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Sample records for chemolithoautotrophic thiosulfate oxidation

  1. Whole-Genome Transcriptional Analysis of Chemolithoautotrophic Thiosulfate Oxidation by Thiobacillus denitrificans Under Aerobic vs. Denitrifying Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beller, H R; Letain, T E; Chakicherla, A; Kane, S R; Legler, T C; Coleman, M A

    2006-04-22

    Thiobacillus denitrificans is one of the few known obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacteria capable of energetically coupling thiosulfate oxidation to denitrification as well as aerobic respiration. As very little is known about the differential expression of genes associated with ke chemolithoautotrophic functions (such as sulfur-compound oxidation and CO2 fixation) under aerobic versus denitrifying conditions, we conducted whole-genome, cDNA microarray studies to explore this topic systematically. The microarrays identified 277 genes (approximately ten percent of the genome) as differentially expressed using Robust Multi-array Average statistical analysis and a 2-fold cutoff. Genes upregulated (ca. 6- to 150-fold) under aerobic conditions included a cluster of genes associated with iron acquisition (e.g., siderophore-related genes), a cluster of cytochrome cbb3 oxidase genes, cbbL and cbbS (encoding the large and small subunits of form I ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, or RubisCO), and multiple molecular chaperone genes. Genes upregulated (ca. 4- to 95-fold) under denitrifying conditions included nar, nir, and nor genes (associated respectively with nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and nitric oxide reductase, which catalyze successive steps of denitrification), cbbM (encoding form II RubisCO), and genes involved with sulfur-compound oxidation (including two physically separated but highly similar copies of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase and of dsrC, associated with dissimilatory sulfite reductase). Among genes associated with denitrification, relative expression levels (i.e., degree of upregulation with nitrate) tended to decrease in the order nar > nir > nor > nos. Reverse transcription, quantitative PCR analysis was used to validate these trends.

  2. Complete genome sequence of the haloalkaliphilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic thiosulfate and sulfide-oxidizing γ-proteobacterium Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum type strain ALM 1 (DSM 14477T)

    OpenAIRE

    Kappler, Ulrike; Davenport, Karen; Beatson, Scott; Lapidus, Alla; Pan, Chongle; Han, Cliff; Montero-Calasanz, Maria del Carmen; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Ivanova, Natalia; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2016-01-01

    Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum Sorokin et al. 2002 is a member of the family Piscirickettsiaceae in the order Thiotrichales. The γ-proteobacterium belongs to the colourless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from saline soda lakes with stable alkaline pH, such as Lake Mono (California) and Soap Lake (Washington State). Strain ALM 1T is characterized by its adaptation to life in the oxic/anoxic interface towards the less saline aerobic waters (mixolimnion) of the stable stratified alkaline salt ...

  3. Complete genome sequence of the haloalkaliphilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic thiosulfate and sulfide-oxidizing γ-proteobacterium Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum type strain ALM 1 (DSM 14477(T)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappler, Ulrike; Davenport, Karen; Beatson, Scott; Lapidus, Alla; Pan, Chongle; Han, Cliff; Montero-Calasanz, Maria Del Carmen; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Ivanova, Natalia; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2016-01-01

    Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum Sorokin et al. 2002 is a member of the family Piscirickettsiaceae in the order Thiotrichales. The γ-proteobacterium belongs to the colourless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from saline soda lakes with stable alkaline pH, such as Lake Mono (California) and Soap Lake (Washington State). Strain ALM 1(T) is characterized by its adaptation to life in the oxic/anoxic interface towards the less saline aerobic waters (mixolimnion) of the stable stratified alkaline salt lakes. Strain ALM 1(T) is the first representative of the genus Thioalkalimicrobium whose genome sequence has been deciphered and the fourth genome sequence of a type strain of the Piscirickettsiaceae to be published. The 1,932,455 bp long chromosome with its 1,684 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2008. PMID:27274784

  4. Oxidation of Molecular Hydrogen by a Chemolithoautotrophic Beggiatoa Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A chemolithoautotrophic strain of the family Beggiatoaceae, Beggiatoa sp. strain 35Flor, was found to oxidize molecular hydrogen when grown in a medium with diffusional gradients of oxygen, sulfide, and hydrogen. Microsensor profiles and rate measurements suggested that the strain oxidized hydrogen aerobically when oxygen was available, while hydrogen consumption under anoxic conditions was presumably driven by sulfur respiration. Beggiatoa sp. 35Flor reached significantly higher biomass in hydrogen-supplemented oxygen-sulfide gradient media, but hydrogen did not support growth of the strain in the absence of reduced sulfur compounds. Nevertheless, hydrogen oxidation can provide Beggiatoa sp. 35Flor with energy for maintenance and assimilatory purposes and may support the disposal of internally stored sulfur to prevent physical damage resulting from excessive sulfur accumulation. Our knowledge about the exposure of natural populations of Beggiatoaceae to hydrogen is very limited, but significant amounts of hydrogen could be provided by nitrogen fixation, fermentation, and geochemical processes in several of their typical habitats such as photosynthetic microbial mats and submarine sites of hydrothermal fluid flow. IMPORTANCE Reduced sulfur compounds are certainly the main electron donors for chemolithoautotrophic Beggiatoaceae, but the traditional focus on this topic has left other possible inorganic electron donors largely unexplored. In this paper, we provide evidence that hydrogen oxidation has the potential to strengthen the ecophysiological plasticity of Beggiatoaceae in several ways. Moreover, we show that hydrogen oxidation by members of this family can significantly influence biogeochemical gradients and therefore should be considered in environmental studies. PMID:26896131

  5. Oscillatory electro-oxidation of thiosulfate on gold

    OpenAIRE

    Bi, W.; He, Y.; Cabral, M.; Varela, H.; Yang, J.; Jiang, R; Gao, Q.

    2014-01-01

    We report experimental results on the oscillatory electro-oxidation of thiosulfate on polycrystalline gold electrode in buffered media of pH 6.0. Importantly, we observed oscillations in the current density (potential) when the system was studied under linear sweep of potential (current density). The system displayed supercritical Hopf, period-doubling, homoclinic and bursting bifurcations at different applied currents and potentials. After presenting the dynamics under both potentiostatic an...

  6. Genome-enabled studies of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation in the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry R Beller

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Thiobacillus denitrificans is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV and Fe(II oxidation, both of which can strongly influence the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium in contaminated aquifers. We previously identified two c-type cytochromes involved in nitrate-dependent U(IV oxidation in T. denitrificans and hypothesized that c-type cytochromes would also catalyze Fe(II oxidation, as they have been found to play this role in anaerobic phototrophic Fe(II-oxidizing bacteria. Here we report on efforts to identify genes associated with nitrate-dependent Fe(II oxidation, namely (a whole-genome transcriptional studies [using FeCO3, Fe2+, and U(IV oxides as electron donors under denitrifying conditions], (b Fe(II oxidation assays performed with knockout mutants targeting primarily highly expressed or upregulated c-type cytochromes, and (c random transposon-mutagenesis studies with screening for Fe(II oxidation. Assays of mutants for 26 target genes, most of which were c-type cytochromes, indicated that none of the mutants tested were significantly defective in nitrate-dependent Fe(II oxidation. The non-defective mutants included the c1-cytochrome subunit of the cytochrome bc1 complex (complex III, which has relevance to a previously proposed role for this complex in nitrate-dependent Fe(II oxidation and to current concepts of reverse electron transfer. A transposon mutant with a disrupted gene associated with NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I was ~35% defective relative to the wild-type strain; this strain was similarly defective in nitrate reduction with thiosulfate as the electron donor. Overall, our results indicate that nitrate-dependent Fe(II oxidation in T. denitrificans is not catalyzed by the same c-type cytochromes involved in U(IV oxidation, nor have other c-type cytochromes yet been implicated in the process.

  7. Engineering the iron-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans for biochemical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernan, Timothy; Majumdar, Sudipta; Li, Xiaozheng; Guan, Jingyang; West, Alan C; Banta, Scott

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in developing non-photosynthetic routes for the conversion of CO2 to fuels and chemicals. One underexplored approach is the transfer of energy to the metabolism of genetically modified chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is an obligate chemolithoautotroph that derives its metabolic energy from the oxidation of iron or sulfur at low pH. Two heterologous biosynthetic pathways have been expressed in A. ferrooxidans to produce either isobutyric acid or heptadecane from CO2 and the oxidation of Fe(2+). A sevenfold improvement in productivity of isobutyric acid was obtained through improved media formulations in batch cultures. Steady-state efficiencies were lower in continuous cultures, likely due to ferric inhibition. If coupled to solar panels, the photon-to-fuel efficiency of this proof-of-principle process approaches estimates for agriculture-derived biofuels. These efforts lay the foundation for the utilization of this organism in the exploitation of electrical energy for biochemical synthesis. PMID:26174759

  8. Genome-Enabled Studies of Anaerobic, Nitrate-Dependent Iron Oxidation in the Chemolithoautotrophic Bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, H. R.; Zhou, P.; Legler, T. C.; Chakicherla, A.; O'Day, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Thiobacillus denitrificans is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, both of which can strongly influence the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium in contaminated aquifers. We previously identified two c-type cytochromes involved in nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidation in T. denitrificans and hypothesized that c-type cytochromes would also catalyze Fe(II) oxidation, as they have been found to play this role in anaerobic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Here we report on efforts to identify genes associated with nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation, namely (a) whole-genome transcriptional studies [using FeCO3, Fe2+, and U(IV) oxides as electron donors under denitrifying conditions], (b) Fe(II) oxidation assays performed with knockout mutants targeting primarily highly expressed or upregulated c-type cytochromes, and (c) random transposon-mutagenesis studies with screening for Fe(II) oxidation. Assays of mutants for 26 target genes, most of which were c-type cytochromes, indicated that none of the mutants tested were significantly defective in nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The non-defective mutants included the c1-cytochrome subunit of the cytochrome bc1 complex (complex III), which has relevance to a previously proposed role for this complex in nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation and to current concepts of reverse electron transfer. Of the transposon mutants defective in Fe(II) oxidation, one mutant with a disrupted gene associated with NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) was ~35% defective relative to the wild-type strain; this strain was similarly defective in nitrate reduction with thiosulfate as the electron donor. Overall, our results indicate that nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation in T. denitrificans is not catalyzed by the same c-type cytochromes involved in U(IV) oxidation, nor have other c-type cytochromes yet been implicated in the process.

  9. Anaerobic, Nitrate-Dependent Oxidation of U(IV) Oxide Minerals by the Chemolithoautotrophic Bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beller, H R

    2004-06-25

    Under anaerobic conditions and at circumneutral pH, cells of the widely-distributed, obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans oxidatively dissolved synthetic and biogenic U(IV) oxides (uraninite) in nitrate-dependent fashion: U(IV) oxidation required the presence of nitrate and was strongly correlated to nitrate consumption. This is the first report of anaerobic U(IV) oxidation by an autotrophic bacterium.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Dyella thiooxydans ATSB10, a Thiosulfate-Oxidizing Bacterium Isolated from Sunflower Fields in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwangbo, Kyeong; Um, Yurry; Chung, Hee; Yoo, Jemin; Kim, Ki Yoon; Madhaiyan, Munusamy; Sa, Tong Min; Lee, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Dyella thiooxydans ATSB10 (KACC 12756(T) = LMG 24673(T)) is a thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium isolated from rhizosphere soils of sunflower plants. In this study, we completely sequenced the genome of D. thiooxydans ATSB10 and identified the genes involved in thiosulfate oxidation and the metabolism of aromatic intermediates. PMID:27340060

  11. Respirometric characterization of aerobic sulfide, thiosulfate and elemental sulfur oxidation by S-oxidizing biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Mabel; López, Luis R; Lafuente, Javier; Pérez, Julio; Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Gamisans, Xavier; Gabriel, David

    2016-02-01

    Respirometry was used to reveal the mechanisms involved in aerobic biological sulfide oxidation and to characterize the kinetics and stoichiometry of a microbial culture obtained from a desulfurizing biotrickling filter. Physical-chemical processes such as stripping and chemical oxidation of hydrogen sulfide were characterized since they contributed significantly to the conversions observed in respirometric tests. Mass transfer coefficient for hydrogen sulfide and the kinetic parameters for chemical oxidation of sulfide with oxygen were estimated. The stoichiometry of the process was determined and the different steps in the sulfide oxidation process were identified. The conversion scheme proposed includes intermediate production of elemental sulfur and thiosulfate and the subsequent oxidation of both compounds to sulfate. A kinetic model describing each of the reactions observed during sulfide oxidation was calibrated and validated. The product selectivity was found to be independent of the dissolved oxygen to hydrogen sulfide concentration ratio in the medium at sulfide concentrations ranging from 3 to 30 mg S L(-1). Sulfide was preferentially consumed (SOURmax = 49.2 mg DO g(-1) VSS min(-1)) and oxidized to elemental sulfur at dissolved oxygen concentrations above 0.8 mg DO L(-1). Substrate inhibition of sulfide oxidation was observed (K(i,S(2-))= 42.4 mg S L(-1)). Intracellular sulfur accumulation also affected negatively the sulfide oxidation rate. The maximum fraction of elemental sulfur accumulated inside cells was estimated (25.6% w/w) and a shrinking particle equation was included in the kinetic model to describe elemental sulfur oxidation. The microbial diversity obtained through pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Thiothrix sp. was the main species present in the culture (>95%). PMID:26704759

  12. Genome sequence of the chemolithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacterium Nitrobacter winogradskyi Nb-255

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Arp, D J [Oregon State University; Hickey, W J [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2006-03-01

    The alphaproteobacterium Nitrobacter winogradskyi (ATCC 25391) is a gram-negative facultative chemolithoautotroph capable of extracting energy from the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate. Sequencing and analysis of its genome revealed a single circular chromosome of 3,402,093 bp encoding 3,143 predicted proteins. There were extensive similarities to genes in two alphaproteobacteria, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 (1,300 genes) and Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009 CG (815 genes). Genes encoding pathways for known modes of chemolithotrophic and chemoorganotrophic growth were identified. Genes encoding multiple enzymes involved in anapleurotic reactions centered on C2 to C4 metabolism, including a glyoxylate bypass, were annotated. The inability of N. winogradskyi to grow on C6 molecules is consistent with the genome sequence, which lacks genes for complete Embden-Meyerhof and Entner-Doudoroff pathways, and active uptake of sugars. Two gene copies of the nitrite oxidoreductase, type I ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, cytochrome c oxidase, and gene homologs encoding an aerobic-type carbon monoxide dehydrogenase were present. Similarity of nitrite oxidoreductases to respiratory nitrate reductases was confirmed. Approximately 10% of the N. winogradskyi genome codes for genes involved in transport and secretion, including the presence of transporters for various organic-nitrogen molecules. The N. winogradskyi genome provides new insight into the phylogenetic identity and physiological capabilities of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. The genome will serve as a model to study the cellular and molecular processes that control nitrite oxidation and its interaction with other nitrogen-cycling processes.

  13. Characterization of a novel thiosulfate dehydrogenase from a marine acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strain SH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin, Sultana; Yoshino, Eriko; Kanao, Tadayoshi; Kamimura, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    A marine acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strain SH, was isolated to develop a bioleaching process for NaCl-containing sulfide minerals. Because the sulfur moiety of sulfide minerals is metabolized to sulfate via thiosulfate as an intermediate, we purified and characterized the thiosulfate dehydrogenase (TSD) from strain SH. The enzyme had an apparent molecular mass of 44 kDa and was purified 71-fold from the solubilized membrane fraction. Tetrathionate was the product of the TSD-oxidized thiosulfate and ferricyanide or ubiquinone was the electron acceptor. Maximum enzyme activity was observed at pH 4.0, 40 °C, and 200 mM NaCl. To our knowledge, this is the first report of NaCl-stimulated TSD activity. TSD was structurally different from the previously reported thiosulfate-oxidizing enzymes. In addition, TSD activity was strongly inhibited by 2-heptyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline N-oxide, suggesting that the TSD is a novel thiosulfate:quinone reductase. PMID:26393925

  14. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Marine, Chemolithoautotrophic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrosococcus oceani ATCC19707

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, M G; Arp, D J; Chain, P S; El-Sheikh, A F; Hauser, L J; Hommes, N G; Larimer, F W; Malfatti, S A; Norton, J M; Poret-Peterson, A T; Vergez, L M; Ward, B B

    2006-08-03

    The Gammaproteobacterium, Nitrosococcus oceani (ATCC 19707), is a Gram-negative obligate chemolithoautotroph capable of extracting energy and reducing power from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Sequencing and annotation of the genome revealed a single circular chromosome (3,481,691 bp; 50.4% G+C) and a plasmid (40,420 bp) that contain 3052 and 41 candidate protein-encoding genes, respectively. The genes encoding proteins necessary for the function of known modes of lithotrophy and autotrophy were identified. In contrast to betaproteobacterial nitrifier genomes, the N. oceani genome contained two complete rrn operons. In contrast, only one copy of the genes needed to synthesize functional ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase, as well as the proteins that relay the extracted electrons to a terminal electron acceptor were identified. The N. oceani genome contained genes for 13 complete two-component systems. The genome also contained all the genes needed to reconstruct complete central pathways, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnass and pentose phosphate pathways. The N. oceani genome contains the genes required to store and utilize energy from glycogen inclusion bodies and sucrose. Polyphosphate and pyrophosphate appear to be integrated in this bacterium's energy metabolism, stress tolerance and the ability to assimilate carbon via gluconeogenesis. One set of genes for type I RuBisCO was identified, while genes necessary for methanotrophy and for carboxysome formation were not identified. The N. oceani genome contains two copies each of the genes or operons necessary to assemble functional complexes I and IV as well as ATP synthase (one H{sup +}-dependent F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-type, one Na{sup +}-dependent V-type).

  15. Chemolithoautotrophic arsenite oxidation by a thermophilic Anoxybacillus flavithermus strain TCC9-4 from a hot spring in Tengchong of Yunnan, China

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Dawei; Li, Ping; Jiang, Zhou; Dai, Xinyue; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yanhong; Guo, Qinghai; Wang, Yanxin

    2015-01-01

    A new facultative chemolithoautotrophic arsenite (AsIII)-oxidizing bacterium TCC9-4 was isolated from a hot spring microbial mat in Tengchong of Yunnan, China. This strain could grow with AsIII as an energy source, CO2–HCO3- as a carbon source and oxygen as the electron acceptor in a minimal salts medium. Under chemolithoautotrophic conditions, more than 90% of 100 mg/L AsIII could be oxidized by the strain TCC9-4 in 36 h. Temperature was an important environmental factor that strongly influe...

  16. Kinetic enrichment of 34S during proteobacterial thiosulfate oxidation and the conserved role of SoxB in S-S bond breaking

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Alam, M.; Pyne, P.; Mazumdar, A.; Peketi, A.; Ghosh, W.

    proteins during sulfur oxidation in the phototrophic sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum. J. Bacteriol. 187: 1392-1404. 23. Grimm F, Franz B, Dahl C. 2008. Thiosulfate and Sulfur Oxidation in Purple Sulfur Bacteria, p 101-116. In Dahl C, Friedrich CG...

  17. From chemolithoautotrophs to electrolithoautotrophs: CO2 fixation by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria coupled with direct uptake of electrons from solid electron sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takumi; Kawaichi, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Hirotaka; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2015-01-01

    At deep-sea vent systems, hydrothermal emissions rich in reductive chemicals replace solar energy as fuels to support microbial carbon assimilation. Until recently, all the microbial components at vent systems have been assumed to be fostered by the primary production of chemolithoautotrophs; however, both the laboratory and on-site studies demonstrated electrical current generation at vent systems and have suggested that a portion of microbial carbon assimilation is stimulated by the direct uptake of electrons from electrically conductive minerals. Here we show that chemolithoautotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, switches the electron source for carbon assimilation from diffusible Fe(2+) ions to an electrode under the condition that electrical current is the only source of energy and electrons. Site-specific marking of a cytochrome aa3 complex (aa3 complex) and a cytochrome bc1 complex (bc1 complex) in viable cells demonstrated that the electrons taken directly from an electrode are used for O2 reduction via a down-hill pathway, which generates proton motive force that is used for pushing the electrons to NAD(+) through a bc1 complex. Activation of carbon dioxide fixation by a direct electron uptake was also confirmed by the clear potential dependency of cell growth. These results reveal a previously unknown bioenergetic versatility of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria to use solid electron sources and will help with understanding carbon assimilation of microbial components living in electronically conductive chimney habitats. PMID:26500609

  18. Thermocrinis jamiesonii sp. nov., a thiosulfate-oxidizing, autotropic thermophile isolated from a geothermal spring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Ong, John C.; Williams, Amanda; Dohnalkova, Alice; Hedlund, Brian P.

    2015-12-12

    An obligately thermophilic, chemolithotrophic, microaerophilic bacterium, designated strain GBS1T, was isolated from the water column of Great Boiling Spring, Nevada, USA. Thiosulfate was required for growth. Although capable of autotrophy, growth of GBS1T was enhanced in the presence of acetate, peptone, or Casamino acids. Growth occurred at 70-85 °C with an optimum at 80 °C, at pH 6.5-7.75 with an optimum at pH 7.25, at 0.5-8% oxygen with an optimum at 1-2%, and at ≤200 mM sodium chloride. The doubling time under optimal growth conditions was 1.3 hrs, with a final cell density of 6.2±0.5 x 107 cells/mL. Non-motile, rod-shaped cells 1.4-2.4 x 0.4-0.6 µm occurred singly or in pairs. Major cellular fatty acids (>5% of total) were C20:1ω9c (44.8%), C18:0 (26.0%), C16:0 (9.9%) and C20:0 (5.4%). Phylogenetic analysis of the GBS1T 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated an affiliation with Thermocrinis ruber and other Thermocrinis spp., but comparisons of 16S rRNA gene identity (≤97.10%) and in silico estimated DNA-DNA hybridization values (≤18.4%) with Thermocrinis spp. indicate that his strain is distinct from described species. Based on phenotypic, genotypic, and phylogenetic characteristics, the name Thermocrinis jamiesonii sp. nov. is proposed, with GBS1T (= JCM 19133T = DSM 27162T) as the type strain.

  19. Thermocrinis jamiesonii sp. nov., a thiosulfate-oxidizing, autotropic thermophile isolated from a geothermal spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Ong, John C; Williams, Amanda J; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Hedlund, Brian P

    2015-12-01

    An obligately thermophilic, chemolithotrophic, microaerophilic bacterium, designated strain GBS1T, was isolated from the water column of Great Boiling Spring, Nevada, USA. Thiosulfate was required for growth. Although capable of autotrophy, growth of GBS1T was enhanced in the presence of acetate, peptone or Casamino acids. Growth occurred at 70-85 °C with an optimum at 80 °C, at pH 6.50-7.75 with an optimum at pH 7.25, with 0.5-8 % oxygen with an optimum at 1-2 % and with ≤ 200 mM NaCl. The doubling time under optimal growth conditions was 1.3 h, with a final mean cell density of 6.2 ± 0.5 × 107 cells ml- 1. Non-motile, rod-shaped cells 1.4-2.4 × 0.4-0.6 μm in size occurred singly or in pairs. The major cellular fatty acids (>5 % of the total) were C20 : 1ω9c, C18 : 0, C16 : 0 and C20 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis of the GBS1T 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated an affiliation with Thermocrinis ruber and other species of the genus Thermocrinis, but determination of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity ( ≤ 97.10 %) and in silico estimated DNA-DNA hybridization values ( ≤ 18.4 %) with the type strains of recognized Thermocrinis species indicate that the novel strain is distinct from described species. Based on phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, a novel species, Thermocrinis jamiesonii sp. nov., is proposed, with GBS1T ( = JCM 19133T = DSM 27162T) as the type strain. PMID:26419502

  20. [Effect of temperature on the rate of oxidation of pyrrhotite-rich sulfide ore flotation concentrate and the structure of the acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic microbial community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshchanetskii, P V; Pivovarova, T A; Belyi, A V; Kondrat'eva, T F

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of flotation concentrate of a pyrrhotite-rich sulfide ore by acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic microbial communities at 35, 40, and 45 degrees C was investigated. According to the physicochemical parameters of the liquid phase of the pulp, as well as the results of analysis of the solid residue after biooxidation and cyanidation, the community developed at 40 degrees C exhibited the highest rate of oxidation. The degree of gold recovery at 35, 40, and 45 degrees C was 89.34, 94.59, and 83.25%, respectively. At 40 degrees C, the highest number of microbial cells (6.01 x 10(9) cells/mL) was observed. While temperature had very little effect on the species composition of microbial communities, except for the absence of Leptospirillum ferriphilum at 35 degrees C, the shares of individual species in the communities varied with temperature. Relatively high numbers of Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, the organism oxidizing iron and elemental sulfur at higher rates than other acidophilic chemolithotrophic species, were observed at 40 degrees C. PMID:25844443

  1. Testing of sodium thiosulfate as an oxidation inhibitor in a limestone FGD scrubber at the DOE Shawnee Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S C; Burbank, D A; Rabb, D T; Patel, H K; McGrath, D P

    1981-10-01

    A total of four limestone runs were made on the 10-MW spray tower system from April 10 through May 30, 1981, including two base case runs without thiosulfate (Runs SST 102 and SST 101) and two runs with thiosulfate addition (Run SST 106 and SST 112). With an inlet SO/sub 2/ concentration of 1500 to 2300 ppM, a scrubber inlet pH of 5.3, and a slurry solids concentration of about 3.5% (Runs SST 101, SST 106, and SST 112), the addition of S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup =/ in the form of sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate (Na/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 3/.5H/sub 2/O) resulted in gypsum descaling mode of operation. At 7.6 lbs/h addition rate of Na/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 3/.5H/sub 2/O during Run SST 106, the S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup =/ concentration appeared to remain constant at about 90 ppM (10 to 200 ppM range), and the spray tower operated under slightly descaling mode. The S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup =/ concentration was questionable for this run because of analytical problems. At 15.2 lbs/h addition rate of Na/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 3/.5H/sub 2/O during Run SST 112, the S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup =/ concentration continued to increase and appeared to level off at 2200 ppM toward the end of the run after 214 operating hours. Gypsum saturation in the scrubber inlet liquor decreased to about 10% at the end of the run, and the scrubber operated under highly descaling mode.

  2. Low expression of thiosulfate sulfurtransferase (rhodanese) predicts mortality in hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krueger, Katharina; Koch, Kathrin; Jühling, Anja; Tepel, Martin; Scholze, Alexandra

    To test the hypothesis that impaired expression of the thiosulfate sulfurtransferase rhodanese is associated with oxidative stress and may predict mortality in hemodialysis patients.......To test the hypothesis that impaired expression of the thiosulfate sulfurtransferase rhodanese is associated with oxidative stress and may predict mortality in hemodialysis patients....

  3. Examining thiosulfate-driven autotrophic denitrification through respirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Mabel; Guisasola, Albert; Gamisans, Xavier; Gabriel, David

    2014-10-01

    Anoxic respirometry was applied to characterize a sulfide-oxidizing nitrate-reducing (SO-NR) culture obtained from an anoxic biogas desulfurizing biotrickling filter treating high loads of H2S. Immobilized biomass extracted from the biotrickling filter was grown in a suspended culture with thiosulfate as electron donor to obtain the biomass growth yield and the S2O3(2)(-)/NO3(-) consumed ratio. Afterward, respirometry was applied to describe thiosulfate oxidation under anoxic conditions. A pure culture of Thiobacillus denitrificans was also used as a control culture in order to validate the procedure proposed in this work to characterize the SO-NR biomass. Respirometric profiles obtained with this microbial culture showed that nitrite was formed as intermediate during nitrate reduction and revealed that no competitive inhibition appeared when both electron acceptors were present in the medium. Although final bioreaction products depended on the initial S2O3(2)(-)/NO3(-) ratio, such ratio did not affect thiosulfate oxidation or denitrification rates. Moreover, respirometric profiles showed that the specific nitrite uptake rate depended on the biomass characteristics being that of a SO-NR mixed culture (39.8mgNg(-1) VSSh(-1)) higher than that obtained from a pure culture of T. denitrificans (19.7mgNg(-1) VSSh(-1)). For the first time, the stoichiometry of the two-step denitrification mechanism with thiosulfate oxidation and biomass growth associated was solved for both reactions. PMID:25065782

  4. The Genome Sequence of the Obligately Chemolithoautotrophic, Facultatively Anaerobic Bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    OpenAIRE

    Beller, Harry R.; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Letain, Tracy E.; Chakicherla, Anu; Larimer, Frank W.; Richardson, Paul M.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Wood, Ann P.; Kelly, Donovan P.

    2006-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Thiobacillus denitrificans ATCC 25259 is the first to become available for an obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-compound-oxidizing, β-proteobacterium. Analysis of the 2,909,809-bp genome will facilitate our molecular and biochemical understanding of the unusual metabolic repertoire of this bacterium, including its ability to couple denitrification to sulfur-compound oxidation, to catalyze anaerobic, nitrate-dependent oxidation of Fe(II) and U(IV), and to...

  5. High cell density cultivation of the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Benedek; Török, Tibor; Sándor, Erzsébet; Fekete, Erzsébet; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente

    2016-05-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is a chemolithoautotrophic nitrifier, a gram-negative bacterium that can obtain all energy required for growth from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, and this may be beneficial for various biotechnological and environmental applications. However, compared to other bacteria, growth of ammonia oxidizing bacteria is very slow. A prerequisite to produce high cell density N. europaea cultures is to minimize the concentrations of inhibitory metabolic by-products. During growth on ammonia nitrite accumulates, as a consequence, N. europaea cannot grow to high cell concentrations under conventional batch conditions. Here, we show that single-vessel dialysis membrane bioreactors can be used to obtain substantially increased N. europaea biomasses and substantially reduced nitrite levels in media initially containing high amounts of the substrate. Dialysis membrane bioreactor fermentations were run in batch as well as in continuous mode. Growth was monitored with cell concentration determinations, by assessing dry cell mass and by monitoring ammonium consumption as well as nitrite formation. In addition, metabolic activity was probed with in vivo acridine orange staining. Under continuous substrate feed, the maximal cell concentration (2.79 × 10(12)/L) and maximal dry cell mass (0.895 g/L) achieved more than doubled the highest values reported for N. europaea cultivations to date. PMID:26358065

  6. Pretreatment and thiosulfate leaching of refractory gold-bearing arsenosulfide concentrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuqun Meng

    2005-01-01

    A hydrometallurgical process for refractory gold-bearing arsenosulfide concentrates at ambient temperature and pressure was presented, including fine grinding with intensified alkali-leaching (FGIAL), enhanced agitation alkali-leaching (EAAL), thiosulfate leaching and displacement. Experimental results on a refractory gold concentrate showed that the total consumption of NaOH in alkaline leaching is only 41% of those theoretically calculated under the conditions of full oxidization for the same amount of arsenides and sulfides transformed into arsenates and sulfates, and 72.3% of gold is synchro-dissoluted by thiosulfate self-generated during alkaline leaching. After alkaline leaching, thiosulfate leaching was carried out for 24 h. The dissolution of gold is increased to 91.9% from 4.6% by cyanide without the pretreatment. The displacement of gold by zinc powder in the solution gets to 99.2%. Due to an amount of thiosulfate self-generated during alkaline leaching, the reagent addition in thiosulfate leaching afterwards is lower than the normal.

  7. Pathways and Microbiology of Thiosulfate Transformations and Sulfate Reduction in a Marine Sediment (Kattegat, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; BAK, F.

    1991-01-01

    Reductive and oxidative pathways of the sulfur cycle were studied in a marine sediment by parallel radiotracer experiments with (SO4(2-))-S-35, (H2S)-S-35, and (S2O3(2-))-S-35 injected into undisturbed sediment cores. The distributions of viable populations of sulfate- and thiosulfate-reducing ba...

  8. The Sulfur Cycle of Fresh-Water Sediments - Role of Thiosulfate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB

    1990-01-01

    The formation and pathways of thiosulfate (S2O3(2-)) in anoxic sediment were studied in the Odder River and Brabrand Lake, Denmark. Time-course experiments were done in slurries with four S-35 tracers: SO4(2-), H2S, and S2O3(2-) with either the inner (oxidized) or the outer (reduced) S atom label...

  9. Chemolithoautotrophic production mediating the cycling of the greenhouse gases N2O and CH4 in an upwelling ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Farías, L.; Fernández, C.; J. Faúndez; M. Cornejo; Alcaman, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    The high availability of electron donors occurring in coastal upwelling ecosystems with marked oxyclines favours chemoautotrophy, in turn leading to high N2O and CH4 cycling associated with aerobic NH4+ (AAO) and CH4 oxidation (AMO). This is the case of the highly productive coastal upwelling area off central Chile (36° S), where we evaluated the importance of total chemolithoautotrophic vs. photoautotrophic production, the specific contributions of AAO and AMO to che...

  10. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, K M; Sievert, S M; Abril, F N; Ball, L A; Barrett, C J; Blake, R A; Boller, A J; Chain, P G; Clark, J A; Davis, C R; Detter, C; Do, K F; Dobrinski, K P; Faza, B I; Fitzpatrick, K A; Freyermuth, S K; Harmer, T L; Hauser, L J; Hugler, M; Kerfeld, C A; Klotz, M G; Kong, W W; Land, M; Lapidus, A; Larimer, F W; Longo, D L; Lucas, S; Malfatti, S A; Massey, S E; Martin, D D; McCuddin, Z; Meyer, F; Moore, J L; Ocampo Jr., L H; Paul, J H; Paulsen, I T; Reep, D K; Ren, Q; Ross, R L; Sato, P Y; Thomas, P; Tinkham, L E; Zerugh, G T

    2007-01-10

    Presented here is the complete genome sequence of Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2, representative of ubiquitous chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. This gammaproteobacterium has a single chromosome (2,427,734 bp), and its genome illustrates many of the adaptations that have enabled it to thrive at vents globally. It has 14 methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein genes, including four that may assist in positioning it in the redoxcline. A relative abundance of CDSs encoding regulatory proteins likely control the expression of genes encoding carboxysomes, multiple dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphate transporters, as well as a phosphonate operon, which provide this species with a variety of options for acquiring these substrates from the environment. T. crunogena XCL-2 is unusual among obligate sulfur oxidizing bacteria in relying on the Sox system for the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds. A 38 kb prophage is present, and a high level of prophage induction was observed, which may play a role in keeping competing populations of close relatives in check. The genome has characteristics consistent with an obligately chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle, including few transporters predicted to have organic allocrits, and Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle CDSs scattered throughout the genome.

  11. Thiosulfate as a metabolic product: the bacterial fermentation of taurine

    OpenAIRE

    Denger, Karin; Laue, Heike; Cook, Alasdair M.

    1997-01-01

    Thiosulfate (S2O3²-) is a natural product that is widely utilized in natural ecosystems as an electron sink or as an electron donor. However, the major biological source(s) of this thiosulfate is unknown. We present the first report that taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonate), the major mammalian solute, is subject to fermentation. This bacterial fermentation was found to be catalyzed by a new isolate, strain GKNTAU, a strictly anaerobic, gram-positive, motile rod that formed subterminal spores. Th...

  12. Chemolithoautotrophic production mediating the cycling of the greenhouses gases N2O and CH4 in an upwelling ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Alcaman, M. E.; M. Cornejo; J. Faúndez; Fernández, C.; Farías, L.

    2009-01-01

    Coastal upwelling ecosystems with marked oxyclines (redoxclines) present high availability of electron donors that favour chemoautotrophy, leading in turn to high N2O and CH4 cycling associated with aerobic NH4+ (AAO) and CH4 oxidation (AMO). This is the case of the highly productive coastal upwelling area off Central Chile (36° S), where we evaluated the importance of total chemolithoautotrophic vs. photoautotrophic production, the specific contributions of AAO and AMO to chemosynthesis ...

  13. Insights into Glycogen Metabolism in Chemolithoautotrophic Bacteria from Distinctive Kinetic and Regulatory Properties of ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase from Nitrosomonas europaea

    OpenAIRE

    Machtey, Matías; Kuhn, Misty L.; Flasch, Diane A; Aleanzi, Mabel; Ballicora, Miguel A; Iglesias, Alberto A.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is a chemolithoautotroph that obtains energy by oxidizing ammonia in the presence of oxygen and fixes CO2 via the Benson-Calvin cycle. Despite its environmental and evolutionary importance, very little is known about the regulation and metabolism of glycogen, a source of carbon and energy storage. Here, we cloned and heterologously expressed the genes coding for two major putative enzymes of the glycogen synthetic pathway in N. europaea, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and...

  14. Synthesis, properties and supramolecular structure of piperazinediium thiosulfate monohydrate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bikshandarkoil R Srinivasan; Ashish R Naik; Sunder N Dhuri; Christian Näther; Wolfgang Bensch

    2011-01-01

    Aqueous reaction of ammonium thiosulfate with piperazine (pip) results in the formation of the title compound (pipH2)[S2O3]$\\cdot$H2O 1 (pipH2 = piperazinediium) in good yield. 1 was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, Raman andNMRspectra, X-ray powder pattern and its structure was determined. On heating at 100°C, 1 transforms to anhydrous piperazinediium thiosulfate 2, which can be rehydrated to the monohydrate on exposure tomoisture. The structure of 1 consists of two crystallographically independent piperazinediium (pipH2)2+ cations located on inversion centers, a thiosulfate anion and a lattice water. The organic cations, thiosulfate anion and lattice water are linked by six varieties of hydrogen bond namely O-H$\\cdots$O, O-H$\\cdots$S, N-H$\\cdots$O, N-H$\\cdots$S, C-H$\\cdots$O and C-H$\\cdots$S, leading to the formation of alternating layers of (pipH2)2+ cations and water linked thiosulfate chains. A comparative study of several compounds charge balanced by the piperazinediium cation is described.

  15. Coupled RNA-SIP and metatranscriptomics of active chemolithoautotrophic communities at a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Caroline S; Huber, Julie A

    2016-08-01

    The chemolithoautotrophic microbial community of the rocky subseafloor potentially provides a large amount of organic carbon to the deep ocean, yet our understanding of the activity and metabolic complexity of subseafloor organisms remains poorly described. A combination of metagenomic, metatranscriptomic, and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) analyses were used to identify the metabolic potential, expression patterns, and active autotrophic bacteria and archaea and their pathways present in low-temperature hydrothermal fluids from Axial Seamount, an active submarine volcano. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic results showed the presence of genes and transcripts for sulfur, hydrogen, and ammonium oxidation, oxygen respiration, denitrification, and methanogenesis, as well as multiple carbon fixation pathways. In RNA-SIP experiments across a range of temperatures under reducing conditions, the enriched (13)C fractions showed differences in taxonomic and functional diversity. At 30 °C and 55 °C, Epsilonproteobacteria were dominant, oxidizing hydrogen and primarily reducing nitrate. Methanogenic archaea were also present at 55 °C, and were the only autotrophs present at 80 °C. Correspondingly, the predominant CO2 fixation pathways changed from the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle to the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway with increasing temperature. By coupling RNA-SIP with meta-omics, this study demonstrates the presence and activity of distinct chemolithoautotrophic communities across a thermal gradient of a deep-sea hydrothermal vent. PMID:26872039

  16. The genome sequence of the obligately chemolithoautotrophic, facultatively anaerobic bacterium Thiobacillus denitfificans.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beller, H R [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL

    2006-02-01

    The complete genome sequence of Thiobacillus denitrificans ATCC 25259 is the first to become available for an obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-compound-oxidizing, {beta}-proteobacterium. Analysis of the 2,909,809-bp genome will facilitate our molecular and biochemical understanding of the unusual metabolic repertoire of this bacterium, including its ability to couple denitrification to sulfur-compound oxidation, to catalyze anaerobic, nitrate-dependent oxidation of Fe(II) and U(IV), and to oxidize mineral electron donors. Notable genomic features include (i) genes encoding c-type cytochromes totaling 1 to 2 percent of the genome, which is a proportion greater than for almost all bacterial and archaeal species sequenced to date, (ii) genes encoding two [NiFe]hydrogenases, which is particularly significant because no information on hydrogenases has previously been reported for T. denitrificans and hydrogen oxidation appears to be critical for anaerobic U(IV) oxidation by this species, (iii) a diverse complement of more than 50 genes associated with sulfur-compound oxidation (including sox genes, dsr genes, and genes associated with the AMP-dependent oxidation of sulfite to sulfate), some of which occur in multiple (up to eight) copies, (iv) a relatively large number of genes associated with inorganic ion transport and heavy metal resistance, and (v) a paucity of genes encoding organic-compound transporters, commensurate with obligate chemolithoautotrophy. Ultimately, the genome sequence of T. denitrificans will enable elucidation of the mechanisms of aerobic and anaerobic sulfur-compound oxidation by {beta}-proteobacteria and will help reveal the molecular basis of this organism's role in major biogeochemical cycles (i.e., those involving sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon) and groundwater restoration.

  17. Genetic manipulation of the obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beller, H.R.; Legler, T.C.; Kane, S.R.

    2011-07-15

    Chemolithoautotrophic bacteria can be of industrial and environmental importance, but they present a challenge for systems biology studies, as their central metabolism deviates from that of model organisms and there is a much less extensive experimental basis for their gene annotation than for typical organoheterotrophs. For microbes with sequenced genomes but unconventional metabolism, the ability to create knockout mutations can be a powerful tool for functional genomics and thereby render an organism more amenable to systems biology approaches. In this chapter, we describe a genetic system for Thiobacillus denitrificans, with which insertion mutations can be introduced by homologous recombination and complemented in trans. Insertion mutations are generated by in vitro transposition, the mutated genes are amplified by the PCR, and the amplicons are introduced into T. denitrificans by electroporation. Use of a complementation vector, pTL2, based on the IncP plasmid pRR10 is also addressed.

  18. Productivity-Diversity Relationships from Chemolithoautotrophically Based Sulfidic Karst Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter Megan L.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Although ecosystems thriving in the absence of photosynthetic processes are no longer considered unique phenomena, we haveyet to understand how these ecosystems are energetically sustained via chemosynthesis. Ecosystem energetics were measuredin microbial mats from active sulfidic caves (Movile Cave, Romania; Frasassi Caves, Italy; Lower Kane Cave, Wyoming, USA; andCesspool Cave, Virginia, USA using radiotracer techniques. We also estimated bacterial diversity using 16S rRNA sequences torelate the productivity measurements to the composition of the microbial communities. All of the microbial communities investigatedwere dominated by chemolithoautotrophic productivity, with the highest rates from Movile Cave at 281 g C/m2/yr. Heterotrophicproductivities were at least one order of magnitude less than autotrophy from all of the caves. We generated 414 new 16S rRNAgene sequences that represented 173 operational taxonomic units (OTUs with 99% sequence similarity. Although 13% of theseOTUs were found in more than one cave, the compositions of each community were significantly different from each other (P≤0.001.Autotrophic productivity was positively correlated with overall species richness and with the number of bacterial OTUs affiliated withthe Epsilonproteobacteria, a group known for sulfur cycling and chemolithoautotrophy. Higher rates of autotrophy were also stronglypositively correlated to available metabolic energy sources, and specifically to dissolved sulfide concentrations. The relationship ofautotrophic productivity and heterotrophic cycling rates to bacterial species richness can significantly impact the diversity of highertrophic levels in chemolithoautotrophically-based cave ecosystems, with the systems possessing the highest productivity supportingabundant and diverse macro-invertebrate communities.

  19. Biological Nitrogen Removal through Nitritation Coupled with Thiosulfate-Driven Denitritation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jin; Zhou, Junmei; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Rulong; Wang, Qilin

    2016-01-01

    A novel biological nitrogen removal system based on nitritation coupled with thiosulfate-driven denitritation (Nitritation-TDD) was developed to achieve a high nitrogen removal rate and low sludge production. A nitritation sequential batch reactor (nitritation SBR) and an anoxic up-flow sludge bed (AnUSB) reactor were applied for effective nitritation and denitritation, respectively. Above 75% nitrite was accumulated in the nitritation SBR with an influent ammonia loading rate of 0.43 kg N/d/m(3). During Nitritation-TDD operation, particle sizes (d50) of the sludge decreased from 406 to 225 um in nitritation SBR and from 327-183 um in AnUSB reactor. Pyrosequencing tests revealed that ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) population was stabilized at approximately 7.0% (calculated as population of AOB-related genus divided by the total microbial population) in the nitritation SBR. In contrast, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) population decreased from 6.5-0.6% over the same time, indicating the effective nitrite accumulation in the nitritation SBR. Thiobacillus, accounting for 34.2% in the AnUSB reactor, was mainly responsible for nitrogen removal via autotrophic denitritation, using an external source of thiosulfate as electron donor. Also, it was found that free nitrous acid could directly affect the denitritation activity. PMID:27272192

  20. Comparing chemolithoautotrophic subseafloor communities across geochemical gradients using meta-omics and RNA-SIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, C. S.; Huber, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The chemolithoautotrophic microbial community of the rocky subseafloor potentially provides a large amount of organic carbon to the deep ocean, yet our understanding of the activity and metabolic complexity of subseafloor organisms remains poorly described. Past studies have shown that the taxonomic structure of subseafloor communities differs based on the geochemical signatures of individual vents. In this study, we expanded beyond phylogeny and used a combination of metagenomic, metatranscriptomic, and RNA-based stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) analyses to identify the metabolic potential, expression patterns, and the active autotrophic players and genomic pathways present in venting fluids from Axial Seamount, an active submarine volcano off the coast of Oregon, USA. Low-temperature diffuse vent fluids from three hydrothermal vents, Marker 113, Marker 33, and Anemone, were filtered and preserved on the seafloor for metagenome and metatranscriptome analyses. Fluid for RNA-SIP was also collected and incubated shipboard with 13C-labeled sodium bicarbonate at 30ºC, 55ºC, and 80ºC for each vent. Taxonomically, Epsilonproteobacteria comprised a significant proportion of the community at all three vents, but each vent also had distinct groups that were abundant including SUP05 at Anemone and Methanococcus at Marker 113. Functionally, vents shared many metabolic processes including genes for denitrification, sulfur reduction and sulfur, hydrogen, and ammonium oxidation, which were present and expressed in similar abundance across all three vents. One metabolic difference between vents was the presence and expression of genes for methanogenesis, which were highly abundant and expressed at Marker 113, in lower abundance and expression at Marker 33, and not present at Anemone. RNA-SIP analysis is ongoing but initial results from Marker 113 revealed that at mesophilic, thermophilic, or hyperthemophilic temperatures, different genera and autotrophic metabolisms dominated

  1. Adipocyte induced arterial calcification is prevented with sodium thiosulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Neal X., E-mail: xuechen@iupui.edu [Divison of Nephrology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); O’Neill, Kalisha; Akl, Nader Kassis [Divison of Nephrology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Moe, Sharon M. [Divison of Nephrology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • High phosphorus can induce calcification of adipocytes, even when fully differentiated. • Adipocytes can induce vascular calcification in an autocrine manner. • Sodium thiosulfate inhibits adipocyte calcification. - Abstract: Background: Calcification can occur in fat in multiple clinical conditions including in the dermis, breasts and in the abdomen in calciphylaxis. All of these are more common in patients with advanced kidney disease. Clinically, hyperphosphatemia and obesity are risk factors. Thus we tested the hypothesis that adipocytes can calcify in the presence of elevated phosphorus and/or that adipocytes exposed to phosphorus can induce vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification. Methods: 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were induced into mature adipocytes and then treated with media containing high phosphorus. Calcification was assessed biochemically and PCR performed to determine the expression of genes for osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation. Adipocytes were also co-cultured with bovine VSMC to determine paracrine effects, and the efficacy of sodium thiosulfate was determined. Results: The results demonstrated that high phosphorus induced the calcification of differentiated adipocytes with increased expression of osteopontin, the osteoblast transcription factor Runx2 and decreased expression of adipocyte transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein α (CEBPα), indicating that high phosphorus led to a phenotypic switch of adipocytes to an osteoblast like phenotype. Sodium thiosulfate, dose dependently decreased adipocyte calcification and inhibited adipocyte induced increase of VSMC calcification. Co-culture studies demonstrated that adipocytes facilitated VSMC calcification partially mediated by changes of secretion of leptin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from adipocytes. Conclusion: High phosphorus induced calcification of mature adipocytes, and

  2. Adipocyte induced arterial calcification is prevented with sodium thiosulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • High phosphorus can induce calcification of adipocytes, even when fully differentiated. • Adipocytes can induce vascular calcification in an autocrine manner. • Sodium thiosulfate inhibits adipocyte calcification. - Abstract: Background: Calcification can occur in fat in multiple clinical conditions including in the dermis, breasts and in the abdomen in calciphylaxis. All of these are more common in patients with advanced kidney disease. Clinically, hyperphosphatemia and obesity are risk factors. Thus we tested the hypothesis that adipocytes can calcify in the presence of elevated phosphorus and/or that adipocytes exposed to phosphorus can induce vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification. Methods: 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were induced into mature adipocytes and then treated with media containing high phosphorus. Calcification was assessed biochemically and PCR performed to determine the expression of genes for osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation. Adipocytes were also co-cultured with bovine VSMC to determine paracrine effects, and the efficacy of sodium thiosulfate was determined. Results: The results demonstrated that high phosphorus induced the calcification of differentiated adipocytes with increased expression of osteopontin, the osteoblast transcription factor Runx2 and decreased expression of adipocyte transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein α (CEBPα), indicating that high phosphorus led to a phenotypic switch of adipocytes to an osteoblast like phenotype. Sodium thiosulfate, dose dependently decreased adipocyte calcification and inhibited adipocyte induced increase of VSMC calcification. Co-culture studies demonstrated that adipocytes facilitated VSMC calcification partially mediated by changes of secretion of leptin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from adipocytes. Conclusion: High phosphorus induced calcification of mature adipocytes, and

  3. Cetia pacifica gen. nov., sp. nov., a chemolithoautotrophic, thermophilic, nitrate-ammonifying bacterium from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosche, Ashley; Sekaran, Hema; Pérez-Rodríguez, Ileana; Starovoytov, Valentin; Vetriani, Costantino

    2015-04-01

    A thermophilic, anaerobic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium, strain TB-6(T), was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent located on the East Pacific Rise at 9° N. The cells were Gram-staining-negative and rod-shaped with one or more polar flagella. Cell size was approximately 1-1.5 µm in length and 0.5 µm in width. Strain TB-6(T) grew between 45 and 70 °C (optimum 55-60 °C), 0 and 35 g NaCl l(-1) (optimum 20-30 g l(-1)) and pH 4.5 and 7.5 (optimum pH 5.5-6.0). Generation time under optimal conditions was 2 h. Growth of strain TB-6(T) occurred with H2 as the energy source, CO2 as the carbon source and nitrate or sulfur as electron acceptors, with formation of ammonium or hydrogen sulfide, respectively. Acetate, (+)-d-glucose, Casamino acids, sucrose and yeast extract were not used as carbon and energy sources. Inhibition of growth occurred in the presence of lactate, peptone and tryptone under a H2/CO2 (80 : 20; 200 kPa) gas phase. Thiosulfate, sulfite, arsenate, selenate and oxygen were not used as electron acceptors. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 36.8 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of strain TB-6(T) showed that this organism branched separately from the three most closely related genera, Caminibacter , Nautilia and Lebetimonas , within the family Nautiliaceae . Strain TB-6(T) contained several unique fatty acids in comparison with other members of the family Nautiliaceae . Based on experimental evidence, it is proposed that the organism represents a novel species and genus within the family Nautiliaceae , Cetia pacifica, gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain is TB-6(T) ( = DSM 27783(T) = JCM 19563(T)). PMID:25604337

  4. Microbial oxidative sulfur metabolism: biochemical evidence of the membrane-bound heterodisulfide reductase-like complex of the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughanemi, Souhela; Lyonnet, Jordan; Infossi, Pascale; Bauzan, Marielle; Kosta, Artémis; Lignon, Sabrina; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Guiral, Marianne

    2016-08-01

    The Hdr (heterodisulfide reductase)-like enzyme is predicted, from gene transcript profiling experiments previously published, to be essential in oxidative sulfur metabolism in a number of bacteria and archaea. Nevertheless, no biochemical and physicochemical data are available so far about this enzyme. Genes coding for it were identified in Aquifex aeolicus, a Gram-negative, hyperthermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic and microaerophilic bacterium that uses inorganic sulfur compounds as electron donor to grow. We provide biochemical evidence that this Hdr-like enzyme is present in this sulfur-oxidizing prokaryote (cultivated with thiosulfate or elemental sulfur). We demonstrate, by immunolocalization and cell fractionation, that Hdr-like enzyme is associated, presumably monotopically, with the membrane fraction. We show by co-immunoprecipitation assay or partial purification, that the Hdr proteins form a stable complex composed of at least five subunits, HdrA, HdrB1, HdrB2, HdrC1 and HdrC2, present in two forms of high molecular mass on native gel (∼240 and 450 kDa). These studies allow us to propose a revised model for dissimilatory sulfur oxidation pathways in A. aeolicus, with Hdr predicted to generate sulfite. PMID:27284018

  5. Numerical Investigations of Vadose Zone Transport of Saturated Sodium Thiosulfate Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M. D.; Ward, A. L.

    2001-12-01

    Compared with water, hypersaline liquid wastes ([NaNO3] > 10 N) from the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) process at the Hanford site have elevated viscosity (μ > 1.2 cP), density (ρ > 1.4 gm/cm3), and surface tension (σ > 100 dyn/cm). Such liquids have infiltrated into the vadose zone at Hanford from leaking underground storage tanks. The migration behavior of saturated or hypersaline salt solutions through unsaturated soils is largely unknown. Laboratory tests with tank-waste simulants suggest that the elevated density, viscosity, and surface tension properties of these liquids can influence the wetting front behavior, altering its shape and migration rate. Conditions under which these mechanisms are active in the field and the extent to which they contribute to transport through the vadose zone are largely unknown, making it impossible to accurately predict the post-leak distribution of these fluids in the field. To investigate the effects of fluid properties on subsurface migration of hypersaline saline solutions, numerical simulations were conducted of a field-scale, tank-leak experiment. The field experiments consisted of five 4000-L injections, at a depth of 5 m, of saturated sodium thiosulfate brine (used as a surrogate for REDOX type wastes) over a 5-week period, followed by three 4000-L injections of Columbia River water. Pre-test modeling of river water injections at this Hanford field site predicted significant lateral spreading of the moisture plume and were confirmed by geophysical logging. A series of three-dimensional, multifluid (i.e., aqueous and gas phases) numerical simulations were conducted that systematically considered the effects of elevated density, viscosity, and surface tension, and reduced vapor pressure on vadose-zone transport. Hydrologic properties were determined from cores collected at the field site and calibrated using river-water injection experiments. Isothermal conditions were assumed for the simulations, however, the effects of

  6. Extraction of Copper(I Thiosulfate by Modified Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okky Anggraito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is one of non-toxic natural biopolymer and abundance in nature. Chitosan have two active sites such as amine and hydroxyl groups. Amine groups (-NH2 in chitosan can be modified into secondary amine (-NHR. In this research, copper was dissolved as copper(I thiosulfate as anion complex (Cu(S2O323- and chitosan was modified by trimethylamine sulfur trioxide (TMAS. One of hydrogen atom in –NH2 was substituted by –SO3Na. The result of this research, the modified chitosan was identified by FT-IR. FT-IR spectra gave characteristic band at 3600-3200 cm-1 (O-H and N-H; 1648 cm-1 (C=O; 1115,74 cm-1 (S=O and 617,18 cm-1 (N-S. The result of surface analysis using SEM and TEM showed that the surface morphology of sulfated chitosan as a result of modification is different in comparison with chitosan. Based on chitosan, pH extraction was adjusted to pH 3 until 8. After optimum pH of extraction was obtained then re-extraction was done by using thiosulfate solution at 0.05 ; 0.10 ; 0.50 ; and 1.00 M. Extraction and re-extraction of copper(I thiosulfate was analyzed by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS. The highest efficiency extraction using modified chitosan and chitosan respectively at pH 3 and 6. The efficiency re-extraction using modified chitosan and chitosan respectively 100% and below 100%.

