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Sample records for chemoreceptor subfamilies differentially

  1. Candidate chemoreceptor subfamilies differentially expressed in the chemosensory organs of the mollusc Aplysia

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    Cummins Scott F

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marine molluscs, as is the case with most aquatic animals, rely heavily on olfactory cues for survival. In the mollusc Aplysia californica, mate-attraction is mediated by a blend of water-borne protein pheromones that are detected by sensory structures called rhinophores. The expression of G protein and phospholipase C signaling molecules in this organ is consistent with chemosensory detection being via a G-protein-coupled signaling mechanism. Results Here we show that novel multi-transmembrane proteins with similarity to rhodopsin G-protein coupled receptors are expressed in sensory epithelia microdissected from the Aplysia rhinophore. Analysis of the A. californica genome reveals that these are part of larger multigene families that possess features found in metazoan chemosensory receptor families (that is, these families chiefly consist of single exon genes that are clustered in the genome. Phylogenetic analyses show that the novel Aplysia G-protein coupled receptor-like proteins represent three distinct monophyletic subfamilies. Representatives of each subfamily are restricted to or differentially expressed in the rhinophore and oral tentacles, suggesting that they encode functional chemoreceptors and that these olfactory organs sense different chemicals. Those expressed in rhinophores may sense water-borne pheromones. Secondary signaling component proteins Gαq, Gαi, and Gαo are also expressed in the rhinophore sensory epithelium. Conclusion The novel rhodopsin G-protein coupled receptor-like gene subfamilies identified here do not have closely related identifiable orthologs in other metazoans, suggesting that they arose by a lineage-specific expansion as has been observed in chemosensory receptor families in other bilaterians. These candidate chemosensory receptors are expressed and often restricted to rhinophores and oral tentacles, lending support to the notion that water-borne chemical detection in Aplysia involves

  2. Differential Evolutionary Constraints in the Evolution of Chemoreceptors: A Murine and Human Case Study

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    Ricardo D’Oliveira Albanus; Rodrigo Juliani Siqueira Dalmolin; José Luiz Rybarczyk-Filho; Mauro Antônio Alves Castro; José Cláudio Fonseca Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Chemoreception is among the most important sensory modalities in animals. Organisms use the ability to perceive chemical compounds in all major ecological activities. Recent studies have allowed the characterization of chemoreceptor gene families. These genes present strikingly high variability in copy numbers and pseudogenization degrees among different species, but the mechanisms underlying their evolution are not fully understood. We have analyzed the functional networks of these genes, th...

  3. Differential Evolutionary Constraints in the Evolution of Chemoreceptors: A Murine and Human Case Study

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    Ricardo D’Oliveira Albanus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemoreception is among the most important sensory modalities in animals. Organisms use the ability to perceive chemical compounds in all major ecological activities. Recent studies have allowed the characterization of chemoreceptor gene families. These genes present strikingly high variability in copy numbers and pseudogenization degrees among different species, but the mechanisms underlying their evolution are not fully understood. We have analyzed the functional networks of these genes, their orthologs distribution, and performed phylogenetic analyses in order to investigate their evolutionary dynamics. We have modeled the chemosensory networks and compared the evolutionary constraints of their genes in Mus musculus, Homo sapiens, and Rattus norvegicus. We have observed significant differences regarding the constraints on the orthologous groups and network topologies of chemoreceptors and signal transduction machinery. Our findings suggest that chemosensory receptor genes are less constrained than their signal transducing machinery, resulting in greater receptor diversity and conservation of information processing pathways. More importantly, we have observed significant differences among the receptors themselves, suggesting that olfactory and bitter taste receptors are more conserved than vomeronasal receptors.

  4. Differential evolutionary constraints in the evolution of chemoreceptors: a murine and human case study.

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    D'Oliveira Albanus, Ricardo; Siqueira Dalmolin, Rodrigo Juliani; Rybarczyk-Filho, José Luiz; Alves Castro, Mauro Antônio; Fonseca Moreira, José Cláudio

    2014-01-01

    Chemoreception is among the most important sensory modalities in animals. Organisms use the ability to perceive chemical compounds in all major ecological activities. Recent studies have allowed the characterization of chemoreceptor gene families. These genes present strikingly high variability in copy numbers and pseudogenization degrees among different species, but the mechanisms underlying their evolution are not fully understood. We have analyzed the functional networks of these genes, their orthologs distribution, and performed phylogenetic analyses in order to investigate their evolutionary dynamics. We have modeled the chemosensory networks and compared the evolutionary constraints of their genes in Mus musculus, Homo sapiens, and Rattus norvegicus. We have observed significant differences regarding the constraints on the orthologous groups and network topologies of chemoreceptors and signal transduction machinery. Our findings suggest that chemosensory receptor genes are less constrained than their signal transducing machinery, resulting in greater receptor diversity and conservation of information processing pathways. More importantly, we have observed significant differences among the receptors themselves, suggesting that olfactory and bitter taste receptors are more conserved than vomeronasal receptors.

  5. Identification and characterization of a novel gene differentially expressed in zebrafish cross-subfamily cloned embryos

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    Wang Ya-Ping

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cross-species nuclear transfer has been shown to be a potent approach to retain the genetic viability of a certain species near extinction. However, most embryos produced by cross-species nuclear transfer were compromised because that they were unable to develop to later stages. Gene expression analysis of cross-species cloned embryos will yield new insights into the regulatory mechanisms involved in cross-species nuclear transfer and embryonic development. Results A novel gene, K31, was identified as an up-regulated gene in fish cross-subfamily cloned embryos using SSH approach and RACE method. K31 complete cDNA sequence is 1106 base pairs (bp in length, with a 342 bp open reading frame (ORF encoding a putative protein of 113 amino acids (aa. Comparative analysis revealed no homologous known gene in zebrafish and other species database. K31 protein contains a putative transmembrane helix and five putative phosphorylation sites but without a signal peptide. Expression pattern analysis by real time RT-PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH shows that it has the characteristics of constitutively expressed gene. Sub-cellular localization assay shows that K31 protein can not penetrate the nuclei. Interestingly, over-expression of K31 gene can cause lethality in the epithelioma papulosum cyprinid (EPC cells in cell culture, which gave hint to the inefficient reprogramming events occurred in cloned embryos. Conclusion Taken together, our findings indicated that K31 gene is a novel gene differentially expressed in fish cross-subfamily cloned embryos and over-expression of K31 gene can cause lethality of cultured fish cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the determination of novel genes involved in nucleo-cytoplasmic interaction of fish cross-subfamily cloned embryos.

  6. Karyotype differentiation patterns in species of the subfamily Scarabaeinae (Scarabaeidae, Coleoptera).

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    Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti; de Oliveira, Sárah Gomes; Ramos, Ituza Celeste; de Moura, Rita de Cássia

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the karyotype of species belonging to the subfamily Scarabaeinae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae) and to compile the conventional cytogenetic data available in the literature for this group. The karyotypes of ten species belonging to the tribes Canthonini, Coprini, Onthophagini and Phanaeini were analyzed by conventional staining. Eight of these species were described for the first time (Canthon aff carbonarius, Canthon chalybaeus, Coprophanaeus dardanus, Deltochilum aff amazonicum, Dichotomius geminatus, Oxysternon silenus, Phanaeus chalcomelas and Malagoniella aff astyanax) and two were redescribed (Diabroctis mimas and Digitonthophagus gazella) since their karyotypes differed from those previously published in the literature. Four species studied showed a diploid number of 2n=20 and a parachute type sex determining system and the karyotype was 2n=20,Xy in two species and 2n=18,Xy(p), 2n=19,X0, 2n=12,XY and 2n=14,neoXY in one each. The chromosome morphology of the different species varied, with the observation of metacentric, submetacentric, subacrocentric and acrocentric chromosomes. The X chromosome was predominantly meta or submetacentric in the species analyzed, whereas the y chromosome presented two arms or was punctiform. In conclusion, the subfamily Scarabaeinae comprises 120 species analyzed cytogenetically, and are observed the occurrence of five chromosome rearrangements (autosome-autosome and X-autosome fusions, pericentric inversions, fissions and loss of the y chromosome) that are related to the chromosome variability and evolution in the group. PMID:18495484

  7. Bacterial chemoreceptors and chemoeffectors.

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    Bi, Shuangyu; Lai, Luhua

    2015-02-01

    Bacteria use chemotaxis signaling pathways to sense environmental changes. Escherichia coli chemotaxis system represents an ideal model that illustrates fundamental principles of biological signaling processes. Chemoreceptors are crucial signaling proteins that mediate taxis toward a wide range of chemoeffectors. Recently, in deep study of the biochemical and structural features of chemoreceptors, the organization of higher-order clusters in native cells, and the signal transduction mechanisms related to the on-off signal output provides us with general insights to understand how chemotaxis performs high sensitivity, precise adaptation, signal amplification, and wide dynamic range. Along with the increasing knowledge, bacterial chemoreceptors can be engineered to sense novel chemoeffectors, which has extensive applications in therapeutics and industry. Here we mainly review recent advances in the E. coli chemotaxis system involving structure and organization of chemoreceptors, discovery, design, and characterization of chemoeffectors, and signal recognition and transduction mechanisms. Possible strategies for changing the specificity of bacterial chemoreceptors to sense novel chemoeffectors are also discussed.

  8. Carotid chemoreceptor development in mice.

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    Shirahata, Machiko; Kostuk, Eric W; Pichard, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    Mice are the most suitable species for understanding genetic aspects of postnatal developments of the carotid body due to the availability of many inbred strains and knockout mice. Our study has shown that the carotid body grows differentially in different mouse strains, indicating the involvement of genes. However, the small size hampers investigating functional development of the carotid body. Hypoxic and/or hyperoxic ventilatory responses have been investigated in newborn mice, but these responses are indirect assessment of the carotid body function. Therefore, we need to develop techniques of measuring carotid chemoreceptor neural activity from young mice. Many studies have taken advantage of the knockout mice to understand chemoreceptor function of the carotid body, but they are not always suitable for addressing postnatal development of the carotid body due to lethality during perinatal periods. Various inbred strains with well-designed experiments will provide useful information regarding genetic mechanisms of the postnatal carotid chemoreceptor development. Also, targeted gene deletion is a critical approach.

  9. Differential epigenetic regulation of TOX subfamily high mobility group box genes in lung and breast cancers.

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    Mathewos Tessema

    Full Text Available Aberrant cytosine methylation affects regulation of hundreds of genes during cancer development. In this study, a novel aberrantly hypermethylated CpG island in cancer was discovered within the TOX2 promoter. TOX2 was unmethylated in normal cells but 28% lung (n = 190 and 23% breast (n = 80 tumors were methylated. Expression of two novel TOX2 transcripts identified was significantly reduced in primary lung tumors than distant normal lung (p<0.05. These transcripts were silenced in methylated lung and breast cancer cells and 5-Aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment re-expressed both. Extension of these assays to TOX, TOX3, and TOX4 genes that share similar genomic structure and protein homology with TOX2 revealed distinct methylation profiles by smoking status, histology, and cancer type. TOX was almost exclusively methylated in breast (43% than lung (5% cancer, whereas TOX3 was frequently methylated in lung (58% than breast (30% tumors. TOX4 was unmethylated in all samples and showed the highest expression in normal lung. Compared to TOX4, expression of TOX, TOX2 and TOX3 in normal lung was 25, 44, and 88% lower, respectively, supporting the premise that reduced promoter activity confers increased susceptibility to methylation during lung carcinogenesis. Genome-wide assays revealed that siRNA-mediated TOX2 knockdown modulated multiple pathways while TOX3 inactivation targeted neuronal development and function. Although these knockdowns did not result in further phenotypic changes of lung cancer cells in vitro, the impact on tissue remodeling, inflammatory response, and cell differentiation pathways suggest a potential role for TOX2 in modulating tumor microenvironment.

  10. Protein complex interactor analysis and differential activity of KDM3 subfamily members towards H3K9 methylation.

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    Michael Brauchle

    Full Text Available Histone modifications play an important role in chromatin organization and gene regulation, and their interpretation is referred to as epigenetic control. The methylation levels of several lysine residues in histone tails are tightly controlled, and JmjC domain-containing proteins are one class of broadly expressed enzymes catalyzing methyl group removal. However, several JmjC proteins remain uncharacterized, gaps persist in understanding substrate recognition, and the integration of JmjC proteins into signaling pathways is just emerging. The KDM3 subfamily is an evolutionarily conserved group of histone demethylase proteins, thought to share lysine substrate specificity. Here we use a systematic approach to compare KDM3 subfamily members. We show that full-length KDM3A and KDM3B are H3K9me1/2 histone demethylases whereas we fail to observe histone demethylase activity for JMJD1C using immunocytochemical and biochemical approaches. Structure-function analyses revealed the importance of a single amino acid in KDM3A implicated in the catalytic activity towards H3K9me1/2 that is not conserved in JMJD1C. Moreover, we use quantitative proteomic analyses to identify subsets of the interactomes of the 3 proteins. Specific interactor candidates were identified for each of the three KDM3 subfamily members. Importantly, we find that SCAI, a known transcriptional repressor, interacts specifically with KDM3B. Taken together, we identify substantial differences in the biology of KDM3 histone demethylases, namely enzymatic activity and protein-protein interactions. Such comparative approaches pave the way to a better understanding of histone demethylase specificity and protein function at a systems level and are instrumental in identifying the more subtle differences between closely related proteins.

  11. A family of chemoreceptors in Tribolium castaneum (Tenebrionidae: Coleoptera.

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    Mohatmed Abdel-Latief

    Full Text Available Chemoperception in invertebrates is mediated by a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. To date nothing is known about the molecular mechanisms of chemoperception in coleopteran species. Recently the genome of Tribolium castaneum was sequenced for use as a model species for the Coleoptera. Using blast searches analyses of the T. castaneum genome with previously predicted amino acid sequences of insect chemoreceptor genes, a putative chemoreceptor family consisting of 62 gustatory receptors (Grs and 26 olfactory receptors (Ors was identified. The receptors have seven transmembrane domains (7TMs and all belong to the GPCR receptor family. The expression of the T. castaneum chemoreceptor genes was investigated using quantification real- time RT-PCR and in situ whole mount RT-PCR analysis in the antennae, mouth parts, and prolegs of the adults and larvae. All of the predicted TcasGrs were expressed in the labium, maxillae, and prolegs of the adults but TcasGr13, 19, 28, 47, 62, 98, and 61 were not expressed in the prolegs. The TcasOrs were localized only in the antennae and not in any of the beetles gustatory organs with one exception; the TcasOr16 (like DmelOr83b, which was localized in the antennae, labium, and prolegs of the beetles. A group of six TcasGrs that presents a lineage with the sugar receptors subfamily in Drosophila melanogaster were localized in the lacinia of the Tribolium larvae. TcasGr1, 3, and 39, presented an ortholog to CO(2 receptors in D. melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae was recorded. Low expression of almost all of the predicted chemoreceptor genes was observed in the head tissues that contain the brains and suboesophageal ganglion (SOG. These findings demonstrate the identification of a chemoreceptor family in Tribolium, which is evolutionarily related to other insect species.

  12. Positioning of bacterial chemoreceptors.

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    Jones, Christopher W; Armitage, Judith P

    2015-05-01

    For optimum growth, bacteria must adapt to their environment, and one way that many species do this is by moving towards favourable conditions. To do so requires mechanisms to both physically drive movement and provide directionality to this movement. The pathways that control this directionality comprise chemoreceptors, which, along with an adaptor protein (CheW) and kinase (CheA), form large hexagonal arrays. These arrays can be formed around transmembrane receptors, resulting in arrays embedded in the inner membrane, or they can comprise soluble receptors, forming arrays in the cytoplasm. Across bacterial species, chemoreceptor arrays (both transmembrane and soluble) are localised to a variety of positions within the cell; some species with multiple arrays demonstrate this variety within individual cells. In many cases, the positioning pattern of the arrays is linked to the need for segregation of arrays between daughter cells on division, ensuring the production of chemotactically competent progeny. Multiple mechanisms have evolved to drive this segregation, including stochastic self-assembly, cellular landmarks, and the utilisation of ParA homologues. The variety of mechanisms highlights the importance of chemotaxis to motile species.

  13. Tonic arterial chemoreceptor activity contributes to cardiac sympathetic activation in mild ovine heart failure.

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    Xing, Daniel T; May, Clive N; Booth, Lindsea C; Ramchandra, Rohit

    2014-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with a large increase in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA), which has detrimental effects on the heart and promotes arrhythmias and sudden death. There is increasing evidence that arterial chemoreceptor activation plays an important role in stimulating renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in HF. Given that sympathetic nerve activity to individual organs is differentially controlled, we investigated whether tonic arterial chemoreceptor activation contributes to the increased CSNA in HF. We recorded CSNA and RSNA in conscious normal sheep and in sheep with mild HF induced by rapid ventricular pacing (ejection fraction chemoreceptor function was evaluated by supplementing room air with 100% intranasal oxygen (2-3 l min(-1)) for 20 min, thereby deactivating chemoreceptors. The effects of hyperoxia on resting levels and baroreflex control of heart rate, CSNA and RSNA were determined. In HF, chemoreceptor deactivation induced by hyperoxia significantly reduced CSNA [90 ± 2 versus 75 ± 5 bursts (100 heart beats)(-1), P chemoreceptor deactivation reduced heart rate without a significant effect on CSNA or RSNA. In summary, deactivation of peripheral chemoreceptors during HF reduced the elevated levels of CSNA, indicating that tonic arterial chemoreceptor activation plays a critical role in stimulating the elevated CSNA in HF.

  14. The chemoreceptor genes of the waterflea Daphnia pulex: many Grs but no Ors

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    Robertson Hugh M

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemoreception is vitally important for all animals, yet little is known about the genetics of chemoreception in aquatic organisms. The keystone species Daphnia pulex, a well known crustacean, is the first aquatic invertebrate to have its genome sequenced. This has allowed us the initial investigation of chemoreceptor genes in an aquatic invertebrate, and to begin the study of chemoreceptor evolution across the arthropod phylum. Results We describe 58 Grs (gustatory receptors, belonging to the insect chemoreceptor superfamily, which were identified bioinformatically in the draft genome of the crustacean waterflea Daphnia pulex. No genes encoding proteins similar to the insect odorant receptors (Ors were identified. These 58 Grs form 3 distinctive subfamilies of 37, 12, and 5 genes, as well as a highly divergent singleton (Gr58. In addition, Grs55–57 share distinctive amino acid motifs and cluster with the sugar receptors of insects, and may illuminate the origin of this distinctive subfamily. ESTs, tiling array, and PCR amplification results support 34 predicted gene models, and preliminary expression data comparing the sexes indicates potential female-biased expression for some genes. Conclusion This repertoire of 58 chemoreceptors presumably mediates the many chemoperception abilities of waterfleas. While it is always possible that the entire Or gene lineage was lost at some point in the history of Daphnia pulex, we think it more likely that the insect Or lineage is indeed a relatively recently expanded gene lineage concomitant with the evolution of terrestriality in the insects or their hexapod ancestors.

  15. Carotid chemoreceptor "resetting" revisited.

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    Carroll, John L; Kim, Insook

    2013-01-01

    Carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors transduce low arterial O(2) tension into increased action potential activity on the carotid sinus nerves, which contributes to resting ventilatory drive, increased ventilatory drive in response to hypoxia, arousal responses to hypoxia during sleep, upper airway muscle activity, blood pressure control and sympathetic tone. Their sensitivity to O(2) is low in the newborn and increases during the days or weeks after birth to reach adult levels. This postnatal functional maturation of the CB O(2) response has been termed "resetting" and it occurs in every mammalian species studied to date. The O(2) environment appears to play a key role; the fetus develops in a low O(2) environment throughout gestation and initiation of CB "resetting" after birth is modulated by the large increase in arterial oxygen tension occurring at birth. Although numerous studies have reported age-related changes in various components of the O(2) transduction cascade, how the O(2) environment shapes normal CB prenatal development and postnatal "resetting" remains unknown. Viewing CB "resetting" as environment-driven (developmental) phenotypic plasticity raises important mechanistic questions that have received little attention. This review examines what is known (and not known) about mechanisms of CB functional maturation, with a focus on the role of the O(2) environment.

  16. The Caenorhabditis chemoreceptor gene families

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    Robertson Hugh M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemoreceptor proteins mediate the first step in the transduction of environmental chemical stimuli, defining the breadth of detection and conferring stimulus specificity. Animal genomes contain families of genes encoding chemoreceptors that mediate taste, olfaction, and pheromone responses. The size and diversity of these families reflect the biology of chemoperception in specific species. Results Based on manual curation and sequence comparisons among putative G-protein-coupled chemoreceptor genes in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified approximately 1300 genes and 400 pseudogenes in the 19 largest gene families, most of which fall into larger superfamilies. In the related species C. briggsae and C. remanei, we identified most or all genes in each of the 19 families. For most families, C. elegans has the largest number of genes and C. briggsae the smallest number, suggesting changes in the importance of chemoperception among the species. Protein trees reveal family-specific and species-specific patterns of gene duplication and gene loss. The frequency of strict orthologs varies among the families, from just over 50% in two families to less than 5% in three families. Several families include large species-specific expansions, mostly in C. elegans and C. remanei. Conclusion Chemoreceptor gene families in Caenorhabditis species are large and evolutionarily dynamic as a result of gene duplication and gene loss. These dynamics shape the chemoreceptor gene complements in Caenorhabditis species and define the receptor space available for chemosensory responses. To explain these patterns, we propose the gray pawn hypothesis: individual genes are of little significance, but the aggregate of a large number of diverse genes is required to cover a large phenotype space.

  17. Olfactory Receptor Database: a sensory chemoreceptor resource

    OpenAIRE

    Skoufos, Emmanouil; Marenco, Luis; Nadkarni, Prakash M.; Miller, Perry L.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2000-01-01

    The Olfactory Receptor Database (ORDB) is a WWW-accessible database that has been expanded from an olfactory receptor resource to a chemoreceptor resource. It stores data on six classes of G-protein-coupled sensory chemoreceptors: (i) olfactory receptor-like proteins, (ii) vomeronasal receptors, (iii) insect olfactory receptors, (iv) worm chemoreceptors, (v) taste papilla receptors and (vi) fungal pheromone receptors. A complementary database of the ligands of these receptors (OdorDB) has bee...

  18. Coexpression of Galanin and Nestin in the Chemoreceptor Cells of the Human Carotid Body.

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    Mazzatenta, Andrea; Marconi, Guya D; Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Cataldi, Amelia; Di Giulio, Camillo; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw

    2016-01-01

    The carotid body is a highly specialized chemoreceptive organ of neural crest origin whose role is to detect changes in arterial oxygen content. The sensory units are the chemoreceptor cells, which are neuronal-like cells, surrounded by sustentacular or glial-like cells. It is suggested that the carotid body contains self-renewing multipotent stem cells, which are putatively represented by glial-like sustentacular cells. The mechanisms of renewal of neuronal-like cells are unclear. Recently, we have demonstrated the expression of galanin, a peptide promoting neurogenesis, in chemoreceptor cells in the human CB. Thus, in the present study we seek to determine whether galanin expression in chemoreceptor cells could be matched with that of nestin, a peptide that is a marker of multipotent neural stem cells, or rather with the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker for glial cells. The latter would underscore the pluasibly essential role of sustentacular cells in the self-renewal capability of chemorecetors. We found that galanin expression is matched with nestin in chemoreceptor cells of the human carotid body, but not with that of GFAP. Thus, galanin expression in chemoreceptor cells could provide a signal for neurogenesis and chemoreceptor cell differentiation in the carotid body.

  19. Requirement of the Carboxyl Terminus of a Bacterial Chemoreceptor for Its Targeted Proteolysis

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    Alley, M. R. K.; Maddock, Janine R.; Shapiro, Lucille

    1993-03-01

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus yields two different progeny at each cell division; a chemotactically competent swarmer cell and a sessile stalked cell. The chemotaxis proteins are synthesized in the predivisional cell and then partition only to the swarmer cell upon division. The chemoreceptors that were newly synthesized were located at the nascent swarmer pole of the predivisional cell, an indication that asymmetry was established prior to cell division. When the swarmer cell differentiated into a stalked cell, the chemoreceptor was specifically degraded by virtue of an amino acid sequence located at its carboxyl terminus. Thus, a temporally and spatially restricted proteolytic event was a component of this differentiation process.

  20. Directed Evolution of Bacterial Chemoreceptors

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    Goulian, Mark

    2006-03-01

    The methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins are a family of receptors in bacteria that mediate chemotaxis to diverse signals. We have developed a simple method for selecting bacteria that swim towards target attractants, which makes it possible to isolate novel chemoreceptors. The procedure is based on establishing a diffusive gradient in semi-soft agar and does not require that the attractant be metabolized or degraded. We have applied this method to evolve the E. coli aspartate receptor, Tar, to mediate chemotaxis to new attractants. We found that Tar is quite plastic and can be readily mutated to respond to diverse compounds. The overall change in specificity depended on the target attractant. In some cases the mutated receptors still showed significant sensitivity to aspartate, indicating that the receptors had a broadened specificity relative to wild-type Tar. In other cases, however, the Tar variants showed a dramatic decrease in their response to aspartate. This occurred in the absence of any counter-selection steps. For many of the receptors, the maximal sensitivity that was obtained could not be attributed solely to substitutions within the ligand binding pocket. The receptors that we have isolated, together with additional variants that may be obtained with our technique, provide new tools for exploring the molecular mechanisms of signal transduction by chemoreceptors. Our selection method will also be useful for constructing new receptors for the development of biosensors and for engineering bacteria for applications in biotechnology.

  1. Central chemoreceptors: locations and functions.

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    Nattie, Eugene; Li, Aihua

    2012-01-01

    Central chemoreception traditionally refers to a change in ventilation attributable to changes in CO2/H(+) detected within the brain. Interest in central chemoreception has grown substantially since the previous Handbook of Physiology published in 1986. Initially, central chemoreception was localized to areas on the ventral medullary surface, a hypothesis complemented by the recent identification of neurons with specific phenotypes near one of these areas as putative chemoreceptor cells. However, there is substantial evidence that many sites participate in central chemoreception some located at a distance from the ventral medulla. Functionally, central chemoreception, via the sensing of brain interstitial fluid H(+), serves to detect and integrate information on (i) alveolar ventilation (arterial PCO2), (ii) brain blood flow and metabolism, and (iii) acid-base balance, and, in response, can affect breathing, airway resistance, blood pressure (sympathetic tone), and arousal. In addition, central chemoreception provides a tonic "drive" (source of excitation) at the normal, baseline PCO2 level that maintains a degree of functional connectivity among brainstem respiratory neurons necessary to produce eupneic breathing. Central chemoreception responds to small variations in PCO2 to regulate normal gas exchange and to large changes in PCO2 to minimize acid-base changes. Central chemoreceptor sites vary in function with sex and with development. From an evolutionary perspective, central chemoreception grew out of the demands posed by air versus water breathing, homeothermy, sleep, optimization of the work of breathing with the "ideal" arterial PCO2, and the maintenance of the appropriate pH at 37°C for optimal protein structure and function.

  2. To the theory of mechanisms subfamilies

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    Fomin, A.; Dvornikov, L.; Paramonov, M.; Jahr, A.

    2016-04-01

    The principles of formation of mechanisms subfamilies based on the usage of different kinds of kinematic pairs within the families of mechanisms are substantiated in the current paper. The division of mechanisms into subfamilies allows defining not only fundamental differences in the structure of mechanisms, but also provides the necessary foundation for the synthesis of new structures. 57 subfamilies of mechanisms have been totally distinguished. Among them, 31 subfamilies - within the zero family, 15 subfamilies - within the first family, 7 subfamilies - within the second family, 3 subfamilies - within the third family and 1 subfamily-within the fourth family. There were separately viewed planar mechanisms of the third family with three general imposed constraints and spatial mechanisms of the second family with two general imposed constraints in terms of their subfamilies. New methods of kinematical and dynamical investigations of mechanisms might be developed according to their analytical equations describing structural organization of different subfamilies of mechanisms.

  3. Characterization of Leptospiral Chemoreceptors Using a Microscopic Agar Drop Assay.

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    Affroze, Samia; Islam, Md Shafiqul; Takabe, Kyosuke; Kudo, Seishi; Nakamura, Shuichi

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is induced by sensing chemical stimuli via chemoreceptors embedded in the cytoplasmic membrane, enabling the cells to migrate toward nutrients or away from toxins. The chemoreceptors of Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. have been well studied and are functionally classified on the basis of detectable substrates. The spirochete Leptospira possesses more than ten chemoreceptors and shows attractive or repellent responses against some sugars, amino acids, and fatty acids. However, the roles of these chemoreceptors have not been investigated. In this study, we conducted a chemotaxis assay called microscopic agar drop assay in combination with competition experiments, determining whether two kinds of attractants are recognized by the same type of chemoreceptor in the saprophytic Leptospira strain, Leptospira biflexa. Analyzing the competition effect observed between several pairs of chemicals, we found that L. biflexa senses sugars via chemoreceptors different from those that sense amino acids and fatty acids.

  4. Plasticity of the chemoreceptor repertoire in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Shanshan Zhou

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available For most organisms, chemosensation is critical for survival and is mediated by large families of chemoreceptor proteins, whose expression must be tuned appropriately to changes in the chemical environment. We asked whether expression of chemoreceptor genes that are clustered in the genome would be regulated independently; whether expression of certain chemoreceptor genes would be especially sensitive to environmental changes; whether groups of chemoreceptor genes undergo coordinated rexpression; and how plastic the expression of chemoreceptor genes is with regard to sex, development, reproductive state, and social context. To answer these questions we used Drosophila melanogaster, because its chemosensory systems are well characterized and both the genotype and environment can be controlled precisely. Using customized cDNA microarrays, we showed that chemoreceptor genes that are clustered in the genome undergo independent transcriptional regulation at different developmental stages and between sexes. Expression of distinct subgroups of chemoreceptor genes is sensitive to reproductive state and social interactions. Furthermore, exposure of flies only to odor of the opposite sex results in altered transcript abundance of chemoreceptor genes. These genes are distinct from those that show transcriptional plasticity when flies are allowed physical contact with same or opposite sex members. We analyzed covariance in transcript abundance of chemosensory genes across all environmental conditions and found that they segregated into 20 relatively small, biologically relevant modules of highly correlated transcripts. This finely pixilated modular organization of the chemosensory subgenome enables fine tuning of the expression of the chemoreceptor repertoire in response to ecologically relevant environmental and physiological conditions.

  5. Peripheral chemoreceptors in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

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    Perez, Iris A; Keens, Thomas G

    2013-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome is a rare disorder caused by a mutation in the PHOX2B gene resulting in hypoventilation that is worse during sleep. Human physiologic studies show that patients with CCHS have absent or decreased rebreathing ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and hypoxemia during sleep as well as during wakefulness. Some ventilatory responses to hypoxia and hyperoxia can be demonstrated using a step change in inspired oxygen. However, these suggest that both central and peripheral chemoreceptor functions are generally defective in all states in children with CCHS. The defect in CCHS may lie in central nervous system pathways regulating ventilation, whose development and function are controlled by PHOX2B. Moreover, the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) may be the major defect in CCHS, where central and peripheral inputs converge. Human physiological studies predicted that the defect in CCHS lies in central integration of the central and peripheral chemoreceptor signals. New evidence suggests the RTN may be the respiratory controller where chemoreceptor inputs are integrated. In this review we present the clinical presentation of CCHS, revisit results of human physiologic studies, and discuss the findings in light of new knowledge about the role of PHOX2B and RTN in CCHS.

  6. Functional and evolutionary aspects of chemoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter eWicher

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The perception and processing of chemical signals from the environment is essential for any living systems and is most probably the first sense developed in life. This perspective discusses the physical limits of chemoreception and gives an overview on the receptor types developed during evolution to detect chemical signals from the outside world of an organism. It discusses the interaction of chemoreceptors with downstream signaling elements, especially the interaction between electrical and chemical signaling. It is further considered how the primary chemosignal is appropriately amplified. Three examples of chemosensory systems illustrate different strategies of such amplification.

  7. Caste-Specific and Sex-Specific Expression of Chemoreceptor Genes in a Termite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitaka, Yuki; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Mikheyev, Alexander; Tin, Mandy M Y; Watanabe, Yutaka; Matsuura, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The sophisticated colony organization of eusocial insects is primarily maintained through the utilization of pheromones. The regulation of these complex social interactions requires intricate chemoreception systems. The recent publication of the genome of Zootermopsis nevadensis opened a new avenue to study molecular basis of termite caste systems. Although there has been a growing interest in the termite chemoreception system that regulates their sophisticated caste system, the relationship between division of labor and expression of chemoreceptor genes remains to be explored. Using high-throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we found several chemoreceptors that are differentially expressed among castes and between sexes in a subterranean termite Reticulitermes speratus. In total, 53 chemoreception-related genes were annotated, including 22 odorant receptors, 7 gustatory receptors, 12 ionotropic receptors, 9 odorant-binding proteins, and 3 chemosensory proteins. Most of the chemoreception-related genes had caste-related and sex-related expression patterns; in particular, some chemoreception genes showed king-biased or queen-biased expression patterns. Moreover, more than half of the genes showed significant age-dependent differences in their expression in female and/or male reproductives. These results reveal a strong relationship between the evolution of the division of labor and the regulation of chemoreceptor gene expression, thereby demonstrating the chemical communication and underlining chemoreception mechanism in social insects. PMID:26760975

  8. Expanding role of ATP as a versatile messenger at carotid and aortic body chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskuric, Nikol A; Nurse, Colin A

    2013-01-15

    In mammals, peripheral arterial chemoreceptors monitor blood chemicals (e.g. O(2), CO(2), H(+), glucose) and maintain homeostasis via initiation of respiratory and cardiovascular reflexes. Whereas chemoreceptors in the carotid bodies (CBs), located bilaterally at the carotid bifurcation, control primarily respiratory functions, those in the more diffusely distributed aortic bodies (ABs) are thought to regulate mainly cardiovascular functions. Functionally, CBs sense partial pressure of O(2) ( ), whereas ABs are considered sensors of O(2) content. How these organs, with essentially a similar complement of chemoreceptor cells, differentially process these two different types of signals remains enigmatic. Here, we review evidence that implicates ATP as a central mediator during information processing in the CB. Recent data allow an integrative view concerning its interactions at purinergic P2X and P2Y receptors within the chemosensory complex that contains elements of a 'quadripartite synapse'. We also discuss recent studies on the cellular physiology of ABs located near the aortic arch, as well as immunohistochemical evidence suggesting the presence of pathways for P2X receptor signalling. Finally, we present a hypothetical 'quadripartite model' to explain how ATP, released from red blood cells during hypoxia, could contribute to the ability of ABs to sense O(2) content.

  9. Caste-Specific and Sex-Specific Expression of Chemoreceptor Genes in a Termite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Mitaka

    Full Text Available The sophisticated colony organization of eusocial insects is primarily maintained through the utilization of pheromones. The regulation of these complex social interactions requires intricate chemoreception systems. The recent publication of the genome of Zootermopsis nevadensis opened a new avenue to study molecular basis of termite caste systems. Although there has been a growing interest in the termite chemoreception system that regulates their sophisticated caste system, the relationship between division of labor and expression of chemoreceptor genes remains to be explored. Using high-throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq, we found several chemoreceptors that are differentially expressed among castes and between sexes in a subterranean termite Reticulitermes speratus. In total, 53 chemoreception-related genes were annotated, including 22 odorant receptors, 7 gustatory receptors, 12 ionotropic receptors, 9 odorant-binding proteins, and 3 chemosensory proteins. Most of the chemoreception-related genes had caste-related and sex-related expression patterns; in particular, some chemoreception genes showed king-biased or queen-biased expression patterns. Moreover, more than half of the genes showed significant age-dependent differences in their expression in female and/or male reproductives. These results reveal a strong relationship between the evolution of the division of labor and the regulation of chemoreceptor gene expression, thereby demonstrating the chemical communication and underlining chemoreception mechanism in social insects.

  10. Chemotactic Signaling by Single-Chain Chemoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Mowery

    Full Text Available Bacterial chemoreceptors of the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP family operate in commingled clusters that enable cells to detect and track environmental chemical gradients with high sensitivity and precision. MCP homodimers of different detection specificities form mixed trimers of dimers that facilitate inter-receptor communication in core signaling complexes, which in turn assemble into a large signaling network. The two subunits of each homodimeric receptor molecule occupy different locations in the core complexes. One subunit participates in trimer-stabilizing interactions at the trimer axis, the other lies on the periphery of the trimer, where it can interact with two cytoplasmic proteins: CheA, a signaling autokinase, and CheW, which couples CheA activity to receptor control. As a possible tool for independently manipulating receptor subunits in these two structural environments, we constructed and characterized fused genes for the E. coli serine chemoreceptor Tsr that encoded single-chain receptor molecules in which the C-terminus of the first Tsr subunit was covalently connected to the N-terminus of the second with a polypeptide linker. We showed with soft agar assays and with a FRET-based in vivo CheA kinase assay that single-chain Tsr~Tsr molecules could promote serine sensing and chemotaxis responses. The length of the connection between the joined subunits was critical. Linkers nine residues or shorter locked the receptor in a kinase-on state, most likely by distorting the native structure of the receptor HAMP domain. Linkers 22 or more residues in length permitted near-normal Tsr function. Few single-chain molecules were found as monomer-sized proteolytic fragments in cells, indicating that covalently joined receptor subunits were responsible for mediating the signaling responses we observed. However, cysteine-directed crosslinking, spoiling by dominant-negative Tsr subunits, and rearrangement of ligand-binding site

  11. A chemoreceptor that detects molecular carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ewan St John; Martinez-Velazquez, Luis; Ringstad, Niels

    2013-12-27

    Animals from diverse phyla possess neurons that are activated by the product of aerobic respiration, CO2. It has long been thought that such neurons primarily detect the CO2 metabolites protons and bicarbonate. We have determined the chemical tuning of isolated CO2 chemosensory BAG neurons of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that BAG neurons are principally tuned to detect molecular CO2, although they can be activated by acid stimuli. One component of the BAG transduction pathway, the receptor-type guanylate cyclase GCY-9, suffices to confer cellular sensitivity to both molecular CO2 and acid, indicating that it is a bifunctional chemoreceptor. We speculate that in other animals, receptors similarly capable of detecting molecular CO2 might mediate effects of CO2 on neural circuits and behavior.

  12. Bacterial chemoreceptors of different length classes signal independently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Seitz, M Karina; Frank, Vered; Massazza, Diego A; Vaknin, Ady; Studdert, Claudia A

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial chemoreceptors sense environmental stimuli and govern cell movement by transmitting the information to the flagellar motors. The highly conserved cytoplasmic domain of chemoreceptors consists in an alpha-helical hairpin that forms in the homodimer a coiled-coil four-helix bundle. Several classes of chemoreceptors that differ in the length of the coiled-coil structure were characterized. Many bacterial species code for chemoreceptors that belong to different classes, but how these receptors are organized and function in the same cell remains an open question. E. coli cells normally code for single class chemoreceptors that form extended arrays based on trimers of dimers interconnected by the coupling protein CheW and the kinase CheA. This structure promotes effective coupling between the different receptors in the modulation of the kinase activity. In this work, we engineered functional derivatives of the Tsr chemoreceptor of E. coli that mimic receptors whose cytoplasmic domain is longer by two heptads. We found that these long Tsr receptors did not efficiently mix with the native receptors and appeared to function independently. Our results suggest that the assembly of membrane-bound receptors of different specificities into mixed clusters is dictated by the length-class to which the receptors belong, ensuring cooperative function only between receptors of the same class.

  13. Odor and pheromone sensing via chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Minghong

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionally, chemosensation is an ancient but yet enigmatic sense. All organisms ranging from the simplest unicellular form to the most advanced multicellular creature possess the capability to detect chemicals in the surroundings. Conversely, all living things emit some forms of smells, either as communicating signals or as by-products of metabolism. Many species (from worms, insects to mammals) rely on the olfactory systems which express a large number of chemoreceptors to locate food and mates and to avoid danger. Most chemoreceptors expressed in olfactory organs are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and can be classified into two major categories: odorant receptors (ORs) and pheromone receptors, which principally detect general odors and pheromones, respectively. In vertebrates, these two types of receptors are often expressed in two distinct apparatuses: The main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO), respectively. Each olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) in the MOE typically expresses one type of OR from a large repertoire. General odors activate ORs and their host OSNs (ranging from narrowly- to broadly-tuned) in a combinatorial manner and the information is sent to the brain via the main olfactory system leading to perception of smells. In contrast, pheromones stimulate relatively narrowly-tuned receptors and their host VNO neurons and the information is sent to the brain via the accessory olfactory system leading to behavioral and endocrinological changes. Recent studies indicate that the functional separation between these two systems is blurred in some cases and there are more subsystems serving chemosensory roles. This chapter focuses on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying odor and pheromone sensing in rodents, the best characterized vertebrate models.

  14. Odor and pheromone sensing via chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Minghong

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionally, chemosensation is an ancient but yet enigmatic sense. All organisms ranging from the simplest unicellular form to the most advanced multicellular creature possess the capability to detect chemicals in the surroundings. Conversely, all living things emit some forms of smells, either as communicating signals or as by-products of metabolism. Many species (from worms, insects to mammals) rely on the olfactory systems which express a large number of chemoreceptors to locate food and mates and to avoid danger. Most chemoreceptors expressed in olfactory organs are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and can be classified into two major categories: odorant receptors (ORs) and pheromone receptors, which principally detect general odors and pheromones, respectively. In vertebrates, these two types of receptors are often expressed in two distinct apparatuses: The main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO), respectively. Each olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) in the MOE typically expresses one type of OR from a large repertoire. General odors activate ORs and their host OSNs (ranging from narrowly- to broadly-tuned) in a combinatorial manner and the information is sent to the brain via the main olfactory system leading to perception of smells. In contrast, pheromones stimulate relatively narrowly-tuned receptors and their host VNO neurons and the information is sent to the brain via the accessory olfactory system leading to behavioral and endocrinological changes. Recent studies indicate that the functional separation between these two systems is blurred in some cases and there are more subsystems serving chemosensory roles. This chapter focuses on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying odor and pheromone sensing in rodents, the best characterized vertebrate models. PMID:22399397

  15. Protein interactions and ligand binding: From protein subfamilies to functional specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Rausell, A.; de Juan, D.; Pazos, F; Valencia, A.

    2010-01-01

    The divergence accumulated during the evolution of protein families translates into their internal organization as subfamilies, and it is directly reflected in the characteristic patterns of differentially conserved residues. These specifically conserved positions in protein subfamilies are known as “specificity determining positions” (SDPs). Previous studies have limited their analysis to the study of the relationship between these positions and ligand-binding specificity, demonstrating sign...

  16. Changing the specificity of a bacterial chemoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derr, Paige; Boder, Eric; Goulian, Mark

    2006-02-01

    The methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins are a family of receptors in bacteria that mediate chemotaxis to diverse signals. To explore the plasticity of these proteins, we have developed a simple method for selecting cells that swim to target attractants. The procedure is based on establishing a diffusive gradient in semi-soft agar plates and does not require that the attractant be metabolized or degraded. We have applied this method to select for variants of the Escherichia coli aspartate receptor, Tar, that have a new or improved response to different amino acids. We found that Tar can be readily mutated to respond to new chemical signals. However, the overall change in specificity depended on the target compound. A Tar variant that could detect cysteic acid still showed a strong sensitivity to aspartate, indicating that the new receptor had a broadened specificity relative to wild-type Tar. Tar variants that responded to phenylalanine or N-methyl aspartate, or that had an increased sensitivity to glutamate showed a strong decrease in their response to aspartate. In at least some of the cases, the maximal level of sensitivity that was obtained could not be attributed solely to substitutions within the binding pocket. The new tar alleles and the techniques described here provide a new approach for exploring the relationship between ligand binding and signal transduction by chemoreceptors and for engineering new receptors for applications in biotechnology.

  17. Contribution of Individual Chemoreceptors to Sinorhizobium meliloti Chemotaxis Towards Amino Acids of Host and Nonhost Seed Exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Benjamin A; Helm, Richard F; Scharf, Birgit E

    2016-03-01

    Plant seeds and roots exude a spectrum of molecules into the soil that attract bacteria to the spermosphere and rhizosphere, respectively. The alfalfa symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti utilizes eight chemoreceptors (McpT to McpZ and IcpA) to mediate chemotaxis. Using a modified hydrogel capillary chemotaxis assay that allows data quantification and larger throughput screening, we defined the role of S. meliloti chemoreceptors in sensing its host, Medicago sativa, and a closely related nonhost, Medicago arabica. S. meliloti wild type and most single-deletion strains displayed comparable chemotaxis responses to host or nonhost seed exudate. However, while the mcpZ mutant responded like wild type to M. sativa exudate, its reaction to M. arabica exudate was reduced by 80%. Even though the amino acid (AA) amounts released by both plant species were similar, synthetic AA mixtures that matched exudate profiles contributed differentially to the S. meliloti wild-type response to M. sativa (23%) and M. arabica (37%) exudates, with McpU identified as the most important chemoreceptor for AA. Our results show that S. meliloti is equally attracted to host and nonhost legumes; however, AA play a greater role in attraction to M. arabica than to M. sativa, with McpZ being specifically important in sensing M. arabica. PMID:26713349

  18. Denervation of carotid baro- and chemoreceptors in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, H.J.L.M.

    2004-01-01

    Carotid baro- and chemoreceptors play an important role in blood pressure and blood gas homeostasis. Inadvertent denervation of these receptors in humans has been reported following surgery and radiotherapy in the area of the carotid bifurcation. The resulting syndrome of baroreflex failure is chara

  19. Peripheral chemoreceptors determine the respiratory sensitivity of central chemoreceptors to CO2 : role of carotid body CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Curtis A; Blain, Grégory M; Henderson, Kathleen S; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2015-09-15

    We asked if the type of carotid body (CB) chemoreceptor stimulus influenced the ventilatory gain of the central chemoreceptors to CO2 . The effect of CB normoxic hypocapnia, normocapnia and hypercapnia (carotid body PCO2 ≈ 22, 41 and 68 mmHg, respectively) on the ventilatory CO2 sensitivity of central chemoreceptors was studied in seven awake dogs with vascularly-isolated and extracorporeally-perfused CBs. Chemosensitivity with one CB was similar to that in intact dogs. In four CB-denervated dogs, absence of hyper-/hypoventilatory responses to CB perfusion with PCO2 of 19-75 mmHg confirmed separation of the perfused CB circulation from the brain. The group mean central CO2 response slopes were increased 303% for minute ventilation (V̇I)(P ≤ 0.01) and 251% for mean inspiratory flow rate (VT /TI ) (P ≤ 0.05) when the CB was hypercapnic vs. hypocapnic; central CO2 response slopes for tidal volume (VT ), breathing frequency (fb ) and rate of rise of the diaphragm EMG increased in 6 of 7 animals but the group mean changes did not reach statistical significance. Group mean central CO2 response slopes were also increased 237% for V̇I(P ≤ 0.01) and 249% for VT /TI (P ≤ 0.05) when the CB was normocapnic vs. hypocapnic, but no significant differences in any of the central ventilatory response indices were found between CB normocapnia and hypercapnia. These hyperadditive effects of CB hyper-/hypocapnia agree with previous findings using CB hyper-/hypoxia.We propose that hyperaddition is the dominant form of chemoreceptor interaction in quiet wakefulness when the chemosensory control system is intact, response gains physiological, and carotid body chemoreceptors are driven by a wide range of O2 and/or CO2 .

  20. Isofunctional Protein Subfamily Detection Using Data Integration and Spectral Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boari de Lima, Elisa; Meira, Wagner; Melo-Minardi, Raquel Cardoso de

    2016-06-01

    As increasingly more genomes are sequenced, the vast majority of proteins may only be annotated computationally, given experimental investigation is extremely costly. This highlights the need for computational methods to determine protein functions quickly and reliably. We believe dividing a protein family into subtypes which share specific functions uncommon to the whole family reduces the function annotation problem's complexity. Hence, this work's purpose is to detect isofunctional subfamilies inside a family of unknown function, while identifying differentiating residues. Similarity between protein pairs according to various properties is interpreted as functional similarity evidence. Data are integrated using genetic programming and provided to a spectral clustering algorithm, which creates clusters of similar proteins. The proposed framework was applied to well-known protein families and to a family of unknown function, then compared to ASMC. Results showed our fully automated technique obtained better clusters than ASMC for two families, besides equivalent results for other two, including one whose clusters were manually defined. Clusters produced by our framework showed great correspondence with the known subfamilies, besides being more contrasting than those produced by ASMC. Additionally, for the families whose specificity determining positions are known, such residues were among those our technique considered most important to differentiate a given group. When run with the crotonase and enolase SFLD superfamilies, the results showed great agreement with this gold-standard. Best results consistently involved multiple data types, thus confirming our hypothesis that similarities according to different knowledge domains may be used as functional similarity evidence. Our main contributions are the proposed strategy for selecting and integrating data types, along with the ability to work with noisy and incomplete data; domain knowledge usage for detecting

  1. Functional diversity among p24 subfamily members.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strating, J.R.P.M.; Hafmans, T.G.M.; Martens, G.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The p24 protein family plays an important but unclear role at the ER (endoplasmic reticulum)-Golgi interface. A p24 member from each subfamily (p24alpha(3), beta(1), gamma(3) and delta(2)) is upregulated with the prohormone POMC (pro-opiomelanocortin) when Xenopus laevis inte

  2. Chemicals and chemoreceptors: ecologically relevant signals driving behavior in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana eDepetris-Chauvin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Insects encounter a vast repertoire of chemicals in their natural environment, which can signal positive stimuli like the presence of a food source, a potential mate, or a suitable oviposition site as well as negative stimuli such as competitors, predators, or toxic substances reflecting danger. The presence of specialized chemoreceptors like taste and olfactory receptors allow animals to detect chemicals at short and long distances and accordingly, trigger proper behaviors towards these stimuli. Since the first description of olfactory and taste receptors in Drosophila fifteen years ago, our knowledge on the identity, properties, and function of specific chemoreceptors has increased exponentially. In the last years, multidisciplinary approaches combining genetic tools with electrophysiological techniques, behavioral recording, evolutionary analysis, and chemical ecology studies are shedding light on our understanding on the ecological relevance of specific chemoreceptors for the survival of Drosophila in their natural environment. In this review we discuss the current knowledge on chemoreceptors of both the olfactory and taste systems of the fruitfly. We focus on the relevance of particular receptors for the detection of ecologically relevant cues such as pheromones, food sources, and toxic compounds, and we comment on the behavioral changes that the detection of these chemicals induce in the fly. In particular, we give an updated outlook of the chemical communication displayed during one of the most important behaviors for fly survival, the courtship behavior. Finally, the ecological relevance of specific chemicals can vary depending on the niche occupied by the individual. In that regard, in this review we also highlight the contrast between adult and larval systems and we propose that these differences could reflect distinctive requirements depending on the change of ecological niche occupied by Drosophila along its life cycle.

  3. Chemicals and chemoreceptors: ecologically relevant signals driving behavior in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Depetris-Chauvin, Ana; Galagovsky, Diego; Grosjean, Yael

    2015-01-01

    Insects encounter a vast repertoire of chemicals in their natural environment, which can signal positive stimuli like the presence of a food source, a potential mate, or a suitable oviposition site as well as negative stimuli such as competitors, predators, or toxic substances reflecting danger. The presence of specialized chemoreceptors like taste and olfactory receptors allows animals to detect chemicals at short and long distances and accordingly, trigger proper behaviors toward these stim...

  4. Chemicals and chemoreceptors: ecologically relevant signals driving behavior in Drosophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Ana eDepetris-Chauvin; Diego eGalagovsky; Yael eGrosjean

    2015-01-01

    Insects encounter a vast repertoire of chemicals in their natural environment, which can signal positive stimuli like the presence of a food source, a potential mate, or a suitable oviposition site as well as negative stimuli such as competitors, predators, or toxic substances reflecting danger. The presence of specialized chemoreceptors like taste and olfactory receptors allow animals to detect chemicals at short and long distances and accordingly, trigger proper behaviors towards these stim...

  5. Carotid body chemoreceptors, sympathetic neural activation, and cardiometabolic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Idiaquez, Juan; Somers, Virend K.

    2016-01-01

    The carotid body (CB) is the main peripheral chemoreceptor that senses the arterial PO2, PCO2 and pH. In response to hypoxemia, hypercapnia and acidosis, carotid chemosensory discharge elicits reflex respiratory, autonomic and cardiovascular adjustments. The classical construct considers the CB as the main peripheral oxygen sensor, triggering reflex physiological responses to acute hypoxemia and facilitating the ventilatory acclimation to chronic hypoxemia at high altitude. However, a growing...

  6. SOLITARY CHEMORECEPTOR CELL SURVIVAL IS INDEPENDENT OF INTACT TRIGEMINAL INNERVATION

    OpenAIRE

    Gulbransen, Brian; Silver, Wayne; Finger, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Nasal solitary chemoreceptor cells (SCCs) are a population of specialized chemosensory epithelial cells presumed to broaden trigeminal chemoreceptivity in mammals (Finger et al., 2003). SCCs are innervated by peptidergic trigeminal nerve fibers (Finger et al., 2003) but it is currently unknown if intact innervation is necessary for SCC development or survival. We tested the dependence of SCCs on innervation by eliminating trigeminal nerve fibers during development with neurogenin-1 knockout m...

  7. Chronic Interactions Between Carotid Baroreceptors and Chemoreceptors in Obesity Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmeier, Thomas E; Iliescu, Radu; Tudorancea, Ionut; Cazan, Radu; Cates, Adam W; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Irwin, Eric D

    2016-07-01

    Carotid bodies play a critical role in protecting against hypoxemia, and their activation increases sympathetic activity, arterial pressure, and ventilation, responses opposed by acute stimulation of the baroreflex. Although chemoreceptor hypersensitivity is associated with sympathetically mediated hypertension, the mechanisms involved and their significance in the pathogenesis of hypertension remain unclear. We investigated the chronic interactions of these reflexes in dogs with sympathetically mediated, obesity-induced hypertension based on the hypothesis that hypoxemia and tonic activation of carotid chemoreceptors may be associated with obesity. After 5 weeks on a high-fat diet, the animals experienced a 35% to 40% weight gain and increases in arterial pressure from 106±3 to 123±3 mm Hg and respiratory rate from 8±1 to 12±1 breaths/min along with hypoxemia (arterial partial pressure of oxygen=81±3 mm Hg) but eucapnia. During 7 days of carotid baroreflex activation by electric stimulation of the carotid sinus, tachypnea was attenuated, and hypertension was abolished before these variables returned to prestimulation values during a recovery period. After subsequent denervation of the carotid sinus region, respiratory rate decreased transiently in association with further sustained reductions in arterial partial pressure of oxygen (to 65±2 mm Hg) and substantial hypercapnia. Moreover, the severity of hypertension was attenuated from 125±2 to 116±3 mm Hg (45%-50% reduction). These findings suggest that hypoxemia may account for sustained stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors in obesity and that this activation leads to compensatory increases in ventilation and central sympathetic outflow that contributes to neurogenically mediated hypertension. Furthermore, the excitatory effects of chemoreceptor hyperactivity are abolished by chronic activation of the carotid baroreflex. PMID:27160198

  8. Central chemoreceptors and neural mechanisms of cardiorespiratory control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Moreira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The arterial partial pressure (P CO2 of carbon dioxide is virtually constant because of the close match between the metabolic production of this gas and its excretion via breathing. Blood gas homeostasis does not rely solely on changes in lung ventilation, but also to a considerable extent on circulatory adjustments that regulate the transport of CO2 from its sites of production to the lungs. The neural mechanisms that coordinate circulatory and ventilatory changes to achieve blood gas homeostasis are the subject of this review. Emphasis will be placed on the control of sympathetic outflow by central chemoreceptors. High levels of CO2 exert an excitatory effect on sympathetic outflow that is mediated by specialized chemoreceptors such as the neurons located in the retrotrapezoid region. In addition, high CO2 causes an aversive awareness in conscious animals, activating wake-promoting pathways such as the noradrenergic neurons. These neuronal groups, which may also be directly activated by brain acidification, have projections that contribute to the CO2-induced rise in breathing and sympathetic outflow. However, since the level of activity of the retrotrapezoid nucleus is regulated by converging inputs from wake-promoting systems, behavior-specific inputs from higher centers and by chemical drive, the main focus of the present manuscript is to review the contribution of central chemoreceptors to the control of autonomic and respiratory mechanisms.

  9. Unequal subfamily proportions among honey bee queen and worker brood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley; Oldroyd

    1997-12-01

    Queens from three colonies of feral honey bees, Apis mellifera were removed and placed in separate nucleus colonies. For each colony, eggs and larvae were taken from the nucleus and placed in the main hive on each of 3-4 consecutive weeks. Workers in the queenless parts selected young larvae to rear as queens. Queen pupae, together with the surrounding worker pupae, were removed from each colony and analysed at two to three microsatellite loci to determine their paternity. In all three colonies, the paternity of larvae chosen by the bees to rear as queens was not a random sample of the paternities in the worker brood, with certain subfamilies being over-represented in queens. These results support an important prediction of kin selection theory: when colonies are queenless, unequal relatedness within colonies could lead to the evolution of reproductive competition, that is some subfamilies achieving greater reproductive success than others. The mechanism by which such dominance is achieved could be through a system of kin recognition and nepotism, but we conclude that genetically based differential attractiveness of larvae for rearing as queens is more likely.Copyright 1997 The Association for the Study of Animal BehaviourCopyright 1997The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:9521799

  10. Narrow-spectrum chemoreceptor cells in the walking legs of the lobster Homarus americanus: taste specialists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derby, C.D.; Atema, J.

    1982-01-01

    The chemoreceptors in the legs of lobsters function in the localization and handling of food. By single-unit extracellular recording techniques, the specificity of single primary chemoreceptor cells is described here in detail. In contrast to what is known in vertebrates, narrow-spectrum chemoreceptors of several different types were found, each type responding with maximal sensitivity to only one of the following compounds: L-glutamate, L-glutamine, L-arginine, taurine, betaine, and ammonium chloride. Ammonium chloride sensitive cells were also highly specific. Other groups of narrow-spectrum cells - L-arginine, L-glutamine, taurine, and betaine sensitive chemoreceptors - showed equally strong specificity. These results indicate that the peripheral coding system in the legs of lobsters is based largely but perhaps not exclusively on narrow-spectrum chemoreceptor cells.

  11. Lead toxicity promotes autonomic dysfunction with increased chemoreceptor sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldes, Vera; Carvalho, Mafalda; Goncalves-Rosa, Nataniel; Tavares, Cristiano; Laranjo, Sérgio; Rocha, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    Mortality and morbidity by toxic metals is an important issue of occupational health. Lead is an ubiquitous heavy metal in our environment despite having no physiological role in biological systems. Being an homeostatic controller is expected that the autonomic nervous system would show a degree of impairment in lead toxicity. In fact, sympathoexcitation associated to high blood pressure and tachypnea has been described together with baroreflex dysfunction. However, the mechanisms underlying the autonomic dysfunction and the interplay between baro- and chemoreflex are not yet fully clarified. The angiotensinogenic PVN-NTS axis (paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus - nucleus tractus solitarius axis) is a particularly important neuronal pathway that could be responsible for the autonomic dysfunction and the cardiorespiratory impairment in lead toxicity. Within the current work, we addressed in vivo, baro- and chemoreceptor reflex behaviour, before and after central angiotensin inhibition, in order to better understand the cardiorespiratory autonomic mechanisms underlying the toxic effects of long-term lead exposure. For that, arterial pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, sympathetic and parasympathetic activity and baro- and chemoreceptor reflex profiles of anaesthetized young adult rats exposed to lead, from foetal period to adulthood, were evaluated. Results showed increased chemosensitivity together with baroreceptor reflex impairment, sympathetic over-excitation, hypertension and tachypnea. Chemosensitivity and sympathetic overexcitation were reversed towards normality values by NTS treatment with A-779, an angiotensin (1-7) antagonist. No parasympathetic changes were observed before and after A-799 treatment. In conclusion, angiotensin (1-7) at NTS level is involved in the autonomic dysfunction observed in lead toxicity. The increased sensitivity of chemoreceptor reflex expresses the clear impairment of autonomic outflow to the cardiovascular and

  12. Chemoreceptors and cardiovascular control in acute and chronic systemic hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Marshall

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the ways in which the primary bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction evoked by selective stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors can be modified by the secondary effects of a chemoreceptor-induced increase in ventilation. The evidence that strong stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors can evoke the behavioural and cardiovascular components of the alerting or defence response which is characteristically evoked by novel or noxious stimuli is considered. The functional significance of all these influences in systemic hypoxia is then discussed with emphasis on the fact that these reflex changes can be overcome by the local effects of hypoxia: central neural hypoxia depresses ventilation, hypoxia acting on the heart causes bradycardia and local hypoxia of skeletal muscle and brain induces vasodilatation. Further, it is proposed that these local influences can become interdependent, so generating a positive feedback loop that may explain sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS. It is also argued that a major contributor to these local influences is adenosine. The role of adenosine in determining the distribution of O2 in skeletal muscle microcirculation in hypoxia is discussed, together with its possible cellular mechanisms of action. Finally, evidence is presented that in chronic systemic hypoxia, the reflex vasoconstrictor influences of the sympathetic nervous system are reduced and/or the local dilator influences of hypoxia are enhanced. In vitro and in vivo findings suggest this is partly explained by upregulation of nitric oxide (NO synthesis by the vascular endothelium which facilitates vasodilatation induced by adenosine and other NO-dependent dilators and attenuates noradrenaline-evoked vasoconstriction.

  13. Regulation of breathing and autonomic outflows by chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyenet, Patrice G

    2014-10-01

    Lung ventilation fluctuates widely with behavior but arterial PCO2 remains stable. Under normal conditions, the chemoreflexes contribute to PaCO2 stability by producing small corrective cardiorespiratory adjustments mediated by lower brainstem circuits. Carotid body (CB) information reaches the respiratory pattern generator (RPG) via nucleus solitarius (NTS) glutamatergic neurons which also target rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) presympathetic neurons thereby raising sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Chemoreceptors also regulate presympathetic neurons and cardiovagal preganglionic neurons indirectly via inputs from the RPG. Secondary effects of chemoreceptors on the autonomic outflows result from changes in lung stretch afferent and baroreceptor activity. Central respiratory chemosensitivity is caused by direct effects of acid on neurons and indirect effects of CO2 via astrocytes. Central respiratory chemoreceptors are not definitively identified but the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) is a particularly strong candidate. The absence of RTN likely causes severe central apneas in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. Like other stressors, intense chemosensory stimuli produce arousal and activate circuits that are wake- or attention-promoting. Such pathways (e.g., locus coeruleus, raphe, and orexin system) modulate the chemoreflexes in a state-dependent manner and their activation by strong chemosensory stimuli intensifies these reflexes. In essential hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea and congestive heart failure, chronically elevated CB afferent activity contributes to raising SNA but breathing is unchanged or becomes periodic (severe CHF). Extreme CNS hypoxia produces a stereotyped cardiorespiratory response (gasping, increased SNA). The effects of these various pathologies on brainstem cardiorespiratory networks are discussed, special consideration being given to the interactions between central and peripheral chemoreflexes. PMID:25428853

  14. An allosteric model for the functional plasticity of olfactory chemoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosimo, Alfredo

    2000-12-01

    A simple allosteric model may describe the relatively (a)specific behaviour of olfactory chemoreceptors (OCs) and their functional plasticity with a minimum number of parameters. Allosteric, heterotropic effectors are suggested as a possible cause of variable responses documented, in particular, in frog OCs. As an immediate spinoff of the continuously increasing amount of structural information available on natural OCs, development of appropriate allosteric models is foreseen to provide plausible molecular mechanisms for their complex functional performance. This may also have implications in the design of artificial olfaction systems.

  15. Analysis of putative chemoreceptor proteins of Campylobacter jejuni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Brøndsted, Lone; Bang, Dang D.;

    Campylobacter jejuni is the primary food borne bacterial pathogen in the developed world. A very important reservoir for C. jejuni is the gut of chickens, which are colonized efficiently and commensally by this organism. Predominantly the mucus filled crypts of the lower gastrointestinal tract...... are found to be colonized by C. jejuni and the bacteria are expected to be attracted to this environment by chemotaxis. In order to explore the role of chemotaxis in C. jejuni colonization and to identify chemoreceptors with matching attractants and/or repellants we have constructed deletion mutants of five...

  16. Seed morphology and anatomy and its utility in recognizing subfamilies and tribes of Zingiberaceae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedict, John C.; Smith, Selena Y.; Collinson, Margaret E.; Leong-Skornickova, Jana; Specht, Chelsea D.; Marone, Federica; Xiao, Xianghui; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.

    2015-11-01

    PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Recent phylogenetic analyses based on molecular data suggested that the monocot family Zingiberaceae be separated into four subfamilies and four tribes. Robust morphological characters to support these clades are lacking. Seeds were analyzed in a phylogenetic context to test independently the circumscription of clades and to better understand evolution of seed characters within Zingiberaceae. METHODS: Seventy-five species from three of the four subfamilies were analyzed using synchrotron based x-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) and scored for 39 morphoanatomical characters. KEY RESULTS: Zingiberaceae seeds are some of the most structurally complex seeds in angiosperms. No single seed character was found to distinguish each subfamily, but combinations of characters were found to differentiate between the subfamilies. Recognition of the tribes based on seeds was possible for Globbeae, but not for Alpinieae, Riedelieae, or Zingibereae, due to considerable variation. CONCLUSIONS: SRXTM is an excellent, nondestructive tool to capture morphoanatomical variation of seeds and allows for the study of taxa with limited material available. Alpinioideae, Siphonochiloideae, Tamijioideae, and Zingiberoideae are well supported based on both molecular and morphological data, including multiple seed characters. Globbeae are well supported as a distinctive tribe within the Zingiberoideae, but no other tribe could be differentiated using seeds due to considerable homoplasy when compared with currently accepted relationships based on molecular data. Novel seed characters suggest tribal affinities for two currently unplaced Zingiberaceae taxa: Siliquamomum may be related to Riedelieae and Monolophus to Zingibereae, but further work is needed before formal revision of the family.

  17. Synaptic and paracrine mechanisms at carotid body arterial chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurse, Colin A

    2014-08-15

    Mammalian carotid bodies are the main peripheral arterial chemoreceptors, strategically located at the bifurcation of the common carotid artery. When stimulated these receptors initiate compensatory respiratory and cardiovascular reflexes to maintain homeostasis. Thus, in response to low oxygen (hypoxia) or increased CO2/H(+) (acid hypercapnia), chemoreceptor type I cells depolarize and release excitatory neurotransmitters, such as ATP, which stimulate postsynaptic P2X2/3 receptors on afferent nerve terminals. The afferent discharge is shaped by autocrine and paracrine mechanisms involving both excitatory and inhibitory neuromodulators such as adenosine, serotonin (5-HT), GABA and dopamine. Recent evidence suggests that paracrine activation of P2Y2 receptors on adjacent glia-like type II cells may help boost the ATP signal via the opening of pannexin-1 channels. The presence of an inhibitory efferent innervation, mediated by release of nitric oxide, provides additional control of the afferent discharge. The broad array of neuromodulators and their receptors appears to endow the carotid body with a remarkable plasticity, most apparent during natural and pathophysiological conditions associated with chronic sustained and intermittent hypoxia.

