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Sample records for chemokine promotes tumor

  1. Treg-cell depletion promotes chemokine production and accumulation of CXCR3(+) conventional T cells in intestinal tumors.

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    Akeus, Paulina; Langenes, Veronica; Kristensen, Jonas; von Mentzer, Astrid; Sparwasser, Tim; Raghavan, Sukanya; Quiding-Järbrink, Marianne

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent tumor types worldwide and tumor-infiltrating T cells are crucial for anti-tumor immunity. We previously demonstrated that Treg cells from CRC patients inhibit transendothelial migration of conventional T cells. However, it remains unclear if local Treg cells affect lymphocyte migration into colonic tumors. By breeding APC(Min/+) mice with depletion of regulatory T cells mice, expressing the diphtheria toxin receptor under the control of the FoxP3 promoter, we were able to selectively deplete Treg cells in tumor-bearing mice, and investigate the impact of these cells on the infiltration of conventional T cells into intestinal tumors. Short-term Treg-cell depletion led to a substantial increase in the frequencies of T cells in the tumors, attributed by both increased infiltration and proliferation of T cells in the Treg-cell-depleted tumors. We also demonstrate a selective increase of the chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 in Treg-cell-depleted tumors, which were accompanied by accumulation of CXCR3(+) T cells, and increased IFN-γ mRNA expression. In conclusion, Treg-cell depletion increases the accumulation of conventional T cells in intestinal tumors, and targeting Treg cells could be a possible anti-tumor immunotherapy, which not only affects T-cell effector functions, but also their recruitment to tumors.

  2. Tumor-Promoting Circuits That Regulate a Cancer-Related Chemokine Cluster: Dominance of Inflammatory Mediators Over Oncogenic Alterations

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    Leibovich-Rivkin, Tal [Department of Cell Research and Immunology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Buganim, Yosef; Solomon, Hilla [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Meshel, Tsipi [Department of Cell Research and Immunology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Rotter, Varda [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Ben-Baruch, Adit, E-mail: aditbb@tauex.tau.ac.il [Department of Cell Research and Immunology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2012-01-20

    Here, we investigated the relative contribution of genetic/signaling components versus microenvironmental factors to the malignancy phenotype. In this system, we took advantage of non-transformed fibroblasts that carried defined oncogenic modifications in Ras and/or p53. These cells were exposed to microenvironmental pressures, and the expression of a cancer-related chemokine cluster was used as readout for the malignancy potential (CCL2, CCL5, CXCL8, CXCL10). In cells kept in-culture, synergism between Ras hyper-activation and p53 dysfunction was required to up-regulate the expression of the chemokine cluster. The in vivo passage of Ras{sup High}/p53{sup Low}-modified cells has led to tumor formation, accompanied by potentiation of chemokine release, implicating a powerful role for the tumor microenvironment in up-regulating the chemokine cluster. Indeed, we found that inflammatory mediators which are prevalent in tumor sites, such as TNFα and IL-1β, had a predominant impact on the release of the chemokines, which was substantially higher than that obtained by the oncogenic modifications alone, possibly acting through the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-κB. Together, our results propose that in the unbiased model system that we were using, inflammatory mediators of the tumor milieu have dominating roles over oncogenic modifications in dictating the expression of a pro-malignancy chemokine readout.

  3. Chemokines and chemokine receptors as promoters of prostate cancer growth and progression.

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    Salazar, Nicole; Castellan, Miguel; Shirodkar, Samir S; Lokeshwar, Bal L

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is estimated to be first in incidence among cancers, with more than 240,000 new cases in 2012 in the United States. Chemokines and their receptors provide survival, proliferation, and invasion characteristics to CaP cells in both primary sites of cancer and metastatic locations. The emerging data demonstrate that many chemokines and their receptors are involved in the multistep process of CaP, leading to metastasis, and, further, that these factors act cooperatively to enhance other mechanisms of tumor cell survival, growth, and metastasis. Changes of chemokine receptor cohorts may be necessary to activate tumor-promoting signals. Chemokine receptors can activate downstream effectors, such as mitogen-activated protein kinases, by complex mechanisms of ligand-dependent activation of cryptic growth factors; guanosine triphosphate-binding, protein-coupled activation of survival kinases; or transactivation of other receptors such as ErbB family members. We describe vanguard research in which more than the classic view of chemokine receptor biology was clarified. Control of chemokines and inhibition of their receptor activation may add critical tools to reduce tumor growth, especially in chemo-hormonal refractory CaP that is both currently incurable and the most aggressive form of the disease, accounting for most of the more than 28,000 annual deaths.

  4. Epidermal Growth Factor and Estrogen Act by Independent Pathways to Additively Promote the Release of the Angiogenic Chemokine CXCL8 by Breast Tumor Cells

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    Karin Haim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment contains multiple cancer-supporting factors, whose joint activities promote malignancy. Here, we show that epidermal growth factor (EGF and estrogen upregulate in an additive manner the transcription and the secretion of the angiogenic chemokine CXCL8 (interleukin 8 [IL-8] in breast tumor cells. In view of published findings on cross-regulatory interactions between EGF receptors and estrogen receptors in breast tumor cells, we asked whether the additive effects of EGF and estrogen were due to their ability to (1 induce intracellular cross talk and amplify shared regulatory pathways or (2 act in independent mechanisms, which complement each other. We found that stimulation by EGF alone induced the release of CXCL8 through signaling pathways involving ErbB2, ErbB1, Erk, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K. ErbB2 and Erk were also involved in estrogen activities on CXCL8 but to a lower extent than with EGF. However, in the joint stimulatory setup, the addition of estrogen to EGF has led to partial (ErbB2, ErbB1, Erk or complete (PI3K shutoff of the involvement of these activation pathways in CXCL8 up-regulation. Furthermore, when costimulation by EGF + estrogen was applied, the effects of estrogen were channeled to regulation of CXCL8 at the transcription level, acting through the transcription factor estrogen receptor α (ERα. In parallel, in the joint stimulation, EGF acted independently at the transcription level through AP-1, to upregulate CXCL8 expression. The independent activities of EGF and estrogen on CXCL8 transcription reinforce the need to introduce simultaneous targeting of ErbBs and ERα to achieve effective therapy in breast cancer.

  5. CXC and CC Chemokines as Angiogenic Modulators in Nonhaematological Tumors

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    Bracarda, Sergio; Nabissi, Massimo; Massari, Francesco; Bria, Emilio; Tortora, Giampaolo; Santoni, Giorgio; Cascinu, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of structurally homologous heparin-binding proteins that includes potent inducers and inhibitors of angiogenesis. The imbalance between angiogenic and angiostatic chemokine activities can lead to abnormalities, such as chronic inflammation, dysplastic transformation, and even tumor development and spreading. In this review, we summarize the current literature regarding the role of chemokines as modulators of tumor angiogenesis and their potential role as therapeutic targets in patients with nonhaematological tumors. PMID:24971349

  6. CXC and CC Chemokines as Angiogenic Modulators in Nonhaematological Tumors

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    Matteo Santoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a superfamily of structurally homologous heparin-binding proteins that includes potent inducers and inhibitors of angiogenesis. The imbalance between angiogenic and angiostatic chemokine activities can lead to abnormalities, such as chronic inflammation, dysplastic transformation, and even tumor development and spreading. In this review, we summarize the current literature regarding the role of chemokines as modulators of tumor angiogenesis and their potential role as therapeutic targets in patients with nonhaematological tumors.

  7. The Role of Chemokines in Promoting Colorectal Cancer Invasion/Metastasis

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    Yoshiro Itatani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Although most of the primary CRC can be removed by surgical resection, advanced tumors sometimes show recurrences in distant organs such as the liver, lung, lymph node, bone or peritoneum even after complete resection of the primary tumors. In these advanced and metastatic CRC, it is the tumor-stroma interaction in the tumor microenvironment that often promotes cancer invasion and/or metastasis through chemokine signaling. The tumor microenvironment contains numerous host cells that may suppress or promote cancer aggressiveness. Several types of host-derived myeloid cells reside in the tumor microenvironment, and the recruitment of them is under the control of chemokine signaling. In this review, we focus on the functions of chemokine signaling that may affect tumor immunity by recruiting several types of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC to the tumor microenvironment of CRC.

  8. Tailored chemokine receptor modification improves homing of adoptive therapy T cells in a spontaneous tumor model

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    Martini, Elisa; Roselli, Giuliana; Morone, Diego; Angioni, Roberta; Cianciotti, Beatrice Claudia; Trovato, Anna Elisa; Franchina, Davide Giuseppe; Castino, Giovanni Francesco; Vignali, Debora; Erreni, Marco; Marchesi, Federica; Rumio, Cristiano; Kallikourdis, Marinos

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, tumor Adoptive Cell Therapy (ACT), using administration of ex vivo-enhanced T cells from the cancer patient, has become a promising therapeutic strategy. However, efficient homing of the anti-tumoral T cells to the tumor or metastatic site still remains a substantial hurdle. Yet the tumor site itself attracts both tumor-promoting and anti-tumoral immune cell populations through the secretion of chemokines. We attempted to identify these chemokines in a model of spontaneous metastasis, in order to “hijack” their function by expressing matching chemokine receptors on the cytotoxic T cells used in ACT, thus allowing us to enhance the recruitment of these therapeutic cells. Here we show that this enabled the modified T cells to preferentially home into spontaneous lymph node metastases in the TRAMP model, as well as in an inducible tumor model, E.G7-OVA. Due to the improved homing, the modified CD8+ T cells displayed an enhanced in vivo protective effect, as seen by a significant delay in E.G7-OVA tumor growth. These results offer a proof of principle for the tailored application of chemokine receptor modification as a means of improving T cell homing to the target tumor, thus enhancing ACT efficacy. Surprisingly, we also uncover that the formation of the peri-tumoral fibrotic capsule, which has been shown to impede T cell access to tumor, is partially dependent on host T cell presence. This finding, which would be impossible to observe in immunodeficient model studies, highlights possible conflicting roles that T cells may play in a therapeutic context. PMID:27177227

  9. Chemokines

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    Richard Horuk

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a family of polypeptides that direct the migration of leukocytestoward a site of infection. They play a major role in autoimmune disease and chemokine receptors have recently been found to mediate HIV-1 fusion. In this short review we examine the role of chemokines in host defence and in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases. We conclude by discussing various therapeutic approaches that target chemokine receptors and that could be beneficial in disease.

  10. The chemokine receptor CCR7 promotes mammary tumorigenesis through amplification of stem-like cells.

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    Boyle, S T; Ingman, W V; Poltavets, V; Faulkner, J W; Whitfield, R J; McColl, S R; Kochetkova, M

    2016-01-07

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 is widely implicated in breast cancer pathobiology. Although recent reports correlated high CCR7 levels with more advanced tumor grade and poor prognosis, limited in vivo data are available regarding its specific function in mammary gland neoplasia and the underlying mechanisms involved. To address these questions we generated a bigenic mouse model of breast cancer combined with CCR7 deletion, which revealed that CCR7 ablation results in a considerable delay in tumor onset as well as significantly reduced tumor burden. Importantly, CCR7 was found to exert its function by regulating mammary cancer stem-like cells in both murine and human tumors. In vivo experiments showed that loss of CCR7 activity either through deletion or pharmacological antagonism significantly decreased functional pools of stem-like cells in mouse primary mammary tumors, providing a mechanistic explanation for the tumor-promoting role of this chemokine receptor. These data characterize the oncogenic properties of CCR7 in mammary epithelial neoplasia and point to a new route for therapeutic intervention to target evasive cancer stem cells.

  11. Positive lymph-node breast cancer patients – activation of NF-κB in tumor-associated leukocytes stimulates cytokine secretion that promotes metastasis via C-C chemokine receptor CCR7.

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    El-Ghonaimy, Eslam A; El-Shinawi, Mohamed; Ibrahim, Sherif A; El-Ghazaly, Hisham; Abd-El-Tawab, Reda; Nouh, Mohamed A; El-Mamlouk, Tahani; Mohamed, Mona M

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metastasis to lymph nodes is most deadly complication among breast cancer patients. Herein, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which tumor-associated leukocytes (TALs) mediate lymph node metastasis. The density of different leukocyte subtypes infiltrating the tumor microenvironment of negative and positive lymph nodes (nLNs, pLNs) in breast cancer patients was measured using immunohistochemistry. In addition, we isolated TALs from blood drained from the axillary tributaries of nLN and pLN patients during breast surgery. Secretions of TALs were subjected to cytokine profiling using a cytokine antibody array. Our results showed an increase in the number of infiltrated CD45+ cells in the carcinoma tissues of pLN patients with the major proportion being myeloid subsets compared with nLN patients. Furthermore, TALs of pLN patients show a significant fivefold increase in the secretion of interleukin (IL)-1α, interferon-γ, IL-5, IL-3 and tumor necrosis factor-β, and are characterized by enhanced constitutive NF-κB/p65 signaling compared with TALs isolated from nLN patients. Using an invasion assay, cytokines secreted by TALs of pLN patients were shown to augment the invasive phenotype of breast cancer MCF-7 and SKBR3 cells compared with nLN patients. Using flow cytometry, we found that C-C chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) is significantly overexpressed in breast carcinoma of pLN patients compared with nLNs patients. Intriguingly, CCR7, a mechanistic clue for metastasis, is upregulated in MCF-7 cells upon stimulation with TAL-conditioned media of pLN patients. Our findings show that the molecular cues secreted by TALs alone or in combination with CCR7 may emerge as future therapeutic targets for lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients.

  12. RNA Sequencing of Tumor-Associated Microglia Reveals Ccl5 as a Stromal Chemokine Critical for Neurofibromatosis-1 Glioma Growth

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    Anne C. Solga

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Solid cancers develop within a supportive microenvironment that promotes tumor formation and growth through the elaboration of mitogens and chemokines. Within these tumors, monocytes (macrophages and microglia represent rich sources of these stromal factors. Leveraging a genetically engineered mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 low-grade brain tumor (optic glioma, we have previously demonstrated that microglia are essential for glioma formation and maintenance. To identify potential tumor-associated microglial factors that support glioma growth (gliomagens, we initiated a comprehensive large-scale discovery effort using optimized RNA-sequencing methods focused specifically on glioma-associated microglia. Candidate microglial gliomagens were prioritized to identify potential secreted or membrane-bound proteins, which were next validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction as well as by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization following minocycline-mediated microglial inactivation in vivo. Using these selection criteria, chemokine (C-C motif ligand 5 (Ccl5 was identified as a chemokine highly expressed in genetically engineered Nf1 mouse optic gliomas relative to nonneoplastic optic nerves. As a candidate gliomagen, recombinant Ccl5 increased Nf1-deficient optic nerve astrocyte growth in vitro. Importantly, consistent with its critical role in maintaining tumor growth, treatment with Ccl5 neutralizing antibodies reduced Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth and improved retinal dysfunction in vivo. Collectively, these findings establish Ccl5 as an important microglial growth factor for low-grade glioma maintenance relevant to the development of future stroma-targeted brain tumor therapies.

  13. Smoothing T cell roads to the tumor: Chemokine post-translational regulation.

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    Molon, Barbara; Viola, Antonella; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2012-05-01

    We described a novel tumor-associated immunosuppressive mechanism based on post-translational modifications of chemokines by reactive nitrogen species (RNS). To overcome tumor immunosuppressive hindrances, we designed and developed a new drug, AT38, that inhibits RNS generation at the tumor site. Combinatorial approaches with AT38 boost the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy protocols.

  14. CCR6, the sole receptor for the chemokine CCL20, promotes spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis.

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    Bisweswar Nandi

    Full Text Available Interactions between the inflammatory chemokine CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 have been associated with colorectal cancer growth and metastasis, however, a causal role for CCL20 signaling through CCR6 in promoting intestinal carcinogenesis has not been demonstrated in vivo. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of CCL20-CCR6 interactions in spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis. CCR6-deficient mice were crossed with mice heterozygous for a mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene (APCMIN/+ mice to generate APCMIN/+ mice with CCR6 knocked out (CCR6KO-APCMIN/+ mice. CCR6KO-APCMIN/+ mice had diminished spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis. CCR6KO-APCMIN/+ also had normal sized spleens as compared to the enlarged spleens found in APCMIN/+ mice. Decreased macrophage infiltration into intestinal adenomas and non-tumor epithelium was observed in CCR6KO-APCMIN/+ as compared to APCMIN/+ mice. CCL20 signaling through CCR6 caused increased production of CCL20 by colorectal cancer cell lines. Furthermore, CCL20 had a direct mitogenic effect on colorectal cancer cells. Thus, interactions between CCL20 and CCR6 promote intestinal carcinogenesis. Our results suggest that the intestinal tumorigenesis driven by CCL20-CCR6 interactions may be driven by macrophage recruitment into the intestine as well as proliferation of neoplastic epithelial cells. This interaction could be targeted for the treatment or prevention of malignancy.

  15. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) and Chemokines in Colitis-Associated Cancer

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    Mukaida, Naofumi, E-mail: naofumim@kenroku.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Sasakki, So-ichiro [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Popivanova, Boryana K. [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Present Address, Division of Cellular Signaling, Institute for Advanced Medical Research, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan)

    2011-06-27

    The connection between inflammation and tumorigenesis has been well established, based on a great deal of supporting evidence obtained from epidemiological, pharmacological, and genetic studies. One representative example is inflammatory bowel disease, because it is an important risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Moreover, intratumoral infiltration of inflammatory cells suggests the involvement of inflammatory responses also in other forms of sporadic as well as heritable colon cancer. Inflammatory responses and tumorigenesis activate similar sets of transcription factors such as NF-κB, Stat3, and hypoxia inducible factor and eventually enhances the expression of inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and chemokines. The expression of TNF and chemokines is aberrantly expressed in a mouse model of colitis-associated carcinogenesis as well as in inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer in humans. Here, after summarizing the presumed actions of TNF and chemokines in tumor biology, we will discuss the potential roles of TNF and chemokines in chronic inflammation-associated colon cancer in mice.

  16. Tumor-Derived CXCL1 Promotes Lung Cancer Growth via Recruitment of Tumor-Associated Neutrophils

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    Ming Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils have a traditional role in inflammatory process and act as the first line of defense against infections. Although their contribution to tumorigenesis and progression is still controversial, accumulating evidence recently has demonstrated that tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs play a key role in multiple aspects of cancer biology. Here, we detected that chemokine CXCL1 was dramatically elevated in serum from 3LL tumor-bearing mice. In vitro, 3LL cells constitutively expressed and secreted higher level of CXCL1. Furthermore, knocking down CXCL1 expression in 3LL cells significantly hindered tumor growth by inhibiting recruitment of neutrophils from peripheral blood into tumor tissues. Additionally, tumor-infiltrated neutrophils expressed higher levels of MPO and Fas/FasL, which may be involved in TAN-mediated inhibition of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These results demonstrate that tumor-derived CXCL1 contributes to TANs infiltration in lung cancer which promotes tumor growth.

  17. Chemokine receptor CXCR4-prognostic factor for gastrointestinal tumors

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    Carl C Schimanski; Peter R Galle; Markus Moehler

    2008-01-01

    To review the implication of CXCR4 for gastrointestinal cancer,a "Pubmed" analysis was performed in order to evaluate the relevance of CXCR4 and its ligands for gastrointestinal cancers.Search terms applied were "cancer,malignoma,esophageal,gastric,colon,colorectal,hepatic,pancreatic,CXCR4,SDF-1α,and SDF-1β"; CXCR4 expression correlated with dissemination of diverse gastrointestinal malignomas.The CXCR4 ligand SDF-1α might act as "chemorepellent"while SDF-1β might act as "chemorepellent" for CTLs,inducing tumor rejection.The paracrine expression of SDF-1α was furthermore closely associated with neoangiogenesis.CXCR4 and its ligands influence the dissemination,immune rejection,and neoangiogenesis of human gastrointestinal cancers.Inhibition of CXCR4 might be an interesting therapeutic option.

  18. Therapeutic T cells induce tumor-directed chemotaxis of innate immune cells through tumor-specific secretion of chemokines and stimulation of B16BL6 melanoma to secrete chemokines

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    Fox Bernard A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms by which tumor-specific T cells induce regression of established metastases are not fully characterized. In using the poorly immunogenic B16BL6-D5 (D5 melanoma model we reported that T cell-mediated tumor regression can occur independently of perforin, IFN-γ or the combination of both. Characterization of regressing pulmonary metastases identified macrophages as a major component of the cells infiltrating the tumor after adoptive transfer of effector T cells. This led us to hypothesize that macrophages played a central role in tumor regression following T-cell transfer. Here, we sought to determine the factors responsible for the infiltration of macrophages at the tumor site. Methods These studies used the poorly immunogenic D5 melanoma model. Tumor-specific effector T cells, generated from tumor vaccine-draining lymph nodes (TVDLN, were used for adoptive immunotherapy and in vitro analysis of chemokine expression. Cellular infiltrates into pulmonary metastases were determined by immunohistochemistry. Chemokine expression by the D5 melanoma following co-culture with T cells, IFN-γ or TNF-α was determined by RT-PCR and ELISA. Functional activity of chemokines was confirmed using a macrophage migration assay. T cell activation of macrophages to release nitric oxide (NO was determined using GRIES reagent. Results We observed that tumor-specific T cells with a type 1 cytokine profile also expressed message for and secreted RANTES, MIP-1α and MIP-1β following stimulation with specific tumor. Unexpectedly, D5 melanoma cells cultured with IFN-γ or TNF-α, two type 1 cytokines expressed by therapeutic T cells, secreted Keratinocyte Chemoattractant (KC, MCP-1, IP-10 and RANTES and expressed mRNA for MIG. The chemokines released by T cells and cytokine-stimulated tumor cells were functional and induced migration of the DJ2PM macrophage cell line. Additionally, tumor-specific stimulation of wt or perforin

  19. Chemokine Receptor Ccr6 Deficiency Alters Hepatic Inflammatory Cell Recruitment and Promotes Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis

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    Blaya, Delia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Coll, Mar; Millán, Cristina; Altamirano, José; Arroyo, Vicente; Caballería, Joan; Bataller, Ramón; Ginès, Pere; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases are characterized by a sustained inflammatory response in which chemokines and chemokine-receptors orchestrate inflammatory cell recruitment. In this study we investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR6 in acute and chronic liver injury. In the absence of liver injury Ccr6-/- mice presented a higher number of hepatic macrophages and increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 markers Tnf-α, Il6 and Mcp1. Inflammation and cell recruitment were increased after carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in Ccr6-/- mice. Moreover, chronic liver injury by carbon tetrachloride in Ccr6-/- mice was associated with enhanced inflammation and fibrosis, altered macrophage recruitment, enhanced CD4+ cells and a reduction in Th17 (CD4+IL17+) and mature dendritic (MHCII+CD11c+) cells recruitment. Clodronate depletion of macrophages in Ccr6-/- mice resulted in a reduction of hepatic pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic markers in the absence and after liver injury. Finally, increased CCR6 hepatic expression in patients with alcoholic hepatitis was found to correlate with liver expression of CCL20 and severity of liver disease. In conclusion, CCR6 deficiency affects hepatic inflammatory cell recruitment resulting in the promotion of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:26691857

  20. Chemokine Receptor Ccr6 Deficiency Alters Hepatic Inflammatory Cell Recruitment and Promotes Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis.

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    Silvia Affò

    Full Text Available Chronic liver diseases are characterized by a sustained inflammatory response in which chemokines and chemokine-receptors orchestrate inflammatory cell recruitment. In this study we investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR6 in acute and chronic liver injury. In the absence of liver injury Ccr6-/- mice presented a higher number of hepatic macrophages and increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 markers Tnf-α, Il6 and Mcp1. Inflammation and cell recruitment were increased after carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in Ccr6-/- mice. Moreover, chronic liver injury by carbon tetrachloride in Ccr6-/- mice was associated with enhanced inflammation and fibrosis, altered macrophage recruitment, enhanced CD4+ cells and a reduction in Th17 (CD4+IL17+ and mature dendritic (MHCII+CD11c+ cells recruitment. Clodronate depletion of macrophages in Ccr6-/- mice resulted in a reduction of hepatic pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic markers in the absence and after liver injury. Finally, increased CCR6 hepatic expression in patients with alcoholic hepatitis was found to correlate with liver expression of CCL20 and severity of liver disease. In conclusion, CCR6 deficiency affects hepatic inflammatory cell recruitment resulting in the promotion of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis.

  1. Chemokine Receptor Ccr6 Deficiency Alters Hepatic Inflammatory Cell Recruitment and Promotes Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis.

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    Affò, Silvia; Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Blaya, Delia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Coll, Mar; Millán, Cristina; Altamirano, José; Arroyo, Vicente; Caballería, Joan; Bataller, Ramón; Ginès, Pere; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases are characterized by a sustained inflammatory response in which chemokines and chemokine-receptors orchestrate inflammatory cell recruitment. In this study we investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR6 in acute and chronic liver injury. In the absence of liver injury Ccr6-/- mice presented a higher number of hepatic macrophages and increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 markers Tnf-α, Il6 and Mcp1. Inflammation and cell recruitment were increased after carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in Ccr6-/- mice. Moreover, chronic liver injury by carbon tetrachloride in Ccr6-/- mice was associated with enhanced inflammation and fibrosis, altered macrophage recruitment, enhanced CD4+ cells and a reduction in Th17 (CD4+IL17+) and mature dendritic (MHCII+CD11c+) cells recruitment. Clodronate depletion of macrophages in Ccr6-/- mice resulted in a reduction of hepatic pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic markers in the absence and after liver injury. Finally, increased CCR6 hepatic expression in patients with alcoholic hepatitis was found to correlate with liver expression of CCL20 and severity of liver disease. In conclusion, CCR6 deficiency affects hepatic inflammatory cell recruitment resulting in the promotion of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis.

  2. Re: Chemokines in Cancer

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    Fehmi Narter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that regulate the trafficking and positioning of cells by activating the seven-transmembrane spanning G protein-coupled chemokine receptors (GPCR or non G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane spanning receptors called atypical chemokine receptors (ACKR. Chemokines are basic proteins that also bind to glycosaminoglycans which play important roles in their biology. Chemokines are divided into four subfamilies based on the position of the first two N-terminal cysteine residues, including the CC, CXC, CX3C and XC subfamilies. Nearly 50 chemokines and 20 signaling chemokine receptors and 4 AKCRs have been identified. Dysregulated expression of chemokines and their corresponding receptors is implicated in many diseases, such as autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and cancer. Chemokines are essential coordinators of cellular migration and cell-cell interactions and, therefore, have great impact on tumor development. In the tumor microenvironment, tumor-associated host cells and cancer cells release an array of different chemokines, resulting in the recruitment and activation of different cell types that mediate the balance between antitumor and pro-tumor responses. In addition to their primary role as chemoattractants, chemokines are also involved in other tumor-related processes, including tumor cell growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Therefore, further studies of the distinctions between the pro-tumor and antitumor activities of chemokines are warranted in order to develop more effective therapies against cancer.

  3. Antitumor immunity by a dendritic cell vaccine encoding secondary lymphoid chemokine and tumor lysate on murine prostate cancer

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    Jun Lu; Qi Zhang; Chun-Min Liang; Shu-Jie Xia; Cui-Ping Zhong; Da-Wei Wang

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the antitumor immunity by a dendritic cell (DC) vaccine encoding secondary lymphoid chemokine gene and tumor lysate on murine prostate cancer. Methods: DC from bone marrow of C57BL/6 were transfected with a plasmid vector expressing secondary lymphoid chemokine (SLC) cDNA by Lipofectamine2000 liposome and tumor lysate. Total RNA extracted from SLC+lysate-DC was used to verify the expression of SLC by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The immunotherapeutic effect of DC vaccine on murine prostate cancer was assessed. Results: We found that in the prostate tumor model of C57BL/6 mice, the adminstration of SLC+lysate-DC inhibited tumor growth most significantly when compared with SLC-DC, lysate-DC, DC or phos-phate buffer solution (PBS) counterparts (P<0.01). Immunohistochemical fluorescent staining analysis showed the infiltration of more CD4+, CD8+ T cell and CD11c+ DC within established tumor treated by SLC+lysate-DC vaccine than other DC vaccines (P<0.01). Conclusion: DC vaccine encoding secondary lymphoid chemokine and tumor lysate can elicit significant antitumor immunity by infiltration of CD4+, CD8+ T cell and DC, which might provide a potential immunotherapy method for prostate cancer.

  4. 肝再生磷酸酶-3促进结肠癌细胞分泌趋化因子26对肿瘤相关性巨噬细胞的趋化作用%The migration of tumor-associated macrophages was enhanced by phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 through promoting human colon cancer cells to secrete chemokine 26

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    黄伟华; 来伟; 蓝球生; 曾献清; 张旸; 褚忠华

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3) promoting colon cancer cells LoVo to secrete chemokine 26 (CCL26),which enhances tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) migration.Methods We used real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR),and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect the mRNA and protein expression of CCL26,and the protein expression of CCL26 after treatment of LoVo cells with nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor,BAY 11-7082 (5,10,and 15 mol/L).Invasion assays were applied to determine the effect of CCL26 on the ability of PRL-3 promoting migration of TAMs.Results RT-qPCR showed that the CCL26 mRNA expression of LoVo-P was higher than LoVo-C [(46 ± 5) fold].ELISA displayed that the protein level of CCL26 of LoVo-P was higher than LoVo-C,and it was attenuated in a concentration-dependent manner by treating LoVo-P with the NF-κB inhibitor,BAY 11-7082 (5,10,and 15 mol/L).Transwell invasion assays showed that the migration of TAMs was enhanced when TAMs were cocultured with LoVo-P cells,and it can be inhibited by NF-κB inhibitor,BAY 11-7082.Also the migration of TAMs was enhanced in a concentration-dependent manner when TAMs were cocultured with different concentrations of CCL26 (P < 0.01).Conclusion PRL-3 promotes colon cancer cells to secrete chemokine CCL26,which can enhance TAMs migration.%目的 观察肝再生磷酸酶-3(PRL-3)促进结肠癌细胞LoVo分泌趋化因子26(CCL26),对肿瘤相关性巨噬细胞的趋化、聚集作用.方法 实时定量反转录聚合酶链反应(RT-qPCR)检测CCL26 mRNA水平表达差异;酶联免疫吸附试验(ELISA)检测CCL26蛋白水平表达差异,检测添加核因子κB(NF-κB)抑制剂BAY 11-7082(5、10、15 mol/L)后,CCL26蛋白水平;Transwell迁移实验检测LoVo-P、LoVo-C与TAM共培养24h后,对TAM迁移作用.结果 RT-qPCR检测结果显示,LoVo-P对比LoVo-C,CCL26升高(46±5)倍,ELISA检测CCL26蛋白水平,LoVo-P为(91

  5. Comprehensive models of human primary and metastatic colorectal tumors in immunodeficient and immunocompetent mice by chemokine targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Sun, Jian; Huang, Zhiliang; Hou, Harry; Arcilla, Myra; Rakhilin, Nikolai; Joe, Daniel J; Choi, Jiahn; Gadamsetty, Poornima; Milsom, Jeff; Nandakumar, Govind; Longman, Randy; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Edwards, Robert; Chen, Jonlin; Chen, Kai Yuan; Bu, Pengcheng; Wang, Lihua; Xu, Yitian; Munroe, Robert; Abratte, Christian; Miller, Andrew D; Gümüş, Zeynep H; Shuler, Michael; Nishimura, Nozomi; Edelmann, Winfried; Shen, Xiling; Lipkin, Steven M

    2015-06-01

    Current orthotopic xenograft models of human colorectal cancer (CRC) require surgery and do not robustly form metastases in the liver, the most common site clinically. CCR9 traffics lymphocytes to intestine and colorectum. We engineered use of the chemokine receptor CCR9 in CRC cell lines and patient-derived cells to create primary gastrointestinal (GI) tumors in immunodeficient mice by tail-vein injection rather than surgery. The tumors metastasize inducibly and robustly to the liver. Metastases have higher DKK4 and NOTCH signaling levels and are more chemoresistant than paired subcutaneous xenografts. Using this approach, we generated 17 chemokine-targeted mouse models (CTMMs) that recapitulate the majority of common human somatic CRC mutations. We also show that primary tumors can be modeled in immunocompetent mice by microinjecting CCR9-expressing cancer cell lines into early-stage mouse blastocysts, which induces central immune tolerance. We expect that CTMMs will facilitate investigation of the biology of CRC metastasis and drug screening.

  6. SIRT1, Is It a Tumor Promoter or Tumor Suppressor?

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    Chu-Xia Deng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available SIRT1 has been considered as a tumor promoter because of its increased expression in some types of cancers and its role in inactivating proteins that are involved in tumor suppression and DNA damage repair. However, recent studies demonstrated that SIRT1 levels are reduced in some other types of cancers, and that SIRT1 deficiency results in genetic instability and tumorigenesis, while overexpression of SIRT1 attenuates cancer formation in mice heterozygous for tumor suppressor p53 or APC. Here, I review these recent findings and discuss the possibility that activation of SIRT1 both extends lifespan and inhibits cancer formation.

  7. Chemokine axes in breast cancer: factors of the tumor microenvironment reshape the CCR7-driven metastatic spread of luminal-A breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzenfeld, Polina; Kossover, Olga; Körner, Cindy; Meshel, Tsipi; Wiemann, Stefan; Seliktar, Dror; Legler, Daniel F; Ben-Baruch, Adit

    2016-06-01

    Chemokine axes have been shown to mediate site-specific metastasis in breast cancer, but their relevance to different subtypes has been hardly addressed. Here, with the focus on the CCR7-CCL21 axis, patient datasets demonstrated that luminal-A tumors express relatively low CCR7 levels compared with more aggressive disease subtypes. Furthermore, lymph node metastasis was not associated with high CCR7 levels in luminal-A patients. The metastatic pattern of luminal-A breast tumors may be influenced by the way luminal-A tumor cells interpret signals provided by factors of the primary tumor microenvironment. Thus, CCR7-expressing human luminal-A cells were stimulated simultaneously by factors representing 3 tumor microenvironment arms typical of luminal-A tumors, hormonal, inflammatory, and growth stimulating: estrogen + TNF-α + epidermal growth factor. Such tumor microenvironment stimulation down-regulated the migration of CCR7-expressing tumor cells toward CCL21 and inhibited the formation of directional protrusions toward CCL21 in a novel 3-dimensional hydrogel system. CCL21-induced migration of CCR7-expressing tumor cells depended on PI3K and MAPK activation; however, when CCR7-expressing cancer cells were prestimulated by tumor microenvironment factors, CCL21 could not effectively activate these signaling pathways. In vivo, pre-exposure of the tumor cells to tumor microenvironment factors has put restraints on CCL21-mediated lymph node-homing cues and shifted the metastatic pattern of CCR7-expressing cells to the aggressive phenotype of dissemination to bones. Several of the aspects were also studied in the CXCR4-CXCL12 system, demonstrating similar patient and in vitro findings. Thus, we provide novel evidence to subtype-specific regulation of the CCR7-CCL21 axis, with more general implications to chemokine-dependent patterns of metastatic spread, revealing differential regulation in the luminal-A subtype.

  8. CXCL17 expression by tumor cells recruits CD11b+Gr1 high F4/80- cells and promotes tumor progression.

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    Aya Matsui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chemokines are involved in multiple aspects of pathogenesis and cellular trafficking in tumorigenesis. In this study, we report that the latest member of the C-X-C-type chemokines, CXCL17 (DMC/VCC-1, recruits immature myeloid-derived cells and enhances early tumor progression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CXCL17 was preferentially expressed in some aggressive types of gastrointestinal, breast, and lung cancer cells. CXCL17 expression did not impart NIH3T3 cells with oncogenic potential in vitro, but CXCL17-expressing NIH3T3 cells could form vasculature-rich tumors in immunodeficient mice. Our data showed that CXCL17-expressing tumor cells increased immature CD11b(+Gr1(+ myeloid-derived cells at tumor sites in mice and promoted CD31(+ tumor angiogenesis. Extensive chemotactic assays proved that CXCL17-responding cells were CD11b(+Gr1(highF4/80(- cells (≈ 90% with a neutrophil-like morphology in vitro. Although CXCL17 expression could not increase the number of CD11b(+Gr1(+ cells in tumor-burdened SCID mice or promote metastases of low metastatic colon cancer cells, the existence of CXCL17-responding myeloid-derived cells caused a striking enhancement of xenograft tumor formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that aberrant expression of CXCL17 in tumor cells recruits immature myeloid-derived cells and promotes tumor progression through angiogenesis.

  9. (+)-Nootkatone inhibits tumor necrosis factor α/interferon γ-induced production of chemokines in HaCaT cells

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    Choi, Hyeon-Jae; Lee, Jin-Hwee [College of Pharmacy, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Yi-Sook, E-mail: yisjung@ajou.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • (+)-Nootkatone inhibits TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC and MDC expression in HaCaT cells. • PKCζ, p38 MAPK, or NF-κB mediate TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC and MDC expression. • (+)-Nootkatone inhibits TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of PKCζ, p38 MAPK, or NF-κB. • (+)-Nootkatone suppresses chemokine expression by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 pathways. - Abstract: Chemokines are important mediators of cell migration, and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22) are well-known typical inflammatory chemokines involved in atopic dermatitis (AD). (+)-Nootkatone is the major component of Cyperus rotundus. (+)-Nootkatone has antiallergic, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of (+)-nootkatone on tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)/interferon γ (IFN-γ)-induced expression of Th2 chemokines in HaCaT cells. We found that (+)-nootkatone inhibited the TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 mRNA in HaCaT cells. It also significantly inhibited TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ). Furthermore, we showed that PKCζ and p38 MAPK contributed to the inhibition of TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression by blocking IκBα degradation in HaCaT cells. Taken together, these results suggest that (+)-nootkatone may suppress TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression in HaCaT cells by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 MAPK signaling pathways that lead to activation of NF-κB. We propose that (+)-nootkatone may be a useful therapeutic candidate for inflammatory skin diseases such as AD.

  10. Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1 Promotes Cell Migration, Tumor Growth of Colorectal Metastasis

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    Otto Kollmar

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In a mouse model of established extrahepatic colorectal metastasis, we analyzed whether stromal cellderived factor (SDF 1 stimulates tumor cell migration in vitro, angiogenesis, tumor growth in vivo. METHODS: Using chemotaxis chambers, CT26.WT colorectal tumor cell migration was studied under stimulation with different concentrations of SDF-1. To evaluate angiogenesis, tumor growth in vivo, green fluorescent protein-transfected CT26.WT cells were implanted in dorsal skinfold chambers of syngeneic BALB/c mice. After 5 days, tumors were locally exposed to SDF-1. Cell proliferation, tumor microvascularization, growth were studied during a further 9-day period using intravital fluorescence microscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry. Tumors exposed to PBS only served as controls. RESULTS:In vitro, > 30% of unstimulated CT26.WT cells showed expression of the SDF-1 receptor CXCR4. On chemotaxis assay, SDF-1 provoked a dose-dependent increase in cell migration. In vivo, SDF-1 accelerated neovascularization, induced a significant increase in tumor growth. Capillaries of SDF-1-treated tumors showed significant dilation. Of interest, SDF-1 treatment was associated with a significantly increased expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a downregulation of cleaved caspase-3. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that the CXC chemokine SDF-1 promotes tumor cell migration in vitro, tumor growth of established extrahepatic metastasis in vivo due to angiogenesis-dependent induction of tumor cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptotic cell death.

  11. Tumor Suppression and Promotion by Autophagy

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    Yenniffer Ávalos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process that involves lysosomal degradation of proteins and organelles, mostly mitochondria, for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and reduction of metabolic stress. Problems in the execution of this process are linked to different pathological conditions, such as neurodegeneration, aging, and cancer. Many of the proteins that regulate autophagy are either oncogenes or tumor suppressor proteins. Specifically, tumor suppressor genes that negatively regulate mTOR, such as PTEN, AMPK, LKB1, and TSC1/2 stimulate autophagy while, conversely, oncogenes that activate mTOR, such as class I PI3K, Ras, Rheb, and AKT, inhibit autophagy, suggesting that autophagy is a tumor suppressor mechanism. Consistent with this hypothesis, the inhibition of autophagy promotes oxidative stress, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, autophagy also functions as a cytoprotective mechanism under stress conditions, including hypoxia and nutrient starvation, that promotes tumor growth and resistance to chemotherapy in established tumors. Here, in this brief review, we will focus the discussion on this ambiguous role of autophagy in the development and progression of cancer.

  12. Tumor suppression and promotion by autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávalos, Yenniffer; Canales, Jimena; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Criollo, Alfredo; Lavandero, Sergio; Quest, Andrew F G

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process that involves lysosomal degradation of proteins and organelles, mostly mitochondria, for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and reduction of metabolic stress. Problems in the execution of this process are linked to different pathological conditions, such as neurodegeneration, aging, and cancer. Many of the proteins that regulate autophagy are either oncogenes or tumor suppressor proteins. Specifically, tumor suppressor genes that negatively regulate mTOR, such as PTEN, AMPK, LKB1, and TSC1/2 stimulate autophagy while, conversely, oncogenes that activate mTOR, such as class I PI3K, Ras, Rheb, and AKT, inhibit autophagy, suggesting that autophagy is a tumor suppressor mechanism. Consistent with this hypothesis, the inhibition of autophagy promotes oxidative stress, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, autophagy also functions as a cytoprotective mechanism under stress conditions, including hypoxia and nutrient starvation, that promotes tumor growth and resistance to chemotherapy in established tumors. Here, in this brief review, we will focus the discussion on this ambiguous role of autophagy in the development and progression of cancer.

  13. The cytomegalovirus-encoded chemokine receptor US28 promotes intestinal neoplasia in transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, G.; Maussang, D.; Muniz, L.R.; Noriega, V.M.; Fraile-Ramos, A.; Barker, N.; Marchesi, F.; Thirunarayanan, N.; Vischer, H.F.; Qin, L.; Mayer, L.; Harpaz, N.; Leurs, R.; Furtado, G.C.; Clevers, H.; Tortorella, D.; Smit, M.J.; Lira, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    US28 is a constitutively active chemokine receptor encoded by CMV (also referred to as human herpesvirus 5), a highly prevalent human virus that infects a broad spectrum of cells, including intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). To study the role of US28 in vivo, we created transgenic mice (VS28 mice)

  14. The chemokine CCL5 induces CCR1-mediated hyperalgesia in mice inoculated with NCTC 2472 tumoral cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevida, M; Lastra, A; Meana, Á; Hidalgo, A; Baamonde, A; Menéndez, Luis

    2014-02-14

    Although the expression of the chemokine receptor CCR1 has been demonstrated in several structures related to nociception, supporting the nociceptive role of chemokines able to activate it, the involvement of CCR1 in neoplastic pain has not been previously assessed. We have assayed the effects of a CCR1 antagonist, J113863, in two murine models of neoplastic hyperalgesia based on the intratibial injection of either NCTC 2472 fibrosarcoma cells, able to induce osteolytic bone injury, or B16-F10 melanoma cells, associated to mixed osteolytic/osteoblastic bone pathological features. The systemic administration of J113863 inhibited thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia but not mechanical allodynia in mice inoculated with NCTC 2472 cells. Moreover, in these mice, thermal hyperalgesia was counteracted following the peritumoral (10-30μg) but not spinal (3-5μg) administration of J113863. In contrast, hyperalgesia and allodynia measured in mice inoculated with B16-F10 cells remained unaffected after the administration of J113863. The inoculation of tumoral cells did not modify the levels of CCL3 at tumor or spinal cord. In contrast, although the concentration of CCL5 remained unmodified in mice inoculated with B16-F10 cells, increased levels of this chemokine were measured in tumor-bearing limbs, but not the spinal cord, of mice inoculated with NCTC 2472 cells. Increased levels of CCL5 were also found following the incubation of NCTC 2472, but not B16-F10, cells in the corresponding culture medium. The intraplantar injection of CCL5 (0.5ng) to naïve mice evoked thermal hyperalgesia prevented by the coadministration of J113863 or the CCR5 antagonist, d-Ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA), demonstrating that CCL5 can induce thermal hyperalgesia in mice through the activation of CCR1 or CCR5. However, contrasting with the inhibitory effect evoked by J113863, the systemic administration of DAPTA did not prevent tumoral hyperalgesia. Finally, the peritumoral administration of an anti

  15. Role of Tertiary Lymphoid Structures (TLS) in Anti-Tumor Immunity: Potential Tumor-Induced Cytokines/Chemokines that Regulate TLS Formation in Epithelial-Derived Cancers

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    Pimenta, Erica M. [Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, New Jersey Medical School-Cancer Center, Newark, NJ 07103 (United States); Barnes, Betsy J., E-mail: barnesbe@njms.rutgers.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, New Jersey Medical School-Cancer Center, Newark, NJ 07103 (United States)

    2014-04-23

    Following the successes of monoclonal antibody immunotherapies (trastuzumab (Herceptin{sup ®}) and rituximab (Rituxan{sup ®})) and the first approved cancer vaccine, Provenge{sup ®} (sipuleucel-T), investigations into the immune system and how it can be modified by a tumor has become an exciting and promising new field of cancer research. Dozens of clinical trials for new antibodies, cancer and adjuvant vaccines, and autologous T and dendritic cell transfers are ongoing in hopes of identifying ways to re-awaken the immune system and force an anti-tumor response. To date, however, few consistent, reproducible, or clinically-relevant effects have been shown using vaccine or autologous cell transfers due in part to the fact that the immunosuppressive mechanisms of the tumor have not been overcome. Much of the research focus has been on re-activating or priming cytotoxic T cells to recognize tumor, in some cases completely disregarding the potential roles that B cells play in immune surveillance or how a solid tumor should be treated to maximize immunogenicity. Here, we will summarize what is currently known about the induction or evasion of humoral immunity via tumor-induced cytokine/chemokine expression and how formation of tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS) within the tumor microenvironment may be used to enhance immunotherapy response.

  16. Role of Tertiary Lymphoid Structures (TLS in Anti-Tumor Immunity: Potential Tumor-Induced Cytokines/Chemokines that Regulate TLS Formation in Epithelial-Derived Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica M. Pimenta

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Following the successes of monoclonal antibody immunotherapies (trastuzumab (Herceptin® and rituximab (Rituxan® and the first approved cancer vaccine, Provenge® (sipuleucel-T, investigations into the immune system and how it can be modified by a tumor has become an exciting and promising new field of cancer research. Dozens of clinical trials for new antibodies, cancer and adjuvant vaccines, and autologous T and dendritic cell transfers are ongoing in hopes of identifying ways to re-awaken the immune system and force an anti-tumor response. To date, however, few consistent, reproducible, or clinically-relevant effects have been shown using vaccine or autologous cell transfers due in part to the fact that the immunosuppressive mechanisms of the tumor have not been overcome. Much of the research focus has been on re-activating or priming cytotoxic T cells to recognize tumor, in some cases completely disregarding the potential roles that B cells play in immune surveillance or how a solid tumor should be treated to maximize immunogenicity. Here, we will summarize what is currently known about the induction or evasion of humoral immunity via tumor-induced cytokine/chemokine expression and how formation of tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS within the tumor microenvironment may be used to enhance immunotherapy response.

  17. Pathophysiological roles of microvascular alterations in pulmonary inflammatory diseases: possible implications of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and CXC chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanami Orihara

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Kanami Orihara, Akio MatsudaDepartment of Allergy and Immunology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and bronchial asthma are common respiratory diseases that are caused by chronic infl ammation of the airways. Although these diseases are mediated by substantially distinct immunological reactions, especially in mild cases, they both show increased numbers of neutrophils, increased production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and poor responses to corticosteroids, particularly in patients with severe diseases. These immunological alterations may contribute strongly to airway structural changes, commonly referred to as airway remodeling. Microvascular alterations, a component of airway remodeling and caused by chronic inflammation, are observed and appear to be clinically involved in both diseases. It has been well established that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF plays important roles in the airway microvascular alterations in mild and moderate cases of both diseases, but any role that VEGF might play in severe cases of these diseases remains unclear. Here, we review recent research findings, including our own data, and discuss the possibility that TNF-α and its associated CXC chemokines play roles in microvascular alterations that are even more crucial than those of VEGF in patients with severe COPD or asthma.Keywords: TNF-α, CXC chemokines, corticosteroid, pulmonary microvessels, COPD, asthma

  18. The hematopoietic chemokine CXCL12 promotes integration of human endothelial colony forming cell-derived cells into immature vessel networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newey, Sarah E; Tsaknakis, Grigorios; Khoo, Cheen P; Athanassopoulos, Thanassi; Camicia, Rosalba; Zhang, Youyi; Grabowska, Rita; Harris, Adrian L; Roubelakis, Maria G; Watt, Suzanne M

    2014-11-15

    Proangiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) prime endothelial cells to respond to "hematopoietic" chemokines and cytokines by inducing/upregulating expression of the respective chemokine/cytokine receptors. Coculture of human endothelial colony forming cell (ECFC)-derived cells with human stromal cells in the presence of VEGF and FGF-2 for 14 days resulted in upregulation of the "hematopoietic" chemokine CXCL12 and its CXCR4 receptor by day 3 of coculture. Chronic exposure to the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 in this vasculo/angiogenesis assay significantly reduced vascular tubule formation, an observation recapitulated by delayed AMD3100 addition. While AMD3100 did not affect ECFC-derived cell proliferation, it did demonstrate a dual action. First, over the later stages of the 14-day cocultures, AMD3100 delayed tubule organization into maturing vessel networks, resulting in enhanced endothelial cell retraction and loss of complexity as defined by live cell imaging. Second, at earlier stages of cocultures, we observed that AMD3100 significantly inhibited the integration of exogenous ECFC-derived cells into established, but immature, vascular networks. Comparative proteome profiler array analyses of ECFC-derived cells treated with AMD3100 identified changes in expression of potential candidate molecules involved in adhesion and/or migration. Blocking antibodies to CD31, but not CD146 or CD166, reduced the ECFC-derived cell integration into these extant vascular networks. Thus, CXCL12 plays a key role not only in endothelial cell sensing and guidance, but also in promoting the integration of ECFC-derived cells into developing vascular networks.

  19. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaofeng Liao; Tharshikha Pirapakaran; Luo, Xin M

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potentia...

  20. Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Promote Resistance to Antimicrobial Chemokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, David L.; Lew, Cynthia S.; Kartchner, Brittany; Porter, Nathan T.; McDaniel, S. Wade; Jones, Nathan M.; Mason, Sara; Wu, Erin; Wilson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemokines (AMCs) are a recently described family of host defense peptides that play an important role in protecting a wide variety of organisms from bacterial infection. Very little is known about the bacterial targets of AMCs or factors that influence bacterial susceptibility to AMCs. In an effort to understand how bacterial pathogens resist killing by AMCs, we screened Yersinia pseudotuberculosis transposon mutants for those with increased binding to the AMCs CCL28 and CCL25. Mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs were subjected to AMC killing assays, which revealed their increased sensitivity to chemokine-mediated cell death. The majority of the mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs contained transposon insertions in genes related to lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. A particularly strong effect on susceptibility to AMC mediated killing was observed by disruption of the hldD/waaF/waaC operon, necessary for ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose synthesis and a complete lipopolysaccharide core oligosaccharide. Periodate oxidation of surface carbohydrates also enhanced AMC binding, whereas enzymatic removal of surface proteins significantly reduced binding. These results suggest that the structure of Y. pseudotuberculosis LPS greatly affects the antimicrobial activity of AMCs by shielding a protein ligand on the bacterial cell surface. PMID:27275606

  1. Pro-inflammatory chemokine CCL2 (MCP-1 promotes healing in diabetic wounds by restoring the macrophage response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Wood

    Full Text Available Prior studies suggest that the impaired healing seen in diabetic wounds derives from a state of persistent hyper-inflammation characterized by harmful increases in inflammatory leukocytes including macrophages. However, such studies have focused on wounds at later time points (day 10 or older, and very little attention has been given to the dynamics of macrophage responses in diabetic wounds early after injury. Given the importance of macrophages for the process of healing, we studied the dynamics of macrophage response during early and late phases of healing in diabetic wounds. Here, we report that early after injury, the diabetic wound exhibits a significant delay in macrophage infiltration. The delay in the macrophage response in diabetic wounds results from reduced Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2 expression. Importantly, one-time treatment with chemoattractant CCL2 significantly stimulated healing in diabetic wounds by restoring the macrophage response. Our data demonstrate that, rather than a hyper-inflammatory state; the early diabetic wound exhibits a paradoxical and damaging decrease in essential macrophage response. Our studies suggest that the restoration of the proper kinetics of macrophage response may be able to jumpstart subsequent healing stages. CCL2 chemokine-based therapy may be an attractive strategy to promote healing in diabetic wounds.

  2. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter and protein expression of the chemokine Eotaxin-1 in colorectal cancer patients

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    Dienus Olaf

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies suggest that chemokines (chemotactic cytokines promote and regulate neoplastic progression including metastasis and angiogenesis. The chemokine eotaxin-1 is a powerful eosinophil attractant but also exerts chemotaxis of other leukocytes. Eotaxin-1 has been implicated in gastrointestinal disorders and may play an important role in colorectal mucosal immunity. Patients and methods The objective of this study was to assess the role of eotaxin-1 in colorectal cancer (CRC. Levels of eotaxin-1 protein in CRC tissues (n = 86 and paired normal mucosa were compared after determination by ELISA. Plasma eotaxin-1 levels from CRC patients (n = 67 were also compared with controls (n = 103 using the same method. Moreover, a TaqMan system was used to evaluate the -384A>G eotaxin-1 gene variant in CRC patients (n = 241 and in a control group (n = 253. Results Eotaxin-1 protein levels in colorectal tumours were significantly (P Conclusion The up-regulated eotaxin-1 protein expression in cancer tissue may reflect an eotaxin-1 mediated angiogenesis and/or a recruitment of leukocytes with potential antitumourigenic role. We noticed a dominance of the G allele in rectal cancer patients compared with colon cancer patients that was independent of eotaxin-1 expression.

  3. The role of chemokines in regualating mast cell recruitment around rat liver tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGZhi-Yong; RUANYou-Bing

    2001-01-01

    Aim To explore the correlation of stem cell factor (SCF)and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) with number difference of mast cell (MC) around the liver tumor.Methods 40 male wistar rats with liver neoplasm were divided into three different groups by numbers of MC in the surroundings of tumor. We performed ELISA for SCF and MCP-1 in serums. And chemotaxis assays of rat peritoneal MCs to SCF and MCP-1 in serums were measured in 48-wellmicroboyden chambers. We also used immunohistochemistryto investigate whether rat MCs express SCF positively.RESULTE There were marked differences in MC numbersaround tumor between different groups. The group that has more MCs around tumor has the higher levels of SCF andMCP-1 in serums and the stronger chemotaxis to ratperitoneal MCs. SCF washigher than MCP-1 in bothchemotactic activity to MCs and levels in serums. And ratMCs positively express SCF.Conclusion SCF and MCP-1 were found to be two particularly efficacious chemoattractants for MCs. The levels of SCF and MCP-1 in serums may be closely correlated with MCs numbers around tumor. The production of SCF by MCs might act on mast cell migration and proliferation of MC.

  4. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Liao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potential and hurdles of developing novel, chemokine-based drugs to treat LN.

  5. Chemokines in cancer related inflammation

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    Allavena, Paola; Germano, Giovanni; Marchesi, Federica [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Mantovani, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.mantovani@humanitasresearch.it [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Translational Medicine, University of Milan (Italy)

    2011-03-10

    Chemokines are key players of the cancer-related inflammation. Chemokine ligands and receptors are downstream of genetic events that cause neoplastic transformation and are abundantly expressed in chronic inflammatory conditions which predispose to cancer. Components of the chemokine system affect multiple pathways of tumor progression including: leukocyte recruitment, neo-angiogenesis, tumor cell proliferation and survival, invasion and metastasis. Evidence in pre-clinical and clinical settings suggests that the chemokine system represents a valuable target for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies.

  6. Transforming Growth Factor-β and Interleukin-1β Signaling Pathways Converge on the Chemokine CCL20 Promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Oliver J; Somanath, Sangeeta; Moermans, Catherine; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Cambier, Stephanie; Markovics, Jennifer; Bondesson, Andrew J; Hill, Arthur; Jablons, David; Wolters, Paul; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D; Baron, Jody L; Nishimura, Stephen L

    2015-06-05

    CCL20 is the only chemokine ligand for the chemokine receptor CCR6, which is expressed by the critical antigen presenting cells, dendritic cells. Increased expression of CCL20 is likely involved in the increased recruitment of dendritic cells observed in fibroinflammatory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). CCL20 expression is increased by the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. We have determined that IL-1β-dependent CCL20 expression is also dependent on the multifunctional cytokine TGF-β. TGF-β is expressed in a latent form that must be activated to function, and activation is achieved through binding to the integrin αvβ8 (itgb8). Here we confirm correlative increases in αvβ8 and IL-1β with CCL20 protein in lung parenchymal lysates of a large cohort of COPD patients. How IL-1β- and αvβ8-mediated TGF-β activation conspire to increase fibroblast CCL20 expression remains unknown, because these pathways have not been shown to directly interact. We evaluate the 5'-flanking region of CCL20 to determine that IL-1β-driven CCL20 expression is dependent on αvβ8-mediated activation of TGF-β. We identify a TGF-β-responsive element (i.e. SMAD) located on an upstream enhancer of the human CCL20 promoter required for efficient IL-1β-dependent CCL20 expression. By chromatin immunoprecipitation, this upstream enhancer complexes with the p50 subunit of NF-κB on a NF-κB-binding element close to the transcriptional start site of CCL20. These interactions are confirmed by electromobility shift assays in nuclear extracts from human lung fibroblasts. These data define a mechanism by which αvβ8-dependent activation of TGF-β regulates IL-1β-dependent CCL20 expression in COPD.

  7. The deubiquitinating enzyme USP8 promotes trafficking and degradation of the chemokine receptor 4 at the sorting endosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Ilana; Higginbotham, Katherine M; Dise, Rebecca S; Sierra, Maria I; Nash, Piers D

    2010-11-26

    Reversible ubiquitination orchestrated by the opposition of ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinating enzymes mediates endocytic trafficking of cell surface receptors for lysosomal degradation. Ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8) has previously been implicated in endocytosis of several receptors by virtue of their deubiquitination. The present study explores an indirect role for USP8 in cargo trafficking through its regulation of the chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4). Contrary to the effects of USP8 loss on enhanced green fluorescent protein, we find that USP8 depletion stabilizes CXCR4 on the cell surface and attenuates receptor degradation without affecting its ubiquitination status. In the presence of ligand, diminished CXCR4 turnover is accompanied by receptor accumulation on enlarged early endosomes and leads to enhancement of phospho-ERK signaling. Perturbation in CXCR4 trafficking, resulting from USP8 inactivation, occurs at the ESCRT-0 checkpoint, and catalytic mutation of USP8 specifically targeted to the ESCRT-0 complex impairs the spatial and temporal organization of the sorting endosome. USP8 functionally opposes the ubiquitin ligase AIP4 with respect to ESCRT-0 ubiquitination, thereby promoting trafficking of CXCR4. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a functional cooperation between USP8, AIP4, and the ESCRT-0 machinery at the early sorting phase of CXCR4 and underscore the versatility of USP8 in shaping trafficking events at the early-to-late endosome transition.

  8. Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Wallace

    Full Text Available Tumor fibroblasts are active partners in tumor progression, but the genes and pathways that mediate this collaboration are ill-defined. Previous work demonstrates that Ets2 function in stromal cells significantly contributes to breast tumor progression. Conditional mouse models were used to study the function of Ets2 in both mammary stromal fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Conditional inactivation of Ets2 in stromal fibroblasts in PyMT and ErbB2 driven tumors significantly reduced tumor growth, however deletion of Ets2 in epithelial cells in the PyMT model had no significant effect. Analysis of gene expression in fibroblasts revealed a tumor- and Ets2-dependent gene signature that was enriched in genes important for ECM remodeling, cell migration, and angiogenesis in both PyMT and ErbB2 driven-tumors. Consistent with these results, PyMT and ErbB2 tumors lacking Ets2 in fibroblasts had fewer functional blood vessels, and Ets2 in fibroblasts elicited changes in gene expression in tumor endothelial cells consistent with this phenotype. An in vivo angiogenesis assay revealed the ability of Ets2 in fibroblasts to promote blood vessel formation in the absence of tumor cells. Importantly, the Ets2-dependent gene expression signatures from both mouse models were able to distinguish human breast tumor stroma from normal stroma, and correlated with patient outcomes in two whole tumor breast cancer data sets. The data reveals a key function for Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts in signaling to endothelial cells to promote tumor angiogenesis. The results highlight the collaborative networks that orchestrate communication between stromal cells and tumor cells, and suggest that targeting tumor fibroblasts may be an effective strategy for developing novel anti-angiogenic therapies.

  9. Promotion of Tumor Invasion by Cooperation of Granulocytes and Macrophages Activated by Anti-tumor Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Barbera-Guillem

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the potential role of anti-tumor antibodies and tumor antigens in the formation of immune complexes which promote matrix degradation and angiogenesis. B-cell deficient or B-cell depleted mice showed a reduction in tumor invasion and metastasis. In vitro invasion assays and in vivo models of metastasis showed that anti-sTn antibodies and sTn tumor antigens form complexes which induce granulocytes and macrophages together to mediate tumor invasion and metastasis by processes including extracellular matrix degradation and angiogenesis. These results suggest the existence of a tumor promoting role of a B-cell immune response induced by shed tumor associated antigens of solid, nonlymphoid tumors.

  10. Notch pathway promotes ovarian cancer growth and migration via CXCR4/SDF1α chemokine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, R; Colombo, M; Bulfamante, G; Falleni, M; Tosi, D; Garavelli, S; De Simone, D; Vigolo, E; Todoerti, K; Neri, A; Platonova, N

    2015-09-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecological malignancy. Understanding the molecular pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is critical to provide new targeted therapeutic strategies. Recent evidence supports a role for Notch in ovarian cancer progression and associates its dysregulation to poor overall survival. Similarly, CXCR4/SDF1α signalling correlates with ovarian cancer progression and metastasis. Recent findings indicate that Notch promotes CXCR4/SDF1α signalling and its effect on cell growth and migration; nonetheless, up to now, the association between Notch and CXCR4/SDFα in ovarian cancer has not been reported. Thereby, the aim of this study was to investigate if Notch and CXCR4/SDF1α cooperate in determining ovarian cancer growth, survival and migration. To address this issue, Notch signalling was inhibited by using γ-secretase inhibitors, or upregulated by forcing of Notch1 expression in ovarian cancer cell lines. Our results indicated that Notch activity influenced tumour cell growth and survival and positively regulated CXCR4 and SDF1α expression. CXCR4/SDF1α signalling mediated the effect of Notch pathway on ovarian cancer cell growth and SDF1α-driven migration. Additionally, for the first time, we demonstrated that Notch signalling activation can be detected in ovarian cancer specimens by immunohistochemistry analysis of the Notch transcriptional target, HES6 and is positively correlated with high expression levels of CXCR4 and SDF1α. Our results demonstrate that Notch affects ovarian cancer cell biology through the modulation of CXCR4/SDF1α signalling and suggest that Notch inhibition may be a rationale therapeutic approach to hamper ovarian cancer progression mediated by the CXCR4/SDF1α axis.

  11. Wild-Type N-Ras, Overexpressed in Basal-like Breast Cancer, Promotes Tumor Formation by Inducing IL-8 Secretion via JAK2 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Yi Zheng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Basal-like breast cancers (BLBCs are aggressive, and their drivers are unclear. We have found that wild-type N-RAS is overexpressed in BLBCs but not in other breast cancer subtypes. Repressing N-RAS inhibits transformation and tumor growth, whereas overexpression enhances these processes even in preinvasive BLBC cells. We identified N-Ras-responsive genes, most of which encode chemokines; e.g., IL8. Expression levels of these chemokines and N-RAS in tumors correlate with outcome. N-Ras, but not K-Ras, induces IL-8 by binding and activating the cytoplasmic pool of JAK2; IL-8 then acts on both the cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts. Thus, BLBC progression is promoted by increasing activities of wild-type N-Ras, which mediates autocrine/paracrine signaling that can influence both cancer and stroma cells.

  12. Wild-Type N-Ras, Overexpressed in Basal-like Breast Cancer, Promotes Tumor Formation by Inducing IL-8 Secretion via JAK2 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ze-Yi; Tian, Lin; Bu, Wen; Fan, Cheng; Gao, Xia; Wang, Hai; Liao, Yi-Hua; Li, Yi; Lewis, Michael T; Edwards, Dean; Zwaka, Thomas P; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Medina, Daniel; Perou, Charles M; Creighton, Chad J; Zhang, Xiang H-F; Chang, Eric C

    2015-07-21

    Basal-like breast cancers (BLBCs) are aggressive, and their drivers are unclear. We have found that wild-type N-RAS is overexpressed in BLBCs but not in other breast cancer subtypes. Repressing N-RAS inhibits transformation and tumor growth, whereas overexpression enhances these processes even in preinvasive BLBC cells. We identified N-Ras-responsive genes, most of which encode chemokines; e.g., IL8. Expression levels of these chemokines and N-RAS in tumors correlate with outcome. N-Ras, but not K-Ras, induces IL-8 by binding and activating the cytoplasmic pool of JAK2; IL-8 then acts on both the cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts. Thus, BLBC progression is promoted by increasing activities of wild-type N-Ras, which mediates autocrine/paracrine signaling that can influence both cancer and stroma cells.

  13. Recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist promotes M1 microglia biased cytokines and chemokines following human traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Adel; Guilfoyle, Mathew R; Carpenter, Keri Lh; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra) has demonstrated efficacy in a wide range of animal models of neuronal injury. We have previously published a randomised controlled study of IL1ra in human severe TBI, with concomitant microdialysis and plasma sampling of 42 cytokines and chemokines. In this study, we have used partial least squares discriminant analysis to model the effects of drug administration and time following injury on the cytokine milieu within the injured brain. We demonstrate that treatment with rhIL1ra causes a brain-specific modification of the cytokine and chemokine response to injury, particularly in samples from the first 48 h following injury. The magnitude of this response is dependent on the concentration of IL1ra achieved in the brain extracellular space. Chemokines related to recruitment of macrophages from the plasma compartment (MCP-1) and biasing towards a M1 microglial phenotype (GM-CSF, IL1) are increased in patient samples in the rhIL1ra-treated patients. In control patients, cytokines and chemokines biased to a M2 microglia phenotype (IL4, IL10, MDC) are relatively increased. This pattern of response suggests that a simple classification of IL1ra as an 'anti-inflammatory' cytokine may not be appropriate and highlights the importance of the microglial response to injury.

  14. A multi-targeted approach to suppress tumor-promoting inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi, Abbas K; Bilsland, Alan; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Bishayee, Anupam; Azmi, Asfar S; Lokeshwar, Bal L; Grue, Brendan; Panis, Carolina; Boosani, Chandra S; Poudyal, Deepak; Stafforini, Diana M; Bhakta, Dipita; Niccolai, Elena; Guha, Gunjan; Vasantha Rupasinghe, H P; Fujii, Hiromasa; Honoki, Kanya; Mehta, Kapil; Aquilano, Katia; Lowe, Leroy; Hofseth, Lorne J; Ricciardiello, Luigi; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Singh, Neetu; Whelan, Richard L; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Ashraf, S Salman; Shantha Kumara, H M C; Nowsheen, Somaira; Mohammed, Sulma I; Keith, W Nicol; Helferich, William G; Yang, Xujuan

    2015-12-01

    Cancers harbor significant genetic heterogeneity and patterns of relapse following many therapies are due to evolved resistance to treatment. While efforts have been made to combine targeted therapies, significant levels of toxicity have stymied efforts to effectively treat cancer with multi-drug combinations using currently approved therapeutics. We discuss the relationship between tumor-promoting inflammation and cancer as part of a larger effort to develop a broad-spectrum therapeutic approach aimed at a wide range of targets to address this heterogeneity. Specifically, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, cyclooxygenase-2, transcription factor nuclear factor-κB, tumor necrosis factor alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase, protein kinase B, and CXC chemokines are reviewed as important antiinflammatory targets while curcumin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, genistein, lycopene, and anthocyanins are reviewed as low-cost, low toxicity means by which these targets might all be reached simultaneously. Future translational work will need to assess the resulting synergies of rationally designed antiinflammatory mixtures (employing low-toxicity constituents), and then combine this with similar approaches targeting the most important pathways across the range of cancer hallmark phenotypes.

  15. Chemokines as Cancer Vaccine Adjuvants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agne Petrosiute

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We are witnessing a new era of immune-mediated cancer therapies and vaccine development. As the field of cancer vaccines advances into clinical trials, overcoming low immunogenicity is a limiting step in achieving full success of this therapeutic approach. Recent discoveries in the many biological roles of chemokines in tumor immunology allow their exploitation in enhancing recruitment of antigen presenting cells (APCs and effector cells to appropriate anatomical sites. This knowledge, combined with advances in gene therapy and virology, allows researchers to employ chemokines as potential vaccine adjuvants. This review will focus on recent murine and human studies that use chemokines as therapeutic anti-cancer vaccine adjuvants.

  16. Deficiency of C-C chemokine receptor 5 suppresses tumor development via inactivation of NF-κB and upregulation of IL-1Ra in melanoma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Kyoung Song

    Full Text Available To evaluate the relevance of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5 expression and tumor development, we compared melanoma growth in CCR5 knockout (CCR5(-/- mice and wild type (CCR5(+/+ mice. CCR5(-/- mice showed reduced tumor volume, tumor weight, and increased survival rate when compared to CCR5(+/+ mice. We investigated the activation of NF-κB since it is an implicated transcription factor in the regulation of genes involving cell growth, apoptosis, and tumor growth. Significant inhibition of DNA binding activity of NF-κB, and translocation of p50 and p65 into the nucleus through the inhibition of phosphorylation of IκB was found in the melanoma tissues of CCR5(-/- mice compared to melanoma tissues of CCR5(+/+ mice. NF-κB target apoptotic protein expression, such as cleaved caspase-3, cleaved PARP, and Bax, was elevated, whereas the survival protein expression levels, such as Bcl-2, C-IAP1, was decreased in the melanoma tissues of CCR5(-/- mice. Interestingly, we found that the level of IL-1Ra, a tumor growth suppressive cytokine, was significantly elevated in tumor tissue and spleen of CCR5(-/- mice compared to the level in CCR5(+/+ mice. Moreover, infiltration of CD8(+ cytotoxic T cell and CD57(+ natural killer cells was significantly increased in melanoma tumor and spleen tissue of CCR5(-/- mice compared to that of CCR5(+/+ mice. Therefore, these results showed that CCR5 deficiency caused apoptotic cell death of melanoma through inhibition of NF-κB and upregulation of IL-1Ra.

  17. DNA vaccination in fish promotes an early chemokine-related recruitment of B cells to the muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro, R.; Martínez-Alonso, S.; Fischer, U.

