dismutase activity, but an actual decrease of glutathione peroxidase activity. Furthermore, antioxidant N-acetylcysteine rescued cells from PFOS-induced apoptosis via blocking ROS. Our results demonstrate that chronic exposure to PFOS can cause obvious neurotoxicity and behavior defects. Oxidative damage and anti-oxidative deficit are crucial mechanisms in neurotoxicity of PFOS.

  9. Major Autonomic Neuroregulatory Pathways Underlying Short- and Long-Term Control of Cardiovascular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Ibrahim M

    2016-03-01

    Short-term and long-term blood pressure (BP) regulation and its maintenance at levels adequate to perfuse tissue organs involve an integrated action of multiple neural, cardiovascular, renal, endocrine and local tissue control systems. In the recent year, there has been a growing interest in the understanding of neural pathways key to BP control. For instance, through major advances in studies using both anesthetized and conscious animals, our knowledge of the essential neural mechanisms that subserve the baroreceptor, cardiopulmonary and chemoreceptor reflexes, and those evoked by the activation of stress pathways has dramatically increased. While the importance of these neural pathways in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis is well established, the recognition of the central processing nuclei that integrate various afferent inputs to produce synchronous adjustments of autonomic outflows is still progressively expanding. Based on the literature provided thus far, the present review provides an overview in relation to the important neural determinants of BP control and later offers a concise description of major neuronal pathways that control autonomic outflows to the cardiovascular system in the short and long term. PMID:26838031

  10. Sensing and surviving hypoxia in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonz, Michael G; Buck, Leslie T; Perry, Steve F; Schwerte, Thorsten; Zaccone, Giacomo

    2016-02-01

    Surviving hypoxia is one of the most critical challenges faced by vertebrates. Most species have adapted to changing levels of oxygen in their environment with specialized organs that sense hypoxia, while only few have been uniquely adapted to survive prolonged periods of anoxia. The goal of this review is to present the most recent research on oxygen sensing, adaptation to hypoxia, and mechanisms of anoxia tolerance in nonmammalian vertebrates. We discuss the respiratory structures in fish, including the skin, gills, and air-breathing organs, and recent evidence for chemosensory neuroepithelial cells (NECs) in these tissues that initiate reflex responses to hypoxia. The use of the zebrafish as a genetic and developmental model has allowed observation of the ontogenesis of respiratory and chemosensory systems, demonstration of a putative intracellular O2 sensor in chemoreceptors that may initiate transduction of the hypoxia signal, and investigation into the effects of extreme hypoxia on cardiorespiratory development. Other organisms, such as goldfish and freshwater turtles, display a high degree of anoxia tolerance, and these models are revealing important adaptations at the cellular level, such as the regulation of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in defense of homeostasis in central neurons.

  11. The retrotrapezoid nucleus and breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyenet, Patrice G; Stornetta, Ruth L; Abbott, Stephen B G; Depuy, Seth D; Kanbar, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) is located in the rostral medulla oblongata close to the ventral surface and consists of a bilateral cluster of glutamatergic neurons that are non-aminergic and express homeodomain transcription factor Phox2b throughout life. These neurons respond vigorously to increases in local pCO(2) via cell-autonomous and paracrine (glial) mechanisms and receive additional chemosensory information from the carotid bodies. RTN neurons exclusively innervate the regions of the brainstem that contain the respiratory pattern generator (RPG). Lesion or inhibition of RTN neurons largely attenuates the respiratory chemoreflex of adult rats whereas their activation increases respiratory rate, inspiratory amplitude and active expiration. Phox2b mutations that cause congenital central hypoventilation syndrome in humans prevent the development of RTN neurons in mice. Selective deletion of the RTN Phox2b-VGLUT2 neurons by genetic means in mice eliminates the respiratory chemoreflex in neonates.In short, RTN Phox2b-VGLUT2 neurons are a major nodal point of the CNS network that regulates pCO(2) via breathing and these cells are probable central chemoreceptors. PMID:23080151

  12. Effects of High Altitude on Sleep and Respiratory System and Theirs Adaptations

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    Turhan San

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High-altitude (HA environments have adverse effects on the normal functioning body of people accustomed to living at low altitudes because of the change in barometric pressure which causes decrease in the amount of oxygen leading to hypobaric hypoxia. Sustained exposure to hypoxia has adverse effects on body weight, muscle structure and exercise capacity, mental functioning, and sleep quality. The most important step of acclimatization is the hyperventilation which is achieved by hypoxic ventilatory response of the peripheral chemoreceptors. Hyperventilation results in increase in arterial carbondioxide concentration. Altitude also affects sleep and cardiac output, which is the other determinant of oxygen delivery. Upon initial exposure to HA, the resting pulse rate increases rapidly, but with acclimatization, heart rate and cardiac output tend to fall. Another important component that leads to decrease in cardiac output is the reduction in the stroke volume with acclimatization. During sleep at HA, the levels of CO2 in the blood can drop very low and this can switch off the drive to breathe. Only after the body senses a further drop in O2 levels breathing is started again. Periodic breathing is thought to result from instability in the control system through the hypoxic drive or the response to CO2.

  13. The Spiny Rat Mite Echinolaelaps echidninus (Berlese, 1887 (Dermanyssoidea: Laelapidae: Redescription of the Female with Emphasis on its Gnathosoma, Sense Organs, Peritreme and Pulvilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Ahmed Montasser

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM study includes redescription of female Echinolaelaps echidninus with emphasis on its gnathosoma, sense organs, peritreme and pulvilli which were rarely described in superfamily Dermanyssoidea. Chaetotaxy of dorsal shield revealed 40 pairs of setae, 22 on prosoma and 18 on opisthosoma. Epigynial plate carried 5 pairs of setae. Gnathosoma consisted of long basis capituli carrying median hypostome and 2 lateral pedipalps. Hypostome had dorsal labrum covered with finger-like processes, 2 lateral 3-segmented chelicerae and ventral labium carrying 4 lobulated plates. Function of labrum processes might be chemosensory while labium lobules might be mechanical, preventing solid material from entering the oral cavity. Palpal and foreleg tarsal organs comprised 10 and 16 sensillae, respectively. Sensillae of palpal organ were mostly chemoreceptors while those of tarsal organ were probably mechanoreceptors. Peritremal pit contained 4 rows of hand-like papillae and 5 concentric rows of minute papillae. Each pulvillus terminated with 2 medioventral claws. Pulvillus I had terminal integumental folds while each pulvillus II-IV had 2 lateral comb-like plates. Each plate carried 8-10 processes.

  14. Pulmonary vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mélot, C; Naeije, R

    2011-04-01

    Diseases of the pulmonary vasculature are a cause of increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in pulmonary embolism, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), and pulmonary arterial hypertension or decreased PVR in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations on hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, portal hypertension, or cavopulmonary anastomosis. All these conditions are associated with a decrease in both arterial PO2 and PCO2. Gas exchange in pulmonary vascular diseases with increased PVR is characterized by a shift of ventilation and perfusion to high ventilation-perfusion ratios, a mild to moderate increase in perfusion to low ventilation-perfusion ratios, and an increased physiologic dead space. Hypoxemia in these patients is essentially explained by altered ventilation-perfusion matching amplified by a decreased mixed venous PO2 caused by a low cardiac output. Hypocapnia is accounted for by hyperventilation, which is essentially related to an increased chemosensitivity. A cardiac shunt on a patent foramen ovale may be a cause of severe hypoxemia in a proportion of patients with pulmonary hypertension and an increase in right atrial pressure. Gas exchange in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations is characterized by variable degree of pulmonary shunting and/or diffusion-perfusion imbalance. Hypocapnia is caused by an increased ventilation in relation to an increased pulmonary blood flow with direct peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation by shunted mixed venous blood flow. PMID:23737196

  15. Modulation of feeding behavior by odorant-binding proteins in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarup, Shilpa; Morozova, Tatiana V; Sridhar, Sruthipriya; Nokes, Michael; Anholt, Robert R H

    2014-02-01

    Nutrient intake and avoidance of toxins are essential for survival and controlled by attractive and aversive feeding responses. Drosophila melanogaster presents one of the best characterized systems for studies on chemosensation, which is mediated by multigene families of chemoreceptors, including olfactory receptors, gustatory receptors, and odorant-binding proteins (OBPs). Although the response profiles of gustatory receptors have been well studied, the contribution of OBPs to food intake is largely unknown. As most aversive ("bitter") tastants are hydrophobic, we hypothesized that OBPs may fulfill an essential function in transporting bitter tastants to gustatory receptors to modulate feeding behavior. Here, we used 16 RNAi lines that inhibit expression of individual target Obp genes and show that OBPs modulate sucrose intake in response to a panel of nine bitter compounds. Similar to their function in olfaction, OBPs appear to interact with bitter compounds in a combinatorial and sex-dependent manner. RNAi-mediated reduction in expression of individual Obp genes resulted either in enhanced or reduced intake of sucrose in the presence of bitter compounds, consistent with roles for OBPs in transporting tastants to bitter taste receptors, sequestering them to limit their access to these receptors, or interacting directly with gustatory neurons that respond to sucrose. PMID:24302688

  16. ULTRASTRUCURAL STUDY OF BEE LOUSE VARROA DESTRUCTOR ANDERSON & TRUEMAN 2000 (ACARI: VARROIDAE) WITH RESISTANCE MODELS FROM APIS MELLIFERA L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Khalaf Nour Abd El-Wahed

    2015-08-01

    The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is the most dangerous pest of honeybee Egyptian race Apis mellifera L., as it causes many losses in apiculture worldwide. Adult female mites are flattened with a dome-shaped dorsal shield. The present SEM study revealed that the flat ventral surface is composed of series of plates. There are 5 rows of small, chemoreceptor papillae posterior to the genito-ventro anal shield, and a unique respiratory structure (peritreme) is located laterally above Coxa III. Peritreme is a chitinized elongated area surrounding stigma opening, provided by a lid that looks like a rose with a curly thick inner membrane which has numerous teeth-like projections. Mite' legs appeared to be modified for parasitism and each is tipped by one distal empodium. The pretarsus of the first pair of legs becomes a concave sucker and the pretarsus of the 3 pairs of the posterior legs consists of membranous amblacral pad (the caruncle). The mouthparts appeared well modified for its diet on bee hernolymph with its' powerful pedipalp for host attachment. High magnification revealed different types of setae distributed on the body, the mechano-receptor pedipalp short. and long anal setae and dorsal shield sensory simple setae. PMID:26485856

  17. Changes in carotid body and nTS neuronal excitability following neonatal sustained and chronic intermittent hypoxia exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, C A; Wilson, C G; MacFarlane, P M

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether pre-treatment with neonatal sustained hypoxia (SH) prior to chronic intermittent hypoxia (SH+CIH) would modify in vitro carotid body (CB) chemoreceptor activity and the excitability of neurons in the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS). Sustained hypoxia followed by CIH exposure simulates an oxygen paradigm experienced by extremely premature infants who developed persistent apnea. Rat pups were treated with 5 days of SH (11% O2) from postnatal age 1 (P1) followed by 10 days of subsequent chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH, 5% O2/5 min, 8 h/day, between P6 and P15) as described previously (Mayer et al., Respir. Physiol. Neurobiol. 187(2): 167-75, 2013). At the end of SH+CIH exposure (P16), basal firing frequency was enhanced, and the hypoxic sensory response of single unit CB chemoafferents was attenuated. Further, basal firing frequency and the amplitude of evoked excitatory post-synaptic currents (ESPC's) of nTS neurons was augmented compared to age-matched rats raised in normoxia. These effects were unique to SH+CIH exposure as neither SH or CIH alone elicited any comparable effect on chemoafferent activity or nTS function. These data indicated that pre-treatment with neonatal SH prior to CIH exposure uniquely modified mechanisms of peripheral (CB) and central (nTS) neural function in a way that would be expected to disturb the ventilatory response to acute hypoxia.

  18. Hypoxia-excited neurons in NTS send axonal projections to Kölliker-Fuse/parabrachial complex in dorsolateral pons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, G; Xu, H; Wang, H; Macdonald, S M; Poon, C-S

    2011-02-23

    Hypoxic respiratory and cardiovascular responses in mammals are mediated by peripheral chemoreceptor afferents which are relayed centrally via the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) in dorsomedial medulla to other cardiorespiratory-related brainstem regions such as ventrolateral medulla (VLM). Here, we test the hypothesis that peripheral chemoafferents could also be relayed directly to the Kölliker-Fuse/parabrachial complex in dorsolateral pons, an area traditionally thought to subserve pneumotaxic and cardiovascular regulation. Experiments were performed on adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Brainstem neurons with axons projecting to the dorsolateral pons were retrogradely labeled by microinjection with choleras toxin subunit B (CTB). Neurons involved in peripheral chemoreflex were identified by hypoxia-induced c-Fos expression. We found that double-labeled neurons (i.e. immunopositive to both CTB and c-Fos) were localized mostly in the commissural and medial subnuclei of NTS and to a lesser extent in the ventrolateral NTS subnucleus, VLM and ventrolateral pontine A5 region. Extracellular recordings from the commissural and medial NTS subnuclei revealed that some hypoxia-excited NTS neurons could be antidromically activated by electrical stimulations at the dorsolateral pons. These findings demonstrate that hypoxia-activated afferent inputs are relayed to the Kölliker-Fuse/parabrachial complex directly via the commissural and medial NTS and indirectly via the ventrolateral NTS subnucleus, VLM and A5 region. These pontine-projecting peripheral chemoafferent inputs may play an important role in the modulation of cardiorespiratory regulation by dorsolateral pons.

  19. Hemodynamic and respiratory responses to microinjection of ATP into the intermediate and caudal NTS of awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Vagner R; Bonagamba, Leni G H; Machado, Benedito H

    2005-01-25

    The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) is the site of integration of the peripheral chemoreceptor afferents in the brainstem. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that microinjection of ATP into the intermediate NTS produced increases in arterial pressure and bradycardia. In the present study, we evaluated the hemodynamic and respiratory responses to microinjection of ATP into the intermediate and caudal commissural NTS. In the same group of rats the responses were compared with cardiorespiratory responses to chemoreflex activation (KCN, i.v.). The data show that microinjection of ATP into the intermediate NTS produced pressor and bradycardic responses similar to those observed in response to chemoreflex activation but apnoea instead of tachypnoea. Microinjection of ATP into caudal commissural NTS produced increase in arterial pressure and tachypnoea similar to the chemoreflex but a minor bradycardia. The data show that microinjection of ATP into different sub-regions of the NTS produces a diverse pattern of hemodynamic and respiratory responses and suggest the involvement of this purine in the neurotransmission of the cardiovascular reflex in the NTS.