  18. Sequences determining the cytoplasmic localization of a chemoreceptor domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, L; Bailey, J; Manoil, C

    1995-01-01

    The Escherichia coli serine chemoreceptor (Tsr) is a protein with a simple topology consisting of two membrane-spanning sequences (TM1 and TM2) separating a large periplasmic domain from N-terminal and C-terminal cytoplasmic regions. We analyzed the contributions of several sequence elements to the cytoplasmic localization of the C-terminal domain by using chemoreceptor-alkaline phosphatase gene fusions. The principal findings were as follows. (i) The cytoplasmic localization of the C-terminal domain depended on TM2 but was quite tolerant of mutations partially deleting or introducing charged residues into the sequence. (ii) The basal level of C-terminal domain export was significantly higher in proteins with the wild-type periplasmic domain than in derivatives with a shortened periplasmic domain, suggesting that the large size of the wild-type domain promotes partial membrane misinsertion. (iii) The membrane insertion of deletion derivatives with a single spanning segment (TM1 or TM2) could be controlled by either an adjacent positively charged sequence or an adjacent amphipathic sequence. The results provide evidence that the generation of the Tsr membrane topology is an overdetermined process directed by an interplay of sequences promoting and opposing establishment of the normal structure. PMID:7730259

  19. Estimating diversence times among subfamilies in Nymphalidae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Min; CAO TianWen; JIN Ke; REN ZhuMei; GUO YaPing; SHI Jing; ZHONG Yang; MA EnBo

    2008-01-01

    The mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene and the nuclear elongation factor 1α (EF-1α) gene were sequenced from 13 species of Nymphalidae. Phylogenetic trees of Nymphalidae, which is the largest family in butterflies, were constructed based on the sequences determined from 13 species sequenced in our laboratory and an additional 43 species obtained from GenBank using the maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian methods. Relative-rate tests between lineages in these phylogenetic trees were performed. On the basis of the results of the relative-rate tests and fossil information of Satyrinae, Nymphalinae and Biblidinae, the average divergence times among the subfamilies are estimated as 44.2-87.1 million years ago (Ma). These results will be helpful for better understanding of the origin and evolution of this family, as well as the divergence time of butterflies and other complex taxa.

  20. The role of carotid chemoreceptors in the sympathetic activation by adenosine in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.; Karemaker, J.M.; Wieling, W.; Marres, H.A.M.; Lenders, J.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    The direct vasodilatory and negative chronotropic effects of adenosine in humans are counterbalanced by a reflex increase in sympathetic nerve traffic. A suggested mechanism for this reflex includes peripheral chemoreceptor activation. We, therefore, assessed the contribution of carotid chemorecepto

  1. Repellent response functions of the Trg and Tap chemoreceptors of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, K.; Macnab, R M; Imae, Y

    1990-01-01

    The chemoreceptors responsible for the repellent response of Escherichia coli to phenol were investigated. In the absence of all four known methyl-accepting chemoreceptors (Tar, Tsr, Trg, and Tap), cells showed no response to phenol. However, when Trg, which mediates the attractant response to ribose and galactose, was introduced via a plasmid, the cells acquired a repellent response to phenol. About 1 mM phenol induced a clear repellent response; this response was suppressed by 1 mM ribose. ...

  2. Functional Gustatory Role of Chemoreceptors in Drosophila Wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raad, Hussein; Ferveur, Jean-François; Ledger, Neil; Capovilla, Maria; Robichon, Alain

    2016-05-17

    Neuroanatomical evidence argues for the presence of taste sensilla in Drosophila wings; however, the taste physiology of insect wings remains hypothetical, and a comprehensive link to mechanical functions, such as flight, wing flapping, and grooming, is lacking. Our data show that the sensilla of the Drosophila anterior wing margin respond to both sweet and bitter molecules through an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. Conversely, genetically modified flies presenting a wing-specific reduction in chemosensory cells show severe defects in both wing taste signaling and the exploratory guidance associated with chemodetection. In Drosophila, the chemodetection machinery includes mechanical grooming, which facilitates the contact between tastants and wing chemoreceptors, and the vibrations of flapping wings that nebulize volatile molecules as carboxylic acids. Together, these data demonstrate that the Drosophila wing chemosensory sensilla are a functional taste organ and that they may have a role in the exploration of ecological niches. PMID:27160896

  3. Cardiorespiratory response to cyanide of arterial chemoreceptors in fetal lambs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itskovitz, J.; Rudolph, A.M.

    1987-05-01

    Cardiorespiratory response to the stimulation of the carotid and aortic receptors by sodium cyanide was examined in fetal lambs in utero at 0.8 (120 days) gestation. Injections of 50-400 ..mu..g cyanide into the inferior vena cava or the carotid artery of intact fetuses elicited bradycardia and respiratory responses that varied from a single gasp to rhythmic respiratory movements but no significant change in arterial blood pressure. Carotid sinus denervation eliminated the cardiorespiratory response to intracarotid injection of cyanide and sinoaortic denervation abolished the response to inferior vena caval injection. It is concluded that in fetal lamb in utero the aortic and carotid bodies are active, and hypoxic stimulation of these chemoreceptors results in cardiorespiratory response characterized by slowing of fetal heart rate, respiratory effort, and no consistent change in arterial blood pressure.

  4. Functional Gustatory Role of Chemoreceptors in Drosophila Wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raad, Hussein; Ferveur, Jean-François; Ledger, Neil; Capovilla, Maria; Robichon, Alain

    2016-05-17

    Neuroanatomical evidence argues for the presence of taste sensilla in Drosophila wings; however, the taste physiology of insect wings remains hypothetical, and a comprehensive link to mechanical functions, such as flight, wing flapping, and grooming, is lacking. Our data show that the sensilla of the Drosophila anterior wing margin respond to both sweet and bitter molecules through an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. Conversely, genetically modified flies presenting a wing-specific reduction in chemosensory cells show severe defects in both wing taste signaling and the exploratory guidance associated with chemodetection. In Drosophila, the chemodetection machinery includes mechanical grooming, which facilitates the contact between tastants and wing chemoreceptors, and the vibrations of flapping wings that nebulize volatile molecules as carboxylic acids. Together, these data demonstrate that the Drosophila wing chemosensory sensilla are a functional taste organ and that they may have a role in the exploration of ecological niches.

  5. Polar Location of the Chemoreceptor Complex in the Escherichia coli Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddock, Janine R.; Shapiro, Lucille

    1993-03-01

    The eukaryotic cell exhibits compartmentalization of functions to various membrane-bound organelles and to specific domains within each membrane. The spatial distribution of the membrane chemoreceptors and associated cytoplasmic chemotaxis proteins in Escherichia coli were examined as a prototypic functional aggregate in bacterial cells. Bacterial chemotaxis involves a phospho-relay system brought about by ligand association with a membrane receptor, culminating in a switch in the direction of flagellar rotation. The transduction of the chemotaxis signal is initiated by a chemoreceptor-CheW-CheA ternary complex at the inner membrane. These ternary complexes aggregate predominantly at the cell poles. Polar localization of the cytoplasmic CheA and CheW proteins is dependent on membrane-bound chemoreceptor. Chemoreceptors are not confined to the cell poles in strains lacking both CheA and CheW. The chemoreceptor-CheW binary complex is polarly localized in the absence of CheA, whereas the chemoreceptor-CheA binary complex is not confined to the cell poles in strains lacking CheW. The subcellular localization of the chemotaxis proteins may reflect a general mechanism by which the bacterial cell sequesters different regions of the cell for specialized functions.

  6. Role of the carotid body chemoreceptors in baroreflex control of blood pressure during hypoglycaemia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberg, Jacqueline K; Taylor, Jennifer L; Dube, Simmi; Basu, Rita; Basu, Ananda; Joyner, Michael J; Wehrwein, Erica A

    2014-04-01

    Activation of the carotid body chemoreceptors with hypoxia alters baroreceptor-mediated responses. We aimed to examine whether this relationship can be translated to other chemoreceptor stimuli (i.e. hypoglycaemia) by testing the following hypotheses: (i) activation of the carotid body chemoreceptors with hypoglycaemia would reduce spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (sCBRS) in healthy humans; and (ii) desensitization of the carotid chemoreceptors with hyperoxia would restore sCBRS to baseline levels during hypoglycaemia. Ten young healthy adults completed two 180 min hyperinsulinaemic [2 mU (kg fat-free mass)(-1) min(-1)], hypoglycaemic (∼ 3.2 μmol ml(-1)) clamps, separated by at least 1 week and randomized to normoxia (arterial partial pressure of O2, 122 ± 10 mmHg) or hyperoxia (arterial partial pressure of O2, 424 ± 123 mmHg; to blunt activation of the carotid body glomus cells). Changes in heart rate, blood pressure, plasma catecholamines, heart rate variability (HRV) and sCBRS were assessed. During hypoglycaemia, HRV and sCBRS were reduced (P 0.05). In summary, hypoglycaemia-mediated changes in HRV and sCBRS cannot be attributed exclusively to the carotid chemoreceptors; however, the chemoreceptors appear to play a role in resetting the baroreflex working range during hypoglycaemia.

  7. Fernando De Castro and the discovery of the arterial chemoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constancio eGonzalez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When De Castro entered the carotid body (CB field, the organ was considered to be a small autonomic ganglion, a gland, a glomus or glomerulus, or a paraganglion. In his 1928 paper, De Castro concluded: In sum, the Glomus caroticum is innervated by centripetal fibers, whose trophic centers are located in the sensory ganglia of the glossopharyngeal, and not by centrifugal [efferent] or secretomotor fibers as is the case for glands; these are precisely the facts which lead to suppose that the Glomus caroticum is a sensory organ. A few pages down, De Castro wrote: The Glomus represents an organ with multiple receptors furnished with specialized receptor cells like those of other sensory organs [taste buds?]…As a plausible hypothesis we propose that the Glomus caroticum represents a sensory organ, at present the only one in its kind, dedicated to capture certain qualitative variations in the composition of blood, a function that, possibly by a reflex mechanism would have an effect on the functional activity of other organs… Therefore, the sensory fiber would not be directly stimulated by blood, but via the intermediation of the epithelial cells of the organ, which, as their structure suggests, possess a secretory function which would participate in the stimulation of the centripetal fibers. In our article we will recreate the experiments that allowed Fernando de Castro to reach this first conclusion. Also, we will scrutinize the natural endowments and the scientific knowledge that drove De Castro to make the triple hypotheses: the CB as chemoreceptor [variations in blood composition], as a secondary sensory receptor which functioning involves a chemical synapse, and as a centre, origin of systemic reflexes. After a brief account of the systemic reflex effects resulting from the CB stimulation, we will complete our article with a general view of the cellular-molecular mechanisms currently thought to be involved in the functioning of this arterial

  8. Enzyme-linked acute oxygen sensing in airway and arterial chemoreceptors--invited article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, J Paul; Peers, C

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have speculated as to the molecular basis of O(2) sensing for decades. In more recent years, since the discovery of ion channels as identified effectors for O(2) sensing pathways, research has focussed on possible pathways coupling a reduction in hypoxia to altered ion channel activity. The most extensively studied systems are the K(+) channels which are inhibited by hypoxia in chemoreceptor tissues (carotid and neuroepithelial bodies). In this review, we consider the evidence supporting the involvement of well defined enzymes in mediating the regulation of K(+) channels by hypoxia. Specifically, we focus on the roles proposed for three enzyme systems; NADPH oxidase, heme oxygenase and AMP activated protein kinase. These systems differ in that the former two utilise O(2) directly (to form superoxide in the case of NADPH oxidase, and as a co-factor in the degradation of heme to carbon monoxide, bilirubin and ferrous iron in the case of heme oxygenase), but the third responds to shifts in the AMP:ATP ratio, so responds to changes in O(2) levels more indirectly. We consider the evidence in favour of each of these systems, and highlight their differential importance in different systems and species. Whilst the evidence for each playing an important role in different tissues is strong, there is a clear need for further study, and current awareness indicates that no one specific cell type may rely on a single mechanism for O(2) sensing. PMID:19536463

  9. Role of Chemoreceptor Activation in Hemodynamic Responses to Electrical Stimulation of the Carotid Sinus in Conscious Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Pedro L; Castania, Jaci A; Dias, Daniel P M; Patel, Kaushik P; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Helio C

    2015-09-01

    Electric carotid baroreflex activation has been used to treat patients with resistant hypertension. It is hypothesized that, in conscious rats, combined activation of carotid baro- and chemoreceptors afferences attenuates the reflex hypotension. Rats were divided into 4 groups: (1) control group, with unilateral denervation of the right carotid chemoreceptors; (2) chemoreceptor denervation group, with bilateral ligation of the carotid body artery; (3) baroreceptor denervation group, with unilateral denervation of the left carotid baroreceptors and right carotid chemoreceptors; and (4) carotid bifurcation denervation group, with denervation of the left carotid baroreceptors and chemoreceptors, plus denervation of the right carotid chemoreceptors. Animals were subjected to 4 rounds of electric stimulation (5 V, 1 ms), with 15, 30, 60, and 90 Hz applied randomly for 20 s. Electric stimulation caused greater hypotensive responses in the chemoreceptor denervation group than in the control group, at 60 Hz (-37 versus -19 mm Hg) and 90 Hz (-33 versus -19 mm Hg). The baroreceptor denervation group showed hypertensive responses at all frequencies of stimulation. In contrast, the carotid sinus denervation group showed no hemodynamic responses. The control group presented no changes in heart rate, whereas the chemoreceptor denervation group and the baroreceptor denervation group showed bradycardic responses. These data demonstrate that carotid chemoreceptor activation attenuates the reflex hypotension caused by combined electric stimulation of the carotid sinus and the carotid sinus nerve in conscious rats. These findings may provide useful insight for clinical studies using baroreflex activation therapy in resistant hypertension and heart failure.

  10. Cladistic analysis of Subfamily Bruchomyiinae (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Rüdiger; Stuckenberg, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Subfamily Bruchomyiinae is comprised of 60 species and has been referred to as the most primitive within the Psychodidae. The assumed sister-group relationship with Phlebotominae is based on ecological constraints of their environment. A cladistics analysis based on 29 characters and 52 species revealed the distinction of an Old World clade characterized by males with elongate, narrow vasa deferentia, and a New World clade with males having shorter and basally widened vasa deferentia. The Old World clade consists of the genera Nemopalpus Macquart (9 species), and Eutonnoiria Alexander (1 species). The New World clade includes Bruchomyia Alexander (10 species), Boreofairchildia genus nov. (13 species), Laurenceomyia genus nov. (5 species), and Notofairchildia genus nov. (15 species). Parsimony and Bayesian analyses resulted in trees that generally support this generic classification; however, with some species groups less resolved. Diagnostic features for genera are provided. In contrast to the other New World genera, Notofairchildia is paraphyletic with the provisional inclusion of at least the Australasian taxa.

  11. Oxygen-sensing by arterial chemoreceptors: Mechanisms and medical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barneo, José; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Fernández-Agüera, M Carmen; Macías, David; Pardal, Ricardo; Gao, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Acute O2 sensing is necessary for the activation of cardiorespiratory reflexes (hyperventilation and sympathetic activation), which permit the survival of individuals under hypoxic environments (e.g. high altitude) or medical conditions presenting with reduced capacity for gas exchange between the lung alveoli and the blood. Changes in blood O2 tension are detected by the arterial chemoreceptors, in particular the carotid body (CB), which act in concert with the adrenal medulla (AM) to facilitate rapid adaptations to hypoxia. The field of arterial chemoreception has undergone a considerable expansion in recent years, with many of the fundamental observations made at the molecular and cellular levels serving to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of numerous medical disorders, and even to propose advances in the treatment strategies. In this review, after a short historical preface, we describe the current model of chemosensory transduction based on the modulation of membrane K(+) channels by O2 in specialized chemoreceptor cells. Recent progress in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation of ion channels by O2 tension, which involves mitochondrial complex I, is also discussed. The discovery in the last few years of a specific population of neural crest-derived stem cells in the CB explains the reversible growth of this organ, an intriguing and unusual property of this type of neuronal tissue that contributes to acclimatization under chronic hypoxia. The essential homeostatic role of the CB-AM axis is clearly evident in newly generated mouse models that reach adulthood, albeit with CB and AM atrophy. These animals exhibit a marked intolerance to even mild hypoxia. CB inhibition or over-activation can have important medical consequences. Respiratory depression by general anesthetics or by opioid use is a common clinical condition that frequently causes death in susceptible individuals. An exaggerated sympathetic outflow due to over

  12. Mechanisms of maladaptive responses of peripheral chemoreceptors to intermittent hypoxia in sleep-disordered breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Man Lung; Tipoe, George Lim; Leung, Po Sing

    2014-02-25

    Peripheral chemoreceptors in the carotid body play important roles in the transduction of chemical stimuli in the arterial blood to the central for eliciting the chemoreflex, which mediates the ventilatory and circulatory responses to hypoxia. The activity of carotid chemoreceptor is modulated and significantly contributes to the ventilatory acclimatization at high altitude. In addition, the carotid chemoreceptor activity is augmented in patients with sleep-disordered breathing, notably in central or obstructive sleep apnea, and also in experimental animals. Thus, the carotid body functions to maintain the oxygen homeostasis, whereas anomalous carotid chemoreceptor activities could be both adaptive and pathogenic in sleep apnea. This review aims to summarize the cellular and molecular mechanisms that could mediate the augmented chemoreceptor activity induced by intermittent hypoxia. Our recent findings suggest a pathogenic role of inflammation mediated by an upregulation of renin-angiotensin system in the carotid body in the over-activity of the chemoreflex. These locally regulated mechanisms are proposed to be a significant part of the hypoxia-mediated maladaptive changes of the carotid body function, which could play a role in the pathophysiology of sleep apnea.

  13. Cardiovascular responses induced by obstructive apnea are enhanced in hypertensive rats due to enhanced chemoreceptor responsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angheben, Juliana M M; Schoorlemmer, Guus H M; Rossi, Marcio V; Silva, Thiago A; Cravo, Sergio L

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), like patients with sleep apnea, have hypertension, increased sympathetic activity, and increased chemoreceptor drive. We investigated the role of carotid chemoreceptors in cardiovascular responses induced by obstructive apnea in awake SHR. A tracheal balloon and vascular cannulas were implanted, and a week later, apneas of 15 s each were induced. The effects of apnea were more pronounced in SHR than in control rats (Wistar Kyoto; WKY). Blood pressure increased by 57±3 mmHg during apnea in SHR and by 28±3 mmHg in WKY (pchemoreceptors were then inactivated by the ligation of the carotid body artery, and apneas were induced two days later. The inactivation of chemoreceptors reduced the responses to apnea and abolished the difference between SHR and controls. The apnea-induced hypertension was 11±4 mmHg in SHR and 8±4 mmHg in WKY. The respiratory effort was 15±2 mmHg in SHR and 15±2 mmHg in WKY. The heart rate fell 63±18 bpm in SHR and 52±14 bpm in WKY. Similarly, when the chemoreceptors were unloaded by the administration of 100% oxygen, the responses to apnea were reduced. In conclusion, arterial chemoreceptors contribute to the responses induced by apnea in both strains, but they are more important in SHR and account for the exaggerated responses of this strain to apnea.

  14. HAMP domain conformers that propagate opposite signals in bacterial chemoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael V Airola

    Full Text Available HAMP domains are signal relay modules in >26,000 receptors of bacteria, eukaryotes, and archaea that mediate processes involved in chemotaxis, pathogenesis, and biofilm formation. We identify two HAMP conformations distinguished by a four- to two-helix packing transition at the C-termini that send opposing signals in bacterial chemoreceptors. Crystal structures of signal-locked mutants establish the observed structure-to-function relationships. Pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy of spin-labeled soluble receptors active in cells verify that the crystallographically defined HAMP conformers are maintained in the receptors and influence the structure and activity of downstream domains accordingly. Mutation of HR2, a key residue for setting the HAMP conformation and generating an inhibitory signal, shifts HAMP structure and receptor output to an activating state. Another HR2 variant displays an inverted response with respect to ligand and demonstrates the fine energetic balance between "on" and "off" conformers. A DExG motif found in membrane proximal HAMP domains is shown to be critical for responses to extracellular ligand. Our findings directly correlate in vivo signaling with HAMP structure, stability, and dynamics to establish a comprehensive model for HAMP-mediated signal relay that consolidates existing views on how conformational signals propagate in receptors. Moreover, we have developed a rational means to manipulate HAMP structure and function that may prove useful in the engineering of bacterial taxis responses.

  15. Distinct signaling of Drosophila chemoreceptors in olfactory sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li-Hui; Jing, Bi-Yang; Yang, Dong; Zeng, Xiankun; Shen, Ying; Tu, Yuhai; Luo, Dong-Gen

    2016-02-16

    In Drosophila, olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) rely primarily on two types of chemoreceptors, odorant receptors (Ors) and ionotropic receptors (Irs), to convert odor stimuli into neural activity. The cellular signaling of these receptors in their native OSNs remains unclear because of the difficulty of obtaining intracellular recordings from Drosophila OSNs. Here, we developed an antennal preparation that enabled the first recordings (to our knowledge) from targeted Drosophila OSNs through a patch-clamp technique. We found that brief odor pulses triggered graded inward receptor currents with distinct response kinetics and current-voltage relationships between Or- and Ir-driven responses. When stimulated with long-step odors, the receptor current of Ir-expressing OSNs did not adapt. In contrast, Or-expressing OSNs showed a strong Ca(2+)-dependent adaptation. The adaptation-induced changes in odor sensitivity obeyed the Weber-Fechner relation; however, surprisingly, the incremental sensitivity was reduced at low odor backgrounds but increased at high odor backgrounds. Our model for odor adaptation revealed two opposing effects of adaptation, desensitization and prevention of saturation, in dynamically adjusting odor sensitivity and extending the sensory operating range.

  16. HAMP domain conformers that propagate opposite signals in bacterial chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airola, Michael V; Sukomon, Nattakan; Samanta, Dipanjan; Borbat, Peter P; Freed, Jack H; Watts, Kylie J; Crane, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    HAMP domains are signal relay modules in >26,000 receptors of bacteria, eukaryotes, and archaea that mediate processes involved in chemotaxis, pathogenesis, and biofilm formation. We identify two HAMP conformations distinguished by a four- to two-helix packing transition at the C-termini that send opposing signals in bacterial chemoreceptors. Crystal structures of signal-locked mutants establish the observed structure-to-function relationships. Pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy of spin-labeled soluble receptors active in cells verify that the crystallographically defined HAMP conformers are maintained in the receptors and influence the structure and activity of downstream domains accordingly. Mutation of HR2, a key residue for setting the HAMP conformation and generating an inhibitory signal, shifts HAMP structure and receptor output to an activating state. Another HR2 variant displays an inverted response with respect to ligand and demonstrates the fine energetic balance between "on" and "off" conformers. A DExG motif found in membrane proximal HAMP domains is shown to be critical for responses to extracellular ligand. Our findings directly correlate in vivo signaling with HAMP structure, stability, and dynamics to establish a comprehensive model for HAMP-mediated signal relay that consolidates existing views on how conformational signals propagate in receptors. Moreover, we have developed a rational means to manipulate HAMP structure and function that may prove useful in the engineering of bacterial taxis responses.

  17. Directional sensing by cooperative chemoreceptor arrays modeled as Monod-Wyman-Changeux clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin

    2013-03-01

    Most sensory cells use transmembrane chemoreceptors to detect chemical signals in the environment. The biochemical properties and spatial organization of chemoreceptors play important roles in achieving and maintaining sensitivity and accuracy of chemical sensing. Here we investigate the effects of receptor cooperativity and adaptation on the physical limits for sensing a chemical gradient. We study a single cell with aggregated chemoreceptor arrays on the cell surface and derive a general formula to the limits for gradient sensing from the uncertainty of instantaneous receptor activity. In comparison to independent receptors, we find that cooperativity by nonadaptive receptors could significantly lower the sensing limits in a chemical concentration range determined by the biochemical properties of ligand-receptor binding and ligand-induced receptor activity. Cooperativity by adaptive receptors is beneficial to gradient sensing within a broad range of background concentrations. Our results also show that the isotropic receptor aggregate layout on the cell surface represents an optimal configuration for gradient sensing.

  18. Cardiovascular responses induced by obstructive apnea are enhanced in hypertensive rats due to enhanced chemoreceptor responsivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana M M Angheben

    Full Text Available Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, like patients with sleep apnea, have hypertension, increased sympathetic activity, and increased chemoreceptor drive. We investigated the role of carotid chemoreceptors in cardiovascular responses induced by obstructive apnea in awake SHR. A tracheal balloon and vascular cannulas were implanted, and a week later, apneas of 15 s each were induced. The effects of apnea were more pronounced in SHR than in control rats (Wistar Kyoto; WKY. Blood pressure increased by 57±3 mmHg during apnea in SHR and by 28±3 mmHg in WKY (p<0.05, n = 14/13. The respiratory effort increased by 53±6 mmHg in SHR and by 34±5 mmHg in WKY. The heart rate fell by 209±19 bpm in SHR and by 155±16 bpm in WKY. The carotid chemoreceptors were then inactivated by the ligation of the carotid body artery, and apneas were induced two days later. The inactivation of chemoreceptors reduced the responses to apnea and abolished the difference between SHR and controls. The apnea-induced hypertension was 11±4 mmHg in SHR and 8±4 mmHg in WKY. The respiratory effort was 15±2 mmHg in SHR and 15±2 mmHg in WKY. The heart rate fell 63±18 bpm in SHR and 52±14 bpm in WKY. Similarly, when the chemoreceptors were unloaded by the administration of 100% oxygen, the responses to apnea were reduced. In conclusion, arterial chemoreceptors contribute to the responses induced by apnea in both strains, but they are more important in SHR and account for the exaggerated responses of this strain to apnea.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide activates the carotid body chemoreceptors in cat, rabbit and rat ex vivo preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yingfu; Li, Qian; Sun, Biying; Zhang, Guohua; Rong, Weifang

    2015-03-01

    We and others previously reported experimental evidence suggesting an important role for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in oxygen sensing in murine carotid body chemoreceptors. More recent data implicated abnormal H2S-mediated chemoreceptor signaling in pathological conditions such as chronic heart failure and hypertension. However, the idea of H2S as a mediator of oxygen-sensing in chemoreceptors has been challenged. In particular, it was shown that exogenous H2S inhibited the release of neurotransmitters (ACh and ATP) from the cat carotid body, raising the possibility that there exists significant species difference in H2S-mediated signaling in chemoreceptors. This study was designed specifically to determine the effect of H2S on chemoreceptors in different species. We conducted multiunit extracellular recordings of the sinus nerve in the ex vivo carotid body preparation taken from the rat, the cat and the rabbit. As observed in the mouse carotid body, H2S donors (NaHS or Na2S) evoked qualitatively similar excitatory responses of the afferent sinus nerves of the species studied here. The excitatory effects of the H2S donors were concentration-dependent and reversible. The sinus nerve responses to H2S donors were prevented by blockade of the transmission between type I cells and the afferent terminals, as was the response to hypoxia. These results demonstrate that exogenous H2S exerts qualitatively similar excitatory effects on chemoreceptor afferents of different species. The role of endogenous H2S-mediated signaling in carotid body function in different species awaits further investigation.

  20. Hypoxia silences retrotrapezoid nucleus respiratory chemoreceptors via alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basting, Tyler M; Burke, Peter G R; Kanbar, Roy; Viar, Kenneth E; Stornetta, Daniel S; Stornetta, Ruth L; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2015-01-14

    In conscious mammals, hypoxia or hypercapnia stimulates breathing while theoretically exerting opposite effects on central respiratory chemoreceptors (CRCs). We tested this theory by examining how hypoxia and hypercapnia change the activity of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a putative CRC and chemoreflex integrator. Archaerhodopsin-(Arch)-transduced RTN neurons were reversibly silenced by light in anesthetized rats. We bilaterally transduced RTN and nearby C1 neurons with Arch (PRSx8-ArchT-EYFP-LVV) and measured the cardiorespiratory consequences of Arch activation (10 s) in conscious rats during normoxia, hypoxia, or hyperoxia. RTN photoinhibition reduced breathing equally during non-REM sleep and quiet wake. Compared with normoxia, the breathing frequency reduction (Δf(R)) was larger in hyperoxia (65% FiO2), smaller in 15% FiO2, and absent in 12% FiO2. Tidal volume changes (ΔV(T)) followed the same trend. The effect of hypoxia on Δf(R) was not arousal-dependent but was reversed by reacidifying the blood (acetazolamide; 3% FiCO2). Δf(R) was highly correlated with arterial pH up to arterial pH (pHa) 7.5 with no frequency inhibition occurring above pHa 7.53. Blood pressure was minimally reduced suggesting that C1 neurons were very modestly inhibited. In conclusion, RTN neurons regulate eupneic breathing about equally during both sleep and wake. RTN neurons are the first putative CRCs demonstrably silenced by hypocapnic hypoxia in conscious mammals. RTN neurons are silent above pHa 7.5 and increasingly active below this value. During hyperoxia, RTN activation maintains breathing despite the inactivity of the carotid bodies. Finally, during hypocapnic hypoxia, carotid body stimulation increases breathing frequency via pathways that bypass RTN.

  1. Oxygen sensitivity of mitochondrial function in rat arterial chemoreceptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckler, Keith J; Turner, Philip J

    2013-07-15

    The mechanism of oxygen sensing in arterial chemoreceptors is unknown but has often been linked to mitochondrial function. A common criticism of this hypothesis is that mitochondrial function is insensitive to physiological levels of hypoxia. Here we investigate the effects of hypoxia (down to 0.5% O2) on mitochondrial function in neonatal rat type-1 cells. The oxygen sensitivity of mitochondrial [NADH] was assessed by monitoring autofluorescence and increased in hypoxia with a P50 of 15 mm Hg (1 mm Hg = 133.3 Pa) in normal Tyrode or 46 mm Hg in Ca(2+)-free Tyrode. Hypoxia also depolarised mitochondrial membrane potential (m, measured using rhodamine 123) with a P50 of 3.1, 3.3 and 2.8 mm Hg in normal Tyrode, Ca(2+)-free Tyrode and Tyrode containing the Ca(2+) channel antagonist Ni(2+), respectively. In the presence of oligomycin and low carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP; 75 nm) m is maintained by electron transport working against an artificial proton leak. Under these conditions hypoxia depolarised m/inhibited electron transport with a P50 of 5.4 mm Hg. The effects of hypoxia upon cytochrome oxidase activity were investigated using rotenone, myxothiazol, antimycin A, oligomycin, ascorbate and the electron donor tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine. Under these conditions m is maintained by complex IV activity alone. Hypoxia inhibited cytochrome oxidase activity (depolarised m) with a P50 of 2.6 mm Hg. In contrast hypoxia had little or no effect upon NADH (P50 = 0.3 mm Hg), electron transport or cytochrome oxidase activity in sympathetic neurons. In summary, type-1 cell mitochondria display extraordinary oxygen sensitivity commensurate with a role in oxygen sensing. The reasons for this highly unusual behaviour are as yet unexplained.

  2. Role of central and peripheral chemoreceptors in vasopressin secretion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovino, Michele; Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Giagulli, Vito Angelo; Fiore, Giorgio; Licchelli, Brunella; Iovino, Emanuela; Triggiani, Vincenzo

    2013-09-01

    In this review, we analyzed the role played by central and peripheral chemoreceptors (CHRs) in vasopressin (AVP) secretion control. Central neural pathways subserving osmotic and non-osmotic control of AVP secretion are strictly correlated to brain areas participating in chemoreception mechanisms. Among the different brain areas involved in central chemoreception, the most important site has been localized in the retrotrapezoid nucleus of the rostral ventrolateral medulla. These central CHRs are able to detect very small pH/CO2 fluctuations, participating in brain blood flow regulation, acid-base balance and blood pressure control. Decreases in arterial pH and increases in arterial pCO2 stimulate AVP release by the Supraoptic and Paraventricular Nuclei. Carotid CHRs transduce low arterial O2 tension into increased action potential activity, leading to bradycardia and coronary vasodilatation via vagal stimulation, and systemic vasoconstriction via catecholaminergic stimulation. Stimulation of carotid CHRs by hypoxia increases neurohypophyseal blood flow and AVP release, an effect inhibited by CHRs denervation. Two renal CHRs have been identified: Type R1 CHRs do not have a resting discharge but are activated by renal ischemia and hypotension; Type R2 CHRs have a resting discharge and respond to backflow of urine into the renal pelvis. Signals arising from renal CHRs modulate the activity of hypothalamic AVPergic neurons: activation of R1 and R2 CHRs, following increased intrapelvic pressure with solutions of mannitol, NaCl and KCl, produces a significant increase of AVP secretion and the same effect has been obtained by the intrarenal infusion of bradykinin, which excites afferent renal nerves, as well as by the electrical stimulation of these nerves.

  3. Effects of low glucose on carotid body chemoreceptor cell activity studied in cultures of intact organs and in dissociated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Martin, Teresa; Fernandez-Martinez, Silvia; Rigual, Ricardo; Obeso, Ana; Gonzalez, Constancio

    2012-04-15

    The participation of the carotid body (CB) in glucose homeostasis and evidence obtained in simplified cultured CB slices or dissociated cells have led to the proposal that CB chemoreceptor cells are glucoreceptors. However, data generated in intact, freshly excised organs deny CB chemoreceptor cells' glucosensing properties. The physiological significance of the contention has prompted the present study, performed in a newly developed preparation of the intact CB organ in culture that maintains chemoreceptor cells' microenvironment. Chemoreceptor cells of intact CBs in culture retained their capacity to store, synthesize, and secrete catecholamine in response to hypoxia for at least 6 days. Aglycemia did not elicit neurosecretion in dissociated chemoreceptor cells or in intact CB in culture, but potentiated hypoxia-elicited neurosecretion, exclusively, in 1-day-old intact CB cultures and dissociated chemoreceptor cells cultured for 24 h. In fura 2-loaded cells, aglycemia (but not 1 mM) caused a slow Ca(2+)-dependent and nifedipine-insensitive increase in fluorescence at 340- to 380-nm wavelength emission ratio and augmented the fluorescent signal elicited by hypoxia. Association of nifedipine and KBR7943 (a Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger inhibitor) completely abolished the aglycemic Ca(2+) response. We conclude that chemoreceptor cells are not sensitive to hypoglycemia. We hypothesize that cultured chemoreceptor cells become transiently more dependent on glycolysis. Consequently, aglycemia would partially inhibit the Na(+)/K(+) pump, causing an increase in intracellular Na(+) concentration, and a reversal of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. This would slowly increase intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and cause the potentiation of the hypoxic responses. We discuss the nature of the signals detected by chemoreceptor cells for the CB to achieve its glycemic homeostatic role.

  4. Organization and evolution of two SIDER retroposon subfamilies and their impact on the Leishmania genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bringaud Frédéric

    2009-05-01

    major differences. The SIDER1 subfamily is more heterogeneous and shows an evolutionary link with vestigial DIRE retroposons as previously observed for the ingi/RIME and L1Tc/NARTc couples identified in the T. brucei and T. cruzi genomes, whereas no identified DIREs are related to SIDER2 sequences. Although SIDER1s and SIDER2s display equivalent genomic distribution globally, the varying degrees of sequence conservation, preferential genomic disposition, and differential association to orthologous genes allude to an intricate web of SIDER assimilation in these parasitic organisms.

  5. Minimal subfamilies and the probabilistic interpretation for modulus on graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Albin, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    The notion of $p$-modulus of a family of objects on a graph is a measure of the richness of such families. We develop the notion of minimal subfamilies using the method of Lagrangian duality for $p$-modulus. We show that minimal subfamilies have at most $|E|$ elements and that these elements carry a weight related to their "importance" in relation to the corresponding $p$-modulus problem. When $p=2$, this measure of importance is in fact a probability measure and modulus can be thought as trying to minimize the expected overlap in the family.

  6. Tonic activity of carotid body chemoreceptors contributes to the increased sympathetic drive in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siński, Maciej; Lewandowski, Jacek; Przybylski, Jacek; Bidiuk, Joanna; Abramczyk, Piotr; Ciarka, Agnieszka; Gaciong, Zbigniew

    2012-05-01

    Carotid chemoreceptors provoke an increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activation (MSNA) in response to hypoxia; they are also tonically active during normoxic breathing. The contribution of peripheral chemoreceptors to sympathetic activation in hypertension is incompletely understood. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of chemoreceptor deactivation on sympathetic activity in untreated patients with hypertension. A total of 12 untreated hypertensive males and 11 male controls participated in this randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled study. MSNA, systolic blood pressure(BP), diastolic BP, heart rate (HR), electrocardiogram, hemoglobin oxygen saturation (Sat%) and respiratory movements were measured during repeated 10-min periods of respiration with 100% oxygen or 21% oxygen in a blinded fashion. Compared with controls, hypertensives had higher resting MSNA (38 ± 10 vs. 29 ± 0.9 burst per min, Pchemoreceptor deactivation with hyperoxia. HR decreased and Sat% increased in both the study groups. These results confirm the role of tonic chemoreceptor drive in the development of sympathetic overactivity in hypertension.

  7. Chemoreceptors of Escherichia coli CFT073 play redundant roles in chemotaxis toward urine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Raterman

    Full Text Available Community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs are commonly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC. We hypothesize that chemotaxis toward ligands present in urine could direct UPEC into and up the urinary tract. Wild-type E. coli CFT073 and chemoreceptor mutants with tsr, tar, or aer deletions were tested for chemotaxis toward human urine in the capillary tube assay. Wild-type CFT073 was attracted toward urine, and Tsr and Tar were the chemoreceptors mainly responsible for mediating this response. The individual components of urine including L-amino acids, D-amino acids and various organic compounds were also tested in the capillary assay with wild-type CFT073. Our results indicate that CFT073 is attracted toward some L- amino acids and possibly toward some D-amino acids but not other common compounds found in urine such as urea, creatinine and glucuronic acid. In the murine model of UTI, the loss of any two chemoreceptors did not affect the ability of the bacteria to compete with the wild-type strain. Our data suggest that the presence of any strong attractant and its associated chemoreceptor might be sufficient for colonization of the urinary tract and that amino acids are the main chemoattractants for E. coli strain CFT073 in this niche.

  8. Role of Dickeya dadantii 3937 chemoreceptors in the entry to Arabidopsis leaves through wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Río-Álvarez, Isabel; Muñoz-Gómez, Cristina; Navas-Vásquez, Mariela; Martínez-García, Pedro M; Antúnez-Lamas, María; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; López-Solanilla, Emilia

    2015-09-01

    Chemotaxis enables bacteria to move towards an optimal environment in response to chemical signals. In the case of plant-pathogenic bacteria, chemotaxis allows pathogens to explore the plant surface for potential entry sites with the ultimate aim to prosper inside plant tissues and to cause disease. Chemoreceptors, which constitute the sensory core of the chemotaxis system, are usually transmembrane proteins which change their conformation when sensing chemicals in the periplasm and transduce the signal through a kinase pathway to the flagellar motor. In the particular case of the soft-rot pathogen Dickeya dadantii 3937, jasmonic acid released in a plant wound has been found to be a strong chemoattractant which drives pathogen entry into the plant apoplast. In order to identify candidate chemoreceptors sensing wound-derived plant compounds, we carried out a bioinformatics search of candidate chemoreceptors in the genome of Dickeya dadantii 3937. The study of the chemotactic response to several compounds and the analysis of the entry process to Arabidopsis leaves of 10 selected mutants in chemoreceptors allowed us to determine the implications of at least two of them (ABF-0020167 and ABF-0046680) in the chemotaxis-driven entry process through plant wounds. Our data suggest that ABF-0020167 and ABF-0046680 may be candidate receptors of jasmonic acid and xylose, respectively.

  9. Positive selection in extra cellular domains in the diversification of Strigamia maritima chemoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca C Almeida

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent publication of a centipede (Strigamia maritima genome has revealed that most members of the chemosensory gene families of ionotropic (IR and gustatory (GR receptors do not have identifiable orthologs in insect species. In other words, the diversity of these chemoreceptors in centipedes appears to have evolved after its split from other arthropod lineages. Here we investigate the role of adaptive evolution in S. maritima chemoreceptor diversification using an approach that allows us to discuss functional aspects of such diversification. We applied codon substitution models in a phylogenetic framework to obtain the distribution of selective constraints across the different domains in the IR and GR proteins, and to assess the impact of positive selection in the evolution of these chemoreceptors. We found low selective constraints in most IR and GR duplicates and significant evidence for the presence of positively selected amino acids in 2 of the 4 IR, and in 6 of the GR recent specific expansions. Mapping the sites with high posterior probability of positive selection in protein structure revealed a remarkable uneven distribution of fast-evolving sites across protein domains. Most of these sites are located in extracellular fragments of these receptors, which likely participate in ligand recognition. We hypothesize that adaptive evolution in ligand-binding domains was a major force driving the functional diversification of centipede chemoreceptors.

  10. Structure of bacterial cytoplasmic chemoreceptor arrays and implications for chemotactic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briegel, Ariane; Ladinsky, Mark S; Oikonomou, Catherine; Jones, Christopher W; Harris, Michael J; Fowler, Daniel J; Chang, Yi-Wei; Thompson, Lynmarie K; Armitage, Judith P; Jensen, Grant J

    2014-01-01

    Most motile bacteria sense and respond to their environment through a transmembrane chemoreceptor array whose structure and function have been well-studied, but many species also contain an additional cluster of chemoreceptors in their cytoplasm. Although the cytoplasmic cluster is essential for normal chemotaxis in some organisms, its structure and function remain unknown. Here we use electron cryotomography to image the cytoplasmic chemoreceptor cluster in Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Vibrio cholerae. We show that just like transmembrane arrays, cytoplasmic clusters contain trimers-of-receptor-dimers organized in 12-nm hexagonal arrays. In contrast to transmembrane arrays, however, cytoplasmic clusters comprise two CheA/CheW baseplates sandwiching two opposed receptor arrays. We further show that cytoplasmic fragments of normally transmembrane E. coli chemoreceptors form similar sandwiched structures in the presence of molecular crowding agents. Together these results suggest that the 12-nm hexagonal architecture is fundamentally important and that sandwiching and crowding can replace the stabilizing effect of the membrane. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02151.001.

  11. RNA-Seq Analysis of Human Trigeminal and Dorsal Root Ganglia with a Focus on Chemoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Flegel

    Full Text Available The chemosensory capacity of the somatosensory system relies on the appropriate expression of chemoreceptors, which detect chemical stimuli and transduce sensory information into cellular signals. Knowledge of the complete repertoire of the chemoreceptors expressed in human sensory ganglia is lacking. This study employed the next-generation sequencing technique (RNA-Seq to conduct the first expression analysis of human trigeminal ganglia (TG and dorsal root ganglia (DRG. We analyzed the data with a focus on G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs and ion channels, which are (potentially involved in chemosensation by somatosensory neurons in the human TG and DRG. For years, transient receptor potential (TRP channels have been considered the main group of receptors for chemosensation in the trigeminal system. Interestingly, we could show that sensory ganglia also express a panel of different olfactory receptors (ORs with putative chemosensory function. To characterize OR expression in more detail, we performed microarray, semi-quantitative RT-PCR experiments, and immunohistochemical staining. Additionally, we analyzed the expression data to identify further known or putative classes of chemoreceptors in the human TG and DRG. Our results give an overview of the major classes of chemoreceptors expressed in the human TG and DRG and provide the basis for a broader understanding of the reception of chemical cues.

  12. Oesophageal chemoreceptors of blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, sense chemical deterrents and can block ingestion of food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggio, Juan F; Tieu, Ryan; Wei, Amy; Derby, Charles D

    2012-05-15

    Decapod crustaceans such as blue crabs possess a variety of chemoreceptors that control different stages of the feeding process. All these chemoreceptors are putative targets for feeding deterrents that cause animals to avoid or reject otherwise palatable food. As a first step towards characterizing the chemoreceptors that mediate the effect of deterrents, we used a behavioral approach to investigate their precise location. Data presented here demonstrate that chemoreceptors located on the antennules, pereiopods and mouthparts do not mediate the food-rejection effects of a variety of deterrents, both natural and artificial to crabs. Crabs always searched for deterrent-laced food and took it to their oral region. The deterrent effect was manifested as either rejection or extensive manipulation, but in both cases crabs bit the food. The biting behavior is relevant because the introduction of food into the oral cavity ensured that the deterrents gained access to the oesophageal taste receptors, and so we conclude that they are the ones mediating rejection. Additional support comes from the fact that a variety of deterrent compounds evoked oesophageal dilatation, which is mediated by oesophageal receptors and has been linked to food rejection. Further, there is a positive correlation between a compound's ability to elicit rejection and its ability to evoke oesophageal dilatation. The fact that deterrents do not act at a distance is in accordance with the limited solubility of most known feeding deterrents, and likely influences predator-prey interactions and their outcome: prey organisms will be attacked and bitten before deterrents become relevant.

  13. Chemoreceptors of Escherichia coli CFT073 play redundant roles in chemotaxis toward urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raterman, Erica L; Welch, Rodney A

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs) are commonly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). We hypothesize that chemotaxis toward ligands present in urine could direct UPEC into and up the urinary tract. Wild-type E. coli CFT073 and chemoreceptor mutants with tsr, tar, or aer deletions were tested for chemotaxis toward human urine in the capillary tube assay. Wild-type CFT073 was attracted toward urine, and Tsr and Tar were the chemoreceptors mainly responsible for mediating this response. The individual components of urine including L-amino acids, D-amino acids and various organic compounds were also tested in the capillary assay with wild-type CFT073. Our results indicate that CFT073 is attracted toward some L- amino acids and possibly toward some D-amino acids but not other common compounds found in urine such as urea, creatinine and glucuronic acid. In the murine model of UTI, the loss of any two chemoreceptors did not affect the ability of the bacteria to compete with the wild-type strain. Our data suggest that the presence of any strong attractant and its associated chemoreceptor might be sufficient for colonization of the urinary tract and that amino acids are the main chemoattractants for E. coli strain CFT073 in this niche.

  14. Both piston-like and rotational motions are present in bacterial chemoreceptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Daqi; Ma, Xiaomin; Tu, Yuhai; Lai, Luhua

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis signaling is triggered by binding of chemo-effectors to the membrane-bound chemoreceptor dimers. Though much is known about the structure of the chemoreceptors, details of the receptor dynamics and their effects on signaling are still unclear. Here, by using molecular dynamics simulations and principle component analysis, we study the dynamics of the periplasmic domain of aspartate chemoreceptor Tar dimer and its conformational changes when binding to different ligands (attractant, antagonist, and two attractant molecules). We found two dominant components (modes) in the receptor dynamics: a relative rotation of the two Tar monomers and a piston-like up-and-down sliding movement of the α4 helix. These two modes are highly correlated. Binding of one attractant molecule to the Tar dimer induced both significant piston-like downward movements of the α4 helix and strong relative rotations of the two Tar monomers, while binding of an antagonist or the symmetric binding of two attractant molecules to a Tar dimer suppresses both modes. The anti-symmetric effects of the relative rotation mode also explained the negative cooperativity between the two binding pockets. Our results suggest a mechanism of coupled rotation and piston-like motion for bacterial chemoreceptor signaling.

  15. Is central chemoreceptor sensitive to intracellular rather than extracellular pH?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A

    1990-01-01

    , however, that the elegant studies by Loeschcke & Ahmad have demonstrated that [pH]e and [pH]i are normally tightly and rapidly coupled (Loeschcke & Ahmad, 1980). For this reason, the stimulus might just as well be the intracellular hydrogen ion concentration in the chemoreceptor area. The administration...

  16. RNA-Seq Analysis of Human Trigeminal and Dorsal Root Ganglia with a Focus on Chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Caroline; Schöbel, Nicole; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Tannapfel, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    The chemosensory capacity of the somatosensory system relies on the appropriate expression of chemoreceptors, which detect chemical stimuli and transduce sensory information into cellular signals. Knowledge of the complete repertoire of the chemoreceptors expressed in human sensory ganglia is lacking. This study employed the next-generation sequencing technique (RNA-Seq) to conduct the first expression analysis of human trigeminal ganglia (TG) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We analyzed the data with a focus on G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and ion channels, which are (potentially) involved in chemosensation by somatosensory neurons in the human TG and DRG. For years, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been considered the main group of receptors for chemosensation in the trigeminal system. Interestingly, we could show that sensory ganglia also express a panel of different olfactory receptors (ORs) with putative chemosensory function. To characterize OR expression in more detail, we performed microarray, semi-quantitative RT-PCR experiments, and immunohistochemical staining. Additionally, we analyzed the expression data to identify further known or putative classes of chemoreceptors in the human TG and DRG. Our results give an overview of the major classes of chemoreceptors expressed in the human TG and DRG and provide the basis for a broader understanding of the reception of chemical cues. PMID:26070209

  17. Control of postnatal apoptosis in the neocortex by RhoA-subfamily GTPases determines neuronal density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanno, Hitomi; Shen, Xiao; Kuru, Nilgün; Bormuth, Ingo; Bobsin, Kristin; Gardner, Humphrey A R; Komljenovic, Dorde; Tarabykin, Victor; Erzurumlu, Reha S; Tucker, Kerry L

    2010-03-24

    Apoptosis of neurons in the maturing neocortex has been recorded in a wide variety of mammals, but very little is known about its effects on cortical differentiation. Recent research has implicated the RhoA GTPase subfamily in the control of apoptosis in the developing nervous system and in other tissue types. Rho GTPases are important components of the signaling pathways linking extracellular signals to the cytoskeleton. To investigate the role of the RhoA GTPase subfamily in neocortical apoptosis and differentiation, we have engineered a mouse line in which a dominant-negative RhoA mutant (N19-RhoA) is expressed from the Mapt locus, such that all neurons of the developing nervous system are expressing the N19-RhoA inhibitor. Postnatal expression of N19-RhoA led to no major changes in neocortical anatomy. Six layers of the neocortex developed and barrels (whisker-related neural modules) formed in layer IV. However, the density and absolute number of neurons in the somatosensory cortex increased by 12-26% compared with wild-type littermates. This was not explained by a change in the migration of neurons during the formation of cortical layers but rather by a large decrease in the amount of neuronal apoptosis at postnatal day 5, the developmental maximum of cortical apoptosis. In addition, overexpression of RhoA in cortical neurons was seen to cause high levels of apoptosis. These results demonstrate that RhoA-subfamily members play a major role in developmental apoptosis in postnatal neocortex of the mouse but that decreased apoptosis does not alter cortical cytoarchitecture and patterning. PMID:20335457

  18. Plasticity of central chemoreceptors: effect of bilateral carotid body resection on central CO2 sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Dahan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human breathing is regulated by feedback and feed-forward control mechanisms, allowing a strict matching between metabolic needs and the uptake of oxygen in the lungs. The most important control mechanism, the metabolic ventilatory control system, is fine-tuned by two sets of chemoreceptors, the peripheral chemoreceptors in the carotid bodies (located in the bifurcation of the common carotid arteries and the central CO2 chemoreceptors in the ventral medulla. Animal data indicate that resection of the carotid bodies results, apart from the loss of the peripheral chemoreceptors, in reduced activity of the central CO2 sensors. We assessed the acute and chronic effect of carotid body resection in three humans who underwent bilateral carotid body resection (bCBR after developing carotid body tumors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The three patients (two men, one woman were suffering from a hereditary form of carotid body tumors. They were studied prior to surgery and at regular intervals for 2-4 y following bCBR. We obtained inspired minute ventilation (Vi responses to hypoxia and CO2. The Vi-CO2 responses were separated into a peripheral (fast response and a central (slow response with a two-compartment model of the ventilatory control system. Following surgery the ventilatory CO2 sensitivity of the peripheral chemoreceptors and the hypoxic responses were not different from zero or below 10% of preoperative values. The ventilatory CO2 sensitivity of the central chemoreceptors decreased by about 75% after surgery, with peak reduction occurring between 3 and 6 mo postoperatively. This was followed by a slow return to values close to preoperative values within 2 y. During this slow return, the Vi-CO2 response shifted slowly to the right by about 8 mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: The reduction in central Vi-CO2 sensitivity after the loss of the carotid bodies suggests that the carotid bodies exert a tonic drive or tonic facilitation on the output of the central

  19. Central chemoreceptor modulation of breathing via multipath tuning in medullary ventrolateral respiratory column circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Mackenzie M; Nuding, Sarah C; Segers, Lauren S; O'Connor, Russell; Morris, Kendall F; Lindsey, Bruce G

    2012-01-01

    Ventrolateral respiratory column (VRC) circuits that modulate breathing in response to changes in central chemoreceptor drive are incompletely understood. We employed multielectrode arrays and spike train correlation methods to test predictions of the hypothesis that pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC) and retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial (RTN-pF) circuits cooperate in chemoreceptor-evoked tuning of ventral respiratory group (VRG) inspiratory neurons. Central chemoreceptors were selectively stimulated by injections of CO(2)-saturated saline into the vertebral artery in seven decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly blocked, and artificially ventilated cats. Among sampled neurons in the Bötzinger complex (BötC)-to-VRG region, 70% (161 of 231) had a significant change in firing rate after chemoreceptor stimulation, as did 70% (101 of 144) of the RTN-pF neurons. Other responsive neurons (24 BötC-VRG; 11 RTN-pF) had a change in the depth of respiratory modulation without a significant change in average firing rate. Seventy BötC-VRG chemoresponsive neurons triggered 189 offset-feature correlograms (96 peaks; 93 troughs) with at least one responsive BötC-VRG cell. Functional input from at least one RTN-pF cell could be inferred for 45 BötC-VRG neurons (19%). Eleven RTN-pF cells were correlated with more than one BötC-VRG target neuron, providing evidence for divergent connectivity. Thirty-seven RTN-pF neurons, 24 of which were chemoresponsive, were correlated with at least one chemoresponsive BötC-VRG neuron. Correlation linkage maps and spike-triggered averages of phrenic nerve signals suggest transmission of chemoreceptor drive via a multipath network architecture: RTN-pF modulation of pre-BötC-VRG rostral-to-caudal excitatory inspiratory neuron chains is tuned by feedforward and recurrent inhibition from other inspiratory neurons and from "tonic" expiratory neurons.

  20. Peripheral chemoreceptor control of cardiovascular function at rest and during exercise in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgell, Heather; McMurtry, M Sean; Haykowsky, Mark J; Paterson, Ian; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Dyck, Jason R B; Stickland, Michael K

    2015-04-01

    Peripheral chemoreceptor activity/sensitivity is enhanced in chronic heart failure (HF), and sensitivity is linked to greater mortality. This study aimed to determine the role of the peripheral chemoreceptor in cardiovascular control at rest and during exercise in HF patients and controls. Clinically stable HF patients (n = 11; ejection fraction: 39 ± 5%) and risk-matched controls (n = 10; ejection fraction: 65 ± 2%) performed randomized trials with or without dopamine infusion (2 μg·min(-1)·kg(-1)) at rest and during 40% maximal voluntary contraction handgrip (HG) exercise, and a resting trial of 2 min of inspired 100% oxygen. Both dopamine and hyperoxia were used to inhibit the peripheral chemoreceptor. At rest in HF patients, dopamine decreased ventilation (P = 0.02), decreased total peripheral resistance index (P = 0.003), and increased cardiac and stroke indexes (P ≤ 0.01), yet there was no effect of dopamine on these variables in controls (P ≥ 0.7). Hyperoxia lowered ventilation in HF (P = 0.01), but not in controls (P = 0.9), indicating suppression of the peripheral chemoreceptors in HF. However, no decrease of total peripheral resistance index was observed in HF. As expected, HG increased heart rate, ventilation, and brachial conductance of the nonexercising arm in controls and HF patients. During dopamine infusion, there were no changes in mean arterial pressure, heart rate, or ventilation responses to HG in either group (P ≥ 0.26); however, brachial conductance increased with dopamine in the control group (P = 0.004), but decreased in HF (P = 0.02). Our findings indicate that the peripheral chemoreceptor contributes to cardiovascular control at rest in HF patients and during exercise in risk-matched controls.

  1. TASK channels in arterial chemoreceptors and their role in oxygen and acid sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckler, Keith J

    2015-05-01

    Arterial chemoreceptors play a vital role in cardiorespiratory control by providing the brain with information regarding blood oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH. The main chemoreceptor, the carotid body, is composed of sensory (type 1) cells which respond to hypoxia or acidosis with a depolarising receptor potential which in turn activates voltage-gated calcium entry, neurosecretion and excitation of adjacent afferent nerves. The receptor potential is generated by inhibition of Twik-related acid-sensitive K(+) channel 1 and 3 (TASK1/TASK3) heterodimeric channels which normally maintain the cells' resting membrane potential. These channels are thought to be directly inhibited by acidosis. Oxygen sensitivity, however, probably derives from a metabolic signalling pathway. The carotid body, isolated type 1 cells, and all forms of TASK channel found in the type 1 cell, are highly sensitive to inhibitors of mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, type1 cell TASK channels are activated by millimolar levels of MgATP. In addition to their role in the transduction of chemostimuli, type 1 cell TASK channels have also been implicated in the modulation of chemoreceptor function by a number of neurocrine/paracrine signalling molecules including adenosine, GABA, and serotonin. They may also be instrumental in mediating the depression of the acute hypoxic ventilatory response that occurs with some general anaesthetics. Modulation of TASK channel activity is therefore a key mechanism by which the excitability of chemoreceptors can be controlled. This is not only of physiological importance but may also offer a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiorespiratory disorders that are associated with chemoreceptor dysfunction.

  2. Vaillantellinae, A New Subfamily Of Cobitidae (Pisces, Cypriniformes)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalbant, T.T.; Banarescu, P.M.

    1977-01-01

    INTRODUCTION It is generally accepted that the Eurasian freshwater fish family Cobitidae includes three main divisions, usually considered as subfamilies: Cobitinae, Botiinae and Noemacheilinae (Berg, 1940; Ramaswami, 1953; Nalbant, 1963). The two first named, in which the lateral ethmoids are movab

  3. First molecular phylogeny of the subfamily Polycerinae (Mollusca, Nudibranchia, Polyceridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomar, Gemma; Pola, Marta; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2014-03-01

    The subfamily Polycerinae includes four genera with around 46 species described to date. This subfamily is characterized by a limaciform body, which may have simple tentacular processes on the margin of the oral veil. Phylogenetic relationships between the genera of the subfamily Polycerinae (Polyceridae) have not yet been studied, and therefore, the only available information is based on morphological descriptions. The present study reports the first phylogenetic analysis of Polycerinae based on the mitochondrial genes cytochrome oxidase subunit I and the large ribosomal subunit (16S rRNA) using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. Our results showed that Polycerinae is monophyletic, but the relationships within the subfamily as well as within Polycera remain unresolved. A key finding of this study is that there are clearly two sympatric species of Polycera present in South Africa: Polycera capensis Quoy and Gaimard, 1824 also found in Australia and an undescribed Polycera sp. On the other hand, the studied specimens of the genus Gymnodoris were clustered within Polycerinae, reopening the problem of the systematic position of this genus. Additional genes and species of Polycerinae and Gymnodoris would provide more information and probably fully resolve this situation.

  4. Review of the subfamily Aganainae (Lepidoptera, Erebidae) from Cambodia

    OpenAIRE

    Ulziijargal Bayarsaikhan; Sol-Moon Na; Yang-Seop Bae

    2016-01-01

    The subfamily Aganainae is reviewed for the first time from Cambodia. Fifteen species of five genera are recognized from Cambodia. Key and diagnoses for the genera and all species are provided. The adults and genitalia are illustrated for all examined species.

  5. Phycoviolobilin formation and spectral tuning in the DXCF cyanobacteriochrome subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Gulevich, Alexander G; Lagarias, J Clark

    2012-02-21

    Phytochromes are red/far-red photosensory proteins that regulate adaptive responses to light via photoswitching of cysteine-linked linear tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophores. The related cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) extend the photosensory range of the phytochrome superfamily to shorter wavelengths of visible light. CBCRs and phytochromes share a conserved Cys residue required for bilin attachment. In one CBCR subfamily, often associated with a blue/green photocycle, a second Cys lies within a conserved Asp-Xaa-Cys-Phe (DXCF) motif and is essential for the blue/green photocycle. Such DXCF CBCRs use isomerization of the phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore into the related phycoviolobilin (PVB) to shorten the conjugated system for sensing green light. We here use recombinant expression of individual CBCR domains in Escherichia coli to survey the DXCF subfamily from the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme. We describe ten new photoreceptors with well-resolved photocycles and three additional photoproteins with overlapping dark-adapted and photoproduct states. We show that the ability of this subfamily to form PVB or retain PCB provides a powerful mechanism for tuning the photoproduct absorbance, with blue-absorbing dark states leading to a broad range of photoproducts absorbing teal, green, yellow, or orange light. Moreover, we use a novel green/teal CBCR that lacks the blue-absorbing dark state to demonstrate that PVB formation requires the DXCF Cys residue. Our results demonstrate that this subfamily exhibits much more spectral diversity than had been previously appreciated. PMID:22279972

  6. Identification and Characterization of the Populus AREB/ABF Subfamily

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lexiang Ji; Jia Wang; Meixia Ye; Ying Li; Bin Guo; Zhong Chen; Hao Li; Xinmin An

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a major plant hormone that plays an important role in responses to abiotic stresses.The ABA-responsive element binding proteinlABRE-binding factor (AREB/ABF) gene subfamily contains crucial transcription factors in the ABA-mediated signaling pathway.In this study,a total of 14 putative AREB/ABF members were identified in the Populus trichocarpa Torr.& Gray.genome using five AREB/ABF amino acid sequences from Arabidopsis thaliana L.as probes.The 14 putative Populus subfamily members showed high protein similarities,especially in the basic leucine zipper (bZlP) domain region.A neighbor-joining analysis combined with gene structure data revealed homology among the 14 genes.The expression patterns of the Populus AREB/ABF subfamily suggested that the most abundant transcripts of 11 genes occurred in leaf tissues,while two genes were most transcribed in root tissues.Significantly,eight Populus AREB/ABF gene members were upregulated after treatment with 100 μM exogenous ABA,while the other six members were downregulated.We identified the expression profiles of the subfamily members in Populus tissues and elucidated different response patterns of Populus AREB/ABF members to ABA stress.This study provided insight into the roles of Populus AREB/ABF homologues in plant response to abiotic stresses.

  7. Oxygen Sensing by Arterial Chemoreceptors Depends on Mitochondrial Complex I Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Agüera, M Carmen; Gao, Lin; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Pintado, C Oscar; Arias-Mayenco, Ignacio; García-Flores, Paula; García-Pergañeda, Antonio; Pascual, Alberto; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia; López-Barneo, José

    2015-11-01

    O2 sensing is essential for mammalian homeostasis. Peripheral chemoreceptors such as the carotid body (CB) contain cells with O2-sensitive K(+) channels, which are inhibited by hypoxia to trigger fast adaptive cardiorespiratory reflexes. How variations of O2 tension (PO2) are detected and the mechanisms whereby these changes are conveyed to membrane ion channels have remained elusive. We have studied acute O2 sensing in conditional knockout mice lacking mitochondrial complex I (MCI) genes. We inactivated Ndufs2, which encodes a protein that participates in ubiquinone binding. Ndufs2-null mice lose the hyperventilatory response to hypoxia, although they respond to hypercapnia. Ndufs2-deficient CB cells have normal functions and ATP content but are insensitive to changes in PO2. Our data suggest that chemoreceptor cells have a specialized succinate-dependent metabolism that induces an MCI state during hypoxia, characterized by the production of reactive oxygen species and accumulation of reduced pyridine nucleotides, which signal neighboring K(+) channels.

  8. A phenylalanine rotameric switch for signal-state control in bacterial chemoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Davi R.; Yang, Chen; Ames, Peter; Baudry, Jerome; Parkinson, John S.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial chemoreceptors are widely used as a model system for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of transmembrane signalling and have provided a detailed understanding of how ligand binding by the receptor modulates the activity of its associated kinase CheA. However, the mechanisms by which conformational signals move between signalling elements within a receptor dimer and how they control kinase activity remain unknown. Here, using long molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the kinase-activating cytoplasmic tip of the chemoreceptor fluctuates between two stable conformations in a signal-dependent manner. A highly conserved residue, Phe396, appears to serve as the conformational switch, because flipping of the stacked aromatic rings of an interacting F396-F396‧ pair in the receptor homodimer takes place concomitantly with the signal-related conformational changes. We suggest that interacting aromatic residues, which are common stabilizers of protein tertiary structure, might serve as rotameric molecular switches in other biological processes as well.

  9. Transmembrane Signaling Characterized in Bacterial Chemoreceptors by Using Sulfhydryl Cross-Linking in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geoffrey F.; Lebert, Michael R.; Lilly, Angela A.; Hazelbauer, Gerald L.

    1995-04-01

    Transmembrane signaling by bacterial chemoreceptors is thought to involve conformational changes within a stable homodimer. We investigated the functional consequences of constraining movement between pairs of helices in the four-helix structure of the transmembrane domain of chemoreceptor Trg. Using a family of cysteine-containing receptors, we identified oxidation treatments for intact cells that catalyzed essentially complete sulfhydryl cross-linking at selected positions and yet left flagellar and sensory functions largely unperturbed. Constraining movement by cross-links between subunits had little effect on tactic response, but constraining movement between transmembrane segments of the monomer drastically reduced function. We deduce that transmembrane signaling requires substantial movement between transmembrane helices of a monomer but not between interacting helices across the interface between subunits.

  10. Nuclear phylogenomics of the palm subfamily Arecoideae (Arecaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Jason R; Zomlefer, Wendy B; Barrett, Craig F; Stevenson, Dennis Wm; Heyduk, Karolina; Leebens-Mack, James H

    2016-04-01

    Palms (Arecaceae) include economically important species such as coconut, date palm, and oil palm. Resolution of the palm phylogeny has been problematic due to rapid diversification and slow rates of molecular evolution. The focus of this study is on relationships of the 14 tribes of subfamily Arecoideae and their inferred ancestral areas. A targeted sequencing approach was used to generate a data set of 168 single/low copy nuclear genes for 34 species representing the Arecoideae tribes and the other palm subfamilies. Species trees from the concatenated and coalescent based analyses recovered largely congruent topologies. Three major tribal clades were recovered: the POS clade (Podococceae, Oranieae, Sclerospermeae), the RRC clade (Roystoneeae, Reinhardtieae, Cocoseae), and the core arecoid clade (Areceae, Euterpeae, Geonomateae, Leopoldinieae, Manicarieae, Pelagodoxeae). Leopoldinieae was sister to the rest of the core arecoids (Geonomateae, Manicarieae+Pelagodoxeae, and Areceae+Euterpeae). The nuclear phylogeny supported a North American origin for subfamily Arecoideae, with most tribal progenitors diversifying within the Americas. The POS clade may have dispersed from the Americas into Africa, with tribe Oranieae subsequently spreading into the Indo-Pacific. Two independent dispersals into the Indo-Pacific were inferred for two tribes within the core arecoids (tribes Areceae and Pelagodoxeae). PMID:26748268

  11. Carotid chemoreceptors do not mediate hypoxic-induced gasping and autoresuscitation in newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Rongzhi; Zhang, Chunfen; Fewell, James E

    2015-07-01

    Experiments were carried out on 48, 5-6-day-old rat pups to investigate the influence of carotid denervation on their time to last gasp during a single period of hypoxia, and on their ability to autoresuscitate from primary apnea during repeated hypoxic challenge. One group of pups was studied with intact carotid chemoreceptors and one group was studied following surgical denervation of the carotid chemoreceptors. Carotid denervation eliminated the early tachypneic phase during exposure to hypoxia and delayed the time to arousal/excitement but did not alter the time to primary apnea, the time to last gasp or the total number of gasps during exposure to a single period of unrelenting hypoxia. Furthermore, carotid denervation did not alter the number of successful autoresuscitations from primary apnea during repeated hypoxic exposure. Thus, the carotid chemoreceptors are not essential for the initiation or maintenance of gasping nor are they are integral to gasping effecting successful autoresuscitation from hypoxic-induced apnea in newborn rats.

  12. Functional coupling of a nematode chemoreceptor to the yeast pheromone response pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehseen, Muhammad; Dumancic, Mira; Briggs, Lyndall; Wang, Jian; Berna, Amalia; Anderson, Alisha; Trowell, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome revealed sequences encoding more than 1,000 G-protein coupled receptors, hundreds of which may respond to volatile organic ligands. To understand how the worm's simple olfactory system can sense its chemical environment there is a need to characterise a representative selection of these receptors but only very few receptors have been linked to a specific volatile ligand. We therefore set out to design a yeast expression system for assigning ligands to nematode chemoreceptors. We showed that while a model receptor ODR-10 binds to C. elegans Gα subunits ODR-3 and GPA-3 it cannot bind to yeast Gα. However, chimaeras between the nematode and yeast Gα subunits bound to both ODR-10 and the yeast Gβγ subunits. FIG2 was shown to be a superior MAP-dependent promoter for reporter expression. We replaced the endogenous Gα subunit (GPA1) of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ste2Δ sst2Δ far1Δ) triple mutant ("Cyb") with a Gpa1/ODR-3 chimaera and introduced ODR-10 as a model nematode GPCR. This strain showed concentration-dependent activation of the yeast MAP kinase pathway in the presence of diacetyl, the first time that the native form of a nematode chemoreceptor has been functionally expressed in yeast. This is an important step towards en masse de-orphaning of C. elegans chemoreceptors.

