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Sample records for chemokine expression profiles

  1. Gene expression profile of cytokines and chemokines in skin lesions from Brazilian Indians with localized cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Silva, Matheus Fernandes; Gomes, Luciana Inácia; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Rodrigues-Silva, Renata; Freire, Janaína de Moura; Quaresma, Patrícia Flávia; Pascoal-Xavier, Marcelo Antônio; Mendes, Tiago Antônio de Oliveira; Serakides, Rogéria; Zauli, Danielle Alves Gomes; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Melo, Maria Norma; Gontijo, Célia Maria Ferreira; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa

    2014-02-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by dermotropic Leishmania species belonging to the Viannia subgenera, with Leishmania (V.) braziliensis considered the main agent in Brazil. After infection, a local inflammatory process is initiated, inducing the expression of several cytokine/chemokine genes. We evaluated the immunity to CL of patients living in the indigenous community Xakriabá, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, by performing detailed analyses of the mRNA expression of different cytokines and chemokines in CL lesions, considering the time evolution (recent or late). We also studied the profile of the inflammatory infiltrate by histopathological analysis. The histopathological features of recent CL lesions showed an intense inflammatory reaction, characterized by the presence of both mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells, whereas late CL lesions exhibited a predominance of mononuclear leukocytes. The gene expression of cytokines/chemokines in skin biopsies from the CL group showed higher transcript levels of modulatory (IL10 and TGFB1), anti-inflammatory (IL4), and pro-inflammatory (TNF, IFNG, IL12B, CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, CXCL10) biomarkers in recent lesions than in late lesions. Our findings suggest that differential gene expression of cytokines and chemokines found in skin lesions from CL patients is associated with time evolution of lesions. PMID:24084096

  2. Lysophosphatidic acid alters the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in mouse liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

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    Chia-Hung Chou

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA is a multi-function glycerophospholipid. LPA affects the proliferation of hepatocytes and stellate cells in vitro, and in a partial hepatectomy induced liver regeneration model, the circulating LPA levels and LPA receptor (LPAR expression levels in liver tissue are significantly changed. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (Lsecs play an important role during liver regeneration. However, the effects of LPA on Lsecs are not well known. Thus, we investigated the effects of LPA on the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in Lsecs.Mouse Lsecs were isolated using CD31-coated magnetic beads. The mRNA expression levels of LPAR's and other target genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The protein levels of angiogenesis factors, cytokines, and chemokines were determined using protein arrays and enzyme immunoassay (EIA. Critical LPAR related signal transduction was verified by using an appropriate chemical inhibitor.LPAR1 and LPAR3 mRNA's were expressed in mouse LPA-treated Lsecs. Treating Lsecs with a physiological level of LPA significantly enhanced the protein levels of angiogenesis related proteins (cyr61 and TIMP-1, cytokines (C5/C5a, M-CSF, and SDF-1, and chemokines (MCP-5, gp130, CCL28, and CXCL16. The LPAR1 and LPAR3 antagonist ki16425 significantly inhibited the LPA-enhanced expression of cyr61, TIMP-1, SDF-1, MCP-5, gp130, CCL28, and CXCL16, but not that of C5/C5a or M-CSF. LPA-induced C5/C5a and M-CSF expression may have been through an indirect regulation mechanism.LPA regulated the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in Lsecs that was mediated via LPAR1 and LPAR3 signaling. Most of the factors that were enhanced by LPA have been found to play critical roles during liver regeneration. Thus, these results may prove useful for manipulating LPA effects on liver regeneration.

  3. Lysophosphatidic Acid Alters the Expression Profiles of Angiogenic Factors, Cytokines, and Chemokines in Mouse Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Hung; Lai, Shou-Lun; Ho, Cheng-Maw; Lin, Wen-Hsi; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lee, Po-Huang; Peng, Fu-Chuo; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Wu, Szu-Yuan; Lai, Hong-Shiee

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a multi-function glycerophospholipid. LPA affects the proliferation of hepatocytes and stellate cells in vitro, and in a partial hepatectomy induced liver regeneration model, the circulating LPA levels and LPA receptor (LPAR) expression levels in liver tissue are significantly changed. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (Lsecs) play an important role during liver regeneration. However, the effects of LPA on Lsecs are not well known. Thus, we investigated the effects of LPA on the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in Lsecs. Methods Mouse Lsecs were isolated using CD31-coated magnetic beads. The mRNA expression levels of LPAR’s and other target genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The protein levels of angiogenesis factors, cytokines, and chemokines were determined using protein arrays and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Critical LPAR related signal transduction was verified by using an appropriate chemical inhibitor. Results LPAR1 and LPAR3 mRNA’s were expressed in mouse LPA-treated Lsecs. Treating Lsecs with a physiological level of LPA significantly enhanced the protein levels of angiogenesis related proteins (cyr61 and TIMP-1), cytokines (C5/C5a, M-CSF, and SDF-1), and chemokines (MCP-5, gp130, CCL28, and CXCL16). The LPAR1 and LPAR3 antagonist ki16425 significantly inhibited the LPA-enhanced expression of cyr61, TIMP-1, SDF-1, MCP-5, gp130, CCL28, and CXCL16, but not that of C5/C5a or M-CSF. LPA-induced C5/C5a and M-CSF expression may have been through an indirect regulation mechanism. Conclusion LPA regulated the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in Lsecs that was mediated via LPAR1 and LPAR3 signaling. Most of the factors that were enhanced by LPA have been found to play critical roles during liver regeneration. Thus, these results may prove useful for manipulating LPA effects on liver regeneration. PMID:25822713

  4. Chemokines and chemokine receptors expression in the lesions of patients with American cutaneous leishmaniasis

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    Nilka Luisa Diaz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL presents distinct active clinical forms with different grades of severity, known as localised (LCL, intermediate (ICL and diffuse (DCL cutaneous leishmaniasis. LCL and DCL are associated with a polarised T-helper (Th1 and Th2 immune response, respectively, whereas ICL, or chronic cutaneous leishmaniasis, is associated with an exacerbated immune response and a mixed cytokine expression profile. Chemokines and chemokine receptors are involved in cellular migration and are critical in the inflammatory response. Therefore, we evaluated the expression of the chemokines CXCL10, CCL4, CCL8, CCL11 and CXCL8 and the chemokine receptors CCR3, CXCR3, CCR5 and CCR7 in the lesions of patients with different clinical forms of ACL using immunohistochemistry. LCL patients exhibited a high density of CXCL10+, CCL4+ and CCL8+ cells, indicating an important role for these chemokines in the local Th1 immune response and the migration of CXCR3+ cells. LCL patients showed a higher density of CCR7+ cells than ICL or DCL patients, suggesting major dendritic cell (DC migration to lymph nodes. Furthermore, DCL was associated with low expression levels of Th1-associated chemokines and CCL11+ epidermal DCs, which contribute to the recruitment of CCR3+ cells. Our findings also suggest an important role for epidermal cells in the induction of skin immune responses through the production of chemokines, such as CXCL10, by keratinocytes.

  5. ELR+ CXC chemokine expression in benign and malignant colorectal conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Brittner Brigitte; Gräber Stefan; Schuld Jochen; Wagner Mathias; Frick Vilma; Rubie Claudia; Bohle Rainer M; Schilling Martin K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background CXCR2 chemokine ligands CXCL1, CXCL5 and CXCL6 were shown to be involved in chemoattraction, inflammatory responses, tumor growth and angiogenesis. Here, we comparatively analyzed their expression profile in resection specimens from patients with colorectal adenoma (CRA) (n = 30) as well as colorectal carcinoma (CRC) (n = 48) and corresponding colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) (n = 16). Methods Chemokine expression was assessed by microdissection, quantitative real-time P...

  6. Chemokine receptor expression by mast cells.

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    Juremalm, Mikael; Nilsson, Gunnar

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the role of chemokines and their receptors in the determination of mast cell tissue localization and how chemokines regulate mast cell function. At least nine chemokine receptors (CXCR1, CXCR2, CXCR3, CXCR4, CX3CR1, CCR1, CCR3, CCR4 and CCR5) have been described to be expressed by human mast cells of different origins. Seven chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL5, CXCL8, CXCL14, CX3CL1, CCL5 and CCL11) have been shown to act on some of these receptors and to induce mast cell migration. Mast cells have a unique expression pattern of CCR3, CXCR1 and CXCR2. These receptors are mainly expressed intracellularly on cytoplasmic membranes. Upon an allergic activation, CCR3 expression is increased on the cell surface and the cell becomes vulnerable for CCL11 treatment. Chemokines do not induce mast cell degranulation but CXCL14 causes secretion of de novo synthesized CXCL8. Because of the expression of CCR3, CCR5 and CXCR4 on mast cell progenitors, these cells are susceptible to HIV infection and mast cells might therefore be a persistent HIV reservoir in AIDS. In this review, we summarize the knowledge about chemokine receptor expression and function on mast cells. PMID:16107768

  7. Cytokine and chemokine mRNA expression profiles in tracheobronchial lymph nodes from pigs singularly infected or coinfected with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (MHYO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to determine cytokine and chemokine mRNA expression profiles in tracheobronchial lymph nodes from pigs singularly infected with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (MHYO), or coinfected with both. Twenty-eight pigs were randomly assigned to one ...

  8. Profiles of cytokine and chemokine gene expression in human pulmonary epithelial cells induced by human and avian influenza viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Chan Paul KS; Chu Ida MT; Yeung Apple CM; Lam WY

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Influenza pandemic remains a serious threat to human health. In this study, the repertoire of host cellular cytokine and chemokine responses to infections with highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1, low pathogenicity avian influenza H9N2 and seasonal human influenza H1N1 were compared using an in vitro system based on human pulmonary epithelial cells. The results showed that H5N1 was more potent than H9N2 and H1N1 in inducing CXCL-10/IP-10, TNF-alpha and CCL-5/RANTES. The cytokine/c...

  9. ELR+ CXC chemokine expression in benign and malignant colorectal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CXCR2 chemokine ligands CXCL1, CXCL5 and CXCL6 were shown to be involved in chemoattraction, inflammatory responses, tumor growth and angiogenesis. Here, we comparatively analyzed their expression profile in resection specimens from patients with colorectal adenoma (CRA) (n = 30) as well as colorectal carcinoma (CRC) (n = 48) and corresponding colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) (n = 16). Chemokine expression was assessed by microdissection, quantitative real-time PCR (Q-RT-PCR), the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). In contrast to CXCL6, we demonstrated CXCL1 and CXCL5 mRNA and protein expression to be significantly up-regulated in CRC and CRLM tissue specimens in relation to their matched tumor neighbor tissues. Moreover, both chemokine ligands were demonstrated to be significantly higher expressed in CRC tissues than in CRA tissues thus indicating a progressive increase in the transition from the premalignant condition to the development of the malignant status. Although a comparative analysis of the CXCL1/CXCL5 protein expression profiles in CRC patients revealed that the absolute expression level of CXCL1 was significantly higher in comparison to CXCL5, mRNA- and protein overexpression of CXCL5 in CRC and CRLM tissues was much more pronounced (80- and 60- fold in CRC tissues, respectively) in comparison to CXCL1 (5- and 3.5- fold in CRC tissues, respectively). Our results demonstrate a significant association between CXCL1 and CXCL5 expression with CRC and CRLM suggesting for both chemokine ligands a potential role in the progression from CRA to CRC and thus, in the initiation of CRC

  10. ELR+ CXC chemokine expression in benign and malignant colorectal conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittner Brigitte

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CXCR2 chemokine ligands CXCL1, CXCL5 and CXCL6 were shown to be involved in chemoattraction, inflammatory responses, tumor growth and angiogenesis. Here, we comparatively analyzed their expression profile in resection specimens from patients with colorectal adenoma (CRA (n = 30 as well as colorectal carcinoma (CRC (n = 48 and corresponding colorectal liver metastases (CRLM (n = 16. Methods Chemokine expression was assessed by microdissection, quantitative real-time PCR (Q-RT-PCR, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and immunohistochemistry (IHC. Results In contrast to CXCL6, we demonstrated CXCL1 and CXCL5 mRNA and protein expression to be significantly up-regulated in CRC and CRLM tissue specimens in relation to their matched tumor neighbor tissues. Moreover, both chemokine ligands were demonstrated to be significantly higher expressed in CRC tissues than in CRA tissues thus indicating a progressive increase in the transition from the premalignant condition to the development of the malignant status. Although a comparative analysis of the CXCL1/CXCL5 protein expression profiles in CRC patients revealed that the absolute expression level of CXCL1 was significantly higher in comparison to CXCL5, mRNA- and protein overexpression of CXCL5 in CRC and CRLM tissues was much more pronounced (80- and 60- fold in CRC tissues, respectively in comparison to CXCL1 (5- and 3.5- fold in CRC tissues, respectively. Conclusion Our results demonstrate a significant association between CXCL1 and CXCL5 expression with CRC and CRLM suggesting for both chemokine ligands a potential role in the progression from CRA to CRC and thus, in the initiation of CRC.

  11. Profiling Heparin-Chemokine Interactions Using Synthetic Tools

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    de Paz, Jose L.; Moseman, E. Ashley; Noti, Christian; Polito, Laura; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as heparin or heparan sulfate, are required for the in vivo function of chemokines. Chemokines play a crucial role in the recruitment of leukocyte subsets to sites of inflammation and lymphocytes trafficking. GAG-chemokine interactions mediate cell migration and determine which leukocyte subsets enter tissues. Identifying the exact GAC sequences that bind to particular chemokines is key to understand chemokine function at the molecular level and develop strategies to interfere with chemokine-mediated processes. Here, we characterize the heparin binding profiles of eight chemokines (CCL21, IL-8, CXCL12, CXCL13, CCL19, CCL25, CCL28, and CXCL16) by employing heparin microarrays containing a small library of synthetic heparin oligosaccharides. The chemokines differ significantly in their interactions with heparin oligosaccharides: While some chemokines, (e.g., CCL21) strongly bind to a hexasaccharide containing the GlcNSO3(6-OSO3)-IdoA(2-OSO3) repeating unit, CCL19 does not bind and CXCL12 binds only weakly. The carbohydrate microarray binding results were validated by surface plasmon resonance experiments. In vitro chemotaxis assays revealed that dendrimers coated with the fully sulfated heparin hexasaccharide inhibit lymphocyte migration toward CCL21. Migration toward CXCL12 or CCL19 was not affected. These in vitro homing assays indicate that multivalent synthetic heparin dendrimers inhibit the migration of lymphocytes toward certain chemokine gradients by blocking the formation of a chemokine concentration gradient on GAG endothelial chains. These findings are in agreement with preliminary in vivo measurements of circulating lymphocytes. The results presented here contribute to the understanding of GAG-chemokine interactions, a first step toward the design of novel drugs that modulate chemokine activity. PMID:18030990

  12. Lysophosphatidic Acid Alters the Expression Profiles of Angiogenic Factors, Cytokines, and Chemokines in Mouse Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chia-Hung Chou; Shou-Lun Lai; Cheng-Maw Ho; Wen-Hsi Lin; Chiung-Nien Chen; Po-Huang Lee; Fu-Chuo Peng; Sung-Hsin Kuo; Szu-Yuan Wu; Hong-Shiee Lai

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a multi-function glycerophospholipid. LPA affects the proliferation of hepatocytes and stellate cells in vitro, and in a partial hepatectomy induced liver regeneration model, the circulating LPA levels and LPA receptor (LPAR) expression levels in liver tissue are significantly changed. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (Lsecs) play an important role during liver regeneration. However, the effects of LPA on Lsecs are not well known. Thus, we ...

  13. Chemokines

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    Richard Horuk

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a family of polypeptides that direct the migration of leukocytestoward a site of infection. They play a major role in autoimmune disease and chemokine receptors have recently been found to mediate HIV-1 fusion. In this short review we examine the role of chemokines in host defence and in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases. We conclude by discussing various therapeutic approaches that target chemokine receptors and that could be beneficial in disease.

  14. The expression and role of CXC chemokines in colorectal cancer.

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    Verbeke, Hannelien; Struyf, Sofie; Laureys, Geneviève; Van Damme, Jo

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a life-threatening disease world-wide and colorectal cancer is the second common cause of cancer mortality. The interaction between tumor cells and stromal cells plays a crucial role in tumor initiation and progression and is partially mediated by chemokines. Chemokines predominantly participate in the chemoattraction of leukocytes to inflammatory sites. Nowadays, it is clear that CXC chemokines and their receptors (CXCR) may also modulate tumor behavior by several important mechanisms: regulation of angiogenesis, activation of a tumor-specific immune response by attracting leukocytes, stimulation of tumor cell proliferation and metastasis. Here, we review the expression and complex roles of CXC chemokines (CXCL1 to CXCL16) and their receptors (CXCR1 to CXCR6) in colorectal cancer. Overall, increased expression levels of CXC chemokines correlate with poor prognosis. PMID:22000992

  15. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE

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    Jyothi Thyagabhavan Mony

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS. The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS. The CCL20 receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4+ T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells. Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. We have assessed whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4+ T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays, whereas less than 1% produced IL-17. About 7.7% of CD4+ T cells produced both cytokines. CCR6 was expressed by Th1, Th1+17 and by Th17 cells, but not by CD8+ T cells. CD8+ T cells expressed CXCR3, which was also expressed by CD4+ T cells, with no correlation to cytokine profile. Messenger RNA for IFNγ, IL-17A, and the Th1 and Th17-associated transcription factors T-bet and RORγt was detected in both CCR6+ and CXCR3+ CD4+ T cells. IFNγ, but not IL-17A mRNA expression was detected in CD8+ T cells in CNS. CCR6 and CD4 were co-localized in spinal cord infiltrates by double immunofluorescence. Consistent with flow cytometry data some but not all CD4+ T cells expressed CCR6 within infiltrates. CD4-negative CCR6+ cells included macrophage/microglial cells. Thus we have for the first time directly studied CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the CNS of mice with peak EAE, and determined IFNγ and IL17 expression by cells expressing CCR6 and CXCR3. We show that neither CCR6 or CXCR3 align with CD4 T cell subsets, and Th1 or mixed Th1+17 predominate in EAE.

  16. Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) CC chemokines: Diversity and expression analysis.

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    Borza, Tudor; Stone, Cynthia; Rise, Matthew L; Bowman, Sharen; Johnson, Stewart C

    2010-08-01

    Chemokines are a large, diverse group of small cytokines that can be classified into several families, including the CC chemokines that are characterized by two adjacent cysteines near their amino terminus. CC chemokines play a pivotal role in host defense mechanisms by inducing leukocyte chemotaxis under physiological and inflammatory conditions. Analysis of CC chemokines from teleost fishes indicates that the number of CC chemokine genes and their tissue expression patterns vary largely in this group of vertebrates. Here we describe 32 distinct CC chemokine sequences from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) identified by analysis of approximately 206,000 ESTs. Phylogenetic analysis of Atlantic cod CC chemokines placed these sequences in seven clusters, most likely resulting from species-specific gene duplications, and two unique sequences; 12 of these CC chemokines, including at least one member of each cluster, were analyzed by QPCR using four immune-related tissues (head kidney, liver, spleen and blood) obtained from unstimulated, polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (pIC)-stimulated and formalin-killed atypical Aeromonas salmonicida-stimulated individuals. EST abundance and QPCR analysis indicate that the expression of closely related CC chemokines GmSCYA101 and GmSCYA102, GmSCYA108 and GmSCYA109 or GmSCYA122 and GmSCYA124 can be highly tissue-specific despite substantial sequence identity. Stimulation with the viral mimic pIC or formalin-killed atypical A. salmonicida resulted in increased expression of most of the CC chemokines, indicating that they can be regarded as either inducible (inflammatory) or dual-function rather than constitutive (homeostatic). Tissue specificity, and the level of induction, varied broadly; for example, GmSCYA123 was at least 4-fold up-regulated by both inducers in all tissues analyzed, whereas pIC increased the expression of GmSCYA124 in liver over 1500 times. PMID:20381521

  17. Th1- and Th2-related chemokine and chemokine receptor expression on the ocular surface in endotoxin-induced uveitis

    OpenAIRE

    Trinh, Liem; BRIGNOLE-BAUDOUIN, Françoise; PAULY, Aude; Liang, Hong; Houssier, Marianne; Baudouin, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether the ocular surface inflammation in uveitis mimics or counteracts intraocular inflammatory pathways by directly comparing T-helper (Th) lymphocytes Th1 and Th2 markers in conjunctival and ciliary body expression in endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU). This study used the following inflammatory markers: chemokine receptor, CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4), and its ligand, macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), to evaluate Th2 participation; chemokine receptor, CCR5, to evalu...

  18. Tropoelastin regulates chemokine expression in fibroblasts in Costello syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly associated with growth and mental retardation, cardiac and skeletal anomalies, and a predisposition to develop neoplasia. Comprehensive expression analysis revealed remarkable up-regulation of several cytokines and chemokines including Gro family proteins, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-8 and MCP-1 but down-regulation of extracellular matrix components including collagens and proteoglycans of skin fibroblasts derived from a Japanese Costello syndrome patient characterized by significantly reduced tropoelastin mRNA, impaired elastogenesis and enhanced cell proliferation. In contrast, decreases in these chemokines and IL-1β expression were observed in Costello fibroblastic cell lines stably expressing the bovine tropoelastin (btEln) gene and in restored elastic fibers. These results strongly suggest that the human TE gene (ELN) transfer could be applicable for the gene therapy of a group of Costello syndrome patients with reduced ELN gene expression

  19. Profile of Cytokines and Chemokines Triggered by Wild-Type Strains of Rabies Virus in Mice.

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    Appolinário, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Ribeiro, Bruna Devidé; Fonseca, Clóvis R; Vicente, Acácia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo A de Paula; Megid, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Rabies is a lethal infectious disease that causes 55,000 human deaths per year and is transmitted by various mammalian species, such as dogs and bats. The host immune response is essential for avoiding viral progression and promoting viral clearance. Cytokines and chemokines are crucial in the development of an immediate antiviral response; the rabies virus (RABV) attempts to evade this immune response. The virus's capacity for evasion is correlated with its pathogenicity and the host's inflammatory response, with highly pathogenic strains being the most efficient at hijacking the host's defense mechanisms and thereby decreasing inflammation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of a set of cytokine and chemokine genes that are related to the immune response in the brains of mice inoculated intramuscularly or intracerebrally with two wild-type strains of RABV, one from dog and the other from vampire bat. The results demonstrated that the gene expression profile is intrinsic to the specific rabies variant. The prompt production of cytokines and chemokines seems to be more important than their levels of expression for surviving a rabies infection. PMID:26711511

  20. Understanding stress-induced immunosuppression: exploration of cytokine and chemokine gene profiles in chicken peripheral leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shini, S; Huff, G R; Shini, A; Kaiser, P

    2010-04-01

    At present, the poultry meat and egg industry has gained a lot of ground, being viewed as a provider of a healthy alternative to red meat and other protein sources. If this trend is to be maintained, solutions must be found to improve resistance of chickens to disease, which often is weakened by stressful conditions. In poultry, stress-induced immunosuppression is manifested by failures in vaccination and increased morbidity and mortality of flocks. Currently, several modern cellular and molecular approaches are being used to explore the status of the immune system during stress and disease. It is likely that these new techniques will lead to the development of new strategies for preventing and controlling immunosuppression in poultry. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assays, a broad spectrum of cytokine, chemokine, and their receptor genes can be quantified in birds and then be used as markers to assess the effects of stress on the immune system. Currently, we are investigating immune and endocrine interactions in the chicken, in particular the cells and molecules that are known to be involved in such interactions in mammals. We have evaluated the effects of corticosterone administration in drinking water on peripheral lymphocyte and heterophil cytokine and chemokine gene profiles. In particular, there seems to be effects on cytokine and chemokine mRNA expression levels in both lymphocytes and heterophils, especially expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and IL-18 and chemokines C-C motif, ligand 1 inflammatory (CCLi1); C-C motif, ligand 2 inflammatory (CCLi2); C-C motif, ligand 5 (CCL5); C-C motif, ligand 16 (CCL16); C-X-C motif ligand 1 inflammatory (CXCLi1); and C-X-C motif ligand 2 inflammatory (CXCLi2), which are initially upregulated and are potentially involved in modulating the adaptive immune response. A chronic treatment with corticosterone downregulates proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, suggesting

  1. Expression of specific chemokines and chemokine receptors in the central nervous system of multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Tani, M; Jensen, J;

    1999-01-01

    Chemokines direct tissue invasion by specific leukocyte populations. Thus, chemokines may play a role in multiple sclerosis (MS), an idiopathic disorder in which the central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory reaction is largely restricted to mononuclear phagocytes and T cells. We asked whether sp...

  2. CCR5 Expression and β-Chemokine Production During Placental Neonatal Monocyte Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Zylla, Dylan; Li, Yuan; BERGENSTAL, EMILY; Merrill, Jeffrey D.; Douglas, Steven D.; MOONEY, KATHY; GUO, CHANG-JIANG; Song, Li; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2003-01-01

    The stage of maturation of monocytes affects their susceptibility to HIV infection. The β-chemokines and their receptor CCR5 play a crucial role in inflammatory reactions and HIV infection. We therefore examined the correlation between the expression of CCR5 and β-chemokine production and the susceptibility to HIV infection during cord monocyte (CM) differentiation into macrophages. CM and CM-derived macrophages (CMDM) were examined for β-chemokine and CCR5 expression. The susceptibility of t...

  3. Differential gene expression during capillary morphogenesis in a microcarrier-based three-dimensional in vitro model of angiogenesis with focus on chemokines and chemokine receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Tai Sun; Min-Yue Zhang; Chang Shu; Qiang Li; Xiao-Gui Yan; Ni Cheng; Yu-Dong Qiu; Yi-Tao Ding

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To globally compare the gene expression profiles during the capillary morphogenesis of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) in an in vitro angiogenesis system with affymetrix oligonucleotide array.METHODS: A microcarrier-based in vitro angiogenesis system was developed, in which ECs migrated into the matrix,proliferated, and formed capillary sprouts. The sprouts elongated, branched and formed networks. The total RNA samples from the HMVECs at the selected time points (0.5,24, and 72 h) during the capillary morphogenesis were used for microarray analyses, and the data were processed with the softwares provided by the manufacturers. The expression patterns of some genes were validated and confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The regulated genes were grouped based on their molecular functions and expression patterns, and among them the expression of chemokines and chemokine receptors was specially examined and their functional implications were analyzed.RESULTS: A total of 1 961 genes were up- or downregulated two-folds or above, and among them, 468 genes were up- or down-regulated three-folds or above. The regulated genes could be grouped into categories based on their molecular functions, and were also clustered into six groups based on their patterns of expression. As for chemokines and chemokine receptors, CXCL1/GRO-α,CXCL2/GRO-β, CXCLS/ENA-78, CXCL6/GCP2, IL-8/CXCL8,CXCL12/SDF-1, CXCL9/Mig, CXC11/ITAC, CX3CL1/fractalkine,CCL2/MCP-1, CCL3, CCLS/RANTES, CCL7, CCL15, CCL21,CCL23, CCL28, and CCR1, CCR9, CXCR4 were identified.Moreover, these genes demonstrated different changing patterns during the capillary morphogenesis, which implied that they might have different roles in the sequential process. Among the chemokines identified, CCL2/MCP-1,CCL5/RANTES and CX3CL1 were specially up-regulated at the 24-h time point when the sprouting characterized the morphological change. It was thus suggested that they might exert crucial roles at the early stage

  4. Chemokine receptor expression on B cells and effect of interferon-beta in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Roed, Hanne; Sellebjerg, Finn

    We investigated the B-cell expression of chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR5 and CCR5 in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients in relapse of multiple sclerosis (MS) and in neurological controls. Chemokine receptor expression was also studied in interferon-beta-treated patients with r...

  5. Chemokine expression by glial cells directs leukocytes to sites of axonal injury in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia A; Kuziel, William A; Rivest, Serge;

    2003-01-01

    Innate responses in the CNS are critical to first line defense against infection and injury. Leukocytes migrate to inflammatory sites in response to chemokines. We studied leukocyte migration and glial chemokine expression within the denervated hippocampus in response to axonal injury caused by e...

  6. Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells Modulate Chemokine Expression and Hyaluronan Synthesis in Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, Inga; Freudenberger, Till; Twarock, Sören; Yamaguchi, Yu; Grandoch, Maria; Fischer, Jens W

    2016-02-19

    The aim of this study was to characterize the interaction of KYSE-410, an esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line, and fibroblasts with respect to the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan (HA) and chemokine expression. KYSE-410 cells induced the mRNA expression of HA synthase 2 (Has2) in normal skin fibroblasts (SF) only in direct co-cultures. Parallel to Has2 mRNA, Has2 antisense RNA (Has2os2) was up-regulated in co-cultures. Knockdown of LEF1, a downstream target of Wnt signaling, abrogated Has2 and Has2os2 induction. After knockdown of Has2 in SF, significantly less α-smooth muscle actin expression was detected in co-cultures. Moreover, it was investigated whether the phenotype of KYSE-410 was affected in co-culture with SF and whether Has2 knockdown in SF had an impact on KYSE-410 cells in co-culture. However, no effects on epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers, proliferation, and migration were detected. In addition to Has2 mRNA, the chemokine CCL5 was up-regulated and CCL11 was down-regulated in SF in co-culture. Furthermore, co-cultures of KYSE-410 cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) were investigated. Similar to SF, Has2 and Ccl5 were up-regulated and Ccl11 was down-regulated in CAF in co-culture. Importantly and in contrast to SF, inhibiting HA synthesis by 4-methylumbelliferone abrogated the effect of co-culture on Ccl5 in CAF. Moreover, HA was found to promote adhesion of CD4(+) but not CD8(+) cells to xenogaft tumor tissues. In conclusion, direct co-culture of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and fibroblasts induced stromal HA synthesis via Wnt/LEF1 and altered the chemokine profile of stromal fibroblasts, which in turn may affect the tumor immune response. PMID:26699196

  7. A complex pattern of chemokine receptor expression is seen in osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent bone tumor in childhood and adolescence. Patients with primary metastatic disease have a poor prognosis. It is therefore important to better characterize the biology of this tumor to define new prognostic markers or therapeutic targets for tailored therapy. Chemokines and their receptors have been shown to be involved in the development and progression of malignant tumors. They are thought to be active participants in the biology of osteosarcoma. The function of specific chemokines and their receptors is strongly associated with the biological context and microenvironment of their expression. In this report we characterized the expression of a series of chemokine receptors in the complex environment that defines osteosarcoma. The overall level of chemokine receptor mRNA expression was determined using TaqMan RT-PCR of microdissected archival patient biopsy samples. Expression was then verified at the protein level by immunohistochemistry using a series of receptor specific antibody reagents to elucidate the cellular association of expression. Expression at the RNA level was found for most of the tested receptors. CCR1 expression was found on infiltrating mononuclear and polynuclear giant cells in the tumor. Cells associated with the lining of intratumoral vessels were shown to express CCR4. Infiltrating mononuclear cells and tumor cells both showed expression of the receptor CCR5, while CCR7 was predominantly expressed by the mononuclear infiltrate. CCR10 was only very rarely detected in few scattered infiltrating cells. Our data elucidate for the first time the cellular context of chemokine receptor expression in osteosarcoma. This is an important issue for better understanding potential chemokine/chemokine receptor function in the complex biologic processes that underlie the development and progression of osteosarcoma. Our data support the suggested involvement of chemokines and their receptors in diverse aspects of the biology

  8. CXCL12 chemokine expression suppresses human breast cancer growth and metastasis in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, Zhi-Dong; Kong, Bin; Liu, Xiang-Ping; Dong, Qian; Niu, Hai-tao; Wang, Yong-Hua; Li, Fu-Nian; Wang, Hai-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are now known to play an important role in cancer growth and metastasis. However, there is little information regarding chemokine expression in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate CXCL12 expression in breast cancer and to investigate the question of whether reduced expression of CXCL12 may have any pathological significance in breast cancer development or progression. In this study, we performed western blotting and immunohistochemistry to evaluate the exp...