  20. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa chemotaxis methyltransferase CheR1 impacts on bacterial surface sampling.

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    Juliane Schmidt

    Full Text Available The characterization of factors contributing to the formation and development of surface-associated bacterial communities known as biofilms has become an area of intense interest since biofilms have a major impact on human health, the environment and industry. Various studies have demonstrated that motility, including swimming, swarming and twitching, seems to play an important role in the surface colonization and establishment of structured biofilms. Thereby, the impact of chemotaxis on biofilm formation has been less intensively studied. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has a very complex chemosensory system with two Che systems implicated in flagella-mediated motility. In this study, we demonstrate that the chemotaxis protein CheR1 is a methyltransferase that binds S-adenosylmethionine and transfers a methyl group from this methyl donor to the chemoreceptor PctA, an activity which can be stimulated by the attractant serine but not by glutamine. We furthermore demonstrate that CheR1 does not only play a role in flagella-mediated chemotaxis but that its activity is essential for the formation and maintenance of bacterial biofilm structures. We propose a model in which motility and chemotaxis impact on initial attachment processes, dispersion and reattachment and increase the efficiency and frequency of surface sampling in P. aeruginosa.

  1. Ultra Morphological Structure of Sensory Sensillae on the Legs and External Genitalia of the Red Palm Weevil Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Oliv.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Red Palm Weevil (RPW) is a major pest infesting date trees in the Gulf region. Chemoreceptors play an important role for insects behaviour in detecting their defined host for feeding, egg laying or mating. The present study is aimed to study morphological structure of sensillae on different legs and external genitalia of both sexes. Three kinds of sensillae are found on the different parts of the three pairs of fore, mid and hind legs, these sensillae are identified as ( Trichoid in three types, coeloconic in two types and one type of Basiconic sensillae). Fore legs bear the highest number of different forms of sensillae, males contained realatively greater number than females. Mid femur only in female bears a dense hair of trichoid sensillae, while they are found on fore- mid and hind femur of males, this may be used for differentiating two sexes. Female ovipositor contained trichoid sensilla can be subdivided into three distinct type1,2, and 3 in addition placoid sensillae, it could be identified four types of trichoid sensilla on the male external genitalia and numerous of placoid sensillae.These may be for hygroreception. (author)

  2. Chemodectoma in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumors of the chemoreceptor organs are referred to as chemodectomas. Such tumors develop principally in the aortic and carotid bodies of animals. Aortic body tumors occur four times more frequently than do carotid body tumors. Brachycephalic breeds (e.g., boxers, Boston terriers, and English bulldogs) are over represented among reported cases of canine chemodectoma. Old male dogs are at greater risk of developing the condition. Tumors of the aortic body occur more often as single or multiple nodules in the pericardial sac near the base of the heart. Carotid body tumors arise near the bifurcation of the common carotid artery in the cranial cervical region. Clinical signs at presentation include signs of right-sided congestive heart failure (aortic body tumor) and the presence of a neck mass (carotid body tumor). In the absence of necropsy, definitive diagnosis is usually based on exploratory surgery and histopathology of surgically excised tissue. Currently, early surgical excision is the preferred treatment. Radiation therapy has been used in a limited number of cases. The prognosis for animals diagnosed with chemodectoma is guarded to fair

  3. Morphology, Quantity and Distribution of Gustatory Hairs in Spiders%一些蜘蛛类群味觉毛的形态、数量和分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖永红; 李枢强

    2012-01-01

    化学通讯是蜘蛛最基础和最普遍的种内及种间通讯方式之一,蜘蛛体表的味觉毛能够接触性地或者近距离地感知环境中的化学物质,但味觉毛的相关研究仅在少数几种蜘蛛中有过报道.我们通过扫描电镜分别对幽灵蛛科( Pholcidae)、弱蛛科(Leptonetidae)、泰莱蛛科(Telemidae)、蟹蛛科(Thomisidae)和球蛛科(Theridiidae)共5科32种蜘蛛味觉毛的形态、数量及分布进行了观察.结果显示:蜘蛛味觉毛一般呈“S”形或弧形;毛根部与体表形成较大角度,末端开口.一般分布在步足的跗节和后跗节,一些种类在步足胫节亦有味觉毛分布.所观察的蜘蛛中绝大部分种类在触肢上未发现味觉毛,仅有2种蟹蛛即角红蟹蛛(Thomisus labefactus)和膨胀微蟹蛛(Lysiteles inflatus)以及1种球蛛即鼬形微姬蛛(Phycosoma mustelinum)在触肢上有味觉毛.味觉毛的数量在不同蜘蛛种类中有较大差异,从十几根到上百根不等.蜘蛛味觉毛的形态、数量和分布等特征除了与遗传相关外,亦有可能与其生境和生活方式等有关.%Chemical communication is a basic and universal intra- and inter-specific communication in spiders. Gustatory hairs are chemoreceptors detecting chemicals from the environment by contacting or close-range olfactory. Up till now, few studies compared chemoreceptors among spiders. Here we studied morphology, quantity and distribution of gustatory hairs in 32 spider species from Pholcidae, Leptonetidae, Telemidae, Thomisidae, Theridiidae by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The typical features of spider gustatory hairs are in "S" or arc shape with open end, and they emerge from the cuticle at a great angle. Spider gustatory hairs usually locate on tarsi and metatarsi of their legs, while some studied species have gustatory hairs on tibia. Except for 3 spider species, Thomisus labefactus and Lysiteles inflatus from Thomisidae and Phycosoma mustelinum from

  4. Chemical speciation of heavy metals by surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy: identification and quantification of inorganic- and methyl-mercury in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrini, Luca; Rodriguez-Loureiro, Ignacio; Correa-Duarte, Miguel A.; Lee, Yih Hong; Ling, Xing Yi; García de Abajo, F. Javier; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A.

    2014-06-01

    Chemical speciation of heavy metals has become extremely important in environmental and analytical research because of the strong dependence that toxicity, environmental mobility, persistence and bioavailability of these pollutants have on their specific chemical forms. Novel nano-optical-based detection strategies, capable of overcoming the intrinsic limitations of well-established analytic methods for the quantification of total metal ion content, have been reported, but the speciation of different chemical forms has not yet been achieved. Here, we report the first example of a SERS-based sensor for chemical speciation of toxic metal ions in water at trace levels. Specifically, the inorganic Hg2+ and the more toxicologically relevant methylmercury (CH3Hg+) are selected as analytical targets. The sensing platform consists of a self-assembled monolayer of 4-mercaptopyridine (MPY) on highly SERS-active and robust hybrid plasmonic materials formed by a dense layer of interacting gold nanoparticles anchored onto polystyrene microbeads. The co-ordination of Hg2+ and CH3Hg+ to the nitrogen atom of the MPY ring yields characteristic changes in the vibrational SERS spectra of the organic chemoreceptor that can be qualitatively and quantitatively correlated to the presence of the two different mercury forms.Chemical speciation of heavy metals has become extremely important in environmental and analytical research because of the strong dependence that toxicity, environmental mobility, persistence and bioavailability of these pollutants have on their specific chemical forms. Novel nano-optical-based detection strategies, capable of overcoming the intrinsic limitations of well-established analytic methods for the quantification of total metal ion content, have been reported, but the speciation of different chemical forms has not yet been achieved. Here, we report the first example of a SERS-based sensor for chemical speciation of toxic metal ions in water at trace levels

  5. The distribution of presumptive thoracic paraganglionic tissue in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus

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    Clarke J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aortic-pulmonary regions (APR of seven adult marmosets (Callithrix jacchus and the region of the right subclavian artery of a further three marmosets were diffusion-fixed with 10% buffered formol-saline solution. In both regions serial 5-µm sections were cut and stained by the Martius yellow, brilliant crystal scarlet and soluble blue method. Presumptive thoracic paraganglionic (PTP tissue was only observed in the APR. PTP tissue was composed of small groups of cells that varied in size and number. The distribution of the groups of cells was extremely variable, so much so that it would be misleading to attempt to classify their position; they were not circumscribed by a connective tissue capsule, but were always related to the thoracic branches of the left vagus nerve. The cells lay in loose areolar tissue characteristic of this part of the mediastinum and received their blood supply from small adjacent connective tissue arterioles. Unlike the paraganglionic tissue found in the carotid body the cells in the thorax did not appear to have a profuse capillary blood supply. There was, however, a close cellular-neural relationship. The cells, 10-15 µm in diameter, were oval or rounded in appearance and possessed a central nucleus and clear cytoplasm. No evidence was found that these cells possessed a 'companion' cell reminiscent of the arrangement of type 1 and type 2 cells in the carotid body. In conclusion, we found evidence of presumed paraganglionic tissue in the APR of the marmoset which, however, did not show the characteristic histological features of the aortic body chemoreceptors that have been described in some non-primate mammals. A survey of the mediastina of other non-human primates is required to establish whether this finding is atypical for these animals.

  6. Physiological and Clinical Implications of Adrenergic Pathways at High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richalet, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The adrenergic system is part of a full array of mechanisms allowing the human body to adapt to the hypoxic environment. Triggered by the stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors, the adrenergic centers in the medulla are activated in acute hypoxia and augment the adrenergic drive to the organs, especially to the heart, leading to tachycardia. With prolonged exposure to altitude hypoxia, the adrenergic drive persists, as witnessed by elevated blood concentrations of catecholamines and nerve activity in adrenergic fibers. In response to this persistent stimulation, the pathways leading to the activation of adenylate cyclase are modified. A downregulation of β-adrenergic and adenosinergic receptors is observed, while muscarinic receptors are upregulated. The expression and activity of Gi and Gs proteins are modified, leading to a decreased response of adenylate cyclase activity to adrenergic stimulation. The clinical consequences of these cellular and molecular changes are of importance, especially for exercise performance and protection of heart function. The decrease in maximal exercise heart rate in prolonged hypoxia is fully accounted for the observed changes in adrenergic and muscarinic pathways. The decreased heart rate response to isoproterenol infusion is another marker of the desensitization of adrenergic pathways. These changes can be considered as mechanisms protecting the heart from a too high oxygen consumption in conditions where the oxygen availability is severely reduced. Similarly, intermittent exposure to hypoxia has been shown to protect the heart from an ischemic insult with similar mechanisms involving G proteins and downregulation of β receptors. Other pathways with G proteins are concerned in adaptation to hypoxia, such as lactate release by the muscles and renal handling of calcium. Altogether, the activation of the adrenergic system is useful for the acute physiological response to hypoxia. With prolonged exposure to hypoxia, the autonomous

  7. Surface morphology and morphometric analysis of sensilla of Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse: an SEM investigation

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    Kavita R. Sharma

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The sensilla and sensory mechanism play a significant role in hostseeking and oviposition behaviour of mosquitoes, which enable them to transmit various diseases to humans. Aedes albopictus (Skuse has emerged as a major vector of Chikungunya virus in the recent epidemics in most parts of southern India. Studies on the sensory structures of dengue vector, Aedes aegypti (Linn are comprehensive; whereas information on the sensillary systems of Asian tiger mosquito, Ae. albopictus is inadequate. Therefore, the present study has been carried out to observe various types of sensilla located on the antenna, maxillary palp, labial palp, tarsi and ovipositor of Ae. albopictus using scanning electron microscopy. Methods: The antennae, maxillary palpi, labellum, tarsi and ovipositor of 10 different female mosquito of Ae. albopictus were fixed individually in 2.5% glutaraldehyde solution, washed twice and dehydrated with ascending grades of ethanol. Samples were cleared with xylene, air-dried, mounted on stubs, gold coated in an ion-sputtering unit and the sensilla were viewed between 5 and 10 KV using FEI Quanta 400 EDAX scanning electron microscope. ANOVA revealed significant differences in the morphometric features of various sensilla. Results: In the antenna Sensilla trichoidea are numerously distributed in all flagellar segments revealed four distinct subtypes. Two types of grooved peg sensilla were observed. Sensilla coeloconica was observed in the terminal flagellum of antenna and tarsomeres with large variation in diameter. Sensilla chaetica are distributed throughout the body and revealed greater variation in morphology and morphometric parameters. Interpretation & conclusion: The significant difference among various types of sensilla would possibly reveal their functions. The porous sensilla are olfactory and contact chemoreceptors while the aporous sensilla would play the role of mechanoreception. Sensilla coeloconica on

  8. A single muscle moves a crustacean limb joint rhythmically by acting against a spring containing resilin

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    Burrows Malcolm

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The beating or fanning movements of three pairs of maxilliped flagella in crabs and crayfish modify exhalent gill currents while drawing water over chemoreceptors on the head. They play an integral part both in signalling by distributing urine odours, and in active chemosensation. Results The rhythmical maxilliped movements start with maxilliped 3 followed after a delay of 15 to 20 ms in shore crabs by maxilliped 2 and then maxilliped 1, at a frequency of 18 to 20 Hz in crabs and 10 to 13 Hz in signal crayfish. The contraction of a single abductor muscle controls the power stroke (abduction of each flagellum, which is accompanied by flaring of feather-like setae which increase its surface area. No muscle can bring about the return stroke (adduction. Release of an isolated flagellum from an imposed abduction is followed by a rapid recoil to its resting adducted position. The relationship between the extent of abduction and the angular velocity of the return stroke indicates the operation of a spring. Blue fluorescence under UV light, and its dependence on the pH of the bathing medium, indicates that resilin is present at the joint between an exopodite and flagellum, at the annuli of a flagellum and at the base of the setae. Conclusion Resilin is progressively bent as a flagellum is abducted and resumes its natural shape when the joint recoils. Other distortions of the exopodites may also contribute to this spring-like action. The joint is therefore controlled by a single abductor muscle operating against a spring in which the elastic properties of resilin play a key role.