    2013-01-01

    cells that infiltrate the muscle at the site of DNA delivery in vaccinated fish and the chemokines that may be involved in their infiltration. It was observed that B lymphocytes, both IgM+ and IgT+, represent a major infiltrating cell type in fish vaccinated with a viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus...... (VHSV) DNA vaccine, whereas in control fish injected with an oil adjuvant mainly granulocytes were attracted. While IgM+ cells were the major B cell population at early time points post vaccination, IgT+ cells represented the predominant cell type later on. Among twelve chemokine genes studied...... might explain the recruitment of immune cells to the site of DNA injection. Our results suggest that B cells are involved in the initial phase of the immune response to intramuscular DNA vaccination against VHSV. This appears to be a major difference to what we know from mammalian models where T cells...

  18. Prognostic Relevance of Tumor Purity and TERT Promoter Mutations on MGMT Promoter Methylation in Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze Heuling, Eva; Knab, Felix; Radke, Josefine; Eskilsson, Eskil; Martinez-Ledesma, Emmanuel; Koch, Arend; Czabanka, Marcus; Dieterich, Christoph; Verhaak, Roel G; Harms, Christoph; Euskirchen, Philipp

    2017-02-01

    Promoter methylation status of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a DNA repair enzyme, is a critical biomarker in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) as treatment decisions and clinical trial inclusion rely on its accurate assessment. However, interpretation of results is complicated by poor inter-assay reproducibility as well as weak a correlation between methylation status and expression levels of MGMT. The present study systematically investigates the influence of tumor purity on tissue subjected to MGMT analysis. A quantitative, allele-specific real-time PCR (qAS-PCR) assay was developed to determine genotype and mutant allele frequency of telomerase promoter (pTERT) mutations as a direct measure of tumor purity. We studied tumor purity, pTERT mutation by Sanger sequencing, MGMT methylation by pyrosequencing, IDH1 mutation status, and clinical parameters in a cohort of high-grade gliomas (n=97). The qAS-PCR reliably predicted pTERT genotype and tumor purity compared with independent methods. Tumor purity positively and significantly correlated with the extent of methylation in MGMT methylated GBMs. Extent of MGMT methylation differed significantly with respect to pTERT mutation hotspot (C228T vs. C250T). Interestingly, frontal lobe tumors showed greater tumor purity than those in other locations. Above all, tumor purity was identified as an independent prognostic factor in GBM. In conclusion, we determined mutual associations of tumor purity with MGMT methylation and pTERT mutations and found that the extent of MGMT methylation reflects tumor purity. In turn, tumor purity is prognostic in IDH1 wildtype GBM.

  19. Tumor-derived IL-35 promotes tumor growth by enhancing myeloid cell accumulation and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Liu, Jin-Qing; Liu, Zhenzhen; Shen, Rulong; Zhang, Guoqiang; Xu, Jianping; Basu, Sujit; Feng, Youmei; Bai, Xue-Feng

    2013-03-01

    IL-35 is a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines that is comprised of an IL-12 p35 subunit and an IL-12 p40-related protein subunit, EBV-induced gene 3 (EBI3). IL-35 functions through IL-35R and has a potent immune-suppressive activity. Although IL-35 was demonstrated to be produced by regulatory T cells, gene-expression analysis revealed that it is likely to have a wider distribution, including expression in cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrated that IL-35 is produced in human cancer tissues, such as large B cell lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and melanoma. To determine the roles of tumor-derived IL-35 in tumorigenesis and tumor immunity, we generated IL-35-producing plasmacytoma J558 and B16 melanoma cells and observed that the expression of IL-35 in cancer cells does not affect their growth and survival in vitro, but it stimulates tumorigenesis in both immune-competent and Rag1/2-deficient mice. Tumor-derived IL-35 increases CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid cell accumulation in the tumor microenvironment and, thereby, promotes tumor angiogenesis. In immune-competent mice, spontaneous CTL responses to tumors are diminished. IL-35 does not directly inhibit tumor Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell activation, differentiation, and effector functions. However, IL-35-treated cancer cells had increased expression of gp130 and reduced sensitivity to CTL destruction. Thus, our study indicates novel functions for IL-35 in promoting tumor growth via the enhancement of myeloid cell accumulation, tumor angiogenesis, and suppression of tumor immunity.

  20. Eutrophication and the dietary promotion of sea turtle tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houtan, Kyle S; Smith, Celia M; Dailer, Meghan L; Kawachi, Migiwa

    2014-01-01

    The tumor-forming disease fibropapillomatosis (FP) has afflicted sea turtle populations for decades with no clear cause. A lineage of α-herpesviruses associated with these tumors has existed for millennia, suggesting environmental factors are responsible for its recent epidemiology. In previous work, we described how herpesviruses could cause FP tumors through a metabolic influx of arginine. We demonstrated the disease prevails in chronically eutrophied coastal waters, and that turtles foraging in these sites might consume arginine-enriched macroalgae. Here, we test the idea using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to describe the amino acid profiles of green turtle (Chelonia mydas) tumors and five common forage species of macroalgae from a range of eutrophic states. Tumors were notably elevated in glycine, proline, alanine, arginine, and serine and depleted in lysine when compared to baseline samples. All macroalgae from eutrophic locations had elevated arginine, and all species preferentially stored environmental nitrogen as arginine even at oligotrophic sites. From these results, we estimate adult turtles foraging at eutrophied sites increase their arginine intake 17-26 g daily, up to 14 times the background level. Arginine nitrogen increased with total macroalgae nitrogen and watershed nitrogen, and the invasive rhodophyte Hypnea musciformis significantly outperformed all other species in this respect. Our results confirm that eutrophication substantially increases the arginine content of macroalgae, which may metabolically promote latent herpesviruses and cause FP tumors in green turtles.

  1. Eutrophication and the dietary promotion of sea turtle tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle S. Van Houtan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The tumor-forming disease fibropapillomatosis (FP has afflicted sea turtle populations for decades with no clear cause. A lineage of α-herpesviruses associated with these tumors has existed for millennia, suggesting environmental factors are responsible for its recent epidemiology. In previous work, we described how herpesviruses could cause FP tumors through a metabolic influx of arginine. We demonstrated the disease prevails in chronically eutrophied coastal waters, and that turtles foraging in these sites might consume arginine-enriched macroalgae. Here, we test the idea using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC to describe the amino acid profiles of green turtle (Chelonia mydas tumors and five common forage species of macroalgae from a range of eutrophic states. Tumors were notably elevated in glycine, proline, alanine, arginine, and serine and depleted in lysine when compared to baseline samples. All macroalgae from eutrophic locations had elevated arginine, and all species preferentially stored environmental nitrogen as arginine even at oligotrophic sites. From these results, we estimate adult turtles foraging at eutrophied sites increase their arginine intake 17–26 g daily, up to 14 times the background level. Arginine nitrogen increased with total macroalgae nitrogen and watershed nitrogen, and the invasive rhodophyte Hypnea musciformis significantly outperformed all other species in this respect. Our results confirm that eutrophication substantially increases the arginine content of macroalgae, which may metabolically promote latent herpesviruses and cause FP tumors in green turtles.

  2. Analysis of Phosphorylation-dependent Protein Interactions of Adhesion and Degranulation Promoting Adaptor Protein (ADAP) Reveals Novel Interaction Partners Required for Chemokine-directed T cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuropka, Benno; Witte, Amelie; Sticht, Jana; Waldt, Natalie; Majkut, Paul; Hackenberger, Christian P R; Schraven, Burkhart; Krause, Eberhard; Kliche, Stefanie; Freund, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Stimulation of T cells leads to distinct changes of their adhesive and migratory properties. Signal propagation from activated receptors to integrins depends on scaffolding proteins such as the adhesion and degranulation promoting adaptor protein (ADAP)(1). Here we have comprehensively investigated the phosphotyrosine interactome of ADAP in T cells and define known and novel interaction partners of functional relevance. While most phosphosites reside in unstructured regions of the protein, thereby defining classical SH2 domain interaction sites for master regulators of T cell signaling such as SLP76, Fyn-kinase, and NCK, other binding events depend on structural context. Interaction proteomics using different ADAP constructs comprising most of the known phosphotyrosine motifs as well as the structured domains confirm that a distinct set of proteins is attracted by pY571 of ADAP, including the ζ-chain-associated protein kinase of 70 kDa (ZAP70). The interaction of ADAP and ZAP70 is inducible upon stimulation either of the T cell receptor (TCR) or by chemokine. NMR spectroscopy reveals that the N-terminal SH2 domains within a ZAP70-tandem-SH2 construct is the major site of interaction with phosphorylated ADAP-hSH3(N) and microscale thermophoresis (MST) indicates an intermediate binding affinity (Kd = 2.3 μm). Interestingly, although T cell receptor dependent events such as T cell/antigen presenting cell (APC) conjugate formation and adhesion are not affected by mutation of Y571, migration of T cells along a chemokine gradient is compromised. Thus, although most phospho-sites in ADAP are linked to T cell receptor related functions we have identified a unique phosphotyrosine that is solely required for chemokine induced T cell behavior.

  3. Paclitaxel tumor priming promotes delivery and transfection of intravenous lipid-siRNA in pancreatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Lu, Ze; Wang, Junfeng; Cui, Minjian; Yeung, Bertrand Z; Cole, David J; Wientjes, M Guillaume; Au, Jessie L-S

    2015-10-28

    The major barrier for using small interfering RNA (siRNA) as cancer therapeutics is the inadequate delivery and transfection in solid tumors. We have previously shown that paclitaxel tumor priming, by inducing apoptosis, expands the tumor interstitial space, improves the penetration and dispersion of nanoparticles and siRNA-lipoplexes in 3-dimensional tumor histocultures, and promotes the delivery and transfection efficiency of siRNA-lipoplexes under the locoregional setting in vivo (i.e., intraperitoneal treatment of intraperitoneal tumors). The current study evaluated whether tumor priming is functional for systemically delivered siRNA via intravenous injection, which would subject siRNA to several additional delivery barriers and elimination processes. We used the same pegylated cationic (PCat)-siRNA lipoplexes as in the intraperitoneal study to treat mice bearing subcutaneous human pancreatic Hs766T xenograft tumors. The target gene was survivin, an inducible chemoresistance gene. The results show single agent paclitaxel delayed tumor growth but also significantly induced the survivin protein level in residual tumors, whereas addition of PCat-siSurvivin completely reversed the paclitaxel-induced survivin and enhanced the paclitaxel activity (p<0.05). In comparison, PCat-siSurvivin alone did not yield survivin knockdown or antitumor activity, indicating the in vivo effectiveness of intravenous siRNA-mediated gene silencing requires paclitaxel cotreatment. Additional in vitro studies showed that paclitaxel promoted the cytoplasmic release of siGLO, a 22 nucleotide double-stranded RNA that has no mRNA targets, from its PCat lipoplex and/or endosomes/lysosomes. Taken together, our earlier and current data show paclitaxel tumor priming, by promoting the interstitial transport and cytoplasmic release, is critical to promote the delivery and transfection of siRNA in vivo. In addition, because paclitaxel has broad spectrum activity and is used to treat multiple types

  4. New Mechanisms of Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Promoting Tumor Progression: Recent Research Advances and Potential Targets for Tumor Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiujun Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of basic and clinical studies have shown a protumor function of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs, which represent a large proportion of matrix cells. TAMs promote tumorigenesis, and their number is related to the malignancy degree and poor prognosis of many kinds of tumors. Macrophage plasticity makes it possible to change the tumor microenvironment and remodel antitumor immunity during cancer immunotherapy. Increasing numbers of studies have revealed the effects of TAMs on the tumor microenvironment, for example, via promotion of tumor growth and tumorigenesis and through an increase in the number of cancer stem cells or via facilitation of angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and metastasis. Investigators also proposed tumor-immunological treatments targeting TAMs by inhibiting TAM recruitment and differentiation, by regulating TAM polarization, and by blocking factors and pathways associated with the protumor function of TAMs. This comprehensive review presents recent research on TAMs in relation to prediction of poor outcomes, remodeling of the tumor immune microenvironment, and immunological targeted therapies.

  5. Inflammation and Cancer: Extra- and Intracellular Determinants of Tumor-Associated Macrophages as Tumor Promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizler, Csaba; Kitajka, Klara; Puskas, Laszlo G.

    2017-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer-related inflammation is the recruitment of monocyte-macrophage lineage cells to the tumor microenvironment. These tumor infiltrating myeloid cells are educated by the tumor milieu, rich in cancer cells and stroma components, to exert functions such as promotion of tumor growth, immunosuppression, angiogenesis, and cancer cell dissemination. Our review highlights the ontogenetic diversity of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and describes their main phenotypic markers. We cover fundamental molecular players in the tumor microenvironment including extra- (CCL2, CSF-1, CXCL12, IL-4, IL-13, semaphorins, WNT5A, and WNT7B) and intracellular signals. We discuss how these factors converge on intracellular determinants (STAT3, STAT6, STAT1, NF-κB, RORC1, and HIF-1α) of cell functions and drive the recruitment and polarization of TAMs. Since microRNAs (miRNAs) modulate macrophage polarization key miRNAs (miR-146a, miR-155, miR-125a, miR-511, and miR-223) are also discussed in the context of the inflammatory myeloid tumor compartment. Accumulating evidence suggests that high TAM infiltration correlates with disease progression and overall poor survival of cancer patients. Identification of molecular targets to develop new therapeutic interventions targeting these harmful tumor infiltrating myeloid cells is emerging nowadays. PMID:28197019

  6. Cocarcinogenic and tumor-promoting agents in tobacco carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duuren, B L; Goldschmidt, B M

    1976-06-01

    A series of 21 tobacco smoke components and related compounds werere applied to mouse skin (50 female ICR/Ha Swiss mice/group) three times weekly with a low dose (5 mug/application) of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). The test compounds were of five classes: aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, and long-chain acids and alcohols. The following compounds enhanced remarkably the carcinogenicity of B[a]P: catechol, pyrogallol, decane, undecane, pyrene, benzo[e]pyrene, and fluoranthene. The following compounds inhibited B[a]P carcinogenicity completely: esculin, quercetin, squalene, and oleic acid. Phenol, eugenol, resorcinol, hydroquinone, hexadecane, and limonene partially inhibited B[a]P carcinogenicity. Six of the 21 compounds were also tested as tumor promoters im two-stage carcinogenesis. No direct correlation existed between tumor-promoting activity and cocarcinogenic activity. The cocarcinogens pyrogallol and catechol did not show tumor-promoting activity. Decane, tetradecane, anthralin, and phorbol myristate acetate showed both types of activity. Structure-activity relationships and possible modes of action were described.

  7. The Chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 Promote a Protective Immune Response but Do Not Contribute to Cardiac Inflammation following Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The expression of chemokines within the heart during experimental infection of susceptible mice with the Colombiana strain of Trypanosoma cruzi was characterized in an attempt to determine a functional role for these molecules in both host defense and disease. Analysis of chemokine transcripts revealed that CXC chemokine ligand 9 (CXCL9) and CXCL10, as well as CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) and CCL5, were prominently expressed during acute disease, whereas transcripts for CXCL9, CXCL10, and CCL...

  8. The impact of stress on tumor growth: peripheral CRF mediates tumor-promoting effects of stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stathopoulos Efstathios N

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Stress has been shown to be a tumor promoting factor. Both clinical and laboratory studies have shown that chronic stress is associated with tumor growth in several types of cancer. Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF is the major hypothalamic mediator of stress, but is also expressed in peripheral tissues. Earlier studies have shown that peripheral CRF affects breast cancer cell proliferation and motility. The aim of the present study was to assess the significance of peripheral CRF on tumor growth as a mediator of the response to stress in vivo. Methods For this purpose we used the 4T1 breast cancer cell line in cell culture and in vivo. Cells were treated with CRF in culture and gene specific arrays were performed to identify genes directly affected by CRF and involved in breast cancer cell growth. To assess the impact of peripheral CRF as a stress mediator in tumor growth, Balb/c mice were orthotopically injected with 4T1 cells in the mammary fat pad to induce breast tumors. Mice were subjected to repetitive immobilization stress as a model of chronic stress. To inhibit the action of CRF, the CRF antagonist antalarmin was injected intraperitoneally. Breast tissue samples were histologically analyzed and assessed for neoangiogenesis. Results Array analysis revealed among other genes that CRF induced the expression of SMAD2 and β-catenin, genes involved in breast cancer cell proliferation and cytoskeletal changes associated with metastasis. Cell transfection and luciferase assays confirmed the role of CRF in WNT- β-catenin signaling. CRF induced 4T1 cell proliferation and augmented the TGF-β action on proliferation confirming its impact on TGFβ/SMAD2 signaling. In addition, CRF promoted actin reorganization and cell migration, suggesting a direct tumor-promoting action. Chronic stress augmented tumor growth in 4T1 breast tumor bearing mice and peripheral administration of the CRF antagonist antalarmin suppressed this

  9. Quantitative Methylation Profiles for Multiple Tumor Suppressor Gene Promoters in Salivary Gland Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durr, Megan L.; Mydlarz, Wojciech K.; Shao, Chunbo; Zahurak, Marianna L.; Chuang, Alice Y.; Hoque, Mohammad O.; Westra, William H.; Liegeois, Nanette J.; Califano, Joseph A.; Sidransky, David; Ha, Patrick K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Methylation profiling of tumor suppressor gene (TSGs) promoters is quickly becoming a powerful diagnostic tool for the early detection, prognosis, and even prediction of clinical response to treatment. Few studies address this in salivary gland tumors (SGTs); hence the promoter methylation profile of various TSGs was quantitatively assessed in primary SGT tissue to determine if tumor-specific alterations could be detected. Methodology DNA isolated from 78 tumor and 17 normal parotid gland specimens was assayed for promoter methylation status of 19 TSGs by fluorescence-based, quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP). The data were utilized in a binary fashion as well as quantitatively (using a methylation quotient) allowing for better profiling and interpretation of results. Principal Findings The average number of methylation events across the studied genes was highest in salivary duct carcinoma (SDC), with a methylation value of 9.6, compared to the normal 4.5 (p<0.0003). There was a variable frequency and individual methylation quotient detected, depending on the TSG and the tumor type. When comparing normal, benign, and malignant SGTs, there was a statistically significant trend for increasing methylation in APC, Mint 1, PGP9.5, RAR-β, and Timp3. Conclusions/Significance Screening promoter methylation profiles in SGTs showed considerable heterogeneity. The methylation status of certain markers was surprisingly high in even normal salivary tissue, confirming the need for such controls. Several TSGs were found to be associated with malignant SGTs, especially SDC. Further study is needed to evaluate the potential use of these associations in the detection, prognosis, and therapeutic outcome of these rare tumors. PMID:20520817

  10. The CC chemokine CK beta-11/MIP-3 beta/ELC/Exodus 3 mediates tumor rejection of murine breast cancer cells through NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, S E; Chen, K; Foster, R G; Kim, C H; Hromas, R; Kaplan, M H; Broxmeyer, H E; Cornetta, K

    2000-04-15

    CK beta-11 chemoattracts T cells, B cells, dendritic cells, macrophage progenitors, and NK cells and facilitates dendritic cell and T cell interactions in secondary lymphoid tissues. We hypothesized that expression of CK beta-11 in tumor cells may generate antitumor immunity through these interactions. After transduction with the retroviral vector L(CK beta 11)SN, the murine breast cancer cell line C3L5 (C3L5-CK beta 11) showed expression of retroviral mRNA by Northern analysis and production of functional CK beta-11 by chemotaxis of human NK cells to C3L5-CK beta 11 supernatant. Only 10% of mice injected with C3L5-CK beta 11 developed tumors, compared with 100% of mice injected with a transduced control C3L5 line (C3L5-G1N). Importantly, the in vitro growth characteristics of the CK beta-11-transduced cell line were unaffected, suggesting the difference in growth in vivo was a result of chemokine production. Vaccination with C3L5-CK beta 11 partially protected animals from parental C3L5 challenge. Immunodepletion with anti-asialo-GM1 or anti-CD4 during C3L5-CK beta 11 vaccination significantly reduced CK beta-11 antitumor activity compared with control and anti-CD8-treated groups. Splenocytes from NK-depleted animals transferred the acquired immunity generated with C3L5-CK beta 11 vaccination, while splenocytes from the CD4-depleted animals did not. These results indicate, for the first time, that expression of CK beta-11 in a breast cancer cell line mediates rejection of the transduced tumor through a mechanism involving NK and CD4+ cells. Furthermore, CK beta-11-transduced tumor cells generate long-term antitumor immunity that requires CD4+ cells. These studies demonstrate the potential role of CK beta-11 as an adjuvant in stimulating antitumor responses.

  11. Simultaneous Activation of Induced Heterodimerization between CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor and Cannabinoid Receptor 2 (CB2) Reveals a Mechanism for Regulation of Tumor Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coke, Christopher J; Scarlett, Kisha A; Chetram, Mahandranauth A; Jones, Kia J; Sandifer, Brittney J; Davis, Ahriea S; Marcus, Adam I; Hinton, Cimona V

    2016-05-06

    The G-protein-coupled chemokine receptor CXCR4 generates signals that lead to cell migration, cell proliferation, and other survival mechanisms that result in the metastatic spread of primary tumor cells to distal organs. Numerous studies have demonstrated that CXCR4 can form homodimers or can heterodimerize with other G-protein-coupled receptors to form receptor complexes that can amplify or decrease the signaling capacity of each individual receptor. Using biophysical and biochemical approaches, we found that CXCR4 can form an induced heterodimer with cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) in human breast and prostate cancer cells. Simultaneous, agonist-dependent activation of CXCR4 and CB2 resulted in reduced CXCR4-mediated expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and ultimately reduced cancer cell functions such as calcium mobilization and cellular chemotaxis. Given that treatment with cannabinoids has been shown to reduce invasiveness of cancer cells as well as CXCR4-mediated migration of immune cells, it is plausible that CXCR4 signaling can be silenced through a physical heterodimeric association with CB2, thereby inhibiting subsequent functions of CXCR4. Taken together, the data illustrate a mechanism by which the cannabinoid system can negatively modulate CXCR4 receptor function and perhaps tumor progression.

  12. A novel role of hematopoietic CCL5 in promoting triple-negative mammary tumor progression by regulating generation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhang; Dandan Lv; Ha-Jeong Kim; Robert A Kurt; Wen Bu; Yi Li; Xiaojing Ma

    2013-01-01

    CCL5 is a member of the CC chemokine family expressed in a wide array of immune and non-immune cells in response to stress signals.CCL5 expression correlates with advanced human breast cancer.However,its functional significance and mode of action have not been established.Here,we show that CCL5-deficient mice are resistant to highly aggressive,triple-negative mammary tumor growth.Hematopoietic CCL5 is dominant in this phenotype.The absence of hematopoietic CCL5 causes aberrant generation of CD11b+/Gr-1+,myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the bone marrow in response to tumor growth by accumulating Ly6Chi and Ly6G+ MDSCs with impaired capacity to suppress cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells.These properties of CCL5 are observed in both orthotopic and spontaneous mammary tumors.Antibody-mediated systemic blockade of CCL5 inhibits tumor progression and enhances the efficacy of therapeutic vaccination against non-immunogenic tumors.CCL5 also helps maintain the immunosuppressive capacity of human MDSCs.Our study uncovers a novel,chemokine-independent activity of the hematopoietically derived CCL5 that promotes mammary tumor progression via generating MDSCs in the bone marrow in cooperation with tumor-derived colony-stimulating factors.The study sheds considerable light on the interplay between the hematopoietic compartment and tumor niche.Because of the apparent dispensable nature of this molecule in normal physiology,CCL5 may represent an excellent therapeutic target in immunotherapy for breast cancer as well as a broad range of solid tumors that have significant amounts of MDSC infiltration.

  13. Germline promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu-Yuan Wu; Zheng Zhang; Jing-Mei Wang; Wen-Wen Guo; Nong Xiao; Qiong He; Ya-Ping Wang; Yi-Mei Fan

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To explore germline hypermethylation of the tumor suppressor genes MLH1 , CDH1 and P16INK4a in suspected cases of hereditary gastric cancer (GC). METHODS: A group of 140 Chinese GC patients in whom the primary cancer had developed before the age of 60 or who had a familial history of cancer were screened for germline hypermethylation of the MLH1 , CDH1 and P16INK4a tumor suppressor genes. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes and modified by sodium bisulfite. The treated DNA was then subjected to bisulfite DNA sequencing for a specific region of the MLH1 promoter. The methylation status of CDH1 or P16INK4a was assayed using methylation- specific PCR. Clonal bisulfite allelic sequencing in positive samples was performed to obtain a comprehensive analysis of the CpG island methylation status of these promoter regions. RESULTS: Methylation of the MLH1 gene promoter was detected in the peripheral blood DNA of only 1/140 (0.7%) of the GC patient group. However, this methylation pattern was mosaic rather than the allelic pattern which has previously been reported for MLH1 in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients. We found that 10% of the MLH1 alleles in the peripheral blood DNA of this patient were methylated, consistent with 20% of cells having one methylated allele. No germline promoter methylation of the CDH1 or P16INK4a genes was detected. CONCLUSION: Mosaic germline epimutation of the MLH1 gene is present in suspected hereditary GC patients in China but at a very low level. Germline epimutation of the CDH1 or P16INK4a gene is not a frequent event.

  14. Differential structural remodelling of heparan sulfate by chemokines: the role of chemokine oligomerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Elisa; Salanga, Catherina L.; Thakar, Dhruv

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines control the migration of cells in normal physiological processes and in the context of disease such as inflammation, autoimmunity and cancer. Two major interactions are involved: (i) binding of chemokines to chemokine receptors, which activates the cellular machinery required for movement; and (ii) binding of chemokines to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which facilitates the organization of chemokines into haptotactic gradients that direct cell movement. Chemokines can bind and activate their receptors as monomers; however, the ability to oligomerize is critical for the function of many chemokines in vivo. Chemokine oligomerization is thought to enhance their affinity for GAGs, and here we show that it significantly affects the ability of chemokines to accumulate on and be retained by heparan sulfate (HS). We also demonstrate that several chemokines differentially rigidify and cross-link HS, thereby affecting HS rigidity and mobility, and that HS cross-linking is significantly enhanced by chemokine oligomerization. These findings suggest that chemokine–GAG interactions may play more diverse biological roles than the traditional paradigms of physical immobilization and establishment of chemokine gradients; we hypothesize that they may promote receptor-independent events such as physical re-organization of the endothelial glycocalyx and extracellular matrix, as well as signalling through proteoglycans to facilitate leukocyte adhesion and transmigration. PMID:28123055

  15. HDAC Activity Is Required for Efficient Core Promoter Function at the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang C. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs have been shown to be required for basal or inducible transcription at a variety of genes by poorly understood mechanisms. We demonstrated previously that HDAC inhibition rapidly repressed transcription from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV promoter by a mechanism that does not require the binding of upstream transcription factors. In the current study, we find that HDACs work through the core promoter sequences of MMTV as well as those of several cellular genes to facilitate transcriptional initiation through deacetylation of nonhistone proteins.

  16. Depletion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells can promote local immunity to suppress tumor growth in benzo[a]pyrene-induced forestomach carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ling Chen; Jung-Hua Fang; Ming-Derg Lai; Yan-Shen Shan

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the distribution of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) in different lymphoid tissues and its local enhancement on tumor growth before and after depletion of CD4+CD25+ Tregs.METHODS: Female ICR mice were gavaged with benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) to induce forestomach carcinoma. CD4+CD25+ Tregs were intraperitoneally depleted with monoclonal antibody PC61. These mice were divided into BaP-only, BaP+IgG, BaP+PC61, and control groups. The forestomach of mice was dissected for histological analysis, and tunnel test was performed for apoptosis of tumor cells. CD4+CD25+ Tregs were sorted from different lymphoid tissues and expression of Foxp3, IL-10, and chemokine receptors was analyzed by flow cytometry, semi-quantitative and real-time polymerase chain reaction.RESULTS: The mice gavaged with only BaP showed increased forestomach papilloma and carcinoma at wk 16 and 32. The proportion of CD4+CD25+ Tregs was significantly higher in peri-stomach regional lymph nodes than in other lymphoid tissues. These CD4+CD25+ Tregs in regional lymph nodes expressed higher levels of Foxp3 and IL-10, enriched in the CD62L-subset, and CCR1 and CCR5 chemokine receptors. In mice gavaged with BaP+PC61, the number of tumor nodules and tumor volume decreased significantly with massive infiltrating cells and apoptosis of tumor cells. In the draining regional lymph nodes, the number of CD4+CD25+ Tregs also decreased significantly.CONCLUSION: Inducible and activated CD4+CD25+ Tregs in the draining regional lymph nodes suppress host local immunity during tumor growth. Depletion of CD4+CD25+ Tregs can promote host local immunity to suppress tumor growth.

  17. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease with classical traits of demyelination, axonal damage, and neurodegeneration. The migration of autoimmune T cells and macrophages from blood to central nervous system as well as the destruction of blood brain barrier are thought to be the major processes in the development of this disease. Chemokines, which are small peptide mediators, can attract pathogenic cells to the sites of inflammation. Each helper T cell subset expresses different chemokine receptors so as to exert their different functions in the pathogenesis of MS. Recently published results have shown that the levels of some chemokines and chemokine receptors are increased in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients. This review describes the advanced researches on the role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of MS and discusses the potential therapy of this disease targeting the chemokine network.

  18. Liver tumor promoting effects of fenbendazole in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, T; Onodera, H; Takeda, M; Uneyama, C; Imazawa, T; Takegawa, K; Yasuhara, K; Watanabe, T; Hirose, M; Mitsumori, K

    1999-01-01

    In order to examine whether fenbendazole has tumor-promoting activity, a total of 70 male Fischer 344 rats were initiated with a single intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg/kg of diethylnitrosamine (DEN) or were given the saline vehicle alone; beginning 1 wk later, rats were given a diet containing 3,600; 1,800; 600; 200; 70; or 0 ppm of fenbendazole for 8 wk. Subgroups of 5 rats each from the DEN+ 1,800; DEN+0; 1,800; and 0 ppm groups were euthanatized after 1 wk of fenbendazole treatment, and the remaining animals were euthanatized at 8 wk. After 1 wk, relative liver weights (ratios to body weights) were significantly increased in the DEN+ 1,800 and 1,800 ppm groups, and based on light microscopy, periportal hepatocellular hypertrophy was evident in these groups. After 8 wk, relative liver weights were significantly increased in the groups given > or =600 ppm with or without DEN initiation. Periportal hepatocellular hypertrophy, characterized by a marked increase in smooth endoplasmic reticulum, was observed in the groups given > or =600 ppm with or without DEN initiation. Induction of cytochrome P-450 (CYP) 1A2, 2B1, or 4A1 was noted in the fenbendazole-treated groups with or without DEN initiation; that associated with CYP 1A2 was most marked. Positive immunostaining for anti-CYP 1A1/2 or CYP 2B1/2 was observed diffusely in the livers of animals in the DEN+1,800 and DEN+3,600 ppm groups. The numbers and areas of connexin 32 (Cx32)-positive spots per square centimeter in centrilobular hepatocytes were significantly decreased in an almost dose-dependent manner with fenbendazole treatment after DEN initiation. In situ hybridization for Cx32 mRNA revealed a remarkable decrease in its expression in the centrilobular hepatocytes in the DEN+70 ppm group. The numbers of glutathione S-transferase placental-form positive single cells (plus mini foci) were significantly increased in the DEN+ 1,800 and DEN+3,600 ppm groups. Since those agents that induce CYP 2B1/2 isozymes

  19. Re: Chemokines in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fehmi Narter

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that regulate the trafficking and positioning of cells by activating the seven-transmembrane spanning G protein-coupled chemokine receptors (GPCR) or non G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane spanning receptors called atypical chemokine receptors (ACKR). Chemokines are basic proteins that also bind to glycosaminoglycans which play important roles in their biology. Chemokines are divided into four subfamilies based on the position of the first two N-termina...

  20. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 activation in mammary tumor cells promotes macrophage recruitment in a CX3CL1-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna R Reed

    Full Text Available Tumor formation is an extensive process requiring complex interactions that involve both tumor cell-intrinsic pathways and soluble mediators within the microenvironment. Tumor cells exploit the intrinsic functions of many soluble molecules, including chemokines and their receptors, to regulate pro-tumorigenic phenotypes that are required for growth and progression of the primary tumor. Previous studies have shown that activation of inducible FGFR1 (iFGFR1 in mammary epithelial cells resulted in increased proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. These studies also demonstrated that iFGFR1 activation stimulated recruitment of macrophages to the epithelium where macrophages contributed to iFGFR1-mediated epithelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis. The studies presented here further utilize this model to identify the mechanisms that regulate FGFR1-induced macrophage recruitment. Results from this study elucidate a novel role for the inflammatory chemokine CX3CL1 in FGFR1-induced macrophage migration. Specifically, we illustrate that activation of both the inducible FGFR1 construct in mouse mammary epithelial cells and endogenous FGFR in the triple negative breast cancer cell line, HS578T, leads to expression of the chemokine CX3CL1. Furthermore, we demonstrate that FGFR-induced CX3CL1 is sufficient to recruit CX3CR1-expressing macrophages in vitro. Finally, blocking CX3CR1 in vivo leads to decreased iFGFR1-induced macrophage recruitment, which correlates with decreased angiogenesis. While CX3CL1 is a known target of FGF signaling in the wound healing environment, these studies demonstrate that FGFR activation also leads to induction of CX3CL1 in a tumor setting. Furthermore, these results define a novel role for CX3CL1 in promoting macrophage recruitment during mammary tumor formation, suggesting that the CX3CL1/CX3CR1 axis may represent a potential therapeutic approach for targeting breast cancers associated

  1. Circulating thymus and activation-regulated chemokine/CC chemokine ligand 17 is a strong candidate diagnostic marker for interstitial lung disease in patients with malignant tumors: a result from a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamane H

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hiromichi Yamane, Nobuaki Ochi, Tomoko Yamagishi, Yoshihiro Honda, Masami Takeyama, Nagio TakigawaDepartment of General Internal Medicine 4, Kawasaki Medical School, Kita-ku, Okayama, JapanIntroduction: Serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6 level is an established diagnostic marker of interstitial lung disease (ILD. However, it is also elevated in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The significance of circulating thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CC chemokine ligand 17 (CCL17 in malignant diseases remains unknown.Methods: We measured circulating TARC/CCL17 and KL-6 using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and electrochemiluminescence immunoassay, respectively, in 26 patients with malignant disease and six patients with benign lung disease (BLD. The cutoff levels were 500 U/mL for KL-6 and 450 pg/mL for TARC/CCL17. The significance of the markers was evaluated in relationship to the presence of ILD (n=10. The statistical significance was set at P<0.05.Results: The KL-6 positive ratio was significantly higher in the patients with NSCLC (n=17 than in those with BLD. There was a significant difference in the KL-6 positive ratio between the patients with NSCLC without ILD and those with BLD without ILD. However, there were no significant differences in the TARC/CCL17 positive ratio between the patients with NSCLC and BLD or between those with NSCLC without ILD and those with BLD without ILD. The TARC/CCL17 positive ratio was significantly higher in the patients with malignancy and ILD than in those without ILD. There was also a significant difference in the TARC/CCL17 positive ratio between the patients with NSCLC without ILD and those with ILD.Conclusion: TARC/CCL17 may be useful for the diagnosis of ILD in patients with malignancies. Confirmation of the results is warranted through a large-scale study.Keywords: thymus and activation-regulated chemokine/CC chemokine ligand 17, Krebs von den Lungen-6, interstitial lung

  2. Promoter mutation and reduced expression of BRCA1 in canine mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, H B; Sun, W D; Yang, X; Jiang, Q Y; Chen, S; Lin, D G

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) is one of the most important genes in human familial breast cancer, which also plays an important role in canine mammary tumors. The objectives of this study were to determine the promoter sequence of canine BRCA1, to investigate its promoter mutation status and to describe BRCA1 expression pattern in canine mammary tumors. The promoter sequence of canine BRCA1 was acquired by aligning human BRCA1 promoter sequence with canine genomic sequence and confirmed by standard promoter activity analysis. Same as human BRCA1 promoter, the CAAT box and G/C box were found in canine BRCA1 promoter. In order to explore the mutation status of the promoter region and to investigate the expression pattern of this gene, 10 normal canine mammary tissues, 15 benign mammary tumors and 15 malignant mammary tumors were used. By sequencing, 46.7% of the malignant mammary tumors were found with a deletion of one cytosine in the promoter region. The mRNA expression of BRCA1 was significantly reduced in benign and malignant mammary tumors (Ppromoter sequence and to describe the promoter mutation status in canine mammary tumors.

  3. The tumor microenvironment: a potential arbitrator of the tumor suppressive and promoting actions of TGFbeta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Nancy; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2002-12-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) members are secreted in biologically inactive complexes that must be activated in order to enable binding to their cell surface receptors. Interestingly, many of the proteins that can activate TGFbeta have been implicated in either suppressing or promoting tumorigenesis. Included among these are matrix proteins (thrombospondin-1), receptors (integrins alphanubeta6 and alphanubeta8) and proteases (matrix metalloproteases and plasmin). These proteins cannot only activate TGFbeta, but can also modulate cell responsiveness to TGFbeta. In this section, we review data highlighting the complexity and bidirectionality of TGFbeta matrix interactions within the tumor microenvironment, and propose that these dynamic interactions are a critical spatial and temporal determinant of the effects of TGFbeta on tumorigenesis.

  4. Chemokines in the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad D

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In last few years, focus has shifted from cytokines which have pleiotropic biologic properties to chemokines with target cell selective activity. The separation has led frequently espoused proposition that chemokines are involved in the pathogenesis of disease having specific infiltrates and point to possible role in Chronic skin diseases. Depending upon the structure these chemokines are divided into three subfamilies, two major subfamilies: CXC and CC, and one putative subfamily C with only one member known as lymphotactin. A recent insight into chemokine physiology comes from demonstration of interaction between chemokines and their cloned receptors. These chemokine receptors are members of the transmembrane spanning (7-TMS, G-protein- coupled receptor family. So far CXC chemokine receptors and seven CC receptors have been cloned. Recently, the importance of selective chemoattractant activity of chemokines has been overshadowed by chemokine receptors emerging as new targets for anti-HIV therapy as the connection between chemokines and HIV-I had been established. Among the CXC chemokine receptors, CXCR4, and among the CC chemokines receptors, CCRI, CCR2b, CCR3, and CCR5 have been implicated as HIV-1 coreceptors.

  5. P-selectin-mediated platelet adhesion promotes tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Cuiling; Wei, Bo; Zhou, Weijie; Yang, Yang; Li, Bin; Guo, Simei; Li, Jialin; Ye, Jie; Li, Jiangchao; Zhang, Qianqian; Lan, Tian; He, Xiaodong; Cao, Liu; Zhou, Jia; Geng, Jianguo; Wang, Lijing

    2015-03-30

    Blood platelets foster carcinogenesis. We found that platelets are accumulated in human tumors. P-selectin deficiency and soluble P-selectin abolish platelet deposition within tumors, decreasing secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenesis, thereby suppressing tumor growth. Binding of the P-selectin cytoplasmic tail to talin1 triggers the talin1 N-terminal head to interact with the β3 cytoplasmic tail. This activates αIIbβ3 and recruits platelets into tumors. Platelet infiltration into solid tumors occurs through a P-selectin-dependent mechanism.

  6. Cancer-associated adipocytes promotes breast tumor radioresistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochet, Ludivine; Meulle, Aline [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM U1048, 1 Avenue du Pr Jean Poulhes, BP 84225, F-31432 Toulouse Cedex (France); Imbert, Sandrine [CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Salles, Bernard [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Valet, Philippe [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM U1048, 1 Avenue du Pr Jean Poulhes, BP 84225, F-31432 Toulouse Cedex (France); Muller, Catherine, E-mail: muller@ipbs.fr [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Tumor-surrounding adipocytes contribute to breast cancer progression. {yields} Breast tumor cells previously co-cultivated with mature adipocytes exhibit radioresistance. {yields} Increased in Chk1 phosphorylation is observed in irradiated co-cultivated tumor cells. {yields} IL-6 is over-expressed in tumor cells co-cultivated with adipocytes. {yields} IL-6 exposure confers increased Chk1 phosphorylation and radioresistance in tumor cells. -- Abstract: Mature adipocytes are excellent candidates to influence tumor behavior through heterotypic signaling processes since these cells produce hormones, growth factors, cytokines and other molecules, a heterogeneous group of molecules named adipokines. Using a 2D coculture system, we demonstrate that breast tumor cells previously co-cultivated with mature adipocytes exhibit radioresistance and an earlier and higher increase in the effector kinase Chk1, a phenotype that was associated with decreased cell death as compared to tumor cells grown alone. Interestingly, the adipocytes-induced tumor changes taking place during the coculture time preceding the exposure to IR were sufficient to confer the radioresistant effect. Notorious among the changes brought by adipocytes was the significant increase of IL-6 expression in tumor cells, whose activity may well account for the observed tumor cell protection from IR toxicity. Indeed, our data confirmed the protective role of this cytokine as tumor cells incubated after irradiation with recombinant IL-6 exhibit an increased in Chk1 phosphorylation and a radioresistant phenotype, thus far recapitulating the effects observed in the presence of adipocytes. Our current study sheds light on a new role of tumor-surrounding adipocytes in fostering a radioresistant phenotype in breast tumors, a finding that might have important clinical implications in obese patients that frequently exhibit aggressive diseases.

  7. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Yu [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Department of Cardivascular Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakahama, Ken-ichi, E-mail: nakacell@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Isobe, Mitsuaki [Department of Cardivascular Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Morita, Ikuo [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    findings revealed that OGCs in the tumor environment promoted tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis, at least in part, by secreting VEGF-C.

  8. Chemokines and immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino, Diana Carolina Torres; Marti, Luciana Cavalheiro

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a large family of small cytokines and generally have low molecular weight ranging from 7 to 15kDa. Chemokines and their receptors are able to control the migration and residence of all immune cells. Some chemokines are considered pro-inflammatory, and their release can be induced during an immune response at a site of infection, while others are considered homeostatic and are involved in controlling of cells migration during tissue development or maintenance. The physiologic importance of this family of mediators is resulting from their specificity − members of the chemokine family induce recruitment of well-defined leukocyte subsets. There are two major chemokine sub-families based upon cysteine residues position: CXC and CC. As a general rule, members of the CXC chemokines are chemotactic for neutrophils, and CC chemokines are chemotactic for monocytes and sub-set of lymphocytes, although there are some exceptions. This review discusses the potential role of chemokines in inflammation focusing on the two best-characterized chemokines: monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a CC chemokine, and interleukin-8, a member of the CXC chemokine sub-family. PMID:26466066

  9. Cloning and characterization of exodus, a novel beta-chemokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromas, R; Gray, P W; Chantry, D; Godiska, R; Krathwohl, M; Fife, K; Bell, G I; Takeda, J; Aronica, S; Gordon, M; Cooper, S; Broxmeyer, H E; Klemsz, M J

    1997-05-01

    Chemokines are a family of related proteins that regulate leukocyte infiltration into inflamed tissue. Some chemokines such as MIP-1 alpha also inhibit hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation. Recently, three chemokines, MIP-1 alpha, MIP-1 beta, and RANTES, have been found to significantly decrease human immunodeficiency virus production from infected T cells. We report here the cloning and characterization of a novel human chemokine termed Exodus for its chemotactic properties. This novel chemokine is distantly related to other chemokines (28% homology with MIP-1 alpha) and shares several biological activities. Exodus is expressed preferentially in lymphocytes and monocytes, and its expression is markedly upregulated by mediators of inflammation such as tumor necrosis factor or lipopolysaccharide. Purified synthetic Exodus was found to inhibit proliferation of myeloid progenitors in colony formation assays. Exodus also stimulated chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The sequence homology, expression, and biological activity indicate that Exodus represents a novel divergent beta-chemokine.

  10. Promotion of lung tumor growth by interleukin-17

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Beibei; Guenther, James F.; Pociask, Derek A.; Wang, Yu; Kolls, Jay K.; You, Zongbing; Chandrasekar, Bysani; Shan, Bin; Sullivan, Deborah E.; Morris, Gilbert F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings demonstrate that inhaled cigarette smoke, the predominant lung carcinogen, elicits a T helper 17 (Th17) inflammatory phenotype. Interleukin-17A (IL-17), the hallmark cytokine of Th17 inflammation, displays pro- and antitumorigenic properties in a manner that varies according to tumor type and assay system. To investigate the role of IL-17 in lung tumor growth, we used an autochthonous tumor model (K-RasLA1 mice) with lung delivery of a recombinant adenovirus that expresses IL-...

  11. Eutrophication and the dietary promotion of sea turtle tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Kyle S Van Houtan; Celia M. Smith; Dailer, Meghan L.; Migiwa Kawachi

    2014-01-01

    The tumor-forming disease fibropapillomatosis (FP) has afflicted sea turtle populations for decades with no clear cause. A lineage of α-herpesviruses associated with these tumors has existed for millennia, suggesting environmental factors are responsible for its recent epidemiology. In previous work, we described how herpesviruses could cause FP tumors through a metabolic influx of arginine. We demonstrated the disease prevails in chronically eutrophied coastal waters, and that turtles foragi...

  12. Tumor Phagocytes Promote Breast Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    passive physiological event to clear unwanted cells, we hypothesize that clearance of apoptotic tumor cells by tumor phagocytes produce soluble...FACS assay. Introduction: The purpose of cancer chemotherapy and immunotherapy is to kill cancer cells, mostly by apoptosis. Phagocytes, which...microenvironment for metastasis. A major barrier to effective anti-cancer immunotherapy is the ability of the host to mount a durable anti-tumor response [4

  13. Folic acid supplementation promotes mammary tumor progression in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deghan Manshadi, Shaidah; Ishiguro, Lisa; Sohn, Kyoung-Jin; Medline, Alan; Renlund, Richard; Croxford, Ruth; Kim, Young-In

    2014-01-01

    Folic acid supplementation may prevent the development of cancer in normal tissues but may promote the progression of established (pre)neoplastic lesions. However, whether or not folic acid supplementation can promote the progression of established (pre)neoplastic mammary lesions is unknown. This is a critically important issue because breast cancer patients and survivors in North America are likely exposed to high levels of folic acid owing to folic acid fortification and widespread supplemental use after cancer diagnosis. We investigated whether folic acid supplementation can promote the progression of established mammary tumors. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on a control diet and mammary tumors were initiated with 7,12-dimethylbenza[a]anthracene at puberty. When the sentinel tumor reached a predefined size, rats were randomized to receive a diet containing the control, 2.5x, 4x, or 5x supplemental levels of folic acid for up to 12 weeks. The sentinel mammary tumor growth was monitored weekly. At necropsy, the sentinel and all other mammary tumors were analyzed histologically. The effect of folic acid supplementation on the expression of proteins involved in proliferation, apoptosis, and mammary tumorigenesis was determined in representative sentinel adenocarcinomas. Although no clear dose-response relationship was observed, folic acid supplementation significantly promoted the progression of the sentinel mammary tumors and was associated with significantly higher sentinel mammary tumor weight and volume compared with the control diet. Furthermore, folic acid supplementation was associated with significantly higher weight and volume of all mammary tumors. The most significant and consistent mammary tumor-promoting effect was observed with the 2.5x supplemental level of folic acid. Folic acid supplementation was also associated with an increased expression of BAX, PARP, and HER2. Our data suggest that folic acid supplementation may promote the progression

  14. The chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 promote a protective immune response but do not contribute to cardiac inflammation following infection with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison, Jenny L; Wrightsman, Ruth A; Carpenter, Philip M; Lane, Thomas E; Manning, Jerry E

    2006-01-01

    The expression of chemokines within the heart during experimental infection of susceptible mice with the Colombiana strain of Trypanosoma cruzi was characterized in an attempt to determine a functional role for these molecules in both host defense and disease. Analysis of chemokine transcripts revealed that CXC chemokine ligand 9 (CXCL9) and CXCL10, as well as CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) and CCL5, were prominently expressed during acute disease, whereas transcripts for CXCL9, CXCL10, and CCL5 remained elevated during chronic infection. Inflammatory macrophages present within the heart were the primary cellular source of these chemokines following T. cruzi infection. Peak chemokine expression levels coincided with increased gamma interferon expression and inflammation within the heart, suggesting a role for these molecules in both host defense and disease. Indeed, simultaneous treatment of T. cruzi-infected mice with neutralizing antibodies specific for CXCL9 and CXCL10 resulted in an increased parasite burden that was sustained out to 50 days p.i. Antibody targeting either CXCL10 or CCL5 did not change either T. cruzi burden within the heart nor attenuate the severity of cardiac inflammation at any time point examined, while targeting CXCL9 in combination with CXCL10 resulted in increased parasite burden. Collectively, these studies imply that CXCL9 and CXCL10 signaling enhances immune responses following parasite infection. However, antibody targeting of CXCL9 and CXCL10, or CXCL10 alone, or CCL5 alone does not directly modulate the inflammatory response within the heart, suggesting that other proinflammatory factors are able to regulate inflammation in this tissue in response to T. cruzi infection.

  15. Research progress of chemokines and chemokine receptors in osteosarcoma%趋化因子及趋化因子受体在骨肉瘤中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈泉池; 华莹奇; 左冬青; 曾辉; 蔡郑东

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant tumors in childhood and adolescence, and easily develops metastasis, especially in the lung. Patients with primary and metastatic tumors have a poor prognosis. Therefore, it is necessary to do some research on the genes associated with the malignancy of osteosarcoma and to ifnd the targeted genes in the treatment of osteosarcoma. In recent years, more and more research on chemokines and chemokine receptors has been performed in oncology, which has gained increasing attention of investigators. The chemokines and chemokine receptors have been found to be important regulators in the occurrence, development and metastasis of osteosarcoma. They are thought to be active participants in the biology of osteosarcoma. Firstly, this study aims to introduce the structure, classiifcation and biological function of chemokines and chemokine receptors. Secondly, the research progress of chemokines and chemokine receptors in oncology will be presented in 4 aspects, including the effects of chemokines and chemokine receptors on tumor growth and tumor cell survival and senescence, their effects on tumor angiogenesis, on tumor metastasis and on tumor microenvironment. At last, the research progress of chemokines and chemokine receptors in osteosarcoma will be introduced, aimed at the study of their specific targeted drugs. The current problems and future prospects of chemokines and chemokine receptors in osteosarcoma will also be clariifed.

  16. Recombinant Parvoviruses Armed to Deliver CXCL4L1 and CXCL10 Are Impaired in Their Antiangiogenic and Antitumoral Effects in a Kaposi Sarcoma Tumor Model Due To the Chemokines' Interference with the Virus Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinsart, Christiane; Pervolaraki, Kalliopi; Stroh-Dege, Alexandra; Lavie, Muriel; Ronsse, Isabelle; Rommelaere, Jean; Van Damme, Jo; Van Raemdonck, Katrien; Struyf, Sofie

    2017-03-01

    Application of oncolytic viruses is a valuable option to broaden the armament of anticancer therapies, as these combine specific cytotoxic effects and immune-stimulating properties. The self-replicating H-1 parvovirus (H-1PV) is a prototypical oncolytic virus that, besides targeting tumor cells, also infects endothelial cells, thus combining oncolytic and angiostatic traits. To increase its therapeutic value, H-1PV can be armed with cytokines or chemokines to enhance the immunological response. Some chemokines-more specifically, the CXCR3 ligands CXCL4L1 and CXCL10-combine immune-stimulating properties with angiostatic activity. This study explores the therapeutic value of recombinant parvoviruses carrying CXCL4L1 or CXCL10 transgenes (Chi-H1/CXCL4L1 or Chi-H1/CXCL10, respectively) to inhibit the growth of the human Kaposi sarcoma cell line KS-IMM. KS-IMM cells infected by Chi-H1/CXCL4L1 or Chi-H1/CXCL10 released the corresponding chemokine and showed reduced migratory capacity. Therefore, the antitumoral capacity of Chi-H1/CXCL4L1 or Chi-H1/CXCL10 was tested in mice. Either in vitro infected KS-IMM cells were injected or subcutaneously growing KS-IMM xenografts were treated by peritumoral injections of the different viruses. Surprisingly, the transgenes did not increase the antitumoral effect of natural H-1PV. Further experiments indicated that CXCL4L1 and CXCL10 interfered with the expression of the viral NS1 protein in KS-IMM cells. These results indicate that the outcome of parvovirus-based delivery of CXCR3 ligands might be tumor cell type dependent, and hence its application must be considered carefully.

  17. RhoA knockout fibroblasts lose tumor-inhibitory capacity in vitro and promote tumor growth in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkasalias, Twana; Alexeyenko, Andrey; Hennig, Katharina; Danielsson, Frida; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Fielden, Matthew; Turunen, S. Pauliina; Lehti, Kaisa; Kashuba, Vladimir; Madapura, Harsha S.; Bozoky, Benedek; Lundberg, Emma; Balland, Martial; Guvén, Hayrettin; Klein, George; Gad, Annica K. B.; Pavlova, Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblasts are a main player in the tumor-inhibitory microenvironment. Upon tumor initiation and progression, fibroblasts can lose their tumor-inhibitory capacity and promote tumor growth. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this switch have not been defined completely. Previously, we identified four proteins overexpressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts and linked to Rho GTPase signaling. Here, we show that knocking out the Ras homolog family member A (RhoA) gene in normal fibroblasts decreased their tumor-inhibitory capacity, as judged by neighbor suppression in vitro and accompanied by promotion of tumor growth in vivo. This also induced PC3 cancer cell motility and increased colony size in 2D cultures. RhoA knockout in fibroblasts induced vimentin intermediate filament reorganization, accompanied by reduced contractile force and increased stiffness of cells. There was also loss of wide F-actin stress fibers and large focal adhesions. In addition, we observed a significant loss of α-smooth muscle actin, which indicates a difference between RhoA knockout fibroblasts and classic cancer-associated fibroblasts. In 3D collagen matrix, RhoA knockout reduced fibroblast branching and meshwork formation and resulted in more compactly clustered tumor-cell colonies in coculture with PC3 cells, which might boost tumor stem-like properties. Coculturing RhoA knockout fibroblasts and PC3 cells induced expression of proinflammatory genes in both. Inflammatory mediators may induce tumor cell stemness. Network enrichment analysis of transcriptomic changes, however, revealed that the Rho signaling pathway per se was significantly triggered only after coculturing with tumor cells. Taken together, our findings in vivo and in vitro indicate that Rho signaling governs the inhibitory effects by fibroblasts on tumor-cell growth. PMID:28174275

  18. Touch of chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier eBLANCHET

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemoattractant cytokines or chemokines constitute a family of structurally related proteins found in vertebrates, bacteria or viruses. So far, 48 chemokines genes have been identified in humans, which bind to around 20 chemokine receptors. These receptors belong to the seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors family. Chemokines and their receptors were originally studied for their role in cellular trafficking of leukocytes during inflammation and immune surveillance as well. It is now known that they exert different functions under physiological conditions such as homeostasis, development, tissue repair, and angiogenesis but also under pathological disorders including tumorigenesis, cancer metastasis, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Physicochemical properties of chemokines and chemokine receptors confer them the ability to homo- and hetero-oligomerize. Many efforts are currently performed in establishing new therapeutically compounds able to target the chemokine/chemokine receptors system.In this review, we are interested in the role of chemokines in inflammatory disease and leukocyte trafficking with a focus on vascular inflammatory diseases, the operating synergism and the emerging therapeutic approaches of chemokines.

  19. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) and their antagonists regulate spontaneous and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Conor J; Sheridan, Clare; Cullen, Sean P; Tynan, Graham A; Logue, Susan E; Afonina, Inna S; Vucic, Domagoj; Lavelle, Ed C; Martin, Seamus J

    2013-02-15

    Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) play a major role in determining whether cells undergo apoptosis in response to TNF as well as other stimuli. However, TNF is also highly proinflammatory through its ability to trigger the secretion of multiple inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which is arguably the most important role of TNF in vivo. Indeed, deregulated production of TNF-induced cytokines is a major driver of inflammation in several autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we show that IAPs are required for the production of multiple TNF-induced proinflammatory mediators. Ablation or antagonism of IAPs potently suppressed TNF- or RIPK1-induced proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production. Surprisingly, IAP antagonism also led to spontaneous production of chemokines, particularly RANTES, in vitro and in vivo. Thus, IAPs play a major role in influencing the production of multiple inflammatory mediators, arguing that these proteins are important regulators of inflammation in addition to apoptosis. Furthermore, small molecule IAP antagonists can modulate spontaneous as well as TNF-induced inflammatory responses, which may have implications for use of these agents in therapeutic settings.

  20. Tumor Restrictive Suicide Gene Therapy for Glioma Controlled by the FOS Promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqing Pan

    Full Text Available Effective suicide gene delivery and expression are crucial to achieving successful effects in gene therapy. An ideal tumor-specific promoter expresses therapeutic genes in tumor cells with minimal normal tissue expression. We compared the activity of the FOS (FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog promoter with five alternative tumor-specific promoters in glioma cells and non-malignant astrocytes. The FOS promoter caused significantly higher transcriptional activity in glioma cell lines than all alternative promoters with the exception of CMV. The FOS promoter showed 13.9%, 32.4%, and 70.8% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in three glioma cell lines (U87, U251, and U373. Importantly, however, the FOS promoter showed only 1.6% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in normal astrocytes. We also tested the biologic activity of recombinant adenovirus containing the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk driven by the FOS promoter, including selective killing efficacy in vitro and tumor inhibition rate in vivo. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of the HSV-tk gene controlled by the FOS promoter conferred a cytotoxic effect on human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. This study suggests that use of the FOS-tk adenovirus system is a promising strategy for glioma-specific gene therapy but still much left for improvement.

  1. Chemokines, lymphocytes, and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farber J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are members of a family of more than 30 human cytokines whose best-described activities are as chemotactic factors for leukocytes and that are presumed to be important in leukocyte recruitment and trafficking. While many chemokines can act on lymphocytes, the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology are poorly understood. The recent discoveries that chemokines can suppress infection by HIV-1 and that chemokine receptors serve, along with CD4, as obligate co-receptors for HIV-1 entry have lent urgency to studies on the relationships between chemokines and lymphocytes. My laboratory has characterized Mig and Crg-2/IP-10, chemokines that are induced by IFN-g and that specifically target lymphocytes, particularly activated T cells. We have demonstrated that the genes for these chemokines are widely expressed during experimental infections in mice with protozoan and viral pathogens, but that the patterns of mig and crg-2 expression differed, suggesting non-redundant roles in vivo. Our related studies to identify new chemokine receptors from activated lymphocytes resulted in the cloning of STRL22 and STRL33. We and others have shown that STRL22 is a receptor for the CC chemokine MIP-3a, and STRL22 has been re-named CCR6. Although STRL33 remains an orphan receptor, we have shown that it can function as a co-receptor for HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, and that it is active with a broader range of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins than the major co-receptors described to date. The ability of STRL33 to function with a wide variety of envelope glycoproteins may become particularly important if therapies are instituted to block other specific co-receptors. We presume that investigations into the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology will provide information important for understanding the pathogenesis of AIDS and for manipulating immune and inflammatory responses for clinical benefit

  2. Carnosol inhibits cell adhesion molecules and chemokine expression by tumor necrosis factor-α in human umbilical vein endothelial cells through the nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hui; Chen, Yufeng; Zhang, Longjuan; He, Xiaosheng; He, Xiaowen; Lian, Lei; Wu, Xiaojian; Lan, Ping

    2014-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are gastrointestinal disorders associated with chronic inflammatory processes. Carnosol has been demonstrated to possess anti-inflammatory properties. This study examined the suppressive effect of carnosol on the expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and chemokines in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the possible underlying mechanism. The effect of carnosol on CAM and chemokine expression in HUVECs was identified by western blotting and ELISA, respectively. nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation of HUVECs was analyzed using the TransAM NF-κB Family kit. The effect of carnosol on the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced activation of the NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and was subsequently analyzed using western blotting. Carnosol not only inhibited TNF-α-induced protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and E-selectin in HUVECs, but also suppressed interleukin (IL)-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 expression. In addition, carnosol inhibited the TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of p-65 and IκB-α, as well as the activation of NF-κB. The same result was observed in TNF-α-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p-38. It was demonstrated that carnosol inhibited TNF-α-induced CAM and chemokine expression in HUVECs. The underlying mechanism may be associated with the blocking of the NF-κB and MAPK pathways. These results indicate that carnosol may be a novel therapeutic agent for targeting endothelial cells in IBDs.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cell 1 (MSC1-based therapy attenuates tumor growth whereas MSC2-treatment promotes tumor growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth S Waterman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently, there are many promising clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in cell-based therapies of numerous diseases. Increasingly, however, there is a concern over the use of MSCs because they home to tumors and can support tumor growth and metastasis. For instance, we established that MSCs in the ovarian tumor microenvironment promoted tumor growth and favored angiogenesis. In parallel studies, we also developed a new approach to induce the conventional mixed pool of MSCs into two uniform but distinct phenotypes we termed MSC1 and MSC2. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we tested the in vitro and in vivo stability of MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes as well as their effects on tumor growth and spread. In vitro co-culture of MSC1 with various cancer cells diminished growth in colony forming units and tumor spheroid assays, while conventional MSCs or MSC2 co-culture had the opposite effect in these assays. Co-culture of MSC1 and cancer cells also distinctly affected their migration and invasion potential when compared to MSCs or MSC2 treated samples. The expression of bioactive molecules also differed dramatically among these samples. MSC1-based treatment of established tumors in an immune competent model attenuated tumor growth and metastasis in contrast to MSCs- and MSC2-treated animals in which tumor growth and spread was increased. Also, in contrast to these groups, MSC1-therapy led to less ascites accumulation, increased CD45+leukocytes, decreased collagen deposition, and mast cell degranulation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations indicate that the MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes may be convenient tools for the discovery of critical components of the tumor stroma. The continued investigation of these cells may help ensure that cell based-therapy is used safely and effectively in human disease.

  4. Activated T cell exosomes promote tumor invasion via Fas signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhijian; Yang, Fei; Yu, Lei; Yu, Zhou; Jiang, Lingling; Wang, Qingqing; Yang, Yunshan; Wang, Lie; Cao, Xuetao; Wang, Jianli

    2012-06-15

    Activated T cells release bioactive Fas ligand (FasL) in exosomes, which subsequently induce self-apoptosis of T cells. However, their potential effects on cell apoptosis in tumors are still unknown. In this study, we purified exosomes expressing FasL from activated CD8(+) T cell from OT-I mice and found that activated T cell exosomes had little effect on apoptosis and proliferation of tumor cells but promoted the invasion of B16 and 3LL cancer cells in vitro via the Fas/FasL pathway. Activated T cell exosomes increased the amount of cellular FLICE inhibitory proteins and subsequently activated the ERK and NF-κB pathways, which subsequently increased MMP9 expression in the B16 murine melanoma cells. In a tumor-invasive model in vivo, we observed that the activated T cell exosomes promoted the migration of B16 tumor cells to lung. Interestingly, pretreatment with FasL mAb significantly reduced the migration of B16 tumor cells to lung. Furthermore, CD8 and FasL double-positive exosomes from tumor mice, but not normal mice, also increased the expression of MMP9 and promoted the invasive ability of B16 murine melanoma and 3LL lung cancer cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that activated T cell exosomes promote melanoma and lung cancer cell metastasis by increasing the expression of MMP9 via Fas signaling, revealing a new mechanism of tumor immune escape.

  5. Soy protein isolate inhibits hepatic tumor promotion in mice fed a high-fat liquid diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Kelly E; Pulliam, Casey F; Pedersen, Kim B; Hennings, Leah; Ronis, Martin Jj

    2017-03-01

    Alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases are risk factors for development of hepatocellular carcinoma, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. On the other hand, ingestion of soy-containing diets may oppose the development of certain cancers. We previously reported that replacing casein with a soy protein isolate reduced tumor promotion in the livers of mice with alcoholic liver disease after feeding a high fat ethanol liquid diet following initiation with diethylnitrosamine. Feeding soy protein isolate inhibited processes that may contribute to tumor promotion including inflammation, sphingolipid signaling, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We have extended these studies to characterize liver tumor promotion in a model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease produced by chronic feeding of high-fat liquid diets in the absence of ethanol. Mice treated with diethylnitrosamine on postnatal day 14 were fed a high-fat liquid diet made with casein or SPI as the sole protein source for 16 weeks in adulthood. Relative to mice fed normal chow, a high fat/casein diet led to increased tumor promotion, hepatocyte proliferation, steatosis, and inflammation. Replacing casein with soy protein isolate counteracted these effects. The high fat diets also resulted in a general increase in transcripts for Wnt/β-catenin pathway components, which may be an important mechanism, whereby hepatic tumorigenesis is promoted. However, soy protein isolate did not block Wnt signaling in this nonalcoholic fatty liver disease model. We conclude that replacing casein with soy protein isolate blocks development of steatosis, inflammation, and tumor promotion in diethylnitrosamine-treated mice fed high fat diets. Impact statement The impact of dietary components on cancer is a topic of great interest for both the general public and the scientific community. Liver cancer is currently the second leading form of cancer deaths worldwide. Our study has addressed the effect of the protein

  6. Roles of Chemokine Receptor 4(CXCR4)and Chemokine Ligand 12(CXCL12)in Metastasis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Liu; Zeya Pan; Aijun Li; Siyuan Fu; Yin Lei; Hangyong Sun; Mengchao Wu; Weiping Zhou

    2008-01-01

    Chemokines are involved in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) carcinogenesis.However,the exact mechanism of chemokines in HCC carcinogenesis remains unknown.Here we investigated the roles of chemokine receptor 4(CXCR4) and chemokine ligand 12(CXCL12)in the metastasis of HCC.We found that the expression levels of CXCR4 mRNA in HCC tissues,MHCC97 cells,and HUVEC cells were 2.52±1.13,2.34±1.16 and 1.63±1.26,respectively and that the CXCR4 protein levels were 1.38±0.13,1.96±0.32 and 1.86±0.21,respectively.In contrast,CXCR4 was not detected in normal hepatic tissues.In 78 HCC patients,we also found that the concentration of CXCL12 in cancerous ascitic fluid was 783-8,364 Pg/ml and that CXCL12 mRNA level in HCC metastasis portal lymph nodes was 1.21±0.87 but undetectable in normal hepatic tissues.Finally we discovered that recombinant human CXCL12 could induce MHCC97 cells and HUVEC cells to migrate with chemotactic indexes(CI)of 3.9±1.1 and 4.1±1.6,respectively.Cancerous ascitic fluid could also induce the migration of MHCC97 cells with a CI of 1.9±0.8.Thus,our data suggest that CXCR4 and CXCL12 may play an important role in the metastasis of HCC by promoting the migration of tumor cells.

  7. Loss of intestinal O-glycans promotes spontaneous duodenal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nan; Bergstrom, Kirk; Fu, Jianxin; Xie, Biao; Chen, Weichang; Xia, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    Mucin-type O-glycans, primarily core 1- and core 3-derived O-glycans, are the major mucus barrier components throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Previous reports identified the biological role of O-glycans in the stomach and colon. However, the biological function of O-glycans in the small intestine remains unknown. Using mice lacking intestinal core 1- and core 3-derived O-glycans [intestinal epithelial cell C1galt1(-/-);C3GnT(-/-) or double knockout (DKO)], we found that loss of O-glycans predisposes DKO mice to spontaneous duodenal tumorigenesis by ∼1 yr of age. Tumor incidence did not increase with age; however, tumors advanced in aggressiveness by 20 mo. O-glycan deficiency was associated with reduced luminal mucus in DKO mice before tumor development. Altered intestinal epithelial homeostasis with enhanced baseline crypt proliferation characterizes these phenotypes as assayed by Ki67 staining. In addition, fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis reveals a significantly lower bacterial burden in the duodenum compared with the large intestine. This phenotype is not reduced with antibiotic treatment, implying O-glycosylation defects, rather than bacterial-induced inflammation, which causes spontaneous duodenal tumorigenesis. Moreover, inflammatory responses in DKO duodenal mucosa are mild as assayed with histology, quantitative PCR for inflammation-associated cytokines, and immunostaining for immune cells. Importantly, inducible deletion of intestinal O-glycans in adult mice leads to analogous spontaneous duodenal tumors, although with higher incidence and heightened severity compared with mice with O-glycans constitutive deletion. In conclusion, these studies reveal O-glycans within the small intestine are critical determinants of duodenal cancer risk. Future studies will provide insights into the pathogenesis in the general population and those at risk for this rare but deadly cancer.

  8. Aberrant CBFA2T3B gene promoter methylation in breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bais Anthony J

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CBFA2T3 locus located on the human chromosome region 16q24.3 is frequently deleted in breast tumors. CBFA2T3 gene expression levels are aberrant in breast tumor cell lines and the CBFA2T3B isoform is a potential tumor suppressor gene. In the absence of identified mutations to further support a role for this gene in tumorigenesis, we explored whether the CBFA2T3B promoter region is aberrantly methylated and whether this correlates with expression. Results Aberrant hypo and hypermethylation of the CBFA2T3B promoter was detected in breast tumor cell lines and primary breast tumor samples relative to methylation index interquartile ranges in normal breast counterpart and normal whole blood samples. A statistically significant inverse correlation between aberrant CBFA2T3B promoter methylation and gene expression was established. Conclusion CBFA2T3B is a potential breast tumor suppressor gene affected by aberrant promoter methylation and gene expression. The methylation levels were quantitated using a second-round real-time methylation-specific PCR assay. The detection of both hypo and hypermethylation is a technicality regarding the methylation methodology.

  9. Oncogenic and tumor-promoting Spermatophytes and Pteridophytes and their active principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, N R; Bingel, A S; Fong, H H; Saleh, A A; Christenson, G M; Saufferer, S M

    1976-08-01

    A survey and discussion are presented of plants classified as Spermatophyta and Pteridophyta, extracts of which have been shown to be oncogenic or tumor-promoting in animals. The active oncogenic and tumor-promoting principles, where known, have been identified. They represent tannins; pyrrolizidine, indole, tropolone, quinoline, purine, and benzophenanthridine alkaloids; nitroso compounds; triterpene glycosides; lignans; isoflavans; allyl benzenoids; simple (nu-pyrenes; and carbocyclic hydroxy acids. A total of 28 compounds of known structure have been identified as oncogens and several phorbol esters as tumor-promoters. Plants known to contain any of the 28 oncogens (excluding shikimic acid and caffeine) have been tabulated; they represent at least 454 species, 110 genera, and 34 families of Spermatophyta and Pteridophyta.

  10. Correlation of CCNA1 Promoter Methylation with Malignant Tumors: A Meta-Analysis Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Bin Yang; Shuai Miao; Le-Ning Zhang; Hong-Bin Sun; Zhe-Nan Xu; Chun-Shan Han

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes by promoter methylation plays vital roles in the process of carcinogenesis. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to determine whether the aberrant methylation of cyclin A1 (CCNA1) may be of great significance to human malignant tumors. By searching both English and Chinese language-based electronic databases carefully, we tabulated and analyzed parameters from each study. All human-associated case-control studies were included providing availabl...