  7. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. II. Formation and decomposition of thiosulfate and polythionate in Cinder Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Schoonen, M.A.A.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Cunningham, K.M.; Ball, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    Cinder Pool is an acid-sulfate-chloride boiling spring in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park. The pool is unique in that its surface is partially covered with mm-size, black, hollow sulfur spherules, while a layer of molten sulfur resides at the bottom of the pool (18 m depth). The sulfur speciation in the pool was determined on four different days over a period of two years. Samples were taken to evaluate changes with depth and to evaluate the importance of the sulfur spherules on sulfur redox chemistry. All analyses were conducted on site using a combination of ion chromatography and colorimetric techniques. Dissolved sulfide (H2S), thiosulfate (S2O32−), polythionates (SxO62−), and sulfate were detected. The polythionate concentration was highly variable in time and space. The highest concentrations were found in surficial samples taken from among the sulfur spherules. With depth, the polythionate concentrations dropped off. The maximum observed polythionate concentration was 8 μM. Thiosulfate was rather uniformly distributed throughout the pool and concentrations ranged from 35 to 45 μM. Total dissolved sulfide concentrations varied with time, concentrations ranged from 16 to 48 μM. Sulfate was relatively constant, with concentrations ranging from 1150 to 1300 μM. The sulfur speciation of Cinder Pool is unique in that the thiosulfate and polythionate concentrations are significantly higher than for any other acid-sulfate spring yet sampled in Yellowstone National Park. Complementary laboratory experiments show that thiosulfate is the intermediate sulfoxyanion formed from sulfur hydrolysis under conditions similar to those found in Cinder Pool and that polythionates are formed via the oxidation of thiosulfate by dissolved oxygen. This last reaction is catalyzed by pyrite that occurs as a minor constituent in the sulfur spherules floating on the pool's surface. Polythionate decomposition proceeds via two pathways: (1) a reaction with H2S

  8. The role of thiosulfate on the microbial induced pitting of carbon steel; Role du thiosulfate sur la corrosion par piqures bacterienne de l`acier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campaignolle, X.; Caumette, P. [Laboratoire d`Oceanographie Biologique, 33 - Arcachon (France); Dabosi, F. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie, 31 - Toulouse (France); Crolet, J.L. [Societe Nationale Elf-Aquitaine (France)

    1996-12-31

    The risk factors connecting a bacterial contamination to the development of a corrosion by rapid pitting were studied by comparing the natural coupling current circulating between two concentric electrodes. Whether they are sulfate-reducing (BSR) or thiosulfate-reducing (BTR) bacteria, the presence and use of thiosulfate appear as a major risk factor, leading o penetration speeds higher than one cm/year. (authors) 24 refs.

  9. Dechlorination with sodium thiosulfate affects the toxicity of wastewater contaminated with copper, cadmium, nickel, or zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, So-Rin; Kim, Jung-Kon; Lee, Min-Jung; Choi, Kyungho

    2008-04-01

    Sodium thiosulfate is recommended by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for dechlorination of the effluent samples containing residual chlorines before the toxicity testing. For samples contaminated with residual chlorine and metals, e.g., Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II); however, metal toxicity as measured with Daphnia magna was reduced even at approximately half the recommended amount of sodium thiosulfate. Formation of metal-thiosulfate complexes that are less bioavailable may explain the apparent reduction of metal toxicity. In contrast, for samples spiked with Zn(II), dechlorination with sodium thiosulfate increased toxicity. The use of sodium thiosulfate for dechlorination should be cautioned when the sample under the bioassay is potentially contaminated with metals. PMID:18214916

  10. Elemental sulfur and thiosulfate disproportionation by Desulfocapsa sulfoexigens sp. nov., a new anaerobic bacterium isolated from marine surface sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finster, Kai; Liesack, Werner; Thamdrup, Bo

    1998-01-01

    A mesophilic, anaerobic, gram-negative bacterium, strain SB164P1, was enriched and isolated from oxidized marine surface sediment with elemental sulfur as the sole energy substrate in the presence of ferrihydrite. Elemental sulfur was disproportionated to hydrogen sulfide and sulfate. Growth was...... chemolithoautotrophically exclusively by the disproportionation of inorganic sulfur compounds. Comparative 16S rDNA sequencing analysis placed strain SB164P1 into the delta subclass of the class Proteobacteria. Its closest relative is Desulfocapsa thiozymogenes, and slightly more distantly related are Desulfofustis...

  11. Crystallization, preliminary crystallographic analysis and phasing of the thiosulfate-binding protein SoxY from Chlorobium limicola f. thiosulfatophilum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SoxY from C. limicola f. thiosulfatophilum is involved in thiosulfate metabolism. Crystallization, preliminary crystallographic analysis and phasing of this protein are presented. The 22 kDa SoxYZ protein complex from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium limicola f. thiosulfatophilum is a central player in the sulfur-oxidizing (Sox) enzyme system of the organism by activating thiosulfate for oxidation by SoxXA and SoxB. It has been proposed that SoxYZ exists as a heterodimer or heterotetramer, but the properties and role of the individual components of the complex thus far remain unknown. Here, the heterologous expression, purification, and the crystallization of stable tetrameric SoxY are reported. Crystals of SoxY diffract to 2.15 Å resolution and belong to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.22, b = 120.11, c = 95.30 Å. MIRAS data from Pt2+- and Hg2+-derivatized SoxY crystals resulted in an interpretable electron-density map at 3 Å resolution after density modification

  12. Chemolithoautotrophic production mediating the cycling of the greenhouses gases N2O and CH4 in an upwelling ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farías, L.; Fernández, C.; Faúndez, J.; Cornejo, M.; Alcaman, M. E.

    2009-06-01

    Coastal upwelling ecosystems with marked oxyclines (redoxclines) present high availability of electron donors that favour chemoautotrophy, leading in turn to high N2O and CH4 cycling associated with aerobic NH4+ (AAO) and CH4 oxidation (AMO). This is the case of the highly productive coastal upwelling area off Central Chile (36° S), where we evaluated the importance of total chemolithoautotrophic vs. photoautotrophic production, the specific contributions of AAO and AMO to chemosynthesis and their role in gas cycling. Chemoautotrophy (involving bacteria and archaea) was studied at a time-series station during monthly (2002-2009) and seasonal cruises (January 2008, September 2008, January 2009) and was assessed in terms of dark carbon assimilation (CA), N2O and CH4 cycling, and the natural C isotopic ratio of particulate organic carbon (δ13POC). Total Integrated dark CA fluctuated between 19.4 and 2.924 mg C m-2 d-1. It was higher during active upwelling and represented on average 27% of the integrated photoautotrophic production (from 135 to 7.626 mg C m-2d-1). At the oxycline, δ13POC averaged -22.209‰ this was significantly lighter compared to the surface (-19.674‰) and bottom layers (-20.716‰). This pattern, along with low NH4+ content and high accumulations of N2O, NO2- and NO3- within the oxycline indicates that chemolithoautotrophs and specifically AA oxydisers were active. Dark CA was reduced from 27 to 48% after addition of a specific AAO inhibitor (ATU) and from 24 to 76% with GC7, a specific archaea inhibitor, indicating that AAO and maybe AMO microbes (most of them archaea) were performing dark CA through oxidation of NH4+ and CH4. AAO produced N2O at rates from 8.88 to 43 nM d-1 and a fraction of it was effluxed into the atmosphere (up to 42.85 μmol m-2 d-1). AMO on the other hand consumed CH4 at rates between 0.41 and 26.8 nM d-1 therefore preventing its efflux to the atmosphere (up to 18.69 μmol m-2 d-1). These findings show that chemically

  13. Chemolithoautotrophic production mediating the cycling of the greenhouses gases N2O and CH4 in an upwelling ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Alcaman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Coastal upwelling ecosystems with marked oxyclines (redoxclines present high availability of electron donors that favour chemoautotrophy, leading in turn to high N2O and CH4 cycling associated with aerobic NH4+ (AAO and CH4 oxidation (AMO. This is the case of the highly productive coastal upwelling area off Central Chile (36° S, where we evaluated the importance of total chemolithoautotrophic vs. photoautotrophic production, the specific contributions of AAO and AMO to chemosynthesis and their role in gas cycling. Chemoautotrophy (involving bacteria and archaea was studied at a time-series station during monthly (2002–2009 and seasonal cruises (January 2008, September 2008, January 2009 and was assessed in terms of dark carbon assimilation (CA, N2O and CH4 cycling, and the natural C isotopic ratio of particulate organic carbon (δ13POC. Total Integrated dark CA fluctuated between 19.4 and 2.924 mg C m−2 d−1. It was higher during active upwelling and represented on average 27% of the integrated photoautotrophic production (from 135 to 7.626 mg C m−2d−1. At the oxycline, δ13POC averaged -22.209‰ this was significantly lighter compared to the surface (-19.674‰ and bottom layers (-20.716‰. This pattern, along with low NH4+ content and high accumulations of N2O, NO2- and NO3- within the oxycline indicates that chemolithoautotrophs and specifically AA oxydisers were active. Dark CA was reduced from 27 to 48% after addition of a specific AAO inhibitor (ATU and from 24 to 76% with GC7, a specific archaea inhibitor, indicating that AAO and maybe AMO microbes (most of them archaea were performing dark CA through oxidation of NH4+ and CH4. AAO produced N2O at rates from 8.88 to 43 nM d−1 and a fraction of it was effluxed into the atmosphere (up to 42.85 μmol m−2 d−1. AMO on the other hand consumed CH4 at rates between 0.41 and 26.8 nM d−1 therefore preventing its efflux to the atmosphere (up to 18.69 μmol m−2 d−1. These

  14. Catabolic and anabolic energy for chemolithoautotrophs in deep-sea hydrothermal systems hosted in different rock types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, Jan P.; McCollom, Thomas M.; Hentscher, Michael; Bach, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Active deep-sea hydrothermal vents are hosted by a range of different rock types, including basalt, peridotite, and felsic rocks. The associated hydrothermal fluids exhibit substantial chemical variability, which is largely attributable to compositional differences among the underlying host rocks. Numerical models were used to evaluate the energetics of seven inorganic redox reactions (potential catabolisms of chemolithoautotrophs) and numerous biomolecule synthesis reactions (anabolism) in a representative sampling of these systems, where chemical gradients are established by mixing hydrothermal fluid with seawater. The wide ranging fluid compositions dictate demonstrable differences in Gibbs energies (Δ G r) of these catabolic and anabolic reactions in three peridotite-hosted, six basalt-hosted, one troctolite-basalt hybrid, and two felsic rock-hosted systems. In peridotite-hosted systems at low to moderate temperatures (10), hydrogen oxidation yields the most catabolic energy, but the oxidation of methane, ferrous iron, and sulfide can also be moderately exergonic. At higher temperatures, and consequent SW:HF mixing ratios biomass synthesis yielded up to ˜900 J per g dry cell mass. The energetics of anabolism in basalt- and felsic rock-hosted systems were far less favorable. The results suggest that in peridotite-hosted (and troctolite-basalt hybrid) systems, compared with their basalt (and felsic rock) counterparts, microbial catabolic strategies—and consequently variations in microbial phylotypes—may be far more diverse and some biomass synthesis may yield energy rather than imposing a high energetic cost.

  15. Pitting of steam-generator tubing alloys in solutions containing thiosulfate and sulfate or chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, William; Carcea, Anatolie G; Newman, Roger C

    2015-01-01

    The pitting of nuclear steam generator tubing alloys 600, 690 and 800 was studied at 60 °C using dilute thiosulfate solutions containing excess sulfate or (for Alloy 600) chloride. A potentiostatic scratch method was used. In sulfate solutions, all alloys pitted at low potentials, reflecting their lack of protective Mo. The alloys demonstrated the most severe pitting at a sulfate : thiosulfate concentration ratio of ∼40. Alloy 600 pitted worst at a chloride : thiosulfate ratio of ∼2000. The results are interpreted through the mutual electromigration of differently charged anions into a pit nucleus, and differences in the major alloy component. PMID:25898311

  16. The Genome of the Epsilonproteobacterial Chemolithoautotroph Sulfurimonas dentrificans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    USF Genomics Class; Sievert, Stefan M.; Scott, Kathleen M.; Klotz, Martin G.; Chain, Patrick S.G.; Hauser, Loren J.; Hemp, James; Hugler, Michael; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Larimer, Frank W.; Lucas, Susan; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Meyer, Folker; Paulsen, Ian T.; Ren, Qinghu; Simon, Jorg

    2007-08-08

    Sulfur-oxidizing epsilonproteobacteria are common in a variety of sulfidogenic environments. These autotrophic and mixotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are believed to contribute substantially to the oxidative portion of the global sulfur cycle. In order to better understand the ecology and roles of sulfur-oxidizing epsilonproteobacteria, in particular those of the widespread genus Sulfurimonas, in biogeochemical cycles, the genome of Sulfurimonas denitrificans DSM1251 was sequenced. This genome has many features, including a larger size (2.2 Mbp), that suggest a greater degree of metabolic versatility or responsiveness to the environment than seen for most of the other sequenced epsilonproteobacteria. A branched electron transport chain is apparent, with genes encoding complexes for the oxidation of hydrogen, reduced sulfur compounds, and formate and the reduction of nitrate and oxygen. Genes are present for a complete, autotrophic reductive citric acid cycle. Many genes are present that could facilitate growth in the spatially and temporally heterogeneous sediment habitat from where Sulfurimonas denitrificans was originally isolated. Many resistance-nodulation-development family transporter genes (10 total) are present; of these, several are predicted to encode heavy metal efflux transporters. An elaborate arsenal of sensory and regulatory protein-encoding genes is in place, as are genes necessary to prevent and respond to oxidative stress.

  17. Microbial- and Thiosulfate-Mediated Dissolution of Mercury Sulfide Minerals and Transformation to Gaseous Mercury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiari eVázquez-Rodríguez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg is a toxic heavy metal that poses significant human and environmental health risks. Soils and sediments, where Hg can exist as the Hg sulfide mineral metacinnabar (β-HgS, represent major Hg reservoirs in aquatic environments. Metacinnabar has historically been considered a sink for Hg in all but severely acidic environments, and thus disregarded as a potential source of Hg back to aqueous or gaseous pools. Here, we conducted a combination of field and laboratory incubations to identify the potential for metacinnabar as a source of dissolved Hg within near neutral pH environments and the underpinning (abiotic mechanisms at play. We show that the abundant and widespread sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiobacillus extensively colonized metacinnabar chips incubated within aerobic, near neutral pH creek sediments. Laboratory incubations of axenic Thiobacillus cultures lead to the release of metacinnabar-hosted Hg(II and subsequent volatilization to Hg(0. This dissolution and volatilization was greatly enhanced in the presence of the sulfur intermediate, thiosulfate, which served a dual role by enhancing HgS dissolution and providing an additional metabolic substrate for Thiobacillus. These findings reveal a new coupled abiotic-biotic pathway for the transformation of metacinnabar-bound Hg(II to Hg(0, while expanding the sulfide substrates available for neutrophilic chemosynthetic bacteria to Hg-laden sulfides. They also point to mineral-hosted Hg as an underappreciated source of gaseous elemental Hg to the environment.

  18. Reduced sulfur compound oxidation by Thiobacillus caldus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hallberg, K. B.; Dopson, M; Lindström, E B

    1996-01-01

    The oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds was studied by using resting cells of the moderate thermophile Thiobacillus caldus strain KU. The oxygen consumption rate and total oxygen consumed were determined for the reduced sulfur compounds thiosulfate, tetrathionate, sulfur, sulfide, and sulfite in the absence and in the presence of inhibitors and uncouplers. The uncouplers 2,4-dinitrophenol and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl-hydrazone had no affect on the oxidation of thiosulfate, ...

  19. Protection Of Chemolithoautotrophic Bacteria Exposed To Simulated Mars Environmental Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, Felipe; Mateo-Martí, Eva; Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Martín-Gago, Jose; Amils, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Current surface conditions (strong oxidative atmosphere, UV radiation, low temperatures and xeric conditions) on Mars are considered extremely challenging for life. The question is whether there are any features on Mars that could exert a protective effect against the sterilizing conditions detected on its surface. Potential habitability in the subsurface would increase if the overlaying material played a protective role. With the aim of evaluating this possibility we stud...

  20. Thiosulfate-Hydrogen Peroxide Redox Oscillator as pH Driver for Ribozyme Activity in the RNA World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Rowena; Brindley, John

    2016-03-01

    The RNA world of more than 3.7 billion years ago may have drawn on thermal and pH oscillations set up by the oxidation of thiosulfate by hydrogen peroxide (the THP oscillator) as a power source to drive replication. Since this primordial RNA also must have developed enzyme functionalities, in this work we examine the responses of two simple ribozymes to a THP periodic drive, using experimental rate and thermochemical data in a dynamical model for the coupled, self-consistent evolution of all reactants and intermediates. The resulting time traces show that ribozyme performance can be enhanced under pH cycling, and that thermal cycling may have been necessary to achieve large performance gains. We discuss three important ways in which the dynamic hydrogen peroxide medium may have acted as an agent for development of the RNA world towards a cellular world: proton gradients, resolution of the ribozyme versus replication paradox, and vesicle formation.

  1. Metagenome of a Versatile Chemolithoautotroph from Expanding Oceanic Dead Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, David A.; Zaikova, Elena; Howes, Charles L.; Song, Young; Wright, Jody; Tringe, Susannah G.; Tortell, Philippe D.; Hallam, Steven J.

    2009-07-15

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), also known as oceanic"dead zones", are widespread oceanographic features currently expanding due to global warming and coastal eutrophication. Although inhospitable to metazoan life, OMZs support a thriving but cryptic microbiota whose combined metabolic activity is intimately connected to nutrient and trace gas cycling within the global ocean. Here we report time-resolved metagenomic analyses of a ubiquitous and abundant but uncultivated OMZ microbe (SUP05) closely related to chemoautotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels. The SUP05 metagenome harbors a versatile repertoire of genes mediating autotrophic carbon assimilation, sulfur-oxidation and nitrate respiration responsive to a wide range of water column redox states. Thus, SUP05 plays integral roles in shaping nutrient and energy flow within oxygen-deficient oceanic waters via carbon sequestration, sulfide detoxification and biological nitrogen loss with important implications for marine productivity and atmospheric greenhouse control.

  2. Importance of Chemolithoautotrophic Production to Mobile Benthic Predators in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, E.; Macavoy, S.; Carney, R.

    2005-05-01

    The continental slope of the Gulf of Mexico is characterized by substantial hydrocarbon seepage which provides reduced energy sources, both CH4 and H2S, for chemolithoautotrophs existing as endosymbionts within mussels and tubeworms found in dense colonies that provide habitat for an array of endemic and colonial fauna. The extent of trophic export of chemosynthetic biomass to the seep communities and the surrounding benthic communities in the Gulf, however, remains an open question. To elucidate the nutritional associations between seep residents and the surrounding benthos the carbon, nitrogen and sulfur stable isotope values of the hagfish Eptatretus sp., the giant isopod Bathynomus giganteus and the predatory snail Phymorhyncus sp. were interpreted through a three source, dual isotope mixing model. The model was able to assess the contributions of different isotopic signals to a mixture and thus could distinguish between photosynthetic/phytodetritus based sources, methanotrophic sources and thiotrophic sources. Incorporation of chemosynthetic based food sources was minimal on the whole and species specific; however some of the organisms considered in this study did incorporate nutrition from chemolithoautotrophic sources.

  3. Abatacept and Sodium Thiosulfate for Treatment of Recalcitrant Juvenile Dermatomyositis Complicated by Ulceration and Calcinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Arabshahi, Bita; Silverman, Robert A.; Jones, Olcay Y.; Rider, Lisa G

    2012-01-01

    We report the successful use of abatacept and sodium thiosulfate in a patient with severe recalcitrant juvenile dermatomyositis complicated by ulcerative skin disease and progressive calcinosis. This combination therapy resulted in significant reduction in muscle and skin inflammation, decreased corticosteroid dependence, and halted the progression of calcinosis.

  4. 77 FR 71006 - Sodium Nitrite Injection and Sodium Thiosulfate Injection Drug Products Labeled for the Treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-1134 Sodium Nitrite Injection and... products containing sodium nitrite labeled for the treatment of cyanide poisoning and unapproved injectable... products containing sodium nitrite or sodium thiosulfate that are labeled for the treatment of...

  5. Population structure of deep-sea chemolithoautotrophs: identification of phenotypic and genotypic correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mino, S.; Nakagawa, S.; Sawabe, T.; Miyazaki, J.; Makita, H.; Nunoura, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Takai, K.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal fields are areas on the seafloor of high biological productivity fueled primarily by microbial chemosynthesis. Chemolithoautotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria and Persephonella with an ability to utilize inorganic substrates such as elemental sulfur and hydrogen are important members in wide range of temperature conditions in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. However, little is known about their population genetic structure such as intraspecific genetic diversity, distribution pattern, and phenotypic characteristics. Previously, using genetic approach based on multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA), we clarified that Epsilonproteobacteria Group A, B, F, and Persephonella populations were geographically separated, and Epsilonproteobacteria appeared to diverge by mutation rather than recombination. Contrary to genetic evidence for allopatric segregation in deep-sea chemoautotrophs, however, phenotypic evidence has never been found. In addition, analyzing such a phenotypic characteristic may lead to a better understanding of the interactions microbes have with their environment. In this study, we present a metabolomic approach based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to reveal phenotypic biogeographical discrimination. We demonstrated the whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS method on Epsilonproteobacteria and Persephonella populations. These chemoautotrophic strains used in this study were isolated from chimney structures, vent fluids, and hydrothermal sediments. These hydrothermal samples were collected from geographically separated hydrothermal areas of the South Mariana Trough, Okinawa Trough and Central Indian Ridge. Based on mass peaks (signal/noise >10) within the m/z range of 2000-14000, phenotypic analysis was carried out by cluster analysis. The result of phenotypic analysis was compared with the genotypic clusters. The whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS revealed that Persephonella population was identified to

  6. Regulation of dissimilatory sulfur oxidation in the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum

    OpenAIRE

    Frauke eGrimm; Bettina eFranz; Christiane eDahl

    2011-01-01

    In the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum, thiosulfate oxidation is strictly dependent on the presence of three periplasmic Sox proteins encoded by the soxBXAK and soxYZ genes. It is also well documented that proteins encoded in the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsr) operon, dsrABEFHCMKLJOPNRS, are essential for the oxidation of sulfur that is stored intracellularly as an obligatory intermediate during the oxidation of thiosulfate and sulfide. Until recently, detailed knowledge...

  7. Chemolithoautotrophic production mediating the cycling of the greenhouse gases N2O and CH4 in an upwelling ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farías, L.; Fernández, C.; Faúndez, J.; Cornejo, M.; Alcaman, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    The high availability of electron donors occurring in coastal upwelling ecosystems with marked oxyclines favours chemoautotrophy, in turn leading to high N2O and CH4 cycling associated with aerobic NH4+ (AAO) and CH4 oxidation (AMO). This is the case of the highly productive coastal upwelling area off central Chile (36° S), where we evaluated the importance of total chemolithoautotrophic vs. photoautotrophic production, the specific contributions of AAO and AMO to chemosynthesis and their role in gas cycling. Chemolithoautotrophy was studied at a time-series station during monthly (2007-2009) and seasonal cruises (January 2008, September 2008, January 2009) and was assessed in terms of the natural C isotopic ratio of particulate organic carbon (δ13POC), total and specific (associated with AAO and AMO) dark carbon assimilation (CA), and N2O and CH4 cycling experiments. At the oxycline, δ13POC averaged -22.2‰; this was significantly lighter compared to the surface (-19.7‰) and bottom layers (-20.7‰). Total integrated dark CA in the whole water column fluctuated between 19.4 and 2.924 mg C m-2 d-1, was higher during active upwelling, and contributed 0.7 to 49.7% of the total integrated autotrophic CA (photo plus chemoautotrophy), which ranged from 135 to 7.626 mg C m-2 d-1, and averaged 20.3% for the whole sampling period. Dark CA was reduced by 27 to 48% after adding a specific AAO inhibitor (ATU) and by 24 to 76% with GC7, a specific archaea inhibitor. This indicates that AAO and AMO microbes (most of them archaea) were performing dark CA through the oxidation of NH4+ and CH4. Net N2O cycling rates varied between 8.88 and 43 nM d-1, whereas net CH4 cycling rates ranged from -0.41 to -26.8 nM d-1. The addition of both ATU and GC7 reduced N2O accumulation and increased CH4 consumption, suggesting that AAO and AMO were responsible, in part, for the cycling of these gases. These findings show that chemically driven chemolithoautotrophy (with NH4+ and CH4 acting

  8. Chemolithoautotrophic production mediating the cycling of the greenhouse gases N2O and CH4 in an upwelling ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Alcaman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The high availability of electron donors occurring in coastal upwelling ecosystems with marked oxyclines favours chemoautotrophy, in turn leading to high N2O and CH4 cycling associated with aerobic NH4+ (AAO and CH4 oxidation (AMO. This is the case of the highly productive coastal upwelling area off central Chile (36° S, where we evaluated the importance of total chemolithoautotrophic vs. photoautotrophic production, the specific contributions of AAO and AMO to chemosynthesis and their role in gas cycling. Chemolithoautotrophy was studied at a time-series station during monthly (2007–2009 and seasonal cruises (January 2008, September 2008, January 2009 and was assessed in terms of the natural C isotopic ratio of particulate organic carbon (δ13POC, total and specific (associated with AAO and AMO dark carbon assimilation (CA, and N2O and CH4 cycling experiments. At the oxycline, δ13POC averaged −22.2‰; this was significantly lighter compared to the surface (−19.7‰ and bottom layers (−20.7‰. Total integrated dark CA in the whole water column fluctuated between 19.4 and 2.924 mg C m−2 d−1, was higher during active upwelling, and contributed 0.7 to 49.7% of the total integrated autotrophic CA (photo plus chemoautotrophy, which ranged from 135 to 7.626 mg C m−2 d−1, and averaged 20.3% for the whole sampling period. Dark CA was reduced by 27 to 48% after adding a specific AAO inhibitor (ATU and by 24 to 76% with GC7, a specific archaea inhibitor. This indicates that AAO and AMO microbes (most of them archaea were performing dark CA through the oxidation of NH4+ and CH4. Net N2O cycling rates varied between 8.88 and 43 nM d−1, whereas net CH4 cycling rates ranged from −0.41 to −26.8 nM d−1. The addition of both ATU and GC7 reduced N2O accumulation and increased CH4 consumption, suggesting that AAO and AMO were responsible, in part, for the cycling of these gases. These findings show that chemically driven

  9. The putative thiosulfate sulfurtransferases PspE and GlpE contribute to virulence of Salmonella Typhimurium in the mouse model of systemic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallrodt, Inke; Jelsbak, Lotte; Thorndahl, Lotte;

    2013-01-01

    The phage-shock protein PspE and GlpE of the glycerol 3-phosphate regulon of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are predicted to belong to the class of thiosulfate sulfurtransferases, enzymes that traffic sulfur between molecules. In the present study we demonstrated that the two genes...... contribute to S. Typhimurium virulence, as a glpE and pspE double deletion strain showed significantly decreased virulence in a mouse model of systemic infection. However, challenge of cultured epithelial cells and macrophages did not reveal any virulence-associated phenotypes. We hypothesized that their...... contribution to virulence could be in sulfur metabolism or by contributing to resistance to nitric oxide, oxidative stress, or cyanide detoxification. In vitro studies demonstrated that glpE but not pspE was important for resistance to H2O2. Since the double mutant, which was the one affected in virulence, was...

  10. Assessment of the stoichiometry and efficiency of CO2 fixation coupled to reduced sulfur oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatt, Judith M.; Polerecky, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB) couple the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds to the production of biomass. Their role in the cycling of carbon, sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen is, however, difficult to quantify due to the complexity of sulfur oxidation pathways. We describe a

  11. Dethiosulfovibrio peptidovorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a new anaerobic, slightly halophilic, thiosulfate-reducing bacterium from corroding offshore oil wells

    OpenAIRE

    Magot, M; Ravot, G; Campaignolle, X.; Ollivier, Bernard; Patel, B.K.C.; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Thomas, P; Crolet, J.L.; Garcia, Jean-Louis

    1997-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic thiosulfate-reducing bacterium was isolated from a corroding offshore oil well in Congo and was designated strain SEBR 4207(T). Pure culture of the strain induced a very active pitting corrosion of mild steel, with penetration rates of up to 4 mm per year. This constitutes the first experimental evidence of the involvement of thiosulfate reduction in microbial corrosion of steel. Strain SEBR 4207(T) cells were vibrios (3 to 5 by 1 micrometer), stained gram negative, and p...

  12. Localized corrosion of nickel-based steam generator tubing alloys in sodium sulfate solutions containing thiosulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitting of steam generator tubing alloys 600, 800 and 690 was studied using chloride-free solutions containing aggressive thiosulfate ions, simulating events that may occur during plant outages when reduced sulfur in sludge piles reacts with incoming oxygen. All three alloys showed pitting at 60oC and potentials that would be easily attained in practice. The most aggressive condition is a molar ratio (sulfate to thiosulfate) of 40, irrespective of the ionic strength of the solution, reflecting the mutual electromigration of the anions into the pit cavity. The strong-acid anion (sulfate) is required to sustain acidification in the pit, while the thiosulfate is reduced to activating adsorbed sulfur on the pit surface. Extremely diluted solutions, in the micromolar range, continue to cause pitting. The conditions for intergranular corrosion are less specific, reflecting the lower corrosion resistance of the grain-boundary material in that case. Studies of oxygen reduction on alloy surfaces pre-exposed to hot water prior to low-temperature exposure have been carried out, and show that whilst the kinetics are quite slow, with increased Cr alloying being beneficial, they are adequate to sustain pitting in practice. (author)

  13. Sulfurifustis variabilis gen. nov., sp. nov., a sulfur oxidizer isolated from a lake, and proposal of Acidiferrobacteraceae fam. nov. and Acidiferrobacterales ord. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hisaya; Shinohara, Arisa; Fukui, Manabu

    2015-10-01

    A novel autotrophic bacterium, strain skN76T, was isolated from sediment of a lake in Japan. As sole electron donor to support chemolithoautotrophic growth, the strain oxidized thiosulfate, tetrathionate and elemental sulfur. For growth, the optimum temperature was 42–45 °C and the optimum pH was 6.8–8.2. The cells were Gram-stain-negative, catalase-positive and oxidase-positive. The strain exhibited changes in morphology depending on growth temperature. Cells grown at the optimum temperature were rod-shaped (0.9–3.0 μm long and 0.3–0.5 μm wide), whereas a filamentous form was observed when the strain was cultured at the lowest permissive growth temperatures. The G+C content of genomic DNA was 69 mol%. The major components in the fatty acid profile were C16 : 0, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) and summed feature 9 (iso-C17 : 1ω9c and/or 10-methyl C16 : 0). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the closest cultivated relative of strain skN76T was Acidiferrobacter thiooxydans m-1T, with sequence similarity of 93 %. On the basis of its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, strain skN76T ( = DSM 100313T =  NBRC 110942T) is proposed as the type strain of a novel species of a novel genus, Sulfurifustis variabilis gen. nov., sp. nov. Novel taxa, Acidiferrobacteraceae fam. nov. and Acidiferrobacterales ord. nov., are also proposed to accommodate the genera Acidiferrobacter and Sulfurifustis gen. nov. PMID:26220671

  14. Investigations of thiosulfate accumulation on 304 stainless steel in neutral solutions by radioactive labeling, electrochemistry, Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, A.E.; Kolics, A.; Wieckowski, A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Thiosulfate accumulation on 304 stainless steel in near neutral solutions (pH {approximately}5.6) was studied using in situ techniques: electrochemistry and radiochemistry, as well as by Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling and angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in ultrahigh vacuum. It was found that thiosulfate accumulation is an irreversible process and occurs over a broad electrode potential range. Thiosulfate surface concentration is very small, below {minus}1.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl reference. In the potential range from {minus}1.0 to 0.50 V the surface concentration increases linearly with potential, reaches a maximum at {minus}0.30 V, and at even more positive potentials, decreases to a slightly lower level. Ultrahigh vacuum spectroscopic measurements indicate that the irreversible surface behavior can be attributed to thiosulfate incorporation into the substrate passive film. The present data obtained with 304 stainless steel are compared to previous results published from this laboratory on thiosulfate adsorption on 316 stainless steel, and the role of molybdenum surface enrichment in the thiosulfate accumulation reversibility is discussed. The effect of chloride on thiosulfate accumulation was also investigated. At high concentration of chloride, thiosulfate is desorbed from the surface due to chloride-induced dissolution of the stainless steel. At very negative potentials, the thiosulfate surface concentration increases upon chloride addition, most probably due to the surface microroughening caused by chloride adsorption.

  15. Long-lasting patch reactions to gold sodium thiosulfate occurs frequently in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus E; Jensen, Charlotte D

    2007-01-01

    In a skin irritancy study in healthy volunteers with 3 metal salts, aqueous gold sodium thiosulfate (GSTS) in a dilution series caused unexpectedly frequent and strong patch test reactions on volar forearm skin in 22 of 31 participants (71%). The reactions showed morphological features consistent...... form of skin and/or mucosal complaints related to exposure to gold items. The results indicate that inclusion of GSTS in routine patch testing may cause problems regarding interpretation and clinical relevance of positive GSTS patch tests, which fulfil the clinical criteria of a contact allergy....

  16. Crystal structure of bis(1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octan-1-ium thiosulfate dihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgui Awa Seck

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the hydrated title salt, 2C6H13N2+·S2O32−·2H2O, contains a centrosymmetric cyclic motif of eight hydrogen-bonded molecular subunits. Two DABCOH+ cations (DABCO = 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane are linked to two water molecules and two thiosulfate anions via O—H...N and O—H...O hydrogen bonds, respectively. Two other water molecules close the cyclic motif through O—H...O contacts to the first two water molecules and to the two thiosulfate anions. A second pair of DABCOH+ cations is N—H...O hydrogen bonded to the two anions and is pendant to the ring. Adjacent cyclic motifs are bridged into a block-like arrangement extending along [100] through O—H...O interactions involving the second pair of water molecules and neighbouring thiosulfate anions.

  17. Influence of microstructure in corrosion behavior of an Inconel 600 commercial alloy in 0.1 M sodium thiosulfate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Inconel 600 is used in diverse components of BWR and PWR type reactors, where diverse cases of intergranular stress corrosion have been presented. It has been reported susceptibility to the corrosion of this alloy, in presence of thiosulfates, which come from the degradation of the ion exchange resins of water treatments that use the reactors. The objective of this work is to study the influence of metallurgical condition in the corrosion velocity of Inconel 600 commercial alloy, in a 0.1 M thiosulfates solution. (Author)

  18. In Situ Analysis of Sulfur Species in Sulfur Globules Produced from Thiosulfate by Thermoanaerobacter sulfurigignens and Thermoanaerobacterium thermosulfurigenes▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yong-Jin; Prange, Alexander; Lichtenberg, Henning; Rohde, Manfred; Dashti, Mona; Wiegel, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    The Firmicutes Thermoanaerobacter sulfurigignens and Thermoanaerobacterium thermosulfurigenes convert thiosulfate, forming sulfur globules inside and outside cells. X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis revealed that the sulfur consisted mainly of sulfur chains with organic end groups similar to sulfur formed in purple sulfur bacteria, suggesting the possibility that the process of sulfur globule formation by bacteria is an ancient feature.

  19. Thiosulfate and Sulfite Distributions in Porewater of Marine-Sediments Related to Manganese, Iron, and Sulfur Geochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    THAMDRUP, B.; FINSTER, K.; FOSSING, H.; HANSEN, JW; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    Depth distributions of thiosulfate (S2O32-) and sulfite (SO32-) were measured in the porewaters of a Danish salt marsh and subtidal marine sediments by HPLC analysis after derivatization with DTNP [2,2'-dithiobis(5-nitropyridine)]. The distributions were compared to the redox zonation as indicate...

  20. Injection of Acanthaster planci with thiosulfate-citrate-bile-sucrose agar (TCBS). I. Disease induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Posada, J A; Pratchett, M; Cano-Gómez, A; Arango-Gómez, J D; Owens, L

    2011-12-01

    This is the first report of the successful induction of a transmissible disease in the coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci (COTS). Injection of thiosulfate-citrate-bile-sucrose agar (TCBS) culture medium into COTS induced a disease characterized by discoloured and necrotic skin, ulcerations, loss of body turgor, accumulation of colourless mucus on many spines especially at their tip, and loss of spines. Blisters on the dorsal integument broke through the skin surface and resulted in large, open sores that exposed the internal organs. Oedema and reddened digestive tissues and destruction of connective fibers were common. Moreover, healthy COTS in contact with these infected animals also displayed signs of disease and died within 24 h. TCBS induced 100% mortality in injected starfish. There was no introduction of new pathogens into the marine environment. TCBS promoted the growth of COTS' naturally occurring Vibrionales to high densities with subsequent symbiont imbalance followed by disease and death. PMID:22303625

  1. Sulfur isotope fractionation by Proteus vulgaris and Salmonella heidelberg during the reduction of thiosulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proteus vulgris metabolized thiosulfate to H2S. The amount evolved and its sulfur isotope composition identifed it solely with sulfane sulfur. In contrast, Salmonella heidelberg sequentially reduced the sulfane sulfur of S2O32- with slight enrichment of the evolved sulfide in 32S and then reduced the sulfonate sulfur of S2O32- with large isotopic selectivities and an inverse isotopic fractional pattern. The inverse isotope fractionation then reduced the sulfonate sulfur of S2O32- with large isotopic selectivities and an inverse isotopic pattern for the H2S derived from the sulfonate sulfur was almost identical to that observed during the reduction of high concentrations of sulfite by S. heidelberg. (auth)

  2. Silver nanoplates-based colorimetric iodide recognition and sensing using sodium thiosulfate as a sensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new colorimetric iodide detection strategy based on triangular Ag nanoplate. • Sodium thiosulfate performed as a sensitizer. • Formation of insoluble AgI on the surface of Ag nanoplate. • This method has the advantages of good selectivity and high sensitivity. - Abstract: A colorimetric method for the recognition and sensing of iodide ions (I−) has been developed by utilizing the reactions between triangular silver nanoplates (TAg-NPs) and I− in the presence of sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3). Specifically, I− together with Na2S2O3 can induce protection of TAg-NPs owing to the formation of insoluble AgI, as confirmed by the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In the absence of Na2S2O3, the etching reactions on TAg-NPs were observed not only by I− but also other halides ions. The Na2S2O3 plays as a sensitizer in this system, which improved the selectivity and sensitivity. The desired colorimetric detection can be achieved by measuring the change of the absorption peak wavelength corresponding to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) with UV–vis spectrophotometer or recognized by naked eye observation. The results show that the shift of the maximum absorption wavelength (Δλ) of the TAg-NPs/Na2S2O3/I mixture was proportional to the concentration of I− in the range 1.0 × 10−9–1.0 × 10−6 mol L−1. Moreover, no other ions besides I− can induce an eye discernible color change as low as 1.0 × 10−7 mol L−1. Finally, this method was successfully applied for I− determination in kelp samples

  3. Possibly enhanced Gd excretion in dialysate, but no major clinical benefit of 3-5 months of treatment with sodium thiosulfate in late stages of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marckmann, P.; Sloth, J.J.; Nielsen, Arne Høj

    2008-01-01

    motion and skin abnormalities. The dialysate Gd content was raised by the treatment, up to fivefold. Conclusions. We could not confirm that sodium thiosulfate treatment results in marked and rapid improvement in late stages of Gd-related nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. However, dialysate contents of Gd......Background. Gd-related nephrogenic systemic fibrosis was successfully treated with intravenous sodium thiosulfate according to a recent case report. Methods. Four haemodialysis patients with severe Gd-related nephrogenic systemic fibrosis were treated with intravenous sodium thiosulfate for 3...

  4. Possibly enhanced Gd-excretion in dialysate, but no clinical benefit of 3-5 months treatment with sodium thiosulfate in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marckmann, P.; Nielsen, A.H.; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    motion and skin abnormalities. The dialysate Gd content was raised by the treatment, up to fivefold. Conclusions. We could not confirm that sodium thiosulfate treatment results in marked and rapid improvement in late stages of Gd-related nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. However, dialysate contents of Gd......Background. Gd-related nephrogenic systemic fibrosis was successfully treated with intravenous sodium thiosulfate according to a recent case report. Methods. Four haemodialysis patients with severe Gd-related nephrogenic systemic fibrosis were treated with intravenous sodium thiosulfate for 3...

  5. A recovery installation for sodium sulfates, thiosulfates and sulfides from waste water resulting from hydrogen sulfide fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An installation for recovery of sodium sulfate and sulfur suspensions from waste water was conceived. It consists from a preheater, vacuum evaporator and a refrigerating system with drum and scraper. This equipment concentration the solution by eliminating in the first stage the water in the vacuum evaporator. The water resulting at this stage is chemically pure and can be discharged in the sewage sludge system. The concentrated solution is then directed to the refrigerating system with drum and scrapper. Here the sodium sulfates, thiosulfates and sulfides get crystallized onto the drum surface. The resulting aqueous solution to be discharged in the sewage sludge system is previously analyzed as in case of the absent of the recovery installation, but the amount of pollutants will be much lower because sulfates, thiosulfates and sulfides were already recovered as scales from the drum. These solid scales can be used in detergent industry

  6. The Chemolithoautotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Can Survive under Phosphate-Limiting Conditions by Expressing a C-P Lyase Operon That Allows It To Grow on Phosphonates▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Vera, Mario; Pagliai, Fernando; Guiliani, Nicolas; Jerez, Carlos A.

    2008-01-01

    The chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is of great importance in biomining operations. During the bioleaching of ores, microorganisms are subjected to a variety of environmental stresses and to the limitations of some nutrients, such as inorganic phosphate (Pi), which is an essential component for all living cells. Although the primary source of phosphorus for microorganisms is Pi, some bacteria are also able to metabolize Pi esters (with a C-O-P bond) and phosphon...

  7. Pattern formation in the iodate-sulfite-thiosulfate reaction-diffusion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haimiao; Pojman, John A; Zhao, Yuemin; Pan, Changwei; Zheng, Juhua; Yuan, Ling; Horváth, Attila K; Gao, Qingyu

    2012-01-01

    Sodium polyacrylate-induced pH pattern formation and starch-induced iodine pattern formation were investigated in the iodate-sulfite-thiosulfate (IST) reaction in a one-side fed disc gel reactor (OSFR). As binding agents of the autocatalyst of hydrogen ions or iodide ions, different content of sodium polyacrylate or starch has induced various types of pattern formation. We observed pH pulses, striped patterns, mixed spots and stripes, and hexagonal spots upon increasing the content of sodium polyacrylate and observed iodine pulses, branched patterns, and labyrinthine patterns upon increasing the starch content in the system. Coexistence of a pH front and an iodine front was also studied in a batch IST reaction-diffusion system. Both pH and iodine front instabilities were observed in the presence of sodium polyacrylate, i.e., cellular fronts and transient Turing structures resulting from the decrease in diffusion coefficients of activators. The mechanism of multiple feedback may explain the different patterns in the IST reaction-diffusion system. PMID:22068976

  8. Genes and pathways for CO2 fixation in the obligate, chemolithoautotrophic acidophile, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Carbon fixation in A. ferrooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esparza Mario

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is chemolithoautotrophic γ-proteobacterium that thrives at extremely low pH (pH 1-2. Although a substantial amount of information is available regarding CO2 uptake and fixation in a variety of facultative autotrophs, less is known about the processes in obligate autotrophs, especially those living in extremely acidic conditions, prompting the present study. Results Four gene clusters (termed cbb1-4 in the A. ferrooxidans genome are predicted to encode enzymes and structural proteins involved in carbon assimilation via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB cycle including form I of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO, EC 4.1.1.39 and the CO2-concentrating carboxysomes. RT-PCR experiments demonstrated that each gene cluster is a single transcriptional unit and thus is an operon. Operon cbb1 is divergently transcribed from a gene, cbbR, encoding the LysR-type transcriptional regulator CbbR that has been shown in many organisms to regulate the expression of RubisCO genes. Sigma70-like -10 and -35 promoter boxes and potential CbbR-binding sites (T-N11-A/TNA-N7TNA were predicted in the upstream regions of the four operons. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs confirmed that purified CbbR is able to bind to the upstream regions of the cbb1, cbb2 and cbb3 operons, demonstrating that the predicted CbbR-binding sites are functional in vitro. However, CbbR failed to bind the upstream region of the cbb4 operon that contains cbbP, encoding phosphoribulokinase (EC 2.7.1.19. Thus, other factors not present in the assay may be required for binding or the region lacks a functional CbbR-binding site. The cbb3 operon contains genes predicted to encode anthranilate synthase components I and II, catalyzing the formation of anthranilate and pyruvate from chorismate. This suggests a novel regulatory connection between CO2 fixation and tryptophan biosynthesis. The presence of a form II Rubis

  9. Geochemical constraints on chemolithoautotrophic metabolism by microorganisms in seafloor hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Shock, Everett L.

    1997-10-01

    Mixing of hydrothermal fluids and seawater at the ocean floor, combined with slow reaction kinetics for oxidation/reduction reactions, provides a source of metabolic energy for chemolithotrophic microorganisms which are the primary biomass producers for an extensive submarine ecosystem that is essentially independent of photosynthesis. Thermodynamic models are used to explore geochemical constraints on the amount of metabolic energy potentially available from chemosynthetic reactions involving S, C, Fe, and Mn compounds during mixing of hydrothermal fluids with seawater. For the vent fluid used in the calculations (EPR 21°N OBS), the model indicates that mixing environments are favorable for oxidation of H 2S, CH 4, Fe 2+ and Mn 2+ only below ˜ 38°C, with methanogenesis and reduction of sulfate or S° favored at higher temperatures, suggesting that environments dominated by mixing provide habitats for mesophilic (but not thermophilic) aerobes and thermophilic (but not mesophilic) anaerobes. A maximum of ˜760 cal per kilogram vent fluid is available from sulfide oxidation while between 8 and 35 cal/kg vent fluid is available from methanotrophy, methanogenesis, oxidation of Fe or Mn, or sulfate reduction. The total potential for chemosynthetic primary production at deep-sea hydrothermal vents globally is estimated to be about 10 13 g biomass per year, which represents ˜0.02% of the global primary production by photosynthesis in the oceans. Thermophilic methanogens and sulfate- and S°-reducers are likely to be the predominant organisms in the walls of vent chimneys and in the diffuse mixing zones beneath warm vents, where biological processes may contribute to the high methane concentrations of vent fluids and heavy 34S/32S S ratios of vent sulfide minerals. The metabolic processes taking place in these systems may be analogs of the first living systems to evolve on the Earth.

  10. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospiracrunogena XCL-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Kathleen M.; Sievert, Stefan M.; Abril, Fereniki N.; Ball,Lois A.; Barrett, Chantell J.; Blake, Rodrigo A.; Boller, Amanda J.; Chain, Patrick S.G.; Clark, Justine A.; Davis, Carisa R.; Detter, Chris; Do, Kimberly F.; Dobrinski, Kimberly P.; Faza, BrandonI.; Fitzpatrick,Kelly A.; Freyermuth, Sharyn K.; Harmer, Tara L.; Hauser, Loren J.; Hugler, Michael; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Klotz, Martin G.; Kong, William W.; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Larimer, Frank W.; Longo, Dana L.; Lucas,Susan; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Massey, Steven E.; Martin, Darlene D.; McCuddin, Zoe; Meyer, Folker; Moore, Jessica L.; Ocampo, Luis H.; Paul,John H.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Reep, Douglas K.; Ren, Qinghu; Ross, Rachel L.; Sato, Priscila Y.; Thomas, Phaedra; Tinkham, Lance E.; Zeruth, Gary T.

    2006-08-23

    Presented here is the complete genome sequence ofThiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2, representative of ubiquitouschemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from deep-seahydrothermal vents. This gammaproteobacterium has a single chromosome(2,427,734 bp), and its genome illustrates many of the adaptations thathave enabled it to thrive at vents globally. It has 14 methyl-acceptingchemotaxis protein genes, including four that may assist in positioningit in the redoxcline. A relative abundance of CDSs encoding regulatoryproteins likely control the expression of genes encoding carboxysomes,multiple dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphate transporters, as wellas a phosphonate operon, which provide this species with a variety ofoptions for acquiring these substrates from the environment. T. crunogenaXCL-2 is unusual among obligate sulfur oxidizing bacteria in relying onthe Sox system for the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds. A 38 kbprophage is present, and a high level of prophage induction was observed,which may play a role in keeping competing populations of close relativesin check. The genome has characteristics consistent with an obligatelychemolithoautotrophic lifestyle, including few transporters predicted tohave organic allocrits, and Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle CDSs scatteredthroughout the genome.

  11. Successfully Treated Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy: Two Cases of a High Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis with Intravenous Sodium Thiosulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua L. Rein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA is a rare and potentially fatal disorder of calcification involving subcutaneous small vessels and fat in patients with renal insufficiency. We describe the successful use of intravenous sodium thiosulfate (STS for the treatment of CUA in two patients. The first case was complicated by the development of a severe anion gap metabolic acidosis, which was accompanied by a seizure. Both patients had complete wound healing within five months. Although STS should be considered in the treatment of CUA, little is known about pharmacokinetics and additional studies are required to determine dosing strategies to minimize severe potential side effects.

  12. Sulfate and thiosulfate inhibit oxalate transport via a dPrestin (Slc26a6)-dependent mechanism in an insect model of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Greg M; Hirata, Taku; Anderson, Jacob B; Cabrero, Pablo; Gallo, Christopher J R; Dow, Julian A T; Romero, Michael F

    2016-01-15

    Nephrolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract disorders, with the majority of kidney stones composed of calcium oxalate (CaOx). Given its prevalence (US occurrence 10%), it is still poorly understood, lacking progress in identifying new therapies because of its complex etiology. Drosophila melanogaster (fruitfly) is a recently developed model of CaOx nephrolithiasis. Effects of sulfate and thiosulfate on crystal formation were investigated using the Drosophila model, as well as electrophysiological effects on both Drosophila (Slc26a5/6; dPrestin) and mouse (mSlc26a6) oxalate transporters utilizing the Xenopus laevis oocyte heterologous expression system. Results indicate that both transport thiosulfate with a much higher affinity than sulfate Additionally, both compounds were effective at decreasing CaOx crystallization when added to the diet. However, these results were not observed when compounds were applied to Malpighian tubules ex vivo. Neither compound affected CaOx crystallization in dPrestin knockdown animals, indicating a role for principal cell-specific dPrestin in luminal oxalate transport. Furthermore, thiosulfate has a higher affinity for dPrestin and mSlc26a6 compared with oxalate These data indicate that thiosulfate's ability to act as a competitive inhibitor of oxalate via dPrestin, can explain the decrease in CaOx crystallization seen in the presence of thiosulfate, but not sulfate. Overall, our findings predict that thiosulfate or oxalate-mimics may be effective as therapeutic competitive inhibitors of CaOx crystallization. PMID:26538444

  13. Isolation of a Sulfur-oxidizing Bacterium That can Grow under Alkaline pH, from Corroded Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, T; Negishi, A; Oshima, Y; Nogami, Y; Kamimura, K; Sugio, T

    1998-01-01

    To study the early stages of concrete corrosion by bacteria, sulfur-oxidizing bacterium strain RO-1, which grows in an alkaline thiosulfate medium (pH 10.0) was isolated from corroded concreate and characterized. Strain RO-1 was a Gram negative, rod-shaped bacterium (0.5-0.6×0.9-1.5 μm). The mean G+C content of the DNA of strain RO-1 was 65.0 mol%. Optimum pH and temperature for growth were 8.0. and 30-37°C, respectively. When grown in thiosulfate medium with pH 10.0, growth rate of the strain was 48% of that observed at the optimum pH for growth. Strain RO-1 used sulfide, thiosulfate, and glucose, but not elemental sulfur or tetrathionate, as a sole energy source. Strain RO-1 grew under anaerobic conditions in pepton-NO3 (-) medium containing sodium nitrate as an electron acceptor, and had enzyme activities that oxidized sulfide, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, sulfite, and glucose, but not tetrathionate. The bacterium had an activity to assimilate (14)CO2 into the cells when thiosulfate was used as an energy source. These results suggest that strain RO-1 is Thiobacillus versutus. Strain RO-1 exuded Ca(2+) from concrete blocks added to thiosulfate medium with pH 9.0 and the pH of the medium decreased from 9.0 to 5.5 after 22 days of cultivation. In contrast, Thiobacillus thiooxidans strain NB1-3 could not exude Ca(2+) in the same thiosulfate medium, suggesting that strain RO-1, but not T. thiooxidans NB1-3, is involved in the early stage of concrete corrosion because concrete structures just after construction contain calcium hydroxide and have a pH of 12-13. PMID:27388643

  14. Feasibility Study of the Use of Thiosulfate as Extractant Agent in the Electrokinetic Remediation of a Soil Contaminated by Mercury from Almadén

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subires-Muñoz, José Diego; García-Rubio, Ana; Vereda-Alonso, Carlos;

    2010-01-01

    Natural soils are rather complex, making the predictability of the behavior of some remediation techniques very complicated. In this paper, the remediation of a Hg contaminated soil close to Almadén using a thiosulfate solution as extractant agent is studied. In addition, the use of the BCR extra...

  15. Sulfate but not thiosulfate reduces calculated and measured urinary ionized calcium and supersaturation: implications for the treatment of calcium renal stones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Rodgers

    Full Text Available Urinary sulfate (SO4(2- and thiosulfate (S2O3(2- can potentially bind with calcium and decrease kidney stone risk. We modeled the effects of these species on the concentration of ionized calcium (iCa and on supersaturation (SS of calcium oxalate (CaOx and calcium phosphate (CaP, and measured their in vitro effects on iCa and the upper limit of stability (ULM of these salts.Urine data from 4 different types of stone patients were obtained from the Mayo Nephrology Clinic (Model 1. A second data set was obtained from healthy controls and hypercalciuric stone formers in the literature who had been treated with sodium thiosulfate (STS (Model 2. The Joint Expert Speciation System (JESS was used to calculate iCa and SS. In Model 1, these parameters were calculated as a function of sulfate and thiosulfate concentrations. In Model 2, data from pre- and post STS urines were analyzed. ULM and iCa were determined in human urine as a function of sulfate and thiosulfate concentrations.Calculated iCa and SS values for all calcium salts decreased with increasing sulfate concentration. Thiosulfate had no effect on these parameters. In Model 2, calculated iCa and CaOx SS increased after STS treatment, but CaP SS decreased, perhaps due to a decrease in pH after STS treatment. In confirmatory in vitro experiments supplemental sulfate, but not thiosulfate, significantly increased the calcium needed to achieve the ULM of CaP and tended to increase the oxalate needed to reach the ULM of CaOx. Sulfate also significantly decreased iCa in human urine, while thiosulfate had no effect.Increasing urinary sulfate could theoretically reduce CaOx and CaP stone risk. Although STS may reduce CaP stone risk by decreasing urinary pH, it might also paradoxically increase iCa and CaOx SS. As such, STS may not be a viable treatment option for stone disease.