  13. Tsr Chemoreceptor Interacts With IL-8 Provoking E. coli Transmigration Across Human Lung Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Li, Manshu; Xu, Yonghao; Islam, Diana; Khang, Julie; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Lee, Warren; Szaszi, Katalin; Zhong, Nanshan; Slutsky, Arthur S; Li, Yimin; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial colonization of epithelial surfaces and subsequent transmigration across the mucosal barrier are essential for the development of infection. We hypothesized that the methyl-accepting proteins (MCPs), known as chemoreceptors expressed on Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterial surface, play an important role in mediating bacterial transmigration. We demonstrated a direct interaction between human interleukin-8 (IL-8) and Tsr receptor, a major MCP chemoreceptor. Stimulation of human lung epithelial cell monolayer with IL-8 resulted in increased E. coli adhesion and transmigration of the native strain (RP437) and a strain expressing only Tsr (UU2373), as compared to a strain (UU2599) with Tsr truncation. The augmented E. coli adhesion and migration was associated with a higher expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 and production of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, and a lower expression of the tight junction protein claudin-1 and the plasma membrane protein caveolin-1 in lung epithelial cells. An increased E. coli colonization and pulmonary cytokine production induced by the RP437 and UU2373 strains was attenuated in mice challenged with the UU2599 strain. Our results suggest a critical role of the E. coli Tsr chemoreceptor in mediating bacterial colonization and transmigration across human lung epithelium during development of pulmonary infections.

  14. Molecular underpinnings of ventral surface chemoreceptor function: focus on KCNQ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkey, Daniel K; Hawkins, Virginia E; Hawryluk, Joanna M; Takakura, Ana C; Moreira, Thiago S; Tzingounis, Anastasios V

    2015-03-01

    Central chemoreception is the mechanism by which CO₂/H(+) -sensitive neurons (i.e. chemoreceptors) regulate breathing in response to changes in tissue CO₂/H(+) . Neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) directly regulate breathing in response to changes in tissue CO₂/H(+) and function as a key locus of respiratory control by integrating information from several respiratory centres, including the medullary raphe. Therefore, chemosensitive RTN neurons appear to be critically important for maintaining breathing, thus understanding molecular mechanisms that regulate RTN chemoreceptor function may identify therapeutic targets for the treatment of respiratory control disorders. We have recently shown that KCNQ (Kv7) channels in the RTN are essential determinants of spontaneous activity ex vivo, and downstream effectors for serotonergic modulation of breathing. Considering that loss of function mutations in KCNQ channels can cause certain types of epilepsy including those associated with sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), we propose that dysfunctions of KCNQ channels may be one cause for epilepsy and respiratory problems associated with SUDEP. In this review, we will summarize the role of KCNQ channels in the regulation of RTN chemoreceptor function, and suggest that these channels represent useful therapeutic targets for the treatment of respiratory control disorders.

  15. High density and ligand affinity confer ultrasensitive signal detection by a guanylyl cyclase chemoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichlo, Magdalena; Bungert-Plümke, Stefanie; Weyand, Ingo; Seifert, Reinhard; Bönigk, Wolfgang; Strünker, Timo; Kashikar, Nachiket Dilip; Goodwin, Normann; Müller, Astrid; Pelzer, Patric; Van, Qui; Enderlein, Jörg; Klemm, Clementine; Krause, Eberhard; Trötschel, Christian; Poetsch, Ansgar; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Körschen, Heinz G; Collienne, Ursel

    2014-08-18

    Guanylyl cyclases (GCs), which synthesize the messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate, control several sensory functions, such as phototransduction, chemosensation, and thermosensation, in many species from worms to mammals. The GC chemoreceptor in sea urchin sperm can decode chemoattractant concentrations with single-molecule sensitivity. The molecular and cellular underpinnings of such ultrasensitivity are not known for any eukaryotic chemoreceptor. In this paper, we show that an exquisitely high density of 3 × 10(5) GC chemoreceptors and subnanomolar ligand affinity provide a high ligand-capture efficacy and render sperm perfect absorbers. The GC activity is terminated within 150 ms by dephosphorylation steps of the receptor, which provides a means for precise control of the GC lifetime and which reduces "molecule noise." Compared with other ultrasensitive sensory systems, the 10-fold signal amplification by the GC receptor is surprisingly low. The hallmarks of this signaling mechanism provide a blueprint for chemical sensing in small compartments, such as olfactory cilia, insect antennae, or even synaptic boutons.

  16. Voltage-gated Na(+) channels in chemoreceptor afferent neurons--potential roles and changes with development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, David F

    2013-01-01

    Carotid body chemoreceptors increase their action potential (AP) activity in response to a decrease in arterial oxygen tension and this response increases in the post-natal period. The initial transduction site is likely the glomus cell which responds to hypoxia with an increase in intracellular calcium and secretion of multiple neurotransmitters. Translation of this secretion to AP spiking levels is determined by the excitability of the afferent nerve terminals that is largely determined by the voltage-dependence of activation of Na(+) channels. In this review, we examine the biophysical characteristics of Na(+) channels present at the soma of chemoreceptor afferent neurons with the assumption that similar channels are present at nerve terminals. The voltage dependence of this current is consistent with a single Na(+) channel isoform with activation around the resting potential and with about 60-70% of channels in the inactive state around the resting potential. Channel openings, due to transitions from inactive/open or closed/open states, may serve to amplify external depolarizing events or generate, by themselves, APs. Over the first two post-natal weeks, the Na(+) channel activation voltage shifts to more negative potentials, thus enhancing the amplifying action of Na(+) channels on depolarization events and increasing membrane noise generated by channel transitions. This may be a significant contributor to maturation of chemoreceptor activity in the post-natal period.

  17. Functional coupling of a nematode chemoreceptor to the yeast pheromone response pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tehseen

    Full Text Available Sequencing of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome revealed sequences encoding more than 1,000 G-protein coupled receptors, hundreds of which may respond to volatile organic ligands. To understand how the worm's simple olfactory system can sense its chemical environment there is a need to characterise a representative selection of these receptors but only very few receptors have been linked to a specific volatile ligand. We therefore set out to design a yeast expression system for assigning ligands to nematode chemoreceptors. We showed that while a model receptor ODR-10 binds to C. elegans Gα subunits ODR-3 and GPA-3 it cannot bind to yeast Gα. However, chimaeras between the nematode and yeast Gα subunits bound to both ODR-10 and the yeast Gβγ subunits. FIG2 was shown to be a superior MAP-dependent promoter for reporter expression. We replaced the endogenous Gα subunit (GPA1 of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ste2Δ sst2Δ far1Δ triple mutant ("Cyb" with a Gpa1/ODR-3 chimaera and introduced ODR-10 as a model nematode GPCR. This strain showed concentration-dependent activation of the yeast MAP kinase pathway in the presence of diacetyl, the first time that the native form of a nematode chemoreceptor has been functionally expressed in yeast. This is an important step towards en masse de-orphaning of C. elegans chemoreceptors.

  18. High density and ligand affinity confer ultrasensitive signal detection by a guanylyl cyclase chemoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichlo, Magdalena; Bungert-Plümke, Stefanie; Weyand, Ingo; Seifert, Reinhard; Bönigk, Wolfgang; Strünker, Timo; Kashikar, Nachiket Dilip; Goodwin, Normann; Müller, Astrid; Pelzer, Patric; Van, Qui; Enderlein, Jörg; Klemm, Clementine; Krause, Eberhard; Trötschel, Christian; Poetsch, Ansgar; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Körschen, Heinz G; Collienne, Ursel

    2014-08-18

    Guanylyl cyclases (GCs), which synthesize the messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate, control several sensory functions, such as phototransduction, chemosensation, and thermosensation, in many species from worms to mammals. The GC chemoreceptor in sea urchin sperm can decode chemoattractant concentrations with single-molecule sensitivity. The molecular and cellular underpinnings of such ultrasensitivity are not known for any eukaryotic chemoreceptor. In this paper, we show that an exquisitely high density of 3 × 10(5) GC chemoreceptors and subnanomolar ligand affinity provide a high ligand-capture efficacy and render sperm perfect absorbers. The GC activity is terminated within 150 ms by dephosphorylation steps of the receptor, which provides a means for precise control of the GC lifetime and which reduces "molecule noise." Compared with other ultrasensitive sensory systems, the 10-fold signal amplification by the GC receptor is surprisingly low. The hallmarks of this signaling mechanism provide a blueprint for chemical sensing in small compartments, such as olfactory cilia, insect antennae, or even synaptic boutons. PMID:25135936

  19. Synaptic transmission of baro- and chemoreceptors afferents in the NTS second order neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accorsi-Mendonça, Daniela; Machado, Benedito H

    2013-04-01

    Second order neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) process and integrate the afferent information from arterial baroreceptors with high fidelity and precise timing synaptic transmission. Since 2nd-order NTS neurons receiving baroreceptors inputs are relatively well characterized, their electrophysiological profile has been accepted as a general characteristic for all 2nd-order NTS neurons involved with the processing of different sensorial inputs. On the other hand, the synaptic properties of other afferent systems in NTS, such as the peripheral chemoreceptors, are not yet well understood. In this context, in previous studies we demonstrated that in response to repetitive afferents stimulation, the chemoreceptors 2nd-order NTS neurons also presented high fidelity of synaptic transmission, but with a large variability in the latency of evoked responses. This finding is different in relation to the precise timing transmission for baroreceptor 2nd-order NTS neurons, which was accepted as a general characteristic profile for all 2nd order neurons in the NTS. In this brief review we discuss this new concept as an index of complexity of the sensorial inputs to NTS with focus on the synaptic processing of baro- and chemoreceptor afferents.

  20. Evolutionary Genomics Suggests That CheV Is an Additional Adaptor for Accommodating Specific Chemoreceptors within the Chemotaxis Signaling Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi R Ortega

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are models for many experiments in molecular biology including chemotaxis, and most of the results obtained with one organism have been generalized to another. While most components of the chemotaxis pathway are strongly conserved between the two species, Salmonella genomes contain some chemoreceptors and an additional protein, CheV, that are not found in E. coli. The role of CheV was examined in distantly related species Bacillus subtilis and Helicobacter pylori, but its role in bacterial chemotaxis is still not well understood. We tested a hypothesis that in enterobacteria CheV functions as an additional adaptor linking the CheA kinase to certain types of chemoreceptors that cannot be effectively accommodated by the universal adaptor CheW. Phylogenetic profiling, genomic context and comparative protein sequence analyses suggested that CheV interacts with specific domains of CheA and chemoreceptors from an orthologous group exemplified by the Salmonella McpC protein. Structural consideration of the conservation patterns suggests that CheV and CheW share the same binding spot on the chemoreceptor structure, but have some affinity bias towards chemoreceptors from different orthologous groups. Finally, published experimental results and data newly obtained via comparative genomics support the idea that CheV functions as a "phosphate sink" possibly to off-set the over-stimulation of the kinase by certain types of chemoreceptors. Overall, our results strongly suggest that CheV is an additional adaptor for accommodating specific chemoreceptors within the chemotaxis signaling complex.

  1. Graded hypoxia acts through a network of distributed peripheral oxygen chemoreceptors to produce changes in respiratory behaviour and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Tara A; Xu, Fenglian; Syed, Naweed I

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory behaviour relies critically upon sensory feedback from peripheral oxygen chemoreceptors. During environmental or systemic hypoxia, chemoreceptor input modulates respiratory central pattern generator activity to produce reflex-based increases in respiration and also shapes respiratory plasticity over longer timescales. The best-studied oxygen chemoreceptors are undoubtedly the mammalian carotid bodies; however, questions remain regarding this complex organ's role in shaping respiration in response to varying oxygen levels. Furthermore, many taxa possess distinct oxygen chemoreceptors located within the lungs, airways and cardiovasculature, but the functional advantage of multiple chemoreceptor sites is unclear. In this study, it is demonstrated that a distributed network of peripheral oxygen chemoreceptors exists in Lymnaea stagnalis and significantly modulates aerial respiration. Specifically, Lymnaea breath frequency and duration represent parameters that are shaped by interactions between hypoxic severity and its time-course. Using a combination of behaviour and electrophysiology approaches, the chemosensory pathways underlying hypoxia-induced changes in breath frequency/duration were explored. The current findings demonstrate that breath frequency is uniquely modulated by the known osphradial ganglion oxygen chemoreceptors during moderate hypoxia, while a newly discovered area of pneumostome oxygen chemoreception serves a similar function specifically during more severe hypoxia. Together, these findings suggest that multiple oxygen chemosensory sites, each with their own sensory and modulatory properties, act synergistically to form a functionally distributed network that dynamically shapes respiration in response to changing systemic or environmental oxygen levels. These distributed networks may represent an evolutionarily conserved strategy vis-à-vis respiratory adaptability and have significant implications for the understanding of fundamental

  2. Evolutionary Genomics Suggests That CheV Is an Additional Adaptor for Accommodating Specific Chemoreceptors within the Chemotaxis Signaling Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Davi R; Zhulin, Igor B

    2016-02-01

    Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are models for many experiments in molecular biology including chemotaxis, and most of the results obtained with one organism have been generalized to another. While most components of the chemotaxis pathway are strongly conserved between the two species, Salmonella genomes contain some chemoreceptors and an additional protein, CheV, that are not found in E. coli. The role of CheV was examined in distantly related species Bacillus subtilis and Helicobacter pylori, but its role in bacterial chemotaxis is still not well understood. We tested a hypothesis that in enterobacteria CheV functions as an additional adaptor linking the CheA kinase to certain types of chemoreceptors that cannot be effectively accommodated by the universal adaptor CheW. Phylogenetic profiling, genomic context and comparative protein sequence analyses suggested that CheV interacts with specific domains of CheA and chemoreceptors from an orthologous group exemplified by the Salmonella McpC protein. Structural consideration of the conservation patterns suggests that CheV and CheW share the same binding spot on the chemoreceptor structure, but have some affinity bias towards chemoreceptors from different orthologous groups. Finally, published experimental results and data newly obtained via comparative genomics support the idea that CheV functions as a "phosphate sink" possibly to off-set the over-stimulation of the kinase by certain types of chemoreceptors. Overall, our results strongly suggest that CheV is an additional adaptor for accommodating specific chemoreceptors within the chemotaxis signaling complex.

  3. Generic revision of the ant subfamily Dorylinae (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiec, Marek L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The generic classification of the ant subfamily Dorylinae is revised, with the aim of facilitating identification of easily-diagnosable monophyletic genera. The new classification is based on recent molecular phylogenetic evidence and a critical reappraisal of doryline morphology. New keys and diagnoses based on workers and males are provided, along with reviews of natural history and phylogenetic relationships, distribution maps, and a list of valid species for each lineage. Twenty-eight genera (27 extant and 1 extinct) are recognized within the subfamily, an increase from 20 in the previous classification scheme. Species classified in the polyphyletic Cerapachys and Sphinctomyrmex prior to this publication are here distributed among 9 and 3 different genera, respectively. Amyrmex and Asphinctanilloides are synonymized under Leptanilloides and the currently recognized subgenera are synonymized for Dorylus. No tribal classification is proposed for the subfamily, but several apparently monophyletic genus-groups are discussed. Valid generic names recognized here include: Acanthostichus (= Ctenopyga), Aenictogiton, Aenictus (= Paraenictus, Typhlatta), Cerapachys (= Ceratopachys), Cheliomyrmex, Chrysapace gen. rev., Cylindromyrmex (= Holcoponera, Hypocylindromyrmex, Metacylindromyrmex), Dorylus (= Alaopone syn. n., Anomma syn. n., Cosmaecetes, Dichthadia syn. n., Rhogmus syn. n., Shuckardia, Sphecomyrmex, Sphegomyrmex, Typhlopone syn. n.), Eburopone gen. n., Eciton (= Camptognatha, Holopone, Mayromyrmex), Eusphinctus gen. rev., Labidus (= Nycteresia, Pseudodichthadia), Leptanilloides (= Amyrmex syn. n., Asphinctanilloides syn. n.), Lioponera gen. rev. (= Neophyracaces syn. n., Phyracaces syn. n.), Lividopone, Neivamyrmex (= Acamatus, Woitkowskia), Neocerapachys gen. n., Nomamyrmex, Ooceraea gen. rev. (= Cysias syn. n.), Parasyscia gen. rev., †Procerapachys, Simopone, Sphinctomyrmex, Syscia gen. rev., Tanipone, Vicinopone, Yunodorylus gen. rev., Zasphinctus

  4. Signalling-dependent interactions between the kinase-coupling protein CheW and chemoreceptors in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedetta, Andrea; Parkinson, John S; Studdert, Claudia A

    2014-09-01

    Chemical signals sensed on the periplasmic side of bacterial cells by transmembrane chemoreceptors are transmitted to the flagellar motors via the histidine kinase CheA, which controls the phosphorylation level of the effector protein CheY. Chemoreceptor arrays comprise remarkably stable supramolecular structures in which thousands of chemoreceptors are networked through interactions between their cytoplasmic tips, CheA, and the small coupling protein CheW. To explore the conformational changes that occur within this protein assembly during signalling, we used in vivo cross-linking methods to detect close interactions between the coupling protein CheW and the serine receptor Tsr in intact Escherichia coli cells. We identified two signal-sensitive contacts between CheW and the cytoplasmic tip of Tsr. Our results suggest that ligand binding triggers changes in the receptor that alter its signalling contacts with CheW (and/or CheA).

  5. Regulation of caste differentiation in the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goewie, E.A.

    1978-01-01

    The nutritional environment of honey-bee larvae affects the juvenile hormone (JH) titre of larval haemolymph and tissues. In this investigation the mechanism for the regulation of caste differentiation has been studied.Chemo- and mechanoreceptors are found on larval mouthparts. Chemoreceptors on max

  6. Transmembrane helix dynamics of bacterial chemoreceptors supports a piston model of signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A Hall

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Transmembrane α-helices play a key role in many receptors, transmitting a signal from one side to the other of the lipid bilayer membrane. Bacterial chemoreceptors are one of the best studied such systems, with a wealth of biophysical and mutational data indicating a key role for the TM2 helix in signalling. In particular, aromatic (Trp and Tyr and basic (Arg residues help to lock α-helices into a membrane. Mutants in TM2 of E. coli Tar and related chemoreceptors involving these residues implicate changes in helix location and/or orientation in signalling. We have investigated the detailed structural basis of this via high throughput coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD of Tar TM2 and its mutants in lipid bilayers. We focus on the position (shift and orientation (tilt, rotation of TM2 relative to the bilayer and how these are perturbed in mutants relative to the wildtype. The simulations reveal a clear correlation between small (ca. 1.5 Å shift in position of TM2 along the bilayer normal and downstream changes in signalling activity. Weaker correlations are seen with helix tilt, and little/none between signalling and helix twist. This analysis of relatively subtle changes was only possible because the high throughput simulation method allowed us to run large (n = 100 ensembles for substantial numbers of different helix sequences, amounting to ca. 2000 simulations in total. Overall, this analysis supports a swinging-piston model of transmembrane signalling by Tar and related chemoreceptors.

  7. Do the carotid body chemoreceptors mediate cardiovascular and sympathetic adjustments induced by sodium overload in rats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrino, Gustavo R; Mourão, Aline A; Moreira, Marina C S; da Silva, Elaine F; Lopes, Paulo R; Fajemiroye, James O; Schoorlemmer, Guss H M; Sato, Mônica A; Reis, Ângela A S; Rebelo, Ana C S; Cravo, Sergio L

    2016-05-15

    Acute plasma hypernatremia induces several cardiovascular and sympathetic responses. It is conceivable that these responses contribute to rapid sodium excretion and restoration of normal conditions. Afferent pathways mediating these responses are not entirely understood. The present study analyses the effects of acute carotid chemoreceptor inactivation on cardiovascular and sympathetic responses induced by infusion of hypertonic saline (HS). All experiments were performed on anesthetized male Wistar rats instrumented for recording of arterial blood pressure (ABP), renal blood flow (RBF) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Animals were subjected to sham surgery or carotid chemoreceptor inactivation by bilateral ligation of the carotid body artery (CBA). In sham rats (n=8), intravenous infusion of HS (3 M NaCl, 1.8 ml/kg b.wt.) elicited a transient increase (9±2mmHg) in ABP, and long lasting (30 min) increases in RBF (138±5%) and renal vascular conductance (RVC) (128±5%) with concurrent decrease in RSNA (-19±4%). In rats submitted to CBA ligation (n=8), the pressor response to HS was higher (24±2mmHg; p<0.05). However, RBF and RVC responses to HS infusion were significantly reduced (113±5% and 93±4%, respectively) while RSNA was increased (13±2%). When HS (3M NaCl, 200μl) was administrated into internal carotid artery (ICA), distinct sympathetic and cardiovascular responses were observed. In sham-group, HS infusion (3M NaCl, 200μl) into ICA promoted an increase in ABP (26±8mmHg) and RSNA (29±13%). In CBA rats, ABP (-3±5.6mmHg) remained unaltered despite sympathoinhibition (-37.6±5.4%). These results demonstrate that carotid body chemoreceptors play a role in the development of hemodynamic and sympathetic responses to acute HS infusion. PMID:27060222

  8. Subfamily logos: visualization of sequence deviations at alignment positions with high information content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beitz Eric

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition of relevant sequence deviations can be valuable for elucidating functional differences between protein subfamilies. Interesting residues at highly conserved positions can then be mutated and experimentally analyzed. However, identification of such sites is tedious because automated approaches are scarce. Results Subfamily logos visualize subfamily-specific sequence deviations. The display is similar to classical sequence logos but extends into the negative range. Positive, upright characters correspond to residues which are characteristic for the subfamily, negative, upside-down characters to residues typical for the remaining sequences. The symbol height is adjusted to the information content of the alignment position. Residues which are conserved throughout do not appear. Conclusion Subfamily logos provide an intuitive display of relevant sequence deviations. The method has proven to be valid using a set of 135 aligned aquaporin sequences in which established subfamily-specific positions were readily identified by the algorithm.

  9. Neural respiratory and circulatory interaction during chemoreceptor stimulation and cooling of ventral medulla in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millhorn, D E

    1986-01-01

    The effects on respiratory and sympathetic neural activity, measured as integrated phrenic and cervical nerve activities respectively, during changing input from the central chemoreceptors was studied in anaesthetized, paralysed cats whose carotid sinus nerves and vagus nerves had been cut. Central respiratory drive was altered either by graded cold block of the intermediate areas, located bilaterally near the ventral surface of the medulla oblongata, or by step increases in end-tidal PCO2. Cervical nerve activity showed both a tonic (or mean) level of activity and a prominent cyclic discharge that was in phase with phrenic nerve activity. Graded focal cooling of the intermediate areas to 20 degrees C when end-tidal PCO2 was kept constant caused progressive decreases in phrenic activity, the amplitude of the inspiratory related discharge and mean arterial pressure, but only a small decrease in mean cervical nerve activity. Cooling the intermediate areas in the absence of the inspiratory related discharge (i.e. when phrenic activity was below the apnoeic threshold) led to a much smaller decrease in arterial pressure. Step increases of end-tidal PCO2 caused progressive increases of both cervical and phrenic nerve activities. The increase in cervical activity was due primarily, if not wholly, to a progressive increase in the amplitude of the inspiratory related discharge. These findings show that the predominant effect on sympathetic activity during stimulation of the central chemoreceptor and graded cold block of the intermediate areas is a change in the amplitude of the inspiratory related discharge and suggest that the change in arterial pressure that accompanies central chemoreceptor stimulation and graded cold block of the intermediate areas is mediated by the inspiratory related discharge rather than by an increase in the mean level of sympathetic activity. When phrenic activity was lowered to below apnoeic threshold by cooling the intermediate areas, step

  10. Two new nematode species of the subfamily Brittonematinae (Dorylaimida: Actinolaimidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrássy, I.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Two new species of actinolaimoid nematodes of the subfamily Brittonematinae are described and illustrated.Actinca marisae sp. n. from Brazil is characterized by the long (on average 2.92 mm and slender body, 30–32 distinct longitudinalridges on cuticle, narrow head, slender odontostyle, onchial tips facing each other, cylindrus occupying somewhat lessthan one-half of pharynx, broad vulval lips, and by medum long tail. Afractinca eburnea sp. n. from Côte d’Ivoire can bedistinguished by a relatively long body (on average 1.88 mm, thin cuticle provided with 14 longitudinal ridges, cap-like offsetlabial ring, very slender odontostyle, long prerectum, vulva sunk in body contour, and by the elongate-conoid female tail. Mainmorphological structures of Actinca and Afractinca species are summarized. Some comments on further brittonematine speciesare added.

  11. Rho GTPases of the RhoBTB subfamily and tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jessica BERTHOLD; Kristína SCHENKOV(A); Francisco RIVERO

    2008-01-01

    RhoBTB proteins constitute a subfamily of atypical members within the Rho fami-ly of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases).Their most salient feature is their domain architecture:a GTPase domain (in most cases,non-functional) is followed by a proline-rich region,a tandem of 2 broad-complex,tramtrack,bric hrac (BTB) domains,and a conserved C-terminal region.In humans,the RhoBTB subfamily consists of 3 isoforms:RhoBTB 1,RhoBTB2,and RhoBTB3.Orthologs are present in several other eukaryotes,such as Drosophila and Dictyostelium,but have been lost in plants and fungi.Interest in RhoBTB arose when RHOBTB2 was identified as the gene homozygously deleted in breast cancer samples and was proposed as a candidate tumor suppressor gene,a property that has been extended to RHOBTBI.The functions of RhoBTB proteins have not been defined yet,but may be related to the roles of BTB domains in the recruitment of cullin3,a component of a family of uhiquitin ligases.A model emerges in which RhoBTB proteins are required to maintain constant levels of putative substrates involved in cell cycle regulation or vesicle transport through targeting for degradation in the 26S proteasome.RhoBTB proteins are engrossing the list of Rho GTPases involved in tumorigenesis.Unlike typical Rho GTPases (usually overexpressed or hyperactive),RhoBTB proteins appear to play a part in the carcinogenic process through a mechanism that involves the decreased or abolished expression of the corresponding genes,or more rarely,mutations that result in impaired functioning of the protein,presumably leading to the accumulation of RhoBTB substrates and alterations of the cellular homeostasis.

  12. Morphology of Some Species in the Subfamily Papilionoideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Adeola OWOLABI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Morphological study of ten species in the subfamily Papilionoideae was carried out with the view to documenting diagnostic characters that would distinguish or group the species. The species studied belong to four tribes, namely: tribe Desmodieae – Desmodium tortuosum (Sw. DC., Desmodium scorpiurus (Sw. Desv., Desmodium adscendens (Sw. DC., tribe Phaseoleae – Cajanus cajan (L. Millsp., Calopogonium mucunoides Desv., Centrosema molle (Mart. ex. Benth., Mucuna pruriens (Linn. Walp., Vigna unguiculata (Linn. Walp., tribe Crotalarieae – Crotalaria retusa Linn., tribe Robinieae – Gliricidia sepium (Jacq. Walp. Qualitative and quantitative traits which had not been documented in previous works, especially in Nigeria, were studied. These include plant life span; leaf/leaflet apex, base, margin and pubescence; stem type, colour, shape and pubescence; sepal colour and pubescence; nature of margin of petal standard and presence or absence of pedicel; fruit colour, pubescence, tip and shape; seed colour, shape, surface and presence or absence of prominent hilum on the seed; number of seeds per fruit; pedicel length; length and width of petal standard, keel and wing. Characters of taxonomic value documented in this study were leaf type, leaf shape, leaf base, petiole type, stem type, seed shape, petal standard length, petal keel length and petal wing width. Data were subjected to one - way analysis of variance using Duncan’s multiple range test. It was noted that the important characters that can be used in establishing taxonomic relationship in the sub-family Papilionoideae were leaf type, leaf shape, leaf base, petiole type, stem shape, petal colour, petal margin and seed shape.

  13. The role of local renin-angiotensin system in arterial chemoreceptors in sleep-breathing disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Lung eFung

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The renin-angiotensin system (RAS plays pivotal roles in the regulation of cardiovascular and renal functions to maintain the fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. Experimental studies have demonstrated a locally expressed RAS in the carotid body, which is functional significant in the effect of angiotensin peptides on the regulation of the activity of peripheral chemoreceptors and the chemoreflex. The physiological and pathophysiological implications of the RAS in the carotid body have been proposed upon recent studies showing a significant upregulation of the RAS expression under hypoxic conditions relevant to altitude acclimation and sleep apnea and also in animal model of heart failure. Specifically, the increased expression of angiotensinogen, angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin AT1 receptors plays significant roles in the augmented carotid chemoreceptor activity and inflammation of the carotid body. This review aims to summarize these results with highlights on the pathophysiological function of the RAS under hypoxic conditions. It is concluded that the maladaptive changes of the RAS in the carotid body plays a pathogenic role in sleep apnea and heart failure, which could potentially be a therapeutic target for the treatment of the pathophysiological consequence of sleep apnea.

  14. Same same but different. Different trigeminal chemoreceptors share the same central pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Kollndorfer

    Full Text Available Intranasal trigeminal sensations are important in everyday life of human beings, as they play a governing role in protecting the airways from harm. Trigeminal sensations arise from the binding of a ligand to various sub-types of transient receptor potential (TRP channels located on mucosal branches of the trigeminal nerve. Which underlying neural networks are involved in the processing of various trigeminal inputs is still unknown. To target this unresolved question fourteen healthy human subjects were investigated by completing three functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI scanning sessions during which three trigeminal substances, activating varying sub-types of chemoreceptors and evoking different sensations in the nose were presented: CO2, menthol and cinnamaldehyde. We identified similar functional networks responding to all stimuli: an olfactory network, a somatosensory network and an integrative network. The processing pathway of all three stimulants was represented by the same functional networks, although CO2 evokes painful but virtually odorless sensations, and the two other stimulants, menthol and cinnamaldehyde are perceived as mostly non painful with a clear olfactory percept. Therefore, our results suggest a common central processing pathway for trigeminal information regardless of the trigeminal chemoreceptor and sensation type.

  15. Same same but different. Different trigeminal chemoreceptors share the same central pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollndorfer, Kathrin; Kowalczyk, Ksenia; Frasnelli, Johannes; Hoche, Elisabeth; Unger, Ewald; Mueller, Christian A; Krajnik, Jacqueline; Trattnig, Siegfried; Schöpf, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal trigeminal sensations are important in everyday life of human beings, as they play a governing role in protecting the airways from harm. Trigeminal sensations arise from the binding of a ligand to various sub-types of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels located on mucosal branches of the trigeminal nerve. Which underlying neural networks are involved in the processing of various trigeminal inputs is still unknown. To target this unresolved question fourteen healthy human subjects were investigated by completing three functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning sessions during which three trigeminal substances, activating varying sub-types of chemoreceptors and evoking different sensations in the nose were presented: CO2, menthol and cinnamaldehyde. We identified similar functional networks responding to all stimuli: an olfactory network, a somatosensory network and an integrative network. The processing pathway of all three stimulants was represented by the same functional networks, although CO2 evokes painful but virtually odorless sensations, and the two other stimulants, menthol and cinnamaldehyde are perceived as mostly non painful with a clear olfactory percept. Therefore, our results suggest a common central processing pathway for trigeminal information regardless of the trigeminal chemoreceptor and sensation type.

  16. Peripheral chemoreceptors in fish: A brief history and a look ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonz, Michael G; Zachar, Peter C; Da Fonte, Dillon F; Mierzwa, Anna S

    2015-08-01

    The story of control of cardiorespiratory reflexes by peripheral chemoreceptors includes a chapter on evolution in large part because of the work of Prof. William K. Milsom. Bill has reminded us to think comparatively about O2 and CO2/H(+) sensing. We present a brief review of the fish gill and O2 chemoreceptors, as well as recent results from our laboratory, that were discussed at a symposium in honour of Prof. Milsom's extensive career. In a series of papers from the Milsom laboratory from 1986 to 1995, it was demonstrated that the fish gill is a major site of chemosensory discharge during hypoxia, and that this response is sensitive to multiple neurochemicals involved in chemosensing. These and other more recent studies by Bill et al. are now fundamental and have helped to shape the field as it is today. At the cellular level, we have shown that chemosensitive neuroepithelial cells (NECs) of the gills may possess unique adaptations compared to their mammalian homologues. In addition, we used injection of the styryl dye, FM1-43, to identify gill NECs in zebrafish and demonstrate increased vesicular activity in NECs in vitro during acute stimulation. In vivo, we have identified 5-HT2, 5-HT3, dopaminergic and nicotinic receptor activity involved in the hyperventilatory response in developing zebrafish. With this model we have also traced the fate of mitotic cells in the gills, and demonstrated the regeneration of resected gill filaments and replacement of O2-sensitive NECs.

  17. SOS System Induction Inhibits the Assembly of Chemoreceptor Signaling Clusters in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazoki, Oihane; Mayola, Albert; Campoy, Susana; Barbé, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Swarming, a flagellar-driven multicellular form of motility, is associated with bacterial virulence and increased antibiotic resistance. In this work we demonstrate that activation of the SOS response reversibly inhibits swarming motility by preventing the assembly of chemoreceptor-signaling polar arrays. We also show that an increase in the concentration of the RecA protein, generated by SOS system activation, rather than another function of this genetic network impairs chemoreceptor polar cluster formation. Our data provide evidence that the molecular balance between RecA and CheW proteins is crucial to allow polar cluster formation in Salmonella enterica cells. Thus, activation of the SOS response by the presence of a DNA-injuring compound increases the RecA concentration, thereby disturbing the equilibrium between RecA and CheW and resulting in the cessation of swarming. Nevertheless, when the DNA-damage decreases and the SOS response is no longer activated, basal RecA levels and thus polar cluster assembly are reestablished. These results clearly show that bacterial populations moving over surfaces make use of specific mechanisms to avoid contact with DNA-damaging compounds.

  18. Reductions in carotid chemoreceptor activity with low-dose dopamine improves baroreflex control of heart rate during hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozer, Michael T; Holbein, Walter W; Joyner, Michael J; Curry, Timothy B; Limberg, Jacqueline K

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the contribution of the carotid body chemoreceptors to changes in baroreflex control of heart rate with exposure to hypoxia. We hypothesized spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (scBRS) would be reduced with hypoxia and this effect would be blunted when carotid chemoreceptor activity was reduced with low-dose dopamine. Fifteen healthy adults (11 M/4 F) completed two visits randomized to intravenous dopamine or placebo (saline). On each visit, subjects were exposed to 5-min normoxia (~99% SpO2), followed by 5-min hypoxia (~84% SpO2). Blood pressure (intra-arterial catheter) and heart rate (ECG) were measured continuously and scBRS was assessed by spectrum and sequence methodologies. scBRS was reduced with hypoxia (P  0.05). Present findings are consistent with a reduction in scBRS with systemic hypoxia. Furthermore, we show this effect is partially mediated by the carotid body chemoreceptors, given the fall in scBRS is attenuated when activity of the chemoreceptors is reduced with low-dose dopamine. However, the improvement in scBRS with dopamine appears to be specific to rising blood pressures. These results may have important implications for impairments in baroreflex function common in disease states of acute and/or chronic hypoxemia, as well as the experimental use of dopamine to assess such changes.

  19. On the correct name for some subfamilies of Mustelidae (Mammalia, Carnivora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Oliveira do Nascimento

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mustelids (Mustelidae exhibit a wide morphological and ecological diversity, ranging from aquatic to semi arboreal and fossorial forms. It is the most diversity family in Carnivora, and this has promoted a great number of taxonomic arrangements for subfamilies, which can range from two to 15 depending on the author. The relatively recent use of molecular data has helped to elucidate the classification of mustelids, and eight subfamilies are currently recognized: Mustelinae, Galictinae, Helictidinae, Martinae, Melinae, Mellivorinae, Taxidiinae and Lutrinae. However, some of these subfamilies have nomenclatural problems, not receiving the oldest available name. The subfamily that includes martens (Martes, Charronia and Pekania, tayra (Eira and wolverine (Gulo has received the name of Martinae Wagner, 1841, but the oldest available name is Guloninae Gray, 1825. This problem also occurs for the subfamily that includes the grisons (Galictis, Patagonian weasel (Lyncodon, marbled polecat (Vormela and striped weasels (Ictonyx and Poecilogale, which are known as Grisoninae Pocock, 1921, but the correct name for this group is Ictonychinae, Pocock, 1921. The subfamily that includes ferret badgers (Melogale retains the name Helictidinae Gray, 1865, because its validity is not affected when the type-genus of the subfamily becomes a junior synonym of another genus. Furthermore, a list of the extant subfamilies of Mustelidae and their respective synonyms and included genera is provided.

  20. Phantoms of Gondwana?-phylogeny of the spider subfamily Mynogleninae (Araneae: Linyphiidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frick, Holger; Scharff, Nikolaj

    2014-01-01

    This is the first genus-level phylogeny of the subfamily Mynogleninae. It is based on 190 morphological characters scored for 44 taxa: 37 mynoglenine taxa (ingroup) representing 15 of the 17 known genera and seven outgroup taxa representing the subfamilies Stemonyphantinae, Linyphiinae (Linyphiin...

  1. An Insight into the Interaction Mode Between CheB and Chemoreceptor from Two Crystal Structures of CheB Methylesterase Catalytic Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K Cho; B Crane; S Park

    2011-12-31

    We have determined 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima CheB methylesterase domain to provide insight into the interaction mode between CheB and chemoreceptors. T. maritima CheB methylesterase domain has identical topology of a modified doubly-wound {alpha}/{beta} fold that was observed from the previously reported Salmonella typhimurium counterpart, but the analysis of the electrostatic potential surface near the catalytic triad indicated considerable charge distribution difference. As the CheB demethylation consensus sites of the chemoreceptors, the CheB substrate, are not uniquely conserved between T. maritima and S. typhimurium, such surfaces with differing electrostatic properties may reflect CheB regions that mediate protein-protein interaction. Via the computational docking of the two T. maritima and S. typhimurium CheB structures to the respective T. maritima and Escherichia coli chemoreceptors, we propose a CheB:chemoreceptor interaction mode.

  2. Differential geometry techniques for sets of nonlinear partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrook, Frank B.

    1990-01-01

    An attempt is made to show that the Cartan theory of partial differential equations can be a useful technique for applied mathematics. Techniques for finding consistent subfamilies of solutions that are generically rich and well-posed and for introducing potentials or other usefully consistent auxiliary fields are introduced. An extended sample calculation involving the Korteweg-de Vries equation is given.

  3. Genetic analysis of evolutionary relationships among deer (subfamily Cervinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, B C; Tate, M L

    1993-01-01

    The evolutionary relationships among 10 taxa of deer from the four genera of the subfamily Cervinae (Cervus, Elaphurus, Axis, and Dama) were examined by a comparison of their electrophoretic types for 22 proteins. We analyzed the data using both phenetic and cladistic methods and found that the genera of the Cervinae were not monophyletic. The genus Cervus was split into two distinct groups with red deer, wapiti (C. elaphus ssp.), and sika (C. nippon) in one clade and sambar (C. unicolor) and rusa (C. timorensis) in another. There was a close genetic relationship between the genus Elaphurus and the red deer, wapiti, sika group, whereas sambar and rusa were more similar to members of the genera Dama and Axis than to the other members of their own genus. These findings contrast with the taxonomy of the species that is based largely on studies of comparative morphology. Our samples (n = 5) showed fixed allelic differences between wapiti and red, wapiti and sika, and red and sika samples at 3, 6, and 7 loci, respectively. Analysis of these protein loci in a wider range of C. elaphus and C. nippon subspecies could resolve debate over the evolutionary relationships of these taxa. PMID:8340615

  4. Anatomy of 31 species from Mimosoideae (Leguminosae) subfamily on Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is about the wood anatomy of 31 species, belonging to 17 genera, of the Mimosoideae subfamily (Leguminosae), proceeding from different geographical regions of Venezuela. For each species, one to five individuals were studied. The descriptions were realized according to the IAWA Committee(1989). The studied species may be divided in two groups according to the presence or absence of septate fibers. All species of Inga showed septate fibers, whereas Albizia and Enterolobium included species with septate fibers and also species with non-septate fibers. The quantitative characteristics of the vessels and the width of rays showed sufficient variation as to be considered important characteristics from ataxonomic point of view. The most common parenchyma type was vasicetric, aliform and confluent. In Calliandra laxa, Prosopis juliflora and Zygia longifolia the main parenchyma type was in wide bands; whereas in Cedrelinga cateniformis, the main parenchyma type was thin vasicentric. All species studied, with the exception of Cedrelinga cateniformis, presented prismatic crystals in the parenchymatous axials cells. In spite of finding certain anatomical uniformity, it was possible to elaborate a key for the identification of the studied species.

  5. Molecular systematics of selected genera of subfamily mimosoidae-fabaceae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Family Mimosoidae-Fabaceae is of economic importance to local communities for its medicinal usage. It has commercial value, but the parts sold in the market are difficult to identify on the basis of morphological characters and therefore needs molecular systematics approaches. Hence, the utility of potential DNA barcodes for selected Acacia and Albizia species by using three cpDNA regions rbcL, matK and trnH-psbA was tested in this study. Our study suggests that the rbcL region can be used to identify these species and discriminate among them more effectively than matK and trnH-psbA. The latter regions proved to be less successful in sequencing particularly trnH-psbA. Therefore, rbcL is an improved and efficient tool for species identification of these medicinal plants and may be recommended for a broad series of subfamily Mimosoideae (Family: Fabaceae) plants, making it a potential DNA barcode for these taxa. Sequence data obtained from rbcL and matK also indicated that Acacia and Albizia are polyphyletic. The phylogenetic analysis on the basis of rbcL proved that Acacia nilotica and Acacia nilotica ssp. hemispherica are closely related as they form the sister groups. (author)

  6. VAMP subfamilies identified by specific R-SNARE motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Valeria; Picco, Raffaella; Vacca, Marcella; D'Esposito, Maurizio; D'Urso, Michele; Galli, Thierry; Filippini, Francesco

    2004-05-01

    In eukaryotes, interactions among the alpha-helical coiled-coil domains (CCDs) of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) play a pivotal role in mediating the fusion among vesicles and target membranes. Surface residues of such CCDs are major candidates to regulate the specificity of membrane fusion, as they may alter local charge at the interaction layers and surface of the fusion complex, possibly modulating its formation and/or the binding of non-SNARE regulatory factors. Based on alternate patterns in surface residues, we have identified two motifs which group vesicular SNAREs in two novel subfamilies: RG-SNAREs and RD-SNAREs. The RG-SNARE CCD is common to all members of the widely conserved family of long VAMPs or longins and to yeast and non-neuronal VAMPs, possibly mediating "basic" fusion mechanisms; instead, only synaptobrevins from Bilateria share an RD-SNARE CCD, which is likely to mediate interactions to specific, yet unknown, regulatory factors and/or be the landmark of rapid fusion reactions like that mediating the release of neurotransmitters.

  7. Mid-tertiary dispersal, not gondwanan vicariance explains distribution patterns in the wax palm subfamily (Ceroxyloideae: Arecaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trénel, Philipp; Gustafsson, Mats H.G.; Baker, William J.;

    2007-01-01

    The Ceroxyloideae is a small but heterogeneous subfamily of palms (Arecaceae, Palmae). It includes a Caribbean lineage (tribe Cyclospathae), a southern hemisphere disjunction (tribe Ceroxyleae), and an amphi-Andean element (tribe Phytelepheae), until recently considered a distinct subfamily (Phyt...

  8. Chemoreceptors, baroreceptors, and autonomic deregulation in children with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozal, David; Hakim, Fahed; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent sleep disorder of breathing in both adults and children that is fraught with substantial cardiovascular morbidities, the latter being attributable to a complex interplay between intermittent hypoxia (IH), episodic hypercapnia, recurrent large intra-thoracic pressure swings, and sleep disruption. Alterations in autonomic nervous system function could underlie the perturbations in cardiovascular, neurocognitive, immune, endocrine and metabolic functions that affect many of the patients suffering from OSA. Although these issues have received substantial attention in adults, the same has thus far failed to occur in children, creating a quasi misperception that children are protected. Here, we provide a critical overview of the evidence supporting the presence of autonomic nervous system (ANS) perturbations in children with OSA, draw some parallel assessments to known mechanisms in rodents and adult humans, particularly, peripheral and central chemoreceptor and baroreceptor pathways, and suggest future research directions.

  9. Chemotransduction in the Carotid Body: K+ Current Modulated by Po2 in Type I Chemoreceptor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Barneo, Jose; Lopez-Lopez, Jose R.; Urena, Juan; Gonzalez, Constancio

    1988-07-01

    The ionic currents of carotid body type I cells and their possible involvement in the detection of oxygen tension (Po2) in arterial blood are unknown. The electrical properties of these cells were studied with the whole-cell patch clamp technique, and the hypothesis that ionic conductances can be altered by changes in Po2 was tested. The results show that type I cells have voltage-dependent sodium, calcium, and potassium channels. Sodium and calcium currents were unaffected by a decrease in Po2 from 150 to 10 millimeters of mercury, whereas, with the same experimental protocol, potassium currents were reversibly reduced by 25 to 50 percent. The effect of hypoxia was independent of internal adenosine triphosphate and calcium. Thus, ionic conductances, and particularly the O2-sensitive potassium current, play a key role in the transduction mechanism of arterial chemoreceptors.

  10. Expression of D2 dopamine receptor mRNA in the arterial chemoreceptor afferent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Lawson, E E; Millhorn, D E

    1992-11-01

    Dopamine is a major neurotransmitter in the arterial chemoreceptor pathway. In the present study we wished to determine if messenger RNAs for dopamine D1 and D2 receptor are expressed in carotid body (type I cells), in sensory neurons of the petrosal ganglion which innervate the carotid body and in sympathetic neurons of the superior cervical ganglion. We failed to detect D1 receptor mRNA in any of these tissues. However, we found that D2 receptor mRNA was expressed by dopaminergic carotid body type I cells. D2 receptor mRNA was also found in petrosal ganglion neurons that innervated the carotid sinus and carotid body. In addition, a large number of sympathetic postganglionic neurons in the superior cervical ganglion expressed D2 receptor mRNA. PMID:1362730

  11. Deactivation of carotid body chemoreceptors by hyperoxia decreases blood pressure in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinski, Maciej; Lewandowski, Jacek; Przybylski, Jacek; Zalewski, Paweł; Symonides, Bartosz; Abramczyk, Piotr; Gaciong, Zbigniew

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that hyperoxia-induced deactivation of carotid body chemoreceptors reduces sympathetic activity in hypertensive patients but it does not affect blood pressure. The maintenance of blood pressure can be explained by the direct, vasoconstrictive effect of hyperoxia, which offsets diminished sympathetic activity. This study compares the effect of acute hyperoxia on hemodynamic parameters between hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Twelve males with hypertension (age 39.4±2.4 years; body mass index 27.4±1.1 kg m(-2)) and 11 normotensive males (age 39.9±2.7 years; body mass index 25.4±0.7 kg m(-2)) received, via non-rebreathing mask ventilation, ambient air, followed by 100% oxygen for 20 min. The stroke volume, heart rate, cardiac output, blood pressure, total peripheral resistance, respiratory rate, baroreceptor control of heart rate and oxygen saturation were recorded continuously. Several 30 s periods were analyzed before, during and after inducing hyperoxia. At baseline, the hypertensive subject's blood pressure was higher and their baroreflex control of heart rate was lower when compared with the normotensive control group. After the first 30 s of hyperoxia, systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressures, as well as the total peripheral resistance, decreased significantly in hypertensives but not in normotensives. After 20 min of 100% oxygen ventilation, systolic and mean blood pressures and total peripheral resistance was increased in hypertensive patients, and the cardiac output and stroke volume had decreased in both groups. The results of this study confirm that deactivation of carotid body chemoreceptors can acutely decrease blood pressure in humans.

  12. Arterial chemoreceptor activation reduces the activity of parapyramidal serotonergic neurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, A C; Moreira, T S

    2013-05-01

    The parapyramidal (ppy) region targets primarily the intermediolateral cell column and is probably involved in breathing and thermoregulation. In the present study, we tested whether ppy serotonergic neurons respond to activation of central and peripheral chemoreceptors. Bulbospinal ppy neurons (n=30) were recorded extracellularly along with the phrenic nerve activity in urethane/α-chloralose-anesthetized, paralyzed, intact (n=7) or carotid body denervated (n=6) male Wistar rats. In intact animals, most of the ppy neurons were inhibited by hypoxia (n=14 of 19) (8% O2, 30s) (1.5 ± 0.03 vs. control: 2.4 ± 0.2 Hz) or hypercapnia (n=15 of 19) (10% CO2) (1.7 ± 0.1 vs. control: 2.2 ± 0.2 Hz), although some neurons were insensitive to hypoxia (n=3 of 19) or hypercapnia (n=4 of 19). Very few neurons (n=2 of 19) were activated after hypoxia, but not after hypercapnia. In carotid body denervated rats, all the 5HT-ppy neurons (n=11) were insensitive to hypercapnia (2.1 ± 0.1 vs. control: 2.3 ± 0.09 Hz). Biotinamide-labeled cells that were recovered after histochemistry were located in the ppy region. Most labeled cells (90%) showed strong tryptophan hydroxylase immunocytochemical reactivity, indicating that they were serotonergic. The present data reveal that peripheral chemoreceptors reduce the activity of the serotonergic premotor neurons located in the ppy region. It is plausible that the serotonergic neurons of the ppy region could conceivably regulate breathing automaticity and be involved in autonomic regulation.

  13. Arterial chemoreceptor activation reduces the activity of parapyramidal serotonergic neurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, A C; Moreira, T S

    2013-05-01

    The parapyramidal (ppy) region targets primarily the intermediolateral cell column and is probably involved in breathing and thermoregulation. In the present study, we tested whether ppy serotonergic neurons respond to activation of central and peripheral chemoreceptors. Bulbospinal ppy neurons (n=30) were recorded extracellularly along with the phrenic nerve activity in urethane/α-chloralose-anesthetized, paralyzed, intact (n=7) or carotid body denervated (n=6) male Wistar rats. In intact animals, most of the ppy neurons were inhibited by hypoxia (n=14 of 19) (8% O2, 30s) (1.5 ± 0.03 vs. control: 2.4 ± 0.2 Hz) or hypercapnia (n=15 of 19) (10% CO2) (1.7 ± 0.1 vs. control: 2.2 ± 0.2 Hz), although some neurons were insensitive to hypoxia (n=3 of 19) or hypercapnia (n=4 of 19). Very few neurons (n=2 of 19) were activated after hypoxia, but not after hypercapnia. In carotid body denervated rats, all the 5HT-ppy neurons (n=11) were insensitive to hypercapnia (2.1 ± 0.1 vs. control: 2.3 ± 0.09 Hz). Biotinamide-labeled cells that were recovered after histochemistry were located in the ppy region. Most labeled cells (90%) showed strong tryptophan hydroxylase immunocytochemical reactivity, indicating that they were serotonergic. The present data reveal that peripheral chemoreceptors reduce the activity of the serotonergic premotor neurons located in the ppy region. It is plausible that the serotonergic neurons of the ppy region could conceivably regulate breathing automaticity and be involved in autonomic regulation. PMID:23403178

  14. The human VH3b gene subfamily is highly polymorphic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adderson, E.E.; Carroll, W.L. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Azmi, F.H.; Wilson, P.M.; Shackelford, P.G. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1993-07-15

    The authors have previously shown that human antibody (Ab) directed against the capsular polysaccharide of the important bacterial pathogen, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is encoded by a small group of VH3 gene family members. The majority of anti-Hib PS Ab use members of the smaller VH3b subfamily. To examine directly the available human VH3 repertoire, they have used PCR to amplify and clone candidate germ-line VH3b H chain V region genes from two unrelated subjects from whom anti-Hib polysaccharide mAb had been previously obtained. A single functional VH3b germ-line gene was obtained from one subject. This gene is identical throughout the coding region to the previously identified gene 9.1. Twelve distinct VH3b germ-line sequences, 87.6-99.8% homologous to one another, were obtained from the second subject. One of these genes, LSG1.1, is also identical to the 9.1 germ-line gene, and a second, LSG6.1 is identical to a previously reported cDNA, M85. These germ-line VH3b genes are 82.7-94.1% homologous to rearranged anti-Hib PS VH3b segments obtained from these subjects. These findings further demonstrate that considerable polymorphism of VH segments exists in the human population. Despite the presence of very highly homologous VH elements in the germ line, particular genes are highly conserved within the outbred human population. 52 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Inter-specific and developmental differences on the array of antennal chemoreceptors in four species of triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Gracco

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to investigate the pattern of chemoreceptor sensilla in adults and fifth stage nymphs of Rhodnius prolixus, R. neglectus, Triatoma infestans and T. sordida in order to study differences and similarities between genera and species. Three types of sensilla were analyzed by light microscopy: thin-walled trichoidea, thick-walled trichoidea and basiconica. The number of sensilla of each three types were counted. The length of the antennal segments were also used as a variable for the analysis. The statistical analysis showed that the number of these antennal chemoreceptors had significant differences between species and between adults and nymphs of each species. Discriminant analysis separates incompletely the fifth stage nymphs of the four species and showed similarity between them. Discriminant analysis performed with 12 variables of the antennae, allowed a complete separation of the adults of the four species.

  16. Expression of messenger RNAs for peptides and tyrosine hydroxylase in primary sensory neurons that innervate arterial baroreceptors and chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Bayliss, D A; Lawson, E E; Millhorn, D E

    1991-08-01

    Retrograde fiber tracing and in situ hybridization were used to determine expression of mRNAs for preprotachykinin A (ppTA), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), preproenkephalin A (ENK), neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY) and somatostatin (SOM) as well as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the petrosal ganglia primary sensory neurons which innervate carotid sinus baroreceptors and carotid body chemoreceptors. Perfusion of the carotid sinus with the retrogradely transported dye (Fluoro-Gold) labeled primary sensory neurons in petrosal ganglion. Numerous somata in the petrosal ganglion labeled with dye contained mRNAs for all the above peptides, except SOM. Moreover, TH mRNA was found in a substantial number of retrogradely labeled cells in the petrosal ganglion. This study provides information concerning which of the numerous peptides identified in sensory neurons of petrosal ganglion may be involved in modulation of the arterial baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes. PMID:1681484

  17. Peripheral chemoreceptors tune inspiratory drive via tonic expiratory neuron hubs in the medullary ventral respiratory column network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, L S; Nuding, S C; Ott, M M; Dean, J B; Bolser, D C; O'Connor, R; Morris, K F; Lindsey, B G

    2015-01-01

    Models of brain stem ventral respiratory column (VRC) circuits typically emphasize populations of neurons, each active during a particular phase of the respiratory cycle. We have proposed that "tonic" pericolumnar expiratory (t-E) neurons tune breathing during baroreceptor-evoked reductions and central chemoreceptor-evoked enhancements of inspiratory (I) drive. The aims of this study were to further characterize the coordinated activity of t-E neurons and test the hypothesis that peripheral chemoreceptors also modulate drive via inhibition of t-E neurons and disinhibition of their inspiratory neuron targets. Spike trains of 828 VRC neurons were acquired by multielectrode arrays along with phrenic nerve signals from 22 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly blocked, artificially ventilated adult cats. Forty-eight of 191 t-E neurons fired synchronously with another t-E neuron as indicated by cross-correlogram central peaks; 32 of the 39 synchronous pairs were elements of groups with mutual pairwise correlations. Gravitational clustering identified fluctuations in t-E neuron synchrony. A network model supported the prediction that inhibitory populations with spike synchrony reduce target neuron firing probabilities, resulting in offset or central correlogram troughs. In five animals, stimulation of carotid chemoreceptors evoked changes in the firing rates of 179 of 240 neurons. Thirty-two neuron pairs had correlogram troughs consistent with convergent and divergent t-E inhibition of I cells and disinhibitory enhancement of drive. Four of 10 t-E neurons that responded to sequential stimulation of peripheral and central chemoreceptors triggered 25 cross-correlograms with offset features. The results support the hypothesis that multiple afferent systems dynamically tune inspiratory drive in part via coordinated t-E neurons.

  18. Reductions in carotid chemoreceptor activity with low-dose dopamine improves baroreflex control of heart rate during hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozer, Michael T; Holbein, Walter W; Joyner, Michael J; Curry, Timothy B; Limberg, Jacqueline K

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the contribution of the carotid body chemoreceptors to changes in baroreflex control of heart rate with exposure to hypoxia. We hypothesized spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (scBRS) would be reduced with hypoxia and this effect would be blunted when carotid chemoreceptor activity was reduced with low-dose dopamine. Fifteen healthy adults (11 M/4 F) completed two visits randomized to intravenous dopamine or placebo (saline). On each visit, subjects were exposed to 5-min normoxia (~99% SpO2), followed by 5-min hypoxia (~84% SpO2). Blood pressure (intra-arterial catheter) and heart rate (ECG) were measured continuously and scBRS was assessed by spectrum and sequence methodologies. scBRS was reduced with hypoxia (P dopamine (P dopamine (P dopamine did not attenuate the decrease in baroreflex sensitivity to falling pressures (scBRS "down-down"; P > 0.05). Present findings are consistent with a reduction in scBRS with systemic hypoxia. Furthermore, we show this effect is partially mediated by the carotid body chemoreceptors, given the fall in scBRS is attenuated when activity of the chemoreceptors is reduced with low-dose dopamine. However, the improvement in scBRS with dopamine appears to be specific to rising blood pressures. These results may have important implications for impairments in baroreflex function common in disease states of acute and/or chronic hypoxemia, as well as the experimental use of dopamine to assess such changes. PMID:27418545

  19. Four distinct alpha satellite subfamilies shared by human chromosomes 13, 14 and 21.

    OpenAIRE

    Vissel, B; Choo, K H

    1991-01-01

    We describe the characterisation of four alpha satellite sequences which are found on a subset of the human acrocentric chromosomes. Direct sequence study, and analysis of somatic cell hybrids carrying specific human chromosomes indicate a unique 'higher-order structure' for each of the four sequences, suggesting that they belong to different subfamilies of alpha DNA. Under very high stringency of Southern hybridisation conditions, all four subfamilies were detected on chromosomes 13, 14 and ...

  20. Comamonas testosteroni uses a chemoreceptor for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates to trigger chemotactic responses towards aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bin; Huang, Zhou; Fan, Zheng; Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis towards aromatic compounds has been frequently observed; however, knowledge of how bacteria sense aromatic compounds is limited. Comamonas testosteroni CNB-1 is able to grow on a range of aromatic compounds. This study investigated the chemotactic responses of CNB-1 to 10 aromatic compounds. We constructed a chemoreceptor-free, non-chemotactic mutant, CNB-1Δ20, by disruption of all 19 putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) and the atypical chemoreceptor in strain CNB-1. Individual complementation revealed that a putative MCP (tagged MCP2201) was involved in triggering chemotaxis towards all 10 aromatic compounds. The recombinant sensory domain of MCP2201 did not bind to 3- or 4-hydroxybenzoate, protocatechuate, catechol, benzoate, vanillate and gentisate, but bound oxaloacetate, citrate, cis-aconitate, isocitrate, α-ketoglutarate, succinate, fumarate and malate. The mutant CNB-1ΔpmdF that lost the ability to metabolize 4-hydroxybenzoate and protocatechuate also lost its chemotactic response to these compounds, suggesting that taxis towards aromatic compounds is metabolism-dependent. Based on the ligand profile, we proposed that MCP2201 triggers taxis towards aromatic compounds by sensing TCA cycle intermediates. Our hypothesis was further supported by the finding that introduction of the previously characterized pseudomonad chemoreceptor (McpS) for TCA cycle intermediates into CNB-1Δ20 likewise triggered chemotaxis towards aromatic compounds.

  1. P2Y1 receptors expressed by C1 neurons determine peripheral chemoreceptor modulation of breathing, sympathetic activity, and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenker, Ian C; Sobrinho, Cleyton R; Takakura, Ana C; Mulkey, Daniel K; Moreira, Thiago S

    2013-08-01

    Catecholaminergic C1 cells of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) are key determinants of the sympathoexcitatory response to peripheral chemoreceptor activation. Overactivation of this reflex is thought to contribute to increased sympathetic activity and hypertension; however, molecular mechanisms linking peripheral chemoreceptor drive to hypertension remain poorly understood. We have recently determined that activation of P2Y1 receptors in the RVLM mimicked effects of peripheral chemoreceptor activation. Therefore, we hypothesize that P2Y1 receptors regulate peripheral chemoreceptor drive in this region. Here, we determine whether P2Y1 receptors are expressed by C1 neurons in the RVLM and contribute to peripheral chemoreceptor control of breathing, sympathetic activity, and blood pressure. We found that injection of a specific P2Y1 receptor agonist (MRS2365) into the RVLM of anesthetized adult rats increased phrenic nerve activity (≈55%), sympathetic nerve activity (38 ± 6%), and blood pressure (23 ± 1 mm Hg), whereas application of a specific P2Y1 receptor antagonist (MRS2179) decreased peripheral chemoreceptor-mediated activation of phrenic nerve activity, sympathetic nerve activity, and blood pressure. To establish that P2Y1 receptors are expressed by C1 cells, we determine in the brain slice preparation using cell-attached recording techniques that cells responsive to MRS2365 are immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (a marker of C1 cells), and we determine in vivo that C1-lesioned animals do not respond to RVLM injection of MRS2365. These data identify P2Y1 receptors as key determinants of peripheral chemoreceptor regulation of breathing, sympathetic nerve activity, and blood pressure.

  2. Analysis of the features and source gene composition of the AluYg6 subfamily of human retrotransposons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brookfield John FY

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alu elements are a family of SINE retrotransposons in primates. They are classified into subfamilies according to specific diagnostic mutations from the general Alu consensus. It is now believed that there may be several retrotranspositionally-competent source genes within an Alu subfamily. To investigate the evolution of young Alu elements it is critical to have access to complete subfamilies, which, following the release of the final human genome assembly, can now be obtained using in silico methods. Results 380 elements belonging to the young AluYg6 subfamily were identified in the human genome, a number significantly exceeding prior expectations. An AluYg6 element was also identified in the chimpanzee genome, indicating that the subfamily is older than previously estimated, and appears to have undergone a period of dormancy before its expansion. The relative contributions of back mutation and gene conversion to variation at the six diagnostic positions are examined, and cases of complete forward gene conversion events are reported. Two small subfamilies derived from AluYg6 have been identified, named AluYg6a2 and AluYg5b3, which contain 40 and 27 members, respectively. These small subfamilies are used to illustrate the ambiguity regarding Alu subfamily definition, and to assess the contribution of secondary source genes to the AluYg6 subfamily. Conclusion The number of elements in the AluYg6 subfamily greatly exceeds prior expectations, indicating that the current knowledge of young Alu subfamilies is incomplete, and that prior analyses that have been carried out using these data may have generated inaccurate results. A definition of primary and secondary source genes has been provided, and it has been shown that several source genes have contributed to the proliferation of the AluYg6 subfamily. Access to the sequence data for the complete AluYg6 subfamily will be invaluable in future computational analyses investigating

  3. Two members of a distinct subfamily of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors differentially expressed in rat brain.

    OpenAIRE

    Erlander, M G; Lovenberg, T W; Baron, B M; de Lecea, L; Danielson, P E; Racke, M; Slone, A L; Siegel, B W; Foye, P. E.; Cannon, K

    1993-01-01

    We report two serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) receptors, MR22 and REC17, that belong to the G-protein-associated receptor superfamily. MR22 and REC17 are 371 and 357 amino acids long, respectively, as deduced from nucleotide sequence and share 68% mutual amino acid identity and 30-35% identity with known catecholamine and 5-HT receptors. Saturable binding of 125I-labeled (+)-lysergic acid diethylamide to transiently expressed MR22 in COS-M6 cells was inhibited by ergotamine > methiothep...

  4. Identification and Structure-Function Analysis of Subfamily Selective G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homan, Kristoff T.; Larimore, Kelly M.; Elkins, Jonathan M.; Szklarz, Marta; Knapp, Stefan; Tesmer, John J.G. [Michigan; (Oxford)

    2015-02-13

    Selective inhibitors of individual subfamilies of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) would serve as useful chemical probes as well as leads for therapeutic applications ranging from heart failure to Parkinson’s disease. To identify such inhibitors, differential scanning fluorimetry was used to screen a collection of known protein kinase inhibitors that could increase the melting points of the two most ubiquitously expressed GRKs: GRK2 and GRK5. Enzymatic assays on 14 of the most stabilizing hits revealed that three exhibit nanomolar potency of inhibition for individual GRKs, some of which exhibiting orders of magnitude selectivity. Most of the identified compounds can be clustered into two chemical classes: indazole/dihydropyrimidine-containing compounds that are selective for GRK2 and pyrrolopyrimidine-containing compounds that potently inhibit GRK1 and GRK5 but with more modest selectivity. The two most potent inhibitors representing each class, GSK180736A and GSK2163632A, were cocrystallized with GRK2 and GRK1, and their atomic structures were determined to 2.6 and 1.85 Å spacings, respectively. GSK180736A, developed as a Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase inhibitor, binds to GRK2 in a manner analogous to that of paroxetine, whereas GSK2163632A, developed as an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor, occupies a novel region of the GRK active site cleft that could likely be exploited to achieve more selectivity. However, neither compound inhibits GRKs more potently than their initial targets. This data provides the foundation for future efforts to rationally design even more potent and selective GRK inhibitors.

  5. Function of chemoreceptor organs in spatial orientation of the lobster, Homarus americanus: differences and overlap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devine, D.V.; Atema, J.

    1982-08-01

    Three of the lobster's main chemoreceptor organs, the lateral and medial antennules (representing smell) and the dactylus-propodus segments of the walking legs (representing taste), are physiologically quite similar. The authors examined their role in spatial orientation in a food-odor stimulus field. Control animals almost always oriented correctly and immediately to an odor plume. Lobsters with unilateral ablations of lateral antennules lost this ability, but did not show preferential turning toward the intact side. Unilateral medial antennule ablation did not affect orientation. Removal of all aesthetasc hairs from one lateral antennule caused loss of orientation ability less severe than unilateral ablation of the entire lateral antennule. Lobsters with unilaterally ablated lateral antennules and blocked walking leg receptors turned preferentially toward the side of the intact antennule. Thus, it appears that intact lobsters orient in odor space by tropotaxis principally using aesthetasc receptor input. Since loss of appendages is relatively common in lobsters, this partial overlap of organ function may serve the animal well in nature.

  6. Oxygen-related chemoreceptor drive to breathe during H₂S infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haouzi, Philippe; Sonobe, Takashi; Chenuel, Bruno

    2014-09-15

    This study addresses the following question: Could the acute depression in breathing produced by hyperoxia, a reflection of the tonic drive to breathe from the arterial chemoreceptors, be accounted for by a background level of endogenous H2S? To address this question, we produced a stable but moderate increase in breathing (24±11%) via continuous infusion of low levels of H2S, in 10 spontaneously breathing urethane-sedated rats. We found that acute exposure to 100% O2 (20 tests) decreased minute ventilation (V˙(I)) from 301±51 to 210±43 ml/min within 15s in control conditions, but no additional significant drop in V˙(I) was observed during H2S induced hyperpnea. In addition, no decrease in the estimated concentrations of gaseous H2S in the arterial blood was observed during the hyperoxic tests. It is concluded that the ventilatory depression induced by high O2 appears to be limited to the tonic background peripheral chemosensory drive to breathe, but has little or no impact on the CB stimulation produced by low levels of H2S.