  11. Disruption of Lysosome Function Promotes Tumor Growth and Metastasis in Drosophila *

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Congwu; Zhu, Huanhu; Han,Min; Zhuang, Yuan; Wu, Xiaohui; Xu, Tian

    2010-01-01

    Lysosome function is essential to many physiological processes. It has been suggested that deregulation of lysosome function could contribute to cancer. Through a genetic screen in Drosophila, we have discovered that mutations disrupting lysosomal degradation pathway components contribute to tumor development and progression. Loss-of-function mutations in the Class C vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) gene, deep orange (dor), dramatically promote tumor overgrowth and invasion of the RasV12 cells....

  12. Overexpression of CTHRC1 in hepatocellular carcinoma promotes tumor invasion and predicts poor prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ling Chen

    Full Text Available Collagen triple helix repeat containing-1 (CTHRC1 is a secreted glycoprotein that activates the planar cell polarity pathway of Wnt signaling. Using microarray analysis, we found that the CTHRC1 gene is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The level of CTHRC1 mRNA was measured in 201 surgically resected HCCs using real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Overexpression of CTHRC1 in HCC was associated with large tumor size and advanced tumor stage. Furthermore, expression of CTHRC1 as was identified as an independent prognostic factors in the multivariate analysis. Suppression of CTHRC1 expression inhibited tumor migration and invasion whereas overexpression of CTHRC1 promoted tumor invasion. Activation of RhoA, but not Rac1 or Cdc42, was found to play a crucial role in CTHRC1-induced cell migration. CTHRC1 promoted adhesion of cancer cells to extracellular matrix through induction of integrin β1 expression and activation of focal adhesion kinase. These results suggest CTHRC1 promotes tumor invasion and metastasis by enhancing the adhesion and migratory abilities of tumor cells. It is also a promising biomarker for predicting the prognosis of patients with HCC.

  13. Syndecan-1 deficiency promotes tumor growth in a murine model of colitis-induced colon carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder Gallimidi, Adi; Nussbaum, Gabriel; Hermano, Esther; Weizman, Barak; Meirovitz, Amichay; Vlodavsky, Israel; Götte, Martin; Elkin, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Syndecan-1 (Sdc1) is an important member of the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan family, highly expressed by epithelial cells in adult organisms. Sdc1 is involved in the regulation of cell migration, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, growth-factor, chemokine and integrin activity, and implicated in inflammatory responses and tumorigenesis. Gastrointestinal tract represents an important anatomic site where loss of Sdc1 expression was reported both in inflammation and malignancy. However, the biological significance of Sdc1 in chronic colitis-associated tumorigenesis has not been elucidated. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to test the effects of Sdc1 loss on colorectal tumor development in inflammation-driven colon tumorigenesis. Utilizing a mouse model of colitis-related colon carcinoma induced by the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM), followed by the inflammatory agent dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), we found that Sdc1 deficiency results in increased susceptibility to colitis-associated tumorigenesis. Importantly, colitis-associated tumors developed in Sdc1-defficient mice were characterized by increased local production of IL-6, activation of STAT3, as well as induction of several STAT3 target genes that act as important effectors of colonic tumorigenesis. Altogether, our results highlight a previously unknown effect of Sdc1 loss in progression of inflammation-associated cancer and suggest that decreased levels of Sdc1 may serve as an indicator of colon carcinoma progression in the setting of chronic inflammation. PMID:28350804

  14. Platelets promote tumor growth and metastasis via direct interaction between Aggrus/podoplanin and CLEC-2.

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    Satoshi Takagi

    Full Text Available The platelet aggregation-inducing factor Aggrus, also known as podoplanin, is frequently upregulated in several types of tumors and enhances hematogenous metastasis by interacting with and activating the platelet receptor CLEC-2. Thus, Aggrus-CLEC-2 binding could be a therapeutic molecular mechanism for cancer therapy. We generated a new anti-human Aggrus monoclonal antibody, MS-1, that suppressed Aggrus-CLEC-2 binding, Aggrus-induced platelet aggregation, and Aggrus-mediated tumor metastasis. Interestingly, the MS-1 monoclonal antibody attenuated the growth of Aggrus-positive tumors in vivo. Moreover, the humanized chimeric MS-1 antibody, ChMS-1, also exhibited strong antitumor activity against Aggrus-positive lung squamous cell carcinoma xenografted into NOD-SCID mice compromising antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic and complement-dependent cytotoxic activities. Because Aggrus knockdown suppressed platelet-induced proliferation in vitro and tumor growth of the lung squamous cell carcinoma in vivo, Aggrus may be involved in not only tumor metastasis but also tumor growth by promoting platelet-tumor interaction, platelet activation, and secretion of platelet-derived factors in vivo. Our results indicate that molecular target drugs inhibiting specific platelet-tumor interactions can be developed as antitumor drugs that suppress both metastasis and proliferation of tumors such as lung squamous cell carcinoma.

  15. VAMP-associated protein B (VAPB) promotes breast tumor growth by modulation of Akt activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Meghana; Song, Wenqiang; Jiang, Aixiang; Shyr, Yu; Lev, Sima; Greenstein, David; Brantley-Sieders, Dana; Chen, Jin

    2012-01-01

    VAPB (VAMP- associated protein B) is an ER protein that regulates multiple biological functions. Although aberrant expression of VAPB is associated with breast cancer, its function in tumor cells is poorly understood. In this report, we provide evidence that VAPB regulates breast tumor cell proliferation and AKT activation. VAPB protein expression is elevated in primary and metastatic tumor specimens, and VAPB mRNA expression levels correlated negatively with patient survival in two large breast tumor datasets. Overexpression of VAPB in mammary epithelial cells increased cell growth, whereas VAPB knockdown in tumor cells inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in orthotopic mammary gland allografts. The growth regulation of mammary tumor cells controlled by VAPB appears to be mediated, at least in part, by modulation of AKT activity. Overexpression of VAPB in MCF10A-HER2 cells enhances phosphorylation of AKT. In contrast, knockdown of VAPB in MMTV-Neu tumor cells inhibited pAKT levels. Pharmacological inhibition of AKT significantly reduced three-dimensional spheroid growth induced by VAPB. Collectively, the genetic, functional and mechanistic analyses suggest a role of VAPB in tumor promotion in human breast cancer.

  16. VAMP-associated protein B (VAPB promotes breast tumor growth by modulation of Akt activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghana Rao

    Full Text Available VAPB (VAMP- associated protein B is an ER protein that regulates multiple biological functions. Although aberrant expression of VAPB is associated with breast cancer, its function in tumor cells is poorly understood. In this report, we provide evidence that VAPB regulates breast tumor cell proliferation and AKT activation. VAPB protein expression is elevated in primary and metastatic tumor specimens, and VAPB mRNA expression levels correlated negatively with patient survival in two large breast tumor datasets. Overexpression of VAPB in mammary epithelial cells increased cell growth, whereas VAPB knockdown in tumor cells inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in orthotopic mammary gland allografts. The growth regulation of mammary tumor cells controlled by VAPB appears to be mediated, at least in part, by modulation of AKT activity. Overexpression of VAPB in MCF10A-HER2 cells enhances phosphorylation of AKT. In contrast, knockdown of VAPB in MMTV-Neu tumor cells inhibited pAKT levels. Pharmacological inhibition of AKT significantly reduced three-dimensional spheroid growth induced by VAPB. Collectively, the genetic, functional and mechanistic analyses suggest a role of VAPB in tumor promotion in human breast cancer.

  17. Interleukin-8 derived from local tissue-resident stromal cells promotes tumor cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welte, Gabriel; Alt, Eckhard; Devarajan, Eswaran; Krishnappa, Srinivasalu; Jotzu, Constantin; Song, Yao-Hua

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of adipose tissue resident stromal cells on tumor cell invasion. Our data show that a subpopulation of adipose tissue derived stromal cells expressing Nestin, NG2, α-smooth muscle actin and PDGFR-α migrate toward the cancer cells. Microarray analysis revealed the upregulation of IL-8 in the migrated cells. We demonstrated that stromal cell derived IL-8 promote the invasion and the anchorage-independent growth of cancer cells. We conclude that human breast cancer cells attract a subpopulation of stromal cells that secrete IL-8 to promote tumor cell invasion in a paracrine fashion.

  18. Is Rab25 a tumor promoter or suppressor--context dependency on RCP status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2010-08-01

    Conflicting reports in the literature suggest that Rab25 could either be a context dependent promoter or suppressor of tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that whether Rab25 acts as a promoter or suppressor in tumor progression depends on the expression status of its effector, the Rab coupling protein (RCP). An elevated expression of RCP resulting from genomic amplification may enhance Rab25's tumor progression activity. Elevation of Rab25 alone may sequester endogenous RCP, and attenuates its activating effect on other oncogenic products, such as mutant Ras.

  19. Morphine Promotes Tumor Angiogenesis and Increases Breast Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bimonte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphine is considered a highly potent analgesic agent used to relieve suffering of patients with cancer. Several in vitro and in vivo studies showed that morphine also modulates angiogenesis and regulates tumour cell growth. Unfortunately, the results obtained by these studies are still contradictory. In order to better dissect the role of morphine in cancer cell growth and angiogenesis we performed in vitro studies on ER-negative human breast carcinoma cells, MDA.MB231 and in vivo studies on heterotopic mouse model of human triple negative breast cancer, TNBC. We demonstrated that morphine in vitro enhanced the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of MDA.MB231 cells. In vivo studies performed on xenograft mouse model of TNBC revealed that tumours of mice treated with morphine were larger than those observed in other groups. Moreover, morphine was able to enhance the neoangiogenesis. Our data showed that morphine at clinical relevant doses promotes angiogenesis and increases breast cancer progression.

  20. Promotion of Tumor-Initiating Cells in Primary and Recurrent Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Currently we have shown that NF-κB is highly active in TICs isolated from different basal-like/ triple - negative cancer cell lines. Inhibition of NF-κB...phenotype, via its regulation of RelB. FDA-approved thiordiazine may be a treatment for basal-like/ triple - negative breast cancer via its ability to...Moreover, we have demonstrated that the EMT transcription factor, Snail, is markedly upregulated in recurrent mammary tumors, and that forced expression of

  1. Peptides Derived from Type IV Collagen, CXC Chemokines, and Thrombospondin-1 Domain-Containing Proteins Inhibit Neovascularization and Suppress Tumor Growth in MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob E. Koskimaki

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis or neovascularization, the process of new blood vessel formation from preexisting microvasculature, involves interactions among several cell types including parenchymal, endothelial cells, and immune cells. The formation of new vessels is tightly regulated by a balance between endogenous proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors to maintain homeostasis in tissue; tumor progression and metastasis in breast cancer have been shown to be angiogenesis-dependent. We previously introduced a systematic methodology to identify putative endogenous antiangiogenic peptides and validated these predictions in vitro in human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation and migration assays. These peptides are derived from several protein families including type IV collagen, CXC chemokines, and thrombospondin-1 domain-containing proteins. On the basis of the results from the in vitro screening, we have evaluated the ability of one peptide selected from each family named pentastatin-1, chemokinostatin-1, and properdistatin, respectively, to suppress angiogenesis in an MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer orthotopic xenograft model in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Peptides were administered intraperitoneally once per day. We have demonstrated significant suppression of tumor growth in vivo and subsequent reductions in microvascular density, indicating the potential of these peptides as therapeutic agents for breast cancer.

  2. MGMT promoter methylation in serum and cerebrospinal fluid as a tumor-specific biomarker of glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Yahong; Guo, Yang; Cong, Zheng; DU, Fangfang; Song, Bin

    2015-07-01

    O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation is a conventional technique to predict the prognosis or individualized treatment of glioma in tumor tissue following surgery or biopsy. However, the technique cannot be applied in those glioma patients with concomitant neurological dysfunctions or advanced age. The present study aimed to find a new minimally invasive and efficient alternative method for the detection of MGMT promoter methylation. The expression of MGMT promoter methylation was assessed in peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and compared to the corresponding tumor tissue from glioma patients. The 89 patients in the study [32 World Health Organization (WHO) grade II, 19 WHO grade III and 38 WHO grade IV) were pathologically-diagnosed glioma and received radiation therapy following sample collection. The resected glioma tumor tissue (89), corresponding serum (89) and CSF (78) samples were collected for the detection of MGMT promoter methylation using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. The sensitivity and specificity of detecting MGMT promoter methylation in CSF and serum were compared. Among the tumor tissue samples, 51/89 (57.3%) showed MGMT promoter methylation. The specificity of the detection in the CSF and serum samples reached 100%. The sensitivity of MGMT promoter methylation detection in CSF and serum were 26/40 (65.0%) and 19/51 (37.3%), respectively (PMGMT promoter methylation detection using CSF were 8/12 (66.7%), 11/18 (61.1%) and 7/10 (70.0%), respectively, which were significantly higher than the sensitivities using serum (7/21, 33.3%; 7/19, 36.8%; and 5/11, 45.5%, respectively PMGMT promoter methylation using CSF and serum were 18/25 (72.0%) and 10/24 (41.7%), respectively, both of which were significantly higher than the corresponding values for patients without residual tumors (8/15, 53.3% and 6/19, 31.6%, respectively; PMGMT promoter methylation in CSF specimens shows higher sensitivity

  3. Adiponectin deficiency promotes tumor growth in mice by reducing macrophage infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yutong; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-08-05

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived plasma protein that has been implicated in regulating angiogenesis, but the role of adiponectin in regulating this process is still controversial. In this study, in order to determine whether adiponectin affects tumor growth and tumor induced vascularization, we implanted B16F10 melanoma and Lewis Lung Carcinoma cells subcutaneously into adiponectin knockout and wild-type control mice, and found that adiponectin deficiency markedly promoted the growth of both tumors. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that adiponectin deficiency reduced macrophage recruitment to the tumor, but did not affect cancer cell mitosis, apoptosis, or tumor-associated angiogenesis. In addition, treatment with recombinant adiponectin did not affect the proliferation of cultured B16F10 tumor cells. Importantly, the restoration of microphage infiltration at an early stage of tumorigenesis by means of co-injection of B16F10 cells and macrophages reversed the increased tumor growth in adiponectin knockout mice. Thus, we conclude that the enhanced tumor growth observed in adiponectin deficient mice is likely due to the reduction of macrophage infiltration rather than enhanced angiogenesis.

  4. Adiponectin deficiency promotes tumor growth in mice by reducing macrophage infiltration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutong Sun

    Full Text Available Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived plasma protein that has been implicated in regulating angiogenesis, but the role of adiponectin in regulating this process is still controversial. In this study, in order to determine whether adiponectin affects tumor growth and tumor induced vascularization, we implanted B16F10 melanoma and Lewis Lung Carcinoma cells subcutaneously into adiponectin knockout and wild-type control mice, and found that adiponectin deficiency markedly promoted the growth of both tumors. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that adiponectin deficiency reduced macrophage recruitment to the tumor, but did not affect cancer cell mitosis, apoptosis, or tumor-associated angiogenesis. In addition, treatment with recombinant adiponectin did not affect the proliferation of cultured B16F10 tumor cells. Importantly, the restoration of microphage infiltration at an early stage of tumorigenesis by means of co-injection of B16F10 cells and macrophages reversed the increased tumor growth in adiponectin knockout mice. Thus, we conclude that the enhanced tumor growth observed in adiponectin deficient mice is likely due to the reduction of macrophage infiltration rather than enhanced angiogenesis.

  5. Tumor fibroblast-derived epiregulin promotes growth of colitis-associated neoplasms through ERK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufert, Clemens; Becker, Christoph; Türeci, Özlem; Waldner, Maximilian J; Backert, Ingo; Floh, Katharina; Atreya, Imke; Leppkes, Moritz; Jefremow, Andre; Vieth, Michael; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Klinger, Patricia; Greten, Florian R; Threadgill, David W; Sahin, Ugur; Neurath, Markus F

    2013-04-01

    Molecular mechanisms specific to colitis-associated cancers have been poorly characterized. Using comparative whole-genome expression profiling, we observed differential expression of epiregulin (EREG) in mouse models of colitis-associated, but not sporadic, colorectal cancer. Similarly, EREG expression was significantly upregulated in cohorts of patients with colitis-associated cancer. Furthermore, tumor-associated fibroblasts were identified as a major source of EREG in colitis-associated neoplasms. Functional studies showed that Ereg-deficient mice, although more prone to colitis, were strongly protected from colitis-associated tumors. Serial endoscopic studies revealed that EREG promoted tumor growth rather than initiation. Additionally, we demonstrated that fibroblast-derived EREG requires ERK activation to induce proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and tumor development in vivo. To demonstrate the functional relevance of EREG-producing tumor-associated fibroblasts, we developed a novel system for adoptive transfer of these cells via mini-endoscopic local injection. It was found that transfer of EREG-producing, but not Ereg-deficient, fibroblasts from tumors significantly augmented growth of colitis-associated neoplasms in vivo. In conclusion, our data indicate that EREG and tumor-associated fibroblasts play a crucial role in controlling tumor growth in colitis-associated neoplasms.

  6. Tumor fibroblast–derived epiregulin promotes growth of colitis-associated neoplasms through ERK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufert, Clemens; Becker, Christoph; Türeci, Özlem; Waldner, Maximilian J.; Backert, Ingo; Floh, Katharina; Atreya, Imke; Leppkes, Moritz; Jefremow, Andre; Vieth, Michael; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Klinger, Patricia; Greten, Florian R.; Threadgill, David W.; Sahin, Ugur; Neurath, Markus F.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms specific to colitis-associated cancers have been poorly characterized. Using comparative whole-genome expression profiling, we observed differential expression of epiregulin (EREG) in mouse models of colitis-associated, but not sporadic, colorectal cancer. Similarly, EREG expression was significantly upregulated in cohorts of patients with colitis-associated cancer. Furthermore, tumor-associated fibroblasts were identified as a major source of EREG in colitis-associated neoplasms. Functional studies showed that Ereg-deficient mice, although more prone to colitis, were strongly protected from colitis-associated tumors. Serial endoscopic studies revealed that EREG promoted tumor growth rather than initiation. Additionally, we demonstrated that fibroblast-derived EREG requires ERK activation to induce proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and tumor development in vivo. To demonstrate the functional relevance of EREG-producing tumor-associated fibroblasts, we developed a novel system for adoptive transfer of these cells via mini-endoscopic local injection. It was found that transfer of EREG-producing, but not Ereg-deficient, fibroblasts from tumors significantly augmented growth of colitis-associated neoplasms in vivo. In conclusion, our data indicate that EREG and tumor-associated fibroblasts play a crucial role in controlling tumor growth in colitis-associated neoplasms. PMID:23549083

  7. Monoallelic loss of the imprinted gene Grb10 promotes tumor formation in irradiated Nf1+/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Mroue

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Imprinted genes are expressed from only one parental allele and heterozygous loss involving the expressed allele is sufficient to produce complete loss of protein expression. Genetic alterations are common in tumorigenesis but the role of imprinted genes in this process is not well understood. In earlier work we mutagenized mice heterozygous for the Neurofibromatosis I tumor suppressor gene (NF1 to model radiotherapy-associated second malignant neoplasms that arise in irradiated NF1 patients. Expression analysis of tumor cell lines established from our mouse models identified Grb10 expression as widely absent. Grb10 is an imprinted gene and polymorphism analysis of cell lines and primary tumors demonstrates that the expressed allele is commonly lost in diverse Nf1 mutant tumors arising in our mouse models. We performed functional studies to test whether Grb10 restoration or loss alter fundamental features of the tumor growth. Restoring Grb10 in Nf1 mutant tumors decreases proliferation, decreases soft agar colony formation and downregulates Ras signaling. Conversely, Grb10 silencing in untransformed mouse embryo fibroblasts significantly increased cell proliferation and increased Ras-GTP levels. Expression of a constitutively activated MEK rescued tumor cells from Grb10-mediated reduction in colony formation. These studies reveal that Grb10 loss can occur during in vivo tumorigenesis, with a functional consequence in untransformed primary cells. In tumors, Grb10 loss independently promotes Ras pathway hyperactivation, which promotes hyperproliferation, an early feature of tumor development. In the context of a robust Nf1 mutant mouse model of cancer this work identifies a novel role for an imprinted gene in tumorigenesis.

  8. Tumor promotion by exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields below exposure limits for humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerchl, Alexander; Klose, Melanie; Grote, Karen; Wilhelm, Adalbert F X; Spathmann, Oliver; Fiedler, Thomas; Streckert, Joachim; Hansen, Volkert; Clemens, Markus

    2015-04-17

    The vast majority of in vitro and in vivo studies did not find cancerogenic effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF), i.e. emitted by mobile phones and base stations. Previously published results from a pilot study with carcinogen-treated mice, however, suggested tumor-promoting effects of RF-EMF (Tillmann et al., 2010). We have performed a replication study using higher numbers of animals per group and including two additional exposure levels (0 (sham), 0.04, 0.4 and 2 W/kg SAR). We could confirm and extend the originally reported findings. Numbers of tumors of the lungs and livers in exposed animals were significantly higher than in sham-exposed controls. In addition, lymphomas were also found to be significantly elevated by exposure. A clear dose-response effect is absent. We hypothesize that these tumor-promoting effects may be caused by metabolic changes due to exposure. Since many of the tumor-promoting effects in our study were seen at low to moderate exposure levels (0.04 and 0.4 W/kg SAR), thus well below exposure limits for the users of mobile phones, further studies are warranted to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Our findings may help to understand the repeatedly reported increased incidences of brain tumors in heavy users of mobile phones.

  9. CMTM5 exhibits tumor suppressor activity through promoter methylation in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Heyu [Central Laboratory, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Nan, Xu [Center for Human Disease Genomics, Department of Immunology, Key Laboratory of Medical Immunology, Ministry of Health, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China); Li, Xuefen [Central Laboratory, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jianyun [Department of Oral Pathology, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Sun, Lisha [Central Laboratory, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Han, Wenlin [Center for Human Disease Genomics, Department of Immunology, Key Laboratory of Medical Immunology, Ministry of Health, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China); Li, Tiejun, E-mail: litiejun22@vip.sina.com [Department of Oral Pathology, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Down-regulation of CMTM5 expression in OSCC tissues was found. • The promoter methylation status of CMTM5 was measured. • CMTM5-v1 inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced apoptosis. • CMTM5 might act as a putative tumor suppressor gene in OSCC. - Abstract: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common types of malignancies in the head and neck region. CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain-containing member 5 (CMTM5) has been recently implicated as a tumor suppressor gene in several cancer types. Herein, we examined the expression and function of CMTM5 in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CMTM5 was down-regulated in oral squamous cell lines and tumor samples from patients with promoter methylation. Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine restored CMTM5 expression. In the OSCC cell lines CAL27 and GNM, the ectopic expression of CMTM5-v1 strongly inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced apoptosis. In addition, CMTM5-v1 inhibited tumor formation in vivo. Therefore, CMTM5 might act as a putative tumor suppressor gene through promoter methylation in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  10. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Pancreatic Tumor Growth by Inducing Alternative Polarization of Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esha Mathew

    2016-03-01

    Significance: Targeting the stroma is emerging as a new paradigm in pancreatic cancer; however, efforts to that effect are hampered by our limited understanding of the nature and function of stromal components. Here, we uncover previously unappreciated heterogeneity within the stroma and identify interactions among stromal components that promote tumor growth and could be targeted therapeutically.

  11. Analysis of Signaling Pathways Involved in Tumor Promoting Functions of TGFbeta in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    development and progression. This multifunctional role represents a major obstacle for the development of drugs aimed at manipulating TGFB functions in a...discoveries have the potential of contributing to a new intellectual framework for the development of drugs that specifically target tumor promoting

  12. Poly-ADP ribosylation of PTEN by tankyrases promotes PTEN degradation and tumor growth

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Nan; Zhang, Yajie; Han, Xin; Liang, Ke; Wang, Jiadong; Feng, Lin; Wang, Wenqi; Songyang, Zhou; Lin, Chunru; Yang, Liuqing; Yu, Yonghao; Chen, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Li et al. report ADP-ribosylation as a new post-translational modification of the tumor suppressor PTEN. Tankyrases interact with and ribosylate PTEN, which promotes the recognition of PTEN by a PAR-binding E3 ubiquitin ligase, RNF146, leading to PTEN ubiquitination and degradation. Tankyrases were up-regulated and negatively correlated with PTEN expression in human colon carcinomas.

  13. Up-Regulation of the Chemokine CCL18 by Macrophages Is a Potential Immunomodulatory Pathway in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Claudia; Zimmermann, Nick; Berndt, Nicole; Großer, Marianne; Stein, Annette; Koch, Andre; Meurer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most frequent form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), which can deteriorate from patch stage to dermal-based tumors and systemic involvement in years. The interaction of chemokines in the skin with CTCL cells might have implications for the pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, we show by PCR analysis and immunofluorescence staining that the chemokine CCL18 is present in skin biopsy specimens of patients with MF and its precursor form parapsoriasis en plaque but not in healthy tissue. In addition, the serum levels of CCL18 were increased threefold in MF patients compared with those in healthy controls. In skin, CCL18 was specifically expressed by CD163+ CD209+ macrophages at the invasive margin of the tumor and not expressed by mature CD208+ dendritic cells in the center of the tumor. The chemokine CCL17 was, by contrast, ubiquitously expressed. Furthermore, CCL18 promoted the chemotaxis but not the proliferation of CTCL cells. CCL18 inhibited proliferation of tumor cells and abolished the CXCL12-induced growth of a CTCL cell line. These data link the increased expression of CCL18 with CTCL and suggest an immunomodulatory effect of the chemokine in the pathogenesis of CTCL. PMID:21741937

  14. Decrease of epidermal histidase activity by tumor-promoting phorbol esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, N H; Lau, S; Head, R

    1975-11-01

    The potent skin tumor promoter (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) stimulates epidermal macromolecular synthesis as well as proliferation, but little is known of specific functional aberrations produced by TPA. This report presents results of a study on the effects of TPA on epidermal histidase (L-histidine ammonia lyase), an enzyme found in normal epidermis but not in dermis or in mouse squamous cell carcinomas. Histidase activity was assayed on postmitochondrial supernatants obtained from hairless mouse epidermis after removal by keratotome. Topical TPA treatment at doses active in tumor promotion (1.7 to 17.0 nmoles/application) produced dose-dependent decreases in epidermal histidase specific activity at 19 hr posttreatment. The onset of the decrease occurred at 12 hr with recovery to control level specific activity by 5 days, showing kinetics similar to those obtained for stimulation of DNA synthesis. This decrease in histidase could not be attributed to a general inhibition of soluble protein synthesis or to the appearance of an inhibitor of histidase activity. The strong promoter TPA produced a greater histidase decrease than did the moderate promoter and mitogen 12,13-didecanoyl phorbol at equimolar dose, while phorbol, a nonpromoter and nonmitogen, produced no effects on histidase. The relationship of this histidase depression to tumor promotion and not initiation is further indicated by the finding that (a) Tween 60, a structurally unrelated tumor promotor, also produced a decrease in histidase; and (b) the tumor initiator urethan and an initiating dose of 9,10-dimethybenz(a)anthracene showed no effects on histadase activity.

  15. Slit-Robo signaling mediates lymphangiogenesis and promotes tumor lymphatic metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Mei; Han, Hai-Xiong; Sui, Fei; Dai, Yu-Min; Chen, Ming; Geng, Jian-Guo

    2010-05-28

    The Slit family of guidance cues binds to Roundabout (Robo) receptors to modulate neuronal, leukocytic, and endothelial migration. Slit-Robo signaling had been reported to function as chemoattractive signal for vascular endothelial cells during angiogenesis. In this study, we found that Robo1 was expressed in lymphatic endothelial cells to mediate the migration and tube formation of these cells upon Slit2 stimulation, which were specifically inhibited by the function-blocking antibody R5 to Slit2/Robo1 interaction. To further explore the lymphangiogenic effect and significance mediated by Slit-Robo signaling, we intercrossed Slit2 transgenic mice with a non-metastatic RIP1-Tag2 mouse tumor model, and found that transgenic overexpression of Slit2 significantly enhanced tumor lymphangiogenesis and subsequently promoted mesenteric lymph node metastasis of pancreatic islet tumors. Taken together, our findings reveal that through interacting with Robo1, Slit2 is a novel and potent lymphangiogenic factor and contributes to tumor lymphatic metastasis.

  16. Dietary suppression of the mammary CD29(hi)CD24(+) epithelial subpopulation and its cytokine/chemokine transcriptional signatures modifies mammary tumor risk in MMTV-Wnt1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahal, Omar M; Machado, Heather L; Montales, Maria Theresa E; Pabona, John Mark P; Heard, Melissa E; Nagarajan, Shanmugam; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2013-11-01

    Diet is highly linked to breast cancer risk, yet little is known about its influence on mammary epithelial populations with distinct regenerative and hence, tumorigenic potential. To investigate this, we evaluated the relative frequency of lineage-negative CD29(hi)CD24(+), CD29(lo)CD24(+) and CD29(hi)Thy1(+)CD24(+) epithelial subpopulations in pre-neoplastic mammary tissue of adult virgin MMTV-Wnt1-transgenic mice fed either control (Casein) or soy-based diets. We found that mammary epithelial cells exposed to soy diet exhibited a lower percentage of CD29(hi)CD24(+)Lin(-) population, decreased ability to form mammospheres in culture, lower mammary outgrowth potential when transplanted into cleared fat pads, and reduced appearance of tumor-initiating CD29(hi)Thy1(+)CD24(+) cells, than in those of control diet-fed mice. Diet had no comparable influence on the percentage of the CD29(lo)CD24(+)Lin(-) population. Global gene expression profiling of the CD29(hi)CD24(+)subpopulation revealed markedly altered expression of genes important to inflammation, cytokine and chemokine signaling, and proliferation. Soy-fed relative to casein-fed mice showed lower mammary tumor incidence, shorter tumor latency, and reduced systemic levels of estradiol 17-β, progesterone and interleukin-6. Our results provide evidence for the functional impact of diet on specific epithelial subpopulations that may relate to breast cancer risk and suggest that diet-regulated cues can be further explored for breast cancer risk assessment and prevention.

  17. The role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in eosinophil activation during inflammatory allergic reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira S.H.P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are important chemotactic cytokines that play a fundamental role in the trafficking of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. They are also potent cell-activating factors, inducing cytokine and histamine release and free radical production, a fact that makes them particularly important in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation. The action of chemokines is regulated at the level of agonist production and processing as well as at the level of receptor expression and coupling. Therefore, an analysis of the ligands must necessarily consider receptors. Eosinophils are target cells involved in the allergic inflammatory response since they are able to release a wide variety of mediators including CC and CXC chemokines and express their receptors. These mediators could damage the airway epithelial cells and might be important to stimulate other cells inducing an amplification of the allergic response. This review focuses on recently emerging data pertaining to the importance of chemokines and chemokine receptors in promoting eosinophil activation and migration during the allergic inflammatory process. The analysis of the function of eosinophils and their chemokine receptors during allergic inflammation might be a good approach to understanding the determinants of asthma severity and to developing novel therapies.

  18. Tumor tissue characterization evaluating the luciferase activity under the control of a hsp70 promoter and MR imaging in three tumor cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hundt, Walter [Department of Radiology, Lucas MRS Research Center, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Department of Clinical Radiology, University of Munich (Germany)], E-mail: walter.hundt@web.de; Steinbach, Silke [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Technical University of Munich (Germany); O' Connell-Rodwell, Caitlin E. [Department of Pediatrics, Microbiology and Immunology and Radiology, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Mayer, Dirk; Bednarski, Mark D.; Guccione, Samira [Department of Radiology, Lucas MRS Research Center, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    We investigated the luciferase activity under the control of a hsp70 promoter and MR imaging for three tumor cell lines. Three tumor cell lines, SCCVII, NIH3T3 and M21 were transfected with a plasmid containing the hsp70 promoter fragment and the luciferase reporter gene and grown in mice. Bioluminescence imaging of the tumors was performed every other day. MR imaging, pre- and post-contrast T1-wt SE, T2-wt FSE, Diffusion-wt STEAM-sequence, T2-time determination were obtained on a 1.5-T GE MRI scanner at a tumor size of 600-800 mm{sup 3} and 1400-1600 mm{sup 3}. Comparing the different tumor sizes the luciferase activity of the M21 tumors increased about 149.3%, for the NIH3T3 tumors about 47.4% and for the SCCVII tumors about 155.8%. Luciferase activity of the M21 tumors (r = 0.82, p < 0.01) and the SCCVII tumors (r = 0.62, p = 0.03) correlated significant with the diffusion coefficient. In the NIH3T3 tumors the best correlation between the luciferase activity and the MRI parameter was seen for the SNR (T2) values (r = 0.78, p < 0.01). The luciferase activity per mm{sup 3} tumor tissue correlated moderate with the contrast medium uptake (r = 0.55, p = 0.01) in the M21 tumors. In the NIH3T3 and SCCVII tumors a negative correlation (r = -0.78, p < 0.01, respectively, r = -0.49, p = 0.02) was found with the T2 time. Different tissue types have different luciferase activity under the control of the same hsp70 promoter. The combination of MR imaging with bioluminescence imaging improves the characterization of tumor tissue giving better information of this tissue on the molecular level.

  19. Interaction between CXCR4 and CCL20 pathways regulates tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Beider

    Full Text Available The chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand CXCL12 is overexpressed in the majority of tumors and is critically involved in the development and metastasis of these tumors. CXCR4 is expressed in malignant tumor cells whereas its ligand SDF-1 (CXCL12 is expressed mainly by cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF. Similarly to CXCR4, the chemokine CCL20 is overexpressed in variety of tumors; however its role and regulation in tumors is not fully clear. Here, we show that the chemokine receptor CXCR4 stimulates the production of the chemokine CCL20 and that CCL20 stimulates the proliferation and adhesion to collagen of various tumor cells. Furthermore, overexpression of CCL20 in tumor cells promotes growth and adhesion in vitro and increased tumor growth and invasiveness in vivo. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies to CCL20 inhibit the in vivo growth of tumors that either overexpress CXCR4 or CCL20 or naturally express CCL20. These results reveal a role for CCL20 in CXCR4-dependent and -independent tumor growth and suggest a therapeutic potential for CCL20 and CCR6 antagonists in the treatment of CXCR4- and CCL20-dependent malignancies.

  20. IP-10 is an important chemokine secreted by tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and is an independent prognostic factor in triple-negative breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elias, Daniel; Ditzel, Henrik; Kupisiewicz, Kasia

    Accumulating evidence suggests that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs)1, particularly CD8+T cells2 , are associated with improved disease-free and overall survival in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC3). To evaluate the functions of TILs in breast cancer, we performed gene expression analysis...

  1. Chemokine Receptors and Transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinquan Tan; Gang Zhou

    2005-01-01

    A complex process including both the innate and acquired immune responses results in allograft rejection. Some chemokine receptors and their ligands play essential roles not only for leukocyte migration into the graft but also in facilitating dendritic and T cell trafficking between lymph nodes and the transplant in the early and late stage of the allogeneic response. This review focuses on the impact of these chemoattractant proteins on transplant outcome and novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for antirejection therapy based on targeting of chemokine receptors and/or their ligands. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  2. P-Selectin-Mediated Adhesion between Platelets and Tumor Cells Promotes Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/+) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Cuiling; Li, Bin; Guo, Simei; Wei, Bo; Shao, Chunkui; Li, Jialin; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Qianqian; Li, Jiangchao; He, Xiaodong; Wang, Lijing; Zhang, Yajie

    2015-01-01

    Studies have indicated that platelets play an important role in tumorigenesis, and an abundance of platelets accumulate in the ovarian tumor microenvironment outside the vasculature. However, whether cancer cells recruit platelets within intestinal tumors and how they signal adherent platelets to enter intestinal tumor tissues remain unknown. Here, we unexpectedly found that large numbers of platelets were deposited within human colorectal tumor specimens using immunohistochemical staining, and these platelets were fully associated with tumor development. We further report the robust adhesion of platelet aggregates to tumor cells within intestinal tumors, which occurs via a mechanism that is dependent on P-selectin (CD62P), a cell adhesion molecule that is abundantly expressed on activated platelets. Using spontaneous intestinal tumor mouse models, we determined that the genetic deletion of P-selectin suppressed intestinal tumor growth, which was rescued by the infusion of wild-type platelets but not P-selectin(-/-) platelets. Mechanistically, platelet adhesion to tumor cells induced the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to promote angiogenesis and accelerate intestinal tumor cell proliferation. Our results indicate that the adherence of platelets to tumor cells could promote tumor growth and metastasis. By targeting this platelet-tumor cell interaction, recombinant soluble P-selectin may have therapeutic value for the treatment of intestinal tumors.

  3. Mutant p53 promotes tumor progression and metastasis by the endoplasmic reticulum UDPase ENTPD5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzi, Fotini; Brandt, Dominique T; Schneikert, Jean; Fuchs, Jeannette; Grikscheit, Katharina; Wanzel, Michael; Pavlakis, Evangelos; Charles, Joël P; Timofeev, Oleg; Nist, Andrea; Mernberger, Marco; Kantelhardt, Eva J; Siebolts, Udo; Bartel, Frank; Jacob, Ralf; Rath, Ariane; Moll, Roland; Grosse, Robert; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2016-12-27

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequent genetic alteration in cancer and are often associated with progression from benign to invasive stages with metastatic potential. Mutations inactivate tumor suppression by p53, and some endow the protein with novel gain of function (GOF) properties that actively promote tumor progression and metastasis. By comparative gene expression profiling of p53-mutated and p53-depleted cancer cells, we identified ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 5 (ENTPD5) as a mutant p53 target gene, which functions as a uridine 5'-diphosphatase (UDPase) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to promote the folding of N-glycosylated membrane proteins. A comprehensive pan-cancer analysis revealed a highly significant correlation between p53 GOF mutations and ENTPD5 expression. Mechanistically, mutp53 is recruited by Sp1 to the ENTPD5 core promoter to induce its expression. We show ENTPD5 to be a mediator of mutant p53 GOF activity in clonogenic growth, architectural tissue remodeling, migration, invasion, and lung colonization in an experimental metastasis mouse model. Our study reveals folding of N-glycosylated membrane proteins in the ER as a mechanism underlying the metastatic progression of tumors with mutp53 that could provide new possibilities for cancer treatment.

  4. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  5. Quantitative promoter methylation analysis of multiple cancer-related genes in renal cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Jorge

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant promoter hypermethylation of cancer-associated genes occurs frequently during carcinogenesis and may serve as a cancer biomarker. In this study we aimed at defining a quantitative gene promoter methylation panel that might identify the most prevalent types of renal cell tumors. Methods A panel of 18 gene promoters was assessed by quantitative methylation-specific PCR (QMSP in 85 primarily resected renal tumors representing the four major histologic subtypes (52 clear cell (ccRCC, 13 papillary (pRCC, 10 chromophobe (chRCC, and 10 oncocytomas and 62 paired normal tissue samples. After genomic DNA isolation and sodium bisulfite modification, methylation levels were determined and correlated with standard clinicopathological parameters. Results Significant differences in methylation levels among the four subtypes of renal tumors were found for CDH1 (p = 0.0007, PTGS2 (p = 0.002, and RASSF1A (p = 0.0001. CDH1 hypermethylation levels were significantly higher in ccRCC compared to chRCC and oncocytoma (p = 0.00016 and p = 0.0034, respectively, whereas PTGS2 methylation levels were significantly higher in ccRCC compared to pRCC (p = 0.004. RASSF1A methylation levels were significantly higher in pRCC than in normal tissue (p = 0.035. In pRCC, CDH1 and RASSF1A methylation levels were inversely correlated with tumor stage (p = 0.031 and nuclear grade (p = 0.022, respectively. Conclusion The major subtypes of renal epithelial neoplasms display differential aberrant CDH1, PTGS2, and RASSF1A promoter methylation levels. This gene panel might contribute to a more accurate discrimination among common renal tumors, improving preoperative assessment and therapeutic decision-making in patients harboring suspicious renal masses.

  6. Methylation Status of Vitamin D Receptor Gene Promoter in Benign and Malignant Adrenal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catia Pilon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously showed a decreased expression of vitamin D receptor (VDR mRNA/protein in a small group of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC tissues, suggesting the loss of a protective role of VDR against malignant cell growth in this cancer type. Downregulation of VDR gene expression may result from epigenetics events, that is, methylation of cytosine nucleotide of CpG islands in VDR gene promoter. We analyzed methylation of CpG sites in the VDR gene promoter in normal adrenals and adrenocortical tumor samples. Methylation of CpG-rich 5′ regions was assessed by bisulfite sequencing PCR using bisulfite-treated DNA from archival microdissected paraffin-embedded adrenocortical tissues. Three normal adrenals and 23 various adrenocortical tumor samples (15 adenomas and 8 carcinomas were studied. Methylation in the promoter region of VDR gene was found in 3/8 ACCs, while no VDR gene methylation was observed in normal adrenals and adrenocortical adenomas. VDR mRNA and protein levels were lower in ACCs than in benign tumors, and VDR immunostaining was weak or negative in ACCs, including all 3 methylated tissue samples. The association between VDR gene promoter methylation and reduced VDR gene expression is not a rare event in ACC, suggesting that VDR epigenetic inactivation may have a role in adrenocortical carcinogenesis.

  7. Tumor initiating and promoting activities of various benzo(a)pyrene metabolites in mouse skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaga, T J; Bracken, W M; Viaje, A; Berry, D L; Fischer, S M; Miller, D R; Levin, W; Conney, A H; Yagi, H; Jerina, D M

    1977-01-01

    The skin tumor-initiating activities of the twelve isomeric phenols of BP revealed that 2-OHBP was as potent as BP while 11-OHBP was moderately active and the others were weak or inactive. However, 2-OHBP has not been shown to be formed from BP in the skin or any other tissue. The (-)-trans-7,8-diol of BP skin was found to be more active as a skin tumor initiator than BP suggesting that it is a proximal carcinogen. The data on carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and metabolism suggest that BP-7..beta.., 8..cap alpha..-diol-9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxide is the ultimate carcinogenic form of BP. The skin tumor-initiating activities of the various BP metabolites correlate very well with their complete carcinogenic in mouse skin except for BP-7..beta.., 8..cap alpha..-diol-9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxide. It was found to have skin tumor initiating activity but not complete carcinogenic activity. However, BP-7..beta.., 8..cap alpha..-diol-9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxide was found to be a very potent complete carcinogen in newborn mice. It is possible that BP-7..beta.., 8..cap alpha..-diol-9..cap alpha.., 10..cap alpha..-epoxide is only a tumor initiator in which a promoting stimulus must be supplied for carcinogenic activity. A natural tumor promoting stimulus may be present in the newborn mouse. There is also a good correlation between the skin tumor initiating activities of the various BP metabolites and their mutagenic activity in the V79 mammalian cell mediated mutagenesis system.

  8. Cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis by modulating the tumor immune microenvironment in a 4T1 murine breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Liao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Local inflammation associated with solid tumors commonly results from factors released by tumor cells and the tumor stroma, and promotes tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts comprise a majority of the cells found in tumor stroma and are appealing targets for cancer therapy. Here, our aim was to determine the efficacy of targeting cancer associated fibroblasts for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts are key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment of a 4T1 murine model of metastatic breast cancer. Elimination of cancer associated fibroblasts in vivo by a DNA vaccine targeted to fibroblast activation protein results in a shift of the immune microenvironment from a Th2 to Th1 polarization. This shift is characterized by increased protein expression of IL-2 and IL-7, suppressed recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages, myeloid derived suppressor cells, T regulatory cells, and decreased tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Additionally, the vaccine improved anti-metastatic effects of doxorubicin chemotherapy and enhanced suppression of IL-6 and IL-4 protein expression while increasing recruitment of dendritic cells and CD8(+ T cells. Treatment with the combination therapy also reduced tumor-associated Vegf, Pdgfc, and GM-CSF mRNA and protein expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis through their role as key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment and are valid targets for therapy of metastatic breast cancer.

  9. Heterophilic chemokine receptor interactions in chemokine signaling and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramp, Birgit K; Sarabi, Alisina; Koenen, Rory R; Weber, Christian

    2011-03-10

    It is generally accepted that G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), like chemokine receptors, form dimers or higher order oligomers. Such homo- and heterophilic interactions have been identified not only among and between chemokine receptors of CC- or CXC-subfamilies, but also between chemokine receptors and other classes of GPCR, like the opioid receptors. Oligomerization affects different aspects of receptor physiology, like ligand affinity, signal transduction and the mode of internalization, in turn influencing physiologic processes such as cell activation and migration. As particular chemokine receptor pairs exert specific modulating effects on their individual functions, they might play particular roles in various disease types, such as cancer. Hence, chemokine receptor heteromers might represent attractive therapeutic targets. This review highlights the state-of-the-art knowledge on the technical and functional aspects of chemokine receptor multimerization in chemokine signaling and biology.

  10. Environmental Factors Impacting Bone-Relevant Chemokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin T.; Schneider, Andrew D.; Katchko, Karina M.; Yun, Chawon; Hsu, Erin L.

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines play an important role in normal bone physiology and the pathophysiology of many bone diseases. The recent increased focus on the individual roles of this class of proteins in the context of bone has shown that members of the two major chemokine subfamilies—CC and CXC—support or promote the formation of new bone and the remodeling of existing bone in response to a myriad of stimuli. These chemotactic molecules are crucial in orchestrating appropriate cellular homing, osteoblastogenesis, and osteoclastogenesis during normal bone repair. Bone healing is a complex cascade of carefully regulated processes, including inflammation, progenitor cell recruitment, differentiation, and remodeling. The extensive role of chemokines in these processes and the known links between environmental contaminants and chemokine expression/activity leaves ample opportunity for disruption of bone healing by environmental factors. However, despite increased clinical awareness, the potential impact of many of these environmental factors on bone-related chemokines is still ill defined. A great deal of focus has been placed on environmental exposure to various endocrine disruptors (bisphenol A, phthalate esters, etc.), volatile organic compounds, dioxins, and heavy metals, though mainly in other tissues. Awareness of the impact of other less well-studied bone toxicants, such as fluoride, mold and fungal toxins, asbestos, and chlorine, is also reviewed. In many cases, the literature on these toxins in osteogenic models is lacking. However, research focused on their effects in other tissues and cell lines provides clues for where future resources could be best utilized. This review aims to serve as a current and exhaustive resource detailing the known links between several classes of high-interest environmental pollutants and their interaction with the chemokines relevant to bone healing. PMID:28261155

  11. Flor-Essence? Herbal Tonic Promotes Mammary Tumor Development in Sprague Dawley Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, L; Montgomery, J; Steinberg, S; Kulp, K

    2004-01-28

    Background: Women who are diagnosed with breast cancer often self-administer complementary and alternative medicines to augment their conventional treatments, improve health, or prevent recurrence. Flor-Essence{reg_sign} Tonic is a complex mixture of herbal extracts used by cancer patients because of anecdotal evidence that it can treat or prevent disease. Methods: Female Sprague Dawley rats were given water or exposed to 3% or 6% Flor-Essence{reg_sign} beginning at one day of age. Mammary tumors were induced with a single oral 40 mg/kg/bw dose of dimethylbenz(a)anthracene at 50 days of age and sacrificed at 23 weeks. Rats were maintained on AIN-76A diet. Results: Control rats had palpable mammary tumor incidence of 51.0% at 19 weeks of age compared to 65.0% and 59.4% for the 3% and 6% Flor-Essence{reg_sign} groups respectively. Overall, no significant difference in time until first palpable tumor was detected among any of the groups. At necropsy, mammary tumor incidence was 82.5% for controls compared to 90.0% and 97.3% for rats consuming 3% and 6% Flor-Essence{reg_sign}, respectively. Mean mammary tumor multiplicity ({+-}SES) for the controls was 2.8 ({+-} 0.5) and statistically different from the 3% or 6% Flor- Essence{reg_sign} groups with 5.2 ({+-} 0.7), and 4.8 ({+-} 0.6), respectively (p{<=}0.01). As expected, the majority of isolated tumors were diagnosed as adenocarcinomas. Conclusions: Flor-Essence{reg_sign} can promote mammary tumor development in the Sprague Dawley rat model. This observation is contrary to widely available anecdotal evidence as well as the desire of the consumer that this commercially available herbal tonic will suppress and/or inhibit tumor growth.

  12. Increased expression of CYP4Z1 promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wei [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Chai, Hongyan [Center for Gene Diagnosis, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Xie, Xianfei; Zheng, Hao; Wang, Chenlong; Wang, Xue [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yang, Guifang [Department of Pathology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Cai, Xiaojun [Department of Ophthalmology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Falck, John R. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States); Yang, Jing, E-mail: yangjingliu@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4Z1, a novel CYP4 family member, is over-expressed in human mammary carcinoma and associated with high-grade tumors and poor prognosis. However, the precise role of CYP4Z1 in tumor progression is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer. Stable expression of CYP4Z1 in T47D and BT-474 human breast cancer cells significantly increased mRNA expression and production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, and decreased mRNA levels and secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), without affecting cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth in vitro. Notably, the conditioned medium from CYP4Z1-expressing cells enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and promoted angiogenesis in the zebrafish embryo and chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. In addition, there were lower levels of myristic acid and lauric acid, and higher contents of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in CYP4Z1-expressing T47D cells compared with vector control. CYP4Z1 overexpression significantly increased tumor weight and microvessel density by 2.6-fold and 1.9-fold in human tumor xenograft models, respectively. Moreover, CYP4Z1 transfection increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt, while PI3K or ERK inhibitors and siRNA silencing reversed CYP4Z1-mediated changes in VEGF-A and TIMP-2 expression. Conversely, HET0016, an inhibitor of the CYP4 family, potently inhibited the tumor-induced angiogenesis with associated changes in the intracellular levels of myristic acid, lauric acid and 20-HETE. Collectively, these data suggest that increased CYP4Z1 expression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer partly via PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 activation. -- Highlights: ► CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes human breast cancer growth and angiogenesis. ► The pro-angiogenic effects of CYP4Z1 have

  13. The miR-24-Bim pathway promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis in pancreatic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Haiyang; Wang, Xia; Zhou, Likun; Li, Hongli; Deng, Ting; Qu, Yanjun; Duan, Jingjing; Bai, Ming; Ge, Shaohua; Ning, Tao; Zhang, Le; Huang, Dingzhi; Ba, Yi

    2015-12-22

    miRNAs are a group of small RNAs that have been reported to play a key role at each stage of tumorigenesis and are believed to have future practical value. We now demonstrate that Bim, which stimulates cell apoptosis, is obviously down-regulated in pancreatic cancer (PaC) tissues and cell lines. And Bim-related miR-24 is significantly up-regulated in PaC. The repressed expression of Bim is proved to be a result of miR-24, thus promoting cell growth of both cancer and vascular cells, and accelerating vascular ring formation. By using mouse tumor model, we clearly showed that miR-24 promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by suppressing Bim expression in vivo. Therefore, a new pathway comprising miR-24 and Bim can be used in the exploration of drug-target therapy of PaC.

  14. Anti-tumor promoting effect of glycosides from Prunus persica seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Toshiyuki; Ito, Hideyuki; Mukainaka, Teruo; Tokuda, Harukuni; Nishino, Hoyoku; Yoshida, Takashi

    2003-02-01

    Four minor components, along with the major cyanogenic glycosides, amygdalin and prunasin, were isolated from Prunus persica seeds (Persicae Semen; Tounin), and characterized as mandelic acid glycosides (beta-gentiobioside and beta-D-glucoside) and benzyl alcohol glycosides (beta-gentiobioside and beta-D-glucoside). The anti-tumor promoting activity of these compounds was examined in both in vitro and in vivo assays. All of the compounds significantly inhibited the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation induced by tumor promoter. In addition, they produced a delay of two-stage carcinogenesis on mouse skin that was comparable in potency to (-)-epigallocatechin gallate from green tea. Structure-activity relationships indicated that a substituent at the benzylic position with glycosidic linkage affected the in vitro and in vivo activities with an order of enhancing potency, CN

  15. The potential role of natural tumor promoters in marine turtle fibropapillomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsberg, J.H.; Balazs, G.H.; Steidinger, K.A.; Baden, D.G.; Work, T.M.; Russel, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    Fibropapillomatosis (FP) in green turtles Chelonia mydas is a debilitating, neoplastic disease that has reached worldwide epizootic levels. The etiology of FP is unknown but has been linked to oncogenic viruses. Toxic benthic dinoflagellates (Prorocentrum spp.) are not typically considered tumorigenic agents, yet they have a worldwide distribution and produce a tumor promoter, okadaic acid (OA). Prorocentrum spp. are epiphytic on macroalgae and seagrasses that are normal components of green turtle diets. Here we show that green turtles in the Hawaiian Islands consume Prorocentrum and that high-risk FP areas are associated with areas where P. lima and P. concavum are both highly prevalent and abundant. The presence of presumptive OA in the tissues of Hawaiian green turtles further suggests exposure and a potential role for this tumor promoter in the etiology of FP.

  16. Laser Therapy Inhibits Tumor Growth in Mice by Promoting Immune Surveillance and Vessel Normalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Ottaviani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser therapy, recently renamed as photobiomodulation, stands as a promising supportive treatment for oral mucositis induced by oncological therapies. However, its mechanisms of action and, more importantly, its safety in cancer patients, are still unclear. Here we explored the anti-cancer effect of 3 laser protocols, set at the most commonly used wavelengths, in B16F10 melanoma and oral carcinogenesis mouse models. While laser light increased cell metabolism in cultured cells, the in vivo outcome was reduced tumor progression. This striking, unexpected result, was paralleled by the recruitment of immune cells, in particular T lymphocytes and dendritic cells, which secreted type I interferons. Laser light also reduced the number of highly angiogenic macrophages within the tumor mass and promoted vessel normalization, an emerging strategy to control tumor progression. Collectively, these results set photobiomodulation as a safety procedure in oncological patients and open the way to its innovative use for cancer therapy.

  17. CD73-Generated Adenosine: Orchestrating the Tumor-Stroma Interplay to Promote Cancer Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Allard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the coming of age of cancer immunotherapy, clinical benefits are still modest. An important barrier to successful cancer immunotherapy is that tumors employ a number of mechanisms to facilitate immune escape, including the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, the recruitment of regulatory immune subsets, and the production of immunosuppressive metabolites. Significant therapeutic opportunity exists in targeting these immunosuppressive pathways. One such immunosuppressive pathway is the production of extracellular adenosine by CD73, an ectonucleotidase overexpressed in various types of cancer. We hereafter review the biology of CD73 and its role in cancer progression and metastasis. We describe the role of extracellular adenosine in promoting tumor growth through paracrine and autocrine action on tumor cells, endothelial cells, and immune cells.

  18. Tumor-protective and tumor-promoting actions of dietary whey proteins in an N-methyl-N-nitrosourea model of rat mammary carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Renea R; Till, S Reneé; Frank, Julie A; Badger, Thomas M; Korourian, Sohelia; Simmen, Frank A; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2006-01-01

    The mammary tumor-protective effects of dietary factors are considered to be mediated by multiple signaling pathways, consistent with the heterogeneous nature of the disease and the distinct genetic profiles of tumors arising from diverse mammary cell populations. In a 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced model of carcinogenesis, we showed previously that female Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to AIN-93G diet containing whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) beginning at gestation Day 4 had reduced tumor incidence than those exposed to diet containing casein (CAS), due partly to increased mammary differentiation and reduced activity of phase I metabolic enzymes. Here, we evaluated the tumor-protective effects of these same dietary proteins to the direct-acting carcinogen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (NMU). We found that lifetime exposure to WPH, relative to CAS, decreased mammary tumor incidence and prolonged the appearance of tumors in NMU-treated female rats, with no corresponding effects on tumor multiplicity. At 115 days post-NMU, histologically normal mammary glands from WPH-fed tumor-bearing rats had increased gene expression for the tumor suppressor BRCA1 and the differentiation marker kappa-casein than those of CAS-fed tumor-bearing rats. Tumor-bearing rats from the WPH group had more advanced tumors, with a greater incidence of invasive ductal carcinoma than ductal carcinoma in situ and higher serum C-peptide levels than corresponding rats fed CAS. WPH-fed tumor-bearing rats were also heavier after NMU administration than CAS tumor-bearing rats, although no correlation was noted between body weight and C-peptide levels for either diet group. Results demonstrate the context-dependent tumor-protective and tumor-promoting effects of WPH; provide support for distinct signaling pathways underlying dietary effects on development of mammary carcinoma; and raise provocative questions on the role of diet in altering the prognosis of existing breast tumors.

  19. EGFR-STAT3 signaling promotes formation of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jianqiang; Deanna M. Patmore; Jousma, Edwin; Eaves, David W.; Breving, Kimberly; Patel, Ami V.; Schwartz, Eric B.; Fuchs, James R.; Cripe, Timothy P.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Ratner, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) develop sporadically or in the context of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). EGFR overexpression has been implicated in MPNST formation, but its precise role and relevant signaling pathways remain unknown. We found that EGFR overexpression promotes mouse neurofibroma transformation to aggressive MPNST (GEM-PNST). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated phosphorylated STAT3 (Tyr705) in both human MPNST and mouse GEM-PNST. A specific JAK2/STAT3 inhibitor...

  20. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurayoshi, Kenta [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Ozono, Eiko [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary, University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus, 12800 East 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Komori, Hideyuki [Center for Stem Cell Biology, Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ohtani, Kiyoshi, E-mail: btm88939@kwansei.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • ARF promoter showed higher responsiveness to deregulated E2F activity than the E2F1 promoter. • ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specificity than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. • HSV-TK driven by ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity than that driven by E2F1 promoter. - Abstract: In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter

  1. ROCK signaling promotes collagen remodeling to facilitate invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumor cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Nicola; Morton, Jennifer P; Julian, Linda; Helbig, Lena; Kadir, Shereen; McGhee, Ewan J; Anderson, Kurt I; Kalna, Gabriela; Mullin, Margaret; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Samuel, Michael S; Olson, Michael F

    2017-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a major cause of cancer death; identifying PDAC enablers may reveal potential therapeutic targets. Expression of the actomyosin regulatory ROCK1 and ROCK2 kinases increased with tumor progression in human and mouse pancreatic tumors, while elevated ROCK1/ROCK2 expression in human patients, or conditional ROCK2 activation in a Kras(G12D)/p53(R172H) mouse PDAC model, was associated with reduced survival. Conditional ROCK1 or ROCK2 activation promoted invasive growth of mouse PDAC cells into three-dimensional collagen matrices by increasing matrix remodeling activities. RNA sequencing revealed a coordinated program of ROCK-induced genes that facilitate extracellular matrix remodeling, with greatest fold-changes for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) Mmp10 and Mmp13 MMP inhibition not only decreased collagen degradation and invasion, but also reduced proliferation in three-dimensional contexts. Treatment of Kras(G12D)/p53(R172H) PDAC mice with a ROCK inhibitor prolonged survival, which was associated with increased tumor-associated collagen. These findings reveal an ancillary role for increased ROCK signaling in pancreatic cancer progression to promote extracellular matrix remodeling that facilitates proliferation and invasive tumor growth.

  2. SIRT6 Depletion Suppresses Tumor Growth by Promoting Cellular Senescence Induced by DNA Damage in HCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Namgyu; Ryu, Hye Guk; Kwon, Jung-Hee; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Kim, Sae Rom; Wang, Hee Jung; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2016-01-01

    The role of Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in liver cancer remains controversial. Thus, we identified the specific role of SIRT6 in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). SIRT6 expression was significantly higher in HCC cell lines and HCC tissues from 138 patients than in an immortalized hepatocyte cell line, THLE-2 and non-tumor tissues, respectively. SIRT6 knockdown by shRNA suppressed the growth of HCC cells and inhibited HCC tumor growth in vivo. In addition, SIRT6 silencing significantly prevented the growth of HCC cell lines by inducing cellular senescence in the p16/Rb- and p53/p21-pathway independent manners. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of genes involved in nucleosome assembly was apparently altered in SIRT6-depleted Hep3B cells. SIRT6 knockdown promoted G2/M phase arrest and downregulation of genes encoding histone variants associated with nucleosome assembly, which could be attributed to DNA damage. Taken together, our findings suggest that SIRT6 acts as a tumor promoter by preventing DNA damage and cellular senescence, indicating that SIRT6 represents a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of HCC. PMID:27824900

  3. Induction of megakaryocytic colony-stimulating activity in mouse skin by inflammatory agents and tumor promoters

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    Clark, D.A.; Dessypris, E.N.; Koury, M.J.

    1987-03-01

    The production of megakaryocytic colony-stimulating activity (MEG-CSA) was assayed in acetic acid extracts of skin from mice topically treated with inflammatory and tumor-promoting agents. A rapid induction of MEG-CSA was found in skin treated both with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a strong tumor promoter, and with mezerein, a weak tumor promoter, but no induction was found in untreated skin. The time course of induction of MEG-CSA following treatment of skin with PMA or mezerein was very similar to that previously demonstrated for the induction of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating activity in mouse skin by these agents. The induced MEG-CSA was found in both the epidermis and the dermis. Pretreatment of the skin with US -methasone abrogated the MEG-CSA induction. The cell number response curve suggests that the MEG-CSA acts directly on the progenitor cells of the megakaryocyte colonies. That topical administration of diterpene esters results in the rapid, local induction of MEG-CSA which can be blocked by US -methasone pretreatment suggests a mechanism for the thrombocytosis associated with some inflammatory states. The indirect action in which diterpene esters induce in certain cells the production or release of growth regulatory factors for other cell types may also aid in understanding their carcinogenic properties.

  4. FGFR2 promotes breast tumorigenicity through maintenance of breast tumor-initiating cells.

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    Sungeun Kim

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that some cancers contain a population of stem-like TICs (tumor-initiating cells and eliminating TICs may offer a new strategy to develop successful anti-cancer therapies. As molecular mechanisms underlying the maintenance of the TIC pool are poorly understood, the development of TIC-specific therapeutics remains a major challenge. We first identified and characterized TICs and non-TICs isolated from a mouse breast cancer model. TICs displayed increased tumorigenic potential, self-renewal, heterogeneous differentiation, and bipotency. Gene expression analysis and immunostaining of TICs and non-TICs revealed that FGFR2 was preferentially expressed in TICs. Loss of FGFR2 impaired self-renewal of TICs, thus resulting in marked decreases in the TIC population and tumorigenic potential. Restoration of FGFR2 rescued the defects in TIC pool maintenance, bipotency, and breast tumor growth driven by FGFR2 knockdown. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of FGFR2 kinase activity led to a decrease in the TIC population which resulted in suppression of breast tumor growth. Moreover, human breast TICs isolated from patient tumor samples were found enriched in a FGFR2+ population that was sufficient to initiate tumor growth. Our data suggest that FGFR2 is essential in sustaining the breast TIC pool through promotion of self-renewal and maintenance of bipotent TICs, and raise the possibility of FGFR2 inhibition as a strategy for anti-cancer therapy by eradicating breast TICs.

  5. Hypoxia-induced down-modulation of PKCepsilon promotes trail-mediated apoptosis of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, Giuliana; Masselli, Elena; Micheloni, Cristina; Nouvenne, Antonio; Russo, Domenico; Santi, Patrizia; Matteucci, Alessandro; Cocco, Lucio; Vitale, Marco; Mirandola, Prisco

    2010-09-01

    Tumor oxygen status is considered as a prognostic marker that impacts on malignant progression and outcome of tumor therapy. TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) plays a key role in cancer immunity, with potential applications in cancer therapy. Protein kinase C (PKC)epsilon, a transforming oncogene, has a role in the protection of cardiomyocytes and neurons from hypoxia-induced damage while, it can also modulate the susceptibility of tumor cells to TRAIL-induced cell death. Here we demonstrate that hypoxia induces a tumor cell phenotype highly sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of TRAIL. Based on the observation that: i) PKCepsilon expression levels are impaired during hypoxia, ii) the overexpression of PKCepsilon, but not of a kinase-inactive PKCepsilon mutant, is able to revert the hypoxia-induced sensitivity to TRAIL, iii) the down-modulation of PKCepsilon levels by RNA interference, on the contrary, induces the highly TRAIL-sensitive phenotype, iv) the inhibition of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) by specific siRNA blocks both the hypoxia-induced down-modulation of PKCepsilon and the induction of the highly TRAIL-sensitive phenotype; we conclude that the HIF-1alpha upregulation during hypoxia is associated to PKCepsilon down-modulation that likely represents the key molecular event promoting the apoptogenic effects of TRAIL in hypoxic tumor cells.

  6. Rnd3 in Cancer: A Review of the Evidence for Tumor Promoter or Suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paysan, Lisa; Piquet, Léo; Saltel, Frédéric; Moreau, Violaine

    2016-11-01

    Rho-GTPases are members of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases and are general modulators of important cellular processes in tumor biology such as migration and proliferation. Among these proteins, Rnd3/RhoE, an atypical Rho-GTPase devoid of GTP hydrolytic activity, has recently been studied for its putative role in tumorigenesis. Indeed, Rnd3 is implicated in processes, such as proliferation and migration, whose deregulation is linked to cancer development and metastasis. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the data surrounding Rnd3 deregulation in cancers, its origin, and consequences. Presented here is a comprehensive account of the expression status and biological output obtained in prostate, liver, stomach, colon, lung, and brain cancers as well as in melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Although there appears to be no general consensus about Rnd3 expression in cancers as this protein is differently altered according to the tumor context, these alterations overwhelmingly favor a protumorigenic role. Thus, depending on the tumor type, it may behave either as a tumor suppressor or as a tumor promoter. Importantly, the deregulation of Rnd3, in most cases, is linked to patient poor outcome.

  7. Methylglyoxal-Mediated Stress Correlates with High Metabolic Activity and Promotes Tumor Growth in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavarina, Barbara; Nokin, Marie-Julie; Bellier, Justine; Durieux, Florence; Bletard, Noëlla; Sherer, Félicie; Lovinfosse, Pierre; Peulen, Olivier; Verset, Laurine; Dehon, Romain; Demetter, Pieter; Turtoi, Andrei; Uchida, Koji; Goldman, Serge; Hustinx, Roland; Delvenne, Philippe; Castronovo, Vincent; Bellahcène, Akeila

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells generally rely on aerobic glycolysis as a major source of energy. Methylglyoxal (MG), a dicarbonyl compound that is produced as a side product during glycolysis, is highly reactive and induces the formation of advanced glycation end-products that are implicated in several pathologies including cancer. All mammalian cells have an enzymatic defense against MG composed by glyoxalases GLO1 and GLO2 that converts MG to d-lactate. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequently occurring cancers with high morbidity and mortality. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry to examine the level of MG protein adducts, in a series of 102 CRC human tumors divided into four clinical stages. We consistently detected a high level of MG adducts and low GLO1 activity in high stage tumors compared to low stage ones suggesting a pro-tumor role for dicarbonyl stress. Accordingly, GLO1 depletion in CRC cells promoted tumor growth in vivo that was efficiently reversed using carnosine, a potent MG scavenger. Our study represents the first demonstration that MG adducts accumulation is a consistent feature of high stage CRC tumors. Our data point to MG production and detoxification levels as an important molecular link between exacerbated glycolytic activity and CRC progression. PMID:28117708

  8. Deregulated SLC2A1 Promotes Tumor Cell Proliferation and Metastasis in Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyan Yan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer (GC is one of the common reasons of cancer-related death with few biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis. Solute carrier family 2 (facilitated glucose transporter member 1 protein SLC2A1, also known as glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT1, has been associated with tumor progression, metastasis, and poor prognosis in many human solid tumors. However, little is reported about its clinical significance and biological functions in GC. Here we observed a strong up-regulation of SLC2A1 in patients with GC and found that SLC2A1 was significantly correlated with depth of invasion and clinical stage. Additionally, over-expression of SLC2A1 in GC cells promotes cellular proliferation and metastasis in vitro and enhances tumor growth in vivo as well as enhancement of glucose utilization. Meanwhile, elevated SLC2A1 also contributes to tumor metastasis in vitro. Our results indicate SLC2A1 exhibits a pivotal role in tumor growth, metastasis and glucose metabolism, and also suggest SLC2A1 as a promising target for gastric cancer therapy.

  9. Disruption of lysosome function promotes tumor growth and metastasis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Congwu; Zhu, Huanhu; Han, Min; Zhuang, Yuan; Wu, Xiaohui; Xu, Tian

    2010-07-09

    Lysosome function is essential to many physiological processes. It has been suggested that deregulation of lysosome function could contribute to cancer. Through a genetic screen in Drosophila, we have discovered that mutations disrupting lysosomal degradation pathway components contribute to tumor development and progression. Loss-of-function mutations in the Class C vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) gene, deep orange (dor), dramatically promote tumor overgrowth and invasion of the Ras(V12) cells. Knocking down either of the two other components of the Class C VPS complex, carnation (car) and vps16A, also renders Ras(V12) cells capable for uncontrolled growth and metastatic behavior. Finally, chemical disruption of the lysosomal function by feeding animals with antimalarial drugs, chloroquine or monensin, leads to malignant tumor growth of the Ras(V12) cells. Taken together, our data provide evidence for a causative role of lysosome dysfunction in tumor growth and invasion and indicate that members of the Class C VPS complex behave as tumor suppressors.

  10. ACKR2: An Atypical Chemokine Receptor Regulating Lymphatic Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavita, Ornella; Mollica Poeta, Valeria; Setten, Elisa; Massara, Matteo; Bonecchi, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in the induction of the immune response by transporting antigens, inflammatory mediators, and leukocytes from peripheral tissues to draining lymph nodes. It is emerging that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are playing an active role in this context via the expression of chemokines, inflammatory mediators promoting cell migration, and chemokine receptors. Particularly, LECs express atypical chemokine receptors (ACKRs), which are unable to promote conventional signaling and cell migration while they are involved in the regulation of chemokine availability. Here, we provide a summary of the data on the role of ACKR2 expressed by lymphatics, indicating an essential role for this ACKRs in the regulation of the inflammation and the immune response in different pathological conditions, including infection, allergy, and cancer. PMID:28123388

  11. Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase β (LPAATβ promotes the tumor growth of human osteosarcoma.