  16. [N,N-Bis(2-aminoethylethane-1,2-diamine](ethane-1,2-diaminenickel(II thiosulfate trihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrix Seidlhofer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Ni(C2H8N2(C6H18N4]S2O3·3H2O, was accidentally synthesized under solvothermal conditions applying [Ni(en3]Cl2 (en is ethane-1,2-diamine as the Ni source. The asymmetric unit consists of one discrete [Ni(tren(en]2+ complex [tren is N,N-bis(2-aminoethylethane-1,2-diamine] in which the Ni2+ cation is sixfold coordinated within a slightly distorted octahedron, one thiosulfate anion and three water molecules. In the crystal, the complex cations, anions and water molecules are linked by an intricate hydrogen-bonding network. One C atom of the tren ligand, as well as one O atom of a water molecule, are disordered over two sites and were refined using a split model (occupancy ratios = 0.85:15 and 0.60:0.40, respectively.

  17. Whole-genome sequencing reveals novel insights into sulfur oxidation in the extremophile Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Huaqun; Zhang, Xian; Li, Xiaoqi; He, Zhili; Liang, Yili; Guo, Xue; Hu, Qi; Xiao, Yunhua; Cong, Jing; Ma, Liyuan; Niu, Jiaojiao; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-01-01

    Background Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans (A. thiooxidans), a chemolithoautotrophic extremophile, is widely used in the industrial recovery of copper (bioleaching or biomining). The organism grows and survives by autotrophically utilizing energy derived from the oxidation of elemental sulfur and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (RISCs). However, the lack of genetic manipulation systems has restricted our exploration of its physiology. With the development of high-throughput sequencing techno...

  18. The chemolithoautotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans can survive under phosphate-limiting conditions by expressing a C-P lyase operon that allows it to grow on phosphonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Mario; Pagliai, Fernando; Guiliani, Nicolas; Jerez, Carlos A

    2008-03-01

    The chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is of great importance in biomining operations. During the bioleaching of ores, microorganisms are subjected to a variety of environmental stresses and to the limitations of some nutrients, such as inorganic phosphate (P(i)), which is an essential component for all living cells. Although the primary source of phosphorus for microorganisms is P(i), some bacteria are also able to metabolize P(i) esters (with a C-O-P bond) and phosphonates (with a very inert C-P bond). By using bioinformatic analysis of genomic sequences of the type strain of A. ferrooxidans (ATCC 23270), we found that as part of a Pho regulon, this bacterium has a complete gene cluster encoding C-P lyase, which is the main bacterial enzyme involved in phosphonate (Pn) degradation in other microorganisms. A. ferrooxidans was able to grow in the presence of methyl-Pn or ethyl-Pn as an alternative phosphorus source. Under these growth conditions, a great reduction in inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) levels was seen compared with the level for cells grown in the presence of P(i). By means of reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), DNA macroarrays, and real-time RT-PCR experiments, it was found that A. ferrooxidans phn genes were cotranscribed and their expression was induced when the microorganism was grown in methyl-Pn as the only phosphorus source. This is the first report of phosphonate utilization in a chemolithoautotrophic microorganism. The existence of a functional C-P lyase system is a clear advantage for the survival under P(i) limitation, a condition that may greatly affect the bioleaching of ores. PMID:18203861

  19. Interpretation of salts influence on the regeneration process of rich thioarsenate solution by oxidative reduction potential measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Bannikov, Leonid; Smirnova, Anna; Nesterenko, Serhiy

    2016-01-01

    In the article various contaminates of thioarsenate process of coke oven gas desulfurization were investigated by measuring oxidative-reduction potential (ORP). ORP measuring is a simple and indicative method of activity determination. The article has also explained the thiosulfate influence on the activity of scrubbing solution based on As3+/As5+ chemistry. ?????????? ????? ?????? ????????????? ? ??????? ???????? ????????? ???? ??? ?????????? ?????????-??????? ???????? ????????? ??????????? ...

  20. Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a Meromictic, Haloalkaline Lake with an Unprecedented High Sulfide Content▿

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitry Y Sorokin; Foti, Mirjam; Pinkart, Holly C.; Muyzer, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    Culture-dependent and -independent techniques were used to study the diversity of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a meromictic, haloalkaline lake containing an unprecedentedly high sulfide concentration in the anoxic monimolimnion. Both approaches revealed the dominance of bacteria belonging to the genus Thioalkalimicrobium, which are common inhabitants of soda lakes. A dense population of Thioalkalimicrobium (up to 107 cells/ml) was found at t...

  1. [Ion chromatography of L-ascorbic acid, sulfite and thiosulfate using their postcolumn reactions with cerium (IV) and fluorescence detection of cerium (III)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q; Hu, K; Miura, Y

    1999-09-01

    An ion chromatographic method was used to separate the species of L-ascorbic acid, sulfite and thiosulfate in their mixtures. This method is based on the separation of each anion in their mixtures by using a separation column, and then on the fluorimetric measurement of cerium (III) formed by a postcolumn reaction of cerium (IV) with the species of L-ascorbic acid, sulfite and thiosulfate in the effluent. The optimal conditions for separating and determining the above three species have been established. By using a 3 mmol/L carbonate eluent, the species of L-ascorbic acid, sulfite and thiosulfate could be eluted at the proper retention times of 1.7, 2.6 and 5.0 min, respectively, and these three anions could be separated completely. The effects of the concentrations of cerium (IV) and sulfuric acid in the postcolumn reaction solution on the chromatographic peak-height were tested in order to obtain the optimal peak-height. It was found that the peak-height at first increases rapidly with an increase in the concentration of cerium (IV) and sulfuric acid respectively up to a certain concertation, then increases slowly. These critical concentrations of cerium (IV) and sulfuric acid also depend on the amount of the analyte injected. Meanwhile the baseline signals of the sepectra increase with an increase in the concentration of cerium (IV). Some concentrations above the critical concentration of sulfuric acid could be selected as the optimal concentration of sulfuric acid, but the concentration of cerium (IV) should be optimized by establishing a compromise between the higher peak-height and the lower baseline signal. The detection limit of this method was found to be 1 mumol/L for thiosulfate when an amount of 100 microL analyte was injected. PMID:12552889

  2. RNA transcript sequencing reveals inorganic sulfur compound oxidation pathways in the acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christel, Stephan; Fridlund, Jimmy; Buetti-Dinh, Antoine; Buck, Moritz; Watkin, Elizabeth L; Dopson, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrivoransis an acidophile implicated in low-temperature biomining for the recovery of metals from sulfide minerals.Acidithiobacillus ferrivoransobtains its energy from the oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds, and genes encoding several alternative pathways have been identified. Next-generation sequencing ofAt. ferrivoransRNA transcripts identified the genes coding for metabolic and electron transport proteins for energy conservation from tetrathionate as electron donor. RNA transcripts suggested that tetrathionate was hydrolyzed by thetetH1gene product to form thiosulfate, elemental sulfur and sulfate. Despite two of the genes being truncated, RNA transcripts for the SoxXYZAB complex had higher levels than for thiosulfate quinone oxidoreductase (doxDAgenes). However, a lack of heme-binding sites insoxXsuggested that DoxDA was responsible for thiosulfate metabolism. Higher RNA transcript counts also suggested that elemental sulfur was metabolized by heterodisulfide reductase (hdrgenes) rather than sulfur oxygenase reductase (sor). The sulfite produced as a product of heterodisulfide reductase was suggested to be oxidized by a pathway involving thesatgene product or abiotically react with elemental sulfur to form thiosulfate. Finally, several electron transport complexes were involved in energy conservation. This study has elucidated the previously unknownAt. ferrivoranstetrathionate metabolic pathway that is important in biomining. PMID:26956550

  3. Remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soil using long-duration sodium thiosulfate supported by micro–nano networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Lulu [School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Wang, Min; Zhang, Guilong [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei 230031 (China); Qiu, Guannan [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Cai, Dongqing, E-mail: dqcai@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Zhengyan, E-mail: zywu@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhang, Xin, E-mail: xinzhang@ahau.edu.cn [School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • This work aims to develop a long-duration remediation agent (LRA). • LRA was obtained using Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported by attapulgite (ATP) micro–nano networks. • ATP micro–nano networks was induced by high-energy electron beam irradiation. • LRA can effectively control the migration of Cr(VI) and reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). • LRA displayed high performance on the remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil. - Abstract: In this work, a long-duration remediation agent (LRA) on hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) was developed using sodium thiosulfate (ST) supported by attapulgite (ATP) micro–nano networks induced through high-energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation. The ATP networks could effectively reduce the leaching amount of Cr(VI) in soil. More importantly, the ATP networks could significantly control the leaching behavior of ST, and then prolong the duration and increase the reduction efficiency of ST on Cr(VI). As a result, LRA displayed high performance on controlling the migration of Cr(VI) and reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Additionally, pot experiment indicated that LRA could effectively decrease the absorbed amount of Cr(VI) in corn, and reduce the inhibition effect of Cr(VI) on the growth of corn. Therefore, this work could provide a facile approach to remediate the Cr(VI)-contaminated soil and lower the harmful effect of Cr(VI) on crop.

  4. Genetic identification of thiosulfate sulfurtransferase as an adipocyte-expressed antidiabetic target in mice selected for leanness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Nicholas M; Beltram, Jasmina; Carter, Roderick N; Michailidou, Zoi; Gorjanc, Gregor; McFadden, Clare; Barrios-Llerena, Martin E; Rodriguez-Cuenca, Sergio; Gibbins, Matthew T G; Aird, Rhona E; Moreno-Navarrete, José Maria; Munger, Steven C; Svenson, Karen L; Gastaldello, Annalisa; Ramage, Lynne; Naredo, Gregorio; Zeyda, Maximilian; Wang, Zhao V; Howie, Alexander F; Saari, Aila; Sipilä, Petra; Stulnig, Thomas M; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kenyon, Christopher J; Seckl, Jonathan R; Walker, Brian R; Webster, Scott P; Dunbar, Donald R; Churchill, Gary A; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Fernandez-Real, José Manuel; Emilsson, Valur; Horvat, Simon

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of genetic mechanisms for resistance to obesity and diabetes may illuminate new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of this global health challenge. We used the polygenic 'lean' mouse model, which has been selected for low adiposity over 60 generations, to identify mitochondrial thiosulfate sulfurtransferase (Tst; also known as rhodanese) as a candidate obesity-resistance gene with selectively increased expression in adipocytes. Elevated adipose Tst expression correlated with indices of metabolic health across diverse mouse strains. Transgenic overexpression of Tst in adipocytes protected mice from diet-induced obesity and insulin-resistant diabetes. Tst-deficient mice showed markedly exacerbated diabetes, whereas pharmacological activation of TST ameliorated diabetes in mice. Mechanistically, TST selectively augmented mitochondrial function combined with degradation of reactive oxygen species and sulfide. In humans, TST mRNA expression in adipose tissue correlated positively with insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue and negatively with fat mass. Thus, the genetic identification of Tst as a beneficial regulator of adipocyte mitochondrial function may have therapeutic significance for individuals with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27270587

  5. Remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soil using long-duration sodium thiosulfate supported by micro–nano networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This work aims to develop a long-duration remediation agent (LRA). • LRA was obtained using Na2S2O3 supported by attapulgite (ATP) micro–nano networks. • ATP micro–nano networks was induced by high-energy electron beam irradiation. • LRA can effectively control the migration of Cr(VI) and reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). • LRA displayed high performance on the remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil. - Abstract: In this work, a long-duration remediation agent (LRA) on hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) was developed using sodium thiosulfate (ST) supported by attapulgite (ATP) micro–nano networks induced through high-energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation. The ATP networks could effectively reduce the leaching amount of Cr(VI) in soil. More importantly, the ATP networks could significantly control the leaching behavior of ST, and then prolong the duration and increase the reduction efficiency of ST on Cr(VI). As a result, LRA displayed high performance on controlling the migration of Cr(VI) and reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Additionally, pot experiment indicated that LRA could effectively decrease the absorbed amount of Cr(VI) in corn, and reduce the inhibition effect of Cr(VI) on the growth of corn. Therefore, this work could provide a facile approach to remediate the Cr(VI)-contaminated soil and lower the harmful effect of Cr(VI) on crop

  6. Pigs fed camelina meal increase hepatic gene expression of cytochrome 8b1, aldehyde dehydrogenase, and thiosulfate transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadus, William Jon; Duff, Pascale; McDonald, Tanya; Caine, William R

    2014-01-01

    Camelina sativa is an oil seed crop which can be grown on marginal lands. Camelina seed oil is rich in omega-3 fatty acids (>35%) and γ-tocopherol but is also high in erucic acid and glucosinolates. Camelina meal, is the by-product after the oil has been extracted. Camelina meal was fed to 28 d old weaned pigs at 3.7% and 7.4% until age 56 d. The camelina meal supplements in the soy based diets, improved feed efficiency but also significantly increased the liver weights. Gene expression analyses of the livers, using intra-species microarrays, identified increased expression of phase 1 and phase 2 drug metabolism enzymes. The porcine versions of the enzymes were confirmed by real time PCR. Cytochrome 8b1 (CYP8B1), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (Aldh2), and thiosulfate transferase (TST) were all significantly stimulated. Collectively, these genes implicate the camelina glucosinolate metabolite, methyl-sulfinyldecyl isothiocyanate, as the main xeniobiotic, causing increased hepatic metabolism and increased liver weight. PMID:24383433

  7. Anodic dissolution of gold in alkaline solutions containing thiourea, thiosulfate and sulfite ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Gold dissolves electrochemically in alkaline solutions containing ligands to form complex ions with gold ion. Therefore, selective leaching of noble metals is expected without dissolution of base metals such as steels, aluminum alloys in scrap treatment. Gold electrodes were investigated using linear sweep voltammetry, EQCM method and potentiostatic electrolysis in alkaline solutions containing thiourea, Na2SO3 and Na2S2O3. The solution composition, electrode potential affect gold dissolution rate and current efficiency. The gold dissolved from anode electrode forms complex ions, suspension particles as compound precipitates and deposits on cathode electrode as a metal. Anodic efficiency for gold dissolution is between 10% and 22%. This is caused by the oxidation decomposition of sulfite ions and thiourea. The stability of the alkaline solution containing these elements was also estimated by capillary electrophoresis technique.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Thialkalivibrio versutus D301 isolated from Soda Lake in northern China, a typical strain with great ability to oxidize sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Tingzhen; Zhou, Jiemin; Yang, Maohua; Xing, Jianmin

    2016-06-10

    Thioalkalivibrio versutus D301 isolated from Soda Lake is a haloalkaliphilic and obligated chemolithoautotrophic Gram-negative bacterium. The strain has a good adaption to hyperhaline and highly alkaline environment and a powerful sulfur-oxidizing ability. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of T. versutus D301, providing insights into the genomic basis of its effects and facilitating its application in microbial desulfurization. PMID:27080450

  9. Arsenite-Oxidizing Hydrogenobaculum Strain Isolated from an Acid-Sulfate-Chloride Geothermal Spring in Yellowstone National Park

    OpenAIRE

    Donahoe-Christiansen, Jessica; D'Imperio, Seth; Jackson, Colin R.; Inskeep, William P.; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2004-01-01

    An arsenite-oxidizing Hydrogenobaculum strain was isolated from a geothermal spring in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo., that was previously shown to contain microbial populations engaged in arsenite oxidation. The isolate was sensitive to both arsenite and arsenate and behaved as an obligate chemolithoautotroph that used H2 as its sole energy source and had an optimum temperature of 55 to 60°C and an optimum pH of 3.0. The arsenite oxidation in this organism displayed saturation kinetics and ...

  10. Complete genome sequence of Nitrosomonas sp. Is79, an ammonia oxidizing bacterium adapted to low ammonium concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollmann, Annette [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Sedlacek, Christopher J [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J [Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW); Suwa, Yuichi [Chuo University, Tokyo, Japan; Stein, Lisa Y [University of California, Riverside; Klotz, Martin G [University of Louisville, Louisville; Arp, D J [Oregon State University; Sayavedra-Soto, LA [Oregon State University; Lu, Megan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pennacchio, Len [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Szeto, Ernest [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2013-01-01

    Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 is a chemolithoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium that belongs to the family Nitrosomonadaceae within the phylum Proteobacteria. Ammonia oxidation is the first step of nitrification, an important process in the global nitrogen cycle ultimately resulting in the production of nitrate. Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 is an ammonia oxidizer of high interest because it is adapted to low ammonium and can be found in freshwater environments around the world. The 3,783,444-bp chromosome with a total of 3,553 protein coding genes and 44 RNA genes was sequenced by the DOE-Joint Genome Institute Program CSP 2006.

  11. Wet-air oxidation cleans up black wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    Sterling Organics produces the analgesic paracetamol (acetaminophen) at its Dudley, England, plant. The wastewater from the batch process contains intermediates such as para-aminophenol (PAP) and byproducts such as thiosulfates, sulfites and sulfides. To stay ahead of increasingly strict environmental legislation, Sterling Organics installed a wet-air oxidation system at the Dudley facility in August 1992. The system is made by Zimpro Environmental Inc. (Rothschild, Wis.). Zimpro's wet-air oxidation system finds a way around the limitations of purely chemical or physical processes. In the process, compressed air at elevated temperature and pressure oxidizes the process intermediates and byproducts and removes the color from the wastewater.

  12. Mechanisms and evolution of oxidative sulfur metabolism in green sulfur bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Lea Haarup; Bryant, Donald A.; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria (GSB) constitute a closely related group of photoautotrophic and thiotrophic bacteria with limited phenotypic variation. They typically oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to sulfate with sulfur globules as an intermediate. Based on genome sequence information from 15 strains, the...... distribution and phylogeny of enzymes involved in their oxidative sulfur metabolism was investigated. At least one homolog of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) is present in all strains. In all sulfur-oxidizing GSB strains except the earliest diverging Chloroherpeton thalassium, the sulfide oxidation...

  13. Strong enhancement of the chemiluminescence of the cerium(IV)-thiosulfate reaction by carbon dots, and its application to the sensitive determination of dopamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the very weak chemiluminescence (CL) of the Ce(IV)-thiosulfate system is enhanced by a factor of ∼150 in the presence of fluorescent carbon dots (C-dots). The C-dots were prepared by a solvothermal method and characterized by fluorescence spectra and transmission electron microscopy. Possible mechanisms that lead to the effect were elucidated by recording fluorescence and CL spectra. It is found that dopamine at even nanomolar levels exerts a diminishing effect on the enhancement of CL. This was exploited to design a method for the determination of dopamine in the concentration range from 2.5 nM to 20 μM, with a limit of detection (at 3 s) of 1.0 nM. Dopamine was determined by this method in spiked human plasma samples with satisfactory results. (author)

  14. Vascular ossification – calcification in metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and calciphylaxis – calcific uremic arteriolopathy: the emerging role of sodium thiosulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowers James R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular calcification is associated with metabolic syndrome, diabetes, hypertension, atherosclerosis, chronic kidney disease, and end stage renal disease. Each of the above contributes to an accelerated and premature demise primarily due to cardiovascular disease. The above conditions are associated with multiple metabolic toxicities resulting in an increase in reactive oxygen species to the arterial vessel wall, which results in a response to injury wound healing (remodeling. The endothelium seems to be at the very center of these disease processes, acting as the first line of defense against these multiple metabolic toxicities and the first to encounter their damaging effects to the arterial vessel wall. Results The pathobiomolecular mechanisms of vascular calcification are presented in order to provide the clinician – researcher a database of knowledge to assist in the clinical management of these high-risk patients and examine newer therapies. Calciphylaxis is associated with medial arteriolar vascular calcification and results in ischemic subcutaneous necrosis with vulnerable skin ulcerations and high mortality. Recently, this clinical syndrome (once thought to be rare is presenting with increasing frequency. Consequently, newer therapeutic modalities need to be explored. Intravenous sodium thiosulfate is currently used as an antidote for the treatment of cyanide poisioning and prevention of toxicities of cisplatin cancer therapies. It is used as a food and medicinal preservative and topically used as an antifungal medication. Conclusion A discussion of sodium thiosulfate's dual role as a potent antioxidant and chelator of calcium is presented in order to better understand its role as an emerging novel therapy for the clinical syndrome of calciphylaxis and its complications.

  15. Identification of Bacteria Potentially Responsible for Oxic and Anoxic Sulfide Oxidation in Biofilters of a Recirculating Mariculture System

    OpenAIRE

    Cytryn, Eddie; van Rijn, Jaap; Schramm, Andreas; Gieseke, Armin; Beer, Dirk de; Minz, Dror

    2005-01-01

    Bacteria presumably involved in oxygen- or nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation in the biofilters of a recirculating marine aquaculture system were identified using a new application of reverse transcription-PCR denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis termed differential-transcription (DT)-DGGE. Biofilter samples were incubated in various concentrations of sulfide or thiosulfate (0 to 5 mM) with either oxygen or nitrate as the sole electron acceptor. Before and after short-term...

  16. Oxidation of Elemental Sulfur in Selected Soils of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An incubation experiment was carried out in laboratory to study the effect of temperature, moisture,phosphorus, organic matter, cropping and previous elemental sulfur application on elemental sulfur oxidation in four selected soils, fluvo-aquic soil, black soil, yellow-brown soil and red soil. In all the soils tested, sulfur oxidation rate was influenced by temperature and the temperature coefficient (Q10) values at the range from 10to 30 ℃ were 4.41, 4.05, 6.19 and 3.71 for the four soils, respectively. The rate of sulfur oxidation was parabolically related to soil water content. The optimum moisture content for the maximum oxidation rate was different among soils. Phosphorus increased the oxidation rate of elemental sulfur by 57.7%, 33.1%, 21.7% and 26.4% for the above four soils, respectively, compared with the control (no phosphorus applied). Organic material of corn straw which was ground and passed through a 0.5-mm sieve also increased the oxidation rate of elemental sulfur in the four soils by 59.8%, 7.8%, 39.2% and 540.4%, respectively. Elemental sulfur which was applied previously to soils significantly enhanced the oxidation of elemental sulfur subsequently added and increased sulfur-oxidizing populations such as autotrophic elemental sulfur oxidizers with pH optimum 6.8, autotrophic thiosulfate oxidizers with pH optimum 6.8, heterotrophic thiosulfate oxidizers and heterotrophic sulfate producers. Cropping had little effect on lemental sulfur-oxidizing potentiality of soils.

  17. Abundance of iron-oxidizing thiobacilli and biological sulfur oxidation potential from soil impacted by coal and coal refuse piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to assess the abundance of iron-oxidizing bacteria and biological sulfur oxidation potential from soil impacted by coal and coal refuse from two coal-burning electric power facilities located at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (Aiken, S.C.) and the South Carolina Electric and Gas Site at Beech Island, S.C. Significantly higher most probable number (MPN) counts of iron-oxidizing bacteria were obtained from samples collected at the confluence of a coal storage runoff containment basin, a coal reject (refuse) pile, and an adjacent wetland at the Savannah River Site. Significant differences in pH, sulfate-S, ferrous- and ferric-iron were also obtained between sampling locations. No significant differences in ferric/ferrous ratios were determined. These ratios however, exceeded a value of 2.0 when sample pH values were less than 4.5. Under optimal conditions, biological thiosulfate-S oxidation potentials (in vitro) showed a 4- to 7-day lag in the appearance of sulfate-S, and a final pH (after twenty-four days of perfusion) of 1.97 to 3.90. These results indicate that contamination of subsurface water by acidic leachate derived from thionic bacterial activity will occur if coal and coal refuse piles are not confined by an impermeable surface or containment facility. 19 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs

  18. Radioprotective Effect of Alk(enyl Thiosulfates Derived from Allium Vegetables against DNA Damage Caused by X-Ray Irradiation in Cultured Cells: Antiradiation Potential of Onions and Garlic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Sook Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate a radioprotective effect of sodium n-propyl thiosulfate (NPTS and sodium 2-propenyl thiosulfate (2PTS derived from onions and garlic, respectively, rat hepatoma H4IIE cells and mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells were preincubated with each of these compounds for 48 hours at 37°C before receiving 10 Gy of X-ray irradiation. Cell damage caused by the irradiation was quantified as comet tail moment, which represents the degree of DNA damage. X-ray-induced DNA damage was significantly decreased in both H4IIE and L5178Y cells by micromolar concentrations of NPTS and 2PTS compared with the control without the compounds. The protective effect was more potent with 2PTS than NPTS. Onions and garlic have antiradiation potential.

  19. Protection of gastric mucosa against hypertonic sodium chloride by 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2 or sodium thiosulfate in the rat: Evidence for decreased mucosal penetration of damaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pihan, G.; Szabo, S. (Brigham Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Protection of the gastric mucosa may be the result of either increased cellular resistance to injury (cytoprotection) or, alternatively, decreased exposure of mucosal cells to the damaging agent. To determine whether decreased exposure of mucosal cells to damaging agents plays a role in mucosal protection by 16,16-dm PGE2 or sodium thiosulfate, we estimated the intramucosal concentration of 22NaCl and measured its absorption from the gastric lumen into the systemic circulation 1 and 5 min after intragastric administration of hypertonic (25% w/v) 22NaCl. In an attempt to explain the differences observed, we also measured the net transmucosal water flux in control animals and rats pretreated with the protective agents. Administration of hypertonic NaCl rapidly (within 1 min) induced extensive hemorrhagic mucosal lesions that were significantly reduced by pretreatment with 16,16-dm PGE2 or sodium thiosulfate. Ultra-low temperature autoradiography indicated that luminal hypertonic 22NaCl penetrates the upper layers of the mucosa in relatively high concentrations (12.5% w/v) within 1 min but its concentration decreases rapidly and reached low levels (3.12% w/v) by 5 min. Absorption of NaCl from the gastric lumen into the systemic circulation 1 and 5 min after hypertonic NaCl was lower in both pretreatment groups than in the control. Net gastric transmucosal water flux (from serosa to mucosa) increased (P less than 0.05) from 100 +/- 2 in controls, to 1470 +/- 8 and 715 +/- 9 microliters in rats pretreated with 16,16-dm PGE2 and sodium thiosulfate, respectively. We conclude that 16,16-dm PGE2 and sodium thiosulfate protect the gastric mucosa against hypertonic NaCl, diminish mucosal penetration of NaCl, decrease mucosal absorption of NaCl, and significantly increase serosal to mucosal transmucosal water flux.

  20. Protection of gastric mucosa against hypertonic sodium chloride by 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2 or sodium thiosulfate in the rat: Evidence for decreased mucosal penetration of damaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protection of the gastric mucosa may be the result of either increased cellular resistance to injury (cytoprotection) or, alternatively, decreased exposure of mucosal cells to the damaging agent. To determine whether decreased exposure of mucosal cells to damaging agents plays a role in mucosal protection by 16,16-dm PGE2 or sodium thiosulfate, we estimated the intramucosal concentration of 22NaCl and measured its absorption from the gastric lumen into the systemic circulation 1 and 5 min after intragastric administration of hypertonic (25% w/v) 22NaCl. In an attempt to explain the differences observed, we also measured the net transmucosal water flux in control animals and rats pretreated with the protective agents. Administration of hypertonic NaCl rapidly (within 1 min) induced extensive hemorrhagic mucosal lesions that were significantly reduced by pretreatment with 16,16-dm PGE2 or sodium thiosulfate. Ultra-low temperature autoradiography indicated that luminal hypertonic 22NaCl penetrates the upper layers of the mucosa in relatively high concentrations (12.5% w/v) within 1 min but its concentration decreases rapidly and reached low levels (3.12% w/v) by 5 min. Absorption of NaCl from the gastric lumen into the systemic circulation 1 and 5 min after hypertonic NaCl was lower in both pretreatment groups than in the control. Net gastric transmucosal water flux (from serosa to mucosa) increased (P less than 0.05) from 100 +/- 2 in controls, to 1470 +/- 8 and 715 +/- 9 microliters in rats pretreated with 16,16-dm PGE2 and sodium thiosulfate, respectively. We conclude that 16,16-dm PGE2 and sodium thiosulfate protect the gastric mucosa against hypertonic NaCl, diminish mucosal penetration of NaCl, decrease mucosal absorption of NaCl, and significantly increase serosal to mucosal transmucosal water flux

  1. Conifer somatic embryogenesis: improvements by supplementation of medium with oxidation-reduction agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullman, Gerald S; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Copeland-Kamp, Brandi; Crockett, Jonathan; Lucrezi, Jacob; May, Sheldon W; Bucalo, Kylie

    2015-02-01

    A major barrier to the commercialization of somatic embryogenesis technology in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) is recalcitrance of some high-value crosses to initiate embryogenic tissue (ET) and continue early-stage somatic embryo growth. Developing initiation and multiplication media that resemble the seed environment has been shown to decrease this recalcitrance. Glutathione (GSH), glutathione disulfide (GSSG), ascorbic acid and dehydroascorbate analyses were performed weekly throughout the sequence of seed development for female gametophyte and zygotic embryo tissues to determine physiological concentrations. Major differences in stage-specific oxidation-reduction (redox) agents were observed. A simple bioassay was used to evaluate potential growth-promotion of natural and inorganic redox agents added to early-stage somatic embryo growth medium. Compounds showing statistically significant increases in early-stage embryo growth were then tested for the ability to increase initiation of loblolly pine. Low-cost reducing agents sodium dithionite and sodium thiosulfate increased ET initiation for loblolly pine and Douglas fir (Mirb) Franco. Germination medium supplementation with GSSG increased somatic embryo germination. Early-stage somatic embryos grown on medium with or without sodium thiosulfate did not differ in GSH or GSSG content, suggesting that sodium thiosulfate-mediated growth stimulation does not involve GSH or GSSG. We have developed information demonstrating that alteration of the redox environment in vitro can improve ET initiation, early-stage embryo development and somatic embryo germination in loblolly pine. PMID:25716878

  2. Effect of mitochondrial potassium channel on the renal protection mediated by sodium thiosulfate against ethylene glycol induced nephrolithiasis in rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Baldev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Sodium thiosulfate (STS is clinically reported to be a promising drug in preventing nephrolithiasis. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of mitochondrial KATP channel in the renal protection mediated by STS. Materials and Methods: Nephrolithiasis was induced in Wistar rats by administrating 0.4% ethylene glycol (EG along with 1% ammonium chloride for one week in drinking water followed by only 0.75% EG for two weeks. Treatment groups received STS, mitochondrial KATP channel opener and closer exclusively or in combination with STS for two weeks. Results: Animals treated with STS showed normal renal tissue architecture, supported by near normal serum creatinine, urea and ALP activity. Diazoxide (mitochondria KATP channel opening treatment to the animal also showed normal renal tissue histology and improved serum chemistry. However, an opposite result was shown by glibenclamide (mitochondria KATP channel closer treated rats. STS administered along with diazoxide negated the renal protection rendered by diazoxide alone, while it imparted protection to the glibenclamide treated rats, formulating a mitochondria modulated STS action. Conclusion: The present study confirmed that STS render renal protection not only through chelation and antioxidant effect but also by modulating the mitochondrial KATP channel for preventing urolithiasis.

  3. Regulation of dissimilatory sulfur oxidation in the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChristianeDahl

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum, thiosulfate oxidation is strictly dependent on the presence of three periplasmic Sox proteins encoded by the soxBXAK and soxYZ genes. It is also well documented that proteins encoded in the dsr (dissimilatory sulfite reductase operon, dsrABEFHCMKLJOPNRS, are essential for the oxidation of sulfur that is stored intracellularly as an obligatory intermediate during the oxidation of thiosulfate and sulfide. Until recently, detailed knowledge about the regulation of the sox genes was not available. We started to fill this gap and show that these genes are expressed on a low constitutive level in A. vinosum in the absence of reduced sulfur compounds. Thiosulfate and possibly sulfide lead to an induction of sox gene transcription. Additional translational regulation was not apparent. Regulation of soxXAK is probably performed by a two-component system consisting of a multisensor histidine kinase and a regulator with proposed di-guanylate cyclase activity. Previous work already provided some information about regulation of the dsr genes encoding the second important sulfur-oxidizing enzyme system in the purple sulfur bacterium. The expression of most dsr genes was found to be at a low basal level in the absence of reduced sulfur compounds and enhanced in the presence of sulfide. In the present work, we focused on the role of DsrS, a protein encoded by the last gene of the dsr locus in A. vinosum. Transcriptional and translational gene fusion experiments suggest a participation of DsrS in the post-transcriptional control of the dsr operon. Characterization of an A. vinosum ΔdsrS mutant showed that the monomeric cytoplasmic 41.1 kDa protein DsrS is important though not essential for the oxidation of sulfur stored in the intracellular sulfur globules.

  4. Highly selective and sensitive paper-based colorimetric sensor using thiosulfate catalytic etching of silver nanoplates for trace determination of copper ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyo, Sudkate; Siangproh, Weena; Apilux, Amara; Chailapakul, Orawon

    2015-03-25

    A novel, highly selective and sensitive paper-based colorimetric sensor for trace determination of copper (Cu(2+)) ions was developed. The measurement is based on the catalytic etching of silver nanoplates (AgNPls) by thiosulfate (S2O3(2-)). Upon the addition of Cu(2+) to the ammonium buffer at pH 11, the absorption peak intensity of AuNPls/S2O3(2-) at 522 nm decreased and the pinkish violet AuNPls became clear in color as visible to the naked eye. This assay provides highly sensitive and selective detection of Cu(2+) over other metal ions (K(+), Cr(3+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), As(3+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Pb(2+), Al(3+), Ni(2+), Fe(3+), Mg(2+), Hg(2+) and Bi(3+)). A paper-based colorimetric sensor was then developed for the simple and rapid determination of Cu(2+) using the catalytic etching of AgNPls. Under optimized conditions, the modified AgNPls coated at the test zone of the devices immediately changes in color in the presence of Cu(2+). The limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 1.0 ng mL(-1) by visual detection. For semi-quantitative measurement with image processing, the method detected Cu(2+) in the range of 0.5-200 ng mL(-1)(R(2)=0.9974) with an LOD of 0.3 ng mL(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied to detect Cu(2+) in the wide range of real samples including water, food, and blood. The results were in good agreement according to a paired t-test with results from inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). PMID:25732695

  5. A pilot study of the effect of sodium thiosulfate on urinary lithogenicity and associated metabolic acid load in non-stone formers and stone formers with hypercalciuria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onyeka W Okonkwo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Sodium thiosulfate (STS reduced calcium stone formation in both humans and genetic hypercalciuric stone forming (GHS rats. We sought to measure urine chemistry changes resulting from STS administration in people. DESIGN SETTING PARTICIPANTS MEASUREMENTS: STS was given to healthy and hypercalciuric stone forming adults. Five normal non-stone forming adults (mean age 33 years, and 5 people with idiopathic hypercalciuria and calcium kidney stones (mean age 66 years participated. Two baseline 24-hour urine collections were performed on days 2 and 3 of 3 days of self-selected diets. Subjects then drank STS 10 mmol twice a day for 7 days and did urine collections while repeating the self-selected diet. Results were compared by non-parametric Wilcoxon signed rank test. The primary outcome was the resulting change in urine chemistry. RESULTS: STS administration did not cause a significant change in urinary calcium excretion in either group. In both groups, 24 hour urinary ammonium (P = 0.005 and sulfate excretion (P = 0.007 increased, and urinary pH fell (P = 0.005; citrate excretion fell (P<0.05 in hypercalciuric participants but not in non-stone formers. Among stone formers with hypercalciuria, 3 of 5 patients had measurement of serum HCO3 concentration after the STS period: it did not change. The net effect was an increase in supersaturation of uric acid, and no change in supersaturation of calcium oxalate or calcium phosphate. CONCLUSIONS: The basis for studies demonstrating that STS prevented stones in rats and people was not reflected by the changes in urine chemistry reported here. Although serum HCO3 did not change, urine tests suggested an acid load in both non-stone forming and hypercalciuric stone-forming participants. The long term safety of STS needs to be determined before the drug can be tested in humans for long-term prevention of stone recurrence.

  6. Effect of potassium sodium dehydroandroan drographolide succinate combined with sodium thiosulfate in the treatment of eczema%炎琥宁联合硫代硫酸钠治疗湿疹的效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔乐

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of potassium sodium dehydroandroan drographolide succinate combined with sodium thiosulfate in the treatment of eczema. Methods 80 patients with eczema were randomly allocated to the control group receiving sodium thiosulfate and the observation group receiving potassium sodium dehydroandroan dro-grapholide succinate combined with sodium thiosulfate,with 40 patients in each group. Clinical efficacy and incidence of side effect of drugs were compared between the two groups. Results Score of clinical symptoms,score of area of skin rash and total score of clinical symptom before treatment in the two groups were not statistically different (P>0.05).The above-mentiond score after treatment in the two groups significantly improved (P0.05). Conclusion Potassium sodium dehydroandroan drographolide succinate combined with sodium thiosulfate can significantly improve the curative effect in the treatment of eczema,and at the same time it does not increase the incidence rate of side effect of drugs.%目的:探讨炎琥宁联合硫代硫酸钠治疗湿疹的效果。方法随机将80例湿疹患者分为接受硫代硫酸钠治疗的对照组及接受炎琥宁联合硫代硫酸钠治疗的观察组,每组各40例。对比两组的临床疗效及药物副作用发生率。结果两组治疗前的临床症状计分、皮疹面积计分及临床症状总积分比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),治疗后,两组的上述评分均明显改善(P0.05)。结论炎琥宁联合硫代硫酸钠可显著改善治疗湿疹的效果,且不增高药物副作用发生率。

  7. Chemolithotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from the galapagos rift hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, E G; Wirsen, C O; Jannasch, H W

    1981-08-01

    Three distinct physiological types of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were enriched and isolated from samples collected at several deep-sea hydrothermal vents (2,550 m) of the Galapagos Rift ocean floor spreading center. Twelve strains of the obligately chemolithotrophic genus Thiomicrospira were obtained from venting water and from microbial mats covering surfaces in the immediate vicinity of the vents. From these and other sources two types of obligately heterotrophic sulfur oxidizers were repeatedly isolated that presumably oxidized thiosulfate either to sulfate (acid producing; 9 strains) or to polythionates (base producing; 74 strains). The former were thiobacilli-like, exhibiting a thiosulfate-stimulated increase in growth and CO(2) incorporation, whereas the latter were similar to previously encountered pseudomonad-like heterotrophs. The presence of chemolithotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in the sulfide-containing hydrothermal water supports the hypothesis that chemosynthesis provides a substantial primary food source for the rich populations of invertebrates found in the immediate vicinity of the vents. PMID:16345831

  8. Enrichment and cultivation of a sulfide-oxidizing bacteria consortium for its deploying in full-scale biogas desulfurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operational experiences and strategies to get suitable chemolithoautotrophic sulfide-oxidizing biomass from activated sludge wastewater treatment plant for its deploying in a full-scale biogas desulfurization plant are described. An economic nutrient source was applied to foster microbial selection and rapid growth. Respirometry was implemented on full-scale installations to monitor the ability of the specialized bacteria consortium to oxidize reduced sulfur i.e. H2S. During the deployment in the full-scale desulfurization reactor, intermittent sulfide feed from biogas scrubbing was performed to accelerate the startup the desulfurization process. - Highlights: • A simple method for reaching high amounts of specialized sulfide-oxidizing bacterial consortium from activated sludge was developed. • The full-scale desulfurization process can be continuously monitored by respirometry allowing fast decision making if problems arise. • The dissolved sulfide concentration was estimated with an empirical correlation between measurements of ORP, dissolved oxygen and pH

  9. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the active substances iron, sodium chloride, water, silica gel, activated carbon, monosodium glutamate, potassium acid tartrate, powdered cellulose, malic acid, chabazite, hydroxypropyl cellulose, potassium carbonate, sodium thiosulfate, propylene glycol, glycerin, polyethyleneglycol sorbitan monooleate, sodium propionate and clinoptilolite for use in food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of iron based oxygen absorber systems comprising iron, sodium chloride, water, silica gel, activated carbon, monosodium glutamate, potassium acid tartrate, powdered cellulose, malic acid, chabazite, hydroxypropyl cellulose, potassium carbonate, sodium thiosulfate, propylene glycol, glycerin, polyethyleneglycol sorbitan monooleate, sodium propionate and clinoptilolite, incorporated in sachets, patches and cards. Iron, the main active ingredient reacts with oxygen to form iron hydroxide and iron oxide, thereby removing oxygen from the primary packaging. Only activated carbon has not been evaluated as such, but it meets the specifications for activated charcoal which is authorised as additive for plastic materials and articles in contact with foods. All other ingredients of the oxygen absorber formulations have been evaluated and approved for use as additives in plastic food contact materials and/or as food additives and/or food supplements or feed additives. The active system being based on solid ingredients and not intended for direct contact with liquid food or food with an external liquid surface, migration through the gas phase was screened for 9 representative active systems. No volatiles derived from the active mixtures were detected. Therefore the CEF Panel concluded that the substances do not raise a safety concern when used in oxygen absorbers in sachets, patches or cards, placed in the headspace of the packaging or when used in direct contact with food, excluding liquid food or foods that have an external aqueous liquid phase on the surface such as sliced fruits and fresh meat.

  10. Cloning and characterization of sulfite dehydrogenase, two c-type cytochromes, and a flavoprotein of Paracoccus denitrificans GB17: essential role of sulfite dehydrogenase in lithotrophic sulfur oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodara, C; Bardischewsky, F; Friedrich, C G

    1997-08-01

    A 13-kb genomic region of Paracoccus dentrificans GB17 is involved in lithotrophic thiosulfate oxidation. Adjacent to the previously reported soxB gene (C. Wodara, S. Kostka, M. Egert, D. P. Kelly, and C. G. Friedrich, J. Bacteriol. 176:6188-6191, 1994), 3.7 kb were sequenced. Sequence analysis revealed four additional open reading frames, soxCDEF. soxC coded for a 430-amino-acid polypeptide with an Mr of 47,339 that included a putative signal peptide of 40 amino acids (Mr of 3,599) with a RR motif present in periplasmic proteins with complex redox centers. The mature soxC gene product exhibited high amino acid sequence similarity to the eukaryotic molybdoenzyme sulfite oxidase and to nitrate reductase. We constructed a mutant, GBsoxC delta, carrying an in-frame deletion in soxC which covered a region possibly coding for the molybdenum cofactor binding domain. GBsoxC delta was unable to grow lithoautotrophically with thiosulfate but grew well with nitrate as a nitrogen source or as an electron acceptor. Whole cells and cell extracts of mutant GBsoxC delta contained 10% of the thiosulfate-oxidizing activity of the wild type. Only a marginal rate of sulfite-dependent cytochrome c reduction was observed from cell extracts of mutant GBsoxC delta. These results demonstrated that sulfite dehydrogenase was essential for growth with thiosulfate of P. dentrificans GB17. soxD coded for a periplasmic diheme c-type cytochrome of 384 amino acids (Mr of 39,983) containing a putative signal peptide with an Mr of 2,363. soxE coded for a periplasmic monoheme c-type cytochrome of 236 amino acids (Mr of 25,926) containing a putative signal peptide with an Mr of 1,833. SoxD and SoxE were highly identical to c-type cytochromes of P. denitrificans and other organisms. soxF revealed an incomplete open reading frame coding for a peptide of 247 amino acids with a putative signal peptide (Mr of 2,629). The deduced amino acid sequence of soxF was 47% identical and 70% similar to the sequence

  11. Sulfur globule oxidation in green sulfur bacteria is dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holkenbrink, Carina; Ocón Barbas, Santiago; Mellerup, Anders;

    2011-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to sulfate with extracellular globules of elemental sulfur as intermediate. Here we investigated which genes are involved in the formation and consumption of these sulfur globules in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. We show that...... sulfur globule oxidation is strictly dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) system. Deletion of dsrM/CT2244 or dsrT/CT2245 or the two dsrCABL clusters (CT0851-CT0854, CT2247-2250) abolished sulfur globule oxidation and prevented formation of sulfate from sulfide, whereas deletion of dsr......:quinone oxidoreductases (sqrB/CT0117 and sqrD/CT1087) were deleted, exhibited a decreased sulfide oxidation rate (~50% of wild type), yet formation and consumption of sulfur globules were not affected. The observation that mutants lacking the DSR system maintain efficient growth, suggests that the DSR system is...

  12. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the active substances iron, sodium chloride, water, silica gel, activated carbon, monosodium glutamate, potassium acid tartrate, powdered cellulose, malic acid, chabazite, hydroxypropyl cellulose, potassium carbonate, sodium thiosulfate, propylene glycol, glycerin, polyethyleneglycol sorbitan monooleate, sodium propionate and clinoptilolite for use in food contact materials

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF)

    2013-01-01

    This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of iron based oxygen absorber systems comprising iron, sodium chloride, water, silica gel, activated carbon, monosodium glutamate, potassium acid tartrate, powdered cellulose, malic acid, chabazite, hydroxypropyl cellulose, potassium carbonate, sodium thiosulfate, propylene glycol, glycerin, polyethyleneglycol sorbitan monooleate, sodium propionate and...

  13. Evidence of novel plant-species specific ammonia oxidizing bacterial clades in acidic South African fynbos soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Lako, Joseph D W; Stafford, William H L; Tuffin, Marla I; Cowan, Don A

    2015-08-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are essential in the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen as they catalyze the rate-limiting oxidation of ammonia into nitrite. Since their first isolation in the late 19th century, chemolithoautotrophic AOBs have been identified in a wide range of natural (e.g., soils, sediments, estuarine, and freshwaters) and man created or impacted habitats (e.g., wastewater treatment plants and agricultural soils). However, little is known on the plant-species association of AOBs, particularly in the nutrient-starved fynbos terrestrial biome. In this study, we evaluated the diversity of AOBs in the plant canopy of three South African fynbos-specific plant species, namely Leucadendron xanthoconus, Leucospermum truncatulum and Leucadendron microcephalum, through the construction of amoA-gene clone libraries. Our results clearly demonstrate that plant-species specific and monophyletic AOB clades are present in fynbos canopy soils. PMID:25721729

  14. Mechanisms and evolution of oxidative sulfur metabolism in green sulfur bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels-UlrikFrigaard

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Green sulfur bacteria (GSB constitute a closely related group of photoautotrophic and thiotrophic bacteria with limited phenotypic variation. They typically oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to sulfate with sulfur globules as an intermediate. Based on genome sequence information from 15 strains, the distribution and phylogeny of enzymes involved in their oxidative sulfur metabolism was investigated. At least one homolog of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR is present in all strains. In all sulfur-oxidizing GSB strains except the earliest diverging Chloroherpeton thalassium, the sulfide oxidation product is further oxidized to sulfite by the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR system. This system consists of components horizontally acquired partly from sulfide-oxidizing and partly from sulfate-reducing bacteria. Depending on the strain, the sulfite is probably oxidized to sulfate by one of two different mechanisms that have different evolutionary origins: adenosine-5’-phosphosulfate reductase (APR or polysulfide reductase-like complex 3 (PSRLC3. Thiosulfate utilization by the SOX system in GSB has apparently been acquired horizontally from proteobacteria. SoxCD does not occur in GSB, and its function in sulfate formation in other bacteria has been replaced by the DSR system in GSB. Sequence analyses suggested that the conserved soxJXYZAKBW gene cluster was horizontally acquired by Chlorobium phaeovibrioides DSM 265 from the Chlorobaculum lineage and that this acquisition was mediated by a mobile genetic element. Thus, the last common ancestor of currently known GSB was probably photoautotrophic, hydrogenotrophic, and contained SQR but not DSR or SOX. In addition, the predominance of the Chlorobium-Chlorobaculum-Prosthecochloris lineage among cultured GSB could be due to the horizontally acquired DSR and SOX systems. Finally, based upon structural, biochemical, and phylogenetic analyses, a uniform nomenclature is suggested for sqr genes in

  15. A Nitrospira metagenome illuminates the physiology and evolution of globally important nitrite-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücker, Sebastian; Wagner, Michael; Maixner, Frank; Pelletier, Eric; Koch, Hanna; Vacherie, Benoit; Rattei, Thomas; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Spieck, Eva; Le Paslier, Denis; Daims, Holger

    2010-07-27

    Nitrospira are barely studied and mostly uncultured nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, which are, according to molecular data, among the most diverse and widespread nitrifiers in natural ecosystems and biological wastewater treatment. Here, environmental genomics was used to reconstruct the complete genome of "Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii" from an activated sludge enrichment culture. On the basis of this first-deciphered Nitrospira genome and of experimental data, we show that Ca. N. defluvii differs dramatically from other known nitrite oxidizers in the key enzyme nitrite oxidoreductase (NXR), in the composition of the respiratory chain, and in the pathway used for autotrophic carbon fixation, suggesting multiple independent evolution of chemolithoautotrophic nitrite oxidation. Adaptations of Ca. N. defluvii to substrate-limited conditions include an unusual periplasmic NXR, which is constitutively expressed, and pathways for the transport, oxidation, and assimilation of simple organic compounds that allow a mixotrophic lifestyle. The reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle as the pathway for CO2 fixation and the lack of most classical defense mechanisms against oxidative stress suggest that Nitrospira evolved from microaerophilic or even anaerobic ancestors. Unexpectedly, comparative genomic analyses indicate functionally significant lateral gene-transfer events between the genus Nitrospira and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing planctomycetes, which share highly similar forms of NXR and other proteins reflecting that two key processes of the nitrogen cycle are evolutionarily connected. PMID:20624973

  16. Cloning and characterization of sulfite dehydrogenase, two c-type cytochromes, and a flavoprotein of Paracoccus denitrificans GB17: essential role of sulfite dehydrogenase in lithotrophic sulfur oxidation.

    OpenAIRE

    Wodara, C; Bardischewsky, F; Friedrich, C G

    1997-01-01

    A 13-kb genomic region of Paracoccus dentrificans GB17 is involved in lithotrophic thiosulfate oxidation. Adjacent to the previously reported soxB gene (C. Wodara, S. Kostka, M. Egert, D. P. Kelly, and C. G. Friedrich, J. Bacteriol. 176:6188-6191, 1994), 3.7 kb were sequenced. Sequence analysis revealed four additional open reading frames, soxCDEF. soxC coded for a 430-amino-acid polypeptide with an Mr of 47,339 that included a putative signal peptide of 40 amino acids (Mr of 3,599) with a RR...

  17. Metal mobilization by iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in a multiple extreme mine tailings in the Atacama Desert, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korehi, H; Blöthe, M; Sitnikova, M A; Dold, B; Schippers, A

    2013-03-01

    The marine shore sulfidic mine tailings dump at the Chañaral Bay in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile, is characterized by extreme acidity, high salinity, and high heavy metals concentrations. Due to pyrite oxidation, metals (especially copper) are mobilized under acidic conditions and transported toward the tailings surface and precipitate as secondary minerals (Dold, Environ. Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 752-758.). Depth profiles of total cell counts in this almost organic-carbon free multiple extreme environment showed variable numbers with up to 10(8) cells g(-1) dry weight for 50 samples at four sites. Real-time PCR quantification and bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity analysis via clone libraries revealed a dominance of Bacteria over Archaea and the frequent occurrence of the acidophilic iron(II)- and sulfur-oxidizing and iron(III)-reducing genera Acidithiobacillus, Alicyclobacillus, and Sulfobacillus. Acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria were also frequently found via most-probable-number (MPN) cultivation. Halotolerant iron(II)-oxidizers in enrichment cultures were active at NaCl concentrations up to 1 M. Maximal microcalorimetrically determined pyrite oxidation rates coincided with maxima of the pyrite content, total cell counts, and MPN of iron(II)-oxidizers. These findings indicate that microbial pyrite oxidation and metal mobilization preferentially occur in distinct tailings layers at high salinity. Microorganisms for biomining with seawater salt concentrations obviously exist in nature. PMID:23373853

  18. Cultivation of a novel cold-adapted nitrite oxidizing betaproteobacterium from the Siberian Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawi, Mashal; Lipski, André; Sanders, Tina; Pfeiffer, Eva Maria; Spieck, Eva

    2007-07-01

    Permafrost-affected soils of the Siberian Arctic were investigated with regard to identification of nitrite oxidizing bacteria active at low temperature. Analysis of the fatty acid profiles of enrichment cultures grown at 4 degrees C, 10 degrees C and 17 degrees C revealed a pattern that was different from that of known nitrite oxidizers but was similar to fatty acid profiles of Betaproteobacteria. Electron microscopy of two enrichment cultures grown at 10 degrees C showed prevalent cells with a conspicuous ultrastructure. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes allocated the organisms to a so far uncultivated cluster of the Betaproteobacteria, with Gallionella ferruginea as next related taxonomically described organism. The results demonstrate that a novel genus of chemolithoautotrophic nitrite oxidizing bacteria is present in polygonal tundra soils and can be enriched at low temperatures up to 17 degrees C. Cloned sequences with high sequence similarities were previously reported from mesophilic habitats like activated sludge and therefore an involvement of this taxon in nitrite oxidation in nonarctic habitats is suggested. The presented culture will provide an opportunity to correlate nitrification with nonidentified environmental clones in moderate habitats and give insights into mechanisms of cold adaptation. We propose provisional classification of the novel nitrite oxidizing bacterium as 'Candidatus Nitrotoga arctica'. PMID:18062041

  19. Uso de Resina de Intercambio Aniónico para la Recuperación del Complejo Oro Tiosulfato desde Soluciones Acuosas Use of Anion Exchange Resin for the Recovery of the Complex Gold Thiosulfate from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam E Chaparro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la adsorción de oro utilizando la resina AuRIX®100 en medio tiosulfato de amonio, evaluando algunas variables que afectan la cinética del proceso tales como: temperatura, velocidad de agitación, pH, concentración de tiosulfato de amonio (NH42S2O3 y concentración de oro. El estudio se llevó a cabo en un reactor batch y una columna de intercambio iónico. Las condiciones de operación que presentaron mejores resultados de extracción de oro a 25°C, fueron: pH=10.5, velocidad de agitación=500 rpm, [Au]=1 mg/l, [(NH42S2O3]=0.04 M, 5 gramos de resina. Los resultados indican que al aumentar [(NH42S2O3] favorece la adsorción en un 99% durante tres horas, siendo afectado notablemente por la presencia de amonio. Las condiciones con mejores resultados en la columna a 25°C fueron, pH= 10.5 y [Au] =1 mg/l.The adsorption and elution of gold in thiosulfate-ammonia media were studied using the resin AuRIX®100, evaluating some variables that affect the kinetico of the process, such as: temperature, stirring speed, pH, thiosulfate concentration (NH42S2O3 and gold concentration. The study was carried out in a batch reactor and an ion exchange column. The operation conditions that presented better results of gold extraction at 25°C were: pH=10.5, stirring opeed=500 rpm, [Au]=1 mg/l, [(NH42S2O3]=0.04 M, and 5 gramo of resin. The results indicate that by increasing [(NH42S2O3] favors the adsorption by 99% during three hours, being noticeably affected by the presence of ammonia. The conditions with results on the column at 25°C were, pH= 10.5, [Au]=1 mg/l.

  20. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beam, Jake; Bernstein, Hans C.; Jay, Z.; Kozubal, Mark; Jennings, Ryan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Inskeep, William P.