  9. Expression of CC Chemokine Ligand 20 and CC Chemokine Receptor 6 mRNA in Patients with Psoriasis Vulgaris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴艳; 李家文

    2004-01-01

    Summary: In order to explore the possible role of CC chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20) and its receptor CC chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6) in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, the expression levels of mRNA of them in psoriatic lesions were investigated. The skin biopsies were collected from skin lesions in 35 cases of psoriasis vulgaris and 18 normal controls. RT-PCR was used to semi-quantitatively analyze the mRNA expression of CCL20 and CCR6 in the psoriatic lesions and the normal skin tissues.The results showed that the mRNA of CCL20 and CCR6 was present in every specimen. The expression levels of CCL20 mRNA in skin lesions were 1. 1397±0. 0521, which were greatly higher than those in normal controls (0.8681±0.0308) (P<0. 001). The expression levels of CCR6 mRNA in skin lesions were 1.1103±0.0538, significantly higher than in the controls (0.9131±0.0433, P<0. 001). These findings indicate that up-regulated expression of CCL20 and CCR6 mRNA might be related to the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  10. Characteristic cerebrospinal fluid cytokine/chemokine profiles in neuromyelitis optica, relapsing remitting or primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

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    Takuya Matsushita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Differences in cytokine/chemokine profiles among patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO, relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS, and primary progressive MS (PPMS, and the relationships of these profiles with clinical and neuroimaging features are unclear. A greater understanding of these profiles may help in differential diagnosis. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured 27 cytokines/chemokines and growth factors in CSF collected from 20 patients with NMO, 26 with RRMS, nine with PPMS, and 18 with other non-inflammatory neurological diseases (OND by multiplexed fluorescent bead-based immunoassay. Interleukin (IL-17A, IL-6, CXCL8 and CXCL10 levels were significantly higher in NMO patients than in OND and RRMS patients at relapse, while granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF and CCL4 levels were significantly higher in NMO patients than in OND patients. In NMO patients, IL-6 and CXCL8 levels were positively correlated with disability and CSF protein concentration while IL-6, CXCL8, G-CSF, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and IFN-γ were positively correlated with CSF neutrophil counts at the time of sample collection. In RRMS patients, IL-6 levels were significantly higher than in OND patients at the relapse phase while CSF cell counts were negatively correlated with the levels of CCL2. Correlation coefficients of cytokines/chemokines in the relapse phase were significantly different in three combinations, IL-6 and GM-CSF, G-CSF and GM-CSF, and GM-CSF and IFN-γ, between RRMS and NMO/NMOSD patients. In PPMS patients, CCL4 and CXCL10 levels were significantly higher than in OND patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest distinct cytokine/chemokine alterations in CSF exist among NMO, RRMS and PPMS. In NMO, over-expression of a cluster of Th17- and Th1-related proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines is characteristic, while in PPMS, increased CCL4 and CXCL10 levels may reflect on-going low grade T cell

  11. Molecular characterization of miiuy croaker CC chemokine gene and its expression following Vibrio anguillarum injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan-zhi; Wang, Ri-xin; Sun, Yue-na; Xu, Tian-jun

    2011-07-01

    A CC chemokine gene was isolated from miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) by expressed sequence tag analysis. The Mimi-CC cDNA contains an open reading frame of 429 nucleotides encoding 142 amino acid residues. The deduced Mimi-CC possesses the typical arrangement of four cysteines as found in other known CC chemokines (C³¹, C³², C⁵⁶, and C⁷⁰). It shares 15.3%-37.4% identity to CC chemokines of mammal and teleost. Phylogenetic analysis showed that miiuy croaker was most closely related to Atlantic cod. Genomic analysis revealed that Mimi-CC gene consists of four exons and three introns, which is not typical of CC chemokines but resembles that of CXC chemokines. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that Mimi-CC is constitutively expressed in most tissues including lymphoid organs, and the highest expression of Mimi-CC transcripts in normal tissues was observed in muscle. Challenge of miiuy croaker with Vibrio anguillarum resulted in significant changes in the expression of CC chemokine transcripts in four tissues, especially in kidney and spleen. PMID:21414411

  12. Expression of chemokine receptors on peripheral blood lymphocytes in multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nomura Fumio

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of different chemokine receptors in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS has been extensively investigated; however, little is known about the difference in the role of chemokine receptors between the pathogenesis of neuromyelitis optica (NMO and MS. Therefore, we examined the expression of chemokine receptors on peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL in MS and NMO. Methods We used flow cytometry to analyse lymphocyte subsets in 12 patients with relapsing NMO, 24 with relapsing-remitting MS during relapse, 3 with NMO and 5 with MS during remission. Results Compared with healthy controls (HC, the percentage of lymphocytes in white blood cells was significantly lower in NMO and MS patients. The percentage of T cells expressing CD4+CD25+ and CD4+CD45RO+ was higher, while that of CD4+CC chemokine receptor (CCR3+ (T helper 2, Th2 was significantly lower in MS patients than in HC. The ratios of CD4+CXC chemokine receptors (CXCR3+/CD4+CCR3+ (Th1/Th2 and CD8+CXCR3+/CD8+CCR4+ (T cytotoxic 1, Tc1/Tc2 were higher in MS patients than in HC. The percentage of CD8+CXCR3+ T cell (Tc1 and CD4+CXCR3+ T cell (Th1 decreased significantly during remission in MS patients (P 0.05. No significant differences were identified in the expression of the chemokine receptors on PBL in NMO patients compared with MS patients and HC. Conclusions Th1 dominance of chemokine receptors on blood T cells and the correlation between CXCR3+ T cell (Th1 and Tc1 and disease activity in MS patients were confirmed by analysing chemokines receptors on PBL. In contrast, deviation in the Th1/Th2 balance was not observed in NMO patients.

  13. Expression of IP-10 Chemokine is Regulated by Pro-inflammatory Cytokines in Cultured Hepatocytes

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    Gholamhossein Hassanshahi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are classified in four distinct groups as CXC, CC, CX3C and C, depending on the presence or absence of a motif called ELR (Arg-Leu-Glu before the first cysteine residue in their structure. CXC chemokines are also subdivided into ELR+ and ELR-. Increasing evidence has indicated the existence of a chemokine network in the liver which is involved in both physiological responses and, under certain circumstances, pathological and repair processes following hepatic injury.  The CXC chemokines play a major role in both these processes, and much attention has been focused on their therapeutic applications to liver disease. The aim of this study was to examine the response of cultured hepatocytes to exogenous inflammatory cytokines (TNF-a and IFN-g regarding expression of IP-10 and growth regulatory oncogen (Gro chemokines. In this study we employed western and northern analysis to measure chemokines at the level of protein and mRNA by hepatocytes in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines. We found that, the pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-a and IFN-g, selectively stimulated expression of IP-10 but were without effect on Gro. This confirms a potential direct involvement of these cytokines in chemokine production by hepatocytes. Thus, IFN-g and TNF-a may play a role in hepatic injury and inflammation and produce some of their biological effects by localized induction of chemokines by hepatocytes. Given the similarity to an acute phase response, we were able to show that IFN-g and TNF-a mimicked the effects of cell isolation and culture on induction of IP-10 expression. Further, evidence for linkages between IFN-g and TNF-a and liver injuries is seen in hepatitis C and hepatitis B in which increased levels of TNF-a and its soluble receptor were reported. 

  14. EXPRESSION OF mRNAS FOR CHEMOKINES AND CHEMOKINE RECEPTORS IN THE SKIN FROM PATIENTS WITH PSORIASIS

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    A. S. Beltiukova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Some issues in etiology and pathogenesis of psoriasis are poorly studied. Therefore, a search for new potential markers is actual for diagnostics of psoriasis in less clear cases. In this study, an attempt was undertaken to evaluate contribution of some chemokines and appropriate receptors into pathogenesis of psoriasis. The main group consisted of the patients with psoriatic arthritis (n = 20 and psoriasis vulgaris (n = 9. A group of comparison consisted of patients with sclerodermia (n = 4, and a control group was represented by healthy persons (n = 9. The specimens were taken from visually normal and affected skin areas from psoriatic patients obtained by punch biopsy. Expression of the following chemokines was performed: CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL4/MIP-1β, CCL5/RANTES, CCL11/eotaxin, CCL24/eotaxin-2, CXCL8/IL-8 and their receptors (CCR1, CCR3, CCR5, CXCR1, CXCR2. In cases with PASI values < 10, an increased expression of the following genes was revealed for CCL11/eotaxin (p = 0.03, CXCR1 (р = 0.008, CXCR2 (р = 0.0006 in virtually intact skin and affected skin areas, as well as increased gene expression of CCL24/eotaxin 2 (p = 0.009, CCL5/RANTES (p = 0.05 in visually normal skin.With PASI values of 10 to 20, an increased gene expression was found for CCL11/eotaxin (p = 0.005, CCL24/eotaxin 2 (p = 0.02, CCL5/RANTES (p = 0.01, CXCR1 (р = 0.0009, CXCR2 (р = 0.002 in skin biopsies from visually healthy and affected skin, as well as increased expression CXCL8 (IL-8 (p = 0.005 in visually normal skin. In cases with PASI > 20, an increased expression of CCL11/eotaxin (p = 0.001, CCL24/eotaxin 2 (p = 0.001, CCL3/MIP-1α (р = 0.02, CXCR1 (p = 0.0001, CXCR2 (p = 0.001 was detected in visually healthy skin samples and affected skin of the patients, as well as higher expression of CCL4/MIP-1β (р = 0.03 in affected skin areas. A reverse correlation was revealed between expression of chemokines, i.e., CCL24/eotaxin 2 (r = –0,94, p = 0.005, CCL3

  15. Chemokine expression in GKO mice (lacking interferon-gamma) with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glabinski, A R; Krakowski, M; Han, Y; Owens, T; Ransohoff, R M

    1999-01-01

    of active investigation. Chemokines including IP-10, GRO-alpha, MCP-1 are produced in EAE tissues selectively by parenchymal astrocytes, but the regulatory stimuli that govern this expression remain undetermined. The unexpected occurrence of increased EAE susceptibility in Balb/c GKO mice (lacking...... IFN-gamma) offered an opportunity to examine the spectrum of chemokine expression during immune-mediated inflammation in the absence of a single regulatory cytokine. We found that chemokines MCP-1 and GRO-alpha were upregulated in the CNS of mice with EAE despite the GKO genotype. IP-10, which is...... highly expressed in the CNS of mice with an intact IFN-gamma gene and EAE, was strikingly absent. In vitro experiments confirmed that IFNgamma selectively stimulates astrocytes for IP-10 expression. These results indicate that IP-10 is dependent upon IFN-gamma for its upregulation during this model...

  16. Up-regulation of chemokine C-C ligand 2 (CCL2) and C-X-C chemokine 8 (CXCL8) expression by monocytes in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J C; de Brito, C A; Futata, E A; Azor, M H; Orii, N M; Maruta, C W; Rivitti, E A; Duarte, A J S; Sato, M N

    2012-01-01

    The disturbed cytokine-chemokine network could play an important role in the onset of diseases with inflammatory processes such as chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU). Our main objectives were to evaluate the relation between proinflammatory chemokine serum levels from CIU patients and their response to autologous skin test (ASST) and basophil histamine release (BHR). We also aimed to assess the chemokine secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) upon polyclonal stimulus and to evaluate chemokine C-C ligand 2/C-X-C chemokine 8 (CCL2/CXCL8) and Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) expression in monocytes. We observed significantly higher serum levels of the CXCL8, CXCL9, CXCL10 and CCL2 in CIU patients compared to the healthy group, regardless of the BHR or ASST response. The basal secretion of CCL2 by PBMC or induced by Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin A (SEA) was higher in CIU patients than in the control group, as well as for CXCL8 and CCL5 secretions upon phytohaemagglutinin stimulation. Also, up-regulation of CCL2 and CXCL8 mRNA expression was found in monocytes of patients upon SEA stimulation. The findings showed a high responsiveness of monocytes through CCL2/CXCL8 expression, contributing to the creation of a proinflammatory environment in CIU. PMID:22132892

  17. Proinflammatory chemokines during Candida albicans keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoyong; Hua, Xia; Wilhelmus, Kirk R

    2010-03-01

    Chemotactic cytokines mediate the recruitment of leukocytes into infected tissues. This study investigated the profile of chemokines during experimental Candida albicans keratitis and determined the effects of chemokine inhibition on leukocyte infiltration and fungal growth during murine keratomycosis. Scarified corneas of BALB/c mice were topically inoculated with C. albicans and monitored daily over one week for fungal keratitis. After a gene microarray for murine chemokines compared infected corneas to controls, real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunostaining assessed chemokine expression in infected and mock-inoculated corneas. An anti-chemokine antibody was then administered subconjunctivally and evaluated for effects on clinical severity, corneal inflammation, fungal recovery, and cytokine expression. Of 33 chemokine genes examined by microarray, 6 CC chemokines and 6 CXC chemokines were significantly (Pamount of recoverable fungi was not significantly (P=0.4) affected. Anti-CCL3 treatment significantly (P=0.01) reduced the expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1beta in infected corneas. These results indicate that chemokines, especially the CC chemokine CCL3, play important roles in the acute inflammatory response to C. albicans corneal infection. PMID:20005222

  18. Modulation of monocyte/macrophage-derived cytokine and chemokine profile by persistent Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection leads to chronic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Mavromara

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available HCV infection presents a major public health problem, with more than 170 million people infected worldwide. Chronicity and persistence of infection constitute the hallmark of the disease. Although HCV is a hepatotropic virus, subsets of immune cells have been found to be permissive to infection and viral replication. Peripheral blood monocytes, attracted to the site of infection and differentiated into macrophages, and resident hepatic macrophages, known as Kupffer cells, are important mediators of innate immunity, through production of several chemokines and cytokines in addition to their phagocytic activity. HCV proteins have been shown to modulate the cytokine and chemokine production profile of monocytes/macrophages, as it is suggested by both in vitro and clinical studies. This modified expression profile appears crucial for the establishment of aberrant inflammation that leads to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  19. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of a CC chemokine gene from miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuanzhi; Sun, Yuena; Shi, Ge; Wang, Rixin; Xu, Tianjun

    2012-12-01

    Chemokines are a family of structurally related chemotactic cytokines that regulate the migration of leukocytes, under both physiological and inflammatory conditions. A partial cDNA of CC chemokine gene designed as Mimi-CC3 was isolated from miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) spleen cDNA library. Unknown 3' part of the cDNA was amplified by 3'-RACE. The complete cDNA of Mimi-CC3 contains an 89-nt 5'-UTR, a 303-nt open reading frame and a 441-nt 3'-UTR. Three exons and two introns were identified in Mimi-CC3. The deduced Mimi-CC3 protein sequences contain a 22 amino acids signal peptide and a 78 amino acids mature polypeptide, which possesses the typical arrangement of four cysteines as found in other known CC chemokines. It shares low amino acid sequence identities with most other fish and mammalian CC chemokines (less than 54.1 %), but shares very high identities with large yellow croaker CC chemokine (94.6 %). Phylogenetic analysis showed that Mimi-CC3 gene may have an orthologous relationship with mammalian/amphibian CCL25 gene. Tissue expression distributed analysis showed that Mimi-CC3 gene was constitutively expressed in all nine tissues examined, although at different levels. Upon stimulated with Vibrio anguillarum, the time-course analysis using a real-time PCR showed that Mimi-CC3 transcript in kidney and liver was obviously up-regulated and reached the peak levels, followed by a recovery. Mimi-CC3 expression in kidney was more strongly increased than in liver. However, down-regulation was observed in spleen. These results indicated that Mimi-CC3 plays important roles in miiuy croaker immune response as well as in homeostatic mechanisms. PMID:22736236

  20. Identification and Profiling of Novel α1A-Adrenoceptor-CXC Chemokine Receptor 2 Heteromer*

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa, Sanam; Heng B See; Seeber, Ruth M.; Armstrong, Stephen P.; White, Carl W; Ventura, Sabatino; Ayoub, Mohammed Akli; Pfleger, Kevin D.G.

    2012-01-01

    We have provided the first evidence for specific heteromerization between the α1A-adrenoceptor (α1AAR) and CXC chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2) in live cells. α1AAR and CXCR2 are both expressed in areas such as the stromal smooth muscle layer of the prostate. By utilizing the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromer identification technology on the live cell-based bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay platform, our studies in human embryonic kidney 293 cells have identified no...

  1. Enhanced Chemokine Receptor Expression on Leukocytes of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Goldeck

    Full Text Available Although primarily a neurological complaint, systemic inflammation is present in Alzheimer's Disease, with higher than normal levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the periphery as well as the brain. A gradient of these factors may enhance recruitment of activated immune cells into the brain via chemotaxis. Here, we investigated the phenotypes of circulating immune cells in AD patients with multi-colour flow cytometry to determine whether their expression of chemokine receptors is consistent with this hypothesis. In this study, we confirmed our previously reported data on the shift of early- to late-differentiated CD4+ T-cells in AD patients. The percentage of cells expressing CD25, a marker of acute T-cell activation, was higher in patients than in age-matched controls, and percentages of CCR6+ cells were elevated. This chemokine receptor is primarily expressed on pro-inflammatory memory cells and Th17 cells. The proportion of cells expressing CCR4 (expressed on Th2 cells and CCR5 (Th1 cells and dendritic cells was also greater in patients, and was more pronounced on CD4+ than CD8+ T-cells. These findings allow a more detailed insight into the systemic immune status of patients with Alzheimer's disease and suggest possible novel targets for immune therapy.

  2. Expression of Secreted Cytokine and Chemokine Inhibitors by Ectromelia Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Vincent P.; Alcami, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    The production of secreted proteins that bind cytokines and block their activity has been well characterized as an immune evasion strategy of the orthopoxviruses vaccinia virus (VV) and cowpox virus (CPV). However, very limited information is available on the expression of similar cytokine inhibitors by ectromelia virus (EV), a virulent natural mouse pathogen that causes mousepox. We have characterized the expression and binding properties of three major secreted immunomodulatory activities i...

  3. The Maternal Cytokine and Chemokine Profile of Naturally Conceived Gestations Is Mainly Preserved during In Vitro Fertilization and Egg Donation Pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Varea, Alicia; Pellicer, Begoña; Serra, Vicente; Hervás-Marín, David; Martínez-Romero, Alicia; Bellver, José; Perales-Marín, Alfredo; Pellicer, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal study aimed at comparing maternal immune response among naturally conceived (NC; n = 25), in vitro fertilization (IVF; n = 25), and egg donation (ED; n = 25) pregnancies. The main outcome measures were, firstly, to follow up plasma levels of interleukin (IL) 1 beta, IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL8, IL10, IL17, interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ), regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF1α), and decidual granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) during the three trimesters of pregnancy during the three trimesters of pregnancy; secondly, to evaluate if the cytokine and chemokine pattern of ED pregnant women differs from that of those with autologous oocytes and, thirdly, to assess if women with preeclampsia show different cytokine and chemokine profile throughout pregnancy versus women with uneventful pregnancies. Pregnant women in the three study groups displayed similar cytokine and chemokine pattern throughout pregnancy. The levels of all quantified cytokines and chemokines, except RANTES, TNFα, IL8, TGFβ, and SDF1α, rose in the second trimester compared with the first, and these higher values remained in the third trimester. ED pregnancies showed lower SDF1α levels in the third trimester compared with NC and IVF pregnancies. Patients who developed preeclampsia displayed higher SDF1α plasma levels in the third trimester. PMID:26346343

  4. The Maternal Cytokine and Chemokine Profile of Naturally Conceived Gestations Is Mainly Preserved during In Vitro Fertilization and Egg Donation Pregnancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Martínez-Varea

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This prospective longitudinal study aimed at comparing maternal immune response among naturally conceived (NC; n=25, in vitro fertilization (IVF; n=25, and egg donation (ED; n=25 pregnancies. The main outcome measures were, firstly, to follow up plasma levels of interleukin (IL 1beta, IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL8, IL10, IL17, interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα, transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ, regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES, stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF1α, and decidual granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF during the three trimesters of pregnancy during the three trimesters of pregnancy; secondly, to evaluate if the cytokine and chemokine pattern of ED pregnant women differs from that of those with autologous oocytes and, thirdly, to assess if women with preeclampsia show different cytokine and chemokine profile throughout pregnancy versus women with uneventful pregnancies. Pregnant women in the three study groups displayed similar cytokine and chemokine pattern throughout pregnancy. The levels of all quantified cytokines and chemokines, except RANTES, TNFα, IL8, TGFβ, and SDF1α, rose in the second trimester compared with the first, and these higher values remained in the third trimester. ED pregnancies showed lower SDF1α levels in the third trimester compared with NC and IVF pregnancies. Patients who developed preeclampsia displayed higher SDF1α plasma levels in the third trimester.

  5. Airway epithelial cell PPARγ modulates cigarette smoke-induced chemokine expression and emphysema susceptibility in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solleti, Siva Kumar; Simon, Dawn M; Srisuma, Sorachai; Arikan, Meltem C; Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Bijli, Kaiser M; Rahman, Arshad; Crossno, Joseph T; Shapiro, Steven D; Mariani, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a highly prevalent, chronic inflammatory lung disease with limited existing therapeutic options. While modulation of peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor (PPAR)-γ activity can modify inflammatory responses in several models of lung injury, the relevance of the PPARG pathway in COPD pathogenesis has not been previously explored. Mice lacking Pparg specifically in airway epithelial cells displayed increased susceptibility to chronic cigarette smoke (CS)-induced emphysema, with excessive macrophage accumulation associated with increased expression of chemokines, Ccl5, Cxcl10, and Cxcl15. Conversely, treatment of mice with a pharmacological PPARγ activator attenuated Cxcl10 and Cxcl15 expression and macrophage accumulation in response to CS. In vitro, CS increased lung epithelial cell chemokine expression in a PPARγ activation-dependent fashion. The ability of PPARγ to regulate CS-induced chemokine expression in vitro was not specifically associated with peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE)-mediated transactivation activity but was correlated with PPARγ-mediated transrepression of NF-κB activity. Pharmacological or genetic activation of PPARγ activity abrogated CS-dependent induction of NF-κB activity. Regulation of NF-κB activity involved direct PPARγ-NF-κB interaction and PPARγ-mediated effects on IKK activation, IκBα degradation, and nuclear translocation of p65. Our data indicate that PPARG represents a disease-relevant pathophysiological and pharmacological target in COPD. Its activation state likely contributes to NF-κB-dependent, CS-induced chemokine-mediated regulation of inflammatory cell accumulation. PMID:26024894

  6. CXCL12 chemokine expression suppresses human pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis.

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    Ishan Roy

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an unsolved health problem with nearly 75% of patients diagnosed with advanced disease and an overall 5-year survival rate near 5%. Despite the strong link between mortality and malignancy, the mechanisms behind pancreatic cancer dissemination and metastasis are poorly understood. Correlative pathological and cell culture analyses suggest the chemokine receptor CXCR4 plays a biological role in pancreatic cancer progression. In vivo roles for the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12 in pancreatic cancer malignancy were investigated. CXCR4 and CXCR7 were consistently expressed in normal and cancerous pancreatic ductal epithelium, established cell lines, and patient-derived primary cancer cells. Relative to healthy exocrine ducts, CXCL12 expression was pathologically repressed in pancreatic cancer tissue specimens and patient-derived cell lines. To test the functional consequences of CXCL12 silencing, pancreatic cancer cell lines stably expressingthe chemokine were engineered. Consistent with a role for CXCL12 as a tumor suppressor, cells producing the chemokine wereincreasingly adherent and migration deficient in vitro and poorly metastatic in vivo, compared to control cells. Further, CXCL12 reintroduction significantly reduced tumor growth in vitro, with significantly smaller tumors in vivo, leading to a pronounced survival advantage in a preclinical model. Together, these data demonstrate a functional tumor suppressive role for the normal expression of CXCL12 in pancreatic ducts, regulating both tumor growth andcellulardissemination to metastatic sites.

  7. Brain microvascular pericytes are immunoactive in culture: cytokine, chemokine, nitric oxide, and LRP-1 expression in response to lipopolysaccharide

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    Erickson Michelle A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain microvascular pericytes are important constituents of the neurovascular unit. These cells are physically the closest cells to the microvascular endothelial cells in brain capillaries. They significantly contribute to the induction and maintenance of the barrier functions of the blood-brain barrier. However, very little is known about their immune activities or their roles in neuroinflammation. Here, we focused on the immunological profile of brain pericytes in culture in the quiescent and immune-challenged state by studying their production of immune mediators such as nitric oxide (NO, cytokines, and chemokines. We also examined the effects of immune challenge on pericyte expression of low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1, a protein involved in the processing of amyloid precursor protein and the brain-to-blood efflux of amyloid-β peptide. Methods Supernatants were collected from primary cultures of mouse brain pericytes. Release of nitric oxide (NO was measured by the Griess reaction and the level of S-nitrosylation of pericyte proteins measured with a modified "biotin-switch" method. Specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway inhibitors were used to determine involvement of these pathways on NO production. Cytokines and chemokines were analyzed by multianalyte technology. The expression of both subunits of LRP-1 was analyzed by western blot. Results Lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced release of NO by pericytes in a dose-dependent manner that was mediated through MAPK pathways. Nitrative stress resulted in S-nitrosylation of cellular proteins. Eighteen of twenty-three cytokines measured were released constitutively by pericytes or with stimulation by LPS, including interleukin (IL-12, IL-13, IL-9, IL-10, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, eotaxin, chemokine (C-C motif ligand (CCL-3, and CCL-4. Pericyte expressions of both subunits of

  8. Temporal expression of chemokines dictates the hepatic inflammatory infiltrate in a murine model of schistosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L Burke

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis continues to be an important cause of parasitic morbidity and mortality world-wide. Determining the molecular mechanisms regulating the development of granulomas and fibrosis will be essential for understanding how schistosome antigens interact with the host environment. We report here the first whole genome microarray analysis of the murine liver during the progression of Schistosoma japonicum egg-induced granuloma formation and hepatic fibrosis. Our results reveal a distinct temporal relationship between the expression of chemokine subsets and the recruitment of cells to the infected liver. Genes up-regulated earlier in the response included T- and B-cell chemoattractants, reflecting the early recruitment of these cells illustrated by flow cytometry. The later phases of the response corresponded with peak recruitment of eosinophils, neutrophils, macrophages and myofibroblasts/hepatic stellate cells (HSCs and the expression of chemokines with activity for these cells including CCL11 (eotaxin 1, members of the Monocyte-chemoattractant protein family (CCL7, CCL8, CCL12 and the Hepatic Stellate Cell/Fibrocyte chemoattractant CXCL1. Peak expression of macrophage chemoattractants (CCL6, CXCL14 and markers of alternatively activated macrophages (e.g. Retnla during this later phase provides further evidence of a role for these cells in schistosome-induced pathology. Additionally, we demonstrate that CCL7 immunolocalises to the fibrotic zone of granulomas. Furthermore, striking up-regulation of neutrophil markers and the localisation of neutrophils and the neutrophil chemokine S100A8 to fibrotic areas suggest the involvement of neutrophils in S. japonicum-induced hepatic fibrosis. These results further our understanding of the immunopathogenic and, especially, chemokine signalling pathways that regulate the development of S. japonicum-induced granulomas and fibrosis and may provide correlative insight into the pathogenesis of other

  9. Delta-Like Ligand 4 Modulates Liver Damage by Down-Regulating Chemokine Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhe; Liu, Yan; Dewidar, Bedair; Hu, Junhao; Park, Ogyi; Feng, Teng; Xu, Chengfu; Yu, Chaohui; Li, Qi; Meyer, Christoph; Ilkavets, Iryna; Müller, Alexandra; Stump-Guthier, Carolin; Munker, Stefan; Liebe, Roman; Zimmer, Vincent; Lammert, Frank; Mertens, Peter R; Li, Hai; Ten Dijke, Peter; Augustin, Hellmut G; Li, Jun; Gao, Bin; Ebert, Matthias P; Dooley, Steven; Li, Youming; Weng, Hong-Lei

    2016-07-01

    Disrupting Notch signaling ameliorates experimental liver fibrosis. However, the role of individual Notch ligands in liver damage is unknown. We investigated the effects of Delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4) in liver disease. DLL4 expression was measured in 31 human liver tissues by immunohistochemistry. Dll4 function was examined in carbon tetrachloride- and bile duct ligation-challenged mouse models in vivo and evaluated in hepatic stellate cells, hepatocytes, and Kupffer cells in vitro. DLL4 was expressed in patients' Kupffer and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. Recombinant Dll4 protein (rDll4) ameliorated hepatocyte apoptosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in mice after carbon tetrachloride challenge. In vitro, rDll4 significantly decreased lipopolysaccharide-dependent chemokine expression in both Kupffer and hepatic stellate cells. In bile duct ligation mice, rDll4 induced massive hepatic necrosis, resulting in the death of all animals within 1 week. Inflammatory cell infiltration and chemokine ligand 2 (Ccl2) expression were significantly reduced in rDll4-receiving bile duct ligation mice. Recombinant Ccl2 rescued bile duct ligation mice from rDll4-mediated death. In patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure, DLL4 expression was inversely associated with CCL2 abundance. Mechanistically, Dll4 regulated Ccl2 expression via NF-κB. Taken together, Dll4 modulates liver inflammatory response by down-regulating chemokine expression. rDll4 application results in opposing outcomes in two models of liver damage. Loss of DLL4 may be associated with CCL2-mediated cytokine storm in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure. PMID:27171900

  10. Effect of Various Concentrations of Inhibitors on the Expression of Chemokine Ip-10/Mob-1

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    A Dickson

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chemokines are low molecular weight proteins (8-17kDa with the main role of immune cells recruitment to injured tissues. IP-10/Mob-1 is a CXC chemokine and different cell systems in response to external stimulation produce this chemokine. Various signaling pathways are used by cell and tissue systems to regulate production of proteins e.g. chemokines. Therefore we have investigated some of these pathways leading to production of IP-10/Mob-1 by primary cultured hepatocytes. Methods: In the present study, hepatocyts were isolated from male Sprague Dawley rats and cultured on Waymouth medium in presence and absence of different inhibitors such as SB203580, MG132, KN62 and Staurosporine for indicated time points. Supernatant medium of culture was centrifuged and proteins were isolated by SDS-PAGE and transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, then membranes were incubated with IP-10/Mob-1 antibody overnight and followed by incubation with secondary antibody and then IP-10/Mob-1 was detected by ECL. Results: We showed that the expression of IP-10/Mob-1 has been decreased in presence of Staurosporine (10 and 50μM, SB203580(50μM MG132 (20μM and KN62 (10 and 20μM but did not change in absence or lower concentrations of these inhibitors. Conclusion: Hence, these in vitro data may aid to a better understanding of the pathways in chronic liver injuries and identify clinical studies that may aid in treatment or prevention of these conditions. Furthermore, there may be further potential to prevent changes to hepatocyte phenotype and allow isolation of hepatocytes with a greater physiological phenotype. Therefore it could be concluded that all of these pathways are used by hepatocytes regarding expression of IP-10/Mob-1.