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    Farbod Rastegar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of bone with poorly characterized molecular pathways important in its pathogenesis. Increasing evidence indicates that elevated lipid biosynthesis is a characteristic feature of cancer. We sought to investigate the role of lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase β (LPAATβ, aka, AGPAT2 in regulating the proliferation and growth of human osteosarcoma cells. LPAATβ can generate phosphatidic acid, which plays a key role in lipid biosynthesis as well as in cell proliferation and survival. Although elevated expression of LPAATβ has been reported in several types of human tumors, the role of LPAATβ in osteosarcoma progression has yet to be elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Endogenous expression of LPAATβ in osteosarcoma cell lines is analyzed by using semi-quantitative PCR and immunohistochemical staining. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of LPAATβ and silencing LPAATβ expression is employed to determine the effect of LPAATβ on osteosarcoma cell proliferation and migration in vitro and osteosarcoma tumor growth in vivo. We have found that expression of LPAATβ is readily detected in 8 of the 10 analyzed human osteosarcoma lines. Exogenous expression of LPAATβ promotes osteosarcoma cell proliferation and migration, while silencing LPAATβ expression inhibits these cellular characteristics. We further demonstrate that exogenous expression of LPAATβ effectively promotes tumor growth, while knockdown of LPAATβ expression inhibits tumor growth in an orthotopic xenograft model of human osteosarcoma. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results strongly suggest that LPAATβ expression may be associated with the aggressive phenotypes of human osteosarcoma and that LPAATβ may play an important role in regulating osteosarcoma cell proliferation and tumor growth. Thus, targeting LPAATβ may be exploited as a novel therapeutic strategy for the clinical management of osteosarcoma. This

  12. The promotion of tumor metastasis by surgery and stress: immunological basis and implications for psychoneuroimmunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar

    2003-02-01

    This mini-review emphasizes a psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) perspective of the hypothesis that stress and surgical excision of the primary tumor can promote tumor metastasis. It first establishes the empirical and theoretical basis for control of metastasis by cell-mediated immunity (CMI), as well as the interactive role of non-immunological risk factors. It then describes the various aspects of surgery that suppress CMI, and the neuroendocrine mechanisms mediating suppression by stress and surgery. Last, it briefly reviews the empirical evidence, from animal and human studies, for the promotion of metastasis by stress and surgery, with specific reference to the mediating role of CMI. It is concluded that: (a) Immunological mechanisms most likely play a role in limiting metastasis in patients with solid tumors. (b) Immunosuppression can be deleterious, especially when surgery is conducted early, before the tumor develops insurmountable mechanisms to escape immune destruction. (c) The most sensitive period for the establishment of metastases is the immediate aftermath of surgery. Interventions aiming at reducing stress and immunosuppression should thus strive to start beforehand. (d) 'Psychological and physiological insults activate similar neuroendocrine mechanisms of immunosuppression. Therefore, a multimodal therapeutic approach should be used to prevent tumor metastasis during the perioperative period. (e) Studies employing interventions aimed at reducing the surgical stress response should preferably assess immunological indices with an established clinical relevance, and follow up long-term recurrence provided sample size assure statistical power. (f) The progress toward earlier detection of cancer, and our growing understanding of immunosuppression, continuously improves the chances for successful PNI interventions.

  13. Teleost Chemokines and Their Receptors

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    Steve Bird

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a superfamily of cytokines that appeared about 650 million years ago, at the emergence of vertebrates, and are responsible for regulating cell migration under both inflammatory and physiological conditions. The first teleost chemokine gene was reported in rainbow trout in 1998. Since then, numerous chemokine genes have been identified in diverse fish species evidencing the great differences that exist among fish and mammalian chemokines, and within the different fish species, as a consequence of extensive intrachromosomal gene duplications and different infectious experiences. Subsequently, it has only been possible to establish clear homologies with mammalian chemokines in the case of some chemokines with well-conserved homeostatic roles, whereas the functionality of other chemokine genes will have to be independently addressed in each species. Despite this, functional studies have only been undertaken for a few of these chemokine genes. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of chemokine biology in teleost fish. We have mainly focused on those species for which more research efforts have been made in this subject, specially zebrafish (Danio rerio, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, outlining which genes have been identified thus far, highlighting the most important aspects of their expression regulation and addressing any known aspects of their biological role in immunity. Finally, we summarise what is known about the chemokine receptors in teleosts and provide some analysis using recently available data to help characterise them more clearly.

  14. Exposures in early life: associations with DNA promoter methylation in breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, M-H; Marian, C; Shields, P G; Potischman, N; Nie, J; Krishnan, S S; Berry, D L; Kallakury, B V; Ambrosone, C; Edge, S B; Trevisan, M; Winston, J; Freudenheim, J L

    2013-04-01

    There is evidence that epigenetic changes occur early in breast carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that early-life exposures associated with breast cancer would be associated with epigenetic alterations in breast tumors. In particular, we examined DNA methylation patterns in breast tumors in association with several early-life exposures in a population-based case-control study. Promoter methylation of E-cadherin, p16 and RAR-β2 genes was assessed in archived tumor blocks from 803 cases with real-time methylation-specific PCR. Unconditional logistic regression was used for case-case comparisons of those with and without promoter methylation. We found no differences in the prevalence of DNA methylation of the individual genes by age at menarche, age at first live birth and weight at age 20. In case-case comparisons of premenopausal breast cancer, lower birth weight was associated with increased likelihood of E-cadherin promoter methylation (OR = 2.79, 95% CI, 1.15-6.82, for ⩽2.5 v. 2.6-2.9 kg); higher adult height with RAR-β2 methylation (OR = 3.34, 95% CI, 1.19-9.39, for ⩾1.65 v. <1.60 m); and not having been breastfed with p16 methylation (OR = 2.75, 95% CI, 1.14-6.62). Among postmenopausal breast cancers, birth order was associated with increased likelihood of p16 promoter methylation. Being other than first in the birth order was inversely associated with likelihood of ⩾1 of the three genes being methylated for premenopausal breast cancers, but positively associated with methylation in postmenopausal women. These results suggest that there may be alterations in methylation associated with early-life exposures that persist into adulthood and affect breast cancer risk.

  15. The commonly used antimicrobial additive triclosan is a liver tumor promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Mei-Fei; Taniguchi, Koji; Chen, Shujuan; Evans, Ronald M; Hammock, Bruce D; Karin, Michael; Tukey, Robert H

    2014-12-02

    Triclosan [5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol; TCS] is a synthetic, broad-spectrum antibacterial chemical used in a wide range of consumer products including soaps, cosmetics, therapeutics, and plastics. The general population is exposed to TCS because of its prevalence in a variety of daily care products as well as through waterborne contamination. TCS is linked to a multitude of health and environmental effects, ranging from endocrine disruption and impaired muscle contraction to effects on aquatic ecosystems. We discovered that TCS was capable of stimulating liver cell proliferation and fibrotic responses, accompanied by signs of oxidative stress. Through a reporter screening assay with an array of nuclear xenobiotic receptors (XenoRs), we found that TCS activates the nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and, contrary to previous reports, has no significant effect on mouse peroxisome proliferation activating receptor α (PPARα). Using the procarcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN) to initiate tumorigenesis in mice, we discovered that TCS substantially accelerates hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development, acting as a liver tumor promoter. TCS-treated mice exhibited a large increase in tumor multiplicity, size, and incidence compared with control mice. TCS-mediated liver regeneration and fibrosis preceded HCC development and may constitute the primary tumor-promoting mechanism through which TCS acts. These findings strongly suggest there are adverse health effects in mice with long-term TCS exposure, especially on enhancing liver fibrogenesis and tumorigenesis, and the relevance of TCS liver toxicity to humans should be evaluated.

  16. Disrupting circadian homeostasis of sympathetic signaling promotes tumor development in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell proliferation in all rapidly renewing mammalian tissues follows a circadian rhythm that is often disrupted in advanced-stage tumors. Epidemiologic studies have revealed a clear link between disruption of circadian rhythms and cancer development in humans. Mice lacking the circadian genes Period1 and 2 (Per or Cryptochrome1 and 2 (Cry are deficient in cell cycle regulation and Per2 mutant mice are cancer-prone. However, it remains unclear how circadian rhythm in cell proliferation is generated in vivo and why disruption of circadian rhythm may lead to tumorigenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice lacking Per1 and 2, Cry1 and 2, or one copy of Bmal1, all show increased spontaneous and radiation-induced tumor development. The neoplastic growth of Per-mutant somatic cells is not controlled cell-autonomously but is dependent upon extracellular mitogenic signals. Among the circadian output pathways, the rhythmic sympathetic signaling plays a key role in the central-peripheral timing mechanism that simultaneously activates the cell cycle clock via AP1-controlled Myc induction and p53 via peripheral clock-controlled ATM activation. Jet-lag promptly desynchronizes the central clock-SNS-peripheral clock axis, abolishes the peripheral clock-dependent ATM activation, and activates myc oncogenic potential, leading to tumor development in the same organ systems in wild-type and circadian gene-mutant mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Tumor suppression in vivo is a clock-controlled physiological function. The central circadian clock paces extracellular mitogenic signals that drive peripheral clock-controlled expression of key cell cycle and tumor suppressor genes to generate a circadian rhythm in cell proliferation. Frequent disruption of circadian rhythm is an important tumor promoting factor.

  17. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2016-05-17

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

  18. Yes-associated protein 1 is widely expressed in human brain tumors and promotes glioblastoma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Brent A; Bai, Haibo; Odia, Yazmin; Jain, Deepali; Anders, Robert A; Eberhart, Charles G

    2011-07-01

    The hippo pathway and its downstream mediator yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) regulate mammalian organ size in part through modulating progenitor cell numbers. YAP1 has also been implicated as an oncogene in multiple human cancers. Currently, little is known about the expression of YAP1 either in normal human brain tissue or in central nervous system neoplasms. We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate nuclear YAP1 expression in the fetal and normal adult human brains and in 264 brain tumors. YAP1 was expressed in fetal and adult brain regions known to harbor neural progenitor cells, but there was little YAP1 immunoreactivity in the adult cerebral cortex. YAP1 protein was also readily detected in the nuclei of human brain tumors. In medulloblastoma, the expression varied between histologic subtypes and was most prominent in nodular/desmoplastic tumors. In gliomas, it was frequently expressed in infiltrating astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas but rarely in pilocytic astrocytomas. Using a loss-of-function approach, we show that YAP1 promoted growth of glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. High levels of YAP1 messenger RNA expression were associated with aggressive molecular subsets of glioblastoma and with a nonsignificant trend toward reduced mean survival in human astrocytoma patients. These findings suggest that YAP1 may play an important role in normal human brain development and that it could represent a new target in human brain tumors.

  19. PERK promotes cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth by limiting oxidative DNA damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrovnikova-Marjon, Ekaterina; Grigoriadou, Christina; Pytel, Dariusz; Zhang, Fang; Ye, Jiangbin; Koumenis, Constantinos; Cavener, Douglas; Diehl, J. Alan

    2010-01-01

    In order to proliferate and expand in an environment with limited nutrients, cancer cells co-opt cellular regulatory pathways that facilitate adaptation and thereby maintain tumor growth and survival potential. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is uniquely positioned to sense nutrient deprivation stress and subsequently engage signaling pathways that promote adaptive strategies. As such, components of the ER stress-signaling pathway represent potential anti-neoplastic targets. However, recent investigations into the role of the ER resident protein kinase PERK have paradoxically suggested both pro- and anti-tumorigenic properties. We have utilized animal models of mammary carcinoma to interrogate PERK contribution in the neoplastic process. The ablation of PERK in tumor cells resulted in impaired regeneration of intracellular antioxidants and accumulation of reactive oxygen species triggering oxidative DNA damage. Ultimately, PERK deficiency impeded progression through the cell cycle due to the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint. Our data reveal that PERK-dependent signaling is utilized during both tumor initiation and expansion to maintain redox homeostasis and thereby facilitates tumor growth. PMID:20453876

  20. PERK promotes cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth by limiting oxidative DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrovnikova-Marjon, E; Grigoriadou, C; Pytel, D; Zhang, F; Ye, J; Koumenis, C; Cavener, D; Diehl, J A

    2010-07-01

    To proliferate and expand in an environment with limited nutrients, cancer cells co-opt cellular regulatory pathways that facilitate adaptation and thereby maintain tumor growth and survival potential. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is uniquely positioned to sense nutrient deprivation stress and subsequently engage signaling pathways that promote adaptive strategies. As such, components of the ER stress-signaling pathway represent potential antineoplastic targets. However, recent investigations into the role of the ER resident protein kinase, RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) have paradoxically suggested both pro- and anti-tumorigenic properties. We have used animal models of mammary carcinoma to interrogate the contribution of PERK in the neoplastic process. The ablation of PERK in tumor cells resulted in impaired regeneration of intracellular antioxidants and accumulation of reactive oxygen species triggering oxidative DNA damage. Ultimately, PERK deficiency impeded progression through the cell cycle because of the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint. Our data reveal that PERK-dependent signaling is used during both tumor initiation and expansion to maintain redox homeostasis, thereby facilitating tumor growth.

  1. Glioma cancer stem cells secrete Gremlin1 to promote their maintenance within the tumor hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kenneth; Wu, Qiulian; Yan, Diana H; Lee, Christine H; Rahim, Nasiha; Tritschler, Isabel; DeVecchio, Jennifer; Kalady, Matthew F; Hjelmeland, Anita B; Rich, Jeremy N

    2014-05-15

    Glioblastomas are the most prevalent and lethal primary brain tumor and are comprised of hierarchies with self-renewing cancer stem cells (CSCs) at the apex. Like neural stem cells (NSCs), CSCs reside in functional niches that provide essential cues to maintain the cellular hierarchy. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) instruct NSCs to adopt an astrocyte fate and are proposed as anti-CSC therapies to induce differentiation, but, paradoxically, tumors express high levels of BMPs. Here we demonstrate that the BMP antagonist Gremlin1 is specifically expressed by CSCs as protection from endogenous BMPs. Gremlin1 colocalizes with CSCs in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, Gremlin1 blocks prodifferentiation effects of BMPs, and overexpression of Gremlin1 in non-CSCs decreases their endogenous BMP signaling to promote stem-like features. Consequently, Gremlin1-overexpressing cells display increased growth and tumor formation abilities. Targeting Gremlin1 in CSCs results in impaired growth and self-renewal. Transcriptional profiling demonstrated that Gremlin1 effects were associated with inhibition of p21(WAF1/CIP1), a key CSC signaling node. This study establishes CSC-derived Gremlin1 as a driving force in maintaining glioblastoma tumor proliferation and glioblastoma hierarchies through the modulation of endogenous prodifferentiation signals.

  2. Inhibition of DNA methylation promotes breast tumor sensitivity to netrin-1 interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandin, Mélodie; Mathot, Pauline; Devailly, Guillaume; Bidet, Yannick; Ghantous, Akram; Favrot, Clementine; Gibert, Benjamin; Gadot, Nicolas; Puisieux, Isabelle; Herceg, Zdenko; Delcros, Jean-Guy; Bernet, Agnès; Mehlen, Patrick; Dante, Robert

    2016-08-01

    In a number of human cancers, NTN1 upregulation inhibits apoptosis induced by its so-called dependence receptors DCC and UNC5H, thus promoting tumor progression. In other cancers however, the selective inhibition of this dependence receptor death pathway relies on the silencing of pro-apoptotic effector proteins. We show here that a substantial fraction of human breast tumors exhibits simultaneous DNA methylation-dependent loss of expression of NTN1 and of DAPK1, a serine threonine kinase known to transduce the netrin-1 dependence receptor pro-apoptotic pathway. The inhibition of DNA methylation by drugs such as decitabine restores the expression of both NTN1 and DAPK1 in netrin-1-low cancer cells. Furthermore, a combination of decitabine with NTN1 silencing strategies or with an anti-netrin-1 neutralizing antibody potentiates tumor cell death and efficiently blocks tumor growth in different animal models. Thus, combining DNA methylation inhibitors with netrin-1 neutralizing agents may be a valuable strategy for combating cancer.

  3. Rapamycin Promotes Mouse 4T1 Tumor Metastasis that Can Be Reversed by a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tien-Jen; Liang, Wen-Miin; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; M S, Pradeep; Wei, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Yin, Shu-Yi; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of tumor metastasis is a key strategy for successful cancer interventions. Previous studies indicated that rapamycin (sirolimus) may promote tumor regression activity or enhance immune response against tumor targets. However, rapamycin also exhibits immunosuppressant effects and is hence used clinically as an organ transplantation drug. We hypothesized that the immunosuppressive activities of rapamycin might also negatively mediate host immunity, resulting in promotion of tumor metastasis. In this study, the effects of rapamycin and phytochemical shikonin were investigated in vitro and in vivo in a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor model through quantitative assessment of immunogenic cell death (ICD), autophagy, tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-bearing mice were immunized with test vaccines to monitor their effect on tumor metastasis. We found that intraperitoneal (ip) administration of rapamycin after a tumor-resection surgery drastically increased the metastatic activity of 4T1 tumors. Possible correlation of this finding to human cancers was suggested by epidemiological analysis of data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Since our previous studies showed that modified tumor cell lysate (TCL)-pulsed, dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines can effectively suppress metastasis in mouse tumor models, we assessed whether such vaccines may help offset this rapamycin-promoted metastasis. We observed that shikonin efficiently induced ICD of 4T1 cells in culture, and DC vaccines pulsed with shikonin-treated TCL (SK-TCL-DC) significantly suppressed rapamycin-enhanced metastasis and Treg cell expansion in test mice. In conclusion, rapamycin treatment in mice (and perhaps in humans) promotes metastasis and the effect may be offset by treatment with a DC-based cancer vaccine.

  4. Soft matrices downregulate FAK activity to promote growth of tumor-repopulating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Youhua; Wood, Adam Richard; Jia, Qiong; Zhou, Wenwen; Luo, Junyu; Yang, Fang; Chen, Junwei; Chen, Junjian; Sun, Jian; Seong, Jihye; Tajik, Arash; Singh, Rishi; Wang, Ning

    2017-01-29

    Tumor-repopulating cells (TRCs) are a tumorigenic sub-population of cancer cells that drives tumorigenesis. We have recently reported that soft fibrin matrices maintain TRC growth by promoting histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9) demethylation and Sox2 expression and that Cdc42 expression influences H3K9 methylation. However, the underlying mechanisms of how soft matrices induce H3K9 demethylation remain elusive. Here we find that TRCs exhibit lower focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and H3K9 methylation levels in soft fibrin matrices than control melanoma cells on 2D rigid substrates. Silencing FAK in control melanoma cells decreases H3K9 methylation, whereas overexpressing FAK in tumor-repopulating cells enhances H3K9 methylation. Overexpressing Cdc42 or RhoA in the presence of FAK knockdown restores H3K9 methylation levels. Importantly, silencing FAK, Cdc42, or RhoA promotes Sox2 expression and proliferation of control melanoma cells in stiff fibrin matrices, whereas overexpressing each gene suppresses Sox2 expression and reduces growth of TRCs in soft but not in stiff fibrin matrices. Our findings suggest that low FAK mediated by soft fibrin matrices downregulates H3K9 methylation through reduction of Cdc42 and RhoA and promotes TRC growth.

  5. SDF-1α mediates wound-promoted tumor growth in a syngeneic orthotopic mouse model of breast cancer.

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    Christina H Stuelten

    Full Text Available Increased growth of residual tumors in the proximity of acute surgical wounds has been reported; however, the mechanisms of wound-promoted tumor growth remain unknown. Here, we used a syngeneic, orthotopic mouse model of breast cancer to study mechanisms of wound-promoted tumor growth. Our results demonstrate that exposure of metastatic mouse breast cancer cells (4T1 to SDF-1α, which is increased in wound fluid, results in increased tumor growth. Both, wounding and exposure of 4T1 cells to SDF-1α not only increased tumor growth, but also tumor cell proliferation rate and stromal collagen deposition. Conversely, systemic inhibition of SDF-1α signaling with the small molecule AMD 3100 abolished the effect of wounding, and decreased cell proliferation, collagen deposition, and neoangiogenesis to the levels observed in control animals. Furthermore, using different mouse strains we could demonstrate that the effect of wounding on tumor growth and SDF-1α levels is host dependent and varies between mouse strains. Our results show that wound-promoted tumor growth is mediated by elevated SDF-1α levels and indicate that the effect of acute wounds on tumor growth depends on the predetermined wound response of the host background and its predetermined wound response.

  6. HIV-1 exploits CCR5 conformational heterogeneity to escape inhibition by chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Philippe; Bénureau, Yann; Staropoli, Isabelle; Wang, Yongjin; Gonzalez, Nuria; Alcami, Jose; Hartley, Oliver; Brelot, Anne; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lagane, Bernard

    2013-06-04

    CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and the coreceptor for R5 HIV-1 entry into CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Chemokines exert anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro, both by displacing the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 from binding to CCR5 and by promoting CCR5 endocytosis, suggesting that they play a protective role in HIV infection. However, we showed here that different CCR5 conformations at the cell surface are differentially engaged by chemokines and gp120, making chemokines weaker inhibitors of HIV infection than would be expected from their binding affinity constants for CCR5. These distinct CCR5 conformations rely on CCR5 coupling to nucleotide-free G proteins ((NF)G proteins). Whereas native CCR5 chemokines bind with subnanomolar affinity to (NF)G protein-coupled CCR5, gp120/HIV-1 does not discriminate between (NF)G protein-coupled and uncoupled CCR5. Interestingly, the antiviral activity of chemokines is G protein independent, suggesting that "low-chemokine affinity" (NF)G protein-uncoupled conformations of CCR5 represent a portal for viral entry. Furthermore, chemokines are weak inducers of CCR5 endocytosis, as is revealed by EC50 values for chemokine-mediated endocytosis reflecting their low-affinity constant value for (NF)G protein-uncoupled CCR5. Abolishing CCR5 interaction with (NF)G proteins eliminates high-affinity binding of CCR5 chemokines but preserves receptor endocytosis, indicating that chemokines preferentially endocytose low-affinity receptors. Finally, we evidenced that chemokine analogs achieve highly potent HIV-1 inhibition due to high-affinity interactions with internalizing and/or gp120-binding receptors. These data are consistent with HIV-1 evading chemokine inhibition by exploiting CCR5 conformational heterogeneity, shed light into the inhibitory mechanisms of anti-HIV-1 chemokine analogs, and provide insights for the development of unique anti-HIV molecules.

  7. Tetrathiomolybdate inhibits head and neck cancer metastasis by decreasing tumor cell motility, invasiveness and by promoting tumor cell anoikis

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    Merajver Sofia D

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metastatic spread of solid tumors is directly or indirectly responsible for most cancer-related deaths. Tumor metastasis is very complex and this process requires a tumor cell to acquire enhanced motility, invasiveness and anoikis resistance to successfully establish a tumor at a distal site. Metastatic potential of tumor cells is directly correlated with the expression levels of several angiogenic cytokines. Copper is a mandatory cofactor for the function of many of these angiogenic mediators as well as other proteins that play an important role in tumor cell motility and invasiveness. We have previously shown that tetrathiomolybdate (TM is a potent chelator of copper and it mediates its anti-tumor effects by suppressing tumor angiogenesis. However, very little is known about the effect of TM on tumor cell function and tumor metastasis. In this study, we explored the mechanisms underlying TM-mediated inhibition of tumor metastasis. Results We used two in vivo models to examine the effects of TM on tumor metastasis. Animals treated with TM showed a significant decrease in lung metastasis in both in vivo models as compared to the control group. In addition, tumor cells from the lungs of TM treated animals developed significantly smaller colonies and these colonies had significantly fewer tumor cells. TM treatment significantly decreased tumor cell motility and invasiveness by inhibiting lysyl oxidase (LOX activity, FAK activation and MMP2 levels. Furthermore, TM treatment significantly enhanced tumor cell anoikis by activating p38 MAPK cell death pathway and by downregulating XIAP survival protein expression. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that TM is a potent suppressor of head and neck tumor metastasis by modulating key regulators of tumor cell motility, invasiveness and anoikis resistance.

  8. Tumor promoter 12-0-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate elevates serum progesterone levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, O.K.; Kerr, S.J.

    1979-04-27

    The phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoyl-13-acetate (TPA), the most potent promoter of two-stage carcinogenesis in mouse skin, simulates some of the early effects of several carcinogens in immature chicks. Actinomycin D, ethionine, thioacetamide (non-mutagenic in the Ames Salmonella test) and kepone are known to increase serum progesterone concentrations and induce synthesis of ovalbumin in chicks. Intraperitoneal administration of TPA to chicks caused a 5- to 7-fold elevation of serum progesterone levels and induced ovalbumin synthesis. Phorbol ester, 4..cap alpha..-phorbol-12, 13-didecanoate, which is inactive as a mouse skin tumor promoter, did not increase serum progesterone levels nor did it induce ovalbumin synthesis.

  9. The Shh receptor Boc promotes progression of early medulloblastoma to advanced tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mille, Frédéric; Tamayo-Orrego, Lukas; Lévesque, Martin; Remke, Marc; Korshunov, Andrey; Cardin, Julie; Bouchard, Nicolas; Izzi, Luisa; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A; Taylor, Michael D; Pfister, Stefan M; Charron, Frédéric

    2014-10-13

    During cerebellar development, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling drives the proliferation of granule cell precursors (GCPs). Aberrant activation of Shh signaling causes overproliferation of GCPs, leading to medulloblastoma. Although the Shh-binding protein Boc associates with the Shh receptor Ptch1 to mediate Shh signaling, whether Boc plays a role in medulloblastoma is unknown. Here, we show that BOC is upregulated in medulloblastomas and induces GCP proliferation. Conversely, Boc inactivation reduces proliferation and progression of early medulloblastomas to advanced tumors. Mechanistically, we find that Boc, through elevated Shh signaling, promotes high levels of DNA damage, an effect mediated by CyclinD1. High DNA damage in the presence of Boc increases the incidence of Ptch1 loss of heterozygosity, an important event in the progression from early to advanced medulloblastoma. Together, our results indicate that DNA damage promoted by Boc leads to the demise of its own coreceptor, Ptch1, and consequently medulloblastoma progression.

  10. Promoter hypermethylation of KLF4 inactivates its tumor suppressor function in cervical carcinogenesis.

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    Wen-Ting Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The KLF4 gene has been shown to be inactivated in cervical carcinogenesis as a tumor suppressor. However, the mechanism of KLF4 silencing in cervical carcinomas has not yet been identified. DNA methylation plays a key role in stable suppression of gene expression. METHODS: The methylation status of the KLF4 promoter CpG islands was analyzed by bisulfite sequencing (BSQ in tissues of normal cervix and cervical cancer. KLF4 gene expression was detected by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot. KLF4 promoter methylation in cervical cancer cell line was determined by BSQ and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR. Cell proliferation ability was detected by cell growth curve and MTT assay. RESULTS: The methylated allele was found in 41.90% of 24 cervical cancer tissues but only in 11.11% of 11 normal cervix tissues (P<0.005. KLF4 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in cervical cancer tissues compared with normal cervix tissues (P<0.01 and KLF4 mRNA expression showed a significant negative correlation with the promoter hypermethylation (r = -0.486, P = 0.003. Cervical cancer cell lines also showed a significant negative correlation between KLF4 expression and hypermethylation. After treatment with the demethylating agent 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza, the expression of KLF4 in the cervical cancer cell lines at both mRNA and protein levels was drastically increased, the cell proliferation ability was inhibited and the chemosensitivity for cisplatin was significantly increased. CONCLUSION: KLF4 gene is inactivated by methylation-induced silencing mechanisms in a large subset of cervical carcinomas and KLF4 promoter hypermethylation inactivates the gene's function as a tumor suppressor in cervical carcinogenesis.

  11. Chemokine control of HIV-1 infection: Beyond a binding competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yuntao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent paper by Cameron et al. demonstrated that certain chemokines such as CCL19 activate cofilin and actin dynamics, promoting HIV nuclear localization and integration into resting CD4 T cells. Apparently, these chomokines synergize with the viral envelope protein, triggering cofilin and actin dynamics necessary for the establishment of viral latency. This study opens a new avenue for understanding chemokine interaction with HIV. Traditionally, chemokine control of HIV infection focuses on competitive binding and down-modulation of the corecptors, particularly CCR5. This new study suggests that a diverse group of chemokines may also affect HIV infection through synergistic or antagonistic interaction with the viral coreceptor signaling pathways.

  12. Distinct effects of SIRT1 in cancer and stromal cells on tumor promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Choi, Yong-Joon; Jin, Peng; Yoon, Haejin; Chun, Yang-Sook; Shin, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Ja-Eun; Park, Jong-Wan

    2016-04-26

    The lysyl deacetylase SIRT1 acts as a metabolic sensor in adjusting metabolic imbalance. To explore the role of SIRT1 in tumor-stroma interplay, we designed an in vivo tumor model using SIRT1-transgenic mice. B16F10 mouse melanoma grew more quickly in SIRT1-transgenic mice than in wild-type mice, whereas SIRT1-overexpressing one grew slowly in both mice. Of human tumors, SIRT1 expression in stromal fibroblasts was found to correlate with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer. B16F10 and human ovarian cancer (SKOV3 and SNU840) cells were more proliferative in co-culture with SIRT1-overexpressiong fibroblasts. In contrast, SIRT1 within cancer cells has a negative effect on cell proliferation. In conditioned media from SIRT1-overexpressing fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) was identified in cytokine arrays to be secreted from fibroblasts SIRT1-dependently. Fibroblast-derived MMP3 stimulated cancer cell proliferation, and such a role of MMP3 was also demonstrated in cancer/fibroblast co-grafts. In conclusion, SIRT1 plays differential roles in cancer and stromal cells. SIRT1 in stromal cells promotes cancer growth by producing MMP3, whereas SIRT1 in cancer cells inhibits growth via an intracellular event. The present study provides a basis for setting new anticancer strategies targeting SIRT1.

  13. Tephrosia purpurea alleviates phorbol ester-induced tumor promotion response in murine skin.

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    Saleem, M; Ahmed Su; Alam, A; Sultana, S

    2001-02-01

    In recent years, considerable emphasis has been placed on identifying new cancer chemopreventive agents, which could be useful for the human population. Tephrosia purpurea has been shown to possess significant activity against hepatotoxicity, pharmacological and physiological disorders. Earlier we showed that Tephrosia purpurea inhibits benzoyl peroxide-mediated cutaneous oxidative stress and toxicity. In the present study, we therefore assessed the effect of Tephrosia purpurea on 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbal-13-acetate (TPA; a well-known phorbol ester) induced cutaneous oxidative stress and toxicity in murine skin. The pre-treatment of Swiss albino mice with Tephrosia purpurea prior to application of croton oil (phorbol ester) resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cutaneous carcinogenesis. Skin tumor initiation was achieved by a single topical application of 7,12-dimethyl benz(a)anthracene (DMBA) (25 microg per animal per 0.2 ml acetone) to mice. Ten days later tumor promotion was started by twice weekly topical application of croton oil (0.5% per animal per 0.2 ml acetone, v /v). Topical application of Tephrosia purpurea 1 h prior to each application of croton oil (phorbol ester) resulted in a significant protection against cutaneous carcinogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The animals pre-treated with Tephrosia purpurea showed a decrease in both tumor incidence and tumor yield as compared to the croton oil (phorbol ester)-treated control group. In addition, a significant reduction in TPA-mediated induction in cutaneous ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity and [3H]thymidine incorporation was also observed in animals pre-treated with a topical application of Tephrosia purpurea. The effect of topical application of Tephrosia purpurea on TPA-mediated depletion in the level of enzymatic and non-enzymatic molecules in skin was also evaluated and it was observed that topical application of Tephrosia purpurea prior to TPA resulted in the significant recovery of

  14. MAPK15 upregulation promotes cell proliferation and prevents DNA damage in male germ cell tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilardi, Gennaro; Acunzo, Mario; Nigita, Giovanni; Sasdelli, Federica; Celetti, Angela; Strambi, Angela; Staibano, Stefania; Croce, Carlo Maria; Chiariello, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCT) are the most common malignancies in males between 15 and 35 years of age. Despite the high cure rate, achieved through chemotherapy and/or surgery, the molecular basis of GCT etiology is still largely obscure. Here, we show a positive correlation between MAPK15 (ERK8; ERK7) expression and specific GCT subtypes, with the highest levels found in the aggressive embryonal carcinomas (EC). Indeed, in corresponding cellular models for EC, MAPK15 enhanced tumorigenicity in vivo and promoted cell proliferation in vitro, supporting a role for this kinase in human GCT. At molecular level, we demonstrated that endogenous MAPK15 is necessary to sustain cell cycle progression of EC cells, by limiting p53 activation and preventing the triggering of p53-dependent mechanisms resulting in cell cycle arrest. To understand MAPK15-dependent mechanisms impinging on p53 activation, we demonstrate that this kinase efficiently protects cells from DNA damage. Moreover, we show that the ability of MAPK15 to control the autophagic process is necessary for basal management of DNA damage and for tumor formation controlled by the kinase. In conclusion, our findings suggest that MAPK15 overexpression may contribute to the malignant transformation of germ cells by controlling a “stress support” autophagic pathway, able to prevent DNA damage and the consequent activation of the p53 tumor suppressor. Moreover, in light of these results, MAPK15-specific inhibitors might represent new tools to enhance the therapeutic index of cytotoxic therapy in GCT treatment, and to increase the sensitivity to DNA-damaging drugs in other chemotherapy-resistant human tumors. PMID:26988910

  15. High Rab11-FIP4 expression predicts poor prognosis and exhibits tumor promotion in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yun; Ye, Mengsi; Zhou, Lingling; Shan, Yunfeng; Lu, Guangrong; Zhou, Yuhui; Zhong, Jinwei; Zheng, Jihang; Xue, Zhanxiong; Cai, Zhenzhai

    2017-01-01

    Some studies have demonstrated that Rab11-family interacting proteins (Rab11-FIPs) are connected with the tumorigenesis, and they may act as tumor promoters in some cancers. The clinicopathological significance of Rab11-family interacting protein 4 (Rab11-FIP4) expression and its possible effects on pancreatic cancer (PC) are still undiscovered. In this study, Rab11-FIP4 protein expression level in 60 PC specimens and pair-matched non-cancerous samples were detected by immunohistochemistry analysis. The results were analysed and compared with each patients' clinical data. Rab11-FIP4 expression in PC tissues increased significantly more than that of adjacent non-cancerous tissues (P=0.0001). Overexpression of Rab11-FIP4 in the PC tissues was significantly related to tumor size (P=0.0001), histological grade (P=0.028), metastasis (P=0.001) and TNM stage (P=0.004) but not with age (P=0.832), gender (P=0.228) or tumor site (P=0.875). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that overexpression of Rab11-FIP4 was significantly related to overall survival time (P=0.0036). In addition, Rab11-FIP4 in PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells were successfully knocked-out using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Rab11-FIP4 knockout in PANC-1 cells inhibited cell growth, invasion and metastasis, and arrested cell cycle progression, but did not alter apoptosis. Our findings suggest that overexpression of Rab11-FIP4 predicts poor clinical outcomes for pancreatic cancer and contributes to pancreatic tumor progression. PMID:28035375

  16. Loss of Sparc in p53-null Astrocytes Promotes Macrophage Activation and Phagocytosis Resulting in Decreased Tumor Size and Tumor Cell Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Stacey L; Schultz, Chad R; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Golembieski, William A; El Naili, Reima; Radakrishnan, Archanna; Lemke, Nancy; Poisson, Laila M; Gutiérrez, Jorge A; Cottingham, Sandra; Rempel, Sandra A

    2015-07-01

    Both the induction of SPARC expression and the loss of the p53 tumor suppressor gene are changes that occur early in glioma development. Both SPARC and p53 regulate glioma cell survival by inverse effects on apoptotic signaling. Therefore, during glioma formation, the upregulation of SPARC may cooperate with the loss of p53 to enhance cell survival. This study determined whether the loss of Sparc in astrocytes that are null for p53 would result in reduced cell survival and tumor formation and increased tumor immunogenicity in an in vivo xenograft brain tumor model. In vitro, the loss of Sparc in p53-null astrocytes resulted in an increase in cell proliferation, but a loss of tumorigenicity. At 7 days after intracranial implantation, Sparc-null tumors had decreased tumor cell survival, proliferation and reduced tumor size. The loss of Sparc promoted microglia/macrophage activation and phagocytosis of tumor cells. Our results indicate that the loss of p53 by deletion/mutation in the early stages of glioma formation may cooperate with the induction of SPARC to potentiate cancer cell survival and escape from immune surveillance.

  17. Effects of type and amount of dietary fat on mouse skin tumor promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, H H; Locniskar, M F; Bechtel, D; Fischer, S M

    1994-01-01

    In a previous study (Cancer Res 51, 907, 1991) in which we found an inverse relationship between quantity of dietary corn oil and saturated fat, in a constant 15% fat diet, on the tumor promotion stage of skin carcinogenesis, it was not clear whether one or both types of fat played a modulatory role. The purpose of the present study therefore was to compare the effect of 1) increasing corn oil in corn oil-only diets and 2) increasing saturated fat, with a constant level of 5% corn oil, on tumor promotion. In the first study, the effects of five levels of dietary corn oil (5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25%) on the incidence and rat of papilloma and carcinoma development were determined in female Sencar mice fed these diets one week after initiation with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and three weeks before the start of promotion with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. A papilloma incidence of 100% was reached first in the 5% corn oil group, at 10 weeks, followed by the 10% group at 13 weeks and the 15% and 20% group at 16 weeks. The highest corn oil group achieved a 90% incidence. There were marked differences in latency of carcinoma development among the diet groups. At Week 29, the cumulative carcinoma incidence was 56% and 32%, respectively, in the 5% and 10% corn oil groups, whereas the incidence in the two highest corn oil (20% and 25%) groups was only 8% and 4%, respectively. In the second study, the effects of diets containing 5% corn oil and increasing levels of coconut oil (5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%) on the incidence and rat of papilloma and carcinoma development were determined, as described above. No significant difference in latency or incidence of papillomas or carcinomas was noted among these saturated fat diet groups. It thus appears that higher levels of dietary corn oil are associated with a reduced cancer incidence in this model system.

  18. Neurotensin, a novel target of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, promotes growth of neuroendocrine tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Tae; Liu, Chunming; Zaytseva, Yekaterina Y; Weiss, Heidi L; Townsend, Courtney M; Evers, B Mark

    2015-03-15

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays a pivotal role in regulating cell growth and differentiation by activation of the β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) complex and subsequent regulation of a set of target genes that have one or more TCF-binding elements (TBEs). Hyperactivation of this pathway has been implicated in numerous malignancies including human neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Neurotensin (NT), an intestinal hormone, induces proliferation of several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including cancers of the pancreas and colon. Here, we analyzed the human NT promoter in silico and found at least four consensus TBEs within the proximal promoter region. Using a combination of ChIP and luciferase reporter assays, we identified one TBE (located ∼900 bp proximal from the transcription start site) that was immunoprecipitated efficiently by TCF4-targeting antibody; mutation of this site attenuated the responsiveness to β-catenin. We also confirmed that the promoter activity and the mRNA and protein expression levels of NT were increased by various Wnt pathway activators and decreased by Wnt inhibitors in NET cell lines BON and QGP-1, which express and secrete NT. Similarly, the intracellular content and secretion of NT were induced by Wnt3a in these cells. Finally, inhibition of NT signaling suppressed cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth and decreased expression levels of growth-related proteins in NET cells. Our results indicate that NT is a direct target of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and may be a mediator for NET cell growth.

  19. The chemokine receptors CXCR4/CXCR7 and their primary heterodimeric ligands CXCL12 and CXCL12/high mobility group box 1 in pancreatic cancer growth and development: finding flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Murtaza; Tang, Daolin; Zeh, Herbert J; Tang, Siu Wah; Anderson, Carolyn J; Bahary, Nathan; Lotze, Michael T

    2015-05-01

    Novel therapies need to be developed for patients with pancreatic cancer because of the poor outcomes of current regimens. Pancreatic cancer cells respond to the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4)/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 7 (CXCR7)/C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12)/high-mobility group box 1 signaling axis and this axis presents a novel target for therapy. C-X-C motif chemokine 12 stimulates CXCR4/CXCR7-bearing cells in a paracrine manner. C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 and CXCR7 are transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors that, upon interaction with ligand CXCL12, activate downstream protein kinases that promote a more aggressive behavior. C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 is expressed on most pancreatic cancer cells, whereas CXCR7 is primarily expressed on tumor-associated endothelium. High-mobility group box 1 promotes the CXCR4 and CXCL12 interaction, promoting angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 is a potent stimulator of CXCR4 and CXCL12 expression, promoting more aggressive behavior. This receptor/ligand interaction can be disrupted by CXCR4 antagonists available and in clinical use to harvest bone marrow stem cells. Novel imaging strategies are now being developed at several centers to evaluate response to therapy and identify early recurrence. Thus, the CXCR4/CXCR7/CXCL12 interaction plays a critical role in cancer cell progression, proliferation, invasion, as well as metastasis and is a suitable target for therapy, imaging, as well as development of novel diagnostics.

  20. Laminins 411 and 421 differentially promote tumor cell migration via α6β1 integrin and MCAM (CD146).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Taichi; Wondimu, Zenebech; Oikawa, Yuko; Gentilcore, Giusy; Kiessling, Rolf; Egyhazi Brage, Suzanne; Hansson, Johan; Patarroyo, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    α4-laminins, such as laminins 411 and 421, are mesenchymal laminins expressed by blood and lymphatic vessels and some tumor cells. Laminin-411 promotes migration of leukocytes and endothelial cells, but the effect of this laminin and laminin-421 on tumor cells is poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that laminin-411 and, to a greater extent, laminin-421 significantly promote migration of tumor cells originated from melanomas, gliomas and different carcinomas via α6β1 integrin. In solid-phase binding assays, both laminins similarly bound α6β1 integrin but only laminin-421, among several laminin isoforms, readily bound MCAM (CD146), a cell-surface adhesion molecule strongly associated with tumor progression. Accordingly, a function-blocking mAb to MCAM inhibited tumor cell migration on laminin-421 but not on laminins 411 or 521. In tumor tissues, melanoma cells co-expressed MCAM, laminin α4, β1, β2 and γ1 chains, and integrin α6 and β1 chains. The present data highlight the novel role of α4-laminins in tumor cell migration and identify laminin-421 as a primary ligand for MCAM and a putative mediator of tumor invasion and metastasis.

  1. Slit2 promotes tumor growth and invasion in chemically induced skin carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Cuiling; Lan, Haimei; Ye, Jie; Li, Weidong; Wei, Ping; Yang, Yang; Guo, Simei; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiangchao; Zhang, Qianqian; He, Xiaodong; Wang, Lijing

    2014-07-01

    Slit, a neuronal guidance cue, binds to Roundabout (Robo) receptors to modulate neuronal, leukocytic, and endothelial migration. Slit has been reported to have an important effect on tumor growth and metastasis. In the current study, we evaluated the role of Slit2 in skin tumor growth and invasion in mice using a two-step chemical carcinogenesis protocol. We found that Slit2 expression correlated with the loss of basement membrane in the samples of human skin squamous cell carcinoma at different stages of disease progression. Slit2-Tg mice developed significantly more skin tumors than wild-type mice. Furthermore, the skin tumors that occurred in Slit2-Tg mice were significantly larger than those in the wild-type mice 10 weeks after 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene initiation until the end of the experiment. We also found that pathological development of the wild-type mice was delayed compared with that of Slit2-Tg mice. To further investigate the mechanism of increasing tumors in Slit2-Tg mice, we analyzed the expression of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in mouse skin lesions and found that the number of BrdU-positive cells and microvessel density in skin lesions were significantly higher in Slit2-Tg mice than in wild-type mice. Histological staining of PAS and type IV collagen and the colocalization of Slit2 and type IV collagen demonstrated varying degrees of loss of the basement membrane in the skin lesions from Slit2-Tg mice that were at the stage of carcinoma in situ. However, the basement membrane was well defined in the wild-type mice. In addition, MMP2, but not MMP9, was upregulated in the skin tissue of Slit2-Tg mice. Interruption of Slit2-Robo1 signaling by the antibody R5 significantly repressed the invasive capability of the squamous cell carcinoma cell line A431. Taken together, our findings reveal that Slit2 promotes DMBA/TPA-induced skin tumorigenesis by increasing cell proliferation, microvessel density, and invasive behavior of cutaneous squamous

  2. Cycling hypoxia induces a specific amplified inflammatory phenotype in endothelial cells and enhances tumor-promoting inflammation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, Céline; Desmet, Déborah; Petit, Laurenne; Finet, Laure; Graux, Carlos; Raes, Martine; Feron, Olivier; Michiels, Carine

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal architecture of the tumor blood network, as well as heterogeneous erythrocyte flow, leads to temporal fluctuations in tissue oxygen tension exposing tumor and stromal cells to cycling hypoxia. Inflammation is another feature of tumor microenvironment and is considered as a new enabling characteristic of tumor progression. As cycling hypoxia is known to participate in tumor aggressiveness, the purpose of this study was to evaluate its role in tumor-promoting inflammation. Firstly, we assessed the impact of cycling hypoxia in vitro on endothelial inflammatory response induced by tumor necrosis factor α. Results showed that endothelial cells exposed to cycling hypoxia displayed an amplified proinflammatory phenotype, characterized by an increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, namely, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8; by an increased expression of adhesion molecules, in particular intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1); and consequently by an increase in THP-1 monocyte adhesion. This exacerbation of endothelial inflammatory phenotype occurs through nuclear factor-κB overactivation. Secondly, the role of cycling hypoxia was studied on overall tumor inflammation in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. Results showed that cycling hypoxia led to an enhanced inflammation in tumors as prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), IL-6, CXCL1 (C-X-C motif ligand 1), and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (murine IL-8 functional homologs) mRNA expression was increased and as a higher leukocyte infiltration was evidenced. Furthermore, cycling hypoxia-specific inflammatory phenotype, characterized by a simultaneous (baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis repeat-containing 5)(low)/PTGS2(high)/ICAM-1(high)/IL-6(high)/IL-8(high) expression, is associated with a poor prognosis in human colon cancer. This new phenotype could thus be used in clinic to more precisely define prognosis for colon cancer patients. In conclusion, our findings evidenced for the first time the

  3. Translationally controlled tumor protein supplemented chitosan modified glass ionomer cement promotes osteoblast proliferation and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangsuwan, Jiraporn [Department of Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics, Center for Genomics and Bioinformatics Research, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90112 (Thailand); Department of Oral Biology and Occlusion, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90112 (Thailand); Wanichpakorn, Supreya; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn [Department of Oral Biology and Occlusion, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90112 (Thailand)

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) supplemented in a novel glass ionomer cement (BIO-GIC) on normal human osteoblasts (NHost cells). BIO-GIC was a glass ionomer cement (GIC) modified by adding chitosan and albumin to promote the release of TCTP. NHost cells were seeded on specimens of GIC, GIC + TCTP, BIO-GIC and BIO-GIC + TCTP. Cell proliferation was determined by BrdU assay. It was found that BIO-GIC + TCTP had significantly higher proliferation of cells than other specimens. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and osteopontin (OPN) gene expressions assessed by quantitative real time PCR and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were used to determine cell differentiation. Bone cell function was investigated by calcium deposition using alizarin assay. Both BMP-2 and OPN gene expressions of cells cultured on specimens with added TCTP increased gradually up-regulation after day 1 and reached the highest on day 3 then down-regulation on day 7. The ALP activity of cells cultured on BIO-GIC + TCTP for 7 days and calcium content after 14 days were significantly higher than other groups. BIO-GIC + TCTP can promote osteoblast cells proliferation, differentiation and function. - Highlights: • Developed a new GIC by supplementing TCTP in BIO-GIC (GIC with chitosan and albumin) • BIO-GIC + TCTP released a higher amount of TCTP than GIC + TCTP. • BIO-GIC + TCTP promoted cell proliferation higher than other specimens and control. • BIO-GIC + TCTP promoted osteoblasts differentiation and function.

  4. HIV-1 exploits CCR5 conformational heterogeneity to escape inhibition by chemokines.

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    International audience; CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and the coreceptor for R5 HIV-1 entry into CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Chemokines exert anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro, both by displacing the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 from binding to CCR5 and by promoting CCR5 endocytosis, suggesting that they play a protective role in HIV infection. However, we showed here that different CCR5 conformations at the cell surface are differentially engaged by chemokines and gp1...

  5. Gomisin A inhibits tumor promotion by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate in two-stage carcinogenesis in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, K; Ikeya, Y; Mitsuhashi, H; Iwasaki, M; Aburada, M; Nakagawa, S; Takeuchi, M; Takido, M

    1992-01-01

    Gomisin A, isolated from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis, is one of the dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans. Application of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA, 1 microgram/ear), a tumor-promoting agent, to the ears of mice induces inflammation. Among seven dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans assayed, gomisin A, gomisin J, and wuweizisu C inhibited the inflammatory activity induced by TPA in mice. The ED50 of these compounds for TPA-induced inflammation was 1.4-4.4 mumol. Gomisin A, with an ED50 of 1.4 mumol, showed the strongest inhibitory effect. Furthermore, at 5 mumol/mouse, it markedly suppressed the promotion effect of TPA (2.5 micrograms/mouse) on skin tumor formation in mice following initiation with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (50 micrograms/mouse). It is assumed that the inhibition of tumor promotion by gomisin A is due to its anti-inflammatory activity.

  6. Implications of chemokines, chemokine receptors, and inflammatory lipids in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, Johannes; Maghazachi, Azzam A

    2014-04-01

    Chemokines are a diverse group of molecules with important implications for the development of solid tissues and normal function of the immune system. However, change of the conditions for such a complex system can have important and dangerous consequences leading to diseases. The specific implications of the various chemokines in diseases have been elucidated in the last few years, prompting hope of manipulating this system for therapy or prevention of diseases. On the other hand, inflammatory lipids are biologically active molecules with crucial impacts on the function of various cell types, including immune cells in health and disease. Here, we describe how these lipids affect the chemokine system and how they interact with chemokines to shape chronic inflammation in the case of atherosclerosis.

  7. FGF19 Contributes to Tumor Progression in Gastric Cancer by Promoting Migration and Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Zhao, Daqi; Tian, Ruihua; Shi, Hailong; Chen, Xiangming; Liu, Wenzhi; Wei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Since patients are often diagnosed at a late stage, very few effective therapies are left in the arsenal. FGF19, as a hormone, has been reported to promote tumor growth in various types of cancer; however, its function in gastric cancer remains unknown. In the current study, we showed that FGF19 is overexpressed in gastric cancer and is associated with depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, and TNM stage. In addition, in vitro experiments demonstrated that FGF19 is able to enhance migration and invasion abilities of gastric cancer cells. Given its great potency in gastric cancer progression, FGF19 may be an effective target of treatment for advanced gastric cancer patients.

  8. In vitro generation of monocyte-derived macrophages under serum-free conditions improves their tumor promoting functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Rey-Giraud

    Full Text Available The tumor promoting role of M2 macrophages has been described in in vivo models and the presence of macrophages in certain tumor types has been linked to a poor clinical outcome. In light of burgeoning activities to clinically develop new therapies targeting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs, reliable in vitro models faithfully mimicking the tumor promoting functions of TAMs are required. Generation and activation of human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM in vitro, described as M1 or M2 macrophages attributed with tumoricidal or tumor-promoting functions, respectively, has been widely reported using mainly serum containing culture methods. In this study, we compared the properties of macrophages originating from monocytes cultured either in media containing serum together with M-CSF for M2 and GM-CSF for M1 macrophages or in serum-free media supplemented with M-CSF or GM-CSF and cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10 to induce activated M2 or LPS together with IFN-γ to generate activated M1 phenotype. We observed differences in cell morphology as well as increased surface receptor expression levels in serum-containing culture whereas similar or higher cytokine production levels were detected under serum-free culture conditions. More importantly, MDM differentiated under serum-free conditions displayed enhanced tumoricidal activity for M1 and tumor promoting property for M2 macrophages in contrast to MDM differentiated in the presence of serum. Moreover, evaluation of MDM phagocytic activity in serum free condition resulted in greater phagocytic properties of M2 compared to M1. Our data therefore confirm the tumor promoting properties of M2 macrophages in vitro and encourage the targeting of TAMs for cancer therapy.

  9. Tumor promoters alter the temporal program of adenovirus replication in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, P B; Young, C S; Weinstein, I B; Carter, T H

    1981-04-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of phorbol ester tumor promoters on the kinetics of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) replication in human cells. When added at the time of infection, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) accelerated the appearance of an early virus antigen (72,000-molecular-weight [72K] deoxyribonucleic acid-binding protein), the onset of viral deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, and the production of infectious virus. The appearance of an Ad5-specific cytopathic effect (CPE) was also accelerated in infected cultures exposed to TPA, whereas phorbol, 4 alpha-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate and 4-OmeTPA, which are inactive as tumor promoters, were ineffective in inducing this morphological change. The acceleration of the CPE seen in TPA-treated Ad5-infected cells was not caused by TPA induction of the protease plasminogen activator, since the protease inhibitors leupeptin and antipain do not inhibit the earlier onset of this CPE and, in contrast, epidermal growth factor, which induces plasminogen activator in HeLa cells, does not induce an earlier CPE. Evidence for a direct effect of TPA on viral gene expression was obtained by analyzing viral messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) synthesis. TPA accelerated the appearance of mRNA from all major early regions of Ad5, transiently stimulated the accumulation of region III mRNA, and accelerated the appearance of late Ad5 mRNA. Thus, TPA altered the temporal program of Ad5 mRNA production and accelerated the appearance of at least some Ad5-specific polypeptides during lytic infection of human cells. These effects presumably explain the earlier onset of the Ad5-specific CPE in TPA-treated cells and may have relevance to the effects of TPA on viral gene expression in nonpermissive cells carrying integrated viral deoxyribonucleic acid sequences.

  10. Poly-ADP ribosylation of PTEN by tankyrases promotes PTEN degradation and tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Zhang, Yajie; Han, Xin; Liang, Ke; Wang, Jiadong; Feng, Lin; Wang, Wenqi; Songyang, Zhou; Lin, Chunru; Yang, Liuqing; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-01-01

    PTEN [phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10], a phosphatase and critical tumor suppressor, is regulated by numerous post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, acetylation, and SUMOylation, which affect PTEN localization and protein stability. Here we report ADP-ribosylation as a new post-translational modification of PTEN. We identified PTEN as a novel substrate of tankyrases, which are members of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). We showed that tankyrases interact with and ribosylate PTEN, which promotes the recognition of PTEN by a PAR-binding E3 ubiquitin ligase, RNF146, leading to PTEN ubiquitination and degradation. Double knockdown of tankyrase1/2 stabilized PTEN, resulting in the subsequent down-regulation of AKT phosphorylation and thus suppressed cell proliferation and glycolysis in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, tankyrases were up-regulated and negatively correlated with PTEN expression in human colon carcinomas. Together, our study revealed a new regulation of PTEN and highlighted a role for tankyrases in the PTEN–AKT pathway that can be explored further for cancer treatment. PMID:25547115

  11. Epithelial membrane protein-2 promotes endometrial tumor formation through activation of FAK and Src.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maoyong Fu

    Full Text Available Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy diagnosed among women in developed countries. One recent biomarker strongly associated with disease progression and survival is epithelial membrane protein-2 (EMP2, a tetraspan protein known to associate with and modify surface expression of certain integrin isoforms. In this study, we show using a xenograft model system that EMP2 expression is necessary for efficient endometrial tumor formation, and we have started to characterize the mechanism by which EMP2 contributes to this malignant phenotype. In endometrial cancer cells, the focal adhesion kinase (FAK/Src pathway appears to regulate migration as measured through wound healing assays. Manipulation of EMP2 levels in endometrial cancer cells regulates the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, and promotes their distribution into lipid raft domains. Notably, cells with low levels of EMP2 fail to migrate and poorly form tumors in vivo. These findings reveal the pivotal role of EMP2 in endometrial cancer carcinogenesis, and suggest that the association of elevated EMP2 levels with endometrial cancer prognosis may be causally linked to its effect on integrin-mediated signaling.

  12. Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines mediates chemokine endocytosis through a macropinocytosis-like process in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Zhao

    Full Text Available The Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC shows high affinity binding to multiple inflammatory CC and CXC chemokines and is expressed by erythrocytes and endothelial cells. Recent evidence suggests that endothelial DARC facilitates chemokine transcytosis to promote neutrophil recruitment. However, the mechanism of chemokine endocytosis by DARC remains unclear.We investigated the role of several endocytic pathways in DARC-mediated ligand internalization. Here we report that, although DARC co-localizes with caveolin-1 in endothelial cells, caveolin-1 is dispensable for DARC-mediated (125I-CXCL1 endocytosis as knockdown of caveolin-1 failed to inhibit ligand internalization. (125I-CXCL1 endocytosis by DARC was also independent of clathrin and flotillin-1 but required cholesterol and was, in part, inhibited by silencing Dynamin II expression.(125I-CXCL1 endocytosis was inhibited by amiloride, cytochalasin D, and the PKC inhibitor Gö6976 whereas Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF enhanced ligand internalization through DARC. The majority of DARC-ligand interactions occurred on the endothelial surface, with DARC identified along plasma membrane extensions with the appearance of ruffles, supporting the concept that DARC provides a high affinity scaffolding function for surface retention of chemokines on endothelial cells.These results show DARC-mediated chemokine endocytosis occurs through a macropinocytosis-like process in endothelial cells and caveolin-1 is dispensable for CXCL1 internalization.

  13. Caffeine promotes anti-tumor immune response during tumor initiation: Involvement of the adenosine A2A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eini, Hadar; Frishman, Valeria; Yulzari, Robert; Kachko, Leonid; Lewis, Eli C; Chaimovitz, Cidio; Douvdevani, Amos

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies depict a negative correlation between caffeine consumption and incidence of tumors in humans. The main pharmacological effects of caffeine are mediated by antagonism of the adenosine receptor, A2AR. Here, we examine whether the targeting of A2AR by caffeine plays a role in anti-tumor immunity. In particular, the effects of caffeine are studied in wild-type and A2AR knockout (A2AR(-/-)) mice. Tumor induction was achieved using the carcinogen 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MCA). Alternatively, tumor cells, comprised of 3-MCA-induced transformed cells or B16 melanoma cells, were inoculated into animal footpads. Cytokine release was determined in a mixed lymphocyte tumor reaction (MLTR). According to our findings, caffeine-consuming mice (0.1% in water) developed tumors at a lower rate compared to water-consuming mice (14% vs. 53%, respectively, p=0.0286, n=15/group). Within the caffeine-consuming mice, tumor-free mice displayed signs of autoimmune alopecia and pronounced leukocyte recruitment intocarcinogen injection sites. Similarly, A2AR(-/-) mice exhibited reduced rates of 3-MCA-induced tumors. In tumor inoculation studies, caffeine treatment resulted in inhibition of tumor growth and elevation in proinflammatory cytokine release over water-consuming mice, as depicted by MLTR. Addition of the adenosine receptor agonist, NECA, to MLTR resulted in a sharp decrease in IFNγ levels; this was reversed by the highly selective A2AR antagonist, ZM241385. Thus, immune response modulation through either caffeine or genetic deletion of A2AR leads to a Th1 immune profile and suppression of carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that the use of pharmacologic A2AR antagonists may hold therapeutic potential in diminishing the rate of cancer development.

  14. Tumor-promoting phorbol ester transiently down-modulates the p53 level and blocks the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skouv, J; Jensen, P O; Forchhammer, J

    1994-01-01

    Activation of the protein kinase C signaling pathway by tumor-promoting phorbol esters, such as 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), induced a decrease in the level of p53 mRNA in several serum-starved human cell lines. Also, the tumor-promoting phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid induced...... rate or the p53 mRNA stability. The protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide completely abolished the PMA-induced down-modulation of the p53 mRNA, suggesting that a short-lived protein was involved in the down-modulation. Flow cytometric cell cycle analysis showed that the phorbol ester treatment...

  15. Adenoviral Vector Driven by a Minimal Rad51 Promoter Is Selective for p53-Deficient Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Vincent; Osterbur, Marika; Capella, Cristina; Kim, Yo-El; Hine, Christopher; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Background The full length Rad51 promoter is highly active in cancer cells but not in normal cells. We therefore set out to assess whether we could confer this tumor-selectivity to an adenovirus vector. Methodology/Principal Findings Expression of an adenovirally-vectored luciferase reporter gene from the Rad51 promoter was up to 50 fold higher in cancer cells than in normal cells. Further evaluations of a panel of truncated promoter mutants identified a 447 bp minimal core promoter element that retained the full tumor selectivity and transcriptional activity of the original promoter, in the context of an adenovirus vector. This core Rad51 promoter was highly active in cancer cells that lack functional p53, but less active in normal cells and in cancer cell lines with intact p53 function. Exogenous expression of p53 in a p53 null cell line strongly suppressed activity of the Rad51 core promoter, underscoring the selectivity of this promoter for p53-deficient cells. Follow-up experiments showed that the p53-dependent suppression of the Rad51 core promoter was mediated via an indirect, p300 coactivator dependent mechanism. Finally, transduction of target cells with an adenovirus vector encoding the thymidine kinase gene under transcriptional control of the Rad51 core promoter resulted in efficient killing of p53 defective cancer cells, but not of normal cells, upon addition of ganciclovir. Conclusions/Significance Overall, these experiments demonstrated that a small core domain of the Rad51 promoter can be used to target selective transgene expression from adenoviral vectors to tumor cells lacking functional p53. PMID:22174876

  16. Adenoviral vector driven by a minimal Rad51 promoter is selective for p53-deficient tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Fong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The full length Rad51 promoter is highly active in cancer cells but not in normal cells. We therefore set out to assess whether we could confer this tumor-selectivity to an adenovirus vector. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Expression of an adenovirally-vectored luciferase reporter gene from the Rad51 promoter was up to 50 fold higher in cancer cells than in normal cells. Further evaluations of a panel of truncated promoter mutants identified a 447 bp minimal core promoter element that retained the full tumor selectivity and transcriptional activity of the original promoter, in the context of an adenovirus vector. This core Rad51 promoter was highly active in cancer cells that lack functional p53, but less active in normal cells and in cancer cell lines with intact p53 function. Exogenous expression of p53 in a p53 null cell line strongly suppressed activity of the Rad51 core promoter, underscoring the selectivity of this promoter for p53-deficient cells. Follow-up experiments showed that the p53-dependent suppression of the Rad51 core promoter was mediated via an indirect, p300 coactivator dependent mechanism. Finally, transduction of target cells with an adenovirus vector encoding the thymidine kinase gene under transcriptional control of the Rad51 core promoter resulted in efficient killing of p53 defective cancer cells, but not of normal cells, upon addition of ganciclovir. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, these experiments demonstrated that a small core domain of the Rad51 promoter can be used to target selective transgene expression from adenoviral vectors to tumor cells lacking functional p53.

  17. Postmenopausal obesity promotes tumor angiogenesis and breast cancer progression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jian-Wei; Young, Emily; Patterson, Sharla G; Makey, Kristina L; Wells, Jeremy; Huang, Min; Tucker, Kevan B; Miele, Lucio

    2011-05-15

    Obese postmenopausal women have a 50% higher risk of breast cancer than non-obese women. There is not an animal model that mimics postmenopausal obesity related to breast cancer progression. Using age-relevant C57BL/6 mice, this study determined whether postmenopausal obesity increases VEGF expression, tumor angiogenesis, and breast tumor growth. Ovariectomy (OVX) was performed in 12 sixty week-old female mice, then followed by a low-fat (5%, LF, n=6) or a high-fat (60%, HF, n=6) diet for 12 weeks. In the eighth week of the dietary program, 10(6) E0771 (mouse breast cancer) cells were injected in the left fourth mammary gland. Tumor size was monitored for 4 weeks. Body weights were monitored weekly. At the end of the experiment, blood samples, visceral fat and tumors were collected for measuring VEGF expression using ELISA and intratumoral microvessel density (IMD) using CD31 immunochemistry. Body weight was significantly increased in OVX/HF mice, compared to OVX/LF group (55.3±1.7 vs. 41.5±1.5 g; p < 0.01). There was a two-fold increase in the ratio of visceral fat/BW in OVX/HF mice, compared to those in OVX/LF group (0.062±0.005 vs. 0.032±0.003; p < 0.01). Postmenopausal obesity significantly increased breast tumor weight over the control (4.62±0.63 vs. 1.98±0.27 g; p < 0.01) and IMD (173±3.7 vs. 139±4.3 IM#/mm^2; p < 0.01). Tumor VEGF levels were higher in OVX/HF mice, compared to OVX/LF group (73.3±3.8 vs. 49.5±4.3 pg/mg protein; p < 0.01). Plasma VEGF levels (69±7.1 vs. 48±3.5 pg/ml) and visceral fat VEGF levels (424.4±39.5 vs. 208.5±22.4 pg/mg protein) were significantly increased in OVX/HF mice, compared to OVX/LF group, respectively (n=6; p < 0.01). Interestingly, adipose tissue primary culture showed that subcutaneous fat released more VEGF, compared to visceral fat (6.77±1.14 vs. 0.94±0.16 pg/mg tissue; n=6; p < 0.01). These findings support the hypothesis that postmenopausal obesity promotes tumor angiogenesis and breast cancer

  18. Translationally controlled tumor protein supplemented chitosan modified glass ionomer cement promotes osteoblast proliferation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangsuwan, Jiraporn; Wanichpakorn, Supreya; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) supplemented in a novel glass ionomer cement (BIO-GIC) on normal human osteoblasts (NHost cells). BIO-GIC was a glass ionomer cement (GIC) modified by adding chitosan and albumin to promote the release of TCTP. NHost cells were seeded on specimens of GIC, GIC+TCTP, BIO-GIC and BIO-GIC+TCTP. Cell proliferation was determined by BrdU assay. It was found that BIO-GIC+TCTP had significantly higher proliferation of cells than other specimens. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and osteopontin (OPN) gene expressions assessed by quantitative real time PCR and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were used to determine cell differentiation. Bone cell function was investigated by calcium deposition using alizarin assay. Both BMP-2 and OPN gene expressions of cells cultured on specimens with added TCTP increased gradually up-regulation after day 1 and reached the highest on day 3 then down-regulation on day 7. The ALP activity of cells cultured on BIO-GIC+TCTP for 7 days and calcium content after 14 days were significantly higher than other groups. BIO-GIC+TCTP can promote osteoblast cells proliferation, differentiation and function.

  19. Tumor suppressor protein C53 antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai; Wu, Jianchun; He, Chen; Yang, Wending; Li, Honglin

    2009-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint. More recently, Wang et al. (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor by way of inhibiting NF-kappaB signaling. We report here the identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexpression. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with Chk1 and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell-cycle progression and DNA damage response.

  20. Tumor suppressor protein C53 antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Jiang; Jianchun Wu; Chen He; Wending Yang; Honglin Li

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint. More recently, Wang et al. (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor by way of inhibiting NF-kB signaling. We report here the identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdkl activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexpression. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with Chkl and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell-cycle progression and DNA damage response.

  1. Initiation-promotion model of tumor prevalence in mice from space radiation exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F A; Wilson, J W

    1995-08-01

    Exposures in space consist of low-level background components from galactic cosmic rays (GCR), occasional intense-energetic solar-particle events, periodic passes through geomagnetic-trapped radiation, and exposure from possible onboard nuclear-propulsion engines. Risk models for astronaut exposure from such diverse components and modalities must be developed to assure adequate protection in future NASA missions. The low-level background exposures (GCR), including relativistic heavy ions (HZE), will be the ultimate limiting factor for astronaut career exposure. We consider herein a two-mutation, initiation-promotion, radiation-carcinogenesis model in mice in which the initiation stage is represented by a linear kinetics model of cellular repair/misrepair, including the track-structure model for heavy ion action cross-sections. The model is validated by comparison with the harderian gland tumor experiments of Alpen et al. for various ion beams. We apply the initiation-promotion model to exposures from galactic cosmic rays, using models of the cosmic-ray environment and heavy ion transport, and consider the effects of the age of the mice prior to and after the exposure and of the length of time in space on predictions of relative risk. Our results indicate that biophysical models of age-dependent radiation hazard will provide a better understanding of GCR risk than models that rely strictly on estimates of the initial slopes of these radiations.

  2. The Effect of Dietary Glycine on the Hepatic Tumor Promoting Activity of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Bunaciu, Rodica Petruta; Tharappel, Job C.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Korwel, Izabela; Robertson, Larry W.; Srinivasan, Cidambi; Spear, Brett T.; Glauert, Howard P.

    2007-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitious lipophilic environmental pollutants. Some of the PCB congeners and mixtures of congeners have tumor promoting activity in rat liver. The mechanism of their activity is not fully understood and is likely to be multifactorial. The aim of this study was to investigate if the resident liver macrophages, Kupffer cells, are important in the promoting activity of PCBs. The hypothesis of this study was that the inhibition of Kupffer cell activity would...

  3. Homogeneous MGMT immunoreactivity correlates with an unmethylated MGMT promoter status in brain metastases of various solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ingold

    Full Text Available The O(6-methylguanine-methyltransferase (MGMT promoter methylation status is a predictive parameter for the response of malignant gliomas to alkylating agents such as temozolomide. First clinical reports on treating brain metastases with temozolomide describe varying effects. This may be due to the fact that MGMT promoter methylation of brain metastases has not yet been explored in depth. Therefore, we assessed MGMT promoter methylation of various brain metastases including those derived from lung (n = 91, breast (n = 72 kidney (n = 49 and from malignant melanomas (n = 113 by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR and MGMT immunoreactivity. Fifty-nine of 199 brain metastases (29.6% revealed a methylated MGMT promoter. The methylation rate was the highest in brain metastases derived from lung carcinomas (46.5% followed by those from breast carcinoma (28.8%, malignant melanoma (24.7% and from renal carcinoma (20%. A significant correlation of homogeneous MGMT-immunoreactivity (>95% MGMT positive tumor cells and an unmethylated MGMT promoter was found. Promoter methylation was detected in 26 of 61 (43% tumors lacking MGMT immunoreactivity, in 17 of 63 (27% metastases with heterogeneous MGMT expression, but only in 5 of 54 brain metastases (9% showing a homogeneous MGMT immunoreactivity. Our results demonstrate that a significant number of brain metastases reveal a methylated MGMT-promoter. Based on an obvious correlation between homogeneous MGMT immunoreactivity and unmethylated MGMT promoter, we hypothesize that immunohistochemistry for MGMT may be a helpful diagnostic tool to identify those tumors that probably will not benefit from the use of alkylating agents. The discrepancy between promoter methylation and a lack of MGMT immunoreactivity argues for assessing MGMT promoter methylation both by immunohistochemical as well as by molecular approaches for diagnostic purposes.

  4. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk; Wittenhagen, P

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta). METHODS: The CCR5 Delta32 allele and a CCR5 promoter polymorphism associated with cell surface expression of CCR5 were...