    2016-02-15

    Iron oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous geobiological features on Earth and occur in extant acidic hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY, USA, and form as a result of microbial processes. The relative contribution of different organisms to the development of these mat ecosystems is of specific interest. We hypothesized that chemolithoautotrophic organisms contribute to the early development and production of Fe(III)-oxide mats, which could support later-colonizing heterotrophic microorganisms. Sterile glass slides were incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs in YNP, and spatiotemporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and abundance of relevant community members were measured. Lithoautotrophic Hydrogenobaculum spp. were first colonizers and the most abundant taxa identified during early successional stages (7 – 40 days). Populations of M. yellowstonensis colonized after ~ 7 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized after 30 days, and emerge as the dominant functional guild in mature iron oxide mats (1 – 2 cm thick) that form after 70 – 120 days. First-order rate constants of iron oxide accretion ranged from 0.05 – 0.046 day-1, and reflected the absolute amount of iron accreted. Micro- and macroscale microterracettes were identified during iron oxide mat development, and suggest that the mass transfer of oxygen limits microbial growth. This was also demonstrated using microelectrode measurements of oxygen as a function of mat depth, which showed steep gradients in oxygen from the aqueous mat interface to ~ 1 mm. The formation and succession of amorphous Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a predictable pattern of distinct stages and growth. The successional stages and microbial signatures observed in these extant Fe(III)-oxide mat communities may be relevant to other past or present Fe(III)-oxide mineralizing systems.

  1. Assessment of the stoichiometry and efficiency of CO2 fixation coupled to reduced sulfur oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith M Klatt

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB couple the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds to the production of biomass. Their role in the cycling of carbon, sulfur, oxygen and nitrogen is, however, difficult to quantify due to the complexity of sulfur oxidation pathways. We describe a generic theoretical framework for linking the stoichiometry and energy conservation efficiency of autotrophic sulfur oxidation while accounting for the partitioning of the reduced sulfur pool between the energy generating and energy conserving steps as well as between the main possible products (sulfate versus elemental sulfur. Using this framework, we show that the energy conservation efficiency varies widely among SOB with no apparent relationship to their phylogeny. Aerobic SOB equipped with reverse dissimilatory sulfite reductase tend to have higher efficiency than those relying on the complete Sox pathway, whereas for anaerobic SOB the presence of membrane-bound, as opposed to periplasmic, nitrate reductase systems appears to be linked to higher efficiency. We employ the framework to also show how limited rate measurements can be used to estimate the primary productivity of SOB without the knowledge of the sulfate-to-elemental-sulfur production ratio. Finally, we discuss how the framework can help researchers gain new insights into the activity of SOB and their niches.

  2. Sulfide Oxidation in the Anoxic Black-Sea Chemocline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; FOSSING, H.; WIRSEN, CO; JANNASCH, HW

    1991-01-01

    The depth distributions of O2 and H2S and of the activity of chemical or bacterial sulfide oxidation were studied in the chemocline of the central Black Sea. Relative to measurements from earlier studies, the sulfide zone had moved upwards by 20-50 m and was now (May 1988) situated at a depth of 81...... per day, occurred in anoxic water at the top of the sulfide zone concurrent with the highest rates of dark CO2 assimilation. The main soluble oxidized products of sulfide were thiosulfate (68-82%) and sulfate. Indirect evidence was presented for the formation of elemental sulfur which accumulated to a...... that the measured H2S oxidation rates were 4-fold higher than could be explained by the downward flux of organic carbon and too high to balance the availability of electron acceptors such as oxidized iron or manganese. A nitrate maximum at the lower boundary of the O2 zone did not extend down to the...

  3. Arsenite Oxidation and Arsenite Resistance by Bacillus sp. PNKP-S2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranee Pattanapipitpaisal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic causes human health problems after accumulate in the body for 10-15 years and arsenite [As(III] is generally regarded as being more mobile and toxic than other oxidation states. In this study, two-hundred and three bacterial strains were isolated from groundwater and soil samples collecting in Ubon Ratchathani Province, Thailand. All strains were screened for arsenic tolerant efficiency at 1-10 mM of sodium arsenite. Eighteen selected strains which had the highest resistance to 10 mM of As(III were further studied for their As(III-oxidizing activity and growth in enrichment and growth medium (EG medium supplemented with 0.58 mM of As(III. It was found that strain PNKP-S2 was able to grow in the medium with As(III as a sole energy source and had 89.11% As(III removal within 48 h. The PCR-based 16S rDNA sequencing analysis revealed that the strain PNKP-S2 was closed relative to Bacillus sp. This is the first report on Bacillus sp. chemolithoautotrophic As(III-oxidizer and this strain could be a potential candidate for application in arsenic remediation of contaminated water.

  4. The oxidative disposition of potassium cyanide in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of oxidative metabolism in the disposition of potassium cyanide (KCN), was investigated in mice administered KCN (4.6 mg/kg, s.c.) containing 4.5 uCi (14C)KCN. The expired pulmonary metabolites, (14C) hydrocyanic acid (HCN) and 14CO2, were collected and analyzed. Approximately 1% and 2% of the KCN dose was expired as (14C)HCN and 14CO2, respectively. Expiration of the pulmonary metabolites was decreased following pretreatment with sodium nitrite, sodium thiosulfate, oxygen, or a combination of cyanide antidotes. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide lowered the amount of (14C)HCN expired and did not alter the expiration of 14CO2. Treatment with 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (catalase inhibitor), superoxide dismutase, or diethyldithiocarbamic acid (superoxide dismutase inhibitor) did not change the amount of (14C)HCN expired. However, superoxide dismutase significantly increased the amount of 14CO2 expired, whereas diethyldithiocarbamic acid decreased 14CO2 expiration. The results from these studies suggest that in vivo cyanide can be oxidized to CO2 and treatment with agents that alter the availability of endogenous superoxide and/or hydrogen peroxide can alter the rate of cyanide oxidation. (author)

  5. Interactions of the metal tolerant heterotrophic microorganisms and iron oxidizing autotrophic bacteria from sulphidic mine environment during bioleaching experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremic, Sanja; Beškoski, Vladimir P; Djokic, Lidija; Vasiljevic, Branka; Vrvić, Miroslav M; Avdalović, Jelena; Gojgić Cvijović, Gordana; Beškoski, Latinka Slavković; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina

    2016-05-01

    Iron and sulfur oxidizing chemolithoautotrophic acidophilic bacteria, such as Acidithiobacillus species, hold the dominant role in mine environments characterized by low pH values and high concentrations of reduced sulfur and iron compounds, such as ores, rocks and acid drainage waters from mines. On the other hand, heterotrophic microorganisms, especially their biofilms, from these specific niches are receiving increased attention, but their potential eco-physiological roles have not been fully understood. Biofilms are considered a threat to human health, but biofilms also have beneficial properties as they are deployed in waste recycling and bioremediation systems. We have analyzed interactions of the metal tolerant heterotrophic microorganisms in biofilms with iron oxidizing autotrophic bacteria both from the sulphidic mine environment (copper mine Bor, Serbia). High tolerance to Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Cr(6+) and the presence of genetic determinants for the respective metal tolerance and biofilm-forming ability was shown for indigenous heterotrophic bacteria that included strains of Staphylococcus and Rhodococcus. Two well characterized bacteria- Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (known biofilm former) and Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 (known metal resistant representative) were also included in the study. The interaction and survivability of autotrophic iron oxidizing Acidithiobacillus bacteria and biofilms of heterotrophic bacteria during co-cultivation was revealed. Finally, the effect of heterotrophic biofilms on bioleaching process with indigenous iron oxidizing Acidithiobacillus species was shown not to be inhibitory under in vitro conditions. PMID:26942859

  6. Microbiological oxidation of antimony(III) with oxygen or nitrate by bacteria isolated from contaminated mine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Lee R; Kulp, Thomas R; Wiatrowski, Heather; Miller, Laurence G; Oremland, Ronald S

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial oxidation of arsenite [As(III)] is a well-studied and important biogeochemical pathway that directly influences the mobility and toxicity of arsenic in the environment. In contrast, little is known about microbiological oxidation of the chemically similar anion antimonite [Sb(III)]. In this study, two bacterial strains, designated IDSBO-1 and IDSBO-4, which grow on tartrate compounds and oxidize Sb(III) using either oxygen or nitrate, respectively, as a terminal electron acceptor, were isolated from contaminated mine sediments. Both isolates belonged to the Comamonadaceae family and were 99% similar to previously described species. We identify these novel strains as Hydrogenophaga taeniospiralis strain IDSBO-1 and Variovorax paradoxus strain IDSBO-4. Both strains possess a gene with homology to the aioA gene, which encodes an As(III)-oxidase, and both oxidize As(III) aerobically, but only IDSBO-4 oxidized Sb(III) in the presence of air, while strain IDSBO-1 could achieve this via nitrate respiration. Our results suggest that expression of aioA is not induced by Sb(III) but may be involved in Sb(III) oxidation along with an Sb(III)-specific pathway. Phylogenetic analysis of proteins encoded by the aioA genes revealed a close sequence similarity (90%) among the two isolates and other known As(III)-oxidizing bacteria, particularly Acidovorax sp. strain NO1. Both isolates were capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth using As(III) as a primary electron donor, and strain IDSBO-4 exhibited incorporation of radiolabeled [(14)C]bicarbonate while oxidizing Sb(III) from Sb(III)-tartrate, suggesting possible Sb(III)-dependent autotrophy. Enrichment cultures produced the Sb(V) oxide mineral mopungite and lesser amounts of Sb(III)-bearing senarmontite as precipitates. PMID:26431974

  7. Verification of Thiosulfate-Citrate-Bile Salts-Sucrose (TCBS)Agar Medium Industrial Standard%硫代硫酸盐-柠檬酸盐-胆盐-蔗糖琼脂培养基行业标准验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙楠; 黄杰; 于婷; 孙彬裕; 高尚先; 曲守方

    2014-01-01

    Objective To verify the application of professional standard for Thiosulfate-Citrate-Bile Salts-Sucrose (TCBS)agar medium.Methods TCBS agar medium produced by different factories are obtained for pH value and microbiological grow test according to the formulated medium standard.pH value and solution of medium are determined and bacterial cultures of the control strains are inoculated in the medium to detected bacterial growth.Results pH value and solution of medium were within the specified range. The control strains grew well. Conclusion As the recommended industrial standard, TCBS agar medium standard may be applied to evaluate and supervise the TCBS agar medium quality in our country.%目的:按照修订的硫代硫酸盐-柠檬酸盐-胆盐-蔗糖(TCBS)琼脂培养基行业标准中的要求进行试验,验证该行业标准的适用性。方法取不同厂家生产的TCBS琼脂培养基,根据TCBS琼脂培养基行业标准的要求,进行pH值、水分的测定和微生物生长试验。测定了TCBS琼脂培养基的pH值和水分,并将质控菌株的培养物接种到受试的培养基平皿中进行微生物生长试验。结果TCBS琼脂培养基的pH值和水分均符合行业标准的规定,且各质控菌株生长良好。结论作为推荐性的国家行业标准,TCBS琼脂培养基行业标准可以用于我国该培养基的质量评价和监管工作的需要。

  8. Accelerated evolutionary rate in sulfur-oxidizing endosymbiotic bacteria associated with the mode of symbiont transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, A S; Vrijenhoek, R C; Gaut, B S

    1998-11-01

    The nearly neutral theory of molecular evolution predicts that the rate of nucleotide substitution should accelerate in small populations at sites under low selective constraint. We examined these predictions with respect to the relative population sizes for three bacterial life histories within chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria: (1) free-living bacteria, (2) environmentally captured symbionts, and (3) maternally transmitted symbionts. Both relative rates of nucleotide substitution and relative ratios of loop, stem, and domain substitutions from 1,165 nt of the small-subunit 16S rDNA were consistent with expectations of the nearly neutral theory. Relative to free-living sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic bacteria, the maternally transmitted symbionts have faster substitution rates overall and also in low-constraint domains of 16S rDNA. Nucleotide substitition rates also differ between loop and stem positions. All of these findings are consistent with the predictions that these symbionts have relatively small effective population sizes. In contrast, the rates of nucleotide substitution in environmentally captured symbionts are slower, particularly in high-constraint domains, than in free-living bacteria. PMID:12572615

  9. Hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide metabolites in the blood of free-ranging brown bears and their potential roles in hibernation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbech, Inge G; Shen, Xinggui; Chakravarti, Ritu;

    2014-01-01

    inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO), in winter-hibernating and summer-active free-ranging Scandinavian brown bears. We found that levels of sulfide metabolites were overall similar in summer-active and hibernating bears but their composition in the plasma...... differed significantly, with a decrease in bound sulfane sulfur in hibernation. High levels of unbound free sulfide correlated with high levels of cysteine (Cys) and with low levels of bound sulfane sulfur, indicating that during hibernation H2S, in addition to being formed enzymatically from the substrate...... Cys, may also be regenerated from its oxidation products, including thiosulfate and polysulfides. In the absence of any dietary intake, this shift in the mode of H2S synthesis would help preserve free Cys for synthesis of glutathione (GSH), a major antioxidant found at high levels in the red blood...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1807 - Sodium thiosulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... metal sulfides and hydrosulfides. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the “Food Chemicals Codex,” 3d Ed. (1981), p. 304, which is incorporated by reference. Copies may be obtained from...

  11. The Effects of Oxy-firing Conditions on Gas-phase Mercury Oxidation by Chlorine and Bromine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buitrago, Paula; Silcox, Geoffrey

    2010-06-30

    Bench-scale experiments were conducted in a quartz-lined, natural gas-fired reactor with the combustion air replaced with a blend of 27 mole percent oxygen, with the balance carbon dioxide. Quench rates of 210 and 440 K/s were tested. In the absence of sulfur dioxide, the oxy-firing environment caused a remarkable increase in oxidation of mercury by chlorine. At 400 ppm chlorine (as HCl equivalent), air-firing results in roughly 5 percent oxidation. At the same conditions with oxy-firing, oxidation levels are roughly 80 percent. Oxidation levels with bromine at 25 and 50 ppm (as HBr equivalent) ranged from 80 to 95 percent and were roughly the same for oxy- and air-firing conditions. Kinetic calculations of levels of oxidation at air- and oxy-conditions captured the essential features of the experimental results but have not revealed a mechanistic basis for the oxidative benefits of oxy-firing conditions. Mixtures of 25 ppm bromine and 100 and 400 ppm chlorine gave more than 90 percent oxidation. At all conditions, the effects of quench rate were not significant. The presence of 500 ppm SO2 caused a dramatic decline in the levels of oxidation at all oxy-fired conditions examined. This effect suggests that SO2 may be preventing oxidation in the gas phase or preventing oxidation in the wetconditioning system that was used in quantifying oxidized and elemental mercury concentrations. Similar effects of SO2 have been noted with air-firing. The addition of sodium thiosulfate to the hydroxide impingers that are part of wet conditioning systems may prevent liquid-phase oxidation from occurring.

  12. Structure and function of natural sulphide-oxidizing microbial mats under dynamic input of light and chemical energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Judith M; Meyer, Steffi; Häusler, Stefan; Macalady, Jennifer L; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2016-04-01

    We studied the interaction between phototrophic and chemolithoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing microorganisms in natural microbial mats forming in sulphidic streams. The structure of these mats varied between two end-members: one characterized by a layer dominated by large sulphur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB; mostly Beggiatoa-like) on top of a cyanobacterial layer (B/C mats) and the other with an inverted structure (C/B mats). C/B mats formed where the availability of oxygen from the water column was limited (45 μM) and continuously present. Here SOB were independent of the photosynthetic activity of cyanobacteria and outcompeted the cyanobacteria in the uppermost layer of the mat where energy sources for both functional groups were concentrated. Outcompetition of photosynthetic microbes in the presence of light was facilitated by the decoupling of aerobic chemolithotrophy and oxygenic phototrophy. Remarkably, the B/C mats conserved much less energy than the C/B mats, although similar amounts of light and chemical energy were available. Thus ecosystems do not necessarily develop towards optimal energy usage. Our data suggest that, when two independent sources of energy are available, the structure and activity of microbial communities is primarily determined by the continuous rather than the intermittent energy source, even if the time-integrated energy flux of the intermittent energy source is greater. PMID:26405833

  13. Magnesium Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium is an element your body needs to function normally. Magnesium oxide may be used for different reasons. Some ... to relieve heartburn, sour stomach, or acid indigestion. Magnesium oxide also may be used as a laxative ...

  14. Carbon dioxide fixation by Metallosphaera yellowstonensis and acidothermophilic iron-oxidizing microbial communities from Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, Ryan; Whitmore, Laura M.; Moran, James J.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Inskeep, William P.

    2014-05-01

    The fixation of inorganic carbon (as carbon dioxide) has been documented in all three domains of life and results in the biosynthesis of a diverse suite of organic compounds that support the growth of heterotrophic organisms. The primary aim of this study was to assess the importance of carbon dioxide fixation in high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat communities and in pure cultures of one of the dominant Fe(II)-oxidizing organisms (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis strain MK1) present in situ. Protein-encoding genes of the complete 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate (3-HP/4-HB) carbon fixation pathway were identified in pure-cultures of M. yellowstonensis strain MK1. Metagenome sequencing from the same environments also revealed genes for the 3-HP/4-HB pathway belonging to M. yellowstonensis populations, as well as genes for a complete reductive TCA cycle from Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales). Stable isotope (13CO2) labeling was used to measure the fixation of CO2 by M. yellowstonensis strain MK1, and in ex situ assays containing live Fe(III)-oxide microbial mats. Results showed that M. yellowstonensis strain MK1 fixes CO2 via the 3-HP/4-HB pathway with a fractionation factor of ~ 2.5 ‰. Direct analysis of the 13C composition of dissolved inorganic C (DIC), dissolved organic C (DOC), landscape C and microbial mat C showed that mat C is comprised of both DIC and non-DIC sources. The estimated contribution of DIC carbon to biomass C (> ~ 35%) is reasonably consistent with the relative abundance of known chemolithoautotrophs and corresponding CO2 fixation pathways detected in metagenome sequence. The significance of DIC as a major source of carbon for Fe-oxide mat communities provides a foundation for examining microbial interactions in these systems that are dependent on the activity of autotrophic organisms such as Hydrogenobaculum and Metallosphaera spp.

  15. The effect of hydrology on the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing betaproteobacteria in impounded black mangroves (Avicennia germinans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrikus J. eLaanbroek

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of species of aerobic chemolitho-autotrophic microorganisms such as the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria will be governed by pH, salinity and temperature as well as by the availability of oxygen, ammonia, carbon dioxide and other inorganic elements required for growth. Impounded mangrove forests in the Indian River Lagoon, a coastal estuary on the east coast of Florida, are dominated by mangroves, especially black mangrove (Avicennia germinans, that differ in size and density. In March 2009 the management in one of the impoundments was changed for purpose of insect control, by pumping water from the adjacent estuary. We collected soil samples in three different black mangrove habitats in this and an adjacent impoundment in 2008, 2009 and 2010, always in March, to determine the pre- and post-management effects of summer flooding on the distribution of 16s rRNA genes belonging to ammonia-oxidizing betaproteobacteria (β-AOB.At the level of 95% mutual similarity in the 16s rRNA gene, 11 different Operational Taxonomic Units were identified; the majority related to the lineages Nitrosomonas marina (57% of the total, Nitrosomonas sp. Nm143 (23% and Nitrosospira cluster 1 (18%. Higher salinities of interstitial water, probably due to severe winter drought, had a significant effect on the composition of the β-AOB in March 2009 compared to March 2008. Nitrosomonas sp. Nm143 was replaced as second important lineage by Nitrosospira cluster 1. Simultaneously with the community change, the level of potential ammonia-oxidizing activities decreased by an average of 67%. Long-term summer flooding in 2009 reduced the percentage of N. marina by half in favor of the two other major lineages, but decreased again the potential ammonia-oxidizing activities by 41% on average. No significant differences were observed between the flooded and non-flooded impoundment. There were differences in the community composition of the bacteria in the three black

  16. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a meromictic, haloalkaline lake with an unprecedented high sulfide content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Foti, Mirjam; Pinkart, Holly C; Muyzer, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    Culture-dependent and -independent techniques were used to study the diversity of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a meromictic, haloalkaline lake containing an unprecedentedly high sulfide concentration in the anoxic monimolimnion. Both approaches revealed the dominance of bacteria belonging to the genus Thioalkalimicrobium, which are common inhabitants of soda lakes. A dense population of Thioalkalimicrobium (up to 10(7) cells/ml) was found at the chemocline, which is characterized by a steep oxygen-sulfide gradient. Twelve Thioalkalimicrobium strains exhibiting three different phenotypes were isolated in pure culture from various locations in Soap Lake. The isolates fell into two groups according to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. One of the groups was closely related to T. cyclicum, which was isolated from Mono Lake (California), a transiently meromictic, haloalkaline lake. The second group, consisting of four isolates, was phylogenetically and phenotypically distinct from known Thioalkalimicrobium species and unique to Soap Lake. It represented a new species, for which we suggest the name Thioalkalimicrobium microaerophilum sp. nov. PMID:17114324

  17. Biogeochemistry of the sulfur oxidizer Thiomicrospira thermophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, J.; Fike, D. A.; Wills, E.; Foustoukos, D.

    2013-12-01

    Near-seafloor hydrothermal environments such as diffuse flow venting or subsurface mixing are characterized by rapidly changing conditions and steep chemical and thermal gradients. Microorganisms living in these environments can take advantage of these changes by switching among metabolic pathways rather than specializing. We present reaction stoichiometry and rates for T. thermophila grown in a closed system both at ambient and elevated pressure (50 bars) that demonstrate substantial metabolic flexibility, shifting between up to 5 different sulfur cycling reactions over a 24 hour period. Based on the stoichiometry between S2O3 consumed and SO4 produced, three reactions are sulfur oxidation and two are disproportionation, which has not previously been demonstrated for Thiomicrospira strains. Reactants include S2O3, elemental S (both polymeric S chains and S8 rings), HS-, and O2, while products include polymeric elemental S, SO4, HS-, and polysulfides. The presence of μmolal concentrations of HS- has been confirmed during the time series only when stoichiometry predicts disproportionation. Production of HS- in the presence of elemental S results in abiotic conversion to polysulfides, keeping the sulfide concentrations low in solution. The transition from oxidation to disproportionation appears to be triggered by a depletion in dissolved oxygen and the rate of reaction is a second order function of S2O3 and O2 concentrations. Growth was tested at conditions spanning their pH tolerance (5.0 - 8.0) using a citrate buffer (pH 5.0), unbuffered media (initial pH 7.0), and Tris buffer (pH 8.0). The highest rates are observed at pH 8.0 with rates decreasing as a function of pH. The lowest rate occurs at pH 5.0 and exhibits pseudo-first order behavior over a 24 hour period, likely due to a long lag and very slow growth. Repeat injections after the culture is acclimated to the experimental conditions result in very high pseudo-first order rates due to rapid consumption of

  18. Application of a palladium hexacyanoferrate film-modified aluminum electrode to electrocatalytic oxidation of hydrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmi, Habib; Azadbakht, Azadeh; Sadr, Moayad Hossaini

    2005-11-01

    A palladium hexacyanoferrate (PdHCF) film as an electrocatalytic material was obtained at an aluminum (Al) electrode by a simple electroless dipping method. The modified Al electrode demonstrated a well-behaved redox couple due to the redox reaction of the PdHCF film. The PdHCF film showed an excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of hydrazine. The electrocatalytic oxidation of hydrazine was studied by cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode voltammetry techniques. A calibration graph obtained for the hydrazine consisted of two segments (localized at concentration ranges 0.39-10 and 20-75 mM). The rate constant k and transfer coefficient alpha for the catalytic reaction and the diffusion coefficient of hydrazine in the solution D, were found to be 3.11 x 10(3) M(-1) s(-1), 0.52 and 8.03 x 10(-6) cm2 s(-1) respectively. The modified electrode was used to amperometric determination of hydrazine in photographic developer. The interference of ascorbic acid and thiosulfate were investigated and greatly reduced using a thin film of Nafion on the modified electrode. The modified electrode indicated reproducible behavior and a high level of stability during electrochemical experiments, making it particularly suitable for analytical purposes. PMID:16317900

  19. Periplasmic proteins of the extremophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans: a high throughput proteomics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, An; Valenzuela, Lissette; Beard, Simon; Mackey, Aaron J; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Jerez, Carlos A

    2007-12-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a chemolithoautotrophic acidophile capable of obtaining energy by oxidizing ferrous iron or sulfur compounds such as metal sulfides. Some of the proteins involved in these oxidations have been described as forming part of the periplasm of this extremophile. The detailed study of the periplasmic components constitutes an important area to understand the physiology and environmental interactions of microorganisms. Proteomics analysis of the periplasmic fraction of A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 was performed by using high resolution linear ion trap-FT MS. We identified a total of 131 proteins in the periplasm of the microorganism grown in thiosulfate. When possible, functional categories were assigned to the proteins: 13.8% were transport and binding proteins, 14.6% were several kinds of cell envelope proteins, 10.8% were involved in energy metabolism, 10% were related to protein fate and folding, 10% were proteins with unknown functions, and 26.1% were proteins without homologues in databases. These last proteins are most likely characteristic of A. ferrooxidans and may have important roles yet to be assigned. The majority of the periplasmic proteins from A. ferrooxidans were very basic compared with those of neutrophilic microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, suggesting a special adaptation of the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium to its very acidic environment. The high throughput proteomics approach used here not only helps to understand the physiology of this extreme acidophile but also offers an important contribution to the functional annotation for the available genomes of biomining microorganisms such as A. ferrooxidans for which no efficient genetic systems are available to disrupt genes by procedures such as homologous recombination. PMID:17911085

  20. Metatranscriptomic analysis of sulfur oxidation genes in the endosymbiont of Solemya velum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FrankStewart

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Thioautotrophic endosymbionts in the Domain Bacteria mediate key sulfur transformations in marine reducing environments. However, the molecular pathways underlying symbiont metabolism and the extent to which these pathways are expressed in situ are poorly characterized for almost all symbioses. This is largely due to the difficulty of culturing symbionts apart from their hosts. Here, we use pyrosequencing of community RNA transcripts (i.e., the metatranscriptome to characterize enzymes of dissimilatory sulfur metabolism in the model symbiosis between the coastal bivalve Solemya velum and its intracellular thioautotrophic symbionts. High-throughput sequencing of total RNA from the symbiont-containing gill of a single host individual generated 1.6 million sequence reads (500 Mbp. Of these, 43,735 matched Bacteria protein-coding genes in BLASTX searches of the NCBI database. The taxonomic identities of the matched genes indicated relatedness to diverse species of sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria, including other thioautotrophic symbionts and the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum. Manual querying of these data identified 28 genes from diverse pathways of sulfur energy metabolism, including the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (Dsr pathway for sulfide oxidation to sulfite, the APS pathway for sulfite oxidation, and the Sox pathway for thiosulfate oxidation. In total, reads matching sulfur energy metabolism genes represented 7% of the Bacteria mRNA pool. Together, these data highlight the dominance of thioautotrophy in the context of symbiont community metabolism, identify the likely pathways mediating sulfur oxidation, and illustrate the utility of metatranscriptome sequencing for characterizing community gene transcription of uncultured symbionts.

  1. Selective oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is presented a revision and discussion about the characteristics and factors that relate activity and selectivity in the catalytic and not catalytic partial oxidation of methane and the effect of variables as the temperature, pressure and others in the methane conversion to methanol. It thinks about the zeolites use modified for the catalytic oxidation of natural gas

  2. Oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 18 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Oxidative Stress: Introductory Remarks; Radiolysis of DNA and Model Systems in the Presence of Oxygen; Organic Peroxy Free Radicals as Ultimate Agents in Oxygen Toxicity; Antimalarials; and the Role of Dietary Components in Oxidative Stress in Tissues

  3. Enhanced metabolic versatility of planktonic sulfur-oxidizing γ-proteobacteria in an oxygen-deficient coastal ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro A. Murillo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur-oxidizing Gamma-proteobacteria are abundant in marine oxygen-deficient waters, and appear to play a key role in a previously unrecognized cryptic sulfur cycle. Metagenomic analyses of members of the uncultured SUP05 lineage in the Canadian seasonally anoxic fjord Saanich Inlet (SI, hydrothermal plumes in the Guaymas Basin (GB and single cell genomics analysis of two ARCTIC96BD-19 representatives from the South Atlantic Sub-Tropical Gyre (SASG have shown them to be metabolically versatile. However, SI and GB SUP05 bacteria seem to be obligate chemolithoautotrophs, whereas ARCTIC96BD-19 has the genetic potential for aerobic respiration. Here, we present results of a metagenomic analysis of sulfur-oxidizing Gamma-proteobacteria (GSO, closely related to the SUP05/ARCTIC96BD-19 clade, from a coastal ecosystem in the eastern South Pacific (ESP. This ecosystem experiences seasonal anoxia and accumulation of nitrite and ammonium at depth, with a corresponding increase in the abundance of GSO representatives. The ESP-GSOs appear to have a significantly different gene complement than those from Saanich Inlet, Guaymas Basin and SASG. Genomic analyses of de novo assembled contigs indicate the presence of a complete aerobic respiratory complex based on the cytochrome bc1 oxidase. Furthermore, they appear to encode a complete TCA cycle and several transporters for dissolved organic carbon species, suggesting a mixotrophic lifestyle. Thus, the success of sulfur-oxidizing Gamma-proteobacteria in oxygen-deficient marine ecosystems appears due not only to their previously recognized anaerobic metabolic versatility, but also to their capacity to function under aerobic conditions using different carbon sources. Finally, members of ESP-GSO cluster also have the genetic potential for reducing nitrate to ammonium based on the nirBD genes, and may therefore facilitate a tighter coupling of the nitrogen and sulfur cycles in oxygen-deficient waters.

  4. Productivity-Diversity Relationships from Chemolithoautotrophically Based Sulfidic Karst Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Porter Megan L.; Summers Engel Annette; Kane Thomas C.; Kinkle Brian K.

    2009-01-01

    Although ecosystems thriving in the absence of photosynthetic processes are no longer considered unique phenomena, we haveyet to understand how these ecosystems are energetically sustained via chemosynthesis. Ecosystem energetics were measuredin microbial mats from active sulfidic caves (Movile Cave, Romania; Frasassi Caves, Italy; Lower Kane Cave, Wyoming, USA; andCesspool Cave, Virginia, USA) using radiotracer techniques. We also estimated bacterial diversity using 16S rRNA sequences torela...

  5. Anodic oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sidney D; Rudd, Eric J; Blomquist, Alfred T; Wasserman, Harry H

    2013-01-01

    Anodic Oxidation covers the application of the concept, principles, and methods of electrochemistry to organic reactions. This book is composed of two parts encompassing 12 chapters that consider the mechanism of anodic oxidation. Part I surveys the theory and methods of electrochemistry as applied to organic reactions. These parts also present the mathematical equations to describe the kinetics of electrode reactions using both polarographic and steady-state conditions. Part II examines the anodic oxidation of organic substrates by the functional group initially attacked. This part particular

  6. Identification of bacteria potentially responsible for oxic and anoxic sulfide oxidation in biofilters of a recirculating mariculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytryn, Eddie; van Rijn, Jaap; Schramm, Andreas; Gieseke, Armin; de Beer, Dirk; Minz, Dror

    2005-10-01

    Bacteria presumably involved in oxygen- or nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation in the biofilters of a recirculating marine aquaculture system were identified using a new application of reverse transcription-PCR denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis termed differential-transcription (DT)-DGGE. Biofilter samples were incubated in various concentrations of sulfide or thiosulfate (0 to 5 mM) with either oxygen or nitrate as the sole electron acceptor. Before and after short-term incubations (10 to 20 h), total DNA and RNA were extracted, and a 550-bp fragment of the 16S rRNA genes was PCR amplified either directly or after reverse transcription. DGGE analysis of DNA showed no significant change of the original microbial consortia upon incubation. In contrast, DGGE of cDNA revealed several phylotypes whose relative band intensities markedly increased or decreased in response to certain incubation conditions, indicating enhanced or suppressed rRNA transcription and thus implying metabolic activity under these conditions. Specifically, species of the gammaproteobacterial genus Thiomicrospira and phylotypes related to symbiotic sulfide oxidizers could be linked to oxygen-dependent sulfide oxidation, while members of the Rhodobacteraceae (genera Roseobacter, Rhodobacter, and Rhodobium) were putatively active in anoxic, nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation. For all these organisms, the physiology of their closest cultured relatives matches their DT-DGGE-inferred function. In addition, higher band intensities following exposure to 5 mM sulfide and nitrate were observed for Thauera-, Hydrogenophaga-, and Dethiosulfovibrio-like phylotypes. For these genera, nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation has not been documented previously and therefore DT-DGGE might indicate a higher relative tolerance to high sulfide concentrations than that of other community members. We anticipate that DT-DGGE will be of general use in tracing functionally equivalent yet

  7. Comparative genomics of freshwater Fe-oxidizing bacteria: Implications for physiology, ecology, and systematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DavidEmerson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The two microaerophilic, Fe-oxidizing bacteria Sideroxydans ES-1 and Gallionella ES-2 have single circular chromosomes of 3.00 and 3.16 Mb that encode 3049 and 3006 genes, respectively. Multi-locus sequence analysis confirmed the relationship of these two organisms to one another, and indicated they may form a novel order, the Gallionellalaes, within the Betaproteobacteria. Both are adapted for chemolithoautotropy, including pathways for CO2-fixation, and electron transport pathways adapted for growth at low O2-levels, an important adaptation for growing on Fe(II. Both genomes contain Mto-genes implicated in iron-oxidation, as well as other genes that could be involved in Fe-oxidation. Nearly 10% of their genomes are devoted to environmental sensing, signal transduction, and chemotaxis, consistent with their requirement for growing in narrow redox gradients of Fe(II and O2. There are important differences as well. Sideroxydans ES-1 is more metabolically flexible, and can utilize reduced S-compounds, including thiosulfate, for lithotrophic growth. It has a suite of genes for nitrogen fixation. Gallionella ES-2 contains additional gene clusters for exopolysaccharide production, and has more capacity to resist heavy metals. Both strains contain genes for hemerythrins and globins, but ES-1 has an especially high numbers of these genes that may be involved in oxygen homeostasis, or storage. The two strains share homology with the marine FeOB Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1 in CO2 fixation genes, and respiratory genes. In addition, ES-1 shares a suite of 20 potentially redox active genes with PV-1, as well as a large prophage. Combined these genetic, morphological, and physiological differences indicate that these are two novel species, Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1T (ATCC 700298T; JCM 14762; DSMZ 22444; NCMA B100, and Gallionella capsiferriformans ES-2T (ATCC 700299T; JCM 14763; DSMZ 22445; NCMA B101.

  8. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    Acid drainage (AMD/ARD) is undoubtedly one of the largest environmental, legislative and economic challenges facing the mining industry. In Australia alone, at least 60m is spent on AMD related issues annually, and the global cost is estimated to be in the order of tens of billions US. Furthermore, the challenge of safely and economically storing or treating sulfidic wastes will likely intensify because of the trend towards larger mines that process increasingly higher volumes of lower grade ores and the associated sulfidic wastes and lower profit margins. While the challenge of managing potentially acid forming (PAF) wastes will likely intensify, the industrial approaches to preventing acid production or ameliorating the effects has stagnated for decades. Conventionally, PAF waste is segregated and encapsulated in non-PAF tips to limit access to atmospheric oxygen. Two key limitations of the 'cap and cover' approach are: 1) the hazard (PAF) is not actually removed; only the pollutant linkage is severed; and, 2) these engineered structures are susceptible to physical failure in short-to-medium term, potentially re-establishing that pollutant linkage. In an effort to address these concerns, CSIRO is investigating a passive, 'low-acid' oxidation mechanism for sulfide treatment, which can potentially produce one quarter as much acidity compared with pyrite oxidation under atmospheric oxygen. This 'low-acid' mechanism relies on nitrate, rather than oxygen, as the primary electron accepter and the activity of specifically cultured chemolithoautotrophic bacteria and archaea communities. This research was prompted by the observation that, in deeply weathered terrains of Australia, shallow (oxic to sub-oxic) groundwater contacting weathering sulfides are commonly inconsistent with the geochemical conditions produced by ARD. One key characteristic of these aquifers is the natural abundance of nitrate on a regional scale, which becomes depleted around the sulfide bodies, and

  9. Radiolytic oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work under the Radiolytic Oxidation Contract from 1986 until April 1989 is reported. The effects of alpha- and gamma-irradiation on the chemistries of plutonium, neptunium and technetium, under conditions representative of the near fields of intermediate and high level waste repositories, were investigated. Gamma-radiolysis of Np (IV) results in oxidation in solutions below pH 12. Solutions of Tc (VII) are reduced to Tc (IV) by gamma-irradiation in contact with blast furnace slag/ordinary Portland cement under an inert atmosphere but not when in contact with pulverized fuel ash/ordinary Portland cement. Tc (IV) is shown to be susceptible to oxidation by the products of the alpha-radiolysis of water. The results of 'overall effects' experiments, which combined representative components of typical ILW or HLW near fields, supported these observations and also showed enhanced plutonium concentrations in alpha-irradiated, HLW simulations. Mathematical models of the behaviour of plutonium and neptunium during gamma-radiolysis have been developed and indicate that oxidation to Pu (VI) is possible at dose rates typical of those expected for HLW. Simulations at ILW dose rates have indicated some effect upon the speciation of neptunium. Laboratory studies of the gamma-irradiation of Np (IV) in bentonite-equilibrated water have also been modelled. Computer code used: PHREEQE, 8 Figs.; 48 Tabs.; 38 refs

  10. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.;

    2015-01-01

    .9 significant hazard ratio for death compared with the quartile with the lowest 8oxoGuo excretion when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoker status, s-HbA1c, urine protein excretion and s-cholesterol. We conclude that it is now established that RNA oxidation is an independent risk factor for death in type 2...

  11. Oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unceasing need for oxygen is in contradiction to the fact that it is in fact toxic to mammals. Namely, its monovalent reduction can have as a consequence the production of short-living, chemically very active free radicals and certain non-radical agents (nitrogen-oxide, superoxide-anion-radicals, hydroxyl radicals, peroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid, and others. There is no doubt that they have numerous positive roles, but when their production is stepped up to such an extent that the organism cannot eliminate them with its antioxidants (superoxide-dismutase, glutathione-peroxidase, catalase, transferrin, ceruloplasmin, reduced glutathion, and others, a series of disorders is developed that are jointly called „oxidative stress.“ The reactive oxygen species which characterize oxidative stress are capable of attacking all main classes of biological macromolecules, actually proteins, DNA and RNA molecules, and in particular lipids. The free radicals influence lipid peroxidation in cellular membranes, oxidative damage to DNA and RNA molecules, the development of genetic mutations, fragmentation, and the altered function of various protein molecules. All of this results in the following consequences: disrupted permeability of cellular membranes, disrupted cellular signalization and ion homeostasis, reduced or loss of function of damaged proteins, and similar. That is why the free radicals that are released during oxidative stress are considered pathogenic agents of numerous diseases and ageing. The type of damage that will occur, and when it will take place, depends on the nature of the free radicals, their site of action and their source. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173034, br. 175061 i br. 31085

  12. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    Semiconducting oxides are amongst the most widely studied and topical materials in contemporary condensed matter science, with interest being driven both by the fundamental challenges posed by their electronic and magnetic structures and properties, and by the wide range of applications, including those in catalysis and electronic devices. This special section aims to highlight recent developments in the physics of these materials, and to show the link between developing fundamental understanding and key application areas of oxide semiconductors. Several aspects of the physics of this wide and expanding range of materials are explored in this special section. Transparent semiconducting oxides have a growing role in several technologies, but challenges remain in understanding their electronic structure and the physics of charge carriers. A related problem concerns the nature of redox processes and the reactions which interconvert defects and charge carriers—a key issue which may limit the extent to which doping strategies may be used to alter electronic properties. The magnetic structures of the materials pose several challenges, while surface structures and properties are vital in controlling catalytic properties, including photochemical processes. The field profits from and exploits a wide range of contemporary physical techniques—both experimental and theoretical. Indeed, the interplay between experiment and computation is a key aspect of contemporary work. A number of articles describe applications of computational methods whose use, especially in modelling properties of defects in these materials, has a long and successful history. Several papers in this special section relate to work presented at a symposium within the European Materials Research Society (EMRS) meeting held in Warsaw in September 2010, and we are grateful to the EMRS for supporting this symposium. We would also like to thank the editorial staff of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for

  13. Efecto de la Temperatura y Concentración de Tiosulfatos sobre la Velocidad de Disolución de Plata contenida en Desechos Mineros usando Soluciones S2O3(2--O2-Zn2+ Temperature and Concentration Effect of Thiosulfates on the Dissolution Rate of Silver contained in Mining Waste using S2O3(2--O2-Zn2+ Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio C Juárez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió el efecto de la temperatura y la concentración de tiosulfatos sobre la velocidad de disolución de la plata contenida en desechos mineros, utilizando el sistema S2O3(2--O2-Zn2+. En el Estado de Hidalgo en México hay miles de toneladas de desechos mineros con contenidos de plata del orden de 71 gramos de plata por tonelada de desecho, razón que motiva el estudio. Se observó que la temperatura influye drásticamente sobre la velocidad de lixiviación de la plata, presentando una energía de activación Ea= 55.85 kJ mol-1, indicando que la reacción de disolución está controlada por la reacción química. La concentración de tiosulfatos presenta una considerable influencia sobre la velocidad de disolución del metal precioso. La máxima disolución de plata fue de aproximadamente 97% a 45 °C y 40 gL-1 de [S2O3(2-]. Se concluye que el proceso estudiado parece una buena alternativa a otros procesos como la tóxica cianuración.The effect of the temperature and thiosulfate concentration on the dissolution rate of silver contained in mining wastes, using the system S2O3(2--O2-Zn2+ was studied. In the State of Hidalgo in México, thousands of tons of waste mining having around 71 grams of silver per ton of waste have been accumulated over the years. This is the main reason that motivates this study. It was observed that the temperature drastically affects the leaching rate of the silver showing an activation energy Ea= 55.85 kJ mol-1, implying that the dissolution reaction is controlled by the chemical reaction. The thiosulfate concentration shows a considerable influence on the precious metal dissolution rate. The maximum silver dissolution was found to be approximately 97% at 45 °C and 40 gL-1 of [S2O3(2-]. It is concluded that the process studied represents a good alternative when compared to other processes such as the toxic cyanidation reaction.

  14. Metagenomic Assembly of the Dominant Zetaproteobacteria in an Iron-oxidizing Hydrothermal Microbial Mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, C. L.; Fullerton, H.

    2013-12-01

    Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust and is potentially one of the most abundant energy sources on the earth as an electron donor for chemolithoautotrophic growth coupled to Fe(II) oxidation. Despite the rapid abiotic oxidation rate of iron, many microbes have adapted to feeding off this fleeting energy source. One such bacterial class is the Zetaproteobacteria. Iron-dominated microbial mat material was collected with a small-scale syringe sampler from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii. From this sample, gDNA was extracted and prepared for paired-end Illumina sequencing. Reconstruction of SSU rDNA genes using EMERGE allowed for comparison to previous SSU rDNA surveys. Clone libraries and qPCR show these microbial mats to be dominated by Zetaproteobacteria. Results from our in silico reconstruction confirm these initial findings. RDP classification of the EMERGE reconstructed sequences resulted in 44% of the community being identified as Zetaproteobacteria. The most abundant SSU rDNA has 99% similarity to Zeta OTU-2, and only a 94% similarity to M. ferrooxidans PV-1. Zeta OTU-2 has been shown to be the most cosmopolitan population in iron-dominated hydrothermal systems from across Pacific Ocean. Metagenomic assembly has resulted in many contigs with high identity to M. ferrooxidans as identified, by BLAST. However, with large differences in SSU rRNA similarity, M. ferrooxidans PV-1 is not an adequate reference. Current work is focusing on reconstruction of the dominant microbial mat member, without the use of a reference genome through an iterative assembly approach. The resulting 'pan-genome' will be compared to other Zetaproteobacteria (at the class level) and the functional ecology of this cosmopolitan microbial mat community member will be extrapolated. Thus far, we have detected multiple housekeeping genes involved in DNA replication, transcription and translation. The most abundant metabolic gene we have found is Aconitase, a key enzyme in the

  15. Microbial iron mats at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and evidence that Zetaproteobacteria may be restricted to iron-oxidizing marine systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrod J Scott

    Full Text Available Chemolithoautotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria play an essential role in the global iron cycle. Thus far, the majority of marine iron-oxidizing bacteria have been identified as Zetaproteobacteria, a novel class within the phylum Proteobacteria. Marine iron-oxidizing microbial communities have been found associated with volcanically active seamounts, crustal spreading centers, and coastal waters. However, little is known about the presence and diversity of iron-oxidizing communities at hydrothermal systems along the slow crustal spreading center of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. From October to November 2012, samples were collected from rust-colored mats at three well-known hydrothermal vent systems on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Rainbow, Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse, and Snake Pit using the ROV Jason II. The goal of these efforts was to determine if iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria were present at sites proximal to black smoker vent fields. Small, diffuse flow venting areas with high iron(II concentrations and rust-colored microbial mats were observed at all three sites proximal to black smoker chimneys. A novel, syringe-based precision sampler was used to collect discrete microbial iron mat samples at the three sites. The presence of Zetaproteobacteria was confirmed using a combination of 16S rRNA pyrosequencing and single-cell sorting, while light micros-copy revealed a variety of iron-oxyhydroxide structures, indicating that active iron-oxidizing communities exist along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Sequencing analysis suggests that these iron mats contain cosmopolitan representatives of Zetaproteobacteria, but also exhibit diversity that may be uncommon at other iron-rich marine sites studied to date. A meta-analysis of publically available data encompassing a variety of aquatic habitats indicates that Zetaproteobacteria are rare if an iron source is not readily available. This work adds to the growing understanding of Zetaproteobacteria ecology and suggests

  16. Oxidation resistance of silicon ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutoshi, H.; Hirota, K.

    1984-01-01

    Oxidation resistance, and examples of oxidation of SiC, Si3N4 and sialon are reviewed. A description is given of the oxidation mechanism, including the oxidation product, oxidation reaction and the bubble size. The oxidation reactions are represented graphically. An assessment is made of the oxidation process, and an oxidation example of silicon ceramics is given.

  17. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  18. RNA modifications by oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E; Specht, Elisabeth; Broedbaek, Kasper;

    2012-01-01

    to encompass various classes of novel regulatory RNAs, including, e.g., microRNAs. It is well known that DNA is constantly oxidized and repaired by complex genome maintenance mechanisms. Analogously, RNA also undergoes significant oxidation, and there are now convincing data suggesting that oxidation......, and the consequent loss of integrity of RNA, is a mechanism for disease development. Oxidized RNA is found in a large variety of diseases, and interest has been especially devoted to degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer disease, in which up to 50-70% of specific mRNA molecules are reported oxidized, whereas...... other RNA molecules show virtually no oxidation. The iron-storage disease hemochromatosis exhibits the most prominent general increase in RNA oxidation ever observed. Oxidation of RNA primarily leads to strand breaks and to oxidative base modifications. Oxidized mRNA is recognized by the ribosomes...

  19. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  20. The Enzymatic Oxidation of Graphene Oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Kotchey, Gregg P.; Allen, Brett L.; Vedala, Harindra; Yanamala, Naveena; Kapralov, Alexander A.; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kagan, Valerian E.; Star, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional graphitic carbon is a new material with many emerging applications, and studying its chemical properties is an important goal. Here, we reported a new phenomenon – the enzymatic oxidation of a single layer of graphitic carbon by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (~40 µM), HRP catalyzed the oxidation of graphene oxide, which resulted in the formation of holes on its basal plane. During the same period of analysis, HRP faile...

  1. Oxidation of soot on iron oxide catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Waglöhner, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    This thesis addresses the rational development of an iron oxide based catalyst for soot oxidation. The approach of this development process comprises three research methods, namely mechanistic and kinetic experiments, kinetic and fluid dynamic modelling and structure-activity relations of different types of iron oxides. A combination of this enables the synthesis of an advanced catalytic material, which is transferred to a real DPF system and tested under real diesel exhaust conditions.

  2. Catalytic ammonia oxidation to nitrogen (I) oxide

    OpenAIRE

    MASALITINA NATALIYA YUREVNA; SAVENKOV ANATOLIY SERGEEVICH

    2015-01-01

    The process of synthesis of nitrous oxide by low-temperature catalytical oxidation of NH has been investigated for organic synthesis. The investigation has been carried out by the stage separation approach with NH oxidation occurring in several reaction zones, which characterized by different catalytic conditions. The selectivity for N₂O was 92–92,5 % at the ammonia conversion of 98–99.5 % in the optimal temperature range.

  3. Inmirania thermothiophila gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic, facultatively autotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing gammaproteobacterium isolated from a shallow-sea hydrothermal vent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodkina, Galina B; Baslerov, Roman V; Novikov, Andrei A; Viryasov, Mikhail B; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Slobodkin, Alexander I

    2016-02-01

    A novel thermophilic, facultatively autotrophic bacterium, strain S2479T, was isolated from a thermal spring located in a tidal zone of a geothermally heated beach (Kuril Islands, Russia). Cells of strain S2479T were rod-shaped and motile with a Gram-negative cell-wall type. The temperature range for growth was 35-68 °C (optimum 65 °C), and the pH range for growth was pH 5.5-8.8 (optimum pH 6.5). Growth of strain S2479T was observed in the presence of NaCl concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 % (w/v) (optimum 1.5-2.0 %). The strain oxidized sulfur and thiosulfate as sole energy sources for autotrophic growth under anaerobic conditions with nitrate as electron acceptor. Strain S2479T was also capable of heterotrophic growth by reduction of nitrate with oxidation of low-chain fatty acids and a limited number of other carboxylic acids or with complex proteinaceous compounds. Nitrate was reduced to N2. Sulfur compounds were oxidized to sulfate. Strain S2479T did not grow aerobically during incubation at atmospheric concentration of oxygen but was able to grow microaerobically (1 % of oxygen in gas phase). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the strain was a member of the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae, order Chromatiales, class Gammaproteobacteria. On the basis of phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, strain S2479T represents a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Inmirania thermothiophila gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is S2479T ( = DSM 100275T = VKM B-2962T). PMID:26582356

  4. Oxidative phosphorylation revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nath, Sunil; Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    The fundamentals of oxidative phosphorylation and photophosphorylation are revisited. New experimental data on the involvement of succinate and malate anions respectively in oxidative phosphorylation and photophosphorylation are presented. These new data offer a novel molecular mechanistic explan...

  5. Nitrous Oxide Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Nitrous Oxide (N20) flux is the net rate of nitrous oxide exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS...

  6. Zinc oxide overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc oxide is an ingredient in many products. Some of these are certain creams and ointments used ... prevent or treat minor skin burns and irritation. Zinc oxide overdose occurs when someone eats one of ...

  7. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases. Major source of oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS is related to mitochondria as an endogenous source. Although there is ample evidence from tissues of patients with neurodegenerative disorders of morphological, biochemical, and molecular abnormalities in mitochondria, it is still not very clear whether the oxidative stress itself contributes to the onset of neurodegeneration or it is part of the neurodegenerative process as secondary manifestation. This paper begins with an overview of how oxidative stress occurs, discussing various oxidants and antioxidants, and role of oxidative stress in diseases in general. It highlights the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The last part of the paper describes the role of oxidative stress causing deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 hyperactivity associated with neurodegeneration.

  8. Oxidation-resistant cermet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1977-01-01

    Chromium metal alloys and chromium oxide ceramic are combined to produce cermets with oxidation-resistant properties. Application of cermets includes use in hot corrosive environments requiring strong resistive materials.

  9. Electrochemical Oxidation of Rutin

    OpenAIRE

    Ghica, Mariana-Emilia; Brett, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2005-01-01

    An electrochemical investigation of rutin oxidation on a glassy carbon electrode was carried out using cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry and square-wave voltammetry over a wide pH interval. The electrochemical oxidation is a complex process, which proceeds in a cascade mechanism, related with the 4-hydroxyl groups of the rutin molecule. The catechol 3prime,4prime-dihydroxyl group is the first to be oxidized by a two-electron - two-proton reversible oxidation reaction, followe...

  10. Biochemistry of Nitric Oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Habib, Safia; Ali, Asif

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) a free radical having both cytoprotective as well as tumor promoting agent is formed from l-arginine by converting it to l-citrulline via nitric oxide synthase enzymes. The reaction product of nitric oxide with superoxide generates potent oxidizing agent, peroxynitrite which is the main mediator of tissue and cellular injury. Peroxynitrite is reactive towards many biomolecules which includes amino acids, nucleic acid bases; metal containing compounds, etc. NO metabolites may...

  11. Oxidation of chromium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors study the interaction between chromium telluride and oxygen at elevated temperatures in view of its application in semiconductor technology. Thermodynamic analysis of the oxidation process and experimental data showed that the alloys of chromium telluride suffer oxidation in the presence of even traces of oxygen in a gaseous medium. Chromium telluride oxidation is a complex process that gives rise to various oxides and is accompanied by partial sublimation

  12. Oxidation of chromium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakhomovskaya, N.S.; Iorga, E.V.; Sheveleva, T.F.; Solov' eva, A.E.

    1986-03-01

    The authors study the interaction between chromium telluride and oxygen at elevated temperatures in view of its application in semiconductor technology. Thermodynamic analysis of the oxidation process and experimental data showed that the alloys of chromium telluride suffer oxidation in the presence of even traces of oxygen in a gaseous medium. Chromium telluride oxidation is a complex process that gives rise to various oxides and is accompanied by partial sublimation.

  13. Oxidative stress and anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Bouayed, Jaouad; Rammal, Hassan; Soulimani, Rachid

    2009-01-01

    High O2 consumption, modest antioxidant defenses and a lipid-rich constitution make the brain highly vulnerable to redox imbalances. Oxidative damage in the brain causes nervous system impairment. Recently, oxidative stress has also been implicated in depression, anxiety disorders and high anxiety levels. The findings which establish a link between oxidative stress and pathological anxiety have inspired a number of other recent studies focusing on the link between oxidative status and normal ...

  14. Oxide catalysts for oxidation of xylene

    OpenAIRE

    Kusman Dossumov; Dina Churina; E. Tulibaev

    2013-01-01

    Polioxide granulated catalysts based on transition and rare earth metals for oxidative conversion of xylene by oxygen have been investigated. It was defined the effect of the composition and concentration of the active phase of oxide catalysts: Cu-Mn-Ln; Cu-Mn-Ce and Cu-Mn-Nd on the o-xylene oxidation. It was found that the Cu-Mn-Ce catalyst has the highest activity at the concentrations of metals: copper – 3.0%; manganese – 3.0%; cerium – 1.0%.

  15. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reaction...... time was less important within the range studied. Nitrifying bacteria were used to measure the inhibition from wet oxidative-treated samples to study the effect of the (wet oxidation) reaction conditions. Wet oxidation made quinoline more toxic to Nitrosomonas. This was observed for Nitrobacter as well....... The combined wet oxidation and biological treatment of reaction products resulted in 91% oxidation of the parent compound to CO2 and water. Following combined wet oxidation and biological treatment the sample showed low toxicity towards Nitrosomonas and no toxicity towards Nitrobacter. (C) 1998 Elsevier...

  16. Heterogeneous partial oxidation catalysis on metal oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Védrine, Jacques C.; Fechete, Ioana

    2016-01-01

    International audience This review paper presents an overview of heterogeneous selective ammoxidation and oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of light alkanes, particularly of ethane. The conversion of ethane to ethene is in great demand in the domestic and worldwide chemical industry. The review has been voluntarily restricted to metal oxide-type catalysts, as it is devoted to the special issue honouring Edmond Payen and is based on 30 years of experience and discussions with pioneering scien...