  9. Parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motoneurons labeled after voluntary diving

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    W Michael ePanneton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A dramatic bradycardia is induced by underwater submersion in vertebrates. The location of parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motor neurons driving this aspect of the diving response was investigated using cFos immunohistochemistry combined with retrograde transport of cholera toxin subunit B (CTB to double-label neurons. After pericardial injections of CTB, trained rats voluntarily dove underwater, and their heart rates dropped immediately to 95±2bpm, an 80% reduction. After immunohistochemical processing, the vast majority of CTB labeled neurons were located in the reticular formation from the rostral cervical spinal cord to the facial motor nucleus, confirming previous studies. Labeled neurons caudal to the rostral ventrolateral medulla were usually spindle-shaped aligned along an oblique line running from the dorsal vagal nucleus to the ventrolateral reticular formation, while those more rostrally were multipolar with extended dendrites. Nine percent of retrogradely-labeled neurons were positive for both cFos and CTB after diving and 74% of these were found rostral to the obex. CTB also was transported transganglionically in primary afferent fibers, resulting in large granular deposits in dorsolateral, ventrolateral, and commissural subnuclei of the nucleus tractus solitarii and finer deposits in lamina I and IV-V of the trigeminocervical complex. The overlap of parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motor neurons activated by diving with those activated by baro- and chemoreceptors in the rostral ventrolateral medulla is discussed. Thus the profound bradycardia seen with underwater submersion reinforces the notion that the mammalian diving response is the most powerful autonomic reflex known.

  10. A closed-loop model of the respiratory system: focus on hypercapnia and active expiration.

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    Yaroslav I Molkov

    Full Text Available Breathing is a vital process providing the exchange of gases between the lungs and atmosphere. During quiet breathing, pumping air from the lungs is mostly performed by contraction of the diaphragm during inspiration, and muscle contraction during expiration does not play a significant role in ventilation. In contrast, during intense exercise or severe hypercapnia forced or active expiration occurs in which the abdominal "expiratory" muscles become actively involved in breathing. The mechanisms of this transition remain unknown. To study these mechanisms, we developed a computational model of the closed-loop respiratory system that describes the brainstem respiratory network controlling the pulmonary subsystem representing lung biomechanics and gas (O2 and CO2 exchange and transport. The lung subsystem provides two types of feedback to the neural subsystem: a mechanical one from pulmonary stretch receptors and a chemical one from central chemoreceptors. The neural component of the model simulates the respiratory network that includes several interacting respiratory neuron types within the Bötzinger and pre-Bötzinger complexes, as well as the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group (RTN/pFRG representing the central chemoreception module targeted by chemical feedback. The RTN/pFRG compartment contains an independent neural generator that is activated at an increased CO2 level and controls the abdominal motor output. The lung volume is controlled by two pumps, a major one driven by the diaphragm and an additional one activated by abdominal muscles and involved in active expiration. The model represents the first attempt to model the transition from quiet breathing to breathing with active expiration. The model suggests that the closed-loop respiratory control system switches to active expiration via a quantal acceleration of expiratory activity, when increases in breathing rate and phrenic amplitude no longer provide sufficient

  11. Increased ventilatory response to carbon dioxide in COPD patients following vitamin C administration

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    Sara E. Hartmann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD have decreased ventilatory and cerebrovascular responses to hypercapnia. Antioxidants increase the ventilatory response to hypercapnia in healthy humans. Cerebral blood flow is an important determinant of carbon dioxide/hydrogen ion concentration at the central chemoreceptors and may be affected by antioxidants. It is unknown whether antioxidants can improve the ventilatory and cerebral blood flow response in individuals in whom these are diminished. Thus, we aimed to determine the effect of vitamin C administration on the ventilatory and cerebrovascular responses to hypercapnia during healthy ageing and in COPD. Using transcranial Doppler ultrasound, we measured the ventilatory and cerebral blood flow responses to hyperoxic hypercapnia before and after an intravenous vitamin C infusion in healthy young (Younger and older (Older subjects and in moderate COPD. Vitamin C increased the ventilatory response in COPD patients (mean (95% CI 1.1 (0.9–1.1 versus 1.5 (1.1–2.0 L·min−1·mmHg−1, p0.05 or Older (1.3 (1.0–1.7 versus 1.3 (1.0–1.7 L·min−1·mmHg−1, p>0.05 healthy subjects. Vitamin C did not affect the cerebral blood flow response in the young or older healthy subjects or COPD subjects (p>0.05. Vitamin C increases the ventilatory but not cerebrovascular response to hyperoxic hypercapnia in patients with moderate COPD.

  12. The Molecular Origins and Functional Role of Noise in a Simple Sensory Network

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    Pontius, William Vincent

    Biological pathways perform calculations with often-small numbers of constituent molecules, leading to potentially significant variability in their output. In this thesis, I use the chemotaxis pathway of the bacterium Escherichia coli as a model to investigate the molecular origins of large temporal fluctuations and their consequences for cellular behavior. The bacterial chemotaxis pathway is a simple sensory network that performs temporal comparisons of external chemical stimuli, enabling the bacterium to perform a random walk biased toward increasingly favorable conditions. In this thesis, I first analyze experimental measurements of living cells and argue that the statistics of pathway noise and the cellular response to stimuli, which both arise from the same biochemical pathway, are intrinsically linked. I then use simple quantitative models to argue that noise in the bacterial chemotaxis pathway may have significant positive consequences for the behavior of the cell: by coordinating the behavior of independent, stochastically switching flagellar motors, noise may enable the cell to respond more quickly to stimuli, track weak chemoattractant gradients more effectively, and explore sparse environments more efficiently. Finally, I construct a detailed, calibrated stochastic model of the mechanism through which the chemotaxis system adapts to persistent stimuli and identify the specific architectural features---densely clustered chemoreceptors and an enzyme localization mechanism---that give rise to large pathway fluctuations. I further argue that these features giving rise to pathway noise also underlie other well-known properties of the chemotaxis system: precise adaptation and functional robustness to expression levels of the pathway constituents. The simplicity of the bacterial chemotaxis system and the ubiquity of many of its architectural features suggest that these results will be relevant to the study of pathway noise in other sensory systems and

  13. Ventilatory response to high inspired carbon dioxide concentrations in anesthetized dogs

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    Jack A. Loeppky

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ventilation (IV response to inspired CO2 has been extensively studied, but rarely with concentrations >10%. Aims: These experiments were performed to determine whether I V  would increase correspondingly to higher concentrations and according to conventional chemoreceptor time delays. Materials and Methods: We exposed anesthetized dogs acutely, with and without vagotomy and electrical stimulation of the right vagus, to 20-100% CO2-balance O2.and to 0 and 10% O2-balance N2. Results: The I V  time delays decreased and response magnitude increased with increasing concentrations (p<0.01, but at higher concentrations the time delays were shorter than expected, i.e., 0.5 s to double I V  at 100% CO2, with the response to 0% O2 being 3 s slower. Right vagotomy significantly reduced baseline breathing frequency (fR, increased tidal volume (VT and increased the time delay by 3 s. Bilateral vagotomy further reduced baseline fR and I V  , and reduced the response to CO2 and increased the time delay by 12 s. Electro-stimulation of the peripheral right vagus while inspiring CO2 caused a 13 s asystole and further reduced and delayed the I V  response, especially after bilateral vagotomy, shifting the mode from VT to fR. Conclusions: Results indicate that airway or lung receptors responded to the rapid increase in lung H+ and that vagal afferents and unimpaired circulation seem necessary for the initial rapid response to high CO2 concentrations by receptors upstream from the aortic bodies.

  14. Reference gene validation for qPCR in rat carotid body during postnatal development

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    Carroll John L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The carotid bodies are the main arterial oxygen chemoreceptors in mammals. Afferent neural output from the carotid bodies to brainstem respiratory and cardiovascular nuclei provides tonic input and mediates important protective responses to acute and chronic hypoxia. It is widely accepted that the selection of reference genes for mRNA normalization in quantitative real-time PCR must be validated for a given tissue and set of conditions. This is particularly important for studies in carotid body during early postnatal maturation as the arterial oxygen tension undergoes major changes from fetal to postnatal life, which may affect reference gene expression. In order to determine the most stable and suitable reference genes for the study of rat carotid body during development, six commonly used reference genes, β-actin, RPII (RNA polymerase II, PPIA (peptidyl-proyl-isomerase A, TBP (TATA-box binding protein, GAPDH, and 18s rRNA, were evaluated in two age groups (P0-1 and P14-16 under three environmental oxygen conditions (normoxia, chronic hypoxia and chronic hyperoxia using the three most commonly used software programs, geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. Findings The three programs produced similar results but the reference gene rankings were not identical between programs or experimental conditions. Overall, 18s rRNA was the least stable reference gene for carotid body and, when hyperoxia and/or hypoxia conditions were included, actin was similarly unstable. Conclusions Reference or housekeeping gene expression for qPCR studies of carotid body during postnatal development may vary with developmental stage and environmental conditions. Selection of the best reference gene or combination of reference genes for carotid body development studies should take environmental conditions into account. Two commonly used reference genes, 18s rRNA and actin, may be unsuitable for studies of carotid body maturation, especially if the study

  15. Olfactory Receptors in Non-Chemosensory Organs: The Nervous System in Health and Disease

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    Ferrer, Isidro; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Carmona, Margarita; Carro, Eva; Aronica, Eleonora; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Grison, Alice; Gustincich, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) and down-stream functional signaling molecules adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), olfactory G protein α subunit (Gαolf), OR transporters receptor transporter proteins 1 and 2 (RTP1 and RTP2), receptor expression enhancing protein 1 (REEP1), and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are expressed in neurons of the human and murine central nervous system (CNS). In vitro studies have shown that these receptors react to external stimuli and therefore are equipped to be functional. However, ORs are not directly related to the detection of odors. Several molecules delivered from the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, neighboring local neurons and glial cells, distant cells through the extracellular space, and the cells’ own self-regulating internal homeostasis can be postulated as possible ligands. Moreover, a single neuron outside the olfactory epithelium expresses more than one receptor, and the mechanism of transcriptional regulation may be different in olfactory epithelia and brain neurons. OR gene expression is altered in several neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s disease (PD), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) subtypes MM1 and VV2 with disease-, region- and subtype-specific patterns. Altered gene expression is also observed in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia with a major but not total influence of chlorpromazine treatment. Preliminary parallel observations have also shown the presence of taste receptors (TASRs), mainly of the bitter taste family, in the mammalian brain, whose function is not related to taste. TASRs in brain are also abnormally regulated in neurodegenerative diseases. These seminal observations point to the need for further studies on ORs and TASRs chemoreceptors in the mammalian brain. PMID:27458372

  16. Morphological changes of carotid bodies in acute respiratory distress syndrome: a morphometric study in humans

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    Vinhaes E.N.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid bodies are chemoreceptors sensitive to a fall of partial oxygen pressure in blood (hypoxia. The morphological alterations of these organs in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and in people living at high altitude are well known. However, it is not known whether the histological profile of human carotid bodies is changed in acute clinical conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. The objective of the present study was to perform a quantitative analysis of the histology of carotid bodies collected from patients who died of ARDS. A morphometric study of carotid bodies collected during routine autopsies was carried out on three groups: patients that died of non-respiratory diseases (controls, N = 8, patients that presented COPD and died of its complications or associated diseases (N = 7, and patients that died of ARDS (N = 7. Morphometric measurements of the volume fraction of clusters of chief cells were performed in five fields on each slide at 40X magnification. The numerical proportion of the four main histological cell types (light, dark, progenitor and sustentacular cells was determined analyzing 10 fields on each slide at 400X magnification. The proportion of dark cells was 0.22 in ARDS patients, 0.12 in controls (P<0.001, and 0.08 in the COPD group. The proportion of light cells was 0.33 (ARDS, 0.44 (controls (P<0.001, and 0.36 (COPD. These findings suggest that chronic and acute hypoxia have different effects on the histology of glomic tissue.

  17. [Involvement of Tas1r3 receptor protein in control of the metabolism of glucose at different levels of glycemia in mice].

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    Murovets, V O; Bachmanov, A A; Travnikov, S V; Tchurikova, A A; Zolotarev, V A

    2014-01-01

    The heterodimeric protein T1R2/T1R3 is a chemoreceptor mediating taste perception of sugars, several amino acids, and non-caloric sweeteners in humans and many other vertebrate species. The T1R2 and T1R3 proteins are expressed not only in the oral cavity, but also in the intestine, pancreas, liver, adipose, tissue, and in structures of the central nervous system, which suggests their involvement in functions other than gustatory perception. In this study, we analyzed the role of the T1R3 protein in regulation of glucose metabolism in experiments with the gene-knockout mouse strain C57BL6J-Tas1r3(tm1Rfm) (Tas1r3-/-), with a deletion of the Tas1r3 gene encoding T1R3, and the control strain C57BL/6ByJ with the intact gene. Glucose tolerance was measured in euglycemic or food-deprived mice after intraperitoneal to disappearance glucose administration. We have shown that in the Tas1r3-/- strain, in addition to disappearance of taste preference for sucrose, glucose tolerance is also substantially reduced, and insulin resistance is observed. The effect of the Tas1r3 gene knockout on glucose utilization was more pronounced in the euglycemic state than after food deprivation. The baseline glucose level after food deprivation was lower in the Tas1r3-/- strain than in the control strain, which suggested that the T1R3 is involved in regulation of endogenous glucose production. These data suggest that the T1R3-mediated glucoreception interacts with the K(ATP)-dependent mechanisms of regulation of the glucose metabolism, and that the main role is likely played by T1R3 expressed in the pancreas and possibly in the central nervous system, but not in the intestinal mucosa, as it was suggested earlier. PMID:25775865

  18. CO2 decreases membrane conductance and depolarizes neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarii.

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    Dean, J B; Lawing, W L; Millhorn, D E