  5. A complex pattern of chemokine receptor expression is seen in osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathrath Michaela

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteosarcoma is the most frequent bone tumor in childhood and adolescence. Patients with primary metastatic disease have a poor prognosis. It is therefore important to better characterize the biology of this tumor to define new prognostic markers or therapeutic targets for tailored therapy. Chemokines and their receptors have been shown to be involved in the development and progression of malignant tumors. They are thought to be active participants in the biology of osteosarcoma. The function of specific chemokines and their receptors is strongly associated with the biological context and microenvironment of their expression. In this report we characterized the expression of a series of chemokine receptors in the complex environment that defines osteosarcoma. Methods The overall level of chemokine receptor mRNA expression was determined using TaqMan RT-PCR of microdissected archival patient biopsy samples. Expression was then verified at the protein level by immunohistochemistry using a series of receptor specific antibody reagents to elucidate the cellular association of expression. Results Expression at the RNA level was found for most of the tested receptors. CCR1 expression was found on infiltrating mononuclear and polynuclear giant cells in the tumor. Cells associated with the lining of intratumoral vessels were shown to express CCR4. Infiltrating mononuclear cells and tumor cells both showed expression of the receptor CCR5, while CCR7 was predominantly expressed by the mononuclear infiltrate. CCR10 was only very rarely detected in few scattered infiltrating cells. Conclusion Our data elucidate for the first time the cellular context of chemokine receptor expression in osteosarcoma. This is an important issue for better understanding potential chemokine/chemokine receptor function in the complex biologic processes that underlie the development and progression of osteosarcoma. Our data support the suggested involvement of

  6. The relationship between tumor necrosis factor-α gene promoter polymorphism and obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘辉国

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α) gene promoter polymorphism and obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Methods The plasma TNF-αlevel of OSAHS group and non-OSAHS group was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Eighteen patients with severe OSAHS were treated with continuous

  7. The Innate Immune Receptor NLRX1 Functions as a Tumor Suppressor by Reducing Colon Tumorigenesis and Key Tumor-Promoting Signals

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    A. Alicia Koblansky

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available NOD-like receptor (NLR proteins are intracellular innate immune sensors/receptors that regulate immunity. This work shows that NLRX1 serves as a tumor suppressor in colitis-associated cancer (CAC and sporadic colon cancer by keeping key tumor promoting pathways in check. Nlrx1−/− mice were highly susceptible to CAC, showing increases in key cancer-promoting pathways including nuclear factor κB (NF-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, and interleukin 6 (IL-6. The tumor-suppressive function of NLRX1 originated primarily from the non-hematopoietic compartment. This prompted an analysis of NLRX1 function in the Apcmin/+ genetic model of sporadic gastrointestinal cancer. NLRX1 attenuated Apcmin/+ colon tumorigenesis, cellular proliferation, NF-κB, MAPK, STAT3 activation, and IL-6 levels. Application of anti-interleukin 6 receptor (IL6R antibody therapy reduced tumor burden, increased survival, and reduced STAT3 activation in Nlrx1−/−Apcmin/+ mice. As an important clinical correlate, human colon cancer samples expressed lower levels of NLRX1 than healthy controls in multiple patient cohorts. These data implicate anti-IL6R as a potential personalized therapy for colon cancers with reduced NLRX1.

  8. Linking ATM Promoter Methylation to Cell Cycle Protein Expression in Brain Tumor Patients: Cellular Molecular Triangle Correlation in ATM Territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdipour, P; Karami, F; Javan, Firouzeh; Mehrazin, M

    2015-08-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a key gene in DNA double-strand break (DSB), and therefore, most of its disabling genetic alterations play an important initiative role in many types of cancer. However, the exact role of ATM gene and its epigenetic alterations, especially promoter methylation in different grades of brain tumors, remains elusive. The current study was conducted to query possible correlations among methylation statue of ATM gene, ATM/ retinoblastoma (RB) protein expression, D1853N ATM polymorphism, telomere length (TL), and clinicopathological characteristics of various types of brain tumors. Isolated DNA from 30 fresh tissues was extracted from different types of brain tumors and two brain tissues from deceased normal healthy individuals. DNAs were treated with bisulfate sodium using DNA modification kit (Qiagen). Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP-PCR) was implicated to determine the methylation status of treated DNA templates confirmed by promoter sequencing. Besides, the ATM and RB protein levels were determined by immunofluorescence (IF) assay using monoclonal mouse antihuman against ATM, P53, and RB proteins. To achieve an interactive correlation, the methylation data were statistically analyzed by considering TL and D1853N ATM polymorphism. More than 73% of the brain tumors were methylated in ATM gene promoter. There was strong correlation between ATM promoter methylation and its protein expression (p ATM promoter and ATM protein expression with D1853N ATM polymorphism (p = 0.01). ATM protein expression was not in line with RB protein expression while it was found to be significantly correlated with ATM promoter methylation (p = 0.01). There was significant correlation between TL neither with ATM promoter methylation nor with ATM protein expression nor with D1853N polymorphism. However, TL has shown strong correlation with patient's age and tumor grade (p = 0.01). Given the important role of cell cycle checkpoint

  9. Extrahepatic synthesis of coagulation factor Ⅶ by colorectal cancer cells promotes tumor invasion and metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jian-qiang; FAN Qing; WU Wen-han; JIA Zhi-chao; LI Hui; YANG Yin-mo; LIU Yu-cun; WAN Yuan-lian

    2010-01-01

    Background Blood coagulation factor Ⅶ (FⅦ) is physiologically synthesized in the liver and released into the blood. Binding of FⅦ to tissue factor (TF) is related to the metastatic potential of tumor cells, also a significant risk factor in the development of hepatic metastasis in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). It has been found that some cancer cells can produce FⅦ extrahepatically. However, litte is known about FⅦ and CRC. We therefore hypothesized that CRC cells may synthese FⅦ, leading to tumor invasion and metastasis.Methods We detected the expression of FⅦ protein in 55 CRC specimens by immunohistochemical staining. The FⅦ mRNA in 45 of 55 CRC cases, 6 colon cancer cell lines and one hepatoma cell line was measured by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). Transwell invasion assays were performed to evaluate the changes of cell migration and invasion of LoVo cancer cells in vitro. We further observed the likely effectors regulated by the TF/FⅦa complex Western blotting assay.Results Extrahepatic synthesis of FⅦ was detected in the cytoplasm of 32 (58.2%) CRC specimens byimmunohistochemistry, but not in normal mucosa. Liver metastasis (P=0.003) and TNM staging (P=0.005) were significantly correlated with FⅦ antigen expression. The positive ratios in stages Ⅰ, Ⅱ, Ⅲ and Ⅳ were 33.3%, 40.0%,52.4% and 87.5%, respectively. The expression of FⅦ mRNA in CRC with hepatic metastasis was significantly higher than CRC without hepatic metastasis (5.33±2.88 vs. 1.47±0.51, P=0.03). Ectopic FⅦa induced a slight increase (1.34-fold) in the number of migrating cells, which was inhibited by the specific TF antibody. The formation of TF/FⅦacomplex resulted in a marked increase in the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 (3.5-fold) and MMP-9(4.7-fold) in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner.Conclusions Extrahepatic synthesis of FⅦ by CRC cells may promote tumor invasion and metastasis. MMPs, as downstream

  10. Degradation of Jatropha curcas phorbol esters derived from Jatropha oil cake and their tumor-promoting activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Motoyuki; Hasegawa, Go; Yasuhara, Tadashi; Ishihara, Yoko

    2015-04-01

    Large amount of oil cake is generated during biodiesel production from Jatropha seeds. Although Jatropha oil cake is rich in plant nutrients, presence of toxic phorbol esters restricts the usage of oil cake as a fertilizer. The objective of this study is to evaluate the components and tumor promoting activity of phorbol esters in Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil and plants grown in the treated soil. Contents and their biological activity of Jatropha phorbol esters in soil and plants were sequentially analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and in vitro cell transformation assay, respectively. Disappearance of Jatropha phorbol-ester-specific peaks were followed with HPLC during incubation of Jatropha oil cake with soil for five weeks. Along with the degradation of Jatropha phorbol ester in soil, tumor-promoting activity in the sample was also attenuated and ultimately disappeared. Jatropha phorbol esters and tumor promoting activity were not detected from mustard spinach grown in the Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil. In addition, the esterase KM109 degrades DHPB (see definition below; Jatropha phorbol ester) and reduced its tumor-promoting activity. From these data, we conclude: (1) components and tumor promoting activity of Jatropha phorbol esters in the oil cake disappeared completely by incubation with soil for five-week, (2) Jatropha phorbol esters did not transfer into plants grown in the Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil, and (3) DHPB can be degraded by esterase from soil bacterium. These observations are useful for utilization of Jatropha oil cake as a fertilizer.

  11. Tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008479 Preliminary study of MR elastography in brain tumors. XU Lei(徐磊), et al.Neurosci Imaging Center, Beijing Tiantan Hosp, Capital Med Univ, Beijing 100050.Chin J Radiol 2008;42(6):605-608. Objective To investigate the potential values of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) for evaluating the brain tumor consistency in vivo. Methods Fourteen patients with known solid brain tumor (5 male, 9 female; age range: 16-63 years)

  12. Cytokine and chemokine inter-regulation in the inflamed or injured CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Babcock, Alicia A; Millward, Jason M;

    2005-01-01

    The distinction between immune-regulatory and effector cytokines and chemokines, and neural growth and survival factors (neurotrophins) becomes increasingly blurred. We discuss here the role of immune cytokines and chemokines as mediators of innate glial responses in the central nervous system...... the earliest responses are the expression of a wide profile of chemokines, and of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha). The cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) is not normally produced in the CNS, but TNFalpha levels are enhanced if it is present. Viral vector-derived IFNgamma directly induces...... are directed by Toll-like receptors (TLR). Our recent studies focus on specific TLR signals as upstream on-switches for glial cytokine and chemokine responses. The biological activity of chemokines is regulated by matrix metalloproteinase enzymes (MMPs) and specific members of this family are expressed...

  13. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Promoter-Containing Retroviral Promoter Conversion Vectors for Gene-Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy are Functional in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Klein

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene directed-enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT is an approach for sensitization of tumor cells to an enzymatically activated, otherwise nontoxic, prodrug. Cytochrome P450 2B1 (CYP2B1 metabolizes the prodrugs cyclophosphamide (CPA and ifosfamide (IFA to produce the cytotoxic substances phosphoramide mustard and isophosphoramide mustard as well as the byproduct acrolein. We have constructed a retroviral promoter conversion (ProCon vector for breast cancer GDEPT. The vector allows expression of CYP2B1 from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV promoter known to be active in the mammary glands of transgenic animals. It is anticipated to be used for the generation of encapsulated viral vector producing cells which, when placed inside or close to a tumor, will act as suppliers of the therapeutic CYP2B1 protein as well as of the therapeutic vector itself. The generated vector was effectively packaged by virus producing cells and allowed the production of high levels of enzymatically active CYP2B1 in infected cells which sensitized them to killing upon treatment with both IFA and CPA. Determination of the respective IC50 values demonstrated that the effective IFA dose was reduced by sixteen folds. Infection efficiencies in vivo were determined using a reporter gene-bearing vector in a mammary cancer cell-derived xenograft tumor mouse model.

  14. In vivo measurement of epidermal thickness changes associated with tumor promotion in murine models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Samatham, Ravikant; Choudhury, Niloy; Gladish, James C.; Thuillier, Philippe; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-07-01

    The characterization of tissue morphology in murine models of pathogenesis has traditionally been carried out by excision of affected tissues with subsequent immunohistological examination. Excision-based histology provides a limited two-dimensional presentation of tissue morphology at the cost of halting disease progression at a single time point and sacrifice of the animal. We investigate the use of noninvasive reflectance mode confocal scanning laser microscopy (rCSLM) as an alternative tool to biopsy in documenting epidermal hyperplasia in murine models exposed to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). An automated technique utilizing average axial rCSLM reflectance profiles is used to extract epidermal thickness values from rCSLM data cubes. In comparisons to epidermal thicknesses determined from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections, we find no significant correlation to rCSLM-derived thickness values. This results from method-specific artifacts: physical alterations of tissue during H&E preparation in standard histology and specimen-induced abberations in rCSLM imaging. Despite their disagreement, both histology and rCSLM methods reliably measure statistically significant thickness changes in response to TPA exposure. Our results demonstrate that in vivo rCSLM imaging provides epithelial biologists an accurate noninvasive means to monitor cutaneous pathogenesis.

  15. Gas6/Axl pathway promotes tumor invasion through the transcriptional activation of Slug in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Jung; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Chen, Yu-Ling; Chung, Ling; Yuan, Ray-Hwang

    2014-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common fatal cancers worldwide. Other than the sorafenib treatment, no effective systemic therapy has been available thus far. Most targets in molecularly targeted therapy for cancer are receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Therefore, identifying activated RTKs in HCC is critical for developing new molecularly targeted therapies. Using a phospho-RTK array, we found that Axl is one of the most frequently activated RTKs in liver cancer cell lines. The knockdown of Axl by RNA interference significantly reduced cell migration and invasion in the HCC cell lines HA22T and Mahlavu. Stimulation of HCC cell lines by Axl ligand growth arrest-specific 6 (Gas6) enhanced cell migration and invasion. The Gas6/Axl pathway enhanced the expression of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factor Slug, which is essential for the invasion-promoting activity of Axl. Treating HCC cells with the Axl inhibitor bosutinib suppressed Slug expression and decreased the invasiveness of HCC cell lines. These findings indicate that Gas6/Axl regulates tumor invasion through the transcriptional activation of Slug.

  16. Arginine Methylation of SREBP1a via PRMT5 Promotes De Novo Lipogenesis and Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liu; Zhao, Xiaoping; Zhao, Li; Li, Jiajin; Yang, Hao; Zhu, Zongping; Liu, Jianjun; Huang, Gang

    2016-03-01

    Dysregulation of the sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factors sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) and SREBF activates de novo lipogenesis to high levels in cancer cells, a critical event in driving malignant growth. In this study, we identified an important posttranslational mechanism by which SREBP1a is regulated during metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells. Mass spectrometry revealed protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) as a binding partner of SREBP1a that symmetrically dimethylated it on R321, thereby promoting transcriptional activity. Furthermore, PRMT5-induced methylation prevented phosphorylation of SREBP1a on S430 by GSK3β, leading to its disassociation from Fbw7 (FBXW7) and its evasion from degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Consequently, methylation-stabilized SREBP1a increased de novo lipogenesis and accelerated the growth of cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. Clinically, R321 symmetric dimethylation status was associated with malignant progression of human hepatocellular carcinoma, where it served as an independent risk factor of poor prognosis. By showing how PRMT5-induced methylation of SREBP1a triggers hyperactivation of lipid biosynthesis, a key event in tumorigenesis, our findings suggest a new generalized strategy to selectively attack tumor metabolism.

  17. Overexpressed HDAC4 is associated with poor survival and promotes tumor progression in esophageal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Shi-Juan; Wang, Meng-He; Zhang, Mei-Yin; Zheng, X.F. Steven; Wang, Hui-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) mediate histone deacetylation, leading to transcriptional repression, which is involved in many diseases, including age-related tissue degeneration, heart failure and cancer. In this study, we were aimed to investigate the expression, clinical significance and biological function of HDAC4 in esophageal carcinoma (EC). We found that HDAC4 mRNA and protein are overexpressed in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues and cell lines. HDAC4 overexpression is associated with higher tumor grade, advanced clinical stage and poor survival. Mechanistically, HDAC4 promotes proliferation and G1/S cell cycle progression in EC cells by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21 and p27 and up-regulating CDK2/4 and CDK-dependent Rb phosphorylation. HDAC4 also enhances ESCC cell migration. Furthermore, HDAC4 positively regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by increasing the expression of Vimentin and decreasing the expression of E-Cadherin/α-Catenin. Together, our study shows that HDAC4 overexpression is important for the oncogenesis of EC, which may serve as a useful prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for this malignancy. PMID:27295551

  18. Viral leads for chemokine-modulatory drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Lüttichau, Hans Rudolf; Schwartz, Thue W

    2003-01-01

    of years of experience in manipulating this system. For example, virally encoded "biopharmaceuticals"--chemokines and chemokine binding proteins--demonstrate the effectiveness of blocking a carefully selected group of chemokine receptors and how the local immune response can be changed from one dominated...... by Th1 cells to one dominated by Th2 cells by targeting specific chemokine receptors. The crucial importance of the binding of chemokines to glycosaminoglycans to produce their effects is also highlighted by viruses that produce binding proteins to disrupt the gradient of chemokines, which guides...

  19. Consumption of hydrogen-rich water protects against ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced nephrotoxicity and early tumor promotional events in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang-Yin; Zhu, Shao-Xing; Wang, Zong-Ping; Wang, Hua; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Gui-Ping

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this work was to test whether consumption with hydrogen-rich water (HW) alleviated renal injury and inhibited early tumor promotional events in Ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA)-treated rats. Rats were injected with Fe-NTA solution (7.5mg Fe/kg body weight) intraperitoneally to induce renal injury and simultaneously treated with HW (1.3 ± 0.2mg/l). We found that consumption with HW ameliorated Fe-NTA-induced renal injuries including suppressing elevation of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen and inhibited early tumor promotional events including decreasing ornithine decarboxylase activity and incorporation of [3H]thymidine into renal DNA. Consumption with HW suppressed Fe-NTA-induced oxidative stress through decreasing formation of lipid peroxidation and peroxynitrite and activities of NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase, increasing activity of catalase, and restoring mitochondrial function in kidneys. Consumption with HW suppressed Fe-NTA-induced inflammation marked by reduced NF-κB, IL-6, and MCP-1 expression and macrophage accumulating in kidneys. In addition, consumption with HW suppressed VEGF expression, STAT3 phosphorylation and PCNA expression in kidneys of Fe-NTA-treated rats. Consumption with HW decreased the incidence of renal cell carcinoma and suppressed tumor growth in Fe-NTA-treated in rats. In conclusion, drinking with HW attenuated Fe-NTA-induced renal injury and inhibited early tumor promotional events in rats.

  20. Antitumor activity of an hTERT promoter-regulated tumor-selective oncolytic adenovirus in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Qing Su; Xing-Hua Wang; Jie Chen; Yong-Jing Liu; Wei-Guo Wang; Lin-Fang Li; Meng-Chao Wu; Qi-Jun Qian

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To construct a tumor-selective replicationcompetent adenovirus (RCAd), SG300, using a modified promoter of human telomerase reverse transcriptase(hTERT).METHODS: The antitumor efficacy of SG300 in epatocellular carcinoma was assessed in vitro and in vivo. In vitro cell viability by MTT assay was used to assess the tumor-selective oncolysis and safety features of SG300, andin vivo antitumor activity of SG300 was assessed in established hepatocellular carcinoma models in nude mice.RESULTS: SG300 could lyse hepatocellular carcinoma cells at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI), but could not affect growth of normal cells even at a high MOI.Both in Hep3B and SMMC-7721 xenograft models of hepatocellular carcinoma, SG300 had an obvious antitumor effect, resulting in a decrease in tumor volume. Its selective oncolysis to tumor cells and safety to normal cells was also superior to that of ONYX-015.Pathological examination of tumor specimens showed that SG300 replicated selectively in cancer cells and resulted in apoptosis and necrosis of cancer cells.CONCLUSION: hTERT promoter-regulated replicative adenovirus SG300 has a better cancer-selective replication-competent ability, and can specifically kill a wide range of cancer cells with positive telomerase activity, and thus has better potential for targeting therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  1. DDX3 promotes tumor invasion in colorectal cancer via the CK1ε/Dvl2 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tsung-Ying; Wu, De-Wei; Lin, Po-Lin; Wang, Lee; Huang, Chi-Chou; Chou, Ming-Chih; Lee, Huei

    2016-02-19

    DDX3, a subunit of CK1ε, phosphorylates Dvl2 to promote β-catenin activation. Overexpression of the Dvl2 protein results in potent activation of β-catenin/TCF signaling in colorectal cancer. Therefore, we hypothesized that DDX3 might promote tumor invasion via the CK1ε/Dvl2 axis due to β-catenin/TCF activation. Western blotting showed that β-catenin expression was decreased by DDX3 knockdown and increased by DDX3 overexpression in colorectal cancer cells. The TCF promoter activity and invasion capability were concomitantly increased and decreased by DDX3 manipulation in these cells. The invasion capability in colon cancer cells and xenograft lung tumor nodules induced by a DDX3-overexpressing T84 stable clone in tail-vein injection model were nearly suppressed by inhibitors of CK1ε (PF4800567) and β-catenin/TCF signaling (XAV939). Among colorectal cancer patients, DDX3 expression was positively correlated with the expression of pDvl2 and nuclear β-catenin in tumor tissues. The expression of pDvl2 occurred more frequently in high-nuclear than in low-nuclear β-catenin tumors. A prognostic significance of DDX3, pDvl2, and nuclear β-catenin on overall survival and relapse free survival was observed in this study population. We therefore suggest CK1ε or β-catenin/TCF signaling as potential targets for improving tumor regression and outcomes in colorectal cancer, particularly tumors with high-DDX3/high-nuclear β-catenin or high-DDX3/high-pDvl2/high-nuclear β-catenin expression.

  2. Directed migration of human neural progenitor cells to interleukin-1β is promoted by chemokines stromal cell-derived factor-1 and monocyte chemotactic factor-1 in mouse brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yumei

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurogenesis, including the proliferation, migration and differentiation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs, is impaired in HIV-1 associated dementia (HAD. We previously demonstrated HIV-1-infected macrophages (HIV-MDM regulate stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1 production in astrocytes through Interleukin-1β (IL-1β. Chemokines are known to induce NPC migration; however, it remains unclear how chemokines produced in inflammation regulate NPC migration. Methods The secretion of SDF-1 and Monocyte chemotactic preotein-1 (MCP-1 in astrocytes upon IL-1β stimulation was measured by ELISA assay. Human NPCs were injected parallel along with IL-1β, SDF-1 or MCP-1 intracranially into basal ganglion 1 mm apart in SCID mice, and immunofluorescent staining was used to study the survival and migration of injected human NPCs. Results SDF-1 and MCP-1 are secreted by astrocytes upon IL-1β stimulation in a time-dependent manner. Injected human NPCs survived in SCID mice and migrated towards sites of IL-1β, SDF-1 and MCP-1 injection. Conclusions In conclusion, chemokines SDF-1 or MCP-1 secreted by astrocytes in the presence of IL-1β injection are attractive to NPCs injected into SCID mouse brains, suggesting that SDF-1 and MCP-1 play important roles in NPC migration during neuroinflammation.

  3. Adiponectin haploinsufficiency promotes mammary tumor development in MMTV-PyVT mice by modulation of phosphatase and tensin homolog activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice B B Lam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adiponectin is an adipokine possessing beneficial effects on obesity-related medical complications. A negative association of adiponectin levels with breast cancer development has been demonstrated. However, the precise role of adiponectin deficiency in mammary carcinogenesis remains elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, MMTV-polyomavirus middle T antigen (MMTV-PyVT transgenic mice with reduced adiponectin expressions were established and the stromal effects of adiponectin haploinsufficiency on mammary tumor development evaluated. In mice from both FVB/N and C57BL/6J backgrounds, insufficient adiponectin production promoted mammary tumor onset and development. A distinctive basal-like subtype of tumors, with a more aggressive phenotype, was derived from adiponectin haplodeficient MMTV-PyVT mice. Comparing with those from control MMTV-PyVT mice, the isolated mammary tumor cells showed enhanced tumor progression in re-implanted nude mice, accelerated proliferation in primary cultures, and hyperactivated phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K/Akt/beta-catenin signaling, which at least partly attributed to the decreased phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN activities. Further analysis revealed that PTEN was inactivated by a redox-regulated mechanism. Increased association of PTEN-thioredoxin complexes was detected in tumors derived from mice with reduced adiponectin levels. The activities of thioredoxin (Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1 were significantly elevated, whereas treatment with either curcumin, an irreversible inhibitor of TrxR1, or adiponectin largely attenuated their activities and resulted in the re-activation of PTEN in these tumor cells. Moreover, adiponectin could inhibit TrxR1 promoter-mediated transcription and restore the mRNA expressions of TrxR1. CONCLUSION: Adiponectin haploinsufficiency facilitated mammary tumorigenesis by down-regulation of PTEN activity and activation of PI3K

  4. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in inflammation of the nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, D; Han, Yong-Chang; Rani, M R

    2000-01-01

    This article focuses on the production of chemokines by resident glial cells of the nervous system. We describe studies in two distinct categories of inflammation within the nervous system: immune-mediated inflammation as seen in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) or multiple sclerosis...

  5. Gr-1+CD11b+ cells are responsible for tumor promoting effect of TGF-β in breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoyang; Pang, Yanli; Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Achyut, B R; Heger, Christopher; Goldsmith, Paul K; Lonning, Scott; Yang, Li

    2012-12-01

    One great challenge in our understanding of TGF-β cancer biology and the successful application of TGF-β-targeted therapy is that TGF-β works as both a tumor suppressor and a tumor promoter. The underlying mechanisms for its functional change remain to be elucidated. Using 4T1 mammary tumor model that shares many characteristics with human breast cancer, particularly its ability to spontaneously metastasize to the lungs, we demonstrate that Gr-1+CD11b+ cells or myeloid derived suppressor cells are important mediators in TGF-β regulation of mammary tumor progression. Depletion of Gr-1+CD11b+ cells diminished the antitumor effect of TGF-β neutralization. Two mechanisms were involved: first, treatment with TGF-β neutralization antibody (1D11) significantly decreased the number of Gr-1+CD11b+ cells in tumor tissues and premetastatic lung. This is mediated through increased Gr-1+CD11b+ cell apoptosis. In addition, 1D11 treatment significantly decreased the expression of Th2 cytokines and Arginase 1. Interestingly, the number and property of Gr-1+CD11b+ cells in peripheral blood/draining lymph nodes correlated with tumor size and metastases in response to 1D11 treatment. Our data suggest that the efficacy of TGF-β neutralization depends on the presence of Gr-1+CD11b+ cells, and these cells could be good biomarkers for TGF-β-targeted therapy.

  6. Chemokines in the brain : neuroimmunology and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biber, K; Zuurman, MW; Dijkstra, IM; Boddeke, HWGM

    2002-01-01

    Chemokines in the brain have been recognised as essential elements in neurodegenerative diseases and related neuroinflammation. Recent studies suggest that in addition to the orchestration of chemotaxis of immune cells, chemokines are also involved in neurodevelopment and neurophysiological signalli

  7. A simple and effective approach for treatment of situs tumor and metastasis:to promote intratumor pus formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The recent emergence of the tumor microenvironment as the critical determinant in cancer outcome opens a new routes to fight cancer, however, the clinical results of targeting microenvironment for treating human cancer have not met expectations. Our purpose is to investigate how to target microenvironment for treatment of situs tumor and metastasis.Methods : We suppose that tumor is a robber from times of anarchy and disorder and can be eradicated in flourishing age. We also suppose that carcinogenesis is largely attributed to physically weak that cann’t get rid of ulcer by pus formation. In vivo,the subcutaneous implant model and pulmonary metastasis model of lewis lung cancer were established. Tumor bearing mice were taken water decoction of Astragalus mongholicus(huangqi and Spina Gleditsiae (zaojiaoci by intragastric administration b.i.d for ten weeks, and the influences of Astragalus mongholicus and Spina Gleditsiae  on tumor progression were evaluated by body temperature,blood oxygen saturation,red cell ATPase,blood  rheology,intratumor hypoxia,capillary permeability, matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs and intratumor pus formation.  Results:We found that both of Astragalus mongholicus and Spina Gleditsiae could keep body temperature,blood oxygen saturation,red cell ATPase and blood rheology,and improve intratumor hypoxia,capillary permeability and MMPs in tumor bearing mice,which led to slower tumor growth and less metastasis. Astragalus mongholicus could remove body poison and stimulate immune responses, and Spina Gleditsiae  could  promote pus formation and proteolytic enzymes. The combination of  Astragalus mongholicus and Spina Gleditsiae favored the restoration of tumor immune responses and proteolytic activity at the tumor site, which not only result to an increase in aseptic pus formation, but also to a decrease in necrotic tissue accumulation, and finally caused a complete intratumor pus

  8. Role of tumor necrosis factor-α -308 G/A promoter polymorphism in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar C Bhayal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Gastric cancer (GC is the fourth most common cancer and the second most common cause of cancer death world-wide after lung cancer. It is a multifactorial disease with the involvement of both genetic and environmental risk factors. Genetic variation in genes encoding cytokines and their receptors, determine the intensity of the inflammatory response, which may contribute to individual differences in severity of outcome of the disease. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine and acid inhibitor. A bi allelic G to A polymorphism at -308 upstream from the transcription initiation site of the promoter is associated with elevated TNF levels. The present study is aimed at evaluating the role of TNF-α-308 (G → A gene polymorphism and susceptibility to GC. Subjects and Methods: A case-control study was carried out in 114 GC patients and 229 healthy control subjects. TNF-α genotyping at position-308 (G → A was carried out by amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR method followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Results: The distribution of TNF-α genotypes at -308 (G → A were GG 28.07%, GA 66.67% and AA 5.26% in GC patients and GG 33.19%, GA 55.89% and AA 10.92% in control subjects. The frequencies of alleles G and A were 0.614 and 0.386 in GC patients and 0.611 and 0.389 in control subjects respectively. Conclusion: The study showed no significant difference in the distribution of genotype and allelic frequencies between GC patients and control subject.

  9. [Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations in the tumors of human endocrine organs: Biological and prognostic value].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selivanova, L S; Volganova, K S; Abrosimov, A Y U

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the data available in the literature has shown that telomerase reverse transcriptase TERT promoter may serve as promising markers of malignancy, aggressive disease course, and poor prognosis for malignant tumors of endocrine organs. Considering the established association of mutations with tumors having a poor prognosis (high-grade and anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid), it is reasonable to perform prognostic-value investigations in a group of low-grade thyroid carcinomas that may occasionally recur and may be resistant to radioactive iodine therapy, i.e. can demonstrate a poor course and prognosis. TERT promoter mutations may be a specific marker of the clinically aggressive forms of adrenocortical carcinoma, but the determination of its diagnostic value calls for additional investigations that will have the larger number cases and establish the association with clinical features and survival rates.

  10. Metastasis-inducing S100A4 and RANTES cooperate in promoting tumor progression in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte Forst

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The tumor microenvironment has been described as a critical milieu determining tumor growth and metastases. A pivotal role of metastasis-inducing S100A4 in the development of tumor stroma has been proven in animal models and verified in human breast cancer biopsies. Expression and release of S100A4 has been shown in various types of stroma composing cells, including fibroblasts and immune cells. However, the events implicated in upstream and downstream pathways regulating the activity of the extracellular S100A4 protein in the tumor milieu remain unsolved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied the interplay between the tumor cell-derived cytokine regulated-upon-activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES; CCL5 and S100A4 which were shown to be critical factors in tumor progression. We found that RANTES stimulates the externalization of S100A4 via microparticle shedding from the plasma membrane of tumor and stroma cells. Conversely, the released S100A4 protein induces the upregulation of fibronectin (FN in fibroblasts and a number of cytokines, including RANTES in tumor cells as well as stimulates cell motility in a wound healing assay. Importantly, using wild type and S100A4-deficient mouse models, we demonstrated a substantial influence of tumor cell-derived RANTES on S100A4 release into blood circulation which ultimately increases the metastatic burden in mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether, the data presented strongly validate the pro-metastatic function of S100A4 in the tumor microenvironment and define how the tumor cell-derived cytokine RANTES acts as a critical regulator of S100A4-dependent tumor cell dissemination. Additionally, for the first time we demonstrated the mechanism of S100A4 release associated with plasma membrane microparticle shedding from various cells types.

  11. Internal radiotherapy of liver cancer with rat hepato-carcinoma-intestine-pancreas gene as a liver tumor-specific promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herve, J.; Cunha, A. Sa; Liu, B.; Valogne, Y.; Longuet, M.; Bregerie, O.; Guettier, C.; Samuel, D.; Brechot, C.; Faivre, J. [Hop Paul Brousse, INSERM, Hepatobiliary Ctr, U785, F-94800 Villejuif (France); Herve, J.; Cunha, A. Sa; Liu, B.; Valogne, Y.; Longuet, M.; Bregerie, O.; Guettier, C.; Samuel, D.; Brechot, C.; Faivre, J. [Univ Paris Sud, Fac Med, F-94800 Villejuif (France); Boisgard, R.; Tavitian, B. [INSERM, U803, F-91400 Orsay (France); Boisgard, R.; Tavitian, B. [CEA, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, Lab Imagerie Mol Expt, F-91400 Orsay (France); Roux, J.; Cales, P. [Univ Angers, UPRES EA 3859, Lab Hemodynam Interact Fibrose et Invas Tumorale H, Angers (France); Clerc, J. [Hop Cochin, AP HP, Dept Nucl Med, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    The hepato-carcinoma-intestine-pancreas (HIP) gene, also called pancreatitis-associated protein-1 (PAP1) or Reg III {alpha}, is activated in most human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) but not in normal liver, which suggests that HIP regulatory sequence could be used as efficient liver tumor-specific promoters to express a therapeutic polynucleotide in liver cancer. The sodium iodide sym-porter (NIS), which has recognized therapeutic and reporter gene properties, is appropriate to evaluate the transcriptional strength and specificity of the HIP promoter in HCC. For this purpose, we constructed a recombinant rat HIP-NIS adeno-viral vector (AdrHIP-NIS), and evaluated its performance as a mediator of selective radio-iodide uptake in tumor hepatocytes. Western blot, immunofluorescence, and iodide uptake assays were performed in AdrHIP-NIS-infected primary hepatocytes and transformed hepatic and non-hepatic cells. Nuclear imaging, tissue counting and immuno-histo-chemistry were performed in normal and HCC-bearing Wistar rats infected with AdrHIP-NIS intra-tumorally or via the hepatic artery. In AdrHIP-NIS-infected transformed hepatic cells, functional NIS was strongly expressed, as in cells infected with a cytomegalovirus-NIS vector. No NIS expression was found in AdrHIP-NIS-infected normal hepatocytes or transformed non-hepatic cells. In rats bearing multi-nodular HCC, AdrHIP-NIS triggered functional NIS expression that was preferential in tumor hepatocytes. Administration of 18 mCi of {sup 131}I resulted in the destruction of AdrHIP-NIS-injected nodules. This study has identified the rHIP regulatory sequence as a potent liver tumor-specific promoter for the transfer of therapeutic genes, and AdrHIP-NIS-mediated. {sup 131}I therapy as a valuable option for the treatment of multi-nodular HCC. (authors)

  12. Transformation and tumor promoter sensitive phosphoproteins in JB-6 mouse epidermal cells: one is also sensitive to heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindhart, T D; Stevens, L; Copley, M P

    1984-09-01

    JB-6 mouse epidermal cells undergo irreversible transformation when exposed to tumor-promoting agents such as 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Phosphoprotein changes related to transformation were sought in four tumor cell lines related to JB-6 cells. Two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed altered abundances of five phosphoproteins in the tumor cell lines compared with five untransformed clones. The mol. wt. in Kilodaltons and isoelectric points in pH units were: 120/6.0, 80/4.5, 55/6.5, 37/5.0 and 23-25/4.5. In all four transformants pp80 was markedly decreased and the pp23-25 doublet increased. In two of the four transformants pp120 and pp55 were increased and pp37 decreased. Treatment of untransformed clones with TPA affected only one of the phosphoproteins altered in the transformants. Treatment of untransformed clones with TPA produced a 2-fold increase in pp80 after 5 h. pp80 returned to baseline levels by 24 h and changed little in the continuous presence of TPA for up to 96 h. The increase in pp80 with short term TPA treatment occurred in all of the untransformed clones but none of four transformants. Late preneoplastic (P+) JB-6 cells only require treatment with a tumor promoter to transform. Early preneoplastic (P-) JB-6 cells require prior transfection of DNA from late preneoplastic JB-6 cells to transform in response to tumor promoter treatment. Quantitative analysis of pp80 in early preneoplastic, late preneoplastic, and tumor cell lines showed an inverse relationship between the level of pp80 and degree of preneoplastic progression in these cells. pp80 represents approximately 2% of total cellular phosphoprotein in JB-6 cells, shows microheterogeneity of both mol. wt. and isoelectric point, occurs in the particulate fraction of cells and is readily solubilized by 1% Triton. pp80 is increased by heat stress and shares other properties with the recently described mammalian heat stress protein, hsp 80. pp80's decrease in

  13. Metastasis-inducing S100A4 and RANTES cooperate in promoting tumor progression in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forst, Birgitte; Hansen, Matilde Thye; Klingelhöfer, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment has been described as a critical milieu determining tumor growth and metastases. A pivotal role of metastasis-inducing S100A4 in the development of tumor stroma has been proven in animal models and verified in human breast cancer biopsies. Expression and release of S100A4...... has been shown in various types of stroma composing cells, including fibroblasts and immune cells. However, the events implicated in upstream and downstream pathways regulating the activity of the extracellular S100A4 protein in the tumor milieu remain unsolved....

  14. Assessing tumor progression factors by somatic gene transfer into a mouse model: Bcl-xL promotes islet tumor cell invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chieh Nancy Du

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumors develop through multiple stages, implicating multiple effectors, but the tools to assess how candidate genes contribute to stepwise tumor progression have been limited. We have developed a novel system in which progression of phenotypes in a mouse model of pancreatic islet cell tumorigenesis can be used to measure the effects of genes introduced by cell-type-specific infection with retroviral vectors. In this system, bitransgenic mice, in which the rat insulin promoter (RIP drives expression of both the SV40 T antigen (RIP-Tag and the receptor for subgroup A avian leukosis virus (RIP-tva, are infected with avian viral vectors carrying cDNAs encoding candidate progression factors. Like RIP-Tag mice, RIP-Tag; RIP-tva bitransgenic mice develop isolated carcinomas by approximately 14 wk of age, after progression through well-defined stages that are similar to aspects of human tumor progression, including hyperplasia, angiogenesis, adenoma, and invasive carcinoma. When avian retroviral vectors carrying a green fluorescent protein marker were introduced into RIP-Tag; RIP-tva mice by intra-cardiac injection at the hyperplastic or early dysplastic stage of tumorigenesis, approximately 20% of the TVA-positive cells were infected and expressed green fluorescent proteins as measured by flow cytometry. Similar infection with vectors carrying cDNA encoding either of two progression factors, a dominant-negative version of cadherin 1 (dnE-cad or Bcl-xL, accelerated the formation of islet tumors with invasive properties and pancreatic lymph node metastasis. To begin studying the mechanism by which Bcl-xL, an anti-apoptotic protein, promotes invasion and metastasis, RIP-Tag; RIP-tva pancreatic islet tumor cells were infected in vitro with RCASBP-Bcl-xL. Although no changes were observed in rates of proliferation or apoptosis, Bcl-xL altered cell morphology, remodeled the actin cytoskeleton, and down-regulated cadherin 1; it also induced cell migration and

  15. Metabolism of indole alkaloid tumor promoter, (-)-indolactam V, which has the fundamental structure of teleocidins, by rat liver microsomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, N.; Irie, K.; Tokuda, H.; Koshimizu, K.

    1987-07-01

    Metabolic activation and/or deactivation of indole alkaloid tumor promoter, (-)-indolactam V (ILV), was examined using rat liver microsomes. Reaction of ILV with the microsomes supplemented with NADPH and MgCl/sub 2/ gave three major metabolites, which were identified as (-)-N13-desmethylindolactam V and two diastereomers of (-)-2-oxyindolactam V at C-3. The tumor-promoting activities of these metabolites were evaluated by induction of Epstein-Barr virus early antigen and inhibition of specific binding of (/sup 3/H)-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate to a mouse epidermal particulate fraction, and proved to be conspicuously lower than that of ILV. These results demonstrate that the metabolism of ILV results in detoxification, and that it itself is the tumor-promoting entity. Studies on the enzymes concerned with this metabolism suggested the involvement of cytochrome P-450-containing mixed-function oxidases. Similar deactivation seems to be possible by skin, where the mixed-function oxidases are known to exist.

  16. alphaB-crystallin promotes tumor angiogenesis by increasing vascular survival during tube morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimberg, Anna; Rylova, Svetlana; Dieterich, Lothar C; Olsson, Anna-Karin; Schiller, Petter; Wikner, Charlotte; Bohman, Svante; Botling, Johan; Lukinius, Agneta; Wawrousek, Eric F; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2008-02-15

    Selective targeting of endothelial cells in tumor vessels requires delineation of key molecular events in formation and survival of blood vessels within the tumor microenvironment. To this end, proteins transiently up-regulated during vessel morphogenesis were screened for their potential as targets in antiangiogenic tumor therapy. The molecular chaperone alphaB-crystallin was identified as specifically induced with regard to expression level, modification by serine phosphorylation, and subcellular localization during tubular morphogenesis of endothelial cells. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of alphaB-crystallin expression did not affect endothelial proliferation but led to attenuated tubular morphogenesis, early activation of proapoptotic caspase-3, and increased apoptosis. alphaB-crystallin was expressed in a subset of human tumor vessels but not in normal capillaries. Tumors grown in alphaB-crystallin(-/-) mice were significantly less vascularized than wild-type tumors and displayed increased areas of apoptosis/necrosis. Importantly, tumor vessels in alphaB-crystallin(-/-) mice were leaky and showed signs of caspase-3 activation and extensive apoptosis. Ultrastructural analyses showed defective vessels partially devoid of endothelial lining. These data strongly implicate alphaB-crystallin as an important regulator of tubular morphogenesis and survival of endothelial cell during tumor angiogenesis. Hereby we identify the small heat shock protein family as a novel class of angiogenic modulators.

  17. Plexin-A4 promotes tumor progression and tumor angiogenesis by enhancement of VEGF and bFGF signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigel, Boaz; Rabinowicz, Noa; Varshavsky, Asya; Kessler, Ofra; Neufeld, Gera

    2011-10-13

    Plexin-A4 is a receptor for sema6A and sema6B and associates with neuropilins to transduce signals of class-3 semaphorins. We observed that plexin-A1 and plexin-A4 are required simultaneously for transduction of inhibitory sema3A signals and that they form complexes. Unexpectedly, inhibition of plexin-A1 or plexin-A4 expression in endothelial cells using specific shRNAs resulted in prominent plexin type specific rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton that were accompanied by inhibition of bFGF and VEGF-induced cell proliferation. The two responses were not interdependent since silencing plexin-A4 in U87MG glioblastoma cells inhibited cell proliferation and strongly inhibited the formation of tumors from these cells without affecting cytoskeletal organization. Plexin-A4 formed stable complexes with the FGFR1 and VEGFR-2 tyrosine-kinase receptors and enhanced VEGF-induced VEGFR-2 phosphorylation in endothelial cells as well as bFGF-induced cell proliferation. We also obtained evidence suggesting that some of the pro-proliferative effects of plexin-A4 are due to transduction of autocrine sema6B-induced pro-proliferative signals, since silencing sema6B expression in endothelial cells and in U87MG cells mimicked the effects of plexin-A4 silencing and also inhibited tumor formation from the U87MG cells. Our results suggest that plexin-A4 may represent a target for the development of novel anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic drugs.

  18. Cigarette Smoking, BPDE-DNA Adducts, and Aberrant Promoter Methylations of Tumor Suppressor Genes (TSGs) in NSCLC from Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yongtang; Xu, Peiwei; Liu, Xinneng; Zhang, Chunye; Tan, Cong; Chen, Chunmei; Sun, Xiaoyu; Xu, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is related to the genetic and epigenetic factors. The goal of this study was to determine association of cigarette smoking and BPDE-DNA adducts with promoter methylations of several genes in NSCLC. Methylation of the promoters of p16, RARβ, DAPK, MGMT, and TIMP-3 genes of tumor tissues from 199 lung cancer patients was analyzed with methylation-specific PCR (MSP), and BPDE-DNA adduct level in lung cancer tissue was obtained by ELISA. Level of BPDE-DNA adduct increased significantly in males, aged people (over 60 years), and smokers; however, no significant difference was found while comparing the BPDE-DNA adduct levels among different tumor types, locations, and stages. Cigarette smoking was also associated with increased BPDE-DNA adducts level (OR = 2.43, p > .05) and increased methylation level in at least 1 gene (OR = 5.22, p smoking also significantly increase the risk of p16 or DAPK methylation (OR = 3.02, p smoking for more than 40 pack-years (OR = 4.21, p smoking is significantly associated with the increase of BPDE-DNA adduct level, promoter hypermethylation of p16 and DAPK genes, while BPDE-DNA adduct was not significantly related to abnormal promoter hypermethylation in TSGs, suggesting that BPDE-DNA adducts and TSGs methylations play independent roles in NSCLC.

  19. High-fat-diet-induced obesity causes an inflammatory and tumor-promoting microenvironment in the rat kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Stemmer

    2012-09-01

    Obesity and concomitant comorbidities have emerged as public health problems of the first order. For instance, obese individuals have an increased risk for kidney cancer. However, direct mechanisms linking obesity with kidney cancer remain elusive. We hypothesized that diet-induced obesity (DIO promotes renal carcinogenesis by inducing an inflammatory and tumor-promoting microenvironment. We compared chow-fed lean Wistar rats with those that were sensitive (DIOsens or partially resistant (DIOres to DIO to investigate the impact of body adiposity versus dietary nutrient overload in the development of renal preneoplasia and activation of tumor-promoting signaling pathways. Our data clearly show a correlation between body adiposity, the severity of nephropathy, and the total number and incidence of preneoplastic renal lesions. However, similar plasma triglyceride, plasma free fatty acid and renal triglyceride levels were found in chow-fed, DIOres and DIOsens rats, suggesting that lipotoxicity is not a critical contributor to the renal pathology. Obesity-related nephropathy was further associated with regenerative cell proliferation, monocyte infiltration and higher renal expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, interleukin (IL-6, IL-6 receptor and leptin receptor. Accordingly, we observed increased signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR phosphorylation in tubules with preneoplastic phenotypes. In summary, our results demonstrate that high body adiposity induces an inflammatory and proliferative microenvironment in rat kidneys that promotes the development of preneoplastic lesions, potentially via activation of the STAT3 and mTOR signaling pathways.

  20. Chemokines in the balance: maintenance of homeostasis and protection at CNS barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Williams

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the adult central nervous system (CNS, chemokines and their receptors are involved in developmental, physiological and pathological processes. Although most lines of investigation focus on their ability to induce the migration of cells, recent studies indicate that chemokines also promote cellular interactions and activate signaling pathways that maintain CNS homeostatic functions. Many homeostatic chemokines are expressed on the vasculature of the blood brain barrier including CXCL12, CCL19, CCL20, and CCL21. While endothelial cell expression of these chemokines is known to regulate the entry of leukocytes into the CNS during immunosurveillance, new data indicate that CXCL12 is also involved in diverse cellular activities including adult neurogenesis and neuronal survival, having an opposing role to the homeostatic chemokine, CXCL14, which appears to regulate synaptic inputs to neural precursors. Neuronal expression of CX3CL1, yet another homeostatic chemokine that promotes neuronal survival and communication with microglia, is partly regulated by CXCL12. Regulation of CXCL12 is unique in that it may regulate its own expression levels via binding to its scavenger receptor CXCR7/ACKR3. In this review, we explore the diverse roles of these and other homeostatic chemokines expressed within the CNS, including the possible implications of their dysfunction as a cause of neurologic disease.

  1. Targeting tumor-associated macrophages and inhibition of MCP-1 reduce angiogenesis and tumor growth in a human melanoma xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzaniga, Silvina; Bravo, Alicia I; Guglielmotti, Angelo; van Rooijen, Nico; Maschi, Fabricio; Vecchi, Annunciata; Mantovani, Alberto; Mordoh, José; Wainstok, Rosa

    2007-08-01

    Chemokines such as monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 are key agonists that attract macrophages to tumors. In melanoma, it has been previously shown that variable levels of MCP-1/CCL2 appear to correlate with infiltrating macrophages and tumor fate, with low to intermediate levels of the chemokine contributing to melanoma development. To work under such conditions, a poorly tumorigenic human melanoma cell line was transfected with an expression vector encoding MCP-1. We found that M2 macrophages are associated to MCP-1+ tumors, triggering a profuse vascular network. To target the protumoral macrophages recruitment and reverting tumor growth promotion, clodronate-laden liposomes (Clod-Lip) or bindarit were administered to melanoma-bearing mice. Macrophage depletion after Clod-Lip treatment induced development of smaller tumors than in untreated mice. Immunohistochemical analysis with an anti-CD31 antibody revealed scarce vascular structures mainly characterized by narrow vascular lights. Pharmacological inhibition of MCP-1 with bindarit also reduced tumor growth and macrophage recruitment, rendering necrotic tumor masses. We suggest that bindarit or Clod-Lip abrogates protumoral-associated macrophages in human melanoma xenografts and could be considered as complementary approaches to antiangiogenic therapy.

  2. The effect of dietary lipid on skin tumor promotion by benzoyl peroxide: comparison of fish, coconut and corn oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locniskar, M; Belury, M A; Cumberland, A G; Patrick, K E; Fischer, S M

    1991-06-01

    Fish or vegetable oils were fed during the promotion stage of a mouse skin carcinogenesis model in order to investigate the effects of dietary fat on tumor development. Two weeks after initiation with 10 nmol dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, SENCAR mice were divided into five groups and maintained on one of the following semipurified diets containing 10% total fat and varying the type of fat: 8.5% coconut oil (CT)/1.5% corn oil (CO); 1% menhaden oil (MO)/7.5% CT/1.5% CO; 4% MO/4.5% CT/1.5% CO; 8.5% MO/1.5% CO; or 10% CO. Promotion with twice-weekly applications of 40 mg benzoyl peroxide was begun 2 weeks later and continued for 52 weeks. No statistically significant differences in kcal food consumed or body weights were observed between diet groups. Papilloma latency, incidence and yield differed among the diet groups with the group fed the 8.5% CT/1.5% CO diet having the shortest latency and highest papilloma incidence and number. In addition, carcinoma latency and incidence was assessed and the first carcinoma appeared in the group fed 8.5% CT/1.5% CO after 20 weeks of benzoyl peroxide treatment; this group yielded the highest carcinoma incidence throughout the study. In comparison, the group fed the 10% CO diet had the longest latency period, and among the lowest papilloma and carcinoma incidence and fewest tumors. In parallel studies, ornithine decarboxylase activity, vascular permeability and hyperplasia were elevated in the epidermis of benzoyl peroxide-treated mice but the extent of the response did not correlate with the different rates of tumor formation observed among the diet groups. These data indicate that dietary fat modulates tumor promotion by benzoyl peroxide in this skin carcinogenesis model with the predominantly saturated fat diet producing the highest rates of papilloma and carcinogen formation and the polyunsaturated fat diet the lowest.

  3. Fasting-Mimicking Diet Reduces HO-1 to Promote T Cell-Mediated Tumor Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Biase, Stefano; Lee, Changhan; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Manes, Brianna; Buono, Roberta; Cheng, Chia-Wei; Cacciottolo, Mafalda; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; de Cabo, Rafael; Wei, Min; Morgan, Todd E; Longo, Valter D

    2016-07-11

    Immune-based interventions are promising strategies to achieve long-term cancer-free survival. Fasting was previously shown to differentially sensitize tumors to chemotherapy while protecting normal cells, including hematopoietic stem and immune cells, from its toxic side effects. Here, we show that the combination of chemotherapy and a fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) increases the levels of bone marrow common lymphoid progenitor cells and cytotoxic CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), leading to a major delay in breast cancer and melanoma progression. In breast tumors, this effect is partially mediated by the downregulation of the stress-responsive enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). These data indicate that FMD cycles combined with chemotherapy can enhance T cell-dependent targeted killing of cancer cells both by stimulating the hematopoietic system and by enhancing CD8(+)-dependent tumor cytotoxicity.

  4. C8-glycosphingolipids preferentially insert into tumor cell membranes and promote chemotherapeutic drug uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro Pedrosa, Lília R; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Steurer, Barbara; Ciceri, Dalila; ten Hagen, Timo L M; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Verheij, Marcel; Goñi, Felix María; Koning, Gerben A; Contreras, F-Xabier

    2015-08-01

    Insufficient drug delivery into tumor cells limits the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy. Co-delivery of liposome-encapsulated drug and synthetic short-chain glycosphingolipids (SC-GSLs) significantly improved drug bioavailability by enhancing intracellular drug uptake. Investigating the mechanisms underlying this SC-GSL-mediated drug uptake enhancement is the aim of this study. Fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize the cell membrane lipid transfer intracellular fate of fluorescently labeled C6-NBD-GalCer incorporated in liposomes in tumor and non-tumor cells. Additionally click chemistry was applied to image and quantify native SC-GSLs in tumor and non-tumor cell membranes. SC-GSL-mediated flip-flop was investigated in model membranes to confirm membrane-incorporation of SC-GSL and its effect on membrane remodeling. SC-GSL enriched liposomes containing doxorubicin (Dox) were incubated at 4°C and 37°C and intracellular drug uptake was studied in comparison to standard liposomes and free Dox. SC-GSL transfer to the cell membrane was independent of liposomal uptake and the majority of the transferred lipid remained in the plasma membrane. The transfer of SC-GSL was tumor cell-specific and induced membrane rearrangement as evidenced by a transbilayer flip-flop of pyrene-SM. However, pore formation was measured, as leakage of hydrophilic fluorescent probes was not observed. Moreover, drug uptake appeared to be mediated by SC-GSLs. SC-GSLs enhanced the interaction of doxorubicin (Dox) with the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of tumor cells at 4°C. Our results demonstrate that SC-GSLs preferentially insert into tumor cell plasma membranes enhancing cell intrinsic capacity to translocate amphiphilic drugs such as Dox across the membrane via a biophysical process.

  5. Galectin-1, a gene preferentially expressed at the tumor margin, promotes glioblastoma cell invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toussaint L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-grade gliomas, including glioblastomas (GBMs, are recalcitrant to local therapy in part because of their ability to invade the normal brain parenchyma surrounding these tumors. Animal models capable of recapitulating glioblastoma invasion may help identify mediators of this aggressive phenotype. Methods Patient-derived glioblastoma lines have been propagated in our laboratories and orthotopically xenografted into the brains of immunocompromized mice. Invasive cells at the tumor periphery were isolated using laser capture microdissection. The mRNA expression profile of these cells was compared to expression at the tumor core, using normal mouse brain to control for host contamination. Galectin-1, a target identified by screening the resulting data, was stably over-expressed in the U87MG cell line. Sub-clones were assayed for attachment, proliferation, migration, invasion, and in vivo tumor phenotype. Results Expression microarray data identified galectin-1 as the most potent marker (p-value 4.0 x 10-8 to identify GBM cells between tumor-brain interface as compared to the tumor core. Over-expression of galectin-1 enhanced migration and invasion in vitro. In vivo, tumors expressing high galectin-1 levels showed enhanced invasion and decreased host survival. Conclusions In conclusion, cells at the margin of glioblastoma, in comparison to tumor core cells, have enhanced expression of mediators of invasion. Galectin-1 is likely one such mediator. Previous studies, along with the current one, have proven galectin-1 to be important in the migration and invasion of glioblastoma cells, in GBM neoangiogenesis, and also, potentially, in GBM immune privilege. Targeting this molecule may offer clinical improvement to the current standard of glioblastoma therapy, i.e. radiation, temozolomide, anti-angiogenic therapy, and vaccinotherapy.

  6. Ghrelin promotes oral tumor cell proliferation by modifying GLUT1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Dominik; Reckenbeil, Jan; Wenghoefer, Matthias; Stark, Helmut; Frentzen, Matthias; Allam, Jean-Pierre; Novak, Natalija; Frede, Stilla; Götz, Werner; Probstmeier, Rainer; Meyer, Rainer; Winter, Jochen

    2016-03-01

    In our study, ghrelin was investigated with respect to its capacity on proliferative effects and molecular correlations on oral tumor cells. The presence of all molecular components of the ghrelin system, i.e., ghrelin and its receptors, was analyzed and could be detected using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. To examine cellular effects caused by ghrelin and to clarify downstream-regulatory mechanisms, two different oral tumor cell lines (BHY and HN) were used in cell culture experiments. Stimulation of either cell line with ghrelin led to a significantly increased proliferation. Signal transduction occurred through phosphorylation of GSK-3β and nuclear translocation of β-catenin. This effect could be inhibited by blocking protein kinase A. Glucose transporter1 (GLUT1), as an important factor for delivering sufficient amounts of glucose to tumor cells having high requirements for this carbohydrate (Warburg effect) was up-regulated by exogenous and endogenous ghrelin. Silencing intracellular ghrelin concentrations using siRNA led to a significant decreased expression of GLUT1 and proliferation. In conclusion, our study describes the role for the appetite-stimulating peptide hormone ghrelin in oral cancer proliferation under the particular aspect of glucose uptake: (1) tumor cells are a source of ghrelin. (2) Ghrelin affects tumor cell proliferation through autocrine and/or paracrine activity. (3) Ghrelin modulates GLUT1 expression and thus indirectly enhances tumor cell proliferation. These findings are of major relevance, because glucose uptake is assumed to be a promising target for cancer treatment.

  7. Over-Expression of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-D Promotes Tumor Growth and Invasion in Endometrial Cancer

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    Yuan Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The platelet-derived growth factor-D (PDGF-D was demonstrated to be able to promote tumor growth and invasion in human malignancies. However, little is known about its roles in endometrial cancer. In the present study, we investigated the expression and functions of PDGF-D in human endometrial cancer. Alterations of PDGF-D mRNA and protein were determined by real time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical staining. Up-regulation of PDGF-D was achieved by stably transfecting the pcDNA3-PDGF-D plasmids into ECC-1 cells; and knockdown of PDGF-D was achieved by transient transfection with siRNA-PDGF-D into Ishikawa cells. The MTT assay, colony formation assay and Transwell assay were used to detect the effects of PDGF-D on cellular proliferation and invasion. The xenograft assay was used to investigate the functions of PDGF-D in vivo. Compared to normal endometrium, more than 50% cancer samples showed over-expression of PDGF-D (p < 0.001, and high level of PDGF-D was correlated with late stage (p = 0.003, deep myometrium invasion (p < 0.001 and lympha vascular space invasion (p = 0.006. In vitro, over-expressing PDGF-D in ECC-1 cells significantly accelerated tumor growth and promoted cellular invasion by increasing the level of MMP2 and MMP9; while silencing PDGF-D in Ishikawa cells impaired cell proliferation and inhibited the invasion, through suppressing the expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Moreover, we also demonstrated that over-expressed PDGF-D could induce EMT and knockdown of PDGF-D blocked the EMT transition. Consistently, in xenografts assay, PDGF-D over-expression significantly promoted tumor growth and tumor weights. We demonstrated that PDGF-D was commonly over-expressed in endometrial cancer, which was associated with late stage deep myometrium invasion and lympha vascular space invasion. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments showed PDGF-D could promote tumor growth and invasion through up-regulating MMP2/9 and inducing EMT. Thus, we

  8. The Rho exchange factors Vav2 and Vav3 favor skin tumor initiation and promotion by engaging extracellular signaling loops.

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    Mauricio Menacho-Márquez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic activity of GDP/GTP exchange factors (GEFs is considered critical to maintain the typically high activity of Rho GTPases found in cancer cells. However, the large number of them has made it difficult to pinpoint those playing proactive, nonredundant roles in tumors. In this work, we have investigated whether GEFs of the Vav subfamily exert such specific roles in skin cancer. Using genetically engineered mice, we show here that Vav2 and Vav3 favor cooperatively the initiation and promotion phases of skin tumors. Transcriptomal profiling and signaling experiments indicate such function is linked to the engagement of, and subsequent participation in, keratinocyte-based autocrine/paracrine programs that promote epidermal proliferation and recruitment of pro-inflammatory cells. This is a pathology-restricted mechanism because the loss of Vav proteins does not cause alterations in epidermal homeostasis. These results reveal a previously unknown Rho GEF-dependent pro-tumorigenic mechanism that influences the biology of cancer cells and their microenvironment. They also suggest that anti-Vav therapies may be of potential interest in skin tumor prevention and/or treatment.

  9. Strong Expression of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 by Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Advanced Disease

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    Thomas C. Wehler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverse chemokines and their receptors have been associated with tumor growth, tumor dissemination, and local immune escape. In different tumor entities, the level of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression has been linked with tumor progression and decreased survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of CXCR4 expression on the progression of human renal cell carcinoma. CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 113 patients. Intensity of CXCR4 expression was correlated with both tumor and patient characteristics. Human renal cell carcinoma revealed variable intensities of CXCR4 expression. Strong CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was significantly associated with advanced T-status (P=.039, tumor dedifferentiation (P = .0005, and low hemoglobin (P = .039. In summary, strong CXCR4 expression was significantly associated with advanced dedifferentiated renal cell carcinoma.

  10. Pre-B-cell leukemia homeobox interacting protein 1 is overexpressed in astrocytoma and promotes tumor cell growth and migration

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    van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Aronica, Eleonora; Hulleman, Esther; Wedekind, Laurine E.; Biesmans, Dennis; Malekzadeh, Arjan; Bugiani, Marianna; Geerts, Dirk; Noske, David P.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Kaspers, Gertjan J.L.; Cloos, Jacqueline; Würdinger, Thomas; van der Stoop, Petra P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Glial brain tumors cause considerable mortality and morbidity in children and adults. Innovative targets for therapy are needed to improve survival and reduce long-term sequelae. The aim of this study was to find a candidate tumor-promoting protein, abundantly expressed in tumor cells but not in normal brain tissues, as a potential target for therapy. Methods In silico proteomics and genomics, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence microscopy validation were performed. RNA interference was used to ascertain the functional role of the overexpressed candidate target protein. Results In silico proteomics and genomics revealed pre-B-cell leukemia homeobox (PBX) interacting protein 1 (PBXIP1) overexpression in adult and childhood high-grade glioma and ependymoma compared with normal brain. PBXIP1 is a PBX-family interacting microtubule-binding protein with a putative role in migration and proliferation of cancer cells. Immunohistochemical studies in glial tumors validated PBXIP1 expression in astrocytoma and ependymoma but not in oligodendroglioma. RNAi-mediated PBXIP1-knockdown in glioblastoma cell lines strongly reduced proliferation and migration and induced morphological changes, indicating that PBXIP1 knockdown decreases glioma cell viability and motility through rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, expression of PBXIP1 was observed in radial glia and astrocytic progenitor cells in human fetal tissues, suggesting that PBXIP1 is an astroglial progenitor cell marker during human embryonic development. Conclusion PBXIP1 is a novel protein overexpressed in astrocytoma and ependymoma, involved in tumor cell proliferation and migration, that warrants further exploration as a novel therapeutic target in these tumors. PMID:24470547

  11. Chemokine gene variants in schizophrenia.

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    Dasdemir, Selcuk; Kucukali, Cem Ismail; Bireller, Elif Sinem; Tuzun, Erdem; Cakmakoglu, Bedia

    2016-08-01

    Background Chemokines are known to play a major role in driving inflammation and immune responses in several neuroinflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Inflammation has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Aim We aimed to investigate a potential link between chemokines and schizophrenia and analyze the role of MCP-1-A2518G, SDF-1-3'A, CCR5-delta32, CCR5-A55029G, CXCR4-C138T and CCR2-V64I gene polymorphisms in the Turkish population. Methods Genotyping was conducted by PCR-RFLP based on 140 patients and 123 unrelated healthy controls to show the relation between chemokine gene variants and schizophrenia risk. Results Frequencies of CCR5-A55029G A genotypes and CCR5-A55029G AG genotypes were found higher in patients than the controls and even also CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes significantly associated according to Bonferroni correction. However, no significant association was found for any of the other polymorphisms with the risk of schizophrenia. Conclusions Our findings suggest that CCR5-A55029G polymorphisms and CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes might have association with schizophrenia pathogenesis.

  12. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T genotype affects promoter methylation of tumor-specific genes in sporadic colorectal cancer through an interaction with folate/vitamin B12 status

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pooneh Mokarram; Fakhraddin Naghibalhossaini; Mehdi Saberi Firoozi; Seyed Vahid Hosseini; Ahmad Izadpanah; Heshmetalah Salahi; Seyed Ali Malek-Hosseini; Abdoulrasool Talei; Mehra Mojallal

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate joint effects of Methy/entetra-hydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677Tgenotypes, and serum folate/vitamin B12 concentrations on promoter methylation of tumor-associated genes among Iranian colorectal cancer patients.METHODS: We examined the associations between MTHFR C677T genotype, and promoter methylation of P16, Hmlh1, and Hmsh2 tumor-related genes amonq 151 sporadic colorectal cancer patients. The promoter methylation of tumor-related genes was determined by methylation-specific PCR. Eighty six patients from whom fresh tumor samples were obtained and 81 controls were also examined for serum folate and vitamin B12, concentrations by a commercia radioimmunoassay kit.RESULTS: We found 29.1% of cases had tumors with at least one methylated gene promoter. In case-case comparison, we did not find a significant association between methylation in tumors and any single genotype. However, in comparison to controls with the CC genotype, an increased risk of tumor methylation was associated with the CT genotype (OR=2.5;95% CI,1.1-5.6). In case-case comparisons, folate/vitamin B12 levels were positively associated with tumor methylation. Adjusted odds ratios for tumor methylation in cases with high (above median) versus low (below median) serum folate/vitamin B12 levels were 4.9 (95% CI,1.4-17.7), and 3.9 (95% CI,1.1-13.9), respectively. The frequency of methylated tumors was significantly higher in high methyl donor than low methyl donor group, especially in those with MTHFR CT (P=0.01), and CT/TT (P=0.002) genotypes, but not in those with the CC genotype (P=1.0).CONCLUSION: We conclude that high concentrations of serum folate/vitamin B12 levels are associated with the risk of promoter methylation in tumor-specific genes, and this relationship is modified by MTHFR C677T genotypes.

  13. Sonic Hedgehog promotes tumor cell survival by inhibiting CDON pro-apoptotic activity.

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    Céline Delloye-Bourgeois

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog signaling is a determinant pathway for tumor progression. However, while inhibition of the Hedgehog canonical pathway-Patched-Smoothened-Gli-has proved efficient in human tumors with activating mutations in this pathway, recent clinical data have failed to show any benefit in other cancers, even though Sonic Hedgehog (SHH expression is detected in these cancers. Cell-adhesion molecule-related/down-regulated by Oncogenes (CDON, a positive regulator of skeletal muscle development, was recently identified as a receptor for SHH. We show here that CDON behaves as a SHH dependence receptor: it actively triggers apoptosis in the absence of SHH. The pro-apoptotic activity of unbound CDON requires a proteolytic cleavage in its intracellular domain, allowing the recruitment and activation of caspase-9. We show that by inducing apoptosis in settings of SHH limitation, CDON expression constrains tumor progression, and as such, decreased CDON expression observed in a large fraction of human colorectal cancer is associated in mice with intestinal tumor progression. Reciprocally, we propose that the SHH expression, detected in human cancers and previously considered as a mechanism for activation of the canonical pathway in an autocrine or paracrine manner, actually provides a selective tumor growth advantage by blocking CDON-induced apoptosis. In support of this notion, we present the preclinical demonstration that interference with the SHH-CDON interaction triggers a CDON-dependent apoptosis in vitro and tumor growth inhibition in vivo. The latter observation qualifies CDON as a relevant alternative target for anticancer therapy in SHH-expressing tumors.

  14. Overexpressed EDIL3 predicts poor prognosis and promotes anchorage-independent tumor growth in human pancreatic cancer

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    Feng, Ming-Xuan; Wang, Ya-Hui; Yang, Xiao-Mei; He, Ping; Tian, Guang-Ang; Zhang, Xiao-Xin; Li, Qing; Cao, Xiao-Yan; Huo, Yan-Miao; Yang, Min-Wei; Fu, Xue-Liang; Li, Jiao; Liu, De-Jun; Dai, Miao; Wen, Shan-Yun; Gu, Jian-Ren; Hong, Jie; Hua, Rong; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Sun, Yong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal Growth Factor-like repeats and Discoidin I-Like Domains 3 (EDIL3), an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein associated with vascular morphogenesis and remodeling, is commonly upregulated in multiple types of human cancers and correlates with tumor progression. However, its expression pattern and underlying cellular functions in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remain largely unexplored. In current study, we observed that expression of EDIL3 was significantly up-regulated in PDAC compared with normal controls in both cell lines and clinical specimens. In addition, elevated EDIL3 expression was positively correlated with patients’ TNM stage and T classification. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that high EDIL3 expression was significantly associated with shorter overall survival times in PDAC patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed EDIL3 expression, age, lymph node metastasis and histological differentiation as independent prognostic factors in PDAC. Knockdown of EDIL3 showed no significant influence on cell viability, migration, invasion and starvation-induced apoptosis, but compromised anoikis resistance and anchorage independent tumor growth of PDAC cells. Meanwhile, treatment with recombinant EDIL3 protein markedly promoted anoikis resistance and anchorage independent tumor growth. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that altered protein expression of Bcl-2 family might contribute to the oncogenic activities of EDIL3. In conclusion, this study provides evidences that EDIL3 is a potential predictor and plays an important role in anchorage independent tumor growth of PDAC and EDIL3-related pathways might represent a novel therapeutic strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26735172

  15. Molecular analysis of tumor-promoting CD8+ T cells in two-stage cutaneous chemical carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Bernice Y; Roberts, Scott J; Silberzahn, Tobias; Filler, Renata B; Neustadter, Jason H; Galan, Anjela; Reddy, Swapna; Lin, William M; Ellis, Peter D; Langford, Cordelia F; Hayday, Adrian C; Girardi, Michael

    2010-06-01

    T-pro are tumor-infiltrating TCRalphabeta(+)CD8(+) cells of reduced cytotoxic potential that promote experimental two-stage chemical cutaneous carcinogenesis. Toward understanding their mechanism of action, this study uses whole-genome expression analysis to compare T-pro with systemic CD8(+) T cells from multiple groups of tumor-bearing mice. T-pro show an overt T helper 17-like profile (high retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-(ROR)gammat, IL-17A, IL-17F; low T-bet and eomesodermin), regulatory potential (high FoxP3, IL-10, Tim-3), and transcripts encoding epithelial growth factors (amphiregulin, Gro-1, Gro-2). Tricolor flow cytometry subsequently confirmed the presence of TCRbeta(+) CD8(+) IL-17(+) T cells among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). Moreover, a time-course analysis of independent TIL isolates from papillomas versus carcinomas exposed a clear association of the "T-pro phenotype" with malignant progression. This molecular characterization of T-pro builds a foundation for elucidating the contributions of inflammation to cutaneous carcinogenesis, and may provide useful biomarkers for cancer immunotherapy in which the widely advocated use of tumor-specific CD8(+) cytolytic T cells should perhaps accommodate the cells' potential corruption toward the T-pro phenotype. The data are also likely germane to psoriasis, in which the epidermis may be infiltrated by CD8(+) IL-17-producing T cells.

  16. Establishing Chinese medicine characteristic tumor response evaluation system is the key to promote internationalization of Chinese medicine oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Li, Lei; Liu, Rui; Lin, Hong-sheng

    2012-10-01

    The features and advantages of Chinese medicine (CM) in cancer comprehensive treatment have been in the spotlight of experts both at home and abroad. However, how to evaluate the effect of CM more objectively, scientifically and systematically is still the key problem of clinical trial, and also a limitation to the development and internationalization of CM oncology. The change of tumor response evaluation system in conventional medicine is gradually consistent with the features of CM clinical effect, such as they both focus on a combination of soft endpoints (i.e. quality of life, clinical benefit, etc.) and hard endpoints (i.e. tumor remission rate, time to progress, etc.). Although experts have proposed protocols of CM tumor response evaluation criteria and come to an agreement in general, divergences still exist in the importance, quantification and CM feature of the potential endpoints. Thus, establishing a CM characteristic and wildly accepted tumor response evaluation system is the key to promote internationalization of CM oncology, and also provides a more convenient and scientific platform for CM international cooperation and communication.