  17. ZIRCONIUM OXIDE NANOSTRUCTURES PREPARED BY ANODIC OXIDATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Y. Y.; Bhuiyan, M.S.; Paranthaman, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Zirconium oxide is an advanced ceramic material highly useful for structural and electrical applications because of its high strength, fracture toughness, chemical and thermal stability, and biocompatibility. If highly-ordered porous zirconium oxide membranes can be successfully formed, this will expand its real-world applications, such as further enhancing solid-oxide fuel cell technology. Recent studies have achieved various morphologies of porous zirconium oxide via anodization, but they have yet to create a porous layer where nanoholes are formed in a highly ordered array. In this study, electrochemical methods were used for zirconium oxide synthesis due to its advantages over other coating techniques, and because the thickness and morphology of the ceramic fi lms can be easily tuned by the electrochemical parameters, such as electrolyte solutions and processing conditions, such as pH, voltage, and duration. The effects of additional steps such as pre-annealing and post-annealing were also examined. Results demonstrate the formation of anodic porous zirconium oxide with diverse morphologies, such as sponge-like layers, porous arrays with nanoholes ranging from 40 to 75 nm, and nanotube layers. X-ray powder diffraction analysis indicates a cubic crystallographic structure in the zirconium oxide. It was noted that increased voltage improved the ability of the membrane to stay adhered to the zirconium substrate, whereas lower voltages caused a propensity for the oxide fi lm to fl ake off. Further studies are needed to defi ne the parameters windows that create these morphologies and to investigate other important characteristics such as ionic conductivity.

  18. Subsurface Uranium Fate and Transport: Integrated Experiments and Modeling of Coupled Biogeochemical Mechanisms of Nanocrystalline Uraninite Oxidation by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides - Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyton, Brent M. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Timothy, Ginn R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Sani, Rajesh K. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States)

    2013-08-14

    Subsurface bacteria including sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO2. We have shown that SRB reduce U(VI) to nanometer-sized UO2 particles (1-5 nm) which are both intra- and extracellular, with UO2 inside the cell likely physically shielded from subsequent oxidation processes. We evaluated the UO2 nanoparticles produced by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 under growth and non-growth conditions in the presence of lactate or pyruvate and sulfate, thiosulfate, or fumarate, using ultrafiltration and HR-TEM. Results showed that a significant mass fraction of bioreduced U (35-60%) existed as a mobile phase when the initial concentration of U(VI) was 160 µM. Further experiments with different initial U(VI) concentrations (25 - 900 M) in MTM with PIPES or bicarbonate buffers indicated that aggregation of uraninite depended on the initial concentrations of U(VI) and type of buffer. It is known that under some conditions SRB-mediated UO2 nanocrystals can be reoxidized (and thus remobilized) by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides, common constituents of soils and sediments. To elucidate the mechanism of UO2 reoxidation by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, we studied the impact of Fe and U chelating compounds (citrate, NTA, and EDTA) on reoxidation rates. Experiments were conducted in anaerobic batch systems in PIPES buffer. Results showed EDTA significantly accelerated UO2 reoxidation with an initial rate of 9.5 M day-1 for ferrihydrite. In all cases, bicarbonate increased the rate and extent of UO2 reoxidation with ferrihydrite. The highest rate of UO2 reoxidation occurred when the chelator promoted UO2 and Fe(III) (hydr)oxide dissolution as demonstrated with EDTA. When UO2 dissolution did not occur, UO2 reoxidation likely proceeded through an aqueous Fe(III) intermediate as observed for both NTA and

  19. Sulfur metabolism in the extreme acidophile Acidithiobacillus caldus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eMangold

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Given the challenges to life at low pH, an analysis of inorganic sulfur compound oxidation was initiated in the chemolithoautotrophic extremophile Acidithiobacillus caldus. A. caldus is able to metabolize elemental sulfur and a broad range of inorganic sulfur compounds. It has been implicated in the production of environmentally damaging acidic solutions as well as participating in industrial bioleaching operations where it forms part of microbial consortia used for the recovery of metal ions. Based upon the recently published A. caldus type strain genome sequence, a bioinformatic reconstruction of elemental sulfur and inorganic sulfur compound metabolism predicted genes included: sulfide quinone reductase (sqr, tetrathionate hydrolase (tth, two sox gene clusters potentially involved in thiosulfate oxidation (soxABXYZ, sulfur oxygenase reductase (sor, and various electron transport components. RNA transcript profiles by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR suggested up-regulation of sox genes in the presence of tetrathionate. Extensive gel based proteomic comparisons of total soluble and membrane enriched protein fractions during growth on elemental sulfur and tetrathionate identified differential protein levels from the two Sox clusters as well as several chaperone and stress proteins up-regulated in the presence of elemental sulfur. Proteomics results also suggested the involvement of heterodisulfide reductase (HdrABC in A. caldus inorganic sulfur compound metabolism. A putative new function of Hdr in acidophiles is discussed. Additional proteomic analysis evaluated protein expression differences between cells grown attached to solid, elemental sulfur versus planktonic cells. This study has provided insights into sulfur metabolism of this acidophilic chemolithotroph and gene expression during attachment to solid elemental sulfur.

  20. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  1. Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2013-09-24

    A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

  2. The Oxidation of Pyrrole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, James K; Rihak, Kieran J; Bissember, Alex C; Smith, Jason A

    2016-01-01

    The dearomatization of heterocycles has been a powerful means for producing functional molecules in synthesis. In the case of pyrroles, reductive methods (such as the Birch reduction) have been most widely exploited, while oxidative methods are generally dismissed as too difficult or unpredictable to be useful. However, since the early twentieth century considerable research has been carried out on the controlled oxidation of pyrroles to give highly functionalized products, using a variety of oxidants. This review presents a summary of all work up until the present day in the area of pyrrole oxidation, looking at the use of peroxide, singlet oxygen, hypervalent iodine reagents, a range or organic and inorganic oxidants, and electrochemical approaches. It also offers some perspective on the potential future role of pyrrole oxidation in synthesis. PMID:26294175

  3. Paraffin Oxidation Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Mrs. S. J. Purohit; Dr. Milind Pradhan

    2013-01-01

    The oxidation of paraffin has been studied with keen interest by several workers from all over the world; as oxidation leads to the introduction of various functional groups in hydrocarbon chains. Processes involving the Oxidation of Paraffin’s in the liquid phase, using air or oxygen are of great importance to industrialized economies because of their role in converting petroleum hydrocarbon feed stocks such as alkanes, olefins and aromatics into industrial organic chemicals important in the...

  4. METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FERNANDEZ-GARCIA,M.; RODGRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2007-10-01

    This chapter covers the fundamental science, synthesis, characterization, physicochemical properties and applications of oxide nanomaterials. Explains fundamental aspects that determine the growth and behavior of these systems, briefly examines synthetic procedures using bottom-up and top-down fabrication technologies, discusses the sophisticated experimental techniques and state of the art theory results used to characterize the physico-chemical properties of oxide solids and describe the current knowledge concerning key oxide materials with important technological applications.

  5. Detecting Organic Compounds Released from Iron Oxidizing Bacteria using Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Like Instrument Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, D. P.; Popa, R.; Martin, M. G.; Freissinet, C.; Fisk, M. R.; Dworkin, J. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2012-01-01

    Mars is a planet of great interest for Astrobiology since its past environmental conditions are thought to have been favourable for the emergence life. At present, the Red Planet is extremely cold and dry and the surface is exposed to intense UV and ionizing radiation, conditions generally considered to be incompatible with life as we know it on Earth. It was proposed that the shallow subsurface of Mars, where temperatures can be above freezing and liquid water can exist on rock surfaces, could harbor chemolithoautotrophic bacteria such as the iron oxidizing microorganism Pseudomonas sp. HerB. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will provide the next opportunity to carry out in situ measurements for organic compounds of possible biological origin on Mars. One instrument onboard MSL, called the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite, will carry out a broad and sensitive search for organic compounds in surface samples using either high temperature pyrolysis or chemical extraction followed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. We present gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GC/MS) data on crushed olivine rock powders that have been inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. HerB at different concentrations ranging from approx 10(exp 2) to 10(exp 7) cells per gram. The inoculated olivine samples were heated under helium carrier gas flow at 500 C and the pyrolysis products concentrated using a SAM-like hydrocarbon trap set at -20 C followed by trap heating and analysis by GC/Ms. In addition, the samples were also extracted using a low temperature "one-pot" chemical extraction technique using N-methyl, N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) as the silylating agent prior to GC/MS analysis. We identified several aldehydes, thiols, and alkene nitriles after pyrolysis GC/MS analysis of the bacteria that were not found in the olivine control samples that had not been inoculated with bacteria. The distribution of pyrolysis products extracted from the

  6. Oxidation mechanisms occurring in wines

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Carla Maria; Ferreira, António César Silva; de Freitas, Victor; Artur M. S. Silva

    2011-01-01

    The present review aims to show the state of the art on the oxidation mechanisms occurring in wines, as well as the methods to monitor, classify and diagnose wine oxidation. Wine oxidation can be divided in enzymatic oxidation and non-enzymatic oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation almost entirely occurs in grape must and is largely correlated with the content of hydroxycinnamates, such as caffeoyltartaric acid and paracoumaroyltartaric acid, and flavan-3-ols. Non-enzymatic oxidation, al...

  7. Molecular water oxidation catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Llobet, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting is a promising strategy for capturing energy from the sun by coupling light harvesting and the oxidation of water, in order to create clean hydrogen fuel. Thus a deep knowledge of the water oxidation catalysis field is essential to be able to come up with useful energy conversion devices based on sunlight and water splitting. Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysis: A Key Topic for New Sustainable Energy Conversion Schemes presents a comprehensive and state-of-the-art overview of water oxidation catalysis in homogeneous phase, describing in detail the most importan

  8. Construction graphite oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In approximation to working conditions considered are the main regularities of graphite oxidation: at the decrease of oxidant concentration to the value, corresponding to the working conditions, with an account of the effect of the preliminary radiation of graphite samples; by the gamma radiation influence during the oxidation; at the influence of reactor radiation on gaseous medium; by the tests in the loop channel of the reactor. Considered are the possibilities of graphite protection from the accelerated oxidation, taking in mind the long exploitation period

  9. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  10. Arsenopyrite oxidation - A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenopyrite (FeAsS) is the most common As-bearing sulfide mineral. Under oxidising conditions, such as those in mine waste systems, it breaks down to release acids of As and S into the environment, resulting in acid mine drainage with high concentrations of dissolved As. In this communication, current knowledge of arsenopyrite oxidation is reviewed based on a survey of the existing literature, which has focused on processes and reactions at the mineral surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has shown that the oxidation of arsenopyrite in acid is more rapid than in air, water, or in alkaline solutions. Oxidation products reported by XPS include Fe(III) oxide, As(III), As(V), SO32- and SO42-. The elemental constituents of arsenopyrite oxidise at different rates, although there is no consensus as to which is the fastest or slowest to oxidise. Electrochemical studies have highlighted the formation of elemental S on the arsenopyrite surface, while XPS studies suggest that only oxy-anions of S form. Kinetic studies of arsenopyrite oxidation suggest that O2 and Fe3+ are the dominant inorganic agents causing arsenopyrite dissolution. The bacterially-mediated oxidation of arsenopyrite by acidophilic Fe- and S-oxidising bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus caldus, is more extensive than abiotic oxidation. The literature pertaining to arsenopyrite oxidation is divided regarding the reaction stoichiometry, and the composition and layering of surface overlayers.

  11. Monolithic metal oxide transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yongsuk; Park, Won-Yeong; Kang, Moon Sung; Yi, Gi-Ra; Lee, Jun-Young; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-04-28

    We devised a simple transparent metal oxide thin film transistor architecture composed of only two component materials, an amorphous metal oxide and ion gel gate dielectric, which could be entirely assembled using room-temperature processes on a plastic substrate. The geometry cleverly takes advantage of the unique characteristics of the two components. An oxide layer is metallized upon exposure to plasma, leading to the formation of a monolithic source-channel-drain oxide layer, and the ion gel gate dielectric is used to gate the transistor channel effectively at low voltages through a coplanar gate. We confirmed that the method is generally applicable to a variety of sol-gel-processed amorphous metal oxides, including indium oxide, indium zinc oxide, and indium gallium zinc oxide. An inverter NOT logic device was assembled using the resulting devices as a proof of concept demonstration of the applicability of the devices to logic circuits. The favorable characteristics of these devices, including (i) the simplicity of the device structure with only two components, (ii) the benign fabrication processes at room temperature, (iii) the low-voltage operation under 2 V, and (iv) the excellent and stable electrical performances, together support the application of these devices to low-cost portable gadgets, i.e., cheap electronics. PMID:25777338

  12. The oxidation of aniline with inorganic oxidants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bláha, Michal; Bober, Patrycja; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Trchová, Miroslava; Prokeš, J.

    Turku: University of Turku, 2014. P3.012, s. 145. [International Conference on Synthetic Metals - ICSM 2014. 30.06.2014-05.07.2014, Turku] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0911 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : anilin e oxidation * conductivity * morphology Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  13. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    The chapter discusses general considerations about protein oxidation and reviews the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and consequences of protein oxidation on fish proteins. It presents two case studies, the first deals with protein and lipid oxidation in frozen rainbow trout......, and the second with oxidation in salted herring. The mechanisms responsible for initiation of protein oxidation are unclear, but it is generally accepted that free radical species initiating lipid oxidation can also initiate protein oxidation. The chapter focuses on interaction between protein and lipid...... oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...

  14. Oxidation of ruthenium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography applications are threatened by various deterioration processes of the surface. During exposure, the dominating contamination processes are carbonization and oxidation due to adsorption of hydrocarbons and oxygen and their reaction with the mirror surface, reducing the mirror lifetime. One possibility to extent the lifetime is to coat the mirror with a dedicated capping material, such as Si, Ti, Mo, Pd, Ru, or their oxides. To study the influence of oxidative species (O2 and H2O), in this work Ru single crystals were used as model systems for real mirror capping layers. The (0001) surface of a Ru single crystal was exposed to oxidative environments with a total pressure ranging from 10 9 mbar to 10-4 mbar and analyzed with low energy electron diffraction (LEED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). Depending on pressure and exposure, different surface reconstructions could be found. At oxygen partial pressures higher than 10-4 mbar and sufficiently long oxygen exposure, bulk oxide formed, the thickness of which was analyzed with ellipsometry. The oxidation behaviour of single crystalline surfaces was compared with the oxidation of thin evaporated Ru layers.

  15. Lignite oxidative desulphurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Volodymyr Gunka; Serhiy Pyshyev

    2014-01-01

    The process of lignite desulphurization via its treatment by an oxidant (air or air–steam mixture) has been studied. The research objective was useful determination of steam application in oxidative lignite desulphurization. It has been proved that the water steam should be included in the oxidant composition to increase the hydrogen sulphide and combustible constituent content in the gases obtained during the processes under research. The impact of factors which affect the reactions between solid (in our case–lignite) and gaseous reagent (oxidant, i.e. air and or air–steam mixture) upon the research process has been investigated, if these reactions occur in the kinetic area. Such factors are linear rate of oxidant movement and coal grain size. The values of oxidant movement linear rate and coal grain size, which the reaction transfer from pyrite sulphur and organic content of lignite from diffusion into kinetic area occurs by, have been determined. Under these‘‘transfer’’ conditions, the values of coefficients of oxidant mass transfer (b, m/s) as well as Sherwood criteria and boiling layer differences have been calculated.

  16. Oxidation of uraninite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of uraninite and pitchblende annealed at 1200 degrees C in H2, and untreated pitchblende were sequentially oxidized in air at 180-190 degrees C, 230 degrees C, and 300 degrees C. Uraninite and untreated pitchblende oxidized to the U4O9-type oxide, and their x-ray symmetry remained isometric up to 300 degrees C. Reduced pitchblende, after oxidation to UO2+x and U4O9-type oxides, transformed into α-U3O8 at 300 degrees C. Two major mechanisms control uraninite and untreated pitchblende stability during oxidation: 1. Th and/or lanthanide elements maintain charge balance and block oxygen interstitials near impurity cations; 2. the uraninite structure saturates with respect to excess and radiation-induced oxygen interstitials. Untreated pitchblende during oxidation behaved similarly to irradiated UO2 in spent nuclear fuel; whereas, reduced pitchblende resembled non-irradiated UO2. An analysis of the data in the literature, as well as our own efforts (XRD, EMPA, SEM, AEM) to identify U3O7 in samples form Cigar Lake, Canada, failed to provide conclusive evidence of the natural occurrence of tetragonal αU3O7. Most probably, reported occurrences of U3O7 are mixtures of isometric uraninites of slightly different compositions, 45 refs

  17. Highly oxidized graphene oxide and methods for production thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tour, James M.; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.

    2016-08-30

    A highly oxidized form of graphene oxide and methods for production thereof are described in various embodiments of the present disclosure. In general, the methods include mixing a graphite source with a solution containing at least one oxidant and at least one protecting agent and then oxidizing the graphite source with the at least one oxidant in the presence of the at least one protecting agent to form the graphene oxide. Graphene oxide synthesized by the presently described methods is of a high structural quality that is more oxidized and maintains a higher proportion of aromatic rings and aromatic domains than does graphene oxide prepared in the absence of at least one protecting agent. Methods for reduction of graphene oxide into chemically converted graphene are also disclosed herein. The chemically converted graphene of the present disclosure is significantly more electrically conductive than is chemically converted graphene prepared from other sources of graphene oxide.

  18. Low-temperature hydration, oxidation and hydrogen production from Oman peridotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H. M.; Mayhew, L.; Templeton, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    Peridotite in the shallow subsurface undergoes hydration and oxidation (serpentinization) during reactions with percolating fluids, generating hydrogen gas and releasing magnesium, iron, and calcium into solution. In the presence of fluids enriched in dissolved carbon dioxide, extensive precipitation of carbonate minerals occurs. This reaction has large-scale implications for mitigating climate change by providing a stable, geological carbon repository. The Samail Ophiolite in Oman contains large quantities of ultramafic rocks that are currently undergoing serpentinization at low temperatures (30°C) and forming carbonate minerals. The production of hydrogen gas provides an electron donor for subsurface chemolithoautotrophic life which can contribute to carbon cycling in the subsurface as microorganisms utilize carbon dioxide as an inorganic carbon source. Serpentinization reactions require the oxidation of Fe (II) to Fe (III) to reduce water to H2, but the mechanisms of hydrogen generation in low-temperature systems is poorly characterized. To address this question, we conducted low temperature (100°C) water-rock reactions with Oman peridotite, measured H2 and characterized the speciation of Fe-bearing minerals before and after water-rock interaction using micro-X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (μXANES) spectra obtained from Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. The experimental water-rock reactions produce H2 at a pH of 9, which corresponds with observations of ultrabasic springs in the Samail ophiolite and the presence of H2 in these spring waters. Significant hydrogen production occurs for two and a half months of reaction, peaking at 400 nmol/gram of reacted peridotite and then steadily decreases with time. These maximum values of hydrogen production from Oman peridotite are greater than observed by our laboratory and others during aqueous alteration of San Carlos peridotite and isolated pyroxenes and olivines (e.g. Mayhew et al. 2013 [1]). The

  19. Paraffin Oxidation Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrs. S. J. Purohit

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of paraffin has been studied with keen interest by several workers from all over the world; as oxidation leads to the introduction of various functional groups in hydrocarbon chains. Processes involving the Oxidation of Paraffin’s in the liquid phase, using air or oxygen are of great importance to industrialized economies because of their role in converting petroleum hydrocarbon feed stocks such as alkanes, olefins and aromatics into industrial organic chemicals important in the polymer, petrochemicals ,cosmetics and detergent industries. The oxidation leads predominantly to the formation of secondary alcohols consisting of a mixture of all possible isomers with the same number of carbon atoms in the molecules as the initial hydrocarbons. The secondary alcohols which are oxidation products of paraffin exhibit excellent hydrolytic, oxidative and color stability, because of the nature of their branching. These alcohols have lower melting points than straight chain alcohols of corresponding length, while retaining their high temperature stability. The oxidation of paraffin wax to fatty acids is carried out in temperature range 110 0C- 140 0C. Paraffin oxidation which is carried out by ALFOL, Oxo-processes, are high temperature, high pressure processes which utilize expensive catalysts, making them energy intensive as well as expensive. The maximum conversion achieved yet by existing processes is 15�0for a batch time of 4 hours. A cheaper alternative in this article has been studied, in which paraffin Oxidation has been carried out in a foam reactor at moderate temperature and pressure with suitable catalyst , the output of the products is increased up to 62%.

  20. Nitric Oxide: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Shaikh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The small molecule nitric oxide (NO has a vast number of actions, many of which are poorly understood. Although NO is produced by three distinct isoforms of the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS, most research is directed toward the form, iNOS which is seen following induction. Nitric oxide has been extensively researched in relation to cancer, where it has a multifaceted role. It has also been investigated in relation to oral lesions and tumors like ameloblastoma, salivary gland tumors, periapical lesions, S jogren’s syndrome, etc. This review looks into all these facets of NO and its potential role as a diagnostic and therapeutic modality.

  1. Engineering complex oxide interfaces for oxide electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    A complex interplay of physics and chemistry in transition metal oxides determines their electronic, magnetic, and ferroic properties enabling a wide range of applications of these materials. BiFeO_3, a canonical multiferroic system exhibits the interesting feature of enhanced conductivity on ferroelectric domain walls, in an otherwise insulating surface. Although it attracted much interest, many aspects regarding its origin and magnetic behavior are not fully understood; particularly at inte...

  2. Oxidative acylation using thioacids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1997-01-01

    Several important prebiotic reactions, including the coupling of amino acids into polypeptides by the formation of amide linkages, involve acylation. Theae reactions present a challenge to the understanding of prebiotic synthesis. Condensation reactions relying on dehydrating agents are either inefficient in aqueous solution or require strongly acidic conditions and high temperatures. Activated amino acids such as thioester derivatives have therefore been suggested as likely substrates for prebiotic peptide synthesis. Here we propose a closely related route to amide bond formation involving oxidative acylation by thioacids. We find that phenylalanine, leucine and phenylphosphate are acylated efficiently in aqueous solution by thioacetic acid and an oxidizing agent. From a prebiotic point of view, oxidative acylation has the advantage of proceeding efficiently in solution and under mild conditions. We anticipate that oxidative acylation should prove to be a general method for activating carboxylic acids, including amino acids.

  3. Markers of protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 gives both side-chain oxidation and backbone fragmentation. These processes can be interrelated, with initial side-chain oxidation giving rise to backbone damage via transfer reactions. We have shown previously that alkoxyl radicals formed...... on the C-3 carbons of Ala, Val, Leu, and Asp residues undergo beta-scission to give backbone alpha-carbon radicals, with the release of the side- chain as a carbonyl compound. We now show that this is a general mechanism that occurs with a wide range of oxidants. The quantitative significance...... of this process depends on the extent of oxidation at C-3 compared with other sites. HO*, generated by gamma radiolysis, gave the highest total carbonyl yield, with protein-bound carbonyls predominating over released. In contrast, metal ion/H2O2 systems, gave more released than bound carbonyls, with this ratio...

  4. Metal atom oxidation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides

  5. Metal atom oxidation laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  6. An oxide thermal rectifier

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, W.; Teraoka, Y.; Terasaki, I.

    2009-01-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated thermal rectification as bulk effect. According to a theoretical design of a thermal rectifier, we have prepared an oxide thermal rectifier made of two cobalt oxides with different thermal conductivities, and have made an experimental system to detect the thermal rectification. The rectifying coefficient of the device is found to be 1.43, which is in good agreement with the numerical calculation.

  7. Thin zirconium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline Zr and two pure Zr single-crystal samples, one oriented with the normal to the surface parallel to the c-axis of the hcp structure (Z1) and the other with the normal perpendicular to c (Z2), were oxidised at 10-8, 10-7 and 10-6 Torr and room temperature. Oxidation kinetics, composition and thicknesses of the oxide films formed in each case were analyzed using XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy) as the main technique. The oxidation kinetics followed logarithmic laws in all cases. The deconvolution of XPS Zr3d peaks indicated the formation of two Zr-O compounds before the formation of ZrO2. Varying the photoelectrons take-off angle, the compound distribution inside the oxide films could be established. Thus, it was confirmed that the most external oxide, in contact with the gas, was ZrO2. The thickness of the films grown at the different pressures was determined. In the polycrystalline samples, thicknesses between 15 and 19 ± 2Angstroem were obtained for pressures between 10-8 and 10-6 Torr, in close coincidence with the determined ones for Z2. The thicknesses measured in Z1 were smaller, reaching 13 ± 2Angstroem for the oxidations performed at 10-6 Torr. (author)

  8. Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii sp. nov., a novel, arsenite-oxidizing haloalkaliphilic gammaproteobacterium capable of chemoautotrophic or heterotrophic growth with nitrate or oxygen as the electron acceptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeft, S.E.; Blum, J.S.; Stolz, J.F.; Tabita, F.R.; Witte, B.; King, G.M.; Santini, J.M.; Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    A facultative chemoautotrophic bacterium, strain MLHE-1T, was isolated from Mono Lake, an alkaline hypersaline soda lake in California, USA. Cells of strain MLHE-1T were Gram-negative, short motile rods that grew with inorganic electron donors (arsenite, hydrogen, sulfide or thiosulfate) coupled with the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. No aerobic growth was attained with arsenite or sulfide, but hydrogen sustained both aerobic and anaerobic growth. No growth occurred when nitrite or nitrous oxide was substituted for nitrate. Heterotrophic growth was observed under aerobic and anaerobic (nitrate) conditions. Cells of strain MLHE-1T could oxidize but not grow on CO, while CH4 neither supported growth nor was it oxidized. When grown chemoautotrophically, strain MLHE-1T assimilated inorganic carbon via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate pathway, with the activity of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO) functioning optimally at 0.1 M NaCl and at pH 7.3. Strain MLHE-1T grew over broad ranges of pH (7.3-10.0; optimum, 9.3), salinity (115-190 g l-1; optimum 30 g l-1) and temperature (113-40 ??C; optimum, 30 ??C). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences placed strain MLHE-1T in the class Gammaproteobacteria (family Ectothiorhodospiraceae) and most closely related to Alkalispirillum mobile (98.5%) and Alkalilimnicola halodurans (98.6%), although none of these three haloalkaliphilic micro-organisms were capable of photoautotrophic growth and only strain MLHE-1T was able to oxidize As(III). On the basis of physiological characteristics and DNA-DNA hybridization data, it is suggested that strain MLHE-1T represents a novel species within the genus Alkalilimnicola for which the name Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is proposed. The type strain is MLHE-1T (=DSM 17681T =ATCC BAA-1101T). Aspects of the annotated full genome of Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii are discussed in the light of its physiology. ?? 2007 IUMS.

  9. Reduction property of rare earth oxide doped molybdenum oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Rare earth oxide doped molybdenum powders were prepared by the reduction of rare earth nitrites doped MoO3. The effect of rare earth oxide on the reduction behavior of molybdenum oxide had been studied by means of Temperature Programmed Reduction (TPR), thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction. Doping rare earth oxide in the powder could lower the reduction temperature of molybdenum oxide and decrease the particle size of molybdenum. The mechanism for the effects had been discussed in this paper.

  10. Selective methane oxidation on zeolite stabilized copper oxide clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Grundner, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Copper oxide clusters stabilized in the micropores of zeolites have been found to selectively oxidize methane to methanol. The synthesis of a catalyst with homotopic trinuclear copper oxide clusters was achieved via ion exchange and oxidation. The steric and chemical environments of these clusters characterized by combinations of physicochemical measurement were critical to activate and convert methane. While the absence of water was critical for methane oxidation, the presence of water was r...

  11. Riboflavin photosensitized oxidation of myoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grippa, Juliana M.; de Zawadzki, Andressa; Grossi, Alberto Blak;

    2014-01-01

    The reaction of the fresh meat pigment oxymyoglobin, MbFe(II)O, and its oxidized form metmyoglobin, MbFe(III), with triplet-state riboflavin involves the pigment protein, which is oxidatively cleaved or dimerized as shown by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The overall rate constant for oxidation...... oxidation but not for discoloration. © 2014 American Chemical Society....

  12. Enargite oxidation: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzi, Pierfranco; Da Pelo, Stefania; Musu, Elodia; Atzei, Davide; Elsener, Bernhard; Fantauzzi, Marzia; Rossi, Antonella

    2008-01-01

    Enargite, Cu 3AsS 4, is common in some deposit types, e.g. porphyry systems and high sulphidation epithermal deposits. It is of environmental concern as a potential source of arsenic. In this communication, we review the current knowledge of enargite oxidation, based on the existing literature and our own original data. Explicit descriptions of enargite oxidation in natural environments are scarce. The most common oxidized alteration mineral of enargite is probably scorodite, FeAsO 4.2H 2O, with iron provided most likely by pyrite, a phase almost ubiquitously associated with enargite. Other secondary minerals after enargite include arsenates such as chenevixite, Cu 2Fe 2(AsO 4) 2(OH) 4.H 2O, and ceruleite, Cu 2Al 7(AsO 4) 4.11.5H 2O, and sulphates such as brochantite, Cu 4(SO 4)(OH) 6, and posnjakite, Cu 4(SO 4)(OH) 6·H 2O. Detailed studies of enargite field alteration at Furtei, Sardinia, suggest that most alteration occurs through dissolution, as testified by the appearance of etch pits at the surface of enargite crystals. However, apparent replacement by scorodite and cuprian melanterite was observed. Bulk oxidation of enargite in air is a very slow process. However, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals subtle surface changes. From synchrotron-based XPS it was suggested that surface As atoms react very fast, presumably by forming bonds with oxygen. Conventional XPS shows the formation, on aged samples, of a nanometer-size alteration layer with an appreciably distinct composition with respect to the bulk. Mechanical activation considerably increases enargite reactivity. In laboratory experiments at acidic to neutral pH, enargite oxidation/dissolution is slow, although it is accelerated by the presence of ferric iron and/or bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Sulfolobus BC. In the presence of sulphuric acid and ferric iron, the reaction involves dissolution of Cu and formation of native sulphur, subsequently partly oxidized to sulphate

  13. Surface-oxidized carbon black as a catalyst for the water oxidation and alcohol oxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanto, Bryan H R; Zhao, Chuan

    2016-05-11

    Carbon black (CB) is popularly used as a catalyst support for metal/metal oxide nanoparticles due to its large surface area, excellent conductivity and stability. Herein, we show that surface oxidized CB itself, after acidic treatment and electrochemical oxidation, exhibits significant catalytic activity for the electrochemical oxidation of water and alcohols. PMID:27097802

  14. Stabilized tin-oxide-based oxidation/reduction catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Leighty, Bradley D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Gulati, Suresh T. (Inventor); Summers, Jerry C. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The invention described herein involves a novel approach to the production of oxidation/reduction catalytic systems. The present invention serves to stabilize the tin oxide reducible metal-oxide coating by co-incorporating at least another metal-oxide species, such as zirconium. In one embodiment, a third metal-oxide species is incorporated, selected from the group consisting of cerium, lanthanum, hafnium, and ruthenium. The incorporation of the additional metal oxide components serves to stabilize the active tin-oxide layer in the catalytic process during high-temperature operation in a reducing environment (e.g., automobile exhaust). Moreover, the additional metal oxides are active components due to their oxygen-retention capabilities. Together, these features provide a mechanism to extend the range of operation of the tin-oxide-based catalyst system for automotive applications, while maintaining the existing advantages.

  15. Biocatalysts for selective oxidations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, M. [Department of Chemistry, Chemical Technology, TU Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Selective oxidations using oxygen (or air) and hydrogen peroxide (or tert.-butyl hydroperoxide) are important transformations in synthetic organic chemistry as well as in industrial chemistry. However, these reactions are rarely regio- or stereo-selective and the selective oxidation of non-activated C-H-bonds is a still challenging problem. In contrast, enzyme-catalyzed reactions offer mild and selective routes to oxidation products which are important intermediates for the production of fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals or even bulk chemicals. However, a productive role of biocatalysts in basic chemical processing is not obvious. For decades, it was believed that enzymes might be suitable catalysts only for specialty applications. Such beliefs were guided by the assumption that enzymes in general are expensive and thus not suitable for processes to basic chemicals. Given sufficiently good stability and acceptable space time yields, enzymes have been proven to be catalysts of choice for quite a number of applications. New technologies such as protein engineering directed evolution and metabolic engineering are likely to open up further opportunities for biocatalytic routes, provided that they can meet the stringent productivity and cost criteria set by processes to basic chemicals. This review will discuss some general features of selective biocatalytic oxidations as well as some already implanted processes. An outlook of remaining challenges and the future potential of biocatalysts in selective oxidations will also be provided. (orig.)

  16. Switching Oxide Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Timothy R.

    2003-01-01

    We consider radiation-induced charge trapping in SiO2 dielectric layers, primarily from the point of view of CMOS devices. However, SiO2 insulators are used in many other ways, and the same defects occur in other contexts. The key studies, which determined the nature of the oxide charge traps, were done primarily on gate oxides in CMOS devices, because that was the main radiation problem in CMOS at one time. There are two major reviews of radiation-induced oxide charge trapping already in the literature, which discuss the subject in far greater detail than is possible here. The first of these was by McLean et al. in 1989, and the second, ten years later, was intended as an update, because of additional, new work that had been reported. Basically, the picture that has emerged is that ionizing radiation creates electron-hole pairs in the oxide, and the electrons have much higher mobility than the holes. Therefore, the electrons are swept out of the oxide very rapidly by any field that is present, leaving behind any holes that escape the initial recombination process. These holes then undergo a polaron hopping transport toward the Si/SiO2 interface (under positive bias). Near the interface, some fraction of them fall into deep, relatively stable, long-lived hole traps. The nature and annealing behavior of these hole traps is the main focus of this paper.

  17. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  18. Crystalline mesoporous metal oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenbo Yue; Wuzong Zhou

    2008-01-01

    Since the discovery of many types of mesoporous silicas, such as SBA-15, KIT-6, FDU-12 and SBA-16, porous crystalline transition metal oxides, such as Cr2O3, Co3O4, In2O3, NiO, CeO2, WO3, Fe2O3 and MnO2, have been synthesized using the mesoporous silicas as hard templates. Several synthetic methods have been developed. These new porous materials have high potential applications in catalysis, Li-ion rechargeable batteries and gas sensors. This article gives a brief review of the research of porous crystals of metal oxides in the last four years.

  19. Krypton oxides under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk; Lata, Pawel M

    2016-01-01

    Under high pressure, krypton, one of the most inert elements is predicted to become sufficiently reactive to form a new class of krypton compounds; krypton oxides. Using modern ab-initio evolutionary algorithms in combination with Density Functional Theory, we predict the existence of several thermodynamically stable Kr/O species at elevated pressures. In particular, our calculations indicate that at approx. 300 GPa the monoxide, KrO, should form spontaneously and remain thermo- and dynamically stable with respect to constituent elements and higher oxides. The monoxide is predicted to form non-molecular crystals with short Kr-O contacts, typical for genuine chemical bonds. PMID:26830129

  20. Low temperature oxidation of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial oxidation of gallium stabilized δ-plutonium metal at 193 K has been followed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. On exposure to Langmuir quantities of oxygen, plutonium rapidly forms a trivalent oxide followed by a tetravalent plutonium oxide. The growth modes of both oxides have been determined. Warming the sample in vacuum, the tetravalent oxide reduces to the trivalent oxide. The kinetics of this reduction reaction have followed and the activation energy has been determined to be 38.8 kJ mol−1.

  1. Copolymerization Kinetics of Ethylene Oxide and Propylene Oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹红; 陈志荣

    2002-01-01

    The copolymerization kinetics of ethylene oxide and propylene oxide in an atomizing-circulation reactorunder semi-continuous operation is studied which is of great importance for molecular designation. The kineticparameters are obtained by numerical optimization of the kinetic model.

  2. Green oxidations: Titanium dioxide induced tandem oxidation coupling reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Vineet Jeena; Robinson, Ross S.

    2009-01-01

    The application of titanium dioxide as an oxidant in tandem oxidation type processes is described. Under microwave irradiation, quinoxalines have been synthesized in good yields from the corresponding α-hydroxyketones.

  3. Uranium oxidation: characterization of oxides formed by reaction with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different uranium oxide samples have been characterized with respect to the different preparation techniques. Results show that the water reaction with uranium metal occurs cyclically forming laminar layers of oxide which spall off due to the strain at the oxide/metal interface. Single laminae are released if liquid water is present due to the prizing penetration at the reaction zone. The rate of reaction of water with uranium is directly proportional to the amount of adsorbed water on the oxide product. Rapid transport is effected through the open hydrous oxide product. Dehydration of the hydrous oxide irreversibly forms a more inert oxide which cannot be rehydrated to the degree that prevails in the original hydrous product of uranium oxidation with water. 27 figures

  4. Iron oxide modified minerals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mashlan, M.; Bartoňková, H.; Jančík, D.; Tuček, J.; Martinec, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 191, 1-3 (2009), s. 151-157. ISSN 0304-3843 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : Mössbauer spectroscopy * clay minerals * iron oxide * nanoparticle Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.209, year: 2007 http://www.springerlink.com/content/9870444lu2g66382/fulltext.pdf

  5. Iron oxides photochemical dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work was intended to study the light irradiation influence of diverse wave-lengths on iron oxides dissolution in aqueous solutions. The objectives of this work were: the exploration of photochemical processes with the aim of its eventual application in: a) decontamination and chemical cleaning under special conditions; b) materials for solar energy conversion. (Author)

  6. Oxidative Stress in Myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch-Morell Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem.

  7. Aqueous polyethylene oxide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of aspects concerning the reorientation of polymer, water and ion hydration complexes have been studied in aqueous solution of polyethylene oxide (PEO). The polymer dynamics are investigated by 1H-PEO and 13C-PEO nuclear relaxation experiments. 162 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  8. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The solid oxide fuel cell comprising a metallic support material, an active anode layer consisting of a good hydrocarbon cracking catalyst, an electrolyte layer, an active cathode layer, and a transition layer consisting of preferably a mixture of LSM and a ferrite to the cathode current collector...

  9. Oxidative Stress in Myopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Bosch-Morell; Salvador, Mérida; Amparo, Navea

    2015-01-01

    Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem. PMID:25922643

  10. Protein oxidation and ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linton, S; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Dean, R T

    2001-01-01

    of redox-active metal ions that could catalyse oxidant formation. As a result of this decrease in antioxidant defences, and increased rate of ROS formation, it is possible that the impact of ROS increases with age. ROS are known to oxidise biological macromolecules, with proteins an important target...

  11. Water oxidation: Intermediate identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Alexander J.

    2016-08-01

    The slow kinetics of light-driven water oxidation on haematite is an important factor limiting the material's efficiency. Now, an intermediate of the water-splitting reaction has been identified offering hope that the full mechanism will soon be resolved.

  12. Dopamine Oxidation and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Muñoz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms involved in the neurodegenerative process of Parkinson's disease remain unclear. Currently, there is a general agreement that mitochondrial dysfunction, α-synuclein aggregation, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and impaired protein degradation are involved in the neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin in Parkinson's disease. Aminochrome has been proposed to play an essential role in the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, the formation of neurotoxic α-synuclein protofibrils, and impaired protein degradation. Here, we discuss the relationship between the oxidation of dopamine to aminochrome, the precursor of neuromelanin, autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin, and the role of dopamine oxidation to aminochrome in autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons. Aminochrome induces the following: (i the formation of α-synuclein protofibrils that inactivate chaperone-mediated autophagy; (ii the formation of adducts with α- and β-tubulin, which induce the aggregation of the microtubules required for the fusion of autophagy vacuoles and lysosomes.

  13. Nanostructured transition metal oxides useful for water oxidation catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Heinz M; Jiao, Feng

    2013-12-24

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a nanostructured transition metal oxide capable of oxidizing two H.sub.2O molecules to obtain four protons. In some embodiments of the invention, the composition further comprises a porous matrix wherein the nanocluster of the transition metal oxide is embedded on and/or in the porous matrix.

  14. Protein oxidation and peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established. PMID:27026395

  15. Thin film metal-oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Ramanathan, Shriram

    2009-01-01

    Presents an account of the fundamental structure-property relations in oxide thin films. This title discusses the functional properties of thin film oxides in the context of applications in the electronics and renewable energy technologies.

  16. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2012-09-11

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  17. Molecular theory of graphene oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Sheka, Elena F.; Popova, Nadezhda A

    2012-01-01

    Applying to graphene oxides, molecular theory of graphene is based on the oxide molecular origin when it is considered as a final product in the succession of a graphene molecule polyderivatives related to a particular oxidation reaction. The graphene oxide structure is created in due course of calculations following the algorithms that take into account the graphene molecules natural radicalization, correlation of odd electrons, an extremely strong influence of structure on properties, a sha...

  18. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...... may not only induce quality losses but may be desirable in some type of foods, such as salted herring....

  19. Nanotoxicology of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Amedea B. Seabra; Nelson Durán

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses recent advances in the synthesis, characterization and toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles obtained mainly through biogenic (green) processes. The in vitro and in vivo toxicities of these oxides are discussed including a consideration of the factors important for safe use of these nanomaterials. The toxicities of different metal oxide nanoparticles are compared. The importance of biogenic synthesized metal oxide nanoparticles has been increasing in recent years; howeve...

  20. Magnetite Oxidation in Aqueous Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Templeton, John Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Magnetite, an iron oxide, is a possible candidate for in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater systems due to its oxidation/reduction potential for reduction of contaminants such as carbon tetrachloride. Little characterization and analysis has been done to describe the kinetics of magnetite transformation during oxidation. This work focuses on monitoring the concentrations of magnetite and one of its oxidation transformation products, maghemite, by the use of UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy...

  1. Self-assembled manganese oxide structures through direct oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2012-12-01

    The morphology and phase of self-assembled manganese oxides during different stages of thermal oxidation were studied. Very interesting morphological patterns of Mn oxide films were observed. At the initial oxidation stage, the surface was characterized by the formation of ring-shaped patterns. As the oxidation proceeded to the intermediate stage, concentric plates formed to relax the compressive stress. Our experimental results gave a clear picture of the evolution of the structures. We also examined the properties of the structures. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Low Temperature Oxidation of Methane: The Influence of Nitrogen Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Anders Broe; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2000-01-01

    ) this enhancement effect is reduced for NO but maintained for NO2. Furthermore two temperature regimes of oxidation separated by an intermediate regime where only little oxidation takes place exist at residence times of 140 ms, if NO is the only nitrogen oxide initially present. The results were......An experimental investigation of methane oxidation in the presence of NO and NO2 has been made in an isothermal plug-flow reactor at 750-1250K. The temperature for on-set of oxidation was lowered by 250 K in the presence of NO or NO2 at residence times of 200 ms. At shorter residence times (140 ms...

  3. Anodic oxidation of Zircaloy-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conte, A.; Borello, A.; Cabrini, A.

    1976-07-01

    The anodic polarization of zircaloy-2 in different electrolytic baths has been investigated in order to obtain thick oxide films with properties suitable for wear applications. The operative conditions to obtain hard, thick, compact oxide films resistant to thermal shocks have been determined. The influence of the bath composition and temperature on the oxide growth is reported.

  4. Catalytic oxidation of dimethyl ether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang; Johnston, Christina M.; Li, Qing

    2016-05-10

    A composition for oxidizing dimethyl ether includes an alloy supported on carbon, the alloy being of platinum, ruthenium, and palladium. A process for oxidizing dimethyl ether involves exposing dimethyl ether to a carbon-supported alloy of platinum, ruthenium, and palladium under conditions sufficient to electrochemically oxidize the dimethyl ether.

  5. Doped palladium containing oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2014-02-18

    A supported oxidation catalyst includes a support having a metal oxide or metal salt, and mixed metal particles thereon. The mixed metal particles include first particles including a palladium compound, and second particles including a precious metal group (PMG) metal or PMG metal compound, wherein the PMG metal is not palladium. The oxidation catalyst may also be used as a gas sensor.

  6. Iron oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  7. Chaperones, but not oxidized proteins, are ubiquitinated after oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kästle, Marc; Reeg, Sandra; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Grune, Tilman

    2012-01-01

    After oxidative stress proteins which are oxidatively modified are degraded by the 20S proteasome. However, several studies documented an enhanced ubiquitination of yet unknown proteins. Since ubiqutination is a prerequisite for degradation by the 26S proteasome in an ATP-dependent manner this...... raises the question whether these proteins are also oxidized and, if not, what proteins need to be ubiquitinated and degraded after oxidative conditions. By determination of oxidized- and ubiquitinated proteins we demonstrate here that most oxidized proteins are not preferentially ubiquitinated. However......, we were able to confirm an increase of ubiquitinated proteins 16h upon oxidative stress. Therefore, we isolated ubiquitinated proteins from hydrogen peroxide treated cells, as well as from control and lactacystin, an irreversible proteasome inhibitor, treated cells, and identified some of these...

  8. Interactions between iron oxides and copper oxides under hydrothermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under hydrothermal conditions, magnetite and hematite have been shown to undergo interconversion reactions, the extent of which is controlled in part by the presence of copper oxides. In oxygenated water, the degree to which magnetite was oxidized to hematite was found to be dependent on the presence of CuO or Cu2O. When these materials were absent, the oxidation of magnetite was limited by the dissolved oxygen in the aqueous system. Participation of the copper oxides in the oxidation process was confirmed by more complete conversion of magnetite was also influenced by the presence of the copper oxides. In addition to driving the reduction to completion, the presence of the copper oxides also exerted a strong influence over the morphology of the magnetite that formed. (author). 13 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  9. Factors Affection Cr(Ⅲ) Oxidation by Manganese Oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENYINGXU; CHENYIYI; 等

    1997-01-01

    The high oxidation ability of manganese oxides or soils was used to study effects of PH and coating on Cr(Ⅲ) oxidation,The results indicated that Cr(Ⅲ) oxidation peaked in PH 4.0-6.5,The amount and rate of Cr(Ⅲ) being oxidized by uncoated δ-MnO2 were larger than those by Fe oxide- of CaCo3-coated one.Inorganic Cr(Ⅲ) wa more easily oxidzed by MnO2 than organic complex Cr(Ⅲ) due to different surface affinities. Precipitated Cr(Ⅲ) and adsorbed Cr(Ⅲ) might be transferred onto MnO2 surface and then oxidized to Cr(Ⅵ)

  10. Enzymatic Oxidation of Methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirajuddin, S; Rosenzweig, AC

    2015-04-14

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) are enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. As potential targets for new gas-to-liquid methane bioconversion processes, MMOs have attracted intense attention in recent years. There are two distinct types of MMO, a soluble, cytoplasmic MMO (sMMO) and a membrane-bound, particulate MMO (pMMO). Both oxidize methane at metal centers within a complex, multisubunit scaffold, but the structures, active sites, and chemical mechanisms are completely different. This Current Topic review article focuses on the overall architectures, active site structures, substrate reactivities, proteinprotein interactions, and chemical mechanisms of both MMOs, with an emphasis on fundamental aspects. In addition, recent advances, including new details of interactions between the sMMO components, characterization of sMMO intermediates, and progress toward understanding the pMMO metal centers are highlighted. The work summarized here provides a guide for those interested in exploiting MMOs for biotechnological applications.

  11. Aluminium oxide exoelectron dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akselrod, M.S.; Odegov, A.L. (Urals State Technical Univ., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)); Durham, J.S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The exoemission properties of aluminium oxide ([alpha]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]:C), in the forms of both a single crystal and of powder, have been investigated. Measurements obtained during readout in a vacuum showed that irradiated Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]:C dosemeters emit exoelectrons with a sensitivity that is 10-20 times higher than that achievable using beryllium oxide (BeO) exoelectron dosemeters (EEDs). This paper presents results of studies using a commercial methane gas reader. The investigators studied the response of the Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]:C EEDs as a function of beta energy and measured the dose-response relationship. The effect of humidity on the dosemeter response was also investigated. (Author).

  12. Demystified … Nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart-Smith, K

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of nitric oxide (NO) demonstrated that cells could communicate via the manufacture and local diffusion of an unstable lipid soluble molecule. Since the original demonstration of the vascular relaxant properties of endothelium derived NO, this fascinating molecule has been shown to have multiple, complex roles within many biological systems. This review cannot hope to cover all of the recent advances in NO biology, but seeks to place the discovery of NO in its historical context, and show how far our understanding has come in the past 20 years. The role of NO in mitochondrial respiration, and consequently in oxidative stress, is described in detail because these processes probably underline the importance of NO in the development of disease. PMID:12456772

  13. Defects at oxide surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and characterization of defects at oxide surfaces. It provides a state-of-the-art review of the field, containing information to the various types of surface defects, describes analytical methods to study defects, their chemical activity and the catalytic reactivity of oxides. Numerical simulations of defective structures complete the picture developed. Defects on planar surfaces form the focus of much of the book, although the investigation of powder samples also form an important part. The experimental study of planar surfaces opens the possibility of applying the large armoury of techniques that have been developed over the last half-century to study surfaces in ultra-high vacuum. This enables the acquisition of atomic level data under well-controlled conditions, providing a stringent test of theoretical methods. The latter can then be more reliably applied to systems such as nanoparticles for which accurate methods of characterization of structure and electronic properties ha...

  14. Ethanol and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, A Y; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Neve, E; Matsumoto, H; Nishitani, Y; Minowa, Y; Fukui, Y; Bailey, S M; Patel, V B; Cunningham, C C; Zima, T; Fialova, L; Mikulikova, L; Popov, P; Malbohan, I; Janebova, M; Nespor, K; Sun, G Y

    2001-05-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a workshop at the 2000 ISBRA Meeting in Yokohama, Japan. The chair was Albert Y. Sun. The presentations were (1) Ethanol-inducible cytochrome P-4502E1 in alcoholic liver disease, by Magnus Ingelman-Sundberg and Etienne Neve; (2) Regulation of NF-kappaB by ethanol, by H. Matsumoto, Y. Nishitani, Y. Minowa, and Y. Fukui; (3) Chronic ethanol consumption increases concentration of oxidized proteins in rat liver, by Shannon M. Bailey, Vinood B. Patel, and Carol C. Cunningham; (4) Antiphospholipids antibodies and oxidized modified low-density lipoprotein in chronic alcoholic patients, by Tomas Zima, Lenka Fialova, Ludmila Mikulikova, Ptr Popov, Ivan Malbohan, Marta Janebova, and Karel Nespor; and (5) Amelioration of ethanol-induced damage by polyphenols, by Albert Y. Sun and Grace Y. Sun. PMID:11391077

  15. Intrinsic anion oxidation potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Patrik

    2006-11-01

    Anions of lithium battery salts have been investigated by electronic structure calculations with the objective to find a computational measure to correlate with the observed (in)stability of nonaqueous lithium battery electrolytes vs oxidation often encountered in practice. Accurate prediction of intrinsic anion oxidation potentials is here made possible by computing the vertical free energy difference between anion and neutral radical (Delta Gv) and further strengthened by an empirical correction using only the anion volume as a parameter. The 6-311+G(2df,p) basis set, the VSXC functional, and the C-PCM SCRF algorithm were used. The Delta Gv calculations can be performed using any standard computational chemistry software. PMID:17078600

  16. Oxidation of plutonium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzhavyi, Pavel A; Vitos, Levente; Andersson, David A; Johansson, Börje

    2004-04-01

    The physics and chemistry of the actinide elements form the scientific basis for rational handling of nuclear materials. In recent experiments, most unexpectedly, plutonium dioxide has been found to react with water to form higher oxides up to PuO(2.27), whereas PuO(2) had always been thought to be the highest stable oxide of plutonium. We perform a theoretical analysis of this complicated situation on the basis of total energies calculated within density functional theory combined with well-established thermodynamic data. The reactions of PuO(2) with either O(2) or H(2)O to form PuO(2+delta) are calculated to be endothermic: that is, in order to occur they require a supply of energy. However, our calculations show that PuO(2+delta) can be formed, as an intermediate product, by reactions with the products of radiolysis of water, such as H(2)O(2). PMID:15034561

  17. Thin Solid Oxide Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material, at least one metal and a catalyst...... material, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same. The present invention also relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous...... cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material and a catalyst material, wherein the electrolyte material is doper zirconia, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same. The...

  18. Heterogeneous Partial (amm) Oxidation and Oxidative Dehydrogenation Catalysis on Mixed Metal Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Védrine, Jacques C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of heterogeneous partial (amm)oxidation and oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of hydrocarbons. The review has been voluntarily restricted to metal oxide-type catalysts, as the partial oxidation field is very broad and the number of catalysts is quite high. The main factors of solid catalysts for such reactions, designated by Grasselli as the " seven pillars " , and playing a determining role in catalytic properties, are considered to be, namely: isolation of acti...

  19. Oxidative stability of polyaniline

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stejskal, Jaroslav; Exnerová, Milena; Morávková, Zuzana; Trchová, Miroslava; Hromádková, Jiřina; Prokeš, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 6 (2012), s. 1026-1033. ISSN 0141-3910 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1626; GA ČR GAP205/12/0911 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polyaniline * nanotubes * oxidation stability Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.770, year: 2012

  20. Hemoglobin oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venous blood obtained from healthy donors and from patients suffering from breast cancer have been treated with acetylphenylhydrazine (APH) for different time. Moessbauer spectra of the packed red cells have been recorded and compared. The largest difference occurs after 50 min of treatment with APH where the patient samples show a broad spectral pattern indicating an advanced hemoglobin oxidation. These results may have some relevance in early cancer diagnosis

  1. Oxidation von Diorganodichalkogeniden

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion and Outlook In this work the synthesis and characterization by X-ray crystallography, NMR and raman spectroscopy of the analogous organochalkogenonium cations (RE)42+, (RE)3+ and (RE)5+ of the iodonium cations I42+, I3+ and I5+ was successful. Furthermore, the reproducibility of the structural motif by oxidizing diorgano dichalcogenides was proven by variation of the organic group and of the chalcogen atom itself. This approach leads to a wide range of the four-membered cations ...

  2. Oxidative metabolism in muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, M; Binzoni, T.; Quaresima, V.

    1997-01-01

    Oxidative metabolism is the dominant source of energy for skeletal muscle. Near-infrared spectroscopy allows the non-invasive measurement of local oxygenation, blood flow and oxygen consumption. Although several muscle studies have been made using various near-infrared optical techniques, it is still difficult to interpret the local muscle metabolism properly. The main findings of near-infrared spectroscopy muscle studies in human physiology and clinical medicine are summarized. The advantage...

  3. Oxidative Stress in Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Dolabela, Maria F; Vilhena, Thyago C; Laurindo, Paula S. O. C.; Gonçalves, Ana Carolina M.; Ferreira, Michelli E. S.; Gomes, Bruno A. Q.; Danilo R. Moreira; Sandro Percário; Green, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is a significant public health problem in more than 100 countries and causes an estimated 200 million new infections every year. Despite the significant effort to eradicate this dangerous disease, lack of complete knowledge of its physiopathology compromises the success in this enterprise. In this paper we review oxidative stress mechanisms involved in the disease and discuss the potential benefits of antioxidant supplementation as an adjuvant antimalarial strategy.