  11. Regulation of MMP-3 expression and secretion by the chemokine eotaxin-1 in human chondrocytes

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    Chao Pin-Zhir

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is characterized by the degradation of articular cartilage, marked by the breakdown of matrix proteins. Studies demonstrated the involvement of chemokines in this process, and some may potentially serve as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets; however, the underlying signal transductions are not well understood. Methods We investigated the effects of the CC chemokine eotaxin-1 (CCL11 on the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP expression and secretion in the human chondrocyte cell line SW1353 and primary chondrocytes. Results Eotaxin-1 significantly induced MMP-3 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibitors of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and p38 kinase were able to repress eotaxin-1-induced MMP-3 expression. On the contrary, Rp-adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate (Rp-cAMPs, a competitive cAMP antagonist for cAMP receptors, and H-89, a protein kinase A (PKA inhibitor, markedly enhanced eotaxin-1-induced MMP-3 expression. These results suggest that MMP-3 expression is specifically mediated by the G protein-coupled eotaxin-1 receptor activities. Interestingly, little amount of MMP-3 protein was detected in the cell lysates of eotaxin-1-treated SW1353 cells, and most of MMP-3 protein was in the culture media. Furthermore we found that the eotaxin-1-dependent MMP-3 protein secretion was regulated by phospholipase C (PLC-protein kinase C (PKC cascade and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK/mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase pathways. These data indicate a specific regulation of MMP-3 secretion also by eotaxin-1 receptor activities. Conclusions Eotaxin-1 not only induces MMP-3 gene expression but also promotes MMP-3 protein secretion through G protein-coupled eotaxin-1 receptor activities. Chemokines, such as eotaxin-1, could be a potential candidate in the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis.

  12. mRNA EXPRESSION OF SOME CHEMOKINES AND THEIR RECEPTORS IN NASAL MUCOSA OF HEALTHY PERSONS

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    A. A. Bibkova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract.  Chemokines  are  a  key  factor  that ensures  the  participation  of  different  cell  types  in the  immunological  protection  of  mucosa.  In  our study  we  chose  some  chemokines  that  ensured  the chemotaxis of neutrophils (CXCL8/IL-8, eosinophils (CCL11/eotaxin,  CCL24/eotaxin-2,  monocytes  and T-lymphocytes  (CCL3/MIP-1α,  CCL4/MIP-1β, CCL5/RANTES,  as  well  as  their  receptors  (CCR1, CCR3, CCR5, CXCR1, CXCR2. mRNA expression of  chemokines  and  their  receptors  in  nasopharyngeal mucosa brush-biopsy specimens determined by RT-PCR in healthy persons, the level of the same chemokines in serum determined by multiplex chemiluminescent assay were analyzed according to smoking. The level of mRNA expression of IL-8 (p < 0.001 and RANTES (p < 0.001 in nasopharynx brush-biopsy specimens and  serum  levels  of  IL-8  (p  <  0.0001  of  smokers  were  significantly  lower  as  compared  with  nonsmokers. Correlation analysis showed the dependence of the chemokine synthesis on the factor of smoking: the index of smoking (pack/years is negatively correlated with mRNA levels of IL-8 (r = -0,67 p = 0,003 and RANTES (r = -0,58, p = 0,015 in nasopharynx brush-biopsy specimens and serum concentration of IL-8 (r = -0,89, p = 0,0000002. Thus, these data offer that smokers manifested a defect of the local synthesis of RANTES and IL-8 in nasopharyngeal mucosa in combination with systemic defect of IL-8 production in peripheral blood, that can lead to chronization of bacterial infection and prolonged persistence of viral infection. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 6, pp 617-622 

  13. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease with classical traits of demyelination, axonal damage, and neurodegeneration. The migration of autoimmune T cells and macrophages from blood to central nervous system as well as the destruction of blood brain barrier are thought to be the major processes in the development of this disease. Chemokines, which are small peptide mediators, can attract pathogenic cells to the sites of inflammation. Each helper T cell subset expresses different chemokine receptors so as to exert their different functions in the pathogenesis of MS. Recently published results have shown that the levels of some chemokines and chemokine receptors are increased in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients. This review describes the advanced researches on the role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of MS and discusses the potential therapy of this disease targeting the chemokine network.

  14. Angiogenic CXC chemokine expression during differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells towards the osteoblastic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, D S; Zhu, J H; Makhijani, N S; Kumar, A; Yamaguchi, D T

    2008-02-15

    The potential role of ELR(+) CXC chemokines in early events in bone repair was studied using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Inflammation, which occurs in the initial phase of tissue healing in general, is critical to bone repair. Release of cytokines from infiltrating immune cells and injured bone can lead to recruitment of MSCs to the region of repair. CXC chemokines bearing the Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif are also released by inflammatory cells and serve as angiogenic factors stimulating chemotaxis and proliferation of endothelial cells. hMSCs, induced to differentiate with osteogenic medium (OGM) containing ascorbate, beta-glycerophosphate (beta-GP), and dexamethasone (DEX), showed an increase in mRNA and protein secretion of the ELR(+) CXC chemokines CXCL8 and CXCL1. CXCL8 mRNA half-life studies reveal an increase in mRNA stability upon OGM stimulation. Increased expression and secretion is a result of DEX in OGM and is dose-dependent. Inhibition of the glucocorticoid receptor with mifepristone only partially inhibits DEX-stimulated CXCL8 expression indicating both glucocorticoid receptor dependent and independent pathways. Treatment with signal transduction inhibitors demonstrate that this expression is due to activation of the ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and is mediated through the G(alphai)-coupled receptors. Angiogenesis assays demonstrate that OGM-stimulated conditioned media containing secreted CXCL8 and CXCL1 can induce angiogenesis of human microvascular endothelial cells in an in vitro Matrigel assay. PMID:17583554

  15. Estrogen, SNP-Dependent Chemokine Expression and Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Fen; Bongartz, Tim; Liu, Mohan; Kalari, Krishna R; Goss, Paul E; Shepherd, Lois E; Goetz, Matthew P; Kubo, Michiaki; Ingle, James N; Wang, Liewei; Weinshilboum, Richard M

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported, on the basis of a genome-wide association study for aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal symptoms, that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near the T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1A (TCL1A) gene were associated with aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal pain and with estradiol (E2)-induced TCL1A expression. Furthermore, variation in TCL1A expression influenced the downstream expression of proinflammatory cytokines and cytokine receptors. Specifically, the top hit genome-wide association study SNP, rs11849538, created a functional estrogen response element (ERE) that displayed estrogen receptor (ER) binding and increased E2 induction of TCL1A expression only for the variant SNP genotype. In the present study, we pursued mechanisms underlying the E2-SNP-dependent regulation of TCL1A expression and, in parallel, our subsequent observations that SNPs at a distance from EREs can regulate ERα binding and that ER antagonists can reverse phenotypes associated with those SNPs. Specifically, we performed a series of functional genomic studies using a large panel of lymphoblastoid cell lines with dense genomic data that demonstrated that TCL1A SNPs at a distance from EREs can modulate ERα binding and expression of TCL1A as well as the expression of downstream immune mediators. Furthermore, 4-hydroxytamoxifen or fulvestrant could reverse these SNP-genotype effects. Similar results were found for SNPs in the IL17A cytokine and CCR6 chemokine receptor genes. These observations greatly expand our previous results and support the existence of a novel molecular mechanism that contributes to the complex interplay between estrogens and immune systems. They also raise the possibility of the pharmacological manipulation of the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in a SNP genotype-dependent fashion. PMID:26866883

  16. The effective impacts of Angi- Pars on Expression of Some CXC Chemokines Group in STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mm Taghavi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Diabetes mellitus (DM has destructive tissue effects via inducing oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Angi Pars effects on the expression of some CXC group of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Methods: This experimental study was conducted on 48 male rats. Induced diabetic rats were done by 50 mg/ kg of Streptozotocin. 56 days after induction of diabetes, rats were randomly divided into 4 groups including control, untreated diabetic, insulin-treated diabetic and diabetic treated with insulin and Angipars. 24 h after the last injection the animals were bled and the expression of cxc Chemokines groups were measured by western blotting. Data were analyzed by t test. Results: Showed that CXCL10 was reduced in the treatment group and the treatment group receiving insulin in combination with angi - pars decreased significantly (P<0.05. The total concentration of CXCL12 chemokine showed that the concentration of the different groups did not change compared to the control group (P<0.05. The study showed that CXCL1 levels in the group receiving insulin in combination with angi-pars the chemokine concentration was significantly lower than the control group (P<0.05. Conclusion: Since, Angi-Pars consists of two major phenolic compound groups, 7 - hydroxy coumarin and flavonoids, has antioxidant, and controls the inflammatory effects of chemokine increase and balances between chemokines its effectiveness in angiogenesis can be maintain. Key words: Diabetes, Angi- Pars, Chemokines

  17. Breast cancer lung metastasis requires expression of chemokine receptor CCR4 and regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Baatar, Dolgor; Bodogai, Monica; Hakim, Fran; Gress, Ronald; Anderson, Robin L; Deng, Jie; Xu, Mai; Briest, Susanne; Biragyn, Arya

    2009-07-15

    Cancer metastasis is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. More needs to be learned about mechanisms that control this process. In particular, the role of chemokine receptors in metastasis remains controversial. Here, using a highly metastatic breast cancer (4T1) model, we show that lung metastasis is a feature of only a proportion of the tumor cells that express CCR4. Moreover, the primary tumor growing in mammary pads activates remotely the expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 in the lungs. These chemokines acting through CCR4 attract both tumor and immune cells. However, CCR4-mediated chemotaxis was not sufficient to produce metastasis, as tumor cells in the lung were efficiently eliminated by natural killer (NK) cells. Lung metastasis required CCR4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which directly killed NK cells using beta-galactoside-binding protein. Thus, strategies that abrogate any part of this process should improve the outcome through activation of effector cells and prevention of tumor cell migration. We confirm this prediction by killing CCR4(+) cells through delivery of TARC-fused toxins or depleting Tregs and preventing lung metastasis. PMID:19567680

  18. Elevated expression of the chemokine CCL18 in chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Sarah; Poposki, Julie A.; Nagarkar, Deepti R.; Chustz, Regina T.; Peters, Anju T.; Suh, Lydia A.; Carter, Roderick; Norton, James; Harris, Kathleen E.; Grammer, Leslie C.; Tan, Bruce K.; Chandra, Rakesh K.; Conley, David B.; Kern, Robert C.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Kato, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is associated with Th2-dominant inflammation including eosinophilia, in contrast to non-polypoid CRS (CRSsNP). Chemokine CCL18/PARC (pulmonary and activation regulated chemokine) is known to recruit naïve T cells, B cells, and immature dendritic cells, as well as activate fibroblasts. CCL18is thought to be involved in Th2-related inflammatory diseases including asthma and atopic dermatitis. Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of CCL18 in patients with CRS. Methods Using nasal polyp tissue (NP) and uncinate tissue (UT) from controls and patients with CRS, we examined the expression of CCL18 mRNA by real-time PCR and measured CCL18 protein by ELISA, western blot and immunofluorescence. Results Compared to UT tissue in control subjects, CCL18 mRNA was significantly increased in NP (p<0.001) and UT (p<0.05) from patients with CRSwNP but not in UT from patients with CRSsNP. Similarly, CCL18 protein was elevated in NP and UT from CRSwNP and levels were even higher in Samter’s triad patients. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed CCL18 expression in inflammatory cells and CCL18+ cells were significantly increased in NP. Immunofluorescence data showed co-localization of CCL18 in CD68+/CD163+/macrophage mannose receptor+ M2 macrophages and tryptase+ mast cells in NP. Levels of CCL18 correlated with markers of M2 macrophages but not with tryptase, suggesting that M2 macrophages are a major CCL18-producing cells in NP. Conclusion Overproduction of CCL18 might contribute to the pathogenesis of CRSwNP through its known activities, which include recruitment of lymphocytes and dendritic cells, activation of fibroblasts, and initiation of local inflammation. PMID:21943944

  19. Cytomegalovirus expresses the chemokine homologue vXCL1 capable of attracting XCR1+ CD4- dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Henriette; Hartung, Evelyn; Mages, Hans Werner; Weise, Christoph; Belužić, Robert; Vugrek, Oliver; Jonjic, Stipan; Kroczek, Richard A; Voigt, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses (CMV) have developed various strategies to escape the immune system of the host. One strategy involves the expression of virus-encoded chemokines to modulate the host chemokine network. We have identified in the English isolate of rat CMV (murid herpesvirus 8 [MuHV8]) an open reading frame encoding a protein homologous to the chemokine XCL1, the only known C chemokine. Viral XCL1 (vXCL1), a glycosylated protein of 96 amino acids, can be detected 13 h postinfection in the supernatant of MuHV8-infected rat embryo fibroblasts. vXCL1 exclusively binds to CD4(-) rat dendritic cells (DC), a subset of DC that express the corresponding chemokine receptor XCR1. Like endogenous rat XCL1, vXCL1 selectively chemoattracts XCR1(+) CD4(-) DC. Since XCR1(+) DC in mice and humans have been shown to excel in antigen cross-presentation and thus in the induction of cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes, the virus has apparently hijacked this gene to subvert cytotoxic immune responses. The biology of vXCL1 offers an interesting opportunity to study the role of XCL1 and XCR1(+) DC in the cross-presentation of viral antigens. PMID:24155383

  20. Chemokines involved in protection from colitis by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Brudzewsky, Dan; Gad, Monika;

    2006-01-01

    /chemokine receptor-specific gene expression profiling system of 67 genes, the authors have determined the expression profile of chemokine and chemokine receptor genes in the rectum of colitic mice and in mice that have been protected fromcolitis by CD4CD25 regulatory T cells. In mice protected from colitis, the...... authors found down regulation of the mRNA expression of the inflammatory chemokine receptors CCR1 and CXCR3 and their ligands CXCL9, CXCL10, CCL5, and CCL7. Also the transcripts for CCR9, CCL25, CCL17, and CXCL1 are found down regulated in protected compared with colitic animals. In addition, the authors...

  1. IL-1 beta-induced chemokine and Fas expression are inhibited by suppressor of cytokine signalling-3 in insulin-producing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, M.L.B.; Ronn, S.G.; Bruun, C.; Larsen, C.M.; Eizirik, D.L.; Mandrup-Poulsen, T.; Billestrup, N.

    2009-01-01

    -induced Fas and chemokine expression in beta cells. Using a beta cell line with inducible Socs3 expression or primary neonatal rat islet cells transduced with a Socs3-encoding adenovirus, we employed real-time RT-PCR analysis to investigate whether SOCS-3 affects cytokine-induced chemokine and Fas m...

  2. IL-1beta-induced chemokine and Fas expression are inhibited by suppressor of cytokine signalling-3 in insulin-producing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, M L B; Rønn, S G; Bruun, C; Larsen, C M; Eizirik, D L; Mandrup-Poulsen, T; Billestrup, N

    2008-01-01

    -induced Fas and chemokine expression in beta cells. METHODS: Using a beta cell line with inducible Socs3 expression or primary neonatal rat islet cells transduced with a Socs3-encoding adenovirus, we employed real-time RT-PCR analysis to investigate whether SOCS-3 affects cytokine-induced chemokine and Fas m...

  3. Differential effects of Radix Paeoniae Rubra (Chishao on cytokine and chemokine expression inducible by mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li James

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upon initial infection with mycobacteria, macrophages secrete multiple cytokines and chemokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, to mediate host immune responses against the pathogen. Mycobacteria also induce the production of IL-10 via PKR activation in primary human monocytes and macrophages. As an anti-inflammatory cytokine, over-expression of IL-10 may contribute to mycobacterial evasion of the host immunity. Radix Paeoniae Rubra (RPR, Chishao, a Chinese medicinal herb with potentials of anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective and neuroprotective effects, is used to treat tuberculosis. This study investigates the immunoregulatory effects of RPR on primary human blood macrophages (PBMac during mycobacterial infection. Methods The interaction of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG with PBMac was used as an experimental model. A series of procedures involving solvent extraction and fractionation were used to isolate bioactive constituents in RPR. RPR-EA-S1, a fraction with potent immunoregulatory effects was obtained with a bioactivity guided fractionation scheme. PBMac were treated with crude RPR extracts or RPR-EA-S1 before BCG stimulation. The expression levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α were measured by qPCR and ELISA. Western blotting was used to determine the effects of RPR-EA-S1 on signaling kinases and transcriptional factors in the BCG-activated PBMac. Results In BCG-stimulated macrophages, crude RPR extracts and fraction RPR-EA-S1 specifically inhibited IL-10 production while enhanced IL-8 expression at both mRNA and protein levels without affecting the expressions of IL-6 and TNF-α. Inhibition of BCG-induced IL-10 expression by RPR-EA-S1 occurred in a dose- and time-dependent manner. RPR-EA-S1 did not affect the phosphorylation of cellular protein kinases including MAPK, Akt and GSK3β. Instead, it suppressed the degradation of IκBα in the cytoplasm and inhibited the

  4. Chemokine Expression in Retinal Pigment Epithelial ARPE-19 Cells in Response to Coculture with Activated T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Helene Bæk; Faber, Carsten; Udsen, Maja;

    2012-01-01

    -cell–derived cytokines by upregulating expression of multiple chemokines related to microglial, T-cell, and monocyte chemotaxis and activation. This inflammatory stress response may have implications for immune homeostasis in the retina, and for the further understanding of inflammatory ocular diseases such as uveitis...

  5. Modulation of Chemokine Gene Expression in CD133 Cord Blood-Derived Human Mast Cells by Cyclosporin A and Dexamethasone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Mette; Kvistgaard, Helene; Dahl, Christine;

    2006-01-01

    dexamethasone prior to mast cell activation. Finally, we demonstrate that the same modulators added after mast cell activation can differentially quench ongoing chemokine gene induction. Thus, considering the vast yields of mast cells, our protocol is valuable not only for studying regulation of gene expression...

  6. Treatment of hypertriglyceridemia and HIV: fenofibrate-induced changes in the expression of chemokine genes in circulating leukocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Alegret Josep M; Camps Jordi; Rull Anna; Fernández-Sender Laura; Beltrán-Debón Raúl; Aragonès Gerard; Alonso-Villaverde Carlos; Joven Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Fenofibrate changed the expression of chemokine genes in circulating leukocytes of HIV-infected patients with hypertriglyceridemia. The data suggest that fenofibrate when effective in the treatment of lipoprotein abnormalities, may act as a modulator of systemic inflammation. This particular action, therefore, may also influence the clinical course of the disease.

  7. Impaired spleen structure and chemokine expression in ME7 scrapie-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soochan; Han, Sinsuk; Lee, Hyung Soo; Kim, Yong-Sun; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Mi-Yeon

    2016-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that prion protein-deficient (Prnp(0/0)) Zürich I mice display impaired T zone structure resulting from decreased splenic expression of the T cell homing chemokines, CCL19 and CCL21. Prions are transported to, and colonise in, the secondary lymphoid tissues. Therefore, in order to investigate how scrapie infection affects the splenic white pulp structure, we infected C57BL/6 mice with the mouse-adapted scrapie strain ME7 and analysed end-stage prion disease. We found that the white pulp regions of ME7-infected spleens were smaller, and contained markedly diminished T zones, as compared to control spleens. Although lymphoid tissue inducer cells were not affected, the expression of both CCL19 and CCL21 was decreased. In addition, the networks of follicular dendritic cells, which are known to express high levels of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) and to accumulate PrP(Sc) following scrapie infection, were larger in ME7-infected spleens. Further, they were associated with increased numbers of B cells expressing high levels of IgM. These data indicate that ME7-infected spleens display phenotype characteristics different from those reported for Prnp(0/0) spleens mainly due to the gain of PrP(Sc) function and suggest that the PrP(C) is required, not only to form the splenic white pulp structure, but also to maintain the intact T zone structure. PMID:27021907

  8. Serum proteome profiling detects myelodysplastic syndromes and identifies CXC chemokine ligands 4 and 7 as markers for advanced disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aivado, Manuel; Spentzos, Dimitrios; Germing, Ulrich; Alterovitz, Gil; Meng, Xiao-Ying; Grall, Franck; Giagounidis, Aristoteles A. N.; Klement, Giannoula; Steidl, Ulrich; Otu, Hasan H.; Czibere, Akos; Prall, Wolf C.; Iking-Konert, Christof; Shayne, Michelle; Ramoni, Marco F.; Gattermann, Norbert; Haas, Rainer; Mitsiades, Constantine S.; Fung, Eric T.; Libermann, Towia A.

    2007-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are among the most frequent hematologic malignancies. Patients have a short survival and often progress to acute myeloid leukemia. The diagnosis of MDS can be difficult; there is a paucity of molecular markers, and the pathophysiology is largely unknown. Therefore, we conducted a multicenter study investigating whether serum proteome profiling may serve as a noninvasive platform to discover novel molecular markers for MDS. We generated serum proteome profiles from 218 individuals by MS and identified a profile that distinguishes MDS from non-MDS cytopenias in a learning sample set. This profile was validated by testing its ability to predict MDS in a first independent validation set and a second, prospectively collected, independent validation set run 5 months apart. Accuracy was 80.5% in the first and 79.0% in the second validation set. Peptide mass fingerprinting and quadrupole TOF MS identified two differential proteins: CXC chemokine ligands 4 (CXCL4) and 7 (CXCL7), both of which had significantly decreased serum levels in MDS, as confirmed with independent antibody assays. Western blot analyses of platelet lysates for these two platelet-derived molecules revealed a lack of CXCL4 and CXCL7 in MDS. Subtype analyses revealed that these two proteins have decreased serum levels in advanced MDS, suggesting the possibility of a concerted disturbance of transcription or translation of these chemokines in advanced MDS. PMID:17220270

  9. 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for Imaging of Chemokine Receptor 4 Expression in Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa, Constantin; Lückerath, Katharina; Kleinlein, Irene; Monoranu, Camelia Maria; Linsenmann, Thomas; Kessler, Almuth F.; Rudelius, Martina; Kropf, Saskia; Buck, Andreas K.; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Löhr, Mario; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) has been reported to be overexpressed in glioblastoma (GBM) and to be associated with poor survival. This study investigated the feasibility of non-invasive CXCR4-directed imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using the radiolabelled chemokine receptor ligand 68Ga-Pentixafor. 15 patients with clinical suspicion on primary or recurrent glioblastoma (13 primary, 2 recurrent tumors) underwent 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for assessment of CXCR4 expression prior to surgery. O-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (18F-FET) PET/CT images were available in 11/15 cases and were compared visually and semi-quantitatively (SUVmax, SUVmean). Tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated for both PET probes. 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT results were also compared to histological CXCR4 expression on neuronavigated surgical samples. 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT was visually positive in 13/15 cases with SUVmean and SUVmax of 3.0±1.5 and 3.9±2.0 respectively. Respective values for 18F-FET were 4.4±2.0 (SUVmean) and 5.3±2.3 (SUVmax). TBR for SUVmean and SUVmax were higher for 68Ga-Pentixafor than for 18F-FET (SUVmean 154.0±90.7 vs. 4.1±1.3; SUVmax 70.3±44.0 and 3.8±1.2, p<0.01), respectively. Histological analysis confirmed CXCR4 expression in tumor areas with high 68Ga-Pentixafor uptake; regions of the same tumor without apparent 68Ga-Pentixafor uptake showed no or low receptor expression. In this pilot study, 68Ga-Pentixafor retention has been observed in the vast majority of glioblastoma lesions and served as readout for non-invasive determination of CXCR4 expression. Given the paramount importance of the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis in tumor biology, 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT might prove a useful tool for sensitive, non-invasive in-vivo quantification of CXCR4 as well as selection of patients who might benefit from CXCR4-directed therapy. PMID:26909116

  10. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for Imaging of Chemokine Receptor 4 Expression in Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa, Constantin; Lückerath, Katharina; Kleinlein, Irene; Monoranu, Camelia Maria; Linsenmann, Thomas; Kessler, Almuth F; Rudelius, Martina; Kropf, Saskia; Buck, Andreas K; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Löhr, Mario; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) has been reported to be overexpressed in glioblastoma (GBM) and to be associated with poor survival. This study investigated the feasibility of non-invasive CXCR4-directed imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using the radiolabelled chemokine receptor ligand (68)Ga-Pentixafor. 15 patients with clinical suspicion on primary or recurrent glioblastoma (13 primary, 2 recurrent tumors) underwent (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for assessment of CXCR4 expression prior to surgery. O-(2-(18)F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ((18)F-FET) PET/CT images were available in 11/15 cases and were compared visually and semi-quantitatively (SUVmax, SUVmean). Tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated for both PET probes. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT results were also compared to histological CXCR4 expression on neuronavigated surgical samples. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT was visually positive in 13/15 cases with SUVmean and SUVmax of 3.0±1.5 and 3.9±2.0 respectively. Respective values for (18)F-FET were 4.4±2.0 (SUVmean) and 5.3±2.3 (SUVmax). TBR for SUVmean and SUVmax were higher for (68)Ga-Pentixafor than for (18)F-FET (SUVmean 154.0±90.7 vs. 4.1±1.3; SUVmax 70.3±44.0 and 3.8±1.2, p<0.01), respectively. Histological analysis confirmed CXCR4 expression in tumor areas with high (68)Ga-Pentixafor uptake; regions of the same tumor without apparent (68)Ga-Pentixafor uptake showed no or low receptor expression. In this pilot study, (68)Ga-Pentixafor retention has been observed in the vast majority of glioblastoma lesions and served as readout for non-invasive determination of CXCR4 expression. Given the paramount importance of the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis in tumor biology, (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT might prove a useful tool for sensitive, non-invasive in-vivo quantification of CXCR4 as well as selection of patients who might benefit from CXCR4-directed therapy. PMID:26909116

  11. Cytokine and Chemokine Expression in Kidneys during Chronic Leptospirosis in Reservoir and Susceptible Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mariko; Roche, Louise; Geroult, Sophie; Soupé-Gilbert, Marie-Estelle; Monchy, Didier; Huerre, Michel; Goarant, Cyrille

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Humans can be infected after exposure to contaminated urine of reservoir animals, usually rodents, regarded as typical asymptomatic carriers of leptospires. In contrast, accidental hosts may present an acute form of leptospirosis with a range of clinical symptoms including the development of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is considered as a possible AKI-residual sequela but little is known about the renal pathophysiology consequent to leptospirosis infection. Herein, we studied the renal morphological alterations in relation with the regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, comparing two experimental models of chronic leptospirosis, the golden Syrian hamster that survived the infection, becoming carrier of virulent leptospires, and the OF1 mouse, a usual reservoir of the bacteria. Animals were monitored until 28 days after injection with a virulent L. borgpetersenii serogroup Ballum to assess chronic infection. Hamsters developed morphological alterations in the kidneys with tubulointerstitial nephritis and fibrosis. Grading of lesions revealed higher scores in hamsters compared to the slight alterations observed in the mouse kidneys, irrespective of the bacterial load. Interestingly, pro-fibrotic TGF-β was downregulated in mouse kidneys. Moreover, cytokines IL-1β and IL-10, and chemokines MIP-1α/CCL3 and IP-10/CXCL-10 were significantly upregulated in hamster kidneys compared to mice. These results suggest a possible maintenance of inflammatory processes in the hamster kidneys with the infiltration of inflammatory cells in response to bacterial carriage, resulting in alterations of renal tissues. In contrast, lower expression levels in mouse kidneys indicated a better regulation of the inflammatory response and possible resolution processes likely related to resistance mechanisms. PMID:27219334

  12. Cytokine and Chemokine Expression in Kidneys during Chronic Leptospirosis in Reservoir and Susceptible Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mariko; Roche, Louise; Geroult, Sophie; Soupé-Gilbert, Marie-Estelle; Monchy, Didier; Huerre, Michel; Goarant, Cyrille

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Humans can be infected after exposure to contaminated urine of reservoir animals, usually rodents, regarded as typical asymptomatic carriers of leptospires. In contrast, accidental hosts may present an acute form of leptospirosis with a range of clinical symptoms including the development of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is considered as a possible AKI-residual sequela but little is known about the renal pathophysiology consequent to leptospirosis infection. Herein, we studied the renal morphological alterations in relation with the regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, comparing two experimental models of chronic leptospirosis, the golden Syrian hamster that survived the infection, becoming carrier of virulent leptospires, and the OF1 mouse, a usual reservoir of the bacteria. Animals were monitored until 28 days after injection with a virulent L. borgpetersenii serogroup Ballum to assess chronic infection. Hamsters developed morphological alterations in the kidneys with tubulointerstitial nephritis and fibrosis. Grading of lesions revealed higher scores in hamsters compared to the slight alterations observed in the mouse kidneys, irrespective of the bacterial load. Interestingly, pro-fibrotic TGF-β was downregulated in mouse kidneys. Moreover, cytokines IL-1β and IL-10, and chemokines MIP-1α/CCL3 and IP-10/CXCL-10 were significantly upregulated in hamster kidneys compared to mice. These results suggest a possible maintenance of inflammatory processes in the hamster kidneys with the infiltration of inflammatory cells in response to bacterial carriage, resulting in alterations of renal tissues. In contrast, lower expression levels in mouse kidneys indicated a better regulation of the inflammatory response and possible resolution processes likely related to resistance mechanisms. PMID:27219334

  13. Inflammation-induced chemokine expression in uveal melanoma cell lines stimulates monocyte chemotaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jehs, Tina; Faber, Carsten; Juel, Helene B; Bronkhorst, Inge H G; Jager, Martine J; Nissen, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    resulted in an upregulation of chemokines such as CXCL8, CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, CCL2, CCL5, VEGF, intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The upregulation of these molecules was confirmed at the protein level. This increase of chemokines...

  14. Blood expression levels of chemokine receptor CCR3 and chemokine CCL11 in age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Mads Krüger; Singh, Amardeep; Faber, Carsten; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Hviid, Thomas; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of the CCR3/CCL11 pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of choroidal neovascularisation, a common feature of late age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of CCR3 and its ligand CCL11 in peripheral blood in patients with...

  15. Non-canonical NFκB activation promotes chemokine expression in podocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiño-Rivas, Lara; Gonzalez-Lafuente, Laura; Sanz, Ana B.; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ortiz, Alberto; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D.