  7. The Structure of a Soluble Chemoreceptor Suggests a Mechanism for Propagating Conformational Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollard, Abiola M.; Bilwes, Alexandrine M.; Crane, Brian R.; Cornell

    2009-09-02

    Transmembrane chemoreceptors, also known as methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs), translate extracellular signals into intracellular responses in the bacterial chemotaxis system. MCP ligand binding domains control the activity of the CheA kinase, situated {approx}200 {angstrom} away, across the cytoplasmic membrane. The 2.17 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a Thermotoga maritima soluble receptor (Tm14) reveals distortions in its dimeric four-helix bundle that provide insight into the conformational states available to MCPs for propagating signals. A bulge in one helix generates asymmetry between subunits that displaces the kinase-interacting tip, which resides more than 100 {angstrom} away. The maximum bundle distortion maps to the adaptation region of transmembrane MCPs where reversible methylation of acidic residues tunes receptor activity. Minor alterations in coiled-coil packing geometry translate the bulge distortion to a >25 {angstrom} movement of the tip relative to the bundle stalks. The Tm14 structure discloses how alterations in local helical structure, which could be induced by changes in methylation state and/or by conformational signals from membrane proximal regions, can reposition a remote domain that interacts with the CheA kinase.

  8. Silk secretion from tarantula feet revisited: alleged spigots are probably chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foelix, Rainer F; Rast, Bastian; Peattie, Anne M

    2012-04-01

    Controversial views have been expressed about whether tarantula feet can secrete fine silk threads that could prevent them from falling off smooth vertical surfaces. Two studies have claimed that 'ribbed hairs' on the tarsi of tarantulas produce silk. We examined these ribbed hairs in several tarantula species using light and scanning electron microscopy, and compared them with the silk-producing spigots on the abdominal spinnerets. We found that, morphologically, these ribbed hairs correspond very closely to known chemosensitive hairs in spiders; they have a distinct socket, a bent hair shaft with fine cuticular ridges, an eccentric double lumen within the hair shaft, and a blunt tip with a subterminal pore. Spigots on the spinnerets have a large bulbous base instead of a socket, a long shaft with a scaly surface and a central terminal pore. We never observed any silk threads coming out of these ribbed hairs under the electron microscope. By contrast, silk threads exiting the spigots on the spinnerets were common. Interestingly, ribbed hairs also occur on the spinnerets, often side by side with the silk-producing spigots. Our conclusion is that the ribbed hairs are chemoreceptors, not spigots. Observations of live tarantulas clinging inverted to glass coverslips confirmed that some substance is produced by the ribbed hairs, but it remains unclear whether this secretion is actually silk. In any case, the thousands of adhesive setae on the tarsi of legs and pedipalps almost certainly far outweigh any potential contribution from the sparsely distributed trails secreted by the ribbed hairs.

  9. Bicarbonate-sensitive soluble and transmembrane adenylyl cyclases in peripheral chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Ana R; Holmes, Andrew P S; Sample, Vedangi; Kumar, Prem; Cann, Martin J; Monteiro, Emília C; Zhang, Jin; Gauda, Estelle B

    2013-08-15

    Stimulation of the carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors by hypercapnia triggers a reflex ventilatory response via a cascade of cellular events, which includes generation of cAMP. However, it is not known if molecular CO2/HCO3(-) and/or H(+) mediate this effect and how these molecules contribute to cAMP production. We previously reported that the CB highly expresses HCO3(-)-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). In the present study we systematically characterize the role of sAC in the CB, comparing the effect of isohydric hypercapnia (IH) in cAMP generation through activation of sAC or transmembrane-adenylyl cyclase (tmAC). Pharmacological deactivation of sAC and tmAC decreased the CB cAMP content in normocapnia and IH with no differences between these two conditions. Changes from normocapnia to IH did not effect the degree of PKA activation and the carotid sinus nerve discharge frequency. sAC and tmAC are functional in CB but intracellular elevations in CO2/HCO3(-) in IH conditions on their own are insufficient to further activate these enzymes, suggesting that the hypercapnic response is dependent on secondary acidosis.

  10. Distribution and innervation of putative arterial chemoreceptors in the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Catalina; Fong, Angelina Y; Brink, Dee L; Milsom, William K

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral arterial chemoreceptors have been located previously in the carotid labyrinth, the aortic arch, and the pulmocutaneous artery of frogs. In the present study we used cholera toxin B neuronal tract tracing and immunohistochemical markers for cholinergic cells (vesicular acetylcholine transporter [VAChT]), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and serotonin (5HT) to identify putative O2-sensing cells in Rana catesbeiana. We found potential O2-sensing cells in all three vascular areas innervated by branches of the vagus nerve, whereas only cells in the carotid labyrinth were innervated by the glossopharyngeal nerve. Cells containing either 5HT or TH were found in all three sites, whereas cells containing both neurotransmitters were found only in the carotid labyrinth. Cell bodies containing VAChT were not found at any site. The morphology and innervation of putative O2-sensing cells were similar to those of glomus cells found in other vertebrates. The presence of 5HT- and TH-immunoreactive cells in the aorta, pulmocutaneous artery, and carotid labyrinth appears to reflect a phylogenetic transition between the major neurotransmitter seen in the putative O2-sensing cells of fish (5HT) and those found in the glomus cells of mammals (acetylcholine, adenosine, and catecholamines).

  11. Phylogenetic relationship and morphological evolution in the subfamily Limenitidinae (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Zhang; Enbo Ma; Yang Zhong; Tianwen Cao; Yupeng Geng; Yuan Zhang; Ke Jin; Zhumei Ren; Rui Zhang; Yaping Guo

    2008-01-01

    The mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (CO1) gene and the nuclear elongation factor lα (EF-Iα) gene were sequenced from 29 species of Nymphalidae (Nymphalidae, Lepidoptera). Phylogenetic trees were constructed based on the sequences determined from the 29 species and sequences of other 36 species deposited in GenBank using the neighbor-joining (N J), maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian methods with Libythea celtis (Libytheinae) as the outgroup. Our phylogenetic trees indicated four major clades. Clade A includes three subfamilies: Apaturinae, Nymphalinae, and Limenitidinae, excluding the tribe Limenitidini; Ciade B includes the subfamilies Heliconiinae and the tribe Limenitidini; Clade C includes Satyrinae, Calinaginae, Charaxinae and Morphinae; and Clade D includes subfamily Danainae. Our study suggested that the tribes Pseudergolini, Biblidini, Limenitidini and Cyrestidini should be considered as subfamilies and confirmed the interspecific relationships within the subfamily Pseudergolinae, namely Amnosia + (Pseudergolis + (Stibochiona + Dichorragia)). We then mapped three morphological characters (spot of anal angle, eyespots, and process from outer margin of hind wing) onto the phylogenetic tree constructed by ML analysis using the combined sequence data. Based on this the evolutionary patterns of these morphological characters were identified, they indicated that the three characters evolved repeatedly in the family Nymphalidae.

  12. Inhibition of the pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus reduces genioglossal activity elicited by stimulation of the retrotrapezoid chemoreceptor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Josiane N; Lucena, Elvis V; Silva, Talita M; Damasceno, Rosélia S; Takakura, Ana C; Moreira, Thiago S

    2016-07-22

    The Kölliker-Fuse (KF) region, located in the dorsolateral pons, projects to several brainstem areas involved in respiratory regulation, including the chemoreceptor neurons within the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN). Several lines of evidence indicate that the pontine KF region plays an important role in the control of the upper airways for the maintenance of appropriate airflow to and from the lungs. Specifically, we hypothesized that the KF region is involved in mediating the response of the hypoglossal motor activity to central respiratory chemoreflex activation and to stimulation of the chemoreceptor neurons within the RTN region. To test this hypothesis, we combined immunohistochemistry and physiological experiments. We found that in the KF, the majority of biotinylated dextran amine (BDA)-labeled axonal varicosities contained detectable levels of vesicular glutamate transporter-2 (VGLUT2), but few contained glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD67). The majority of the RTN neurons that were FluorGold (FG)-immunoreactive (i.e., projected to the KF) contained hypercapnia-induced Fos, but did not express tyrosine hydroxylase. In urethane-anesthetized sino-aortic denervated and vagotomized male Wistar rats, hypercapnia (10% CO2) or N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) injection (0.1mM) in the RTN increased diaphragm (DiaEMG) and genioglossus muscle (GGEMG) activities and elicited abdominal (AbdEMG) activity. Bilateral injection of muscimol (GABA-A agonist; 2mM) into the KF region reduced the increase in DiaEMG and GGEMG produced by hypercapnia or NMDA into the RTN. Our data suggest that activation of chemoreceptor neurons in the RTN produces a significant increase in the genioglossus muscle activity and the excitatory pathway is dependent on the neurons located in the dorsolateral pontine KF region. PMID:27126558

  13. Leptin signaling in the nucleus of the solitary tract alters the cardiovascular responses to activation of the chemoreceptor reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriello, John; Moreau, Jason M

    2012-10-01

    Circulating levels of leptin are elevated in individuals suffering from chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). Systemic and central administration of leptin elicits increases in sympathetic nervous activity (SNA), arterial pressure (AP), and heart rate (HR), and it attenuates the baroreceptor reflex, cardiovascular responses that are similar to those observed during CIH as a result of activation of chemoreceptors by the systemic hypoxia. Therefore, experiments were done in anesthetized Wistar rats to investigate the effects of leptin in nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) on AP and HR responses, and renal SNA (RSNA) responses during activation of NTS neurons and the chemoreceptor reflex. Microinjection of leptin (5-100 ng; 20 nl) into caudal NTS pressor sites (l-glutamate; l-Glu; 0.25 M; 10 nl) elicited dose-related increases in AP, HR, and RSNA. Leptin microinjections (5 ng; 20 nl) into these sites potentiated the increase in AP and HR elicited by l-Glu. Additionally, bilateral injections of leptin (5 ng; 100 nl) into NTS potentiated the increase in AP and attenuated the bradycardia to systemic activation of the chemoreflex. In the Zucker obese rat, leptin injections into NTS neither elicited cardiovascular responses nor altered the cardiovascular responses to activation of the chemoreflex. Taken together, these data indicate that leptin exerts a modulatory effect on neuronal circuits within NTS that control cardiovascular responses elicited during the reflex activation of arterial chemoreceptors and suggest that increased AP and SNA observed in individuals with CIH may be due, in part, by leptin's effects on the chemoreflex at the level of NTS.

  14. Distribution and innervation of putative peripheral arterial chemoreceptors in the red-eared slider (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Catalina; Fong, Angelina Y; Milsom, William K

    2015-06-15

    Peripheral arterial chemoreceptors have been isolated to the common carotid artery, aorta, and pulmonary artery of turtles. However, the putative neurotransmitters associated with these chemoreceptors have not yet been described. The goal of the present study was to determine the neurochemical content, innervations, and distribution of putative oxygen-sensing cells in the central vasculature of turtles and to derive homologies with peripheral arterial chemoreceptors of other vertebrates. We used tract tracing together with immunohistochemical markers for cholinergic cells (vesicular acetylcholine transporter [VAChT]), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine synthesis), and serotonin (5HT) to identify putative oxygen-sensing cells and to determine their anatomical relation to branches of the vagus nerve (Xth cranial nerve). We found potential oxygen-sensing cells in all three chemosensory areas innervated by branches of the Xth cranial nerve. Cells containing either 5HT or VAChT were found in all three sites. The morphology and size of these cells resemble glomus cells found in amphibians, mammals, tortoises, and lizards. Furthermore, we found populations of cholinergic cells located at the base of the aorta and pulmonary artery that are likely involved in efferent regulation of vessel resistance. Catecholamine-containing cells were not found in any of the putative chemosensitive areas. The presence of 5HT- and VAChT-immunoreactive cells in segments of the common carotid artery, aorta, and pulmonary artery appears to reflect a transition between cells containing the major neurotransmitters seen in fish (5HT) and mammals (ACh and adenosine).

  15. A new subfamily of the grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acridoidea:Gomphoceridae) from the Tibetan Plateau of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dao-Chuan Zhang; Yu-Long Zhang; Xiang-Chu Yin

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a new subfamily,a new genus and a new species,that is,Pacrinae subfam.nov.,Pacris gen.nov and Pacris xizangensis sp.nov in Gomphoceridae.The new subfamily is allied to Orinhippinae of Gomphoceridae and it differs from the latter by wings and tympanum absent.The new genus is similar to Orinhippus Uvarov,1921 but differs from the latter in: (i) foveolae absent; (ii) tegmina absent; (iii) tympanum absent;(iv) hind margin ofpronotum with incised in the middle.Type specimens are deposited in the Museum of Hebei University,Baoding,China.

  16. A young Alu subfamily amplified independently in human and African great apes lineages.

    OpenAIRE

    Zietkiewicz, E; Richer, C.; Makalowski, W; Jurka, J; Labuda, D

    1994-01-01

    A variety of Alu subfamilies amplified in primate genomes at different evolutionary time periods. Alu Sb2 belongs to a group of young subfamilies with a characteristic two-nucleotide deletion at positions 65/66. It consists of repeats having a 7-nucleotide duplication of a sequence segment involving positions 246 through 252. The presence of Sb2 inserts was examined in five genomic loci in 120 human DNA samples as well as in DNAs of higher primates. The lack of the insertional polymorphism se...

  17. Nine novel microsatellite markers for the army ant Simopelta pergandei (subfamily Ponerinae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronauer, D.J.C.; Boomsma, J.J.; Pierce, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    Simopelta (subfamily Ponerinae) army ants are specialized predators of other ants in New World tropical forests. Although they show a striking convergence in overall life-history with the well known army ants of the subfamilies Aenictinae, Dorylinae, and Ecitoninae, the genus has been little.......0) and expected heterozygosities between 0.32 and 0.85 (mean: 0.65). These genetic markers will be useful in studying the sociobiology and molecular ecology of Simopelta army ants and in elucidating convergent evolutionary trajectories that have culminated in the army ant lifestyle...

  18. Extracellular H+ induces Ca2+ signals in respiratory chemoreceptors of zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Sara J; Jonz, Michael G; Perry, Steve F

    2015-02-01

    Neuroepithelial cells (NECs) of the fish gill are respiratory chemoreceptors that detect changes in O2 and CO2/H(+) and are homologous to type I cells of the mammalian carotid body. In zebrafish (Danio rerio), stimulation of NECs by hypoxia or hypercapnia initiates inhibition of K(+) channels and subsequent membrane depolarisation. The goal of the present study was to further elucidate, in zebrafish NECs, the signalling pathways that underlie CO2/H(+) sensing and generate intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) signals. Breathing frequency was elevated maximally in fish exposed to 5 % CO2 (~37.5 mmHg). Measurement of [Ca(2+)]i in isolated NECs using Fura-2 imaging indicated that [Ca(2+)]i increased in response to acidic hypercapnia (5 % CO2, pH 6.6) and isocapnic acidosis (normocapnia, pH 6.6), but not to isohydric hypercapnia (5 % CO2, pH 7.6). Measurement of intracellular pH (pHi) using BCECF demonstrated a rapid decrease in pHi in response to acidic and isohydric hypercapnia, while isocapnic acidosis produced a smaller change in pHi. Intracellular acidification was reduced by the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide, without affecting [Ca(2+)]i responses. Moreover, intracellular acidification using acetate (at constant extracellular pH) was without effect on [Ca(2+)]i. The acid-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i persisted in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) and was unaffected by Ca(2+) channel blockers (Cd(2+), Ni(2+) or nifedipine). The results of this study demonstrate that, unlike type I cells, extracellular H(+) is critical to the hypercapnia-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in NECs. The increase in [Ca(2+)]i occurs independently of pHi and appears to originate primarily from Ca(2+) derived from intracellular stores.

  19. TASK-2 channels contribute to pH sensitivity of retrotrapezoid nucleus chemoreceptor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Benamer, Najate; Zanella, Sébastien; Kumar, Natasha N; Shi, Yingtang; Bévengut, Michelle; Penton, David; Guyenet, Patrice G; Lesage, Florian; Gestreau, Christian; Barhanin, Jacques; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2013-10-01

    Phox2b-expressing glutamatergic neurons of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) display properties expected of central respiratory chemoreceptors; they are directly activated by CO2/H(+) via an unidentified pH-sensitive background K(+) channel and, in turn, facilitate brainstem networks that control breathing. Here, we used a knock-out mouse model to examine whether TASK-2 (K2P5), an alkaline-activated background K(+) channel, contributes to RTN neuronal pH sensitivity. We made patch-clamp recordings in brainstem slices from RTN neurons that were identified by expression of GFP (directed by the Phox2b promoter) or β-galactosidase (from the gene trap used for TASK-2 knock-out). Whereas nearly all RTN cells from control mice were pH sensitive (95%, n = 58 of 61), only 56% of GFP-expressing RTN neurons from TASK-2(-/-) mice (n = 49 of 88) could be classified as pH sensitive (>30% reduction in firing rate from pH 7.0 to pH 7.8); the remaining cells were pH insensitive (44%). Moreover, none of the recorded RTN neurons from TASK-2(-/-) mice selected based on β-galactosidase activity (a subpopulation of GFP-expressing neurons) were pH sensitive. The alkaline-activated background K(+) currents were reduced in amplitude in RTN neurons from TASK-2(-/-) mice that retained some pH sensitivity but were absent from pH-insensitive cells. Finally, using a working heart-brainstem preparation, we found diminished inhibition of phrenic burst amplitude by alkalization in TASK-2(-/-) mice, with apneic threshold shifted to higher pH levels. In conclusion, alkaline-activated TASK-2 channels contribute to pH sensitivity in RTN neurons, with effects on respiration in situ that are particularly prominent near apneic threshold.

  20. KCNQ channels determine serotonergic modulation of ventral surface chemoreceptors and respiratory drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawryluk, Joanna M; Moreira, Thiago S; Takakura, Ana C; Wenker, Ian C; Tzingounis, Anastasios V; Mulkey, Daniel K

    2012-11-21

    Chemosensitive neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) regulate breathing in response to CO(2)/H(+) changes. Their activity is also sensitive to neuromodulatory inputs from multiple respiratory centers, and thus they serve as a key nexus of respiratory control. However, molecular mechanisms that control their activity and susceptibility to neuromodulation are unknown. Here, we show in vitro and in vivo that KCNQ channels are critical determinants of RTN neural activity. In particular, we find that pharmacological block of KCNQ channels (XE991, 10 μm) increased basal activity and CO(2) responsiveness of RTN neurons in rat brain slices, whereas KCNQ channel activation (retigabine, 2-40 μm) silenced these neurons. Interestingly, we also find that KCNQ and apamin-sensitive SK channels act synergistically to regulate firing rate of RTN chemoreceptors; simultaneous blockade of both channels led to a increase in CO(2) responsiveness. Furthermore, we also show that KCNQ channels but not SK channels are downstream effectors of serotonin modulation of RTN activity in vitro. In contrast, inhibition of KCNQ channel did not prevent modulation of RTN activity by Substance P or thyrotropin-releasing hormone, previously identified neuromodulators of RTN chemoreception. Importantly, we also show that KCNQ channels are critical for RTN activity in vivo. Inhibition of KCNQ channels lowered the CO(2) threshold for phrenic nerve discharge in anesthetized rats and decreased the ventilatory response to serotonin in awake and anesthetized animals. Given that serotonergic dysfunction may contribute to respiratory failure, our findings suggest KCNQ channels as a new therapeutic avenue for respiratory complications associated with multiple neurological disorders.

  1. Four new species of the subfamily Psilodercinae (Araneae: Ochyroceratidae) from Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunxia; Li, Shuqiang

    2013-01-01

    Four new species of the family Ochyroceratidae are described from Southwest China: Althepus christae sp. nov., Lecler- cera undulatus sp. nov., Psiloderces incomptus sp. nov. from Yunnan; and P. exilis sp. nov. from Guangxi. The four spe- cies belong to the subfamily Psilodercinae.

  2. Bayesian Inference for Concomitants based on Weibull Subfamily of Morgenstern Family Under Generalized Order Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Mohie EL-Din

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, for Weibull subfamily of Morgenstern family, the joint density of the concomitants of generalized order statistics (GOS's is used to obtain the maximum likelihood estimates (MLE and Bayes estimates for the distribution parameters. Applications of these results for concomitants of order statistics are presented.

  3. Flora of subfamily Prunoideae of family Rosaceae in botanical garden of Dnipropetrovsk university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Opanasenko

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The present state of genofond of the 24 taxa collection of subfamily Prunoideae Focke (family Rosaceae Juss in DNU botanical garden has been analysed. Valuable genotypes for practical use in the development of landscape, farm horticulture and further selection were marked out. The ways of further exploit was planned.

  4. New taxa of the subfamily Doryctinae Foerster (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) from French Guiana and Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braet, Y.; Achterberg, van C.

    2001-01-01

    Three genera of the subfamily Doryctinae Foerster, 1862 (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) are treated and keyed: Ptesimogaster Marsh, 1965, Caingangia Marsh, 1993, and Leptodoryctes Barbalho & Penteado- Dias, 1999. The latter genus is characterised by the presence of an apical setal comb on the hind tibia.

  5. A new genus and subgenus of the subfamily Euphorinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) from East Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belokobylskij, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    Three new taxa belonging to the subfamily Euphorinae Foerster (Hymenoptera; Braconidae) are described and illustrated. Mama mariae gen. nov. & spec. nov. from southern Far East Russia and two species of the subgenus Chaetocentistes nov. of the genus Centistes Haliday. A key to species (i.e. Centiste

  6. Branchial O(2) chemoreceptors in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus: Control of cardiorespiratory function in response to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeraik, Vivian M; Belão, Thiago C; Florindo, Luiz Henrique; Kalinin, Ana L; Rantin, F Tadeu

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the distribution and orientation of gill O(2) chemoreceptors in Oreochromis niloticus and their role in cardiorespiratory responses to graded hypoxia. Intact fish, and a group with the first gill arch excised (operated), were submitted to graded hypoxia and their cardiorespiratory responses (oxygen uptake - V˙O(2) , breathing frequency - fR, ventilatory stroke volume - VT, gill ventilation - V˙G, O(2) extraction from the ventilatory current - EO(2) , and heart rate - fH) were compared. Their responses to bolus injections of NaCN into the bloodstream (internal) or ventilatory water stream (external) were also determined. The V˙O(2) of operated fish was significantly lower at the deepest levels of hypoxia. Neither reflex bradycardia nor ventilatory responses were completely abolished by bilateral excision of the first gill arch. EO(2) of the operated group was consistently lower than the intact group. The responses to internal and external NaCN included transient decreases in fH and increases in fR and Vamp (ventilation amplitude). These cardiorespiratory responses were attenuated but not abolished in the operated group, indicating that chemoreceptors are not restricted to the first gill arch, and are sensitive to oxygen levels in both blood and water.

  7. Rho participates in chemoreceptor-induced changes in morphology to hair bundle mechanoreceptors of the sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire, Kathryn M; Watson, Glen M

    2013-06-01

    Adjustable hair bundle mechanoreceptors located on anemone tentacles detect movements of nearby, swimming prey. The hair bundles are formed by numerous actin-based stereocilia that converge onto a single, central kinocilium. Interestingly, morphological and functional changes to the hair bundles are induced by activating chemoreceptors that bind prey-derived N-acetylated sugars and proline, respectively. Morphological changes to the hair bundles involve alterations to the actin cytoskeleton of stereocilia. A pharmacological activation of Rho induces hair bundles to elongate to lengths comparable to those normally induced by exposure to N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) and prevents shortening of hair bundles normally induced by proline. Rho inhibition prevents NANA-induced elongation, but does not prevent proline-induced shortening of hair bundles. Western blots feature a band similar in mass to that predicted for a Rho homolog in the genome of Nematostella. Immunocytochemistry localizes Rho in stereocilia of the hair bundle. Anemone hair bundles arise from multicellular complexes. Data from experiments using heptanol, a gap junction uncoupler, indicate that cell-cell communication is required in order for activated chemoreceptors to induce morphological changes to the hair bundles.

  8. Phylogenetic relationships of Rutaceae: a cladistic analysis of the subfamilies using evidence from RBC and ATP sequence variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, M W; Morton, C M; Kallunki, J A

    1999-08-01

    Sequence data for plastid rbcL and atpB from members of Anacardiaceae, Burseraceae, Cneoraceae, Meliaceae, Ptaeroxylaceae, Rutaceae, and Simaroubaceae were analyzed cladistically to evaluate the familial and subfamilial circumscriptions of Rutaceae. Taxa representing all subfamilies and tribes were sampled. The analysis shows that Rutaceae are paraphyletic, with Spathelia and Dictyoloma (Rutaceae), Harrisonia (Simaroubaceae), Cneorum (Cneoraceae), and Ptaeroxylon (Ptaeroxylaceae) forming a clade sister to all other Rutaceae. Circumscription of Rutaceae to include all of these taxa is recommended. This analysis indicates that Simaroubaceae and Meliaceae are the outgroups closest to Rutaceae. Correlation of the molecular phylogenies with biochemical data indicates that chemotaxonomic information is more reliable than fruit type as an indicator of familial and subfamilial circumscriptions. The subfamilial classification needs revision; none of the subfamilies of more than one genus is monophyletic.

  9. ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1) and subfamily C member 10 (ABCC10) are not primary resistance factors for cabazitaxel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rishil J Kathawala; Yi-Jun Wang; Suneet Shukla; Yun-Kai Zhang; Saeed Alqahtani; Amal Kaddoumi; Suresh V Ambudkar; Charles R Ashby Jr; Zhe-Sheng Chen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1) and subfamily C member 10 (ABCC10) proteins are efflux transporters that couple the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to the translocation of toxic substances and chemotherapeutic drugs out of cells. Cabazitaxel is a novel taxane that differs from paclitaxel by its lower affinity for ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Methods:We determined the effects of cabazitaxel, a novel tubulin-binding taxane, and paclitaxel on paclitaxel-resistant, ABCB1-overexpressing KB-C2 and LLC-MDR1-WT cells and paclitaxel-resistant, ABCC10-overexpressing HEK293/ABCC10 cells by calculating the degree of drug resistance and measuring ATPase activity of the ABCB1 transporter. Results:Decreased resistance to cabazitaxel compared with paclitaxel was observed in KB-C2, LLC-MDR1-WT, and HEK293/ABCC10 cells. Moreover, cabazitaxel had low efficacy, whereas paclitaxel had high efficacy in stimulating the ATPase activity of ABCB1, indicating a direct interaction of both drugs with the transporter. Conclusion:ABCB1 and ABCC10 are not primary resistance factors for cabazitaxel compared with paclitaxel, suggesting that cabazitaxel may have a low affinity for these efflux transporters.

  10. Evolution of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins. II. Domains of several subfamilies have diverse evolutionary histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, S.; Moncrief, N. D.; Kretsinger, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    In the first report in this series we described the relationships and evolution of 152 individual proteins of the EF-hand subfamilies. Here we add 66 additional proteins and define eight (CDC, TPNV, CLNB, LPS, DGK, 1F8, VIS, TCBP) new subfamilies and seven (CAL, SQUD, CDPK, EFH5, TPP, LAV, CRGP) new unique proteins, which we assume represent new subfamilies. The main focus of this study is the classification of individual EF-hand domains. Five subfamilies--calmodulin, troponin C, essential light chain, regulatory light chain, CDC31/caltractin--and three uniques--call, squidulin, and calcium-dependent protein kinase--are congruent in that all evolved from a common four-domain precursor. In contrast calpain and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (SARC) each evolved from its own one-domain precursor. The remaining 19 subfamilies and uniques appear to have evolved by translocation and splicing of genes encoding the EF-hand domains that were precursors to the congruent eight and to calpain and to SARC. The rates of evolution of the EF-hand domains are slower following formation of the subfamilies and establishment of their functions. Subfamilies are not readily classified by patterns of calcium coordination, interdomain linker stability, and glycine and proline distribution. There are many homoplasies indicating that similar variants of the EF-hand evolved by independent pathways.

  11. Predaceous diving beetles in Maine: Faunal list and keys to subfamilies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boobar, L.R.; Spangler, P.J.; Gibbs, K.E.; Longcore, J.R.; Hopkins, K.M.

    1998-01-01

    Records of predaceous diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) collected in Maine are summarized. These records are augmented by field surveys of beetles in Aroostook Co., Maine during 1993-95. Keys to subfamilies are presented with color plates for selected species. A list of diving beetles that have been collected near Maine (state or province) is presented so that investigators will know what additional species might be expected in Maine. Basic taxonomy is presented to facilitate use of keys.

  12. Ombrophytum guayanensis, the first record of subfamily Lophophytoideae (Balanophoraceae) in the Guayana Shield

    OpenAIRE

    Delprete, Piero

    2014-01-01

    The family Balanophoraceae continues to be poorly known and rarely collected, mostly due to its partially or completely subterranean habit and its general aspect resembling a fungus. A recent collection from French Guiana was identified as a species of Ombrophytum unknown to science (O. guayanensis), which is here described and illustrated. This species also represents the first record of the subfamily Lophophytoideae for the Guayana Shield.

  13. The first records of the subfamily Beridinae (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) from Iran

    OpenAIRE

    S. Khaghaninia; Kazerani, F.

    2014-01-01

    Based on collected specimens from Arasbaran Forests during 2013, four species belonging to 3 genera of the subfamily Beridinae (Diptera; Stratiomyidae) [Actina chalybea Meigen, 1804; Beris schaposchnikowi Pleske, 1926; Beris clavipes (Linnaeus, 1767) and Chorisops nagatomii Rozkošný, 1979] were recognised, which are recorded for the first time from Iran. A key to the studied species is provided, as well as diagnostic characters along with photos of the studied species; their geographical dist...

  14. The first records of the subfamily Beridinae (Diptera: Stratiomyidae from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khaghaninia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on collected specimens from Arasbaran Forests during 2013, four species belonging to 3 genera of the subfamily Beridinae (Diptera; Stratiomyidae [Actina chalybea Meigen, 1804; Beris schaposchnikowi Pleske, 1926; Beris clavipes (Linnaeus, 1767 and Chorisops nagatomii Rozkošný, 1979] were recognised, which are recorded for the first time from Iran. A key to the studied species is provided, as well as diagnostic characters along with photos of the studied species; their geographical distributions are discussed.

  15. A faunal study of the subfamily Doryctinae in Turkey (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    OpenAIRE

    BEYARSLAN, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    From the serial studies of the Braconidae fauna of Turkey, the subfamily Doryctinae was treated. Adult specimens were collected from various habitats of Turkey between 1979 and 2013. In total, 58 species belonging 25 genera were reported for the studied region, among which 52 species were recorded for the first time from Turkey. The numbers of species of each genus are as follows: Clinocentrus Haliday, 1833: 1; Coeloides Wesmael, 1838: 1; Colastes Haliday, 1833: 6; Dendrosoter Wesmael, 1838: ...

  16. Masitinib Antagonizes ATP-Binding Cassette Subfamily C Member 10-Mediated Paclitaxel Resistance: A Preclinical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kathawala, Rishil J; Sodani, Kamlesh; Chen, Kang; PATEL, ATISH; Abuznait, Alaa H.; Anreddy, Nagaraju; Sun, Yue-Li; Kaddoumi, Amal; Ashby, Charles R.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Paclitaxel displays clinical activity against a wide variety of solid tumors. However, resistance to paclitaxel significantly attenuates the response to chemotherapy. The ABC transporter subfamily C member 10 (ABCC10), also known as multi-drug resistance protein 7 (MRP7) efflux transporter, is a major mediator of paclitaxel resistance. In this study, we show that masitinib, a small molecule stem-cell growth factor receptor (c-Kit) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, at non-toxic concentrations, signif...

  17. Modulation of the Rat Hepatic Cytochrome P4501A Subfamily Using Biotin Supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    Ronquillo-Sánchez, M. D.; Camacho-Carranza, R.; C. Fernandez-Mejia; S. Hernández-Ojeda; Elinos-Baez, M.; Espinosa-Aguirre, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Studies have found that biotin favors glucose and lipid metabolism, and medications containing biotin have been developed. Despite the use of biotin as a pharmacological agent, few studies have addressed toxicity aspects including the possible interaction with cytochrome P450 enzyme family. This study analyzed the effects of pharmacological doses of biotin on the expression and activity of the cytochrome P4501A subfamily involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. Wistar rats were treated dail...

  18. Problems in nomenclature and systematics in the subfamily kalanchoideae (Crassulaceae over the years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykhaylo Chernetskyy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ambiguity concerning the systematics and nomenclature of the subfamily Kalanchoideae has been observed in the family Crassulaceae. In the history of research on representatives of the above-mentioned systematic group, there have been two opposing viewpoints aiming at either the establishment of separate genera Bryophyllum, Kalanchoë and Kitchingia or combining all the species into one genus Kalanchoë divided into subgenera (Bryophyllum, Calophygia, Kalanchoë or sections (Bryophyllum, Kalanchoë (Eukalanchoë and Kitchingia or Bryophyllum, and Kalanchoë. According to the analysis of various morphological, anatomical, embryological, karyological, phytogeographical, molecular genetics researches, it is challenging to establish the three genera in the subfamily Kalanchoideae due to the existence of intermediate species. Taking also into account the results of his own research, the author of the present work postulates that the most appropriate taxonomic approach is to recognize one genus Kalanchoë with the division into three sections: Bryophyllum, Kalanchoë and Kitchingia. The names of two of these sections correspond with the previously adopted names of the genera, thus referring to the initial stages of research concerning this subfamily.

  19. Computational identification and evolutional analysis of Piwi subfamily in 11 Drosophila species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Zhou; Ya-Long Xu; Luo-Gen Cheng; Fei Li

    2008-01-01

    The complete genome sequences of 11 Drosophila species provide an opportu-nity to investigate the gene family evolution in closely related species.Drosophila Piwi subfamily,including three mcmbers,piwi,Aub and Ago3,has attracted increasing attention as it participates in the biogenesis of piRNA.Here,we identified 33 Piwi homologs from the genome of 11 Drosophila species.The full-length cDNA sequences of piwi and Aub genes were obtained by using New GENSCAN Web Server.The Ago3 homologs were diffcult regarding full-length information because they had long introns.The genomic structure of Piwf subfamily genes are highly conserved among diverse Drosophila species.Insect piwi and Aub genes have long first introns.The average length of the first intmn is 1 284 bp for piwf and 840 bp for Aub,Which is much larger than those of other introns(93 bp for Piwf and 54 bp for Aub).However,this phenomenon is not observed in mammalian piwi genes.We alSO found that there were abundant repeat sequences in both exons and introns of insect Ago3 genes.DHe to recent insertions of long terminal repeat elements in four Drosophila species.part of the third introns exhibit higher conservation thall adjacent exons and other introns.An evolutional tree created by Minimum Evolution method indicates that mamma-lian piwf genes are more closely related to the insect Ag03 Piwi subfamily.

  20. Clonal Expansion and Cytotoxicity of TCRVβ Subfamily T Cells Induced by CML and K562 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YupingZHang; YangqiuLi; ShaohuaChen; LijianYang; GengxinLuo; XueliZhang

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the anti-leukemia effect, the distribution and clonal expansion of TCRVβ subfamily T cells in T cells from cord blood and adult peripheral blood induced by CML cells and K562 cells in vitro. METHODS Peripheral blood T cells from one adult donor and 3 cases of cord blood were stimulated with CML cells and K562 cells and further amplified by a suspended T cell-bulk culture,in order to induce CML specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The induced T cells were further analyzed for the specific cytotoxicity in CML by LDH assay, the phenotype identification by indirect immunofiuorescence technique and the distribution and clonal expansion of TCRVβ subfamily by using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and genescan analysis, respectively. RESULTS Oligoclonal and oligoclonal tendency T cells with higher specific cytotoxicity from cord blood and adult peripheral blood could be induced by stimulation with CML cells and K562 cells. CONCLUSIONS Specific cytotoxic T cells for an anti-CML effect could be induced by CML cells and K562 cells .The induced T cells which have the characteristic of specific cytotoxicity against CML cells may come from the clonal expansion of TCRVβ subfamily T cells.

  1. Designing exons for human olfactory receptor gene subfamilies using a mathematical paradigm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sk Sarif Hassan; Pabitra Pal Choudhury; Amita Pal; R L Brahmachary; Arunava Goswami

    2010-09-01

    Ligands for only two human olfactory receptors are known. One of them, OR1D2, binds to Bourgeonal, a volatile chemical constituent of the fragrance of the mythical flower, Lily of the valley or Our Lady’s tears, Convallaria majalis (also the national flower of Finland). OR1D2, OR1D4 and OR1D5 are three full-length olfactory receptors present in an olfactory locus in the human genome. These receptors are more than 80% identical in DNA sequences and have 108 base pair mismatches among them. Apparently, these mismatch positions show no striking pattern using computer pattern recognition tools. In an attempt to find a mathematical rule in those mismatches, we find that an L-system generated sequence can be inserted into the OR1D2 subfamily-specific star model and novel full-length olfactory receptors can be generated. This remarkable mathematical principle could be utilized for making new subfamily olfactory receptor members from any olfactory receptor subfamily. The aroma and electronic nose industry might utilize this rule in future.

  2. A mechanism for the polarity formation of chemoreceptors at the growth cone membrane for gradient amplification during directional sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Bouzigues

    Full Text Available Accurate response to external directional signals is essential for many physiological functions such as chemotaxis or axonal guidance. It relies on the detection and amplification of gradients of chemical cues, which, in eukaryotic cells, involves the asymmetric relocalization of signaling molecules. How molecular events coordinate to induce a polarity at the cell level remains however poorly understood, particularly for nerve chemotaxis. Here, we propose a model, inspired by single-molecule experiments, for the membrane dynamics of GABA chemoreceptors in nerve growth cones (GCs during directional sensing. In our model, transient interactions between the receptors and the microtubules, coupled to GABA-induced signaling, provide a positive-feedback loop that leads to redistribution of the receptors towards the gradient source. Using numerical simulations with parameters derived from experiments, we find that the kinetics of polarization and the steady-state polarized distribution of GABA receptors are in remarkable agreement with experimental observations. Furthermore, we make predictions on the properties of the GC seen as a sensing, amplification and filtering module. In particular, the growth cone acts as a low-pass filter with a time constant approximately 10 minutes determined by the Brownian diffusion of chemoreceptors in the membrane. This filtering makes the gradient amplification resistant to rapid fluctuations of the external signals, a beneficial feature to enhance the accuracy of neuronal wiring. Since the model is based on minimal assumptions on the receptor/cytoskeleton interactions, its validity extends to polarity formation beyond the case of GABA gradient sensing. Altogether, it constitutes an original positive-feedback mechanism by which cells can dynamically adapt their internal organization to external signals.

  3. Tetrodotoxin as a Tool to Elucidate Sensory Transduction Mechanisms: The Case for the Arterial Chemoreceptors of the Carotid Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constancio Gonzalez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Carotid bodies (CBs are secondary sensory receptors in which the sensing elements, chemoreceptor cells, are activated by decreases in arterial PO2 (hypoxic hypoxia. Upon activation, chemoreceptor cells (also known as Type I and glomus cells increase their rate of release of neurotransmitters that drive the sensory activity in the carotid sinus nerve (CSN which ends in the brain stem where reflex responses are coordinated. When challenged with hypoxic hypoxia, the physiopathologically most relevant stimulus to the CBs, they are activated and initiate ventilatory and cardiocirculatory reflexes. Reflex increase in minute volume ventilation promotes CO2 removal from alveoli and a decrease in alveolar PCO2 ensues. Reduced alveolar PCO2 makes possible alveolar and arterial PO2 to increase minimizing the intensity of hypoxia. The ventilatory effect, in conjunction the cardiocirculatory components of the CB chemoreflex, tend to maintain an adequate supply of oxygen to the tissues. The CB has been the focus of attention since the discovery of its nature as a sensory organ by de Castro (1928 and the discovery of its function as the origin of ventilatory reflexes by Heymans group (1930. A great deal of effort has been focused on the study of the mechanisms involved in O2 detection. This review is devoted to this topic, mechanisms of oxygen sensing. Starting from a summary of the main theories evolving through the years, we will emphasize the nature and significance of the findings obtained with veratridine and tetrodotoxin (TTX in the genesis of current models of O2-sensing.

  4. Highly conserved salt bridge stabilizes a proteinase K subfamily enzyme, Aqualysin I, from Thermus aquaticus YT-1

    OpenAIRE

    Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Osaku, Kanae; Maejima, Susumu; Ohno, Nao; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka; Kawakita, Masao

    2014-01-01

    The proteinase K subfamily enzymes, thermophilic Aqualysin I (AQN) from Thermus aquaticus YT-1 and psychrophilic serine protease (VPR) from Vibrio sp. PA-44, have six and seven salt bridges, respectively. To understand the possible significance of salt bridges in the thermal stability of AQN, we prepared mutant proteins in which amino acid residues participating in salt bridges common to proteinase K subfamily members and intrinsic to AQN were replaced to disrupt the bridges one at a time. Di...

  5. Chemotaxis to the Quorum-Sensing Signal AI-2 Requires the Tsr Chemoreceptor and the Periplasmic LsrB AI-2-Binding Protein▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hegde, Manjunath; Englert, Derek L.; Schrock, Shanna; Cohn, William B.; Vogt, Christian; Wood, Thomas K.; Manson, Michael D.; Jayaraman, Arul

    2010-01-01

    AI-2 is an autoinducer made by many bacteria. LsrB binds AI-2 in the periplasm, and Tsr is the l-serine chemoreceptor. We show that AI-2 strongly attracts Escherichia coli. Both LsrB and Tsr are necessary for sensing AI-2, but AI-2 uptake is not, suggesting that LsrB and Tsr interact directly in the periplasm.

  6. Genetic tracing of the gustatory and trigeminal neural pathways originating from T1R3-expressing taste receptor cells and solitary chemoreceptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmoto, Makoto; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Yasuoka, Akihito; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro; Abe, Keiko

    2008-08-01

    We established transgenic mouse lines expressing a transneuronal tracer, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), under the control of mouse T1R3 gene promoter/enhancer. In the taste buds, WGA transgene was faithfully expressed in T1R3-positive sweet/umami taste receptor cells. WGA protein was transferred not laterally to the synapse-bearing, sour-responsive type III cells in the taste buds but directly to a subset of neurons in the geniculate and nodose/petrosal ganglia, and further conveyed to a rostro-central region of the nucleus of solitary tract. In addition, WGA was expressed in solitary chemoreceptor cells in the nasal epithelium and transferred along the trigeminal sensory pathway to the brainstem neurons. The solitary chemoreceptor cells endogenously expressed T1R3 together with bitter taste receptors T2Rs. This result shows an exceptional signature of receptor expression. Thus, the t1r3-WGA transgenic mice revealed the sweet/umami gustatory pathways from taste receptor cells and the trigeminal neural pathway from solitary chemoreceptor cells.

  7. Expression, refolding, purification and crystallization of the sensory domain of the TlpC chemoreceptor from Helicobacter pylori for structural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu Chih; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections are associated with gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma. Bacterial chemotaxis, mediated by four different chemoreceptors (also termed transducer-like proteins (Tlp)), plays an important role in initial colonization and development of disease. Chemoreceptor sensory domains of H. pylori share no significant sequence similarity with those of Escherichia coli or any other non-Epsilonproteobacteria. The structural basis of how chemical signals are recognized by chemoreceptors of H. pylori is poorly understood mainly due to the lack of a robust procedure to purify their sensory domains in a soluble form. This study reports a method for extraction of the periplasmic sensory domain of transducer-like protein C (TlpC) from inclusion bodies and refolding to yield 5mg pure crystallizable protein per 1l of bacterial culture. Purified protein was monomeric in solution by size-exclusion chromatography and folded according to the circular dichroism spectrum. Crystals have been grown by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method using PEG 4000 as a precipitating agent. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a=189.3, b=103.2, c=61.8Å, β=98.3. A complete X-ray diffraction data set has been collected to 2.2 Å resolution using cryocooling conditions and synchrotron radiation. Self-rotation function and Matthews coefficient calculations suggest that the asymmetric unit contains three monomers.

  8. Phylogeny and evolutionary patterns in the Dwarf crayfish subfamily (Decapoda: Cambarellinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Pedraza-Lara

    Full Text Available The Dwarf crayfish or Cambarellinae, is a morphologically singular subfamily of decapod crustaceans that contains only one genus, Cambarellus. Its intriguing distribution, along the river basins of the Gulf Coast of United States (Gulf Group and into Central México (Mexican Group, has until now lacked of satisfactory explanation. This study provides a comprehensive sampling of most of the extant species of Cambarellus and sheds light on its evolutionary history, systematics and biogeography. We tested the impact of Gulf Group versus Mexican Group geography on rates of cladogenesis using a maximum likelihood framework, testing different models of birth/extinction of lineages. We propose a comprehensive phylogenetic hypothesis for the subfamily based on mitochondrial and nuclear loci (3,833 bp using Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood methods. The phylogenetic structure found two phylogenetic groups associated to the two main geographic components (Gulf Group and Mexican Group and is partially consistent with the historical structure of river basins. The previous hypothesis, which divided the genus into three subgenera based on genitalia morphology was only partially supported (P = 0.047, resulting in a paraphyletic subgenus Pandicambarus. We found at least two cases in which phylogenetic structure failed to recover monophyly of recognized species while detecting several cases of cryptic diversity, corresponding to lineages not assigned to any described species. Cladogenetic patterns in the entire subfamily are better explained by an allopatric model of speciation. Diversification analyses showed similar cladogenesis patterns between both groups and did not significantly differ from the constant rate models. While cladogenesis in the Gulf Group is coincident in time with changes in the sea levels, in the Mexican Group, cladogenesis is congruent with the formation of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Our results show how similar allopatric

  9. Phthiria sharafi sp. nov., a new record of the subfamily Phthiriinae (Bombyliidae, Diptera) from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hawagry, Magdi S; Al Dhafer, Hathal M

    2014-01-01

    This new species (Phthiria sharafi sp. nov.) represents the first record of the subfamily Phthiriinae (Bombyliidae, Diptera) from Saudi Arabia. The species was collected from Garf Raydah Protected Area, Abha, Asir Province, south-western part of Saudi Arabia, using a Malaise trap erected in a site rich in olive, cactus and Juniper trees. The type locality has an Afrotropical influence, with the Afrotropical elements predominant, and a closer affiliation to the Afrotropical region than to the Palearctic region or the Eremic zone.  PMID:25544092

  10. Data supporting the nuclear phylogenomics of the palm subfamily Arecoideae (Arecaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Jason R; Zomlefer, Wendy B; Barrett, Craig F; Stevenson, Dennis Wm; Heyduk, Karolina; Leebens-Mack, James H

    2016-06-01

    This data article provides data and supplemental materials referenced in "Nuclear phylogenomics of the palm subfamily Arecoideae (Arecaceae)" (Comer et al., 2016) [1]. Raw sequence reads generated for this study are available through the Sequence Read Archive (SRA Study Accession: SRP061467). An aligned supermatrix of 168 nuclear genes for 35 taxa (34 palms and one outgroup taxon) is provided. Also provided are individual maximum likelihood gene trees used for the coalescent based analyses, output from the maximum parsimony analyses, and two figures. PMID:27054154

  11. Discovery and Characterization of the Short κA-Conotoxins: A Novel Subfamily of Excitatory Conotoxins

    OpenAIRE

    Teichert, Russell W.; Jacobsen, Richard; Terlau, Heinrich; Yoshikami, Doju; Olivera, Baldomero M.

    2006-01-01

    We have characterized the defining members of a novel subfamily of excitatory conotoxins, the short κA-conotoxins (κAS-conotoxins). κA-conotoxins PIVE and PIVF (κA-PIVE and κA-PIVF) were purified from Conus purpurascens venom. Both peptides elicited excitatory activity upon injection into fish. κA-PIVE was synthesized for further characterization. The excitatory effects of κA-PIVE in vivo were dose dependent, causing hyperactivity at low doses and rapid immobilization at high doses, symptomat...

  12. Species discrimination in the subfamily Ostertagiinae of Northern China: assessment of DNA barcode in a taxonomically challenging group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jizhou; Zhang, Yongning; Feng, Chunyan; Yuan, Xiangfen; Sun, Degang; Deng, Junhua; Wang, Caixia; Wu, Shaoqiang; Lin, Xiangmei

    2016-03-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes within the subfamily Ostertagiinae (Teladorsagia, Ostertagia, and Marshallagia et al.) are among the most common infections of domesticated livestock. These parasites are of particular interest, as many of the species within this group are of economic importance worldwide. Traditionally, nematode species designations have been based on morphological criteria. However, this group possesses poorly defined species. There is an urgent need to develop a reliable technique that can distinguish species of Ostertagiinae. DNA barcoding has been proved to be a powerful tool to identify species of birds, mammals, and arthropods, but this technique has not yet been examined for identifying species of Ostertagiinae. In this study, a total of 138 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences from individuals representing 11 species of Ostertagiinae were acquired by PCR for the first time. The specimens were collected from pastoral area of northern China. Genetic divergence analyses showed that mean interspecific Kimura two-parameter distances of COI (13.61 %) were about four times higher than the mean value of the intraspecific divergence (3.69 %). Then, the performance of the COI to identify species of Ostertagiinae was evaluated by identification success rates using nearest neighbor (NN) and BLASTn. The results indicated that the rates of correct sequence identification for COI were high (>80 %) when using the NN and BLASTn methods. Besides, the deep lineage divergences are detected in Teladorsagia circumcincta. Meanwhile, the analyses also detected no genetic differentiation between some species such as Ostertagia hahurica and Ostertagia buriatica. These results indicate that the traditional status of species within Ostertagiinae should be closely examined based on the molecular data. PMID:26584827

  13. A cladistic analysis of the genera in the subfamily Pudicinae (Nematoda, Trichostrongyloidea, Heligmonellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durette-Desset, M C; Justine, J L

    1991-09-01

    A parsimony analysis was performed on 37 specific taxa belonging to the subfamily Pudicinae (family Heligmonellidae), which contains parasites mainly from South American caviomorph rodents. Thirteen characters were used from the synlophe (rotation of axis, presence of carene, carene asymmetry, presence of comaretes, single ventral comarete length, ridge discontinuity, ventral ridge numbers, presence of a peculiar posterior synlophe, presence of supernumerary spines) and the male caudal bursa (relative length of rays 9 and 10, caudal bursa type, division of the dorsal ray, divergence of the 10th rays). The cladogram shows a consistency index of 1.0. The subfamily Pudicinae has two synapomorphies. Two suprageneric groups are recognized. Suprageneric group 1 shows one synapomorphy and contains Heligmostrongylus, Fuellebornema, Sciurodendrium and Pseudoheligmosomum; suprageneric group 2 shows two synapomorphies and contains Pudica, Acanthostrongylus, Justinema and Durettestrongylus. Five genera are defined on the basis of synapomorphies. The genera Heligmostrongylus, Sciurodendrium and Pudica which are considered paraphyletic, however, are retained due to lack of knowledge as to their relationships.

  14. Characteristics of the LrhA subfamily of transcriptional regulators from Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingsheng Qi; Li Luo; Haiping Cheng; Jiabi Zhu; Guanqiao Yu

    2008-01-01

    In our previous work, we identified 94 putative genes encoding LysR-type transcriptional regulators from Sinorhizobium meliloti. All of these putative lysR genes were mutagenized using plasmid insertions to determine their phenotypes. Six LysR-type regulators, encoded by mutants SMa1979, SMb20715, SMc00820, SMc04163, SMc03975,and SMc04315, showed similar amino acid sequences (30%)and shared the conserved DNA-binding domain with LrhA,HexA, or DgdR. Phenotype analysis of these gene mutants indicated that the regulators control the swimming behaviors of the bacteria, production of quorum-sensing signals, and secretion of extracellular proteins. These characteristics are very similar to those of LrhA, HexA, and DgdR.Thus, we refer to this group as the LrhA subfamily. Sequence analysis showed that a great number of homologous genes of the LrhA subfamily were distributed in the α,β, and γsubdivisions of proteobacteria, and a few in actinobacteria. These findings could provide new clues to the roles of the LysR gene family.

  15. Nonlinear interaction of intense hypergeometric Gaussian subfamily laser beams in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, H.; Vaziri (Khamedi), M.; Rooholamininejad, H.; Bahrampour, A. R.

    2016-07-01

    Propagation of Hypergeometric-Gaussian laser beam in a nonlinear plasma medium is investigated by considering the Source Dependent Expansion method. A subfamily of Hypergeometric-Gaussian beams with a non-negative, even and integer radial index, can be expressed as the linear superposition of finite number of Laguerre-Gaussian functions. Propagation of Hypergeometric-Gaussian beams in a nonlinear plasma medium depends on the value of radial index. The bright rings' number of these beams is changed during the propagation in plasma medium. The effect of beam vortex charge number l and initial (input) beam intensity on the self-focusing of Hypergeometric-Gaussian beams is explored. Also, by choosing the suitable initial conditions, Hypergeometric-Gaussian subfamily beams can be converted to one or more mode components that a typical of mode conversion may be occurred. The self-focusing of these winding beams can be used to control the focusing force and improve the electron bunch quality in laser plasma accelerators.

  16. Subfamilial relationships within solanaceae as inferred from atp beta-rbcl intergenic spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A phylogenetic analysis of family Solanaceae was conducted using sequence data from the chloroplast intergenic atp beta-rbcL spacer. Sequence data was generated from 17 species representing 09 out of 14 genera of Solanaceae from Pakistan. Cladogram was constructed using maximum parsimony method and results indicate that Solanaceae is mainly divided into two subfamilies; Solanoideae and Cestroideae. Four major clades within Solanoideae represent tribes; Physaleae, Capsiceae, Datureae and Solaneae are supported by high bootstrap value and the relationships among them are not corroborating with the previous studies. The findings established that subfamily Cestroideae comprised of three genera; Cestrum, Lycium and Nicotiana with high bootstrap support. Position of Nicotiana inferred with atp beta-rbcL sequence is congruent with traditional classification, which placed the taxa in Cestroideae. In the current study Lycium unexpectedly nested with Nicotiana with 100% bootstrap support and identified as a member of tribe Nicotianeae. Expanded sampling of other genera from Pakistan could be valuable towards improving our understanding of intrafamilial relationships within Solanaceae. (author)

  17. Flight patterns and sex ratio of beetles of the subfamily Dynastinae (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Simões Corrêa de Albuquerque

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Dynastinae is one of the most representative subfamilies of Melolonthidae (Scarabaeoidea and has considerable ecological importance due mainly to interactions with plants of the families Araceae and Annonaceae. This relationship has led to the evolution of nocturnal activity patterns, which are influenced by environmental conditions. In the present study, abiotic factors were investigated to comprehend the influence on the flight patterns and identify the sex ratio of beetles from this subfamily. A study was conducted at Campo de Instrução Marechal Newton Cavalcanti in northeastern Brazil between December 2010 and November 2011. Thirteen species of Dynastinae were identified, most of which were from the genus Cyclocephala. Abundance and richness were greater in the dry season. Six species exhibited peak flight activity at specific periods of the night. More females than males were recorded for Cyclocephala distincta and C. paraguayensis. The present findings suggest that rainfall reduces the flight activity of these beetles and different time schedules may be related to mating behavior, foraging behavior and the avoidance of interspecific resource competition.

  18. The Evolutionary History of R2R3-MYB Proteins Across 50 Eukaryotes: New Insights Into Subfamily Classification and Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hai; Liang, Zhe; Zhao, Sen; Nan, Ming-Ge; Tran, Lam-Son Phan; Lu, Kun; Huang, Yu-Bi; Li, Jia-Na

    2015-06-05

    R2R3-MYB proteins (2R-MYBs) are one of the main transcription factor families in higher plants. Since the evolutionary history of this gene family across the eukaryotic kingdom remains unknown, we performed a comparative analysis of 2R-MYBs from 50 major eukaryotic lineages, with particular emphasis on land plants. A total of 1548 candidates were identified among diverse taxonomic groups, which allowed for an updated classification of 73 highly conserved subfamilies, including many newly identified subfamilies. Our results revealed that the protein architectures, intron patterns, and sequence characteristics were remarkably conserved in each subfamily. At least four subfamilies were derived from early land plants, 10 evolved from spermatophytes, and 19 from angiosperms, demonstrating the diversity and preferential expansion of this gene family in land plants. Moreover, we determined that their remarkable expansion was mainly attributed to whole genome and segmental duplication, where duplicates were preferentially retained within certain subfamilies that shared three homologous intron patterns (a, b, and c) even though up to 12 types of patterns existed. Through our integrated distributions, sequence characteristics, and phylogenetic tree analyses, we confirm that 2R-MYBs are old and postulate that 3R-MYBs may be evolutionarily derived from 2R-MYBs via intragenic domain duplication.

  19. Chemoreceptor Sensitivity ‘in Women Mountaineering Trainees of Different Altitudes Inducted by Trekking to 4350 m

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bhaumik

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted on women mountaineering trainees to evaluate the hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses, and the precise nature of changes in the sensitivity of chemoreceptors on induction by trekking to 4350 m. Two groups of women belonging to different ethnic origins and residents of different altitudes, ie, moderate-altitude women (MAWMongolians and low-altitude women (LAW-Caucasians were the subjects in this study. Tests of sensitivity to hypoxia and hypercapnia were carried out initially at 2100 m, then during 4 to7 days of sojourn at 4350 m following induction by trekking, and re-tested on return to 2 100 m. The results indicate that there is a significant difference (P c 0.05 of hypoxic ventilatory response in women of two different ethnic groups: Both hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses increased significantly (P < 0.05 on induction to high altitude. On descent, hypoxic values reverted back to pre-induction levels, whereas hypercapnic ventilatory response showed relatively higher values (P < 0.05.

  20. Fast Fourier Transform-based Support Vector Machine for Prediction of G-protein Coupled Receptor Subfamilies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Zhi GUO; Meng-Long LI; Ke-Long WANG; Zhi-Ning WEN; Min-Chun LU; Li-Xia LIU; Lin JIANG

    2005-01-01

    Although the sequence information on G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) continues to grow, many GPCRs remain orphaned (i.e. ligand specificity unknown) or poorly characterized with little structural information available, so an automated and reliable method is badly needed to facilitate the identification of novel receptors. In this study, a method of fast Fourier transform-based support vector machine has been developed for predicting GPCR subfamilies according to protein's hydrophobicity. In classifying Class B, C, D and F subfamilies, the method achieved an overall Matthew's correlation coefficient and accuracy of 0.95 and 93.3%, respectively, when evaluated using the jackknife test. The method achieved an accuracy of 100% on the Class B independent dataset. The results show that this method can classify GPCR subfamilies as well as their functional classification with high accuracy. A web server implementing the prediction is available at http://chem.scu.edu.cn/blast/Pred-GPCR.

  1. An automated stochastic approach to the identification of the protein specificity determinants and functional subfamilies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhmaninova Aleksandra B

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent progress in sequencing and 3 D structure determination techniques stimulated development of approaches aimed at more precise annotation of proteins, that is, prediction of exact specificity to a ligand or, more broadly, to a binding partner of any kind. Results We present a method, SDPclust, for identification of protein functional subfamilies coupled with prediction of specificity-determining positions (SDPs. SDPclust predicts specificity in a phylogeny-independent stochastic manner, which allows for the correct identification of the specificity for proteins that are separated on a phylogenetic tree, but still bind the same ligand. SDPclust is implemented as a Web-server http://bioinf.fbb.msu.ru/SDPfoxWeb/ and a stand-alone Java application available from the website. Conclusions SDPclust performs a simultaneous identification of specificity determinants and specificity groups in a statistically robust and phylogeny-independent manner.

  2. TSH increases synthesis of hepatic ATP-binding cassette subfamily A member 1 in hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Zhou, Lingyan; Li, Cong Cong; Shi, Hong; Zhou, Xinli

    2016-07-22

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that thyrotropin (TSH) levels are closely correlated with the severity of hypercholesterolemia. Reverse cholesterol transfer (RCT) plays an important role in regulating bloodcholesterol. However, the molecular mechanism of hypercholesterolemia in subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) has not been fully clarified. The SCH mouse model, which is characterized by elevated serum TSH but not thyroid hormone levels, demonstrated a significant increase in plasma cholesterol compared with controls. Interestingly, Tshr KO mice, with normal thyroid hormone levels after thyroid hormone supplementation, showed lower plasma cholesterol levels compared with their wild-type littermates. ATP binding cassette subfamily A member 1(ABCA1) is a member of the ABC superfamily, which induces transfer of intracellular cholesterol to extracellular apolipoprotein. TSH upregulated hepatic ABCA1 to promote the efflux of intercellular cumulative cholesterol, resulting in increased plasma cholesterol. These data might partially explain the pathogenesis of hypercholesterolemia in SCH. PMID:27179782

  3. That awkward age for butterflies: insights from the age of the butterfly subfamily Nymphalinae (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlberg, Niklas

    2006-10-01

    The study of the historical biogeography of butterflies has been hampered by a lack of well-resolved phylogenies and a good estimate of the temporal span over which butterflies have evolved. Recently there has been surge of phylogenetic hypotheses for various butterfly groups, but estimating ages of divergence is still in its infancy for this group of insects. The main problem has been the sparse fossil record for butterflies. In this study I have used a surprisingly good fossil record for the subfamily Nymphalinae (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) to estimate the ages of diversification of major lineages using Bayesian relaxed clock methods. I have investigated the effects of varying priors on posterior estimates in the analyses. For this data set, it is clear that the prior of the rate of molecular evolution at the ingroup node had the largest effect on the results. Taking this into account, I have been able to arrive at a plausible history of lineage splits, which appears to be correlated with known paleogeological events. The subfamily appears to have diversified soon after the K/T event about 65 million years ago. Several splits are coincident with major paleogeological events, such as the connection of the African and Asian continents about 21 million years ago and the presence of a peninsula of land connecting the current Greater Antilles to the South American continent 35 to 33 million years ago. My results suggest that the age of Nymphalidae is older than the 70 million years speculated to be the age of butterflies as a whole.

  4. Systemic administration of leptin potentiates the response of neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract to chemoreceptor activation in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriello, J; Moreau, J M

    2013-01-15

    Leptin microinjections into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) have been shown to elicit sympathoexcitatory responses, and potentiate the cardiovascular responses to activation of the chemoreflex. In this study, experiments were done in Sprague-Dawley rats initially to provide a detailed mapping within the NTS complex of cells containing immunoreactivity to the long form of the leptin receptor (Ob-Rb). In a second series, this NTS region containing Ob-Rb immunoreactive cells was explored for single units antidromically activated by stimulation of pressor sites in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). These antidromically identified neurons were then tested for their response to intra-carotid injections of leptin (50-100 ng/0.1 ml), and to activation of peripheral chemoreceptors following an injection of potassium cyanide (KCN) (80 μg/0.1 ml) into the carotid artery. Cells containing Ob-Rb-like immunoreactivity were found predominantly in the caudal NTS: within the medial, commissural and gelatinous (sub-postremal area) subnuclei of the NTS complex. Of 73 single units tested in these NTS regions, 48 were antidromically activated by stimulation of RVLM pressor sites and 25 of these single units responded with an increase in discharge rate after intra-carotid injections of leptin. In addition, 17 of these leptin responsive neurons were excited by the intra-carotid injections of KCN (80 μg/0.1 ml). Furthermore, the excitatory response of these single units to KCN was potentiated (59-83%) immediately following the leptin injection. These data indicate that leptin responsive neurons in NTS mediate chemoreceptor afferent information to pressor sites in the RVLM, and suggest that leptin may act as a facilitator on neuronal circuits within the NTS that potentiates the sympathoexcitatory responses elicited during the reflex activation of arterial chemoreceptors.

  5. Cell-Autonomous and Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of a Feeding State-Dependent Chemoreceptor Gene via MEF-2 and bHLH Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winbush, Ari; van der Linden, Alexander M.

    2016-01-01

    Food and feeding-state dependent changes in chemoreceptor gene expression may allow Caenorhabditis elegans to modify their chemosensory behavior, but the mechanisms essential for these expression changes remain poorly characterized. We had previously shown that expression of a feeding state-dependent chemoreceptor gene, srh-234, in the ADL sensory neuron of C. elegans is regulated via the MEF-2 transcription factor. Here, we show that MEF-2 acts together with basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors to regulate srh-234 expression as a function of feeding state. We identify a cis-regulatory MEF2 binding site that is necessary and sufficient for the starvation-induced down regulation of srh-234 expression, while an E-box site known to bind bHLH factors is required to drive srh-234 expression in ADL. We show that HLH-2 (E/Daughterless), HLH-3 and HLH-4 (Achaete-scute homologs) act in ADL neurons to regulate srh-234 expression. We further demonstrate that the expression levels of srh-234 in ADL neurons are regulated remotely by MXL-3 (Max-like 3 homolog) and HLH-30 (TFEB ortholog) acting in the intestine, which is dependent on insulin signaling functioning specifically in ADL neurons. We also show that this intestine-to-neuron feeding-state regulation of srh-234 involves a subset of insulin-like peptides. These results combined suggest that chemoreceptor gene expression is regulated by both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous transcriptional mechanisms mediated by MEF2 and bHLH factors, which may allow animals to fine-tune their chemosensory responses in response to changes in their feeding state. PMID:27487365

  6. Australian water mites of the subfamily Notoaturinae Besch (Acari: Hydrachnidia: Aturidae), with the description of 24 new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Smit

    2010-01-01

    New data are presented on the subfamily Notoaturinae from Australia. Twenty-four new species are described: Austraturus aculeatus n. sp., A. canaliculatus n. sp., A. lamingtonensis n. sp., A. longigenitalis n. sp., A. montanus n. sp., A. otwayensis n. sp., A. tasmanicus n. sp., Azugaturus gibberipal

  7. Frames of exponentials:lower frame bounds for finite subfamilies, and approximation of the inverse frame operator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole; Lindner, Alexander M

    2001-01-01

    We give lower frame bounds for finite subfamilies of a frame of exponentials {e(i lambdak(.))}k is an element ofZ in L-2(-pi,pi). We also present a method for approximation of the inverse frame operator corresponding to {e(i lambdak(.))}k is an element ofZ, where knowledge of the frame bounds for...

  8. Three new species in the subfamily Eriopeltinae Sulc from Italy (Hemiptera, Coccoidea, Coccidae) with comments on the genus Lecanopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzari, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Three new coccid species, namely Hadzibejliaspis ferenci Pellizzari n. sp., Lecanopsis sicula Pellizzari n. sp. and L. salvatorei Pellizzari n. sp. are described and illustrated. Identification keys for the genera in the subfamily Eriopeltinae Sulc and to species in the genera Hadzibejliaspis Koteja and Lecanopsis Targioni Tozzetti are provided.

  9. ROLE OF ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUB-FAMILY MEMBER 2 (ABCG2) IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATP binding cassette sub-family member 2 (ABCG2), is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily and a principal xenobiotic transporter. ABCG2 is also highly expressed in certain stem cell populations where it is thought to be related to stem cell plasticity, although the role o...

  10. Two new species and a new genus of neotropical mailed catfishes of the subfamily Loricariinae Swainson, 1838 (Pisces, Siluriformes, Loricariidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isbrücker, I.J.H.; Nijssen, H.

    1978-01-01

    A new monotypic genus and two new species of South American mailed catfishes of the subfamily Loricariinae are described and figured. A discussion of and comparative notes on related taxa are added. Ricola genus novum is established for the species originally described by Regan (1904) as Loricaria (

  11. THE GRK4 SUBFAMILY OF G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR KINASES: ALTERNATIVE SPLICING, GENE ORGANIZATION, AND SEQUENCE CONSERVATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The GRK4 subfamily of G protein-coupled receptor kinases. Alternative splicing, gene organization, and sequence conservation.Premont RT, Macrae AD, Aparicio SA, Kendall HE, Welch JE, Lefkowitz RJ.Department of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke Univer...