  4. Magnetoplumbite-related oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These ferrites were prepared from Fe2O3, MO oxides (M = Ba,Sr,Pb) and MeO oxides (Me = Mg,Mn,Co,Zn). Chemical compositions of the main barium ferrites (M = Ba) are represented in a ternary diagram. The structures of these various compounds (M,Y,W,Z,X,U) are closely related. The simplest one is the compound BaFe12O19 (M). Its crystal structure is similar to that of the mineral magnetoplumbite PbFe7.5Mn3.5Al0.5O19 (PbM12O19) (5). For this reason the hexagonal ferrites are also known as magnetoplumbite-type ferrites (called MP-type in this paper). When the Fe3+ ions are replaced by other trivalent ions, such as Al3+, Ga3+, another group of MP-type oxides, namely AB12O19 (A = Ba2+ or a large divalent ion; B = Al3+ or Ga3+) is obtained. In this paper, the authors briefly review ideal structure and major properties and uses, especially in the case of ferrites

  5. Nonisostructural complex oxide heteroepitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present an overview of the fundamentals and representative examples of the growth of epitaxial complex oxide thin films on structurally dissimilar substrates. The authors will delineate how the details of particular crystal structures and symmetry of different oxide surfaces can be employed for a rational approach to the synthesis of nonisostructural epitaxial heterostructures. The concept of oxygen eutaxy can be widely applied. Materials combinations will be split into three categories, and in all cases the films and substrates occur in different crystal structures: (1) common translational and rotational symmetry between the film and substrate planes; (2) translational symmetry mismatch between the substrates and films that is distinct from a simple mismatch in lattice parameters; and (3) rotational symmetry mismatch. In case (1), in principle single-crystalline thin films can be attained despite the films and substrates possessing different crystal structures. In case (2), antiphase boundaries will be prevalent in the thin films. In case (3), thin-film rotational variants that are joined by tilt boundaries will be present. Diffraction techniques to determine crystallographic alignment and epitaxial variants are discussed, and transmission electron microscopy studies to investigate extended defects in the thin films will also be reviewed. The authors end with open problems in this field regarding the structure of oxide interfaces that can be topics for future research

  6. Superparamagnetic iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (AMI 25) is a promising new contrast agent for imaging the reticuloendothelial-system. Iron oxide crystals possess a large magnetic susceptibility and enhance proton relaxation rates, especially transverse relaxation (T2). In order to guide the clinical utilization of this contrast media 4 patients with malignant lesions of the liver are analyzed before and after slow intravenous administration (20 μmol Fe/kg) of AMI 25. Two magnetic resonance (MR) sequences are performed at different times using 0.35 T magnet. MR signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reticuloendothelial-system (particularly the liver SNR) decrease promptly. The maximum decrease in SNR (67-72 percent for the liver, 46-65 percent for the spleen, 23-41 percent for the bone marrow) is observed 3 h after injection (P<0.01). However, except the peak of contrast enhancement in T1-weighted sequence of splenic tissue, the curve describes a plateau within 30 min and 6 h, allowing a delay between injection and imaging. T2-weighted sequences give a greater contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) by adding the spontaneous tumor contrast to the effect yielded by AMI 25. These results suggest that images must be acquired between 1 and 6 h after intravenous administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide. (author). 18 refs.; 6 figs

  7. Antiviral activity of oxidized polyamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachrach, U

    2007-08-01

    Polyamines, oxidized by serum amine oxidase, yield aminoaldehydes and hydrogen peroxide. Acrolein may be formed from the aminoaldehydes by a spontaneous beta-elimination process. These oxidation products "oxidized polyamines" inhibit bacterial growth and exhibit anticancer activity. The antimicrobial activity of oxidized polyamines is not limited to bacteria; and the inactivation of bacterial viruses, plant viruses and animal viruses, was also reported. Bacteriophages of the T-odd series are permeable and were inactivated by oxidized polyamines. The inactive phages absorb to their bacterial host and injected their DNA, which formed a stable inactive complex with the aminoaldehydes. Aminoaldehydes, synthesized chemically, also inactivated viruses. The growth of the plant viruses: Tobacco mosaic virus, Potato virus X and Alfalfa mosaic virus was also inhibited by oxidized polyamines. The animal viruses, which were inactivated by oxidized polyamines included Myxoviruses (influenza and Newcastle disease viruses), West Nile, vaccinia and Sindbis viruses. These findings may have practical implications. PMID:17429570

  8. Lipid oxidation induced oxidative degradation of cereal beta-glucan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Jie; Mäkelä, Noora; Maina, Ndegwa Henry; Lampi, Anna-Maija; Sontag-Strohm, Tuula

    2016-04-15

    In food systems, lipid oxidation can cause oxidation of other molecules. This research for the first time investigated oxidative degradation of β-glucan induced by lipid oxidation using an oil-in-water emulsion system which simulated a multi-phased aqueous food system containing oil and β-glucan. Lipid oxidation was monitored using peroxide value and hexanal production while β-glucan degradation was evaluated by viscosity and molecular weight measurements. The study showed that while lipid oxidation proceeded, β-glucan degradation occurred. Emulsions containing β-glucan, oil and ferrous ion showed significant viscosity and molecular weight decrease after 1 week of oxidation at room temperature. Elevated temperature (40°C) enhanced the oxidation reactions causing higher viscosity drop. In addition, the presence of β-glucan appeared to retard the hexanal production in lipid oxidation. The study revealed that lipid oxidation may induce the degradation of β-glucan in aqueous food systems where β-glucan and lipids co-exist. PMID:26675874

  9. Oxidative stress by inorganic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Jie Kai; Ong, Choon Nam; Bay, Boon Huat; Ho, Han Kiat; Leong, David Tai

    2016-05-01

    Metallic and metallic oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been increasingly used for various bio-applications owing to their unique physiochemical properties in terms of conductivity, optical sensitivity, and reactivity. With the extensive usage of NPs, increased human exposure may cause oxidative stress and lead to undesirable health consequences. To date, various endogenous and exogenous sources of oxidants contributing to oxidative stress have been widely reported. Oxidative stress is generally defined as an imbalance between the production of oxidants and the activity of antioxidants, but it is often misrepresented as a single type of cellular stress. At the biological level, NPs can initiate oxidative stress directly or indirectly through various mechanisms, leading to profound effects ranging from the molecular to the disease level. Such effects of oxidative stress have been implicated owing to their small size and high biopersistence. On the other hand, cellular antioxidants help to counteract oxidative stress and protect the cells from further damage. While oxidative stress is commonly known to exert negative biological effects, measured and intentional use of NPs to induce oxidative stress may provide desirable effects to either stimulate cell growth or promote cell death. Hence, NP-induced oxidative stress can be viewed from a wide paradigm. Because oxidative stress is comprised of a wide array of factors, it is also important to use appropriate assays and methods to detect different pro-oxidant and antioxidant species at molecular and disease levels. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:414-438. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1374 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26359790

  10. Complete nitrification by Nitrospira bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daims, Holger; Lebedeva, Elena V.; Pjevac, Petra;

    2015-01-01

    Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia via nitrite to nitrate, has always been considered to be a two-step process catalysed by chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms oxidizing either ammonia or nitrite. No known nitrifier carries out both steps, although complete nitrification should be energetic...

  11. Arsenite oxidation by three types of manganese oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Oxidation of As(Ⅲ) by three types of manganese oxides and the effects of pH, ion strength and tartaric acid on the oxidation were investigated by means of chemical analysis, equilibrium redox, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Three synthesized Mn oxide minerals, birnessite, cryptomelane, and hausmarnite, which widely occur in soil and sediments, could actively oxidize As(Ⅲ) to As(Ⅴ). However, their ability in As(Ⅲ)-oxidation varied greatly depending on their structure, composition and surface properties. Tunnel structured cryptomelane exhibited the highest ability of As (Ⅲ) oxidation, followed by the layer structured birnessite and the lower oxide hausmannite. The maximum amount of As (Ⅴ) produced by the oxidation was in the order (mmol/kg) ofcryptomelane (824.2) > birnessite (480.4) > hausmannite (117.9). As pH increased from the very low value(pH 2.5), the amount of As(Ⅲ) oxidized by the tested Mn oxides was firstly decreased, then negatively peaked in pH 3.0-6.5,and eventually increased remarkably. Oxidation of As(Ⅲ) by the Mn oxides had a buffering effects on the pH variation in the solution.It is proposed that the oxidative reaction processes between As( Ⅲ ) and birnessite(or cryptomelane) are as follows: (1) at lower pH condition: (MnO2)x + H3AsO3 + 0.5H+=0.5H2AsO4- + 0.5HAsO42- +Mn2++ (MnO2)x-1 + H2O; (2) at higher pH condition: (MnO2)x +cryptomelane decreased and was negatively correlated with ion strength. However, ion strength had little influence on As (Ⅲ) oxidation by the hausmannite. The presence of tartaric acid promoted oxidation of As(Ⅲ) by birnessite. As for cryptomelane and hausmannite, the same effect was observed when the concentration of tartaric acid was below 4 mmol/L, otherwise the oxidized As(Ⅲ)decreased. These findings are of great significance in improving our understanding of As geochemical cycling and controlling As contamination.

  12. Oxidative stress and oxidative damage in chemical carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are induced through a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. Overwhelming of antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms in the cell by ROS may result in oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the cell. This resulting oxidative stress can damage critical cellular macromolecules and/or modulate gene expression pathways. Cancer induction by chemical and physical agents involves a multi-step process. This process includes multiple molecular and cellular events to transform a normal cell to a malignant neoplastic cell. Oxidative damage resulting from ROS generation can participate in all stages of the cancer process. An association of ROS generation and human cancer induction has been shown. It appears that oxidative stress may both cause as well as modify the cancer process. Recently association between polymorphisms in oxidative DNA repair genes and antioxidant genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and human cancer susceptibility has been shown.

  13. Partial Oxidation of Methane Over the Perovskite Oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Ba0.sSr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ and Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Ti0.2O3-δ oxides were synthesized by a combined EDTA-citrate complexing method. The catalytic behavior of these two oxides with the perovskite structure was studied during the reaction of methane oxidation. The pre-treatment with methane has different effect on the catalytic activities of both the oxides. The methane pre-treatment has not resulted in the change of the catalytic activity of BSCFO owing to its excellent reversibility of the perovskite structure resulting from the excellent synergistic interaction between Co and Fe in the oxide. However, the substitution with Ti on Fe-site in the lattice makes the methane pre-treatment have an obvious influence on the activity of the formed BSCTO oxide.

  14. The oxidative hypothesis of senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilca M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative hypothesis of senescence, since its origin in 1956, has garnered significant evidence and growing support among scientists for the notion that free radicals play an important role in ageing, either as "damaging" molecules or as signaling molecules. Age-increasing oxidative injuries induced by free radicals, higher susceptibility to oxidative stress in short-lived organisms, genetic manipulations that alter both oxidative resistance and longevity and the anti-ageing effect of caloric restriction and intermittent fasting are a few examples of accepted scientific facts that support the oxidative theory of senescence. Though not completely understood due to the complex "network" of redox regulatory systems, the implication of oxidative stress in the ageing process is now well documented. Moreover, it is compatible with other current ageing theories (e.g., those implicating the mitochondrial damage/mitochondrial-lysosomal axis, stress-induced premature senescence, biological "garbage" accumulation, etc. This review is intended to summarize and critically discuss the redox mechanisms involved during the ageing process: sources of oxidant agents in ageing (mitochondrial -electron transport chain, nitric oxide synthase reaction- and non-mitochondrial- Fenton reaction, microsomal cytochrome P450 enzymes, peroxisomal β -oxidation and respiratory burst of phagocytic cells, antioxidant changes in ageing (enzymatic- superoxide dismutase, glutathione-reductase, glutathion peroxidase, catalase- and non-enzymatic glutathione, ascorbate, urate, bilirubine, melatonin, tocopherols, carotenoids, ubiquinol, alteration of oxidative damage repairing mechanisms and the role of free radicals as signaling molecules in ageing.

  15. Partial oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process is described for the production of gaseous mixtures comprising H/sub 2/+CO comprising: (1) mixing an ash fusion temperature reducing agent comprising a comminuted ore having a particle size of ASTM E-11 Standard Sieve Designation in the range of about 0.1-210 microns with at least one material selected from the group consisting of a pumpable ash-containing liquid hydrocarbonaceous material and ash-containing petroleum coke. The ash from the liquid hydrocarbonaceous material or petroleum coke principally comprises the oxides of Ni, V, and Fe along with a minor amount of the oxides selected from the group consisting of Si, Al, Ca, Ti, Cr, and mixtures thereof. The weight ratio of ash fusion temperature reducing agent to ash produced in (2) is in the range of about 0.5 to 10. The comminuted ash fusion temperature reducing agent principally comprises monoclinic amphibole and/or pyroxene minerals in which the following elements are present principally as silicate compounds in weight percent (basis ore): iron in the range of about 5-55, calcium in the range of about 1-10, silicon in the range of about 4-25, magnesium in the range of about 1-10, and aluminum in the range of about 0.25-5.0; and (2) reacting the mixture from (1) at a temperature in the range of about 21000F to 27000F and a pressure in the range of about 1 to 200 atmospheres in a free-flow refractory lined partial oxidation reaction zone with a free-oxygen containing gas

  16. Electrolytic oxide reduction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Barnes, Laurel A; Williamson, Mark A; Willit, James L; Berger, John F

    2015-04-28

    An electrolytic oxide reduction system according to a non-limiting embodiment of the present invention may include a plurality of anode assemblies, a plurality of cathode assemblies, and a lift system configured to engage the anode and cathode assemblies. The cathode assemblies may be alternately arranged with the anode assemblies such that each cathode assembly is flanked by two anode assemblies. The lift system may be configured to selectively engage the anode and cathode assemblies so as to allow the simultaneous lifting of any combination of the anode and cathode assemblies (whether adjacent or non-adjacent).

  17. Nanostructures of zinc oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Lin Wang

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide (ZnO is a unique material that exhibits semiconducting, piezoelectric, and pyroelectric multiple properties. Using a solid-vapor phase thermal sublimation technique, nanocombs, nanorings, nanohelixes/nanosprings, nanobows, nanobelts, nanowires, and nanocages of ZnO have been synthesized under specific growth conditions. These unique nanostructures unambiguously demonstrate that ZnO is probably the richest family of nanostructures among all materials, both in structures and properties. The nanostructures could have novel applications in optoelectronics, sensors, transducers, and biomedical science because it is bio-safe.

  18. Heterogeneous Oxidation of Catechol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillar, Elizabeth A; Zhou, Ruixin; Guzman, Marcelo I

    2015-10-15

    Natural and anthropogenic emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons from biomass burning, agro-industrial settings, and fossil fuel combustion contribute precursors to secondary aerosol formation (SOA). How these compounds are processed under humid tropospheric conditions is the focus of current attention to understand their environmental fate. This work shows how catechol thin films, a model for oxygenated aromatic hydrocarbons present in biomass burning and combustion aerosols, undergo heterogeneous oxidation at the air-solid interface under variable relative humidity (RH = 0-90%). The maximum reactive uptake coefficient of O3(g) by catechol γO3 = (7.49 ± 0.35) × 10(-6) occurs for 90% RH. Upon exposure of ca. 104-μm thick catechol films to O3(g) mixing ratios between 230 ppbv and 25 ppmv, three main reaction pathways are observed. (1) The cleavage of the 1,2 carbon-carbon bond at the air-solid interface resulting in the formation of cis,cis-muconic acid via primary ozonide and hydroperoxide intermediates. Further direct ozonolysis of cis,cis-muconic yields glyoxylic, oxalic, crotonic, and maleic acids. (2) A second pathway is evidenced by the presence of Baeyer-Villiger oxidation products including glutaconic 4-hydroxy-2-butenoic and 5-oxo-2-pentenoic acids during electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (MS) and ion chromatography MS analyses. (3) Finally, indirect oxidation by in situ produced hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) results in the generation of semiquinone radical intermediates toward the synthesis of polyhydoxylated aromatic rings such as tri-, tetra-, and penta-hydroxybenzene. Remarkably, heavier polyhydroxylated biphenyl and terphenyl products present in the extracted oxidized films result from coupling reactions of semiquinones of catechol and its polyhydroxylated rings. The direct ozonolysis of 1,2,3- and 1,2,4-trihydroxybenezene yields 2- and 3-hydroxy-cis,cis-muconic acid, respectively. The production of 2,4- or 3,4-dihdroxyhex-2-enedioic acid is

  19. Transparent oxide optoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromichi Ohta

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews transparent oxide optoelectronic devices based on our efforts focusing on transparent thin-film transistors fabricated from single-crystalline films of InGaO3(ZnO5 with a natural superlattice structure, near-ultraviolet (UV emitting diodes composed of heteroepitaxially grown p-type SrCu2O2 and n-type ZnO, and single-crystalline NiO and ZnO pn-heterojunction diode UV detectors.

  20. Ultra supercritical steamside oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David A.; Ochs, Thomas L.

    2004-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vision 21 goals. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Vision 21 goals include steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems. Emphasis is placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

  1. Semiconducting transition metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Open shell transition metal oxides are usually described as Mott or charge transfer insulators, which are often viewed as being disparate from semiconductors. Based on the premise that the presence of a correlated gap and semiconductivity are not mutually exclusive, this work reviews electronic structure calculations on the binary 3d oxides, so to distill trends and design principles for semiconducting transition metal oxides. This class of materials possesses the potential for discovery, design, and development of novel functional semiconducting compounds, e.g. for energy applications. In order to place the 3d orbitals and the sp bands into an integrated picture, band structure calculations should treat both contributions on the same footing and, at the same time, account fully for electron correlation in the 3d shell. Fundamentally, this is a rather daunting task for electronic structure calculations, but quasi-particle energy calculations in GW approximation offer a viable approach for band structure predictions in these materials. Compared to conventional semiconductors, the inherent multivalent nature of transition metal cations is more likely to cause undesirable localization of electron or hole carriers. Therefore, a quantitative prediction of the carrier self-trapping energy is essential for the assessing the semiconducting properties and to determine whether the transport mechanism is a band-like large-polaron conduction or a small-polaron hopping conduction. An overview is given for the binary 3d oxides on how the hybridization between the 3d crystal field symmetries with the O-p orbitals of the ligands affects the effective masses and the likelihood of electron and hole self-trapping, identifying those situations where small masses and band-like conduction are more likely to be expected. The review concludes with an illustration of the implications of the increased electronic complexity of transition metal cations on the defect physics and doping, using

  2. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  3. Sputtered tin oxide and titanium oxide thin films as alternative transparent conductive oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boltz, Janika

    2011-12-12

    Alternative transparent conductive oxides to tin doped indium oxide have been investigated. In this work, antimony doped tin oxide and niobium doped titanium oxide have been studied with the aim to prepare transparent and conductive films. Antimony doped tin oxide and niobium doped titanium oxide belong to different groups of oxides; tin oxide is a soft oxide, while titanium oxide is a hard oxide. Both oxides are isolating materials, in case the stoichiometry is SnO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}. In order to achieve transparent and conductive films free carriers have to be generated by oxygen vacancies, by metal ions at interstitial positions in the crystal lattice or by cation doping with Sb or Nb, respectively. Antimony doped tin oxide and niobium doped titanium oxide films have been prepared by reactive direct current magnetron sputtering (dc MS) from metallic targets. The process parameters and the doping concentration in the films have been varied. The films have been electrically, optically and structurally analysed in order to analyse the influence of the process parameters and the doping concentration on the film properties. Post-deposition treatments of the films have been performed in order to improve the film properties. For the deposition of transparent and conductive tin oxide, the dominant parameter during the deposition is the oxygen content in the sputtering gas. The Sb incorporation as doping atoms has a minor influence on the electrical, optical and structural properties. Within a narrow oxygen content in the sputtering gas highly transparent and conductive tin oxide films have been prepared. In this study, the lowest resistivity in the as deposited state is 2.9 m{omega} cm for undoped tin oxide without any postdeposition treatment. The minimum resistivity is related to a transition to crystalline films with the stoichiometry of SnO{sub 2}. At higher oxygen content the films turn out to have a higher resistivity due to an oxygen excess. After post

  4. PREPARATION OF REFRACTORY OXIDE MICROSPHERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haws, C.C. Jr.

    1963-09-24

    A method is described of preparing thorium oxide in the form of fused spherical particles about 1 to 2 microns in diameter. A combustible organic solution of thorium nitrate containing additive metal values is dispersed into a reflected, oxygen-fed flame at a temperature above the melting point of the resulting oxide. The metal additive is aluminum at a proportion such as to provide 1 to 10 weight per cent aluminum oxide in the product, silicon at the same proportion, or beryllium at a proportion of 12 to 25 weight per cent beryllium oxide in the product. A minor proportion of uranium values may also be provided in the solution. The metal additive lowers the oxide melting point and allows fusion and sphere formation in conventional equipment. The product particles are suitable for use in thorium oxide slurries for nuclear reactors. (AEC)

  5. Transparent conducting oxide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivov, Yahya; Singh, Vivek; Ding, Yuchen; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-09-01

    Thin film or porous membranes made of hollow, transparent, conducting oxide (TCO) nanotubes, with high chemical stability, functionalized surfaces and large surface areas, can provide an excellent platform for a wide variety of nanostructured photovoltaic, photodetector, photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic devices. While large-bandgap oxide semiconductors offer transparency for incident light (below their nominal bandgap), their low carrier concentration and poor conductivity makes them unsuitable for charge conduction. Moreover, materials with high conductivity have nominally low bandgaps and hence poor light transmittance. Here, we demonstrate thin films and membranes made from TiO2 nanotubes heavily-doped with shallow Niobium (Nb) donors (up to 10%, without phase segregation), using a modified electrochemical anodization process, to fabricate transparent conducting hollow nanotubes. Temperature dependent current-voltage characteristics revealed that TiO2 TCO nanotubes, doped with 10% Nb, show metal-like behavior with resistivity decreasing from 6.5 × 10-4 Ωcm at T = 300 K (compared to 6.5 × 10-1 Ωcm for nominally undoped nanotubes) to 2.2 × 10-4 Ωcm at T = 20 K. Optical properties, studied by reflectance measurements, showed light transmittance up to 90%, within wavelength range 400 nm-1000 nm. Nb doping also improves the field emission properties of TCO nanotubes demonstrating an order of magnitude increase in field-emitter current, compared to undoped samples.

  6. Nanoporous silicon oxide memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gunuk; Yang, Yang; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Abramova, Vera; Fei, Huilong; Ruan, Gedeng; Thomas, Edwin L; Tour, James M

    2014-08-13

    Oxide-based two-terminal resistive random access memory (RRAM) is considered one of the most promising candidates for next-generation nonvolatile memory. We introduce here a new RRAM memory structure employing a nanoporous (NP) silicon oxide (SiOx) material which enables unipolar switching through its internal vertical nanogap. Through the control of the stochastic filament formation at low voltage, the NP SiOx memory exhibited an extremely low electroforming voltage (∼ 1.6 V) and outstanding performance metrics. These include multibit storage ability (up to 9-bits), a high ON-OFF ratio (up to 10(7) A), a long high-temperature lifetime (≥ 10(4) s at 100 °C), excellent cycling endurance (≥ 10(5)), sub-50 ns switching speeds, and low power consumption (∼ 6 × 10(-5) W/bit). Also provided is the room temperature processability for versatile fabrication without any compliance current being needed during electroforming or switching operations. Taken together, these metrics in NP SiOx RRAM provide a route toward easily accessed nonvolatile memory applications. PMID:24992278

  7. Transparent conducting oxide nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin film or porous membranes made of hollow, transparent, conducting oxide (TCO) nanotubes, with high chemical stability, functionalized surfaces and large surface areas, can provide an excellent platform for a wide variety of nanostructured photovoltaic, photodetector, photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic devices. While large-bandgap oxide semiconductors offer transparency for incident light (below their nominal bandgap), their low carrier concentration and poor conductivity makes them unsuitable for charge conduction. Moreover, materials with high conductivity have nominally low bandgaps and hence poor light transmittance. Here, we demonstrate thin films and membranes made from TiO2 nanotubes heavily-doped with shallow Niobium (Nb) donors (up to 10%, without phase segregation), using a modified electrochemical anodization process, to fabricate transparent conducting hollow nanotubes. Temperature dependent current–voltage characteristics revealed that TiO2 TCO nanotubes, doped with 10% Nb, show metal-like behavior with resistivity decreasing from 6.5 × 10−4 Ωcm at T = 300 K (compared to 6.5 × 10−1 Ωcm for nominally undoped nanotubes) to 2.2 × 10−4 Ωcm at T = 20 K. Optical properties, studied by reflectance measurements, showed light transmittance up to 90%, within wavelength range 400 nm–1000 nm. Nb doping also improves the field emission properties of TCO nanotubes demonstrating an order of magnitude increase in field-emitter current, compared to undoped samples. (paper)

  8. Enzymatic oxidation of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirajuddin, Sarah; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2015-04-14

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) are enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. As potential targets for new gas-to-liquid methane bioconversion processes, MMOs have attracted intense attention in recent years. There are two distinct types of MMO, a soluble, cytoplasmic MMO (sMMO) and a membrane-bound, particulate MMO (pMMO). Both oxidize methane at metal centers within a complex, multisubunit scaffold, but the structures, active sites, and chemical mechanisms are completely different. This Current Topic review article focuses on the overall architectures, active site structures, substrate reactivities, protein-protein interactions, and chemical mechanisms of both MMOs, with an emphasis on fundamental aspects. In addition, recent advances, including new details of interactions between the sMMO components, characterization of sMMO intermediates, and progress toward understanding the pMMO metal centers are highlighted. The work summarized here provides a guide for those interested in exploiting MMOs for biotechnological applications. PMID:25806595

  9. Plasma electrolytic oxidation of tantalum

    OpenAIRE

    Petković Marija; Stojadinović Stevan; Vasilić Rastko; Belča Ivan; Kasalica Bećko; Zeković Ljubiša

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a review of our research on the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process of tantalum in 12-tungstosilicic acid. For the characterization of microdischarges during PEO, real-time imaging and optical emission spectroscopy (OES) were used. The surface morphology, chemical and phase composition of oxide coatings were investigated by AFM, SEM-EDS and XRD. Oxide coating morphology is strongly dependent on PEO time. The elemental components of PEO coatings are Ta, O, Si and W....

  10. Intramuscular lipid oxidation and obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Houmard, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    There is an accumulating amount of evidence indicating that lipid oxidation is depressed in the skeletal muscle of obese individuals. Decrements in fatty acid oxidation (FAO) have been reported with obesity in models ranging from whole body measurements to isolated skeletal muscle preparations as well as in myotubes raised in culture. This reduction appears to be associated with a depression in the activities of enzymes involved in various steps of lipid oxidation, which subsequently partitio...

  11. Pillared layered transition metal oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress in the synthesis and application of pillared transition metal oxides during the last decade, mainly concerning the synthetic methods, structures, physical properties and catalytic applications of the layered transition metal oxides pillared by inorganic oxides. The factors and their affecting regularity in the process of preparation, and some important results obtained in the catalytic application studies are summarized. Finally, a prospect on the potential new directions in this research area is also presented.

  12. Oxidative Stress and Psychological Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Salim, Samina

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is an imbalance between cellular production of reactive oxygen species and the counteracting antioxidant mechanisms. The brain with its high oxygen consumption and a lipid-rich environment is considered highly susceptible to oxidative stress or redox imbalances. Therefore, the fact that oxidative stress is implicated in several mental disorders including depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, is not surprising. Although several elegant studies have...

  13. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Weon Yi; Hyo Jin Kang; Insoo Bae

    2014-01-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to tre...

  14. Oxidative phosphonylation of aromatic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Effenberger, Franz; Kottmann, Hariolf

    1985-01-01

    Aryl phosphonates can be prepared in good yield from the respective arenes and tri- or dialkyphosphites by either chemical or anodic oxidation. The anodic oxidation proceeds either via phosphinium radical cations, which then attack the arenes electrophilically, or via arene radical cations, which add the trialkylphosphite as nucleophile. Aryl phosphonates are also obtained in good yield by chemical oxidation with peroxodisulfate/AgNO3 in acetonitrile/water or glacial acetic acid. The diethylp...

  15. Oxidative Imbalance and Anxiety Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    R, Krolow; D. M, Arcego; C, Noschang; S. N, Weis; C, Dalmaz

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative imbalance appears to have an important role in anxiety development. Studies in both humans and animals have shown a strong correlation between anxiety and oxidative stress. In humans, for example, the increased malondialdehyde levels and discrepancies in antioxidant enzymes in erythrocytes have been observed. In animals, several studies also show that anxiety-like behavior is related to the oxidative imbalance. Moreover, anxiety-like behavior can be caused by pharmacological-ind...

  16. Rare Earth Oxide Thin Films

    CERN Document Server

    Fanciulli, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Thin rare earth (RE) oxide films are emerging materials for microelectronic, nanoelectronic, and spintronic applications. The state-of-the-art of thin film deposition techniques as well as the structural, physical, chemical, and electrical properties of thin RE oxide films and of their interface with semiconducting substrates are discussed. The aim is to identify proper methodologies for the development of RE oxides thin films and to evaluate their effectiveness as innovative materials in different applications.

  17. Nitric Oxide Synthases and Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    CynthiaAnnCarnes; ArunSridhar; SandorGyorke

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. There are multiple systems in the myocardium which contribute to redox homeostasis, and loss of homeostasis can result in oxidative stress. Potential sources of oxidants include nitric oxide synthases, which normally produce nitric oxide in the heart. Two nitric oxide synthase isoforms (1 and 3) are normally expressed in the heart. During pathologies such as heart failure, there is induction of nitric oxide syn...

  18. Heterogeneously Catalyzed Oxidation Reactions Using Molecular Oxygen

    OpenAIRE

    Beier, Matthias Josef; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Jensen, Anker Degn; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2011-01-01

    Denne afhandling giver indledningsvist et overblik over heterogene kobber og sølv katalysatorer til selektiv oxidation i væskefase og sammenligner virkningsgraden og katalytiske egenskaber af disse med den i vidt omfang benyttede guld katalysator. Resultater fra litteraturen er opsummeret for alkohol oxidation, epoxidation, amin oxidation, fenyl hydroxylation, silan og sulfid oxidation, (side-kæde) oxidation af alkyl aromatiske stoffer, hydroquinon oxidation samt cyklohexan oxidation. Det er ...

  19. Plasma electrolytic oxidation of tantalum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petković Marija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of our research on the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO process of tantalum in 12-tungstosilicic acid. For the characterization of microdischarges during PEO, real-time imaging and optical emission spectroscopy (OES were used. The surface morphology, chemical and phase composition of oxide coatings were investigated by AFM, SEM-EDS and XRD. Oxide coating morphology is strongly dependent on PEO time. The elemental components of PEO coatings are Ta, O, Si and W. The oxide coatings are partly crystallized and mainly composed of WO3, Ta2O5 and SiO2.

  20. Intercalating oleylamines in graphite oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kaikun; Liang, Si; Zou, Lianfeng; Huang, Liwei; Park, Cheol; Zhu, Lisheng; Fang, Jiye; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Howard

    2012-02-01

    Graphite oxide has been synthesized from raw graphite particles and been treated with various mass amounts of oleylamine as intercalants to form intercalation compounds. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the inter-sheet distances strongly depend on the graphite oxide to oleylamine mass ratios. The equilibrium-like behavior implies diffusion-dominated oleylamine adsorption on graphite oxide in solution and excluded volume intercalations among oleylamine-adsorbed graphite oxide during restacking. The intercalation compounds are soluble in organic solvents, and their applications in the fabrication of transparent and conductive coatings have been demonstrated. PMID:22229856

  1. OXIDATIVE STRESS AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Radovanović

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The cells continuously produce free radicals and reactive oxygen species as a part of metabolic processes. Increased aerobic metabolism during exercise is a potential source of oxidative stress. Also, anaerobic physical activity and oxidative stress are interrelated because the intense anaerobic activity leads to damage proteins, lipids and nucleic acids in muscle cells and blood. Complex system of antioxidant defense, which has the enzymatic and non-enzymatic part, has a role in protecting tissues from excessive oxidative damage. Most of the research conducted so far about the impact of various forms of physical activity on levels of oxidative stress is confirmed by changes in biomarkers that indicate lipid peroxidation and proteins modification. Untrained persons, as opposed to trained, are more susceptible to major changes in the body caused by oxidative stress during physical activity. The results of researches have shown that there are no significant differences between the genders in the level of oxidative stress during physical activity and response to antioxidant supplementation possibly applied. It is interesting that, despite of numerous studies, the exact location of oxidative stress origin during physical activity has not been reliably established. In addition, research results provide insufficient evidence on the effectiveness of using antioxidant supplementation to increase the defense against oxidative stress. It is necessary further investigation about the redox status and oxidative stress during physical activity in adolescent athletes.

  2. Heterogeneous oxidation of carbonyl sulfide on mineral oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YongChun; LIU JunFeng; HE Hong; YU YunBo; XUE Li

    2007-01-01

    Heterogeneous oxidation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) on mineral oxides including SiO2, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO, ZnO and TiO2, which are the main components of atmospheric particles, were investigated using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (in situ DRIFTS), ion chromatography (IC), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) methods. The main products and intermediates of the heterogeneous oxidation of OCS on these oxides were identified with in situ DRIFTS and IC. The reaction mechanism and kinetics were also discussed. It is found that the reaction mechanism on these mineral oxides is the same as that on Al2O3 for the same final products and the intermediates at room temperature. Namely, OCS can be catalytically oxidized to produce surface SO42- species and gaseous CO2 through the surface hydrogen thiocarbonate (HSCO2-) and HSO3- species. The activity series for heterogeneous oxidation of OCS follows: Al2O3 ≈ CaO>MgO>TiO2 ≈ ZnO>Fe2O3>SiO2. The specific area, basic hydroxyl and surface basicity of these oxides have effect on the reactivity. This study suggests that heterogeneous reactions of OCS on mineral dust may be an unneglectable sink of OCS.

  3. Size of oxide vacancies in fluorite and perovskite structured oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Norby, Poul; Hendriksen, Peter Vang;

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of the effective radii of vacancies and the stoichiometric expansion coefficient is performed on metal oxides with fluorite and perovskite structures. Using the hard sphere model with Shannon ion radii we find that the effective radius of the oxide vacancy in fluorites increases with...

  4. Absorption and oxidation of nitrogen oxide in ionic liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunov-Kruse, Andreas Jonas; Thomassen, Peter Langelund; Riisager, Anders;

    2016-01-01

    A new strategy for capturing nitrogen oxide, NO, from the gas phase is presented. Dilute NO gas is removed from the gas phase by ionic liquids under ambient conditions. The nitrate anion of the ionic liquid catalyzes the oxidation of NO to nitric acid by atmospheric oxygen in the presence of water...

  5. Detecting Organic Compounds Released from Iron Oxidizing Bacteria using Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)-like Instrument Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, D. P.; Popa, R.; Martin, M. G.; Freissinet, C.; Fisk, M. R.; Dworkin, J. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    Mars is a planet of great interest for Astrobiology since its past environmental conditions are thought to have been favourable for the emergence life. At present, the Red Planet is extremely cold and dry and the surface is exposed to intense UV and ionizing radiation, conditions generally considered to be incompatible with life as we know it on Earth. It was proposed that the shallow subsurface of Mars, where temperatures can be above freezing and liquid water can exist on rock surfaces, could harbor chemolithoautotrophic bacteria such as the iron oxidizing microorganism Pseudomonas sp. HerB [Popa et al. 2012]. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will provide the next opportunity to carry out in situ measurements for organic compounds of possible biological origin on Mars. One instrument onboard MSL, called the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite, will carry out a broad and sensitive search for organic compounds in surface samples using either high temperature pyrolysis or chemical extraction followed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry [Mahaffy et al. 2012]. We present gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GC/MS) data on crushed olivine rock powders that have been inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. HerB at different concentrations ranging from ~102 to 107 cells per gram. The inoculated olivine samples were heated under helium carrier gas flow at 500°C and the pyrolysis products concentrated using a SAM-like hydrocarbon trap set at -20°C followed by trap heating and analysis by GC/MS. In addition, the samples were also extracted using a low temperature "one-pot" chemical extraction technique using N-methyl, N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) as the silylating agent prior to GC/MS analysis [Stalport et al. 2012]. We identified several aldehydes, thiols, and alkene nitriles after pyrolysis GC/MS analysis of the bacteria that were not found in the olivine control samples that had not been inoculated with bacteria. The

  6. Hydrogen oxidation in Azospirillum brasilense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tibelius, K.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrogen oxidation by Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 was studied in N/sub 2/-fixing and NH/sub 4//sup +/-grown batch cultures. The K/sub m/ for H/sub 2/ of O/sub 2/-dependent H/sup 3/H oxidation in whole cells was 9 uM. The rates of H/sup 3/H and H/sub 2/ oxidation were very similar, indicating that the initial H/sub 2/ activation step in the overall H/sub 2/ oxidation reaction was not rate-limiting and that H/sup 3/H oxidation was a valid measure of H/sub 2/-oxidation activity. Hydrogen-oxidation activity was inhibited irreversibly by air. In N-free cultures the O/sub 2/ optima for O/sub 2/-dependent H/sub 2/ oxidation, ranging from 0.5-1.25% O/sub 2/ depending on the phase of growth, were significantly higher than those of C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ reduction, 0.15-0.35%, suggesting that the H/sub 2/-oxidation system may have a limited ability to aid in the protection of nitrogenase against inactivation by O/sub 2/. Oxygen-dependent H/sub 2/ oxidation was inhibited by NO/sub 2//sup +/, NO, CO, and C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ with apparent K/sub 1/ values of 20, 0.4, 28, and 88 uM, respectively. Hydrogen-oxidation activity was 50 to 100 times higher in denitrifying cultures when the terminal electron acceptor for growth was N/sub 2/O rather than NO/sub 3//sup -/, possibly due to the irreversible inhibition of hydrogenase by NO/sub 2//sup -/ and NO in NO/sub 3//sup -/-grown cultures.

  7. Thin film growth of epitaxial gadolinium oxide, gadolinium yttrium oxide, and gadolinium cerium oxide by electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films of gadolinium oxide, gadolinium yttrium oxide, and gadolinium cerium oxide were electrodeposited from non-aqueous baths. The films were on the order of 15 nm thick, and were grown epitaxially on textured nickel-tungsten substrates. The effect of deposition rate, annealing temperature and secondary metals on crystallinity and crystal orientation was investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Slower rates, higher temperatures and low concentrations of yttrium improve the crystallinity of gadolinium oxide films, whereas the introduction of cerium induced polycrystallinity.

  8. Thin film growth of epitaxial gadolinium oxide, gadolinium yttrium oxide, and gadolinium cerium oxide by electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Jonathan R., E-mail: jonathan.mann@nrel.gov; Bhattacharya, Raghu N.

    2010-10-29

    Thin films of gadolinium oxide, gadolinium yttrium oxide, and gadolinium cerium oxide were electrodeposited from non-aqueous baths. The films were on the order of 15 nm thick, and were grown epitaxially on textured nickel-tungsten substrates. The effect of deposition rate, annealing temperature and secondary metals on crystallinity and crystal orientation was investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Slower rates, higher temperatures and low concentrations of yttrium improve the crystallinity of gadolinium oxide films, whereas the introduction of cerium induced polycrystallinity.

  9. Effects of Oxidation on Oxidation-Resistant Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windes, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Rebecca [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Carroll, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades that exhibit oxidation resistance through the formation of protective oxides on the surface of the graphite material. In the unlikely event of an oxygen ingress accident, graphite components within the VHTR core region are anticipated to oxidize so long as the oxygen continues to enter the hot core region and the core temperatures remain above 400°C. For the most serious air-ingress accident which persists over several hours or days the continued oxidation can result in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material during any air-ingress accident would mitigate the structural effects and keep the core intact. Previous air oxidation testing of nuclear-grade graphite doped with varying levels of boron-carbide (B4C) at a nominal 739°C was conducted for a limited number of doped specimens demonstrating a dramatic reduction in oxidation rate for the boronated graphite grade. This report summarizes the conclusions from this small scoping study by determining the effects of oxidation on the mechanical strength resulting from oxidation of boronated and unboronated graphite to a 10% mass loss level. While the B4C additive did reduce mechanical strength loss during oxidation, adding B4C dopants to a level of 3.5% or more reduced the as-fabricated compressive strength nearly 50%. This effectively minimized any benefits realized from the protective film formed on the boronated grades. Future work to infuse different graphite grades with silicon- and boron-doped material as a post-machining conditioning step for nuclear components is discussed as a potential solution for these challenges in this report.

  10. Selective oxidation of uranium in situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on O2, NcC103, H2O2, NaOCl and Ce+4 which have been examined as oxidants in an alkaline carbonate system for uranium in in-situ leaching. The South Texas and New Mexico ores contained up to 2.6 meq/g of reducing compounds which consume oxidants in the leading operation. Leaching rates did not increase linearly with the oxidation potential of the oxidants. A mild oxidant can be used to maximize uranium oxidation selectively and oxidant efficiency. O2 can oxidize most of the uranium mineral with an adequate rate and high oxidant efficiency

  11. Superparamagnetic iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper assesses the value of MR imaging of hepatic malignant tumors after injection of different concentrations of superparamagnetic iron oxide (AMI-25) at 1.5 T. Fourteen patients with pathologically proved hepatic malignant tumors were imaged on a 1.5 T magnet. T1-weighted (TR = 400 msec, TE = 20 msec) and T2-weighted (TR = 2,000 msec, TE = 40, 90 msec) sequences were obtained before and 1 hour after intravenous injection of varying concentrations of AMI-25 (10-20 μmol/kg). Signal intensity measurements were obtained from tumor, liver, and background noise. The contrast-to-noise ratio was calculated at the lesion-to-liver signal intensity difference scaled to image noise, including ghost artifacts. Statistical tests were then applied to compare the lesion-to-liver contrast before and after injection

  12. Phosphine oxide surfactants revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Preisig, Natalie; Laughlin, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes everything we currently know about the nonionic surfactants alkyl dimethyl (C(n)DMPO) and alkyl diethyl (C(n)DEPO) phosphine oxide (PO surfactants). The review starts with the synthesis and the general properties (Section 2) of these compounds and continues with their interfacial properties (Section 3) such as surface tension, surface rheology, interfacial tension and adsorption at solid surfaces. We discuss studies on thin liquid films and foams stabilized by PO surfactants (Section 4) as well as studies on their self-assembly into lyotropic liquid crystals and microemulsions, respectively (Section 5). We aim at encouraging colleagues from both academia and industry to take on board PO surfactants whenever possible and feasible because of their broad variety of excellent properties. PMID:26869216

  13. Main Oxidizer Valve Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addona, Brad; Eddleman, David

    2015-01-01

    A developmental Main Oxidizer Valve (MOV) was designed by NASA-MSFC using additive manufacturing processes. The MOV is a pneumatically actuated poppet valve to control the flow of liquid oxygen to an engine's injector. A compression spring is used to return the valve to the closed state when pneumatic pressure is removed from the valve. The valve internal parts are cylindrical in shape, which lends itself to traditional lathe and milling operations. However, the valve body represents a complicated shape and contains the majority of the mass of the valve. Additive manufacturing techniques were used to produce a part that optimized mass and allowed for design features not practical with traditional machining processes.

  14. Ultra Supercritical Steamside Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Malgorzata

    2005-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which require steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

  15. Uranium plutonium oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium plutonium oxide is the principal fuel material for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR's) throughout the world. Development of this material has been a reasonably straightforward evolution from the UO2 used routinely in the light water reactor (LWR's); but, because of the lower neutron capture cross sections and much lower coolant pressures in the sodium cooled LMFBR's, the fuel is operated to much higher discharge exposures than that of a LWR. A typical LMFBR fuel assembly is shown. Depending on the required power output and the configuration of the reactor, some 70 to 400 such fuel assemblies are clustered to form the core. There is a wide variation in cross section and length of the assemblies where the increasing size reflects a chronological increase in plant size and power output as well as considerations of decreasing the net fuel cycle cost. Design and performance characteristics are described

  16. Solid Oxide Electrolyser Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Højgaard

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) produced at Risø National Laboratory was tested as steam electrolysers under various current densities, operating temperatures and steam partial pressures. At 950 °C and a cell voltage of 1.48V the current density was -3.6A/cm2 with app. 30% H2 + 70% H2O in the inlet...... possible to achieve a production price of 0.7 US$/kg H2 with an electricity price of 1.3 US¢/kWh. The cell voltage was measured as function of time. In test ofabout two month of duration a long-term degradation was observed. At 850 °C, -0.5 A/cm2 with 50 vol% H2 the degradation rate was app. 20 mV/1000h...

  17. Wet oxidation of a spacecraft model waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wydeven, T.

    1985-01-01

    Wet oxidation was used to oxidize a spacecraft model waste under different oxidation conditions. The variables studied were pressure, temperature, duration of oxidation, and the use of one homogeneous and three heterogeneous catalysts. Emphasis is placed on the final oxidation state of carbon and nitrogen since these are the two major components of the spacecraft model waste and two important plant nutrients.

  18. High temperature oxidation resistant cermet compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Cermet compositions are designed to provide high temperature resistant refractory coatings on stainless steel or molybdenum substrates. A ceramic mixture of chromium oxide and aluminum oxide form a coating of chromium oxide as an oxidation barrier around the metal particles, to provide oxidation resistance for the metal particles.

  19. Water oxidation: High five iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Costas, Miquel

    2016-03-01

    The oxidation of water is essential to the sustainable production of fuels using sunlight or electricity, but designing active, stable and earth-abundant catalysts for the reaction is challenging. Now, a complex containing five iron atoms is shown to efficiently oxidize water by mimicking key features of the oxygen-evolving complex in green plants.

  20. Inhibiting Wet Oxidation of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, D. B. L.

    1985-01-01

    Simple modification of wet-oxidation process for treating organicwaste reduces loss of fixed nitrogen, potentially valuable byproduct of process. Addition of sufficient sulfuric acid to maintain reaction pH below 3 greatly reduces oxidation of ammonia to free nitrogen. No equipment modification required.

  1. Hole transport in MOS oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hole and electron transport are reported for three different kinds of MOS oxides: wet, dry, and ion-implanted. The electron-hole pairs are generated in the bulk of the oxide by a 3 ns x-ray pulse and the separation of the electron and hole photocurrents is made possible by the large difference in mobility. The electrons are so mobile that they are swept from the oxide (or trapped in a heavily ion-implanted region) during the x-ray pulse. The holes, on the other hand, have much lower mobilities which depend strongly on the preparation of the oxide. In the dry oxide the nominal mobility at room temperature is several orders of magnitude higher than in the wet oxide. The mobility is strongly activated by temperature in the oxides, and at liquid N2 temperature no hole motion could be detected even though the electrons are still swept out. The low temperature charging of oxides can be understood in terms of the bulk trapped holes, but room temperature charging seems to be dominated by trapping close to the Si/SiO2 interface rather than the transport of the holes from the bulk to the interface. Ion implantation provides electron traps which seem to be associated with the lattice damage rather than the ion. The electron traps can be successfully annealed out at 9000C in 20 minutes

  2. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: CHEMICAL OXIDATION TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidation destroys hazardous contaminants by chemically converting them to nonhazardous or less toxic compounds that are ideally more stable, less mobile, and/or inert. However, under some conditions, other hazardous compounds may be formed. The oxidizing agents most commonly use...

  3. Catalysts for low temperature oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toops, Todd J.; Parks, III, James E.; Bauer, John C.

    2016-03-01

    The invention provides a composite catalyst containing a first component and a second component. The first component contains nanosized gold particles. The second component contains nanosized platinum group metals. The composite catalyst is useful for catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen, and other pollutants at low temperatures.

  4. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  5. Oxidative stability of marine phospholipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Baron, Caroline Pascale;

    Many studies have shown that marine phospholipids (MPL) provide more advantages than fish oil. They have better bioavailability, better resistance towards oxidation and higher content of eicosapentaenoic acids (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) than oily triglycerides (fish oil). The objective...... of this study is to investigate the oxidative and hydrolytic stability of MPL. In addition, this study also investigates the effect of chemical composition of MPL and Maillard reaction (interaction between lipids oxidation products with the residue of amino acids) on MPL emulsions’ stability. Firstly, MPL were...... prepared in the form of emulsions by high pressure homogenizer. Then, the oxidative and hydrolytic stability of phospholipids was investigated by measurement of simple chemical analyses such as Peroxide Value and Free Fatty Acids, and 31PNMR after 32 days storage at 2ºC. The oxidative stability of MPL...

  6. Oxide fiber targets at ISOLDE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köster, U.; Bergmann, U.C.; Carminati, D.; Catherall, R.; Cederkäll, J.; Correia, J.G.; Crepieux, B.; Dietrich, M.; Elder, K.; Fedoseyev, V.N.; Fraile, L.; Franchoo, S.; Fynbo, Hans Otto Uldall; Georg, U.; Giles, T.; Joinet, A.; Jonsson, Olle; Lau, Ch.; Lettry, J.; Oinonen, M.; Peräjärvi, K.; Ravn, H.L.; Rinaldi, T.; Santana-Leitner, M.; Weissman, L.; Mishin, V.I.; Kirchner, R.; Maier, H.J.; Wahl, U.; Rinaldi Barkat, Tania

    2003-01-01

    Many elements are rapidly released from oxide matrices. Some oxide powder targets show a fast sintering, thus losing their favorable release characteristics. Loosely packed oxide fiber targets are less critical since they may maintain their open structure even when starting to fuse together at some...... contact points. The experience with various oxide fiber targets (titania, zirconia, ceria and thoria) used in the last years at ISOLDE is reviewed. For short-lived isotopes of Cu, Ga and Xe the zirconia and ceria targets respectively provided significantly higher yields than any other target (metal foils......, oxide powders, etc.) tested before. Titania fibers, which were not commercially available, were produced in a relic process by impregnation of a rayon felt in a titanium chloride solution and subsequent calcination by heating the dried felt in air. Thoria fibers were obtained either by the same process...

  7. Oxidants and antioxidants in disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Svendsen, Ove

    2007-01-01

    in disease or be prevented are complex questions with no simple answers. However, the considerable literature on the subject suggests that many researchers consider oxidative stress-related mechanisms to be important early events in disease development. A particularly intriguing aspect is that, at......Important infectious diseases in farm animals, such as pneumonia and enteritis, are thought to be associated with the so-called oxidative stress, i.e. a chemical phenomenon involving an imbalance in the redox status of the individual animal. The specifics of oxidative stress and how it may result...... least theoretically, oxidative stress should be easily prevented with antioxidants yet the use of antioxidants as therapy remains controversial. The present knowledge on oxidative stress in farm animals is the topic of this review....

  8. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Yong Weon; Kang, Hyo Jin [Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057 (United States); Bae, Insoo, E-mail: ib42@georgetown.edu [Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057 (United States)

    2014-04-03

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to treat human cancer. Thus, it is essential to understand the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. In this review, we briefly summarize BRCA1’s many binding partners and mechanisms, and discuss data supporting the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. Finally, we consider its significance in prevention and/or treatment of BRCA1-related cancers.

  9. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to treat human cancer. Thus, it is essential to understand the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. In this review, we briefly summarize BRCA1’s many binding partners and mechanisms, and discuss data supporting the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. Finally, we consider its significance in prevention and/or treatment of BRCA1-related cancers

  10. Catalyzed electrolytic plutonium oxide dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalyzed electrolytic plutonium oxide dissolution (CEPOD) was first demonstrated at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in early 1974 in work funded by the Exxon Corporation. The work, aimed at dissolution of Pu-containing residues remaining after the dissolution of spent mixed-oxide reactor fuels, was first publicly disclosed in 1981. The process dissolves PuO2 in an anolyte containing small (catalytic) amounts of elements that form kinetically fast, strongly oxidizing ions. These are continuously regenerated at the anode. Catalysts used, in their oxidized form, include Ag2+, Ce4+, Co3+, and AmO22+. This paper reviews the chemistry involved in CEPOD and the results of its application to the dissolution of the Pu content of a variety of PuO2-containing materials such as off-standard oxide, fuels dissolution residues, incinerator ash, contaminated soils, and other scraps or wastes. Results are presented for both laboratory-scale and plant-scale dissolves

  11. Nanotoxicology of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedea B. Seabra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses recent advances in the synthesis, characterization and toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles obtained mainly through biogenic (green processes. The in vitro and in vivo toxicities of these oxides are discussed including a consideration of the factors important for safe use of these nanomaterials. The toxicities of different metal oxide nanoparticles are compared. The importance of biogenic synthesized metal oxide nanoparticles has been increasing in recent years; however, more studies aimed at better characterizing the potent toxicity of these nanoparticles are still necessary for nanosafely considerations and environmental perspectives. In this context, this review aims to inspire new research in the design of green approaches to obtain metal oxide nanoparticles for biomedical and technological applications and to highlight the critical need to fully investigate the nanotoxicity of these particles.

  12. Trends for Methane Oxidation at Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleis, Jesper; Jones, Glenn; Abild-Pedersen, Frank;

    2009-01-01

    First-principles calculations are used to predict a plausible reaction pathway for the methane oxidation reaction. In turn, this pathway is used to obtain trends in methane oxidation activity at solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode materials. Reaction energetics and barriers for the elementary...... reaction steps on both the close-packed Ni{111} and stepped Ni{211} surfaces are presented. Quantum-mechanical calculations augmented with thermodynamic corrections allow appropriate treatment of the elevated temperatures in SOFCs. Linear scaling relationships are used to extrapolate the results from the...

  13. Catalysis of water oxidation in acetonitrile by iridium oxide nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Hidalgo-Acosta, Jonnathan C.; Méndez, Manuel A.; Scanlon, Micheál D.; Vrubel, Heron; Amstutz, Véronique; Adamiak, Wojciech; Opallo, Marcin; Girault, Hubert H.

    2015-01-01

    Water oxidation catalysed by iridium oxide nanoparticles (IrO2 NPs) in water–acetonitrile mixtures using [RuIII(bpy)3]3+ as oxidant was studied as a function of the water content, the acidity of the reaction media and the catalyst concentration. It was observed that under acidic conditions (HClO4) and at high water contents (80% (v/v)) the reaction is slow, but its rate increases as the water content decreases, reaching a maximum at approximately equimolar proportions (≈25% H2O (v/v)). The re...

  14. Direct Coal Oxidation in Modified Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Gil, Vanesa; Ippolito, Davide;

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells employ a classical solid oxide fuel cell together with carbon dispersed in a carbonate melt on the anode side. In a European project, the utilization of various coals has been investigated with and without addition of an oxidation catalyst to the carbon......-carbonate slurry or anode layer. The nature of the coal affects both open circuit voltage and power output. Highest OCV and power densities were observed for bituminous coal and by adding manganese oxide or praseodymium-doped ceria to the carbon/carbonate mixture. Comparing the carbon black fueled performance of...

  15. Catalyst for Decomposition of Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Ates (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Jale (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a platinized tin oxide-based catalyst. It relates particularly to an improved platinized tin oxide-based catalyst able to decompose nitric oxide to nitrogen and oxygen without the necessity of a reducing gas.