    2016-01-01

    TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) receptor Fn14 is expressed by podocytes and Fn14 deficiency protects from experimental proteinuric kidney disease. However, the downstream effectors of TWEAK/Fn14 in podocytes are poorly characterized. We have explored TWEAK activation of non-canonical NFκB signaling in cultured podocytes. In cultured podocytes, TWEAK increased the expression of the chemokines CCL21, CCL19 and RANTES in a time-dependent manner. The inhibitor of canonical NFκB activation parthenolide inhibited the CCL19 and the early RANTES responses, but not the CCL21 or late RANTES responses. In this regard, TWEAK induced non-canonical NFκB activation in podocytes, characterized by NFκB2/p100 processing to NFκB2/p52 and nuclear migration of RelB/p52. Silencing by a specific siRNA of NIK, the upstream kinase of the non-canonical NFκB pathway, prevented CCL21 upregulation but did not modulate CCL19 or RANTES expression in response to TWEAK, thus establishing CCL21 as a non-canonical NFκB target in podocytes. Increased kidney Fn14 and CCL21 expression was also observed in rat proteinuric kidney disease induced by puromycin, and was localized to podocytes. In conclusion, TWEAK activates the non-canonical NFκB pathway in podocytes, leading to upregulation of CCL21 expression. The non-canonical NFκB pathway should be explored as a potential therapeutic target in proteinuric kidney disease. PMID:27353019

  16. Role of chemokine receptor CXCR2 expression in mammary tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan C Nannuru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemokines and their receptors have long been known to regulate metastasis in various cancers. Previous studies have shown that CXCR2 expression is upregulated in malignant breast cancer tissues but not in benign ductal epithelial samples. The functional role of CXCR2 in the metastatic phenotype of breast cancer still remains unclear. We hypothesize that the chemokine receptor, CXCR2, mediates tumor cell invasion and migration and promotes metastasis in breast cancer. The objective of this study is to investigate the potential role of CXCR2 in the metastatic phenotype of mouse mammary tumor cells. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the functional role of CXCR2 in breast cancer by stably downregulating the expression of CXCR2 in metastatic mammary tumor cell lines Cl66 and 4T1, using short hairpin RNA (shRNA. The effects of CXCR2 downregulation on tumor growth, invasion and metastatic potential were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Results: We demonstrated knock down of CXCR2 in Cl66 and 4T1 cells (Cl66-shCXCR2 and 4T1-shCXCR2 cells by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR at the transcriptional level and by immunohistochemistry at the protein level. We did not observe a significant difference in in vitro cell proliferation between vector control and CXCR2 knock-down Cl66 or 4T1 cells. Next, we examined the invasive potential of Cl66-shCXCR2 cells by in vitro Matrigel invasion assay. We observed a significantly lower number (52 ± 5 of Cl66-shCXCR2 cells invading through Matrigel compared to control cells (Cl66-control (182 ± 3 (P < 0.05. We analyzed the in vivo metastatic potential of Cl66-shCXCR2 using a spontaneous metastasis model by orthotopically implanting cells into the mammary fat pad of female BALB/c mice. Animals were sacrificed 12 weeks post tumor implantation and tissue samples were analyzed for metastatic nodules. CXCR2 downregulation significantly inhibited tumor cell metastasis. All the mice (n = 10

  17. Triptolide suppresses IL-1β-induced chemokine and stromelysin-1 gene expression in human colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-song TAO; Jian-an REN; Jie-shou LI

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To examine the inhibitive effects of triptolide on the expression of IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-3 in subepithelial myofibroblasts (SEMF) stimulated with IL-1β. Methods: SEMF cultures were established from normal colons in patients who underwent gut resection for colorectal carcinoma. Chemokine and MMP-3 expressions were determined by ELISA and RT-PCR. The cytosolic amount of phosphorylation of IκB-α (p-IκB-α) was determined by Western blotting. The DNA binding capacity of NF-κB was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Results: IL-1βstimulated protein and mRNA expression of IL-8, MCP-1, and MMP-3 in SEMF,Triptolide inhibited these effects of IL-1β in a dose-dependent manner. Mecha-nistic studies revealed that triptolide markedly decreased IL-1β-induced NF- κB DNA binding capacity and cytosolic amount of p-IκB-α. These results showed that triptolide inhibited IL-1β-induced chemokine and MMP-3 expression in SEMF through the NF-κB pathway. Conclusion: Triptolide inhibited IL-1β-induced chemokine and MMP-3 expression in SEMF by preventing the phosphorylation of IκB-α.

  18. The early activation marker CD69 regulates the expression of chemokines and CD4 T cell accumulation in intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Radulovic

    Full Text Available Migration of naïve and activated lymphocytes is regulated by the expression of various molecules such as chemokine receptors and ligands. CD69, the early activation marker of C-type lectin domain family, is also shown to regulate the lymphocyte migration by affecting their egress from the thymus and secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of CD69 in accumulation of CD4 T cells in intestine using murine models of inflammatory bowel disease. We found that genetic deletion of CD69 in mice increases the expression of the chemokines CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 in CD4(+ T cells and/or CD4(- cells. Efficient in vitro migration of CD69-deficient CD4 T cells toward the chemokine stimuli was the result of increased expression and/or affinity of chemokine receptors. In vivo CD69(-/- CD4 T cells accumulate in the intestine in higher numbers than B6 CD4 T cells as observed in competitive homing assay, dextran sodium sulphate (DSS-induced colitis and antigen-specific transfer colitis. In DSS colitis CD69(-/- CD4 T cell accumulation in colonic lamina propria (cLP was associated with increased expression of CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 genes. Furthermore, treatment of DSS-administrated CD69(-/- mice with the mixture of CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 neutralizing Abs significantly decreased the histopathological signs of colitis. Transfer of OT-II×CD69(-/- CD45RB(high CD4 T cells into RAG(-/- hosts induced CD4 T cell accumulation in cLP. This study showed CD69 as negative regulator of inflammatory responses in intestine as it decreases the expression of chemotactic receptors and ligands and reduces the accumulation of CD4 T cells in cLP during colitis.

  19. Ascidian gene-expression profiles

    OpenAIRE

    William R Jeffery

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of gene-expression profiling, a large number of genes can now be investigated simultaneously during critical stages of development. This approach will be particularly informative in studies of ascidians, basal chordates whose genomes and embryology are uniquely suited for mapping developmental gene networks.

  20. The effect of aging and caloric restriction on murine CD8+ T cell chemokine receptor gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo RuRan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanism explaining the increased disease susceptibility in aging is not well understood. CD8+ T cells are crucial in anti-viral and anti-tumor responses. Although the chemokine system plays a critical role in CD8+ T cell function, very little is known about the relationship between aging and the T cell chemokine system. Results In this study we have examined the effect of aging on murine CD8+ T cell chemokine receptor gene expression. Freshly isolated splenic CD8+ T cells from old C57BL/6 mice were found to have higher CCR1, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5 and CXCR5, and lower CCR7 gene expression compared to their younger cohort. Anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation elicited a similar robust chemokine receptor response from young and old CD8+ T cells. Western blot analyses confirmed elevated protein level of CCR4 and CCR5 in aged CD8+ T cells. Increases in T cell CCR1 and CCR5 expression also correlate to increased in vitro chemotaxis response to macrophage-inflammatory protein-1 α(MIP-1α. Finally, caloric restriction selectively prevents the loss of CD8+ T cell CCR7 gene expression in aging to the level that is seen in young CD8+ T cells. Conclusion These findings are consistent with the notion that aging exists in a state of low grade pro-inflammatory environment. In addition, our results provide a potential mechanism for the reported aging-associated impaired T cell lymphoid homing and allograft response, and reduced survival in sepsis.

  1. Expression of adhesion molecules, chemokines and matrix metallo- proteinases (MMPs) in viable and degenerating stage of Taenia solium metacestode in swine neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satyendra K; Singh, Aloukick K; Prasad, Kashi N; Singh, Amrita; Singh, Avinash; Rai, Ravi P; Tripathi, Mukesh; Gupta, Rakesh K; Husain, Nuzhat

    2015-11-30

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasitic infection of central nervous system (CNS). Expression of adhesion molecules, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were investigated on brain tissues surrounding viable (n=15) and degenerating cysticerci (n=15) of Taenia solium in swine by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. Gelatin gel zymography was performed for MMPs activity. ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), E-selectin, MIP-1α (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α), Eotaxin-1 and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) were associated with degenerating cysticerci (cysts). However, VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1), MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein-1), MMP-2 and MMP-9 were associated with both viable and degenerating cysts. In conclusion, viable and degenerating cysticerci have different immune molecule profiles and role of these molecules in disease pathogenesis needs to be investigated. PMID:26412140

  2. Elevated expression of CC Chemokine ligand 23 in eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poposki, Julie A.; Uzzaman, Ashraf; Nagarkar, Deepti R.; Chustz, Regina T.; Peters, Anju T.; Suh, Lydia A.; Carter, Roderick; Norton, James; Harris, Kathleen E.; Grammer, Leslie C.; Tan, Bruce K.; Chandra, Rakesh K.; Conley, David B.; Kern, Robert C.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Kato, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a heterogeneous chronic disease characterized by local inflammation of the sinonasal tissues. The pathogenesis of CRS remains controversial but it has been associated with the accumulation of various immune and inflammatory cells in sinus tissue. Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of chemokine CCL23, known to bind to CCR1 and recruit monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, in patients with CRS. Methods We collected nasal tissue from patients with CRS and control subjects. We assayed mRNA for CCL23 by using real-time PCR and measured CCL23 protein by ELISA, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Results CCL23 mRNA was significantly elevated in nasal polyps from patients with polypoid CRS (CRSwNP) (p<0.05) compared to inferior turbinate and uncinate tissue from patients with CRS or control subjects. CCL23 protein was also elevated in nasal polyps, although these levels were not statistically significant. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed CCL23 expression in mucosal epithelial cells and inflammatory cells, but accumulation of CCL23 positive inflammatory cells occurred only in nasal polyps. Immunofluorescence data showed CCL23 co-localization with ECP positive eosinophils. The concentration of CCL23 in nasal polyps positively correlated with the concentration of ECP, suggesting that eosinophils are major CCL23 producing cells in nasal polyps. Finally, we found that CCL23 protein was significantly elevated in nasal polyps from patients with CRSwNP with aspirin sensitivity. Conclusion Overproduction of CCL23 in nasal polyps may contribute to the pathogenesis of eosinophilic CRSwNP via the recruitment of CCR1 positive inflammatory cells including monocytes and macrophages, and the amplification of local inflammation. PMID:21497884

  3. Chemokines, lymphocytes, and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farber J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are members of a family of more than 30 human cytokines whose best-described activities are as chemotactic factors for leukocytes and that are presumed to be important in leukocyte recruitment and trafficking. While many chemokines can act on lymphocytes, the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology are poorly understood. The recent discoveries that chemokines can suppress infection by HIV-1 and that chemokine receptors serve, along with CD4, as obligate co-receptors for HIV-1 entry have lent urgency to studies on the relationships between chemokines and lymphocytes. My laboratory has characterized Mig and Crg-2/IP-10, chemokines that are induced by IFN-g and that specifically target lymphocytes, particularly activated T cells. We have demonstrated that the genes for these chemokines are widely expressed during experimental infections in mice with protozoan and viral pathogens, but that the patterns of mig and crg-2 expression differed, suggesting non-redundant roles in vivo. Our related studies to identify new chemokine receptors from activated lymphocytes resulted in the cloning of STRL22 and STRL33. We and others have shown that STRL22 is a receptor for the CC chemokine MIP-3a, and STRL22 has been re-named CCR6. Although STRL33 remains an orphan receptor, we have shown that it can function as a co-receptor for HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, and that it is active with a broader range of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins than the major co-receptors described to date. The ability of STRL33 to function with a wide variety of envelope glycoproteins may become particularly important if therapies are instituted to block other specific co-receptors. We presume that investigations into the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology will provide information important for understanding the pathogenesis of AIDS and for manipulating immune and inflammatory responses for clinical benefit

  4. Higher Expression of CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, CCL21, and CXCL8 Chemokines in the Skin Associated with Parasite Density in Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Guerra-Sá, Renata; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Vitoriano-Souza, Juliana; Giunchetti, Rodolfo Cordeiro; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Silveira-Lemos, Denise; Oliveira, Guilherme Corrêa; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    Background The immune response in the skin of dogs infected with Leishmania infantum is poorly understood, and limited studies have described the immunopathological profile with regard to distinct levels of tissue parasitism and the clinical progression of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL). Methodology/Principal Findings A detailed analysis of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, mast cells, lymphocytes, and macrophages) as well as the expression of chemokines (CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, CCL13, CCL17, CCL21, CCL24, and CXCL8) was carried out in dermis skin samples from 35 dogs that were naturally infected with L. infantum. The analysis was based on real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the context of skin parasitism and the clinical status of CVL. We demonstrated increased inflammatory infiltrate composed mainly of mononuclear cells in the skin of animals with severe forms of CVL and high parasite density. Analysis of the inflammatory cell profile of the skin revealed an increase in the number of macrophages and reductions in lymphocytes, eosinophils, and mast cells that correlated with clinical progression of the disease. Additionally, enhanced parasite density was correlated with an increase in macrophages and decreases in eosinophils and mast cells. The chemokine mRNA expression demonstrated that enhanced parasite density was positively correlated with the expression of CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, CCL21, and CXCL8. In contrast, there was a negative correlation between parasite density and CCL24 expression. Conclusions/Significance These findings represent an advance in the knowledge about skin inflammatory infiltrates in CVL and the systemic consequences. Additionally, the findings may contribute to the design of new and more efficient prophylactic tools and immunological therapies against CVL. PMID:22506080

  5. Establishment of tolerance to commensal bacteria requires a complex microbiota and is accompanied by decreased intestinal chemokine expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Metzdorff, S. B.; Zeuthen, Louise; Nellemann, Christine Lydia; Kristensen, Matilde Bylov; Licht, Tine Rask; Frøkiær, H.

    2012-01-01

    spleen displaying downregulation of Cxcl2 compared with germ-free animals on day 1 after birth. Colonization reduced the expression of genes involved in antigen presentation in the intestine-draining mesenteric lymph nodes, but not in the popliteal lymph nodes, as evidenced by gene expression on day 23...... after birth. We propose that microbial detection systems in the intestine are upregulated by colonization with a diverse microbiota, whereas expression of proinflammatory chemokines is reduced to avoid excess recruitment of immune cells to the maturing intestine....

  6. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells expressing both chemotactic cytokines IL-8, MCP-1, RANTES and their receptors,and their selective migration to these chemokines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To characterize the mRNA expression of CXC chemokine IL-8, CC chemokine monocyte chemothractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and regulated on activation,normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and a newly defined DC chemokine DC- CK1 as well as the expression of IL-8 receptor, MCP-1 receptor and RANTES receptor in human monocyte derived dendritic cells (MoDCs).The migratory responsiveness of MoDC to IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES was alsso studied. Methods In vitro generated MoDCs were obtained by differentiating monocytes in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 for 5 days. The time course of RNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR and migratoly ability was assessed by a micromultiwell chemotaxis chamber assay. Results IL-8, MCP-1, RANTES and their corres ponding receptors were consistently expressed in MoDCs. DC-CK-1 expression was detectable efter 48 hours of differentiation. MoDC selectively migrated in response to MCP-1 and RANTES but not to IL-8 though transcripts of IL-8 receptor were present. Conclusion Because the capacity of dendritic cells to initiate immune responses depends on their specialized migratory and tissue homing properties, the expression of chemokines and their receptors along with the migratory responsiveness to chemokines of MoDC in our study suggests a potential role of chemokines in the interaction between dendritic cells and T cells and the induction of immune responses.

  7. Overexpression of GAB2 in ovarian cancer cells promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by upregulating chemokine expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, C; Zhang, L; Carroll, S L; Ethier, S P; Cheung, H W

    2016-01-01

    We previously found that the scaffold adapter GRB2-associated binding protein 2 (GAB2) is amplified and overexpressed in a subset of primary high-grade serous ovarian cancers and cell lines. Ovarian cancer cells overexpressing GAB2 are dependent on GAB2 for activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and are sensitive to PI3K inhibition. In this study, we show an important role of GAB2 overexpression in promoting tumor angiogenesis by upregulating expression of multiple chemokines. Specifically, we found that suppression of GAB2 by inducible small hairpin RNA in ovarian cancer cells inhibited tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis and peritoneal tumor growth in immunodeficient mice. Overexpression of GAB2 upregulated the secretion of several chemokines from ovarian cancer cells, including CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL8. The secreted chemokines not only signal through endothelial CXCR2 receptor in a paracrine manner to promote endothelial tube formation, but also act as autocrine growth factors for GAB2-induced transformation of fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells and clonogenic growth of ovarian cancer cells overexpressing GAB2. Pharmacological inhibition of inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B kinase subunit β (IKKβ), but not PI3K, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK), could effectively suppress GAB2-induced chemokine expression. Inhibition of IKKβ augmented the efficacy of PI3K/mTOR inhibition in suppressing clonogenic growth of ovarian cancer cells with GAB2 overexpression. Taken together, these findings suggest that overexpression of GAB2 in ovarian cancer cells promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by upregulating expression of CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL8 that is IKKβ-dependent. Co-targeting IKKβ and PI3K pathways downstream of GAB2 might be a promising therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancer that overexpresses GAB2. PMID:26657155

  8. Chemokine (C-X-C) ligand 1 (CXCL1) protein expression is increased in aggressive bladder cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), may regulate tumor epithelial-stromal interactions that facilitate tumor growth and invasion. Studies have linked CXCL1 expression to gastric, colon and skin cancers, but limited studies to date have described CXCL1 protein expression in human bladder cancer (BCa). CXCL1 protein expression was examined in 152 bladder tissue specimens (142 BCa) by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of CXCL1 was scored by assigning a combined score based on the proportion of cells staining and intensity of staining. CXCL1 expression patterns were correlated with clinicopathological features and follow-up data. CXCL1 protein expression was present in cancerous tissues, but was entirely absent in benign tissue. CXCL1 combined immunostaining score was significantly higher in high-grade tumors relative to low-grade tumors (p = 0.012). Similarly, CXCL1 combined immunostaining score was higher in high stage tumors (T2-T4) than in low stage tumors (Ta-T1) (p < 0.0001). An increase in the combined immunostaining score of CXCL1 was also associated with reduced disease-specific survival. To date, this is the largest study describing increased CXCL1 protein expression in more aggressive phenotypes in human BCa. Further studies are warranted to define the role CXCL1 plays in bladder carcinogenesis and progression

  9. Cytokine, chemokine, and growth factor profile of platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussano, F; Genova, T; Munaron, L; Petrillo, S; Erovigni, F; Carossa, S

    2016-07-01

    During wound healing, biologically active molecules are released from platelets. The rationale of using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) relies on the concentration of bioactive molecules and subsequent delivery to healing sites. These bioactive molecules have been seldom simultaneously quantified within the same PRP preparation. In the present study, the flexible Bio-Plex system was employed to assess the concentration of a large range of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors in 16 healthy volunteers so as to determine whether significant baseline differences may be found. Besides IL-1b, IL-1ra, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, INF-γ, TNF-α, MCP-1, MIP-1a, RANTES, bFGF, PDGF, and VEGF that were already quantified elsewhere, the authors reported also on the presence of IL-2, IL-5, IL-7, IL-9, IL-10, IL-15 G-CSF, GM-CSF, Eotaxin, CXCL10 chemokine (IP-10), and MIP 1b. Among the most interesting results, it is convenient to mention the high concentrations of the HIV-suppressive and inflammatory cytokine RANTES and a statistically significant difference between males and females in the content of PDGF-BB. These data are consistent with previous reports pointing out that gender, diet, and test system affect the results of platelet function in healthy subjects, but seem contradictory when compared to other quantification assays in serum and plasma. The inconsistencies affecting the experimental results found in literature, along with the variability found in the content of bioactive molecules, urge further research, hopefully in form of randomized controlled clinical trials, in order to find definitive evidence of the efficacy of PRP treatment in various pathologic and regenerative conditions. PMID:26950533

  10. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Profiles of Cytokine, Chemokine, and Growth Factors Produced by Human Decidual Cells Are Altered by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 Supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yang, Siwen; Kim, Sung O; Reid, Gregor; Challis, John R G; Bocking, Alan D

    2014-01-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 supernatant (GR-1SN) on secretion profiles of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors from primary cultures of human decidual cells. Lipopolysaccharide significantly increased the output of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1B, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17A, interferon gamma [IFN-γ], and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]); anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1RN, IL-4, IL-9, and IL-10); chemokines (IL-8, eotaxin, IFN-inducible protein 10 [IP-10], monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], macrophage inflammatory protein-1α [MIP-1α], macrophage inflammatory protein-1β [MIP-1β], and regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted [RANTES]); and growth factors (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [CSF] 3, CSF-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor A [VEGFA]). Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1SN alone significantly increased CSF-3, MIP-1α MIP-1β, and RANTES but decreased IL-15 and IP-10 output. The GR-1SN also significantly or partially reduced LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines TNF, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-2 IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17, and IP-10; partially reduced LPS-induced anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-1RN, IL-4 and IL-10, and LPS-induced VEGFA output but did not affect CSF-3, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MCP-1, IL-8, and IL-9. Our results demonstrate that GR-1SN attenuates the inflammatory responses to LPS by human decidual cells, suggesting its potential role in ameliorating intrauterine infection. PMID:24429676

  11. Differential Chemokine Signature between Human Preadipocytes and Adipocytes.

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    Ignacio, Rosa Mistica C; Gibbs, Carla R; Lee, Eun-Sook; Son, Deok-Soo

    2016-06-01

    Obesity is characterized as an accumulation of adipose tissue mass represented by chronic, low-grade inflammation. Obesity-derived inflammation involves chemokines as important regulators contributing to the pathophysiology of obesity-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and some cancers. The obesity-driven chemokine network is poorly understood. Here, we identified the profiles of chemokine signature between human preadipocytes and adipocytes, using PCR arrays and qRT-PCR. Both preadipocytes and adipocytes showed absent or low levels in chemokine receptors in spite of some changes. On the other hand, the chemokine levels of CCL2, CCL7-8, CCL11, CXCL1-3, CXCL6 and CXCL10-11 were dominantly expressed in preadipocytes compared to adipocytes. Interestingly, CXCL14 was the most dominant chemokine expressed in adipocytes compared to preadipocytes. Moreover, there is significantly higher protein level of CXCL14 in conditioned media from adipocytes. In addition, we analyzed the data of the chemokine signatures in adipocytes obtained from healthy lean and obese postmenopausal women based on Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) dataset. Adipocytes from obese individuals had significantly higher levels in chemokine signature as follows: CCL2, CCL13, CCL18-19, CCL23, CCL26, CXCL1, CXCL3 and CXCL14, as compared to those from lean ones. Also, among the chemokine networks, CXCL14 appeared to be the highest levels in adipocytes from both lean and obese women. Taken together, these results identify CXCL14 as an important chemokine induced during adipogenesis, requiring further research elucidating its potential therapeutic benefits in obesity. PMID:27340388

  12. Glutamine Supplementation Attenuates Expressions of Adhesion Molecules and Chemokine Receptors on T Cells in a Murine Model of Acute Colitis

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    Yu-Chen Hou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Migration of T cells into the colon plays a major role in the pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease. This study investigated the effects of glutamine (Gln supplementation on chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules expressed by T cells in mice with dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS- induced colitis. Methods. C57BL/6 mice were fed either a standard diet or a Gln diet replacing 25% of the total nitrogen. After being fed the diets for 5 days, half of the mice from both groups were given 1.5% DSS in drinking water to induce colitis. Mice were killed after 5 days of DSS exposure. Results. DSS colitis resulted in higher expression levels of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand- (PSGL- 1, leukocyte function-associated antigen- (LFA- 1, and C-C chemokine receptor type 9 (CCR9 by T helper (Th and cytotoxic T (Tc cells, and mRNA levels of endothelial adhesion molecules in colons were upregulated. Gln supplementation decreased expressions of PSGL-1, LFA-1, and CCR9 by Th cells. Colonic gene expressions of endothelial adhesion molecules were also lower in Gln-colitis mice. Histological finding showed that colon infiltrating Th cells were less in the DSS group with Gln administration. Conclusions. Gln supplementation may ameliorate the inflammation of colitis possibly via suppression of T cell migration.

  13. Gene expression profiling: can we identify the right target genes?

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    J. E. Loyd

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling allows the simultaneous monitoring of the transcriptional behaviour of thousands of genes, which may potentially be involved in disease development. Several studies have been performed in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, which aim to define genetic links to the disease in an attempt to improve the current understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of the disease and target pathways for intervention. Expression profiling has shown a clear difference in gene expression between IPF and normal lung tissue, and has identified a wide range of candidate genes, including those known to encode for proteins involved in extracellular matrix formation and degradation, growth factors and chemokines. Recently, familial pulmonary fibrosis cohorts have been examined in an attempt to detect specific genetic mutations associated with IPF. To date, these studies have identified families in which IPF is associated with mutations in the gene encoding surfactant protein C, or with mutations in genes encoding components of telomerase. Although rare and clearly not responsible for the disease in all individuals, the nature of these mutations highlight the importance of the alveolar epithelium in disease pathogenesis and demonstrate the potential for gene expression profiling in helping to advance the current understanding of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  14. Differential expression of CC chemokines (CCLs and receptors (CCRs by human T lymphocytes in response to different Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans serotypes

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    Carla ALVAREZ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, different serotypes have been described based on LPS antigenicity. Recently, our research group has reported a differential immunogenicity when T lymphocytes were stimulated with these different serotypes. In particular, it was demonstrated that the serotype b of A. actinomycetemcomitans has a stronger capacity to trigger Th1- and Th17-type cytokine production.Objective This study aimed to quantify the expression of different CC chemokines (CCLs and receptors (CCRs in T lymphocytes stimulated with the differentA. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes. In addition, the expression of the transcription factors T-bet, GATA-3, RORC2, and Foxp3, master-switch genes implied in the Th1, Th2, Th17, and T-regulatory differentiation, respectively, was analysed in order to determine T-cell phenotype-specific patterns of CCL and CCR expression upon A. actinomycetemcomitans stimulation.Material and Methods Human naïve CD4+ T lymphocytes were obtained from healthy subjects and stimulated with autologous dendritic cells primed with the differentA. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes. The expression levels for the chemokines CCL1, CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, CCL11, CCL17, CCL20, CCL21, CCL25, and CCL28, as well as the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR6, CCR7, CCR8, CCR9, and CCR10 were quantified by qPCR. Similarly, the expression levels for the transcription factors T-bet, GATA-3, RORC2, and Foxp3 were quantified and correlated with the CCL and CCR expression levels.Results Higher expression levels of CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, CCL20, CCL21, CCL28, CCR1, CCR2, CCR5, CCR6, CCR7, and CCR9 were detected in T lymphocytes stimulated with the serotype b of A. actinomycetemcomitans compared with the other serotypes. In addition, these higher expression levels of CCLs and CCRs positively correlated with the increased levels of T-bet and RORC2 when T lymphocytes were stimulated with the serotype b.Conclusion A T-lymphocyte response

  15. Differential expression of CC chemokines (CCLs) and receptors (CCRs) by human T lymphocytes in response to different Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Carla; Benítez, Alvaro; Rojas, Leticia; Pujol, Myriam; Carvajal, Paola; Díaz-Zúñiga, Jaime; Vernal, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    In Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, different serotypes have been described based on LPS antigenicity. Recently, our research group has reported a differential immunogenicity when T lymphocytes were stimulated with these different serotypes. In particular, it was demonstrated that the serotype b of A. actinomycetemcomitans has a stronger capacity to trigger Th1- and Th17-type cytokine production. Objective This study aimed to quantify the expression of different CC chemokines (CCLs) and receptors (CCRs) in T lymphocytes stimulated with the different A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes. In addition, the expression of the transcription factors T-bet, GATA-3, RORC2, and Foxp3, master-switch genes implied in the Th1, Th2, Th17, and T-regulatory differentiation, respectively, was analyzed in order to determine T-cell phenotype-specific patterns of CCL and CCR expression upon A. actinomycetemcomitans stimulation. Material and Methods Human naïve CD4+ T lymphocytes were obtained from healthy subjects and stimulated with autologous dendritic cells primed with the different A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes. The expression levels for the chemokines CCL1, CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, CCL11, CCL17, CCL20, CCL21, CCL25, and CCL28, as well as the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR6, CCR7, CCR8, CCR9, and CCR10 were quantified by qPCR. Similarly, the expression levels for the transcription factors T-bet, GATA-3, RORC2, and Foxp3 were quantified and correlated with the CCL and CCR expression levels. Results Higher expression levels of CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, CCL20, CCL21, CCL28, CCR1, CCR2, CCR5, CCR6, CCR7, and CCR9 were detected in T lymphocytes stimulated with the serotype b of A. actinomycetemcomitans compared with the other serotypes. In addition, these higher expression levels of CCLs and CCRs positively correlated with the increased levels of T-bet and RORC2 when T lymphocytes were stimulated with the serotype b. Conclusion A T-lymphocyte response biased towards a

  16. Expression pattern of CXC chemokine receptor-4 is correlated with lymph node metastasis in human invasive ductal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stromal cell-derived factor-1/CXC chemokine receptor-4 (SDF-1/CXCR4) signal has been shown to be important in various immunological reactions. Recent studies have suggested that CXCR4 is expressed in certain cancer cells and that they use this chemokine receptor efficiently for metastasis formation. The expression of CXCR4 was evaluated by immunohistochemical study in 79 surgically resected invasive ductal carcinomas, and the relation between the staining pattern and clinicopathological features was examined. CXCR4 was diffusely and homogeneously expressed in 59 cancers, which were further divided into 28 high-expression and 31 low-expression cancers by their staining intensity. The other 20 cancers showed heterogeneous immunoreactivity in tumor tissue, which was defined as focal type. In comparison with the diffuse type, focal type tumors showed significantly more extensive lymph node metastasis, because the number and extent of metastatic nodes were larger in the focal than the diffuse type. In the diffuse type, the rate of node-positive cases did not show a difference in staining intensity. However, high-CXCR4 tumors showed more extensive nodal metastasis in comparison with low-expression tumors. In contrast, the expression pattern of CXCR4 did not have a significant correlation with hematogeneous metastasis. The overall survival of these patients tended to be better in the diffuse type than in the focal type, although the difference was not statistically significant. The expression pattern of CXCR4 was significantly correlated with the degree of lymph node metastasis in breast cancers. Our data suggest that CXCR4 might be particularly important in facilitating metastasis through the lymphatic system

  17. Progranulin inhibits expression and release of chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 in a TNFR1 dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundra, Jyoti Joshi; Jian, Jinlong; Bhagat, Priyal; Liu, Chuan-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN), a pleiotrophic growth factor, is known to play an important role in the maintenance and regulation of the homeostatic dynamics of normal tissue development, proliferation, regeneration, and host-defense. PGRN also has potent anti-inflammatory functionality, and deregulated PGRN is associated with rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. We have previously reported that PGRN directly binds to TNFR and significantly enhances Treg population and stimulatesIL-10 production. To further investigate PGRN's function in the immune system we performed a gene array analysis on CD4+ T cells from wild type B6 mice and PGRN -/- mice. We identified many chemokines and their receptors, among which CXCL9 and CXCL10 were most prominent, that were significantly induced in PGRN null mice. Administration of recombinant PGRN protein strongly inhibited TNF and IFN-γ-induced CXCL9 and CXCL10 expression. In addition, CXCL9 expression is strongly upregulated in PGRN KO mice and its level is correlated with severity of inflammation in a dermatitis model. Further, we have demonstrated that PGRN-mediated inhibition of chemokine expression largely depends on TNFR1. Taken together, this study provides new insights into the mechanisms underlying PGRN mediated regulation of various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26892362

  18. Inhibition of cytokine gene expression and induction of chemokine genes in non-lymphatic cells infected with SARS coronavirus

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    Weber Friedemann

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV is the etiologic agent of the severe acute respiratory syndrome. SARS-CoV mainly infects tissues of non-lymphatic origin, and the cytokine profile of those cells can determine the course of disease. Here, we investigated the cytokine response of two human non-lymphatic cell lines, Caco-2 and HEK 293, which are fully permissive for SARS-CoV. Results A comparison with established cytokine-inducing viruses revealed that SARS-CoV only weakly triggered a cytokine response. In particular, SARS-CoV did not activate significant transcription of the interferons IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2/3, as well as of the interferon-induced antiviral genes ISG56 and MxA, the chemokine RANTES and the interleukine IL-6. Interestingly, however, SARS-CoV strongly induced the chemokines IP-10 and IL-8 in the colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2, but not in the embryonic kidney cell line 293. Conclusion Our data indicate that SARS-CoV suppresses the antiviral cytokine system of non-immune cells to a large extent, thus buying time for dissemination in the host. However, synthesis of IP-10 and IL-8, which are established markers for acute-stage SARS, escapes the virus-induced silencing at least in some cell types. Therefore, the progressive infiltration of immune cells into the infected lungs observed in SARS patients could be due to the production of these chemokines by the infected tissue cells.