  12. Highly conserved salt bridge stabilizes a proteinase K subfamily enzyme, Aqualysin I, from Thermus aquaticus YT-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Osaku, Kanae; Maejima, Susumu; Ohno, Nao; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka; Kawakita, Masao

    2014-01-01

    The proteinase K subfamily enzymes, thermophilic Aqualysin I (AQN) from Thermus aquaticus YT-1 and psychrophilic serine protease (VPR) from Vibrio sp. PA-44, have six and seven salt bridges, respectively. To understand the possible significance of salt bridges in the thermal stability of AQN, we prepared mutant proteins in which amino acid residues participating in salt bridges common to proteinase K subfamily members and intrinsic to AQN were replaced to disrupt the bridges one at a time. Disruption of a salt bridge common to proteinase K subfamily enzymes in the D183N mutant resulted in a significant reduction in thermal stability, and a massive change in the content of the secondary structure was observed, even at 70°C, in the circular dichroism (CD) analysis. These results indicate that the common salt bridge Asp183-Arg12 is important in maintaining the conformation of proteinase K subfamily enzymes and suggest the importance of proximity between the regions around Asp183 and the N-terminal region around Arg12. Of the three mutants that lack an AQN intrinsic salt bridge, D212N was more prone to unfolding at 80°C than the wild-type enzyme. Similarly, D17N and E237Q were less thermostable than the wild-type enzyme, although this may be partially due to increased autolysis. The AQN intrinsic salt bridges appear to confer additional thermal stability to this enzyme. These findings will further our understanding of the factors involved in stabilizing protein structure.

  13. Taxonomic study on the family Mitridae (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Neogastropoda) from the China's seas. Subfamilies: Imbricariinae and Cylindromitrinae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Ninteen species of subfamilies Imbricariinae and Cylindromitrinae, family Mitridae, are recorded from the China's seas. Of which, one genus and six species are recorded for the first time from China' s seas, i.e., genus Ziba Adams H and Adams A, Cancilla (Cancilla)carnicolor, Ziba duplilirata, Z. insculpta, Neocancilla circula, Scabricola (Scabricola) desetangsii, Scabricola (Swainsonia) ocellata ocellata.

  14. Effects of exogenous hydrogen sulphide on calcium signalling, background (TASK) K channel activity and mitochondrial function in chemoreceptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckler, Keith J

    2012-04-01

    It has been proposed that endogenous H(2)S mediates oxygen sensing in chemoreceptors; this study investigates the mechanisms by which H(2)S excites carotid body type 1 cells. H(2)S caused a rapid reversible increase in intracellular calcium with EC(50) ≈ 6 μM. This [Ca(2+)](i) response was abolished in Ca-free Tyrode. In perforated patch current clamp recordings, H(2)S depolarised type 1 cells from -59 to -35 mV; this was accompanied by a robust increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Voltage clamping at the resting membrane potential abolished the H(2)S-induced rise in [Ca(2+)](i). H(2)S inhibited background K(+) current in whole cell perforated patch and reduced background K(+) channel activity in cell-attached patch recordings. It is concluded that H(2)S excites type 1 cells through the inhibition of background (TASK) potassium channels leading to membrane depolarisation and voltage-gated Ca(2+) entry. These effects mimic those of hypoxia. H(2)S also inhibited mitochondrial function over a similar concentration range as assessed by NADH autofluorescence and measurement of intracellular magnesium (an index of decline in MgATP). Cyanide inhibited background K channels to a similar extent to H(2)S and prevented H(2)S exerting any further influence over channel activity. These data indicate that the effects of H(2)S on background K channels are a consequence of inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. Whilst this does not preclude a role for endogenous H(2)S in oxygen sensing via the inhibition of cytochrome oxidase, the levels of H(2)S required raise questions as to the viability of such a mechanism.

  15. Crystallization and crystallographic analysis of the ligand-binding domain of the Pseudomonas putida chemoreceptor McpS in complex with malate and succinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallization of the ligand-binding domain of the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein chemoreceptor McpS (McpS-LBD) is reported. Methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) are transmembrane proteins that sense changes in environmental signals, generating a chemotactic response and regulating other cellular processes. MCPs are composed of two main domains: a ligand-binding domain (LBD) and a cytosolic signalling domain (CSD). Here, the crystallization of the LBD of the chemoreceptor McpS (McpS-LBD) is reported. McpS-LBD is responsible for sensing most of the TCA-cycle intermediates in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440. McpS-LBD was expressed, purified and crystallized in complex with two of its natural ligands (malate and succinate). Crystals were obtained by both the counter-diffusion and the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion techniques after pre-incubation of McpS-LBD with the ligands. The crystals were isomorphous and belonged to space group C2, with two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected at the ESRF synchrotron X-ray source to resolutions of 1.8 and 1.9 Å for the malate and succinate complexes, respectively

  16. A suggested new bacteriophage genus, "Kp34likevirus", within the Autographivirinae subfamily of Podoviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Harald; Maciejewska, Barbara; Latka, Agnieszka; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Hellstrand, Marios; Melefors, Öjar; Wang, Jin-Town; Kropinski, Andrew M; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Nilsson, Anders S

    2015-04-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae phages vB_KpnP_SU503 (SU503) and vB_KpnP_SU552A (SU552A) are virulent viruses belonging to the Autographivirinae subfamily of Podoviridae that infect and kill multi-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates. Phages SU503 and SU552A show high pairwise nucleotide identity to Klebsiella phages KP34 (NC_013649), F19 (NC_023567) and NTUH-K2044-K1-1 (NC_025418). Bioinformatic analysis of these phage genomes show high conservation of gene arrangement and gene content, conserved catalytically active residues of their RNA polymerase, a common and specific lysis cassette, and form a joint cluster in phylogenetic analysis of their conserved genes. Also, we have performed biological characterization of the burst size, latent period, host specificity (together with KP34 and NTUH-K2044-K1-1), morphology, and structural genes as well as sensitivity testing to various conditions. Based on the analyses of these phages, the creation of a new phage genus is suggested within the Autographivirinae, called "Kp34likevirus" after their type phage, KP34. This genus should encompass the recently genome sequenced Klebsiella phages KP34, SU503, SU552A, F19 and NTUH-K2044-K1-1.

  17. A Suggested New Bacteriophage Genus, “Kp34likevirus”, within the Autographivirinae Subfamily of Podoviridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Eriksson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae phages vB_KpnP_SU503 (SU503 and vB_KpnP_SU552A (SU552A are virulent viruses belonging to the Autographivirinae subfamily of Podoviridae that infect and kill multi-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates. Phages SU503 and SU552A show high pairwise nucleotide identity to Klebsiella phages KP34 (NC_013649, F19 (NC_023567 and NTUH-K2044-K1-1 (NC_025418. Bioinformatic analysis of these phage genomes show high conservation of gene arrangement and gene content, conserved catalytically active residues of their RNA polymerase, a common and specific lysis cassette, and form a joint cluster in phylogenetic analysis of their conserved genes. Also, we have performed biological characterization of the burst size, latent period, host specificity (together with KP34 and NTUH-K2044-K1-1, morphology, and structural genes as well as sensitivity testing to various conditions. Based on the analyses of these phages, the creation of a new phage genus is suggested within the Autographivirinae, called “Kp34likevirus” after their type phage, KP34. This genus should encompass the recently genome sequenced Klebsiella phages KP34, SU503, SU552A, F19 and NTUH-K2044-K1-1.

  18. Cytogenetic analysis of five species of the subfamily Corydoradinae (Teleostei: Siluriformes: Callichthyidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Kioko Shimabukuro-Dias

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, five callichthyid species belonging to the subfamily Corydoradinae were karyotyped: three species of Aspidoras and two of Corydoras. The three species of Aspidoras had the same diploid number, 2n = 46 chromosomes, similar karyotypic formulae, with most chromosomes metacentric or submetacentric, single interstitial Ag-NORs and C-band positive segments mainly found in the centromeric position. The comparative analysis of cytogenetic data available for the genus Aspidoras and other species of Corydoradinae suggest that several events of centric fusion occurred in the origin of the species of Aspidoras. The two analyzed species of Corydoras showed high diploid numbers, 2n = 74 in C. sodalis and 2n = 90 in C. britskii. While C. sodalis exhibited single Ag-NORs and terminal, interstitial and centromeric C-band positive segments in almost all chromosomes, C. britskii showed multiple Ag-NORs and a small number of C-band positive segments found in the terminal position in one acrocentric (A pair and in the interstitial position in one subtelocentric (ST pair. The occurrence of high diploid numbers and many ST and A chromosomes are uncommon among the Corydoradinae, suggesting the occurrence of a high number of chromosome rearrangements, mainly centric fissions, in the origin of the Corydoras species studied.

  19. Out of Africa:Miocene Dispersal, Vicariance, and Extinction within Hyacinthaceae Subfamily Urgineoideae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Syed Shujait Ali; Martin Pfosser; Wolfgang Wetschnig; Mario MartnezAzorn; Manuel B. Crespo; Yan Yu

    2013-01-01

    Disjunct distribution patterns in plant lineages are usually explained according to three hypotheses:vicariance, geodispersal, and long-distance dispersal. The role of these hypotheses is tested in Urgineoideae (Hyacinthaceae), a subfamily disjunctly distributed in Africa, Madagascar, India, and the Mediterranean region. The potential ancestral range, dispersal routes, and factors responsible for the current distribution in Urgineoideae are investigated using divergence time estimations. Urgineoideae originated in Southern Africa approximately 48.9 Mya. Two independent dispersal events in the Western Mediterranean region possibly occurred during Early Oligocene and Miocene (29.9-8.5 Mya) via Eastern and Northwestern Africa. A dispersal from Northwestern Africa to India could have occurred between 16.3 and 7.6 Mya. Vicariance and extinction events occurred approximately 21.6 Mya. Colonization of Madagascar occurred between 30.6 and 16.6 Mya, after a single transoceanic dispersal event from Southern Africa. The current disjunct distributions of Urgineoideae are not satisfactorily explained by Gondwana fragmentation or dispersal via boreotropical forests, due to the younger divergence time estimates. The flattened winged seeds of Urgineoideae could have played an important role in long-distance dispersal by strong winds and big storms, whereas geodispersal could have also occurred from Southern Africa to Asia and the Mediterranean region via the so-called arid and high-altitude corridors.

  20. Modulation of the Rat Hepatic Cytochrome P4501A Subfamily Using Biotin Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Ronquillo-Sánchez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have found that biotin favors glucose and lipid metabolism, and medications containing biotin have been developed. Despite the use of biotin as a pharmacological agent, few studies have addressed toxicity aspects including the possible interaction with cytochrome P450 enzyme family. This study analyzed the effects of pharmacological doses of biotin on the expression and activity of the cytochrome P4501A subfamily involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. Wistar rats were treated daily with biotin (2 mg/kg, i.p., while the control groups were treated with saline. All of the rats were sacrificed by cervical dislocation after 1, 3, 5, or 7 days of treatment. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 mRNAs were modified by biotin while enzyme activity and protein concentration were not affected. The lack of an effect of biotin on CYP1A activity was confirmed using other experimental strategies, including (i cotreatment of the animals with biotin and a known CYP1A inducer; (ii the addition of biotin to the reaction mixtures for the measurement of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 activities; and (iii the use of an S9 mixture that was prepared from control and biotin-treated rats to analyze the activation of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP into mutagenic metabolites using the Ames test. The results suggest that biotin does not influence the CYP1A-mediated metabolism of xenobiotics.

  1. Identification of the Alternative Promoters of the KChIP4 Subfamily

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yun DENG; Jia-Hui XIA; Fang CAI; Kun XIA; Qian PAN; Zhi-Gao LONG; Ling-Qian WU; De-Sheng LIANG; He-Ping DAI; Zhuo-Hua ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    The subfamily of voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channel interacting protein 4 (KChIP4)is made up of the auxiliary interacting protein of voltage-dependent potassium channels. In this study, the structure of four splicing variants of the human KChIP4 gene was analyzed. Three of the four isoforms of the KChIP4 gene, KChIP4.1, KChIP4.2 and KChIP4.4, were amplified from mouse and human fetal brain tissues by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and then identified. Based on the bioinformatics analysis of the genomic sequences of the gene, we cloned and characterized two promoter fragments from the KChIP4 gene. One was a 325 bp fragment upstream of the 5' end of the KChIP4.1 mRNA sequence and the other was an 818 bp fragment located immediately at the 5' end of the KChIP4.4 variant. Both of them can initiate the transcription of the reporter gene in HT1080 cells and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat fetal brain neurons, and they contain C+G islands, except typical TATA boxes and CAAT boxes. This shows that the KChIP4 gene expression is regulated by an alternative promoter.

  2. Biodiversity of Food Species of the Solanaceae Family: A Preliminary Taxonomic Inventory of Subfamily Solanoideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Samuels

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last fifty years there has been a continual reduction in horticultural and agricultural biodiversity of nutritionally important plants, including those of the Solanaceae family. To add to this, the broad range of traditional crops, previously grown on a sustainable scale in some parts of the world, has been replaced by a narrow range of major crops grown as large-scale monocultures. In order to counteract this trend, and to help maintain a broad wealth of genetic resources, conservation is essential. This, in turn, helps to safeguard food security. A taxonomic inventory, covering the diversity of species in a plant group, is an important first step in conservation. The Solanaceae is one of the major plant families providing food species. A survey of the biodiversity, ethnobotany and taxonomy of subfamily Solanoideae was undertaken and is presented here as an inventory of food species. Fifteen genera provide species that are utilised for food across the world. Of these, only four genera contain economically significant cultivated food cropspecies. The majority of these are in the genus Solanum, whilst Capsicum, Physalis and Lycium contribute the remainder of cultivated crop species. These genera and others also comprise species that are semi-cultivated, tolerated as useful weeds, or gathered from the wild.

  3. A review of the subfamily Picobiinae Johnston and Kethley, 1973 (Acariformes: Prostigmata: Syringophilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoracki, Maciej; Sikora, Bozena; Spicer, Greg S

    2016-01-01

    The fauna of quill mites of the subfamily Picobiinae Johnston and Kethley, 1973 (Acariformes: Cheyletoidea: Syringophilidae) is comprehensively revised. All of 78 known species, which are grouped into 11 genera, are examined and diagnosed or redescribed. Data on picobiine hosts and distribution are summarized, including new host and locality records. The following new species are described: Charadriineopicobia apricaria sp. nov. ex Pluvialis apricaria (Linnaeus) (Charadriiformes: Charadriidae) from France, Neopicobia pari sp. nov. ex Periparus venustulus Swinhoe (type host) (Passeriformes: Paridae) from China, Parus major Linnaeus (Paridae) from Macedonia and Finland, and Poecile varius Temminck and Schlegel (Paridae) from Japan, Picobia magellani sp. nov. ex Scytalopus magellanicus (Gmelin) (Passeriformes: Rhinocryptidae) from Colombia, Picobia lonchura sp. nov. ex Lonchura leucogastra (Blyth) (Passeriformes: Estrildidae) from Indonesia, Picobia makoli sp. nov. ex Xiphocolaptes promeropirhynchus (Lesson) (Passeriformes: Furnariidae) from Colombia. The species Picobia polonica Skoracki, Magowski and Dabert, 2001 syn. nov. is a junior synonym of C. khulkhaskhani Kivganov and Sharafat, 1995. The following new combinations are proposed: Neopicobia ictericus (Skoracki and Glowska, 2010) comb. nov., Rafapicobia brotogeris (Fain, Bochkov and Mironov, 2000) comb. nov., and Rafapicobia ramphastos (Fain, Bochkov and Mironov, 2000) comb. nov. Keys to the all picobiine genera and species are presented, along with a check-list of picobiine species and their hosts.

  4. A cladistic analysis and classification of the subfamily Bembicinae (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae), with a key to the genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemkov, Pavel G; Lelej, Arkady S

    2013-01-01

    A cladistic analysis of the digger wasp subfamily Bembicinae based on morphological characters is presented. The underlying data matrix comprises 83 terminal taxa (coded on genus-level) and 64 morphological characters. The resulting strict consensus tree was used as the basis for a revised tribal and subtribal classification of the Bembicinae. Based on a previously published classification, we herewith propose a change: the tribe Heliocausini Handlirsch 1925, stat. resurr. (composed of Acanthocausus Fritz & Toro 1977, Heliocausus Kohl 1892, and Tiguipa Fritz & Toro 1976) is separated from Bembicini Latreille 1802. Four tribes are recognized within the subfamily Bembicinae and seven subtribes within the tribe Gorytini and two subtribes in the tribe Nyssonini, based on the present cladistic analysis.The subtribe Nurseina Nemkov & Lelej, subtrib. nov. (comprising of Nippononysson Yasumatsu & Maidl 1936 and Nursea Cameron 1902) is separated from other genera in the tribe Nyssonini Latreille 1804. An new identification key to the genera of the Bembicinae is provided.

  5. A BAYES COMPARISON OF TWO DIFFERENT CANCER THERAPIES UNDER THE ASSUMPTION OF WEIBULL SURVIVAL MODEL OR ITS SUBFAMILY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja Arora

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a group of patients suffering from leukemia B non-small lung cancer. Suchpatients are generally suggested to undergo for either radiotherapy or chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy.The objective of the paper is to compare the two therapies based on survival functions of the patients assumingWeibull survival model for each therapy. The paper further examines the feasibility of a subfamily of Weibullmodel, namely the exponential distribution, for a date set available from a clinical trial experiment. Thisfeasibility is judged based on Bayes information criterion by comparing the Weibull model with its subfamily.The model compatibility study with the data based on posterior p-values has also been given to ensure thesuitability of the two models. Finally, the recommendations are made accordingly.

  6. Revision of the Oriental subfamily Heteropteryginae Kirby, 1896, with a re-arrangement of the family Heteropterygidae and the descriptions of five new species of Haaniella Kirby, 1904. (Phasmatodea: Areolatae: Heteropterygidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennemann, Frank H; Conle, Oskar V; Brock, Paul D; Seow-Choen, Francis

    2016-01-01

    established for the three basal genera Tisamenus Stål, 1875, Ilocano Rehn & Rehn, 1939 and Hoploclonia Stål, 1875 all of which were placed in Eubulidini by Zompro (2004). The latter genus differs from the other two genera by the morphology of the female genitalia, which is unique amongst the entire family. Three generic groups are recognized within Obrimini, the Obrimus-group, Stenobrimus-group and Theramenes-group. Keys are presented to distinguish between the three tribes now contained in the Obriminae, i.e. Obrimini, Tisamenini n. trib. and Miroceramiini. The genus Hennobrimus Conle, 2006 is synonymised with Mearnsiana Rehn & Rehn, 1939, based on the fact that the type-species of both genera are conspecific (n. syn.). Hennobrimus hennemanni Conle, 2006, the type-species of Hennobrimus, and Trachyaretaon manobo Lit & Eusebio, 2005 are synonymised with Mearnsiana bullosa Rehn & Rehn, 1939, the type-species of Mearnsiana (n. syn.). Theramenes dromedarius Stål, 1877 from the Philippines is removed from synonymy with the Wallacean Theramenes olivaceus (Westwood, 1859) and re-established as a valid species (rev. stat.).        The subfamily Heteropteryginae Kirby, 1896 is revised at the species-level and a new diagnosis is presented. Keys to the two genera and all 16 known species are provided along with new descriptions, differential diagnoses, lists of examined material, detailed information on the known distributions, measurements and illustrations of the insects and eggs. The intra-subfamiliar and intra-generic relationships are discussed and a cladogram is presented. Heteropteryginae contains two genera: Heteropteryx Gray, 1835 (Type-species: Phasma dilatatum Parkinson, 1798) and Haaniella Kirby, 1896 (Type-species: Phasma (Heteropteryx) muelleri de Haan, 1842). The distribution of this subfamily is restricted to Sundaland with the exception of a single species that is found in Vietnam. All other species are distributed in Borneo, Sumatra, the Mentawai Islands

  7. Citrus (Rutaceae) SNP Markers Based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR; Transferability Across the Aurantioideae Subfamily

    OpenAIRE

    Andres Garcia-Lor; Gema Ancillo; Luis Navarro; Patrick Ollitrault

    2013-01-01

    Premise of the study: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR (KASPar) were developed from sequences of three Citrus species. Their transferability was tested in 63 Citrus genotypes and 19 relative genera of the subfamily Aurantioideae to estimate the potential of SNP markers, selected from a limited intrageneric discovery panel, for ongoing broader diversity analysis at the intra- and intergeneric levels and systematic germplasm bank characteriza...

  8. Alternative splicing produces two transcripts encoding female-biased pheromone subfamily receptors in the navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella

    OpenAIRE

    Garczynski, Stephen F.; Walter S. Leal

    2015-01-01

    Insect odorant receptors (ORs) are key sensors of environmental odors and members of the lepidopteran pheromone receptor subfamily are thought to play important roles in mate finding by recognizing sex pheromones. Much research has been done to identify putative pheromone receptors in lepidopteran males, but little attention has been given to female counterparts. In this study, degenerate oligonucleotide primers designed against a conserved amino acid region in the C-terminus of lepidopteran ...

  9. RINL, Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Rab5-Subfamily, Is Involved in the EphA8-Degradation Pathway with Odin

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroaki Kajiho; Shinichi Fukushima; Kenji Kontani; Toshiaki Katada

    2012-01-01

    The Rab family of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) plays a vital role in membrane trafficking. Its active GTP-bound state is driven by guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs). Ras and Rab interactor (or Ras interaction/interference)-like (RINL), which contains a conserved VPS9 domain critical for GEF action, was recently identified as a new Rab5 subfamily GEF in vitro. However, its detailed function and interacting molecules have not yet been fully elucidated. Here we found that R...

  10. RINL, guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rab5-subfamily, is involved in the EphA8-degradation pathway with odin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Kajiho

    Full Text Available The Rab family of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases plays a vital role in membrane trafficking. Its active GTP-bound state is driven by guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs. Ras and Rab interactor (or Ras interaction/interference-like (RINL, which contains a conserved VPS9 domain critical for GEF action, was recently identified as a new Rab5 subfamily GEF in vitro. However, its detailed function and interacting molecules have not yet been fully elucidated. Here we found that RINL has GEF activity for the Rab5 subfamily proteins by measuring their GTP-bound forms in cultured cells. We also found that RINL interacts with odin, a member of the ankyrin-repeat and sterile-alpha motif (SAM domain-containing (Anks protein family. In addition, the Eph tyrosine kinase receptor EphA8 formed a ternary complex with both RINL and odin. Interestingly, RINL expression in cultured cells reduced EphA8 levels in a manner dependent on both its GEF activity and interaction with odin. In addition, knockdown of RINL increased EphA8 level in HeLa cells. Our findings suggest that RINL, as a GEF for Rab5 subfamily, is implicated in the EphA8-degradation pathway via its interaction with odin.

  11. Comparative genome analysis between Agrostis stolonifera and members of the Pooideae subfamily, including Brachypodium distachyon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreto Araneda

    Full Text Available Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera, allotetraploid 2n = 4x = 28 is one of the major cool-season turfgrasses. It is widely used on golf courses due to its tolerance to low mowing and aggressive growth habit. In this study, we investigated genome relationships of creeping bentgrass relative to the Triticeae (a consensus map of Triticum aestivum, T. tauschii, Hordeum vulgare, and H. spontaneum, oat, rice, and ryegrass maps using a common set of 229 EST-RFLP markers. The genome comparisons based on the RFLP markers revealed large-scale chromosomal rearrangements on different numbers of linkage groups (LGs of creeping bentgrass relative to the Triticeae (3 LGs, oat (4 LGs, and rice (8 LGs. However, we detected no chromosomal rearrangement between creeping bentgrass and ryegrass, suggesting that these recently domesticated species might be closely related, despite their memberships to different Pooideae tribes. In addition, the genome of creeping bentgrass was compared with the complete genome sequence of Brachypodium distachyon in Pooideae subfamily using both sequences of the above-mentioned mapped EST-RFLP markers and sequences of 8,470 publicly available A. stolonifera ESTs (AgEST. We discovered large-scale chromosomal rearrangements on six LGs of creeping bentgrass relative to B. distachyon. Also, a total of 24 syntenic blocks based on 678 orthologus loci were identified between these two grass species. The EST orthologs can be utilized in further comparative mapping of Pooideae species. These results will be useful for genetic improvement of Agrostis species and will provide a better understanding of evolution within Pooideae species.

  12. The Crystal Structure of Streptococcus pyogenes Uridine Phosphorylase Reveals a Distinct Subfamily of Nucleoside Phosphorylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Timothy H.; Christoffersen, S.; Allan, Paula W.; Parker, William B.; Piskur, Jure; Serra, I.; Terreni, M.; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell); (Pavia); (Lund); (Southern Research)

    2011-09-20

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine or 2'-deoxyuridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate or 2'-deoxyribose 1-phosphate. This enzyme belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase I superfamily whose members show diverse specificity for nucleoside substrates. Phylogenetic analysis shows Streptococcus pyogenes uridine phosphorylase (SpUP) is found in a distinct branch of the pyrimidine subfamily of nucleoside phosphorylases. To further characterize SpUP, we determined the crystal structure in complex with the products, ribose 1-phosphate and uracil, at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. Like Escherichia coli UP (EcUP), the biological unit of SpUP is a hexamer with an ?/? monomeric fold. A novel feature of the active site is the presence of His169, which structurally aligns with Arg168 of the EcUP structure. A second active site residue, Lys162, is not present in previously determined UP structures and interacts with O2 of uracil. Biochemical studies of wild-type SpUP showed that its substrate specificity is similar to that of EcUP, while EcUP is {approx}7-fold more efficient than SpUP. Biochemical studies of SpUP mutants showed that mutations of His169 reduced activity, while mutation of Lys162 abolished all activity, suggesting that the negative charge in the transition state resides mostly on uracil O2. This is in contrast to EcUP for which transition state stabilization occurs mostly at O4.

  13. Evolutionary relationships among primary endosymbionts of the mealybug subfamily phenacoccinae (hemiptera: Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruwell, Matthew E; Hardy, Nate B; Gullan, Penny J; Dittmar, Katharina

    2010-11-01

    Mealybugs (Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae) are sap-sucking plant parasites that harbor bacterial endosymbionts within specialized organs. Previous studies have identified two subfamilies, Pseudococcinae and Phenacoccinae, within mealybugs and determined the primary endosymbionts (P-endosymbionts) of the Pseudococcinae to be Betaproteobacteria ("Candidatus Tremblaya princeps") containing Gammaproteobacteria secondary symbionts. Here, the P-endosymbionts of phenacoccine mealybugs are characterized based on 16S rRNA from the bacteria of 20 species of phenacoccine mealybugs and four outgroup Puto species (Coccoidea: Putoidae) and aligned to more than 100 published 16S rRNA sequences from symbiotic and free-living bacteria. Phylogenetic analyses recovered three separate lineages of bacteria from the Phenacoccinae, and these are considered to be the P-endosymbionts of their respective mealybug hosts, with those from (i) the mealybug genus Rastrococcus belonging to the Bacteroidetes, (ii) the subterranean mealybugs, tribe Rhizoecini, also within Bacteroidetes, in a clade sister to cockroach endosymbionts (Blattabacterium), and (iii) the remaining Phenacoccinae within the Betaproteobacteria, forming a well-supported sister group to "Candidatus Tremblaya princeps." Names are proposed for two strongly supported lineages: "Candidatus Brownia rhizoecola" for P-endosymbionts of Rhizoecini and "Candidatus Tremblaya phenacola" for P-endosymbionts of Phenacoccinae excluding Rastrococcus and Rhizoecini. Rates of nucleotide substitution among lineages of Tremblaya were inferred to be significantly faster than those of free-living Betaproteobacteria. Analyses also recovered a clade of Gammaproteobacteria, sister to the P-endosymbiont lineage of aphids ("Candidatus Buchnera aphidicola"), containing the endosymbionts of Putoidae, the secondary endosymbionts of pseudococcine mealybugs, and the endosymbionts of several other insect groups.

  14. Dynamic Distribution and Interaction of the Arabidopsis SRSF1 Subfamily Splicing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovic, Nancy; Schloesser, Marie; Joris, Marine; Sauvage, Eric; Hanikenne, Marc; Motte, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    Ser/Arg-rich (SR) proteins are essential nucleus-localized splicing factors. Our prior studies showed that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RSZ22, a homolog of the human SRSF7 SR factor, exits the nucleus through two pathways, either dependent or independent on the XPO1 receptor. Here, we examined the expression profiles and shuttling dynamics of the Arabidopsis SRSF1 subfamily (SR30, SR34, SR34a, and SR34b) under control of their endogenous promoter in Arabidopsis and in transient expression assay. Due to its rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and high expression level in transient assay, we analyzed the multiple determinants that regulate the localization and shuttling dynamics of SR34. By site-directed mutagenesis of SR34 RNA-binding sequences and Arg/Ser-rich (RS) domain, we further show that functional RRM1 or RRM2 are dispensable for the exclusive protein nuclear localization and speckle-like distribution. However, mutations of both RRMs induced aggregation of the protein whereas mutation in the RS domain decreased the stability of the protein and suppressed its nuclear accumulation. Furthermore, the RNA-binding motif mutants are defective for their export through the XPO1 (CRM1/Exportin-1) receptor pathway, but retain nucleocytoplasmic mobility. We performed a yeast two hybrid screen with SR34 as bait and discovered SR45 as a new interactor. SR45 is an unusual SR splicing factor bearing two RS domains. These interactions were confirmed in planta by FLIM-FRET and BiFC and the roles of SR34 domains in protein-protein interactions were further studied. Altogether, our report extends our understanding of shuttling dynamics of Arabidopsis SR splicing factors. PMID:26697894

  15. The human N-formylpeptide receptor. Characterization of two cDNA isolates and evidence for a new subfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two variants of the human N-formylpeptide chemoattractant receptor have been isolated from a CDM8 expression library prepared from mRNA of human myeloid HL-60 cells differentiated to the granulocyte phenotype with Bt2cAMP. Both recombinant receptors, fMLP-R26 and fMLP-R98, are 350 amino acids long (Mr 38 420); they differ from each other by two residue changes at positions 101 and 346 and by significant differences in the 5' and 3' untranslated regions. Both clones were able to transfer to COS-7 cells the capacity to specificaly bind a new and highly efficient hydrophilic derivative of N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-Lys, referred to as fMLPK-Pep12. Photolabeling experiments revealed that the glycosylated form of the fMLP receptor in COS cells has a molecular weight (Mr 50 000-70 000) similar to that observed for the native receptor in differentiated HL-60 cells. Northern blot analysis revealed a major transcript of 1.6-1.7 kb and two minor hybridization signals of 2.3 and 3.1 kb, suggesting a related family of receptors. The complex hybridization pattern obtained with restricted genomic DNA was consistent with either two genes encoding fMLP receptor isoforms or a single gene with at least one intron in the coding sequence. Sequence comparison established that the fMLP receptor belongs to the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily. The structural similarities observed with RDC1, a receptor isolated from a dog thyroid cDNA library, which shares weak homologies with other members of the family, suggests that the fMLP receptor is representative of a new subfamily

  16. Identification of a novel pentatricopeptide repeat subfamily with a C-terminal domain of bacterial origin acquired via ancient horizontal gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Manna, Sam; Barth, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are a large family of sequence-specific RNA binding proteins involved in organelle RNA metabolism. Very little is known about the origin and evolution of these proteins, particularly outside of plants. Here, we report the identification of a novel subfamily of PPR proteins not found in plants and explore their evolution. Results We identified a novel subfamily of PPR proteins, which all contain a C-terminal tRNA guanine methyltransferase (TGM...

  17. Members of rice plasma membrane intrinsic proteins subfamily are involved in arsenite permeability and tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosa, Kareem A; Kumar, Kundan; Chhikara, Sudesh; Mcdermott, Joseph; Liu, Zijuan; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2012-12-01

    Rice accumulates high level of arsenic (As) in its edible parts and thus plays an important role in the transfer of As into the food chain. However, the mechanisms of As uptake and its detoxification in rice are not well understood. Recently, members of the Nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein (NIP) subfamily of plant aquaporins were shown to transport arsenite in rice and Arabidopsis. Here we report that members of the rice plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) subfamily are also involved in As tolerance and transport. Based on the homology search with the mammalian AQP9 and yeast Fps1 arsenite transporters, we identified and cloned five rice PIP gene subfamily members. qRT-PCR analysis of PIPs in rice root and shoot tissues revealed a significant down regulation of transcripts encoding OsPIP1;2, OsPIP1;3, OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in response to arsenite treatment. Heterologous expression of OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in Xenopus laevis oocytes significantly increased the uptake of arsenite. Overexpression of OsPIP2;4, OsPIP2;6, and OsPIP2;7 in Arabidopsis yielded enhanced arsenite tolerance and higher biomass accumulation. Further, these transgenic plants showed no significant accumulation of As in shoot and root tissues in long term uptake assays. Whereas, short duration exposure to arsenite caused both active influx and efflux of As in the roots. The data suggests a bidirectional arsenite permeability of rice PIPs in plants. These rice PIPs genes will be highly useful for engineering important food and biofuel crops for enhanced crop productivity on contaminated soils without increasing the accumulation of toxic As in the biomass or edible tissues.

  18. Alu Sb2 subfamily is present in all higher primates but was most succesfully amplified in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richer, C.; Zietkiewicz, E.; Labuda, D. [Universite de Montreal, Que (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Alu repeats can be classified into subfamilies which amplified in primate genomes at different evolutionary time periods. A young Alu subfamily, Sb2, with a characteristic 7-nucleotide duplication at position 256, has been described in seven human loci. An Sb2 insertion found near the HD gene was unique to two HD families, indicating that Sb2 was still retropositionally active. Here, we have shown that the Sb2 insertion in the CHOL locus was similarly rare, being absent in 120 individuals of Caucasian, Oriental and Black origin. In contrast, Sb2 inserts in five other loci were found fixed (non-polymorphic), based on measurements in the same population sample, but absent from orthologous positions in higher apes. This suggest that Sb2 repeats spread relatively early in the human lineage following divergence from other primates and that these elements may be human-specific. By quantitative PCR, we investigated the presence of Sb2 sequences in different primate DNA, using one PCR primer anchored at the 5{prime} Alu-end and the other complementary to the duplicated Sb2-specific segment. With an Sb2-containing plasmid as a standard, we estimated the number of Sb2 repeats at 1500-1800 copies per human haploid equivalent; corresponding numbers in chimpanzee and gorilla were almost two orders of magnitude lower, while the signal observed in orangutan and gibbon DNAs was consistent with the presence of a single copy. The analysis of 22 human, 11 chimpanzee and 10 gorilla sequences indicates that the Alu Sb2 dispersed independently in these three primate lineages; gorilla consensus differs from the human Sb2 sequence by one position, while all chimpanzee repeats have their linker expanded by up to eight A-residues. Should they be thus considered as separate subfamilies? It is possible that sequence modifications with respect to the human consensus are responsible for poor retroposition of Sb2 in apes.

  19. Discovery of a linear cyclotide from the bracelet subfamily and its disulfide mapping by top-down mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Giang Kien Truc; Zhang, Sen; Wang, Wei; Wong, Clarence Tsun Ting; Nguyen, Ngan Thi Kim; Tam, James P

    2011-12-30

    Cyclotides are heat-stable macrocyclic peptides from plants that display a wide range of biological activities. They can be divided into two subfamilies: Möbius or bracelet, based on the presence or absence of a cis-proline residue in loop 5, respectively. Currently, over 150 cyclotides have been discovered, but only four linear variants of the Möbius subfamily have been hitherto isolated. In this study, we report the discovery of two novel cyclotides, hedyotide B1 and hedyotide B2, from the aerial parts of Hedyotis biflora. Hedyotide B1 has a cyclic cystine knot structure typical of cyclotides. Interestingly, hedyotide B2 possesses a linear backbone and is the first linear representative of the bracelet subfamily. Disulfide mapping of hedyotide B2 by a top-down MS/MS approach showed that it shares the same knotted disulfide arrangement as conventional cyclotides. Its unfolding pathway also showed that the penetrating disulfide bond Cys III-VI is the most stable disulfide linkage. Cloning of the gene encoding hedyotide B2 revealed a nonsense mutation that introduces a premature stop codon at the conserved Asn residue position, which is essential for an end-to-end backbone ligation. Biophysical characterization showed that hedyotide B2 was more susceptible to exopeptidase degradation as compared with hedyotide B1. Hedyotide B2 was also inactive against all four tested bacterial strains, whereas hedyotide B1 was bactericidal to Escherichia coli and Streptococcus salivarius at low micromolar concentration. Our results provide a deeper understanding of the structures, functions, and biosynthetic processing of cyclotides and uncyclotides in plants. PMID:21979955

  20. Sea snakes in Australian waters (Serpentes: subfamilies Hydrophiinae and Laticaudinae)--a review with an updated identification key.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Arne Redsted; Sanders, Kate Laura; Guinea, Michael L; Amey, Andrew P

    2014-10-02

    Sea snakes (Elapidae, subfamilies Hydrophiinae and Laticaudinae) reach high species richness in the South China Sea and in the Australian region; however, most countries in the two regions still lack up-to-date checklists and identification tools for these snakes. We present an updated reviewed checklist and a new complete identification key to sea snakes in Australian waters. The identification key includes 29 species documented and 4 possibly occurring taxa and is based mostly on easy-to-use external characters. We find no evidence for breeding populations of Laticauda in Australian waters, but include the genus on the list of possibly occurring taxa. 

  1. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of Homeodomain Leucine Zipper Subfamily IV (HDZ IV) Gene Family from Musa accuminata

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Ashutosh; Misra, Prashant; Alok, Anshu; Kaur, Navneet; Sharma, Shivani; Lakhwani, Deepika; Asif, Mehar H.; Tiwari, Siddharth; Trivedi, Prabodh K.

    2016-01-01

    The homeodomain zipper family (HD-ZIP) of transcription factors is present only in plants and plays important role in the regulation of plant-specific processes. The subfamily IV of HDZ transcription factors (HD-ZIP IV) has primarily been implicated in the regulation of epidermal structure development. Though this gene family is present in all lineages of land plants, members of this gene family have not been identified in banana, which is one of the major staple fruit crops. In the present w...

  2. Genome wide identification and expression analysis of Homeodomain leucine zipper subfamily IV (HDZ IV) gene family from Musa accuminata

    OpenAIRE

    Ashutosh ePandey; Prashant eMisra; Anshu eAlok; Navneet eKaur; Shivai eSharma; Deepika eLakhwani; Mehar H Hasan; Siddhartha eTiwari; Prabodh KUMAR Trivedi

    2016-01-01

    The homedodomain zipper family (HD-ZIP) of transcription factors is present only in plants and plays important role in the regulation of plant-specific processes. The subfamily IV of HDZ transcription factors (HD-ZIP IV) has primarily been implicated in the regulation of epidermal structure development. Though this gene family is present in all lineages of land plants, members of this gene family have not been identified in banana, which is one of the major staple fruit crops. In the present ...

  3. Sea snakes in Australian waters (Serpentes: subfamilies Hydrophiinae and Laticaudinae)—a review with an updated identification key

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redsted Rasmussen, Arne; Sanders, Kate Laura; Guinea, Michael L;

    2014-01-01

    Sea snakes (Elapidae, subfamilies Hydrophiinae and Laticaudinae) reach high species richness in the South China Sea and in the Australian region; however, most countries in the two regions still lack up-to-date checklists and identification tools for these snakes. We present an updated reviewed...... checklist and a new complete identification key to sea snakes in Australian waters. The identification key includes 29 species documented and 4 possibly occurring taxa and is based mostly on easy-to-use external characters. We find no evidence for breeding populations of Laticauda in Australian waters...

  4. Whole genome identification, phylogeny and evolution of the cytochrome P450 family 2 (CYP2) sub-families in birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Daniela; Maldonado, Emanuel; Khan, Imran;

    2016-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily defends organisms from endogenous and noxious environmental compounds, and thus is crucial for survival. However, beyond mammals the molecular evolution of CYP2 subfamilies is poorly understood. Here, we characterized the CYP2 family across 48 novel avian whole......0, SRS2_SRS3 and SRS3.1) and heme binding areas that influence CYP2 structure and function of functional importance as under significant positive selection. Some of the positively selected sites in avian CYP2D are located within the same SRS1 region that was previously linked with the metabolism...

  5. Cloning of MASK, a novel member of the mammalian germinal center kinase III subfamily, with apoptosis-inducing properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dan, Ippeita; Ong, Shao-En; Watanabe, Norinobu M;

    2002-01-01

    We have cloned a novel human GCK family kinase that has been designated as MASK (Mst3 and SOK1-related kinase). MASK is widely expressed and encodes a protein of 416 amino acid residues, with an N-terminal kinase domain and a unique C-terminal region. Like other GCK-III subfamily kinases, MASK do...... apoptosis upon overexpression in mammalian cells that is abrogated by CrmA, suggesting involvement of MASK in the apoptotic machinery in mammalian cells. Udgivelsesdato: 2002-Feb-22...

  6. A genomic view of the NOD-like receptor family in teleost fish: Identification of a novel NLR subfamily in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, K.J.; Purcell, M.K.; Winton, J.R.; Hansen, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Background. A large multigene family of NOD-like receptor (NLR) molecules have been described in mammals and implicated in immunity and apoptosis. Little information, however, exists concerning this gene family in non-mammalian taxa. This current study, therefore, provides an in-depth investigation of this gene family in lower vertebrates including extensive phylogenetic comparison of zebrafish NLRs with orthologs in tetrapods, and analysis of their tissue-specific expression. Results. Three distinct NLR subfamilies were identified by mining genome databases of various non-mammalian vertebrates; the first subfamily (NLR-A) resembles mammalian NODs, the second (NLR-B) resembles mammalian NALPs, while the third (NLR-C) appears to be unique to teleost fish. In zebrafish, NLR-A and NLR-B subfamilies contain five and six genes respectively. The third subfamily is large, containing several hundred NLR-C genes, many of which are predicted to encode a C-terminal B30.2 domain. This subfamily most likely evolved from a NOD3-like molecule. Gene predictions for zebrafish NLRs were verified using sequence derived from ESTs or direct sequencing of cDNA. Reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR analysis confirmed expression of representative genes from each subfamily in selected tissues. Conclusion. Our findings confirm the presence of multiple NLR gene orthologs, which form a large multigene family in teleostei. Although the functional significance of the three major NLR subfamilies is unclear, we speculate that conservation and abundance of NLR molecules in all teleostei genomes, reflects an essential role in cellular control, apoptosis or immunity throughout bony fish. ?? 2008 Laing et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  7. Analysis of Comparative Sequence and Genomic Data to Verify Phylogenetic Relationship and Explore a New Subfamily of Bacterial Lipases.

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    Malihe Masomian

    Full Text Available Thermostable and organic solvent-tolerant enzymes have significant potential in a wide range of synthetic reactions in industry due to their inherent stability at high temperatures and their ability to endure harsh organic solvents. In this study, a novel gene encoding a true lipase was isolated by construction of a genomic DNA library of thermophilic Aneurinibacillus thermoaerophilus strain HZ into Escherichia coli plasmid vector. Sequence analysis revealed that HZ lipase had 62% identity to putative lipase from Bacillus pseudomycoides. The closely characterized lipases to the HZ lipase gene are from thermostable Bacillus and Geobacillus lipases belonging to the subfamily I.5 with ≤ 57% identity. The amino acid sequence analysis of HZ lipase determined a conserved pentapeptide containing the active serine, GHSMG and a Ca(2+-binding motif, GCYGSD in the enzyme. Protein structure modeling showed that HZ lipase consisted of an α/β hydrolase fold and a lid domain. Protein sequence alignment, conserved regions analysis, clustal distance matrix and amino acid composition illustrated differences between HZ lipase and other thermostable lipases. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this lipase represented a new subfamily of family I of bacterial true lipases, classified as family I.9. The HZ lipase was expressed under promoter Plac using IPTG and was characterized. The recombinant enzyme showed optimal activity at 65 °C and retained ≥ 97% activity after incubation at 50 °C for 1h. The HZ lipase was stable in various polar and non-polar organic solvents.

  8. Resolution of phylogenetic relationships of the major subfamilies of the Delphacidae (Homoptera: Fulgoroidea) using the mitochondrial ribosomal DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EDDY DIJKSTRA; MICHEL A. SLOTMAN; RORY J. POST

    2006-01-01

    Delphacid relationships from the genus level to the subfamily have been completely resolved (among those taxa examined) using sequence data from the 3' end of the 12S gene. Monophyly of the non-asiracine subfamilies was strongly supported and the asiracine Ugyops was placed in the most basal position of the tree. Support levels for monophyly of the Delphacini increased after weighting transversions more heavily than transitions and after removing the cixiid outgroup from the dataset. Among the Delphacini,Conomelus and Megamelus were more closely related to each other than either was to Chloriona. These results are in agreement with the tree based on morphological characters. However, in contrast to morphological data our results strongly supported a sister group relationship between the Stenocraninae and the Kelisiinae. Although the 12S gene fragment gave some information about the species relationships within Chloriona, neither this fragment nor the 5' end of the 16S gene appear to be very useful for this level. Molecular evolutionary patterns provided evidence that there has been a shift in base composition from T to A during the early evolution of the non-Asiracinae. The non-Asiracinae also had comparatively fast substitution rates and these two observations are possibly correlated. In the 'modern' delphacid Chloriona, the AT content was comparatively low in regions free of constraints but this was not the case for 'non-modern' delphacids. The tRNA for valine has been translocated elsewhere, probably before the Delphacidae and Cixiidae diverged from each other.

  9. Analysis of Comparative Sequence and Genomic Data to Verify Phylogenetic Relationship and Explore a New Subfamily of Bacterial Lipases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masomian, Malihe; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2016-01-01

    Thermostable and organic solvent-tolerant enzymes have significant potential in a wide range of synthetic reactions in industry due to their inherent stability at high temperatures and their ability to endure harsh organic solvents. In this study, a novel gene encoding a true lipase was isolated by construction of a genomic DNA library of thermophilic Aneurinibacillus thermoaerophilus strain HZ into Escherichia coli plasmid vector. Sequence analysis revealed that HZ lipase had 62% identity to putative lipase from Bacillus pseudomycoides. The closely characterized lipases to the HZ lipase gene are from thermostable Bacillus and Geobacillus lipases belonging to the subfamily I.5 with ≤ 57% identity. The amino acid sequence analysis of HZ lipase determined a conserved pentapeptide containing the active serine, GHSMG and a Ca(2+)-binding motif, GCYGSD in the enzyme. Protein structure modeling showed that HZ lipase consisted of an α/β hydrolase fold and a lid domain. Protein sequence alignment, conserved regions analysis, clustal distance matrix and amino acid composition illustrated differences between HZ lipase and other thermostable lipases. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this lipase represented a new subfamily of family I of bacterial true lipases, classified as family I.9. The HZ lipase was expressed under promoter Plac using IPTG and was characterized. The recombinant enzyme showed optimal activity at 65 °C and retained ≥ 97% activity after incubation at 50 °C for 1h. The HZ lipase was stable in various polar and non-polar organic solvents. PMID:26934700

  10. 细菌化学趋向性受体聚集体的相互作用%Molecular Interactions of Bacterial Chemoreceptor Assemblies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余大启; 涂豫海; 来鲁华

    2014-01-01

    细菌化学趋向性受体的最小结构单元为二聚体,在细胞膜上这些二聚体会聚集成大团簇.X射线晶体结构和低分辨电镜结构测定表明,这些团簇有两类不同的形式,一种是在晶体结构中观察到的倒金字塔式二聚体的三聚体重复形成的聚集,另一种为由二聚体尾部相互盘绕形成的拉链状聚集.有关拉链状聚集的详细分子模型目前尚不清楚.本文使用蛋白质-蛋白质对接的方法研究了大肠杆菌丝氨酸化学趋向性受体Tsr二聚体之间的相互作用.分子对接计算表明,倒金字塔式聚集和拉链状聚集的基本复合物都是可以出现的,相应复合物的分子动力学模拟表明这些结构都具有一定的稳定性.对于所获得的拉链状聚集体的基本复合物结构模型进行了详细的二聚体作用界面分析,发现二聚体间主要通过静电和疏水作用形成复合物,其中Arg388、Phe373和Ile377是形成拉链状聚集的关键作用残基.所建立的Tsr拉链状聚集的结构模型有助于揭示细菌化学趋向性受体在细胞膜上聚集的分子机制,为进一步的聚集理论及模拟研究提供了基础.%Bacterial chemoreceptors form homodimers that assemble into large clusters on cellmembranes to respond to external signals. These clusters have been found to have two different types of patterns:one is composed of inverted pyramid like trimers-of-dimers observed in the X-ray crystal structures, and the other is formed by the zipper like overlap of tips of dimers, as revealed by low-resolution electron microscopy. The detailed molecular model of the zipper like assemblies has remained unknown until now. Using protein-protein docking method, we studied the interactions between serine chemoreceptor Tsr dimers in Escherichia coli. The basic complexes for the two types of clustering patterns were both found in the docking complexes. Molecular dynamics simulations confirmed that these

  11. HCV Proteins and Immunoglobulin Variable Gene (IgV Subfamilies in HCV-Induced Type II Mixed Cryoglobulinemia: A Concurrent Pathogenetic Role

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    Giuseppe Sautto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MCII is well established, but the role played by distinct HCV proteins and by specific components of the anti-HCV humoral immune response remains to be clearly defined. It is widely accepted that HCV drives the expansion of few B-cell clones expressing a restricted pool of selected immunoglobulin variable (IgV gene subfamilies frequently endowed with rheumatoid factor (RF activity. Moreover, the same IgV subfamilies are frequently observed in HCV-transformed malignant B-cell clones occasionally complicating MCII. In this paper, we analyze both the humoral and viral counterparts at the basis of cryoglobulins production in HCV-induced MCII, with particular attention reserved to the single IgV subfamilies most frequently involved.

  12. NR-2L: a two-level predictor for identifying nuclear receptor subfamilies based on sequence-derived features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Wang

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptors (NRs are one of the most abundant classes of transcriptional regulators in animals. They regulate diverse functions, such as homeostasis, reproduction, development and metabolism. Therefore, NRs are a very important target for drug development. Nuclear receptors form a superfamily of phylogenetically related proteins and have been subdivided into different subfamilies due to their domain diversity. In this study, a two-level predictor, called NR-2L, was developed that can be used to identify a query protein as a nuclear receptor or not based on its sequence information alone; if it is, the prediction will be automatically continued to further identify it among the following seven subfamilies: (1 thyroid hormone like (NR1, (2 HNF4-like (NR2, (3 estrogen like, (4 nerve growth factor IB-like (NR4, (5 fushi tarazu-F1 like (NR5, (6 germ cell nuclear factor like (NR6, and (7 knirps like (NR0. The identification was made by the Fuzzy K nearest neighbor (FK-NN classifier based on the pseudo amino acid composition formed by incorporating various physicochemical and statistical features derived from the protein sequences, such as amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, complexity factor, and low-frequency Fourier spectrum components. As a demonstration, it was shown through some benchmark datasets derived from the NucleaRDB and UniProt with low redundancy that the overall success rates achieved by the jackknife test were about 93% and 89% in the first and second level, respectively. The high success rates indicate that the novel two-level predictor can be a useful vehicle for identifying NRs and their subfamilies. As a user-friendly web server, NR-2L is freely accessible at either http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/NR2L or http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/NR2L. Each job submitted to NR-2L can contain up to 500 query protein sequences and be finished in less than 2 minutes. The less the number of query proteins is, the shorter the time will

  13. NR-2L: a two-level predictor for identifying nuclear receptor subfamilies based on sequence-derived features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are one of the most abundant classes of transcriptional regulators in animals. They regulate diverse functions, such as homeostasis, reproduction, development and metabolism. Therefore, NRs are a very important target for drug development. Nuclear receptors form a superfamily of phylogenetically related proteins and have been subdivided into different subfamilies due to their domain diversity. In this study, a two-level predictor, called NR-2L, was developed that can be used to identify a query protein as a nuclear receptor or not based on its sequence information alone; if it is, the prediction will be automatically continued to further identify it among the following seven subfamilies: (1) thyroid hormone like (NR1), (2) HNF4-like (NR2), (3) estrogen like, (4) nerve growth factor IB-like (NR4), (5) fushi tarazu-F1 like (NR5), (6) germ cell nuclear factor like (NR6), and (7) knirps like (NR0). The identification was made by the Fuzzy K nearest neighbor (FK-NN) classifier based on the pseudo amino acid composition formed by incorporating various physicochemical and statistical features derived from the protein sequences, such as amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, complexity factor, and low-frequency Fourier spectrum components. As a demonstration, it was shown through some benchmark datasets derived from the NucleaRDB and UniProt with low redundancy that the overall success rates achieved by the jackknife test were about 93% and 89% in the first and second level, respectively. The high success rates indicate that the novel two-level predictor can be a useful vehicle for identifying NRs and their subfamilies. As a user-friendly web server, NR-2L is freely accessible at either http://icpr.jci.edu.cn/bioinfo/NR2L or http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/NR2L. Each job submitted to NR-2L can contain up to 500 query protein sequences and be finished in less than 2 minutes. The less the number of query proteins is, the shorter the time will

  14. Kbot55, purified from Buthus occitanus tunetanus venom, represents the first member of a novel α-KTx subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElFessi-Magouri, Rym; Peigneur, Steve; Khamessi, Oussema; Srairi-Abid, Najet; ElAyeb, Mohamed; Mille, Bea Garcia; Cuypers, Eva; Tytgat, Jan; Kharrat, Riadh

    2016-06-01

    Kbot55 is a 39 amino acid peptide isolated from the venom of the Tunisian scorpion Buthus occitanus tunetanus. This peptide is cross-linked by 3 disulfide bridges and has a molecular mass of 4128.65Da. Kbot55 is very low represented in the venom and thus represents a challenge for biochemical characterization. In this study, Kbot55 has been subjected to a screening on ion channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. It was found that Kbot55 targets voltage-gated potassium channels with high affinity. Kbot55 shows very low amino acid identity with other scorpion potassium toxins and therefore was considered a bona fide novel type of scorpion toxin. Sequence alignment analysis indicated that Kbot55 is the first representative of the new α-Ktx31 subfamily and therefore was classified as α-Ktx31.1. PMID:26079392

  15. Identification of mariner-like elements belonging to the cecropia subfamily in two closely related Helicoverpa species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianjun Wang; Thomas A. Miller; Yoonseong Park

    2011-01-01

    Mariner transposons are widespread in eukaryote genomes and have been used as transposon vectors in insect transgenesis.We examined two closely related Helicoverpa species,the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera and corn earworm Helicoverpa zea,for the presence of mariner-like elements (MLEs).Multiple copies of two distinct MLEs,Hamarl and Hamar2,were isolated in H.armigera,and a MLE showing a high degree of conservation to Hamarl was detected in H.zea and was named Hzmarl.These MLEs belong to the cecropia subfamily,containing indels in the transposase coding region.Sequence analysis indicated the earlier invasion of Hamarl and relatively recent activity of Hamar2.

  16. Cyclophilins of a novel subfamily interact with SNW/SKIP coregulator in Dictyostelium discoideum and Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skruzný, M; Ambrozková, M; Fuková, I; Martínková, K; Blahůsková, A; Hamplová, L; Půta, F; Folk, P

    2001-10-31

    We screened the Dictyostelium discoideum two-hybrid cDNA library with the SNW/SKIP transcription coregulator SnwA and identified a novel cyclophilin CypE. Independently, the Schizosaccharomyces pombe cDNA library was screened with the SnwA ortholog Snw1 and the ortholog of CypE (named Cyp2) was found. Both cyclophilins bind the respective SNW protein in their autologous systems. The interaction was localized to the N-terminal part of SnwA as well as of Snw1. CypE was confirmed in vitro to be a cyclosporin A-sensitive peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase. Remarkably, both SNW proteins bind the cyclophilins in a cyclosporin A independent manner, possibly serving as adaptors for these novel isomerases. These results are the first characterization of the members of a novel cyclophilin subfamily, which includes the human CGI-124/PPIL1 protein. PMID:11690648

  17. A Species-Level Phylogeny of Extant Snakes with Description of a New Colubrid Subfamily and Genus

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvy, Alexander D.; Grismer, L. Lee; Bell, Charles D.; Lailvaux, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    Background With over 3,500 species encompassing a diverse range of morphologies and ecologies, snakes make up 36% of squamate diversity. Despite several attempts at estimating higher-level snake relationships and numerous assessments of generic- or species-level phylogenies, a large-scale species-level phylogeny solely focusing on snakes has not been completed. Here, we provide the largest-yet estimate of the snake tree of life using maximum likelihood on a supermatrix of 1745 taxa (1652 snake species + 7 outgroup taxa) and 9,523 base pairs from 10 loci (5 nuclear, 5 mitochondrial), including previously unsequenced genera (2) and species (61). Results Increased taxon sampling resulted in a phylogeny with a new higher-level topology and corroborate many lower-level relationships, strengthened by high nodal support values (> 85%) down to the species level (73.69% of nodes). Although the majority of families and subfamilies were strongly supported as monophyletic with > 88% support values, some families and numerous genera were paraphyletic, primarily due to limited taxon and loci sampling leading to a sparse supermatrix and minimal sequence overlap between some closely-related taxa. With all rogue taxa and incertae sedis species eliminated, higher-level relationships and support values remained relatively unchanged, except in five problematic clades. Conclusion Our analyses resulted in new topologies at higher- and lower-levels; resolved several previous topological issues; established novel paraphyletic affiliations; designated a new subfamily, Ahaetuliinae, for the genera Ahaetulla, Chrysopelea, Dendrelaphis, and Dryophiops; and appointed Hemerophis (Coluber) zebrinus to a new genus, Mopanveldophis. Although we provide insight into some distinguished problematic nodes, at the deeper phylogenetic scale, resolution of these nodes may require sampling of more slowly-evolving nuclear genes. PMID:27603205

  18. The search for therapeutic bacteriophages uncovers one new subfamily and two new genera of Pseudomonas-infecting Myoviridae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Henry

    Full Text Available In a previous study, six virulent bacteriophages PAK_P1, PAK_P2, PAK_P3, PAK_P4, PAK_P5 and CHA_P1 were evaluated for their in vivo efficacy in treating Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections using a mouse model of lung infection. Here, we show that their genomes are closely related to five other Pseudomonas phages and allow a subdivision into two clades, PAK_P1-like and KPP10-like viruses, based on differences in genome size, %GC and genomic contents, as well as number of tRNAs. These two clades are well delineated, with a mean of 86% and 92% of proteins considered homologous within individual clades, and 25% proteins considered homologous between the two clades. By ESI-MS/MS analysis we determined that their virions are composed of at least 25 different proteins and electron microscopy revealed a morphology identical to the hallmark Salmonella phage Felix O1. A search for additional bacteriophage homologs, using profiles of protein families defined from the analysis of the 11 genomes, identified 10 additional candidates infecting hosts from different species. By carrying out a phylogenetic analysis using these 21 genomes we were able to define a new subfamily of viruses, the Felixounavirinae within the Myoviridae family. The new Felixounavirinae subfamily includes three genera: Felixounalikevirus, PAK_P1likevirus and KPP10likevirus. Sequencing genomes of bacteriophages with therapeutic potential increases the quantity of genomic data on closely related bacteriophages, leading to establishment of new taxonomic clades and the development of strategies for analyzing viral genomes as presented in this article.

  19. Structural and Functional Analysis of a New Subfamily of Glycosyltransferases Required for Glycosylation of Serine-rich Streptococcal Adhesins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Fan; Erlandsen, Heidi; Ding, Lei; Li, Jingzhi; Huang, Ying; Zhou, Meixian; Liang, Xiaobo; Ma, Jinbiao; Wu, Hui (UAB)

    2011-09-16

    Serine-rich repeat glycoproteins (SRRPs) are a growing family of bacterial adhesins found in many streptococci and staphylococci; they play important roles in bacterial biofilm formation and pathogenesis. Glycosylation of this family of adhesins is essential for their biogenesis. A glucosyltransferase (Gtf3) catalyzes the second step of glycosylation of a SRRP (Fap1) from an oral streptococcus, Streptococcus parasanguinis. Although Gtf3 homologs are highly conserved in SRRP-containing streptococci, they share minimal homology with functionally known glycosyltransferases. We report here the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of Gtf3. The structural analysis indicates that Gtf3 forms a tetramer and shares significant structural homology with glycosyltransferases from GT4, GT5, and GT20 subfamilies. Combining crystal structural analysis with site-directed mutagenesis and in vitro glycosyltransferase assays, we identified residues that are required for UDP- or UDP-glucose binding and for oligomerization of Gtf3 and determined their contribution to the enzymatic activity of Gtf3. Further in vivo studies revealed that the critical amino acid residues identified by the structural analysis are crucial for Fap1 glycosylation in S. parasanguinis in vivo. Moreover, Gtf3 homologs from other streptococci were able to rescue the gtf3 knock-out mutant of S. parasanguinis in vivo and catalyze the sugar transfer to the modified SRRP substrate in vitro, demonstrating the importance and conservation of the Gtf3 homologs in glycosylation of SRRPs. As the Gtf3 homologs only exist in SRRP-containing streptococci, we conclude that the Gtf3 homologs represent a unique subfamily of glycosyltransferases.

  20. In silico cloning and characterization of the TGA (TGACG MOTIF-BINDING FACTOR) transcription factors subfamily in Carica papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrovo Espín, Fabio Marcelo; Peraza-Echeverria, Santy; Fuentes, Gabriela; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2012-05-01

    The TGA transcription factors belong to the subfamily of bZIP group D that play a major role in disease resistance and development. Most of the TGA identified in Arabidopsis interact with the master regulator of SAR, NPR1 that controls the expression of PR genes. As a first approach to determine the possible involvement of these transcription factors in papaya defense, we characterized Arabidopsis TGA orthologs from the genome of Carica papaya cv. SunUp. Six orthologs CpTGA1 to CpTGA6, were identified. The predicted CpTGA proteins were highly similar to AtTGA sequences and probably share the same DNA binding properties and transcriptional regulation features. The protein sequences alignment evidenced the presence of conserved domains, characteristic of this group of transcription factors. The phylogeny showed that CpTGA evolved into three different subclades associated with defense and floral development. This is the first report of basal expression patterns assessed by RT-PCR, from the whole subfamily of CpTGA members in different tissues from papaya cv. Maradol mature plants. Overall, CpTGA1, CpTGA3 CpTGA6 and CpTGA4 showed a basal expression in all tissues tested; CpTGA2 expressed strongly in all tissues except in petioles while CpTGA5 expressed only in petals and to a lower extent in petioles. Although more detailed studies in anthers and other floral structures are required, we suggest that CpTGA5 might be tissue-specific, and it might be involved in papaya floral development. On the other hand, we report here for the first time, the expression of the whole family of CpTGA in response to salicylic acid (SA). The expression of CpTGA3, CpTGA4 and CpTGA6 increased in response to SA, what would suggest its involvement in the SAR response in papaya.

  1. In silico cloning and characterization of the TGA (TGACG MOTIF-BINDING FACTOR) transcription factors subfamily in Carica papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrovo Espín, Fabio Marcelo; Peraza-Echeverria, Santy; Fuentes, Gabriela; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2012-05-01

    The TGA transcription factors belong to the subfamily of bZIP group D that play a major role in disease resistance and development. Most of the TGA identified in Arabidopsis interact with the master regulator of SAR, NPR1 that controls the expression of PR genes. As a first approach to determine the possible involvement of these transcription factors in papaya defense, we characterized Arabidopsis TGA orthologs from the genome of Carica papaya cv. SunUp. Six orthologs CpTGA1 to CpTGA6, were identified. The predicted CpTGA proteins were highly similar to AtTGA sequences and probably share the same DNA binding properties and transcriptional regulation features. The protein sequences alignment evidenced the presence of conserved domains, characteristic of this group of transcription factors. The phylogeny showed that CpTGA evolved into three different subclades associated with defense and floral development. This is the first report of basal expression patterns assessed by RT-PCR, from the whole subfamily of CpTGA members in different tissues from papaya cv. Maradol mature plants. Overall, CpTGA1, CpTGA3 CpTGA6 and CpTGA4 showed a basal expression in all tissues tested; CpTGA2 expressed strongly in all tissues except in petioles while CpTGA5 expressed only in petals and to a lower extent in petioles. Although more detailed studies in anthers and other floral structures are required, we suggest that CpTGA5 might be tissue-specific, and it might be involved in papaya floral development. On the other hand, we report here for the first time, the expression of the whole family of CpTGA in response to salicylic acid (SA). The expression of CpTGA3, CpTGA4 and CpTGA6 increased in response to SA, what would suggest its involvement in the SAR response in papaya. PMID:22410205

  2. Prevalent Exon-Intron Structural Changes in the APETALA1/FRUITFULL, SEPALLATA, AGAMOUS-LIKE6, and FLOWERING LOCUS C MADS-Box Gene Subfamilies Provide New Insights into Their Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xianxian; Duan, Xiaoshan; Zhang, Rui; Fu, Xuehao; Ye, Lingling; Kong, Hongzhi; Xu, Guixia; Shan, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    AP1/FUL, SEP, AGL6, and FLC subfamily genes play important roles in flower development. The phylogenetic relationships among them, however, have been controversial, which impedes our understanding of the origin and functional divergence of these genes. One possible reason for the controversy may be the problems caused by changes in the exon-intron structure of genes, which, according to recent studies, may generate non-homologous sites and hamper the homology-based sequence alignment. In this study, we first performed exon-by-exon alignments of these and three outgroup subfamilies (SOC1, AG, and STK). Phylogenetic trees reconstructed based on these matrices show improved resolution and better congruence with species phylogeny. In the context of these phylogenies, we traced evolutionary changes of exon-intron structures in each subfamily. We found that structural changes have occurred frequently following gene duplication and speciation events. Notably, exons 7 and 8 (if present) suffered more structural changes than others. With the knowledge of exon-intron structural changes, we generated more reasonable alignments containing all the focal subfamilies. The resulting trees showed that the SEP subfamily is sister to the monophyletic group formed by AP1/FUL and FLC subfamily genes and that the AGL6 subfamily forms a sister group to the three abovementioned subfamilies. Based on this topology, we inferred the evolutionary history of exon-intron structural changes among different subfamilies. Particularly, we found that the eighth exon originated before the divergence of AP1/FUL, FLC, SEP, and AGL6 subfamilies and degenerated in the ancestral FLC-like gene. These results provide new insights into the origin and evolution of the AP1/FUL, FLC, SEP, and AGL6 subfamilies.

  3. Enzymes of the AKR1B and AKR1C subfamilies and uterine diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tea eLanisnik Rizner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial and cervical cancers, uterine myoma, and endometriosis are very common uterine diseases. Worldwide, more than 800,000 women are affected annually by gynecological cancers, as a result of which, more than 360,000 die. During their reproductive age, about 70% of women develop uterine myomas, 10% to 15% suffer from endometriosis, and 35% to 50% from infertility associated with endometriosis. Uterine diseases are associated with aberrant inflammatory responses and concomitant increased production of prostaglandins (PG. They are also related to decreased differentiation, due to low levels of protective progesterone and retinoic acid, and to enhanced proliferation, due to high local concentrations of estrogens. The pathogenesis of these diseases can thus be attributed to disturbed PG, estrogen and retinoid metabolism and actions. Five human members of the aldo-keto reductase 1B (AKR1B and 1C (AKR1C superfamilies, i.e., AKR1B1, AKR1B10, AKR1C1, AKR1C2 and AKR1C3, have roles in these processes and can thus be implicated in uterine diseases. AKR1B1 and AKR1C3 catalyze the formation of PGF2alpha which stimulates cell proliferation. AKR1C3 converts PGD2 to 9alpha,11beta-PGF2, and thus counteracts the formation of 15deoxy-PGJ2, which can activate pro-apoptotic peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor beta. AKR1B10 catalyzes the reduction of retinal to retinol, and in thus lessens the formation of retinoic acid, with potential pro-differentiating actions. The AKR1C1-AKR1C3 enzymes also act as 17-keto- and 20-ketosteroid reductases to varying extents, and are implicated in increased estradiol and decreased progesterone levels. This review comprises a short introduction to uterine diseases, followed by an overview of the current literature on the AKR1B and AKR1C expression in the uterus and in uterine diseases. The potential implications of the AKR1B and AKR1C enzymes and their pathophysiologies are then discussed, followed by conclusions and

  4. Differential characters

    CERN Document Server

    Bär, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Providing a systematic introduction to differential characters as introduced by Cheeger and Simons, this text describes important concepts such as fiber integration, higher dimensional holonomy, transgression, and the product structure in a geometric manner. Differential characters form a model of what is nowadays called differential cohomology, which is the mathematical structure behind the higher gauge theories in physics.  