  16. Zinc oxide nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chik, Hope Wuming

    Non-lithographic, bottom-up techniques have been developed to advance the state of the art and contribute to the development of new material structures, fabrication methods, devices, and applications using the Zinc Oxide material system as a demonstration vehicle. The novel low temperature catalytic vapour-liquid-solid growth process developed is technologically simple, inexpensive, and a robust fabrication technique offering complete control over the physical dimensions of the nanorod such as its diameter and length, and over the positioning of the nanorods for site-selective growth. By controlling the distribution of the Au catalysts with the use of a self-organized anodized aluminum oxide nanopore membrane as a template, we have been able to synthesize highly ordered, hexagonally packed, array of ZnO nanorods spanning a large area. These nanorods are single crystal, hexagonally shaped, indicative of the wurtzite structure, and are vertically aligned to the substrate. By pre-patterning the template, arbitrary nanorod patterns can be formed. We have also demonstrated the assembly of the nanorods into functional devices using controlled methods that are less resource intensive, easily scalable, and adaptable to other material systems, without resorting to the manipulation of each individual nanostructures. Examples of these devices include the random network device that exploits the common attributes of the nanorods, and those formed using an external field to control the nanorod orientation. Two and three terminal device measurements show that the as-grown nanorods are n-type doped, and that by controlling the external optical excitation and its test environment, the photoconductivity can be altered dramatically. Self assemble techniques such as the spontaneous formation of nanodendrites into complex networks of interconnects were studied. Controlled formation of interconnects achieved by controlling the placement of the catalyst is demonstrated by growing the

  17. Nanowire-based All Oxide Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Peidong

    2009-01-01

    We present an all-oxide solar cell fabricated from vertically oriented zinc oxide nanowires and cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solar cell consists of vertically oriented n-type zinc oxide nanowires, surrounded by a film constructed from p-type cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solution-based synthesis of inexpensive and environmentally benign oxide materials in a solar cell would allow for the facile production of large-scale photovoltaic devices. We found that the solar cell performance is ...

  18. Oxidation kinetics of aluminum diboride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Michael L.; Sohn, H. Y.; Cutler, Raymond A.

    2013-11-01

    The oxidation characteristics of aluminum diboride (AlB2) and a physical mixture of its constituent elements (Al+2B) were studied in dry air and pure oxygen using thermal gravimetric analysis to obtain non-mechanistic kinetic parameters. Heating in air at a constant linear heating rate of 10 °C/min showed a marked difference between Al+2B and AlB2 in the onset of oxidation and final conversion fraction, with AlB2 beginning to oxidize at higher temperatures but reaching nearly complete conversion by 1500 °C. Kinetic parameters were obtained in both air and oxygen using a model-free isothermal method at temperatures between 500 and 1000 °C. Activation energies were found to decrease, in general, with increasing conversion for AlB2 and Al+2B in both air and oxygen. AlB2 exhibited O2-pressure-independent oxidation behavior at low conversions, while the activation energies of Al+2B were higher in O2 than in air. Differences in the composition and morphology between oxidized Al+2B and AlB2 suggested that Al2O3-B2O3 interactions slowed Al+2B oxidation by converting Al2O3 on aluminum particles into a Al4B2O9 shell, while the same Al4B2O9 developed a needle-like morphology in AlB2 that reduced oxygen diffusion distances and increased conversion. The model-free kinetic analysis was critical for interpreting the complex, multistep oxidation behavior for which a single mechanism could not be assigned. At low temperatures, moisture increased the oxidation rate of Al+2B and AlB2, but both appear to be resistant to oxidation in cool, dry environments.

  19. Oxidative desulfurization: kinetic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, S; Uppaluri, R; Purkait, M K

    2009-01-30

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H(2)O(2) over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel. PMID:18541367

  20. Oxidative desulfurization: Kinetic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H2O2 over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel

  1. Graphene oxide aerogel-supported Pt electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jialin; Zhang, Xuelin; Yuan, Weijian; Chen, Hailong; Jiang, Shan; Liu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yufeng; Chang, Limin; Sun, Zhiyuan; Du, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Graphene oxide aerogel (GOA) was prepared to serve as catalyst support for Pt nanoparticles for methanol electro-oxidation. Analyses by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were conducted to physically characterize the Pt/GOA catalyst. The results show that Pt/GOA has a 3D macroporous structure, which can not only accelerate mass transfer but also provide a larger efficient surface area for methanol oxidation. The results of electrochemical tests reveal that Pt/GOA has an electrochemical surface area as large as 95.5 m2 g-1, and its peak current density toward methanol oxidation is as high as 876 mA mg-1Pt.

  2. Selective propene oxidation on mixed metal oxide catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    James, D W

    2002-01-01

    Selective catalytic oxidation processes represent a large segment of the modern chemical industry and a major application of these is the selective partial oxidation of propene to produce acrolein. Mixed metal oxide catalysts are particularly effective in promoting this reaction, and the two primary candidates for the industrial process are based on iron antimonate and bismuth molybdate. Some debate exists in the literature regarding the operation of these materials and the roles of their catalytic components. In particular, iron antimonate catalysts containing excess antimony are known to be highly selective towards acrolein, and a variety of proposals for the enhanced selectivity of such materials have been given. The aim of this work was to provide a direct comparison between the behaviour of bismuth molybdate and iron antimonate catalysts, with additional emphasis being placed on the component single oxide phases of the latter. Studies were also extended to other antimonate-based catalysts, including coba...

  3. Optical properties of graphite oxide and reduced graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eilho; Lee, Seokbae; Roh, Seulki; Hwang, Eunhee; Lee, Junghyun; Lee, Hyoyoung; Hwang, Jungseek

    2014-07-01

    We studied the optical properties of a graphite oxide and a reduced graphite oxide by using the optical spectroscopic technique. The graphite oxide does not show a finite dc conductivity and has several characteristic absorption modes in the mid-infrared region, caused by an epoxide functional group and hydroxyl and carboxyl moieties in the mid-infrared range. The reduced graphite oxide shows a Drude-like response in the far-infrared region and the estimated dc conductivity and electric mobility are around 200 Ω-1cm-1 and ˜100 cm2V-1s-1, respectively. We found that the optical conductivity cannot be fitted with a simple Drude model, which indicates that the charge carriers are correlated. We applied an extended Drude model and obtained the optical scattering rate and the optical effective mass. We found that the optical effective mass can carry information of both the enhanced mass by correlation and the electronic band structure.

  4. Alumina composites for oxide/oxide fibrous monoliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most work on ceramic fibrous monoliths (FMs) has focused on the Si3N4/BN system. In an effort to develop oxidation-resistant FMs, several oxide systems have recently been examined. Zirconia-toughened alumina and alumina/mullite appear to be good candidates for the cell phase of FMs. These composites offer higher strength and toughness than pure alumina and good high-temperature stability. By combining these oxides, possibly with a weaker high-temperature oxide as the cell-boundary phase, it should be possible to product a strong, resilient FM that exhibits graceful failure. Several material combinations have been examined. Results on FM fabrication and microstructural development are presented

  5. Thermodynamic properties of cerium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermodynamic properties of cerium oxides in the CeO2-CeO1.5 composition range are studied. For this purpose method of electromotive force with solid electrolyte is used, equilibrium constants of reduction of cerium oxides by hydrogen are measured. Necessity of using atmosphere of argon or purified nitrogen to work with pyrophoric cerium oxides is stressed. The obtained results and the earlier known literary data on CeO2 and Ce2O3 thermodynamic properties are tabulated. 14 refs.; 5 tabs

  6. Activation of constitutive nitric oxide synthases by oxidized calmodulin mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Heather J; Bartlett, Ryan; Perdicakis, Basil; Jervis, Eric; Squier, Thomas C; Guillemette, J Guy

    2003-07-01

    Several calmodulin (CaM) mutants were engineered in an effort to identify the functional implications of the oxidation of individual methionines in CaM on the activity of the constitutive isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Site-directed mutagenesis was used to substitute the majority of methionines with leucines. Substitution of all nine methionine residues in CaM with leucines had minimal effects on the binding affinity or maximal enzyme activation for either the neuronal (nNOS) or endothelial (eNOS) isoform. Selective substitution permitted determination of the functional consequences of the site-specific oxidation of Met(144) and Met(145) on the regulation of electron transfer within nNOS and eNOS. Site-specific oxidation of Met(144) and Met(145) resulted in changes in the CaM concentration necessary for half-maximal activation of nNOS and eNOS, suggesting that these side chains are involved in stabilizing the productive association between CaM and NOS. However, the site-specific oxidation of Met(144) and Met(145) had essentially no effect on the maximal extent of eNOS activation in the presence of saturating concentrations of CaM. In contrast, the site-specific oxidation of Met(144) (but not Met(145)) resulted in a reduction in the level of nNOS activation that was associated with decreased rates of electron transfer within the reductase domain. Thus, nNOS and eNOS exhibit different functional sensitivities to conditions of oxidative stress that are expected to oxidize CaM. This may underlie some aspects of the observed differences in the sensitivities of proteins in vasculature and neuronal tissues to nitration that are linked to NOS activation and the associated generation of peroxynitrite. PMID:12820885

  7. Oxidation of DOPAC by nitric oxide: effect of superoxide dismutase

    OpenAIRE

    Laranjinha, João; Cadenas, Enrique

    2002-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the redox interaction between 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and nitric oxide (·NO), and to assess the reductive and oxidative decay pathways of the DOPAC semiquinone originating from this interaction. The reaction between DOPAC and ·NO led to the formation of the DOPAC semiquinone radical, detected by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and stabilized by Mg2+, and the nitrosyl anion detected as nitrosylmyoglobin. The EPR signal corresponding to the ...

  8. Metal-Catalyzed Oxidation and Photo-oxidation of Glucagon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    The oxidation of glucagon by the H2O2/Cu(2+) system and by simulated sunlight was studied using HPLC-MS methodologies. It was found that copper ion-catalyzed oxidation is much faster in the residue 1-12 region than in photo-oxidation, but it is slower than photo-oxidation in the residue 18-29 region. This difference is due to the unique feature of the primary sequence of glucagon. The residue 1-12 region contains His-1 and Asp-9 that can bind to Cu(2+) ions and catalyze the oxidation of His-1 and Tyr-10, while the residue 18-29 region lacks these charged residues near the liable Met-27 and Trp-25 and hence no catalysis by the neighboring groups occurs. Fragment (residue 13-17) was more stable than the other regions of the peptide toward photo-oxidation because it contains only one oxidizable residue, Tyr-13. These findings may help explain the mechanism of action of glucagon and provide some hints for the development of effective anti-diabetic drug molecules and stable glucagon formulations. PMID:27435200

  9. Alkali oxide-tantalum, niobium and antimony oxide ionic conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, R. S.; Brower, W. S.; Parker, H. S.; Minor, D. B.; Waring, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The phase equilibrium relations of four systems were investigated in detail. These consisted of sodium and potassium antimonates with antimony oxide and tantalum and niobium oxide with rubidium oxide as far as the ratio 4Rb2O:llB2O5 (B=Nb, Ta). The ternary system NaSbO3-Sb2O4-NaF was investigated extensively to determine the actual composition of the body centered cubic sodium antimonate. Various other binary and ternary oxide systems involving alkali oxides were examined in lesser detail. The phases synthesized were screened by ion exchange methods to determine mobility of the mobility of the alkali ion within the niobium, tantalum or antimony oxide (fluoride) structural framework. Five structure types warranted further investigation; these structure types are (1) hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB), (2) pyrochlore, (3) the hybrid HTB-pyrochlore hexagonal ordered phases, (4) body centered cubic antimonates and (5) 2K2O:3Nb2O5. Although all of these phases exhibit good ion exchange properties only the pyrochlore was prepared with Na(+) ions as an equilibrium phase and as a low porosity ceramic. Sb(+3) in the channel interferes with ionic conductivity in this case, although relatively good ionic conductivity was found for the metastable Na(+) ion exchanged analogs of RbTa2O5F and KTaWO6 pyrochlore phases.

  10. Nitric Oxide synthases and atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CynthiaAnnCarnes

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. There are multiple systems in the myocardium which contribute to redox homeostasis, and loss of homeostasis can result in oxidative stress. Potential sources of oxidants include nitric oxide synthases, which normally produce nitric oxide in the heart. Two nitric oxide synthase isoforms (1 and 3 are normally expressed in the heart. During pathologies such as heart failure, there is induction of nitric oxide synthase 2 in multiple cell types in the myocardium. In certain conditions, the NOS enzymes may become uncoupled, shifting from production of nitric oxide to superoxide anion, a potent free radical and oxidant. Multiple lines of evidence suggest a role for nitric oxide synthases in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. Therapeutic approaches to reduce atrial fibrillation by modulation of nitric oxide synthase activity may be beneficial, although further investigation of this strategy is needed.

  11. Contemporary microbes in hypersaline springs that contain fossil carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziolkowski, L. A.; Mykytczuk, N. C.; Whyte, L.; Slater, G. F.

    2011-12-01

    On Axel Heiberg Island, near 80 oN in the Canadian Arctic, perennial hypersaline springs provide a unique environment for cold-active microbes. The neutral pH Gypsum Hill springs originate in a gypsum diaper and flow through 600 m of continuous permafrost before reaching the surface at ~6 oC, 7.5 % NaCl, low dissolved inorganic carbon and rich in both sulfate and sulfide (Pollard et al., 2009). In the first part of the year, when ambient temperatures dip as low as -40 oC, filamentous streamers are abundant under the snow covered run-off channels. These microbial assemblages are not present during the summer, when the snow cover has melted. Culture- and molecular-based analyses of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that the streamers are dominated by a chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing Thiomicrospira species and under in situ conditions the streamers oxidized sulfide and thiosulfate and also fixed CO2 (Perreault et al., 2008). We characterized the isotopic composition (13C and 14C) of the microbial community biomarkers as phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and glycolipid fatty acid (GLFA) methyl esters. These components represent the cell membranes of the viable microbial community, which are quickly hydrolyzed after cell death and provide insight into the carbon cycling of the organisms. Even though isotopic measurements of the bulk biomass indicate carbon and nitrogen limitation within the system, the streamers are rich in biomass with greater than 109 cells/g. While the PLFA and GLFA profiles were similar, indicating a predominantly gram-negative bacteria community, the 13C composition of these two lipid types was different. The PLFA δ13C indicated a dominant autotrophic signal, while the δ13C of the GLFA had a more heterotrophic signal. While the streamers grow yearly, their 14C age based on the lipid results was 6400 years, indicating utilization of a carbon source that is 14C depleted. We hypothesize that these microbes are using 14C depleted dissolved inorganic

  12. Oxidation dynamics of aluminum nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminum nanorods (Al-NRs) are promising fuels for pyrotechnics due to the high contact areas with oxidizers, but their oxidation mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, reactive molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study thermally initiated burning of oxide-coated Al-NRs with different diameters (D = 26, 36, and 46 nm) in oxygen environment. We found that thinner Al-NRs burn faster due to the larger surface-to-volume ratio. The reaction initiates with the dissolution of the alumina shell into the molten Al core to generate heat. This is followed by the incorporation of environmental oxygen atoms into the resulting Al-rich shell, thereby accelerating the heat release. These results reveal an unexpectedly active role of the alumina shell as a “nanoreactor” for oxidation

  13. Oxides having high energy densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-09-10

    Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

  14. Resonating Nitrous Oxide Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AeroAstro proposes decomposing nitrous oxide (N2O) as an alternative propellant to existing spacecraft propellants. Decomposing N2O can be used as either a high...

  15. Exploring oxidative modifications of tyrosine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houée-Lévin, C; Bobrowski, K; Horakova, L;

    2015-01-01

    Protein oxidation is increasingly recognised as an important modulator of biochemical pathways controlling both physiological and pathological processes. While much attention has focused on cysteine modifications in reversible redox signalling, there is increasing evidence that other protein resi...

  16. Millisecond Oxidation of Alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Han

    2011-09-30

    This project was undertaken in response to the Department of Energy's call to research and develop technologies 'that will reduce energy consumption, enhance economic competitiveness, and reduce environmental impacts of the domestic chemical industry.' The current technology at the time for producing 140 billion pounds per year of propylene from naphtha and Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) relied on energy- and capital-intensive steam crackers and Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) units. The propylene is isolated from the product stream in a costly separation step and subsequently converted to acrylic acid and other derivatives in separate production facilities. This project proposed a Short Contact Time Reactor (SCTR)-based catalytic oxydehydrogenation process that could convert propane to propylene and acrylic acid in a cost-effective and energy-efficient fashion. Full implementation of this technology could lead to sizeable energy, economic and environmental benefits for the U. S. chemical industry by providing up to 45 trillion BTUs/year, cost savings of $1.8 billion/year and a combined 35 million pounds/year reduction in environmental pollutants such as COx, NOx, and SOx. Midway through the project term, the program directive changed, which approval from the DOE and its review panel, from direct propane oxidation to acrylic acid at millisecond contact times to a two-step process for making acrylic acid from propane. The first step was the primary focus, namely the conversion of propane to propylene in high yields assisted by the presence of CO2. The product stream from step one was then to be fed directly into a commercially practiced propylene-to-acrylic acid tandem reactor system.

  17. Catalytic oxidations by vanadium complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Ligtenbarg, A.G J; Hage, R.; Feringa, B. L.

    2003-01-01

    Vanadium haloperoxidases catalyse the oxidation of halides leading to halogenation of substrates or, in the absence of suitable substrates, to oxidation of hydrogen peroxide into singlet oxygen and water. Furthermore, V-haloperoxidases are capable to give enantioselective sulfoxidation under the appropriate conditions. The most interesting model compounds that have been synthesised and studied as bromination catalysts, and catalysts for, i.e. epoxidation, hydroxylation, sulfoxidation and alco...

  18. Reconstructions at complex oxide interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kleibeuker, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    Perovskite-type oxides, ABO3, are of high interest since they exhibit a wide variety of properties. Having comparable oxygen backbone structures, perovskite-type oxides can easily be stacked on top of each other with atomic precision. This may result in advanced materials with new or enhanced functionalities. Moreover, near the interface, interplay between the different materials occurs, which may lead to interesting functionalities confined at the interface. For the development of device app...

  19. Biokompatibilitas Semen Zinc Oxide Eugenol

    OpenAIRE

    Trisna Wahyudi

    2008-01-01

    Bahan kedokteran gigi hams memenuhi syarat biokompatibilitas yang dapat diterima tubuh atau dengan kata lain tidak membahayakan dalam penggunaannya. Idealnya bahan yang diletakkan dalam rongga mulut tidak membahayakan jaringan pulpa dan jaringan lunak rongga mulut, tidak mengandung bahan toksik yang mampu berdifusi dan dapat diabsorpsi ke dalam sistem sirkulasi tubuh yang akhirya menyebabkan reaksi toksik yang sistemik. Semen zinc oxide eugenol dengan kandungan utamanya zinc oxide dan e...

  20. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Li; Wuliji O; Wei Li; Zhi-Gang Jiang; Ghanbari, Hossein A.

    2013-01-01

    Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. T...

  1. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Dezhao, Liu; Hansen, Michael Jørgen;

    oxidizing bacteria but several fungal families including Trichocomaceae. A positive correlation was found between the presence of mold and sulfide uptake. However there have been no reports on fungi metabolizing hydrogen sulfide. We hypothesize that the mold increases the air exposed surface, enabling...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  2. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Liu, Dezhao; Hansen, Michael Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    oxidizing bacteria but several fungal families including Trichocomaceae. A positive correlation was found between the presence of mold and sulfide uptake. However there have been no reports on fungi metabolizing hydrogen sulfide. We hypothesize that the mold increases the air exposed surface, enabling...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  3. Lutetium Oxide Coatings by PVD

    OpenAIRE

    Topping, Stephen G; Park, CH; Rangan, SK; Sarin, VK

    2007-01-01

    Due to its high density and cubic structure, Lutetium oxide (Lu2O3) has been extensively researched for scintillating applications. Present manufacturing methods, such as hot pressing and sintering, do not provide adequate resolution due to light scattering of polycrystalline materials. Vapor deposition has been investigated as an alternative manufacturing method. Lutetium oxide transparent optical coatings by magnetron sputtering offer a means of tailoring the coating for optimum scintillati...

  4. Catalytic Chemistry on Oxide Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asthagiri, Aravind; Dixon, David A.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.; Rodriquez, Jose A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Stacchiola, Dario; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-05-29

    Metal oxides represent one of the most important and widely employed materials in catalysis. Extreme variability of their chemistry provides a unique opportunity to tune their properties and to utilize them for the design of highly active and selective catalysts. For bulk oxides, this can be achieved by varying their stoichiometry, phase, exposed surface facets, defect, dopant densities and numerous other ways. Further, distinct properties from those of bulk oxides can be attained by restricting the oxide dimensionality and preparing them in the form of ultrathin films and nanoclusters as discussed throughout this book. In this chapter we focus on demonstrating such unique catalytic properties brought by the oxide nanoscaling. In the highlighted studies planar models are carefully designed to achieve minimal dispersion of structural motifs and to attain detailed mechanistic understanding of targeted chemical transformations. Detailed level of morphological and structural characterization necessary to achieve this goal is accomplished by employing both high-resolution imaging via scanning probe methods and ensemble-averaged surface sensitive spectroscopic methods. Three prototypical examples illustrating different properties of nanoscaled oxides in different classes of reactions are selected.

  5. Oxidation Mechanism of Molybdenite Concentrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utigard, T.

    2009-08-01

    The oxidation mechanism of a commercial molybdenum concentrate was investigated up to 650 °C using thermal analysis. Upon introduction of air, the molybdenite concentrate started to lose mass due to the oxidation of MoS2 to form molybdenum oxide and SO2. After a rapid mass loss, this was followed by a period of mass gain due to the oxidation of MoO2 to MoO3. The solid-state reaction between MoS2 and MoO3 to form MoO2 was also found to take place. Initially, as air is introduced, the rate is controlled by gas-phase diffusion of oxygen to the reaction surface. With time, as the surfaces of the MoS2 particles become oxidized and the rates start to slow, MoO3 starts to form. This generally leads to a mass gain as well as a slow down in oxidation rate due to the formation of a fairly dense MoO3 product layer. The timing of the various reactions was very dependent on the actual experimental conditions such as sample mass, gas flow rate, and heating rates.

  6. Structure of simple (binary) oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal structures of different simple and binary oxides of M3O, M2O, MO, MO2, MO4, MO3, M2O3, M3O4, M2O5, M2O7 composition as well as lowest cesium oxides (Cs7O, Cs4O, Cs11O3) are considered. Cs3O crystals are constructed out of the colomns of the Cs3O composition consisting of octahedrals OCs6 jointed through the opposite faces. This is the ZrI3 ''antistructure''. Cs2O has the CdCl2 antistructure. ZrO2, HfO2, CeO2, ThO2, UO2, NpO2, PuO2, AmO2, CmO2, PoO2 oxides have the structural type of fluorite of rutile - VO2, NbO2, TaO2, MoO2, ReO2 oxides, of wurtzite - BeO. The NbO oxide is unique, in its structure the oxygen and niobium atoms form four complanar bonds. A three-dimensional skeleton constructed out of the octahedral structural units Nb6 (Nb-Nb 2.98 A) is separated. ZrO2 is a polymorphous, at 1100 grad. the monoclinic modification transfers to tetragonal. M2O7 oxides are Re2O7, Tc2O7

  7. Draft genome sequence of the extremely acidophilic biomining bacterium Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ATCC 19377 provides insights into the evolution of the Acidithiobacillus genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Jorge; Ossandon, Francisco; Quatrini, Raquel; Dopson, Mark; Holmes, David S

    2011-12-01

    Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans is a mesophilic, extremely acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic gammaproteobacterium that derives energy from the oxidation of sulfur and inorganic sulfur compounds. Here we present the draft genome sequence of A. thiooxidans ATCC 19377, which has allowed the identification of genes for survival and colonization of extremely acidic environments. PMID:22123759

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Extremely Acidophilic Biomining Bacterium Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ATCC 19377 Provides Insights into the Evolution of the Acidithiobacillus Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Valdes, Jorge; Ossandon, Francisco; Quatrini, Raquel; Dopson, Mark; Holmes, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans is a mesophilic, extremely acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic gammaproteobacterium that derives energy from the oxidation of sulfur and inorganic sulfur compounds. Here we present the draft genome sequence of A. thiooxidans ATCC 19377, which has allowed the identification of genes for survival and colonization of extremely acidic environments.

  9. Cyroscopic investigation of lead oxide mixtures with garnet forming oxides, garnets, and related oxide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The freezing point depression of PbO as solvent caused by the trivalent oxides and oxide compounds Fe2O3, Ga2O3, Al2O3, Bi2O3, Y2O3, Gd2O3, La2O3, YFeO3, Fe3O4, Y3Fe5O12, Gd3Ga5O12, and PbFe12O19 allows to determine the number of particles which are formed from these compounds in the diluted solutions. We have measured the liquidus temperatures of binary mixtures with the help of a DTA-equipment. In this way the cryoscopic constant of PbO was determined by addition of ZnO, Cu2O, PbSO4, and PbF2, respectively. The experimental results show that the oxides and oxide compounds dissociate in particles which contain only one cation of the solved compound. (author)

  10. Metal oxide nanostructures with hierarchical morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lao, Jing Yu; Banerjee, Debasish

    2007-11-13

    The present invention relates generally to metal oxide materials with varied symmetrical nanostructure morphologies. In particular, the present invention provides metal oxide materials comprising one or more metallic oxides with three-dimensionally ordered nanostructural morphologies, including hierarchical morphologies. The present invention also provides methods for producing such metal oxide materials.

  11. Oxidation kinetics of aluminum diboride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation characteristics of aluminum diboride (AlB2) and a physical mixture of its constituent elements (Al+2B) were studied in dry air and pure oxygen using thermal gravimetric analysis to obtain non-mechanistic kinetic parameters. Heating in air at a constant linear heating rate of 10 °C/min showed a marked difference between Al+2B and AlB2 in the onset of oxidation and final conversion fraction, with AlB2 beginning to oxidize at higher temperatures but reaching nearly complete conversion by 1500 °C. Kinetic parameters were obtained in both air and oxygen using a model-free isothermal method at temperatures between 500 and 1000 °C. Activation energies were found to decrease, in general, with increasing conversion for AlB2 and Al+2B in both air and oxygen. AlB2 exhibited O2-pressure-independent oxidation behavior at low conversions, while the activation energies of Al+2B were higher in O2 than in air. Differences in the composition and morphology between oxidized Al+2B and AlB2 suggested that Al2O3–B2O3 interactions slowed Al+2B oxidation by converting Al2O3 on aluminum particles into a Al4B2O9 shell, while the same Al4B2O9 developed a needle-like morphology in AlB2 that reduced oxygen diffusion distances and increased conversion. The model-free kinetic analysis was critical for interpreting the complex, multistep oxidation behavior for which a single mechanism could not be assigned. At low temperatures, moisture increased the oxidation rate of Al+2B and AlB2, but both appear to be resistant to oxidation in cool, dry environments. - Graphical abstract: Isothermal kinetic data for AlB2 in air, showing a constantly decreasing activation energy with increasing conversion. Model-free analysis allowed for the calculation of global kinetic parameters despite many simultaneous mechanisms occurring concurrently. (a) Time–temperature plots, (b) conversion as a function of time, (c) Arrhenius plots used to calculate activation energies, and (d) activation energy

  12. Solid oxide electrolyser cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejgaard Jensen, S.

    2006-12-15

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) produced at Riso National Laboratory was tested as steam electrolysers under various current densities, operating temperatures and steam partial pressures. At 950 deg. C and a cell voltage of 1.48V the current density was -3.6 A/cm{sup 2} with app. 30% H{sub 2} + 70% H{sub 2}O in the inlet gas and a H{sub 2}O utilization of app. 40%. The tested SOECs were also used for CO{sub 2} electrolysis. Economy studies of CO and H2 production show that especially H{sub 2} production can be competitive in areas with cheap electricity. Assuming the above described initial performance and a lifetime of 10 years it is possible to achieve a production price of 0.7 US dollar/kg H{sub 2} with an electricity price of 1.3 US cent/kWh. The cell voltage was measured as function of time. In test of about two month of duration a long-term degradation was observed. At 850 deg. C, -0.5 A/cm{sup 2} with 50 vol% H{sub 2} the degradation rate was app. 20 mV/1000h. It was shown that the degradation happens at Ni/YSZ-electrode. The long term degradation is probably caused by coarsening of the Ni-particles. After onset of electrolysis operation a transient passivation/reactivation phenomena with duration of several days was observed. It was shown that the phenomenon is attributed to the SiO{sub 2} contamination at the Ni/YSZ electrode-electrolyte interface. The SiO{sub 2} arises from the albite glass sealing (NaAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}) that surrounds the electrode. Si may enter the Ni/YSZ electrode via the reaction Si(OH){sub 4}(g) {r_reversible} SiO{sub 2}(l)+H{sub 2}O(g). At the active sites of the Ni/YSZ electrode steam is reduced via the reaction H{sub 2}O - 2e {yields} H{sub 2}+O{sup 2-} . This shifts the equilibrium of the first reaction to form SiO{sub 2}(l) at the active sites. After a certain time the sealing crystallizes and the SiO{sub 2}(l) evaporates from the active sites and the cell reactivates. The passivation is shown to relate to a build up of a

  13. Oxidative stress-mediated antibacterial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Gurunathan S; Han JW; Dayem AA; Eppakayala V; Kim JH

    2012-01-01

    Sangiliyandi Gurunathan, Jae Woong Han, Ahmed Abdal Dayem, Vasuki Eppakayala, Jin-Hoi KimDepartment of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul, South KoreaBackground: Graphene holds great promise for potential use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices due to its unique high carrier mobility, good optical transparency, large surface area, and biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxid...

  14. Oxidized Corrugated Al Foils as Supports of Catalysts Containing Co Oxides for VOC Oxidation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirátová, Květa; Balabánová, Jana; Klempa, Jan; Kovanda, F.

    Prague : J Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i, 2015, P10. ISBN 978-80-87351-37-6. [Symposium on Catalysis /47./. Prague (CZ), 02.11.2015-04.11.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13750S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : Al monoliths * ethanol oxidation * Co oxides Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  15. Oxidized Corrugated Al Foils as Supports of Catalysts Containing Co Oxides for VOC Oxidation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirátová, Květa; Balabánová, Jana; Klempa, Jan; Kovanda, F.

    Prague : J Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i, 2015, P10. ISBN 978-80-87351-37-6. [ Symposium on Catalysis /47./. Prague (CZ), 02.11.2015-04.11.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13750S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : Al monoliths * ethanol oxidation * Co oxides Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  16. Novel biomarker pipeline to probe the oxidation sites and oxidation degrees of hemoglobin in bovine erythrocytes exposed to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Wansong; Wang, Xiaoning; Yang, Chuanxi; Du, Yonggang; Sun, Weijun; Xu, Zhenzhen

    2016-06-01

    Research on biomarkers for protein oxidation might give insight into the mechanistic mode of oxidative stress. In the work present here, a novel pipeline was established to probe the oxidation mechanism of bovine hemoglobin (Hb) with its oxidation products serving as the biomarkers. Reactive oxygen species generated by irradiation were used to mimic oxidative stress conditions to oxidize Hb in bovine erythrocytes. After Hb extraction and digestion, oxidized peptides in the tryptic fragments were assigned by comparison with the extracted ion chromatography spectra of native peptide from the control sample. Subsequent tandem mass spectrometry analysis of these peptides proved that oxidation was limited to partially exposed amino acid residues (α-Phe36 , β-Met1 , β-Trp14 , for instance) in Hb. Quantitation analysis on these oxidized peptides showed that oxidation degrees of target sites had positive correlations with the extended oxidation dose and the oxidation processes were also controlled by residues types. Compared with the conventional protein carbonyl assay, the identified oxidized products were feasibility biomarkers for Hb oxidation, indicating that the proposed biomarker pipeline was suitable to provide specific and valid information for protein oxidation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26348117

  17. OXIDATIVE STRESS AND ANTI OXIDANTS STATUS IN PELLAGRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desireddy Neelima, Bandi Hari Krishna, Masthan Saheb, Natham Mallikarjuna Reddy.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Pellagra was vanished from most parts of the world where it was formerly present due to its dietary modification. However, it is still encountered among the jowar eating populations of India. The information about the role of oxidative stress in pellagra was not established. Therefore, in this study we assessed the oxidative stress status by using malondialdehyde (MDA, total anti oxidant status (TAOS and redox ratio (RER in clinically diagnosed pellagra patients. Materials and methods: Clinically diagnosed pellagra patients aged between 18 to 40 years, both male and females were recruited (n=78 from department of Dermatology. Age and gender matched controls (n=78 were recruited from the student and residents of the hospital. Malondialdehyde (MDA is a marker of lipid peroxidation, Total Anti Oxidant Status (TAOS and Redox Ratio (RER markers were assessed by using commercially available kits. Results: There were no significant differences in the anthropometric parameters. However, the oxidative stress markers MDA (p<0.05, RER (p<0.001 were significantly high and TAOS was low (P<0.001 in pellagra patients in comparison with age and gender matched controls. Conclusion: The results of this study showed the increased MDA, RER levels and decreased TAOS levels. Estimation of these markers at early stage will help to take measures to prevent the progression of disease and develop antioxidant strategies.

  18. Low Temperature Oxidation of Methane: The Influence of Nitrogen Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Anders Broe; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation of methane oxidation in the presence of NO and NO2 has been made in an isothermal plug-flow reactor at 750-1250K. The temperature for on-set of oxidation was lowered by 250 K in the presence of NO or NO2 at residence times of 200 ms. At shorter residence times (140 ms......) this enhancement effect is reduced for NO but maintained for NO2. Furthermore two temperature regimes of oxidation separated by an intermediate regime where only little oxidation takes place exist at residence times of 140 ms, if NO is the only nitrogen oxide initially present. The results were...... explained by the competition between three reaction paths from CH3 to CH2O. A direct high temperature path (A), a two-step NO2 enhanced low temperature path (B) and a slow three step NO enhanced path (C), which may produce NO2 to activate path B. The negative temperature coefficient behaviour was explained...

  19. Luminescence of oxide films during the electrolytic oxidation of tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Electrolytic oxidation of tantalum in phosphoric acid and oxalic acid. • Galvanoluminescence (GL) is related to the existence of flaws in oxide coating. • GL is more intense for higher current density and higher electrolyte temperature. • GL shows wide bands mostly in the visible and near infrared spectral region. • Spectrum under spark discharging reveals only oxygen and hydrogen lines. - Abstract: Luminescence during a constant current electrolytic oxidation of tantalum in phosphoric acid and oxalic acid is investigated. Weak anodic luminescence (galvanoluminescence) of barrier oxide films during the electrolytic oxidation is correlated to the existence of surface imperfections. Galvanoluminescence is more intense for rougher tantalum samples, higher current density, and higher electrolyte temperature. Spectral characterization of galvanoluminescence showed that there are wide luminescence bands mostly in the visible and near infrared spectral region. Small sized sparks generated by dielectric breakdown cause rapidly increasing luminescence intensity. The luminescence spectrum under spark discharging has several intensive peaks caused by electronic transitions in oxygen and hydrogen atoms

  20. Nanoparticular metal oxide/anatase catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts having a narrow particle size distribution. In particular, the invention concerns preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalyst precursors comprising combustible crystallization seeds upon which th...... nitrogen oxides with ammonia or urea as reductant, oxidations of alcohols or aldehydes with dioxygen or air to provide aldehydes, ketones or carboxylic acids, and photocatalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs).......The present invention concerns a method of preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts having a narrow particle size distribution. In particular, the invention concerns preparation of nanoparticular metal oxide catalyst precursors comprising combustible crystallization seeds upon which the...... catalyst metai oxide is co-precipitated with the carrier metal oxide, which crystallization seeds are removed by combustion in a final calcining step. The present invention also concerns processes wherein the nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts of the invention are used, such as SCR (deNOx) reactions of...

  1. Troilite oxidation by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics and mechanism of troilite oxidation by H2O2 was studied at temperatures of 25 and 45 deg. C. Solutions within the range 0.1-0.85 mol L-1 H2O2 in HClO4 (0.01-0.1 mol L-1) were used as dissolution media. The experimental amount of dissolved iron was plotted versus t(n), with n ranging from 0.25 to 1.55. The theoretical interpretation of this dependence suggests that the troilite oxidation involves several processes: acidic troilite dissolution, FeS + 2H+ ↔ /SH2/ + /Fe2+/, where /SH2/ and /Fe2+/ are H2S and Fe2+ at troilite/sulfur rich layer (SRL) interface; /Fe2+/ migration into solution across SRL, and its rapid oxidation by hydrogen peroxide into ferric iron, 2Fe2+ + H2O2 + 2H+ 2Fe3+ + 2H2O; oxidation of /SH2/ sites to elemental sulfur, a process that contributes to sulfur enrichment of troilite surface, /SH2/ + 2Fe3+ S + 2Fe2+ + 2H+; oxidation of elemental sulfur to sulfate, a sulfur-consuming process, S + 3H2O2 = SO42- + 2H2O + 2H+. Both experimental results and theoretical considerations illustrate the importance of temperature, pH, and [H2O2] for the kinetics and mechanisms of troilite oxidation. The amounts of dissolved iron strongly increase with temperature and [H+], whereas an increase of H2O2 concentration seems to reduce the troilite oxidation. The reaction orders with respect to [H+] are variable, pointing out notable modifications of reaction mechanism with experimental conditions. The estimated value Ea 25.4 ± 0.9 kJ mol-1 ([H2O2] = 0.4 mol L-1 and pH 1) points to dissolution kinetics controlled by a mix regime of surface reaction and diffusion. (authors)

  2. Is the Oxidative Stress Really a Disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Fogarasi Erzsébet; Croitoru Mircea Dumitru; Fülöp Ibolya; Muntean Daniela-Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is an imbalance between free radicals or other reactive species and the antioxidant activity of the organism. Oxidative stress can induce several illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer and Parkinson. The biomarkers of oxidative stress are used to test oxidative injury of biomolecules. The indicators of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy- 2-nonenal, 2-propenal, isoprostanes), of protein oxidation (carbonyl...

  3. Mesoporous metal oxide graphene nanocomposite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Kou, Rong; Wang, Donghai

    2016-05-24

    A nanocomposite material formed of graphene and a mesoporous metal oxide having a demonstrated specific capacity of more than 200 F/g with particular utility when employed in supercapacitor applications. A method for making these nanocomposite materials by first forming a mixture of graphene, a surfactant, and a metal oxide precursor, precipitating the metal oxide precursor with the surfactant from the mixture to form a mesoporous metal oxide. The mesoporous metal oxide is then deposited onto a surface of the graphene.

  4. Large-scale oxide nanostructures grown by thermal oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large scale oxide nanostructures of CuO, Fe2O3, Co3O4, ZnO, etc. were prepared by catalyst-free thermal oxidation process in atmosphere using pure metal as the starting material. Various single crystalline nanostructure arrays, including nanowires, nanobelts, nononeedles, nanoflakes, and nanowalls were obtained. These nanostructures can be grown from bulk materials, like foils or sheet, or from the microsized metal powders and the pre-deposited metal film. The growth time, temperature and substrate have important effects on the morphology, size and distribution of the nanostructures. Different from V-S or V-L-S mechanisms, the growth of nanostructure is found to be based on the metal ion diffusion process. The gradual oxidation process of the metals was clearly demonstrated. The properties of these nanostructures including gas sensing, magnetism, photoluminescence, and field emission were extensively investigated

  5. Heterogeneous Partial (ammOxidation and Oxidative Dehydrogenation Catalysis on Mixed Metal Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques C. Védrine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of heterogeneous partial (ammoxidation and oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH of hydrocarbons. The review has been voluntarily restricted to metal oxide-type catalysts, as the partial oxidation field is very broad and the number of catalysts is quite high. The main factors of solid catalysts for such reactions, designated by Grasselli as the “seven pillars”, and playing a determining role in catalytic properties, are considered to be, namely: isolation of active sites (known to be composed of ensembles of atoms, Me–O bond strength, crystalline structure, redox features, phase cooperation, multi-functionality and the nature of the surface oxygen species. Other important features and physical and chemical properties of solid catalysts, more or less related to the seven pillars, are also emphasized, including reaction sensitivity to metal oxide structure, epitaxial contact between an active phase and a second phase or its support, synergy effect between several phases, acid-base aspects, electron transfer ability, catalyst preparation and activation and reaction atmospheres, etc. Some examples are presented to illustrate the importance of these key factors. They include light alkanes (C1–C4 oxidation, ethane oxidation to ethylene and acetic acid on MoVTe(SbNb-O and Nb doped NiO, propene oxidation to acrolein on BiMoCoFe-O systems, propane (ammoxidation to (acrylonitrile acrylic acid on MoVTe(SbNb-O mixed oxides, butane oxidation to maleic anhydride on VPO: (VO2P2O7-based catalyst, and isobutyric acid ODH to methacrylic acid on Fe hydroxyl phosphates. It is shown that active sites are composed of ensembles of atoms whose size and chemical composition depend on the reactants to be transformed (their chemical and size features and the reaction mechanism, often of Mars and van Krevelen type. An important aspect is the fact that surface composition and surface crystalline structure vary with reaction on stream until

  6. Oxidation and Assimilation of Atmospheric Methane by Soil Methane Oxidizers

    OpenAIRE

    Roslev, P.; Iversen, N.; Henriksen, K.

    1997-01-01

    The metabolism of atmospheric methane in a forest soil was studied by radiotracer techniques. Maximum (sup14)CH(inf4) oxidation (163.5 pmol of C cm(sup-3) h(sup-1)) and (sup14)C assimilation (50.3 pmol of C cm(sup-3) h(sup-1)) occurred at the A(inf2) horizon located 15 to 18 cm below the soil surface. At this depth, 31 to 43% of the atmospheric methane oxidized was assimilated into microbial biomass; the remaining methane was recovered as (sup14)CO(inf2). Methane-derived carbon was incorporat...

  7. Solid oxide electrochemical reactor science.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Neal P. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO); Stechel, Ellen Beth; Moyer, Connor J. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO); Ambrosini, Andrea; Key, Robert J. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO)

    2010-09-01

    Solid-oxide electrochemical cells are an exciting new technology. Development of solid-oxide cells (SOCs) has advanced considerable in recent years and continues to progress rapidly. This thesis studies several aspects of SOCs and contributes useful information to their continued development. This LDRD involved a collaboration between Sandia and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) ins solid-oxide electrochemical reactors targeted at solid oxide electrolyzer cells (SOEC), which are the reverse of solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC). SOECs complement Sandia's efforts in thermochemical production of alternative fuels. An SOEC technology would co-electrolyze carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with steam at temperatures around 800 C to form synthesis gas (H{sub 2} and CO), which forms the building blocks for a petrochemical substitutes that can be used to power vehicles or in distributed energy platforms. The effort described here concentrates on research concerning catalytic chemistry, charge-transfer chemistry, and optimal cell-architecture. technical scope included computational modeling, materials development, and experimental evaluation. The project engaged the Colorado Fuel Cell Center at CSM through the support of a graduate student (Connor Moyer) at CSM and his advisors (Profs. Robert Kee and Neal Sullivan) in collaboration with Sandia.

  8. TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isogai, Akira; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Fukuzumi, Hayaka

    2011-01-01

    Native wood celluloses can be converted to individual nanofibers 3-4 nm wide that are at least several microns in length, i.e. with aspect ratios >100, by TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and successive mild disintegration in water. Preparation methods and fundamental characteristics of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TOCN) are reviewed in this paper. Significant amounts of C6 carboxylate groups are selectively formed on each cellulose microfibril surface by TEMPO-mediated oxidation without any changes to the original crystallinity (~74%) or crystal width of wood celluloses. Electrostatic repulsion and/or osmotic effects working between anionically-charged cellulose microfibrils, the ζ-potentials of which are approximately -75 mV in water, cause the formation of completely individualized TOCN dispersed in water by gentle mechanical disintegration treatment of TEMPO-oxidized wood cellulose fibers. Self-standing TOCN films are transparent and flexible, with high tensile strengths of 200-300 MPa and elastic moduli of 6-7 GPa. Moreover, TOCN-coated poly(lactic acid) films have extremely low oxygen permeability. The new cellulose-based nanofibers formed by size reduction process of native cellulose fibers by TEMPO-mediated oxidation have potential application as environmentally friendly and new bio-based nanomaterials in high-tech fields.

  9. Task-specific ionic liquid for solubilizing metal oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Nockemann, Peter; Thijs, Ben; Pittois, Stijn; Thoen, Jan; Glorieux, Christ; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Meervelt, Luc; Kirchner, Barbara; Binnemans, Koen

    2006-01-01

    Protonated betaine bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide is an ionic liquid with the ability to dissolve large quantities of metal oxides. This metal-solubilizing power is selective. Soluble are oxides of the trivalent rare earths, uranium(VI) oxide, zinc(II) oxide, cadmium(II) oxide, mercury(II) oxide, nickel( II) oxide, copper(II) oxide, palladium(II) oxide, lead(II) oxide, manganese(II) oxide, and silver(I) oxide. Insoluble or very poorly soluble are iron(III), manganese(IV), and cobalt oxide...

  10. Oxides gets environmentally-friendly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini

    A large amount of thermal energy is available from the waste heat associated with many industrial and social activities of mankind. However, it is difficult to reclaim this heat due to the dispersed nature and relative smallness of its sources. Thermoelectric conversion offers a very promising...... for high temperature oxide thermoelectric (TE) modules to become a viable route for power generation, the overall efficiency of these devices must be improved. While most research currently focuses on the enhancement of the thermoelectric properties of the p- and n-type elements of the module, it is...... also necessary to demonstrate a working oxide module and develop stable interconnects with low contact resistance as well as mechanical and the chemical stability. In this presentation I will also show our latest results on the performance of oxide module made of ZnO doped Al (n-type) and CaCoO 349 (p-type...

  11. Fundamentals of metal oxide catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Hari

    The properties of metal oxide catalysts and hence, catalytic activity are highly dependent on the composition and structure of these oxides. This dissertation has 3 parts -- all directed towards understanding relationships between structure, composition and activity in metal oxide catalysts. The first part of this dissertation focuses on supported metal oxide catalysts of tungsten, vanadium and molybdenum. Mechanisms are proposed for ethanol oxidative dehydrogenation which is used to probe the acidity and reducibility of these oxide catalysts. These studies are then used to develop a novel method to quantify active redox sites and determine the nature of the active site on these catalysts -- our results show that the intrinsic redox turn-over frequency is independent of the nature of the metal oxide and its loading and that the actual rate obtained over an oxide is only a function of the number of removable oxygen atoms linking the metal to the support. The extension of Ultraviolet-visible Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS) to the study of active oxide domains in binary oxide catalysts is demonstrated for distinguishing between interacting and non-interacting domains in binary MoO x-WOx catalysts on alumina. We show also how the rigorous analysis of pre-edge features, absorption white-line intensity and the full width at half maximum of the white-line in X-ray Absorption Spectra provide determinants for metal atom coordination and domain size in supported metal oxide catalysts. The second part of this work looks at effects of structure variations on the activity of polyoxometalate catalysts that are promising for the production of Methacrylic Acid from Isobutane. The use of these catalysts is limited by structural changes that impact their performance -- an "activation" period is required before the catalysts become active for methacrylic acid production and structural changes also lead to degradation of the catalyst, which are also seen during thermal

  12. [Heme metabolism and oxidative stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, P A; Barannik, T B

    2001-01-01

    The role of heme metabolism in oxidative stress development and defense reactions formation in mammals under different stress factors are discussed in the article. Heme metabolism is considered as the totality of synthesis, degradation, transport and exchange processes of exogenous heme and heme liberated from erythrocyte hemoglobin under erythrocyte aging and hemolysis. The literature data presented display normal heme metabolism including mammals heme-binding proteins and intracellular free heme pool and heme metabolism alterations under oxidative stress development. The main attention is focused to the prooxidant action of heme, the interaction of heme transport and lipid exchange, and to the heme metabolism key enzymes (delta-aminolevulinate synthase and heme oxygenase), serum heme-binding protein hemopexin and intracellular heme-binding proteins participating in metabolism adaptation under the action of factors, which cause oxidative stress. PMID:11599427

  13. Reduced graphene oxide molecular sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jeremy T; Perkins, F Keith; Snow, Eric S; Wei, Zhongqing; Sheehan, Paul E

    2008-10-01

    We demonstrate reduced graphene oxide as the active material for high-performance molecular sensors. Sensors are fabricated from exfoliated graphene oxide platelets that are deposited to form an ultrathin continuous network. These graphene oxide networks are tunably reduced toward graphene by varying the exposure time to a hydrazine hydrate vapor. The conductance change of the networks upon exposure to trace levels of vapor is measured as a function of the chemical reduction. The level of reduction affects both the sensitivity and the level of 1/ f noise. The sensors are capable of detecting 10 s exposures to simulants of the three main classes of chemical-warfare agents and an explosive at parts-per-billion concentrations. PMID:18763832

  14. Patterning by area selective oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Chang-Yong; Kamcev, Jovan; Black, Charles T.; Grubbs, Robert

    2015-12-29

    Technologies are described for methods for producing a pattern of a material on a substrate. The methods may comprise receiving a patterned block copolymer on a substrate. The patterned block copolymer may include a first polymer block domain and a second polymer block domain. The method may comprise exposing the patterned block copolymer to a light effective to oxidize the first polymer block domain in the patterned block copolymer. The method may comprise applying a precursor to the block copolymer. The precursor may infuse into the oxidized first polymer block domain and generate the material. The method may comprise applying a removal agent to the block copolymer. The removal agent may be effective to remove the first polymer block domain and the second polymer block domain from the substrate, and may not be effective to remove the material in the oxidized first polymer block domain.

  15. Oxide Fiber Targets at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Köster, U; Carminati, D; Catherall, R; Cederkäll, J; Correia, J G; Crepieux, B; Dietrich, M; Elder, K; Fedosseev, V; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Fynbo, H O U; Georg, U; Giles, T; Joinet, A; Jonsson, O C; Kirchner, R; Lau, C; Lettry, Jacques; Maier, H J; Mishin, V I; Oinonen, M; Peräjärvi, K; Ravn, H L; Rinaldi, T; Santana-Leitner, M; Wahl, U; Weissman, L

    2003-01-01

    Many elements are rapidly released from oxide matrices. Some oxide powder targets show a fast sintering, thus losing their favorable release characteristics. Loosely packed oxyde fiber targets are less critical since they may maintain their open structure even when starting to fuse together at some contact points. The experience with various oxyde fiber targets (titania, zirconia, ceria and thoria) used in the last years at ISOLDE is reviewed. For short-lived isotopes of Cu, Ga and Xe the zirconia and ceria targets respectively provided significantly higher yields than any other target (metal foils, oxide powders, etc.) tested before. Titania fibers, which were not commercially available, were produced in a relic process by impregnation of a rayon felt in a titanium chloride solution and subsequent calcination by heating the dried felt in air. Thoria fibers were obtained either by the same process or by burning commercial gas lantern mantle cloth. In the future a beryllia fiber target could be used to produce...

  16. Atmospheric oxidation of selected hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benter, T.; Olariu, R.I.

    2002-02-01

    This work presents investigations on the gas-phase chemistry of phenol and the cresol isomers performed in a 1080 l quartz glass reactor in Wuppertal and in a large-volume outdoor photoreactor EUPHORE in Valencia, Spain. The studies aimed at clarifying the oxidation mechanisms of the reactions of these compounds with OH and NO{sub 3} radicals. Product investigations on the oxidation of phenol and the cresol isomers initiated by OH radicals were performed in the 1080 l quartz glass reactor with analyses by in situ FT-IR absorption spectroscopy. The primary focus of the investigations was on the determination of product yields. This work represents the first determination and quantification of 1,2-dihydroxybenzenes in the OH oxidation of phenolic compounds. Possible reaction pathways leading to the observed products have been elucidated. (orig.)

  17. Atomistic stimulation of defective oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Minervini, L

    2000-01-01

    defect processes. The predominant intrinsic disorder reaction and the mechanism by which excess oxygen is accommodated are established. Furthermore, the most favourable migration mechanism and pathway for oxygen ions is predicted. Chapters 7 and 8 investigate pyrochlore oxides. These materials are candidates for solid oxide fuel cell components and as actinide host phases. Such applications require a detailed understanding of the defect processes. The defect energies, displayed as contour maps, are able to account for structure stability and, given an appropriate partial charge potential model, to accurately determine the oxygen positional parameter. In particular, the dependence of the positional parameter on intrinsic disorder is predicted. It is demonstrated, by radiation damage experiments, that these results are able to predict the radiation performance of pyrochlore oxides. Atomistic simulation calculations based on energy minimization techniques and classical pair potentials are used to study several i...

  18. Cellulose degradation by oxidative enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  19. Adaptive oxide electronics: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sieu D.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2011-10-01

    Novel information processing techniques are being actively explored to overcome fundamental limitations associated with CMOS scaling. A new paradigm of adaptive electronic devices is emerging that may reshape the frontiers of electronics and enable new modalities. Creating systems that can learn and adapt to various inputs has generally been a complex algorithm problem in information science, albeit with wide-ranging and powerful applications from medical diagnosis to control systems. Recent work in oxide electronics suggests that it may be plausible to implement such systems at the device level, thereby drastically increasing computational density and power efficiency and expanding the potential for electronics beyond Boolean computation. Intriguing possibilities of adaptive electronics include fabrication of devices that mimic human brain functionality: the strengthening and weakening of synapses emulated by electrically, magnetically, thermally, or optically tunable properties of materials.In this review, we detail materials and device physics studies on functional metal oxides that may be utilized for adaptive electronics. It has been shown that properties, such as resistivity, polarization, and magnetization, of many oxides can be modified electrically in a non-volatile manner, suggesting that these materials respond to electrical stimulus similarly as a neural synapse. We discuss what device characteristics will likely be relevant for integration into adaptive platforms and then survey a variety of oxides with respect to these properties, such as, but not limited to, TaOx, SrTiO3, and Bi4-xLaxTi3O12. The physical mechanisms in each case are detailed and analyzed within the framework of adaptive electronics. We then review theoretically formulated and current experimentally realized adaptive devices with functional oxides, such as self-programmable logic and neuromorphic circuits. Finally, we speculate on what advances in materials physics and engineering may

  20. Heterogeneously Catalyzed Oxidation Reactions Using Molecular Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Matthias Josef

    Heterogeneously catalyzed selective oxidation reactions have attracted a lot of attention in recent time. The first part of the present thesis provides an overview over heterogeneous copper and silver catalysts for selective oxidations in the liquid phase and compared the performance and catalytic...... that both copper and silver can function as complementary catalyst materials to gold showing different catalytic properties and being more suitable for hydrocarbon oxidation reactions. Potential opportunities for future research were outlined. In an experimental study, the potential of silver as a...... properties to the widely discussed gold catalysts. Literature results were summarized for alcohol oxidation, epoxidation, amine oxidation, phenol hydroxylation, silane and sulfide oxidation, (side-chain) oxidation of alkyl aromatic compounds, hydroquinone oxidation and cyclohexane oxidation. It was found...

  1. Trends in reactivity of oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftelund, Anja

    linearly with the adsorption energy of their central N, O and S atoms. It is also found that they follow the same trend as in the case of adsorption of the same molecules on transition metals. The same type of scaling relations are also established between the adsorption energies of the halides (Cl, Br...... chemisorption energies. It turns out that the BEP relation for rutile oxides is almost coinciding with the dissociation line, i.e. no barrier exists for the reactive surfaces. The heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of hydrogen halides (HCl, HBr, and HI) is investigated. A micro-kinetic model is solved and the...

  2. Antisite defects at oxide interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hanghui; Millis, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    We use ab initio calculations to estimate the formation energies of cation (transition-metal) antisite defects at oxide interfaces and to understand the basic physical effects that drive or suppress the formation of these defects. Antisite defects are found to be favored in systems with substantial charge transfer across the interface, while Jahn-Teller distortions and itinerant ferromagnetism can prevent antisite defects and help stabilize atomically sharp interfaces. Our results enable identification of classes of systems that may be more and less susceptible to the formation of antisite defects, and they motivate experimental studies and further theoretical calculations to elucidate the local structure and stability of oxide interface systems.