  19. Chemokines and skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Chemokines are small molecules that induce chemotaxis and activation of certain subsets of leukocytes. The expression patterns of chemokines and chemokine receptors are specific to certain organs and cells. Therefore, chemokines are important to elucidate the mechanism of organ-specific human diseases. CCL17 expressed by Langerhans cells, blood endothelial cells, and fibroblasts plays a key role in attracting Th2 cells and tumor cells of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome into the skin, developing various Th2-type inflammatory skin diseases as well as cutaneous lymphoma. CCL11 and CCL26 expressed by skin-resident cells, such as fibroblasts, blood endothelial cells, and keratinocytes, induce infiltration of CCR3-expressing cells such as Th2 cells and eosinophils. CCL11 may also serve as an autocrine as well as a paracrine in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. CX3CL1 expressed on blood endothelial cells leads to infiltration of CX3CR1(+) immune cells, such as mast cells, neutrophils, and macrophages, playing important roles in wound healing, tumor immunity, and vasculitis. Biologics targeting chemokines and their receptors are promising strategies for various skin diseases that are resistant to the current therapy. PMID:25182982

  20. Effect of Methamphetamine on expression of HIV coreceptors and CC-chemokines by dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Madhavan P.N.; Zainulabedin M Saiyed

    2010-01-01

    The United States is currently experiencing an entangled epidemic of HIV infection and use of different drugs of abuse, especially of methamphetamine (Meth). Blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) are the first line of defense against HIV-1 infection, and are the initial target of HIV-1 infection in injection drug users. DC-SIGN present on dendritic cells is the first molecule that facilitates HIV-1 infection independent of CD4 or HIV coreceptors. Chemokines are known to be HIV-1 suppres...

  1. Radiation and SN38 treatments modulate the expression of microRNAs, cytokines and chemokines in colon cancer cells in a p53-directed manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Surajit; Meng, Wen-Jian; Nandy, Suman Kumar; Ping, Jie; Bisgin, Atil; Helmfors, Linda; Waldmann, Patrik; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2015-12-29

    Aberrant expression of miRNAs, cytokines and chemokines are involved in pathogenesis of colon cancer. However, the expression of p53 mediated miRNAs, cyto- and chemokines after radiation and SN38 treatment in colon cancer remains elusive. Here, human colon cancer cells, HCT116 with wild-type, heterozygous and a functionally null p53, were treated by radiation and SN38. The expression of 384 miRNAs was determined by using the TaqMan® miRNA array, and the expression of cyto- and chemokines was analyzed by Meso-Scale-Discovery instrument. Up- or down-regulations of miRNAs after radiation and SN38 treatments were largely dependent on p53 status of the cells. Cytokines, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β, Il-4, IL-10, VEGF, and chemokines, IL-8, MIP-1α were increased, and IFN-γ expression was decreased after radiation, whereas, IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, Il-4, IL-10, IL-8 were decreased, and VEGF and MIP-1α were increased after SN38 treatment. Bioinformatic analysis pointed out that the highly up-regulated miRNAs, let-7f-5p, miR-455-3p, miR-98, miR-155-5p and the down-regulated miRNAs, miR-1, miR-127-5p, miR-142-5p, miR-202-5p were associated with colon cancer pathways and correlated with cyto- or chemokine expression. These miRNAs have the potential for use in colon cancer therapy as they are related to p53, pro- or anti-inflammatory cyto- or chemokines after the radiation and SN38 treatment. PMID:26556872

  2. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Profiles of Cytokine, Chemokine, and Growth Factors Produced by Human Decidual Cells Are Altered by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 Supernatant

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wei; Yang, Siwen; Kim, Sung O.; Reid, Gregor; Challis, John R. G.; Bocking, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 supernatant (GR-1SN) on secretion profiles of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors from primary cultures of human decidual cells. Lipopolysaccharide significantly increased the output of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1B, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17A, interferon gamma [IFN-γ], and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]); anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1RN, IL-4...

  3. T-Cadherin Expression in Melanoma Cells Stimulates Stromal Cell Recruitment and Invasion by Regulating the Expression of Chemokines, Integrins and Adhesion Molecules

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    Rubina, Kseniya A., E-mail: rkseniya@mail.ru; Surkova, Ekaterina I.; Semina, Ekaterina V.; Sysoeva, Veronika Y.; Kalinina, Natalia I. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Lomonosovsky av., 31/5, Moscow 119192 (Russian Federation); Poliakov, Alexei A. [Division of Developmental Neurobiology, MRC National Institute for Medical Research, The Ridgeway, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA (United Kingdom); Treshalina, Helena M. [Federal State Budgetary Scietific Institution «N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center» (FSBSI “N.N.Blokhin RCRC”), Kashirskoe Shosse 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Tkachuk, Vsevolod A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Lomonosovsky av., 31/5, Moscow 119192 (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-21

    T-cadherin is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored member of the cadherin superfamily involved in the guidance of migrating cells. We have previously shown that in vivo T-cadherin overexpression leads to increased melanoma primary tumor growth due to the recruitment of mesenchymal stromal cells as well as the enhanced metastasis. Since tumor progression is highly dependent upon cell migration and invasion, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms of T-cadherin participation in these processes. Herein we show that T-cadherin expression results in the increased invasive potential due to the upregulated expression of pro-oncogenic integrins, chemokines, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components. The detected increase in chemokine expression could be responsible for the stromal cell recruitment. At the same time our previous data demonstrated that T-cadherin expression inhibited neoangiogenesis in the primary tumors. We demonstrate that T-cadherin overexpression leads to the increase in the expression of anti-angiogenic molecules and reduction in pro-angiogenic factors. Thus, T-cadherin plays a dual role in melanoma growth and progression: T-cadherin expression results in anti-angiogenic effects in melanoma, however, this also stimulates transcription of genes responsible for migration and invasion of melanoma cells.

  4. T-Cadherin Expression in Melanoma Cells Stimulates Stromal Cell Recruitment and Invasion by Regulating the Expression of Chemokines, Integrins and Adhesion Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T-cadherin is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored member of the cadherin superfamily involved in the guidance of migrating cells. We have previously shown that in vivo T-cadherin overexpression leads to increased melanoma primary tumor growth due to the recruitment of mesenchymal stromal cells as well as the enhanced metastasis. Since tumor progression is highly dependent upon cell migration and invasion, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms of T-cadherin participation in these processes. Herein we show that T-cadherin expression results in the increased invasive potential due to the upregulated expression of pro-oncogenic integrins, chemokines, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components. The detected increase in chemokine expression could be responsible for the stromal cell recruitment. At the same time our previous data demonstrated that T-cadherin expression inhibited neoangiogenesis in the primary tumors. We demonstrate that T-cadherin overexpression leads to the increase in the expression of anti-angiogenic molecules and reduction in pro-angiogenic factors. Thus, T-cadherin plays a dual role in melanoma growth and progression: T-cadherin expression results in anti-angiogenic effects in melanoma, however, this also stimulates transcription of genes responsible for migration and invasion of melanoma cells

  5. Teleost Chemokines and Their Receptors

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    Steve Bird

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a superfamily of cytokines that appeared about 650 million years ago, at the emergence of vertebrates, and are responsible for regulating cell migration under both inflammatory and physiological conditions. The first teleost chemokine gene was reported in rainbow trout in 1998. Since then, numerous chemokine genes have been identified in diverse fish species evidencing the great differences that exist among fish and mammalian chemokines, and within the different fish species, as a consequence of extensive intrachromosomal gene duplications and different infectious experiences. Subsequently, it has only been possible to establish clear homologies with mammalian chemokines in the case of some chemokines with well-conserved homeostatic roles, whereas the functionality of other chemokine genes will have to be independently addressed in each species. Despite this, functional studies have only been undertaken for a few of these chemokine genes. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of chemokine biology in teleost fish. We have mainly focused on those species for which more research efforts have been made in this subject, specially zebrafish (Danio rerio, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, outlining which genes have been identified thus far, highlighting the most important aspects of their expression regulation and addressing any known aspects of their biological role in immunity. Finally, we summarise what is known about the chemokine receptors in teleosts and provide some analysis using recently available data to help characterise them more clearly.

  6. Different expression of chemokines in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis bone marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowska, Weronika J.; Radzikowska, Anna; Massalska, Magdalena A.; Burakowski, Tomasz; Kontny, Ewa; Słowińska, Iwona; Gasik, Robert; Maśliński, Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease leading to joint destruction. In addition to involvement of the joints, there is growing evidence that inflammatory/autoimmune processes take place in bone marrow, beginning the disease onset. Activated T and B cells accumulate in bone marrow, where also effective antigen presentation takes place. An increased number of activated T cells was observed in RA in comparison to osteoarthritis (OA) bone marrow. In the present study we analyzed the levels of chemokines that may be responsible for accumulation/retention of T-cells in the bone marrow of RA and OA patients. Material and methods Bone marrow samples were obtained from RA and OA patients during total hip replacement surgery, and bone marrow plasma was obtained by gradient centrifugation. Levels of the chemokines CX3CL1, CCL5, CCL2, CXCL12 and CXCL1 were measured in bone marrow plasma by specific ELISAs. Comparison between the groups of patients and statistical significance were analyzed by the two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test. Results Increased levels of CX3CL1 (818 ±431 pg/ml vs. 502 ±131 pg/ml, p < 0.0007) and CCL5 (5967 ±1680 pg/ml vs. 4878 ±2360 pg/ml, p < 0.05) respectively in bone marrow plasma from RA in comparison with OA patients were observed. In contrast, similar levels of CCL2, CXCL12 and CXCL1 in RA and OA bone marrow suggest that these cytokines do not play a significant role in the observed T cell accumulation in RA bone marrow. Conclusions CX3CL1 and CCL5 overproduced in RA bone marrow may contribute to the accumulation of T cells observed in RA bone marrow. PMID:27407279

  7. Ubiquinol decreases monocytic expression and DNA methylation of the pro-inflammatory chemokine ligand 2 gene in humans

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    Fischer Alexandra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coenzyme Q10 is an essential cofactor in the respiratory chain and serves in its reduced form, ubiquinol, as a potent antioxidant. Studies in vitro and in vivo provide evidence that ubiquinol reduces inflammatory processes via gene expression. Here we investigate the putative link between expression and DNA methylation of ubiquinol sensitive genes in monocytes obtained from human volunteers supplemented with 150 mg/ day ubiquinol for 14 days. Findings Ubiquinol decreases the expression of the pro-inflammatory chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 2 gene (CXCL2 more than 10-fold. Bisulfite-/ MALDI-TOF-based analysis of regulatory regions of the CXCL2 gene identified six adjacent CpG islands which showed a 3.4-fold decrease of methylation status after ubiquinol supplementation. This effect seems to be rather gene specific, because ubiquinol reduced the expression of two other pro-inflammatory genes (PMAIP1, MMD without changing the methylation pattern of the respective gene. Conclusion In conclusion, ubiquinol decreases monocytic expression and DNA methylation of the pro-inflammatory CXCL2 gene in humans. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN26780329.

  8. A chemokine gene expression signature derived from meta-analysis predicts the pathogenicity of viral respiratory infections

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    Chang Stewart T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During respiratory viral infections host injury occurs due in part to inappropriate host responses. In this study we sought to uncover the host transcriptional responses underlying differences between high- and low-pathogenic infections. Results From a compendium of 12 studies that included responses to influenza A subtype H5N1, reconstructed 1918 influenza A virus, and SARS coronavirus, we used meta-analysis to derive multiple gene expression signatures. We compared these signatures by their capacity to segregate biological conditions by pathogenicity and predict pathogenicity in a test data set. The highest-performing signature was expressed as a continuum in low-, medium-, and high-pathogenicity samples, suggesting a direct, analog relationship between expression and pathogenicity. This signature comprised 57 genes including a subnetwork of chemokines, implicating dysregulated cell recruitment in injury. Conclusions Highly pathogenic viruses elicit expression of many of the same key genes as lower pathogenic viruses but to a higher degree. This increased degree of expression may result in the uncontrolled co-localization of inflammatory cell types and lead to irreversible host damage.

  9. CCR2 and CXCR3 agonistic chemokines are differently expressed and regulated in human alveolar epithelial cells type II

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    Prasse Antje

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The attraction of leukocytes from circulation to inflamed lungs depends on the activation of both the leukocytes and the resident cells within the lung. In this study we determined gene expression and secretion patterns for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2 and T-cell specific CXCR3 agonistic chemokines (Mig/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10, and I-TAC/CXCL11 in TNF-α-, IFN-γ-, and IL-1β-stimulated human alveolar epithelial cells type II (AEC-II. AEC-II constitutively expressed high level of CCL2 mRNA in vitro and in situ , and released CCL2 protein in vitro . Treatment of AEC-II with proinflammatory cytokines up-regulated both CCL2 mRNA expression and release of immunoreactive CCL2, whereas IFN-γ had no effect on CCL2 release. In contrast, CXCR3 agonistic chemokines were not detected in freshly isolated AEC-II or in non-stimulated epithelial like cell line A549. IFN-γ, alone or in combination with IL-1β and TNF-α resulted in an increase in CXCL10, CXCL11, and CXCL9 mRNA expression and generation of CXCL10 protein by AEC-II or A549 cells. CXCL10 gene expression and secretion were induced in dose-dependent manner after cytokine-stimulation of AEC-II with an order of potency IFN-γ>>IL-1β ≥ TNF-α. Additionally, we localized the CCL2 and CXCL10 mRNAs in human lung tissue explants by in situ hybridization, and demonstrated the selective effects of cytokines and dexamethasone on CCL2 and CXCL10 expression. These data suggest that the regulation of the CCL2 and CXCL10 expression exhibit significant differences in their mechanisms, and also demonstrate that the alveolar epithelium contributes to the cytokine milieu of the lung, with the ability to respond to locally generated cytokines and to produce potent mediators of the local inflammatory response.

  10. Prognostic value of the expression of C-Chemokine Receptor 6 and 7 and their ligands in non-metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are major actors of leukocytes trafficking and some have been shown to play an important role in cancer metastasis. Chemokines CCL19, CCL20 and CCL21 and their receptors CCR6 and CCR7, were assessed as potential biomarkers of metastatic dissemination in primary breast cancer. Biomarker expression levels were evaluated using immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded tissue sections of breast cancer (n = 207). CCR6 was expressed by tumor cells in 35% of cases. CCR7 was expressed by spindle shaped stromal cells in 43% of cases but not by tumor cells in this series. CCL19 was the only chemokine found expressed in a significant number of breast cancers and was expressed by both tumor cells and dendritic cells (DC). CCR6, CCL19 and CCR7 expression correlated with histologic features of aggressive disease. CCR6 expression was associated with shorter relapse-free survival (RFS) in univariate and but not in multivariate analysis (p = 0.0316 and 0.055 respectively), and was not associated with shorter overall survival (OS). Expression of CCR7 was not significantly associated with shorter RFS or OS. The presence of CCL19-expressing DC was associated with shorter RFS in univariate and multivariate analysis (p = 0.042 and 0.020 respectively) but not with shorter OS. These results suggest a contribution of CCR6 expression on tumor cells and CCL19-expressing DC in breast cancer dissemination. In our series, unlike what was previously published, CCR7 was exclusively expressed on stromal cells and was not associated with survival

  11. An Ultra-High Fluorescence Enhancement and High Throughput Assay for Revealing Expression and Internalization of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hua; Wang, Xiaojuan; Cheng, Tiantian; Xia, Yongqing; Lao, Jun; Ge, Baosheng; Ren, Hao; Khan, Naseer Ullah; Huang, Fang

    2016-04-18

    Revealing chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression, distribution, and internalization levels in different cancers helps to evaluate cancer progression or prognosis and to set personalized treatment strategy. We here describe a sensitive and high-throughput immunoassay for determining CXCR4 expression and distribution in cancer cells. The assay is accessible to a wide range of users in an ordinary lab only by dip-coating poly(styrene-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) spheres on the glass substrate. The self- assembled spheres form three-dimensional photonic colloidal crystals which enhance the fluorescence of CF647 and Alexa Fluor 647 by a factor of up to 1000. CXCR4 in cells is detected by using the sandwich immunoassay, where the primary antibody recognizes CXCR4 and the secondary antibody is labeled with CF647. With the newly established assay, we quantified the total expression of CXCR4, its distribution on the cell membrane and cytoplasm, and revealed their internalization level upon SDF-1α activation in various cancer cells, even for those with extremely low expression level. PMID:26879206

  12. Chemokines and diabetic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Oscar; Torres, Francis M; Shireman, Paula K

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines are critical for white blood cell recruitment to injured tissues and play an important role in normal wound healing processes. In contrast, impaired wound healing in diabetic patients is accompanied by decreased early inflammatory cell infiltration but persistence of neutrophils and macrophages in the chronic, nonhealing wounds. These changes in inflammatory cell recruitment occur in conjunction with alterations in chemokine and growth factor expression. In addition to leukocyte trafficking, many different cell types, including endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and keratinocytes, produce and respond to chemokines, and these interactions are altered in diabetic wounds. Thus, the chemokine system may have both direct and inflammatory-mediated effects on many different aspects of diabetic wound healing. The potential roles of chemokines and inflammatory or immune cells in nonhealing diabetic wounds, including impairments in growth factor expression, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix formation, and reepithelialization, are examined. PMID:18053419

  13. Elevated expression of chemokine C-C ligand 2 in stroma is associated with recurrent basal-like breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Min; Yu, Elaine; Staggs, Vincent; Fan, Fang; Cheng, Nikki

    2016-08-01

    Despite advances in treatment, up to 30% of breast cancer patients experience disease recurrence accompanied by more aggressive disease and poorer prognosis. Treatment of breast cancer is complicated by the presence of multiple breast cancer subtypes, including: luminal, Her2 overexpressing, and aggressive basal-like breast cancers. Identifying new biomarkers specific to breast cancer subtypes could enhance the prediction of patient prognosis and contribute to improved treatment strategies. The microenvironment influences breast cancer progression through expression of growth factors, angiogenic factors and other soluble proteins. In particular, chemokine C-C ligand 2 (CCL2) regulates macrophage recruitment to primary tumors and signals to cancer cells to promote breast tumor progression. Here we employed a software-based approach to evaluate the prognostic significance of CCL2 protein expression in breast cancer subtypes in relation to its expression in the epithelium or stroma or in relation to fibroblast-specific protein 1 (Fsp1), a mesenchymal marker. Immunohistochemistry analysis of tissue microarrays revealed that CCL2 significantly correlated with Fsp1 expression in the stroma and tumor epithelium of invasive ductal carcinoma. In the overall cohort of invasive ductal carcinomas (n=427), CCL2 and Fsp1 expression in whole tissues, stroma and epithelium were inversely associated with cancer stage and tumor size. When factoring in molecular subtype, stromal CCL2 was observed to be most highly expressed in basal-like breast cancers. By Cox regression modeling, stromal CCL2, but not epithelial CCL2, expression was significantly associated with decreased recurrence-free survival. Furthermore, stromal CCL2 (HR=7.51 P=0.007) was associated with a greater hazard than cancer stage (HR=2.45, P=0.048) in multivariate analysis. These studies indicate that stromal CCL2 is associated with decreased recurrence-free survival in patients with basal-like breast cancer, with

  14. Prediction of Clinical Outcomes by Chemokine and Cytokine Profiling In CSF from Radiation Treated Breast Cancer Primary with Brain Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Edwin

    Whole brain radiation is the standard treatment for patients with brain metastasis but unfortunately tumors can recover from radiation-induced damage with the help of the immune system. The hypothesis that differences in immunokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pre- and post-irradiation could reveal tumor biology and correlate with outcome of patients with metastatic breast cancer to the brain is tested. Collected CSF samples were analyzed using Luminex's multiplexing assays to survey global immunokine levels while Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays were used to quantify each individual immunokines. Cluster analysis was performed to segregate patients based on their common immunokine profile and each cluster was correlated with survival and other clinical parameters. Breast cancer brain metastasis was found to have altered immunokine profiles in the CSF, and that Interleukin-1α expression was elevated after irradiation. Therefore, immunokine profiling in the CSF could enable cancer physicians to monitor the status of brain metastases.

  15. Chemokine and chemokine receptor expression during colony stimulating factor-1–induced osteoclast differentiation in the toothless osteopetrotic rat: a key role for CCL9 (MIP-1γ) in osteoclastogenesis in vivo and in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Meiheng; Mailhot, Geneviève; MacKay, Carole A.; Mason-Savas, April; Aubin, Justin; Odgren, Paul R.

    2006-01-01

    Osteoclasts differentiate from hematopoietic precursors under systemic and local controls. Chemokines and receptors direct leukocyte traffic throughout the body and may help regulate site-specific bone resorption. We investigated bone gene expression in vivo during rapid osteoclast differentiation induced by colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) in Csf1-null toothless (tl/tl) rats. Long-bone RNA from CSF-1–treated tl/tl rats was analyzed by high-density microarray over a time course. TRAP (tart...

  16. Genetically determined inflammatory-response related cytokine and chemokine transcript profiles between mammary carcinoma resistant and susceptible rat strains

    OpenAIRE

    Devapatla, Bharat; Sanders, Jennifer; Samuelson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple human breast and rat mammary carcinoma susceptibility (Mcs) alleles have been identified. Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats are resistant to developing mammary carcinomas, while Wistar Furth (WF) females are susceptible. Gene transcripts at Mcs5a1, Mcs5a2, and Mcs5c are differentially expressed between resistant WKY and susceptible WF alleles in immune-system tissues. We hypothesized that immune-related gene transcript profiles are genetically determined in mammary carcinoma resistant and susc...

  17. 弥漫增生型狼疮肾炎患者趋化因子及其受体的表达%The study of chemokines and chemokine receptors expression in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭桂梅; 陈顺乐; 沈南; 戴岷; 倪旭鸣; 郑林

    2008-01-01

    目的 了解弥漫增生型狼疮肾炎(LN)患者趋化因子MCP-1、CCL19、CXCL9、CXCL10和趋化因子受体CCR2、CCR7、CXCR3的表达,探讨趋化因子及其受体在LN发病中的作用.方法 ①同步收集12例弥漫增生型LN患者肾组织和外周血,抽提总RNA并反转录为cDNA,以实时荧光定量聚合酶链反应(PCR)方法 检测趋化因子基因MCP-1、CCL19、CXCL9、CXCL10和趋化因子受体基因CCR2、CCR7、CXCR3的表达水平.②应用免疫荧光抗体标记、激光扫描共聚焦显微镜技术观察患者肾组织趋化因子MCP-1、CCL19、CXCL9和CXCL10的表达.结果 弥漫增生型LN患者趋化因子基因MCP-1、CCL19、CXCL9和CXCL10 mRNA在肾脏组织和外周血的表达呈同步增高趋势,4种趋化因子蛋白在肾小球的表达显著增高.趋化因子受体CCR2和CXCR3在LN患者外周血高表达.结论 趋化因子MCP-1、CCL19、CXCL9和CXCL10外周血表达水平可能做为评估狼疮患者肾脏病变的生物学标记.阻断趋化因子与其相应受体的结合将可能减轻患者的临床症状、改善预后.%Objective To explore the role of chemokines and ehemokine receptors in the etiopathog-enesis of diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (LN). Methods ① Total RNA from the kidney tissues and peripheral blood cells of 12 patients with diffuse proliferative LN and 10 normal controls were prepared simultaneously and reverse transcribed into complementary DNA. Sybr green dye based real-time quantitative PCR method was used to compare the expression levels (indicated as-AACt value) of MCP-1, CCL19,CXCLg, CXCL10 and CCR2, CCR7, CXCR3. ② Immunofluoresceee labeling and immunohistochemical staining technique were used to observe the distribution of chemokines MCP-1, CCL19, CXCL9 and CXCL10 in normal and patients kidney tissues. Results The 4 chemokines genes (MCP-1, CCL19, CXCL9 and CXCL10) were consistently highly expressed in kidney tissues and peripheral blood ceils of diffuse proliferative LN

  18. High-dose hydrocortisone reduces expression of the pro-inflammatory chemokines CXCL8 and CXCL10 in SARS coronavirus-infected intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinatl, Jindrich; Michaelis, Martin; Morgenstern, Birgit; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm

    2005-02-01

    Clinical observations and our high-density oligonucleotide microarray results demonstrated increased expression of proinflammatory chemokines after SARS-CoV infection. Here, we investigated the influence of SARS-CoV infection on CXCL8 (interleukin 8) and CXCL10 (interferon-gamma-inducible protein 10) in human intestinal epithelial (Caco2) cells. RT-PCR and ELISA showed time-dependent up-regulation of both chemokines after SARS-CoV infection. Electric mobility shift assay revealed increased DNA binding activity of the cellular transcription factors activator protein 1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor (B (NF-kappaB) in SARS-CoV infected cells. High hydrocortisone concentrations (> or =50 microg/ml) completely prevented increased DNA binding activity of AP-1 and NF-kappaB and inhibited up-regulation of CXCL8 and CXCL10, but did not reduce chemokine expression to basal levels. Ribavirin that does not inhibit SARS-CoV replication in Vero cells inhibited SARS-CoV replication in Caco2 cells at therapeutical concentrations. Hydrocortisone neither influenced SARS-CoV titres alone nor in combination with ribavirin. Our results show that corticosteroids may be of limited benefit in the suppression of chemokine production by SARS-CoV-infected cells. PMID:15647850

  19. Delayed functional expression of neuronal chemokine receptors following focal nerve demyelination in the rat: a mechanism for the development of chronic sensitization of peripheral nociceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monahan Patrick E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal and clinical studies have revealed that focal peripheral nerve axon demyelination is accompanied by nociceptive pain behavior. C-C and C-X-C chemokines and their receptors have been strongly implicated in demyelinating polyneuropathies and persistent pain syndromes. Herein, we studied the degree to which chronic nociceptive pain behavior is correlated with the neuronal expression of chemokines and their receptors following unilateral lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC-induced focal demyelination of the sciatic nerve in rats. Results Focal nerve demyelination increased behavioral reflex responsiveness to mechanical stimuli between postoperative day (POD 3 and POD28 in both the hindpaw ipsilateral and contralateral to the nerve injury. This behavior was accompanied by a bilateral increase in the numbers of primary sensory neurons expressing the chemokine receptors CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR4 by POD14, with no change in the pattern of CXCR3 expression. Significant increases in the numbers of neurons expressing the chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2, Regulated on Activation, Normal T Expressed and Secreted (RANTES/CCL5 and interferon γ-inducing protein-10 (IP-10/CXCL10 were also evident following nerve injury, although neuronal expression pattern of stromal cell derived factor-1α (SDF1/CXCL12 did not change. Functional studies demonstrated that acutely dissociated sensory neurons derived from LPC-injured animals responded with increased [Ca2+]i following exposure to MCP-1, IP-10, SDF1 and RANTES on POD 14 and 28, but these responses were largely absent by POD35. On days 14 and 28, rats received either saline or a CCR2 receptor antagonist isomer (CCR2 RA-[R] or its inactive enantiomer (CCR2 RA-[S] by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection. CCR2 RA-[R] treatment of nerve-injured rats produced stereospecific bilateral reversal of tactile hyperalgesia. Conclusion These results suggest that the presence of chemokine

  20. Chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma patients increases the risk of bone metastases and poor survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ying

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chemokine and bone marrow-homing receptor CXCR4 is implicated in metastases of various cancers. This study was conducted to analyze the association of CXCR4 expression with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC bone metastasis and patient survival. Methods Tumor tissue from HCC patients with (n = 43 and without (n = 138 bone metastasis was subjected to immunohistochemical staining for CXCR4 using tissue microarrays. Immunoreactivity was evaluated semi-quantitatively. A receiver-operating characteristic-based approach and logistical regression analysis were used to determine the predictive value of clinicopathologic factors, including CXCR4 expression, in bone metastasis. Patient survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests. Results CXCR4 overexpression was detected in 34 of 43 (79.1% patients with bone metastases and in 57 of 138 (41.3% without bone metastases. CXCR4 expression correlated with (correlation coefficient: 0.551, P predictive of HCC bone metastases (AUC: 0.689; 95%CI: 0.601 – 0.776; P . CXCR4 staining intensity correlated with the bone metastasis-free survival (correlation coefficient: -0.359; P = 0.018. CXCR4 overexpression in primary tumors (n = 91 decreased overall median survival (18.0 months vs. 36.0 months, P 0.001. Multivariable analysis identified CXCR4 as a strong, independent risk factor for reduced disease-free survival (relative risk [RR]: 5.440; P = 0.023 and overall survival (RR: 7.082; P = 0.001. Conclusion CXCR4 expression in primary HCCs may be an independent risk factor for bone metastasis and may be associated with poor clinical outcome.