  17. Long-term High Fat Ketogenic Diet Promotes Renal Tumor Growth in a Rat Model of Tuberous Sclerosis.

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    Liśkiewicz, Arkadiusz D; Kasprowska, Daniela; Wojakowska, Anna; Polański, Krzysztof; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna; Kotulska, Katarzyna; Jędrzejowska-Szypułka, Halina

    2016-02-19

    Nutritional imbalance underlies many disease processes but can be very beneficial in certain cases; for instance, the antiepileptic action of a high fat and low carbohydrate ketogenic diet. Besides this therapeutic feature it is not clear how this abundant fat supply may affect homeostasis, leading to side effects. A ketogenic diet is used as anti-seizure therapy i.a. in tuberous sclerosis patients, but its impact on concomitant tumor growth is not known. To examine this we have evaluated the growth of renal lesions in Eker rats (Tsc2+/-) subjected to a ketogenic diet for 4, 6 and 8 months. In spite of existing opinions about the anticancer actions of a ketogenic diet, we have shown that this anti-seizure therapy, especially in its long term usage, leads to excessive tumor growth. Prolonged feeding of a ketogenic diet promotes the growth of renal tumors by recruiting ERK1/2 and mTOR which are associated with the accumulation of oleic acid and the overproduction of growth hormone. Simultaneously, we observed that Nrf2, p53 and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase α dependent antitumor mechanisms were launched by the ketogenic diet. However, the pro-cancerous mechanisms finally took the ascendency by boosting tumor growth.

  18. TCDD promotes lung tumors via attenuation of apoptosis through activation of the Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways.

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    Rong-Jane Chen

    Full Text Available 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD is a multiple-site, multiple-species carcinogen that induces cancer in multiple organs. The molecular mechanisms underlying TCDD-induced lung tumorigenesis remain unclear. In the present study, a two-stage lung tumorigenesis model was established by administrating a single low dose of 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK combined with TCDD to female A/J mice. The results indicated that TCDD combined with low-dose NNK has a significant tumor-promoting effect compared with TCDD or low-dose NNK alone. Resistance to apoptosis is a hallmark of cancer and is thought to be one of the tumor-promoting mechanisms regulated by TCDD. We performed an additional series of experiments in the normal human bronchial epithelial cell line Beas2B cells, in which TCDD was combined with the apoptosis inducer staurosporine. Our in vitro results confirmed that TCDD could rescue cells from apoptosis induced by staurosporine. The inhibition of apoptosis is likely mediated by the activation of the Akt and ERK1/2 pathways, as determined by the effectiveness of pathway-specific inhibitors in abrogating the anti-apoptotic activity of TCDD. In conclusion, we demonstrated that TCDD promoted NNK-induced lung tumorigenesis and revealed that TCDD inhibits staurosporine-induced apoptosis, at least in part, through the Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways.

  19. TCDD promotes lung tumors via attenuation of apoptosis through activation of the Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong-Jane; Siao, Shih-He; Hsu, Chung-Huei; Chang, Chu-Yung; Chang, Louis W; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Lin, Pinpin; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2014-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a multiple-site, multiple-species carcinogen that induces cancer in multiple organs. The molecular mechanisms underlying TCDD-induced lung tumorigenesis remain unclear. In the present study, a two-stage lung tumorigenesis model was established by administrating a single low dose of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) combined with TCDD to female A/J mice. The results indicated that TCDD combined with low-dose NNK has a significant tumor-promoting effect compared with TCDD or low-dose NNK alone. Resistance to apoptosis is a hallmark of cancer and is thought to be one of the tumor-promoting mechanisms regulated by TCDD. We performed an additional series of experiments in the normal human bronchial epithelial cell line Beas2B cells, in which TCDD was combined with the apoptosis inducer staurosporine. Our in vitro results confirmed that TCDD could rescue cells from apoptosis induced by staurosporine. The inhibition of apoptosis is likely mediated by the activation of the Akt and ERK1/2 pathways, as determined by the effectiveness of pathway-specific inhibitors in abrogating the anti-apoptotic activity of TCDD. In conclusion, we demonstrated that TCDD promoted NNK-induced lung tumorigenesis and revealed that TCDD inhibits staurosporine-induced apoptosis, at least in part, through the Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways.

  20. Interleukin-8 promotes canine hemangiosarcoma growth by regulating the tumor microenvironment

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    Kim, Jong-Hyuk, E-mail: jhkim@umn.edu [Department of Veterinary Clinical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Frantz, Aric M.; Anderson, Katie L.; Graef, Ashley J.; Scott, Milcah C. [Department of Veterinary Clinical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Robinson, Sally [Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Sharkey, Leslie C. [Department of Veterinary Clinical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); O' Brien, Timothy D. [Department of Veterinary Clinical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Dickerson, Erin B. [Department of Veterinary Clinical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Modiano, Jaime F., E-mail: modiano@umn.edu [Department of Veterinary Clinical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene expression is highly up-regulated in canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA); however, its role in the pathogenesis of this disease is unknown. We investigated the expression of IL-8 in canine HSA tissues and cell lines, as well and the effects of IL-8 on canine HSA in vitro, and in vivo using a mouse xenograft model for the latter. Constitutive expression of IL-8 mRNA, IL-8 protein, and IL-8 receptor were variable among different tumor samples and cell lines, but they showed stable steady states in each cell line. Upon the addition of IL-8, HSA cells showed transient intracellular calcium fluxes, suggesting that their IL-8 receptors are functional and that IL-8 binding activates relevant signaling pathways. Yet, neither addition of exogenous IL-8 nor blockade of endogenous IL-8 by neutralizing anti-IL-8 antibody (α-IL-8 Ab) affected HSA cell proliferation or survival in vitro. To assess potential effects of IL-8 in other tumor constituents, we stratified HSA cell lines and whole tumor samples into “IL-8 high” and “IL-8 low” groups. Genome-wide gene expression profiling showed that samples in the “IL-8 high” tumor group were enriched for genes associated with a “reactive microenvironment,” including activation of coagulation, inflammation, and fibrosis networks. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that the effects of IL-8 on these tumors were mostly indirect, regulating interactions with the microenvironment. This hypothesis was supported by in vivo xenograft experiments where survival and engraftment of tumor cells was inhibited by administration of neutralizing α-IL-8 Ab. Together, our results suggest that IL-8 contributes to establishing a permissive microenvironment during the early stages of tumorigenesis in HSA. - Highlights: • IL-8 is expressed in canine hemangiosarcoma tumor samples and cell lines. • IL-8 transduces a relevant biological signal in canine hemangiosarcoma cells. • IL-8 gene signature is associated

  1. Boosting high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced anti-tumor immunity using a sparse-scan strategy that can more effectively promote dendritic cell maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Pei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The conventional treatment protocol in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU therapy utilizes a dense-scan strategy to produce closely packed thermal lesions aiming at eradicating as much tumor mass as possible. However, this strategy is not most effective in terms of inducing a systemic anti-tumor immunity so that it cannot provide efficient micro-metastatic control and long-term tumor resistance. We have previously provided evidence that HIFU may enhance systemic anti-tumor immunity by in situ activation of dendritic cells (DCs inside HIFU-treated tumor tissue. The present study was conducted to test the feasibility of a sparse-scan strategy to boost HIFU-induced anti-tumor immune response by more effectively promoting DC maturation. Methods An experimental HIFU system was set up to perform tumor ablation experiments in subcutaneous implanted MC-38 and B16 tumor with dense- or sparse-scan strategy to produce closely-packed or separated thermal lesions. DCs infiltration into HIFU-treated tumor tissues was detected by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. DCs maturation was evaluated by IL-12/IL-10 production and CD80/CD86 expression after co-culture with tumor cells treated with different HIFU. HIFU-induced anti-tumor immune response was evaluated by detecting growth-retarding effects on distant re-challenged tumor and tumor-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells in HIFU-treated mice. Results HIFU exposure raised temperature up to 80 degrees centigrade at beam focus within 4 s in experimental tumors and led to formation of a well-defined thermal lesion. The infiltrated DCs were recruited to the periphery of lesion, where the peak temperature was only 55 degrees centigrade during HIFU exposure. Tumor cells heated to 55 degrees centigrade in 4-s HIFU exposure were more effective to stimulate co-cultured DCs to mature. Sparse-scan HIFU, which can reserve 55 degrees-heated tumor cells surrounding the separated lesions, elicited an

  2. Cancer Stem Cell Plasticity as Tumor Growth Promoter and Catalyst of Population Collapse

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    Jan Poleszczuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly argued that cancer stem cells are not a cellular phenotype but rather a transient state that cells can acquire, either through intrinsic signaling cascades or in response to environmental cues. While cancer stem cell plasticity is generally associated with increased aggressiveness and treatment resistance, we set out to thoroughly investigate the impact of different rates of plasticity on early and late tumor growth dynamics and the response to therapy. We develop an agent-based model of cancer stem cell driven tumor growth, in which plasticity is defined as a spontaneous transition between stem and nonstem cancer cell states. Simulations of the model show that plasticity can substantially increase tumor growth rate and invasion. At high rates of plasticity, however, the cells get exhausted and the tumor will undergo spontaneous remission in the long term. In a series of in silico trials, we show that such remission can be facilitated through radiotherapy. The presented study suggests that stem cell plasticity has rather complex, nonintuitive implications on tumor growth and treatment response. Further theoretical, experimental, and integrated studies are needed to fully decipher cancer stem cell plasticity and how it can be harnessed for novel therapeutic approaches.

  3. Specific expression of short-interfering RNA driven by human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter in tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuejing Luan; Limin Guo; Zuozhen Yang; Min Liu; Xin Li; Hua Tang

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been shown to be an effective method for inhibiting the expression of a given gene in human cells by targeting with short duplex RNA (short-interfering RNA or siRNA). However, more and more studies suggest that non-specific effects can be induced by siRNAs, such as off-target inhibition, activation of interferon response, and saturation of cellular silencing machinery. It has been known that more than 90% of human tumors exhibit teiomerase activity. Consequently, teiomerase is believed to be a broadspectrum molecular marker of malignancies. In the present study we attempt to develop a tumor-specific RNAi system using the human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter.This system may provide a basis for RNAi therapy.

  4. A Novel Immunomodulatory Hemocyanin from the Limpet Fissurella latimarginata Promotes Potent Anti-Tumor Activity in Melanoma

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    Arancibia, Sergio; Espinoza, Cecilia; Salazar, Fabián; Del Campo, Miguel; Tampe, Ricardo; Zhong, Ta-Ying; De Ioannes, Pablo; Moltedo, Bruno; Ferreira, Jorge; Lavelle, Ed C.; Manubens, Augusto; De Ioannes, Alfredo E.; Becker, María Inés

    2014-01-01

    Hemocyanins, the huge oxygen-transporting glycoproteins of some mollusks, are used as immunomodulatory proteins with proven anti-cancer properties. The biodiversity of hemocyanins has promoted interest in identifying new anti-cancer candidates with improved immunological properties. Hemocyanins promote Th1 responses without known side effects, which make them ideal for long-term sustained treatment of cancer. In this study, we evaluated a novel hemocyanin from the limpet/gastropod Fissurella latimarginata (FLH). This protein has the typical hollow, cylindrical structure of other known hemocyanins, such as the keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and the Concholepas hemocyanin (CCH). FLH, like the KLH isoforms, is composed of a single type of polypeptide with exposed N- and O-linked oligosaccharides. However, its immunogenicity was significantly greater than that of KLH and CCH, as FLH induced a stronger humoral immune response and had more potent anti-tumor activity, delaying tumor growth and increasing the survival of mice challenged with B16F10 melanoma cells, in prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Additionally, FLH-treated mice demonstrated increased IFN-γ production and higher numbers of tumor-infiltrating CD4+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, in vitro assays demonstrated that FLH, but not CCH or KLH, stimulated the rapid production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-12, IL-23 and TNF-α) by dendritic cells, triggering a pro-inflammatory milieu that may explain its enhanced immunological activity. Moreover, this effect was abolished when deglycosylated FLH was used, suggesting that carbohydrates play a crucial role in the innate immune recognition of this protein. Altogether, our data demonstrate that FLH possesses increased anti-tumor activity in part because it activates a more potent innate immune response in comparison to other known hemocyanins. In conclusion, FLH is a potential new marine adjuvant for immunization and possible cancer immunotherapy. PMID

  5. A novel immunomodulatory hemocyanin from the limpet Fissurella latimarginata promotes potent anti-tumor activity in melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Arancibia

    Full Text Available Hemocyanins, the huge oxygen-transporting glycoproteins of some mollusks, are used as immunomodulatory proteins with proven anti-cancer properties. The biodiversity of hemocyanins has promoted interest in identifying new anti-cancer candidates with improved immunological properties. Hemocyanins promote Th1 responses without known side effects, which make them ideal for long-term sustained treatment of cancer. In this study, we evaluated a novel hemocyanin from the limpet/gastropod Fissurella latimarginata (FLH. This protein has the typical hollow, cylindrical structure of other known hemocyanins, such as the keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH and the Concholepas hemocyanin (CCH. FLH, like the KLH isoforms, is composed of a single type of polypeptide with exposed N- and O-linked oligosaccharides. However, its immunogenicity was significantly greater than that of KLH and CCH, as FLH induced a stronger humoral immune response and had more potent anti-tumor activity, delaying tumor growth and increasing the survival of mice challenged with B16F10 melanoma cells, in prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Additionally, FLH-treated mice demonstrated increased IFN-γ production and higher numbers of tumor-infiltrating CD4(+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, in vitro assays demonstrated that FLH, but not CCH or KLH, stimulated the rapid production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-12, IL-23 and TNF-α by dendritic cells, triggering a pro-inflammatory milieu that may explain its enhanced immunological activity. Moreover, this effect was abolished when deglycosylated FLH was used, suggesting that carbohydrates play a crucial role in the innate immune recognition of this protein. Altogether, our data demonstrate that FLH possesses increased anti-tumor activity in part because it activates a more potent innate immune response in comparison to other known hemocyanins. In conclusion, FLH is a potential new marine adjuvant for immunization and possible cancer

  6. A novel immunomodulatory hemocyanin from the limpet Fissurella latimarginata promotes potent anti-tumor activity in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arancibia, Sergio; Espinoza, Cecilia; Salazar, Fabián; Del Campo, Miguel; Tampe, Ricardo; Zhong, Ta-Ying; De Ioannes, Pablo; Moltedo, Bruno; Ferreira, Jorge; Lavelle, Ed C; Manubens, Augusto; De Ioannes, Alfredo E; Becker, María Inés

    2014-01-01

    Hemocyanins, the huge oxygen-transporting glycoproteins of some mollusks, are used as immunomodulatory proteins with proven anti-cancer properties. The biodiversity of hemocyanins has promoted interest in identifying new anti-cancer candidates with improved immunological properties. Hemocyanins promote Th1 responses without known side effects, which make them ideal for long-term sustained treatment of cancer. In this study, we evaluated a novel hemocyanin from the limpet/gastropod Fissurella latimarginata (FLH). This protein has the typical hollow, cylindrical structure of other known hemocyanins, such as the keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and the Concholepas hemocyanin (CCH). FLH, like the KLH isoforms, is composed of a single type of polypeptide with exposed N- and O-linked oligosaccharides. However, its immunogenicity was significantly greater than that of KLH and CCH, as FLH induced a stronger humoral immune response and had more potent anti-tumor activity, delaying tumor growth and increasing the survival of mice challenged with B16F10 melanoma cells, in prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Additionally, FLH-treated mice demonstrated increased IFN-γ production and higher numbers of tumor-infiltrating CD4(+) lymphocytes. Furthermore, in vitro assays demonstrated that FLH, but not CCH or KLH, stimulated the rapid production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-12, IL-23 and TNF-α) by dendritic cells, triggering a pro-inflammatory milieu that may explain its enhanced immunological activity. Moreover, this effect was abolished when deglycosylated FLH was used, suggesting that carbohydrates play a crucial role in the innate immune recognition of this protein. Altogether, our data demonstrate that FLH possesses increased anti-tumor activity in part because it activates a more potent innate immune response in comparison to other known hemocyanins. In conclusion, FLH is a potential new marine adjuvant for immunization and possible cancer immunotherapy.

  7. Tumor promoters cause a rapid and reversible inhibition of the formation and maintenance of electrical cell coupling in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, T; Sasaki, Y; Shiba, Y; Kanno, Y; Yamasaki, H

    1981-01-01

    The effect of tumor promoters on electrical coupling between human FL cells was investigated with a microelectrode technique. When a low concentration (100 ng/ml) of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) was added to culture medium, only 6% of the cells showed electrical coupling after 5 hr, whereas in control medium more than 90% of the cells were coupled. In the presence of TPA, cell coupling remained suppressed for at least another 19 hr. When TPA was washed out from the culture medium, the cells commenced electrical coupling: 90% of the cells were coupled within 4 hr of the removal of TPA, a rate very similar to that of nontreated control cells. Therefore, TPA-mediated inhibition of cell coupling is reversible. When TPA was added to a culture in which more than 90% of the cells had already established electrical coupling, the percentage of coupled cells decreased to 6% within 8 hr, indicating that TPA can also diminish already established cell coupling. Inhibition of cell coupling also was achieved with other mouse skin tumor promoters--phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, ingenol dibenzoate, and mezerein--whereas nonpromoting derivatives--phorbol and 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate-showed no effect. None of these compounds changed the membrane potential, membrane resistance, or growth rate of FL cells. Thus, it appears that TPA and structurally-related tumor promoters specifically disturb the formation or function, or both, of cell-cell junctions, without significantly affecting the general properties of the surface membrane or the growth of FL cells. Images PMID:6946500

  8. Thapsigargin, a tumor promoter, discharges intracellular Ca2+ stores by specific inhibition of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2(+)-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thastrup, Ole; Cullen, P J; Drøbak, B K

    1990-01-01

    Thapsigargin, a tumor-promoting sesquiterpene lactone, discharges intracellular Ca2+ in rat hepatocytes, as it does in many vertebrate cell types. It appears to act intracellularly, as incubation of isolated rat liver microsomes with thapsigargin induces a rapid, dose-dependent release of stored Ca....... This hypothesis is strongly supported by the demonstration that thapsigargin causes a rapid inhibition of the Ca2(+)-activated ATPase activity of rat liver microsomes, with an identical dose dependence to that seen in whole cell or isolated microsome Ca2+ discharge. The inhibition of the endoplasmic reticulum...

  9. Tumor promoters cause a rapid and reversible inhibition of the formation and maintenance of electrical cell coupling in culture.

    OpenAIRE

    ENOMOTO, T; Sasaki, Y.; Y Shiba; Kanno, Y.; Yamasaki, H

    1981-01-01

    The effect of tumor promoters on electrical coupling between human FL cells was investigated with a microelectrode technique. When a low concentration (100 ng/ml) of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) was added to culture medium, only 6% of the cells showed electrical coupling after 5 hr, whereas in control medium more than 90% of the cells were coupled. In the presence of TPA, cell coupling remained suppressed for at least another 19 hr. When TPA was washed out from the culture mediu...

  10. Soy promotes juvenile granulosa cell tumor development in mice and in the human granulosa cell tumor-derived COV434 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri-Attia, Nadéra; James, Rebecca; Ligon, Alysse; Li, Xiaohui; Pangas, Stephanie A

    2014-10-01

    Soy attracts attention for its health benefits, such as lowering cholesterol or preventing breast and colon cancer. Soybeans contain isoflavones, which act as phytoestrogens. Even though isoflavones have beneficial health effects, a role for isoflavones in the initiation and progression of diseases including cancer is becoming increasingly recognized. While data from rodent studies suggest that neonatal exposure to genistein (the predominant isoflavone in soy) disrupts normal reproductive function, its role in ovarian cancers, particularly granulosa cell tumors (GCT), is largely unknown. Our study aimed to define the contribution of a soy diet in GCT development using a genetically modified mouse model for juvenile GCTs (JGCT; Smad1 Smad5 conditional double knockout mice) as well as a human JGCT cell line (COV434). While dietary soy cannot initiate JGCT development in mice, we show that it has dramatic effects on GCT growth and tumor progression compared to a soy-free diet. Loss of Smad1 and Smad5 alters estrogen receptor alpha (Esr1) expression in granulosa cells, perhaps sensitizing the cells to the effects of genistein. In addition, we found that genistein modulates estrogen receptor expression in the human JGCT cell line and positively promotes cell growth in part by suppressing caspase-dependent apoptosis. Combined, our work suggests that dietary soy consumption has deleterious effects on GCT development.

  11. Interaction of chemokines with their receptors--from initial chemokine binding to receptor activating steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2014-01-01

    interactions possibly occur, resulting in a multi-step process, as recently proposed for other 7TM receptors. Overall, the N-terminus of chemokine receptors is pivotal for binding of all chemokines. During receptor activation, differences between the two major chemokine subgroups occur, as CC-chemokines mainly......The human chemokine system comprises 19 seven-transmembrane helix (7TM) receptors and 45 endogenous chemokines that often interact with each other in a promiscuous manner. Due to the chemokine system's primary function in leukocyte migration, it has a central role in immune homeostasis...... and surveillance. Chemokines are a group of 8-12 kDa large peptides with a secondary structure consisting of a flexible N-terminus and a core-domain usually stabilized by two conserved disulfide bridges. They mainly interact with the extracellular domains of their cognate 7TM receptors. Affinityand activity...

  12. Very CIN-ful: whole chromosome instability promotes tumor suppressor loss of heterozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotillo, Rocio; Schvartzman, Juan-Manuel; Benezra, Robert

    2009-12-01

    Mechanisms by which whole chromosome instability lead to tumorigenesis have eluded the cancer research field. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Baker et al. show that CIN induced by a defective mitotic checkpoint, under certain genetic and tissue contexts, leads to accelerated loss of heterozygosity of a tumor suppressor gene.

  13. ANALYSIS OF 2,3,7,8-TCDD TUMOR PROMOTION ACTIVITY AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO CANCER

    Science.gov (United States)

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has a high estimated cancer potency in animals which has been reasoned to imply that TCDD might be carcinogenic to man. The animal cancer data show that TCDD can act in a solitary manner causing tumors without the participation of other ...

  14. High interstitial fluid pressure promotes tumor cell proliferation and invasion in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Liu, Kun; Wu, Yingying; Fan, Jinchuan; Chen, Jianchao; Li, Chao; Zhu, Guiquan; Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Longjiang

    2013-11-01

    It has been shown that interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is elevated in many solid tumors. The elevated IFP in tumors is responsible, at least in part, for the poor blood supply, inadequate delivery of therapeutic agents to solid tumors and poor treatment response in patients. The present study was carried out to examine alterations in malignant phenotypes in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells subjected to conditions mimicking IFP and to identify the relevant molecular mechanisms. We investigated tumor cell proliferation and invasion using SCC-4 and SCC-9 cells subjected to an increased extracellular pressure of 0, 15 and 30 mmHg in vitro. The results revealed that the increased IFP resulted in a marked increase in cancer cell proliferation, survival and invasion in vitro and altered the expression of >1,800 genes involved in invasion and metastasis, the heat shock pathway, the p38 and JNK signaling pathway, apoptosis and the cell growth and differentiation signaling pathway. These results suggest the important potential clinical application of measuring IFP, which can be used as a generic marker of prognosis and response to therapy.

  15. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 is Present in the Vascular Extracellular Matrix and Promotes Angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller-Enbergs, Helmut; Hu, Jiong; Popp, Rüdiger;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) belongs to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily of proteins and is implicated in innate immunity, cell polarity, and differentiation. Here we studied the role of DMBT1 in endothelial cells. METHODS AND RESULTS: DMBT1 was secreted...

  16. Lack of a protective effect of menhaden oil on skin tumor promotion by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locniskar, M; Belury, M A; Cumberland, A G; Patrick, K E; Fischer, S M

    1990-09-01

    Fish oil has been shown to have a protective effect in some cancer models. To determine whether fish oil alters skin tumorigenesis, a study was designed using the initiation-promotion mouse skin carcinogenesis model, feeding mice during the promotion stage a constant overall amount of dietary fat (10%) in which the levels of menhaden oil (MO) varied from 0 to 8.5% or corn oil (CO) at 10%. SENCAR mice were initiated with 10 nmol dimethylbenz[a]anthracene. Two weeks later mice were divided into five groups and maintained on one of the following AIN-76 based diets consisting of: 8.5% coconut oil (CT)/1.5% CO (diet A); 1% MO/7.5% CT/1.5% CO (diet B); 4% MO/4.5% CT/1.5% CO (diet C); 8.5% MO/1.5% CO (diet D); or 10% CO (diet E). Two weeks later, promotion with twice weekly applications of 1 micrograms 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was begun and continued for 24 weeks. No statistically significant differences in kcal food consumed or body wts were observed between diet groups during the study. The final papilloma and carcinoma incidence was not different among the diet groups. However, differences were seen in the rate of papilloma appearance with the group fed diet E (10% CO) being the slowest and diet B being the most rapid. In a parallel study, ornithine decarboxylase activity, a suggested marker of promotion, was greatly elevated in the epidermis of all TPA-treated mice and the effect of diet tended to reflect the different rates of tumor formation observed among the groups. These data indicate that the diets containing fish oil were not protective in the final incidence of tumor formation and suggest that a better understanding of the complex interactions is warranted before recommendations are made to alter the human diet for cancer prevention.

  17. Chemokine Systems Link Obesity to Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuguhito Ota

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a state of chronic low-grade systemic inflammation. This chronic inflammation is deeply involved in insulin resistance, which is the underlying condition of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. A significant advance in our understanding of obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance has been recognition of the critical role of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs. Chemokines are small proteins that direct the trafficking of immune cells to sites of inflammation. In addition, chemokines activate the production and secretion of inflammatory cytokines through specific G protein-coupled receptors. ATM accumulation through C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 and its ligand monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 is considered pivotal in the development of insulin resistance. However, chemokine systems appear to exhibit a high degree of functional redundancy. Currently, more than 50 chemokines and 18 chemokine receptors exhibiting various physiological and pathological properties have been discovered. Therefore, additional, unidentified chemokine/chemokine receptor pathways that may play significant roles in ATM recruitment and insulin sensitivity remain to be fully identified. This review focuses on some of the latest findings on chemokine systems linking obesity to inflammation and subsequent development of insulin resistance.

  18. Perillyl Alcohol Protects against Fe-NTA-Induced Nephrotoxicity and Early Tumor Promotional Events in Rat Experimental Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamanna Jahangir

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants have been widely used as protective agents against a wide variety of processes and compounds that damage tissues via free radical mechanisms. Perillyl alcohol (PA is a naturally occurring monoterpene found in the essential oils of numerous species of plants including mints, cherries and celery seeds. This monocyclic monoterpene has shown antioxidant and therapeutic activity in various studies against various xenobiotics. In this study, we have analyzed the effects of PA against single intraperitoneal dose of ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA (9 mg iron per kg body weight-induced nephrotoxicity and early tumor promotional events. The pretreatment of Fe-NTA-treated rats with 0.5% per kg body weight dose and 1% per kg body weight dose of PA for seven consecutive days significantly reversed the Fe-NTA-induced malondialdehyde formation, xanthine oxidase activity (P < 0.001, ornithine decarboxylase activity (P < 0.001 and 3[H]thymidine incorporation in renal DNA (P < 0.001 with simultaneous significant depletion in serum toxicity markers blood urea nitrogen and creatinine (P < 0.001. Significant restoration at both the doses was recorded in depleted renal glutathione content, and its dependent enzymes with prophylactic treatment of PA. Present results suggest that PA potentially attenuates against Fe-NTA-induced oxidative damage and tumor promotional events that preclude its development as a future drug to avert the free radical-induced toxicity.

  19. Over-expressed and truncated midkines promote proliferation of BGC823 cells in vitro and tumor growth in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Ling Wang; Hui Wang; Shu-Li Zhao; Ya-Hong Huang; Ya-Yi Hou

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether midkine (MK) and its truncated form (tMK) contribute to gastric tumorigenesis using in vitro and in vivo models.METHODS: Human MK and tMK plasmids were constructed and expressed in BGC823 (a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line) to investigate the effect of over-expressed MK or tMK on cell growth and turmorigenesis in nude mice.RESULTS: The growth of MK-transfected or tMK-transfected cells was significantly increased compared with that of the control cells, and tMK-transfected cells grew more rapidly than MK-transfected cells. The number of colony formation of the cells transfected with MK or tMK gene was larger than the control cells. In nude mice injected with MK-transfected or tMK-transfected cells, visible tumor was observed earlier and the tumor tissues were larger in size and weight than in control animals that were injected with cells without the transfection of either genes.CONCLUSION: Over-expressed MK or tMK can promote human gastric cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo, and tMK has greater effect than MK. tMK may be a more promising gene therapeutic target compared with MK for treatment of malignant tumors.

  20. Phosphoglycerate Mutase 1 Coordinates Glycolysis and Biosynthesis to Promote Tumor Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitosugi, Taro [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Zhou, Lu [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Elf, Shannon [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Fan, Jun [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kang, Hee-Bum [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Seo, Jae Ho [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Shan, Changliang [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Dai, Qing [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Zhang, Liang [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Xie, Jianxin [Cell Signaling Technology, Inc., Danvers, MA (United States); Gu, Ting-Lei [Cell Signaling Technology, Inc., Danvers, MA (United States); Jin, Peng [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Alečković, Masa [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); LeRoy, Gary [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Kang, Yibin [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Sudderth, Jessica A. [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); DeBerardinis, Ralph J. [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Luan, Chi-Hao [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Chen, Georgia Z. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Muller, Susan [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Shin, Dong M. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Owonikoko, Taofeek K. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lonial, Sagar [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Arellano, Martha L. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Khoury, Hanna J. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Khuri, Fadlo R. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lee, Benjamin H. [Novartis Inst. for BioMedical Research, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ye, Keqiang [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Boggon, Titus J. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Kang, Sumin [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); He, Chuan [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Chen, Jing [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-11-12

    It is unclear how cancer cells coordinate glycolysis and biosynthesis to support rapidly growing tumors. We found that the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1), commonly upregulated in human cancers due to loss of TP53, contributes to biosynthesis regulation partially by controlling intracellular levels of its substrate, 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG), and product, 2-phosphoglycerate (2-PG). 3-PG binds to and inhibits 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), while 2-PG activates 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase to provide feedback control of 3-PG levels. Inhibition of PGAM1 by shRNA or a small molecule inhibitor PGMI-004A results in increased 3-PG and decreased 2-PG levels in cancer cells, leading to significantly decreased glycolysis, PPP flux and biosynthesis, as well as attenuated cell proliferation and tumor growth.

  1. Rock2 stabilizes β-catenin to promote tumor invasion and metastasis in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yumin; Yuan, Rongfa; Zhang, Shouhua; Chen, Leifeng; Huang, Da; Hao, Haibin; Shao, Jianghua

    2015-11-27

    Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 2 (Rock2) is an effector for the small GTPase Rho and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. However, the effect of Rock2 in colorectal cancer (CRC) still remains unclear. In this study, we found that Rock2 expression was markedly increased in clinical CRC tissues compared with adjacent non-cancerous tissues. High expression of Rock2 was correlated with tumor metastasis and poor prognosis in CRC. In addition, the knockdown of Rock2 suppressed the invasion and metastasis of CRC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we found that the β-catenin/TCF4 pathway contributed to the effects of Rock2 in CRC cells, and Rock2 stabilized β-catenin by preventing its ubiquitination and degradation. Taken together, this novel pathway for β-catenin control plays a biologically relevant role in CRC metastasis.

  2. ATRX loss promotes tumor growth and impairs nonhomologous end joining DNA repair in glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschmann, Carl; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Nunez, Felipe J; Mackay, Alan; Fazal-Salom, Janet; Thomas, Daniel; Mendez, Flor; Kamran, Neha; Dzaman, Marta; Mulpuri, Lakshman; Krasinkiewicz, Johnathon; Doherty, Robert; Lemons, Rosemary; Brosnan-Cashman, Jacqueline A; Li, Youping; Roh, Soyeon; Zhao, Lili; Appelman, Henry; Ferguson, David; Gorbunova, Vera; Meeker, Alan; Jones, Chris; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2016-03-02

    Recent work in human glioblastoma (GBM) has documented recurrent mutations in the histone chaperone protein ATRX. We developed an animal model of ATRX-deficient GBM and showed that loss of ATRX reduces median survival and increases genetic instability. Further, analysis of genome-wide data for human gliomas showed that ATRX mutation is associated with increased mutation rate at the single-nucleotide variant (SNV) level. In mouse tumors, ATRX deficiency impairs nonhomologous end joining and increases sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents that induce double-stranded DNA breaks. We propose that ATRX loss results in a genetically unstable tumor, which is more aggressive when left untreated but is more responsive to double-stranded DNA-damaging agents, resulting in improved overall survival.

  3. Regulation of inflammatory chemokine receptors on blood T cells associated to the circulating versus liver chemokines in dengue fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzia Maria de-Oliveira-Pinto

    Full Text Available Little is known about the role of chemokines/chemokines receptors on T cells in natural DENV infection. Patients from DENV-2 and -3- outbreaks were studied prospectively during the acute or convalescent phases. Expression of chemokine receptor and activation markers on lymphocyte subpopulations were determined by flow cytometry analysis, plasma chemokine ligands concentrations were measured by ELISA and quantification of CCL5/RANTES(+ cells in liver tissues from fatal dengue cases was performed by immunochemistry. In the acute DENV-infection, T-helper/T-cytotoxic type-1 cell (Th1/Tc1-related CCR5 is significantly higher expressed on both CD4 and CD8 T cells. The Th1-related CXCR3 is up-regulated among CD4 T cells and Tc2-related CCR4 is up-regulated among CD8 T cells. In the convalescent phase, all chemokine receptor or chemokine ligand expression tends to reestablish control healthy levels. Increased CCL2/MCP-1 and CCL4/MIP-1β but decreased CCL5/RANTES levels were observed in DENV-patients during acute infection. Moreover, we showed an increased CD107a expression on CCR5 or CXCR3-expressing T cells and higher expression of CD29, CD44(HIGH and CD127(LOW markers on CCR4-expressing CD8 T cells in DENV-patients when compared to controls. Finally, liver from dengue fatal patients showed increased number of cells expressing CCL5/RANTES in three out of four cases compared to three death from a non-dengue patient. In conclusion, both Th1-related CCR5 and CXCR3 among CD4 T cells have a potential ability to exert cytotoxicity function. Moreover, Tc1-related CCR5 and Tc2-related CCR4 among CD8 T cells have a potential ability to exert effector function and migration based on cell markers evaluated. The CCR5 expression would be promoting an enhanced T cell recruitment into liver, a hypothesis that is corroborated by the CCL5/RANTES increase detected in hepatic tissue from dengue fatal cases. The balance between protective and pathogenic immune response

  4. Regulation of inflammatory chemokine receptors on blood T cells associated to the circulating versus liver chemokines in dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia Maria; Marinho, Cíntia Ferreira; Povoa, Tiago Fajardo; de Azeredo, Elzinandes Leal; de Souza, Luiza Assed; Barbosa, Luiza Damian Ribeiro; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita C; Alves, Ada M B; Ávila, Carlos André Lins; de Souza, Luiz José; da Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio; Damasco, Paulo Vieira; Paes, Marciano Viana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the role of chemokines/chemokines receptors on T cells in natural DENV infection. Patients from DENV-2 and -3- outbreaks were studied prospectively during the acute or convalescent phases. Expression of chemokine receptor and activation markers on lymphocyte subpopulations were determined by flow cytometry analysis, plasma chemokine ligands concentrations were measured by ELISA and quantification of CCL5/RANTES(+) cells in liver tissues from fatal dengue cases was performed by immunochemistry. In the acute DENV-infection, T-helper/T-cytotoxic type-1 cell (Th1/Tc1)-related CCR5 is significantly higher expressed on both CD4 and CD8 T cells. The Th1-related CXCR3 is up-regulated among CD4 T cells and Tc2-related CCR4 is up-regulated among CD8 T cells. In the convalescent phase, all chemokine receptor or chemokine ligand expression tends to reestablish control healthy levels. Increased CCL2/MCP-1 and CCL4/MIP-1β but decreased CCL5/RANTES levels were observed in DENV-patients during acute infection. Moreover, we showed an increased CD107a expression on CCR5 or CXCR3-expressing T cells and higher expression of CD29, CD44(HIGH) and CD127(LOW) markers on CCR4-expressing CD8 T cells in DENV-patients when compared to controls. Finally, liver from dengue fatal patients showed increased number of cells expressing CCL5/RANTES in three out of four cases compared to three death from a non-dengue patient. In conclusion, both Th1-related CCR5 and CXCR3 among CD4 T cells have a potential ability to exert cytotoxicity function. Moreover, Tc1-related CCR5 and Tc2-related CCR4 among CD8 T cells have a potential ability to exert effector function and migration based on cell markers evaluated. The CCR5 expression would be promoting an enhanced T cell recruitment into liver, a hypothesis that is corroborated by the CCL5/RANTES increase detected in hepatic tissue from dengue fatal cases. The balance between protective and pathogenic immune response mediated by

  5. The dark side of fly TNF: An ancient developmental proofreading mechanism turned into tumor promoter

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila is an important model for biological research; however, due to its relatively short lifespan its relevance in cancer research is often questioned. Nevertheless, among many other intriguing Drosophila models, scribble group mutants provided early evidence for the existence of tumor suppressor genes, and their importance in mammalian systems is beginning to emerge. In this extra view, I discuss recent advances in our understanding of the phenotypes of scrib-group mutant...

  6. Leptin as a mediator of tumor-stromal interactions promotes breast cancer stem cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Cinzia; Chemi, Francesca; Panza, Salvatore; Barone, Ines; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Lanzino, Marilena; Cordella, Angela; Campana, Antonella; Hashim, Adnan; Rizza, Pietro; Leggio, Antonella; Győrffy, Balázs; Simões, Bruno M; Clarke, Robert B; Weisz, Alessandro; Catalano, Stefania; Andò, Sebastiano

    2016-01-12

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) play crucial roles in tumor initiation, metastasis and therapeutic resistance. A strict dependency between BCSCs and stromal cell components of tumor microenvironment exists. Thus, novel therapeutic strategies aimed to target the crosstalk between activated microenvironment and BCSCs have the potential to improve clinical outcome. Here, we investigated how leptin, as a mediator of tumor-stromal interactions, may affect BCSC activity using patient-derived samples (n = 16) and breast cancer cell lines, and determined the potential benefit of targeting leptin signaling in these model systems. Conditioned media (CM) from cancer-associated fibroblasts and breast adipocytes significantly increased mammosphere formation in breast cancer cells and depletion of leptin from CM completely abrogated this effect. Mammosphere cultures exhibited increased leptin receptor (OBR) expression and leptin exposure enhanced mammosphere formation. Microarray analyses revealed a similar expression profile of genes involved in stem cell biology among mammospheres treated with CM and leptin. Interestingly, leptin increased mammosphere formation in metastatic breast cancers and expression of OBR as well as HSP90, a target of leptin signaling, were directly correlated with mammosphere formation in metastatic samples (r = 0.68/p = 0.05; r = 0.71/p = 0.036, respectively). Kaplan-Meier survival curves indicated that OBR and HSP90 expression were associated with reduced overall survival in breast cancer patients (HR = 1.9/p = 0.022; HR = 2.2/p = 0.00017, respectively). Furthermore, blocking leptin signaling by using a full leptin receptor antagonist significantly reduced mammosphere formation in breast cancer cell lines and patient-derived samples. Our results suggest that leptin/leptin receptor signaling may represent a potential therapeutic target that can block the stromal-tumor interactions driving BCSC-mediated disease progression.

  7. Effect of hydroxyurea on the promoter occupancy profiles of tumor suppressor p53 and p73

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The p53 tumor suppressor and its related protein, p73, share a homologous DNA binding domain, and mouse genetics studies have suggested that they have overlapping as well as distinct biological functions. Both p53 and p73 are activated by genotoxic stress to regulate an array of cellular responses. Previous studies have suggested that p53 and p73 independently activate the cellular apoptotic program in response to cytotoxic drugs. The goal of this study was to compare the ...

  8. Cdk5 disruption attenuates tumor PD-L1 expression and promotes antitumor immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorand, R. Dixon; Nthale, Joseph; Myers, Jay T.; Barkauskas, Deborah S.; Avril, Stefanie; Chirieleison, Steven M.; Pareek, Tej K.; Abbott, Derek W.; Stearns, Duncan S.; Letterio, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Cancers often evade immune surveillance by adopting peripheral tissue–tolerance mechanisms, such as the expression of programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1), the inhibition of which results in potent antitumor immunity. Here, we show that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), a serine-threonine kinase that is highly active in postmitotic neurons and in many cancers, allows medulloblastoma (MB) to evade immune elimination. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-induced PD-L1 up-regulation on MB requires Cdk5, and disruption of Cdk5 expression in a mouse model of MB results in potent CD4+ T cell–mediated tumor rejection. Loss of Cdk5 results in persistent expression of the PD-L1 transcriptional repressors, the interferon regulatory factors IRF2 and IRF2BP2, which likely leads to reduced PD-L1 expression on tumors. Our finding highlights a central role for Cdk5 in immune checkpoint regulation by tumor cells. PMID:27463676

  9. Promotion of thyroid tumors in rats by pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile (PCN) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansell, Nichole R; Muppidi, Jagan R; Habeebu, Sultan M; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2004-09-01

    Pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile (PCN) and Aroclor 1254 (PCB) both reduce serum thyroid hormone levels in rats, but only PCN consistently produces an increase in serum thyrotropin (TSH). PCN-mediated increases in TSH result in increased thyroid follicular cell proliferation and hyperplasia, which may represent early events on a morphological continuum leading to neoplasia. The purpose of this study was to assess whether PCN, a compound that increases serum TSH, and PCB, which does not increase TSH, promote thyroid tumors in a two-stage carcinogenesis model. Male SD rats were administered the thyroid tumor initiator diisopropanolnitrosamine (2.5 g/kg, sc), and after seven days were fed control diet, diet containing 1000 ppm PCN, or diet containing 100 ppm PCB for 19 weeks. Body weights were unaffected by PCN treatment, but were reduced 21% after 19 weeks of PCB treatment compared to control. PCN treatment significantly reduced serum T4 through week 3 before returning to control concentrations, whereas T4 levels following PCB treatment fell below detection limits by week 3 and remained drastically reduced through week 19. TSH concentrations in PCN-treated rats increased three-fold at week 2, then declined to near control values at week 19. After one week of PCB treatment, TSH concentrations reached nearly twice that of controls, and were sustained until week 6. The incidence of thyroid follicular cell proliferative lesions, including cystic and follicular hyperplasia, cystic and follicular adenoma, and follicular carcinoma, was significantly increased following PCN treatment, but not following PCB treatment. PCB treatment caused an increase in thyroid carcinomas (4 of 22 rats) not associated with the proliferative-type lesions produced by PCN, despite an increase in TSH serum concentrations. In conclusion, PCN appears to promote thyroid tumors in a manner consistent with known effects of excessive TSH stimulation. However, thyroid carcinomas stemming from PCB

  10. BRCA1-IRIS overexpression promotes and maintains the tumor initiating phenotype: implications for triple negative breast cancer early lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Abhilasha; Paul, Bibbin T; Sullivan, Lisa M; Sims, Hillary; El Bastawisy, Ahmed; Yousef, Hend F; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N; Bahnassy, Abeer A; ElShamy, Wael M

    2017-02-07

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are cancer cells endowed with self-renewal, multi-lineage differentiation, increased chemo-resistance, and in breast cancers the CD44+/CD24-/ALDH1+ phenotype. Triple negative breast cancers show lack of BRCA1 expression in addition to enhanced basal, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and TIC phenotypes. BRCA1-IRIS (hereafter IRIS) is an oncogene produced by the alternative usage of the BRCA1 locus. IRIS is involved in induction of replication, transcription of selected oncogenes, and promoting breast cancer cells aggressiveness. Here, we demonstrate that IRIS overexpression (IRISOE) promotes TNBCs through suppressing BRCA1 expression, enhancing basal-biomarkers, EMT-inducers, and stemness-enforcers expression. IRISOE also activates the TIC phenotype in TNBC cells through elevating CD44 and ALDH1 expression/activity and preventing CD24 surface presentation by activating the internalization pathway EGFR→c-Src→cortactin. We show that the intrinsic sensitivity to an anti-CD24 cross-linking antibody-induced cell death in membranous CD24 expressing/luminal A cells could be acquired in cytoplasmic CD24 expressing IRISOE TNBC/TIC cells through IRIS silencing or inactivation. We show that fewer IRISOE TNBC/TICs cells form large tumors composed of TICs, resembling TNBCs early lesions in patients that contain metastatic precursors capable of disseminating and metastasizing at an early stage of the disease. IRIS-inhibitory peptide killed these IRISOE TNBC/TICs, in vivo and prevented their dissemination and metastasis. We propose IRIS inactivation could be pursued to prevent dissemination and metastasis from early TNBC tumor lesions in patients.

  11. Matriptase promotes inflammatory cell accumulation and progression of established epidermal tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales, K U; Friis, S; Abusleme, L

    2015-01-01

    Deregulation of matriptase is a consistent feature of human epithelial cancers and correlates with poor disease outcome. We have previously shown that matriptase promotes multi-stage squamous cell carcinogenesis in transgenic mice through dual activation of pro-hepatocyte growth factor-cMet-Akt-m......Deregulation of matriptase is a consistent feature of human epithelial cancers and correlates with poor disease outcome. We have previously shown that matriptase promotes multi-stage squamous cell carcinogenesis in transgenic mice through dual activation of pro-hepatocyte growth factor...

  12. Free radical-derived quinone methide mediates skin tumor promotion by butylated hydroxytoluene hydroperoxide: expanded role for electrophiles in multistage carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, K Z; Bhan, P; Kuppusamy, P; Zweier, J L; Trush, M A; Kensler, T W

    1991-01-01

    Free radical derivatives of peroxides, hydroperoxides, and anthrones are thought to mediate tumor promotion by these compounds. Further, the promoting activity of phorbol esters is attributed, in part, to their ability to stimulate the cellular generation of oxygen radicals. A hydroperoxide metabolite of butylated hydroxytoluene, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroperoxyl-4-methyl-2,5-cyclohexadienone (BHTOOH), has previously been shown to be a tumor promoter in mouse skin. BHTOOH is extensively metabolized by murine keratinocytes to several radical species. The primary radical generated from BHTOOH is a phenoxyl radical that can disproportionate to form butylated hydroxytoluene quinone methide, a reactive electrophile. Since electrophilic species have not been previously postulated to mediate tumor promotion, the present study was undertaken to examine the role of this electrophile in the promoting activity of BHTOOH. The biological activities of two chemical analogs of BHTOOH, 4-trideuteromethyl-BHTOOH and 4-tert-butyl-BHTOOH, were compared with that of the parent compound. 4-Trideuteromethyl-BHTOOH and 4-tert-butyl-BHTOOH have a reduced ability or inability, respectively, to form a quinone methide; however, like the parent compound, they both generate a phenoxyl radical when incubated with keratinocyte cytosol. The potency of BHTOOH, 4-trideuteromethyl-BHTOOH, and 4-tert-butyl-BHTOOH as inducers of ornithine decarboxylase, a marker of tumor promotion, was commensurate with their capacity for generating butylated hydroxytoluene quinone methide. These initial results were confirmed in a two-stage tumor promotion protocol in female SENCAR mice. Together, these data indicate that a quinone methide is mediating tumor promotion by BHTOOH, providing direct evidence that an electrophilic intermediate can elicit this stage of carcinogenesis. PMID:1846971

  13. Chemokine Function in Periodontal Disease and Oral Cavity Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Esra Sahingur

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The chemotactic cytokines, or chemokines, comprise a superfamily of polypeptides with a wide range of activities that include recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as stimulation of cell proliferation. As such, they function as antimicrobial molecules and play a central role in host defenses against pathogen challenge. However, their ability to recruit leukocytes and potentiate or prolong the inflammatory response may have profound implications for the progression of oral diseases such as chronic periodontitis, where tissue destruction may be widespread. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that chronic inflammation is a key component of tumor progression. Interaction between cancer cells and their microenvironment is mediated in large part by secreted factors such as chemokines, and serves to enhance the malignant phenotype in oral and other cancers. In this article, we will outline the biological and biochemical mechanisms of chemokine action in host-microbiome interactions in periodontal disease and in oral cancer, and how these may overlap and contribute to pathogenesis.

  14. CXC Chemokine Ligand 10 Controls Viral Infection in the Central Nervous System: Evidence for a Role in Innate Immune Response through Recruitment and Activation of Natural Killer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Trifilo, Matthew J.; Montalto-Morrison, Cynthia; Stiles, Linda N.; Hurst, Kelley R.; Hardison, Jenny L.; Manning, Jerry E.; Masters, Paul S.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2004-01-01

    How chemokines shape the immune response to viral infection of the central nervous system (CNS) has largely been considered within the context of recruitment and activation of antigen-specific lymphocytes. However, chemokines are expressed early following viral infection, suggesting an important role in coordinating innate immune responses. Herein, we evaluated the contributions of CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) in promoting innate defense mechanisms following coronavirus infection of the C...

  15. Microbiological exploitation of the chemokine system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter J; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2003-01-01

    Several viruses encode chemokine elements in their genome. This review focuses on the roles of such elements in the ongoing battle between the virus and the host. The biological and pharmacological characterizations of several of these chemokine elements have highlighted their importance in the m...

  16. Targeting herpesvirus reliance of the chemokine system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Kledal, Thomas N

    2006-01-01

    acquired homologs of both chemokines and chemokine receptors belonging to the 7 transmembrane (7TM) spanning, G protein-coupled receptor family. 7TM receptors are very efficient drug targets and are currently the most popular class of investigational drug targets. A notable trait for the virus encoded...

  17. Interlaboratory studies with the Chinese hamster V79 cell metabolic cooperation assay to detect tumor-promoting agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohrman, J.S.; Burg, J.R.; Elmore, E.; Gulati, D.K.; Barfknecht, T.R.; Niemeier, R.W.; Dames, B.L.; Toraason, M.; Langenbach, R.

    1988-01-01

    Three laboratories participated in an interlaboratory study to evaluate the usefulness of the Chinese hamster V79 cell metabolic cooperation assay to predict the tumor-promoting activity of selected chemical. Twenty-three chemicals of different chemical structures (phorbol esters, barbiturates, phenols, artificial sweeteners, alkanes, and peroxides) were chosen for testing based on in vivo promotion activities, as reported in the literature. Assay protocols and materials were standardized, and the chemicals were coded to facilitate unbiased evaluation. A chemical was tested only once in each laboratory, with one of the three laboratories testing only 15 out of 23 chemicals. Dunnett's test was used for statistical analysis. Chemicals were scored as positive (at least two concentration levels statistically different than control), equivocal (only one concentration statistically different), or negative. For 15 chemicals tested in all three laboratories, there was complete agreement among the laboratories for nine chemicals. For the 23 chemicals tested in only two laboratories, there was agreement on 16 chemicals. With the exception of the peroxides and alkanes, the metabolic cooperation data were in general agreement with in vivo data. However, an overall evaluation of the V79 cell system for predicting in vivo promotion activity was difficult because of the organ specificity of certain chemicals and/or the limited number of adequately tested nonpromoting chemicals.

  18. High KRT8 expression promotes tumor progression and metastasis of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jian; Wang, Hao; Liu, Yun; Ding, Fangfang; Ni, Ying; Shao, Shihe

    2017-02-01

    Keratin8 (KRT8) is the major component of the intermediate filament cytoskeleton and predominantly expressed in simple epithelial tissues. Aberrant expression of KRT8 is associated with multiple tumor progression and metastasis. However, the role of KRT8 in gastric cancer (GC) remains unclear. In this study, KRT8 expression was investigated and it was found to be upregulated along with human GC progression and metastasis at both mRNA and protein levels in human gastric cancer tissues. In addition, KRT8 overexpression enhanced the proliferation and migration of human gastric cancer cells, whereas the knock-down of KRT8 by siRNA only inhibited migration of human gastric cancer cells. Integrinβ1-FAK-induced epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) only existed in the high KRT8 cells. Furthermore, KRT8 overexpression led to increase in p-smad2/3 levels and TGFβ dependent signaling events. KRT8 expression in GC was related to tumor clinical stage and worse survival. Kaplan-Meier analysis proved that KRT8 was associated with overall survival of patients with GC that patients with high KRT8 expression tend to have unfavorable outcome. Moreover, Cox's proportional hazards analysis showed that high KRT8 expression was a prognostic marker of poor outcome. These results provided that KRT8 expression may therefore be a biomarker or potential therapeutic target to identify patients with worse survival.

  19. Claudin-2 promotes breast cancer liver metastasis by facilitating tumor cell interactions with hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabariès, Sébastien; Dupuy, Fanny; Dong, Zhifeng; Monast, Anie; Annis, Matthew G; Spicer, Jonathan; Ferri, Lorenzo E; Omeroglu, Atilla; Basik, Mark; Amir, Eitan; Clemons, Mark; Siegel, Peter M

    2012-08-01

    We previously identified claudin-2 as a functional mediator of breast cancer liver metastasis. We now confirm that claudin-2 levels are elevated in liver metastases, but not in skin metastases, compared to levels in their matched primary tumors in patients with breast cancer. Moreover, claudin-2 is specifically expressed in liver-metastatic breast cancer cells compared to populations derived from bone or lung metastases. The increased liver tropism exhibited by claudin-2-expressing breast cancer cells requires claudin-2-mediated interactions between breast cancer cells and primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, the reduction of the claudin-2 expression level, either in cancer cells or in primary hepatocytes, diminishes these heterotypic cell-cell interactions. Finally, we demonstrate that the first claudin-2 extracellular loop is essential for mediating tumor cell-hepatocyte interactions and the ability of breast cancer cells to form liver metastases in vivo. Thus, during breast cancer liver metastasis, claudin-2 shifts from acting within tight-junctional complexes to functioning as an adhesion molecule between breast cancer cells and hepatocytes.

  20. Capsaicin-mediated denervation of sensory neurons promotes mammary tumor metastasis to lung and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin, Nuray; Boyer, Philip J; Bonneau, Robert H; Clawson, Gary A; Welch, Danny R

    2004-01-01

    Capsaicin specifically activates or destroys small diameter nociceptive sensory neurons that contain the capsaicin receptor, also called vanilloid receptor 1. Neurons sensitive to capsaicin mediate inflammatory pain and are important targets for management of chronic pain. These neurons also regulate local tissue homeostasis, inflammation, healing and development, especially under conditions of psychological stress. Stress contributes to increased cancer recurrence and metastasis through as yet undefined mechanisms. Likewise, activity of capsaicin-sensitive neurons is altered by pathological conditions that may lead to metastatic growth (e.g. stress). Therefore, we examined effects of a treatment that induces sensory nerve denervation on breast cancer metastases. Systemic denervation of sensory neurons caused by treatment with 125 mg/kg capsaicin resulted in significantly more lung and cardiac metastases in adult mice injected orthotopically with syngeneic 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells than was observed in vehicle-treated controls. Heart metastases, normally very rare, occurred as pericardial nodules, intra-myocardial nodules, or combined pericardial-myocardial lesions. Since the rate of primary tumor growth was unaffected, effects on metastases appear to be host tissue-specific. Although preliminary, these observations provide one possible explanation for resistance of cardiac tissue to tumor involvement and highlight contributions of host tissue, including sensory neurons, in the efficiency of cancer metastasis.

  1. Chemokines Associated with Pathologic Responses to Orthopedic Implant Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallab, Nadim J.; Jacobs, Joshua J.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the success in returning people to health saving mobility and high quality of life, the over 1 million total joint replacements implanted in the US each year are expected to eventually fail after approximately 15–25 years of use, due to slow progressive subtle inflammation to implant debris compromising the bone implant interface. This local inflammatory pseudo disease state is primarily caused by implant debris interaction with innate immune cells, i.e., macrophages. This implant debris can also activate an adaptive immune reaction giving rise to the concept of implant-related metal sensitivity. However, a consensus of studies agree the dominant form of this response is due to innate reactivity by macrophages to implant debris danger signaling (danger-associated molecular pattern) eliciting cytokine-based and chemokine inflammatory responses. This review covers implant debris-induced release of the cytokines and chemokines due to activation of the innate (and the adaptive) immune system and how this leads to subsequent implant failure through loosening and osteolysis, i.e., what is known of central chemokines (e.g., IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, MIP-1, CCL9, CCL10, CCL17, and CCL22) associated with implant debris reactivity as related to the innate immune system activation/cytokine expression, e.g., danger signaling (e.g., IL-1β, IL-18, IL-33, etc.), toll-like receptor activation (e.g., IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α, etc.), bone catabolism (e.g., TRAP5b), and hypoxia responses (HIF-1α). More study is needed, however, to fully understand these interactions to effectively counter cytokine- and chemokine-based orthopedic implant-related inflammation.

  2. Turning tumor-promoting copper into an anti-cancer weapon via high-throughput chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F; Jiao, P; Qi, M; Frezza, M; Dou, Q P; Yan, B

    2010-01-01

    Copper is an essential element for multiple biological processes. Its concentration is elevated to a very high level in cancer tissues for promoting cancer development through processes such as angiogenesis. Organic chelators of copper can passively reduce cellular copper and serve the role as inhibitors of angiogenesis. However, they can also actively attack cellular targets such as proteasome, which plays a critical role in cancer development and survival. The discovery of such molecules initially relied on a step by step synthesis followed by biological assays. Today high-throughput chemistry and high-throughput screening have significantly expedited the copper-binding molecules discovery to turn "cancer-promoting" copper into anti-cancer agents.

  3. Role of the Endothelium during Tumor Cell Metastasis: Is the Endothelium a Barrier or a Promoter for Cell Invasion and Metastasis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Tanja Mierke

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The malignancy of cancer disease depends on the ability of the primary tumor to metastasize to distant organs. The process of the metastasis formation has largely been analyzed, but still main pathways regarding the extravasation step at the end of the metastasis formation process are controversially discussed. An agreement has been reached about the importance of the endothelium to promote metastasis formation either by enhancing the growth of the primary tumor or by homing (targeting the tumor cells to blood or lymph vessels. The mechanical properties of the invading tumor cells become the focus of several studies, but the endothelial cell mechanical properties are still elusive. This paper describes the different roles of the endothelium in the process of metastasis formation and focuses on a novel role of the endothelium in promoting tumor cell invasion. It discusses how novel biophysical tools and in vivo animal models help to determine the role of the endothelium in the process of tumor cell invasion. Evidence is provided that cell mechanical properties, for example, contractile force generation of tumor cells, are involved in the process of tumor cell invasion.

  4. Pigment epithelial-derived factor gene loaded novel COOH-PEG-PLGA-COOH nanoparticles promoted tumor suppression by systemic administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ting; Xu, Bei; He, Lili; Xia, Shan; Chen, Yan; Zeng, Jun; Liu, Yongmei; Li, Shuangzhi; Tan, Xiaoyue; Ren, Ke; Yao, Shaohua; Song, Xiangrong

    2016-01-01

    Anti-angiogenesis has been proposed as an effective therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is one of the most powerful endogenous anti-angiogenic reagents discovered to date and PEDF gene therapy has been recognized as a promising treatment option for various tumors. There is an urgent need to develop a safe and valid vector for its systemic delivery. Herein, a novel gene delivery system based on the newly synthesized copolymer COOH-PEG-PLGA-COOH (CPPC) was developed in this study, which was probably capable of overcoming the disadvantages of viral vectors and cationic lipids/polymers-based nonviral carriers. PEDF gene loaded CPPC nanoparticles (D-NPs) were fabricated by a modified double-emulsion water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) solvent evaporation method. D-NPs with uniform spherical shape had relatively high drug loading (~1.6%), probably because the introduced carboxyl group in poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) terminal enhanced the interaction of copolymer with the PEDF gene complexes. An excellent in vitro antitumor effect was found in both C26 and A549 cells treated by D-NPs, in which PEDF levels were dramatically elevated due to the successful transfection of PEDF gene. D-NPs also showed a strong inhibitory effect on proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro and inhibited the tumor-induced angiogenesis in vivo by an alginate-encapsulated tumor cell assay. Further in vivo antitumor investigation, carried out in a C26 subcutaneous tumor model by intravenous injection, demonstrated that D-NPs could achieve a significant antitumor activity with sharply reduced microvessel density and significantly promoted tumor cell apoptosis. Additionally, the in vitro hemolysis analysis and in vivo serological and biochemical analysis revealed that D-NPs had no obvious toxicity. All the data indicated that the novel CPPC nanoparticles were ideal vectors for the systemic delivery of PEDF gene and might be widely

  5. An Inducible Lentiviral Guide RNA Platform Enables the Identification of Tumor-Essential Genes and Tumor-Promoting Mutations In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon J. Aubrey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The CRISPR/Cas9 technology enables the introduction of genomic alterations into almost any organism; however, systems for efficient and inducible gene modification have been lacking, especially for deletion of essential genes. Here, we describe a drug-inducible small guide RNA (sgRNA vector system allowing for ubiquitous and efficient gene deletion in murine and human cells. This system mediates the efficient, temporally controlled deletion of MCL-1, both in vitro and in vivo, in human Burkitt lymphoma cell lines that require this anti-apoptotic BCL-2 protein for sustained survival and growth. Unexpectedly, repeated induction of the same sgRNA generated similar inactivating mutations in the human Mcl-1 gene due to low mutation variability exerted by the accompanying non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ process. Finally, we were able to generate hematopoietic cell compartment-restricted Trp53-knockout mice, leading to the identification of cancer-promoting mutants of this critical tumor suppressor.

  6. Dietary iron enhances colonic inflammation and IL-6/IL-11-Stat3 signaling promoting colonic tumor development in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita C G Chua

    Full Text Available Chronic intestinal inflammation and high dietary iron are associated with colorectal cancer development. The role of Stat3 activation in iron-induced colonic inflammation and tumorigenesis was investigated in a mouse model of inflammation-associated colorectal cancer. Mice, fed either an iron-supplemented or control diet, were treated with azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS. Intestinal inflammation and tumor development were assessed by endoscopy and histology, gene expression by real-time PCR, Stat3 phosphorylation by immunoblot, cytokines by ELISA and apoptosis by TUNEL assay. Colonic inflammation was more severe in mice fed an iron-supplemented compared with a control diet one week post-DSS treatment, with enhanced colonic IL-6 and IL-11 release and Stat3 phosphorylation. Both IL-6 and ferritin, the iron storage protein, co-localized with macrophages suggesting iron may act directly on IL-6 producing-macrophages. Iron increased DSS-induced colonic epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis consistent with enhanced mucosal damage. DSS-treated mice developed anemia that was not alleviated by dietary iron supplementation. Six weeks post-DSS treatment, iron-supplemented mice developed more and larger colonic tumors compared with control mice. Intratumoral IL-6 and IL-11 expression increased in DSS-treated mice and IL-6, and possibly IL-11, were enhanced by dietary iron. Gene expression of iron importers, divalent metal transporter 1 and transferrin receptor 1, increased and iron exporter, ferroportin, decreased in colonic tumors suggesting increased iron uptake. Dietary iron and colonic inflammation synergistically activated colonic IL-6/IL-11-Stat3 signaling promoting tumorigenesis. Oral iron therapy may be detrimental in inflammatory bowel disease since it may exacerbate colonic inflammation and increase colorectal cancer risk.

  7. A tumor-promoting mechanism mediated by retrotransposon-encoded reverse transcriptase is active in human transformed cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamanna, Ilaria; Gualtieri, Alberto; Cossetti, Cristina; Osimo, Emanuele Felice; Ferracin, Manuela; Macchia, Gianfranco; Aricò, Eleonora; Prosseda, Gianni; Vitullo, Patrizia; Misteli, Tom; Spadafora, Corrado

    2013-01-01

    LINE-1 elements make up the most abundant retrotransposon family in the human genome. Full-length LINE-1 elements encode a reverse transcriptase (RT) activity required for their own retrotranpsosition as well as that of non-autonomous Alu elements. LINE-1 are poorly expressed in normal cells and abundantly in cancer cells. Decreasing RT activity in cancer cells, by either LINE-1-specific RNA interference, or by RT inhibitory drugs, was previously found to reduce proliferation and promote differentiation and to antagonize tumor growth in animal models. Here we have investigated how RT exerts these global regulatory functions. We report that the RT inhibitor efavirenz (EFV) selectively downregulates proliferation of transformed cell lines, while exerting only mild effects on non-transformed cells; this differential sensitivity matches a differential RT abundance, which is high in the former and undetectable in the latter. Using CsCl density gradients, we selectively identify Alu and LINE-1 containing DNA:RNA hybrid molecules in cancer but not in normal cells. Remarkably, hybrid molecules fail to form in tumor cells treated with EFV under the same conditions that repress proliferation and induce the reprogramming of expression profiles of coding genes, microRNAs (miRNAs) and ultraconserved regions (UCRs). The RT-sensitive miRNAs and UCRs are significantly associated with Alu sequences. The results suggest that LINE-1-encoded RT governs the balance between single-stranded and double-stranded RNA production. In cancer cells the abundant RT reverse-transcribes retroelement-derived mRNAs forming RNA:DNA hybrids. We propose that this impairs the formation of double-stranded RNAs and the ensuing production of small regulatory RNAs, with a direct impact on gene expression. RT inhibition restores the ‘normal’ small RNA profile and the regulatory networks that depend on them. Thus, the retrotransposon-encoded RT drives a previously unrecognized mechanism crucial to the

  8. Promotion of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced thyroid tumors by iodine deficiency in F344/NCr rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, M; Ward, J M

    1984-07-01

    Six-week-old male F344 rats were each given an injection once iv of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea [(MNU) CAS: 684-93-5] at a dose of 41.2 mg/kg body weight. Two weeks later, groups of rats were placed on iodine-deficient (ID) or iodine-adequate (IA) diets and then sacrificed at 20 and 33 weeks. Other groups received ID or IA diets without MNU. For localizing thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and prolactin, sections of pituitary glands were stained by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex technique with the use of anti-rat TSH or prolactin antibody. At 20 weeks, rats receiving MNU and ID diets had a 100% incidence of diffuse follicular goiter and multiple follicular adenomas of the thyroid. Focal proliferative thyroid follicular lesions including focal hyperplasias and adenomas per square centimeter of thyroid gland were significantly increased in rats given MNU and ID diets in comparison with rats given MNU and IA diets. At 33 weeks, all MNU rats on ID diets had a significantly increased incidence of thyroid carcinoma of the follicular or papillary types and diffuse pituitary thyrotroph hyperplasia, hypertrophy, and vacuolar degeneration. Rats fed ID diets without MNU had diffuse follicular goiter but no tumors at any time period. MNU given alone in rats fed IA diets induced a 10% incidence of single thyroid adenomas at 20 weeks and 70% at 33 weeks and a 10% incidence of thyroid carcinoma at 33 weeks. Tumors induced in other organs by MNU were not affected by the ID diets. Thus this experiment provided evidence that ID diets are potent promoters of thyroid tumors in this system, but the ID diet itself without carcinogen was not carcinogenic under the conditions of the study.

  9. A tumor-promoting mechanism mediated by retrotransposon-encoded reverse transcriptase is active in human transformed cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamanna, Ilaria; Gualtieri, Alberto; Cossetti, Cristina; Osimo, Emanuele Felice; Ferracin, Manuela; Macchia, Gianfranco; Aricò, Eleonora; Prosseda, Gianni; Vitullo, Patrizia; Misteli, Tom; Spadafora, Corrado

    2013-12-01

    LINE-1 elements make up the most abundant retrotransposon family in the human genome. Full-length LINE-1 elements encode a reverse transcriptase (RT) activity required for their own retrotranpsosition as well as that of non-autonomous Alu elements. LINE-1 are poorly expressed in normal cells and abundantly in cancer cells. Decreasing RT activity in cancer cells, by either LINE-1-specific RNA interference, or by RT inhibitory drugs, was previously found to reduce proliferation and promote differentiation and to antagonize tumor growth in animal models. Here we have investigated how RT exerts these global regulatory functions. We report that the RT inhibitor efavirenz (EFV) selectively downregulates proliferation of transformed cell lines, while exerting only mild effects on non-transformed cells; this differential sensitivity matches a differential RT abundance, which is high in the former and undetectable in the latter. Using CsCl density gradients, we selectively identify Alu and LINE-1 containing DNA:RNA hybrid molecules in cancer but not in normal cells. Remarkably, hybrid molecules fail to form in tumor cells treated with EFV under the same conditions that repress proliferation and induce the reprogramming of expression profiles of coding genes, microRNAs (miRNAs) and ultraconserved regions (UCRs). The RT-sensitive miRNAs and UCRs are significantly associated with Alu sequences. The results suggest that LINE-1-encoded RT governs the balance between single-stranded and double-stranded RNA production. In cancer cells the abundant RT reverse-transcribes retroelement-derived mRNAs forming RNA:DNA hybrids. We propose that this impairs the formation of double-stranded RNAs and the ensuing production of small regulatory RNAs, with a direct impact on gene expression. RT inhibition restores the 'normal' small RNA profile and the regulatory networks that depend on them. Thus, the retrotransposon-encoded RT drives a previously unrecognized mechanism crucial to the

  10. Deregulation of the Pit-1 transcription factor in human breast cancer cells promotes tumor growth and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Batalla, Isabel; Seoane, Samuel; Garcia-Caballero, Tomas; Gallego, Rosalia; Macia, Manuel; Gonzalez, Luis O.; Vizoso, Francisco; Perez-Fernandez, Roman

    2010-01-01

    The Pit-1 transcription factor (also know as POU1F1) plays a critical role in cell differentiation during organogenesis of the anterior pituitary in mammals and is a transcriptional activator for pituitary gene transcription. Increased expression of Pit-1 has been reported in human tumorigenic breast cells. Here, we found that Pit-1 overexpression or knockdown in human breast cancer cell lines induced profound phenotypic changes in the expression of proteins involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and invasion. Some of these protumorigenic effects of Pit-1 were mediated by upregulation of Snai1, an inductor of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In immunodeficient mice, Pit-1 overexpression induced tumoral growth and promoted metastasis in lung. In patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and node-positive tumor, high expression of Pit-1 was significantly correlated with Snai1 positivity. Notably, in these patients elevated expression of Pit-1 was significantly and independently associated with the occurrence of distant metastasis. These findings suggest that Pit-1 could help to make a more accurate prognosis in patients with node-positive breast cancer and may represent a new therapeutic target. PMID:21060149

  11. VEGF-C Promotes Immune Tolerance in B16 Melanomas and Cross-Presentation of Tumor Antigen by Lymph Node Lymphatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda W. Lund

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor expression of the lymphangiogenic factor VEGF-C is correlated with metastasis and poor prognosis, and although VEGF-C enhances transport to the draining lymph node (dLN and antigen exposure to the adaptive immune system, its role in tumor immunity remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that VEGF-C promotes immune tolerance in murine melanoma. In B16 F10 melanomas expressing a foreign antigen (OVA, VEGF-C protected tumors against preexisting antitumor immunity and promoted local deletion of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells. Naive OVA-specific CD8+ T cells, transferred into tumor-bearing mice, were dysfunctionally activated and apoptotic. Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs in dLNs cross-presented OVA, and naive LECs scavenge and cross-present OVA in vitro. Cross-presenting LECs drove the proliferation and apoptosis of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells ex vivo. Our findings introduce a tumor-promoting role for lymphatics in the tumor and dLN and suggest that lymphatic endothelium in the local microenvironment may be a target for immunomodulation.