    1989-01-01

    To identify central sites of potential CO2/H+-chemoreceptive neurons, and the mechanism responsible for neuronal chemosensitivity, intracellular recordings were made in rat tissue slices in two cardiopulmonary-related regions (i.e., nucleus tractus solitarii, NTS; nucleus ambiguus, AMBc) during exposure to high CO2. When the NTS was explored slices were bisected and the ventral half discarded. Utilizing such "dorsal" medullary slices removed any impinging synaptic input from putative chemoreceptors in the ventrolateral medulla. In the NTS, CO2-induced changes in firing rate were associated with membrane depolarizations ranging from 2-25 mV (n = 15). In some cases increased e.p.s.p. activity was observed during CO2 exposure. The CO2-induced depolarization occurred concomitantly with an increased input resistance ranging from 19-23 M omega (n = 5). The lower membrane conductance during hypercapnia suggests that CO2-induced depolarization is due to a decreased outward potassium conductance. Unlike neurons in the NTS, AMBc neurons were not spontaneously active and were rarely depolarized by hypercapnia. Eleven of 12 cells tested were either hyperpolarized by or insensitive to CO2. Only 1 neuron in the AMBc was depolarized and it also showed an increased input resistance during CO2 exposure. Our findings suggest that CO2/H+-related stimuli decrease potassium conductance which depolarizes the cell and increases firing rate. Although our in vitro studies cannot guarantee the specific function of these cells, we believe they may be involved with brain pH homeostasis and cardiopulmonary regulation. PMID:2507342

  19. Expression of taste receptors in Solitary Chemosensory Cells of rodent airways

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    Sbarbati Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemical irritation of airway mucosa elicits a variety of reflex responses such as coughing, apnea, and laryngeal closure. Inhaled irritants can activate either chemosensitive free nerve endings, laryngeal taste buds or solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs. The SCC population lies in the nasal respiratory epithelium, vomeronasal organ, and larynx, as well as deeper in the airway. The objective of this study is to map the distribution of SCCs within the airways and to determine the elements of the chemosensory transduction cascade expressed in these SCCs. Methods We utilized a combination of immunohistochemistry and molecular techniques (rtPCR and in situ hybridization on rats and transgenic mice where the Tas1R3 or TRPM5 promoter drives expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP. Results Epithelial SCCs specialized for chemoreception are distributed throughout much of the respiratory tree of rodents. These cells express elements of the taste transduction cascade, including Tas1R and Tas2R receptor molecules, α-gustducin, PLCβ2 and TrpM5. The Tas2R bitter taste receptors are present throughout the entire respiratory tract. In contrast, the Tas1R sweet/umami taste receptors are expressed by numerous SCCs in the nasal cavity, but decrease in prevalence in the trachea, and are absent in the lower airways. Conclusions Elements of the taste transduction cascade including taste receptors are expressed by SCCs distributed throughout the airways. In the nasal cavity, SCCs, expressing Tas1R and Tas2R taste receptors, mediate detection of irritants and foreign substances which trigger trigeminally-mediated protective airway reflexes. Lower in the respiratory tract, similar chemosensory cells are not related to the trigeminal nerve but may still trigger local epithelial responses to irritants. In total, SCCs should be considered chemoreceptor cells that help in preventing damage to the respiratory tract caused by inhaled irritants and

  20. Exercise training attenuates chemoreflex-mediated reductions of renal blood flow in heart failure.

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    Marcus, Noah J; Pügge, Carolin; Mediratta, Jai; Schiller, Alicia M; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Zucker, Irving H; Schultz, Harold D

    2015-07-15

    In chronic heart failure (CHF), carotid body chemoreceptor (CBC) activity is increased and contributes to increased tonic and hypoxia-evoked elevation in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Elevated RSNA and reduced renal perfusion may contribute to development of the cardio-renal syndrome in CHF. Exercise training (EXT) has been shown to abrogate CBC-mediated increases in RSNA in experimental heart failure; however, the effect of EXT on CBC control of renal blood flow (RBF) is undetermined. We hypothesized that CBCs contribute to tonic reductions in RBF in CHF, that stimulation of the CBC with hypoxia would result in exaggerated reductions in RBF, and that these responses would be attenuated with EXT. RBF was measured in CHF-sedentary (SED), CHF-EXT, CHF-carotid body denervation (CBD), and CHF-renal denervation (RDNX) groups. We measured RBF at rest and in response to hypoxia (FiO2 10%). All animals exhibited similar reductions in ejection fraction and fractional shortening as well as increases in ventricular systolic and diastolic volumes. Resting RBF was lower in CHF-SED (29 ± 2 ml/min) than in CHF-EXT animals (46 ± 2 ml/min, P hypoxia, and this was prevented in CHF-EXT animals. Both CBD and RDNX abolished the RBF response to hypoxia in CHF. Mean arterial pressure increased in response to hypoxia in CHF-SED, but was prevented by EXT, CBD, and RDNX. EXT is effective in attenuating chemoreflex-mediated tonic and hypoxia-evoked reductions in RBF in CHF. PMID:26001414

  1. Peptides and Food Intake

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    Carmen Sobrino Crespo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nutrients created by the digestion of food are proposed to active G protein coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells e.g. the L-cell. This stimulates the release of gut hormones. Hormones released from the gut and adipose tissue play an important rol in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure (1.Many circulating signals, including gut hormones, can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC neurons directly, after passing across the median eminence. The ARC is adjacent to the median eminence, a circumventricular organ with fenestrated capillaries and hence an incomplete blood-brain barrier (2. The ARC of the hypothalamus is believed to play a crucial role in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. The ARC contains two populations of neurons with opposing effect on food intake (3. Medially located orexigenic neurons (i.e those stimulating appetite express neuropeptide Y (NPY and agouti-related protein (AgRP (4-5. Anorexigenic neurons (i.e. those inhibiting appetite in the lateral ARC express alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH derived from pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC and cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART (6. The balance between activities of these neuronal circuits is critical to body weight regulation.In contrast, other peripheral signals influence the hypothalamus indirectly via afferent neuronal pathway and brainstem circuits. In this context gastrointestinal’s vagal afferents are activated by mechanoreceptors and chemoreceptors, and converge in the nucleus of the tractus solitaries (NTS of the brainstem. Neuronal projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypotalamus (1, 7. Gut hormones also alter the activity of the ascending vagal pathway from the gut to the brainstem. In the cases of ghrelin and Peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY, there are evidences for both to have a direct action on the arcuate nucleus and an action via the vagus nerve a

  2. Continued neurogenesis in adult Drosophila as a mechanism for recruiting environmental cue-dependent variants.

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    Selim Ben Rokia-Mille

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The skills used by winged insects to explore their environment are strongly dependent upon the integration of neurosensory information comprising visual, acoustic and olfactory signals. The neuronal architecture of the wing contains a vast array of different sensors which might convey information to the brain in order to guide the trajectories during flight. In Drosophila, the wing sensory cells are either chemoreceptors or mechanoreceptors and some of these sensors have as yet unknown functions. The axons of these two functionally distinct types of neurons are entangled, generating a single nerve. This simple and accessible coincidental signaling circuitry in Drosophila constitutes an excellent model system to investigate the developmental variability in relation to natural behavioral polymorphisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A fluorescent marker was generated in neurons at all stages of the Drosophila life cycle using a highly efficient and controlled genetic recombination system that can be induced in dividing precursor cells (MARCM system, flybase web site. It allows fluorescent signals in axons only when the neuroblasts and/or neuronal cell precursors like SOP (sensory organ precursors undergo division during the precedent steps. We first show that a robust neurogenesis continues in the wing after the adults emerge from the pupae followed by an extensive axonal growth. Arguments are presented to suggest that this wing neurogenesis in the newborn adult flies was influenced by genetic determinants such as the frequency dependent for gene and by environmental cues such as population density. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that the neuronal architecture in the adult Drosophila wing is unfinished when the flies emerge from their pupae. This unexpected developmental step might be crucial for generating non-heritable variants and phenotypic plasticity. This might therefore constitute an advantage in an unstable ecological system and

  3. Comparative genomics of pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains of Xanthomonas arboricola unveil molecular and evolutionary events linked to pathoadaptation

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    Sophie eCesbron

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial species Xanthomonas arboricola contains plant pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. It includes the pathogen X. arboricola pv. juglandis, causing the bacterial blight of Juglans regia. The emergence of a new bacterial disease of Juglans regia in France called vertical oozing canker (VOC was previously described and the causal agent was identified as a distinct genetic lineage within the pathovar juglandis. Symptoms on walnut leaves and fruits are similar to those of a bacterial blight but VOC includes also cankers on trunk and branches. In this work, we used comparative genomics and physiological tests to detect differences between four X. arboricola strains isolated from walnut tree: strain CFBP 2528 causing walnut blight, strain CFBP 7179 causing VOC and two nonpathogenic strains, CFBP 7634 and CFBP 7651, isolated from healthy walnut buds. Whole genome sequence comparisons revealed that pathogenic strains possess a larger and wider range of mobile genetic elements than nonpathogenic strains. One pathogenic strain, CFBP 7179, possessed a specific integrative and conjugative element of 95 kb encoding genes involved in copper resistance, transport and regulation. The type three effector repertoire was larger in pathogenic strains than in nonpathogenic strains. Moreover, CFBP 7634 strain lacked the type three secretion system encoding genes. The flagellar system appeared incomplete and nonfunctional in the pathogenic strain CFBP 2528. Differential sets of chemoreceptor and different repertoires of genes coding adhesins were identified between pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. Besides these differences, some strain-specific differences were also observed. Altogether, this study provides valuable insights to highlight the mechanisms involved in ecology, environment perception, plant adhesion and interaction, leading to the emergence of new strains in a dynamic environment.

  4. The Odorant Binding Protein Gene Family from the Genome of Silkworm, Bombyx mori

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    Zhao Ping

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemosensory systems play key roles in the survival and reproductive success of insects. Insect chemoreception is mediated by two large and diverse gene superfamilies, chemoreceptors and odorant binding proteins (OBPs. OBPs are believed to transport hydrophobic odorants from the environment to the olfactory receptors. Results We identified a family of OBP-like genes in the silkworm genome and characterized their expression using oligonucleotide microarrays. A total of forty-four OBP genes were annotated, a number comparable to the 57 OBPs known from Anopheles gambiae and 51 from Drosophila melanogaster. As seen in other fully sequenced insect genomes, most silkworm OBP genes are present in large clusters. We defined six subfamilies of OBPs, each of which shows lineage-specific expansion and diversification. EST data and OBP expression profiles from multiple larvae tissues of day three fifth instars demonstrated that many OBPs are expressed in chemosensory-specific tissues although some OBPs are expressed ubiquitously and others exclusively in non-chemosensory tissues. Some atypical OBPs are expressed throughout development. These results reveal that, although many OBPs are chemosensory-specific, others may have more general physiological roles. Conclusion Silkworms possess a number of OBPs genes similar to other insects. Their expression profiles suggest that many OBPs may be involved in olfaction and gustation as well as general carriers of hydrophobic molecules. The expansion of OBP gene subfamilies and sequence divergence indicate that the silkworm OBP family acquired functional diversity concurrently with functional constraints. Further investigation of the OBPs of the silkworm could give insights in the roles of OBPs in chemoreception.

  5. Role of sex hormones in hypercapnia-induced activation of the locus coeruleus in female and male rats.

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    de Carvalho, D; Marques, D A; Bernuci, M P; Leite, C M; Araújo-Lopes, R; Anselmo-Franci, J; Bícego, K C; Szawka, R E; Gargaglioni, L H

    2016-01-28

    The locus coeruleus (LC) has been suggested as a CO2 chemoreceptor site in mammals. Most of the studies involving the role of the LC in hypercapnic ventilatory responses have been performed in males. Since ovarian steroids modulate the activity of LC neurons and females have a different respiratory response to CO2 than males, we evaluated the activity of LC noradrenergic neurons during normocapnia and hypercapnia in female and male rats with distinct sex hormone levels. Ovariectomized (OVX), estradiol (E2)-treated ovariectomized (OVX+E2) and female rats on the diestrous day of the estrous cycle were evaluated. Concurrently, males were investigated as gonad-intact, orchidectomized (ORX), testosterone (T)-treated ORX (ORX+T), and E2-treated ORX (ORX+E2). Activation of LC neurons was determined by double-label immunohistochemistry to c-Fos and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Hypercapnia induced by 7% CO2 increased the number of c-Fos/TH-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the LC of all groups when compared to air exposure. Hypercapnia-induced c-Fos expression did not differ between diestrous females and intact male rats. In the OVX+E2 group, there was attenuation in the c-Fos expression during normocapnia compared with OVX rats, but CO2 responsiveness was not altered. Moreover, in ORX rats, neither T nor E2 treatments changed c-Fos expression in LC noradrenergic neurons. Thus, in female rats, E2 reduces activation of LC noradrenergic neurons, whereas in males, sex hormones do not influence the LC activity.

  6. Variation of chemosensory receptor content of Campylobacter jejuni strains and modulation of receptor gene expression under different in vivo and in vitro growth conditions

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    Day Christopher J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotaxis is crucial for the colonisation/infection of hosts with Campylobacter jejuni. Central to chemotaxis are the group A chemotaxis genes that are responsible for sensing the external environment. The distribution of group A chemoreceptor genes, as found in the C. jejuni sequenced strains, tlp1-4, 7, 10 and 11 were determined in 33 clinical human and avian isolates. Results Group A tlp gene content varied among the strains with genes encoding tlp1 (aspartate receptor, ccaA and tlp7 present in all strains tested, where as tlp11 was present in only one of our international collection clinical isolates, C. jejuni 520, but was more prevalent (9/13 in the freshly isolated clinical stains from patients who required hospitalisation due to C. jejuni infection (GCH1-17. Relative expression levels of the group A tlp genes were also determined in C. jejuni reference strains NCTC 11168-GS, 11168-O and 81116 using cells grown in vitro at 37°C, 42°C and maintained at room temperature and with cells isolated directly from murine and avian hosts by immune magnetic separation without subsequent culture. Gene expression of tlp genes was varied based on strain, growth conditions and in vivo isolation source. Tlp1, although the most conserved, showed the lowest and most varied mRNA expression and protein production under laboratory conditions. Tlp7 was highly expressed at most conditions tested, and gene expression was not influenced by the tlp7 gene encoding a full length protein or one expressed as separate periplasmic and cytoplasmic domains. Conclusion We have shown that chemosensory receptor set variation exists among C. jejuni strains, but is not dependent on the isolation source.