  1. Chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma patients increases the risk of bone metastases and poor survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemokine and bone marrow-homing receptor CXCR4 is implicated in metastases of various cancers. This study was conducted to analyze the association of CXCR4 expression with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) bone metastasis and patient survival. Tumor tissue from HCC patients with (n = 43) and without (n = 138) bone metastasis was subjected to immunohistochemical staining for CXCR4 using tissue microarrays. Immunoreactivity was evaluated semi-quantitatively. A receiver-operating characteristic-based approach and logistical regression analysis were used to determine the predictive value of clinicopathologic factors, including CXCR4 expression, in bone metastasis. Patient survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests. CXCR4 overexpression was detected in 34 of 43 (79.1%) patients with bone metastases and in 57 of 138 (41.3%) without bone metastases. CXCR4 expression correlated with (correlation coefficient: 0.551, P < 0.001) and was predictive of HCC bone metastases (AUC: 0.689; 95%CI: 0.601 – 0.776; P < 0.001). CXCR4 staining intensity correlated with the bone metastasis-free survival (correlation coefficient: -0.359; P = 0.018). CXCR4 overexpression in primary tumors (n = 91) decreased overall median survival (18.0 months vs. 36.0 months, P <0.001). Multivariable analysis identified CXCR4 as a strong, independent risk factor for reduced disease-free survival (relative risk [RR]: 5.440; P = 0.023) and overall survival (RR: 7.082; P = 0.001). CXCR4 expression in primary HCCs may be an independent risk factor for bone metastasis and may be associated with poor clinical outcome

  2. Toll-like receptor 2 contributes to chemokine gene expression and macrophage infiltration in the dorsal root ganglia after peripheral nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sung Joong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported that nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain is attenuated in toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 knock-out mice. In these mice, inflammatory gene expression and spinal cord microglia actvation is compromised, whereas the effects in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG have not been tested. In this study, we investigated the role of TLR2 in inflammatory responses in the DRG after peripheral nerve injury. Results L5 spinal nerve transection injury induced the expression of macrophage-attracting chemokines such as CCL2/MCP-1 and CCL3/MIP-1 and subsequent macrophage infiltration in the DRG of wild-type mice. In TLR2 knock-out mice, however, the induction of chemokine expression and macrophage infiltration following nerve injury were markedly reduced. Similarly, the induction of IL-1β and TNF-α expression in the DRG by spinal nerve injury was ameliorated in TLR2 knock-out mice. The reduced inflammatory response in the DRG was accompanied by attenuation of nerve injury-induced spontaneous pain hypersensitivity in TLR2 knock-out mice. Conclusions Our data show that TLR2 contributes to nerve injury-induced proinflammatory chemokine/cytokine gene expression and macrophage infiltration in the DRG, which may have relevance in the reduced pain hypersensitivity in TLR2 knock-out mice after spinal nerve injury.

  3. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  4. The Possible Diagnostic and Prognostic Use of Systemic Chemokine Profiles in Clinical Medicine—The Experience in Acute Myeloid Leukemia from Disease Development and Diagnosis via Conventional Chemotherapy to Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øystein Bruserud

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are important regulators of many different biological processes, including (i inflammation with activation and local recruitment of immunocompetent cells; (ii angiogenesis as a part of inflammation or carcinogenesis; and (iii as a bridge between the coagulation system and inflammation/immune activation. The systemic levels of various chemokines may therefore reflect local disease processes, and such variations may thereby be used in the routine clinical handling of patients. The experience from patients with myeloproliferative diseases, and especially patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, suggests that systemic plasma/serum cytokine profiles can be useful, both as a diagnostic tool and for prognostication of patients. However, cytokines/chemokines are released by a wide range of cells and are involved in a wide range of biological processes; the altered levels may therefore mainly reflect the strength and nature of the biological processes, and the optimal clinical use of chemokine/cytokine analyses may therefore require combination with organ-specific biomarkers. Chemokine levels are also altered by clinical procedures, therapeutic interventions and the general status of the patients. A careful standardization of sample collection is therefore important, and the interpretation of the observations will require that the overall clinical context is considered. Despite these limitations, we conclude that analysis of systemic chemokine/cytokine profiles can reflect important clinical characteristics and, therefore, is an important scientific tool that can be used as a part of future clinical studies to identify clinically relevant biomarkers.

  5. The Anti-Atherosclerotic Effect of Naringin Is Associated with Reduced Expressions of Cell Adhesion Molecules and Chemokines through NF-κB Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Tun-Pin Hsueh; Jer-Ming Sheen; Pang, Jong-Hwei S.; Kuo-Wei Bi; Chao-Chun Huang; Hsiao-Ting Wu; Sheng-Teng Huang

    2016-01-01

    Naringin has been reported to have an anti-atherosclerosis effect but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of naringin on the TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines and NF-κB signaling pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The experiments revealed that naringin, at concentrations without cytotoxicity, dose-dependently inhibited the adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to the TNF-α-stimulated...

  6. Dogs infected with the blood trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi display an increase expression of cytokines and chemokines plus an intense cardiac parasitism during acute infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Sheler Martins; Vieira, Paula Melo de Abreu; Roatt, Bruno Mendes; Reis, Levi Eduardo Soares; da Silva Fonseca, Kátia; Nogueira, Nívia Carolina; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Tafuri, Washington Luiz; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins

    2014-03-01

    The recent increase in immigration of people from areas endemic for Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi) to the United States and Europe has raised concerns about the transmission via blood transfusion and organ transplants in these countries. Infection by these pathways occurs through blood trypomastigotes (BT), and these forms of T. cruzi are completely distinct of metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT), released by triatomine vector, in relation to parasite-host interaction. Thus, research comparing infection with these different infective forms is important for explaining the potential impacts on the disease course. Here, we investigated tissue parasitism and relative mRNA expression of cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in the heart during acute infection by MT or BT forms in dogs. BT-infected dogs presented a higher cardiac parasitism, increased relative mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory cytokines and of the chemokines CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL5/RANTES, and the chemokine receptor CCR5 during the acute phase of infection, as compared to MT-infected dogs. These results suggest that infection with BT forms may lead to an increased immune response, as revealed by the cytokines ratio, but this kind of immune response was not able to control the cardiac parasitism. Infection with the MT form presented an increase in the relative mRNA expression of IL-12p40 as compared to that of IL-10 or TGF-β1. Correlation analysis showed increased relative mRNA expression of IFN-γ as well as IL-10, which may be an immunomodulatory response, as well as an increase in the correlation of CCL5/RANTES and its CCR5 receptor. Our findings revealed a difference between inoculum sources of T. cruzi, as vectorial or transfusional routes of T. cruzi infection may trigger distinct parasite-host interactions during the acute phase, which may influence immunopathological aspects of Chagas disease. PMID:24317279

  7. Effects of adrenomedullin on the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in oviducts from women with tubal ectopic pregnancy: an in-vitro experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hang Wun Raymond; Liao, Su-Bin; Chiu, Philip Chi Ngong; Yeung, William Shu Biu; Ng, Ernest Hung Yu; Cheung, Annie Nga Yin; Tang, Fai; O, Wai Sum

    2015-01-01

    Background The occurrence of tubal ectopic pregnancy (tEP) is related to the inflammation of the oviduct. Recently, Adrenomedullin (ADM) was found highly expression in human oviduct. The current study is to investigate whether ADM have a modulatory action on inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in oviductal tissue from women with tubal ectopic pregnancy (tEP). Methods Oviductal isthmus samples were collected from women with tEP undergoing salpingectomy, and women undergoing hysterectomy for ...

  8. Lateral fluid percussion injury of the brain induces CCL20 inflammatory chemokine expression in rats

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    Das Mahasweta

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI evokes a systemic immune response including leukocyte migration into the brain and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines; however, the mechanisms underlying TBI pathogenesis and protection are poorly understood. Due to the high incidence of head trauma in the sports field, battlefield and automobile accidents identification of the molecular signals involved in TBI progression is critical for the development of novel therapeutics. Methods In this report, we used a rat lateral fluid percussion impact (LFPI model of TBI to characterize neurodegeneration, apoptosis and alterations in pro-inflammatory mediators at two time points within the secondary injury phase. Brain histopathology was evaluated by fluoro-jade (FJ staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL assay, polymerase chain reaction (qRT PCR, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and immunohistochemistry were employed to evaluate the CCL20 gene expression in different tissues. Results Histological analysis of neurodegeneration by FJ staining showed mild injury in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. TUNEL staining confirmed the presence of apoptotic cells and CD11b+ microglia indicated initiation of an inflammatory reaction leading to secondary damage in these areas. Analysis of spleen mRNA by PCR microarray of an inflammation panel led to the identification of CCL20 as an important pro-inflammatory signal upregulated 24 h after TBI. Although, CCL20 expression was observed in spleen and thymus after 24h of TBI, it was not expressed in degenerating cortex or hippocampal neurons until 48 h after insult. Splenectomy partially but significantly decreased the CCL20 expression in brain tissues. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the systemic inflammatory reaction to TBI starts earlier than the local brain response and suggest that spleen- and/ or thymus-derived CCL20 might play a role in

  9. Chemokine CXCL16 Expression Suppresses Migration and Invasiveness and Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeying Fang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Increasing evidence argues that soluble CXCL16 promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of cancer cells in vitro. However, the role of transmembrane or cellular CXCL16 in cancer remains relatively unknown. In this study, we determine the function of cellular CXCL16 as tumor suppressor in breast cancer cells. Methods. Expression of cellular CXCL16 in breast cancer cell lines was determined at both RNA and protein levels. In vitro and in vivo studies that overexpressed or downregulated CXCL16 were conducted in breast cancer cells. Results. We report differential expression of cellular CXCL16 in breast cancer cell lines that was negatively correlated with cell invasiveness and migration. Overexpression of CXCL16 in MDA-MB-231 cells led to a decrease in cell invasion and migration and induced apoptosis of the cells; downregulation of CXCL16 in MCF-7 cells increased cell migration and invasiveness. Consistent with the in vitro data, CXCL16 overexpression inhibited tumorigenesis in vivo. Conclusions. Cellular CXCL16 suppresses invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells in vitro and inhibits tumorigenesis in vivo. Targeting of cellular CXCL16 expression is a potential therapeutic strategy for breast cancer.

  10. Analysis of porcine MHC expression profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Fanbo; CHEN Chen; DENG Yajun; YU Jun; HU Songnian

    2005-01-01

    The porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC, also named swine leukocyte antigen, SLA) is associated not only with immune responsibility and disease susceptibility, but also with some reproductive and productive traits such as growth rate and carcass composition. As yet systematical research on SLA expression profile is not reported. In order to illustrate SLA expression comprehensively and deepen our understanding of its function, we outlined the expression profile of SLA in 51 tissues of Landrace by analyzing a large amount of ESTs produced by "Sino-Danish Porcine Genome Project". In addition, we also compared the expression profile of SLA in several tissues from different development stages and from another breed (Erhualian). The result shows: (i) classical SLA genes are highly expressed in immune tissues and middle part of intestine; (ii) although SLA-3 is an SLA Ia gene, its expression abundance and pattern are quite different from those of the other two SLA Ia genes. The same phenomenon is seen in HLA-C expression, suggesting that the two genes may function similarly and undergo convergent evolution; (iii) except in jejunum, the antigen presenting genes are more highly expressed in breed Erhualian than in Landrace. The difference might associate with the higher resistance to bad conditions (including pathogens) of Erhualian and higher growth rates of Landrace.

  11. The Anti-Atherosclerotic Effect of Naringin Is Associated with Reduced Expressions of Cell Adhesion Molecules and Chemokines through NF-κB Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Tun-Pin; Sheen, Jer-Ming; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Bi, Kuo-Wei; Huang, Chao-Chun; Wu, Hsiao-Ting; Huang, Sheng-Teng

    2016-01-01

    Naringin has been reported to have an anti-atherosclerosis effect but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of naringin on the TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines and NF-κB signaling pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The experiments revealed that naringin, at concentrations without cytotoxicity, dose-dependently inhibited the adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to the TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. The TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, including VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin, at both the mRNA and protein levels, were significantly suppressed by naringin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, the TNF-α-induced mRNA and protein levels of chemokines, including fractalkine/CX3CL1, MCP-1 and RANTES, were also reduced by naringin. Naringin significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which resulted from the inhibited phosphorylation of IKKα/β, IκB-α and NF-κB. Altogether, we proposed that naringin modulated TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules and chemokines through the inhibition of TNF-α-induced activation of IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway to exert the anti-atherosclerotic effect. PMID:26861272

  12. The Anti-Atherosclerotic Effect of Naringin Is Associated with Reduced Expressions of Cell Adhesion Molecules and Chemokines through NF-κB Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tun-Pin Hsueh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Naringin has been reported to have an anti-atherosclerosis effect but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of naringin on the TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines and NF-κB signaling pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. The experiments revealed that naringin, at concentrations without cytotoxicity, dose-dependently inhibited the adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to the TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. The TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, including VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin, at both the mRNA and protein levels, were significantly suppressed by naringin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, the TNF-α-induced mRNA and protein levels of chemokines, including fractalkine/CX3CL1, MCP-1 and RANTES, were also reduced by naringin. Naringin significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which resulted from the inhibited phosphorylation of IKKα/β, IκB-α and NF-κB. Altogether, we proposed that naringin modulated TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules and chemokines through the inhibition of TNF-α-induced activation of IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway to exert the anti-atherosclerotic effect.

  13. Expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor types 1/2 in patients with gastric carcinoma: Clinicopathological correlations and significance

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, JUN PU; HU, WAN MING; WANG, KUAN SONG; Yu, Jun; LUO, BAI HUA; Wu, Chang; CHEN, ZHI HONG; LUO, GENG QIU; LIU, YU WU; LIU, QIN LAI; Xiao, Yan; ZHOU, HAI YAN; YANG, XIAO JING; JIANG, HAI YING; LI, JING HE

    2012-01-01

    C-X-C chemokine receptor types 1/2 (CXCR1/2) may play multiple roles in the development and progression of a number of types of tumor. The abnormal expression of CXCR1/2 in various types of malignant tumors has been reported, but less is known with regard to gastric carcinoma. The present study was preliminarily conducted to elucidate the correlation between clinicopathological factors and the immunohistochemical expression of CXCR1/2 in patients with gastric carcinoma. The expression of CXCR...

  14. Proinflammatory Chemokines during Candida albicans Keratitis

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Xiaoyong; Hua, Xia; Wilhelmus, Kirk R.

    2009-01-01

    Chemotactic cytokines mediate the recruitment of leukocytes into infected tissues. This study investigated the profile of chemokines during experimental Candida albicans keratitis and determined the effects of chemokine inhibition on leukocyte infiltration and fungal growth during murine keratomycosis. Scarified corneas of BALB/c mice were topically inoculated with C. albicans and monitored daily over one week for fungal keratitis. After a gene microarray for murine chemokines compared infect...

  15. Apoptosis in human germinal centre B cells by means of CC chemokine receptor 3 expression induced by interleukin-2 and interleukin-4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiu-ping; XIE Luo-kun; ZHANG Li-jun; TAN Jin-quan

    2005-01-01

    Background CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3), expressed on some inflammatory cells, is a member of the chemokine receptor family. Its ligand is eotaxin/CCL11. In this research, we studied the expression and function of CCR3 induced by interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) on human germinal centre (GC) B cells.Methods Cells isolated from human tonsils were stimulated with IL-2 or/and IL-4 followed by bonding with eotaxin/CCL11. Flow cytometry was used to detect expression of CCR3 on GC B cells and apoptosis of GC B cells. Real time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Northern blot assays were used to analyse the CCR3 mRNA expressed in the GC B cells. Chemotaxis and adhesion assays were used to determine the effect of eotaxin/CCL11 ligand bonded to CCR3 on GC B cells.Results There was no CCR3 expression on human freshly isolated GC B cells. The combination IL-2 and IL-4 could upregulate CCR3 mRNA and protein expression on GC B cells. Eotaxin could not induce GC B cell chemotaxis and adhesion but triggered apoptosis of GC B cells.Conclusion IL-2 and IL-4 together induced expression of CCR3 on GC B cells, and the receptor acted as a death receptor.

  16. Involvement of M3 Cholinergic Receptor Signal Transduction Pathway in Regulation of the Expression of Chemokine MOB-1, MCP-1 Genes in Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑海; 陈道达; 张景輝; 田原

    2004-01-01

    Whether M3 cholinergic receptor signal transduction pathway is involved in regulation of the activation of NF-κB and the expression of chemokine MOB-1, MCP-1genes in pancreatic acinar cells was investigated. Rat pancreatic acinar cells were isolated, cultured and treated with carbachol, atropine and PDTC in vitro. The MOB-1 and MCP-1 mRNA expression was detected by using RT-PCR. The activation of NF-κB was monitored by using electrophoretic mobility shift assay.The results showed that as compared with control group, M3 cholinergic receptor agonist (103mol/L, 104-4ol/L carbachol) could induce a concentration-dependent and time-dependent increase in the expression of MOB-1, MCP-1 mRNA in pancreatic acinar cells. After treatment with 10 -3mol/L carbachol for 2 h, the expression of MOB-1, MCP-1 mRNA was strongest. The activity of NF-κB in pancreatic acinar cells was significantly increased (P<0.01) after treated with M3 cholinergic receptor agonist (10-3 mol/L carbachol) in vitro for 30 min. Either M3 cholinergic receptor antagonist (10-5 mol/L atropine) or NF-κB inhibitor (10-2 mol/L PDTC) could obviously inhibit the activation of NF-κB and the chemokine MOB-1, MCP-1 mRNA expression induced by carbachol (P <0.05). This inhibitory effect was significantly increased by atropine plus PDTC (P<0.01). The results of these studies indicated that M3 cholinergic receptor signal transduction pathway was likely involved in regulation of the expression of chemokine MOB-1 and MCP-1genes in pancreatic acinar cells in vitro through the activation of NF-κB.

  17. Exercise-induced liver chemokine CXCL-1 expression is linked to muscle-derived interleukin-6 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line; Pilegaard, Henriette; Hansen, Jakob; Brandt, Claus; Adser, Helle; Hidalgo, Juan; Olesen, Jesper; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Hojman, Pernille

    2011-01-01

    interleukin-6 (IL-6) and muscle IL-6 mRNA. In contrast, exercise-induced regulation of liver CXCL-1 mRNA expression was completely blunted in IL-6 knockout mice. Based on these findings, we examined the possible existence of a muscle-to-liver axis by overexpressing IL-6 in muscles. This resulted in increases...... in serum CXCL-1 (5-fold) and liver CXCL-1 mRNA expression (24-fold) compared with control. Because IL-6 expression and release are known to be augmented during exercise in glycogen-depleted animals, CXCL-1 and IL-6 expression were examined after exercise in overnight-fasted mice.We found that fasting...... significantly augmented serum CXCL-1, and CXCL-1 expression in liver and muscle. Taken together, these data indicate that liver is the main source of serum CXCL-1 during exercise in mice, and that the CXCL-1 expression in the liver is regulated by muscle-derived IL-6....

  18. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in renal transplantation--from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischereder, M

    2007-03-01

    Attraction of mononuclear cells to sites of inflammation requires a close interplay of the inflammatory signal presented via chemokines and specific receptors on effector cells. First studies on acute renal transplant rejection demonstrated the involvement of CC-chemokines, such as RANTES, MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta and MCP-1, as well as CXC-chemokines such as IL-8 and IP-10, correlating with expression of the corresponding chemokine receptors, CCR1, CCR5 and CCR2 as well as CXCR3. Since then, the pathophysiologic relevance has been extended to chronic allograft nephropathy and transplant glomerulopathy. Chemokine expression can be triggered by different stimuli, e.g. brain death, ischemia, HLA-mismatch and infection. Furthermore, anti-inflammatory chemokines have been identified. Chemokine receptor 7, e.g. enhances homing of lymphocytes to lymphatic tissues and the Duffy antigen receptor, DARC, a non-specific receptor that binds and inactivates different chemokines. While measurement of chemokine expression in clinical transplantation may facilitate the differential diagnosis of allograft dysfunction, knowledge of the chemokine network has also widened the understanding of transplant rejection and opened novel therapeutic approaches. Observations from humans with mutations of the chemokine network as well as transplantation of animals with targeted deletions in this system suggest that manipulations of chemokine signalling may improve the success rates of transplantation. Blocking chemokines unselectively with Met-RANTES or specifically with small molecule inhibitors of various chemokine receptors has lead to improved outcome in animal models. Currently, first human trials are under way to investigate drugs that stimulate lymphocyte homing. Inhibitors of CCR1 and CCR5 are being tested for other human diseases and may eventually be available in transplantation. Nonetheless, chemokine blockade my rather serve as an adjunct in the management of transplant recipients than

  19. The Intricate Expression of CC Chemokines in Glial Tumors: Evidence for Involvement of CCL2 and CCL5 but Not CCL11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Moogooei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are biologically active peptides involved in the pathogenesis of various pathologies including brain malignancies. They are amongst primitive regulators of the development of immune responses against malignant glial tumors. The present study aimed to examine the expression of CC chemokines in anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiform patients at both mRNA and protein levels. Blood specimens in parallel with stereotactic biopsy specimens were obtained from 123 patients suffering from glial tumors and 100 healthy participants as a control. The serum levels of CCL2, CCL5, and CCL11 were measured by ELISA and stereotactic samples subjected to western and northern blotting methods for protein and mRNA, respectively. Demographic characteristics were also collected by a researcher-designed questionnaire. Results of the present study indicated that, however,CCL2 andCCL5 are elevated in serum and tumor tissues of patients suffering from a glial tumor at both mRNA and protein levels, theCCL11 was almost undetectable. According to the findings of the present investigation, it could presumably be reasonable to conclude that chemokines are good predictive molecules for expecting disease severity, metastasis, and response to treatment.

  20. The Intricate Expression of CC Chemokines in Glial Tumors: Evidence for Involvement of CCL2 and CCL5 but Not CCL11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moogooei, Mozhgan; Shamaei, Masoud; Khorramdelazad, Hossein; Fattahpour, Shirin; Seyedmehdi, Seyed Mohammad; Moogooei, Maryam; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Kalantari Khandani, Behjat

    2015-12-01

    Chemokines are biologically active peptides involved in the pathogenesis of various pathologies including brain malignancies. They are amongst primitive regulators of the development of immune responses against malignant glial tumors. The present study aimed to examine the expression of CC chemokines in anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiform patients at both mRNA and protein levels. Blood specimens in parallel with stereotactic biopsy specimens were obtained from 123 patients suffering from glial tumors and 100 healthy participants as a control. The serum levels of CCL2, CCL5, and CCL11 were measured by ELISA and stereotactic samples subjected to western and northern blotting methods for protein and mRNA, respectively. Demographic characteristics were also collected by a researcher-designed questionnaire. Results of the present study indicated that, however,CCL2 and CCL5 are elevated in serum and tumor tissues of patients suffering from a glial tumor at both mRNA and protein levels, the CCL11 was almost undetectable. According to the findings of the present investigation, it could presumably be reasonable to conclude that chemokines are good predictive molecules for expecting disease severity, metastasis, and response to treatment. PMID:26749234

  1. Differential gene expression of proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines in lungs of ascites-resistant and -susceptible broiler chickens following intravenous cellulose microparticle injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamal, Krishna R; Wideman, Robert F; Anthony, Nicholas B; Erf, Gisela F

    2010-02-15

    Intravenous injection of microparticles (MPs) is a tool to reveal susceptibility to pulmonary hypertension (PH) syndrome (PHS, ascites) in broilers. After injection MPs get lodged in pulmonary arterioles and cause localized inflammation. To examine the expression of chemokines/cytokines during the MP-induced pulmonary inflammatory response, lungs were collected from 4-week-old broilers (6/line/time point) from the PHS-resistant (RES) and -susceptible (SUS) broilers before (0h) and after (2, 6, 12, 24, and 48h) MP injection and analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR. In both lines, expression of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, IL-8, and K60 increased from 0 to 6h, reached peak levels at 6 and 12h, and decreased thereafter, whereas IL-4 and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) expression remained elevated past 12h. Lungs from the RES line broilers had higher expression (Pbroilers. Higher expression of chemokines/cytokines in RES compared to SUS line lungs may explain the ability of RES line broilers to effectively counteract the MP-induced PH and resolve the vascular occlusion. PMID:19698998

  2. Elevated level of pro inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression in chicken bone marrow and monocyte derived dendritic cells following LPS induced maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaiyarasu, Semmannan; Bhatia, Sandeep; Mishra, Niranjan; Sood, Richa; Kumar, Manoj; SenthilKumar, D; Bhat, Sushant; Dass Prakash, M

    2016-09-01

    The study was designed to characterize and compare chicken bone marrow and peripheral blood monocyte derived dendritic cells (chBM-DC and chMoDC) and to evaluate inflammatory cytokine and chemokine alterations in response upon LPS stimulation. Typical morphology was observed in DCs from 48h of culture using recombinant chicken GM-CSF and IL-4. Maturation of DCs with LPS (1μg/ml) showed significant up regulation of mRNA of surface markers (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, MHC-II and DC-LAMP (CD208)), pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α (LITAF)), iNOS, chemokine CXCli2 and TLRs4 and 15. Basal level of TLR1 mRNA expression was higher followed by TLR15 in both DCs irrespective of their origin. Expression of iNOS and CXCLi2 mRNA in mature DCs of both origins were higher than other surface molecules and cytokines studied. Hence, its level of expression can also be used as an additional maturation marker for LPS induced chicken dendritic cell maturation along with CD83 and CD40. LPS matured DCs of both origins upregulated IL-12 and IFN-γ. Based on CD40 and CD83 mRNA expression, it was observed that LPS induced the maturation in both DCs, but chMoDCs responded better in expression of surface markers and inflammatory mediator genes. PMID:27344111

  3. Tumor-specific gene expression patterns with gene expression profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN; Xiaogang; LI; Yingxin; LI; Jiangeng; GONG; Daoxiong

    2006-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of 14 common tumors and their counterpart normal tissues were analyzed with machine learning methods to address the problem of selection of tumor-specific genes and analysis of their differential expressions in tumor tissues. First, a variation of the Relief algorithm, "RFE_Relief algorithm" was proposed to learn the relations between genes and tissue types. Then, a support vector machine was employed to find the gene subset with the best classification performance for distinguishing cancerous tissues and their counterparts. After tissue-specific genes were removed, cross validation experiments were employed to demonstrate the common deregulated expressions of the selected gene in tumor tissues. The results indicate the existence of a specific expression fingerprint of these genes that is shared in different tumor tissues, and the hallmarks of the expression patterns of these genes in cancerous tissues are summarized at the end of this paper.

  4. Gene expression profiling in sinonasal adenocarcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Sébille-Rivain Véronique; Malard Olivier; Guisle-Marsollier Isabelle; Ferron Christophe; Renaudin Karine; Quéméner Sylvia; Tripodi Dominique; Verger Christian; Géraut Christian; Gratas-Rabbia-Ré Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Sinonasal adenocarcinomas are uncommon tumors which develop in the ethmoid sinus after exposure to wood dust. Although the etiology of these tumors is well defined, very little is known about their molecular basis and no diagnostic tool exists for their early detection in high-risk workers. Methods To identify genes involved in this disease, we performed gene expression profiling using cancer-dedicated microarrays, on nine matched samples of sinonasal adenocarcinomas and n...

  5. Gene expression profiling reveals novel protective effects of Aminaphtone on ECV304 endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Giulia; Bellocchi, Chiara; Todoerti, Katia; Saporiti, Federica; Piacentini, Luca; Scorza, Raffaella; Colombo, Gualtiero I

    2016-07-01

    Aminaphtone, a drug used in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), showed a remarkable role in the modulation of several vasoactive factors, like endothelin-1 and adhesion molecules. We analysed in vitro the effects of Aminaphtone on whole-genome gene expression and production of different inflammatory proteins. ECV-304 endothelial cells were stimulated with IL-1β 100U/ml in the presence or absence of Aminaphtone 6μg/ml. Gene expression profiles were compared at 1, 3, and 6h after stimulation by microarray. Supernatants of ECV-304 cultures were analysed at 3, 6, 12, and 24h by multiplex ELISA for production of several cytokine and chemokines. Microarrays showed a significant down-regulation at all times of a wide range of inflammatory genes. Aminaphtone appeared also able to modulate the regulation of immune response process (down-regulating cytokine biosynthesis, transcripts involved in lymphocyte differentiation and cell proliferation, and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction) and to regulate genes engaged in homeostasis, secretion, body fluid levels, response to hypoxia, cell division, and cell-to-cell communication and signalling. Results were confirmed and extended analysing the secretome, which showed significant reduction of the release of 14 cytokines and chemokines. These effects are predicted to be mediated by interaction with different transcription factors. Aminaphtone was able to modulate the expression of inflammatory molecules relevant to the pathogenesis of several conditions in which the endothelial dysfunction is the main player and early event, like scleroderma, lung fibrosis, or atherosclerosis. PMID:27083548

  6. Universal expression and dual function of the atypical chemokine receptor D6 on innate-like B cells in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hansell, Chris A H; Schiering, Chris; Kinstrie, Ross; Ford, Laura; Bordon, Yvonne; McInnes, Iain B; Goodyear, Carl S.; Nibbs, Robert J B

    2011-01-01

    Mouse innate-like B cells are a heterogeneous collection of multifunctional cells that control infection, play housekeeping roles, contribute to adaptive immunity, and suppress inflammation. We show that, amongst leukocytes, chemokine internalisation by the D6 receptor is a unique and universal feature of all known innate-like B cell populations and, to our knowledge, the most effective unifying marker of these cells. Moreover, we identify novel D6active B1 cell subsets, including those we te...

  7. Universal expression and dual function of the atypical chemokine receptor D6 on innate-like B cells in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansell, Chris A. H.; Schiering, Chris; Kinstrie, Ross; Ford, Laura; Bordon, Yvonne; McInnes, Iain B.; Goodyear, Carl S.; Nibbs, Robert J. B.

    2011-01-01

    Mouse innate-like B cells are a heterogeneous collection of multifunctional cells that control infection, play housekeeping roles, contribute to adaptive immunity, and suppress inflammation. We show that, amongst leukocytes, chemokine internalisation by the D6 receptor is a unique and universal feature of all known innate-like B cell populations and, to our knowledge, the most effective unifying marker of these cells. Moreover, we identify novel D6active B1 cell subsets, including those we term B1d, which lack CD5 and CD11b but exhibit typical B1 cell properties, including spontaneous ex vivo production of IgM, interleukin-10, and anti-phosphorylcholine antibody. The unprecedented opportunity to examine D6 on primary cells has allowed us to clarify its ligand specificity and show that, consistent with a scavenging role, D6 internalises chemokines but cannot induce Ca2+ fluxes or chemotaxis. Unexpectedly, however, D6 can also suppress the function of CXCR5, a critical chemokine receptor in innate-like B cell biology. This is associated with a reduction in B1 cells and circulating class-switched anti-phosphorylcholine antibody in D6-deficient mice. Thus, we identify a unifying marker of innate-like B cells; describe novel B1 cell subsets; reveal a dual role for D6; and provide the first evidence of defects in resting D6-deficient mice. PMID:21450903

  8. Serum proteome profiling detects myelodysplastic syndromes and identifies CXC chemokine ligands 4 and 7 as markers for advanced disease

    OpenAIRE

    Aivado, Manuel; Spentzos, Dimitrios; Germing, Ulrich; Alterovitz, Gil; Meng, Xiao-Ying; Grall, Franck; Giagounidis, Aristoteles A N; Klement, Giannoula; Steidl, Ulrich; Otu, Hasan H.; Czibere, Akos; Wolf C. Prall; Iking-Konert, Christof; Shayne, Michelle; Ramoni, Marco F.

    2007-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are among the most frequent hematologic malignancies. Patients have a short survival and often progress to acute myeloid leukemia. The diagnosis of MDS can be difficult; there is a paucity of molecular markers, and the pathophysiology is largely unknown. Therefore, we conducted a multicenter study investigating whether serum proteome profiling may serve as a noninvasive platform to discover novel molecular markers for MDS. We generated serum proteome profiles f...