  5. Transfer of All Cybalomiinae to other Subfamilies (Crambidae: Pyraloidea: Lepidoptera: Elusia Schaus, Dichochroma Forbes, Schacontia Dyar, Cybalomia extorris Warren, and C. lojanalis Dognin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cybalomiinae contained 4 genera and 9 species in the Western Hemisphere, according to Munroe (1995). These species were morphologically compared with the type species, Cybalomia pentadalis Lederer, of Cybalomiinae. All species were found to belong to other subfamilies and the following new com...

  6. Doryctorgilus gen. nov. and other new taxa, with a study of the internal microsculpture of the ovipositor in the subfamily Orgilinae Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braet, Y.; Achterberg, van C.

    2003-01-01

    One new monotypic genus of the subfamily Orgilinae Ashmead, 1900 (type species: D. morvanae spec. nov.), two new species of the genus Podorgilus van Achterberg, 1994 (P. nemorensis spec. nov. and P. luteus spec. nov.) and one new species of the genus Agathis Latreille, 1804 (A. depressifrons spec. n

  7. Design factors that influence the performance of flight intercept traps for the capture of longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) from the subfamilies Lamiinae and Cerambycinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Jeremy D; Bhandari, Basu D; McKenney, Jessica L; Millar, Jocelyn G

    2014-01-01

    In North America, cerambycid beetles can have significant ecological and economic effects on forest ecosystems, and the rate of introduction and/or detection of exotic species is increasing. Detection and survey programs rely on semiochemical-baited intercept traps which are often ineffective for large woodborers like cerambycid beetles. This study examined the effects of flight intercept trap design on the capture of cerambycid beetles in the subfamilies Lamiinae and Cerambycinae. These subfamilies are the two largest in the Cerambycidae and they include many of the most damaging cerambycid pests and species on regulatory watch lists in North America. This study demonstrates that intercept trap design, treatment of trap surfaces with a lubricant, and the type of collection cup all influence the capture of beetles from the subfamilies Lamiinae and Cerambycinae. It also demonstrates that the addition of a large lubricant-treated collar to the bottom funnel of a multiple-funnel trap significantly increases the capture of some Lamiinae. The best trap design for both subfamilies was a lubricant treated multiple-funnel [MF] trap equipped with a wet cup and lubricant treated large collar on the bottom funnel. This design captured between 4 and 14 times more Lamiinae and Cerambycinae than commercially-available MF and panel traps.

  8. Discovery of a living fossil: a new xylastodorine species from New Caledonia (Heteroptera: Thaumastocoridae) and first record of the subfamily from the eastern Hemisphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doesburg, van P.H.; Cassis, G.; Monteith, G.B.

    2010-01-01

    A new species belonging to the genus Proxylastodoris Heiss & Popov, 2002, P. kuscheli spec. nov., of the subfamily Xylastodorinae Barber, 1920 (Heteroptera: Thaumastocoridae) is described from New Caledonia. It is the first recent record outside the western Hemisphere of the Xyalstodorinae and is th

  9. Phylogeny of Bromelioideae (Bromeliaceae) inferred from nuclear and plastid DNA loci reveals the evolution of the tank habit within the subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Katharina; Barfuss, Michael H J; Zizka, Georg

    2009-05-01

    Phylogenetic relationships within subfamily Bromelioideae (Bromeliaceae, Poales) were inferred using DNA sequence data from the low-copy nuclear gene phosphoribulokinase (PRK) and five plastid loci (matK gene, 3'trnK intron, trnL intron, trnL-trnF spacer, atpB-rbcL spacer). The PRK dataset exhibited a considerably higher proportion of potentially informative characters than the plastid dataset (16.9% vs. 3.1%), leading to a higher resolution and improved nodal support of the resulting phylogenies. Bromelia is resolved as sister to the remainder of the subfamily, albeit this relationship receives only weak nodal support. The basal position of Bromelia, as well as Deinacanthon, Greigia, Ochagavia, Fascicularia and Fernseea within the subfamily is corroborated and the remainder of the subfamily forms a highly supported clade (the eu-bromelioids). By the inclusion of nuclear data the sister group position of Fernseea to the eu-bromelioids is now highly supported. Within the eu-bromelioids the resolution of the clade representing the more advanced core bromelioids has increased and further demonstrates the highly problematic generic concept of Aechmea as well as Quesnelia. Moreover, the data were used to examine the evolution of sepal symmetry and the tank habit. Tracing of character transitions onto the molecular phylogeny implies that both characters have undergone only few transitions within the subfamily and thus are not as homoplasious as previously assumed. The character state reconstruction reveals the great importance of the evolution of the tank habit for the diversification of the core bromelioids.

  10. Observation on the head and chemoreceptors of Maruca vitrata(Lepidoptera:Crambidae)larvae%豇豆荚螟幼虫头部形态及化学感受器观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王攀; 郑霞林; 雷朝亮; 王小平

    2011-01-01

    [目的]了解豇豆英螟(Maruca vitrata)幼虫头部感受器的形态、数量和分布,为探讨其功能和感应机制提供依据.[方法]利用扫描电镜对豇豆英螟5龄幼虫的头部以及触角和口器上的化学感受器进行扫描观察并描述.[结果]豇豆英螟幼虫的头式为下口式;头上具有单眼、触角、感觉刚毛、上唇、上颚、下颚、下唇、吐丝器;幼虫的触角上存在检形、锥形和毛形3种感受器;口器附肢下颚须上有8个锥形感受器;下唇须在第2、3节上各着生有1个锥形感受器.[结论]豇豆英螟幼虫头部共有4种类型的感受器:毛形感受器(Str)、锥形感受器(Sb)、小锥形感受器(Sbs)和栓形感受器(Ss),各自担负着不同的功能.%[Objective]The morphology, amount and distribution of chemoreceptors on the head of Maruca vitrata (Fabricius) were observed, which will provide a basis for its functional and mechanical research.[Method]The chemoreceptors on antennae and mouthparts of the 5th instar larvae of M.vitrata were observed with scanning electron microscopy.[Result]The head structure type of the larvae was hypognathous.Three kinds of chemoreceptors were found on antennae of the larvae, namely sensilla styloconicum, sensilla basiconica and sensilla trichodea.The mouthparts bears plenty of hemoreceptors, especially on gelea and maxillary palpus of maxilla.The maxillary palpus of mouthparts appendages had eight kinds of sensilla basiconica, and one kind of sensilla basiconica was also observed on the second and third segments of labial palpus respectively.[Conclusion]There are four types of chemoreceptors on the head of M.vitrata larvae, named sensilla trichodea, sensilla basiconica, small sensilla basiconica and sensilla styloconicum with different functions.

  11. Insect Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab Is Conferred by Mutations in an ABC Transporter Subfamily A Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wee Tek Tay

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of conventional chemical insecticides and bacterial toxins to control lepidopteran pests of global agriculture has imposed significant selection pressure leading to the rapid evolution of insecticide resistance. Transgenic crops (e.g., cotton expressing the Bt Cry toxins are now used world wide to control these pests, including the highly polyphagous and invasive cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera. Since 2004, the Cry2Ab toxin has become widely used for controlling H. armigera, often used in combination with Cry1Ac to delay resistance evolution. Isolation of H. armigera and H. punctigera individuals heterozygous for Cry2Ab resistance in 2002 and 2004, respectively, allowed aspects of Cry2Ab resistance (level, fitness costs, genetic dominance, complementation tests to be characterised in both species. However, the gene identity and genetic changes conferring this resistance were unknown, as was the detailed Cry2Ab mode of action. No cross-resistance to Cry1Ac was observed in mutant lines. Biphasic linkage analysis of a Cry2Ab-resistant H. armigera family followed by exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC marker mapping and candidate gene sequencing identified three independent resistance-associated INDEL mutations in an ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC transporter gene we named HaABCA2. A deletion mutation was also identified in the H. punctigera homolog from the resistant line. All mutations truncate the ABCA2 protein. Isolation of further Cry2Ab resistance alleles in the same gene from field H. armigera populations indicates unequal resistance allele frequencies and the potential for Bt resistance evolution. Identification of the gene involved in resistance as an ABC transporter of the A subfamily adds to the body of evidence on the crucial role this gene family plays in the mode of action of the Bt Cry toxins. The structural differences between the ABCA2, and that of the C subfamily required for Cry1Ac toxicity, indicate differences in the

  12. Insect Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab Is Conferred by Mutations in an ABC Transporter Subfamily A Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Wee Tek; Mahon, Rod J; Heckel, David G; Walsh, Thomas K; Downes, Sharon; James, William J; Lee, Sui-Fai; Reineke, Annette; Williams, Adam K; Gordon, Karl H J

    2015-11-01

    The use of conventional chemical insecticides and bacterial toxins to control lepidopteran pests of global agriculture has imposed significant selection pressure leading to the rapid evolution of insecticide resistance. Transgenic crops (e.g., cotton) expressing the Bt Cry toxins are now used world wide to control these pests, including the highly polyphagous and invasive cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera. Since 2004, the Cry2Ab toxin has become widely used for controlling H. armigera, often used in combination with Cry1Ac to delay resistance evolution. Isolation of H. armigera and H. punctigera individuals heterozygous for Cry2Ab resistance in 2002 and 2004, respectively, allowed aspects of Cry2Ab resistance (level, fitness costs, genetic dominance, complementation tests) to be characterised in both species. However, the gene identity and genetic changes conferring this resistance were unknown, as was the detailed Cry2Ab mode of action. No cross-resistance to Cry1Ac was observed in mutant lines. Biphasic linkage analysis of a Cry2Ab-resistant H. armigera family followed by exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC) marker mapping and candidate gene sequencing identified three independent resistance-associated INDEL mutations in an ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter gene we named HaABCA2. A deletion mutation was also identified in the H. punctigera homolog from the resistant line. All mutations truncate the ABCA2 protein. Isolation of further Cry2Ab resistance alleles in the same gene from field H. armigera populations indicates unequal resistance allele frequencies and the potential for Bt resistance evolution. Identification of the gene involved in resistance as an ABC transporter of the A subfamily adds to the body of evidence on the crucial role this gene family plays in the mode of action of the Bt Cry toxins. The structural differences between the ABCA2, and that of the C subfamily required for Cry1Ac toxicity, indicate differences in the detailed mode

  13. Increase in cytosolic Ca2+ produced by hypoxia and other depolarizing stimuli activates a non-selective cation channel in chemoreceptor cells of rat carotid body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dawon; Wang, Jiaju; Hogan, James O; Vennekens, Rudi; Freichel, Marc; White, Carl; Kim, Donghee

    2014-05-01

    The current model of O2 sensing by carotid body chemoreceptor (glomus) cells is that hypoxia inhibits the outward K(+) current and causes cell depolarization, Ca(2+) influx via voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels and a rise in intracellular [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)]i). Here we show that hypoxia (<5% O2), in addition to inhibiting the two-pore domain K(+) channels TASK-1/3 (TASK), indirectly activates an ∼20 pS channel in isolated glomus cells. The 20 pS channel was permeable to K(+), Na(+) and Cs(+) but not to Cl(-) or Ca(2+). The 20 pS channel was not sensitive to voltage. Inhibition of TASK by external acid, depolarization of glomus cells with high external KCl (20 mm) or opening of the Ca(2+) channel with FPL64176 activated the 20 pS channel when 1 mm Ca(2+) was present in the external solution. Ca(2+) (10 μm) applied to the cytosolic side of inside-out patches activated the 20 pS channel. The threshold [Ca(2+)]i for activation of the 20 pS channel in cell-attached patches was ∼200 nm. The reversal potential of the 20 pS channel was estimated to be -28 mV. Our results reveal a sequential mechanism in which hypoxia (<5% O2) first inhibits the K(+) conductance and then activates a Na(+)-permeable, non-selective cation channel via depolarization-induced rise in [Ca(2+)]i. Our results suggest that inhibition of K(+) efflux and stimulation of Na(+) influx both contribute to the depolarization of glomus cells during moderate to severe hypoxia.

  14. Constraint Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander; Basin, David; Viganò, Luca

    2010-01-01

    We introduce constraint differentiation, a powerful technique for reducing search when model-checking security protocols using constraint-based methods. Constraint differentiation works by eliminating certain kinds of redundancies that arise in the search space when using constraints to represent...... results show that constraint differentiation substantially reduces search and considerably improves the performance of OFMC, enabling its application to a wider class of problems....

  15. Downregulation of transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C, member 1 (TRPC1 is associated with drug resistance and high histologic grade in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Liu

    2015-12-01

    between grade 2 (moderately-differentiated and grade 3 (poorly-differentiated (p = 0.006, and low expression of TRPC1 was correlated with high tumor grade.Conclusion: Downregulation of TRPC1 is potentially associated with drug resistance and high histologic grade in OC. This study would pave the way for further investigation of the drug resistance-related functions of TRPC1.-----------------------------------------Cite this article as:  Liu X, Zhang J, Li L, Yin F. Downregulation of transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C, member 1 (TRPC1 is associated with drug resistance and high histologic grade in ovarian cancer. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2015; 3(4:3409.[This abstract was presented at the BIT’s 8th Annual World Cancer Congress, which was held from May 15-17, 2015 in Beijing, China.

  16. Differential manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Kosinski, Antoni A

    2007-01-01

    The concepts of differential topology form the center of many mathematical disciplines such as differential geometry and Lie group theory. Differential Manifolds presents to advanced undergraduates and graduate students the systematic study of the topological structure of smooth manifolds. Author Antoni A. Kosinski, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at Rutgers University, offers an accessible approach to both the h-cobordism theorem and the classification of differential structures on spheres.""How useful it is,"" noted the Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society, ""to have a single, sho

  17. TP0262 is a modulator of promoter activity of tpr Subfamily II genes of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Godornes, Charmie; Puray-Chavez, Maritza; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; Tompa, Martin; Lukehart, Sheila A; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2009-06-01

    Transcriptional regulation in Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum is poorly understood, primarily because this organism cannot be cultivated in vitro or genetically manipulated. We have recently shown a phase variation mechanism controlling transcription initiation of Subfamily II tpr (T. pallidumrepeat) genes (tprE, tprG and tprJ), a group of virulence factor candidates. Furthermore, the same study suggested that additional mechanisms might influence the level of transcription of these tprs. The T. pallidum genome sequence has revealed a few open reading frames with similarity to known bacterial transcription factors, including four catabolite activator protein homologues. In this work, sequences matching the Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein (CRP) binding motif were identified in silico upstream of tprE, tprG and tprJ. Using elecrophoretic mobility shift assay and DNaseI footprinting assay, recombinant TP0262, a T. pallidum CRP homologue, was shown to bind specifically to amplicons obtained from the tpr promoters containing putative CRP binding motifs. Using a heterologous reporter system, binding of TP0262 to these promoters was shown to either increase (tprE and tprJ) or decrease (tprG) tpr promoter activity. This is the first characterization of a T. pallidum transcriptional modulator that influences tpr promoter activity.

  18. The unique ligand binding features of subfamily-II iLBPs with respect to bile salts and related drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favretto, Filippo; Ceccon, Alberto; Zanzoni, Serena; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Ragona, Laura; Molinari, Henriette; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Intracellular lipid binding proteins (iLBPs) are a family of evolutionarily related small cytoplasmic proteins implicated in the transcellular transport of lipophilic ligands. Subfamily-II iLBPs include the liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), and the ileal and the liver and ileal bile acid binding proteins (L-BABP and I-BABP). Atomic-level investigations during the past 15-20 years have delivered relevant information on bile acid binding by this protein group, revealing unique features including binding cooperativity, promiscuity, and site selectivity. Using NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical techniques, our laboratories have contributed to an understanding of the molecular determinants of some of these properties and their generality among proteins from different animal species. We focused especially on formation of heterotypic complexes, considering the mixed compositions of physiological bile acid pools. Experiments performed with synthetic bile acid derivatives showed that iLBPs could act as targets for cell-specific contrast agents and, more generally, as effective carriers of amphiphilic drugs. This review collects the major findings related to bile salt interactions with iLBPs aiming to provide keys for a deeper understanding of protein-mediated intracellular bile salt trafficking. PMID:25468388

  19. Linear array of conserved sequence motifs to discriminate protein subfamilies: study on pyridine nucleotide-disulfide reductases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Las Rivas Javier

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pyridine nucleotide disulfide reductase (PNDR is a large and heterogeneous protein family divided into two classes (I and II, which reflect the divergent evolution of its characteristic disulfide redox active site. However, not all the PNDR members fit into these categories and this suggests the need of further studies to achieve a more comprehensive classification of this complex family. Results A workflow to improve the clusterization of protein families based on the array of linear conserved motifs is designed. The method is applied to the PNDR large family finding two main groups, which correspond to PNDR classes I and II. However, two other separate protein clusters, previously classified as class I in most databases, are outgrouped: the peroxide reductases (NAOX, NAPE and the type II NADH dehydrogenases (NDH-2. In this way, two novel PNDR classes III and IV for NAOX/NAPE and NDH-2 respectively are proposed. By knowledge-driven biochemical and functional data analyses done on the new class IV, a linear array of motifs putatively related to Cu(II-reductase activity is detected in a specific subset of NDH-2. Conclusion The results presented are a novel contribution to the classification of the complex and large PNDR protein family, supporting its reclusterization into four classes. The linear array of motifs detected within the class IV PNDR subfamily could be useful as a signature for a particular subgroup of NDH-2.

  20. Differential meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Bergstra; A. Ponse

    2008-01-01

    A meadow is a zero totalised field (0^{-1}=0), and a cancellation meadow is a meadow without proper zero divisors. In this paper we consider differential meadows, i.e., meadows equipped with differentiation operators. We give an equational axiomatization of these operators and thus obtain a finite b

  1. The Na+/H+ exchanger, NHE1, differentially regulates mitogen-activated protein kinase subfamilies after osmotic shrinkage in Ehrlich Lettre Ascites cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Rasmussen, Maria; Darborg, Barbara Vasek;

    2007-01-01

    Osmotic stress modulates mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) activities, leading to altered gene transcription and cell death/survival balance, however, the mechanisms involved are incompletely elucidated. Here, we show, using a combination of biochemical and molecular biology approaches......, that three MAPKs exhibit unique interrelationships with the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, NHE1, after osmotic cell shrinkage: Extracellular Signal Regulated Kinase (ERK1/2) is inhibited in an NHE1-dependent, pH(i)-independent manner, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1/2) is stimulated, in part through NHE1-mediated...

  2. Estrous Cycle and Gestational Age-Dependent Expression of Members of the Interleukin-36 Subfamily in a Semi-Allogeneic Model of Infected and Non-Infected Murine Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrieta-Coxca, José Martin; Gómez-Chávez, Fernando; Baeza-Martínez, Damariz Adriana; Cancino-Diaz, Mario Eugenio; Cancino-Diaz, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia Mayra; Reyes-Maldonado, Elba; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    The IL-36 subfamily is a recently described group of cytokines with pro-inflammatory behavior, comprising three agonists (α, β, and γ), its receptor (R), and one antagonist (Ra). The expression and function of IL-36 subfamily members in the estrous cycle in healthy and infected pregnancy has not been described. We evaluated mRNA and protein expression of IL-36 family members during the estrous cycle, implantation, fetal development, and post-labor periods in a model of allogenic pregnancy in mice. We also explored the ability of Listeria monocytogenes to modulate the expression of IL-36 subfamily members during pregnancy. Expression of IL-36 subfamily members showed different expression during the estrous cycle and pregnancy but was induced at estrous, 16.5 days post coitum (dpc), 18.5 dpc, and labor. IL-36 subfamily members showed a characteristic distribution in the glandular epithelium, perimetrium, myometrium, and stratum vasculare. Infection with L. monocytogenes during pregnancy induced strong production of IL-36 subfamily members, an observation that correlated with an increasing prevalence of fetal loss. In conclusion, IL-36 agonists showed specific patterns of mRNA and protein expression that might suggest functional specialization or specific target cells. Infection with L. monocytogenes during pregnancy induced strong production of IL-36 subfamily members. PMID:27713746

  3. Checklist of the subfamily Adoncholaiminae Gerlach and Riemann, 1974 (Nematoda: Oncholaimida: Oncholaimidae) of the world: genera, species, distribution, and reference list for taxonomists and ecologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Adoncholaiminae is one of the seven subfamilies in the free-living aquatic nematode family Oncholaimidae. Nematodes in Adoncholaiminae are found from various water environment of the world. However, a checklist of all Adoncholaiminae species including full literature, especially information of experimental (not taxonomic) works, has not been updated for more than 40 years. New information A revised checklist of the subfamily Adoncholaiminae of the world is provided. It contains 31 valid and 13 invalid species names in four genera with synonyms, collection records, and full literature from 1860's to 2015 for each species. A literature survey of total 477 previous papers was conducted in this work, and 362 of them are newly added to checklist. PMID:26929708

  4. Comparative analysis of serine/arginine-rich proteins across 27 eukaryotes: insights into sub-family classification and extent of alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale N Richardson

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS of pre-mRNA is a fundamental molecular process that generates diversity in the transcriptome and proteome of eukaryotic organisms. SR proteins, a family of splicing regulators with one or two RNA recognition motifs (RRMs at the N-terminus and an arg/ser-rich domain at the C-terminus, function in both constitutive and alternative splicing. We identified SR proteins in 27 eukaryotic species, which include plants, animals, fungi and "basal" eukaryotes that lie outside of these lineages. Using RNA recognition motifs (RRMs as a phylogenetic marker, we classified 272 SR genes into robust sub-families. The SR gene family can be split into five major groupings, which can be further separated into 11 distinct sub-families. Most flowering plants have double or nearly double the number of SR genes found in vertebrates. The majority of plant SR genes are under purifying selection. Moreover, in all paralogous SR genes in Arabidopsis, rice, soybean and maize, one of the two paralogs is preferentially expressed throughout plant development. We also assessed the extent of AS in SR genes based on a splice graph approach (http://combi.cs.colostate.edu/as/gmap_SRgenes. AS of SR genes is a widespread phenomenon throughout multiple lineages, with alternative 3' or 5' splicing events being the most prominent type of event. However, plant-enriched sub-families have 57%-88% of their SR genes experiencing some type of AS compared to the 40%-54% seen in other sub-families. The SR gene family is pervasive throughout multiple eukaryotic lineages, conserved in sequence and domain organization, but differs in gene number across lineages with an abundance of SR genes in flowering plants. The higher number of alternatively spliced SR genes in plants emphasizes the importance of AS in generating splice variants in these organisms.

  5. Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 expressing corneal sensory neurons can be subdivided into at least three subpopulations

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulhakeem eAlamri; Romke eBron; James Alexander Brock; Jason eIvanusic

    2015-01-01

    The cornea is innervated by three main functional classes of sensory neurons: polymodal nociceptors, pure mechano-nociceptors and cold-sensing neurons. Here we explored transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) expression in guinea pig corneal sensory neurons, a widely used molecular marker of polymodal nociceptors. We used retrograde tracing to identify corneal afferent neurons in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) and double label in situ hybridization and/or immuno...

  6. The expression of T-cell receptor Vβ subfamily in hepatitis B virus-related acute-on-chronic liver failure patients and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施文娟

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression and clinical significance of T-cell receptor(TCR)Vβsubfamily in hepatitis B virus(HBV)-related acute-on-chronic liverfailure(HBV-ACLF)patients.Methods Twenty-eight patients with HBV-ACLF(HBV-ACLF group)and 32patients with chronic hepatitis B flare(CHB-F group),who were treated in The Second People’s Hospital from

  7. Identification of a GH110 subfamily of alpha 1,3-galactosidases: novel enzymes for removal of the alpha 3Gal xenotransplantation antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qiyong P; Yuan, Huaiping; Bennett, Eric P;

    2008-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis had exquisite substrate specificity for the branched blood group B structure Galalpha1-3(Fucalpha1-2)Gal, whereas linear oligosaccharides terminated by alpha1,3-linked galactose such as the immunodominant xenotransplantation epitope Galalpha1-3Galbeta1-4GlcNAc did not serve as substrates...... mechanism. The novel GH110 subfamily offers enzymes with highly improved performance in enzymatic removal of the immunodominant alpha3Gal xenotransplantation epitope....

  8. Differential games

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Avner

    2006-01-01

    This volume lays the mathematical foundations for the theory of differential games, developing a rigorous mathematical framework with existence theorems. It begins with a precise definition of a differential game and advances to considerations of games of fixed duration, games of pursuit and evasion, the computation of saddle points, games of survival, and games with restricted phase coordinates. Final chapters cover selected topics (including capturability and games with delayed information) and N-person games.Geared toward graduate students, Differential Games will be of particular interest

  9. A novel fractal approach for predicting G-protein-coupled receptors and their subfamilies with support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Guoping; Li, Yong; Wang, Feichi; Wang, Siwen; Hu, Xuehai

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven membrane-spanning proteins and regulate many important physiological processes, such as vision, neurotransmission, immune response and so on. GPCRs-related pathways are the targets of a large number of marketed drugs. Therefore, the design of a reliable computational model for predicting GPCRs from amino acid sequence has long been a significant biomedical problem. Chaos game representation (CGR) reveals the fractal patterns hidden in protein sequences, and then fractal dimension (FD) is an important feature of these highly irregular geometries with concise mathematical expression. Here, in order to extract important features from GPCR protein sequences, CGR algorithm, fractal dimension and amino acid composition (AAC) are employed to formulate the numerical features of protein samples. Four groups of features are considered, and each group is evaluated by support vector machine (SVM) and 10-fold cross-validation test. To test the performance of the present method, a new non-redundant dataset was built based on latest GPCRDB database. Comparing the results of numerical experiments, the group of combined features with AAC and FD gets the best result, the accuracy is 99.22% and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) is 0.9845 for identifying GPCRs from non-GPCRs. Moreover, if it is classified as a GPCR, it will be further put into the second level, which will classify a GPCR into one of the five main subfamilies. At this level, the group of combined features with AAC and FD also gets best accuracy 85.73%. Finally, the proposed predictor is also compared with existing methods and shows better performances.

  10. The ZNF75 zinc finger gene subfamily: Isolation and mapping of the four members in humans and great apes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, A.; Strina, D.; Frattini, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy)] [and others

    1996-07-15

    We have previously reported the characterization of the human ZNF75 gene located on Xq26, which has only limited homology (less than 65%) to other ZF genes in the databases. Here, we describe three human zinc finger genes with 86 to 95% homology to ZNF75 at the nucleotide level, which represent all the members of the human ZNF75 subfamily. One of these, ZNF75B, is a pseudogene mapped to chromosome 12q13. The other two, ZNF75A and ZNF75C, maintain on ORF in the sequenced region, and at least the latter is expressed in the U937 cell line. They were mapped to chromosomes 16 and 11, respectively. All these genes are conserved in chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans. The ZNF75B homologue is a pseudogene in all three great apes, and in chimpanzee it is located on chromosome 10 (phylogenetic XII), at p13 (corresponding to the human 12q13). The chimpanzee homologue of ZNF75 is also located on the Xq26 chromosome, in the same region, as detected by in situ hybridization. As expected, nucleotide changes were clearly more abundant between human and organutan than between human and chimpanzee or gorilla homologues. Members of the same class were more similar to each other than to the other homologues within the same species. This suggests that the duplication and/or retrotranscription events occurred in a common ancestor long before great ape speciation. This, together with the existance of at least two genes in cows and horses, suggests a relatively high conservation of this gene family. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Differential topology

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Amiya

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a systematic and comprehensive account of the theory of differentiable manifolds and provides the necessary background for the use of fundamental differential topology tools. The text includes, in particular, the earlier works of Stephen Smale, for which he was awarded the Fields Medal. Explicitly, the topics covered are Thom transversality, Morse theory, theory of handle presentation, h-cobordism theorem, and the generalised Poincaré conjecture. The material is the outcome of lectures and seminars on various aspects of differentiable manifolds and differential topology given over the years at the Indian Statistical Institute in Calcutta, and at other universities throughout India. The book will appeal to graduate students and researchers interested in these topics. An elementary knowledge of linear algebra, general topology, multivariate calculus, analysis, and algebraic topology is recommended.

  12. Revision of the Oriental subfamily Heteropteryginae Kirby, 1896, with a re-arrangement of the family Heteropterygidae and the descriptions of five new species of Haaniella Kirby, 1904. (Phasmatodea: Areolatae: Heteropterygidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennemann, Frank H; Conle, Oskar V; Brock, Paul D; Seow-Choen, Francis

    2016-01-01

    established for the three basal genera Tisamenus Stål, 1875, Ilocano Rehn & Rehn, 1939 and Hoploclonia Stål, 1875 all of which were placed in Eubulidini by Zompro (2004). The latter genus differs from the other two genera by the morphology of the female genitalia, which is unique amongst the entire family. Three generic groups are recognized within Obrimini, the Obrimus-group, Stenobrimus-group and Theramenes-group. Keys are presented to distinguish between the three tribes now contained in the Obriminae, i.e. Obrimini, Tisamenini n. trib. and Miroceramiini. The genus Hennobrimus Conle, 2006 is synonymised with Mearnsiana Rehn & Rehn, 1939, based on the fact that the type-species of both genera are conspecific (n. syn.). Hennobrimus hennemanni Conle, 2006, the type-species of Hennobrimus, and Trachyaretaon manobo Lit & Eusebio, 2005 are synonymised with Mearnsiana bullosa Rehn & Rehn, 1939, the type-species of Mearnsiana (n. syn.). Theramenes dromedarius Stål, 1877 from the Philippines is removed from synonymy with the Wallacean Theramenes olivaceus (Westwood, 1859) and re-established as a valid species (rev. stat.).        The subfamily Heteropteryginae Kirby, 1896 is revised at the species-level and a new diagnosis is presented. Keys to the two genera and all 16 known species are provided along with new descriptions, differential diagnoses, lists of examined material, detailed information on the known distributions, measurements and illustrations of the insects and eggs. The intra-subfamiliar and intra-generic relationships are discussed and a cladogram is presented. Heteropteryginae contains two genera: Heteropteryx Gray, 1835 (Type-species: Phasma dilatatum Parkinson, 1798) and Haaniella Kirby, 1896 (Type-species: Phasma (Heteropteryx) muelleri de Haan, 1842). The distribution of this subfamily is restricted to Sundaland with the exception of a single species that is found in Vietnam. All other species are distributed in Borneo, Sumatra, the Mentawai Islands

  13. Identification and characterization of three TLR1 subfamily members from the orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Wei; Xu, Dong-Dong; Li, Xia; Mo, Ze-Quan; Luo, Xiao-Chun; Li, An-Xing; Dan, Xue-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which play important roles in host defense against pathogen infection, are the most intensively studied pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). In this study, we identified three novel TLR1 subfamily members, including TLR1 (EcTLR1b), TLR2 (EcTLR2b) and TLR14 (EcTLR14), from the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). EcTLR1b and EcTLR2b displayed low sequence identity with the previously reported grouper TLR1 (EcTLR1a) and TLR2 (EcTLR2a), respectively. The open reading frames (ORFs) of EcTLR1b, EcTLR2b and EcTLR14 contain 2484 bp, 2394 bp and 2640 bp, which encode the corresponding 827 amino acids (aa), 797 aa and 879 aa, respectively. All three TLRs have leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains (including an LRR-NT (except for EcTLR1b), several LRR motifs and an LRR-CT), a trans-membrane region and a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. The TIR domains of the three TLRs exhibited conserved boxes, namely box1, box2 and box3, and their 3D models were similar to those of human TLR1 or TLR2. Sequence alignment demonstrated that the TIR domains of the three TLRs shared higher sequence identity with those of other species than the full-length receptors. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that EcTLR1s and EcTLR2s are characterized by their differing evolutionary status, whereas EcTLR14 was found to be in the same group as other piscine TLR14/18s. The three TLRs were ubiquitously expressed in seven tested tissues of healthy groupers, although their expression profiles were different. Post Cryptocaryon irritans infection, TLR1s expression was up-regulated in the gills. The expression of TLR2b was mainly increased in the spleen, but decreased in the gills, which was similar to the expression pattern of TLR2a post C. irritans infection. Unlike EcTLR1b and EcTLR2b, however, the grouper TLR14 transcript was substantially induced in both tissues post challenge. These findings may be helpful in understanding the innate immune mechanism of host

  14. Phylogenetic relationships and biogeographical patterns in Circum-Mediterranean subfamily Leuciscinae (Teleostei, Cyprinidae inferred from both mitochondrial and nuclear data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perea Silvia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leuciscinae is a subfamily belonging to the Cyprinidae fish family that is widely distributed in Circum-Mediterranean region. Many efforts have been carried out to deciphering the evolutionary history of this group. Thus, different biogeographical scenarios have tried to explain the colonization of Europe and Mediterranean area by cyprinids, such as the "north dispersal" or the "Lago Mare dispersal" models. Most recently, Pleistocene glaciations influenced the distribution of leuciscins, especially in North and Central Europe. Weighing up these biogeographical scenarios, this paper constitutes not only the first attempt at deciphering the mitochondrial and nuclear relationships of Mediterranean leuciscins but also a test of biogeographical hypotheses that could have determined the current distribution of Circum-Mediterranean leuciscins. Results A total of 4439 characters (mitochondrial + nuclear from 321 individuals of 176 leuciscine species rendered a well-supported phylogeny, showing fourteen main lineages. Analyses of independent mitochondrial and nuclear markers supported the same main lineages, but basal relationships were not concordant. Moreover, some incongruence was found among independent mitochondrial and nuclear phylogenies. The monophyly of some poorly known genera such as Pseudophoxinus and Petroleuciscus was rejected. Representatives of both genera belong to different evolutionary lineages. Timing of cladogenetic events among the main leuciscine lineages was gained using mitochondrial and all genes data set. Conclusions Adaptations to a predatory lifestyle or miniaturization have superimposed the morphology of some species. These species have been separated into different genera, which are not supported by a phylogenetic framework. Such is the case of the genera Pseudophoxinus and Petroleuciscus, which real taxonomy is not well known. The diversification of leuciscine lineages has been determined by intense

  15. Crystal structures of two transcriptional regulators from Bacillus cereus define the conserved structural features of a PadR subfamily.

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    Guntur Fibriansah

    Full Text Available PadR-like transcriptional regulators form a structurally-related family of proteins that control the expression of genes associated with detoxification, virulence and multi-drug resistance in bacteria. Only a few members of this family have been studied by genetic, biochemical and biophysical methods, and their structure/function relationships are still largely undefined. Here, we report the crystal structures of two PadR-like proteins from Bacillus cereus, which we named bcPadR1 and bcPadR2 (products of gene loci BC4206 and BCE3449 in strains ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987, respectively. BC4206, together with its neighboring gene BC4207, was previously shown to become significantly upregulated in presence of the bacteriocin AS-48. DNA mobility shift assays reveal that bcPadR1 binds to a 250 bp intergenic region containing the putative BC4206-BC4207 promoter sequence, while in-situ expression of bcPadR1 decreases bacteriocin tolerance, together suggesting a role for bcPadR1 as repressor of BC4206-BC4207 transcription. The function of bcPadR2 (48% identical in sequence to bcPadR1 is unknown, but the location of its gene just upstream from genes encoding a putative antibiotic ABC efflux pump, suggests a role in regulating antibiotic resistance. The bcPadR proteins are structurally similar to LmrR, a PadR-like transcription regulator in Lactococcus lactis that controls expression of a multidrug ABC transporter via a mechanism of multidrug binding and induction. Together these proteins define a subfamily of conserved, relatively small PadR proteins characterized by a single C-terminal helix for dimerization. Unlike LmrR, bcPadR1 and bcPadR2 lack a central pore for ligand binding, making it unclear whether the transcriptional regulatory roles of bcPadR1 and bcPadR2 involve direct ligand recognition and induction.

  16. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Guggenheimer, Heinrich W

    1977-01-01

    This is a text of local differential geometry considered as an application of advanced calculus and linear algebra. The discussion is designed for advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate study, and presumes of readers only a fair knowledge of matrix algebra and of advanced calculus of functions of several real variables. The author, who is a Professor of Mathematics at the Polytechnic Institute of New York, begins with a discussion of plane geometry and then treats the local theory of Lie groups and transformation groups, solid differential geometry, and Riemannian geometry, leading to a

  17. A new subfamily of penaeidin with an additional serine-rich region from kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus) contributes to antimicrobial and phagocytic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ming-Yu; Gao, Jie; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2016-06-01

    Penaeidins are an important family of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in penaeid shrimp. To date, five groups of penaeidins have been identified in penaeid shrimp. All are composed of a proline-rich N-terminus and a C-terminus containing six cysteine residues engaged in three disulfide bridges. In this study, a new type of penaeidin from Marsupenaeus japonicus was identified. The full-length penaeidin contains a unique serine-rich region and a penaeidin domain, which consists of a proline-rich region and a cysteine-rich region. Here, we classify all penaeidins into two subfamilies. All reported penaeidins are in subfamily I, and the new penaeidin identified in M. japonicus is designated as Penaeidin subfamily II (MjPen-II). MjPen-II was expressed in hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach and intestine, and was upregulated after bacterial challenge. A liquid bacteriostatic assay showed that MjPen-II had antibacterial activity to some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. MjPen-II could bind to bacteria by binding to polysaccharides on the surface of bacteria, thus promoting bacterial agglutination. The serine-rich region enhanced the agglutination activity of MjPen-II. The proline-rich domain had a stronger bacterial-binding activity and polysaccharide-binding activity than the cysteine-rich domain. MjPen-II was also found to be involved in the phagocytosis of bacteria and efficiently improved the phagocytosis rate. Therefore, MjPen-II eliminates bacteria through direct bacterial inhibition as well as by promoting phagocytosis in shrimp. PMID:26855016

  18. First record of the subfamily Proctolabinae (Orthoptera: Acridoidea: Acrididae from Argentina Primer registro de la subfamilia Proctolabinae (Orthoptera: Acridoidea: Acrididae para la Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bardi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution records for the first time the subfamily Proctolabinae from Argentina. This subfamily contains 29 genera and 209 species restricted to the Neotropics with only one genus, Eucephalacris Descamps, reaching south as far as Mato Grosso in Brazil and northern Paraguay. Specimens belonging to Eucephalacris borellii (Giglio-Tos were collected in Misiones province. The presence of this species registered herein raises to eleven the number of Acrididae subfamilies known to occur in the country, and highlights the importance of conducting surveys of Acridoidea and Orthoptera in general, in diverse regions of Argentina. Brief diagnoses and illustrations of the characters that allowed the identification of the genus and species are also given in this contribution.Esta contribución registra por primera vez la subfamilia Proctolabinae para la Argentina. La subfamilia Proctolabinae contiene 29 géneros y 209 especies restringidas a la región Neotropical, con sólo uno de sus géneros, Eucephalacris Descamps, que llega al sur hasta Mato Grosso en Brasil y el norte de Paraguay. Ejemplares pertenecientes a Eucephalacris borellii (Giglio-Tos fueron colectados en el departamento de Guaraní, provincia de Misiones. La presencia de Eucephalacris borellii, registrada en este trabajo, eleva a once el número de subfamilias de Acrididae presentes en la Argentina, y destaca la necesidad de realizar relevamientos sobre la diversidad de Acridoidea y de Orthoptera en general, en diversas regiones de nuestro país. También se brindan en esta contribución una breve diagnosis e ilustraciones de los caracteres que permiten la identificación del género y de la especie.

  19. A New Subfamily of Aphids(Hemiptera,Aphidomorpha)from the Early Cretaceous Lebanese Amber with a Description of the Oldest Apterous Morphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piotr WEGIEREK; David A.GRIMALDI

    2010-01-01

    Aphids are marked by their high polymorphism,but species reported from the Early Cretaceous are known only from alate morphs.The discovery of an apterous adult morph in Lebanese amber and a larva of the same species are very important for the understanding of both the morphological and biological evolution of this insect group at the very early stage of development.Gondvanoaphis estephani new subfamily,new genus and species of the recent aphids family Thelaxidae is described.The characters of the new genus in respect to other genera placed in Thelaxidae are reviewed.The palaeoecologicai and palaeogeographical data concerning Gondvanoaphis new genus are also discussed.

  20. The subfamily-specific interaction between Kv2.1 and Kv6.4 subunits is determined by interactions between the N- and C-termini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Bocksteins

    Full Text Available The "silent" voltage-gated potassium (KvS channel subunit Kv6.4 does not form electrically functional homotetramers at the plasma membrane but assembles with Kv2.1 subunits, generating functional Kv2.1/Kv6.4 heterotetramers. The N-terminal T1 domain determines the subfamily-specific assembly of Kv1-4 subunits by preventing interactions between subunits that belong to different subfamilies. For Kv6.4, yeast-two-hybrid experiments showed an interaction of the Kv6.4 N-terminus with the Kv2.1 N-terminus, but unexpectedly also with the Kv3.1 N-terminus. We confirmed this interaction by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP using N-terminal Kv3.1 and Kv6.4 fragments. However, full-length Kv3.1 and Kv6.4 subunits do not form heterotetramers at the plasma membrane. Therefore, additional interactions between the Kv6.4 and Kv2.1 subunits should be important in the Kv2.1/Kv6.4 subfamily-specificity. Using FRET and co-IP approaches with N- and C-terminal fragments we observed that the Kv6.4 C-terminus physically interacts with the Kv2.1 N-terminus but not with the Kv3.1 N-terminus. The N-terminal amino acid sequence CDD which is conserved between Kv2 and KvS subunits appeared to be a key determinant since charge reversals with arginine substitutions abolished the interaction between the N-terminus of Kv2.1 and the C-terminus of both Kv2.1 and Kv6.4. In addition, the Kv6.4(CKv3.1 chimera in which the C-terminus of Kv6.4 was replaced by the corresponding domain of Kv3.1, disrupted the assembly with Kv2.1. These results indicate that the subfamily-specific Kv2.1/Kv6.4 heterotetramerization is determined by interactions between Kv2.1 and Kv6.4 that involve both the N- and C-termini in which the conserved N-terminal CDD sequence plays a key role.

  1. Revision of the subfamily Opiinae (Hymenoptera, Braconidae from Hunan (China, including thirty-six new species and two new genera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xi-Ying

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The species of the subfamily Opiinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae from Hunan (Oriental China are revised and illustrated. Thirty-six new species are described: Apodesmia bruniclypealis Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., A. melliclypealis Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Areotetes albiferus Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Areotetes carinuliferus Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., A. striatiferus Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Coleopioides diversinotum Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., C. postpectalis Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Fopius dorsopiferus Li, van Achterberg & Tan, sp. n., Indiopius chenae Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Opiognathus aulaciferus Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., O. brevibasalis Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Opius crenuliferus Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., O. malarator Li, van Achterberg & Tan, sp. n., O. monilipalpis Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., O. pachymerus Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., O. songi Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., O. youi Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., O. zengi Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Phaedrotoma acuticlypeata Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., P.angiclypeata Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., P. antenervalis Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., P. depressiclypealis Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., P. flavisoma Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., P. nigrisoma Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., P. protuberator Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., P. rugulifera Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Li & van Achterberg, P. striatinota Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., P. vermiculifera Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Rhogadopsis latipennis Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., R. longicaudifera Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., R. maculosa Li, van Achterberg & Tan, sp. n., R. obliqua Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., R. sculpturator Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Utetes longicarinatus Li & van Achterberg, sp. n. and Xynobius notauliferus Li & van Achterberg, sp. n. Areotetes van Achterberg & Li, gen. n. (type species: Areotetes carinuliferus sp. n. and Coleopioides van Achterberg & Li, gen. n. (type species: Coleopioides

  2. Differential topology

    CERN Document Server

    Margalef-Roig, J

    1992-01-01

    ...there are reasons enough to warrant a coherent treatment of the main body of differential topology in the realm of Banach manifolds, which is at the same time correct and complete. This book fills the gap: whenever possible the manifolds treated are Banach manifolds with corners. Corners add to the complications and the authors have carefully fathomed the validity of all main results at corners. Even in finite dimensions some results at corners are more complete and better thought out here than elsewhere in the literature. The proofs are correct and with all details. I see this book as a reliable monograph of a well-defined subject; the possibility to fall back to it adds to the feeling of security when climbing in the more dangerous realms of infinite dimensional differential geometry. Peter W. Michor

  3. The distribution of glutathione and homoglutathione in leaf, root and seed tissue of 73 species across the three sub-families of the Leguminosae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colville, Louise; Sáez, Clara M Blanco; Lewis, Gwilym P; Kranner, Ilse

    2015-07-01

    Homoglutathione (γ-glutamyl-cysteinyl-β-alanine) is a homologue of glutathione (γ-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine), which is a ubiquitous and indispensable tripeptide in eukaryotes with multi-facetted functions, many of which relate to cellular redox regulation. Homoglutathione is unique to the Leguminosae family, but studies of its occurrence have been restricted to the Papilionoideae subfamily, and almost exclusively to crop species. To determine whether the distribution of homoglutathione in the Leguminosae has a phylogenetic basis the occurrence of homoglutathione was investigated in the leaves, roots and seeds of 73 wild species of Leguminosae, representing 30 tribes across the Caesalpinioideae, Mimosoideae and Papilionoideae subfamilies. Homoglutathione was found only in the Papilionoideae, and was generally restricted to the 'Old World Clade'. It is proposed that homoglutathione may have arisen following a whole genome duplication event after the divergence of the Old World Clade. Homoglutathione is believed to fulfil the same functional roles as glutathione, but this study showed that homoglutathione and glutathione have different tissue-specific distribution patterns. Homoglutathione tended to occur more frequently in root tissue, and higher concentrations were found in leaves and roots, whereas glutathione tended to be present at the highest concentrations in seeds. This may reflect a distinct role for homoglutathione, particularly in roots, or an inability of homoglutathione to functionally replace glutathione in reproductive tissues. However, no relationships with environmental factors or nodulation were observed. Greater understanding of the factors that influence homoglutathione distribution may help to elucidate its unique function in some legume species.

  4. The CC-NBS-LRR Subfamily in Pinus monticola: Targeted Identification, Gene Expression, and Genetic Linkage with Resistance to Cronartium ribicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Jun; Ekramoddoullah, Abul K M

    2007-06-01

    ABSTRACT To investigate disease resistance gene analogs (RGAs) encoding coiled-coil-nucelotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeats (CC-NBS-LRR) proteins in western white pine, degenerate primers targeting the conserved motifs in the NBS domain were designed to amplify RGAs from genomic DNA and cDNA. Sixty-one distinct RGAs were identified with identities to well-known R proteins of the CC-NBS-LRR subfamily. These RGAs exhibited variation of putative amino acid sequences from 13% to 98%, representing a complex CC-NBS-LRR subfamily. A phylogenetic tree constructed from the amino acid sequence alignment revealed that these 61 RGAs were grouped with other CC-NBS-LRR members from angiosperms, and could be further divided into six classes with an identity threshold of 68%. To map RGAs, RGA polymorphisms and a modified amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method with incorporated sequences from the NBS domain were used to reveal NBS or NBS-AFLP markers. RGA polymorphism study revealed that three off the identified RGAs were not linked to the Cr2 gene imparting resistance to white pine blister rust. However, the AFLP strategy, using bulk segregant analysis (BSA) and haploid segregation analysis, identified 11 NBS-AFLP markers localized in the Cr2 linkage, the closest two to the gene being 0.41 cM and 1.22 cM away at either side. Eight of these markers showed significant amino acid sequence homologies with RGAs. PMID:18943604

  5. 水蛇亚科形态学特征的支序分析%Morphological Phylogeny of the Water Snake Subfamily Homalopsinae (Serpent: Colubridae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕顺清; 庞峻锋; 杨大同

    2006-01-01

    The morphological phylogeny of the water snake subfamily Homalopsinae, containing 10 genera, of which seven are monotypic, was not reported up until now. Here fourteen morphological characters were selected for the cladistic analysis. Using software Hennig 86, two phylogenetic trees were inferred and the results showed that the subfamily Homalopsinae was divided into two groups. Compared with the molecular phylonenetic tree of Voris et al (2002), the genera Gerarda and Fordonia are sister groups in both studies; both studies also yielded the same monophyletic lineage, which contained three genera ( Cerberus + Erpeton + Homalopsis ). However, the position of the genus Cantoria is distinctly different with the study of Voris et al(2002).%水蛇亚科属于游蛇科,包含10个属.其中7个属为单型属.选取水蛇亚科14个形态学特征进行支序分析,并利用计算机软件Hennig 86对水蛇亚科中8个属之间的系统发育关系进行初步探讨,结果显示水蛇亚科分为两支:Gerarda和Fordonia两个属构成姊妹群,Cerberus、Erpeton和Homalopsis三个属也构成单系群,与Voris et al(2002)的分子系统树相同,但Cantoria属的地位则与Voris et al(2002)的明显不同.

  6. iDPF-PseRAAAC: A Web-Server for Identifying the Defensin Peptide Family and Subfamily Using Pseudo Reduced Amino Acid Alphabet Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yongchun; Lv, Yang; Wei, Zhuying; Yang, Lei; Li, Guangpeng; Fan, Guoliang

    2015-01-01

    Defensins as one of the most abundant classes of antimicrobial peptides are an essential part of the innate immunity that has evolved in most living organisms from lower organisms to humans. To identify specific defensins as interesting antifungal leads, in this study, we constructed a more rigorous benchmark dataset and the iDPF-PseRAAAC server was developed to predict the defensin family and subfamily. Using reduced dipeptide compositions were used, the overall accuracy of proposed method increased to 95.10% for the defensin family, and 98.39% for the vertebrate subfamily, which is higher than the accuracy from other methods. The jackknife test shows that more than 4% improvement was obtained comparing with the previous method. A free online server was further established for the convenience of most experimental scientists at http://wlxy.imu.edu.cn/college/biostation/fuwu/iDPF-PseRAAAC/index.asp. A friendly guide is provided to describe how to use the web server. We anticipate that iDPF-PseRAAAC may become a useful high-throughput tool for both basic research and drug design. PMID:26713618

  7. SLIDE, the Protein Interacting Domain of Imitation Switch Remodelers, Binds DDT-Domain Proteins of Different Subfamilies in Chromatin Remodeling Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaqiang Dong; Zheng Gao; Shujing Liu; Guang Li; Zhongnan Yang; Hai Huang; Lin Xu

    2013-01-01

    The Imitation Switch (ISWI) type adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent chromatin remodeling factors are conserved proteins in eukaryotes, and some of them are known to form stable remodeling complexes with members from a family of proteins, termed DDT-domain proteins. Although it is well documented that ISWIs play important roles in different biological processes in many eukaryotic species, the molecular basis for protein interactions in ISWI complexes has not been fully addressed. Here, we report the identification of interaction domains for both ISWI and DDT-domain proteins. By analyzing CHROMATIN REMODELING11 (CHR11) and RINGLET1 (RLT1), an Arabidopsis thaliana ISWI (AtISWI) and AtDDT-domain protein, respectively, we show that the SLIDE domain of CHR11 and the DDT domain together with an adjacent sequence of RLT1 are responsible for their binding. The Arabidopsis genome contains at least 12 genes that encode DDT-domain proteins, which could be grouped into five subfamilies based on the sequence similarity. The SLIDE domain of AtISWI is able to bind members from different AtDDT subfamilies. Moreover, a human ISWI protein SNF2H is capable of binding AtDDT-domain proteins through its SLIDE domain, suggesting that binding to DDT-domain proteins is a conserved biochemical function for the SLIDE domain of ISWIs in eukaryotes.

  8. iDPF-PseRAAAC: A Web-Server for Identifying the Defensin Peptide Family and Subfamily Using Pseudo Reduced Amino Acid Alphabet Composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchun Zuo

    Full Text Available Defensins as one of the most abundant classes of antimicrobial peptides are an essential part of the innate immunity that has evolved in most living organisms from lower organisms to humans. To identify specific defensins as interesting antifungal leads, in this study, we constructed a more rigorous benchmark dataset and the iDPF-PseRAAAC server was developed to predict the defensin family and subfamily. Using reduced dipeptide compositions were used, the overall accuracy of proposed method increased to 95.10% for the defensin family, and 98.39% for the vertebrate subfamily, which is higher than the accuracy from other methods. The jackknife test shows that more than 4% improvement was obtained comparing with the previous method. A free online server was further established for the convenience of most experimental scientists at http://wlxy.imu.edu.cn/college/biostation/fuwu/iDPF-PseRAAAC/index.asp. A friendly guide is provided to describe how to use the web server. We anticipate that iDPF-PseRAAAC may become a useful high-throughput tool for both basic research and drug design.

  9. Sensitivity to chemical stimuli plays a fundamental role in the food preferences. Examples in the evolutionary scale: 1. Role of the walking leg chemoreceptors in the red swamp crayfish Procambarus Clarkii 2. PROP bitter taste sensitivity and its nutritional implications in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Melis, Melania

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, we studied two examples of the sensitivity to chemical stimuli and its role in the food preferences in two models of the evolutionary scale. The red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii (Girard, 1852) (Crustacea: Decapoda) is an invasive species of freshwater habitats that has spread worldwide. In crayfish, like in other decapod crustaceans, reception of chemical cues occurs by way of peripheral chemoreceptors grouped within sensory hairs and typically located on the cuticle ...

  10. Revision of the subfamily Opiinae (Hymenoptera, Braconidae) from Hunan (China), including thirty-six new species and two new genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi-Ying; van Achterberg, Cornelis; Tan, Ji-Cai

    2013-01-01

    The species of the subfamily Opiinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) from Hunan (Oriental China) are revised and illustrated. Thirty-six new species are described: Apodesmia bruniclypealis Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Apodesmia melliclypealis Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Areotetes albiferus Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Areotetes carinuliferus Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Areotetes striatiferus Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Coleopioides diversinotum Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Coleopioides postpectalis Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Fopius dorsopiferus Li, van Achterberg & Tan, sp. n., Indiopius chenae Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Opiognathus aulaciferus Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Opiognathus brevibasalis Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Opius crenuliferus Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Opius malarator Li, van Achterberg & Tan, sp. n., Opius monilipalpis Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Opius pachymerus Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Opius songi Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Opius youi Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Opius zengi Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Phaedrotoma acuticlypeata Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Phaedrotoma angiclypeata Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Phaedrotoma antenervalis Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Phaedrotoma depressiclypealisLi & van Achterberg, sp. n., Phaedrotoma flavisoma Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Phaedrotoma nigrisoma Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Phaedrotoma protuberator Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Phaedrotoma rugulifera Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Li & van Achterberg,Phaedrotoma striatinota Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Phaedrotoma vermiculifera Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Rhogadopsis latipennis Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Rhogadopsis longicaudifera Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Rhogadopsis maculosa Li, van Achterberg & Tan, sp. n., Rhogadopsis obliqua Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Rhogadopsis sculpturator Li & van Achterberg, sp. n., Utetes longicarinatus Li & van Achterberg, sp. n. and Xynobius notauliferus Li & van Achterberg, sp. n. Areotetes van

  11. Uncharacterized conserved motifs outside the HD-Zip domain in HD-Zip subfamily I transcription factors; a potential source of functional diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabello Julieta V

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant HD-Zip transcription factors are modular proteins in which a homeodomain is associated to a leucine zipper. Of the four subfamilies in which they are divided, the tested members from subfamily I bind in vitro the same pseudopalindromic sequence CAAT(A/TATTG and among them, several exhibit similar expression patterns. However, most experiments in which HD-Zip I proteins were over or ectopically expressed under the control of the constitutive promoter 35S CaMV resulted in transgenic plants with clearly different phenotypes. Aiming to elucidate the structural mechanisms underlying such observation and taking advantage of the increasing information in databases of sequences from diverse plant species, an in silico analysis was performed. In addition, some of the results were also experimentally supported. Results A phylogenetic tree of 178 HD-Zip I proteins together with the sequence conservation presented outside the HD-Zip domains allowed the distinction of six groups of proteins. A motif-discovery approach enabled the recognition of an activation domain in the carboxy-terminal regions (CTRs and some putative regulatory mechanisms acting in the amino-terminal regions (NTRs and CTRs involving sumoylation and phosphorylation. A yeast one-hybrid experiment demonstrated that the activation activity of ATHB1, a member of one of the groups, is located in its CTR. Chimerical constructs were performed combining the HD-Zip domain of one member with the CTR of another and transgenic plants were obtained with these constructs. The phenotype of the chimerical transgenic plants was similar to the observed in transgenic plants bearing the CTR of the donor protein, revealing the importance of this module inside the whole protein. Conclusions The bioinformatical results and the experiments conducted in yeast and transgenic plants strongly suggest that the previously poorly analyzed NTRs and CTRs of HD-Zip I proteins play an important

  12. The Exiguobacterium sibiricum 255-15 GtfC Enzyme Represents a Novel Glycoside Hydrolase 70 Subfamily of 4,6-α-Glucanotransferase Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangoiti, Joana; Pijning, Tjaard; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2015-11-20

    The glycoside hydrolase 70 (GH70) family originally was established for glucansucrase enzymes found solely in lactic acid bacteria synthesizing α-glucan polysaccharides from sucrose (e.g., GtfA). In recent years, we have characterized GtfB and related Lactobacillus enzymes as 4,6-α-glucanotransferase enzymes. These GtfB-type enzymes constitute the first GH70 subfamily of enzymes that are unable to act on sucrose as a substrate but are active with maltodextrins and starch, cleave α1→4 linkages, and synthesize linear α1→6-glucan chains. The GtfB disproportionating type of activity results in the conversion of malto-oligosaccharides into isomalto/malto-polysaccharides with a relatively high percentage of α1→6 linkages. This paper reports the identification of the members of a second GH70 subfamily (designated GtfC enzymes) and the characterization of the Exiguobacterium sibiricum 255-15 GtfC enzyme, which is also inactive with sucrose and displays 4,6-α-glucanotransferase activity with malto-oligosaccharides. GtfC differs from GtfB in synthesizing isomalto/malto-oligosaccharides. Biochemically, the GtfB- and GtfC-type enzymes are related, but phylogenetically, they clearly constitute different GH70 subfamilies, displaying only 30% sequence identity. Whereas the GtfB-type enzyme largely has the same domain order as glucansucrases (with α-amylase domains A, B, and C plus domains IV and V), this GtfC-type enzyme differs in the order of these domains and completely lacks domain V. In GtfC, the sequence of conserved regions I to IV of clan GH-H is identical to that in GH13 (I-II-III-IV) but different from that in GH70 (II-III-IV-I because of a circular permutation of the (β/α)8 barrel. The GtfC 4,6-α-glucanotransferase enzymes thus represent structurally and functionally very interesting evolutionary intermediates between α-amylase and glucansucrase enzymes.

  13. Getting from A to B-exploring the activation motifs of the class B adhesion G protein-coupled receptor subfamily G member 4/GPR112

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peeters, Miriam C; Mos, Iris; Lenselink, Eelke B;

    2016-01-01

    The adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs/class B2 G protein-coupled receptors) constitute an ancient family of G protein-coupled receptors that have recently been demonstrated to play important roles in cellular and developmental processes. Here, we describe a first insight...... into the structure-function relationship of ADGRs using the family member ADGR subfamily G member 4 (ADGRG4)/GPR112 as a model receptor. In a bioinformatics approach, we compared conserved, functional elements of the well-characterized class A and class B1 secretin-like G protein-coupled receptors with the ADGRs. We...... identified several potential equivalent motifs and subjected those to mutational analysis. The importance of the mutated residues was evaluated by examining their effect on the high constitutive activity of the N-terminally truncated ADGRG4/GPR112 in a 1-receptor-1-G protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  14. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins H, H', and F are members of a ubiquitously expressed subfamily of related but distinct proteins encoded by genes mapping to different chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Rasmussen, H H; Vorum, H;

    1995-01-01

    epitopes and sequence identity with two other proteins, isoelectric focusing sample spot numbers 2222 (37.6 kDa; pI 6.5) and 2326 (39.5 kDa; pI 6.6), indicating that the subfamily may contain additional members. The identity between hnRNPs H and H' is 96%, between H and F 78%, and between H' and F 75...... treatment with 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, indicating that the protein kinase C signaling pathway regulates its expression. No effect of 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was observed on the expression of hnRNP H. The genes coding for hnRNPs H, H', and F were chromosome-mapped to 5q35...

  15. Frequency analysis of TRBV subfamily sjTRECs to characterize T-cell reconstitution in acute leukemia patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lijian

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT leads to a prolonged state of immunodeficiency and requires reconstitution of normal T-cell immunity. Signal joint T-cell receptor excision DNA circles (sjTRECs are markers of developmental proximity to the thymus that have been used to evaluate thymic function related to T-cell immune reconstitution after HSCT. To assess the proliferative history in different T-cell receptor beta variable region (TRBV subfamilies of T cells after HSCT, expansion of TRBV subfamily-naive T cells was determined by analysis of a series of TRBV-BD1 sjTRECs. Methods sjTRECs levels were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from 43 Chinese acute leukemia patients who underwent allo-HSCT. Twenty-three TRBV-BD1 sjTRECs were amplified by semi-nested PCR. Sixteen age-matched healthy volunteers served as normal controls. Results sjTRECs levels were low or undetectable in the first 6 weeks after allo-HSCT and increased after 8 weeks post HSCT; however, sjTRECs levels at week 20 post-HSCT were still less than normal controls. Frequencies of TRBV subfamily sjTRECs in PBMCs from recipients at week 8 post-HSCT (29.17 ± 20.97% or at week 16 post-HSCT (38.33 ± 9.03% were significantly lower than those in donors (47.92 ± 13.82% or recipients at pre-HSCT (45.83 ± 14.03%. However, frequencies of TRBV subfamily sjTRECs in recipients at week 30 post-HSCT (42.71 ± 21.62% were similar to those in donors and recipients at pre-HSCT. sjTRECs levels in donors had a positive linear correlation with sjTRECs levels in recipients within 8-12 weeks post-HSCT. Patients with acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD or chronic GVHD had profoundly reduced TRECs levels during the first year post-HSCT. Frequencies of BV22-BD1 sjTRECs and BV23-BD1 sjTRECs in patients with GVHD were significantly lower than those in recipients at pre-HSCT, and the

  16. Have giant lobelias evolved several times independently? Life form shifts and historical biogeography of the cosmopolitan and highly diverse subfamily Lobelioideae (Campanulaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonelli Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tendency of animals and plants to independently develop similar features under similar evolutionary pressures - convergence - is a widespread phenomenon in nature. In plants, convergence has been suggested to explain the striking similarity in life form between the giant lobelioids (Campanulaceae, the bellflower family of Africa and the Hawaiian Islands. Under this assumption these plants would have developed the giant habit from herbaceous ancestors independently, in much the same way as has been suggested for the giant senecios of Africa and the silversword alliance of Hawaii. Results Phylogenetic analyses based on plastid (rbcL, trnL-F and nuclear (internal transcribed spacer [ITS] DNA sequences for 101 species in subfamily Lobelioideae demonstrate that the large lobelioids from eastern Africa the Hawaiian Islands, and also South America, French Polynesia and southeast Asia, form a strongly supported monophyletic group. Ancestral state reconstructions of life form and distribution, taking into account phylogenetic uncertainty, indicate their descent from a woody ancestor that was probably confined to Africa. Molecular dating analyses using Penalized Likelihood and Bayesian relaxed clock approaches, and combining multiple calibration points, estimate their first diversification at ~25-33 million years ago (Ma, shortly followed by several long-distance dispersal events that resulted in the current pantropical distribution. Conclusion These results confidently show that lobelioid species, commonly called 'giant', are very closely related and have not developed their giant form from herbaceous ancestors independently. This study, which includes the hitherto largest taxon sampling for subfamily Lobelioideae, highlights the need for a broad phylogenetic framework for testing assumptions about morphological development in general, and convergent evolution in particular.

  17. The Atypical Response Regulator Protein ChxR Has Structural Characteristics and Dimer Interface Interactions That Are Unique within the OmpR/PhoB Subfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, John M.; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Hu, Lei; Middaugh, C. Russell; Hefty, P. Scott (Kansas); (HWMRI)

    2013-05-29

    Typically as a result of phosphorylation, OmpR/PhoB response regulators form homodimers through a receiver domain as an integral step in transcriptional activation. Phosphorylation stabilizes the ionic and hydrophobic interactions between monomers. Recent studies have shown that some response regulators retain functional activity in the absence of phosphorylation and are termed atypical response regulators. The two currently available receiver domain structures of atypical response regulators are very similar to their phospho-accepting homologs, and their propensity to form homodimers is generally retained. An atypical response regulator, ChxR, from Chlamydia trachomatis, was previously reported to form homodimers; however, the residues critical to this interaction have not been elucidated. We hypothesize that the intra- and intermolecular interactions involved in forming a transcriptionally competent ChxR are distinct from the canonical phosphorylation (activation) paradigm in the OmpR/PhoB response regulator subfamily. To test this hypothesis, structural and functional studies were performed on the receiver domain of ChxR. Two crystal structures of the receiver domain were solved with the recently developed method using triiodo compound I3C. These structures revealed many characteristics unique to OmpR/PhoB subfamily members: typical or atypical. Included was the absence of two {alpha}-helices present in all other OmpR/PhoB response regulators. Functional studies on various dimer interface residues demonstrated that ChxR forms relatively stable homodimers through hydrophobic interactions, and disruption of these can be accomplished with the introduction of a charged residue within the dimer interface. A gel shift study with monomeric ChxR supports that dimerization through the receiver domain is critical for interaction with DNA.

  18. Identification and initial characterization of the 3' end of gene transcripts encoding putative members of the pheromone receptor subfamily in Lepidoptera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen F. Garczynski; Kevin W. Wanner; Thomas R. Unruh

    2012-01-01

    Semiochemicals,including pheromones and kairomones,used in pest management programs reduce the need for chemical insecticides,and understanding their interactions with their membrane receptors may help make them more effective in the field.Identification of odorant receptors in the Lepidoptera has mainly been achieved using bioinformatics to search DNA sequences generated by genome or expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing projects.This study reports a rapid method to identify members of the pheromone receptor subfamily in Lepidoptera.Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were designed against a conserved amino acid sequence in the carboxyl terminus of known lepidopteran pheromone receptors,and the primers were used in a 3' rapid amplification of complementary DNA (cDNA) ends procedure.Polymerase chain reaction products generated from seven different lepidopteran species were TA cloned and sequenced.The eDNA sequences of 25 transcripts were determined to encode potential members of the pheromone receptor subfamily.These cDNAs ranged from 238 to 642 bp and encoded 49-54 amino acids of the carboxyl terminus.Analysis of the 3' untranslated region reveals that most of the transcripts contain multiple polyadenylation signal sequences,and in the case ofManduca sexta,an alternate polyadenylation signal appears to be used in transcript processing.The 3' untranslated region was also useful in determining unique receptors encoded by transcripts having highly similar nucleotide and amino acid sequences.Overall,this technique provides a complementary method of pheromone receptor identification in EST sequencing projects,or can be used as a stand-alone method in conjunction with 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends procedures.

  19. Regulation of protease-activated receptor 1 signaling by the adaptor protein complex 2 and R4 subfamily of regulator of G protein signaling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Buxin; Siderovski, David P; Neubig, Richard R; Lawson, Mark A; Trejo, Joann

    2014-01-17

    The G protein-coupled protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is irreversibly proteolytically activated by thrombin. Hence, the precise regulation of PAR1 signaling is important for proper cellular responses. In addition to desensitization, internalization and lysosomal sorting of activated PAR1 are critical for the termination of signaling. Unlike most G protein-coupled receptors, PAR1 internalization is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex 2 (AP-2) and epsin-1, rather than β-arrestins. However, the function of AP-2 and epsin-1 in the regulation of PAR1 signaling is not known. Here, we report that AP-2, and not epsin-1, regulates activated PAR1-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis via two different mechanisms that involve, in part, a subset of R4 subfamily of "regulator of G protein signaling" (RGS) proteins. A significantly greater increase in activated PAR1 signaling was observed in cells depleted of AP-2 using siRNA or in cells expressing a PAR1 (420)AKKAA(424) mutant with defective AP-2 binding. This effect was attributed to AP-2 modulation of PAR1 surface expression and efficiency of G protein coupling. We further found that ectopic expression of R4 subfamily members RGS2, RGS3, RGS4, and RGS5 reduced activated PAR1 wild-type signaling, whereas signaling by the PAR1 AKKAA mutant was minimally affected. Intriguingly, siRNA-mediated depletion analysis revealed a function for RGS5 in the regulation of signaling by the PAR1 wild type but not the AKKAA mutant. Moreover, activation of the PAR1 wild type, and not the AKKAA mutant, induced Gαq association with RGS3 via an AP-2-dependent mechanism. Thus, AP-2 regulates activated PAR1 signaling by altering receptor surface expression and through recruitment of RGS proteins. PMID:24297163

  20. Cymapamphantus valentineorum, a new genus and species of Pamphantinae (Heteroptera: Lygaeoidea: Geocoridae) from the British Virgin Islands, with a checklist of the species and keys to the tribes and genera of the subfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    The new genus and new species Cymapamphantus valentineorum, belonging to the geocorid subfamily Pamphantinae, is described from one brachypterous male and six brachypterous females taken on Guana Island, British Virgin Islands. A dorsal habitus illustration, dorsal and lateral photographs of the ma...