  7. Dependence of bacterial chemotaxis on gradient shape and adaptation rate.

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    Nikita Vladimirov

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of cellular behavior on multiple scales requires models that are sufficiently detailed to capture central intracellular processes but at the same time enable the simulation of entire cell populations in a computationally cheap way. In this paper we present RapidCell, a hybrid model of chemotactic Escherichia coli that combines the Monod-Wyman-Changeux signal processing by mixed chemoreceptor clusters, the adaptation dynamics described by ordinary differential equations, and a detailed model of cell tumbling. Our model dramatically reduces computational costs and allows the highly efficient simulation of E. coli chemotaxis. We use the model to investigate chemotaxis in different gradients, and suggest a new, constant-activity type of gradient to systematically study chemotactic behavior of virtual bacteria. Using the unique properties of this gradient, we show that optimal chemotaxis is observed in a narrow range of CheA kinase activity, where concentration of the response regulator CheY-P falls into the operating range of flagellar motors. Our simulations also confirm that the CheB phosphorylation feedback improves chemotactic efficiency by shifting the average CheY-P concentration to fit the motor operating range. Our results suggest that in liquid media the variability in adaptation times among cells may be evolutionary favorable to ensure coexistence of subpopulations that will be optimally tactic in different gradients. However, in a porous medium (agar such variability appears to be less important, because agar structure poses mainly negative selection against subpopulations with low levels of adaptation enzymes. RapidCell is available from the authors upon request.

  8. NO INFLUENCE OF HYPOXIA ON COORDINATION BETWEEN RESPIRATORY AND LOCOMOTOR RHYTHMS DURING ROWING AT MODERATE INTENSITY

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    Nicolas Fabre

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Besides neuro-mechanical constraints, chemical or metabolic stimuli have also been proposed to interfere with the coordination between respiratory and locomotor rhythms. In the light of the conflicting data observed in the literature, this study aimed to assess whether acute hypoxia modifies the degree of coordination between respiratory and locomotor rhythms during rowing exercises in order to investigate competitive interactions between neuro-mechanical (movement and chemical (hypoxia respiratory drives. Nine male healthy subjects performed one submaximal 6-min rowing exercise on a rowing ergometer in both normoxia (altitude: 304 m and acute hypoxia (altitude: 2877 m. The exercise intensity was about 40 % and 35 % (for normoxia and hypoxia conditions, respectively of the individual maximal power output measured during an incremental rowing test to volitional exhaustion carried out in normoxia. Metabolic rate and minute ventilation were continuously collected throughout exercise. Locomotor movement and breathing rhythms were continuously recorded and synchronized cycle-by-cycle. The degree of coordination was expressed as a percentage of breaths starting during the same phase of the locomotor cycle. For a same and a constant metabolic rate, acute hypoxia did not influence significantly the degree of coordination (mean ± SEM, normoxia: 20.0 ± 6.2 %, hypoxia: 21.3 ± 11.1 %, p > 0.05 while ventilation and breathing frequency were significantly greater in hypoxia. Our results may suggest that during rowing exercise at a moderate metabolic load, neuro-mechanical locomotion-linked respiratory stimuli appear "stronger" than peripheral chemoreceptors- linked respiratory stimuli induced by hypoxia, in the context of our study

  9. Ibuprofen Blunts Ventilatory Acclimatization to Sustained Hypoxia in Humans.

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    Kemal Erdem Basaran

    Full Text Available Ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia is a time-dependent increase in ventilation and the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR that involves neural plasticity in both carotid body chemoreceptors and brainstem respiratory centers. The mechanisms of such plasticity are not completely understood but recent animal studies show it can be blocked by administering ibuprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, during chronic hypoxia. We tested the hypothesis that ibuprofen would also block the increase in HVR with chronic hypoxia in humans in 15 healthy men and women using a double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over trial. The isocapnic HVR was measured with standard methods in subjects treated with ibuprofen (400 mg every 8 hrs or placebo for 48 hours at sea level and 48 hours at high altitude (3,800 m. Subjects returned to sea level for at least 30 days prior to repeating the protocol with the opposite treatment. Ibuprofen significantly decreased the HVR after acclimatization to high altitude compared to placebo but it did not affect ventilation or arterial O2 saturation breathing ambient air at high altitude. Hence, compensatory responses prevent hypoventilation with decreased isocapnic ventilatory O2-sensitivity from ibuprofen at this altitude. The effect of ibuprofen to decrease the HVR in humans provides the first experimental evidence that a signaling mechanism described for ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia in animal models also occurs in people. This establishes a foundation for the future experiments to test the potential role of different mechanisms for neural plasticity and ventilatory acclimatization in humans with chronic hypoxemia from lung disease.

  10. Force-dependent discharge of nematocysts in the sea anemone Haliplanella luciae (Verrill

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    Dustin Todaro

    2012-05-01

    Sea anemones discharge cnidae (‘stinging capsules’ including nematocysts to capture prey and to defend themselves. In the present study, we tested the relationship between the force of test probes striking feeding tentacles and discharge of microbasic p-mastigophore nematocysts into the test probes. In seawater alone, the response curve is bimodal with maximal discharge observed at 0.33 and 1.10 millinewtons (mN and with minimal discharge at 1.50 mN. Upon activating chemoreceptors for N-acetylated sugars, maximal discharge is observed across a broad range of smaller forces from 0.16 to 0.9 mN before decreasing to a minimum at 1.50 mN. Likewise, in the presence of nearby vibrations at key frequencies, maximal discharge is observed over a broad range of smaller forces before decreasing to a minimum at 1.50 mN. It appears that sensory input indicating proximity of potential prey expands the range of small forces of impact that stimulate maximal discharge (i.e. to less than 1.10 mN but not at larger forces of impact (i.e. at approximately 1.50 mN. Thus, contact by small prey would stimulate maximal discharge, and all the more so if such contact is accompanied by specific odorants or by vibrations at specific frequencies. Nevertheless, anemones would not maximally discharge nematocysts into large animals that blunder into contact with their tentacles.

  11. Sleep and Respiration in Microgravity

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    West, John B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Prisk, G. Kim; Paiva, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Sleep is often reported to be of poor quality in microgravity, and studies on the ground have shown a strong relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and sleep disruption. During the 16-day Neurolab mission, we studied the influence of possible changes in respiratory function on sleep by performing comprehensive sleep recordings on the payload crew on four nights during the mission. In addition, we measured the changes in the ventilatory response to low oxygen and high carbon dioxide in the same subjects during the day, hypothesizing that changes in ventilatory control might affect respiration during sleep. Microgravity caused a large reduction in the ventilatory response to reduced oxygen. This is likely the result of an increase in blood pressure at the peripheral chemoreceptors in the neck that occurs when the normally present hydrostatic pressure gradient between the heart and upper body is abolished. This reduction was similar to that seen when the subjects were placed acutely in the supine position in one-G. In sharp contrast to low oxygen, the ventilatory response to elevated carbon dioxide was unaltered by microgravity or the supine position. Because of the similarities of the findings in microgravity and the supine position, it is unlikely that changes in ventilatory control alter respiration during sleep in microgravity. During sleep on the ground, there were a small number of apneas (cessation of breathing) and hypopneas (reduced breathing) in these normal subjects. During sleep in microgravity, there was a reduction in the number of apneas and hypopneas per hour compared to preflight. Obstructive apneas virtually disappeared in microgravity, suggesting that the removal of gravity prevents the collapse of upper airways during sleep. Arousals from sleep were reduced in microgravity compared to preflight, and virtually all of this reduction was as a result of a reduction in the number of arousals from apneas and hypopneas. We conclude that any sleep

  12. Olfactory Receptors in Non-Chemosensory Organs: The Nervous System in Health and Disease.

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    Ferrer, Isidro; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Carmona, Margarita; Carro, Eva; Aronica, Eleonora; Kovacs, Gabor G; Grison, Alice; Gustincich, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) and down-stream functional signaling molecules adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), olfactory G protein α subunit (Gαolf), OR transporters receptor transporter proteins 1 and 2 (RTP1 and RTP2), receptor expression enhancing protein 1 (REEP1), and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are expressed in neurons of the human and murine central nervous system (CNS). In vitro studies have shown that these receptors react to external stimuli and therefore are equipped to be functional. However, ORs are not directly related to the detection of odors. Several molecules delivered from the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, neighboring local neurons and glial cells, distant cells through the extracellular space, and the cells' own self-regulating internal homeostasis can be postulated as possible ligands. Moreover, a single neuron outside the olfactory epithelium expresses more than one receptor, and the mechanism of transcriptional regulation may be different in olfactory epithelia and brain neurons. OR gene expression is altered in several neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) subtypes MM1 and VV2 with disease-, region- and subtype-specific patterns. Altered gene expression is also observed in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia with a major but not total influence of chlorpromazine treatment. Preliminary parallel observations have also shown the presence of taste receptors (TASRs), mainly of the bitter taste family, in the mammalian brain, whose function is not related to taste. TASRs in brain are also abnormally regulated in neurodegenerative diseases. These seminal observations point to the need for further studies on ORs and TASRs chemoreceptors in the mammalian brain. PMID:27458372

  13. The efficacy of antihypertensive drugs in chronic intermittent hypoxia conditions.

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    Diogo, Lucilia N; Monteiro, Emília C

    2014-01-01

    Sleep apnea/hypopnea disorders include centrally originated diseases and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This last condition is renowned as a frequent secondary cause of hypertension (HT). The mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of HT can be summarized in relation to two main pathways: sympathetic nervous system stimulation mediated mainly by activation of carotid body (CB) chemoreflexes and/or asphyxia, and, by no means the least important, the systemic effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). The use of animal models has revealed that CIH is the critical stimulus underlying sympathetic activity and hypertension, and that this effect requires the presence of functional arterial chemoreceptors, which are hyperactive in CIH. These models of CIH mimic the HT observed in humans and allow the study of CIH independently without the mechanical obstruction component. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), the gold standard treatment for OSA patients, to reduce blood pressure seems to be modest and concomitant antihypertensive therapy is still required. We focus this review on the efficacy of pharmacological interventions to revert HT associated with CIH conditions in both animal models and humans. First, we explore the experimental animal models, developed to mimic HT related to CIH, which have been used to investigate the effect of antihypertensive drugs (AHDs). Second, we review what is known about drug efficacy to reverse HT induced by CIH in animals. Moreover, findings in humans with OSA are cited to demonstrate the lack of strong evidence for the establishment of a first-line antihypertensive regimen for these patients. Indeed, specific therapeutic guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of HT in these patients are still lacking. Finally, we discuss the future perspectives concerning the non-pharmacological and pharmacological management of this particular type of HT. PMID:25295010

  14. The efficacy of antihypertensive drugs in chronic intermittent hypoxia conditions

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    Lucilia Neves Diogo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep apnea/hypopnea disorders include centrally originated diseases and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. This last condition is renowned as a frequent secondary cause of hypertension (HT. The mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of HT can be summarized in relation to two main pathways: sympathetic nervous system stimulation mediated mainly by activation of carotid body (CB chemoreflexes and/or asphyxia, and, by no means the least important, the systemic effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH. The use of animal models has revealed that CIH is the critical stimulus underlying sympathetic activity and hypertension, and that this effect requires the presence of functional arterial chemoreceptors, which are hyperactive in CIH. These models of CIH mimic the HT observed in humans and allow the study of CIH independently without the mechanical obstruction component. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure, the gold standard treatment for OSA patients, to reduce blood pressure seems to be modest and concomitant antihypertensive therapy is still required. We focus this review on the efficacy of pharmacological interventions to revert HT associated with CIH conditions in both animal models and humans. First, we explore the experimental animal models, developed to mimic HT related to CIH, which have been used to investigate the effect of antihypertensive drugs (AHDs. Second, we review what is known about drug efficacy to reverse HT induced by CIH in animals. Moreover, findings in humans with OSA are cited to demonstrate the lack of strong evidence for the establishment of a first-line antihypertensive regimen for these patients. Indeed, specific therapeutic guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of HT in these patients are still lacking. Finally, we discuss the future perspectives concerning the non-pharmacological and pharmacological management of this particular type of HT.

  15. Leptin in nucleus of the solitary tract alters the cardiovascular responses to aortic baroreceptor activation.

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    Ciriello, John

    2013-06-01

    Recent data suggests that neurons expressing the long form of the leptin receptor form at least two distinct groups within the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS): a group within the lateral NTS (Slt) and one within the medial (Sm) and gelantinosa (Sg) NTS. Discrete injections of leptin into Sm and Sg, a region that receives chemoreceptor input, elicit increases in arterial pressure (AP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). However, the effect of microinjections of leptin into Slt, a region that receives baroreceptor input is unknown. Experiments were done in the urethane-chloralose anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated Wistar or Zucker obese rat to determine leptin's effect in Slt on heart rate (HR), AP and RSNA during electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN). Depressor sites within Slt were first identified by the microinjection of l-glutamate (Glu; 0.25M; 10nl) followed by leptin microinjections. In the Wistar rat leptin microinjection (50ng; 20nl) into depressor sites within the lateral Slt elicited increases in HR and RSNA, but no changes in AP. Additionally, leptin injections into Slt prior to Glu injections at the same site or to stimulation of the ADN were found to attenuate the decreases in HR, AP and RSNA to both the Glu injection and ADN stimulation. In Zucker obese rats, leptin injections into NTS depressor sites did not elicit cardiovascular responses, nor altered the cardiovascular responses elicited by stimulation of ADN. Those data suggest that leptin acts at the level of NTS to alter the activity of neurons that mediate the cardiovascular responses to activation of the aortic baroreceptor reflex. PMID:23535030

  16. Respiratory gases and the regulation of transcription.

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    Cummins, Eoin P; Keogh, Ciara E

    2016-08-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review highlights the transcriptional consequences for decreased cellular O2 levels (hypoxia) and increased cellular CO2 levels (hypercapnia). What advances does it highlight? We discuss recent advances in our understanding of the cellular response to hypoxia and consider the potential cross-talk between O2 - and CO2 -dependent transcriptional regulation. Oxygen and carbon dioxide are the substrate and product of aerobic metabolism, respectively. Thus, the levels of these physiological gases are inextricably linked in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Increased mitochondrial consumption of O2 (to produce ATP) will produce more CO2 . Furthermore, in lung pathologies such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sleep apnoea and central hypoventilation syndrome, hypoxia and hypercapnia are co-incident. Acute responses to hypoxia involve carotid body-mediated changes in the rate and depth of breathing. Chronic adaptation to hypoxia involves a multitude of changes on a transcriptional level, which simultaneously increases oxygen utilization (via hypoxia-inducible factor and others), while suppressing superfluous energy-demanding processes. Acute responses to CO2 affect breathing primarily via central chemoreceptors. The nature of hypercapnia-dependent transcriptional regulation is an emerging area of research, but at present the mechanisms underpinning this response are not fully characterized and understood. Thus, given the juxtaposition of hypoxia and hypercapnia in health and disease, this manuscript reviews the current evidence for transcriptional responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia. Finally, we discuss the potential cross-talk between hypoxia and hypercapnia on a transcriptional level. PMID:27474261