  12. Metformin limits the adipocyte tumor-promoting effect on ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebbe, Calvin; Chhina, Jasdeep; Dar, Sajad A; Sarigiannis, Kalli; Giri, Shailendra; Munkarah, Adnan R; Rattan, Ramandeep

    2014-07-15

    Omental adipocytes promote ovarian cancer by secretion of adipokines, cytokines and growth factors, and acting as fuel depots. We investigated if metformin modulates the ovarian cancer promoting effects of adipocytes. Effect of conditioned media obtained from differentiated mouse 3T3L1 preadipoctes on the proliferation and migration of a mouse ovarian surface epithelium cancer cell line (ID8) was estimated. Conditioned media from differentiated adipocytes increased the proliferation and migration of ID8 cells, which was attenuated by metformin. Metformin inhibited adipogenesis by inhibition of key adipogenesis regulating transcription factors (CEBPα, CEBPß, and SREBP1), and induced AMPK. A targeted Cancer Pathway Finder RT-PCR (real-time polymerase chain reaction) based gene array revealed 20 up-regulated and 2 down-regulated genes in ID8 cells exposed to adipocyte conditioned media, which were altered by metformin. Adipocyte conditioned media also induced bio-energetic changes in the ID8 cells by pushing them into a highly metabolically active state; these effects were reversed by metformin. Collectively, metformin treatment inhibited the adipocyte mediated ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration, expression of cancer associated genes and bio-energetic changes. Suggesting, that metformin could be a therapeutic option for ovarian cancer at an early stage, as it not only targets ovarian cancer, but also modulates the environmental milieu.

  13. Aberrant hypomethylation-mediated CD147 overexpression promotes aggressive tumor progression in human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu-Xiang; Mo, Ru-Jun; He, Hui-Chan; Chen, Jia-Hong; Zou, Jun; Han, Zhao-Dong; Lu, Jian-Ming; Cai, Chao; Zeng, Yan-Ru; Zhong, Wei-De; Wu, Chin-Lee

    2015-05-01

    Our previous study revealed the potential role of CD147 in human prostate cancer (PCa). Here, we investigated the CD147 promoter methylation status and the correlation with tumorigenicity in human PCa. CD147 mRNA and protein expression levels were both significantly higher in the 4 PCa cell lines, than in the 2 non-tumorigenic benign human prostatic epithelial cell lines (all PCD147 in PCa cell lines with significant CD147 expression as compared to non-tumorigenic benign human prostatic epithelial cell lines slowly expressing CD147. Additionally, the treatment of methylated cell lines with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine increased CD147 expression significantly in low-expressing cell lines and also activated the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, which may be one of the most important downstream targets of CD147. Furthermore, PCa tissues displayed decreased DNA methylation in the promoter region of CD147 compared to the corresponding non-cancerous prostate tissues, and methylation intensity correlated inversely with the CD147 mRNA levels. There was a significant negative correlation between CD147 mRNA levels and the number of methylated sites in PCa tissues (r=-0.467, PCD147 may be one of the regulatory mechanisms involved in the cancer-related overexpression of CD147 and may play a crucial role in the tumorigenesis of PCa.

  14. Unlocking tumor vascular barriers with CXCR3: Implications for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikucki, Maryann E; Skitzki, Joseph J; Frelinger, John G; Odunsi, Kunle; Gajewski, Thomas F; Luster, Andrew D; Evans, Sharon S

    2016-05-01

    Promising cancer immunotherapeutics depend on mobilization of cytotoxic T cells across tumor vascular barriers through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Recently, we discovered that the CXCR3 chemokine receptor uniquely functions as the master-regulator of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell extravasation and tumor control despite the multiplicity of chemokines available in the tumor landscape.

  15. Intra- and Extra-Cellular Events Related to Altered Glycosylation of MUC1 Promote Chronic Inflammation, Tumor Progression, Invasion, and Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Cascio

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Altered glycosylation of mucin 1 (MUC1 on tumor cells compared to normal epithelial cells was previously identified as an important antigenic modification recognized by the immune system in the process of tumor immunosurveillance. This tumor form of MUC1 is considered a viable target for cancer immunotherapy. The importance of altered MUC1 glycosylation extends also to its role as a promoter of chronic inflammatory conditions that lead to malignant transformation and cancer progression. We review here what is known about the role of specific cancer-associated glycans on MUC1 in protein-protein interactions and intracellular signaling in cancer cells and in their adhesion to each other and the tumor stroma. The tumor form of MUC1 also creates a different landscape of inflammatory cells in the tumor microenvironment by controlling the recruitment of inflammatory cells, establishing specific interactions with dendritic cells (DCs and macrophages, and facilitating tumor escape from the immune system. Through multiple types of short glycans simultaneously present in tumors, MUC1 acquires multiple oncogenic properties that control tumor development, progression, and metastasis at different steps of the process of carcinogenesis.

  16. Designing a HER2/neu promoter to drive alpha1,3galactosyltransferase expression for targeted anti-alphaGal antibody-mediated tumor cell killing.

    OpenAIRE

    Lanteri, Marion; Ollier, Laurence; Giordanengo, Valérie; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Our goal was to specifically render tumor cells susceptible to natural cytolytic anti-alphaGal antibodies by using a murine alpha1,3galactosyltransferase (malphaGalT) transgene driven by a designed form of HER2/neu promoter (pNeu), the transcription of which is frequently observed to be above basal in breast tumors. Indeed, the alphaGalT activity that promotes Galalpha1,3Galbeta1,4GlcNAc-R (alphaGal) epitope expression has been mutationally disrupted during the course of evoluti...

  17. β-Catenin signaling increases during melanoma progression and promotes tumor cell survival and chemoresistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Sinnberg

    Full Text Available Beta-catenin plays an important role in embryogenesis and carcinogenesis by controlling either cadherin-mediated cell adhesion or transcriptional activation of target gene expression. In many types of cancers nuclear translocation of beta-catenin has been observed. Our data indicate that during melanoma progression an increased dependency on the transcriptional function of beta-catenin takes place. Blockade of beta-catenin in metastatic melanoma cell lines efficiently induces apoptosis, inhibits proliferation, migration and invasion in monolayer and 3-dimensional skin reconstructs and decreases chemoresistance. In addition, subcutaneous melanoma growth in SCID mice was almost completely inhibited by an inducible beta-catenin knockdown. In contrast, the survival of benign melanocytes and primary melanoma cell lines was less affected by beta-catenin depletion. However, enhanced expression of beta-catenin in primary melanoma cell lines increased invasive capacity in vitro and tumor growth in the SCID mouse model. These data suggest that beta-catenin is an essential survival factor for metastatic melanoma cells, whereas it is dispensable for the survival of benign melanocytes and primary, non-invasive melanoma cells. Furthermore, beta-catenin increases tumorigenicity of primary melanoma cell lines. The differential requirements for beta-catenin signaling in aggressive melanoma versus benign melanocytic cells make beta-catenin a possible new target in melanoma therapy.

  18. O-GlcNAcylation of G6PD promotes the pentose phosphate pathway and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Xiongjian; Duan, Xiaotao; Mao, Weimin; Li, Xuexia; Li, Zhonghua; Li, Qian; Zheng, Zhiguo; Xu, Haimiao; Chen, Min; Wang, Peng G; Wang, Yingjie; Shen, Binghui; Yi, Wen

    2015-09-24

    The pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) plays a critical role in macromolecule biosynthesis and maintaining cellular redox homoeostasis in rapidly proliferating cells. Upregulation of the PPP has been shown in several types of cancer. However, how the PPP is regulated to confer a selective growth advantage on cancer cells is not well understood. Here we show that glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the rate-limiting enzyme of the PPP, is dynamically modified with an O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine sugar in response to hypoxia. Glycosylation activates G6PD activity and increases glucose flux through the PPP, thereby providing precursors for nucleotide and lipid biosynthesis, and reducing equivalents for antioxidant defense. Blocking glycosylation of G6PD reduces cancer cell proliferation in vitro and impairs tumor growth in vivo. Importantly, G6PD glycosylation is increased in human lung cancers. Our findings reveal a mechanistic understanding of how O-glycosylation directly regulates the PPP to confer a selective growth advantage to tumours.

  19. In Vivo Models to Study Chemokine Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, F A; Boff, D; Teixeira, M M

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are essential mediators of leukocyte movement in vivo. In vitro assays of leukocyte migration cannot mimic the complex interactions with other cell types and matrix needed for cells to extravasate and migrate into tissues. Therefore, in vivo strategies to study the effects and potential relevance of chemokines for the migration of particular leukocyte subsets are necessary. Here, we describe methods to study the effects and endogenous role of chemokine in mice. Advantages and pitfalls of particular models are discussed and we focus on description in model's joint and pleural cavity inflammation and the effects and relevance of CXCR2 and CCR2 ligands on cell migration.

  20. A tumor suppressor C53 protein antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai; Wu, Jianchun; He, Chen; Yang, Wending; Li, Honglin

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint (1). More recently, Wang et al (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor via inhibiting NF-κB signaling (2). We report here identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexrepsssion. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell cycle progression and DNA damage response. PMID:19223857

  1. TRIP-Br2 promotes oncogenesis in nude mice and is frequently overexpressed in multiple human tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peh Bee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the TRIP-Br/SERTAD family of mammalian transcriptional coregulators have recently been implicated in E2F-mediated cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis. We, herein, focus on the detailed functional characterization of the least understood member of the TRIP-Br/SERTAD protein family, TRIP-Br2 (SERTAD2. Methods Oncogenic potential of TRIP-Br2 was demonstrated by (1 inoculation of NIH3T3 fibroblasts, which were engineered to stably overexpress ectopic TRIP-Br2, into athymic nude mice for tumor induction and (2 comprehensive immunohistochemical high-throughput screening of TRIP-Br2 protein expression in multiple human tumor cell lines and human tumor tissue microarrays (TMAs. Clinicopathologic analysis was conducted to assess the potential of TRIP-Br2 as a novel prognostic marker of human cancer. RNA interference of TRIP-Br2 expression in HCT-116 colorectal carcinoma cells was performed to determine the potential of TRIP-Br2 as a novel chemotherapeutic drug target. Results Overexpression of TRIP-Br2 is sufficient to transform murine fibroblasts and promotes tumorigenesis in nude mice. The transformed phenotype is characterized by deregulation of the E2F/DP-transcriptional pathway through upregulation of the key E2F-responsive genes CYCLIN E, CYCLIN A2, CDC6 and DHFR. TRIP-Br2 is frequently overexpressed in both cancer cell lines and multiple human tumors. Clinicopathologic correlation indicates that overexpression of TRIP-Br2 in hepatocellular carcinoma is associated with a worse clinical outcome by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Small interfering RNA-mediated (siRNA knockdown of TRIP-Br2 was sufficient to inhibit cell-autonomous growth of HCT-116 cells in vitro. Conclusion This study identifies TRIP-Br2 as a bona-fide protooncogene and supports the potential for TRIP-Br2 as a novel prognostic marker and a chemotherapeutic drug target in human cancer.

  2. A mutant RNA pseudoknot that promotes ribosomal frameshifting in mouse mammary tumor virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H; Tinoco, I

    1997-05-15

    A single A-->G mutation that changes a potential A.U base pair to a G.U pair at the junction of the stems and loops of a non-frameshifting pseudoknot dramatically increases its frameshifting efficiency in mouse mammary tumor virus. The structure of the non-frameshifting pseudoknot APK has been found to be very different from that of pseudoknots that cause efficient frameshifting [Kang,H., Hines,J.V. and Tinoco,I. (1995) J. Mol. Biol. , 259, 135-147]. The 3-dimensional structure of the mutant pseudoknot was determined by restrained molecular dynamics based on NMR-derived interproton distance and torsion angle constraints. One striking feature of the mutant pseudoknot compared with the parent pseudoknot is that a G.U base pair forms at the top of stem 2, thus leaving only 1 nt at the junction of the two stems. The conformation is very different from that of the previously determined non-frameshifting parent pseudoknot, which lacks the A.U base pair at the top of the stem and has 2 nt between the stems. However, the conformation is quite similar to that of efficient frameshifting pseudoknots whose structures were previously determined by NMR. A single adenylate residue intervenes between the two stems and interrupts their coaxial stacking. This unpaired nucleotide produces a bent structure. The structural similarity among the efficient frameshifting pseudoknots indicates that a specific conformation is required for ribosomal frameshifting, further implying a specific interaction of the pseudoknot with the ribosome.

  3. Aberrant promoter methylation and gene expression of H-cadherin gene is associated with tumor progression and recurrence in epithelial ovarian carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Bhagat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Loss of expression of cadherins by promoter hypermethylation has been described in many epithelial cancers, and it may play a role in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Previously, we reported that E-cadherin gene is frequently methylated in epithelial ovarian cancer. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the promoter hypermethylation of H-cadherin gene in ovarian epithelial neoplasms to better understand the role of epigenetic silencing in carcinogenesis. Materials and Methods: We examined the promoter methylation of the H-cadherin gene in 134 epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOC, 23 low malignant potential (LMP tumors, 26 benign cystadenomas and 15 normal ovarian tissues. Methylation was investigated by methylation specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP and the results confirmed by bisulfite DNA sequencing. Relative gene expression of H-cadherin was done using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR on 51 EOC cases, 9 LMP tumors, 7 benign cystadenomas with 5 normal ovarian tissues. Results: Aberrant methylation of H-cadherin was present in 20 of 134 (15% carcinoma cases, 2 of 23 (09% LMP tumors and 1 of 26 (4% benign cystadenomas. No methylation was observed in any of the normal ovarian tissues. The mRNA expression level of H-cadherin was significantly down-regulated in EOC and LMP tumors than the corresponding normal tissues, whereas the expression level was normal in benign cystadenomas. A significant correlation of H-cadherin promoter methylation was observed with reduced gene expression in EOC. The prevalence of H-cadherin methylation was associated significantly with stage, histopathological grade, and menopausal status of the patient. H-cadherin methylation also had significant association with recurrence and differentiation of tumor. Conclusion: Our findings suggest an association between H-cadherin methylation, tumor progression and recurrence in EOC.

  4. 肿瘤相关巨噬细胞促进肿瘤血管生成和转移的研究进展%Tumor-associated macrophages as promoters of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐建

    2011-01-01

    Macropahges originate from blood monocytes and can differentiate into classically activated macrophages (M1) and alternatively activated macrophages (M2) under different stimulus. As far as we know, tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) was thought to resemble M2-polarized macrophages. The tumor patients whose tumor tissues were infiltrated by lots of TAM were believed to have poor prognosis, and TAM can promote tumor angiogenesis and metastasis by diverse molecular mechanisms.Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that TAM promote tumor angiogenesis and metastasis.%巨噬细胞起源于血液单核细胞,在不同的刺激因素作用下,巨噬细胞可分化为经典激活的巨噬细胞(M1型)和选择性激活的巨噬细胞(M2型).现在认为,肿瘤相关巨噬细胞(tumor-associated macrophages,TAM)具有M2型巨噬细胞表型.TAM在肿瘤中大量浸润被认为是肿瘤患者预后不良的重要标志.TAM通过多种分子机制促进肿瘤血管生成和转移.本文就TAM促进肿瘤血管生成和转移的相关分子机制作一综述.

  5. Pigment epithelial-derived factor gene loaded novel COOH-PEG-PLGA-COOH nanoparticles promoted tumor suppression by systemic administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu T

    2016-02-01

    proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro and inhibited the tumor-induced angiogenesis in vivo by an alginate-encapsulated tumor cell assay. Further in vivo antitumor investigation, carried out in a C26 subcutaneous tumor model by intravenous injection, demonstrated that D-NPs could achieve a significant antitumor activity with sharply reduced microvessel density and significantly promoted tumor cell apoptosis. Additionally, the in vitro hemolysis analysis and in vivo serological and biochemical analysis revealed that D-NPs had no obvious toxicity. All the data indicated that the novel CPPC nanoparticles were ideal vectors for the systemic delivery of PEDF gene and might be widely used as systemic gene vectors. Keywords: pigment epithelium-derived factor gene, nanoparticles based on PLGA derivative, gene delivery, systemic delivery, tumor

  6. WO3/Pt nanoparticles promote light-induced lipid peroxidation and lysosomal instability within tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrea J.; Petty, Howard R.

    2016-02-01

    Although metal-metal oxide nanoparticles have attracted considerable interest as catalysts, they have attracted little interest in nanomedicine. This is likely due to the fact that metal oxide semiconductors generally require biologically harmful ultraviolet excitation. In contrast, this study focuses upon WO3/Pt nanoparticles, which can be excited by visible light. To optimize the nanoparticles’ catalytic performance, platinization was performed at alkaline pH. These nanoparticles destroyed organic dyes, consumed dissolved oxygen and produced hydroxyl radicals. 4T1 breast cancer cells internalized WO3/Pt nanoparticles within the membrane-bound endo-lysosomal compartment as shown by electron and fluorescence microscopy. During visible light exposure, but not in darkness, WO3/Pt nanoparticles manufacture reactive oxygen species, promote lipid peroxidation, and trigger lysosomal membrane disruption. As cells of the immune system degrade organic molecules, produce reactive oxygen species, and activate the lipid peroxidation pathway within target cells, these nanoparticles mimic the chemical attributes of immune effector cells. These biomimetic nanoparticles should become useful in managing certain cancers, especially ocular cancer.

  7. Expressions of chemokine SDF-1 and its receptor CXCR4 in epithelial ovarian tumor of elderly patients and its clinical significance%SDF-1/CXCR4在老年卵巢癌组织中的表达及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雅丽; 辛维政; 王轶英

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expressions and clinical significance of chemokine SDF-1 and its receptor CXCR4 in elderly patients with epithelial ovarian tumor. Methods 43 cases with epithelial ovarian cancer were studied ran-domly. The expressions of SDF-1 and CXCR4 proteins were detected by Western blotting. Results There were weak ex-pression of SDF-1 and modest expression of CXCR4 in benign ovarian tumor of elderly patients. The expressions of SDF-1 protein and CXCR4 protein were significantly increased in epithelial ovarian cancer, compared with benign ovarian tumor (2.38±0.20 vs 3.32±0.26) (P<0.05). Conclusion SDF-1/CXCR4 may play a role in the malignant transformation of primary ovarian cancer and involve in the initiation, progression and metastasis of ovarian cancer of elderly patients.%目的 探讨趋化因子SDF-1及其受体CXCR4在老年人卜皮性卵巢癌组织中的表达及意义.方法 应用western blotting方法定量检测43例老年患者卜皮性卵巢癌组织中SDF-1和CXCR4的蛋白表达情况.结果 老年人上皮性卵巢癌组织中SDF-1/CXCR4蛋白表达较卵巢良性肿瘤对照组明显增加.其相对表达量分别为(2.38±0.20)和(3.32±0.26),差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 SDF-1/CXCR4生物学轴可能在老年人卵巢癌的发生与转移过程中起着重要作用.

  8. Candidate Tumor-Suppressor Gene DLEC1 Is Frequently Downregulated by Promoter Hypermethylation and Histone Hypoacetylation in Human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Kwong

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of ovarian tumor growth by chromosome 3p was demonstrated in a previous study. Deleted in Lung and Esophageal Cancer 1 (DLEC1 on 3p22.3 is a candidate tumor suppressor in lung, esophageal, and renal cancers. The potential involvement of DLEC1 in epithelial ovarian cancer remains unknown. In the present study, DLEC1 downregulation was found in ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian tumors. Focus-expressed DLEC1 in two ovarian cancer cell lines resulted in 41% to 52% inhibition of colony formation. No chromosomal loss of chromosome 3p22.3 in any ovarian cancer cell line or tissue was found. Promoter hypermethylation of DLEC1 was detected in ovarian cancer cell lines with reduced DLEC1 transcripts, whereas methylation was not detected in normal ovarian epithelium and DLEC1-expressing ovarian cancer cell lines. Treatment with demethylating agent enhanced DLEC1 expression in 90% (9 of 10 of ovarian cancer cell lines. DLEC1 promoter methylation was examined in 13 high-grade ovarian tumor tissues with DLEC1 downregulation, in which 54% of the tumors showed DLEC1 methylation. In addition, 80% of ovarian cancer cell lines significantly upregulated DLEC1 transcripts after histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment. Therefore, our results suggested that DLEC1 suppressed the growth of ovarian cancer cells and that its downregulation was closely associated with promoter hypermethylation and histone hypoacetylation.

  9. Chemokines: Small Molecules Participate in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mostafa Hosseini-Zijoud

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemokines are small protein molecules involved in cell signaling processes. They play a crucial role in many physiological and pathological processes. Chemokines are functionally classified into two categories; inflammatory/inducible and constitutive. Their biologic functional differences are the result of their receptors structural differences. Recently some studies were performed about the chemokines changes in diabetes. Inflammatory mechanisms have an important role in diabetes.Materials and Methods: In this review article we searched the keywords chemokines, diabetes, diabetes pathogenesis, and type 1 and 2 diabetes in Persian resources, PubMed and famous English-language websites through advanced search engines and found the newest studies about the role of chemokines in the pathogenesis of diabetes.Results: The results of the studies showed that diabetes and its disorders enhance the activation of immune cells and the expression of cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, SDF-1, INF-γ, TGF-β, MCP-1, IP-10, TNF-α, and RANTES; most of them have impact on the pathogenesis of diabetes.Conclusion: Comparison and analysis of the results obtained from our research and the results of performed studies in the world and Iran shows that chemokines, like other protein molecules involved in the pathogenesis and etiology of diabetes, play a role in this process.

  10. [Chemokine CC receptors in the nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzik, Tomasz Łukasz; Głabiński, Andrzej; Żylińska, Ludmiła

    2015-01-01

    Chemoattractant cytokines (chemokines) are traditionally known as the important mediators of inflammatory processes, however, recently, is also given to their other functions in the body. Acting through specific receptors belonging to the G proteins they regulate immune processes in the body. About 20 chemokine receptors have been identified so far, and 10 of them bind chemokines CC, i.e. having in amino-terminal domain 2 adjacent molecules of cysteins. An increasing number of data indicates that chemokines and their receptors play an important role in the nervous system by acting as trophic factors, increasing the neurons survival, neural migration and synaptic transmission. Special role chemokine receptors play primarily in the diseases of the nervous system, because due to damage of the blood-brain barrier and the blood cerebrospinal fluid barrier, infiltration of leukocytes results in development of inflammation. Chemokine CC receptors has been shown to participate in Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, dementia associated with HIV infection, stroke or some type of cancers.

  11. The tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) accelerates expression of differentiation markers in cultures of rat palatal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenholt, D; Dabelsteen, Erik

    1987-01-01

    Cultures of rat palatal epithelium grown on collagen rafts were treated with different doses of the potent tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Sections from biopsies taken 1, 6, 24, and 48 hr after the addition of TPA were examined for the localization of staining by blood...

  12. Wedelolactone mitigates UVB induced oxidative stress, inflammation and early tumor promotion events in murine skin: plausible role of NFkB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Farrah; Khan, Bilal Azhar; Sultana, Sarwat

    2016-09-05

    UVB (Ultra-violet B) radiation is one of the major etiological factors in various dermal pathology viz. dermatitis, actinic folliculitis, solar urticaria, psoriasis and cancer among many others. UVB causes toxic manifestation in tissues by inciting inflammatory and tumor promoting events. We have designed this study to assess the anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor promotion effect of Wedelolactone (WDL) a specific IKK inhibitor. Results indicate significant restoration of anti-oxidative enzymes due to WDL treatments. We also found that WDL was effective in mitigating inflammatory markers consisting of MPO (myeloperoxidase), Mast cells trafficking, Langerhans cells suppression and COX 2 expression up regulation due to UVB exposure. We also deduce that WDL presented a promising intervention in attenuating early tumor promotion events caused by UVB exposure as indicated by the results of ODC (Ornithine Decarboxylase), Thymidine assay, Vimentin and VEGF (Vascular-endothelial growth factor) expression. This study was able to provide substantial cues for the therapeutic ability of Wedelolactone against inflammatory and tumor promoting events in murine skin depicting plausible role of NFkB pathway.

  13. CXCL12 chemokine expression suppresses human pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishan Roy

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an unsolved health problem with nearly 75% of patients diagnosed with advanced disease and an overall 5-year survival rate near 5%. Despite the strong link between mortality and malignancy, the mechanisms behind pancreatic cancer dissemination and metastasis are poorly understood. Correlative pathological and cell culture analyses suggest the chemokine receptor CXCR4 plays a biological role in pancreatic cancer progression. In vivo roles for the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12 in pancreatic cancer malignancy were investigated. CXCR4 and CXCR7 were consistently expressed in normal and cancerous pancreatic ductal epithelium, established cell lines, and patient-derived primary cancer cells. Relative to healthy exocrine ducts, CXCL12 expression was pathologically repressed in pancreatic cancer tissue specimens and patient-derived cell lines. To test the functional consequences of CXCL12 silencing, pancreatic cancer cell lines stably expressingthe chemokine were engineered. Consistent with a role for CXCL12 as a tumor suppressor, cells producing the chemokine wereincreasingly adherent and migration deficient in vitro and poorly metastatic in vivo, compared to control cells. Further, CXCL12 reintroduction significantly reduced tumor growth in vitro, with significantly smaller tumors in vivo, leading to a pronounced survival advantage in a preclinical model. Together, these data demonstrate a functional tumor suppressive role for the normal expression of CXCL12 in pancreatic ducts, regulating both tumor growth andcellulardissemination to metastatic sites.

  14. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) extract modulates CHOP/GADD153 to promote androgen receptor degradation and decreases xenograft tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petiwala, Sakina M; Berhe, Saba; Li, Gongbo; Puthenveetil, Angela G; Rahman, Ozair; Nonn, Larisa; Johnson, Jeremy J

    2014-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet has long been attributed to preventing or delaying the onset of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and various solid organ cancers. In this particular study, a rosemary extract standardized to carnosic acid was evaluated for its potential in disrupting the endoplasmic reticulum machinery to decrease the viability of prostate cancer cells and promote degradation of the androgen receptor. Two human prostate cancer cell lines, 22Rv1 and LNCaP, and prostate epithelial cells procured from two different patients undergoing radical prostatectomy were treated with standardized rosemary extract and evaluated by flow cytometry, MTT, BrdU, Western blot and fluorescent microscopy. A significant modulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins was observed in cancer cells while normal prostate epithelial cells did not undergo endoplasmic reticulum stress. This biphasic response suggests that standardized rosemary extract may preferentially target cancer cells as opposed to "normal" cells. Furthermore, we observed standardized rosemary extract to decrease androgen receptor expression that appears to be regulated by the expression of CHOP/GADD153. Using a xenograft tumor model we observed standardized rosemary extract when given orally to significantly suppress tumor growth by 46% compared to mice not receiving standardized rosemary extract. In the last several years regulatory governing bodies (e.g. European Union) have approved standardized rosemary extracts as food preservatives. These results are especially significant as it is becoming more likely that individuals will be receiving standardized rosemary extracts that are a part of a natural preservative system in various food preparations. Taken a step further, it is possible that the potential benefits that are often associated with a "Mediterranean Diet" in the future may begin to extend beyond the Mediterranean diet as more of the population is consuming standardized rosemary extracts.

  15. Stathmin, interacting with Nf-κB, promotes tumor growth and predicts poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y; Liu, C; Cheng, H; Xu, Y; Jiang, J; Xu, J; Long, J; Liu, L; Yu, X

    2014-03-01

    Stathmin (STMN) has been known as a p53-regulated protein and has been shown to play an oncogenic role in a range of human malignancies. Paradoxically, most recent studies demonstrated that stathmin has a dual function as both an oncogene and a metastasis suppressor. Stathmin is a member of microtubule dynamic destabilizing proteins and stathmin-regulated microtubule disruption could lead to a variety of cell dysfunctions such as enhanced chronic hypoxia in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we identified that stathmin promotes proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells by an underlying nuclear factor kappa B (Nf-κB) interacting mechanism. In human specimens, stathmin was significantly overexpressed in pancreatic cancer tissues and high expression of stathmin was correlated with vascular emboli (p=0.028), tumor size (p=0.019), and overall survival (p=0.031). Functional assays showed that knockdown of stathmin significantly reduced pancreatic cancer cell viability, colony formation, and arrested the cell cycle at the G2/M phase. Furthermore, silence of stathmin could reduce pancreatic tumor growth in nude mice. For the mechanism, Western blot analyses demonstrated that Nf-κB (p65) was significantly down-regulated when stathmin was silenced. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation (CoIP) assay suggested that stathmin was able to interact with Nf-κB (p65). Our findings indicate that stathmin might play its oncogenic role by an interaction with Nf-κB pathway, which may reveal a novel mechanism to uncover the role of microtubule-destabilizing stathmin in pancreatic cancer environment as well as provide a potential therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer.

  16. PI3K/Akt signaling mediated Hexokinase-2 expression inhibits cell apoptosis and promotes tumor growth in pediatric osteosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuo, Baobiao; Li, Yuan; Li, Zhengwei; Qin, Haihui; Sun, Qingzeng; Zhang, Fengfei; Shen, Yang; Shi, Yingchun [Department of Surgery, The Children' s Hospital of Xuzhou, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province 221006 (China); Wang, Rong, E-mail: wangrong2008163@163.com [Department of Ultrasonography, Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province 221006 (China)

    2015-08-21

    Accumulating evidence has shown that PI3K/Akt pathway is frequently hyperactivated in osteosarcoma (OS) and contributes to tumor initiation and progression. Altered phenotype of glucose metabolism is a key hallmark of cancer cells including OS. However, the relationship between PI3K/Akt pathway and glucose metabolism in OS remains largely unexplored. In this study, we showed that elevated Hexokinase-2 (HK2) expression, which catalyzes the first essential step of glucose metabolism by conversion of glucose into glucose-6-phosphate, was induced by activated PI3K/Akt signaling. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that HK2 was overexpressed in 83.3% (25/30) specimens detected and was closely correlated with Ki67, a cell proliferation index. Silencing of endogenous HK2 resulted in decreased aerobic glycolysis as demonstrated by reduced glucose consumption and lactate production. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling also suppressed aerobic glycolysis and this effect can be reversed by reintroduction of HK2. Furthermore, knockdown of HK2 led to increased cell apoptosis and reduced ability of colony formation; meanwhile, these effects were blocked by 2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), a glycolysis inhibitor through its actions on hexokinase, indicating that HK2 functions in cell apoptosis and growth were mediated by altered aerobic glycolysis. Taken together, our study reveals a novel relationship between PI3K/Akt signaling and aerobic glycolysis and indicates that PI3K/Akt/HK2 might be potential therapeutic approaches for OS. - Highlights: • PI3K/Akt signaling contributes to elevated expression of HK2 in osteosarcoma. • HK2 inhibits cell apoptosis and promotes tumor growth through enhanced Warburg effect. • Inhibition of glycolysis blocks the oncogenic activity of HK2.

  17. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis extract modulates CHOP/GADD153 to promote androgen receptor degradation and decreases xenograft tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakina M Petiwala

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean diet has long been attributed to preventing or delaying the onset of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and various solid organ cancers. In this particular study, a rosemary extract standardized to carnosic acid was evaluated for its potential in disrupting the endoplasmic reticulum machinery to decrease the viability of prostate cancer cells and promote degradation of the androgen receptor. Two human prostate cancer cell lines, 22Rv1 and LNCaP, and prostate epithelial cells procured from two different patients undergoing radical prostatectomy were treated with standardized rosemary extract and evaluated by flow cytometry, MTT, BrdU, Western blot and fluorescent microscopy. A significant modulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins was observed in cancer cells while normal prostate epithelial cells did not undergo endoplasmic reticulum stress. This biphasic response suggests that standardized rosemary extract may preferentially target cancer cells as opposed to "normal" cells. Furthermore, we observed standardized rosemary extract to decrease androgen receptor expression that appears to be regulated by the expression of CHOP/GADD153. Using a xenograft tumor model we observed standardized rosemary extract when given orally to significantly suppress tumor growth by 46% compared to mice not receiving standardized rosemary extract. In the last several years regulatory governing bodies (e.g. European Union have approved standardized rosemary extracts as food preservatives. These results are especially significant as it is becoming more likely that individuals will be receiving standardized rosemary extracts that are a part of a natural preservative system in various food preparations. Taken a step further, it is possible that the potential benefits that are often associated with a "Mediterranean Diet" in the future may begin to extend beyond the Mediterranean diet as more of the population is consuming standardized rosemary

  18. Promotion of melanoma cell invasion and tumor metastasis by microcystin-LR via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Miao, Chen; Fu, Ziyi; Li, Zhengrong; Zhang, Gen; Zheng, Maqing; Liu, Yuefang; Yang, Liuyan; Wang, Ting

    2013-08-06

    Recently, we have indicated that microcystin-LR, a cyanobacterial toxin produced in eutrophic lakes or reservoirs, can increase invasive ability of melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells; however, the stimulatory effect needs identification by in vivo experiment and the related molecular mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of microcystin-LR on invasion and metastasis of human melanoma cells, and the underlying molecular mechanism was also explored. MDA-MB-435 xenograft model assay showed that oral administration of nude mice with microcystin-LR at 0.001-0.1 mg/kg/d posed no significant effect on tumor weight. Histological examination demonstrated that microcystin-LR could promote lung metastasis, which is confirmed by Matrigel chamber assay suggesting that microcystin-LR treatment at 25 nM can increase the invasiveness of MDA-MB-435 cells. In vitro and in vivo experiments consistently showed that microcystin-LR exposure increased mRNA and protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2/-9) by activating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)/AKT. Additionally, microcystin-LR treatment at low doses (≤25 nM) decreased lipid phosphatase PTEN expression, and the microcystin-induced invasiveness enhancement and MMP-2/-9 overexpression were reversed by the PI3-K/AKT chemical inhibitor LY294002 and AKT siRNA, indicating that microcystin-LR promotes invasion and metastasis of MDA-MB-435 cells via the PI3-K/AKT pathway.

  19. Presence of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins Correlates With Tumor-Promoting Effects of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hyun Park

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The stroma of breast cancer can promote the disease’s progression, but whether its composition and functions are shared among different subtypes is poorly explored. We compared stromal components of a luminal [mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV–Neu] and a triple-negative/basal-like [C3(1–Simian virus 40 large T antigen (Tag] genetically engineered breast cancer mouse model. The types of cytokines and their expression levels were very different in the two models, as was the extent of innate immune cell infiltration; however, both models showed infiltration of innate immune cells that expressed matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, an extracellular protease linked to the progression of many types of cancer. By intercrossing with Mmp9 null mice, we found that the absence of MMP9 delayed tumor onset in the C3(1-Tag model but had no effect on tumor onset in the MMTV-Neu model. We discovered that protein levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1, an MMP9 substrate, were increased in C3(1-Tag;Mmp9−/− compared to C3(1-Tag;Mmp9+/+ tumors. In contrast, IGFBP-1 protein expression was low in MMTV-Neu tumors regardless of Mmp9 status. IGFBP-1 binds and antagonizes IGFs, preventing them from activating their receptors to promote cell proliferation and survival. Tumors from C3(1-Tag;Mmp9−/− mice had reduced IGF-1 receptor phosphorylation, consistent with slower tumor onset. Finally, gene expression analysis of human breast tumors showed that high expression of IGFBP mRNA was strongly correlated with good prognosis but not when MMP9 mRNA was also highly expressed. In conclusion, MMP9 has different effects on breast cancer progression depending on whether IGFBPs are expressed.

  20. Fas ligand based immunotherapy: A potent and effective neoadjuvant with checkpoint inhibitor properties, or a systemically toxic promoter of tumor growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modiano, Jaime F; Bellgrau, Donald

    2016-02-01

    Fas ligand (FasL, CD95L) is a 40-kDa type II transmembrane protein that binds to Fas (CD95) receptors and promotes programmed cell death. Fas receptors are expressed at higher levels in many tumors than in normal cells; however, systemic administration of FasL or agonistic anti-Fas antibodies to mice with tumors caused lethal hepatitis. Somewhat paradoxically, elimination of Fas or FasL from tumors also leads to death induced by CD95 receptor/ligand elimination (DICE). At face value, this suggests that Fas signaling not only kills normal cells, but that it also is essential for tumor cell survival. Targeting this pathway may not only fail to kill tumors, but instead may even enhance their growth, leading some to report the demise of Fas ligand in cancer immunotherapy. But, to paraphrase Mark Twain, is this death an exaggeration? Here, we provide a careful examination of the literature exploring the merits of FasL as a novel form of cancer immunotherapy. With local administration using delivery vectors that achieve high levels of expression in the tumor environment, our results indicate that the potential for systemic toxicity is eliminated in higher mammals, and that a systemic anti-tumor response ensues, which delays or prevents progression and simultaneously attacks distant metastases.

  1. Genomic loss of tumor suppressor miRNA-204 promotes cancer cell migration and invasion by activating AKT/mTOR/Rac1 signaling and actin reorganization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Saadi Imam

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that chromosomal regions containing microRNAs are functionally important in cancers. Here, we show that genomic loci encoding miR-204 are frequently lost in multiple cancers, including ovarian cancers, pediatric renal tumors, and breast cancers. MiR-204 shows drastically reduced expression in several cancers and acts as a potent tumor suppressor, inhibiting tumor metastasis in vivo when systemically delivered. We demonstrated that miR-204 exerts its function by targeting genes involved in tumorigenesis including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a neurotrophin family member which is known to promote tumor angiogenesis and invasiveness. Analysis of primary tumors shows that increased expression of BDNF or its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB parallel a markedly reduced expression of miR-204. Our results reveal that loss of miR-204 results in BDNF overexpression and subsequent activation of the small GTPase Rac1 and actin reorganization through the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway leading to cancer cell migration and invasion. These results suggest that microdeletion of genomic loci containing miR-204 is directly linked with the deregulation of key oncogenic pathways that provide crucial stimulus for tumor growth and metastasis. Our findings provide a strong rationale for manipulating miR-204 levels therapeutically to suppress tumor metastasis.

  2. DDX3, a DEAD box RNA helicase with tumor growth-suppressive property and transcriptional regulation activity of the p21waf1/cip1 promoter, is a candidate tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chi-Hong; Chen, Chun-Ming; Cheng, Pei-Lin; Shih, Jing-Wen; Tsou, Ann-Ping; Lee, Yan-Hwa Wu

    2006-07-01

    DDX3 is a DEAD box RNA helicase with diverse biological functions. Using colony formation assay, our results revealed that DDX3 inhibited the colony formation ability of various tumor cells, and this inhibition might be due to a reduced growth rate caused by DDX3. Additionally, we identified p21(waf1/cip1), a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, as a target gene of DDX3, and the up-regulation of p21(waf1/cip1) expression accounted for the colony-suppressing activity of DDX3. Moreover, DDX3 exerted its transactivation function on p21(waf1/cip1) promoter through an ATPase-dependent but helicase-independent mechanism, and the four Sp1 sites located within the -123 to -63 region, relative to the transcription start site of p21(waf1/cip1) promoter, were essential for the response to DDX3. Furthermore, DDX3 interacted and cooperated with Sp1 to up-regulate the promoter activity of p21(waf1/cip1). To determine the relevance of DDX3 in clinical cancers, the expression profile of DDX3 in various tumors was also examined. A declined expression of DDX3 mRNA and protein was found in approximately 58% to 73% of hepatoma specimens, which led to the reduction of p21(waf1/cip1) expression in a manner independent of p53 status. Additionally, an alteration of subcellular localization from nuclei to cytoplasm was also observed in >70% of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma samples. Because DDX3 exhibits tumor suppressor functions, such as a growth-suppressive property and transcriptional activation of the p21(waf1/cip1) promoter, and is inactivated through down-regulation of gene expression or alteration of subcellular localization in tumor cells, all these features together suggest that DDX3 might be a candidate tumor suppressor.

  3. Inhibitory effect of α-lipoic acid on thioacetamide-induced tumor promotion through suppression of inflammatory cell responses in a two-stage hepatocarcinogenesis model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yuta; Segawa, Risa; Kimura, Masayuki; Wang, Liyun; Ishii, Yuji; Yamamoto, Ryuichi; Morita, Reiko; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2013-09-25

    To investigate the protective effect of α-lipoic acid (a-LA) on the hepatocarcinogenic process promoted by thioacetamide (TAA), we used a two-stage liver carcinogenesis model in N-diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-initiated and TAA-promoted rats. We examined the modifying effect of co-administered a-LA on the liver tissue environment surrounding preneoplastic hepatocellular lesions, with particular focus on hepatic macrophages and the mechanism behind the decrease in apoptosis of cells surrounding preneoplastic hepatocellular lesions during the early stages of hepatocellular tumor promotion. TAA increased the number and area of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P)(+) liver cell foci and the numbers of proliferating and apoptotic cells in the liver. Co-administration with a-LA suppressed these effects. TAA also increased the numbers of ED2(+), cyclooxygenase-2(+), and heme oxygenase-1(+) hepatic macrophages as well as the number of CD3(+) lymphocytes. These effects were also suppressed by a-LA. Transcript levels of some inflammation-related genes were upregulated by TAA and downregulated by a-LA in real-time RT-PCR analysis. Outside the GST-P(+) foci, a-LA reduced the numbers of apoptotic cells, active caspase-8(+) cells and death receptor (DR)-5(+) cells. These results suggest that hepatic macrophages producing proinflammatory factors may be activated in TAA-induced tumor promotion. a-LA may suppress tumor-promoting activity by suppressing the activation of these macrophages and the subsequent inflammatory responses. Furthermore, a-LA may suppress tumor-promoting activity by suppressing the DR5-mediated extrinsic pathway of apoptosis and the subsequent regeneration of liver cells outside GST-P(+) foci.

  4. Human chorionic somatomammotropin and growth hormone gene expression in rat pituitary tumor cells is dependent on proximal promoter sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachtigal, M.W.; Nickel, B.E.; Klassen, M.E.; Cattini, P.A. (Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada)); Zhang, Wengang; Eberhardt, N.L. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1989-06-12

    Human placental chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS-A or hCS-B) and pituitary growth hormone (hGH-N) are related by structure and function. The hCS-A gene is expressed in rat pituitary tumor (GC) cells after gene transfer. Deletion of hCS-A 5{prime}-flanking DNA reveals repressor activity upstream of nucleotide {minus}132, and a region essential for expression in GC cells between nucleotides {minus}94 and {minus}61. The sequences in this region differ from the equivalent hGH-N gene DNA by one nucleotide, and include the binding site for a pituitary-specific factor (GHF-1), required for hGH-N expression in GC cells. Exchange of hGH-N with hCS-A gene DNA in this region maintains expression in GC cells. By contrast, modification of these sequences blocks expression. These data indicate that proximal promoter sequences, equivalent to those bound by GHF-1 on the hGH-N gene, are required for hCS-A expression in GC cells.

  5. Correlation of chemokine receptor CCR7 expression with tumor lymphatic invasion and lymph node metastasis in ovarian carcinoma%趋化因子受体CCR7的表达与卵巢癌淋巴管入侵及淋巴结转移的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟; 于占江; 师岩; 王娜; 马晶

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察趋化因子受体CCR7在卵巢癌组织内的表达情况,分析CCR7的表达与肿瘤淋巴管入侵和淋巴结转移之间的关系.方法 取临床资料完整的卵巢癌病例64例,其中,淋巴结转移组40例,无淋巴结转移组24例.应用免疫组化法和Western blot技术观察CCR7在卵巢癌组织内的表达.以D2-40作为淋巴管内皮特异性标记物,观察卵巢癌组织内肿瘤淋巴管入侵的情况.结果 免疫组化法和Westernblot检测结果表明,CCR7表达于卵巢癌细胞浆和胞膜内,有淋巴结转移组的表达量明显高于无淋巴结转移组(P<0.05).D2-40表达于卵巢癌组织内淋巴管内皮细胞,肿瘤淋巴管入侵在CCR7阳性组的发生率明显高于CCR7阴性组的发生率,CCR7表达与肿瘤淋巴管入侵发生率有显著相关性(P<0.05).结论 CCR7的表达与卵巢癌发生肿瘤淋巴管入侵和淋巴结转移密切相关,提示CCR7在卵巢癌淋巴结转移中可能起重要作用.%Objective To investigate the correlation of chemokine receptor 7(CCR7) expression with tumor lymphatic invasion as well as lymph node metastasis in epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Methods Sixty-four paraffin embedded stored specimens of ovarian carcinoma patients diagnosed pathologically were divided into lymph node metastatic group(n=40) and nonmetastatic group(n=24). The expressions of CCR7 were detected by immunohistochemical stain and Western blot. D2-40 was used as the specific lymphatic endothelial marker for detecting tumor lymphatic invasion in epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Results CCR7 protein positive product was observed in cytoplasm and membrane of tumor cells, the expression level of CCR7 in lymph node metastatic group was significantly higher than that in nonmetastatic group (P<0.05) by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. D2-40 specifically expressed in lymphatic endothelium in ovarian carcinoma, the incidence of tumor lymphatic invasion was higher in CCR7 positive group than in CCR

  6. Association of polymorphism of tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene promoter region with outcome of hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Quan Li; Zhuo Li; Ying Liu; Jun-Hong Li; Jian-Qun Dong; Ji-Rong Gao; Chun-Yan Gou; Hui Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether -238G/A and -857C/T polymorphisms of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), gene promoter and hepatitis B (HB) viral genotypes were associated with outcomes of HBV infection.METHODS: A total of 244 HBV self-limited infected subjects, 208 asymptomatic carriers, and 443 chronic HB patients were recruited to conduct a case-control study.TNF-α -238G/A and -857C/T gene promoter polymorphisms were examined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), and HBV genotypes were examined by nested PCR.RESULTS: The positive rate of HBV DNA in asymptomatic carrier group and chronic HB group was 46.6% and 49.9%,respectively. HBV genotype proportion among the asymptomatic carriers was 2.1% for genotype A, 25.8% for genotype B, 68.0% for genotype C, and 4.1% for genotype B+C mixed infection, and 0.9% for genotype A,21.7% for genotype B, 71.5% for genotype C, 5.9% for genotype B+C mixed infection in chronic HB group. There was no significant difference in genotype distribution between the asymptomatic carrier group and chronic HB group (x2 = 1.66, P = 0.647). The frequency of -238GG genotype in self-limited group was 95.1%, significantly higher than 90.7% in chronic HB group and 89.0% in asymptomatic carrier group (P = 0.041 and P = 0.016,respectively).The frequency of TNF-α-857 CC in chronic HB group was 79.7%, significantly higher than 64.4% in asymptomatic carrier group and 70.9% in self-limited group (P<0.001 and P = 0.023, respectively). A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that TNF-α-238GA and -857CC were independently associated with chronic HB after gender and age were adjusted.CONCLUSION: TNF-α promoter variants are likely to play a substantial role in the outcome of HBV infection.

  7. Chemokine and chemokine receptors in autoimmunity: the case of primary biliary cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinjung; Selmi, Carlo; Leung, Patrick S C; Kenny, Thomas P; Roskams, Tania; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-06-01

    Chemokines represent a major mediator of innate immunity and play a key role in the selective recruitment of cells during localized inflammatory responses. Beyond critical extracellular mediators of leukocyte trafficking, chemokines and their cognate receptors are expressed by a variety of resident and infiltrating cells (monocytes, lymphocytes, NK cells, mast cells, and NKT cells). Chemokines represent ideal candidates for mechanistic studies (particularly in murine models) to better understand the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation and possibly become biomarkers of disease. Nonetheless, therapeutic approaches targeting chemokines have led to unsatisfactory results in rheumatoid arthritis, while biologics against pro-inflammatory cytokines are being used worldwide with success. In this comprehensive review we will discuss the evidence supporting the involvement of chemokines and their specific receptors in mediating the effector cell response, utilizing the autoimmune/primary biliary cholangitis setting as a paradigm.

  8. Expression of specific chemokines and chemokine receptors in the central nervous system of multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Tani, M; Jensen, J

    1999-01-01

    specific chemokines were expressed in the CNS during acute demyelinating events by analyzing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), whose composition reflects the CNS extracellular space. During MS attacks, we found elevated CSF levels of three chemokines that act toward T cells and mononuclear phagocytes: interferon......Chemokines direct tissue invasion by specific leukocyte populations. Thus, chemokines may play a role in multiple sclerosis (MS), an idiopathic disorder in which the central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory reaction is largely restricted to mononuclear phagocytes and T cells. We asked whether......-gamma-inducible protein of 10 kDa (IP-10); monokine induced by interferon-gamma (Mig); and regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES). We then investigated whether specific chemokine receptors were expressed by infiltrating cells in demyelinating MS brain lesions and in CSF. CXCR3, an IP-10...

  9. Induction of the Chemokines CCL3α, CCL3α and CCL5 in Atherosclerotic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyaa Mousa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines recruit immune cells to inflammatory sites and promote the process of inflammation. The role of these mediators in the disease process in atherosclerosis is not fully studied. The spontaneous mRNA expression and intracellular protein production of the potential inflammatory chemokines CCL3 and CCL3 (macrophage- inflammatory protein-1and ; CCR3 ligand and CCL5 (regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES; CCR5 ligand in atherosclerotic patients was examined together with the effects of the chlamydial antigen HSP60 and LPS on the gene expression and protein induction of these mediators. Detection of chemokine mRNA and protein levels was assessed by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry respectively. The examined chemokines were detected at significantly high levels on atherosclerotic patients compared to healthy controls at both mRNA and protein levels. Stimulation with HSP60 and LPS from Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae and E. coli showed increased numbers of CCL3, CCL3 and CCL5 mRNA expressing cells in patients compared to health controls. Protein translation of these chemokines was depicted in correspondence to the mRNA gene expression for all examined chemokines spontaneously and after stimulation with chlamydial HSP60 and LPS and E. coli LPS. Thus, the herein data demonstrate the induction of potential inflammatory chemokines in atherosclerotic patients and that bacterial antigens play a role in the immunopathologic events in this disease by generating more inflammatory mediators.

  10. Polo-like kinase 2 acting as a promoter in human tumor cells with an abundance of TAp73

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu ZB

    2015-11-01

    flow cytometry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assays.Results: PLK2 binds to and phosphorylates TAp73. PLK2 phosphorylates TAp73 at residue Ser48 and prohibits TAp73 translocation to the nucleus. Additionally, PLK2 inhibition combined with a DNA-damaging drug upregulated p21 and PUMA mRNA expression to a greater extent than DNA-damaging drug treatment alone. Inhibiting PLK2 in TAp73-enriched cells strengthened the effects of the DNA-damaging drug on both G1 phase arrest and apoptosis. Pretreatment with TAp73-siRNA weakened these effects.Conclusion: These findings reveal a novel PLK2 function (catalyzed phosphorylation of TAp73 which suppresses TAp73 functions. PLK2 promotes the survival of human tumor cells, a novel insight into the workings of malignant tumors characterized by TAp73 overexpression, and one that could speed the development of therapies. Keywords: antitumor therapy, DNA damaging reagent, phosphorylation, PLK2, TAp73

  11. Genetic and Epigenetic Tumor Suppressor Gene Silencing Are Distinct Molecular Phenotypes Driven by Growth Promoting Mutations in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen J. Marsit

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Both genetic and epigenetic alterations characterize human nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC, but the biological processes that create or select these alterations remain incompletely investigated. Our hypothesis posits that a roughly reciprocal relationship between the propensity for promoter hypermethylation and a propensity for genetic deletion leads to distinct molecular phenotypes of lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we examined promoter hypermethylation of 17 tumor suppressor genes, as a marker of epigenetic alteration propensity, and deletion events at the 3p21 region, as a marker of genetic alteration. To model the complex biology between these somatic alterations, we utilized an item response theory model. We demonstrated that tumors exhibiting LOH at greater than 30% of informative alleles in the 3p21 region have a significantly reduced propensity for hypermethylation. At the same time, tumors with activating KRAS mutations showed a significantly increased propensity for hypermethylation of the loci examined, a result similar to what has been observed in colon cancer. These data suggest that NSCLCs have distinct epigenetic or genetic alteration phenotypes acting upon tumor suppressor genes and that mutation of oncogenic growth promoting genes, such as KRAS, is associated with the epigenetic phenotype.

  12. Melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling in the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Deyi; Barry, Samantha; Kmetz, Daniel; Egger, Michael; Pan, Jianmin; Rai, Shesh N; Qu, Jifu; McMasters, Kelly M; Hao, Hongying

    2016-07-01

    The tumor microenvironment is abundant with exosomes that are secreted by the cancer cells themselves. Exosomes are nanosized, organelle-like membranous structures that are increasingly being recognized as major contributors in the progression of malignant neoplasms. A critical element in melanoma progression is its propensity to metastasize, but little is known about how melanoma cell-derived exosomes modulate the microenvironment to optimize conditions for tumor progression and metastasis. Here, we provide evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote phenotype switching in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling. We found that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was activated during the exosome-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-resembling process, which promotes metastasis. Let-7i, an miRNA modulator of EMT, was also involved in this process. We further defined two other miRNA modulators of EMT (miR-191 and let-7a) in serum exosomes for differentiating stage I melanoma patients from non-melanoma subjects. These results provide the first strong molecular evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote the EMT-resembling process in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, novel strategies targeting EMT and modulating the tumor microenvironment may emerge as important approaches for the treatment of metastatic melanoma.

  13. Expression of the B-cell receptor component CD79a on immature myeloid cells contributes to their tumor promoting effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dror Luger

    Full Text Available The role of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs in promoting tumorigenesis is well-established, and significant effort is being made to further characterize surface markers on MDSCs both for better diagnosis and as potential targets for therapy. Here we show that the B cell receptor adaptor molecule CD79a is unexpectedly expressed on immature bone marrow myeloid cells, and is upregulated on MDSCs generated in multiple different mouse models of metastatic but not non-metastatic cancer. CD79a on MDSCs is upregulated and activated in response to soluble factors secreted by tumor cells. Activation of CD79a on mouse MDSCs, by crosslinking with a specific antibody, maintained their immature phenotype (CD11b+Gr1+, enhanced their migration, increased their suppressive effect on T cell proliferation, and increased secretion of pro-tumorigenic cytokines such as IL-6 and CCL22. Furthermore, crosslinking CD79a on myeloid cells activated signaling through Syk, BLNK, ERK and STAT3 phosphorylation. In vivo, CD79+ myeloid cells showed enhanced ability to promote primary tumor growth and metastasis. Finally we demonstrate that CD79a is upregulated on circulating myeloid cells from lung cancer patients, and that CD79a+ myeloid cells infiltrate human breast tumors. We propose that CD79a plays a functional role in the tumor promoting effects of myeloid cells, and may represent a novel target for cancer therapy.

  14. Overexpression of forkhead Box C2 promotes tumor metastasis and indicates poor prognosis in colon cancer via regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingguo; Wu, Jitao; Wei, Ping; Xu, Ye; Zhuo, Changhua; Wang, Yuwei; Li, Dawei; Cai, Sanjun

    2015-01-01

    Forkhead box protein C2 (FOXC2) plays a vital role in carcinogenesis; however, its significance and prognostic value in colon cancer remain unclear. In this study, FOXC2 expression was analyzed in a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 185 samples of primary colon cancer tumor samples and in human colon cancer cell lines. The effect of FOXC2 on cell proliferation, tumorigenesis, and metastasis was examined in vitro and in vivo. FOXC2 was overexpressed in human colon cancer cells and tissues, and correlated with colon cancer progression and patient survival. Functional study demonstrated that FOXC2 promoted cell growth, cell migration, and tumor formation in nude mice, whereas knockdown of FOXC2 by short hairpin RNA (shRNAs) significantly suppressed cell growth, cell migration and tumor formation. Further study found that FOXC2 enhanced AKT activity with subsequent GSK-3β phosphorylation and Snail stabilization, and then induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and promoted tumor invasion and metastasis. Collectively, FOXC2 promotes colon cancer metastasis by facilitating EMT and acts as a potential prognostic factor and therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  15. Chemokine axes CXCL12/CXCR4 and CXCL16/CXCR6 correlate with lymph node metastasis in epithelial ovarian carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guo; Zhu-Mei Cui; Jia Zhang; Yu Huang

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the chemokine axis of CXC chemokine ligand-12 and its receptor CXC chemokine receptor-4 (CXCL12/CXCR4) is highly expressed in gynecological tumors and the axis of CXC chemokine ligand-16 and CXC chemokine receptor-6 (CXCL16/CXCR6) is overexpressed in inflammation-associated tumors. This study aimed to determine the relationship between CXCL12/CXCR4, CXCL16/CXCR6 and ovadan carcinoma's clinicopathologic features and prognosis. Accordingly, the expression of these proteins in ovarian tissues was detected by tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. The expressions of CXCL12/CXCR4 and CXCL16/CXCR6 were significantly higher in epithelial ovadan carcinomas than in normal epithelial ovadan tissues or benign epithelial ovadan tumors. The expression of chemokines CXCL12 and CXCL16 were positively correlated with their receptors CXCR4 and CXCR6 in ovarian carcinoma, respectively (r = 0.300, P < 0.05; r = 0.395, P < 0.05). Moreover, the expression of CXCL12 was related to the occurrence of ascites (X2 = 4.76, P < 0.05), the expression of CXCR4 was significantly related to lymph node metastasis (X2 = 4.37, P < 0.05), the expression of CXCR6 was significantly related to lymph node metastasis (X2 = 7.43, P < 0.05) and histological type (X2 = 33.48, P < 0.05). ln univariate analysis, the expression of CXCR4 and CXCL16 significantly correlated with reduced median survival (X2 = 4.67, P < 0.05; X2 = 4.48, P < 0.05). Therefore, we conclude that the chemokine axes CXCL12/CXCR4 and CXCL16/CXCR6 may play important roles in the growth, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

  16. Cysteine Cathepsins Activate ELR Chemokines and Inactivate Non-ELR Chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repnik, Urska; Starr, Amanda E; Overall, Christopher M; Turk, Boris

    2015-05-29

    Cysteine cathepsins are primarily lysosomal proteases involved in general protein turnover, but they also have specific proteolytic functions in antigen presentation and bone remodeling. Cathepsins are most stable at acidic pH, although growing evidence indicates that they have physiologically relevant activity also at neutral pH. Post-translational proteolytic processing of mature chemokines is a key, yet underappreciated, level of chemokine regulation. Although the role of selected serine proteases and matrix metalloproteases in chemokine processing has long been known, little has been reported about the role of cysteine cathepsins. Here we evaluated cleavage of CXC ELR (CXCL1, -2, -3, -5, and -8) and non-ELR (CXCL9-12) chemokines by cysteine cathepsins B, K, L, and S at neutral pH by high resolution Tris-Tricine SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Whereas cathepsin B cleaved chemokines especially in the C-terminal region, cathepsins K, L, and S cleaved chemokines at the N terminus with glycosaminoglycans modulating cathepsin processing of chemokines. The functional consequences of the cleavages were determined by Ca(2+) mobilization and chemotaxis assays. We show that cysteine cathepsins inactivate and in some cases degrade non-ELR CXC chemokines CXCL9-12. In contrast, cathepsins specifically process ELR CXC chemokines CXCL1, -2, -3, -5, and -8 N-terminally to the ELR motif, thereby generating agonist forms. This study suggests that cysteine cathepsins regulate chemokine activity and thereby leukocyte recruitment during protective or pathological inflammation.

  17. Heterogenous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) promotes tumor growth by increasing protein translation of selected transcripts in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Elizabeth T; Parekh, Palak R; Yang, Qingyuan; Nguyen, Duc M; Carrier, France

    2016-03-01

    The heterogenous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) promotes tumor growth by coordinating the translation of selected transcripts associated with proliferation and survival. hnRNP A18 binds to and stabilizes the transcripts of pro-survival genes harboring its RNA signature motif in their 3'UTRs. hnRNP A18 binds to ATR, RPA, TRX, HIF-1α and several protein translation factor mRNAs on polysomes and increases de novo protein translation under cellular stress. Most importantly, down regulation of hnRNP A18 decreases proliferation, invasion and migration in addition to significantly reducing tumor growth in two mouse xenograft models, melanoma and breast cancer. Moreover, tissue microarrays performed on human melanoma, prostate, breast and colon cancer indicate that hnRNP A18 is over expressed in 40 to 60% of these malignant tissue as compared to normal adjacent tissue. Immunohistochemistry data indicate that hnRNP A18 is over expressed in the stroma and hypoxic areas of human tumors. These data thus indicate that hnRNP A18 can promote tumor growth in in vivo models by coordinating the translation of pro-survival transcripts to support the demands of proliferating cells and increase survival under cellular stress. hnRNP A18 therefore represents a new target to selectively inhibit protein translation in tumor cells.

  18. Critical roles of chemokine receptor CCR5 in regulating glioblastoma proliferation and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lanfu; Wang, Yuan; Xue, Yafei; Lv, Wenhai; Zhang, Yufu; He, Shiming

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent malignant primary brain tumor in adults and exhibits a spectrum of aberrantly aggressive phenotype. Tumor cell proliferation and invasion are critically regulated by chemokines and their receptors. Recent studies have shown that the chemokine CCL5 and its receptor CCR5 play important roles in tumor invasion and metastasis. Nonetheless, the roles of the CCR5 in GBM still remain unclear. The present study provides the evidence that the chemokine receptor CCR5 is highly expressed and associated with poor prognosis in human GBM. Mechanistically, CCL5-CCR5 mediates activation of Akt, and subsequently induces proliferation and invasive responses in U87 and U251 cells. Moreover, down-regulation of CCR5 significantly inhibited the growth of glioma in U87 tumor xenograft mouse model. Finally, high CCR5 expression in GBM is correlated with increased p-Akt expression in patient samples. Together, these findings suggest that the CCR5 is a critical molecular event associated with gliomagenesis.

  19. Chemokine Receptors as Biomarkers in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Fox

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukocyte infiltrates characterize tissue inflammation and are thought to be integral in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS. This attribute underlines the importance of understanding mechanisms of leukocyte migration. Chemokines are secreted proteins which govern leukocyte trafficking into targeted organs. Chemokine receptors (CKR are differentially expressed on leukocytes and their modulation is a potential target for MS disease modifying therapies. Chemokines and their receptors are also potential biomarkers of both disease activity and response to treatment. We describe the fluctuations in CKR expression on peripheral leukocytes in a group of MS patients followed longitudinally for up to 36 months. We observed little fluctuation in CKR expression within each patient over time, despite considerable variability in CKR expression between patients. These observations suggest that individual patients have a CKR set point, and this set point varies from one patient to another. Evaluation of chemokines or chemokine receptors as biomarkers in MS will need to account for this individual variability in CKR expression.

  20. Estrogen-induced SDF-1α production promotes the progression of ER-negative breast cancer via the accumulation of MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liquan; Chang, Weilong; Fang, Bin; Qin, Jieting; Qu, Xincai; Cheng, Fanjun

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen plays a role in the processes of tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer (BC). Whether estrogen contributes to ER-negative BC is unclear. Here, we aimed to investigate whether estrogen could stimulate the secretion of stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1α) by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) to promote the progression of ER-negative BC. We transplanted ER-negative BC cells into ovariectomized mice, which was followed by continuous injection of estrogen, and found that estrogen promoted the tumorigenesis of BC. Furthermore, High levels of SDF-1α and tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were detected in the estrogen treatment group. Estrogen stimulates secretion of SDF-1α by CAFs extracted from BC patients. Recombinant SDF-1α could recruit MDSCs isolated from bone marrow cells of mice. In addition, the co-culture of CAFs and MDSCs demonstrated that the recruitment of MDSCs was increased when CAFs were exposed to estrogen. Using AMD3100 to block the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis or gemcitabine to delete MDSCs, we observed that both of these agents could neutralize the effect of estrogen on tumorigenesis. Together, these results suggest that estrogen may promote the progression of ER-negative BC by stimulating CAFs to secrete SDF-1α, which can recruit MDSCs to the tumor microenvironment to exert tumor-promoting effects. PMID:27996037

  1. Estrogen-induced SDF-1α production promotes the progression of ER-negative breast cancer via the accumulation of MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liquan; Chang, Weilong; Fang, Bin; Qin, Jieting; Qu, Xincai; Cheng, Fanjun

    2016-12-20

    Estrogen plays a role in the processes of tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer (BC). Whether estrogen contributes to ER-negative BC is unclear. Here, we aimed to investigate whether estrogen could stimulate the secretion of stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1α) by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) to promote the progression of ER-negative BC. We transplanted ER-negative BC cells into ovariectomized mice, which was followed by continuous injection of estrogen, and found that estrogen promoted the tumorigenesis of BC. Furthermore, High levels of SDF-1α and tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were detected in the estrogen treatment group. Estrogen stimulates secretion of SDF-1α by CAFs extracted from BC patients. Recombinant SDF-1α could recruit MDSCs isolated from bone marrow cells of mice. In addition, the co-culture of CAFs and MDSCs demonstrated that the recruitment of MDSCs was increased when CAFs were exposed to estrogen. Using AMD3100 to block the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis or gemcitabine to delete MDSCs, we observed that both of these agents could neutralize the effect of estrogen on tumorigenesis. Together, these results suggest that estrogen may promote the progression of ER-negative BC by stimulating CAFs to secrete SDF-1α, which can recruit MDSCs to the tumor microenvironment to exert tumor-promoting effects.

  2. Neuronal apoptotic signaling pathways probed and intervened by synthetically and modularly modified (SMM) chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Tak; Kaul, Marcus; Kumar, Santosh; Wang, Jun; Kumar, I M Krishna; Dong, Chang-Zhi; An, Jing; Lipton, Stuart A; Huang, Ziwei

    2007-03-09

    As the main coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry, CXCR4 and CCR5 play important roles in HIV-associated dementia (HAD). HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 contributes to HAD by causing neuronal damage and death, either directly by triggering apoptotic pathways or indirectly by stimulating glial cells to release neurotoxins. Here, to understand the mechanism of CXCR4 or CCR5 signaling in neuronal apoptosis associated with HAD, we have applied synthetically and modularly modified (SMM)-chemokine analogs derived from natural stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha or viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II as chemical probes of the mechanism(s) whereby these SMM-chemokines prevent or promote neuronal apoptosis. We show that inherently neurotoxic natural ligands of CXCR4, such as stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha or viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II, can be modified to protect neurons from apoptosis induced by CXCR4-preferring gp120(IIIB), and that the inhibition of CCR5 by antagonist SMM-chemokines, unlike neuroprotective CCR5 natural ligands, leads to neurotoxicity by activating a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent pathway. Furthermore, we discover distinct signaling pathways activated by different chemokine ligands that are either natural agonists or synthetic antagonists, thus demonstrating a chemical biology strategy of using chemically engineered inhibitors of chemokine receptors to study the signaling mechanism of neuronal apoptosis and survival.

  3. Low prevalence of antibodies and other plasma factors binding to CC chemokines and IL-2 in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Svenson, M; Larsen, Carsten Schade;

    2000-01-01

    Neutralizing cytokine antibodies are found in healthy and diseased individuals, including patients treated with recombinant cytokines. Identification of CCR-5 as co-receptor for HIV has focused interest on CC chemokines and their potential therapeutic use. Chemokine-binding components in plasma...... of HIV-infected patients were therefore assessed by radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay. IgG from 4/505 HIV patients and 9/2000 healthy controls (p>0.05) bound rMIP-1alpha and rMIP-1beta, but not rRANTES. No other plasma factors bound the chemokines. The antibodies inhibited receptor binding of both...... chemokines. There was no association between presence of antibodies and disease stage or HIV progression rate. Three of 11 patients treated with rIL-2 developed IgG antibodies suppressing cellular binding and growth promotion of rIL-2. Hence, circulating factors, including antibodies MIP-1alpha/MIP-1beta...

  4. Cell surface syndecan-1 contributes to binding and function of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) on epithelial tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualon, Tobias; Lue, Hongqi; Groening, Sabine; Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Jahr, Holger; Denecke, Bernd; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Ludwig, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Surface expressed proteoglycans mediate the binding of cytokines and chemokines to the cell surface and promote migration of various tumor cell types including epithelial tumor cells. We here demonstrate that binding of the chemokine-like inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) to epithelial lung and breast tumor cell lines A549 and MDA-MB231 is sensitive to enzymatic digestion of heparan sulphate chains and competitive inhibition with heparin. Moreover, MIF interaction with heparin was confirmed by chromatography and a structural comparison indicated a possible heparin binding site. These results suggested that proteoglycans carrying heparan sulphate chains are involved in MIF binding. Using shRNA-mediated gene silencing, we identified syndecan-1 as the predominant proteoglycan required for the interaction with MIF. MIF binding was decreased by induction of proteolytic shedding of syndecan-1, which could be prevented by inhibition of the metalloproteinases involved in this process. Finally, MIF induced the chemotactic migration of A549 cells, wound closure and invasion into matrigel without affecting cell proliferation. These MIF-induced responses were abrogated by heparin or by silencing of syndecan-1. Thus, our study indicates that syndecan-1 on epithelial tumor cells promotes MIF binding and MIF-mediated cell migration. This may represent a relevant mechanism through which MIF enhances tumor cell motility and metastasis.

  5. Chemokines in CSF of Alzheimer's disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jôice Dias Corrêa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Some studies have linked the presence of chemokines to the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Then, the identification of these mediators may contribute to diagnosis. Our objective was to evaluate the levels of beta-amyloid (BA, tau, phospho-tau (p-tau and chemokines (CCL2, CXCL8 and CXCL10 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients with AD and healthy controls. The correlation of these markers with clinical parameters was also evaluated. The levels of p-tau were higher in AD compared to controls, while the tau/p-tau ratio was decreased. The expression of CCL2 was increased in AD. A positive correlation was observed between BA levels and all chemokines studied, and between CCL2 and p-tau levels. Our results suggest that levels of CCL2 in CSF are involved in the pathogenesis of AD and it may be an additional useful biomarker for monitoring disease progression.

  6. Chemokine Receptors in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goda G. Muralidhar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian carcinoma is the deadliest gynecologic malignancy with very poor rate of survival, and it is characterized by the presence of vast incurable peritoneal metastasis. Studies of the role of chemokine receptors, a family of proteins belonging to the group of G protein-coupled receptors, in ovarian carcinoma strongly placed this family of membrane receptors as major regulators of progression of this malignancy. In this review, we will discuss the roles that chemokine-receptor interactions play to support angiogenesis, cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, invasion, metastasis, and immune evasion in progression of ovarian carcinoma. Data regarding the role that the chemokine receptors play in the disease progression accumulated insofar strongly suggest that this family of proteins could be good therapeutic targets against ovarian carcinoma.

  7. Molecular piracy of chemokine receptors by herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, P M

    1994-01-01

    To succeed as a biological entity, viruses must exploit normal cellular functions and elude the host immune system; they often do so by molecular mimicry. One way that mimicry may occur is when viruses copy and modify host genes. The best studied examples of this are the oncogenes of RNA retroviruses, but a growing number of examples are also known for DNA viruses. So far they all come from just two groups of DNA viruses, the herpesviruses and poxviruses, and the majority of examples are for genes whose products regulate immune responses, such as cytokines, cytokine receptors, and complement control proteins. This review will focus on human and herpesvirus receptors for chemokines, a family of leukocyte chemoattractant and activating factors that are thought to be important mediators of inflammation. Although the biological roles of the viral chemokine receptor homologues are currently unknown, their connection to specific sets of chemokines has suggested a number of possible functions.