  3. Direct electrochemical oxidation of polyacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellagamba, Riccardo; Comninellis, Christos; Vatistas, Nicolaos

    2002-10-01

    A promising elimination treatment of non-biodegradable organic pollutants is the direct electro-oxidation. In this work has been proposed the electrochemical elimination of polyacrylates by using boron-doped diamond (BDD) as anodic material. The complete elimination of organic contaminants has been obtained and this is the first case of successful electrochemical treatment of polymeric and bio-refractory species. The tests of the electrochemical oxidation have been conducted at constant current conditions and a complete elimination of organic species has been reached. The decrease of the COD value with time follows the behaviour of an ideal anode as in the case of low molecular organic compounds. PMID:12489259

  4. Problems in monitoring oxidizing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the three factors required to obtain intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) is an oxidizing condition. For many years only oxygen was considered important in giving this oxidizing condition in BWR (boiling water reactor) water during operation. During the last three years, however, hydrogen peroxide has been found to be present also at high temperatures. An increasing interest in this compound has therefore grown recently. In this presentation some results from measurements in BWRs and in the laboratory and the consequences of these new results on the use of ECP as a materials monitoring method are discussed

  5. Aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The research effort has focussed on discovering an explanation for the anomalously high CO{sub 2} concentrations observed early in the reaction sequence of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene. To explain this observation, a number of plausible mechanisms have been developed which now await experimental verification. One experimental technique for verifying mechanisms is to probe the reacting system by perturbing the radical concentrations. Two forms of chemical perturbation of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene were begun during this past year--the addition of NO{sub 2} and CO to the reacting mixture.

  6. Plutonium oxidation states in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of the oxidation-state distribution of plutonium in the ocean illustrate the need to characterize seawater by means of the pH, the EH, and quantitative complexation parameters. The parameters are combined in an easy-to-use equation that determines the fractions of the four oxidation states. Similar analyses have been applied to plutonium in other solutions, and the same methods can be applied to seawater. An appendix shows how to estimate and interpret the alpha coefficient for tetravalent plutonium using published information for tetravalent thorium

  7. Oxidative stress and immunotoxicity induced by graphene oxide in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minjie; Yin, Junfa; Liang, Yong; Yuan, Shaopeng; Wang, Fengbang; Song, Maoyong; Wang, Hailin

    2016-05-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively explored as a promising nanomaterial for applications in biology because of its unique properties. Therefore, systematic investigation of GO toxicity is essential to determine its fate in the environment and potential adverse effects. In this study, acute toxicity, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity of GO were investigated in zebrafish. No obvious acute toxicity was observed when zebrafish were exposed to 1, 5, 10 or 50mg/L GO for 14 days. However, a number of cellular alterations were detected by histological analysis of the liver and intestine, including vacuolation, loose arrangement of cells, histolysis and disintegration of cell boundaries. As evidence for oxidative stress, malondialdehyde levels and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were increased and glutathione content was decreased in the liver after treatment with GO. GO treatment induced an immune response in zebrafish, as demonstrated by increased expression of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1 β, and interleukin-6 in the spleen. Our findings demonstrated that GO administration in an aquatic system can cause oxidative stress and immune toxicity in adult zebrafish. To our knowledge, this is the first report of immune toxicity of GO in zebrafish. PMID:26921726

  8. Graphene oxide and H2 production from bioelectrochemical graphite oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Zeng, Cuiping; Wang, Luda; Yin, Xiaobo; Jin, Song; Lu, Anhuai; Jason Ren, Zhiyong

    2015-11-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an emerging material for energy and environmental applications, but it has been primarily produced using chemical processes involving high energy consumption and hazardous chemicals. In this study, we reported a new bioelectrochemical method to produce GO from graphite under ambient conditions without chemical amendments, value-added organic compounds and high rate H2 were also produced. Compared with abiotic electrochemical electrolysis control, the microbial assisted graphite oxidation produced high rate of graphite oxide and graphene oxide (BEGO) sheets, CO2, and current at lower applied voltage. The resultant electrons are transferred to a biocathode, where H2 and organic compounds are produced by microbial reduction of protons and CO2, respectively, a process known as microbial electrosynthesis (MES). Pseudomonas is the dominant population on the anode, while abundant anaerobic solvent-producing bacteria Clostridium carboxidivorans is likely responsible for electrosynthesis on the cathode. Oxygen production through water electrolysis was not detected on the anode due to the presence of facultative and aerobic bacteria as O2 sinkers. This new method provides a sustainable route for producing graphene materials and renewable H2 at low cost, and it may stimulate a new area of research in MES.

  9. Oxidation of aniline with strong and weak oxidants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sapurina, I. Yu.; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2012), s. 256-275. ISSN 1070-3632 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400500905 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polyaniline * conducting polymer * oxidant Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.432, year: 2012

  10. Nanosized Cobalt Oxides over Aluminum Monoliths for VOC Oxidation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirátová, Květa; Kovanda, F.; Klempa, Jan; Balabánová, Jana

    Poznań: Poznan Science and Technology Park, 2016, P61. ISBN N. [Designing New Heterogeneous Catalysts: Faraday Discussion. London (GB), 04.04.2016-06.04.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13750S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : cobalt oxides * Al monoliths * catalyst layer Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  11. Optical properties of graphite oxide and reduced graphite oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the optical properties of a graphite oxide and a reduced graphite oxide by using the optical spectroscopic technique. The graphite oxide does not show a finite dc conductivity and has several characteristic absorption modes in the mid-infrared region, caused by an epoxide functional group and hydroxyl and carboxyl moieties in the mid-infrared range. The reduced graphite oxide shows a Drude-like response in the far-infrared region and the estimated dc conductivity and electric mobility are around 200 Ω−1cm−1 and ∼100 cm2V−1s−1, respectively. We found that the optical conductivity cannot be fitted with a simple Drude model, which indicates that the charge carriers are correlated. We applied an extended Drude model and obtained the optical scattering rate and the optical effective mass. We found that the optical effective mass can carry information of both the enhanced mass by correlation and the electronic band structure. (paper)

  12. Oxidation mechanisms for alloys in single-oxidant gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittle, D.P.

    1981-03-01

    Scales formed on alloys invariably contain the alloy constituents in a ratio different from that in the alloy, owing to the differing thermodynamic tendencies of the alloy components to react with the oxidant and to differences in diffusion rates in scale and alloy phases. This complex interrelationship between transport rates and the thermodynamics of the alloy-oxidant system can be analyzed using multicomponent diffusion theory when transport-controlled growth of single or multi-layered scales occurs. In particular, the superimposition of the diffusion data on an isothermal section of the appropriate phase diagram indicates the likely morphologies of the reaction products, including the sequence of phases found in the scale, the occurrence of internal oxidation and the development of an irregular metal/scale interface. The scale morphologies on alloys are also time-dependent: there is an initial transient stage, a steady state period, and a final breakdown, the latter often related to mechanical influences such as scale adherence, spallation, thermal or mechanical stresses and void formation. Mechanical influences have a more devastating effect in alloy oxidation due to the changes in alloy surface composition during the steady state period.

  13. Hydrous metal oxide catalysts for oxidation of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.E.; Dosch, R.G.; McLaughlin, L.I. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Process Research Dept.

    1993-07-01

    This report describes work performed at Sandia under a CRADA with Shell Development of Houston, Texas aimed at developing hydrous metal oxide (HMO) catalysts for oxidation of hydrocarbons. Autoxidation as well as selective oxidation of 1-octene was studied in the presence of HMO catalysts based on known oxidation catalysts. The desired reactions were the conversion of olefin to epoxides, alcohols, and ketones, HMOs seem to inhibit autoxidation reactions, perhaps by reacting with peroxides or radicals. Attempts to use HMOs and metal loaded HMOs as epoxidation catalysts were unsuccessful, although their utility for this reaction was not entirely ruled out. Likewise, alcohol formation from olefins in the presence of HMO catalysts was not achieved. However, this work led to the discovery that acidified HMOs can lead to carbocation reactions of hydrocarbons such as cracking. An HMO catalyst containing Rh and Cu that promotes the reaction of {alpha}-olefins with oxygen to form methyl ketones was identified. Although the activity of the catalyst is relatively low and isomerization reactions of the olefin simultaneously occur, results indicate that these problems may be addressed by eliminating mass transfer limitations. Other suggestions for improving the catalyst are also made. 57 refs.

  14. Facile Access to Graphene Oxide from Ferro-Induced Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Wang, Cai-Feng; Chen, Su

    2016-01-01

    Methods allowing the oxidation of graphite to graphene oxide (GO) are vital important for the production of graphene from GO. This oxidation reaction has mainly relied on strong acid strategy for 174 years, which circumvents issues associated with toxicity of reagent and product, complex post-treatment, high cost and waste generation. Here, we report a green route for performing this oxidization reaction via a ferro-induced strategy, with use of water, potassium ferrate (Fe(VI)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as reagents, to produce about 65% yield of GO (vs. 40% for Hummers’ method, the most commonly used concentrated acid strategy) and non-toxic by-products. Moreover, GO produced from this new method shows equivalent performance to those reported previously. This H2SO4-free strategy makes it possible to process graphite into GO in a safe, low-cost, time-saving, energy-efficient and eco-friendly pathway, opening a promising avenue for the large-scale production of GO and GO-based materials.

  15. Facile Access to Graphene Oxide from Ferro-Induced Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Wang, Cai-Feng; Chen, Su

    2016-01-01

    Methods allowing the oxidation of graphite to graphene oxide (GO) are vital important for the production of graphene from GO. This oxidation reaction has mainly relied on strong acid strategy for 174 years, which circumvents issues associated with toxicity of reagent and product, complex post-treatment, high cost and waste generation. Here, we report a green route for performing this oxidization reaction via a ferro-induced strategy, with use of water, potassium ferrate (Fe(VI)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as reagents, to produce about 65% yield of GO (vs. 40% for Hummers' method, the most commonly used concentrated acid strategy) and non-toxic by-products. Moreover, GO produced from this new method shows equivalent performance to those reported previously. This H2SO4-free strategy makes it possible to process graphite into GO in a safe, low-cost, time-saving, energy-efficient and eco-friendly pathway, opening a promising avenue for the large-scale production of GO and GO-based materials. PMID:26818784

  16. Copper Oxide Nanoparticles Induce Oxidative Stress and Cytotoxicity in Airway Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fahmy, Baher; Cormier, Stephania A

    2009-01-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are often used as industrial catalysts and elevated levels of these particles have been clearly demonstrated at sites surrounding factories. To date, limited toxicity data on metal oxide nanoparticles are available. To understand the impact of these airborne pollutants on the respiratory system, airway epithelial (HEp-2) cells were exposed to increasing doses of silicon oxide (SiO2), ferric oxide (Fe2O3) and copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles, the leading metal oxides ...

  17. Molybdenum-vanadium-antimony mixed oxide catalyst for isobutane partial oxidation synthesized using magneto hydrodynamic forces

    OpenAIRE

    Stuyven, Bernard; Emmerich, Jens; Eloy, Pierre; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Jacobs, Pierre; Kirschhock, Christine; Martens, Johan; Breynaert, Eric

    2014-01-01

    A peculiar effect was observed that the oxidation behavior of antimony oxide prepared in presence of a weak permanent magnetic field is changed. Reactivity of alpha-Sb2O3 (senarmontite) towards oxidation is significantly enhanced after recirculating its suspension in a magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) system. This inspired the MHD synthesis of a molybdenum-vanadiumantimony mixed oxide with superior catalytic activity for selective partial oxidation of isobutane. Traditionally these mixed oxides are...

  18. Oxidation phase growth diagram of vanadium oxides film fabricated by rapid thermal annealing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tamura KOZO; Zheng-cao LI; Yu-quan WANG; Jie NI; Yin HU; Zheng-jun ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Thermal evaporation deposited vanadium oxide films were annealed in air by rapid thermal annealing (RTP). By adjusting the annealing temperature and time, a series of vanadium oxide films with various oxidation phases and surface morphologies were fabricated, and an oxidation phase growth diagram was established. It was observed that different oxidation phases appear at a limited and continuous annealing condition range, and the morphologic changes are related to the oxidation process.

  19. Saltstone Oxidation Study: Leaching Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.; Burns, H. H.

    2013-02-24

    Cementitious waste forms can be designed to chemically stabilize selected contaminants, such as Tc{sup +7} and Cr{sup +6}, by chemically reduction to lower valance states, Tc{sup +4} and Cr{sup +3}, respectively, and precipitation of these species in alkaline media as low solubility solid phases. Data for oxidation of this type of cementitious waste form cured under field conditions as a function of time is required for predicting the performance of the waste form and disposal facility. The rate of oxidation (oxidation front advancement) is an important parameter for predicting performance because the solubilities of some radionuclide contaminants, e.g., technetium, are a function of the oxidation state. A non-radioactive experiment was designed for quantifying the oxidation front advancement using chromium, as an approximate redox-sensitive surrogate (Cr{sup +6} / Cr{sup +3}) for technetium (Tc{sup +7} / Tc{sup +4}). Nonradioactive cementitious waste forms were prepared in the laboratory and cured under both laboratory and ?field conditions.? Laboratory conditions were ambient temperature and sealed sample containers. Field conditions were approximated by curing samples in open containers which were placed inside a plastic container stored outdoors at SRS. The container had a lid and was instrumented with temperature and humidity probes. Subsamples as thin as 0.2 mm were taken as a function of distance from the exposed surface of the as-cast sample. The subsamples were leached and the leachates were analyzed for chromium, nitrate, nitrite and sodium. Nitrate, nitrite, and sodium concentrations were used to provide baseline data because these species are not chemically retained in the waste form matrix to any significant extent and are not redox sensitive. ?Effective? oxidation fronts for Cr were measured for samples containing 1000, 500 and 20 mg/kg Cr added as soluble sodium chromate, Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. For a sample cured for 129 days under field conditions

  20. Production of oceanic nitrous oxide by ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, C. R.; Kock, A.; Könneke, M.; LaRoche, J.; Bange, H. W.; Schmitz, R. A.

    2012-07-01

    The recent finding that microbial ammonia oxidation in the ocean is performed by archaea to a greater extent than by bacteria has drastically changed the view on oceanic nitrification. The numerical dominance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOA) over their bacterial counterparts (AOB) in large parts of the ocean leads to the hypothesis that AOA rather than AOB could be the key organisms for the oceanic production of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) that occurs as a by-product of nitrification. Very recently, enrichment cultures of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been reported to produce N2O. Here, we demonstrate that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA) were detectable throughout the water column of the eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) and eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) Oceans. Particularly in the ETNA, comparable patterns of abundance and expression of archaeal amoA genes and N2O co-occurred in the oxygen minimum, whereas the abundances of bacterial amoA genes were negligible. Moreover, selective inhibition of archaea in seawater incubations from the ETNA decreased the N2O production significantly. In studies with the only cultivated marine archaeal ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, we provide the first direct evidence for N2O production in a pure culture of AOA, excluding the involvement of other microorganisms as possibly present in enrichments. N. maritimus showed high N2O production rates under low oxygen concentrations comparable to concentrations existing in the oxycline of the ETNA, whereas the N2O production from two AOB cultures was comparably low under similar conditions. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the production of N2O in tropical ocean areas results mainly from archaeal nitrification and will be affected by the predicted decrease in dissolved oxygen in the ocean.

  1. [Solidification of volatile oil with graphene oxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong-Mei; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Sun, E; Xu, Yi-Hao

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the properties of solidifying volatile oil with graphene oxide, clove oil and zedoary turmeric oil were solidified by graphene oxide. The amount of graphene oxide was optimized with the eugenol yield and curcumol yield as criteria. Curing powder was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of graphene oxide on dissolution in vitro and thermal stability of active components were studied. The optimum solidification ratio of graphene oxide to volatile oil was 1:1. Dissolution rate of active components had rare influence while their thermal stability improved after volatile oil was solidified. Solidifying herbal volatile oil with graphene oxide deserves further study. PMID:25975033

  2. Refractoies and Anti—Oxidation Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUKaiqi

    2000-01-01

    Carbon-containing refiactories are easily oxidized at high tenperature,thus making service life rapidly drop.The anti-oxidation methods,such as impregnation and adding anti-oxidaton agents,can't meet the require-ments of industry's development and some special cases, By analyzing the charcteristics of several oxides and non-oxides raw maerials,the oxidation resistant mechanism of the refractory anti-oxidation coatings(RAOC),which possess the characteristc of self-healing at hight temperature,is discussed.

  3. Si and C emission into the oxide layer during the oxidation of silicon carbide and its influence on the oxidation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuto Hijikata

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Si and C emission into the oxide layer during the oxidation of silicon carbide and SiO2 growth on the oxide surface were experimentally confirmed from depth profiles of oxidized HfO2/SiC structures. With longer oxidation times, surface SiO2 growth transitioned to oxide/SiC interface growth. The influence of Si and C emission on the oxidation rate was investigated by real-time measurements of the oxide growth rate. Experimental observations of annealing-inserted oxidation and two-temperature oxidation indicated that the emission suppressed the oxidation rate.

  4. Structure, adhesion, and stability of metal/oxide and oxide/oxide interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past six months, we have begun our studies of the fundamental properties of metal/oxide and oxide/oxide heterogeneous interfaces which are being prepared by epitaxial growth of ultra-thin-films on single crystal TiO2 and NiO surfaces. A new ultra-high vacuum film growth chamber was assembled and coupled to an existing surface analysis chamber; a sample transfer system, metal deposition sources, and a RHEED systems with microchannel plate detection were constructed and implemented. Atomic Force Microscopy was used to characterize and refine the preparation procedures for the single crystal surfaces. The electronic structure of stoichiometric, oxygen-deficient, and potassium-covered TiO2 (110) surfaces was investigated. Preliminary results on the Al/TiO2 (110) system have been obtained. Two graduate students have begun thesis research on the project. 6 figs

  5. Oxidative stress-mediated antibacterial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurunathan S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sangiliyandi Gurunathan, Jae Woong Han, Ahmed Abdal Dayem, Vasuki Eppakayala, Jin-Hoi KimDepartment of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul, South KoreaBackground: Graphene holds great promise for potential use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices due to its unique high carrier mobility, good optical transparency, large surface area, and biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of graphene oxide (GO and reduced graphene oxide (rGO in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we used a novel reducing agent, betamercaptoethanol (BME, for synthesis of graphene to avoid the use of toxic materials. To uncover the impacts of GO and rGO on human health, the antibacterial activity of two types of graphene-based material toward a bacterial model P. aeruginosa was studied and compared.Methods: The synthesized GO and rGO was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, particle-size analyzer, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Further, to explain the antimicrobial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide, we employed various assays, such as cell growth, cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation, and DNA fragmentation.Results: Ultraviolet-visible spectra of the samples confirmed the transition of GO into graphene. Dynamic light-scattering analyses showed the average size among the two types of graphene materials. X-ray diffraction data validated the structure of graphene sheets, and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was employed to investigate the morphologies of prepared graphene. Raman spectroscopy data indicated the removal of oxygen-containing functional groups from the surface of GO and the formation of graphene. The exposure of cells to GO and rGO induced the production of superoxide radical anion and loss of cell viability. Results suggest that the antibacterial activities are contributed to by loss of

  6. Formaldehyde degradation by catalytic oxidation.

    OpenAIRE

    Shirey, W N; Hall, T. A.; Hanel, E; Sansone, E B

    1981-01-01

    Formaldehyde used for the disinfection of a laminar-flow biological safety cabinet was oxidatively degraded by using a catalyst. This technique reduced the formaldehyde concentration in the cabinet from about 5,000 to about 45 mg/m3 in 8 h. This technique should prove useful in other applications.

  7. Plasma electrolytic oxidation of metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojadinović Stevan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this lecture results of the investigation of plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO process on some metals (aluminum, titanium, tantalum, magnesium, and zirconium were presented. Whole process involves anodizing metals above the dielectric breakdown voltage where numerous micro-discharges are generated continuously over the coating surface. For the characterization of PEO process optical emission spectroscopy and real-time imaging were used. These investigations enabled the determination of electron temperature, electron number density, spatial density of micro-discharges, the active surface covered by micro-discharges, and dimensional distribution of micro-discharges at various stages of PEO process. Special attention was focused on the results of the study of the morphology, chemical, and phase composition of oxide layers obtained by PEO process on aluminum, tantalum, and titanium in electrolytes containing tungsten. Physicochemical methodes: atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS, x-ray diffraction (XRD, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and Raman spectroscopy served as tools for examining obtained oxide coatings. Also, the application of the obtained oxide coatings, especially the application of TiO2/WO3 coatings in photocatalysis, were discussed.

  8. Generation of Mn oxides nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikuška, Pavel; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Dočekal, Bohumil; Moravec, Pavel

    Prague : Czech Aerosol Society, 2013. B143. ISBN N. [European Aerosol Conference (EAC 2013). 01.09.2013-06.09.2013, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/2315 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 ; RVO:67985858 Keywords : inhalation * manganese oxides nanoparticles * chemical composition * synthesis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UCHP-M)

  9. Radiation annealing in cuprous oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vajda, P.

    1966-01-01

    Experimental results from high-intensity gamma-irradiation of cuprous oxide are used to investigate the annealing of defects with increasing radiation dose. The results are analysed on the basis of the Balarin and Hauser (1965) statistical model of radiation annealing, giving a square...

  10. Oxidative stress in oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesarwala, A H; Krishna, M C; Mitchell, J B

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative species, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), are components of normal cellular metabolism and are required for intracellular processes as varied as proliferation, signal transduction, and apoptosis. In the situation of chronic oxidative stress, however, ROS contribute to various pathophysiologies and are involved in multiple stages of carcinogenesis. In head and neck cancers specifically, many common risk factors contribute to carcinogenesis via ROS-based mechanisms, including tobacco, areca quid, alcohol, and viruses. Given their widespread influence on the process of carcinogenesis, ROS and their related pathways are attractive targets for intervention. The effects of radiation therapy, a central component of treatment for nearly all head and neck cancers, can also be altered via interfering with oxidative pathways. These pathways are also relevant to the development of many benign oral diseases. In this review, we outline how ROS contribute to pathophysiology with a focus toward head and neck cancers and benign oral diseases, describing potential targets and pathways for intervention that exploit the role of oxidative species in these pathologic processes. PMID:25417961

  11. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. Thus, oxidative stress elicits various neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, chemotherapy could result in severe side effects on the CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS of cancer patients, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates the involvement of ROS in drug-induced neurotoxicities as well. Therefore, development of antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs is a potentially beneficial strategy for clinical therapy. In this review, we summarize the source, balance maintenance and physiologic functions of ROS, oxidative stress and its toxic mechanisms underlying a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and the possible involvement of ROS in chemotherapy-induced toxicity to the CNS and PNS. We ultimately assess the value for antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs and provide our comments on the unmet needs.

  12. Oxidation mechanism of tungstovanadophosphoric heteropolyanions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction and reoxidation of single heteropolyanions (HPA)PW12-nVnO40(3+n)-, n=1-4 are studied under the conditions of chemical and isomeric composition conservation. For reduced HPA, containing 5(4), it is shown that PW11V and PW10V2 don't oxidize by the molecular oxygen, and the rate of PW2V4 oxidation is considerably higher than the rate of PW9V3 oxidation at similar degree of HPA reduction. Taking PW11V and PW10V2 as the example, the role of HPA complexing with VO2+ ions in reoxidation of reduced solutions is shown. O2 reduction proceeds mainly by the tetraelectron mechanism, where HPA complexes participate, obviously, with three VO2+ ions. For all P-W-V HPA electron exchange equilibrium with particle formation with 4 atoms of 5(4) is quickly reached, and these reactions don't limit the oxidation rate of HPA reduced by dioxygen. Solution composition was controlled by 31P and 51V NMR spectra

  13. Ferroelectricity in undoped hafnium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polakowski, Patrick; Müller, Johannes [Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS - Business Unit Center Nanoelectronic Technologies CNT, Dresden 01099 (Germany)

    2015-06-08

    We report the observation of ferroelectric characteristics in undoped hafnium oxide thin films in a thickness range of 4–20 nm. The undoped films were fabricated using atomic layer deposition (ALD) and embedded into titanium nitride based metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors for electrical evaluation. Structural as well as electrical evidence for the appearance of a ferroelectric phase in pure hafnium oxide was collected with respect to film thickness and thermal budget applied during titanium nitride electrode formation. Using grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction (GIXRD) analysis, we observed an enhanced suppression of the monoclinic phase fraction in favor of an orthorhombic, potentially, ferroelectric phase with decreasing thickness/grain size and for a titanium nitride electrode formation below crystallization temperature. The electrical presence of ferroelectricity was confirmed using polarization measurements. A remanent polarization P{sub r} of up to 10 μC cm{sup −2} as well as a read/write endurance of 1.6 × 10{sup 5} cycles was measured for the pure oxide. The experimental results reported here strongly support the intrinsic nature of the ferroelectric phase in hafnium oxide and expand its applicability beyond the doped systems.

  14. Oxidative Stress and Major Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Bajpai, Ashutosh; Verma, Akhilesh Kumar; Srivastava, Mona; Srivastava, Ragini

    2014-01-01

    Background: Major causative factor for major depression is inflammation, autoimmune tissue damage and prolonged psychological stress, which leads to oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to know the association of free radicals and antioxidant status in subjects suffering from major depression.

  15. Compton profile of scandium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we report the measurement of the Compton profile of polycrystalline scandium oxide using 59.54 keV gamma radiation from a Am241 source. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical Compton profile values calculated based on the linear combination of Gaussian orbital (LCGO) method. The theoretical values from such calculations agree well with the experimental results

  16. The Analysis of Biodiesel Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stability is one of the major technical issues facing biodiesel, an alternative diesel fuel derived from vegetable oils, animal fats or used frying oils. The content of unsaturated fatty acids, especially those with bis-allylic methylene positions, is the main cause of this problem. Besi...

  17. Generation of Mn oxides nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikuška, Pavel; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Dočekal, Bohumil; Moravec, Pavel

    Prague : Czech Aerosol Society, 2013. B143. ISBN N. [European Aerosol Conference (EAC 2013). 01.09.2013-06.09.2013, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:68081715 ; RVO:67985858 Keywords : manganese oxides nanoparticles * inhalation * synthesis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UCHP-M) http://eac2013.cz/index.php

  18. Catalysis by Oxidic Spinel Ferrites

    OpenAIRE

    Darshane, V.; Lokegaonkar, S.; Oak, S.

    1997-01-01

    Mixed metal oxides viz. ferrites, ferrochromites and chromites have been studied with a view to investigating a correlation between bulk physical properties and catalytic performance over decomposition of alcohols. We could observe a satisfactory relationship between lattice parameter, electronic activation energy, nature and mobility of charge carriers and Curie temperature with reference to catalytic activity of various spinel ferrites.

  19. Generation of Mn oxides nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Večeřa, Zbyněk; Mikuška, Pavel; Dočekal, Bohumil; Moravec, Pavel

    Praha, 2013. s. 106. ISBN N. [QNano Integrating Conference /2./. 27.02.2013-01.03.2013, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/2315; GA ČR(CZ) GBP503/12/G147 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 ; RVO:67985858 Keywords : nanoparticles * manganese oxides Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  20. Chemical oxidative polymerization of benzocaine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marjanovic, B.; Juranic, I.; Ciric-Marjanovic, G.; Pašti, I.; Trchová, Miroslava; Holler, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 7 (2011), s. 704-712. ISSN 1381-5148 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0686 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : benzocaine * electro-active oligomer * oxidative polymerization Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.479, year: 2011

  1. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  2. Substrate-Sensitive Graphene Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuhua; Yin, Jun; Liu, Xiaofei; Li, Jidong; Zhang, Jiahuan; Guo, Wanlin

    2016-03-01

    The inertness of graphene toward reaction with ambient molecules is essential for realizing durable devices with stable performance. Many device applications require graphene to contact with substrates, but whose impact on the chemical property of graphene has been largely overlooked. Here, we combine comprehensive first-principles analyses with experiments to show that graphene oxidation is highly sensitive to substrates. Graphene remains inert on SiO2 and hexagonal boron nitride but becomes increasingly weak against oxidation on metal substrates because of enhanced charge transfer and chemical interaction between them. In particular, Ni and Co substrates lead to spontaneous oxidation of graphene, while a Cu substrate maximally promotes the oxygen diffusion on graphene, with an estimated diffusivity 13 orders of magnitude higher than that on freestanding graphene. Bilayer graphene is revealed to have high oxidation resistance independent of substrate and thus is a better choice for high-performance nanoelectronics. Our findings should be extendable to a wide spectrum of chemical functionalizations of two-dimensional materials mediated by substrates. PMID:26884318

  3. Ferroelectricity in undoped hafnium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polakowski, Patrick; Müller, Johannes

    2015-06-01

    We report the observation of ferroelectric characteristics in undoped hafnium oxide thin films in a thickness range of 4-20 nm. The undoped films were fabricated using atomic layer deposition (ALD) and embedded into titanium nitride based metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors for electrical evaluation. Structural as well as electrical evidence for the appearance of a ferroelectric phase in pure hafnium oxide was collected with respect to film thickness and thermal budget applied during titanium nitride electrode formation. Using grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction (GIXRD) analysis, we observed an enhanced suppression of the monoclinic phase fraction in favor of an orthorhombic, potentially, ferroelectric phase with decreasing thickness/grain size and for a titanium nitride electrode formation below crystallization temperature. The electrical presence of ferroelectricity was confirmed using polarization measurements. A remanent polarization Pr of up to 10 μC cm-2 as well as a read/write endurance of 1.6 × 105 cycles was measured for the pure oxide. The experimental results reported here strongly support the intrinsic nature of the ferroelectric phase in hafnium oxide and expand its applicability beyond the doped systems.

  4. Selective propene oxidation on mixed metal oxide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selective catalytic oxidation processes represent a large segment of the modern chemical industry and a major application of these is the selective partial oxidation of propene to produce acrolein. Mixed metal oxide catalysts are particularly effective in promoting this reaction, and the two primary candidates for the industrial process are based on iron antimonate and bismuth molybdate. Some debate exists in the literature regarding the operation of these materials and the roles of their catalytic components. In particular, iron antimonate catalysts containing excess antimony are known to be highly selective towards acrolein, and a variety of proposals for the enhanced selectivity of such materials have been given. The aim of this work was to provide a direct comparison between the behaviour of bismuth molybdate and iron antimonate catalysts, with additional emphasis being placed on the component single oxide phases of the latter. Studies were also extended to other antimonate-based catalysts, including cobalt antimonate and vanadium antimonate. Reactivity measurements were made using a continuous flow microreactor, which was used in conjunction with a variety of characterisation techniques to determine relationships between the catalytic behaviour and the properties of the materials. The ratio of Fe/Sb in the iron antimonate catalyst affects the reactivity of the system under steady state conditions, with additional iron beyond the stoichiometric value being detrimental to the acrolein selectivity, while extra antimony provides a means of enhancing the selectivity by decreasing acrolein combustion. Studies on the single antimony oxides of iron antimonate have shown a similarity between the reactivity of 'Sb2O5' and FeSbO4, and a significant difference between these and the Sb2O3 and Sb2O4 phases, implying that the mixed oxide catalyst has a surface mainly comprised of Sb5+. The lack of reactivity of Sb2O4 implies a similarity of the surface with that of Sb2O3

  5. Oxide growth mechanism on zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that in order to get a better understanding of the mechanisms governing corrosion of Zr-based alloys, several examinations have been performed on a variety of samples with uniform and nodular corrosion and different oxide layer thicknesses. The results point to a barrier layer concept. The oxide layer becomes porous at a critical thickness. Open porosity increases form 0.01% at 10 μm to 3% at 100 μm. Between the outer porous oxide and the metal, a dense interlayer exists. This is only ≤30 nm in nodular oxide but has been found to be several hundred nm in uniform post-transition oxide. The barrier layer is obviously influenced by the crystallization of the oxide at the interface. This crystallization leads either to a columnal monoclinic, an equiaxed tetragonal, or to a fine equiaxed monoclinic oxide. The latter, which probably forms only under the mineralizing effect of hydrogen, was found in nodular oxide. It easily cracks at the grain boundaries. Well developed columnar oxide is seen in uniform oxide, when corrosion resistance is high. Recrystallization seems to be responsible for the pore or microcrack formation at the transition. The intermetallic precipitates influence the corrosion behavior significantly. They probably oxidize slowly. This oxidation starts with the zirconium and is accompanied by iron diffusion into the surrounding oxide

  6. Oxidation of pyrite: Consequences and significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Mile D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the most important studies on the oxidation of pyrite particularly in aqueous solutions. The consequences of pyrite oxidation was examined, as well as its importance, from both the technical-technological and environmental points of view. The oxidation of pyrite was considered in two parts. The spontaneous oxidation of pyrite in nature was described in the first part, with this part comprising pyrite oxidation in deposits depots and mines. It is explained how way natural electrochemical processes lead to the decomposition of pyrite and other minerals associated with pyrite. The oxidation of pyrite occurring during technological processes such as grinding, flotation and leaching, was shown in the second part. Particular emphasis was placed on the oxidation of pyrite during leaching. This part includes the leaching of sulphide and oxide ores, the leaching of pyrite coal and the leaching of refractory gold-bearing ores (pressure oxidation, bacterial oxidation, oxidation by means of strong oxidants and the electrolysis of pyrite suspensions. Various mechanisms of pyrite oxidation and of the galvanic interaction of pyrite with other sulphide minerals are shown.

  7. Troilite oxidation by hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chirita, Paul [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Craiova, Calea Bucuresti BB 107, Craiova 200512 (Romania); Descostes, Michael [CEA, DEN/DANS/DPC/SECR/Laboratory of Radionuclides Migration Measurements and Modelling, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-07-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of troilite oxidation by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was studied at temperatures of 25 and 45 deg. C. Solutions within the range 0.1-0.85 mol L{sup -1} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in HClO{sub 4} (0.01-0.1 mol L{sup -1}) were used as dissolution media. The experimental amount of dissolved iron was plotted versus t(n), with n ranging from 0.25 to 1.55. The theoretical interpretation of this dependence suggests that the troilite oxidation involves several processes: acidic troilite dissolution, FeS + 2H{sup +} {r_reversible} /SH{sub 2}/ + /Fe{sup 2+}/, where /SH{sub 2}/ and /Fe{sup 2+}/ are H{sub 2}S and Fe{sup 2+} at troilite/sulfur rich layer (SRL) interface; /Fe{sup 2+}/ migration into solution across SRL, and its rapid oxidation by hydrogen peroxide into ferric iron, 2Fe{sup 2+} + H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + 2H{sup +} 2Fe{sup 3+} + 2H{sub 2}O; oxidation of /SH{sub 2}/ sites to elemental sulfur, a process that contributes to sulfur enrichment of troilite surface, /SH{sub 2}/ + 2Fe{sup 3+} S + 2Fe{sup 2+} + 2H{sup +}; oxidation of elemental sulfur to sulfate, a sulfur-consuming process, S + 3H{sub 2}O{sub 2} = SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} + 2H{sub 2}O + 2H{sup +}. Both experimental results and theoretical considerations illustrate the importance of temperature, pH, and [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] for the kinetics and mechanisms of troilite oxidation. The amounts of dissolved iron strongly increase with temperature and [H{sup +}], whereas an increase of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration seems to reduce the troilite oxidation. The reaction orders with respect to [H{sup +}] are variable, pointing out notable modifications of reaction mechanism with experimental conditions. The estimated value E{sub a} 25.4 {+-} 0.9 kJ mol{sup -1} ([H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] = 0.4 mol L{sup -1} and pH 1) points to dissolution kinetics controlled by a mix regime of surface reaction and diffusion. (authors)

  8. Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Morales-González

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic disease of multifactorial origin and can be defined as an increase in the accumulation of body fat. Adipose tissue is not only a triglyceride storage organ, but studies have shown the role of white adipose tissue as a producer of certain bioactive substances called adipokines. Among adipokines, we find some inflammatory functions, such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6; other adipokines entail the functions of regulating food intake, therefore exerting a direct effect on weight control. This is the case of leptin, which acts on the limbic system by stimulating dopamine uptake, creating a feeling of fullness. However, these adipokines induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, generating a process known as oxidative stress (OS. Because adipose tissue is the organ that secretes adipokines and these in turn generate ROS, adipose tissue is considered an independent factor for the generation of systemic OS. There are several mechanisms by which obesity produces OS. The first of these is the mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids, which can produce ROS in oxidation reactions, while another mechanism is over-consumption of oxygen, which generates free radicals in the mitochondrial respiratory chain that is found coupled with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Lipid-rich diets are also capable of generating ROS because they can alter oxygen metabolism. Upon the increase of adipose tissue, the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx, was found to be significantly diminished. Finally, high ROS production and the decrease in antioxidant capacity leads to various abnormalities, among which we find endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by a reduction in the bioavailability of vasodilators, particularly nitric oxide (NO, and an increase in endothelium-derived contractile factors, favoring atherosclerotic disease.

  9. Strength of nonuniformly oxidized PGX graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flexural and tensile tests were performed on PGX graphite oxidized to produce a steep surface oxidation gradient. Companion tensile specimens were oxidized under different conditions to produce uniform oxidation throughout the specimen, and their tensile strength and Young's modulus were measured. The flexural strength, flexural elastic modulus, and tensile strength were reduced much less by surface oxidation than by uniform oxidation. The test data were in good agreement with a simple linear elastic model in which Young's modulus at any point is a function of oxidation burnoff, and the strain at failure is independent of oxidation. The unoxidized interior of the specimens appears unaffected by the surface burnoff and remains able to fulfill its load-bearing function. 18 figures, 8 tables

  10. "UCx fission targets oxidation test stand"

    CERN Document Server

    Lacroix, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    "Set up a rig dedicated to the oxidation of UCx and define a procedure for repeatable, reliable and safe method for converting UC2 fission targets into an acceptable uranium carbide oxide waste for subsequent disposal by the Swiss Authorities."

  11. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Experimental Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Experimental Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, gives researchers access to models and simulations that predict how solid oxide fuel cells...

  12. Hanford tank waste oxidative leach behavior analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper study develops a modeling assumption for oxidative leaching Hanford tank wastes based on observed behavior of a limited set of samples tested. Oxidative Leaching of solids from Hanford tank wastes can reduce chromium concentrations appreciably

  13. EFFICIENCY PROBLEMS RELATED TO PERMANGANATE OXIDATION SCHEMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidation schemes for the in-situ destruction of chlorinated solvents, using potassium permanganate, are receiving considerable attention. Indication from field studies and from our own work are that permanganate oxidation schemes have inherent problems that could severely limit...

  14. Thermal Oxidation of Structured Silicon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Hansen, Ole; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt;

    2014-01-01

    The topography of thermally oxidized, structured silicon dioxide is investigated through simulations, atomic force microscopy, and a proposed analytical model. A 357 nm thick oxide is structured by removing regions of the oxide in a masked etch with either reactive ion etching or hydrofluoric acid....... Subsequent thermal oxidation is performed in both dry and wet ambients in the temperature range 950◦C to 1100◦C growing a 205 ± 12 nm thick oxide in the etched mask windows. Lifting of the original oxide near the edge of the mask in the range 6 nm to 37 nm is seen with increased lifting for increasing...... mainly by diffusion and the geometry of the oxide. Simulations also predict the oxide topography quantitatively, with an average root mean square deviation of 1.2 nm and a maximum deviation of 13 nm (39%) from the mean of the measured values....

  15. Complex oxides useful for thermoelectric energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arunava; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Yu, Choongho; Scullin, Matthew L.; Huijben, Mark

    2012-07-17

    The invention provides for a thermoelectric system comprising a substrate comprising a first complex oxide, wherein the substrate is optionally embedded with a second complex oxide. The thermoelectric system can be used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  16. Methods for synthesizing metal oxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Kumar, Vivekanand; Kim, Jeong H.; Clark, Ezra Lee

    2016-08-09

    A method of synthesizing a metal oxide nanowire includes the steps of: combining an amount of a transition metal or a transition metal oxide with an amount of an alkali metal compound to produce a mixture; activating a plasma discharge reactor to create a plasma discharge; exposing the mixture to the plasma discharge for a first predetermined time period such that transition metal oxide nanowires are formed; contacting the transition metal oxide nanowires with an acid solution such that an alkali metal ion is exchanged for a hydrogen ion on each of the transition metal oxide nanowires; and exposing the transition metal oxide nanowires to the plasma discharge for a second predetermined time period to thermally anneal the transition metal oxide nanowires. Transition metal oxide nanowires produced using the synthesis methods described herein are also provided.

  17. The oxidation and surface speciation of indium and indium oxides exposed to atmospheric oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detweiler, Zachary M.; Wulfsberg, Steven M.; Frith, Matthew G.; Bocarsly, Andrew B.; Bernasek, Steven L.

    2016-06-01

    Metallic indium and its oxides are useful in electronics applications, in transparent conducting electrodes, as well as in electrocatalytic applications. In order to understand more fully the speciation of the indium and oxygen composition of the indium surface exposed to atmospheric oxidants, XPS, HREELS, and TPD were used to study the indium surface exposed to water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide. Clean In and authentic samples of In2O3 and In(OH)3 were examined with XPS to provide standard spectra. Indium was exposed to O2 and H2O, and the ratio of O2 - to OH- in the O1s XPS region was used to monitor oxidation and speciation of the surface. HREELS and TPD indicate that water dissociates on the indium surface even at low temperature, and that In2O3 forms at higher temperatures. Initially, OH- is the major species at the surface. Pure In2O3 is also OH- terminated following water exposure. Ambient pressure XPS studies of water exposure to these surfaces suggest that high water pressures tend to passivate the surface, inhibiting extensive oxide formation.

  18. Electronic structure of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutar, D. S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Central Surface Analytical Facility, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Singh, Gulbagh; Divakar Botcha, V. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2012-09-03

    Graphene oxide (GO) monolayers obtained by Langmuir Blodgett route and suitably treated to obtain reduced graphene oxide (RGO) monolayers were studied by photoelectron spectroscopy. Upon reduction of GO to form RGO C1s x-ray photoelectron spectra showed increase in graphitic carbon content, while ultraviolet photoelectron spectra showed increase in intensity corresponding to C2p-{pi} electrons ({approx}3.5 eV). X-ray excited Auger transitions C(KVV) and plasmon energy loss of C1s photoelectrons have been analyzed to elucidate the valence band structure. The effective number of ({pi}+{sigma}) electrons as obtained from energy loss spectra was found to increase by {approx}28% on reduction of GO.

  19. The use of niobia in oxidation catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Julian R.H.; Smits, Richard H.H.; Seshan, K.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarises the background to work carried out at the University of Twente on the use of niobia as a catalyst for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane to propylene and discusses the development of promoted niobia catalysts for this reaction. Results are also presented which illustrate the use of niobia in catalysts for other reactions such as the oxidative coupling of methane, the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane and the oxidative dehydrogenation of methanol. It appears that ...

  20. Mechanisms of wet oxidation by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A research programme is currently under way at BNL and MEL to investigate the possible use of Hydrogen Peroxide with metal ion catalysts as a wet oxidation treatment system for CEGB organic radioactive wastes. The published literature relating to the kinetics and mechanism of oxidation and decomposition reactions of hydrogen peroxide is reviewed and the links with practical waste management by wet oxidation are examined. Alternative wet oxidation systems are described and the similarities to the CEGB research effort are noted. (author)

  1. radiolabeling of metallic and metal oxide nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanobiology, nanomedicine, and naontoxicology are newly developed interdisciplinary research fields accompanied by the development of nanotechnology. Quantitative determination of nanomaterials in vivo is the common problem that is experienced by these disciplines. Radiotracer techniques had the advantage of high sensitivity, good accuracy, simplicity and low interference. This review describes radiolabeling methods of 6 important metallic and metal oxide nanomaterials, such as gold, silver, iron oxide, titanium oxide, and zinc oxide nanoparticles. Advantage, disadvantage, and caution of each method are summarized. (authors)

  2. Autotrophic ammonia oxidation by soil thaumarchaea

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Offre, Pierre R.; He, Ji-Zheng; Verhamme, Daniel T.; Nicol, Graeme W.; Prosser, James I.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrification plays a central role in the global nitrogen cycle and is responsible for significant losses of nitrogen fertilizer, atmospheric pollution by the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide, and nitrate pollution of groundwaters. Ammonia oxidation, the first step in nitrification, was thought to be performed by autotrophic bacteria until the recent discovery of archaeal ammonia oxidizers. Autotrophic archaeal ammonia oxidizers have been cultivated from marine and thermal spring environments, bu...

  3. Niche specialization of terrestrial archaeal ammonia oxidizers

    OpenAIRE

    Gubry-Rangin, Cécile; Hai, Brigitte; Quince, Christopher; Engel, Marion; Thomson, Bruce C.; James, Phillip; Schloter, Michael; Robert I. Griffiths; Prosser, James I.; Nicol, Graeme W.

    2011-01-01

    Soil pH is a major determinant of microbial ecosystem processes and potentially a major driver of evolution, adaptation, and diversity of ammonia oxidizers, which control soil nitrification. Archaea are major components of soil microbial communities and contribute significantly to ammonia oxidation in some soils. To determine whether pH drives evolutionary adaptation and community structure of soil archaeal ammonia oxidizers, sequences of amoA, a key functional gene of ammonia oxidation, were...

  4. Silicene oxides: formation, structures and electronic properties

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Rong; Pi, Xiaodong; Ni, Zhenyi; Liu, Yong; Lin, Shisheng; Xu, Mingsheng; Yang, Deren

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the oxidation of silicon has been critical to the success of all types of silicon materials, which are the cornerstones of modern silicon technologies. For the recent experimentally obtained two-dimensional silicene, oxidation should also be addressed to enable the development of silicene-based devices. Here we focus on silicene oxides (SOs) that result from the partial or full oxidation of silicene in the framework of density functional theory. It is found that the formation of...

  5. The initial oxidation of magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurth, M.

    2004-07-01

    Pure Magnesium samples have been oxidised in an UHV chamber under controlled conditions. Pressure range was 10{sup -10} Torr to 10{sup -7} Torr, temperature range was 273 K to 435 K. The samples have then been investigated with XPS, Ellipsometry and HERDA. Additionally, furnace oxidations at 750 Torr and 673 K have been carried out and investigated with XPS. From the XPS measurements data concerning layer thickness, composition, oxidation state and binding state have been gained. The ellipsometrie measurements yielded additional data concerning layer thickness as well as the size of the band gap of the developing oxide. With the HERDA measurements, the oxygen content within the oxide layer has been determined yielding additional information about composition and layer thickness. The layer thickness as a function of time have then been modelled with a kinetic growth model of Fromhold and Cook. For the refinement of the XPS data concerning layer thickness and composition, the pronounced plasmon excitations that occur in magnesium have been determined with two different procedures which have been developed in the methodical part of this work. The layer thickness and composition values have thus been corrected. Results: Two oxidation stages could be identified: a strong increase for the first few Langmuirs (1L = 1s x 10{sup -6} Torr), followed by a saturation'' region which was about 1.2 nm to 1.5 nm in magnitude. XPS and ellipsometry results have thereby been in very good agreement. The composition of the developing oxide showed a clear deviation from stoichiometric MgO, mainly caused by an oxygen deficiency; this deficiency has also been confirmed with the HERDA measurements. The Mg/O ratio as a function of layer thickness showed a continous decay starting from very high values for the thinnest layers (>{proportional_to}2.5) down to a saturation value of about 1.4, even for larger layer thicknesses gained with the furnace oxidations. The determination of

  6. Oxidation of phenolic acids by soil iron and manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, R.G.; Cheng, H.H.; Harsh, J.B.

    Phenolic acids are intermediary metabolites of many aromatic chemicals and may be involved in humus formation, allelopathy, and nutrient availability. Depending on their structures, six phenolic acids were shown to react at different rates with oxidized forms of Fe and Mn in a Palouse soil (fine-silty, mixed, mesic Pachic Ultic Haploxeroll). Increasing methoxy substitution on the aromatic ring of phenolic acids increased the reaction rate. Reaction rate was also increased for longer carboxyl-containing side chains. After 4 h reaction, little of the applied (10 mg kg/sup -1/ soil) p-hydroxybenzoic or p-coumaric acids had reacted, while 0 to 5, 70, 90, and 100% of the vanillic, ferulic, syringic, and sinapic acids, respectively, had reacted. After 72 h under conditions limiting microbial growth, none of the p-hydroxybenzoic, 30% of the p-coumaric, and 50% of the vanillic acids had reacted. The reaction was shown to be predominantly chemical, and not biological, since phenolic acid extractabilities were similar for Palouse soil and for Palouse soil pretreated with LiOBr to remove organic matter. When the Palouse soil was pretreated with a sodium dithionite-citrate solution to remove Fe and Mn oxides, none of the phenolic acids reacted after 1 h. The reaction of sinapic acid with Palouse soil was shown to produce Fe(II) and soluble Mn as reaction products. The reaction of phenolic acids with soil was thus shown to be an oxidation of the phenolic acids, coupled with a reduction of soil Fe and Mn oxides.

  7. Dual-Templated Cobalt Oxide for Photochemical Water Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaohui; Bongard, Hans-Josef; Chan, Candace K; Tüysüz, Harun

    2016-02-01

    Mesoporous Co3 O4 was prepared using a dual templating approach whereby mesopores inside SiO2 nanospheres, as well as the void spaces between the nanospheres, were used as templates. The effect of calcination temperature on the crystallinity, morphology, and textural parameters of the Co3 O4 replica was investigated. The catalytic activity of Co3 O4 for photochemical water oxidation in a [Ru(bpy)3 ](2+) [S2 O8 ](2-) system was evaluated. The Co3 O4 replica calcined at the lowest temperature (150 °C) exhibited the best performance as a result of the unique nanostructure and high surface area arising from the dual templating. The performance of Co3 O4 with highest surface area was further examined in electrochemical water oxidation. Superior activity over high temperature counterpart and decent stability was observed. Furthermore, CoO with identical morphology was prepared from Co3 O4 using an ethanol reduction method and a higher turnover-frequency number for photochemical water oxidation was obtained. PMID:26404798

  8. Epitaxial copper oxide thin films deposited on cubic oxide substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the growth conditions of Cu2O thin films deposited on MgO (0 0 1) and SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrates by pulsed laser ablation, in order to explore the compatibility between semiconducting p-type Cu2O and other perovskite oxides in view of the fabrication of oxide electronics heterostructures. We find that in both cases perfect epitaxy, high crystalline quality and good out-of-plane orientation are achieved. In this context, epitaxy plays a major role in driving the phase formation. On the other hand, in films deposited at temperatures higher than 700 deg. C transport is inhibited by poor grain connectivity, which is an inevitable consequence of the necessity for the crystal to release the lattice strain. Instead, better connectivity and bulk-like values of resistivity, as well as good crystallinity and orientation, are obtained for films deposited at 650 deg. C. This should be kept in mind for the fabrication of stacked layer oxide heterostructures, where deep grooves between adjacent grains would be a serious drawback both for vertical and planar transport

  9. Oxides and oxide superconductors: Elastic and related properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using both measurements and modeling, the elastic and related properties of some oxides and oxide superconductors were studied. The polycrystal elastic constants were measured using a MHz-frequency pulse-echo method between 295 and 4 K and corrected to the void-free state by using a model for a composite material containing spherical particles. The elastic moduli of the high-Tc superconductor YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) were compared with that of oxides, especially the perovskites BaTiO3 and SrTiO3, which are crystal-structure building blocks for the YBCO superconductor. The bulk moduli were also calculated using a Born ionic model with two energy terms: electrostatic (Madelung) and ion-core-repulsion. The calculated bulk modulus of YBCO, 98 GPa, agrees well with measurement, 101 GPa. Based on monocrystal measurements combined with analysis-theory, elastic stiffnesses Cij for orthorhombic YBCO were estimated. The bulk modulus obtained from the estimated Cij by the Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging method agrees with the monocrystal measurement

  10. Characterization And Dissolution Properties Of Ruthenium Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthenium oxides (RuO2•1.10H2O and RuO2) have been synthesized by forced hydrolysis and oxidation of ruthenium chloride. The resulting materials were extensively characterized to determine the crystallinity, surface area, and ruthenium oxidation ...

  11. Limits to the adherence of oxide scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fracture mechanics is used to identify criteria under which uniform oxide scales may be expected to fail due to rapidly applied strains. The most common failure mode occurs when the strain, ε, builds up in the scale until the strain energy density per unit area exceeds the fracture surface energy, γ, of the oxide. This produces spalling when ε > (2γ/hE)1/2, where h is the scale thickness and E is the oxide Youngs modulus. In thin scales, as the external strain is applied to the oxide via the metal substrate, it is clear that no further strain can be applied to the oxide if the substrate has itself been strained beyond yield. This gives rise to extended oxide adherence in which the oxide cracks and forms a series of islands but remains attached to the deformed metal. When the oxide thickness is less than its comminution limit, the flaw size necessary for brittle fracture exceeds the oxide thickness and the oxide yields in a ductile manner without cracking. The results are presented as maps of failure strain versus oxide thickness for various oxide systems such as Fe3O4, Cr2O3, Al2O3, SiO2 and NiO. The observed cases of spalling are found to lie within the predicted regions. (author)

  12. Metastable defects in beryllium oxide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metastable luminescence centers of regular lattice are investigated in binary beryllium oxide crystals. Beryllium oxide hexagonal crystals are the simplest among low-symmetry oxide scintillators and serve as a model system. The anisotropy of energy transformation and transfer is analyzed

  13. Method for preparing hollow metal oxide microsphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, C.R.

    1974-02-12

    Hollow refractory metal oxide microspheres are prepared by impregnating resinous microspheres with a metallic compound, drying the impregnated microspheres, heating the microspheres slowly to carbonize the resin, and igniting the microspheres to remove the carbon and to produce the metal oxide. Zirconium oxide is given as an example. (Official Gazette)

  14. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources...

  15. Extreme exercise and oxidative DNA modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, H E; Loft, S; Vistisen, K

    1996-01-01

    increased the rate of oxidative DNA modification by 33% (95% confidence limits, 3-67%; P < 0.02) in 20 men owing to the urinary excretion of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, an oxidatively modified deoxynucleoside originating from nuclear DNA repair, oxidation of the nucleotide pool from mitochondrial...

  16. Graphene oxide reduction recipes, spectroscopy, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on a group of new materials labeled ""graphene oxides."" It provides a comprehensive overview of graphene oxide-based nanomaterials in terms of their synthesis, structures, properties, and extensive applications in catalysis, separation, filtration, energy storage and conversion. The book also covers emerging research on graphite oxides and the impact of the research on fundamental and applied sciences.

  17. CO oxidation on gold nanoparticles: Theoretical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remediakis, Ioannis; Lopez, Nuria; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    We present a summary of our theoretical results regarding CO oxidation on both oxide-supported and isolated gold nanoparticles. Using Density Functional Theory we have studied the adsorption of molecules and the oxidation reaction of CO on gold clusters. Low-coordinated sites on the gold...

  18. Myoglobin-induced lipid oxidation : A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline; Andersen, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of myoglobin-initiated lipid oxidation in simple model systems, muscle, and muscle-based foods is presented. The potential role of myoglobin spin and redox states in initiating lipid oxidation is reviewed. Proposed mechanisms for myoglobin- initiated lipid oxidation in muscle tissue (p...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  20. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...