  17. Control of the Cutaneous Circulation by the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blessing, William; McAllen, Robin; McKinley, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS), via its control of sympathetic outflow, regulates blood flow to the acral cutaneous beds (containing arteriovenous anastomoses) as part of the homeostatic thermoregulatory process, as part of the febrile response, and as part of cognitive-emotional processes associated with purposeful interactions with the external environment, including those initiated by salient or threatening events (we go pale with fright). Inputs to the CNS for the thermoregulatory process include cutaneous sensory neurons, and neurons in the preoptic area sensitive to the temperature of the blood in the internal carotid artery. Inputs for cognitive-emotional control from the exteroceptive sense organs (touch, vision, sound, smell, etc.) are integrated in forebrain centers including the amygdala. Psychoactive drugs have major effects on the acral cutaneous circulation. Interoceptors, chemoreceptors more than baroreceptors, also influence cutaneous sympathetic outflow. A major advance has been the discovery of a lower brainstem control center in the rostral medullary raphé, regulating outflow to both brown adipose tissue (BAT) and to the acral cutaneous beds. Neurons in the medullary raphé, via their descending axonal projections, increase the discharge of spinal sympathetic preganglionic neurons controlling the cutaneous vasculature, utilizing glutamate, and serotonin as neurotransmitters. Present evidence suggests that both thermoregulatory and cognitive-emotional control of the cutaneous beds from preoptic, hypothalamic, and forebrain centers is channeled via the medullary raphé. Future studies will no doubt further unravel the details of neurotransmitter pathways connecting these rostral control centers with the medullary raphé, and those operative within the raphé itself. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1161-1197, 2016. PMID:27347889

  18. Sympatric speciation revealed by genome-wide divergence in the blind mole rat Spalax.

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    Li, Kexin; Hong, Wei; Jiao, Hengwu; Wang, Guo-Dong; Rodriguez, Karl A; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Zhao, Yang; Nevo, Eviatar; Zhao, Huabin

    2015-09-22

    Sympatric speciation (SS), i.e., speciation within a freely breeding population or in contiguous populations, was first proposed by Darwin [Darwin C (1859) On the Origins of Species by Means of Natural Selection] and is still controversial despite theoretical support [Gavrilets S (2004) Fitness Landscapes and the Origin of Species (MPB-41)] and mounting empirical evidence. Speciation of subterranean mammals generally, including the genus Spalax, was considered hitherto allopatric, whereby new species arise primarily through geographic isolation. Here we show in Spalax a case of genome-wide divergence analysis in mammals, demonstrating that SS in continuous populations, with gene flow, encompasses multiple widespread genomic adaptive complexes, associated with the sharply divergent ecologies. The two abutting soil populations of S. galili in northern Israel habituate the ancestral Senonian chalk population and abutting derivative Plio-Pleistocene basalt population. Population divergence originated ∼0.2-0.4 Mya based on both nuclear and mitochondrial genome analyses. Population structure analysis displayed two distinctly divergent clusters of chalk and basalt populations. Natural selection has acted on 300+ genes across the genome, diverging Spalax chalk and basalt soil populations. Gene ontology enrichment analysis highlights strong but differential soil population adaptive complexes: in basalt, sensory perception, musculature, metabolism, and energetics, and in chalk, nutrition and neurogenetics are outstanding. Population differentiation of chemoreceptor genes suggests intersoil population's mate and habitat choice substantiating SS. Importantly, distinctions in protein degradation may also contribute to SS. Natural selection and natural genetic engineering [Shapiro JA (2011) Evolution: A View From the 21st Century] overrule gene flow, evolving divergent ecological adaptive complexes. Sharp ecological divergences abound in nature; therefore, SS appears to be an

  19. Enhanced Firing in NTS Induced by Short-Term Sustained Hypoxia Is Modulated by Glia-Neuron Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accorsi-Mendonça, Daniela; Almado, Carlos E L; Bonagamba, Leni G H; Castania, Jaci A; Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H

    2015-04-29

    Humans ascending to high altitudes are submitted to sustained hypoxia (SH), activating peripheral chemoreflex with several autonomic and respiratory responses. Here we analyzed the effect of short-term SH (24 h, FIO210%) on the processing of cardiovascular and respiratory reflexes using an in situ preparation of rats. SH increased both the sympatho-inhibitory and bradycardiac components of baroreflex and the sympathetic and respiratory responses of peripheral chemoreflex. Electrophysiological properties and synaptic transmission in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neurons, the first synaptic station of afferents of baroreflexes and chemoreflexes, were evaluated using brainstem slices and whole-cell patch-clamp. The second-order NTS neurons were identified by previous application of fluorescent tracer onto carotid body for chemoreceptor afferents or onto aortic depressor nerve for baroreceptor afferents. SH increased the intrinsic excitability of NTS neurons. Delayed excitation, caused by A-type potassium current (IKA), was observed in most of NTS neurons from control rats. The IKA amplitude was higher in identified second-order NTS neurons from control than in SH rats. SH also blunted the astrocytic inhibition of IKA in NTS neurons and increased the synaptic transmission in response to afferent fibers stimulation. The frequency of spontaneous excitatory currents was also increased in neurons from SH rats, indicating that SH increased the neurotransmission by presynaptic mechanisms. Therefore, short-term SH changed the glia-neuron interaction, increasing the excitability and excitatory transmission of NTS neurons, which may contribute to the observed increase in the reflex sensitivity of baroreflex and chemoreflex in in situ preparation.

  20. Autonomic processing of the cardiovascular reflexes in the nucleus tractus solitarii

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    Machado B.H.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS receives afferent projections from the arterial baroreceptors, carotid chemoreceptors and cardiopulmonary receptors and as a function of this information produces autonomic adjustments in order to maintain arterial blood pressure within a narrow range of variation. The activation of each of these cardiovascular afferents produces a specific autonomic response by the excitation of neuronal projections from the NTS to the ventrolateral areas of the medulla (nucleus ambiguus, caudal and rostral ventrolateral medulla. The neurotransmitters at the NTS level as well as the excitatory amino acid (EAA receptors involved in the processing of the autonomic responses in the NTS, although extensively studied, remain to be completely elucidated. In the present review we discuss the role of the EAA L-glutamate and its different receptor subtypes in the processing of the cardiovascular reflexes in the NTS. The data presented in this review related to the neurotransmission in the NTS are based on experimental evidence obtained in our laboratory in unanesthetized rats. The two major conclusions of the present review are that a the excitation of the cardiovagal component by cardiovascular reflex activation (chemo- and Bezold-Jarisch reflexes or by L-glutamate microinjection into the NTS is mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors, and b the sympatho-excitatory component of the chemoreflex and the pressor response to L-glutamate microinjected into the NTS are not affected by an NMDA receptor antagonist, suggesting that the sympatho-excitatory component of these responses is mediated by non-NMDA receptors.

  1. Taurolidine and congeners activate hTRPA1 but not hTRPV1 channels and stimulate CGRP release from mouse tracheal sensory nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kichko, Tatjana I; Pfirrmann, Rolf W; Reeh, Peter W

    2016-02-01

    Taurolidine has long been in clinical use as an antimicrobial irrigation that does not impede wound healing. It can even be administered intravenously (30 g/day) to treat sepsis or to exert newly recognized antineoplastic actions. Only one irritant effect is reported, that is, to temporarily induce burning pain of unknown origin when applied to body cavities or peripheral veins. The structure of the molecule suggested the chemoreceptor channel TRPA1 as a potential target, which was verified measuring stimulated CGRP release from sensory nerves of the isolated mouse trachea and calcium influx in hTRPA1-transfected HEK293 cells. With both methods, the concentration-response relationship of taurolidine exceeded the threshold value below 500 μmol/L and 100 μmol/L, respectively, and reached saturation at 1 mmol/L. The clinical 2% taurolidine solution did not evoke greater or longer lasting responses. The reversible tracheal response was abolished in TRPA1(-/-) but retained in TRPV1(-/-) mice. Consistently, hTRPV1-HEK showed no calcium influx as a response, likewise native HEK293 cells and hTRPA1-HEK deprived of extracellular calcium did not respond to taurolidine 1 mmol/L. The metabolite taurultam and its oxathiazine derivative, expected to cause less burning pain, showed weak tracheal irritancy only at 10 mmol/L, acting also through hTRPA1 but not hTRPV1. In conclusion, taurolidine, its metabolite, and a novel derivative showed no unspecific cellular effects but selectively, concentration-dependently and reversibly activated the irritant receptor TRPA1 in CGRP-expressing, thus nociceptive, neurons. The clinical solution of 2% taurolidine (~70 mmol/L) can, thus, rightly be expected to cause transient burning pain and neurogenic inflammation. PMID:26977296

  2. Ibuprofen Blunts Ventilatory Acclimatization to Sustained Hypoxia in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaran, Kemal Erdem; Villongco, Michael; Ho, Baran; Ellis, Erika; Zarndt, Rachel; Antonova, Julie; Hopkins, Susan R; Powell, Frank L

    2016-01-01

    Ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia is a time-dependent increase in ventilation and the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) that involves neural plasticity in both carotid body chemoreceptors and brainstem respiratory centers. The mechanisms of such plasticity are not completely understood but recent animal studies show it can be blocked by administering ibuprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, during chronic hypoxia. We tested the hypothesis that ibuprofen would also block the increase in HVR with chronic hypoxia in humans in 15 healthy men and women using a double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over trial. The isocapnic HVR was measured with standard methods in subjects treated with ibuprofen (400 mg every 8 hrs) or placebo for 48 hours at sea level and 48 hours at high altitude (3,800 m). Subjects returned to sea level for at least 30 days prior to repeating the protocol with the opposite treatment. Ibuprofen significantly decreased the HVR after acclimatization to high altitude compared to placebo but it did not affect ventilation or arterial O2 saturation breathing ambient air at high altitude. Hence, compensatory responses prevent hypoventilation with decreased isocapnic ventilatory O2-sensitivity from ibuprofen at this altitude. The effect of ibuprofen to decrease the HVR in humans provides the first experimental evidence that a signaling mechanism described for ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia in animal models also occurs in people. This establishes a foundation for the future experiments to test the potential role of different mechanisms for neural plasticity and ventilatory acclimatization in humans with chronic hypoxemia from lung disease.

  3. Genes encoding Cher-TPR fusion proteins are predominantly found in gene clusters encoding chemosensory pathways with alternative cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Martínez, Francisco; García-Fontana, Cristina; Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Alfonso, Carlos; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemosensory pathways correspond to major signal transduction mechanisms and can be classified into the functional families flagellum-mediated taxis, type four pili-mediated taxis or pathways with alternative cellular functions (ACF). CheR methyltransferases are core enzymes in all of these families. CheR proteins fused to tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains have been reported and we present an analysis of this uncharacterized family. We show that CheR-TPRs are widely distributed in GRAM-negative but almost absent from GRAM-positive bacteria. Most strains contain a single CheR-TPR and its abundance does not correlate with the number of chemoreceptors. The TPR domain fused to CheR is comparatively short and frequently composed of 2 repeats. The majority of CheR-TPR genes were found in gene clusters that harbor multidomain response regulators in which the REC domain is fused to different output domains like HK, GGDEF, EAL, HPT, AAA, PAS, GAF, additional REC, HTH, phosphatase or combinations thereof. The response regulator architectures coincide with those reported for the ACF family of pathways. Since the presence of multidomain response regulators is a distinctive feature of this pathway family, we conclude that CheR-TPR proteins form part of ACF type pathways. The diversity of response regulator output domains suggests that the ACF pathways form a superfamily which regroups many different regulatory mechanisms, in which all CheR-TPR proteins appear to participate. In the second part we characterize WspC of Pseudomonas putida, a representative example of CheR-TPR. The affinities of WspC-Pp for S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine were comparable to those of prototypal CheR, indicating that WspC-Pp activity is in analogy to prototypal CheRs controlled by product feed-back inhibition. The removal of the TPR domain did not impact significantly on the binding constants and consequently not on the product feed-back inhibition. WspC-Pp was found to be

  4. Comparative genomics of Geobacter chemotaxis genes reveals diverse signaling function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antommattei Frances M

    2008-10-01

    28 and σ54 play a role in regulating the Geobacter chemotaxis gene expression. Conclusion The numerous chemoreceptors and chemotaxis-like gene clusters of Geobacter appear to be responsible for a diverse set of signaling functions in addition to chemotaxis, including gene regulation and biofilm formation, through functionally and spatially distinct signaling pathways.

  5. 帕洛诺司琼用于预防术后恶心呕吐的研究进展%The advance in clinical application of palonosetron to prevent postoperative nausea and vomiting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐睿; 姜虹

    2013-01-01

    Background The 5-HT3 antagonist,especially the second-generation of 5-HT3 antagonist palonosetron shows better efficacy against postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV),its pharmacological mechanism and clinical efficacy were further investigated.Objective This paper sums up litures on its pharmacological mechanism and clinical efficacy on PONV prophylaxis.Content The second-generation 5-HT3 antagonist palonosetron has properties of greater receptor affinity,prolonged duration of action and few adverse effects.It blocks serotonin binding at vagal afferents in the gut and in the regions of the CNS involved in emesis,including the chemoreceptor trigger zone and the nucleus tractus solitarii,inhibits and emesis reflex,the high efficacy of palonosetron is being recognized.Trend This review summarizes its pharmacological mechanism of action,adverse effects,and clinical application on prevention of PONV,offering clinical reference to clinician to prevent PONV more reasonably.%背景 5-羟色胺3(5-HT3)受体拮抗剂特别是第2代5-HT3受体拮抗剂帕洛诺司琼对术后恶心呕吐(postoperative nausea and vomiting,PONV)具有较好的预防作用,其药理学机制及临床应用状况近年来有了较为深入的研究和临床应用.目的 分析总结帕洛诺对各类手术PONV的预防效果及其作用机制.内容 第2代5-HT3受体拮抗剂帕洛诺司琼具有高度亲和性、长效性、副作用少等优点,通过阻断5-HT3与外周或中枢神经元的5-HT3受体结合,阻断迷走神经传入呕吐中枢和第四脑室化学感受区触发带,抑制呕吐反射,临床应用其预防PONV的高效性不断得到认可. 趋向 深入探讨其药理机制、副作用、预防PONV的临床应用等方面,以供临床工作者更加合理地应用其预防PONV.