  8. Chemokine and cytokine levels in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Udai P; Singh, Narendra P; Murphy, E Angela; Price, Robert L; Fayad, Raja; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), two forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are chronic, relapsing, and tissue destructive lesions that are accompanied by the uncontrolled activation of effector immune cells in the mucosa. Recent estimates indicate that there are 1.3 million annual cases of IBD in the United States, 50% of which consists of CD and 50% of UC. Chemokines and cytokines play a pivotal role in the regulation of mucosal inflammation by promoting leukocyte migration to sites of inflammation ultimately leading to tissue damage and destruction. In recent years, experimental studies in rodents have led to a better understanding of the role played by these inflammatory mediators in the development and progression of colitis. However, the clinical literature on IBD remains limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate systemic concentrations of key chemokines and cytokines in forty-two IBD patients with a range of disease activity compared to levels found in ten healthy donors. We found a significant increase in an array of chemokines including macrophage migration factor (MIF), CCL25, CCL23, CXCL5, CXCL13, CXCL10, CXCL11, MCP1, and CCL21 in IBD patients as compared to normal healthy donors (Pcytokines IL-16, IFN-γ, IL-1β and TNF-α in IBD patients when compared to healthy donors (Pcytokines that are known to modulate systemic level through immune cells results in affecting local intestinal inflammation and tissue damage in IBD patients. Blockade of these inflammatory mediators should be explored as a mechanism to alleviate or even reverse symptoms of IBD.

  9. Chemokines and chemokine receptors expression in the lesions of patients with American cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilka Luisa Diaz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL presents distinct active clinical forms with different grades of severity, known as localised (LCL, intermediate (ICL and diffuse (DCL cutaneous leishmaniasis. LCL and DCL are associated with a polarised T-helper (Th1 and Th2 immune response, respectively, whereas ICL, or chronic cutaneous leishmaniasis, is associated with an exacerbated immune response and a mixed cytokine expression profile. Chemokines and chemokine receptors are involved in cellular migration and are critical in the inflammatory response. Therefore, we evaluated the expression of the chemokines CXCL10, CCL4, CCL8, CCL11 and CXCL8 and the chemokine receptors CCR3, CXCR3, CCR5 and CCR7 in the lesions of patients with different clinical forms of ACL using immunohistochemistry. LCL patients exhibited a high density of CXCL10+, CCL4+ and CCL8+ cells, indicating an important role for these chemokines in the local Th1 immune response and the migration of CXCR3+ cells. LCL patients showed a higher density of CCR7+ cells than ICL or DCL patients, suggesting major dendritic cell (DC migration to lymph nodes. Furthermore, DCL was associated with low expression levels of Th1-associated chemokines and CCL11+ epidermal DCs, which contribute to the recruitment of CCR3+ cells. Our findings also suggest an important role for epidermal cells in the induction of skin immune responses through the production of chemokines, such as CXCL10, by keratinocytes.

  10. Primary stromal cells isolated from human various histological/pathological prostate have different phenotypes and tumor promotion role

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-hai; ZHAO Fu-jun; HAN Bang-min; JIANG Qi; WANG Yong-chuan; WU Jian-hong; TANG Yue-qing; ZHANG Yue-ping; XIA Shu-jie

    2011-01-01

    Background Prostate stromal cells are known to regulate epithelial growth as well as support and maintain epithelial function. However, how stromal cells regulate epithelial cells and what differences among various histological/pathological prostate stromal cells in prostate cancer progression still remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the different phenotypes of human various histological/pathological prostate stromal cells, and their role in tumor promotion.Methods The different phenotypes of the human normal prostatic peripheral zonal primary stromal cells (NPPF),transitional zonal primary stromal cells (NPTF), and prostate cancer associated primary stromal cells (CAF) were examined with growth curves and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) assay. The different effects on prostate cancer cell line C4-2B by NPPF, NPTF, and CAF were examined with MTT assay and Annexin V-FITC assay. The gene expression of different histological/pathological prostate stromal cells was profiled by microarray and hierarchical cluster analysis.Results The growth rate of NPPF, NPTF and CAF gradually increased, followed by decreasing apoptosis. In vitro stromal-C4-2B cell line co-culture models, the proliferation and apoptosis of C4-2B cell line were differently affected by human various histological/pathological prostate stromal cells. CAF showed the most powerful effect to C4-2B cell line,as opposed to a weakest effect of NPTF. Microarray and hierarchical cluster analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes of CAF and NPPF were less than NPPF and NPTF, or CAF and NPTF. This was consistent with clinical observations that prostate cancer mostly derived from the peripheral zone and does not usually occur in the transitional zone.Conclusion NPPF, NPTF and CAF possess extremely different biological characteristics and gene expression, which may play an important role in genesis and development of prostate cancer.

  11. Staphylococcal Superantigen-like 10 Inhibits CXCL12-Induced Human Tumor Cell Migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walenkamp, Annemiek M. E.; Boer, Ingrid G. J.; Bestebroer, Jovanka; Rozeveld, Dennie; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; Hemrika, Wieger; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; de Haas, Carla J. C.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Tumor cell migration and metastasis share many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is critically regulated by chemokines and their receptors. CXCR4 is the most widely expressed chemokine receptor in many different types of cancer and has been linked to tumor dissemination and poo

  12. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors: Their Manifold Roles in Homeostasis and Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YingyingLe; YeZhou; PabloIribarren; JiMingWang

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of small proteins that bind to G protein-coupled receptors on target cells and were originally discovered as mediators of directional migration of immune cells to sites of inflammation and injury. In recent years, it has become clear that the function of chemokines extends well beyond the role in leukocyte chemotaxis. They participate in organ development, angiogenesis/angiostasis, leukocyte trafficking and homing, tumorigenesis and metastasis, as well as in immune responses to microbial infection. Therefore, chemokines and their receptors are important targets for modulation of host responses in pathophysiological conditions and for therapeutic intervention of human diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):95-104.

  13. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors: Their Manifold Roles in Homeostasis and Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingying Le; Ye Zhou; Pablo Iribarren; Ji Ming Wang

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of small proteins that bind to G protein-coupled receptors on target cells and were originally discovered as mediators of directional migration of immune cells to sites of inflammation and injury. In recent years, it has become clear that the function of chemokines extends well beyond the role in leukocyte chemotaxis. They participate in organ development, angiogenesis/angiostasis, leukocyte trafficking and homing, tumorigenesis and metastasis, as well as in immune responses to microbial infection. Therefore,chemokines and their receptors are important targets for modulation of host responses in pathophysiological conditions and for therapeutic intervention of human diseases.

  14. The viral KSHV chemokine vMIP-II inhibits the migration of Naive and activated human NK cells by antagonizing two distinct chemokine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Yamin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate immune cells able to rapidly kill virus-infected and tumor cells. Two NK cell populations are found in the blood; the majority (90% expresses the CD16 receptor and also express the CD56 protein in intermediate levels (CD56(Dim CD16(Pos while the remaining 10% are CD16 negative and express CD56 in high levels (CD56(Bright CD16(Neg. NK cells also reside in some tissues and traffic to various infected organs through the usage of different chemokines and chemokine receptors. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is a human virus that has developed numerous sophisticated and versatile strategies to escape the attack of immune cells such as NK cells. Here, we investigate whether the KSHV derived cytokine (vIL-6 and chemokines (vMIP-I, vMIP-II, vMIP-III affect NK cell activity. Using transwell migration assays, KSHV infected cells, as well as fusion and recombinant proteins, we show that out of the four cytokine/chemokines encoded by KSHV, vMIP-II is the only one that binds to the majority of NK cells, affecting their migration. We demonstrate that vMIP-II binds to two different receptors, CX3CR1 and CCR5, expressed by naïve CD56(Dim CD16(Pos NK cells and activated NK cells, respectively. Furthermore, we show that the binding of vMIP-II to CX3CR1 and CCR5 blocks the binding of the natural ligands of these receptors, Fractalkine (Fck and RANTES, respectively. Finally, we show that vMIP-II inhibits the migration of naïve and activated NK cells towards Fck and RANTES. Thus, we present here a novel mechanism in which KSHV uses a unique protein that antagonizes the activity of two distinct chemokine receptors to inhibit the migration of naïve and activated NK cells.

  15. Roles of Chemokines in Thymopoiesis: Redundancy and Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WenxianFu; WeifengChen

    2004-01-01

    Thymus is the primary lymphoid organ involved in the development of thymocytes. Maturation related events of thymocytes within thymus, especially the widely discussed directional migration of thymocytes, is regulated by chemokines via chemokine receptors mediated signaling pathway. Multiple types of chemokines and chemokine receptors, as components of the network-interaction within thymic microenvironment, are involved in the thymopoiesis. It appears that these chemokines are functionally redundant and such phenomenon may be explained not only by the promiscuous, non-one-to-one matching between ligands-receptors within CXC or CC chemokine subfamily, but also by the various spatio-temporal expression patterns within different cell types and developmental stages. The redundancy and regulation of thymus expressed chemokines and chemokine receptors during thymocyte development are herein discussed. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  16. Roles of Chemokines in Thymopoiesis: Redundancy and Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenxian Fu; Weifeng Chen

    2004-01-01

    Thymus is the primary lymphoid organ involved in the development of thymocytes. Maturation related events of thymocytes within thymus, especially the widely discussed directional migration of thymocytes, is regulated by chemokines via chemokine receptors mediated signaling pathway. Multiple types of chemokines and chemokine receptors, as components of the network-interaction within thymic microenvironment, are involved in the thymopoiesis. It appears that these chemokines are functionally redundant and such phenomenon may be explained not only by the promiscuous, non-one-to-one matching between ligands-receptors within CXC or CC chemokine subfamily, but also by the various spatio-temporal expression patterns within different cell types and developmental stages. The redundancy and regulation of thymus expressed chemokines and chemokine receptors during thymocyte development are herein discussed.

  17. Inhibition of mammary tumor promotion by dietary D,L-2-difluoromethylornithine in combination with omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunce, O.R.; Abou-El-Ela, S.H. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (United States))

    1990-02-26

    The authors laboratory has shown an inhibitor effect on mammary tumor promotion by a 20% corn oil diet when D,L-2-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), was fed to female rats with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary tumors. Analyses of mammary adenocarcinomas from these rats showed that DFMO not only inhibited ODC but also eicosanoid synthesis. Inhibition of tumor promotion, ODC activity and eicosanoid synthesis was additive when dietary combinations of DFMO and menhaden oil were fed. However, when 0.5% DFMO was fed along with 20% dietary fat, signs of toxicity were seen. The overall objective of this study was to establish the minimal and non-toxic dose of DFMO which can give an additive or synergistic antipromoter effect when fed along with dietary n-3 and/or n-6 fatty acids to female Sprague-Dawley rats with DMBA-induced mammary tumors. Four dietary levels of DFMO (0, 0.125, 0.250, and 0.500%) were fed in diets containing 20% fat as either corn, black currant seed or menhaden oil. Dose response effects on tumorigenicity as well as toxicity were noted. Long chain n-3 fatty acids gave greater inhibition of tumorigenesis than shorter chain fatty acids when combined with DFMO. DFMO (0.25%) inhibited tumorigenesis without toxic effects on weight gain, whereas, 0.125% DFMO did not alter tumorigenesis. Supporting biochemical data are presented.

  18. Indolo[3,2-b]carbazole inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication in rat primary hepatocytes and acts as a potential tumor promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Susan; Seidelin, Michel; Bisgaard, Hanne Cathrine

    2002-01-01

    Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) is a naturally occurring substance that shows anti-carcinogenic properties in animal models. Besides its clear anti-carcinogenic effects, some studies indicate that I3C may sometimes act as a tumor promoter. Indolo[3,2-b]carbazole (ICZ), which is formed in the acidic...... environment of the stomach after intake of I3C, has a similar structure to, and shares biological effects with, the well-known tumor promoter 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin (TCDD). Therefore, we hypothesized that ICZ could be responsible for the potential tumor-promoting activity of I3C. The aim...... of the present study was to investigate the effect of ICZ on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in primary cultured rat hepatocytes co-cultured with the rat liver epithelial cell line WB-F344. Indolo[3,2-b]carbazole inhibited GJIC in the rat hepatocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner...

  19. Inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by tumor-promoting organic peroxides and protection by resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upham, Brad L; Guzvić, Miodrag; Scott, Jacob; Carbone, Joseph M; Blaha, Ludek; Coe, Chad; Li, Lan Lan; Rummel, Alisa M; Trosko, James E

    2007-01-01

    Dicumyl peroxide (di-CuOOH) and benzoyl peroxide (BzOOH) act as tumor promoters in SENCAR mice, whereas di-tert-butylhydroperoxide does not. Tumor promotion requires the removal of growth suppression by inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and the induction of mitogenic intracellular pathways. We showed that di-CuOOH and BzOOH both reversibly inhibited GJIC and transiently activated mitogen-activated protein kinase, specifically, the extracellular receptor kinase at noncytotoxic conditions in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells, whereas the non-tumor-promoting di-tert-butylhydroperoxide did not inhibit GJIC or activate extracellular receptor kinase. di-CuOOH but not BzOOH inhibited GJIC through a phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C-dependent mechanism. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was needed to prevent a cytotoxic, glutathione-depleting effect of BzOOH, whereas di-CuOOH was noncytotoxic and did not alter glutathione levels at all doses and times tested. Pretreatment of WB-F344 cells with resveratrol, a polyphenolic antioxidant present in red wine, prevented at physiological doses the inhibition of GJIC by di-CuOOH but not from BzOOH and was effective in significantly preventing extracellular receptor kinase activation by both peroxides. NAC did not prevent any of the peroxide effects on either GJIC or extracellular receptor kinase, suggesting a specific antioxidant effect of resveratrol.

  20. CCL5/CCR5 axis induces vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated tumor angiogenesis in human osteosarcoma microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Wei; Liu, Shih-Chia; Sun, Hui-Lung; Huang, Te-Yang; Chan, Chia-Han; Yang, Chen-Yu; Yeh, Hung-I; Huang, Yuan-Li; Chou, Wen-Yi; Lin, Yu-Min; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines modulate angiogenesis and metastasis that dictate cancer development in tumor microenvironment. Osteosarcoma is the most frequent bone tumor and is characterized by a high metastatic potential. Chemokine CCL5 (previously called RANTES) has been reported to facilitate tumor progression and metastasis. However, the crosstalk between chemokine CCL5 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as well as tumor angiogenesis in human osteosarcoma microenvironment has not been well explored. In this study, we found that CCL5 increased VEGF expression and production in human osteosarcoma cells. The conditioned medium (CM) from CCL5-treated osteosarcoma cells significantly induced tube formation and migration of human endothelial progenitor cells. Pretreatment of cells with CCR5 antibody or transfection with CCR5 specific siRNA blocked CCL5-induced VEGF expression and angiogenesis. CCL5/CCR5 axis demonstrably activated protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), c-Src and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) signaling cascades to induce VEGF-dependent angiogenesis. Furthermore, knockdown of CCL5 suppressed VEGF expression and attenuated osteosarcoma CM-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. CCL5 knockdown dramatically abolished tumor growth and angiogenesis in the osteosarcoma xenograft animal model. Importantly, we demonstrated that the expression of CCL5 and VEGF were correlated with tumor stage according the immunohistochemistry analysis of human osteosarcoma tissues. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that CCL5/CCR5 axis promotes VEGF-dependent tumor angiogenesis in human osteosarcoma microenvironment through PKCδ/c-Src/HIF-1α signaling pathway. CCL5 may represent a potential therapeutic target against human osteosarcoma.

  1. Quantitative protein profiling of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis biomarkers in mouse and human models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor and stromal cells secrete a variety of proteins acting as extracellular signals and creating a supportive microenvironment for tumor development, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We used the Luminex immunoassay platform (including MILLIPLEX® MAP cytokine/chemokine, bone metabolism, adipocyte, M...

  2. A Role for T-Lymphocytes in Human Breast Cancer and in Canine Mammary Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation in the tumor microenvironment has a prominent role in carcinogenesis and benefits the proliferation and survival of malignant cells, promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Mammary tumors are frequently infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of immune cells where T-lymphocytes have a great importance. Interestingly, similar inflammatory cell infiltrates, cytokine and chemokine expression in humans and canine mammary tumors were recently described. However, in both species, despite all the scientific evidences that appoint for a significant role of T-lymphocytes, a definitive conclusion concerning the effectiveness of T-cell dependent immune mechanisms has not been achieved yet. In the present review, we describe similarities between human breast cancer and canine mammary tumors regarding tumor T-lymphocyte infiltration, such as relationship of TILs and mammary tumors malignancy, association of ratio CD4+/ CD8+ T-cells with low survival rates, promotion of tumor progression by Th2 cells actions, and association of great amounts of Treg cells with poor prognostic factors. This apparent parallelism together with the fact that dogs develop spontaneous tumors in the context of a natural immune system highlight the dog as a possible useful biological model for studies in human breast cancer immunology.

  3. Chemokines and their receptors in central nervous system disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biber, K; de Jong, EK; van Weering, HRJ; Boddeke, HWGM

    2006-01-01

    Almost a decade ago, it was discovered that the human deficiency virus (HIV) makes use of chemokine receptors to infect blood cells. This appreciation of the clinical relevance of specific chemokine receptors has initiated a considerable boost in the field of chemokine research. It is clear today th

  4. Virally encoded chemokines and chemokine receptors in the role of viral infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter J; Lüttichau, Hans R; Schwartz, Thue W

    2003-01-01

    are the acquisition and modification of host-encoded chemokines and chemokine receptors. The described viral molecules leave nothing to chance and have thoroughly and efficiently corrupted the host immune system. Through this process viruses have identified key molecules in antiviral responses by their inhibition...... of these or potent ways to alter an efficient antiviral response to a weak Th2-driven response. Examples here are the chemokine scavenging by US28, attractance of Th2 cells and regulatory cells by vMIP1-3 and the selective engaging of CCR8 by MC148. Important insights into viral pathology and possible targets...... for antiviral therapies have been provided by UL33, UL78 and in particular ORF74 and the chances are that many more will follow. In HHV8 vMIP-2 and the chemokine-binding proteins potent anti-inflammatory agents have been provided. These have already had their potential demonstrated in animal models and may...

  5. Chapter 8. Activation mechanisms of chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2009-01-01

    Chemokine receptors belong to the large family of 7-transmembrane (7TM) G-protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are targeted and activated by a variety of different ligands, indicating that activation is a result of similar molecular mechanisms but not necessarily similar modes of ligand bin...

  6. The pro-inflammatory peptide LL-37 promotes ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Marini, Frank C.; Watson, Keri; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Dembinski, Jennifer L.; LaMarca, Heather L.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; zu Bentrup, Kerstin Honer; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Henkle, Sarah L.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to engraft into the stroma of several tumor types, where they contribute to tumor progression and metastasis. However, the chemotactic signals mediating MSC migration to tumors remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that LL-37 (leucine, leucine-37), the C-terminal peptide of human cationic antimicrobial protein 18, stimulates the migration of various cell types and is overexpressed in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Although there is evidence to support a pro-tumorigenic role for LL-37, the function of the peptide in tumors remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that neutralization of LL-37 in vivo significantly reduces the engraftment of MSCs into ovarian tumor xenografts, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth as well as disruption of the fibrovascular network. Migration and invasion experiments conducted in vitro indicated that the LL-37-mediated migration of MSCs to tumors likely occurs through formyl peptide receptor like-1. To assess the response of MSCs to the LL-37-rich tumor microenvironment, conditioned medium from LL-37-treated MSCs was assessed and found to contain increased levels of several cytokines and pro-angiogenic factors compared with controls, including IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6, IL-10, CCL5, VEGF, and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Similarly, Matrigel mixed with LL-37, MSCs, or the combination of the two resulted in a significant number of vascular channels in nude mice. These data indicate that LL-37 facilitates ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of progenitor cell populations to serve as pro-angiogenic factor-expressing tumor stromal cells. PMID:19234121

  7. The hypoxia-inducible factor-responsive proteins semaphorin 4D and vascular endothelial growth factor promote tumor growth and angiogenesis in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hua; Yang, Ying-Hua [Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Maryland Dental School, 650W. Baltimore Street, 7-North, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Binmadi, Nada O. [Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Maryland Dental School, 650W. Baltimore Street, 7-North, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Oral Basic and Clinical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Proia, Patrizia [Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Maryland Dental School, 650W. Baltimore Street, 7-North, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Sports Science (DISMOT), University of Palermo, Via Eleonora Duse 2 90146, Palermo (Italy); Basile, John R., E-mail: jbasile@umaryland.edu [Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Maryland Dental School, 650W. Baltimore Street, 7-North, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Greenebaum Cancer Center, 22S. Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Growth and metastasis of solid tumors requires induction of angiogenesis to ensure the delivery of oxygen, nutrients and growth factors to rapidly dividing transformed cells. Through either mutations, hypoxia generated by cytoreductive therapies, or when a malignancy outgrows its blood supply, tumor cells undergo a change from an avascular to a neovascular phenotype, a transition mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family of transcriptional regulators. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one example of a gene whose transcription is stimulated by HIF. VEGF plays a crucial role in promoting tumor growth and survival by stimulating new blood vessel growth in response to such stresses as chemotherapy or radiotherapy-induced hypoxia, and it therefore has become a tempting target for neutralizing antibodies in the treatment of advanced neoplasms. Emerging evidence has shown that the semaphorins, proteins originally associated with control of axonal growth and immunity, are regulated by changes in oxygen tension as well and may play a role in tumor-induced angiogenesis. Through the use of RNA interference, in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis assays and tumor xenograft experiments, we demonstrate that expression of semaphorin 4D (SEMA4D), which is under the control of the HIF-family of transcription factors, cooperates with VEGF to promote tumor growth and vascularity in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We use blocking antibodies to show that targeting SEMA4D function along with VEGF could represent a novel anti-angiogenic therapeutic strategy for the treatment of OSCC and other solid tumors. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar to VEGF, SEMA4D promotes angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both VEGF and SEMA4D are produced by OSCC cells in a HIF-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These factors combine to elicit a robust pro-angiogenic phenotype in OSCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-SEMA4D

  8. Genetic variants in the chemokines and chemokine receptors in Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez, Oscar; Martín, Javier; González, Clara Isabel

    2012-08-01

    Clinical symptoms of Chagas' disease occur in 30% of the individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and are characterised by heart inflammation and dysfunction. Chemokines and chemokine receptors control the migration of leukocytes during the inflammatory process and are involved in the modulation of Th1 or Th2 responses. To determine their influence, we investigated the possible role of CCL5/RANTES and CXCL8/IL8 chemokines, and CCR2 and CCR5 chemokines receptors cluster gene polymorphisms with the development of chagasic cardiomyopathy. Our study included 260 Chagas seropositive individuals (asymptomatic, n=130; cardiomyopathic, n=130) from an endemic area of Colombia. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and TaqMan SNP genotyping assay. We found statistically significant differences in the distribution of the CCR5 human haplogroup (HH)-A (p=0.027; OR=3.78, 95% CI=1.04-13.72). Moreover, we found that the CCR5-2733 G and CCR5-2554 T alleles are associated, respectively, with a reduced risk of susceptibility and severity to develop chagasic cardiomyopathy. No other associations were found to be significant for the other polymorphisms analysed in the CCR5, CCR2, CCL5/RANTES and CXCL8/IL8 genes. Our data suggest that the analysed chemokines and chemokine receptor genetic variants have a weak but important association with the development of chagasic cardiomyopathy in the population under study.

  9. A Combinatorial Approach to Biophysically Characterise Chemokine-Glycan Binding Affinities for Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Gerlza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemokine binding to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs is recognised to be an important step in inflammation and other pathological disorders like tumor growth and metastasis. Although different ways and strategies to interfere with these interactions are being pursued, no major breakthrough in the development of glycan-targeting drugs has been reported so far. We have engineered CXCL8 towards a dominant-negative form of this chemokine (dnCXCL8 which was shown to be highly active in various inflammatory animal models due to its inability to bind/activate the cognate CXCL8 GPC receptors on neutrophils in combination with its significantly increased GAG-binding affinity [1]. For the development of GAG-targeting chemokine-based biopharmaceuticals, we have established a repertoire of methods which allow the quantification of protein-GAG interactions. Isothermal fluorescence titration (IFT, surface plasmon resonance (SPR, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, and a novel ELISA-like competition assay (ELICO have been used to determine Kd and IC50 values for CXCL8 and dnCXCL8 interacting with heparin and heparan sulfate (HS, the proto-typical members of the GAG family. Although the different methods gave different absolute affinities for the four protein-ligand pairs, the relative increase in GAG-binding affinity of dnCXCL8 compared to the wild type chemokine was found by all methods. In combination, these biophysical methods allow to discriminate between unspecific and specific protein-GAG interactions.

  10. Rapid copper acquisition by developing murine mesothelioma: decreasing bioavailable copper slows tumor growth, normalizes vessels and promotes T cell infiltration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Crowe

    Full Text Available Copper, an essential trace element acquired through nutrition, is an important co-factor for pro-angiogenic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Decreasing bioavailable copper has been used as an anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer strategy with promising results. However, the role of copper and its potential as a therapy in mesothelioma is not yet well understood. Therefore, we monitored copper levels in progressing murine mesothelioma tumors and analyzed the effects of lowering bioavailable copper. Copper levels in tumors and organs were assayed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Mesothelioma tumors rapidly sequestered copper at early stages of development, the copper was then dispersed throughout growing tumor tissues. These data imply that copper uptake may play an important role in early tumor development. Lowering bioavailable copper using the copper chelators, penicillamine, trientine or tetrathiomolybdate, slowed in vivo mesothelioma growth but did not provide any cures similar to using cisplatin chemotherapy or anti-VEGF receptor antibody therapy. The impact of copper lowering on tumor blood vessels and tumor infiltrating T cells was measured using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Copper lowering was associated with reduced tumor vessel diameter, reduced endothelial cell proliferation (reduced Ki67 expression and lower surface ICAM/CD54 expression implying reduced endothelial cell activation, in a process similar to endothelial normalization. Copper lowering was also associated with a CD4(+ T cell infiltrate. In conclusion, these data suggest copper lowering is a potentially useful anti-mesothelioma treatment strategy that slows tumor growth to provide a window of opportunity for inclusion of other treatment modalities to improve patient outcomes.

  11. The Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor Protein (pRb)/E2 Promoter Binding Factor 1 (E2F1) Pathway as a Novel Mediator of TGFβ-induced Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korah, Juliana; Canaff, Lucie; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-29

    TGFβ is a multifunctional cytokine that regulates cell proliferation, cell immortalization, and cell death, acting as a key homeostatic mediator in various cell types and tissues. Autophagy is a programmed mechanism that plays a pivotal role in controlling cell fate and, consequently, many physiological and pathological processes, including carcinogenesis. Although autophagy is often considered a pro-survival mechanism that renders cells viable in stressful conditions and thus might promote tumor growth, emerging evidence suggests that autophagy is also a tumor suppressor pathway. The relationship between TGFβ signaling and autophagy is context-dependent and remains unclear. TGFβ-mediated activation of autophagy has recently been suggested to contribute to the growth inhibitory effect of TGFβ in hepatocarcinoma cells. In the present study, we define a novel process of TGFβ-mediated autophagy in cancer cell lines of various origins. We found that autophagosome initiation and maturation by TGFβ is dependent on the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein/E2 promoter binding factor (pRb/E2F1) pathway, which we have previously established as a critical signaling axis leading to various TGFβ tumor suppressive effects. We further determined that TGFβ induces pRb/E2F1-dependent transcriptional activation of several autophagy-related genes. Together, our findings reveal that TGFβ induces autophagy through the pRb/E2F1 pathway and transcriptional activation of autophagy-related genes and further highlight the central relevance of the pRb/E2F1 pathway downstream of TGFβ signaling in tumor suppression.

  12. Pathophysiological roles of chemokines in human reproduction: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaya, Kotaro; Yamada, Hisao

    2011-05-01

    Chemokines are a group of small cytokines that have an ability to induce leukocyte migration. Chemokines exert their functions by binding and activating specific G protein-coupled receptors. Studies have unveiled pleiotropic bioactivities of chemokines in various phenomena ranging from immunomodulation, embryogenesis, and homeostasis to pathogenesis. In the mammalian reproductive system, chemokines unexceptionally serve in multimodal events that are closely associated with establishment, maintenance, and deterioration of fecundity. The aim of this review is to update the knowledge on chemokines in male and female genital organs, with a focus on their potential pathophysiological roles in human reproduction.

  13. Interferon-inducible CXC chemokines directly contribute to host defense against inhalational anthrax in a murine model of infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Crawford

    Full Text Available Chemokines have been found to exert direct, defensin-like antimicrobial activity in vitro, suggesting that, in addition to orchestrating cellular accumulation and activation, chemokines may contribute directly to the innate host response against infection. No observations have been made, however, demonstrating direct chemokine-mediated promotion of host defense in vivo. Here, we show that the murine interferon-inducible CXC chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 each exert direct antimicrobial effects in vitro against Bacillus anthracis Sterne strain spores and bacilli including disruptions in spore germination and marked reductions in spore and bacilli viability as assessed using CFU determination and a fluorometric assay of metabolic activity. Similar chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity was also observed against fully virulent Ames strain spores and encapsulated bacilli. Moreover, antibody-mediated neutralization of these CXC chemokines in vivo was found to significantly increase host susceptibility to pulmonary B. anthracis infection in a murine model of inhalational anthrax with disease progression characterized by systemic bacterial dissemination, toxemia, and host death. Neutralization of the shared chemokine receptor CXCR3, responsible for mediating cellular recruitment in response to CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, was not found to increase host susceptibility to inhalational anthrax. Taken together, our data demonstrate a novel, receptor-independent antimicrobial role for the interferon-inducible CXC chemokines in pulmonary innate immunity in vivo. These data also support an immunomodulatory approach for effectively treating and/or preventing pulmonary B. anthracis infection, as well as infections caused by pathogenic and potentially, multi-drug resistant bacteria including other spore-forming organisms.

  14. Semaphorin 7A Promotes Chemokine-Driven Dendritic Cell Migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Anoek; Paulis, Leonie; te Riet, Joost; Vasaturo, Angela; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; van der Schaaf, Alie; Kuipers, Arthur J.; Schulte, Luuk P.; Jongbloets, Bart C.; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen; Figdor, Carl G.; van Spriel, Annemiek B.; Buschow, Sonja I.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) migration is essential for efficient host defense against pathogens and cancer, as well as for the efficacy of DC-based immunotherapies. However, the molecules that induce the migratory phenotype of DCs are poorly defined. Based on a largescale proteome analysis of maturing DCs,

  15. Crosstalk between Tumor Cells and Macrophages in Stroma Renders Tumor Cells as the Primary Source of MCP-1/CCL2 in Lewis Lung Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teizo eYoshimura

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The chemokine MCP-1/CCL2 is produced by a variety of tumors and plays an important role in cancer progression. We and others previously demonstrated that the primary source of MCP-1 in several mouse tumors, including 4T1 breast cancer, M5076 sarcoma and B16 melanoma, was stromal cells. In the present study, we identified that tumor cells were the primary source of MCP-1 in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC, because MCP-1 mRNA was highly expressed in tumors grown in both WT and MCP-1-/- mice with elevated serum MCP-1 levels. Since LLC cells isolated from tumors expressed low levels of MCP-1 in vitro, it appeared that the tumor-stromal cell interaction in a tumor microenvironment increased MCP-1 expression in LLC cells. In fact, co-culture of LLC cells with normal mouse peritoneal macrophages or normal lung cells containing macrophages increased MCP-1 expression by LLC cells. Macrophages from TNFα-/- mice failed to activate LLC cells and anti-TNFα neutralizing antibody abolished the effect of WT macrophages on LLC cells. When LLC cells were transplanted into TNFα-/- mice, the levels of MCP-1 mRNA in tumors and serum MCP-1 levels were markedly lower as compared to WT mice, and importantly tumors grew more slowly. Taken together, our results indicate that TNFα released by tumor cell-activated macrophages is critical for increased MCP-1 production by tumors cells. Thus, disruption of tumor-stromal cell interaction may inhibit tumor progression by reducing the production of tumor-promoting proinflammatory mediators, such as MCP-1.

  16. Crosstalk between Tumor Cells and Macrophages in Stroma Renders Tumor Cells as the Primary Source of MCP-1/CCL2 in Lewis Lung Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Teizo; Liu, Mingyong; Chen, Xin; Li, Liangzhu; Wang, Ji Ming

    2015-01-01

    The chemokine MCP-1/CCL2 is produced by a variety of tumors and plays an important role in cancer progression. We and others previously demonstrated that the primary source of MCP-1 in several mouse tumors, including 4T1 breast cancer, M5076 sarcoma, and B16 melanoma, was stromal cells. In the present study, we identified that tumor cells were the primary source of MCP-1 in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC), because MCP-1 mRNA was highly expressed in tumors grown in both wild type (WT) and MCP-1(-/-) mice with elevated serum MCP-1 levels. Since LLC cells isolated from tumors expressed low levels of MCP-1 in vitro, it appeared that the tumor-stromal cell interaction in a tumor microenvironment increased MCP-1 expression in LLC cells. In fact, co-culture of LLC cells with normal mouse peritoneal macrophages or normal lung cells containing macrophages increased MCP-1 expression by LLC cells. Macrophages from TNFα(-/-) mice failed to activate LLC cells and anti-TNFα neutralizing antibody abolished the effect of WT macrophages on LLC cells. When LLC cells were transplanted into TNFα(-/-) mice, the levels of MCP-1 mRNA in tumors and serum MCP-1 levels were markedly lower as compared to WT mice, and importantly, tumors grew more slowly. Taken together, our results indicate that TNFα released by tumor cell-activated macrophages is critical for increased MCP-1 production by tumors cells. Thus, disruption of tumor-stromal cell interaction may inhibit tumor progression by reducing the production of tumor-promoting proinflammatory mediators, such as MCP-1.

  17. Chemokines: structure, receptors and functions. A new target for inflammation and asthma therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. A. van Acker

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Five to 10% of the human population have a disorder of the respiratory tract called ‘asthma’. It has been known as a potentially dangerous disease for over 2000 years, as it was already described by Hippocrates and recognized as a disease entity by Egyptian and Hebrew physicians. At the beginning of this decade, there has been a fundamental change in asthma management. The emphasis has shifted from symptom relief with bronchodilator therapies (e.g. β2-agonists to a much earlier introduction of anti-inflammatory treatment (e.g. corticosteroids. Asthma is now recognized to be a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, involving various inflammatory cells and their mediators. Although asthma has been the subject of many investigations, the exact role of the different inflammatory cells has not been elucidated completely. Many suggestions have been made and several cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma, such as the eosinophils, the mast cells, the basophils and the lymphocytes. To date, however, the relative importance of these cells is not completely understood. The cell type predominantly found in the asthmatic lung is the eosinophil and the recruitment of these eosinophils can be seen as a characteristic of asthma. In recent years much attention is given to the role of the newly identified chemokines in asthma pathology. Chemokines are structurally and functionally related 8–10 kDa peptides that are the products of distinct genes clustered on human chromosomes 4 and 17 and can be found at sites of inflammation. They form a superfamily of proinflammatory mediators that promote the recruitment of various kinds of leukocytes and lymphocytes. The chemokine superfamily can be divided into three subgroups based on overall sequence homology. Although the chemokines have highly conserved amino acid sequences, each of the chemokines binds to and induces the chemotaxis of particular classes of white blood cells. Certain

  18. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in HIV infection: Role in pathogenesis and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are known to function as regulatory molecules in leukocyte maturation, traffic, homing of lymphocytes and in the development of lymphoid tissues. Besides these functions in the immune system, certain chemokines and their receptors are involved in HIV pathogenesis. In order to infect a target cell, the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 has to interact with the cellular receptor CD-4 and co-receptor, CC or CXC chemokine receptors. Genetic findings have yielded major insights into the in vivo roles of individual co-receptors and their ligands in providing resistance to HIV infection. Mutations in chemokine receptor genes are associated with protection against HIV infections and also involved in delayed progression to AIDS in infected individuals. Blocking of chemokine receptors interrupts HIV infection in vitro and this offers new options for therapeutic strategies. Approaches have been made to study the CCR-5 inhibitors as antiviral therapies and possibly as components of a topical microbicide to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission. Immune strategies aimed at generating anti-CCR-5 antibodies at the level of the genital mucosa might be feasible and represent a strategy to induce mucosal HIV- protective immunity. It also remains to be seen how these types of agents will act in synergy with existing HIV-1 targeted anti viral, or those currently in developments. Beyond providing new perspectives in fundamental aspects of the HIV-1 transmission and pathogenesis, chemokines and their receptors suggest new areas for developing novel therapeutic and preventive strategies against HIV infections. Studies in this review were identified through a search for relevant literature in the pubmed database of the national library of medicine. In this review, some developments in chemokine research with particular focus on their roles in HIV pathogenesis, resistance and therapeutic applications have been discussed.

  19. Homogeneous MGMT Immunoreactivity Correlates with an Unmethylated MGMT Promoter Status in Brain Metastases of Various Solid Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Ingold; Peter Schraml; Heppner, Frank L.; Holger Moch

    2009-01-01

    The O(6)-methylguanine-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation status is a predictive parameter for the response of malignant gliomas to alkylating agents such as temozolomide. First clinical reports on treating brain metastases with temozolomide describe varying effects. This may be due to the fact that MGMT promoter methylation of brain metastases has not yet been explored in depth. Therefore, we assessed MGMT promoter methylation of various brain metastases including those derived fr...

  20. NOK/STYK1 promotes the genesis and remodeling of blood and lymphatic vessels during tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue; Li, Tianqi; Hu, Dan; Zhang, Shuping

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the overexpression of NOK, also named STYK1, led to tumorigenesis and metastasis. Here, we provide evidence that increased expression of NOK/STYK1 caused marked alterations in the overall and inner structures of tumors and substantially facilitates the genesis and remodeling of the blood and lymphatic vessels during tumor progression. In particular, NOK-expressed HeLa stable cells (HeLa-K) significantly enhanced tumor growth and metastasis in xenografted nude mice. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining demonstrated that the tumor tissues generated by HeLa-K cells were much more ichorous and had more interspaces than those generated by control HeLa cells (HeLa-C). The fluorescent areas stained with cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31), a marker protein for blood vessels, appeared to be in different patterns. The total blood vessels, especially the ring patterns, within the tumors of the HeLa-K group were highly enriched compared with those in the HeLa-C group. NOK-HA was demonstrated to be well colocalized with CD31 in the wall of the tubular structures within tumor tissues. Interestingly, antibody staining of the lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor (LYVE-1) further revealed the increase in ring (oratretic strip-like) lymphatic vessels in either the peritumoral or intratumoral areas in the HeLa-K group compared with the HeLa-C group. Consistently, the analysis of human cancerous tissue also showed that NOK was highly expressed in the walls of tubular structures. Thus, our results reveal a novel tumorigenic function of NOK to mediate the genesis and remodeling of blood and lymphatic vessels during tumor progression.

  1. Bone morphogenetic protein antagonist gremlin 1 is widely expressed by cancer-associated stromal cells and can promote tumor cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Julie B.; Zhen, Hanson H.; Montgomery, Kelli; van de Rijn, Matt; Tward, Aaron D.; West, Robert; Gladstone, Hayes; Chang, Howard Y.; Morganroth, Greg S.; Oro, Anthony E.; Brown, Patrick O.

    2006-10-01

    Although tissue microenvironments play critical roles in epithelial development and tumorigenesis, the factors mediating these effects are poorly understood. In this work, we used a genomic approach to identify factors produced by cells in the microenvironment of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin, one of the most common human cancers. The global gene expression programs of stromal cell cultures derived from human BCCs showed consistent, systematic differences from those derived from nontumor skin. The gene most consistently expressed at a higher level in BCC tumor stromal cells compared with those from nontumor skin was GREMLIN 1, which encodes a secreted antagonist of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. BMPs and their antagonists are known to play a crucial role in stem and progenitor cell biology as regulators of the balance between expansion and differentiation. Consistent with the hypothesis that BMP antagonists might have a similar role in cancer, we found GREMLIN 1 expression in the stroma of human BCC tumors but not in normal skin in vivo. Furthermore, BMP 2 and 4 are expressed by BCC cells. Ex vivo, BMP inhibits, and Gremlin 1 promotes, proliferation of cultured BCC cells. We further found that GREMLIN 1 is expressed by stromal cells in many carcinomas but not in the corresponding normal tissue counterparts that we examined. Our data suggest that BMP antagonists may be important constituents of tumor stroma, providing a favorable microenvironment for cancer cell survival and expansion in many cancers. cancer biology | stem cell regulation | tissue microenvironment | tumor stroma

  2. The chimeric genes AML1/DS1 and AML1/EAP inhibit AML1B activation at the CSF1R promoter, but only AML1/MDS1 has tumor-promoter properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zent, C.S.; Matheiu, C.; Rowley, J.D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

    1996-02-06

    The (3;21)(q26;q22) translocation associated with treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome, treatment-related acute myeloid leukemia, and blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia results in the expression of the chimeric genes AML1/EAP, AML1MDS1, and AML1/EVI1. AML1 (CBFA2), which codes for the {alpha} subunit of the heterodimeric transcription factor CBF, is also involved in the t(8;21), and the gene coding for the {beta} subunit (CBFB) is involved in the inv(16). These are two of the most common recurring chromosomal rearrangements in acute myeloid leukemia. CBF corresponds to the murine Pebp2 factor, and CBF binding sites are found in a number of eukaryotic and viral enhancers and promoters. We studied the effects of AML1/EAP and AML1/MDS1 at the AML1 binding site of the CSF1R (macrophage-colony-stimulating factor receptor gene) promoter by using reporter gene assays, and we analyzed the consequences of the expression of both chimeric proteins in an embryonic rat fibroblast cell line (Rat1A) in culture and after injection into athymic nude mice. Unlike AML1, which is an activator of the CSF1R promoter, the chimeric proteins did not transactivate the CSF1R promoter site but acted as inhibitors of AMLI (CBFA2). AML1/EAP and AML1/MDS1 expressed in adherent Rat1A cells decreased contact inhibition of growth, and expression of AML1/MDS1 was associated with acquisition of the ability to grow in suspension culture. Expression of AML1/MDS1 increased the tumorigenicity of Rat1A cells injected into athymic nude mice, whereas AML1/EAP expression provented tumor growth. These results suggest that expression of AML1/MDS1 can interfere with normal AML1 function, and that AML1/MDS1 has tumor-promoting properties in an embryonic rat fibroblast cell line. 26 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Screening of candidate tumor-suppressor genes in 3p21.3 and investigation of the methylation of gene promoters in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Ling, Tianyou; Wu, Hanjiang; Zhang, Jie

    2013-03-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common type of head and neck malignant tumor. however, its pathological mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we screened for candidate tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs) related to OSCC among 10 candidate genes located in 3p21.3, a region abundant with TSGs based on previous studies, using semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Three genes, GNAT1, SEMA3B and AXUD1, with low or no expression in OSCC tissues and the cell line TCA8113 were selected, and the promoter methylation status was further analyzed by methylation-specific PCR (MS-PCR). Hypermethylation in the promoter regions of SEMA3B was found in OSCC tissues, and a significant difference in the frequency of methylation of SEMA3B was observed between OSCC and non-cancerous tissues. Furthermore, TCA8113 cells treated with 5-Aza-Cdc started to re-express SEMA3B at a concentration of 5 µM or higher. Our study confirmed that three candidate TSGs with low expression may be involved in OSCC and that hypermethylation in promoter regions may contribute to the low expression of SEMA3B. These findings offer novel insights for clarifying the molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis of OSCC as well as for aiding in its clinical diagnosis and therapeutic strategy.

  4. THE ISOLATION OF NOVEL MESENCHYMAL STROMAL CELL CHEMOTACTIC FACTORS FROM THE CONDITIONED MEDIUM OF TUMOR CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Siang-Yo; Yang, Jun; Everett, Allen D.; Clevenger, Charles V.; Koneru, Mythili; Mishra, Pravin J.; Kamen, Barton; Banerjee, Debabrata; Glod, John

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) localize to solid tumors. Defining the signaling mechanisms that regulate this process is important to understanding the role of MSCs in tumor growth. Using a combination of chromatography and electrospray tandem mass spectrometry we have identified novel soluble signaling molecules that induce MSC chemotaxis present in conditioned medium of the breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB231. Previous work has employed survey strategies using ELISA assay to identify known chemokines that promote MSC chemotaxis. While these studies provide valuable insights into the intercellular signals that impact MSC behavior, many less well-described, but potentially important soluble signaling molecules could be overlooked using these methods. Through the less directed method of column chromatography we have identified novel candidate MSC chemotactic peptides. Two proteins, cyclophilin B and hepatoma-derived growth factor were then further characterized and shown to promote MSC chemotaxis. PMID:18722367

  5. Immune inhibitory molecules LAG-3 and PD-1 synergistically regulate T-cell function to promote tumoral immune escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Seng-Ryong; Turnis, Meghan E; Goldberg, Monica V; Bankoti, Jaishree; Selby, Mark; Nirschl, Christopher J; Bettini, Matthew L; Gravano, David M; Vogel, Peter; Liu, Chih Long; Tangsombatvisit, Stephanie; Grosso, Joseph F; Netto, George; Smeltzer, Matthew P; Chaux, Alcides; Utz, Paul J; Workman, Creg J; Pardoll, Drew M; Korman, Alan J; Drake, Charles G; Vignali, Dario A A

    2012-02-15

    Inhibitory receptors on immune cells are pivotal regulators of immune escape in cancer. Among these inhibitory receptors, CTLA-4 (targeted clinically by ipilimumab) serves as a dominant off-switch while other receptors such as PD-1 and LAG-3 seem to serve more subtle rheostat functions. However, the extent of synergy and cooperative interactions between inhibitory pathways in cancer remain largely unexplored. Here, we reveal extensive coexpression of PD-1 and LAG-3 on tumor-infiltrating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in three distinct transplantable tumors. Dual anti-LAG-3/anti-PD-1 antibody treatment cured most mice of established tumors that were largely resistant to single antibody treatment. Despite minimal immunopathologic sequelae in PD-1 and LAG-3 single knockout mice, dual knockout mice abrogated self-tolerance with resultant autoimmune infiltrates in multiple organs, leading to eventual lethality. However, Lag3(-/-)Pdcd1(-/-) mice showed markedly increased survival from and clearance of multiple transplantable tumors. Together, these results define a strong synergy between the PD-1 and LAG-3 inhibitory pathways in tolerance to both self and tumor antigens. In addition, they argue strongly that dual blockade of these molecules represents a promising combinatorial strategy for cancer.

  6. Designing a HER2/neu promoter to drive α1,3galactosyltransferase expression for targeted anti-αGal antibody-mediated tumor cell killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanteri, Marion; Ollier, Laurence; Giordanengo, Valérie; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Our goal was to specifically render tumor cells susceptible to natural cytolytic anti-αGal antibodies by using a murine α1,3galactosyltransferase (mαGalT) transgene driven by a designed form of HER2/neu promoter (pNeu), the transcription of which is frequently observed to be above basal in breast tumors. Indeed, the αGalT activity that promotes Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc-R (αGal) epitope expression has been mutationally disrupted during the course of evolution, starting from Old World primates, and this has led to the counter-production of large amounts of cytotoxic anti-αGal antibodies in recent primates, including man. Method Expression of the endogenous c-erbB-2 gene was investigated in various cell lines by northern blotting. A mαGalT cDNA was constructed into pcDNA3 vector downstream of the original CMV promoter (pCMV/mαGalT) and various forms of pNeu were prepared by PCR amplification and inserted in the pCMV/mαGalT construct upstream of the mαGalT cDNA, in the place of the CMV promoter. These constructs were transferred into HEK-293 control and breast tumor cell lines. Stably transfected cells were analyzed by northern blotting for their expression of αGalT and c-erbB-2, and by flow cytometry for their binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated Griffonia simplicifolia/isolectin B4. Results We show that expression of the mαGalT was up- or down-modulated according to the level of endogenous pNeu activity and the particular form of constructed pNeu. Among several constructs, two particular forms of the promoter, pNeu250 containing the CCAAT box and the PEA3 motif adjacent to the TATAA box, and pNeu664, which has three additional PEA3 motifs upstream of the CCAAT box, were found to promote differential αGalT expression. Conclusion Our results strengthen current concepts about the crucial role played by the proximal PEA3 motif of pNeu, and may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the development of targeted transgene expression

  7. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors as Novel Therapeutic Targets in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Inhibitory Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicinal Components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Chen; Joost J. Oppenheim; O.M.Zack Howard

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines belong to a large family of inflammatory cytokines responsible for migration and accumulation of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Over the past decade, accumulating evidence indicated a crucial role for chemokines and chemokine receptors in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is a chronic autoimmune disease in which the synovial tissue is heavily infiltrated by leukocytes. Chemokines play an important role in the infiltration, localization, retention of infiltrating leukocytes and generation of ectopic germinal centers in the inflamed synovium. Recent evidence also suggests that identification of inhibitors directly targeting chemokines or their receptors may provide a novel therapeutic strategy in RA. Traditional Chinese medicinals (TCMs) have a long history in the treatment of inflammatory joint disease. The basis for the clinical benefits of TCM remains largely unclear. Our studies have led to the identification of numerous novel chemokine/chemokine receptor inhibitors present in anti-inflammatory TCMs. All of these inhibitors were previously reported by other researchers to have anti-arthritic effect, which may be attributable, at least in part, to their inhibitory effect on chemokine and/or chemokine receptor. Therefore, identification of agents capable of targeting chemokine/chemokine receptor interactions has suggested a mechanism of action for several TCM components and provided a means of identifying additional anti-RA TCM. Thus, this approach may lead to the discovery of new inhibitors of chemokines or chemokine receptors that can be used to treat diseases associated with inappropriately overactive chemokine mediated inflammatory reactions. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):336-342.

  8. Gene Electrotransfer of Plasmid with Tissue Specific Promoter Encoding shRNA against Endoglin Exerts Antitumor Efficacy against Murine TS/A Tumors by Vascular Targeted Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Stimac

    Full Text Available Vascular targeted therapies, targeting specific endothelial cell markers, are promising approaches for the treatment of cancer. One of the targets is endoglin, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β co-receptor, which mediates proliferation, differentiation and migration of endothelial cells forming neovasculature. However, its specific, safe and long-lasting targeting remains the challenge. Therefore, in our study we evaluated the transfection efficacy, vascular targeted effects and therapeutic potential of the plasmid silencing endoglin with the tissue specific promoter, specific for endothelial cells marker endothelin-1 (ET (TS plasmid, in comparison to the plasmid with constitutive promoter (CON plasmid, in vitro and in vivo. Tissue specificity of TS plasmid was demonstrated in vitro on several cell lines, and its antiangiogenic efficacy was demonstrated by reducing tube formation of 2H11 endothelial cells. In vivo, on a murine mammary TS/A tumor model, we demonstrated good antitumor effect of gene electrotransfer (GET of either of both plasmids in treatment of smaller tumors still in avascular phase of growth, as well as on bigger tumors, already well vascularized. In support to the observations on predominantly vascular targeted effects of endoglin, histological analysis has demonstrated an increase in necrosis and a decrease in the number of blood vessels in therapeutic groups. A significant antitumor effect was observed in tumors in avascular and vascular phase of growth, possibly due to both, the antiangiogenic and the vascular disrupting effect. Furthermore, the study indicates on the potential use of TS plasmid in cancer gene therapy since the same efficacy as of CON plasmid was determined.

  9. ERβ and PEA3 co-activate IL-8 expression and promote the invasion of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Chen, Li; Li, Ji-Yu; Mukaida, Naofumi; Wang, Qiaoqiao; Yang, Chen; Yin, Wen-Jin; Zeng, Xiao-Hua; Jin, Wei; Shao, Zhi-ming

    2011-03-01

    Metastasis represents the major remaining cause of mortality in human breast cancer. Interleukin-8 (IL-8), a proinflammatory chemokine, plays an important role during tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. In this study, we found that IL-8 and ERβ showed positive association. Overexpression of ERβ or PEA3 could up-regulate IL-8 promoter activity, mRNA and secretion; silencing of ERβ or PEA3 decreased IL-8 mRNA and secretion. ERβ and PEA3 increased IL-8 expression through binding to the IL-8 promoter and increased cell invasion. HER2 could increase ERβ and PEA3 expression and their binding to the IL-8 promoter. We conclude that ERβ and PEA3 play important roles in tumor invasion by regulating IL-8 expression, and HER2 maybe the upstream of ERβ and PEA3 - IL-8 pathway.

  10. Profiling Heparin-Chemokine Interactions Using Synthetic Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paz, Jose L.; Moseman, E. Ashley; Noti, Christian; Polito, Laura; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as heparin or heparan sulfate, are required for the in vivo function of chemokines. Chemokines play a crucial role in the recruitment of leukocyte subsets to sites of inflammation and lymphocytes trafficking. GAG-chemokine interactions mediate cell migration and determine which leukocyte subsets enter tissues. Identifying the exact GAC sequences that bind to particular chemokines is key to understand chemokine function at the molecular level and develop strategies to interfere with chemokine-mediated processes. Here, we characterize the heparin binding profiles of eight chemokines (CCL21, IL-8, CXCL12, CXCL13, CCL19, CCL25, CCL28, and CXCL16) by employing heparin microarrays containing a small library of synthetic heparin oligosaccharides. The chemokines differ significantly in their interactions with heparin oligosaccharides: While some chemokines, (e.g., CCL21) strongly bind to a hexasaccharide containing the GlcNSO3(6-OSO3)-IdoA(2-OSO3) repeating unit, CCL19 does not bind and CXCL12 binds only weakly. The carbohydrate microarray binding results were validated by surface plasmon resonance experiments. In vitro chemotaxis assays revealed that dendrimers coated with the fully sulfated heparin hexasaccharide inhibit lymphocyte migration toward CCL21. Migration toward CXCL12 or CCL19 was not affected. These in vitro homing assays indicate that multivalent synthetic heparin dendrimers inhibit the migration of lymphocytes toward certain chemokine gradients by blocking the formation of a chemokine concentration gradient on GAG endothelial chains. These findings are in agreement with preliminary in vivo measurements of circulating lymphocytes. The results presented here contribute to the understanding of GAG-chemokine interactions, a first step toward the design of novel drugs that modulate chemokine activity. PMID:18030990

  11. A novel tumor-promoting function residing in the 5' non-coding region of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Masuda

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF is one of the key regulators of tumor development, hence it is considered to be an important therapeutic target for cancer treatment. However, clinical trials have suggested that anti-VEGF monotherapy was less effective than standard chemotherapy. On the basis of the evidence, we hypothesized that vegf mRNA may have unrecognized function(s in cancer cells. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Knockdown of VEGF with vegf-targeting small-interfering (si RNAs increased susceptibility of human colon cancer cell line (HCT116 to apoptosis caused with 5-fluorouracil, etoposide, or doxorubicin. Recombinant human VEGF165 did not completely inhibit this apoptosis. Conversely, overexpression of VEGF165 increased resistance to anti-cancer drug-induced apoptosis, while an anti-VEGF165-neutralizing antibody did not completely block the resistance. We prepared plasmids encoding full-length vegf mRNA with mutation of signal sequence, vegf mRNAs lacking untranslated regions (UTRs, or mutated 5'UTRs. Using these plasmids, we revealed that the 5'UTR of vegf mRNA possessed anti-apoptotic activity. The 5'UTR-mediated activity was not affected by a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. We established HCT116 clones stably expressing either the vegf 5'UTR or the mutated 5'UTR. The clones expressing the 5'UTR, but not the mutated one, showed increased anchorage-independent growth in vitro and formed progressive tumors when implanted in athymic nude mice. Microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analyses indicated that the vegf 5'UTR-expressing tumors had up-regulated anti-apoptotic genes, multidrug-resistant genes, and growth-promoting genes, while pro-apoptotic genes were down-regulated. Notably, expression of signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1 was markedly repressed in the 5'UTR-expressing tumors, resulting in down-regulation of a STAT1-responsive cluster of genes (43 genes. As a result, the

  12. Enhancement of the pro-apoptotic properties of Newcastle disease virus promotes tumor remission in syngeneic murine cancer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado-Castano, Sara; Ayllon, Juan; Mansour, Mena; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Jordan, Stefan; Tripathi, Shashank; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Villar, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is considered a promising agent for cancer therapy due to its oncolytic properties. These include preferential replication in transformed cells, induction of innate and adaptive immune responses within tumors and cytopathic effects in infected tumor cells due to the activation of apoptosis. In order to enhance the latter and thus possibly enhance the overall oncolytic activity of NDV, we generated a recombinant NDV encoding the human TNF receptor Fas (rNDV-B1/Fas). rNDV-B1/Fas replicates to similar titers as its wild type (rNDV-B1) counterpart, however overexpression of Fas in infected cells leads to higher levels of cytotoxicity correlated with faster and increased apoptosis responses in which both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways are activated earlier. Furthermore, in vivo studies in syngeneic murine melanoma model show an enhancement of the oncolytic properties of rNDV-B1/Fas, with major improvements in survival and tumor remission. Altogether, our data suggest that up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic function of NDV is a viable approach to enhance its anti-tumor properties, and adds to the currently known, rationally-based strategies to design optimized therapeutic viral vectors for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25761895

  13. Macrophages, Inflammation, and Tumor Suppressors: ARF, a New Player in the Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paqui G. Través

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between tumor progression and innate immune system has been well established in the last years. Indeed, several lines of clinical evidence indicate that immune cells such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs interact with tumor cells, favoring growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis of a variety of cancers. In most tumors, TAMs show properties of an alternative polarization phenotype (M2 characterized by the expression of a series of chemokines, cytokines, and proteases that promote immunosuppression, tumor proliferation, and spreading of the cancer cells. Tumor suppressor genes have been traditionally linked to the regulation of cancer progression; however, a growing body of evidence indicates that these genes also play essential roles in the regulation of innate immunity pathways through molecular mechanisms that are still poorly understood. In this paper, we provide an overview of the immunobiology of TAMs as well as what is known about tumor suppressors in the context of immune responses. Recent advances regarding the role of the tumor suppressor ARF as a regulator of inflammation and macrophage polarization are also reviewed.

  14. Chemokines and their receptors in central nervous system disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biber, Knut; de Jong, Eiko K; van Weering, Hilmar R J; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2006-01-01

    Almost a decade ago, it was discovered that the human deficiency virus (HIV) makes use of chemokine receptors to infect blood cells. This appreciation of the clinical relevance of specific chemokine receptors has initiated a considerable boost in the field of chemokine research. It is clear today that chemokine signaling orchestrates the immune system and is widely involved in both physiological and pathophysiological processes. Since the chemokine system offers various targets through which pathology could be influenced, most pharmaceutical companies have chosen this system as a therapeutic target for a variety of diseases. Here recent developments concerning the role of chemokines in diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as their possible therapeutic relevance are discussed.

  15. Type I Interferons Exert Anti-tumor Effect via Reversing Immunosuppression Mediated by Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Peishun; Chen, Qing; Jiang, Jingting; Xu, Chunliang; Zhang, Jimin; Zheng, Chunxing; Jiang, Menghui; Velletri, Tania; Cao, Wei; Huang, Yin; Yang, Qian; Han, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Liying; Wei, Lixin; Rabson, Arnold B.; Chin, Y. Eugene; Wang, Ying; Shi, Yufang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are strongly immunosuppressive via producing nitric oxide (NO) and known to migrate into tumor sites to promote tumor growth, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely elusive. Here, we found that IFNα-secreting MSCs showed more dramatic inhibition effect on tumor progression than that of IFNα alone. Interestingly, IFNα-primed MSCs could also effectively suppress tumor growth. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that both IFNα and IFNβ (type I IFNs) reversed the immunosuppressive effect of MSCs on splenocyte proliferation. This effect of type I IFNs was exerted through inhibiting iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) expression in IFNγ and TNFα-stimulated MSCs. Notably, only NO production was inhibited by IFNα; production of other cytokines or chemokines tested was not suppressed. Furthermore, IFNα promoted the switch from Stat1 homodimers to Stat1-Stat2 heterodimers. Studies using the luciferase reporter system and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that IFNα suppressed iNOS transcription through inhibiting the binding of Stat1 to iNOS promoter. Therefore, the synergistic anti-tumor effects of type I IFNs and MSCs were achieved by inhibiting NO production. This study provides essential information for understanding the mechanisms of MSC-mediated immunosuppression and for the development of better clinical strategies using IFNs and MSCs for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27109100

  16. A copper-hydrogen peroxide redox system induces dityrosine cross-links and chemokine oligomerisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Helen J; Kato, Yoji; Marshall, Lindsay J; Nevell, Thomas G; Shute, Janis K

    2011-12-01

    The activity of the chemoattractant cytokines, the chemokines, in vivo is enhanced by oligomerisation and aggregation on glycosaminoglycan (GAG), particularly heparan sulphate, side chains of proteoglycans. The chemokine RANTES (CCL5) is a T-lymphocyte and monocyte chemoattractant, which has a minimum tetrameric structure for in vivo activity and a propensity to form higher order oligomers. RANTES is unusual among the chemokines in having five tyrosine residues, an amino acid susceptible to oxidative cross-linking. Using fluorescence emission spectroscopy, Western blot analysis and LCMS-MS, we show that a copper/H2O2 redox system induces the formation of covalent dityrosine cross-links and RANTES oligomerisation with the formation of tetramers, as well as higher order oligomers. Amongst the transition metals tested, namely copper, nickel, mercury, iron and zinc, copper appeared unique in this respect. At high (400 μM) concentrations of H2O2, RANTES monomers, dimers and oligomers are destroyed, but heparan sulphate protects the chemokine from oxidative damage, promoting dityrosine cross-links and multimer formation under oxidative conditions. Low levels of dityrosine cross-links were detected in copper/H2O2-treated IL-8 (CXCL8), which has one tyrosine residue, and none were detected in ENA-78 (CXCL5), which has none. Redox-treated RANTES was fully functional in Boyden chamber assays of T-cell migration and receptor usage on activated T-cells following RANTES oligomerisation was not altered. Our results point to a protective, anti-oxidant, role for heparan sulphate and a previously unrecognised role for copper in chemokine oligomerisation that may offer an explanation for the known anti-inflammatory effect of copper-chelators such as penicillamine and tobramycin.

  17. CTHRC1 Acts as a Prognostic Factor and Promotes Invasiveness of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors by Activating Wnt/PCP-Rho Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ze Ma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are the major gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors with a variable malignancy ranging from a curable disorder to highly malignant sarcomas. Metastasis and recurrence are the main causes of death in GIST patients. To further explore the mechanism of metastasis and to more accurately estimate the recurrence risk of GISTs after surgery, the clinical significance and functional role of collagen triple helix repeat containing-1 (CTHRC1 in GIST were investigated. We found that CTHRC1 expression was gradually elevated as the risk grade of NIH classification increased, and was closely correlated with disease-free survival and overall survival in 412 GIST patients. In vitro experiments showed that recombinant CTHRC1 protein promoted the migration and invasion capacities of primary GIST cells. A luciferase reporter assay and pull down assay demonstrated that recombinant CTHRC1 protein activated noncanonical Wnt/PCP-Rho signaling but inhibited canonical Wnt signaling. The pro-motility effect of CTHRC1 on GIST cells was reversed by using a Wnt5a neutralizing antibody and inhibitors of Rac1 or ROCK. Taken together, these data indicate that CTHRC1 may serve as a new predictor of recurrence risk and prognosis in post-operative GIST patients and may play an important role in facilitating GIST progression. Furthermore, CTHRC1 promotes GIST cell migration and invasion by activating Wnt/PCP-Rho signaling, suggesting that the CTHRC1-Wnt/PCP-Rho axis may be a new therapeutic target for interventions against GIST invasion and metastasis.

  18. Tumor-promoting function and prognostic significance of the RNA-binding protein T-cell intracellular antigen-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Junichi; Shoda, Katsutoshi; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Fujita, Yuji; Naruto, Takuya; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Miyakami, Yuko; Watanabe, Miki; Kudo, Yasusei; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Otsuji, Eigo; Imoto, Issei

    2016-03-29

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA1) is an RNA-binding protein involved in many regulatory aspects of mRNA metabolism. Here, we report previously unknown tumor-promoting activity of TIA1, which seems to be associated with its isoform-specific molecular distribution and regulation of a set of cancer-related transcripts, in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Immunohistochemical overexpression of TIA1 ectopically localized in the cytoplasm of tumor cells was an independent prognosticator for worse overall survival in a cohort of 143 ESCC patients. Knockdown of TIA1 inhibited proliferation of ESCC cells. By exogenously introducing each of two major isoforms, TIA1a and TIA1b, only TIA1a, which was localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm, promoted anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent ESCC cell proliferation. Ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation, followed by microarray analysis or massive-parallel sequencing, identified a set of TIA1-binding mRNAs, including SKP2 and CCNA2. TIA1 increased SKP2 and CCNA2 protein levels through the suppression of mRNA decay and translational induction, respectively. Our findings uncover a novel oncogenic function of TIA1 in esophageal tumorigenesis, and implicate its use as a marker for prognostic evaluation and as a therapeutic target in ESCC.

  19. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid from Creosote Bush (Larrea tridentata Mitigates 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-Acetate-Induced Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Responses of Tumor Promotion Cascade in Mouse Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakilur Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA is a phenolic antioxidant found in the leaves and twigs of the evergreen desert shrub, Larrea tridentata (Sesse and Moc. ex DC Coville (creosote bush. It has a long history of traditional medicinal use by the Native Americans and Mexicans. The modulatory effects of topically applied NDGA was studied on acute inflammatory and oxidative stress responses in mouse skin induced by stage I tumor promoting agent, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA. Double TPA treatment adversely altered many of the marker responses of stage I skin tumor promotion cascade. Pretreatment of NDGA in TPA-treated mice mitigated cutaneous lipid peroxidation and inhibited production of hydrogen peroxide. NDGA treatment also restored reduced glutathione level and activities of antioxidant enzymes. Elevated activities of myeloperoxidase, xanthine oxidase and skin edema formation in TPA-treated mice were also lowered by NDGA indicating a restrained inflammatory response. Furthermore, results of histological study demonstrated inhibitory effect of NDGA on cellular inflammatory responses. This study provides a direct evidence of antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of NDGA against TPA-induced cutaneous inflammation and oxidative stress corroborating its chemopreventive potential against skin cancer.

  20. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid from Creosote Bush (Larrea tridentata) Mitigates 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-Acetate-Induced Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Responses of Tumor Promotion Cascade in Mouse Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shakilur; Ansari, Rizwan Ahmed; Rehman, Hasibur; Parvez, Suhel; Raisuddin, Sheikh

    2011-01-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is a phenolic antioxidant found in the leaves and twigs of the evergreen desert shrub, Larrea tridentata (Sesse and Moc. ex DC) Coville (creosote bush). It has a long history of traditional medicinal use by the Native Americans and Mexicans. The modulatory effects of topically applied NDGA was studied on acute inflammatory and oxidative stress responses in mouse skin induced by stage I tumor promoting agent, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Double TPA treatment adversely altered many of the marker responses of stage I skin tumor promotion cascade. Pretreatment of NDGA in TPA-treated mice mitigated cutaneous lipid peroxidation and inhibited production of hydrogen peroxide. NDGA treatment also restored reduced glutathione level and activities of antioxidant enzymes. Elevated activities of myeloperoxidase, xanthine oxidase and skin edema formation in TPA-treated mice were also lowered by NDGA indicating a restrained inflammatory response. Furthermore, results of histological study demonstrated inhibitory effect of NDGA on cellular inflammatory responses. This study provides a direct evidence of antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of NDGA against TPA-induced cutaneous inflammation and oxidative stress corroborating its chemopreventive potential against skin cancer.

  1. Ha-ras oncogene expression directed by a milk protein gene promoter: tissue specificity, hormonal regulation, and tumor induction in transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, A.C.; Schoenenberger, C.A.; Groner, B.; Henninghausen, L.; LeMeur, M.; Gelinger, P.

    1987-03-01

    The activated human Ha-ras oncogene was subjected to the control of the promoter region of the murine whey acidic protein (Wap) gene, which is expressed in mammary epithelial cells in response to lactogenic hormones. The Wap-ras gene was stably introduced into the mouse germ line of five transgenic mice (one male and four females). Wap-ras expression was observed in the mammary glands of lactating females in two lines derived from female founders. The tissue-directed and hormone-dependent Wap expression was conferred on the Ha-ras oncogene. The signals governing Wap expression are located within 2.5 kilobases of 5' flanking sequence. The other two lines derived from female founders did not express the chimeric gene. In the line derived from the male founder the Wap-ras gene is integrated into the Y chromosome. Expression was found in the salivary gland of male animals only. After a long latency, Wap-ras-expressing mice developed tumors. The tumors arose in tissues expressing Wap-ras - i.e., mammary or salivary glands. Compared to the corresponding nonmalignant tissues, Wap-ras expression was enhanced in the tumors.

  2. Impact of mTORC1 inhibition on keratinocyte proliferation during skin tumor promotion in wild-type and BK5.AktWT mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Okkyung; Kiguchi, Kaoru; Jiang, Guiyu; DiGiovanni, John

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we examined the impact of rapamycin on mTORC1 signaling during 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced keratinocyte proliferation and skin tumor promotion in both wild-type (FVB/N) and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. TPA activated mTORC1 signaling in a time-dependent manner in cultured primary mouse keratinocytes and a mouse keratinocyte cell line. Early activation (15-30 min) of mTORC1 signaling induced by TPA was mediated in part by PKC activation, whereas later activation (2-4 h) was mediated by activation of EGFR and Akt. BK5.Akt(WT) transgenic mice, where Akt1 is overexpressed in basal epidermis, are highly sensitive to TPA-induced epidermal proliferation and two-stage skin carcinogenesis. Targeting mTORC1 with rapamycin effectively inhibited TPA-induced epidermal hyperplasia and hyperproliferation as well as tumor promotion in a dose-dependent manner in both wild-type and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. A significant expansion (∼threefold) of the label retaining cell (LRC) population per hair follicle was observed in BK5.Akt(WT) mice compared to FVB/N mice. There was also a significant increase in K15 expressing cells in the hair follicle of transgenic mice that coincided with expression of phospho-Akt, phospho-S6K, and phospho-PRAS40, suggesting an important role of mTORC1 signaling in bulge-region keratinocyte stem cell (KSC) homeostasis. After 2 weeks of TPA treatment, LRCs had moved upward into the interfollicular epidermis from the bulge region of both wild-type and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. TPA-mediated LRC proliferation and migration was significantly inhibited by rapamycin. Collectively, the current data indicate that signaling through mTORC1 contributes significantly to the process of skin tumor promotion through effects on proliferation of the target cells for tumor development.

  3. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghazal, Roland; Yin, Xin; Johns, Scott C; Swanson, Lee; Macal, Monica; Ghosh, Pradipta; Zuniga, Elina I; Fuster, Mark M

    2016-05-01

    In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs) in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1) in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21)-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt) were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4-deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  4. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth

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