  1. Leaf and stem CO/sub 2/ uptake in the three subfamilies of the Cactaceae. [Pereskia aculeata; Pereskia grandifolia; Maihuenia poeppigii; Carnegiea gigantea; Ferocactus acanthodes; Coryphantha vivipara; Mammillaria dioica; Opuntia ficus-inidica; Pereskiopsis porteri; Quiabentia chacoensis; Austrocylindropuntia subulata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobel, P.S.; Hartsock, T.L.

    1986-04-01

    Net CO/sub 2/ uptake over 24-hour periods was examined for the leaves and for the stems of 11 species of cacti representing all three subfamilies. For Pereskia aculeata, Pereskia grandifolia, and Maihuenia poeppigii (subfamily Pereskioideae), all the net shoot CO/sub 2/ uptake was by the leaves and during the daytime. In contrast, for the leafless species Carnegiea gigantea, Ferocactus acanthodes, Coryphantha vivipara, and Mammillaria dioica (subfamily Cactoideae), all the shoot net CO/sub 2/ uptake was by the stems and at night. Similarly, for leafless Opuntia ficus-indica (subfamily Opuntioideae), all net CO/sub 2/ uptake occurred at night. For leafy members of the Opuntioideae (Pereskiopsis porteri, Quiabentia chacoensis, Austrocylindropuntia subulata), at least 88% of the shoot CO/sub 2/ uptake over 24 hours was by the leaves and some CO/sub 2/ uptake occurred at night. Leaves responded to the instantaneous level of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) during the daytime, as occurs for C/sub 3/ plants, whereas nocturnal CO/sub 2/ uptake by stems of O. ficus-indica and F. acanthodes responded to the total daily PAR, as occurs for Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants. Thus, under the well-watered conditions employed, the Pereskioideae behaved as C/sub 3/ plants, the Cactoideae behaved as CAM plants, and the Opuntioideae exhibited characteristics of both pathways.

  2. Cytochrome P450 CYP3A in marsupials: cloning and characterisation of the second identified CYP3A subfamily member, isoform 3A78 from koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Merhibi, Adaweyah; Ngo, Suong N T; Crittenden, Tamara A; Marchant, Ceilidh L; Stupans, Ieva; McKinnon, Ross A

    2011-11-01

    Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) are critically important in the oxidative metabolism of a diverse array of xenobiotics and endogenous substrates. Previously, we cloned and characterised the CYP2C, CYP4A, and CYP4B gene subfamilies from marsupials and demonstrated important species-differences in both activity and tissue expression of these CYP enzymes. Recently, we isolated the Eastern grey kangaroo CYP3A70. Here we have cloned and characterised the second identified member of marsupial CYP3A gene subfamily, CYP3A78 from the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus). In addition, we have examined the gender-differences in microsomal erythromycin N-demethylation activity (a CYP3A marker) and CYP3A protein expression across test marsupial species. Significant differences in hepatic erythromycin N-demethylation activity were observed between male and female koalas, with the activity detected in female koalas being 2.5-fold higher compared to that in male koalas (pkoala, tammar wallaby, and Eastern grey kangaroo, with no gender-differences detected across test marsupials. A 1610 bp koala hepatic CYP3A complete cDNA, designated CYP3A78, was cloned by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction approaches. It displays 64% nucleotide and 57% amino acid sequence identity to the Eastern grey kangaroo CYP3A70. The CYP3A78 cDNA encodes a protein of 515 amino acids, shares approximately 68% nucleotide and 56% amino acid sequence identity to human CYP3A4, and displays high sequence similarity to other published mammalian CYP3As from human, monkey, cow, pig, dog, rat, rabbit, mouse, hamster, and guinea pig. Collectively, this study provides primary molecular data regarding koala hepatic CYP3A78 gene and enables further functional analyses of CYP3A enzymes in marsupials. Given the significant role that CYP3A enzymes play in the metabolism of both endogenous and exogenous compounds, the clone provides an important step in elucidating the metabolic capacity of marsupials.

  3. Boolean Differential Operators

    OpenAIRE

    Catumba, Jorge; Diaz, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    We consider four combinatorial interpretations for the algebra of Boolean differential operators. We show that each interpretation yields an explicit matrix representation for Boolean differential operators.

  4. Homodimerization Controls the Fibroblast Growth Factor 9 Subfamily's Receptor Binding and Heparan Sulfate-Dependent Diffusion in the Extracellular Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinina, J.; Byron, S; Makarenkova, H; Olsen, S; Eliseenkova, A; Larochelle, W; Dhanabal, M; Blais, S; Mohammadi, M; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Uncontrolled fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling can lead to human diseases, necessitating multiple layers of self-regulatory control mechanisms to keep its activity in check. Herein, we demonstrate that FGF9 and FGF20 ligands undergo a reversible homodimerization, occluding their key receptor binding sites. To test the role of dimerization in ligand autoinhibition, we introduced structure-based mutations into the dimer interfaces of FGF9 and FGF20. The mutations weakened the ability of the ligands to dimerize, effectively increasing the concentrations of monomeric ligands capable of binding and activating their cognate FGF receptor in vitro and in living cells. Interestingly, the monomeric ligands exhibit reduced heparin binding, resulting in their increased radii of heparan sulfate-dependent diffusion and biologic action, as evidenced by the wider dilation area of ex vivo lung cultures in response to implanted mutant FGF9-loaded beads. Hence, our data demonstrate that homodimerization autoregulates FGF9 and FGF20's receptor binding and concentration gradients in the extracellular matrix. Our study is the first to implicate ligand dimerization as an autoregulatory mechanism for growth factor bioactivity and sets the stage for engineering modified FGF9 subfamily ligands, with desired activity for use in both basic and translational research.

  5. Role of NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic motif in the subcellular localization of ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily D: Common features in eukaryotic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Asaka; Asahina, Kota; Okamoto, Takumi; Kawaguchi, Kosuke [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Kostsin, Dzmitry G. [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Institute of Biophysics and Cell Engineering, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Academicheskaya Str. 27, Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Kashiwayama, Yoshinori [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Takanashi, Kojiro; Yazaki, Kazufumi [Laboratory of Plant Gene Expression, Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoko University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Imanaka, Tsuneo, E-mail: imanaka@pha.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Morita, Masashi [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • ABCD proteins classifies based on with or without NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment. • The ABCD proteins with the segment are targeted peroxisomes. • The ABCD proteins without the segment are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum. • The role of the segment in organelle targeting is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. - Abstract: In mammals, four ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 possesses the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and are targeted to peroxisomes, while ABCD4 lacking the region is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Based on hydropathy plot analysis, we found that several eukaryotes have ABCD protein homologs lacking the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment (H0 motif). To investigate whether the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in subcellular localization is conserved across species, we expressed ABCD proteins from several species (metazoan, plant and fungi) in fusion with GFP in CHO cells and examined their subcellular localization. ABCD proteins possessing the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif were localized to peroxisomes, while ABCD proteins lacking this region lost this capacity. In addition, the deletion of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif of ABCD protein resulted in their localization to the ER. These results suggest that the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in organelle targeting is widely conserved in living organisms.

  6. A systematic review of the subfamily Syringophilinae (Acari: Syringophilidae) of the Nearctic region. Part 1: quill mites associated with passerines (Aves: Passeriformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoracki, Maciej; Spicer, Greg S; Oconnor, Barry M

    2016-01-01

    Quill mites belonging to the subfamily Syringophilinae Lavoipierre, 1953 associated with the Nearctic passeriform birds are revised. All of the 49 known species, which are grouped in seven genera, are recorded. Among them, four new species are described: Syringophiloidus audubioni sp. nov. from Spizella breweri (Cassini) (Emberizidae), Syringophilopsis catesbyi sp. nov. from Vireo olivaceus (Linnaeus) (Vireonidae), S. wilsoni sp. nov. from Pheucticus melanocephalus (Swainson) (Cardinalidae), and S. bartrami sp. nov. from Spizella passerina (Bechstein) (Emberizidae). The species Syringophilopsis hylocichlae Clark, 1964 syn. nov. is synonymized with Syringophilopsis turdus (Fritsch, 1958), and Syringophiloidus zonotrichia syn. nov. is synonymized with Betasyringophiloidus seiuri (Clark, 1964) comb. nov. Six species are recorded from the Nearctic region for the first time: Syringophiloidus delichonum Bochkov, 2001, S. glandarii (Fritsch, 1958), S. weiszii Skoracki et al., 2001, S. bombycillae Skoracki, 2002, Syringophilopsis mimidus Sikora et al., 2011, and Torotrogla merulae Skoracki et al., 2000. Data on Nearctic syringophiline species, their hosts and distribution are summarized and the keys to all species are constructed. PMID:27394276

  7. Physical mapping of 18S and 5S rDNA loci and histone H3 gene in grasshopper species of the subfamily Gomphocerinae (Acrididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Neto, L C; Bernardino, A C S; Loreto, V; Moura, R C

    2015-11-25

    In this study, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis was used to determine and compare the numbers and chromosomal locations of two multigene families (rDNA and histone H3) in four Neotropical species of gomphocerine grasshoppers. FISH using the 18S rDNA probe identified a single site on the S9 chromosome of Amblytropidia sp and Cauratettix borelli, a single site on chromosome M6 of Compsacris pulcher, and two sites (chromosomes L1 and L2) in Orphulella punctata. By contrast, FISH with a 5S rDNA probe identified dispersion of this sequence in the genomes of the four species, with evidence of intraspecific variations. Amblytropidia sp had six to eight FISH signals on autosomal chromosomes, while C. pulcher exhibited a signal only on the M5 bivalent. The histone H3 gene was less variable and was restricted to a single pair in all species. The conservation of the numbers and locations of 18S rDNA and H3 genes in conjunction with data from the literature was useful for evaluating karyotype evolution in this subfamily. The variation in the number and sizes of 5S rDNA sites indicates a process of recent dispersion that might have been mediated by transposition.

  8. Role of NH2-terminal hydrophobic motif in the subcellular localization of ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily D: Common features in eukaryotic organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • ABCD proteins classifies based on with or without NH2-terminal hydrophobic segment. • The ABCD proteins with the segment are targeted peroxisomes. • The ABCD proteins without the segment are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum. • The role of the segment in organelle targeting is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. - Abstract: In mammals, four ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 possesses the NH2-terminal hydrophobic region and are targeted to peroxisomes, while ABCD4 lacking the region is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Based on hydropathy plot analysis, we found that several eukaryotes have ABCD protein homologs lacking the NH2-terminal hydrophobic segment (H0 motif). To investigate whether the role of the NH2-terminal H0 motif in subcellular localization is conserved across species, we expressed ABCD proteins from several species (metazoan, plant and fungi) in fusion with GFP in CHO cells and examined their subcellular localization. ABCD proteins possessing the NH2-terminal H0 motif were localized to peroxisomes, while ABCD proteins lacking this region lost this capacity. In addition, the deletion of the NH2-terminal H0 motif of ABCD protein resulted in their localization to the ER. These results suggest that the role of the NH2-terminal H0 motif in organelle targeting is widely conserved in living organisms

  9. CXC chemokine subfamily and its biological relationship with tumor%趋化因子CXC亚家族及其与肿瘤的生物学关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱庆超; 汪昱

    2010-01-01

    Chemokines are a class of functional chemotactic peptide. CXC chemokine class is a large family of chemokines in a sub- tribe. In the occurrence and development of tumor cells, there often accompanied by a series of molecular and biology change. CXC chemokine subfamily is closely related to the body' s immune response to tumor and biological behaviors of tumor. In this paper, CXC chemokine sub-Several members of the tribe and their receptor and tumor biological relationship are reviewed.%趋化因子是一类具有化学趋化功能的多肽,CXC类趋化因子是趋化因子大家族中的一个亚族;在肿瘤细胞的发生、发展中常伴随着一系列的分子生物学改变,趋化因子CXC亚家族与机体对肿瘤的免疫应答及其与生物学之间有着密切的关系.本文就趋化因子CXC亚族中的几个成员及其受体与肿瘤的生物学关系进行综述.

  10. A new member of the GM130 golgin subfamily is expressed in the optic lobe anlagen of the metamorphosing brain of Manduca sexta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiou-Miin Wang

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available During metamorphosis of the insect brain, the optic lobe anlagen generate the proliferation centers for the visual cortices. We show here that, in the moth Manduca sexta, an 80 kDa Golgi complex protein (Ms-golgin80 is abundantly expressed in the cytoplasm of neuroblasts and ganglion mother cells in the optic lobe anlagen and proliferation centers. The predicted amino acid sequence for Ms-golgin80 is similar to that of several members of the GM130 subfamily of Golgi-associated proteins, including rat GM130 and human golgin-95. Homologs of Ms-golgin80 from Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Brugia malayi were identified through homology sequence search. Sequence similarities are present in three regions: the N-terminus, an internal domain of 89 amino acids, and another domain of 89 amino acids near the C-terminus. Structural similarities further suggest that these molecules play the same cellular role as GM130. GM130 is involved in the docking and fusion of coatomer (COP I coated vesicles to the Golgi membranes; it also regulates the fragmentation and subsequent reassembly of the Golgi complex during mitosis. Abundant expression of Ms-golgin80 in neuroblasts and ganglion mother cells and its reduced expression in the neuronal progeny of these cells suggest that this protein may be involved in the maintenance of the proliferative state.

  11. 3,4-diaminobenzoic acid derivatives as inhibitors of the oxytocinase subfamily of M1 aminopeptidases with immune-regulating properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Tsoukalidou, Sofia; Mauvais, Francois-Xavier; Sfyroera, Georgia; Mastellos, Dimitrios C; van Endert, Peter; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A; Vourloumis, Dionisios; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2015-02-12

    Members of the oxytocinase subfamily of M1 aminopeptidases (ERAP1, ERAP2, and IRAP) play important roles in both the adaptive and innate human immune responses. Their enzymatic activity can contribute to the pathogenesis of several major human diseases ranging from viral and parasitic infections to autoimmunity and cancer. We have previously demonstrated that diaminobenzoic acid derivatives show promise as selective inhibitors for this group of aminopeptidases. In this study, we have thoroughly explored a series of 3,4-diaminobenzoic acid derivatives as inhibitors of this class of enzymes, achieving submicromolar inhibitors for ERAP2 (IC50 = 237 nM) and IRAP (IC50 = 105 nM). Cell-based analysis indicated that the lead compounds can be effective in downregulating macrophage activation induced by lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ as well as cross-presentation by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Our results indicate that this class of inhibitors may be useful for the targeted downregulation of immune responses. PMID:25635706

  12. Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) population dynamics and bamboo (subfamily Bambusoideae) life history: a structured population approach to examining carrying capacity when the prey are semelparous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.; Ackleh, A.S.; Leonard, B.P.; Wang, Hongfang

    1999-01-01

    The giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca, is a highly specialized Ursid whose diet consists almost entirely of various species of bamboo. Bamboo (Bambusoideae) is a grass subfamily whose species often exhibit a synchronous semelparity. Synchronous semelparity can create local drops in carrying capacity for the panda. We modeled the interaction of pandas and their bamboo food resources with an age structured panda population model linked to a natural history model of bamboo biomass dynamics based on literature values of bamboo biomass, and giant panda life history dynamics. This paper reports the results of our examination of the interaction between pandas and their bamboo food resource and its implications for panda conservation. In the model all panda populations were well below the carrying capacity of the habitat. The giant panda populations growth was most sensitive to changes in birth rates and removal of reproductive aged individuals. Periodic starvation that has been documented in conjunction with bamboo die-offs is probably related to the inability to move to other areas within the region where bamboo is still available. Based on the results of this model, giant panda conservation should concentrate on keeping breeding individuals in the wild, keep corridors to different bamboo species open to pandas, and to concentrate research on bamboo life history.

  13. The mammalian Rab family of small GTPases: definition of family and subfamily sequence motifs suggests a mechanism for functional specificity in the Ras superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Leal, J B; Seabra, M C

    2000-08-25

    The Rab/Ypt/Sec4 family forms the largest branch of the Ras superfamily of GTPases, acting as essential regulators of vesicular transport pathways. We used the large amount of information in the databases to analyse the mammalian Rab family. We defined Rab-conserved sequences that we designate Rab family (RabF) motifs using the conserved PM and G motifs as "landmarks". The Rab-specific regions were used to identify new Rab proteins in the databases and suggest rules for nomenclature. Surprisingly, we find that RabF regions cluster in and around switch I and switch II regions, i.e. the regions that change conformation upon GDP or GTP binding. This finding suggests that specificity of Rab-effector interaction cannot be conferred solely through the switch regions as is usually inferred. Instead, we propose a model whereby an effector binds to RabF (switch) regions to discriminate between nucleotide-bound states and simultaneously to other regions that confer specificity to the interaction, possibly Rab subfamily (RabSF) specific regions that we also define here. We discuss structural and functional data that support this model and its general applicability to the Ras superfamily of proteins.

  14. Effect of acid sensing ion channels on respiratory regulation by central chemoreceptors%酸敏感离子通道在中枢化学感受器呼吸调节中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽; 刘文彦; 高波

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨脑室内注射酸化人工脑脊液(artificialcerebrospinalfluid,aCSF)引起的呼吸效应及酸敏感离子通道( acid sensing ion channels , ASICs )在此过程中的作用。方法:健康成年SD大鼠30只,随机分为aCSF(pH 7.4)对照组、aCSF(pH 6.5)组、ASICs阻断剂阿米洛利(amiloride)对照组、amiloride+aCSF(pH 6.5)组、ASIC1a阻断剂psalmotoxin 1(PcTx1)对照组及PcTx1+aCSF(pH 6.5)组。通过膈肌肌电记录脑室内注射酸化aCSF后呼吸的变化;通过脑室内先注射阿米洛利和PcTx1再注射酸化aCSF的方法,观察酸敏感离子通道在中枢化学感受器呼吸调节中的作用。结果:脑室内注射酸化aCSF后,呼吸较注射前明显兴奋(P<0.05);脑室内注射阿米洛利能完全阻断脑室内注射酸化aCSF引起的呼吸兴奋;脑室内注射PcTx1能部分阻断脑室内注射酸化aCSF引起的呼吸兴奋。结论:ASICs是参与中枢化学感受器呼吸调节的关键离子通道,ASIC1a则发挥了部分作用。%[ABSTRACT]AIM:Toinvestigatetheeffectofintracerebroventricular(icv)injectionofacidulatedartificialce-rebrospinal fluid ( aCSF ) on the respiratory reactions and the functions of acid sensing ion channels ( ASICs ) in this process.METHODS:Healthy adult SD rats (n=30) were divided into aCSF with pH 7.4 control group, aCSF with pH 6.5 group, amiloride control group, amiloride plus aCSF with pH 6.5 group, psalmotoxin 1 (PcTx1) control group and PcTx1 plus aCSF with pH 6.5 group.The electromyogram (EMG) of the diaphragm was monitored to observe the respirato-ry responses induced by icv injection of acidulated aCSF .The ASICs blockers were also injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle firstly and acidulated aCSF was injected following the ASICs blockers to observe the effect of ASICs on the respira -tory regulation by the central chemoreceptor .RESULTS:After icv injection of acidulated aCSF , the

  15. Differential Hybrid Games

    OpenAIRE

    Platzer, André

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces differential hybrid games, which combine differential games with hybrid games. In both kinds of games, two players interact with continuous dynamics. The difference is that hybrid games also provide all the features of hybrid systems and discrete games, but only deterministic differential equations. Differential games, instead, provide differential equations with continuous-time game input by both players, but not the luxury of hybrid games, such as mode switches and d...

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of the spider mite sub-family Tetranychinae (Acari: Tetranychidae based on the mitochondrial COI gene and the 18S and the 5' end of the 28S rRNA genes indicates that several genera are polyphyletic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Matsuda

    Full Text Available The spider mite sub-family Tetranychinae includes many agricultural pests. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS region of nuclear ribosomal RNA genes and the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI gene of mitochondrial DNA have been used for species identification and phylogenetic reconstruction within the sub-family Tetranychinae, although they have not always been successful. The 18S and 28S rRNA genes should be more suitable for resolving higher levels of phylogeny, such as tribes or genera of Tetranychinae because these genes evolve more slowly and are made up of conserved regions and divergent domains. Therefore, we used both the 18S (1,825-1,901 bp and 28S (the 5' end of 646-743 bp rRNA genes to infer phylogenetic relationships within the sub-family Tetranychinae with a focus on the tribe Tetranychini. Then, we compared the phylogenetic tree of the 18S and 28S genes with that of the mitochondrial COI gene (618 bp. As observed in previous studies, our phylogeny based on the COI gene was not resolved because of the low bootstrap values for most nodes of the tree. On the other hand, our phylogenetic tree of the 18S and 28S genes revealed several well-supported clades within the sub-family Tetranychinae. The 18S and 28S phylogenetic trees suggest that the tribes Bryobiini, Petrobiini and Eurytetranychini are monophyletic and that the tribe Tetranychini is polyphyletic. At the genus level, six genera for which more than two species were sampled appear to be monophyletic, while four genera (Oligonychus, Tetranychus, Schizotetranychus and Eotetranychus appear to be polyphyletic. The topology presented here does not fully agree with the current morphology-based taxonomy, so that the diagnostic morphological characters of Tetranychinae need to be reconsidered.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of the spider mite sub-family Tetranychinae (Acari: Tetranychidae) based on the mitochondrial COI gene and the 18S and the 5' end of the 28S rRNA genes indicates that several genera are polyphyletic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Tomoko; Morishita, Maiko; Hinomoto, Norihide; Gotoh, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    The spider mite sub-family Tetranychinae includes many agricultural pests. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal RNA genes and the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene of mitochondrial DNA have been used for species identification and phylogenetic reconstruction within the sub-family Tetranychinae, although they have not always been successful. The 18S and 28S rRNA genes should be more suitable for resolving higher levels of phylogeny, such as tribes or genera of Tetranychinae because these genes evolve more slowly and are made up of conserved regions and divergent domains. Therefore, we used both the 18S (1,825-1,901 bp) and 28S (the 5' end of 646-743 bp) rRNA genes to infer phylogenetic relationships within the sub-family Tetranychinae with a focus on the tribe Tetranychini. Then, we compared the phylogenetic tree of the 18S and 28S genes with that of the mitochondrial COI gene (618 bp). As observed in previous studies, our phylogeny based on the COI gene was not resolved because of the low bootstrap values for most nodes of the tree. On the other hand, our phylogenetic tree of the 18S and 28S genes revealed several well-supported clades within the sub-family Tetranychinae. The 18S and 28S phylogenetic trees suggest that the tribes Bryobiini, Petrobiini and Eurytetranychini are monophyletic and that the tribe Tetranychini is polyphyletic. At the genus level, six genera for which more than two species were sampled appear to be monophyletic, while four genera (Oligonychus, Tetranychus, Schizotetranychus and Eotetranychus) appear to be polyphyletic. The topology presented here does not fully agree with the current morphology-based taxonomy, so that the diagnostic morphological characters of Tetranychinae need to be reconsidered.

  18. Axiomatic differential geometry II-2 - differential forms

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    We refurbish our axiomatics of differential geometry introduced in [Mathematics for Applications,, 1 (2012), 171-182]. Then the notion of Euclideaness can naturally be formulated. The principal objective in this paper is to present an adaptation of our theory of differential forms developed in [International Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics, 64 (2010), 85-102] to our present axiomatic framework.

  19. Axiomatic Differential Geometry Ⅱ-2: Differential Forms

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    We refurbish our axiomatics of differential geometry introduced in [arXiv 1203.3911]. Then the notion of Euclideaness can naturally be formulated. The principal objective in this paper is to present an adaptation of our theory of differential forms developed in [International Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics, 64 (2010), 85-102] to our present axiomatic framework.

  20. Some differential equations in synthetic differential geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Kock, Anders; Reyes, Gonzalo E.

    2001-01-01

    Some differential equations are considered in the context of Synthetic Differential Geometry. Here, this means that not only nilpotent infinitesimals, but also the formation of function spaces, is exploited. In particular, we utilize distribution spaces in our study of wave and heat equations.

  1. Alona iheringula Sinev & Kotov, 2004 (Crustacea, Anomopoda, Chydoridae, Aloninae): life cycle and DNA barcode with implications for the taxonomy of the Aloninae subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Erika dos Santos; de Abreu, Cínthia Bruno; Orlando, Tereza Cristina; Wisniewski, Célio; dos Santos-Wisniewski, Maria José

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of reproductive rates and life cycle of the Cladocera species is essential for population dynamic studies, secondary production and food webs, as well as the management and preservation of aquatic ecosystems. The present study aimed to understand the life cycle and growth of Alona iheringula Kotov & Sinev, 2004 (Crustacea, Anomopoda, Chydoridae), a Neotropical species, as well as its DNA barcoding, providing new information on the Aloninae taxonomy. The specimens were collected in the dammed portion of the Cabo Verde River (21°26'05″ S and 46°10'57″ W), in the Furnas Reservoir, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Forty neonates were observed individually two or three times a day under controlled temperature (25±1°C), photoperiod (12 h light/12 h dark) and feeding (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata at a concentration of 105 cells.mL-1 and a mixed suspension of yeast and fish feed in equal proportion). Individual body growth was measured daily under optical microscope using a micrometric grid and 40× magnification. The species had a mean size of 413(±29) µm, a maximum size of 510 µm and reached maturity at 3.24(±0.69) days of age. Mean fecundity was 2 eggs per female per brood and the mean number of eggs produced per female during the entire life cycle was 47.6(±6.3) eggs per female. The embryonic development time was 1.79(±0.23) days and the maximum longevity was 54 days. The species had eight instars throughout its life cycle and four instars between neonate and primipara stage. The present study using molecular data (a 461 bp smaller COI fragment) demonstrated a deep divergence in the Aloninae subfamily. PMID:24878503

  2. Alona iheringula Sinev & Kotov, 2004 (Crustacea, Anomopoda, Chydoridae, Aloninae: life cycle and DNA barcode with implications for the taxonomy of the Aloninae subfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika dos Santos Silva

    Full Text Available Knowledge of reproductive rates and life cycle of the Cladocera species is essential for population dynamic studies, secondary production and food webs, as well as the management and preservation of aquatic ecosystems. The present study aimed to understand the life cycle and growth of Alona iheringula Kotov & Sinev, 2004 (Crustacea, Anomopoda, Chydoridae, a Neotropical species, as well as its DNA barcoding, providing new information on the Aloninae taxonomy. The specimens were collected in the dammed portion of the Cabo Verde River (21°26'05″ S and 46°10'57″ W, in the Furnas Reservoir, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Forty neonates were observed individually two or three times a day under controlled temperature (25±1°C, photoperiod (12 h light/12 h dark and feeding (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata at a concentration of 105 cells.mL-1 and a mixed suspension of yeast and fish feed in equal proportion. Individual body growth was measured daily under optical microscope using a micrometric grid and 40× magnification. The species had a mean size of 413(±29 µm, a maximum size of 510 µm and reached maturity at 3.24(±0.69 days of age. Mean fecundity was 2 eggs per female per brood and the mean number of eggs produced per female during the entire life cycle was 47.6(±6.3 eggs per female. The embryonic development time was 1.79(±0.23 days and the maximum longevity was 54 days. The species had eight instars throughout its life cycle and four instars between neonate and primipara stage. The present study using molecular data (a 461 bp smaller COI fragment demonstrated a deep divergence in the Aloninae subfamily.

  3. The X-ray Crystallographic Structure and Activity Analysis of a Pseudomonas-Specific Subfamily of the HAD Enzyme Superfamily Evidences a Novel Biochemical Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peisach,E.; Wang, L.; Burroughs, A.; Aravind, L.; Dunaway-Mariano, D.; Allen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily is a large family of proteins dominated by phosphotransferases. Thirty-three sequence families within the HAD superfamily (HADSF) have been identified to assist in function assignment. One such family includes the enzyme phosphoacetaldehyde hydrolase (phosphonatase). Phosphonatase possesses the conserved Rossmanniod core domain and a C1-type cap domain. Other members of this family do not possess a cap domain and because the cap domain of phosphonatase plays an important role in active site desolvation and catalysis, the function of the capless family members must be unique. A representative of the capless subfamily, PSPTO{_}2114, from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, was targeted for catalytic activity and structure analyses. The X-ray structure of PSPTO{_}2114 reveals a capless homodimer that conserves some but not all of the intersubunit contacts contributed by the core domains of the phosphonatase homodimer. The region of the PSPTO{_}2114 that corresponds to the catalytic scaffold of phosphonatase (and other HAD phosphotransfereases) positions amino acid residues that are ill suited for Mg+2 cofactor binding and mediation of phosphoryl group transfer between donor and acceptor substrates. The absence of phosphotransferase activity in PSPTO{_}2114 was confirmed by kinetic assays. To explore PSPTO{_}2114 function, the conservation of sequence motifs extending outside of the HADSF catalytic scaffold was examined. The stringently conserved residues among PSPTO{_}2114 homologs were mapped onto the PSPTO{_}2114 three-dimensional structure to identify a surface region unique to the family members that do not possess a cap domain. The hypothesis that this region is used in protein-protein recognition is explored to define, for the first time, HADSF proteins which have acquired a function other than that of a catalyst. Proteins 2008.

  4. Prognostic significance and molecular mechanism of ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 4 in resistance to neoadjuvant radiotherapy of locally advanced rectal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqi Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mechanism of radioresistance in rectal carcinoma remains largely unknown. We aimed to evaluate the predictive role of ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 4 (ABCC4 in locally advanced rectal carcinoma and explore possible molecular mechanisms by which ABCC4 confers the resistance to neoadjuvant radiotherapy. METHODS: The expression of ABCC4 and P53 mutant in biopsy tissue specimens from 121 locally advanced rectal carcinoma patients was examined using immunohistochemistry. The factors contributing to 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard model. Lentivirus-mediated small hairpin RNA was applied to inhibit ABCC4 expression in colorectal carcinoma cell line RKO, and investigate the radiosensitivity in xenograft model. Intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate concentration and cell cycle distribution following irradiation were detected. RESULTS: High expression of ABCC4 and p53 mutant in pretreated tumors, poor pathological response, and high final tumor staging were significant factors independently predicted an unfavorable prognosis of locally advanced rectal carcinoma patients after neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Down-regulation of ABCC4 expression significantly enhanced irradiation-induced suppression of tumor growth in xenograft model. Furthermore, down-regulation of ABCC4 expression enhanced intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate production and noticeable deficiency of G1-S phase checkpoint in cell cycle following irradiation. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that ABCC4 serves as a novel predictive biomarker that is responsible for the radioresistance and predicts a poor prognosis for locally advanced rectal carcinoma after neoadjuvant radiotherapy.

  5. Over-expression in Escherichia coli, purification and reconstitution in liposomes of the third member of the OCTN sub-family: The mouse carnitine transporter OCTN3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Galluccio, Michele; Pochini, Lorena [Department of Cell Biology, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci 4c, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (Italy); Indiveri, Cesare, E-mail: indiveri@unical.it [Department of Cell Biology, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci 4c, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (Italy)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mOCTN3 transport protein has been cloned in pET-21a(+) and over-expressed in Escherichia coli. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expressed mOCTN3 has been purified to homogeneity by Ni-chelating chromatography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The protein solubilised in Triton X-100 has been reconstituted in liposomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recombinant mOCTN3 catalyses transport of carnitine by a uniport mode. -- Abstract: pET-21a(+)-mOCTN3-6His was constructed and used for over-expression in Escherichia coli Rosetta(DE3)pLysS. After IPTG induction a protein with apparent molecular mass of 53 kDa was collected in the insoluble fraction of the cell lysate and purified by Ni{sup 2+}-chelating chromatography with a yield of 2 mg/l of cell culture. The over-expressed protein was identified with mOCTN3 by anti-His antibody and reconstitution in liposomes. mOCTN3 required peculiar conditions for optimal expression and reconstitution in liposomes. The protein catalyzed a time dependent [{sup 3}H]carnitine uptake which was stimulated by intraliposomal ATP and nearly independent of the pH. The K{sub m} for carnitine was 36 {mu}M. [{sup 3}H]carnitine transport was inhibited by carnitine analogues and some Cys and NH{sub 2} reagents. This paper represents the first outcome in over-expressing, in active form, the third member of the OCTN sub-family, mOCTN3, in E. coli.

  6. Over-expression in Escherichia coli, purification and reconstitution in liposomes of the third member of the OCTN sub-family: The mouse carnitine transporter OCTN3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► mOCTN3 transport protein has been cloned in pET-21a(+) and over-expressed in Escherichia coli. ► The expressed mOCTN3 has been purified to homogeneity by Ni-chelating chromatography. ► The protein solubilised in Triton X-100 has been reconstituted in liposomes. ► Recombinant mOCTN3 catalyses transport of carnitine by a uniport mode. -- Abstract: pET-21a(+)-mOCTN3-6His was constructed and used for over-expression in Escherichia coli Rosetta(DE3)pLysS. After IPTG induction a protein with apparent molecular mass of 53 kDa was collected in the insoluble fraction of the cell lysate and purified by Ni2+-chelating chromatography with a yield of 2 mg/l of cell culture. The over-expressed protein was identified with mOCTN3 by anti-His antibody and reconstitution in liposomes. mOCTN3 required peculiar conditions for optimal expression and reconstitution in liposomes. The protein catalyzed a time dependent [3H]carnitine uptake which was stimulated by intraliposomal ATP and nearly independent of the pH. The Km for carnitine was 36 μM. [3H]carnitine transport was inhibited by carnitine analogues and some Cys and NH2 reagents. This paper represents the first outcome in over-expressing, in active form, the third member of the OCTN sub-family, mOCTN3, in E. coli.

  7. Molecular and morphological description of Haemoproteus (Parahaemoproteus) bukaka (species nova), a haemosporidian associated with the strictly Australo-Papuan host subfamily Cracticinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, W; Adlard, R D; Clegg, S M; Clark, N J

    2016-09-01

    Linking morphological studies with molecular phylogeny is important to understanding cryptic speciation and the evolution of host-parasite relationships. Haemosporidian parasites of the Australo-Papuan bird family Artamidae are relatively unstudied. Only one parasite species from the subfamily Cracticinae has been described, and this was based solely on morphological description. This is despite many Cracticinae species being easily observed and abundant over large ranges and in close proximity to human populations. We used morphological and molecular methods to describe a new Haemoproteus species (H. bukaka sp. nov.) from an endemic Butcherbird host (Cracticus louisiadensis) in a relatively unstudied insular area of high avian endemism (Papua New Guinea's Louisiade Archipelago). Phylogenetic reconstructions using parasite cyt-b gene sequences placed the proposed Haemoproteus bukaka sp. nov. close to other host-specialist Haemoproteus species that infect meliphagid honeyeater hosts in the region, e.g. H. ptilotis. Distinct morphological characters of this haemosporidian include macrogametocytes with characteristic large vacuoles opposing a subterminal nucleus on the host cell envelope. Among 27 sampled individuals, prevalence of H. bukaka sp.nov. was high (74 % infection rate) but strongly variable across four islands in the archipelago (ranging from 0 to 100 % prevalence). Parasitaemia levels were low across all infected individuals (0.1-0.6 %). We suspect host density may play a role in maintaining high prevalence given the close proximity and similar physical environments across islands. The findings are discussed in the context of the host genus Cracticus and theory relating to parasite-host evolution and its conservation implications in Papua New Guinea. PMID:27169863

  8. Automatic differentiation bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corliss, G.F. (comp.)

    1992-07-01

    This is a bibliography of work related to automatic differentiation. Automatic differentiation is a technique for the fast, accurate propagation of derivative values using the chain rule. It is neither symbolic nor numeric. Automatic differentiation is a fundamental tool for scientific computation, with applications in optimization, nonlinear equations, nonlinear least squares approximation, stiff ordinary differential equation, partial differential equations, continuation methods, and sensitivity analysis. This report is an updated version of the bibliography which originally appeared in Automatic Differentiation of Algorithms: Theory, Implementation, and Application.

  9. Netrin-1 is a critical autocrine/paracrine factor for osteoclast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediero, Aránzazu; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; Perez-Aso, Miguel; Moore, Kathryn J; Cronstein, Bruce N

    2015-05-01

    Bone metabolism is a vital process that involves resorption by osteoclasts and formation by osteoblasts, which is closely regulated by immune cells. The neuronal guidance protein Netrin-1 regulates immune cell migration and inflammatory reactions, but its role in bone metabolism is unknown. During osteoclast differentiation, osteoclast precursors increase expression of Netrin-1 and its receptor Unc5b. Netrin-1 binds, in an autocrine and paracrine manner, to Unc5b to promote osteoclast differentiation in vitro, and absence of Netrin-1 or antibody-mediated blockade of Netrin-1 or Unc5b prevents osteoclast differentiation of both murine and human precursors. We confirmed the functional relationship of Netrin-1 in osteoclast differentiation in vivo using Netrin-1-deficient (Ntn1(-/-) ) or wild-type (WT) bone marrow transplanted mice. Notably, Ntn1(-/-) chimeras have markedly diminished osteoclasts, as well as increased cortical and trabecular bone density and volume compared with WT mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that Netrin-1 regulates osteoclast differentiation by altering cytoskeletal assembly. Netrin-1 increases regulator of Rho-GEF subfamily (LARG) and repulsive guidance molecule (RGMa) association with Unc5b, which increases expression and activation of cytoskeletal regulators RhoA and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Netrin-1 and its receptor Unc5b likely play a role in fusion of osteoclast precursors because Netrin-1 and DC-STAMP are tightly linked. These results identify Netrin-1 as a key regulator of osteoclast differentiation that may be a new target for bone therapies.

  10. Detection of differential DNA methylation in repetitive DNA of mice and humans perinatally exposed to bisphenol A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulk, Christopher; Kim, Jung H.; Anderson, Olivia S.; Nahar, Muna S.; Jones, Tamara R.; Sartor, Maureen A.; Dolinoy, Dana C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Developmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) has been shown to induce changes in DNA methylation in both mouse and human genic regions; however, the response in repetitive elements and transposons has not been explored. Here we present novel methodology to combine genomic DNA enrichment with RepeatMasker analysis on next-generation sequencing data to determine the effect of perinatal BPA exposure on repetitive DNA at the class, family, subfamily, and individual insertion level in both mouse and human samples. Mice were treated during gestation and lactation to BPA in chow at 0, 50, or 50,000 ng/g levels and total BPA was measured in stratified human fetal liver tissue samples as low (non-detect to 0.83 ng/g), medium (3.5 to 5.79 ng/g), or high (35.44 to 96.76 ng/g). Transposon methylation changes were evident in human classes, families, and subfamilies, with the medium group exhibiting hypomethylation compared to both high and low BPA groups. Mouse repeat classes, families, and subfamilies did not respond to BPA with significantly detectable differential DNA methylation. In human samples, 1251 individual transposon loci were detected as differentially methylated by BPA exposure, but only 19 were detected in mice. Of note, this approach recapitulated the discovery of a previously known mouse environmentally labile metastable epiallele, CabpIAP. Thus, by querying repetitive DNA in both mouse and humans, we report the first known transposons in humans that respond to perinatal BPA exposure. PMID:27267941

  11. functional-differential inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwik Byszewski

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A theorem about a system of strong impulsive degenerate nonlinear parabolic functional-differential inequalities in an arbitrary parabolic set is proved. As a consequence of the theorem, some theorems about impulsive degenerate nonlinear parabolic differential inequalities and the uniqueness of a classical solution of an impulsive degenerate nonlinear parabolic differential problem are established.

  12. Differential evolution in electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Qing, Anyong

    2010-01-01

    Differential evolution has proven itself a very simple while very powerful stochastic global optimizer. It has been applied to solve problems in many scientific and engineering fields. This book focuses on applications of differential evolution in electromagnetics to showcase its achievement and capability in solving synthesis and design problems in electromagnetics.Topics covered in this book include:*A comprehensive up-to-date literature survey on differential evolution*A systematic description of differential evolution*A topical review on applications of differential evolution in electromag

  13. A new species of Glaphyropoma: the first subterranean copionodontine catfish and the first occurrence of opercular odontodes in the subfamily (Siluriformes: Trichomycteridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elina Bichuette

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A new species of the rare copionodontine genus Glaphyropoma is described from subterranean waters in the Diamantina Plateau, Bahia State, central northeastern Brazil. This is the first troglomorphic species in the subfamily Copionodontinae. It is distinguished from all other copionodontines by the presence of opercular odontodes, and further distinguished from its only congener, G. rodriguesi, by the reduction of dark integumentary pigmentation. The new species shares the single synapomorphy previously proposed for Glaphyropoma, the marked narrowing of the first hypobranchial and indirect character evidence also supports its inclusion in the genus. The presence of opercular odontodes in the new species, in combination with a reviewed hypothesis of sister group relationship between Copionodontinae and Trichogeninae, indicate that the absence of opercular odontodes in previously-known copionodontines is secondary, rather than primitive.Uma nova espécie do raro gênero de Copionodontinae Glaphyropoma é descrita de águas subterrâneas da Chapada Diamantina, estado da Bahia, região central do Nordeste Brasileiro. Esta é a primeira espécie troglomórfica na subfamília Copionodontinae. Distingue-se de todos os outros Copionodontinae pela presença de odontódeos operculares, e de seu único congênere, G. rodriguesi, também pela redução de pigmentação tegumentar. A nova espécie apresenta a única sinapomorfia previamente proposta para Glaphyropoma, um estreitamento acentuado do primeiro hipobranquial e evidência indireta de outros caracteres também suportam sua inclusão no gênero. A presença de odontódeos operculares na nova espécie, em combinação com uma hipótese revisada de grupo-irmão entre Copionodontinae e Trichogeninae, indica que a ausência de odontódeos operculares nos Copionodontinae previamente conhecidos é secundária e não primitiva.

  14. Fundamentals of differential beamforming

    CERN Document Server

    Benesty, Jacob; Pan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a systematic study of the fundamental theory and methods of beamforming with differential microphone arrays (DMAs), or differential beamforming in short. It begins with a brief overview of differential beamforming and some popularly used DMA beampatterns such as the dipole, cardioid, hypercardioid, and supercardioid, before providing essential background knowledge on orthogonal functions and orthogonal polynomials, which form the basis of differential beamforming. From a physical perspective, a DMA of a given order is defined as an array that measures the differential acoustic pressure field of that order; such an array has a beampattern in the form of a polynomial whose degree is equal to the DMA order. Therefore, the fundamental and core problem of differential beamforming boils down to the design of beampatterns with orthogonal polynomials. But certain constraints also have to be considered so that the resulting beamformer does not seriously amplify the sensors’ self noise and the mism...

  15. High resolution differential thermometer

    OpenAIRE

    Gotra Z. Yu.; Holyaka R. L.; Pavlov S. V.; Kulenko S. S.; Manus O. V.

    2009-01-01

    Main schematic solutions of differential thermometers with measurement resolution about 0.001°C are considered. Differential temperature primary transducer realized on a transistor differential circuit in microampere mode. Analytic calculation and schematic mathematic simulation of primary transducer are fulfilled. Signal transducer is realized on a high precision Zero-Drift Single-Supply Rail-to-Rail operation amplifier AD8552 and 24-Bit S-D microconverter ADuC834.

  16. Differentiation strategy in retailing

    OpenAIRE

    WILLEMS, Kim

    2012-01-01

    As the retailing industry has reached the maturity stage, being characterized by an overcapacity of rather homogeneous stores, the necessity of differentiation through positioning becomes increasingly obvious. Traditionally, the differentiation strategy is classified as one of Porter’s main generic types of competitive strategy. In order to obtain a true differential advantage, the following conditions should be met: (1) the offer should be perceived as valuable by the consumer, (2) it should...

  17. Reducible functional differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Shah

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first part of a survey on analytic solutions of functional differential equations (FDE. Some classes of FDE that can be reduced to ordinary differential equations are considered since they often provide an insight into the structure of analytic solutions to equations with more general argument deviations. Reducible FDE also find important applications in the study of stability of differential-difference equations and arise in a number of biological models.

  18. High resolution differential thermometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotra Z. Yu.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Main schematic solutions of differential thermometers with measurement resolution about 0.001°C are considered. Differential temperature primary transducer realized on a transistor differential circuit in microampere mode. Analytic calculation and schematic mathematic simulation of primary transducer are fulfilled. Signal transducer is realized on a high precision Zero-Drift Single-Supply Rail-to-Rail operation amplifier AD8552 and 24-Bit S-D microconverter ADuC834.

  19. Multivector Differential Calculus

    OpenAIRE

    Hitzer, Eckhard

    2013-01-01

    Universal geometric calculus simplifies and unifies the structure and notation of mathematics for all of science and engineering, and for technological applications. This paper treats the fundamentals of the multivector differential calculus part of geometric calculus. The multivector differential is introduced, followed by the multivector derivative and the adjoint of multivector functions. The basic rules of multivector differentiation are derived explicitly, as well as a variety of basic m...

  20. Depolarizing differential Mueller matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2011-07-01

    The evolution of a polarized beam can be described by the differential formulation of Mueller calculus. The nondepolarizing differential Mueller matrices are well known. However, they only account for 7 out of the 16 independent parameters that are necessary to model a general anisotropic depolarizing medium. In this work we present the nine differential Mueller matrices for general depolarizing media, highlighting the physical implications of each of them. Group theory is applied to establish the relationship between the differential matrix and the set of transformation generators in the Minkowski space, of which Lorentz generators constitute a particular subgroup. PMID:21725434

  1. Digital differential analysers

    CERN Document Server

    Shilejko, A V; Higinbotham, W

    1964-01-01

    Digital Differential Analysers presents the principles, operations, design, and applications of digital differential analyzers, a machine with the ability to present initial quantities and the possibility of dividing them into separate functional units performing a number of basic mathematical operations. The book discusses the theoretical principles underlying the operation of digital differential analyzers, such as the use of the delta-modulation method and function-generator units. Digital integration methods and the classes of digital differential analyzer designs are also reviewed. The te

  2. Singular stochastic differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Cherny, Alexander S

    2005-01-01

    The authors introduce, in this research monograph on stochastic differential equations, a class of points termed isolated singular points. Stochastic differential equations possessing such points (called singular stochastic differential equations here) arise often in theory and in applications. However, known conditions for the existence and uniqueness of a solution typically fail for such equations. The book concentrates on the study of the existence, the uniqueness, and, what is most important, on the qualitative behaviour of solutions of singular stochastic differential equations. This is done by providing a qualitative classification of isolated singular points, into 48 possible types.

  3. Mueller matrix differential decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2011-05-15

    We present a Mueller matrix decomposition based on the differential formulation of the Mueller calculus. The differential Mueller matrix is obtained from the macroscopic matrix through an eigenanalysis. It is subsequently resolved into the complete set of 16 differential matrices that correspond to the basic types of optical behavior for depolarizing anisotropic media. The method is successfully applied to the polarimetric analysis of several samples. The differential parameters enable one to perform an exhaustive characterization of anisotropy and depolarization. This decomposition is particularly appropriate for studying media in which several polarization effects take place simultaneously. PMID:21593943

  4. Introduction to differentiable manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Auslander, Louis

    2009-01-01

    The first book to treat manifold theory at an introductory level, this text surveys basic concepts in the modern approach to differential geometry. The first six chapters define and illustrate differentiable manifolds, and the final four chapters investigate the roles of differential structures in a variety of situations.Starting with an introduction to differentiable manifolds and their tangent spaces, the text examines Euclidean spaces, their submanifolds, and abstract manifolds. Succeeding chapters explore the tangent bundle and vector fields and discuss their association with ordinary diff

  5. Completeness in Partial Differential Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Freitag, James

    2011-01-01

    We study completeness in partial differential varieties. We generalize many results from ordinary differential fields to the partial differential setting. In particular, we establish a valuative criterion for differential completeness and use it to give a new class of examples of complete partial differential varieties. We use methods from both differential algebra and model theory.

  6. Amphibious Shelter-Builder Oniscidea Species from the New World with Description of a New Subfamily, a New Genus and a New Species from Brazilian Cave (Isopoda, Synocheta, Styloniscidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The new subfamily Iuiuniscinae, Styloniscidae, is erected for the new genus Iuiuniscus and the new species I. iuiuensis, which is described from cave of the State of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil. A special ecological character is shown here for the first time for a New World Oniscidea: the construction of mud shelters. An introduction addressing the systematics of Synocheta with emphasis on Styloniscidae Vandel, 1952 is provided, as well as general comments about the dependence of water in some Oniscidea and ecological traits of amphibious Synocheta. The problems referring to nomenclature, taxonomy and the interrelationships in Styloniscidae are discussed. PMID:25992909

  7. A putative autonomous 20.5 kb-CACTA transposon insertion in an F3'H allele identifies a new CACTA transposon subfamily in Glycine max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodkin Lila

    2008-12-01

    in the gray trichome allele t*. Conclusion The molecular characterization of a 20.5 kb insertion in the flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H gene of a soybean gray pubescence allele (t* identified the structure of a CACTA transposon designated Tgmt*. Besides the terminal inverted repeats and subterminal repeated motifs,Tgmt* encoded a large gene with two putative functions that are required for excision and transposition of a CACTA element, a transposase and the DNA binding protein known to associate to the subterminal repeated motifs. The degree of dissimilarity between Tgmt* transposase and subterminal repeated motifs with those of previously characterized defective CACTA elements (Tgm1-7 were evidence of the existence of two subfamilies of CACTA transposons in soybean, an observation not previously reported in other plants. In addition, our analyses of a genetically active and potentially autonomous element sheds light on the complete structure of a soybean element that is useful for annotation of the repetitive fraction of the soybean genome sequence and may prove useful for transposon tagging or transposon display experiments in different genetic lines.

  8. On Quadratic Differential Forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, J.C.; Trentelman, H.L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper develops a theory around the notion of quadratic differential forms in the context of linear differential systems. In many applications, we need to not only understand the behavior of the system variables but also the behavior of certain functionals of these variables. The obvious cases w

  9. Patterning Stem Cell Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of cell differentiation and assembly remains a fundamental question in developmental biology. Now, a report from the Chen laboratory (Ruiz and Chen, 2008) describes an approach that represents a major step toward a more profound understanding of the geometric-force control of stem cell differentiation.

  10. Calculus & ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Pearson, David

    1995-01-01

    Professor Pearson's book starts with an introduction to the area and an explanation of the most commonly used functions. It then moves on through differentiation, special functions, derivatives, integrals and onto full differential equations. As with other books in the series the emphasis is on using worked examples and tutorial-based problem solving to gain the confidence of students.

  11. Differential equations for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Holzner, Steven

    2008-01-01

    The fun and easy way to understand and solve complex equations Many of the fundamental laws of physics, chemistry, biology, and economics can be formulated as differential equations. This plain-English guide explores the many applications of this mathematical tool and shows how differential equations can help us understand the world around us. Differential Equations For Dummies is the perfect companion for a college differential equations course and is an ideal supplemental resource for other calculus classes as well as science and engineering courses. It offers step-by-step techniques, practical tips, numerous exercises, and clear, concise examples to help readers improve their differential equation-solving skills and boost their test scores.

  12. Nonlinear differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresner, L.

    1988-01-01

    This report is the text of a graduate course on nonlinear differential equations given by the author at the University of Wisconsin-Madison during the summer of 1987. The topics covered are: direction fields of first-order differential equations; the Lie (group) theory of ordinary differential equations; similarity solutions of second-order partial differential equations; maximum principles and differential inequalities; monotone operators and iteration; complementary variational principles; and stability of numerical methods. The report should be of interest to graduate students, faculty, and practicing scientists and engineers. No prior knowledge is required beyond a good working knowledge of the calculus. The emphasis is on practical results. Most of the illustrative examples are taken from the fields of nonlinear diffusion, heat and mass transfer, applied superconductivity, and helium cryogenics.

  13. Nonlinear differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the text of a graduate course on nonlinear differential equations given by the author at the University of Wisconsin-Madison during the summer of 1987. The topics covered are: direction fields of first-order differential equations; the Lie (group) theory of ordinary differential equations; similarity solutions of second-order partial differential equations; maximum principles and differential inequalities; monotone operators and iteration; complementary variational principles; and stability of numerical methods. The report should be of interest to graduate students, faculty, and practicing scientists and engineers. No prior knowledge is required beyond a good working knowledge of the calculus. The emphasis is on practical results. Most of the illustrative examples are taken from the fields of nonlinear diffusion, heat and mass transfer, applied superconductivity, and helium cryogenics

  14. The Echinococcus granulosus antigen B gene family comprises at least 10 unique genes in five subclasses which are differentially expressed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbao Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antigen B (EgAgB is a major protein produced by the metacestode cyst of Echinococcus granulosus, the causative agent of cystic hydatid disease. This protein has been shown to play an important role in modulating host immune responses, although its precise biological function still remains unknown. It is generally accepted that EgAgB is comprised of a gene family of five subfamilies which are highly polymorphic, but the actual number of genes present is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on published sequences for the family, we designed specific primers for each subfamily and used PCR to amplify them from genomic DNA isolated from individual mature adult worms (MAW taken from an experimentally infected dog in China and individual larval protoscoleces (PSC excised from a single hydatid cyst taken from an Australian kangaroo. We then used real-time PCR to measure expression of each of the genes comprising the five EgAgB subfamilies in all life-cycle stages including the oncosphere (ONC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on sequence alignment analysis, we found that the EgAgB gene family comprises at least ten unique genes. Each of the genes was identical in both larval and adult E. granulosus isolates collected from two geographical areas (different continents. DNA alignment comparisons with EgAgB sequences deposited in GenBank databases showed that each gene in the gene family is highly conserved within E. granulosus, which contradicts previous studies claiming significant variation and polymorphism in EgAgB. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the genes were differentially expressed in different life-cycle stages of E. granulosus with EgAgB3 expressed predominantly in all stages. These findings are fundamental for determining the expression and the biological function of antigen B.

  15. Differential expression of members of the E2F family of transcription factors in rodent testes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toppari Jorma

    2006-12-01

    profile of stage-specificity compared to E2F-1, which is probably related to its prevalence and role in Sertoli cells. IHC of rat testis indicates that localization of E2F-5 is distinct from that of E2F-4 and overlaps those of E2F-1 and E2F-2. Conclusion The E2F-1 represents the subfamily of transcription factors required during stages of DNA replication and gene expression for development of germ cells and the E2F-4 represents the subfamily of transcription factors that help maintain gene expression for a terminally differentiated state within the testis.

  16. Linking Diversity and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Rolf Gregorius

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, the term differentiation refers to differences between collections for the distribution of specified traits of their members, while diversity deals with (effective numbers of trait states (types. Counting numbers of types implies discrete traits such as alleles and genotypes in population genetics or species and taxa in ecology. Comparisons between the concepts of differentiation and diversity therefore primarily refer to discrete traits. Diversity is related to differentiation through the idea that the total diversity of a subdivided collection should be composed of the diversity within the subcollections and a complement called “diversity between subcollections”. The idea goes back to the perception that the mixing of differentiated collections increases diversity. Several existing concepts of “diversity between subcollections” are based on this idea. Among them, β-diversity and fixation (inadvertently called differentiation are the most prominent in ecology and in population genetics, respectively. The pertaining measures are shown to quantify the effect of differentiation in terms of diversity components, though from a dual perspective: the classical perspective of differentiation between collections for their type compositions, and the reverse perspective of differentiation between types for their collection affiliations. A series of measures of diversity-oriented differentiation is presented that consider this dual perspective at two levels of diversity partitioning: the overall type or subcollection diversity and the joint type-subcollection diversity. It turns out that, in contrast with common notions, the measures of fixation (such as FST or GST refer to the perspective of type rather than subcollection differentiation. This unexpected observation strongly suggests that the popular interpretations of fixation measures must be reconsidered.

  17. Differential Equations as Actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronkko, Mauno; Ravn, Anders P.

    1997-01-01

    We extend a conventional action system with a primitive action consisting of a differential equation and an evolution invariant. The semantics is given by a predicate transformer. The weakest liberal precondition is chosen, because it is not always desirable that steps corresponding to differential...... actions shall terminate. It is shown that the proposed differential action has a semantics which corresponds to a discrete approximation when the discrete step size goes to zero. The extension gives action systems the power to model real-time clocks and continuous evolutions within hybrid systems....

  18. Differential equations problem solver

    CERN Document Server

    Arterburn, David R

    2012-01-01

    REA's Problem Solvers is a series of useful, practical, and informative study guides. Each title in the series is complete step-by-step solution guide. The Differential Equations Problem Solver enables students to solve difficult problems by showing them step-by-step solutions to Differential Equations problems. The Problem Solvers cover material ranging from the elementary to the advanced and make excellent review books and textbook companions. They're perfect for undergraduate and graduate studies.The Differential Equations Problem Solver is the perfect resource for any class, any exam, and

  19. Differentiation transforming system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Cheng; Haibin Zhang; Bin Wang; Yonghua Zhao

    2009-01-01

    The differentiation transforming(DFT)system is developed to produce the tangent linear codes,which is used to calculate the Jacobian-and the Hessian-vector products with no truncation errors.This paper first gives the introduction of the functionality and features of the DFT system,and then discusses several techniques for the implementation of automatic differentiation tools,including data dependence analysis,singular differentiation and code optimization.Finally,the codes generated with DFT used in several applications have been demonstrated.

  20. Ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Richard K

    1982-01-01

    Ordinary Differential Equations is an outgrowth of courses taught for a number of years at Iowa State University in the mathematics and the electrical engineering departments. It is intended as a text for a first graduate course in differential equations for students in mathematics, engineering, and the sciences. Although differential equations is an old, traditional, and well-established subject, the diverse backgrounds and interests of the students in a typical modern-day course cause problems in the selection and method of presentation of material. In order to compensate for this diversity,

  1. Theory of differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Gel'fand, I M

    1967-01-01

    Generalized Functions, Volume 3: Theory of Differential Equations focuses on the application of generalized functions to problems of the theory of partial differential equations.This book discusses the problems of determining uniqueness and correctness classes for solutions of the Cauchy problem for systems with constant coefficients and eigenfunction expansions for self-adjoint differential operators. The topics covered include the bounded operators in spaces of type W, Cauchy problem in a topological vector space, and theorem of the Phragmén-Lindelöf type. The correctness classes for the Cau

  2. Beginning partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neil, Peter V

    2011-01-01

    A rigorous, yet accessible, introduction to partial differential equations-updated in a valuable new edition Beginning Partial Differential Equations, Second Edition provides a comprehensive introduction to partial differential equations (PDEs) with a special focus on the significance of characteristics, solutions by Fourier series, integrals and transforms, properties and physical interpretations of solutions, and a transition to the modern function space approach to PDEs. With its breadth of coverage, this new edition continues to present a broad introduction to the field, while also addres

  3. Hyperbolic partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Witten, Matthew

    1986-01-01

    Hyperbolic Partial Differential Equations III is a refereed journal issue that explores the applications, theory, and/or applied methods related to hyperbolic partial differential equations, or problems arising out of hyperbolic partial differential equations, in any area of research. This journal issue is interested in all types of articles in terms of review, mini-monograph, standard study, or short communication. Some studies presented in this journal include discretization of ideal fluid dynamics in the Eulerian representation; a Riemann problem in gas dynamics with bifurcation; periodic M

  4. Uncertain differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces readers to the basic concepts of and latest findings in the area of differential equations with uncertain factors. It covers the analytic method and numerical method for solving uncertain differential equations, as well as their applications in the field of finance. Furthermore, the book provides a number of new potential research directions for uncertain differential equation. It will be of interest to researchers, engineers and students in the fields of mathematics, information science, operations research, industrial engineering, computer science, artificial intelligence, automation, economics, and management science.

  5. Differentiability of fractal curves

    OpenAIRE

    Bandt, Christoph; Kravchenko, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    While self-similar sets have no tangents at any single point, self-affine curves can be smooth. We consider plane self-affine curves without double points and with two pieces. There is an open subset of parameter space for which the curve is differentiable at all points except for a countable set. For a parameter set of codimension one, the curve is continuously differentiable. However, there are no twice differentiable self-affine curves in the plane, except for parabolic arcs.

  6. Wavelets with Differential Relation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Tao CHUANG; Youming LIU

    2011-01-01

    Divergence-free wavelets are successfully applied to numerical solutions of Navier-Stokes equation and to analysis of incompressible flows. They closely depend on a pair of one-dimensional wavelets with some differential relations. In this paper, we point out some restrictions of those wavelets and study scaling functions with the differential relation; Wavelets and their duals are discussed; In addition to the differential relation, we are particularly interested in a class of examples with the interpolatory property; It turns out there is a connection between our examples and Micchelli's work.

  7. Adaptation dynamics in densely clustered chemoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Pontius

    Full Text Available In many sensory systems, transmembrane receptors are spatially organized in large clusters. Such arrangement may facilitate signal amplification and the integration of multiple stimuli. However, this organization likely also affects the kinetics of signaling since the cytoplasmic enzymes that modulate the activity of the receptors must localize to the cluster prior to receptor modification. Here we examine how these spatial considerations shape signaling dynamics at rest and in response to stimuli. As a model system, we use the chemotaxis pathway of Escherichia coli, a canonical system for the study of how organisms sense, respond, and adapt to environmental stimuli. In bacterial chemotaxis, adaptation is mediated by two enzymes that localize to the clustered receptors and modulate their activity through methylation-demethylation. Using a novel stochastic simulation, we show that distributive receptor methylation is necessary for successful adaptation to stimulus and also leads to large fluctuations in receptor activity in the steady state. These fluctuations arise from noise in the number of localized enzymes combined with saturated modification kinetics between the localized enzymes and the receptor substrate. An analytical model explains how saturated enzyme kinetics and large fluctuations can coexist with an adapted state robust to variation in the expression levels of the pathway constituents, a key requirement to ensure the functionality of individual cells within a population. This contrasts with the well-mixed covalent modification system studied by Goldbeter and Koshland in which mean activity becomes ultrasensitive to protein abundances when the enzymes operate at saturation. Large fluctuations in receptor activity have been quantified experimentally and may benefit the cell by enhancing its ability to explore empty environments and track shallow nutrient gradients. Here we clarify the mechanistic relationship of these large fluctuations to well-studied aspects of the chemotaxis system, precise adaptation and functional robustness.

  8. Adaptation dynamics in densely clustered chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontius, William; Sneddon, Michael W; Emonet, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    In many sensory systems, transmembrane receptors are spatially organized in large clusters. Such arrangement may facilitate signal amplification and the integration of multiple stimuli. However, this organization likely also affects the kinetics of signaling since the cytoplasmic enzymes that modulate the activity of the receptors must localize to the cluster prior to receptor modification. Here we examine how these spatial considerations shape signaling dynamics at rest and in response to stimuli. As a model system, we use the chemotaxis pathway of Escherichia coli, a canonical system for the study of how organisms sense, respond, and adapt to environmental stimuli. In bacterial chemotaxis, adaptation is mediated by two enzymes that localize to the clustered receptors and modulate their activity through methylation-demethylation. Using a novel stochastic simulation, we show that distributive receptor methylation is necessary for successful adaptation to stimulus and also leads to large fluctuations in receptor activity in the steady state. These fluctuations arise from noise in the number of localized enzymes combined with saturated modification kinetics between the localized enzymes and the receptor substrate. An analytical model explains how saturated enzyme kinetics and large fluctuations can coexist with an adapted state robust to variation in the expression levels of the pathway constituents, a key requirement to ensure the functionality of individual cells within a population. This contrasts with the well-mixed covalent modification system studied by Goldbeter and Koshland in which mean activity becomes ultrasensitive to protein abundances when the enzymes operate at saturation. Large fluctuations in receptor activity have been quantified experimentally and may benefit the cell by enhancing its ability to explore empty environments and track shallow nutrient gradients. Here we clarify the mechanistic relationship of these large fluctuations to well-studied aspects of the chemotaxis system, precise adaptation and functional robustness.

  9. Signal processing at mammalian carotid body chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurse, Colin A; Piskuric, Nikol A

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian carotid bodies are richly vascularized chemosensory organs that sense blood levels of O(2), CO(2)/H(+), and glucose and maintain homeostatic regulation of these levels via the reflex control of ventilation. Carotid bodies consist of innervated clusters of type I (or glomus) cells in intimate association with glial-like type II cells. Carotid bodies make afferent connections with fibers from sensory neurons in the petrosal ganglia and receive efferent inhibitory innervation from parasympathetic neurons located in the carotid sinus and glossopharyngeal nerves. There are synapses between type I (chemosensory) cells and petrosal afferent terminals, as well as between neighboring type I cells. There is a broad array of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and their ionotropic and metabotropic receptors in the carotid body. This allows for complex processing of sensory stimuli (e.g., hypoxia and acid hypercapnia) involving both autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. This review summarizes and evaluates current knowledge of these pathways and presents an integrated working model on information processing in carotid bodies. Included in this model is a novel hypothesis for a potential role of type II cells as an amplifier for the release of a key excitatory carotid body neurotransmitter, ATP, via P2Y purinoceptors and pannexin-1 channels.

  10. Influenza Differentiation and Evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study is to do a very wide analysis of HA, NA and M influenza gene segments to find short nucleotide regions, which differentiate between strains (i.e. H1, H2, ... etc.), hosts, geographic regions, time when sequence was found and combination of time and region using a simple methodology. Finding regions differentiating between strains has as its goal the construction of a Luminex microarray which will allow quick and efficient strain recognition. Discovery for the other splitting factors could shed light on structures significant for host specificity and on the history of influenza evolution. A large number of places in the HA, NA and M gene segments were found that can differentiate between hosts, regions, time and combination of time and region. Also very good differentiation between different Hx strains can be seen. We link one of our findings to a proposed stochastic model of creation of viral phylogenetic trees. (authors)

  11. Elementary differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Pressley, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Curves and surfaces are objects that everyone can see, and many of the questions that can be asked about them are natural and easily understood Differential geometry is concerned with the precise mathematical formulation of some of these questions, and with trying to answer them using calculus techniques It is a subject that contains some of the most beautiful and profound results in mathematics yet many of these are accessible to higher-level undergraduates Elementary Differential Geometry presents the main results in the differential geometry of curves and surfaces while keeping the prerequisites to an absolute minimum Nothing more than first courses in linear algebra and multivariate calculus are required, and the most direct and straightforward approach is used at all times Numerous diagrams illustrate both the ideas in the text and the examples of curves and surfaces discussed there The book will provide an invaluable resource to all those taking a first course in differential geometry, for their lecture...

  12. Ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Features a balance between theory, proofs, and examples and provides applications across diverse fields of study Ordinary Differential Equations presents a thorough discussion of first-order differential equations and progresses to equations of higher order. The book transitions smoothly from first-order to higher-order equations, allowing readers to develop a complete understanding of the related theory. Featuring diverse and interesting applications from engineering, bioengineering, ecology, and biology, the book anticipates potential difficulties in understanding the various solution steps

  13. Beginning partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neil, Peter V

    2014-01-01

    A broad introduction to PDEs with an emphasis on specialized topics and applications occurring in a variety of fields Featuring a thoroughly revised presentation of topics, Beginning Partial Differential Equations, Third Edition provides a challenging, yet accessible,combination of techniques, applications, and introductory theory on the subjectof partial differential equations. The new edition offers nonstandard coverageon material including Burger's equation, the telegraph equation, damped wavemotion, and the use of characteristics to solve nonhomogeneous problems. The Third Edition is or

  14. Solving Ordinary Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, F. T.

    1987-01-01

    Initial-value ordinary differential equation solution via variable order Adams method (SIVA/DIVA) package is collection of subroutines for solution of nonstiff ordinary differential equations. There are versions for single-precision and double-precision arithmetic. Requires fewer evaluations of derivatives than other variable-order Adams predictor/ corrector methods. Option for direct integration of second-order equations makes integration of trajectory problems significantly more efficient. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  15. Differentially Private Gaussian Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Michael Thomas; Zwiessele, Max; Lawrence, Neil D.