  6. 丝光绿蝇触角鞭节感受器官超显微形态研究%Ultrastructure of the antennal funiculus sensory organs of adult Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera:Calliphoridae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘贤慧; 李心钰; 张东

    2015-01-01

    Objectives] To investigate the ultrastructure, and discuss the potential functions of antennal sensilla on funiculus of Lucilia sericata, which is a synanthropic fly of great medical importance. [Methods] Using transmission electron microscopy and a laser scanning confocal microscope. [Results] The ultrastructure of four types of sensilla, including trichoid sensilla (Tr), basiconic sensilla (Ba), coeloconic sensilla (Co), and sensory sacculus (SS), were identified and descripted. [Conclusion] Tr and Ba may function as olfactory receptors, while Co might be involved in thermo- or hygro- reception. In the sensory sacculus, non-pore basiconic sensilla could be hygro- and thermo- sensilla, whereas basiconic-like sensilla and coeloconic-like sensilla might indicate a potential chemoreceptor function. Sensilla in the sacculus can function together, which demonstrates that the sensory sacculus acts as a functional complex. Due to the various types of sensilla and the complex sacculus, the antennae of flies could be a useful model for morphological, functional and evolutionary research on insect antennae.%【目的】观察研究重要的医学昆虫丝光绿蝇Lucilia sericata触角感受器的形态,以明确不同类型感受器的结构及功能。【方法】采用透射电镜与激光共聚焦显微镜技术相结合的方法。【结果】明确并详细描述了毛型感受器、锥型感受器、腔锥型感受器及感觉囊的形态结构。【结论】毛型感受器和锥型感受器可能为化学感受器,腔锥型感受器可能为温湿度感受器;感觉囊中的无孔锥型感受器可能为温湿度感受器,类锥型感受器及类腔锥型感受器可能为化学感受器,各类型感受器同时行使功能,表明感觉囊为一个功能复合体。蝇类触角的感器类型多样、囊结构复杂,可作为研究昆虫触角感器形态、功能及演化的模式类群。

  7. Genes encoding Cher-TPR fusion proteins are predominantly found in gene clusters encoding chemosensory pathways with alternative cellular functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Muñoz-Martínez

    Full Text Available Chemosensory pathways correspond to major signal transduction mechanisms and can be classified into the functional families flagellum-mediated taxis, type four pili-mediated taxis or pathways with alternative cellular functions (ACF. CheR methyltransferases are core enzymes in all of these families. CheR proteins fused to tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domains have been reported and we present an analysis of this uncharacterized family. We show that CheR-TPRs are widely distributed in GRAM-negative but almost absent from GRAM-positive bacteria. Most strains contain a single CheR-TPR and its abundance does not correlate with the number of chemoreceptors. The TPR domain fused to CheR is comparatively short and frequently composed of 2 repeats. The majority of CheR-TPR genes were found in gene clusters that harbor multidomain response regulators in which the REC domain is fused to different output domains like HK, GGDEF, EAL, HPT, AAA, PAS, GAF, additional REC, HTH, phosphatase or combinations thereof. The response regulator architectures coincide with those reported for the ACF family of pathways. Since the presence of multidomain response regulators is a distinctive feature of this pathway family, we conclude that CheR-TPR proteins form part of ACF type pathways. The diversity of response regulator output domains suggests that the ACF pathways form a superfamily which regroups many different regulatory mechanisms, in which all CheR-TPR proteins appear to participate. In the second part we characterize WspC of Pseudomonas putida, a representative example of CheR-TPR. The affinities of WspC-Pp for S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine were comparable to those of prototypal CheR, indicating that WspC-Pp activity is in analogy to prototypal CheRs controlled by product feed-back inhibition. The removal of the TPR domain did not impact significantly on the binding constants and consequently not on the product feed-back inhibition. WspC-Pp was

  8. Efeitos de derivados benzodiazepines na epilepsia: estudos eletrencefalográficos longitudinais The effects of benzodiazepine dérivâtes in epilepsies: longitudinal electroencephalographic studies

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    Michel Pierre Lison

    1970-09-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudadas as modificações do quadro eletrencefalográfico em 24 crianças com manifestações epilépticas diárias, tratadas com derivados da benzodiazepina. O conjunto dos fenômenos eletrencefalográficos observados durante os seguimentos terapêuticos longitudinais traduz uma modificação importante dos mecanismos subcorticais envolvidos na gênese das crises convulsivas e na produção das descargas paroxísticas. Os fatos observados coadunam-se com a teoria de uma ação benzodiazepínica sobre o sistema reticular talâmico inespecífico. A ação benzodiazepínica predomina sobre o sistema de inibição ativo anexo ao sistema de projeção talamocortical. Discute-se ainda se essa ação se faz diretamente, através de formações quimiosensíveis existentes no seio do sistema reticular talâmico e/ou indiretamente, pela depressão de certas estruturas do sistema límbico, modificando desta forma o "feed-back" de importantes circuitos subcorticais que podem influenciar os neurônios centrencefálicos hiperexcitáveis.The modifications of the electroencephalic patterns in 24 childrens with daily epileptic seizures treated by benzodiazepine derivatives were studied. The electroencephalographic findings during the longitudinal therapeutic follow-ups disclose important modifications of the subcortical mechanisms involved in the production of the convulsive seizures and paroxistical discharges. These facts are in accordance with the hypothesis that benzodiazepine derivatives act upon the non-specific thalamic reticular system. The benzodiazepine derivatives are more active upon the inhibitory system related to the thalamocortical projection system. Two hypothesis are discussed: 1 — the drugs act upon chemoreceptors present in the thalamic reticular system; 2 — the act indirectly, depressing some elements of the limbic system and modifying in this way the feed-back of subcortical circuits which discharge upon hyperactive

  9. Olfactory Responses of the Asiatic Citrus Psyllid (Diaphorina citri to Mineral Oil-Treated Mandarin Leaves

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    Mofit E. Poerwanto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Evidence of rejection or acceptance by phytophagous pests of citrus plants treated with mineral oils suggests that impacts of oils may be related to detection by olfactory and/or contact chemoreceptors of repellent oils or plant volatiles. Alternatively, the oils may mask or suppress attractant host plant volatiles. To date, no studies have reported that oils elicit an olfactory response in Diaphorina citri Kuwayama [Hemiptera: Psyllidae]. Therefore, we undertook two studies to determine how oil deposits on citrus leaves influenced the behaviour of D. citri. Approach: The attractiveness of citrus leaves treated separately with an nC21 horticultural mineral oil and an nC24 agricultural mineral oil to D. citri was evaluated under laboratory conditions. In the first of two studies, the oils were applied as 0.5% aqueous emulsions to mandarin leaves and responses of adults determined after they walked on surfaces saturated with either distilled water or 2% aqueous emulsions of the oils. In the second study, responses of adult psyllids to host-leaf volatiles, mineral oil volatiles emanating from leaves dipped in 2% v/v aqueous emulsions of each oil and similarly treated filter paper paired with water-dipped leaves were determined in single, linear-tube olfactometers. Results: In the first study, deposits of both oils significantly reduced the proportion of D. citri attracted to citrus leaves. Prior exposure of the insects to oil deposits did not influence this response. However, prior contact with the HMO slightly reduced the proportion of psyllids alighting on the water-dipped leaves. In the second study, oil volatiles emanating from filter paper significantly reduced the attractiveness of water-dipped mandarin leaves. Conclusion: These results indicate that application of the oils to the mandarin leaves may have: (a suppressed release of attractant host plant volatiles; (b masked attractant host plant volatiles; (c led to the

  10. A QSAR Study of the Repellency of some Terpenoids to the Bedbug Cimex lectularius L.%萜类臭虫(Cimex lectularius L.)驱避化合物的定量构效关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋杰; 王宗德; 韩招久; 陈金珠; 姜志宽; 郑卫青; 商士斌

    2012-01-01

    测定了一系列六元环萜类化合物对臭虫(Cimex lectularius L.)的驱避活性,利用Codessa Pro程序计算了这些化合物的结构描述符,再利用Codessa Pro程序中的最优线性回归方法计算了驱避活性与这些化合物结构描述符之间的定量构效关系.所得到的最优定量构效关系计算模型的R2为0.924,模型所包含的4个参数分别是:FNSA3 fractional PNSA、Min n-n repulsion for bond H-C、YZ Shadow/YZ rectangle、Max electrophilic reactivity index for atom C.通过对模型的分析讨论了臭虫化学感受器与驱避剂之间可能存在的相互作用.%The quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) between the repellency against bedbug,Cimex lectularius L.(Hemiptera:Cimicidae) and the molecular structural descriptors of a series of terpenoid compounds with six-member-ring was correlated by best multilinear regression (BMLR) method.The descriptors and the multilinear regression were all calculated by Codessa Pro.The optimum multilinear model with R2 value of 0.924 and 4 descriptors,i.e.the fractional atomic charge weighted partial megative surface area (FNSA3) fractional the atomic charge weighted partial negative charge molecular surface area (PNSA),Min n-n repulsion for bond H-C,YZ Shadow/YZ rectangle and Max electrophilic reactivity index for atom C was validated and presented.The probable interaction between the chemoreceptor of bedbug and the repellent was also discussed according to the optimum model and its descriptors.

  11. The effect of hyperoxia on central blood pressure in healthy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siński, Maciej; Dobosiewicz, Anna; Przybylski, Jacek; Abramczyk, Piotr; Gaciong, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hyperoxia increases total peripheral resistance by acting locally but also inhibits the activity of carotid body chemoreceptors. We studied the effect of hyperoxia on central pressure in normotensive subjects. Material and methods Medical air followed by 100% oxygen was provided to 19 subjects (12/7 female/male, age 28.2 ±1.1 years) for 15 min through a non-rebreather mask. Central blood pressure was then measured using applanation tonometry. Results After the first 2 min of hyperoxia, heart rate decreased significantly (65 ±2.6 beats/min vs. 61 ±2.1 beats/min, p = 0.0002). Peripheral and central blood pressure remained unchanged, while hemoglobin oxygen saturation and subendocardial viability ratio index increased (97 ±0.4% vs. 99 ±0.2%, p = 0.03; 168 ±8.4% vs. 180 ±8.2%, p = 0.009). After 15 min of 100% oxygen ventilation, heart rate and peripheral and central blood pressures remained unchanged from the first 2 min. The augmentation index, augmentation pressure and ejection duration increased as compared to baseline values and those obtained at 2 min (–5.1 ±2.9% vs. –1.2 ±2.6%, p = 0.005 and –4.6 ±2.7% vs. –1.2 ±2.6%, p = 0.0015; –1.3 ±0.7 mm Hg vs. –0.2 ±1.2 mm Hg, p = 0.003 and –1.1 ±0.7 mm Hg vs. –0.2 ±1.2 mm Hg, p = 0.012; 323 ±3.6 ms vs. 330 ±3.5 ms, p = 0.0002 and 326 ±3.5 ms vs. 330 ±3.5 ms, p = 0.021, respectively). Conclusions The present study shows that hyperoxia does not affect central blood pressure in young healthy subjects and may improve myocardial blood supply estimated indirectly from applanation tonometry. PMID:27695489

  12. Baroreceptor reflex in heart failure%心力衰竭状态下的动脉压力感受器反射

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玮; 朱国庆; 高列; 谭文; 钱忠明

    2004-01-01

    Congestive heart failure is a syndrome that is usually initiated by a reduction in pump function of the heart, i.e. a decrease in cardiac output. Initially, a reduction in cardiac output leads to unloading of baroreceptor reflex that, in turn, increases heart rate through vago-sympathetic mechanisms and total peripheral resistance via an increase in sympathetic outflow to vascular beds. In this review we are thinking on how baroreceptor reflex plays a role in the abnormal control of the circulation in heart failure. This review and our recent studies suggest that: (1) baroreceptor reflex is blunted in heart failure; (2) central angiotensin Ⅱ and reactive oxygen species play an important role in blunted baroreceptor reflex; (3) cardiac sympathetic afferent stimulation and chemoreceptor reflex inhibit baroreceptor reflex; and (4) exercise training normalizes abnormal reflexes in the heart failure state.%心力衰竭是以心脏泵血功能降低(心输出量减少)为始动因素的临床综合征.心输出量降低首先引起动脉压力感受性反射失负荷,进而通过迷走-交感机制加快心率;同时,支配血管床的交感传出活动增强,进而增加总外周阻力.本文主要论述在心力衰竭状态下压力感受性反射在循环功能异常调控中的作用机制.本综述及我们近年的研究表明:(1)在心力衰竭状态下压力感受性反射功能明显减弱;(2)中枢血管紧张素Ⅱ和活性氧在压力感受性反射功能失调中发挥关键作用;(3)心交感传入刺激和化学感受性反射能抑制压力感受性反射;(4)适当的运动可以部分纠正异常的心血管反射活动.