  9. Human p38δ MAP kinase mediates UV irradiation induced up-regulation of the gene expression of chemokine BRAK/CXCL14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family comprises ERK, JNK, p38 and ERK5 (big-MAPK, BMK1). UV irradiation of squamous cell carcinoma cells induced up-regulation of gene expression of chemokine BRAK/CXCL14, stimulated p38 phosphorylation, and down-regulated the phosphorylation of ERK. Human p38 MAPKs exist in 4 isoforms: p38α, β, γ and δ. The UV stimulation of p38 phosphorylation was not inhibited by the presence of SB203580 or PD169316, inhibitors of p38α and β, suggesting p38 phosphorylation was not dependent on these 2 isoforms and that p38γ and/or δ was responsible for the phosphorylation. In fact, inhibition of each of these 4 p38 isoforms by the introduction of short hairpin (sh) RNAs for respective isoforms revealed that only shRNA for p38δ attenuated the UV-induced up-regulation of BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression. In addition, over-expression of p38 isoforms in the cells showed the association of p38δ with ERK1 and 2, concomitant with down-regulation of ERK phosphorylation. The usage of p38δ isoform by UV irradiation is not merely due to the abundance of this p38 isoform in the cells. Because serum deprivation of the cells also induced an increase in BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression, and in this case p38α and/or β isoform is responsible for up-regulation of BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression. Taken together, the data indicate that the respective stress-dependent action of p38 isoforms is responsible for the up-regulation of the gene expression of the chemokine BRAK/CXCL14.

  10. Evaluation of expression rate of chemokines receptor CCR5 on peripheral blood CD8+ T cells of occult hepatitis B infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazemi Arababadi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 5 Oct, 2008; Accepted 14 Feb, 2009AbstractBackground and purpose: Occult hepatitis B infection (OBI is defined as a form of hepatitis B that despite absence of detectable HBsAg, HBV-DNA is present in patient’s peripheral blood. Genetic and immunological differences appear to play important roles in producing OBI. Therefore, this project was aimed to examine the expression of a chemokine receptor (CCR5 on CD8 T cells of OBI patients.Materials and methods: In this experimental study, 3,700 HBsAg- plasma samples were collected. Samples were tested for anti-HBc antibody and all of HBsAg-/anti-HBc+ samples were screened for HBV-DNA by PCR. HBV-DNA positive samples were assigned as OBI cases. Also, flow cytometry analysis was performed to examine the expression of CCR5 on CD8 T cells of OBI patients.Results: Results of current study showed that 352 (9.5% cases of samples were positive for anti-HBc. Examination of HBsAg-/anti-HBc+ samples for HBV-DNA by PCR showed that 57 (16.1% cases had HBV-DNA. Flow cytometric studies indicated lymphocytosis in these patients; however, the number of cells which expressed CD8 and CCR5 is decreased significantly in patients, compared to healthy control. In addition to CD8 T cells, the expression of CCR5 is also decreased on all immune cells.Conclusion: One of the chemokine receptors which are expressed by CD8+ T cells is CCR5 and these cells are recruited to infected tissues, including liver by CCR5. Therefore, based on results of this investigation, one may conclude that due to the decreased expression of CCR5, the CD8+ T cells are unable to respond to the chemokines (CCR5 ligands and, hence, can not immigrate to the infected liver and incorporate in clearance of hepatitis B virus.J Mazand Univ Med Sci 2009; 19(68: 11-18 (Persian

  11. The atypical chemokine receptor D6 contributes to the development of experimental colitis1

    OpenAIRE

    Bordon, Yvonne; Hansell, Chris A H; Sester, David P; Clarke, Mairi; Mowat, Allan McI; Nibbs, Robert J B

    2009-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory CC chemokines control leukocyte recruitment and function during inflammation by engaging chemokine receptors expressed on circulating leukocytes. The D6 chemokine receptor can bind several of these chemokines but appears unable to couple to signal transduction pathways or direct cell migration. Instead, D6 has been proposed to act as a chemokine scavenger, removing pro-inflammatory chemokines to dampen leukocyte responses. In this report, we have examined the role of D6 in th...

  12. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses

  13. Prognostic Gene Expression Profiles in Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristina Pilekær

    Each year approximately 4,800 Danish women are diagnosed with breast cancer. Several clinical and pathological factors are used as prognostic and predictive markers to categorize the patients into groups of high or low risk. Around 90% of all patients are allocated to the high risk group and...... clinical courses, and they may be useful as novel prognostic biomarkers in breast cancer. The aim of the present project was to predict the development of metastasis in lymph node negative breast cancer patients by RNA profiling. We collected and analyzed 82 primary breast tumors from patients who...... the time of event. Previous findings have shown that high expression of the lncRNA HOTAIR is correlated with poor survival in breast cancer. We validated this finding by demonstrating that high HOTAIR expression in our primary tumors was significantly associated with worse prognosis independent of...

  14. Gene expression profiling in sinonasal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébille-Rivain Véronique

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sinonasal adenocarcinomas are uncommon tumors which develop in the ethmoid sinus after exposure to wood dust. Although the etiology of these tumors is well defined, very little is known about their molecular basis and no diagnostic tool exists for their early detection in high-risk workers. Methods To identify genes involved in this disease, we performed gene expression profiling using cancer-dedicated microarrays, on nine matched samples of sinonasal adenocarcinomas and non-tumor sinusal tissue. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry on two additional sets of tumors. Results Among the genes with significant differential expression we selected LGALS4, ACS5, CLU, SRI and CCT5 for further exploration. The overexpression of LGALS4, ACS5, SRI, CCT5 and the downregulation of CLU were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed for LGALS4 (Galectin 4, ACS5 (Acyl-CoA synthetase and CLU (Clusterin proteins: LGALS4 was highly up-regulated, particularly in the most differentiated tumors, while CLU was lost in all tumors. The expression of ACS5, was more heterogeneous and no correlation was observed with the tumor type. Conclusion Within our microarray study in sinonasal adenocarcinoma we identified two proteins, LGALS4 and CLU, that were significantly differentially expressed in tumors compared to normal tissue. A further evaluation on a new set of tissues, including precancerous stages and low grade tumors, is necessary to evaluate the possibility of using them as diagnostic markers.

  15. Neuronal Chemokines: Versatile Messengers In Central Nervous System Cell Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    de Haas, A. H.; van Weering, H. R. J.; Jong, E.K.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.; Biber, K.P.H.

    2007-01-01

    Whereas chemokines are well known for their ability to induce cell migration, only recently it became evident that chemokines also control a variety of other cell functions and are versatile messengers in the interaction between a diversity of cell types. In the central nervous system (CNS), chemokines are generally found under both physiological and pathological conditions. Whereas many reports describe chemokine expression in astrocytes and microglia and their role in the migration of leuko...

  16. Regulatory role of Cdx-2 and Taq I polymorphism of vitamin D receptor gene on chemokine expression in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harishankar, M; Selvaraj, P

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene variants have been shown to be regulating the immune response in tuberculosis. We studied the regulatory role of VDR promoter Cdx-2 and 3'UTR TaqI gene variants on chemokine levels from culture filtrate antigen (CFA) stimulated with or without 1,25(OH)2D3 treated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 50 pulmonary tuberculosis patients (PTB) and 51 normal healthy controls (HCs). In CFA with 1,25(OH)2D3 treated cultures, the MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES levels were significantly decreased in Cdx-2 AA genotype compared to GG genotype, while a significantly increased MIG level was observed in Cdx-2 AA genotype (p<0.05). In TaqI polymorphism, tt genotype significantly decreased MIP-1β and RANTES levels compared to TT genotype. Moreover, a significantly increased level of IP-10 and MIG was observed in TaqI tt genotype compared with TT genotype (p<0.05). The results suggests that the 1,25(OH)2D3 may alter the chemokine response through the VDR polymorphic variants during infection. PMID:27067904

  17. Apigenin suppresses migration and invasion of transformed cells through down-regulation of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei; Kuang, Lisha; Hitron, John Andrew; Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Xin; Budhraja, Amit [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Institute of Oral Biosciences and BK21 Program, Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Pratheeshkumar, Poyil [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Chen, Gang [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo, Jia [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Environmental exposure to arsenic is known to cause various cancers. There are some potential relationships between cell malignant transformation and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) expressions. Metastasis, one of the major characteristics of malignantly transformed cells, contributes to the high mortality of cells. CXCR4 and its natural chemokine ligand C-X-C motif ligand 12 (CXCL12) play a critical role in metastasis. Therefore, identification of nutritional factors which are able to inhibit CXCR4 is important for protection from environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis and for abolishing metastasis of malignantly transformed cells. The present study demonstrates that apigenin (4′,5,7-trihydroxyflavone), a natural dietary flavonoid, suppressed CXCR4 expression in arsenic-transformed Beas-2B cells (B-AsT) and several other types of transformed/cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Neither proteasome nor lysosome inhibitor had any effect in reducing the apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4, indicating that apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4 is not due to proteolytic degradation. The down-regulation of CXCR4 is mainly due to the inhibition of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity. Apigenin also abolished migration and invasion of transformed cells induced by CXCL12. In a xenograft mouse model, apigenin down-regulated CXCR4 expression and suppressed tumor growth. Taken together, our results show that apigenin is a novel inhibitor of CXCR4 expression. This dietary flavonoid has the potential to suppress migration and invasion of transformed cells and prevent environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Apigenin has a potential in preventing environmental arsenic induced carcinogenesis. • Apigenin suppresses CXCR4 in malignant transformed cells in vitro and in vivo. • The down-regulation of CXCR4 is mainly due to inhibition of NF-κB activity.

  18. Chemokine receptors in cancer metastasis and cancer cell-derived chemokines in host immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Keiichi; Hojo, Shozo; Akashi, Takuya; Yasumoto, Kazuo; Saiki, Ikuo

    2007-11-01

    The chemotactic cytokines called chemokines are a superfamily of small secreted cytokines that were initially characterized through their ability to prompt the migration of leukocytes. Attention has been focused on the chemokine receptors expressed on cancer cells because cancer cell migration and metastasis show similarities to leukocyte trafficking. CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) was first investigated as a chemokine receptor that is associated with lung metastasis of breast cancers. Recently, CXCR4 was reported to be a key molecule in the formation of peritoneal carcinomatosis in gastric cancer. In the present review, we highlight current knowledge about the role of CXCR4 in cancer metastases. In contrast to chemokine receptors expressed on cancer cells, little is known about the roles of cancer cell-derived chemokines. Cancer tissue consists of both cancer cells and various stromal cells, and leukocytes that infiltrate into cancer are of particular importance in cancer progression. Although colorectal cancer invasion is regulated by the chemokine CCL9-induced infiltration of immature myeloid cells into cancer, high-level expression of cancer cell-derived chemokine CXCL16 increases infiltrating CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells into cancer tissues, and correlates with a good prognosis. We discuss the conflicting biological effects of cancer cell-derived chemokines on cancer progression, using CCL9 and CXCL16 as examples. PMID:17894551

  19. Gene expression profiling in adipose tissue from growing broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausman, Gary J; Barb, C Rick; Fairchild, Brian D; Gamble, John; Lee-Rutherford, Laura

    2014-01-01

    In this study, total RNA was collected from abdominal adipose tissue samples obtained from ten broiler chickens at 3, 4, 5, and 6 weeks of age and prepared for gene microarray analysis with Affymetrix GeneChip Chicken Genome Arrays (Affymetrix) and quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Studies of global gene expression in chicken adipose tissue were initiated since such studies in many animal species show that adipose tissue expresses and secretes many factors that can influence growth and physiology. Microarray results indicated 333 differentially expressed adipose tissue genes between 3 and 6 wk, 265 differentially expressed genes between 4 and 6 wk and 42 differentially expressed genes between 3 and 4 wk. Enrichment scores of Gene Ontology Biological Process categories indicated strong age upregulation of genes involved in the immune system response. In addition to microarray analysis, quantitative real-time PCR analysis was used to confirm the influence of age on the expression of adipose tissue CC chemokine ligands (CCL), toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF factor (LITAF), chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 8 (CCR8), and several other genes. Between 3 and 6 wk of age CCL5, CCL1, and CCR8 expression increased (P = 0.0001) with age. Furthermore, TLR2, CCL19, and LITAF expression increased between 4 and 6 wk of age (P = 0.001). This is the first demonstration of age related changes in CCL, LITAF, and TLR2 gene expression in chicken adipose tissue. Future studies are needed to elucidate the role of these adipose tissue genes in growth and the immune system. PMID:26317054

  20. Kinin B2 receptor regulates chemokines CCL2 and CCL5 expression and modulates leukocyte recruitment and pathology in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bader Michael

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinins are important mediators of inflammation and act through stimulation of two receptor subtypes, B1 and B2. Leukocyte infiltration contributes to the pathogenesis of autoimmune inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS, occurring not only in multiple sclerosis (MS but also in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. We have previously shown that the chemokines CCL2 and CCL5 play an important role in the adhesion of leukocytes to the brain microcirculation in EAE. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relevance of B2 receptors to leukocyte-endothelium interactions in the cerebral microcirculation, and its participation in CNS inflammation in the experimental model of myelin-oligodendrocyte-glycoprotein (MOG35–55-induced EAE in mice. Methods In order to evaluate the role of B2 receptor in the cerebral microvasculature we used wild-type (WT and kinin B2 receptor knockout (B2-/- mice subjected to MOG35–55-induced EAE. Intravital microscopy was used to investigate leukocyte recruitment on pial matter vessels in B2-/- and WT EAE mice. Histological documentation of inflammatory infiltrates in brain and spinal cords was correlated with intravital findings. The expression of CCL5 and CCL2 in cerebral tissue was assessed by ELISA. Results Clinical parameters of disease were reduced in B2-/- mice in comparison to wild type EAE mice. At day 14 after EAE induction, there was a significant decrease in the number of adherent leukocytes, a reduction of cerebral CCL5 and CCL2 expressions, and smaller inflammatory and degenerative changes in B2-/- mice when compared to WT. Conclusion Our results suggest that B2 receptors have two major effects in the control of EAE severity: (i B2 regulates the expression of chemokines, including CCL2 and CCL5, and (ii B2 modulates leukocyte recruitment and inflammatory lesions in the CNS.

  1. A high throughput analysis of cytokines and chemokines expression during the course of Trypanosoma cruzi experimental oral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Adele A; Notário, Ana Flávia O; Teixeira, Thaise L; Silva, Rebecca T E; Quintal, Amanda P N; Alves, Rosiane N; Brígido, Paula C; Siqueira, Carla S; Martins, Flávia A; Machado, Fabrício C; Clemente, Tatiana M; Silva, Aline A da; Borges, Bruna C; Teixeira, Samuel C; Santos, Marlus A Dos; Silva, Claudio V da

    2016-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has high biological and biochemical diversity and variable tissue tropism. Here we aimed to verify the kinetics of cytokine and chemokine in situ secretion in animals infected with two distinct T. cruzi strains after oral inoculation. Also, we investigated parasite migration, residence and pathological damage in stomach, heart and spleen. Our results showed that host immune response against T. cruzi infection is an intricate phenomenon that depends on the parasite strain, on the infected organ and on the time point of the infection. We believe that a wide comprehension of host immune response will potentially provide basis for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies in order to clear parasitism and minimize tissue injury. In this context, we find that KC poses as a possible tool to be used. PMID:26827742

  2. HSV-1-induced chemokine expression via IFI16-dependent and IFI16-independent pathways in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søby, Stine; Laursen, Rune R; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen; Melchjorsen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    -mediated chemokine responses are not dependent on TLR2 and TLR9 in human macrophages. Here, we investigated the role of the recently identified innate IFN-inducible DNA receptor IFI16 during HSV-1 infection in human macrophages. METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were purified from buffy coats and...... monocytes were differentiated to macrophages. Macrophages infected with HSV-1 were analyzed using siRNA-mediated knock-down of IFI16 by real-time PCR, ELISA, and Western blotting. RESULTS: We determined that both CXCL10 and CCL3 are induced independent of HSV-1 replication. IFI16 mediates CCL3 m......RNA accumulation during early HSV-1 infection. In contrast, CXCL10 was induced independently of IFI16. CONCLUSIONS: Our data provide the first evidence of HSV-1-induced innate immune responses via IFI16 in human primary macrophages. In addition, the data suggest that at least one additional unidentified receptor...

  3. Transcriptional expression profile of cultured human embryonic stem cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Marlen; Siegert, Antje; Eckert, Klaus; Gerlach, Jörg; Haider, Wolfram; Fichtner, Iduna

    2012-03-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the spontaneous differentiation of human embryonic stem cells in vitro and in vivo and to investigate the influence of in vitro partial differentiation on in vivo teratoma formation in immunodeficient mice. Standardized methods are needed for long-term cultivation of undifferentiated stem cells and the multilineage cells that spontaneously differentiate from them. Accordingly, SA002 human embryonic stem cells were cultured on irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblasts cells, on irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts, or were cultured feeder-free using matrigel. Expression of marker protein transcripts was analyzed in undifferentiated and differentiated stem cells using real-time PCR, and both types of stem cells were transplanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice to test for teratoma formation. Teratoma histology and expression profiles were subsequently characterized. Cells cultured using different conditions and morphologically undifferentiated cells had comparable marker expression profiles, showing high expression levels of markers for pluripotency and low-to-moderate expression levels of germ layer markers. Cells showing spontaneous differentiation that were cultured in feeder-free conditions in the absence of basic fibroblast growth factor demonstrated slight upregulation of sex determining region Y-box 17, connexin 32, and albumin expression at early time points, as well as expression of octamer-binding transcription factor 4, proteoglycan epitopes on podocalyxin (Trafalgar), and alkaline phosphatase. At later time points, expression of hepatocyte nuclear factor-3-beta, and hepatocyte nuclear factor-4-alpha and alpha fetoprotein was upregulated, whereas beta-3-tubulin, chemokine receptor, nestin, sex-determining region Y-box 17, and connexin 32 were downregulated. Expression of pluripotency markers remained high, and hematopoetic markers were not expressed. SA002 cells that showed

  4. High beta-chemokine expression levels in lymphoid tissues of simian/human immunodeficiency virus 89.6-vaccinated rhesus macaques are associated with uncontrolled replication of simian immunodeficiency virus challenge inoculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFranco-Scheuch, Lisa; Abel, Kristina; Makori, Norbert; Rothaeusler, Kristina; Miller, Christopher J

    2004-06-01

    Viral suppression by noncytolytic CD8+ T cells, in addition to that by classic antiviral CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes, has been described for human immunodeficiency virus and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infections. However, the role of soluble effector molecules, especially beta-chemokines, in antiviral immunity is still controversial. In an attenuated vaccine model, approximately 60% of animals immunized with simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) 89.6 and then challenged intravaginally with SIVmac239 controlled viral replication (viral RNA level in plasma, Compton, T. Rourke, D. Montefiori, D. Lu, K. Rothaeusler, L. Fritts, K. Bost, and C. J. Miller, J. Virol. 77:3099-3118, 2003). To determine the in vivo importance of beta-chemokine secretion and CD8+-T-cell proliferation in the control of viral replication in this vaccine model, we examined the relationship between viral RNA levels in the axillary and genital lymph nodes of vaccinated, protected (n = 20) and vaccinated, unprotected (n = 11) monkeys by measuring beta-chemokine mRNA levels and protein expression, the frequency of CD8+ T cells expressing beta-chemokines, and the extent of CD8+-T-cell proliferation. Tissues from uninfected (n = 3) and unvaccinated, SIVmac239-infected (n = 9) monkeys served as controls. Axillary and genital lymph nodes from unvaccinated and vaccinated, unprotected monkeys had significantly higher beta-chemokine mRNA expression levels and increased numbers of beta-chemokine-positive cells than did vaccinated, protected animals. Furthermore, the lymph nodes of vaccinated, unprotected monkeys had significantly higher numbers of beta-chemokine(+) CD8+ T cells than did vaccinated, protected monkeys. Lymph nodes from vaccinated, unprotected animals also had significantly more CD8+-T-cell proliferation and marked lymph node hyperplasia than the lymph nodes of vaccinated, protected monkeys. Thus, higher levels of virus replication were associated with increased beta-chemokine

  5. Gene Expression Profile Changes in Germinating Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongli He; Chao Han; Pingfang Yang

    2011-01-01

    Water absorption is a prerequisite for seed germination.During imbibition,water influx causes the resumption of many physiological and metabolic processes in growing seed.In order to obtain more complete knowledge about the mechanism of seed germination,two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was applied to investigate the protein profile changes of rice seed during the first 48 h of imbibition.Thirtynine differentially expressed proteins were identified,including 19 down-regulated and 20 up-regulated proteins.Storage proteins and some seed development- and desiccation-associated proteins were down regulated.The changed patterns of these proteins indicated extensive mobilization of seed reserves.By contrast,catabolism-associated proteins were up regulated upon imbibition.Semi-quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that most of the genes encoding the down- or upregulated proteins were also down or up regulated at mRNA level.The expression of these genes was largely consistent at mRNA and protein levels.In providing additional information concerning gene regulation in early plant life,this study will facilitate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of seed germination.

  6. Gene Expression Profiling of Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowden Nikola A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a rare recessive disorder that is characterized by extreme sensitivity to UV light. UV light exposure results in the formation of DNA damage such as cyclobutane dimers and (6-4 photoproducts. Nucleotide excision repair (NER orchestrates the removal of cyclobutane dimers and (6-4 photoproducts as well as some forms of bulky chemical DNA adducts. The disease XP is comprised of 7 complementation groups (XP-A to XP-G, which represent functional deficiencies in seven different genes, all of which are believed to be involved in NER. The main clinical feature of XP is various forms of skin cancers; however, neurological degeneration is present in XPA, XPB, XPD and XPG complementation groups. The relationship between NER and other types of DNA repair processes is now becoming evident but the exact relationships between the different complementation groups remains to be precisely determined. Using gene expression analysis we have identified similarities and differences after UV light exposure between the complementation groups XP-A, XP-C, XP-D, XP-E, XP-F, XP-G and an unaffected control. The results reveal that there is a graded change in gene expression patterns between the mildest, most similar to the control response (XP-E and the severest form (XP-A of the disease, with the exception of XP-D. Distinct differences between the complementation groups with neurological symptoms (XP-A, XP-D and XP-G and without (XP-C, XP-E and XP-F were also identified. Therefore, this analysis has revealed distinct gene expression profiles for the XP complementation groups and the first step towards understanding the neurological symptoms of XP.

  7. Integrated Analysis of Expression Profile Based on Differentially Expressed Genes in Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huaqiang; Qiu, Zeting; Gao, Shaowei; Chen, Qinchang; Li, Si; Tan, Wulin; Liu, Xiaochen; Wang, Zhongxing

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of death, only second to heart disease. Molecular investigations about stroke are in acute shortage nowadays. This study is intended to explore a gene expression profile after brain ischemia reperfusion. Meta-analysis, differential expression analysis, and integrated analysis were employed on an eight microarray series. We explored the functions and pathways of target genes in gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis and constructed a protein-protein interaction network. Meta-analysis identified 360 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) for Mus musculus and 255 for Rattus norvegicus. Differential expression analysis identified 44 DEGs for Mus musculus and 21 for Rattus norvegicus. Timp1 and Lcn2 were overexpressed in both species. The cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and chemokine signaling pathway were highly enriched for the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway. We have exhibited a global view of the potential molecular differences between middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) animal model and sham for Mus musculus or Rattus norvegicus, including the biological process and enriched pathways in DEGs. This research helps contribute to a clearer understanding of the inflammation process and accurate identification of ischemic infarction stages, which might be transformed into a therapeutic approach. PMID:27213359

  8. Integrated Analysis of Expression Profile Based on Differentially Expressed Genes in Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaqiang Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the most common causes of death, only second to heart disease. Molecular investigations about stroke are in acute shortage nowadays. This study is intended to explore a gene expression profile after brain ischemia reperfusion. Meta-analysis, differential expression analysis, and integrated analysis were employed on an eight microarray series. We explored the functions and pathways of target genes in gene ontology (GO enrichment analysis and constructed a protein-protein interaction network. Meta-analysis identified 360 differentially expressed genes (DEGs for Mus musculus and 255 for Rattus norvegicus. Differential expression analysis identified 44 DEGs for Mus musculus and 21 for Rattus norvegicus. Timp1 and Lcn2 were overexpressed in both species. The cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and chemokine signaling pathway were highly enriched for the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway. We have exhibited a global view of the potential molecular differences between middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO animal model and sham for Mus musculus or Rattus norvegicus, including the biological process and enriched pathways in DEGs. This research helps contribute to a clearer understanding of the inflammation process and accurate identification of ischemic infarction stages, which might be transformed into a therapeutic approach.

  9. Integrated Analysis of Expression Profile Based on Differentially Expressed Genes in Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huaqiang; Qiu, Zeting; Gao, Shaowei; Chen, Qinchang; Li, Si; Tan, Wulin; Liu, Xiaochen; Wang, Zhongxing

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of death, only second to heart disease. Molecular investigations about stroke are in acute shortage nowadays. This study is intended to explore a gene expression profile after brain ischemia reperfusion. Meta-analysis, differential expression analysis, and integrated analysis were employed on an eight microarray series. We explored the functions and pathways of target genes in gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis and constructed a protein-protein interaction network. Meta-analysis identified 360 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) for Mus musculus and 255 for Rattus norvegicus. Differential expression analysis identified 44 DEGs for Mus musculus and 21 for Rattus norvegicus. Timp1 and Lcn2 were overexpressed in both species. The cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and chemokine signaling pathway were highly enriched for the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway. We have exhibited a global view of the potential molecular differences between middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) animal model and sham for Mus musculus or Rattus norvegicus, including the biological process and enriched pathways in DEGs. This research helps contribute to a clearer understanding of the inflammation process and accurate identification of ischemic infarction stages, which might be transformed into a therapeutic approach. PMID:27213359

  10. Expression profiling of insulin action in human myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Gaster, Michael; Oakeley, Edward J;

    2004-01-01

    ), 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 h, mRNA contents were analyzed in human myotubes for each time point using Affymetrix DNA chip technology. Insulin treatment induced an inflammatory and pro-angiogenic response in the myotubes, with expression of early response factors followed by inflammatory chemokines...... diabetic skeletal muscle. We conclude, (i) that insulin induces a time-dependent inflammatory and pro-angiogenic transcriptional response in cultured human myotubes, (ii) that myotubes in vitro retain a gene expression pattern specific for type 2 diabetes and sharing five genes with that of type 2 diabetic......Myotube cultures from patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) represent an experimental in vitro model of T2DM that offers a possibility to perform gene expression studies under standardized conditions. During a time-course of insulin stimulation (1 microM) at 5.5 mM glucose for 0 (no insulin...

  11. Localization and Expression of CCR3 and CCR5 by Interleukin-1ß in the RIN-5AH Insulin-Producing Model System: A Protective Mechanism Involving Down-Regulation of Chemokine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassiliadis S

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta has been considered to be an immune effector molecule in insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. As such, we examined its role on chemokine receptors which, when expressed in the pancreas, have also been associated with the development of type I autoimmune diabetes. DESIGN AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The presence of membrane and cytoplasmic levels of CCR3 and CCR5 expression is assessed by immunofluorescence in control and interleukin-1beta-treated RIN-5AH cells. The cytoplasmic expression is also shown by confocal microscopy as assessed by the brightness of the cells whereas enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detects secreted CCR3 and CCR5 molecules by comparing optical density values as these derive from the control and the treated cells. Cell-fractionation experiments show the exact location of the intracellular pools of the chemokine receptors by using the rab7 monoclonal antibody as a guiding molecule. RESULTS: Interleukin-1beta down-regulates constitutively expressed surface CCR3 and CCR5 levels implying receptor internalization for re-utilization or destruction, secretion or both. Cytoplasmic immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy demonstrate cellular retention of chemokine receptors by interleukin-1beta which may be released in the absence of interleukin-1beta as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Finally, cell-fractionation shows the presence of both receptors in endosomes exhibiting an increasing density after interleukin-1beta treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Given the association of chemokine receptors with progression to diabetes, it appears that interleukin-1beta-induced down-regulation of CCR3 and CCR5 promotes a protective mechanism against cellular destruction. The major role of interleukin-1beta is to maintain these molecules within the endosomes. Thus, interleukin-1beta modulates the movement and the expression of constitutively expressed chemokine receptors

  12. Increased expression of the chemokines CXCL1 and MIP-1α by resident brain cells precedes neutrophil infiltration in the brain following prolonged soman-induced status epilepticus in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koemeter-Cox Andrew I

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to the nerve agent soman (GD causes neuronal cell death and impaired behavioral function dependent on the induction of status epilepticus (SE. Little is known about the maturation of this pathological process, though neuroinflammation and infiltration of neutrophils are prominent features. The purpose of this study is to quantify the regional and temporal progression of early chemotactic signals, describe the cellular expression of these factors and the relationship between expression and neutrophil infiltration in damaged brain using a rat GD seizure model. Methods Protein levels of 4 chemokines responsible for neutrophil infiltration and activation were quantified up to 72 hours in multiple brain regions (i.e. piriform cortex, hippocampus and thalamus following SE onset using multiplex bead immunoassays. Chemokines with significantly increased protein levels were localized to resident brain cells (i.e. neurons, astrocytes, microglia and endothelial cells. Lastly, neutrophil infiltration into these brain regions was quantified and correlated to the expression of these chemokines. Results We observed significant concentration increases for CXCL1 and MIP-1α after seizure onset. CXCL1 expression originated from neurons and endothelial cells while MIP-1α was expressed by neurons and microglia. Lastly, the expression of these chemokines directly preceded and positively correlated with significant neutrophil infiltration in the brain. These data suggest that following GD-induced SE, a strong chemotactic response originating from various brain cells, recruits circulating neutrophils to the injured brain. Conclusions A strong induction of neutrophil attractant chemokines occurs following GD-induced SE resulting in neutrophil influx into injured brain tissues. This process may play a key role in the progressive secondary brain pathology observed in this model though further study is warranted.

  13. Sulindac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, selectively inhibits interferon-γ-induced expression of the chemokine CXCL9 gene in mouse macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to exert an anti-tumor effect on several types of cancer. To determine the effect of sulindac on intracellular signaling pathways in host immune cells such as macrophages, we investigated the effect of the drug on interferon gamma (IFNγ)-induced expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and other genes in mouse macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Sulindac, but not aspirin or sodium salicylate, inhibited IFNγ-induced expression of the CXC ligand 9 (CXCL9) mRNA, a chemokine for activated T cells, whereas the interferon-induced expression of CXCL10 or IFN regulatory factor-1 was not affected by sulindac. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that sulindac inhibited IFNγ-induced promoter activity of the CXCL9 gene. Surprisingly, sulindac had no inhibitory effect on IFNγ-induced STAT1 activation; however, constitutive nuclear factor κB activity was suppressed by the drug. These results indicate that sulindac selectively inhibited IFNγ-inducible gene expression without inhibiting STAT1 activation

  14. Impact of intramammary treatment on gene expression profiles in bovine Escherichia coli mastitis.

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    Anja Sipka

    Full Text Available Clinical mastitis caused by E. coli accounts for significant production losses and animal welfare concerns on dairy farms worldwide. The benefits of therapeutic intervention in mild to moderate cases are incompletely understood. We investigated the effect of intramammary treatment with cefapirin alone or in combination with prednisolone on gene expression profiles in experimentally-induced E. coli mastitis in six mid-lactating Holstein Friesian cows. Cows were challenged with E. coli in 3 quarters and received 4 doses of 300 mg cefapirin in one quarter and 4 doses of 300 mg cefapirin together with 20 mg prednisolone in another quarter. At 24 h (n = 3 or 48 h (n = 3 post-challenge, tissue samples from control and treated quarters were collected for microarray analysis. Gene expression analysis of challenged, un-treated quarters revealed an up-regulation of transcripts associated with immune response functions compared to un-challenged quarters. Both treatments resulted in down-regulation of these transcripts compared to challenged, un-treated quarters most prominently for genes representing Chemokine and TLR-signaling pathways. Gene expression of Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein (LBP, CCL2 and CXCL2 were only significantly down-regulated in cefapirin-prednisolone-treated quarters compared to un-treated controls. Down-regulation of chemokines was further confirmed on the basis of protein levels in milk whey for CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL8 in both treatments with a greater decrease in cefapirin-prednisolone-treated quarters. The data reveal a significant effect of treatment on cell recruitment with a more pronounced effect in cefapirin-prednisolone treated quarters. Provided a rapid bacteriological clearance, combination therapy may prevent neutrophil-induced tissue damage and promote recovery of the gland.