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge for machine learning is increasing the availability of data while respecting the privacy of individuals. Differential privacy is a framework which allows algorithms to have provable privacy guarantees. Gaussian processes are a widely used approach for dealing with uncertainty in functions. This paper explores differentially private mechanisms for Gaussian processes. We compare binning and adding noise before regression with adding noise post-regression. For the former we dev...

  16. On paragrassmann differential calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper significantly extends and generalizes our previous paper. Here we discuss explicit general constructions for paragrassmann calculus with one and many variables. For one variable nondegenerate differentiation algebras are identified and shown to be equivalent to the algebra of (p+1)x(p+1) complex matrices. For many variables we give a general construction of the differentiation algebras. Some particular examples are related to the multiparametric quantum deformations of the harmonic oscillators. 18 refs

  17. Differential topology an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Gauld, David B

    2006-01-01

    Offering classroom-proven results, Differential Topology presents an introduction to point set topology via a naive version of nearness space. Its treatment encompasses a general study of surgery, laying a solid foundation for further study and greatly simplifying the classification of surfaces.This self-contained treatment features 88 helpful illustrations. Its subjects include topological spaces and properties, some advanced calculus, differentiable manifolds, orientability, submanifolds and an embedding theorem, and tangent spaces. Additional topics comprise vector fields and integral curv

  18. Role of Rhipicephalus microplus cheliceral receptors in gustation and host differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhipicephalus microplus is considered the most economically important ectoparasite of cattle worldwide. It is known that zebuine breeds of cattle are less susceptible to tick infestation than taurine breeds. Contact chemoreceptors in the cheliceral pit sensilla of ticks respond selectively to phagos...

  19. [Differential diagnosis of hoarseness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt-Zimmermann, S; Lampe, K; Arens, C

    2014-04-01

    Hoarseness can be the leading symptom of dysphonia. In combination with impaired vocal performance and subjective voice-related discomfort, it can represent an individually different handicap for patients and lead to limited participation in social and professional life. Since the reasons for dysphonia may be not only functional but also organic with a potentially poor prognosis, hoarseness must be clarified using differential diagnosis. In addition to the knowledge of possible diseases, pathogenesis, and treatment options for dysphonia, the differential diagnostic approach requires profound knowledge of the various diagnostic methods, and of the interpretation of the results in particular. The etiology of dysphonia is very diverse and rarely monocausal. Therefore, a team-based and interdisciplinary differential diagnostic approach is recommended.

  20. Overshooting by differential heating

    CERN Document Server

    Andrássy, R

    2015-01-01

    On the long nuclear time scale of stellar main-sequence evolution, even weak mixing processes can become relevant for redistributing chemical species in a star. We investigate a process of "differential heating," which occurs when a temperature fluctuation propagates by radiative diffusion from the boundary of a convection zone into the adjacent radiative zone. The resulting perturbation of the hydrostatic equilibrium causes a flow that extends some distance from the convection zone. We study a simplified differential-heating problem with a static temperature fluctuation imposed on a solid boundary. The astrophysically relevant limit of a high Reynolds number and a low P\\'eclet number (high thermal diffusivity) turns out to be interestingly non-intuitive. We derive a set of scaling relations for the stationary differential heating flow. A numerical method adapted to a high dynamic range in flow amplitude needed to detect weak flows is presented. Our two-dimensional simulations show that the flow reaches a sta...

  1. Advanced differential quadrature methods

    CERN Document Server

    Zong, Zhi

    2009-01-01

    Modern Tools to Perform Numerical DifferentiationThe original direct differential quadrature (DQ) method has been known to fail for problems with strong nonlinearity and material discontinuity as well as for problems involving singularity, irregularity, and multiple scales. But now researchers in applied mathematics, computational mechanics, and engineering have developed a range of innovative DQ-based methods to overcome these shortcomings. Advanced Differential Quadrature Methods explores new DQ methods and uses these methods to solve problems beyond the capabilities of the direct DQ method.After a basic introduction to the direct DQ method, the book presents a number of DQ methods, including complex DQ, triangular DQ, multi-scale DQ, variable order DQ, multi-domain DQ, and localized DQ. It also provides a mathematical compendium that summarizes Gauss elimination, the Runge-Kutta method, complex analysis, and more. The final chapter contains three codes written in the FORTRAN language, enabling readers to q...

  2. A single amino acid substitution in IIIf subfamily of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor AtMYC1 leads to trichome and root hair patterning defects by abolishing its interaction with partner proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaoxue; Zhu, Dandan; Cui, Sujuan; Li, Xia; Cao, Ying; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-04-20

    Plant trichomes and root hairs are powerful models for the study of cell fate determination. In Arabidopsis thaliana, trichome and root hair initiation requires a combination of three groups of proteins, including the WD40 repeat protein transparent TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1), R2R3 repeat MYB protein GLABRA1 (GL1), or werewolf (WER) and the IIIf subfamily of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein GLABRA3 (GL3) or enhancer of GLABRA3 (EGL3). The bHLH component acts as a docking site for TTG1 and MYB proteins. Here, we isolated a mutant showing defects in trichome and root hair patterning that carried a point mutation (R173H) in AtMYC1 that encodes the fourth member of IIIf bHLH family protein. Genetic analysis revealed partial redundant yet distinct function between AtMYC1 and GL3/EGL3. GLABRA2 (GL2), an important transcription factor involved in trichome and root hair control, was down-regulated in Atmyc1 plants, suggesting the requirement of AtMYC1 for appropriate GL2 transcription. Like its homologs, AtMYC1 formed a complex with TTG1 and MYB proteins but did not dimerized. In addition, the interaction of AtMYC1 with MYB proteins and TTG1 was abrogated by the R173H substitution in Atmyc1-1. We found that this amino acid (Arg) is conserved in the AtMYC1 homologs GL3/EGL3 and that it is essential for their interaction with MYB proteins and for their proper functions. Our findings indicate that AtMYC1 is an important regulator of trichome and root hair initiation, and they reveal a novel amino acid necessary for protein-protein interactions and gene function in IIIf subfamily bHLH transcription factors.

  3. ERF Subfamily Transcription Factors and Their Potential Breeding Roles' Research Progress in Cotton%棉花中ERF亚族转录因子抗逆育种潜力的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单国芳; 刘坤; 张朝军; 刘传亮; 武芝侠; 李付广

    2012-01-01

    Yield and quality of cotton have been seriously influenced by the Verticillium wilt and environment stresses such as drought, salinity, cold and so on. Molecular biology has been employed to make cotton more resistant to disease and variety stresses. ERF subfamily members of ethylene-responsive factor of ERF family show improved disease-tolerance and stress-tolerance no matter in wild type or in over-expression plants. In this paper, structure, classification, function, signaling transduction pathway and application of ERF subfamily genes from different species in different wild type or transgenic plants were reviewed, and suggestions were made about cotton resistant breeding according by researches of ERFs in different plants.%为了减少棉花的生长和产量受到黄萎病菌侵染和干旱、盐碱、低温等非生物逆境的影响,利用生物技术的方法选育棉花抗逆品种被认为是一种行之有效的途径之一.乙烯应答因子(Ethylene Responsive Factor) ERF家族ERF亚族成员在不同植物野生型或者转基因植株中均表现出抗逆能力增强.研究综述了ERF的结构、分类、功能及其参与的主要信号转导途径,着重介绍了棉花及其他植物中ERF抗逆的研究,并对今后利用ERF亚族成员进行棉花抗逆育种研究提供了几点建议.

  4. Exterior Differential Systems for Higher Order Partial Differential Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Bracken

    2010-01-01

    The theory of exterior differential systems is applied to study integrability of a set of related partial differential equations expressed in the terms of differential forms using Cartan's method. The Camassa-Holm equation and the Degasperis-Procesi equations are special cases that are described by these exterior differential systems. Some conservation laws are obtained in the cases of the more relevant equations. A closed differential ideal is constructed for each case studied.

  5. Exterior Differential Systems for Higher Order Partial Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Bracken

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of exterior differential systems is applied to study integrability of a set of related partial differential equations expressed in the terms of differential forms using Cartan's method. The Camassa-Holm equation and the Degasperis-Procesi equations are special cases that are described by these exterior differential systems. Some conservation laws are obtained in the cases of the more relevant equations. A closed differential ideal is constructed for each case studied.

  6. Digital Differential Geometry Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Guo Liu; Hu-Jun Bao; Qun-Sheng Peng

    2006-01-01

    The theory and methods of digital geometry processing has been a hot research area in computer graphics, as geometric models serves as the core data for 3D graphics applications. The purpose of this paper is to introduce some recent advances in digital geometry processing, particularly mesh fairing, surface parameterization and mesh editing, that heavily use differential geometry quantities. Some related concepts from differential geometry, such as normal, curvature, gradient,Laplacian and their counterparts on digital geometry are also reviewed for understanding the strength and weakness of various digital geometry processing methods.

  7. Numerical differential protection

    CERN Document Server

    Ziegler, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Differential protection is a fast and selective method of protection against short-circuits. It is applied in many variants for electrical machines, trans?formers, busbars, and electric lines.Initially this book covers the theory and fundamentals of analog and numerical differential protection. Current transformers are treated in detail including transient behaviour, impact on protection performance, and practical dimensioning. An extended chapter is dedicated to signal transmission for line protection, in particular, modern digital communication and GPS timing.The emphasis is then pla

  8. Fractional Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An extended fractional subequation method is proposed for solving fractional differential equations by introducing a new general ansätz and Bäcklund transformation of the fractional Riccati equation with known solutions. Being concise and straightforward, this method is applied to the space-time fractional coupled Burgers’ equations and coupled MKdV equations. As a result, many exact solutions are obtained. It is shown that the considered method provides a very effective, convenient, and powerful mathematical tool for solving fractional differential equations.

  9. Differential Equations with Linear Algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Boelkins, Matthew R; Potter, Merle C

    2009-01-01

    Linearity plays a critical role in the study of elementary differential equations; linear differential equations, especially systems thereof, demonstrate a fundamental application of linear algebra. In Differential Equations with Linear Algebra, we explore this interplay between linear algebra and differential equations and examine introductory and important ideas in each, usually through the lens of important problems that involve differential equations. Written at a sophomore level, the text is accessible to students who have completed multivariable calculus. With a systems-first approach, t

  10. Modern introduction to differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Ricardo, Henry J

    2009-01-01

    A Modern Introduction to Differential Equations, Second Edition, provides an introduction to the basic concepts of differential equations. The book begins by introducing the basic concepts of differential equations, focusing on the analytical, graphical, and numerical aspects of first-order equations, including slope fields and phase lines. The discussions then cover methods of solving second-order homogeneous and nonhomogeneous linear equations with constant coefficients; systems of linear differential equations; the Laplace transform and its applications to the solution of differential equat

  11. Stochastic differential equations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Avner

    2006-01-01

    This text develops the theory of systems of stochastic differential equations, and it presents applications in probability, partial differential equations, and stochastic control problems. Originally published in two volumes, it combines a book of basic theory and selected topics with a book of applications.The first part explores Markov processes and Brownian motion; the stochastic integral and stochastic differential equations; elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations and their relations to stochastic differential equations; the Cameron-Martin-Girsanov theorem; and asymptotic es

  12. Modelling by Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaachoua, Hamid; Saglam, Ayse

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to show the close relation between physics and mathematics taking into account especially the theory of differential equations. By analysing the problems posed by scientists in the seventeenth century, we note that physics is very important for the emergence of this theory. Taking into account this analysis, we show the…

  13. Do Differential Equations Swing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    One of the units of in a standard differential equations course is a discussion of the oscillatory motion of a spring and the associated material on forcing functions and resonance. During the presentation on practical resonance, the instructor may tell students that it is similar to when they take their siblings to the playground and help them on…

  14. Ghrelin and cell differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geyang Xu; Yin Li; Wenjiao An; Weizhen Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin, an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor, is a gastric hormone that has been found to have a wide variety of biological functions. This review summarizes our current understanding of the effects of ghrelin on cell differentiation and tissue development, with an emphasis on the lineage determination of mesenchymal stem cells.

  15. Invariant differential operators

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrev, Vladimir K

    2016-01-01

    With applications in quantum field theory, elementary particle physics and general relativity, this two-volume work studies invariance of differential operators under Lie algebras, quantum groups, superalgebras including infinite-dimensional cases, Schrödinger algebras, applications to holography. This first volume covers the general aspects of Lie algebras and group theory.

  16. Kepler's Differential Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Holder, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Although the differential calculus was invented by Newton, Kepler established his famous laws 70 years earlier by using the same idea, namely to find a path in a nonuniform field of force by small steps. It is generally not known that Kepler demonstrated the elliptic orbit to be composed of intelligeable differential pieces, in modern language, to result from a differential equation. Kepler was first to attribute planetary orbits to a force from the sun, rather than giving them a predetermined geometric shape. Even though neither the force was known nor its relation to motion, he could determine the differential equations of motion from observation. This is one of the most important achievements in the history of physics. In contrast to Newton's Principia and Galilei's Dialogo Kepler's text is not easy to read, for various reasons. Therefore, in the present article, his results -- most of them well known -- are first presented in modern language. Then, in order to justify the claim, the full text of some rele...

  17. 454 Transcriptome sequencing suggests a role for two-component signalling in cellularization and differentiation of barley endosperm transfer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Thiel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell specification and differentiation in the endosperm of cereals starts at the maternal-filial boundary and generates the endosperm transfer cells (ETCs. Besides the importance in assimilate transfer, ETCs are proposed to play an essential role in the regulation of endosperm differentiation by affecting development of proximate endosperm tissues. We attempted to identify signalling elements involved in early endosperm differentiation by using a combination of laser-assisted microdissection and 454 transcriptome sequencing. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 454 sequencing of the differentiating ETC region from the syncytial state until functionality in transfer processes captured a high proportion of novel transcripts which are not available in existing barley EST databases. Intriguingly, the ETC-transcriptome showed a high abundance of elements of the two-component signalling (TCS system suggesting an outstanding role in ETC differentiation. All components and subfamilies of the TCS, including distinct kinds of membrane-bound receptors, have been identified to be expressed in ETCs. The TCS system represents an ancient signal transduction system firstly discovered in bacteria and has previously been shown to be co-opted by eukaryotes, like fungi and plants, whereas in animals and humans this signalling route does not exist. Transcript profiling of TCS elements by qRT-PCR suggested pivotal roles for specific phosphorelays activated in a coordinated time flow during ETC cellularization and differentiation. ETC-specificity of transcriptionally activated TCS phosphorelays was assessed for early differentiation and cellularization contrasting to an extension of expression to other grain tissues at the beginning of ETC maturation. Features of candidate genes of distinct phosphorelays and transcriptional activation of genes putatively implicated in hormone signalling pathways hint at a crosstalk of hormonal influences, putatively ABA and ethylene, and

  18. Fertility differentials in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogum, G E

    1980-01-01

    A review of the numerous fertility studies carried out in Nigeria during the last 3 decades. Evidence of differences in fertility among subgroups of the population is gleaned from these studies, as very few have addressed this issue specifically. Results still need to be evaluated. The only strong indication of possible geographic fertility differentials remains Van de Walle's analysis of age data from the census of 1952-53. 2 studies among populations of southwestern Nigeria yielded conflicting results with regard to urban-rural differentials, 1 finding lower fertility among urban residents while the other found no differences. Similarly, 2 studies with regard to religious differences yielded somewhat conflicting results, 1 showing Moslems and traditional worshippers having higher fertility than Christians, the other showing Moslems with lower fertility than traditional believers. There is some consensus among researchers that education has some depressing effect on fertility.

  19. Measurement of differential magnification

    CERN Document Server

    Er, Xinzhong

    2014-01-01

    In gravitational lensing, the magnification effect changes the luminosity and size of a background galaxy. If the image sizes are not small compared to the scale over which the magnification and shear vary, higher-order distortions occur which are termed differential magnification. We give an approximation of the magnification gradient for several halo models. Assuming a symmetric distribution of source brightness, estimates for the differential magnification are obtained and then tested with simulations. One of the main uncertainties of our estimators comes from the finite resolution of the image. We study the strength of our method with the resolution of current and future telescopes. We point out that out method is a potential approach to estimate the first flexion, and can be used to study galaxy and cluster mass profiles.

  20. Pseudo-differentiation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Khalaf

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A patient with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML (M2 FAB classification developed a differentiating syndrome upon receiving Decitabine therapy given with palliative intent. The patient presented with high grade fever, constitutional symptoms and severe chest symptoms with no underlying lung condition. Chest x-ray (CXR showed diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. Septic work up followed by intravenous broad spectrum antimicrobials did not improve his condition. Pan cultures’ results were repeatedly negative. Treatment with high dose Dexamethasone (DXM resulted in marked clinical and radiological improvement. Our patient initially presented with relapsed AML (M2 Fab classification with t (8; 21; negative FMS-like tyrosine kinase -internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD which are all good prognostic factors, yet the patient had an atypical clinical course with early frequent relapses, differentiation syndrome associated with Decitabine therapy and late in his disease, he developed a granulocytic sarcoma.

  1. Differential auger spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strongin, Myron; Varma, Matesh Narayan; Anne, Joshi

    1976-06-22

    Differential Auger spectroscopy method for increasing the sensitivity of micro-Auger spectroanalysis of the surfaces of dilute alloys, by alternately periodically switching an electron beam back and forth between an impurity free reference sample and a test sample containing a trace impurity. The Auger electrons from the samples produce representative Auger spectrum signals which cancel to produce an Auger test sample signal corresponding to the amount of the impurity in the test samples.

  2. Differentiated Services on Linux

    OpenAIRE

    Salim, Jamal Hadi; Kuznetsov, Alexey; Almesberger, Werner

    1999-01-01

    Recent Linux kernels offer a wide variety of traffic control functions, which can be combined in a modular way. We have designed support for Differentiated Services based on the existing traffic control elements, and we have implemented new components where necessary. In this document we give a brief overview of the structure of Linux traffic control, and we describe our prototype implementation in more detail.

  3. Interconnecting Differentiated Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Alexei Alexandrov

    2008-01-01

    I examine interconnection decisions of differentiated firms. I find that previous results that firms never interconnect enough do not hold. In a Hotelling model consumers may suffer from interconnection, and firms may interconnect when it is not socially optimal. The firms interconnect too much when the network effects are steeper - this makes firms compete much less aggressively after interconnection, raising prices for consumers and profits for firms. Price and profit rise results holds und...

  4. Differential fat harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Torres Farr

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Volume replacement with fillers is regularly performed with the use of diverse volumetric materials to correct different structures around the face, depending on the volume enhancement required and the thickness of the soft tissue envelope. Differential fat harvesting and posterior grafting is performed to place the correct fat parcel size for each target area, expanding the potential applications of fat. Methods: Sixty patients consecutively recruited on a first come basis undergone a facial fat grafting procedure, in private practice setting between March 2012 and October 2013. Fat grafting quantity and quality was predicted for each case. Differential harvesting was performed, with 2 fat parcels size. Processing was performed through washing. Fat infiltration was carried out through small cannulas or needles depending on the treated area. Outcomes were analysed both by the physicians and the patients at 7 days, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months through a perceived satisfaction questionnaire. Parameters considered were downtime or discomfort, skin benefits, volume restoration, reabsorption rate estimated and overall improvement. Results: Full facial differential fat grafting procedure lasted an average of 1.5-2.5 h. Average downtime was 3-4 days. Follow-up was performed to a minimum of 6 months. Both patient and physician overall satisfaction rates were mostly excellent. Adverse events like lumps or irregularities were not encountered. Conclusion: Differential fat harvesting and posterior grafting is a valid alternative, to expand the repertoire of fat use, allow a more homogeneous effect, reduce the potential complications, speed up the process, improve graft survival, and to enhance overall aesthetic outcome.

  5. Differentiated nasosinusal epidermoid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two case reports of young patients, who were treated in the Otolaryngology Department from 'Dr. Joaquin Castillo Duany' Teaching Clinical Surgical Hospital in Santiago de Cuba are presented. One of the cases presented nasal obstruction, rhinorrhoea and facial pain, for 7 months; the other one presented an increase of volume in the right ocular globe. In both, the results of the biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of differentiated nasosinusal epidermoid carcinoma

  6. Differentiation in Classroom Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mottelson, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation in School Practice is an ongoing research project currently being carried out in UCC’s research department by myself and my coworker Christina Jørgensen. The project includes a field study of everyday life in a Danish 5th grade classroom with the aim to observe, describe and analyze...... those everyday practices in the classroom that ultimately result in offering students different positions, identities and opportunities for participation....

  7. Leadership and Gender Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Catalina RADU (GHERASE); Marian NASTASE

    2011-01-01

    Leadership is clearly one of the main factors that influence organizational competitiveness. It means both science and art, both born and learned skills. Leadership and gender differentiation is a subject that leads to at least two main questions: (1) Do significant differences exist between men and women in terms of leadership styles? (2) What are the real determinants of differences between men and women especially looking at who assumes leadership positions and what is leadership behavior ...

  8. Differential equations with Mathematica

    CERN Document Server

    Abell, Martha L

    2004-01-01

    The Third Edition of the Differential Equations with Mathematica integrates new applications from a variety of fields,especially biology, physics, and engineering. The new handbook is also completely compatible with recent versions of Mathematica and is a perfect introduction for Mathematica beginners.* Focuses on the most often used features of Mathematica for the beginning Mathematica user* New applications from a variety of fields, including engineering, biology, and physics* All applications were completed using recent versions of Mathematica

  9. Automatic Differentiation Variational Inference

    OpenAIRE

    Kucukelbir, Alp; Tran, Dustin; Ranganath, Rajesh; Gelman, Andrew; Blei, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Probabilistic modeling is iterative. A scientist posits a simple model, fits it to her data, refines it according to her analysis, and repeats. However, fitting complex models to large data is a bottleneck in this process. Deriving algorithms for new models can be both mathematically and computationally challenging, which makes it difficult to efficiently cycle through the steps. To this end, we develop automatic differentiation variational inference (ADVI). Using our method, the scientist on...

  10. SIMULTANEOUS DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION COMPUTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, D.M.; Meeks, L.A.; Palmer, J.P.

    1960-05-10

    A description is given for an electronic simulator for a system of simultaneous differential equations, including nonlinear equations. As a specific example, a homogeneous nuclear reactor system including a reactor fluid, heat exchanger, and a steam boiler may be simulated, with the nonlinearity resulting from a consideration of temperature effects taken into account. The simulator includes three operational amplifiers, a multiplier, appropriate potential sources, and interconnecting R-C networks.

  11. Differential equations I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Differential Equations I covers first- and second-order equations, series solutions, higher-order linear equations, and the Laplace transform.

  12. Fractional Differential Forms

    OpenAIRE

    Cotrill-Shepherd, Kathleen; NAber, Mark

    2003-01-01

    A generalization of exterior calculus is considered by allowing the partial derivatives in the exterior derivative to assume fractional orders. That is, a fractional exterior derivative is defined. This is found to generate new vector spaces of finite and infinite dimension, fractional differential form spaces. The definitions of closed and exact forms are extended to the new fractional form spaces with closure and integrability conditions worked out for a special case. Coordinate transformat...

  13. Is Titan Partially Differentiated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, G.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The recent measurement of the gravity coefficients from the Radio Doppler data of the Cassini spacecraft has improved our knowledge of the interior structure of Titan (Rappaport et al. 2008 AGU, P21A-1343). The measured gravity field of Titan is dominated by near hydrostatic quadrupole components. We have used the measured gravitational coefficients, thermal models and the hydrostatic equilibrium theory to derive Titan's interior structure. The axial moment of inertia gives us an indication of the degree of the interior differentiation. The inferred axial moment of inertia, calculated using the quadrupole gravitational coefficients and the Radau-Darwin approximation, indicates that Titan is partially differentiated. If Titan is partially differentiated then the interior must avoid melting of the ice during its evolution. This suggests a relatively late formation of Titan to avoid the presence of short-lived radioisotopes (Al-26). This also suggests the onset of convection after accretion to efficiently remove the heat from the interior. The outer layer is likely composed mainly of water in solid phase. Thermal modeling indicates that water could be present also in liquid phase forming a subsurface ocean between an outer ice I shell and a high pressure ice layer. Acknowledgments: This work was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  14. Nth-order Fuzzy Differential Equations Under Generalized Differentiability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil Salahshour

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the multiple solutions of Nth-order fuzzy differential equations by the equivalent integral forms are considered. Also, an Existence and uniqueness theorem of solution of Nth-order fuzzy differential equations is proved under Nth-order generalized differentiability in Banach space.

  15. Converting fractional differential equations into partial differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    He Ji-Huan; Li Zheng-Biao

    2012-01-01

    A transform is suggested in this paper to convert fractional differential equations with the modified Riemann-Liouville derivative into partial differential equations, and it is concluded that the fractional order in fractional differential equations is equivalent to the fractal dimension.

  16. Investigation and Fauna Analysis of the Subfamily Larrinae in Chongqing%重庆市小唇泥蜂亚科种类调查及区系分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武振呼; 李廷景; 陈斌

    2012-01-01

    通过近几年来对重庆市各区县的小唇泥蜂(Larrinae)种类资源的调查和查阅有关文献资料,共鉴定小唇泥蜂3族7属13种,属数约占中国小唇泥蜂昆虫总属数的46.67%,种数约占中国总种数的7.78%.重庆市现已知的小唇泥蜂中东洋区成分7种,跨东洋区与古北区共有成分3种,东洋、非洲区共有成分1种,东洋、古北及非洲区共有成分1种,东洋、古北及新北区共有成分1种;此外,已知种类跨中国华南与西南两区分布4种,跨华中、华南与西南3区分布4种,跨东北、华北与西南3区分布1种,跨华北、华中、华南与西南4区分布4种.调查结果显示,重庆小唇泥蜂亚科属级阶元的调查结果与中国已知属的分布特点吻合,但由于重庆生态环境特点及采集深度等因素的影响,重庆已知的各属种类数量相对较少.%In recent years, the fauna survey of the subfamily Larrinae in the family Crabronidae throughout various districts and counties in Chongqing was carried out, and the literature related to the subfamily was analyzed. As a result, 10 known species and 3 subspecies belonging to 3 tribes, 7 genera of the subfamily were identified. The number of genera and species account for about 46.67% and 7.78% of the total number of known Chinese genera and species respectively. In the fauna composition of the Larrinae species in Chongqing, there are 7 Oriental Region species, 3 Oriental-Palearctic species, 1 Oriental-Africa species, 1 Oriental-Palearctic-Africa species and 1 Oriental-Palearctic-Nearctic species. Limited in Chinese zoogeographic regions, there are 4 species distributed in South China and South-West subregions, 4 species distributed in Central China, South China and South-West; 1 species in Northeast, North China and South-West; more over, 4 species distributed in North China, Central China, South China and South-West. The results show that the distribution of Larrinae genera in Chongqing and in

  17. Molecular Evolution and Expression Analysis of Subfamily ABCB Transporter Genes in Rice%水稻ABCB转运蛋白基因的分子进化和表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐杏; 邱杰; 徐扬; 徐辰武

    2012-01-01

    系统鉴定了水稻和拟南芥中27个和29个ABC家族B亚族(ABCB)基因,发现其外显子数目、编码蛋白质的长度和分子量在两种植物中均存在较大变异,而等电点分布的变化较小.系统发育分析把该亚族蛋白分为4个亚组,说明其功能可能已经发生了分化;在水稻和拟南芥中各鉴定了6对和9对旁系同源基因,说明单、双子叶植物分离之后,该亚族在水稻和拟南芥中均以物种特异的方式进行了扩张.片段复制和串联重复是水稻ABC家族扩张的主要机制.多序列比对显示,核苷酸结合域(NBD)的Walker A、Walker B和ABC域基序均高度保守,而Q环和H环的保守性略差;跨膜结构域(TMD)在不同蛋白之间和同一蛋白内没有明显的保守性.表达模式分析表明,水稻ABCB基因的表达具有明显的组织特异性,不同基因的表达特征已经发生分化.非生物胁迫下的表达分析显示多数水稻ABCB基因受到至少一种非生物胁迫因素的调控.旁系同源基因Ka/Ks分析表明,净化选择在水稻ABCB基因复制后功能的保留中发挥了重要作用.%With the accomplishment of genome sequencing projects, over 130 ABCs were identified separately from the model plants of monocots and dicots, rice and Arabidopsis, but the functions of most of the members remain elusive. Therefore, 27 and 29 subfamily B of ABC genes (ABCB) in rice and Arabidopsis were systematically characterized, respectively. The exon number, length and molecular weight of proteins encoded by these genes varied greatly between the two plants. Albeit the isoelectric point was less diverse. Proteins of this subfamily were divided into 4 subgroups accordingpar to phylogenetic analysis, suggesting that divergence probably occurred among them; 6 and 9 pairs of paralogous genes were identified from rice and Arabidopsis, respectively, indicating that species-specific expansion contributed to the evolution of this subfamily in rice and

  18. Checklist of Chinese Ants :Formicomorph Subfamilies (Hymenoptera : Formicidae) (Ⅱ)%中国蚁科昆虫名录——蚁型亚科群(膜翅目:蚁科)(Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冉浩; 周善义

    2012-01-01

    本文总结中国蚁型亚科群(the formicomorph subfamilies)蚁亚科Formieinae已知昆虫10属107种4亚种,其中箭蚁属Cataglyphis 7种,蚁属Formica 44种1亚种,短角蚁属Gesomyrmex 1种,毛蚁属Lasius 19种,刺结蚁属Lepisiota 8种3亚种,长齿蚁属Myrmoteras 2种,尼氏蚁属Nylanderia 21种,织叶蚁属Oecophylla 1种,拟立毛蚁属Paraparatrechina 3种,立毛蚁属Paratrechina 1种.因长有德和贺达汉于2002年命名的粗壮黑蚁的Formica robusta已被Carpenter占用,故将其重命名为长贺氏蚁Formica changhei Ran et Zhou.根据Lapolla最新研究成果,将观音立毛蚁和孔明立毛蚁从立毛蚁属Paratrechina中移至拟立毛蚁属Paraparatrechina,提出了2个新组合,即:观音拟立毛蚁Paraparatrechina guanyin (Terayama,2009)com.nov.和孔明拟立毛蚁Paraparatrechina kongming (Terayama,2009) com.nov..文中给出各种的中文译名、拉丁学名和分布,并对近年来分类地位发生变化、具有较大经济意义和社会意义的种,以及需要特别说明的种作了注解.%107 known species, 4 subspcies belonging to 10 genera of the subfamily Formicinae of the formicomorph subfamilies from China are listed. Among them Cataglyphis with 7 species, Formica with 44 species and 1 subspecies,Gesomyrmex with 1 species,Lasius with 19 species,Lepisiota with 8 species and 3 subspecies,Myrmoteras with 2 species,Nylanderia with 21 species,Oecophylla with 1 species,Para-paratrechina with 3 species,and Paratrechina with 1 species. Formica robusta Chang et He,2002 was renamed as Formica changhei Ran et Zhou as the former was occupied by Formica robusta Carpenter. According to the results of Lapolla et al. ,removed guanyin and kongming from the genus Paratrechina to the genus Paraparatrechina, and combinated two species, i. e. Paraparatrechina guanyin (Terayama, 2009),com. nov. and Paraparatrechina kongming (Terayama,2009) ,com. nov.. All species were treated with Chinese translated names and latin names

  19. Group valued differential forms revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Anders

    We study the relationship between combinatorial group valued differential forms, and classical differential forms with values in the corresponding Lie algebra. In particular, we compare simplicial coboundary and exterior derivative for 1-forms. The results represent strengthenings of results...

  20. Putting Differentials Back into Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dray, Tevian; Manogue, Corrine A.

    2010-01-01

    We argue that the use of differentials in introductory calculus courses is useful and provides a unifying theme, leading to a coherent view of the calculus. Along the way, we meet several interpretations of differentials, some better than others.

  1. Wage Differentials, Discrimination and Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Shouyong Shi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper I construct a search model of a large labor market in which workers are heterogeneous in productivity and (homogeneous) firms post wages and a ranking of workers to direct workers' search. I establish the following results. First, the wage differential is negatively related to productivity when the productivity differential is small, while a positive relationship emerges when the productivity differential is large. Second, as the productivity differential decreases to zero, the ...

  2. Anticipated backward stochastic differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Shige; Yang, Zhe

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss new types of differential equations which we call anticipated backward stochastic differential equations (anticipated BSDEs). In these equations the generator includes not only the values of solutions of the present but also the future. We show that these anticipated BSDEs have unique solutions, a comparison theorem for their solutions, and a duality between them and stochastic differential delay equations.

  3. Differential expression profiles in the midgut of Triatoma infestans infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego S Buarque

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, is a parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi and is transmitted by insects from the Triatominae subfamily. To identify components involved in the protozoan-vector relationship, we constructed and analyzed cDNA libraries from RNA isolated from the midguts of uninfected and T. cruzi-infected Triatoma infestans, which are major vectors of Chagas disease. We generated approximately 440 high-quality Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs from each T. infestans midgut cDNA library. The sequences were grouped in 380 clusters, representing an average length of 664.78 base pairs (bp. Many clusters were not classified functionally, representing unknown transcripts. Several transcripts involved in different processes (e.g., detoxification showed differential expression in response to T. cruzi infection. Lysozyme, cathepsin D, a nitrophorin-like protein and a putative 14 kDa protein were significantly upregulated upon infection, whereas thioredoxin reductase was downregulated. In addition, we identified several transcripts related to metabolic processes or immunity with unchanged expressions, including infestin, lipocalins and defensins. We also detected ESTs encoding juvenile hormone binding protein (JHBP, which seems to be involved in insect development and could be a target in control strategies for the vector. This work demonstrates differential gene expression upon T. cruzi infection in the midgut of T. infestans. These data expand the current knowledge regarding vector-parasite interactions for Chagas disease.

  4. Differential operator multiplication method for fractional differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shaoqiang; Ying, Yuping; Lian, Yanping; Lin, Stephen; Yang, Yibo; Wagner, Gregory J.; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-08-01

    Fractional derivatives play a very important role in modeling physical phenomena involving long-range correlation effects. However, they raise challenges of computational cost and memory storage requirements when solved using current well developed numerical methods. In this paper, the differential operator multiplication method is proposed to address the issues by considering a reaction-advection-diffusion equation with a fractional derivative in time. The linear fractional differential equation is transformed into an integer order differential equation by the proposed method, which can fundamentally fix the aforementioned issues for select fractional differential equations. In such a transform, special attention should be paid to the initial conditions for the resulting differential equation of higher integer order. Through numerical experiments, we verify the proposed method for both fractional ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations.

  5. Differentiation in online retailing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellner, Julian; Wagner, Gerhard; Zielke, Stephan;

    Due to the highly competitive nature of the online retail environment, differentiation strategies are of importance for online retailers to gain competitive advantages and to achieve a unique positioning in the market. However, little is known about perceptual dimensions used by consumers to make...... a distinction between online retailers. The present study addresses this research gap by using a repertory grid approach to identify points of difference between online retailers from a consumer’s perspective. The results have important implications for positioning strategies of online retailers and research...... on online store formats....

  6. Ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, William

    1995-01-01

    Building on introductory calculus courses, this text provides a sound foundation in the underlying principles of ordinary differential equations. Important concepts, including uniqueness and existence theorems, are worked through in detail and the student is encouraged to develop much of the routine material themselves, thus helping to ensure a solid understanding of the fundamentals required.The wide use of exercises, problems and self-assessment questions helps to promote a deeper understanding of the material and it is developed in such a way that it lays the groundwork for further

  7. Differentiating among penal states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Nicola

    2010-12-01

    This review article assesses Loïc Wacquant's contribution to debates on penality, focusing on his most recent book, Punishing the Poor: The Neoliberal Government of Social Insecurity (Wacquant 2009), while setting its argument in the context of his earlier Prisons of Poverty (1999). In particular, it draws on both historical and comparative methods to question whether Wacquant's conception of 'the penal state' is adequately differentiated for the purposes of building the explanatory account he proposes; about whether 'neo-liberalism' has, materially, the global influence which he ascribes to it; and about whether, therefore, the process of penal Americanization which he asserts in his recent writings is credible.

  8. Differentiating among penal states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Nicola

    2010-12-01

    This review article assesses Loïc Wacquant's contribution to debates on penality, focusing on his most recent book, Punishing the Poor: The Neoliberal Government of Social Insecurity (Wacquant 2009), while setting its argument in the context of his earlier Prisons of Poverty (1999). In particular, it draws on both historical and comparative methods to question whether Wacquant's conception of 'the penal state' is adequately differentiated for the purposes of building the explanatory account he proposes; about whether 'neo-liberalism' has, materially, the global influence which he ascribes to it; and about whether, therefore, the process of penal Americanization which he asserts in his recent writings is credible. PMID:21138432

  9. Differential diagnosis of tonsillolith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Schertel Cassiano

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Tonsillolith is a rare type of dystrophic calcification in the palatine tonsils or in the peritonsilar region, which can mimics several intraosseous radiopaque lesions when evaluated by two-dimensional or overlapping images.This may lead to an erroneous diagnosis and to invasive and unnecessary procedures.This study reports a case of tonsillolith that was wrongly diagnosed as an odontoma. Case report: A patient with primary diagnosis of odontoma in the mandibular ramus was referred to surgical treatment of this lesion. Conclusion: Computed tomography (CT scans are fundamentally important to establish differential diagnosis and appropriate treatment for the patient.

  10. Differential diagnosis diphtheria adults

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. I. Liashenko; D. A. Pavlovich; Yu. P. Finogeev; Yu. A. Vinakmen; V. F. Krumgolts

    2010-01-01

    A total of 1,824 human cases of diphtheria, treated at the Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital SP Botkin (St. Petersburg) during 1993, as well as 19 deaths in 1994. It is known that early diagnosis of infectious diseases, especially diphtheria, contributes to the favorable outcome of the disease. The diagnosis of diphtheria at the prehospital stage is always difficult. Presented in detail the differential diagnosis of the disease, clinically similar to diphtheria: Lacunal angina, angina Sim...

  11. Boolean differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbach, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    The Boolean Differential Calculus (BDC) is a very powerful theory that extends the structure of a Boolean Algebra significantly. Based on a small number of definitions, many theorems have been proven. The available operations have been efficiently implemented in several software packages. There is a very wide field of applications. While a Boolean Algebra is focused on values of logic functions, the BDC allows the evaluation of changes of function values. Such changes can be explored for pairs of function values as well as for whole subspaces. Due to the same basic data structures, the BDC can

  12. Elementary differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neill, Barrett

    2006-01-01

    Written primarily for students who have completed the standard first courses in calculus and linear algebra, ELEMENTARY DIFFERENTIAL GEOMETRY, REVISED SECOND EDITION, provides an introduction to the geometry of curves and surfaces. The Second Edition maintained the accessibility of the first, while providing an introduction to the use of computers and expanding discussion on certain topics. Further emphasis was placed on topological properties, properties of geodesics, singularities of vector fields, and the theorems of Bonnet and Hadamard. This revision of the Second Edition p

  13. Investigating typographic differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    Text designers are likely to benefit from guidance on how to use typographic differentiation for emphasis. Three experiments use purposely-designed fonts to explore the size and nature of differences in the stylistic characteristics of fonts (weight, width, contrast, italic) which affect letter...... identification. Results indicate that words set in bold and expanded fonts, when alternated with words set in a Neutral test font, may impair performance, whereas changing to italic does not. Possible explanations are explored through measuring the physical and perceptual similarities of the test fonts...

  14. Partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Sloan, D; Süli, E

    2001-01-01

    /homepage/sac/cam/na2000/index.html7-Volume Set now available at special set price ! Over the second half of the 20th century the subject area loosely referred to as numerical analysis of partial differential equations (PDEs) has undergone unprecedented development. At its practical end, the vigorous growth and steady diversification of the field were stimulated by the demand for accurate and reliable tools for computational modelling in physical sciences and engineering, and by the rapid development of computer hardware and architecture. At the more theoretical end, the analytical insight in

  15. Matlab differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    MATLAB is a high-level language and environment for numerical computation, visualization, and programming. Using MATLAB, you can analyze data, develop algorithms, and create models and applications. The language, tools, and built-in math functions enable you to explore multiple approaches and reach a solution faster than with spreadsheets or traditional programming languages, such as C/C++ or Java. MATLAB Differential Equations introduces you to the MATLAB language with practical hands-on instructions and results, allowing you to quickly achieve your goals. In addition to giving an introduct

  16. Overexpression of Bcl2 in osteoblasts inhibits osteoblast differentiation and induces osteocyte apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Moriishi

    Full Text Available Bcl2 subfamily proteins, including Bcl2 and Bcl-X(L, inhibit apoptosis. As osteoblast apoptosis is in part responsible for osteoporosis in sex steroid deficiency, glucocorticoid excess, and aging, bone loss might be inhibited by the upregulation of Bcl2; however, the effects of Bcl2 overexpression on osteoblast differentiation and bone development and maintenance have not been fully investigated. To investigate these issues, we established two lines of osteoblast-specific BCL2 transgenic mice. In BCL2 transgenic mice, bone volume was increased at 6 weeks of age but not at 10 weeks of age compared with wild-type mice. The numbers of osteoblasts and osteocytes increased, but osteoid thickness and the bone formation rate were reduced in BCL2 transgenic mice with high expression at 10 weeks of age. The number of BrdU-positive cells was increased but that of TUNEL-positive cells was unaltered at 2 and 6 weeks of age. Osteoblast differentiation was inhibited, as shown by reduced Col1a1 and osteocalcin expression. Osteoblast differentiation of calvarial cells from BCL2 transgenic mice also fell in vitro. Overexpression of BCL2 in primary osteoblasts had no effect on osteoclastogenesis in co-culture with bone marrow cells. Unexpectedly, overexpression of BCL2 in osteoblasts eventually caused osteocyte apoptosis. Osteocytes, which had a reduced number of processes, gradually died with apoptotic structural alterations and the expression of apoptosis-related molecules, and dead osteocytes accumulated in cortical bone. These findings indicate that overexpression of BCL2 in osteoblasts inhibits osteoblast differentiation, reduces osteocyte processes, and causes osteocyte apoptosis.

  17. Differential diagnosis diphtheria adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. I. Liashenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 1,824 human cases of diphtheria, treated at the Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital SP Botkin (St. Petersburg during 1993, as well as 19 deaths in 1994. It is known that early diagnosis of infectious diseases, especially diphtheria, contributes to the favorable outcome of the disease. The diagnosis of diphtheria at the prehospital stage is always difficult. Presented in detail the differential diagnosis of the disease, clinically similar to diphtheria: Lacunal angina, angina Simanovsky, infectious mononucleosis, angina Ludwig’s angina Dugue, syphilis, non-infectious with clinical «masks» of diphtheria and other. Diphtheria epidemic of 1993–1994 in Russia and, in particular, in St. Petersburg, showed that the late admission of patients with diphtheria infection in hospitals, usually associated with irregular differential diagnosis of this dangerous disease.

  18. Differential diagnosis of hyponatraemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thompson, Chris

    2012-03-01

    The appropriate management of hyponatraemia is reliant on the accurate identification of the underlying cause of the hyponatraemia. In the light of evidence which has shown that the use of a clinical algorithm appears to improve accuracy in the differential diagnosis of hyponatraemia, the European Hyponatraemia Network considered the use of two algorithms. One was developed from a nephrologist\\'s view of hyponatraemia, while the other reflected the approach of an endocrinologist. Both of these algorithms concurred on the importance of assessing effective blood volume status and the measurement of urine sodium concentration in the diagnostic process. To demonstrate the importance of accurate diagnosis to the correct treatment of hyponatraemia, special consideration was given to hyponatraemia in neurosurgical patients. The differentiation between the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), acute adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency, fluid overload and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome was discussed. In patients with SIADH, fluid restriction has been the mainstay of treatment despite the absence of an evidence base for its use. An approach to using fluid restriction to raise serum tonicity in patients with SIADH and to identify patients who are likely to be recalcitrant to fluid restriction was also suggested.

  19. 中国细蚁亚科系统分类研究(膜翅目:蚁科)%A Systematic Study on the Ant Subfamily Leptanillinae of China ( Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐正会

    2002-01-01

    Two genera of the ant subfamily Leptanillinae are recorded in China. Three species including a new species of the genus LeptanillaEmery are reported: L. hunaneasis Tang, Li et Chen from Hunan Province, L. taiwanensis Ogata, Terayama et Masuko from Taiwan Province, L. yuananensis sp. nov. from Yunnan Province. Protanilla Taylor is newly recorded in China, of which 2 new species are describedfrom Yunnan Province, i.e.P, concolor sp. nov. and P. bicolor sp. nov. Keys to the two genera of Leptanillinae and their species in Chinabased on worker caste are provided%记载中国细蚁亚科kptanilliBae昆虫2属.报道细蚁属Leptanilla Emery3种:湖南细蚁L. hunanensis Tang, Li et Chen 分布于湖南省,台湾细蚁L. taiwanensis Ogata, Terayama et Masuko分布于台湾省,云南细蚁L. yunnanensis sp. nov.分布于云南省.原细蚁属Protanilla Taylor为中国新记录属,在云南省采集并描述该属2新种:单色原细蚁P. concolor sp. nov.和双色原细蚁P.bicolor sp.nov..编制了细蚁亚科这2属的工蚁分属检索表和中国分布种工蚁分种检索表.

  20. Scaling of differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Langtangen, Hans Petter

    2016-01-01

    The book serves both as a reference for various scaled models with corresponding dimensionless numbers, and as a resource for learning the art of scaling. A special feature of the book is the emphasis on how to create software for scaled models, based on existing software for unscaled models. Scaling (or non-dimensionalization) is a mathematical technique that greatly simplifies the setting of input parameters in numerical simulations. Moreover, scaling enhances the understanding of how different physical processes interact in a differential equation model. Compared to the existing literature, where the topic of scaling is frequently encountered, but very often in only a brief and shallow setting, the present book gives much more thorough explanations of how to reason about finding the right scales. This process is highly problem dependent, and therefore the book features a lot of worked examples, from very simple ODEs to systems of PDEs, especially from fluid mechanics. The text is easily accessible and exam...

  1. DIFFERENTIAL PULSE HEIGHT DISCRIMINATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Test, L.D.

    1958-11-11

    Pulse-height discriminators are described, specifically a differential pulse-height discriminator which is adapted to respond to pulses of a band of amplitudes, but to reject pulses of amplitudes greater or less than tbe preselected band. In general, the discriminator includes a vacuum tube having a plurality of grids adapted to cut off plate current in the tube upon the application of sufficient negative voltage. One grid is held below cutoff, while a positive pulse proportional to the amplltude of each pulse is applled to this grid. Another grid has a negative pulse proportional to the amplitude of each pulse simultaneously applied to it. With this arrangement the tube will only pass pulses which are of sufficlent amplitude to counter the cutoff bias but not of sufficlent amplitude to cutoff the tube.

  2. Elliptic partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Volpert, Vitaly

    If we had to formulate in one sentence what this book is about it might be "How partial differential equations can help to understand heat explosion, tumor growth or evolution of biological species". These and many other applications are described by reaction-diffusion equations. The theory of reaction-diffusion equations appeared in the first half of the last century. In the present time, it is widely used in population dynamics, chemical physics, biomedical modelling. The purpose of this book is to present the mathematical theory of reaction-diffusion equations in the context of their numerous applications. We will go from the general mathematical theory to specific equations and then to their applications. Mathematical anaylsis of reaction-diffusion equations will be based on the theory of Fredholm operators presented in the first volume. Existence, stability and bifurcations of solutions will be studied for bounded domains and in the case of travelling waves. The classical theory of reaction-diffusion equ...

  3. Differentiation as symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigira, M; Watanabe, H

    1994-07-01

    Preservation of the identity of DNA is the ultimate goal of multicellular organisms. An abnormal DNA sequence in cells within an individual means its parasitic nature in cell society as shown in tumors. Somatic gene arrangement and gene mutation in development may be considered as de novo formation of parasites. It is likely that the developmental process with genetic alterations means symbiosis between altered cells and germ line cells preserving genetic information without alterations, when somatic alteration of DNA sequence is a major mechanism of differentiation. According to the selfish gene theory of Dawkins, germ line cells permit symbiosis when somatic cell society derives clear profit for the replication of original DNA copies. PMID:7968715

  4. Koszul differential graded modules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE JiWei; WU QuanShui

    2009-01-01

    The concept of Koszulity for differential graded (DG, for short) modules is introduced. It is shown that any bounded below DG module with bounded Ext-group to the trivial module over a Koszul DG algebra has a Koszul DG submodule (up to a shift and truncation), moreover such a DG module can be approximated by Koszul DG modules (Theorem 3.6). Let A be a Koszul DG algebra, and Dc (A) be the full triangulated subcategory of the derived category of DG A-modules generated by the object AA. If the trivial DG module kA lies in Dc(A), then the heart of the standard t-structure on Dc(A) is anti-equivalent to the category of finitely generated modules over some finite dimensional algebra. As a corollary, Dc(A) is equivalent to the bounded derived category of its heart as triangulated categories.

  5. Koszul differential graded modules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The concept of Koszulity for differential graded (DG, for short) modules is introduced. It is shown that any bounded below DG module with bounded Ext-group to the trivial module over a Koszul DG algebra has a Koszul DG submodule (up to a shift and truncation), moreover such a DG module can be approximated by Koszul DG modules (Theorem 3.6). Let A be a Koszul DG algebra, and Dc(A) be the full triangulated subcategory of the derived category of DG A-modules generated by the object AA. If the trivial DG module kA lies in Dc(A), then the heart of the standard t-structure on Dc(A) is anti-equivalent to the category of finitely generated modules over some finite dimensional algebra. As a corollary, Dc(A) is equivalent to the bounded derived category of its heart as triangulated categories.

  6. Applied partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Logan, J David

    2004-01-01

    This primer on elementary partial differential equations presents the standard material usually covered in a one-semester, undergraduate course on boundary value problems and PDEs. What makes this book unique is that it is a brief treatment, yet it covers all the major ideas: the wave equation, the diffusion equation, the Laplace equation, and the advection equation on bounded and unbounded domains. Methods include eigenfunction expansions, integral transforms, and characteristics. Mathematical ideas are motivated from physical problems, and the exposition is presented in a concise style accessible to science and engineering students; emphasis is on motivation, concepts, methods, and interpretation, rather than formal theory. This second edition contains new and additional exercises, and it includes a new chapter on the applications of PDEs to biology: age structured models, pattern formation; epidemic wave fronts, and advection-diffusion processes. The student who reads through this book and solves many of t...

  7. Pseudo-differentiation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathi Jehani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    A patient with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML (M2 FAB classification developed a differentiating syndrome upon receiving Decitabine therapy given with palliative intent. The patient presented with high grade fever, constitutional symptoms and severe chest symptoms with no underlying lung condition. Chest x-ray (CXR showed diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. Septic work up followed by intravenous broad spectrum antimicrobials did not improve his condition. Pan cultures’ results were repeatedly negative. Treatment with high dose Dexamethasone (DXM resulted in marked clinical and radiological improvement.

    Our patient initially presented with relapsed AML (M2 Fab classification with t (8; 21; negative FMS-like tyrosine kinase -internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD which are all good prognostic factors, yet the patient had an atypical clinical course with early frequent relapses, differentiation syndrome associated with Decitabine therapy and late in his disease, he developed a granulocytic sarcoma.

  8. DNA microarray analysis of genes differentially expressed in adipocyte differentiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chunyan Yin; Yanfeng Xiao; Wei Zhang; Erdi Xu; Weihua Liu; Xiaoqing Yi; Ming Chang

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, the human liposarcoma cell line SW872 was used to identify global changes in gene expression profiles occurring during adipogenesis. We further explored some of the genes expressed during the late phase of adipocyte differentiation. These genes may play a major role in promoting excessive proliferation and accumulation of lipid droplets, which contribute to the development of obesity. By using microarray-based technology, we examined differential gene expression in early differentiated adipocytes and late differentiated adipocytes. Validated genes exhibited a ≥ 10-fold increase in the late phase of adipocyte differentiation by polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Compared with undifferentiated preadipocytes, we found that 763 genes were increased in early differentiated adipocytes, and 667 genes were increased in later differentiated adipocytes. Furthermore, 21 genes were found being expressed 10-fold higher in the late phase of adipocyte differentiation. The results were in accordance with the RT-PCR test, which validated 11 genes, namely, CIDEC, PID1, LYRM1, ADD1, PPAR2, ANGPTL4, ADIPOQ, ACOX1, FIP1L1, MAP3K2 and PEX14. Most of these genes were found being expressed in the later phase of adipocyte differentiation involved in obesity-related diseases. The findings may help to better understand the mechanism of obesity and related diseases.

  9. An introduction to differential manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Lafontaine, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book is an introduction to differential manifolds. It gives solid preliminaries for more advanced topics: Riemannian manifolds, differential topology, Lie theory. It presupposes little background: the reader is only expected to master basic differential calculus, and a little point-set topology. The book covers the main topics of differential geometry: manifolds, tangent space, vector fields, differential forms, Lie groups, and a few more sophisticated topics such as de Rham cohomology, degree theory and the Gauss-Bonnet theorem for surfaces. Its ambition is to give solid foundations. In particular, the introduction of “abstract” notions such as manifolds or differential forms is motivated via questions and examples from mathematics or theoretical physics. More than 150 exercises, some of them easy and classical, some others more sophisticated, will help the beginner as well as the more expert reader. Solutions are provided for most of them. The book should be of interest to various readers: undergra...

  10. Computational differentiation and multidisciplinary design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischof, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Griewank, A. [Institute of Scientific Computing, Technical Univ. of Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    1993-12-31

    Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) by means of formal sensitivity analysis requires that each single-discipline analysis code supply not only the output functions for the (usually constrained) optimization process and other discipline analysis inputs, but also the derivatives of all of these output functions with respect to its input variables. Computational differentiation techniques and automatic differentiation tools enable MDO by providing accurate and efficient derivatives of computer programs with little human effort. We discuss the principles behind automatic differentiation and give a brief overview of automatic differentiation tools and how they can be employed judiciously, for example, for sparse Jacobians and to exploit parallelism. We show how, and under what circumstances, automatic differentiation applied to iterative solvers delivers the mathematically desired derivatives. We then show how derivatives that can now be feasibly obtained by computational differentiation techniques can lead to improved solution schemes for nonlinear coupled systems and multidisciplinary design optimization.

  11. Introduction to partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Greenspan, Donald

    2000-01-01

    Designed for use in a one-semester course by seniors and beginning graduate students, this rigorous presentation explores practical methods of solving differential equations, plus the unifying theory underlying the mathematical superstructure. Topics include basic concepts, Fourier series, second-order partial differential equations, wave equation, potential equation, heat equation, approximate solution of partial differential equations, and more. Exercises appear at the ends of most chapters. 1961 edition.

  12. Introduction to ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Rabenstein, Albert L

    1966-01-01

    Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations is a 12-chapter text that describes useful elementary methods of finding solutions using ordinary differential equations. This book starts with an introduction to the properties and complex variable of linear differential equations. Considerable chapters covered topics that are of particular interest in applications, including Laplace transforms, eigenvalue problems, special functions, Fourier series, and boundary-value problems of mathematical physics. Other chapters are devoted to some topics that are not directly concerned with finding solutio

  13. [Differentiated thyroid cancer -- 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrády, András

    2011-01-30

    Three years ago continental guidelines were published referring management and follow-up of low risk thyroid cancer patients. The aim of this paper is to summarize the changes and new directions in this field. High risk patients require another protocol. Neck ultrasound plays important role in differential diagnosis and in detecting recurrences. Some new ultrasound techniques are discussed, too. FDG-PET can help to solve the problem of patients having negative scan and increased thyroglobulin level. In recent years there was an expansion of our knowledge about the pathomechanism of thyroid cancer. It appears that genetic alterations frequently play a key role in carcinogenesis. There are molecular methods that allow the detection of these genetic events in thyroid fine needle aspirations samples providing important information for diagnosis, management and prognosis. Instead of diagnostic whole body scanning the posttherapeutic scan became preferable but in high risk cases the diagnostic whole body scintigrams serve useful data. Primary therapy of thyroid cancer is an adequate surgery: total thyreoidectomy and, if necessary, lymph node dissection or limited surgery in selected cases. Nowadays radioguided surgery can help to improve the results. Radioiodine therapy (e.g. rest ablation) proved to be a safe and effective method to complete surgery. It can prevent relapses and results in longer survival. Thyroid hormone withdrawal or recombinant human thyrotropin stimulation can increase thyrotropin level before radioiodine treatment. These two methods have similar success rate of rest ablation but irradiation burden of blood is lower in the case of exogenous stimulation which avoids hypothyroid state and preserves quality of life. Since tumor cells fail to maintain the ability to perform physiological functions they undergo dedifferentiation. Therefore, an important aim is to reactivate some function of differentiated cells, e.g. iodine uptake, production of

  14. Taxonomia da subfamília Corinninae (Araneae, Corinnidae nas regiões neotropical e neártica Taxonomy of the subfamily Corinninae (Araneae, Corinnidae in neotropical and neartic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Bragio Bonaldo

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available The subfamily Corinninae is characterized and diagnosed. Two synapomorphies are hypothesized for the subfamily, both regarding the male palpal reservoir, which is primarily coiled and presents a sclerotized distal sector. Seventeen genera are recognized, six of which are new: Abapeba (type species Corinna lacertosa Simon, Erendira (type species Corinna pallidoguttata Simon, Septentrinna (type species Corinna bicalcarata Simon, Simonestus (type species Diestus validus Simon, Tapixaua (type species T. callida sp. nov. and Tupirinna (type species T. rosae sp. nov.. The genera Creugas Thorell, Falconina Brignoli and Paradiestus Mello-Leitão are revalidated. Diestus Simon and Lausus Simon are newly synonymized with Corinna C. L. Koch. Chemmis Simon is included in the synonymy of Megalostrata Karsch. Hypsinotus L. Koch is removed from the synonymy of Corinna and included in the synonymy of Creugas. Thirteen new species are described: Septentrinna yucatan and S. potosi from Mexico; Tupirinna rosae from Venezuela and Brazil; Tapixaua callida from Brazil and Peru; Abapeba hoeferi, A. rioclaro, A. taruma, Corinna ducke, C. colombo, C. mourai, C. recurva and Parachemmis manauara from Brazil; Creugas lisei from Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay. Twenty seven species are redescribed. Fifty eight new combinations are presented: from Chemmis, Septentrinna steckleri (Gertsch; from Corinna, Abapeba abalosi (Mello-Leitão, A. cleonei (Petrunkevitch, A. echinus (Simon, A. grassima (Chickering, A. guanicae (Petrunkevitch, A. lacertosa (Simon, A. luctuosa (F. O. Pickard-Cambridge, A. lugubris (Schenkel, A. pennata (Caporiacco, A. kochi (Petrunkevitch, A. saga (F. O. Pickard-Cambridge, A. wheeleri (Petrunkevitch, Creugas annamae (Gertsch & Davis, C. apophysarius (Caporiacco, C. bajulus (Gertsch, C. bellator (L. Koch, C. bicuspis (F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, C. epicureanus (Chamberlin, C. falculus (F. O. Pickard-Cambridge, C. mucronatus (F. O. Pickard-Cambridge, C. navus (F

  15. Conservation of linkage and evolution of developmental function within the Tbx2/3/4/5 subfamily of T-box genes: implications for the origin of vertebrate limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Amy C; Mahadevan, Navin R; Minguillon, Carolina; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Ruvinsky, Ilya; de Jong, Pieter J; Logan, Malcolm P; Gibson-Brown, Jeremy J

    2008-12-01

    T-box genes encode a family of DNA-binding transcription factors implicated in numerous developmental processes in all metazoans. The Tbx2/3/4/5 subfamily genes are especially interesting because of their key roles in the evolution of vertebrate appendages, eyes, and the heart, and, like the Hox genes, the longevity of their chromosomal linkage. A BAC library derived from the single male amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae) used to sequence the amphioxus genome was screened for AmphiTbx2/3 and AmphiTbx4/5, yielding two independent clones containing both genes. Using comparative expression, genomic linkage, and phylogenetic analyses, we have reconstructed the evolutionary histories of these members of the T-box gene family. We find that the Tbx2-Tbx4 and Tbx3-Tbx5 gene pairs have maintained tight linkage in most animal lineages since their birth by tandem duplication, long before the divergence of protostomes and deuterostomes (e.g., arthropods and vertebrates) at least 600 million years ago, and possibly before the divergence of poriferans and cnidarians (e.g., sponges and jellyfish). Interestingly, we find that the gene linkage detected in all vertebrate genomes has been maintained in the primitively appendage-lacking, basal chordate, amphioxus. Although all four genes have been involved in the evolution of developmental programs regulating paired fin and (later) limb outgrowth and patterning, and most are also implicated in eye and heart development, linkage maintenance--often considered due to regulatory constraints imposed by limb, eye, and/or heart associated gene expression--is undoubtedly a consequence of other, much more ancient functional constraints. PMID:18815807

  16. Differential Topic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changyou; Buntine, Wray; Ding, Nan; Xie, Lexing; Du, Lan

    2015-02-01

    In applications we may want to compare different document collections: they could have shared content but also different and unique aspects in particular collections. This task has been called comparative text mining or cross-collection modeling. We present a differential topic model for this application that models both topic differences and similarities. For this we use hierarchical Bayesian nonparametric models. Moreover, we found it was important to properly model power-law phenomena in topic-word distributions and thus we used the full Pitman-Yor process rather than just a Dirichlet process. Furthermore, we propose the transformed Pitman-Yor process (TPYP) to incorporate prior knowledge such as vocabulary variations in different collections into the model. To deal with the non-conjugate issue between model prior and likelihood in the TPYP, we thus propose an efficient sampling algorithm using a data augmentation technique based on the multinomial theorem. Experimental results show the model discovers interesting aspects of different collections. We also show the proposed MCMC based algorithm achieves a dramatically reduced test perplexity compared to some existing topic models. Finally, we show our model outperforms the state-of-the-art for document classification/ideology prediction on a number of text collections. PMID:26353238

  17. Networked differential GPS system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, K. Tysen (Inventor); Loomis, Peter V. W. (Inventor); Kalafus, Rudolph M. (Inventor); Sheynblat, Leonid (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An embodiment of the present invention relates to a worldwide network of differential GPS reference stations (NDGPS) that continually track the entire GPS satellite constellation and provide interpolations of reference station corrections tailored for particular user locations between the reference stations Each reference station takes real-time ionospheric measurements with codeless cross-correlating dual-frequency carrier GPS receivers and computes real-time orbit ephemerides independently. An absolute pseudorange correction (PRC) is defined for each satellite as a function of a particular user's location. A map of the function is constructed, with iso-PRC contours. The network measures the PRCs at a few points, so-called reference stations and constructs an iso-PRC map for each satellite. Corrections are interpolated for each user's site on a subscription basis. The data bandwidths are kept to a minimum by transmitting information that cannot be obtained directly by the user and by updating information by classes and according to how quickly each class of data goes stale given the realities of the GPS system. Sub-decimeter-level kinematic accuracy over a given area is accomplished by establishing a mini-fiducial network.

  18. Differential expression profiling between the relative normal and dystrophic muscle tissues from the same LGMD patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wei

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD is a group of heterogeneous muscular disorders with autosomal dominant and recessive inheritance, in which the pelvic or shoulder girdle musculature is predominantly or primarily involved. Although analysis of the defective proteins has shed some light onto their functions implicated in the etiology of LGMD, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying muscular dystrophy remains incomplete. Methods To give insight into the molecular mechanisms of AR-LGMD, we have examined the differentially expressed gene profiling between the relative normal and pathological skeletal muscles from the same AR-LGMD patient with the differential display RT-PCR approach. The research subjects came from a Chinese AR-LGMD family with three affected sisters. Results In this report, we have identified 31 known genes and 12 unknown ESTs, which were differentially expressed between the relative normal and dystrophic muscle from the same LGMD patient. The expression of many genes encoding structural proteins of skeletal muscle fibers (such as titin, myosin heavy and light chains, and nebulin were dramatically down-regulated in dystrophic muscles compared to the relative normal muscles. The genes, reticulocalbin 1, kinectin 1, fatty acid desaturase 1, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 5 (IGFBP5, Nedd4 family interacting protein 1 (NDFIP1, SMARCA2 (SWI/SNF related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 2, encoding the proteins involved in signal transduction and gene expression regulation were up-regulated in the dystrophic muscles. Conclusion The functional analysis of these expression-altered genes in the pathogenesis of LGMD could provide additional information for understanding possible molecular mechanisms of LGMD development.

  19. A gene regulatory network for root epidermis cell differentiation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Bruex

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The root epidermis of Arabidopsis provides an exceptional model for studying the molecular basis of cell fate and differentiation. To obtain a systems-level view of root epidermal cell differentiation, we used a genome-wide transcriptome approach to define and organize a large set of genes into a transcriptional regulatory network. Using cell fate mutants that produce only one of the two epidermal cell types, together with fluorescence-activated cell-sorting to preferentially analyze the root epidermis transcriptome, we identified 1,582 genes differentially expressed in the root-hair or non-hair cell types, including a set of 208 "core" root epidermal genes. The organization of the core genes into a network was accomplished by using 17 distinct root epidermis mutants and 2 hormone treatments to perturb the system and assess the effects on each gene's transcript accumulation. In addition, temporal gene expression information from a developmental time series dataset and predicted gene associations derived from a Bayesian modeling approach were used to aid the positioning of genes within the network. Further, a detailed functional analysis of likely bHLH regulatory genes within the network, including MYC1, bHLH54, bHLH66, and bHLH82, showed that three distinct subfamilies of bHLH proteins participate in root epidermis development in a stage-specific manner. The integration of genetic, genomic, and computational analyses provides a new view of the composition, architecture, and logic of the root epidermal transcriptional network, and it demonstrates the utility of a comprehensive systems approach for dissecting a complex regulatory network.

  20. Glioma initiating cells form a differentiation niche via the induction of extracellular matrices and integrin αV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Niibori-Nambu

    Full Text Available Glioma initiating cells (GICs are considered responsible for the therapeutic resistance and recurrence of malignant glioma. To clarify the molecular mechanism of GIC maintenance/differentiation, we established GIC clones having the potential to differentiate into malignant gliomas, and subjected to DNA microarray/iTRAQ based integrated proteomics. 21,857 mRNAs and 8,471 proteins were identified and integrated into a gene/protein expression analysis chart. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that the expression of cell adhesion molecules, including integrin subfamilies, such as α2 and αV, and extracellular matrices (ECMs, such as collagen IV (COL4, laminin α2 (LAMA2, and fibronectin 1 (FN, was significantly upregulated during serum-induced GIC differentiation. This differentiation process, accompanied by the upregulation of MAPK as well as glioma specific proteins in GICs, was dramatically accelerated in these ECM (especially FN-coated dishes. Integrin αV blocking antibody and RGD peptide significantly suppressed early events in GIC differentiation, suggesting that the coupling of ECMs to integrin αV is necessary for GIC differentiation. In addition, the expression of integrin αV and its strong ligand FN was prominently increased in glioblastomas developed from mouse intracranial GIC xenografts. Interestingly, during the initial phase of GIC differentiation, the RGD treatment significantly inhibited GIC proliferation and raised their sensitivity against anti-cancer drug temozolomide (TMZ. We also found that combination treatments of TMZ and RGD inhibit glioma progression and lead the longer survival of mouse intracranial GIC xenograft model. These results indicate that GICs induce/secrete ECMs to develop microenvironments with serum factors, namely differentiation niches that further stimulate GIC differentiation and proliferation via the integrin recognition motif RGD. A combination of RGD treatment with TMZ could have the higher inhibitory