  13. Spinal cord injury is associated with enhanced peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascom, Amy T; Sankari, Abdulghani; Badr, M Safwan

    2016-09-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is prevalent in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI), but the exact mechanism is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether peripheral chemoreceptors activity is enhanced in individuals with chronic SCI compared to abled-bodied control subjects using CO2 and O2 chemical tests. In protocol (1) 30 subjects (8 cervical [cSCI], 7 thoracic [tSCI] and 15 able-bodied [AB]) were studied to determine the ventilatory response to hyperoxia during wakefulness in the supine position. In protocol (2) 24 subjects (6 cSCI, 6 tSCI, and 12 AB subjects) were studied to determine the ventilatory response to a single breath of CO2 (SBCO2). The chemoreflex response to SBCO2 was calculated as ∆VE/∆CO2 (L/min/mmHg). The ventilatory response to hyperoxia was defined as the % change in VT following acute hyperoxia compared to preceding baseline. During hyperoxia SCI subjects had a significant decrease in VT and VE (63.4 ± 21.7% and 63.1 ± 23.0% baseline, respectively, P < 0.05) compared to AB (VT: 87.1 ± 14.3% and VE: 91.38 ± 15.1% baseline, respectively, P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between cSCI and tSCI in the VT or VE during hyperoxia (P = NS). There was no significant correlation between AHI and VE% baseline (r = -0.28) in SCI and AB (n = 30). SCI participants had a greater ventilatory response to an SBCO2 than AB (0.78 ± 0.42 L/min/mmHg vs. 0.26 ± 0.10 L/min/mmHg, respectively, P < 0.05). Peripheral ventilatory chemoresponsiveness is elevated in individuals with chronic SCI compared to able-bodied individuals. PMID:27597767

  14. Investigation into the characteristics, triggers and mechanism of apnoea and bradycardia in the anaesthetized platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgregor, J W; Holyoake, C; Fleming, P A; Robertson, I D; Connolly, J H; Warren, K S

    2014-01-01

    Health and conservation research on platypuses (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) may require anaesthesia to reduce stress and the risk of injury to both the animal and the researcher, as well as to facilitate examination and sample collection. Platypus anaesthesia can be difficult to manage, with reports of periods of apnoea and bradycardia described. This study investigated the conditions around sudden-onset apnoea and bradycardia in 163 field-anaesthetized platypuses as part of a health study. Anaesthesia was induced and maintained using isoflurane delivered in oxygen by face mask. Sudden-onset apnoea and bradycardia was observed in 19% of platypuses, occurring either at induction of anaesthesia, during recovery, or both. At induction, occurrence was more often recorded for adults (P = 0.19) and was correlated with low body temperature (P time (P = 0.16). At recovery, sudden-onset apnoea and bradycardia occurred only in platypuses that had been placed in dorsal recumbency as part of their examination, and correlated with poor body condition (P = 0.002), time in dorsal recumbency (P = 0.005), adults (P = 0.06), number of fieldworkers (P = 0.06) and females (P = 0.11). The sudden-onset apnoea and bradycardia we observed is likely to result from the irritant nature of isoflurane (stimulating the trigeminal nerve via nasal chemoreceptors). We propose that this mechanism is analogous to that of submersion of the face/nasal cavity in cold water during a natural dive response, but that the term 'nasopharyngeal response' would more appropriately describe the changes observed under isoflurane anaesthesia. Although we did not record any long-term adverse effects on platypuses that had undergone this response, the nasopharyngeal response could complicate the diagnosis of anaesthetic dose-dependent apnoea and bradycardia. Therefore, we suggest that these responses during anaesthesia of platypuses might be avoided by minimizing the stress around capture

  15. Do polymorphisms in chemosensory genes matter for human ingestive behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, John E.; Feeney, Emma L.; Allen, Alissa L.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, basic research in chemoreceptor genetics and neurobiology have revolutionized our understanding of individual differences in chemosensation. From an evolutionary perspective, chemosensory variations appear to have arisen in response to different living environments, generally in the avoidance of toxins and to better detect vital food sources. Today, it is often assumed that these differences may drive variable food preferences and choices, with downstream effects on health and wellness. A growing body of evidence indicates chemosensory variation is far more complex than previously believed. However, just because a genetic polymorphism results in altered receptor function in cultured cells or even behavioral phenotypes in the laboratory, this variation may not be sufficient to influence food choice in free living humans. Still, there is ample evidence to indicate allelic variation in TAS2R38 predicts variation in bitterness of synthetic pharmaceuticals (e.g., propylthiouracil) and natural plant compounds (e.g., goitrin), and this variation associates with differential intake of alcohol and vegetables. Further, this is only one of 25 unique bitter taste genes (TAS2Rs) in humans, and emerging evidence suggests other TAS2Rs may also contain polymorphisms that a functional with respect to ingestive behavior. For example, TAS2R16 polymorphisms are linked to the bitterness of naturally occurring plant compounds and alcoholic beverage intake, a TAS2R19 polymorphism predicts differences in quinine bitterness and grapefruit bitterness and liking, and TAS2R31 polymorphisms associate with differential bitterness of plant compounds like aristolochic acid and the sulfonyl amide sweeteners saccharin and acesulfame-K. More critically with respect to food choices, these polymorphisms may vary independently from each other within and across individuals, meaning a monolithic one-size-fits-all approach to bitterness needs to be abandoned. Nor are genetic

  16. The Mouse Solitary Odorant Receptor Gene Promoters as Models for the Study of Odorant Receptor Gene Choice.

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    Andrea Degl'Innocenti

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, several anatomical regions located within the nasal cavity mediate olfaction. Among these, the main olfactory epithelium detects most conventional odorants. Olfactory sensory neurons, provided with cilia exposed to the air, detect volatile chemicals via an extremely large family of seven-transmembrane chemoreceptors named odorant receptors. Their genes are expressed in a monogenic and monoallelic fashion: a single allele of a single odorant receptor gene is transcribed in a given mature neuron, through a still uncharacterized molecular mechanism known as odorant receptor gene choice.Odorant receptor genes are typically arranged in genomic clusters, but a few are isolated (we call them solitary from the others within a region broader than 1 Mb upstream and downstream with respect to their transcript's coordinates. The study of clustered genes is problematic, because of redundancy and ambiguities in their regulatory elements: we propose to use the solitary genes as simplified models to understand odorant receptor gene choice.Here we define number and identity of the solitary genes in the mouse genome (C57BL/6J, and assess the conservation of the solitary status in some mammalian orthologs. Furthermore, we locate their putative promoters, predict their homeodomain binding sites (commonly present in the promoters of odorant receptor genes and compare candidate promoter sequences with those of wild-caught mice. We also provide expression data from histological sections.In the mouse genome there are eight intact solitary genes: Olfr19 (M12, Olfr49, Olfr266, Olfr267, Olfr370, Olfr371, Olfr466, Olfr1402; five are conserved as solitary in rat. These genes are all expressed in the main olfactory epithelium of three-day-old mice. The C57BL/6J candidate promoter of Olfr370 has considerably varied compared to its wild-type counterpart. Within the putative promoter for Olfr266 a homeodomain binding site is predicted. As a whole, our findings

  17. Characteristics of renal sympathetic nerve single units in rabbits with angiotensin-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Sandra L; Lukoshkova, Elena V; Head, Geoffrey A

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effect of chronic angiotensin (Ang II)-induced hypertension on activity of postganglionic renal sympathetic units to determine whether altered whole renal nerve activity is due to recruitment or changes in firing frequency. Rabbits were treated with a low (20 ng kg(-1) min(-1), 8 weeks) or high dose (50 ng kg(-1) min(-1), 4 weeks) of Ang II before the experiment under chloralose-urethane anaesthesia. Spontaneously active units were detected from multiunit recordings using an algorithm that separated units by action potential shape using templates that matched spikes within a prescribed standard deviation. Multiunit sympathetic nerve activity was 40% higher in rabbits treated with low-dose Ang II than in sham (P = 0.012) but not different in high-dose Ang II. Resting firing frequency was similar in sham rabbits (1.00 ± 0.09 spikes s(-1), n = 144) and in those treated with high-dose Ang II (1.10 ± 0.08 spikes s(-1), n = 112) but was lower with low-dose Ang II (0.65 ± 0.08 spikes s(-1), n = 149, P < 0.05). Unit firing rhythmicity was linked to the cardiac cycle and was similar in sham and low-dose Ang II groups but 29-32% lower in rabbits treated with high-dose Ang II (P < 0.001). Cardiac linkage followed a similar pattern during hypoxia. All units showed baroreceptor dependency. Baroreflex gain and range were reduced and curves shifted to the right in Ang II groups. Firing frequency during hypoxia increased by +39% in low-dose Ang II and +82% in shams, but the greatest increase was in the high-dose Ang II group (+103%, P(dose) = 0.001). Responses to hypercapnia were similar in all groups. Increases in sympathetic outflow in hypertension caused by low-dose chronic Ang II administration are due to recruitment of neurons, but high-dose Ang II increases firing frequency in response to chemoreceptor stimuli independently of the arterial baroreceptors. PMID:26467849

  18. Do polymorphisms in chemosensory genes matter for human ingestive behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, John E; Feeney, Emma L; Allen, Alissa L

    2013-12-01

    In the last decade, basic research in chemoreceptor genetics and neurobiology have revolutionized our understanding of individual differences in chemosensation. From an evolutionary perspective, chemosensory variations appear to have arisen in response to different living environments, generally in the avoidance of toxins and to better detect vital food sources. Today, it is often assumed that these differences may drive variable food preferences and choices, with downstream effects on health and wellness. A growing body of evidence indicates chemosensory variation is far more complex than previously believed. However, just because a genetic polymorphism results in altered receptor function in cultured cells or even behavioral phenotypes in the laboratory, this variation may not be sufficient to influence food choice in free living humans. Still, there is ample evidence to indicate allelic variation in TAS2R38 predicts variation in bitterness of synthetic pharmaceuticals (e.g., propylthiouracil) and natural plant compounds (e.g., goitrin), and this variation associates with differential intake of alcohol and vegetables. Further, this is only one of 25 unique bitter taste genes (TAS2Rs) in humans, and emerging evidence suggests other TAS2Rs may also contain polymorphisms that a functional with respect to ingestive behavior. For example, TAS2R16 polymorphisms are linked to the bitterness of naturally occurring plant compounds and alcoholic beverage intake, a TAS2R19 polymorphism predicts differences in quinine bitterness and grapefruit bitterness and liking, and TAS2R31 polymorphisms associate with differential bitterness of plant compounds like aristolochic acid and the sulfonyl amide sweeteners saccharin and acesulfame-K. More critically with respect to food choices, these polymorphisms may vary independently from each other within and across individuals, meaning a monolithic one-size-fits-all approach to bitterness needs to be abandoned. Nor are genetic

  19. The retrotrapezoid nucleus stimulates breathing by releasing glutamate in adult conscious mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Benjamin B; Viar, Kenneth E; Stornetta, Ruth L; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2015-09-01

    The retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) is a bilateral cluster of neurons located at the ventral surface of the brainstem below the facial nucleus. The RTN is activated by hypercapnia and stabilises arterial Pco2 by adjusting lung ventilation in a feedback manner. RTN neurons contain vesicular glutamate transporter-2 (Vglut2) transcripts (Slc17a6), and their synaptic boutons are Vglut2-immunoreactive. Here, we used optogenetics to test whether the RTN increases ventilation in conscious adult mice by releasing glutamate. Neurons located below the facial motor nucleus were transduced unilaterally to express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-enhanced yellow fluorescent protein, with lentiviral vectors that employ the Phox2b-activated artificial promoter PRSx8. The targeted population consisted of two types of Phox2b-expressing neuron: non-catecholaminergic neurons (putative RTN chemoreceptors) and catecholaminergic (C1) neurons. Opto-activation of a mix of ChR2-expressing RTN and C1 neurons produced a powerful stimulus frequency-dependent (5-15 Hz) stimulation of breathing in control conscious mice. Respiratory stimulation was comparable in mice in which dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DβH)-positive neurons no longer expressed Vglut2 (DβH(C) (re/0);;Vglut2(fl/fl)). In a third group of mice, i.e. DβH(+/+);;Vglut2(fl/fl) mice, we injected a mixture of PRSx8-Cre lentiviral vector and Cre-dependent ChR2 adeno-associated virus 2 unilaterally into the RTN; this procedure deleted Vglut2 from ChR2-expressing neurons regardless of whether or not they were catecholaminergic. The ventilatory response elicited by photostimulation of ChR2-positive neurons was almost completely absent in these mice. Resting ventilatory parameters were identical in the three groups of mice, and their brains contained similar numbers of ChR2-positive catecholaminergic and non-catecholaminergic neurons. From these results, we conclude that RTN neurons increase breathing in conscious adult mice by releasing glutamate.

  20. 不同频率间歇低氧暴露后兔颈动脉体的炎症状态和窦神经传入活性%Carotid body inflammation and carotid sinus nerve afferent activity after intermittent hypoxia exposure of various frequencies in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯靖; 陈宝元; 崔林阳; 王宝利; 刘春霞; 陈攀峰; 郭美南; 董丽霞; 李硕

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the inflammatory reactions,endothelin level and carotid sinus nerve(CSN)afferent activity of carotid body(CB)after intermittent hypoxia/reoxygenation(IH/ROX)exposure of various frequencies in rabbits.Methods Forty-nine male adult New Zealand white rabbits (2.5~3.0 kg)were separated into 7 groups(n=7 each).After anesthetization,the fight carotid artery and CSN were cleared of surrounding tissues without touching the right CB and the left carotid region.The CSN was unenveloped to pareally expose the myelin sheath.and electrodes were placed to the"single"chemoreceptor bundle of the CSN.with CSN afferent activity carefully monitored and recorded.Then the right common carotid artery was exposed,cannulated to distal part and its proximal part was ligated.Preparations were challenged by changing the PO2 of the gas mixture equilibrating the perfusate.Alternatively perfusion (2 mL/min) of equilibrated perfusate bubbled with normoxia or hypoxia gas mixtures formed IH/ROX cycles in right carotid common artery,simulating the pattern of hypoxic episodes seen in obstructive sleep apnea,or with continuously perfusing hypoxia perfusate to form continuous hypoxia (CH)modes.Groups were defined with different frequencies,and groups were: intermittent normnxia group (IN group) (21% O2,15 s;21% O2,1 min 45 s),10/hr group (5% O2,15 s ;21% O2,5 rain 45 s),30/hrgroup (5%O2,15 s;21%O2,1 min45 s),50/hr group (5%O2,15 s;21%O2,57 s),60/hr group (5%O2 ,15 s;21%O2,45 s) and 90/hr group (5%O2,15 s;21%O2,25 s).All the above groups were exposed to 60 treatment cycles;continuous hypoxia group (CH group),IN for 1 h 45min and then 5% O2 for 15 min.After exposure and 30 min of static placing,CSN afferent frequencies (Charge F) were recorded from chemoreceptor bundles,and the right CB was cleared of surrounding tissues and harvested.Interleukin-6 (IL-6),endothelin-1 (ET-1),hypoxla-indacible factor-1 (HIF-I),and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations of the CB