  15. CXC chemokine CXCL12 tissue expression and circulating levels in peptic ulcer patients with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Vahid; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Mirzaee, Vahid; Khorramdelazad, Hossein

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is among the most prevalent human infections. CXCL12 is a well-known CXC chemokine involved in inflammation and play major roles in angiogenesis. There is currently very limited data on the role of CXCL12 in peptic ulcer disease. Hence, we aimed to explore whether CXCL12 is involved in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer induced by H. pylori. In this study, we enrolled 102 H. pylori-infected patients, including 51 with active ulcer (GA) and 51 with healing ulcer (GH). We also recruited 50 healthy subjects as control, which did not show any sign or symptoms of chronic inflammatory diseases, infection, or immune-related disorders. Endoscopy was performed to determine the stage of the disease. ELISA was used for detection of H. pylori infection and CXCL12 measurement. We also employed western blotting to detect CXCL12 in ulcerative lesions of H. pylori. Demographic data were also collected by questionnaire. Our results demonstrated that CXCL12 serum levels in GA group (151.8±18.31pg/mL) were significantly higher than those in GH (36.89±6.78pg/mL) and control groups (33.77±9.12pg/mL) (Pdisease. PMID:27269177

  16. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in mucosal homeostasis at the intestinal epithelial barrier in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Noah P; Vongsa, Rebecca A; Wendt, Michael K; Dwinell, Michael B

    2008-07-01

    Chemokines, a large family of small chemoattractive cytokines, and their receptors play an integral role in the regulation of the immune response and homeostasis. The ability of chemokines to attract specific populations of immune cells sets them apart from other chemoattractants. Chemokines produced within the gastrointestinal mucosa are critical players in directing the balance between physiological and pathophysiological inflammation in health, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and the progression to colon cancer. In addition to the well-characterized role of chemokines in directed trafficking of immune cells to the gut mucosa, the expression of chemokine receptors on the cells of the epithelium makes them active participants in the chemokine signaling network. Recent findings demonstrate an important role for chemokines and chemokine receptors in epithelial barrier repair and maintenance as well as an intricate involvement in limiting metastasis of colonic carcinoma. Increased recognition of the association between barrier defects and inflammation and the subsequent progression to cancer in IBD thus implicates chemokines as key regulators of mucosal homeostasis and disease pathogenesis. PMID:18452220

  17. Methodological Considerations For Gene Expression Profiling Of Human Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Atz, Mary; Walsh, David; Cartagena, Preston; Li, Jun; Evans, Simon; Choudary, Prabhakara; Overman, Kevin; Stein, Richard; Tomita, Hiro; Potkin, Steven; Myers, Rick; Watson, Stanley J.; Jones, E G; Akil, Huda; Bunney, William E.

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of postmortem brain tissue represent important resources for understanding neuropsychiatric illnesses. The impact(s) of quality covariables on the analysis and results of gene expression studies are important questions. This paper addressed critical variables which might affect gene expression in two brain regions. Four broad groups of quality indicators in gene expression profiling studies (clinical, tissue, RNA, and microarray quality) were identified. These quality...

  18. Gene expression profiling of cutaneous wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ena

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the sequence of events leading to wound repair has been described at the cellular and, to a limited extent, at the protein level this process has yet to be fully elucidated. Genome wide transcriptional analysis tools promise to further define the global picture of this complex progression of events. Study Design This study was part of a placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial in which basal cell carcinomas were treated topically with an immunomodifier – toll-like receptor 7 agonist: imiquimod. The fourteen patients with basal cell carcinoma in the placebo arm of the trial received placebo treatment consisting solely of vehicle cream. A skin punch biopsy was obtained immediately before treatment and at the end of the placebo treatment (after 2, 4 or 8 days. 17.5K cDNA microarrays were utilized to profile the biopsy material. Results Four gene signatures whose expression changed relative to baseline (before wound induction by the pre-treatment biopsy were identified. The largest group was comprised predominantly of inflammatory genes whose expression was increased throughout the study. Two additional signatures were observed which included preferentially pro-inflammatory genes in the early post-treatment biopsies (2 days after pre-treatment biopsies and repair and angiogenesis genes in the later (4 to 8 days biopsies. The fourth and smallest set of genes was down-regulated throughout the study. Early in wound healing the expression of markers of both M1 and M2 macrophages were increased, but later M2 markers predominated. Conclusion The initial response to a cutaneous wound induces powerful transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory stimuli which may alert the host defense. Subsequently and in the absence of infection, inflammation subsides and it is replaced by angiogenesis and remodeling. Understanding this transition which may be driven by a change from a mixed macrophage population to predominately M2

  19. Effects of oral exposure to naturally-occurring and synthetic deoxynivalenol congeners on proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNA expression in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foodborne mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) induces a ribotoxic stress response in mononuclear phagocytes that mediate aberrant multi-organ upregulation of TNF-α, interleukins and chemokines in experimental animals. While other DON congeners also exist as food contaminants or pharmacologically-active derivatives, it is not known how these compounds affect expression of these cytokine genes in vivo. To address this gap, we compared in mice the acute effects of oral DON exposure to that of seven relevant congeners on splenic expression of representative cytokine mRNAs after 2 and 6 h. Congeners included the 8-ketotrichothecenes 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), fusarenon X (FX), nivalenol (NIV), the plant metabolite DON-3-glucoside (D3G) and two synthetic DON derivatives with novel satiety-inducing properties (EN139528 and EN139544). DON markedly induced transient upregulation of TNF-α IL-1β, IL-6, CXCL-2, CCL-2 and CCL-7 mRNA expressions. The two ADONs also evoked mRNA expression of these genes but to a relatively lesser extent. FX induced more persistent responses than the other DON congeners and, compared to DON, was: 1) more potent in inducing IL-1β mRNA, 2) approximately equipotent in the induction of TNF-α and CCL-2 mRNAs, and 3) less potent at upregulating IL-6, CXCL-2, and CCL-2 mRNAs. EN139528's effects were similar to NIV, the least potent 8-ketotrichothecene, while D3G and EN139544 were largely incapable of eliciting cytokine or chemokine mRNA responses. Taken together, the results presented herein provide important new insights into the potential of naturally-occurring and synthetic DON congeners to elicit aberrant mRNA upregulation of cytokines associated with acute and chronic trichothecene toxicity. - Highlights: • We compared effects of DON congeners on biomarker proinflammatory genes in mice. • Oral DON induced splenic IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α,CXCL-2, CCL-2 and CCL-7 mRNAs. • 8-Ketotrichothecene ranking

  20. Effects of oral exposure to naturally-occurring and synthetic deoxynivalenol congeners on proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNA expression in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wenda [College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Dept. of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); He, Kaiyu [Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Dept. of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zhou, Hui-Ren [Dept. of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Berthiller, Franz [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Mycotoxin Metabolism and Center for Analytical Chemistry, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Tulln (Austria); Adam, Gerhard [Dept. of Applied Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko [Food and Life Sciences, Azabu University, 1-17-71 Fuchinobe Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa Pref., 252-5201 (Japan); Watanabe, Maiko [Division of Microbiology, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Krantis, Anthony [Dept. of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa (Canada); Durst, Tony [Dept. of Chemistry, University of Ottawa (Canada); Zhang, Haibin [College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Pestka, James J., E-mail: pestka@msu.edu [Dept. of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Dept. of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The foodborne mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) induces a ribotoxic stress response in mononuclear phagocytes that mediate aberrant multi-organ upregulation of TNF-α, interleukins and chemokines in experimental animals. While other DON congeners also exist as food contaminants or pharmacologically-active derivatives, it is not known how these compounds affect expression of these cytokine genes in vivo. To address this gap, we compared in mice the acute effects of oral DON exposure to that of seven relevant congeners on splenic expression of representative cytokine mRNAs after 2 and 6 h. Congeners included the 8-ketotrichothecenes 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), fusarenon X (FX), nivalenol (NIV), the plant metabolite DON-3-glucoside (D3G) and two synthetic DON derivatives with novel satiety-inducing properties (EN139528 and EN139544). DON markedly induced transient upregulation of TNF-α IL-1β, IL-6, CXCL-2, CCL-2 and CCL-7 mRNA expressions. The two ADONs also evoked mRNA expression of these genes but to a relatively lesser extent. FX induced more persistent responses than the other DON congeners and, compared to DON, was: 1) more potent in inducing IL-1β mRNA, 2) approximately equipotent in the induction of TNF-α and CCL-2 mRNAs, and 3) less potent at upregulating IL-6, CXCL-2, and CCL-2 mRNAs. EN139528's effects were similar to NIV, the least potent 8-ketotrichothecene, while D3G and EN139544 were largely incapable of eliciting cytokine or chemokine mRNA responses. Taken together, the results presented herein provide important new insights into the potential of naturally-occurring and synthetic DON congeners to elicit aberrant mRNA upregulation of cytokines associated with acute and chronic trichothecene toxicity. - Highlights: • We compared effects of DON congeners on biomarker proinflammatory genes in mice. • Oral DON induced splenic IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α,CXCL-2, CCL-2 and CCL-7 mRNAs. • 8-Ketotrichothecene ranking

  1. Essential roles of the interaction between cancer cell-derived chemokine, CCL4, and intra-bone CCR5-expressing fibroblasts in breast cancer bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Soichiro; Baba, Tomohisa; Nishimura, Tatsunori; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Hashimoto, Shin-Ichi; Gotoh, Noriko; Mukaida, Naofumi

    2016-08-01

    From a murine breast cancer cell line, 4T1, we established a subclone, 4T1.3, which consistently metastasizes to bone upon its injection into the mammary fat pad. 4T1.3 clone exhibited similar proliferation rate and migration capacity as the parental clone. However, the intra-bone injection of 4T1.3 clone caused larger tumors than that of the parental cells, accompanied with increases in fibroblast, but not osteoclast or osteoblast numbers. 4T1.3 clone displayed an enhanced expression of a chemokine, CCL4, but not its specific receptor, CCR5. CCL4 shRNA-transfection of 4T1.3 clone had few effects on its in vitro properties, but reduced the tumorigenicity arising from the intra-bone injection. Moreover, intra-bone injection of 4T1.3 clone caused smaller tumors in mice deficient in CCR5 or those receiving CCR5 antagonist than in wild-type mice. The reduced tumor formation was associated with attenuated accumulation of CCR5-positive fibroblasts expressing connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)/CCN2. Tumor cell-derived CCL4 could induce fibroblasts to express CTGF/CCN2, which could support 4T1.3 clone proliferation under hypoxic culture conditions. Thus, the CCL4-CCR5 axis can contribute to breast cancer metastasis to bone by mediating the interaction between cancer cells and fibroblasts in bone cavity. PMID:27177471

  2. Gene expression profiles of mouse spermatogenesis during recovery from irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Fozia J; Tanaka, Masami; Nielsen, John E;

    2009-01-01

    cellular changes that happen during recovery from irradiation by means of histology. We have earlier generated gene expression profiles during induction of spermatogenesis in mouse postnatal developing testes and found a correlation between profiles and the expressing cell types. The aim of the present...... work was to utilize the link between expression profile and cell types to follow the cellular changes that occur during post-irradiation recovery of spermatogenesis in order to describe recovery by means of gene expression. METHODS: Adult mouse testes were subjected to irradiation with 1 Gy or a...

  3. Significance of chemokine and chemokine receptors in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Janine Mayra; Soave, Danilo Figueiredo; Moreira Dos Santos, Tálita Pollyanna; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Russo, Remo Castro; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida da

    2016-05-01

    Chemokines are small chemotactic proteins that coordinate circulation of immune/inflammatory cells throughout body compartments. Because of this property chemokines and their cell surface receptors are implicated in several physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer. These molecules are expressed by neoplastic or stromal cells and have effects at tumor primary site (e.g. stimulating angiogenesis and tumor cells motility) and lymph nodes (creating a gradient to direct migration of neoplastic cells). In this article we review the current knowledge about the function(s) of chemokines and receptors in squamous cell carcinoma from the oral cavity and head and neck region. Accumulating evidence suggests some chemokine(s) and receptor(s) as potential targets in adjuvant therapies for these malignancies. PMID:27086481

  4. Chemokine receptor expression in the human ectocervix: implications for infection by the human immunodeficiency virus-type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Grant R; Asin, Susana; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; Gonzalez, Jorge L; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W; Howell, Alexandra L

    2004-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) is a sexually transmitted pathogen that can infect cells in the female reproductive tract (FRT). The mechanism of viral transmission within the FRT and the mode of viral spread to the periphery are not well understood. To characterize the frequency of potential targets of HIV infection within the FRT, we performed a systematic study of the expression of HIV receptors (CD4, galactosyl ceramide (GalCer)) and coreceptors (CXCR4 and CCR5) on epithelial cells and leucocytes from the ectocervix. The ectocervix is a likely first site of contact with HIV-1 following heterosexual transmission, and expression of these receptors is likely to correlate with susceptibility to viral infection. We obtained ectocervical tissue specimens from women undergoing hysterectomy, and compared expression of these receptors among patients who were classified as being in the proliferative or secretory phases of their menstrual cycle at the time of hysterectomy, as well as from postmenopausal tissues. Epithelial cells from tissues at early and mid-proliferative stages of the menstrual cycle express CD4, although by late proliferative and secretory phases, CD4 expression was absent or weak. In contrast, GalCer expression was uniform in all stages of the menstrual cycle. CXCR4 expression was not detected on ectocervical epithelial cells and positive staining was only evident on individual leucocytes. In contrast, CCR5 expression was detected on ectocervical epithelial cells from tissues at all stages of the menstrual cycle. Overall, our results suggest that HIV infection of cells in the ectocervix could most likely occur through GalCer and CCR5. These findings are important to define potential targets of HIV-1 infection within the FRT, and for the future design of approaches to reduce the susceptibility of women to infection by HIV-1. PMID:15554931

  5. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, T B; Wittenhagen, P;

    2007-01-01

    To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta).......To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta)....

  6. Neurotactin, a membrane-anchored chemokine upregulated in brain inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y; Lloyd, C; Zhou, H; Dolich, S; Deeds, J; Gonzalo, J A; Vath, J; Gosselin, M; Ma, J; Dussault, B; Woolf, E; Alperin, G; Culpepper, J; Gutierrez-Ramos, J C; Gearing, D

    1997-06-01

    Chemokines are small secreted proteins that stimulate the directional migration of leukocytes and mediate inflammation. During screening of a murine choroid plexus complementary DNA library, we identified a new chemokine, designated neurotactin. Unlike other chemokines, neurotactin has a unique cysteine pattern, Cys-X-X-X-Cys, and is predicted to be a type 1 membrane protein. Full-length recombinant neurotactin is localized on the surface of transfected 293 cells. Recombinant neurotactin containing the chemokine domain is chemotactic for neutrophils both in vitro and in vivo. Neurotactin messenger RNA is predominantly expressed in normal murine brain and its protein expression in activated brain microglia is upregulated in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, as well as in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide. Distinct from all other chemokine genes, the neurotactin gene is localized to human chromosome 16q. Consequently we propose that neurotactin represents a new delta-chemokine family and that it may play a role in brain inflammation processes. PMID:9177350

  7. Gene expression profiling of liver from dairy cows treated intra-mammary with lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vels Lotte

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver plays a profound role in the acute phase response (APR observed in the early phase of acute bovine mastitis caused by Escherichia coli (E. coli. To gain an insight into the genes and pathways involved in hepatic APR of dairy cows we performed a global gene expression analysis of liver tissue sampled at different time points before and after intra-mammary (IM exposure to E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS treatment. Results Approximately 20% target transcripts were differentially expressed and eight co-expression clusters were identified. Each cluster had a unique time-dependent expression profile and consisted of genes involved in different biological processes. Our findings suggest that APR in the liver is triggered by the activation of signaling pathways that are involved with common and hepatic-specific transcription factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines. These mediators in turn stimulated or repressed the expression of genes encoding acute phase proteins (APP, collectins, complement components, chemokines, cell adhesion molecules and key metabolic enzymes during the APR. Hormones, anti-inflammatory and other hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA linked mediators also seemed to participate in APR. Conclusion Performing global gene expression analysis on liver tissue from IM LPS treated cows verified that the liver plays a major role in the APR of E. coli mastitis, and that the bovine hepatic APR follows the same pattern as other mammals when they are challenged with LPS. Our work presents the first insight into the dynamic changes in gene expression in the liver that influences the induction, kinetics and clinical outcome of the APR in dairy cows.

  8. Requirement of Interleukin 17 Receptor Signaling for Lung Cxc Chemokine and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Expression, Neutrophil Recruitment, and Host Defense

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Peng; Rodriguez, Fred H.; Kanaly, Suzanne; Stocking, Kim L.; Schurr, Jill; Schwarzenberger, Paul; Oliver, Peter; Huang, Weitao; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Jason; Shellito, Judd E.; Bagby, Greg J.; Nelson, Steve; Charrier, Keith; Peschon, Jacques J.

    2001-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is an increasing complication of HIV infection and inversely correlates with the CD4+ lymphocyte count. Interleukin (IL)-17 is a cytokine produced principally by CD4+ T cells, which induces granulopoiesis via granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) production and induces CXC chemokines. We hypothesized that IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) signaling is critical for G-CSF and CXC chemokine production and lung host defenses. To test this, we used a model of Klebsiella pneumonia...

  9. PRAME gene expression profile in medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Maria Vulcani-Freitas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant tumors of central nervous system in the childhood. The treatment is severe, harmful and, thus, has a dismal prognosis. As PRAME is present in various cancers, including meduloblastoma, and has limited expression in normal tissues, this antigen can be an ideal vaccine target for tumor immunotherapy. In order to find a potential molecular target, we investigated PRAME expression in medulloblastoma fragments and we compare the results with the clinical features of each patient. Analysis of gene expression was performed by real-time quantitative PCR from 37 tumor samples. The Mann-Whitney test was used to analysis the relationship between gene expression and clinical characteristics. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to evaluate survival. PRAME was overexpressed in 84% samples. But no statistical association was found between clinical features and PRAME overexpression. Despite that PRAME gene could be a strong candidate for immunotherapy since it is highly expressed in medulloblastomas.

  10. CpG-ODNs induces up-regulated expression of chemokine CCL9 in mouse macrophages and microglia

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ravindran, C.; Cheng, Y.-C.; Liang, S.-M.

    with a variety of CpG-ODN sequences. The CpG-ODNs-mediated induction of CCL9 was TLR9/MyD88 dependent and associated with activation of stress kinases, particularly ERK, p38 MAPK and PI3K. The expression of CCR1 was also significantly increased by Cp...

  11. CXCL12 chemokine expression and secretion regulates colorectal carcinoma cell anoikis through Bim-mediated intrinsic apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke J Drury

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Resistance to anoikis, apoptosis triggered by a loss of cellular adhesion to the underlying extracellular matrix, is a hallmark of metastatic cancer. Previously we have shown re-establishment of CXCL12 expression in colorectal carcinoma cells inhibits metastasis by enhancing anoikis sensitivity. The objective of these studies was to define the signaling mechanisms regulating CXCL12-mediated anoikis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adhesion, examined by crystal violet staining, immunofluorescence microscopy, and immunoblot analysis indicated decreased focal adhesion signaling corresponding with loss of adhesion in cells constitutively simulated by CXCL12. Loss of adhesion was inhibited by pertussis toxin treatment, indicating CXCL12 regulating anoikis through G(αi-protein coupled receptors. Non-adherent HCT116 and HT29 colorectal carcinoma cells expressing CXCL12 exhibited enhanced anoikis sensitivity by propidium iodide staining, caspase activity assays, and immunoblot compared to GFP control cells. CXCL12 producing carcinomas cultured on poly-HEMA displayed heightened Bim and loss of Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 preceding cytochrome c release, and caspase-9 activation. RNAi knockdown of Bim reversed anoikis sensitivity of CXCL12-expressing cells and fostered increased soft-agar foci formation and hepatic tumors in an orthotopic mouse model of metastasis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate CXCL12 provides a barrier to metastasis by increasing anoikis via activation of a Bim-mediated intrinsic apoptotic pathway. These results underscore the importance of retaining CXCL12 expression to sensitize colorectal carcinomas to anoikis and minimize tumor progression.

  12. Pentraxin 3 (PTX3 expression in allergic asthmatic airways: role in airway smooth muscle migration and chemokine production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is a soluble pattern recognition receptor with non-redundant functions in inflammation and innate immunity. PTX3 is produced by immune and structural cells. However, very little is known about the expression of PTX3 and its role in allergic asthma. OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: We sought to determine the PTX3 expression in asthmatic airways and its function in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMC. In vivo PTX3 expression in bronchial biopsies of mild, moderate and severe asthmatics was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. PTX3 mRNA and protein were measured by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. Proliferation and migration were examined using (3H-thymidine incorporation, cell count and Boyden chamber assays. RESULTS: PTX3 immunoreactivity was increased in bronchial tissues of allergic asthmatics compared to healthy controls, and mainly localized in the smooth muscle bundle. PTX3 protein was expressed constitutively by HASMC and was significantly up-regulated by TNF, and IL-1β but not by Th2 (IL-4, IL-9, IL-13, Th1 (IFN-γ, or Th-17 (IL-17 cytokines. In vitro, HASMC released significantly higher levels of PTX3 at the baseline and upon TNF stimulation compared to airway epithelial cells (EC. Moreover, PTX3 induced CCL11/eotaxin-1 release whilst inhibited the fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2-driven HASMC chemotactic activity. CONCLUSIONS: Our data provide the first evidence that PTX3 expression is increased in asthmatic airways. HASMC can both produce and respond to PTX3. PTX3 is a potent inhibitor of HASMC migration induced by FGF-2 and can upregulate CCL11/eotaxin-1 release. These results raise the possibility that PTX3 may play a dual role in allergic asthma.

  13. Peripheral blood gene expression profiles in COPD subjects

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    To identify non-invasive gene expression markers for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we performed genome-wide expression profiling of peripheral blood samples from 12 subjects with significant airflow obstruction and an equal number of non-obstructed controls. RNA was isolated from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) and gene expression was assessed using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Tests for gene expression changes that discriminate between COPD cases (FEV1< 70% pre...

  14. Long non-coding RNA-GAS5 acts as a tumor suppressor in bladder transitional cell carcinoma via regulation of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 1 expression

    OpenAIRE

    CAO, QIFENG; Wang, Ning; QI, JUAN; GU, ZHENGQIN; SHEN, HAIBO

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important roles in diverse biological processes, including transcriptional regulation, cell growth and tumorigenesis. The present study aimed to investigate whether lncRNA-growth arrest-specific (GAS)5 regulated bladder cancer progression via regulation of chemokine (C-C) ligand (CCL)1 expression. The viability of BLX bladder cancer cells was detected using a Cell Counting kit-8 assay, and cell apoptosis was assessed by annexin V-propidium iodide double-sta...

  15. High doses of dietary zinc induce cytokines, chemokines, and apoptosis in reproductive tissues during regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, N R; Anish, D; Sastry, K V H; Saxena, V K; Nagarajan, K; Subramani, J; Leo, M D M; Shit, N; Mohan, J; Saxena, M; Ahmed, K A

    2008-06-01

    In chickens, high levels of dietary zinc cause molting, and the reproductive system undergoes complete remodeling concomitant to feather replacement. In the present study, the expression profiles of cytokines and chemokines were investigated in the ovary and oviduct of control hens and of hens induced to molt by zinc feeding. The zinc-induced feed-intake suppression, the changes in corticosterone levels, the immune cell populations in the reproductive tract, and the apoptosis of reproductive tissues were analyzed. The expression of mRNAs for interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), the avian ortholog of mammalian IL-8 (chCXCLi2), and a chicken MIP-1beta-like chemokine (chCCLi2) in the ovary and of mRNAs for IL-1beta, IL-6, IFN-gamma, transforming growth factor-beta2, chCXCLi2, and chCCLi2 in the oviduct were upregulated significantly during zinc-induced molting. A simultaneous feed-intake reduction was observed with higher expression of cytokines and chemokines. The results of the present investigation also suggested that the upregulation of corticosterone was closely associated with the increased expression of cytokines and chemokines. An increase in apoptosis within reproductive tissue during tissue regression was also noted. We had previously observed the upregulation of these cytokines expression in an earlier study (molting by feed withdrawal). However, the pattern and the level of expression were different among these two methods. These findings indicate that cytokines might be a common mediator of tissue regression during molting induced by diverse methods, although the pattern of induction is different. Thus, a high dose of dietary zinc seems to induce reproductive regression via the upregulation of cytokines and chemokines, the suppression of feed intake, and the increase in serum corticosterone, resulting finally in the apoptosis of reproductive tissues. PMID:18351392

  16. Gene Expression Profiling Predicts the Development of Oral Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Saintigny, Pierre; Zhang, Li; Fan, You-Hong; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vali; Feng, Lei; Lee, J. Jack; Kim, Edward S.; Hong, Waun Ki; Mao, Li

    2011-01-01

    Patients with oral preneoplastic lesion (OPL) have high risk of developing oral cancer. Although certain risk factors such as smoking status and histology are known, our ability to predict oral cancer risk remains poor. The study objective was to determine the value of gene expression profiling in predicting oral cancer development. Gene expression profile was measured in 86 of 162 OPL patients who were enrolled in a clinical chemoprevention trial that used the incidence of oral cancer develo...

  17. The effective impacts of Angi- Pars on Expression of Some CXC Chemokines Group in STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    mm Taghavi; F. Fatehi; G Hassanshahi; SE Hoseini; J Hasani; Z Jamali

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background & aim: Diabetes mellitus (DM) has destructive tissue effects via inducing oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Angi Pars effects on the expression of some CXC group of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Methods: This experimental study was conducted on 48 male rats. Induced diabetic rats were done by 50 mg/ kg of Streptozotocin. 56 days after induction of diabetes, rats were randomly divided into 4 groups including control, untreated diabe...

  18. A chemokine gene expression signature derived from meta-analysis predicts the pathogenicity of viral respiratory infections

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Stewart T; Tchitchek Nicolas; Ghosh Debashis; Benecke Arndt; Katze Michael G

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background During respiratory viral infections host injury occurs due in part to inappropriate host responses. In this study we sought to uncover the host transcriptional responses underlying differences between high- and low-pathogenic infections. Results From a compendium of 12 studies that included responses to influenza A subtype H5N1, reconstructed 1918 influenza A virus, and SARS coronavirus, we used meta-analysis to derive multiple gene expression signatures. We compared these...

  19. CC chemokine ligand 2 upregulates the current density and expression of TRPV1 channels and Nav1.8 sodium channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kao Der-Jang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation or nerve injury-induced upregulation and release of chemokine CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 within the dorsal root ganglion (DRG is believed to enhance the activity of DRG nociceptive neurons and cause hyperalgesia. Transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1 and tetrodotoxin (TTX-resistant Nav1.8 sodium channels play an essential role in regulating the excitability and pain transmission of DRG nociceptive neurons. We therefore tested the hypothesis that CCL2 causes peripheral sensitization of nociceptive DRG neurons by upregulating the function and expression of TRPV1 and Nav1.8 channels. Methods DRG neuronal culture was prepared from 3-week-old Sprague–Dawley rats and incubated with various concentrations of CCL2 for 24 to 36 hours. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings were performed to record TRPV1 agonist capsaicin-evoked inward currents or TTX-insensitive Na+ currents from control or CCL2-treated small DRG sensory neurons. The CCL2 effect on the mRNA expression of TRPV1 or Nav1.8 was measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR assay. Results Pretreatment of CCL2 for 24 to 36 hours dose-dependently (EC50 value = 0.6 ± 0.05 nM increased the density of capsaicin-induced currents in small putative DRG nociceptive neurons. TRPV1 mRNA expression was greatly upregulated in DRG neurons preincubated with 5 nM CCL2. Pretreating small DRG sensory neurons with CCL2 also increased the density of TTX-resistant Na+ currents with a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 value = 0.7 ± 0.06 nM. The Nav1.8 mRNA level was significantly increased in DRG neurons pretreated with CCL2. In contrast, CCL2 preincubation failed to affect the mRNA level of TTX-resistant Nav1.9. In the presence of the specific phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or Akt inhibitor IV, CCL2 pretreatment failed to increase the current density of capsaicin-evoked inward currents or TTX-insensitive Na+ currents and

  20. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo;

    2007-01-01

    A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...... differences in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (MNC) gene expression patterns between 15 newly diagnosed HT patients and 15 matched healthy controls. However, the MNC expression levels of five genes were significantly upregulated in 25 IBD patients, compared to 18 matched healthy controls (CD14, FACL2, FCN1......, RNASE2, VNN2). There was concordance in the directional change for all genes between IBD and RA patients, i.e. increased expression compared to controls. These data show that one third of the genes significantly upregulated in MNC from RA patients were upregulated in patients with other chronic...

  1. Chemokines: Small Molecules Participate in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mostafa Hosseini-Zijoud

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemokines are small protein molecules involved in cell signaling processes. They play a crucial role in many physiological and pathological processes. Chemokines are functionally classified into two categories; inflammatory/inducible and constitutive. Their biologic functional differences are the result of their receptors structural differences. Recently some studies were performed about the chemokines changes in diabetes. Inflammatory mechanisms have an important role in diabetes.Materials and Methods: In this review article we searched the keywords chemokines, diabetes, diabetes pathogenesis, and type 1 and 2 diabetes in Persian resources, PubMed and famous English-language websites through advanced search engines and found the newest studies about the role of chemokines in the pathogenesis of diabetes.Results: The results of the studies showed that diabetes and its disorders enhance the activation of immune cells and the expression of cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, SDF-1, INF-γ, TGF-β, MCP-1, IP-10, TNF-α, and RANTES; most of them have impact on the pathogenesis of diabetes.Conclusion: Comparison and analysis of the results obtained from our research and the results of performed studies in the world and Iran shows that chemokines, like other protein molecules involved in the pathogenesis and etiology of diabetes, play a role in this process.

  2. Aberrant host immune response induced by highly virulent PRRSV identified by digital gene expression tag profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Xiao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There was a large scale outbreak of the highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS in China and Vietnam during 2006 and 2007 that resulted in unusually high morbidity and mortality among pigs of all ages. The mechanisms underlying the molecular pathogenesis of the highly virulent PRRS virus (H-PRRSV remains unknown. Therefore, the relationship between pulmonary gene expression profiles after H-PRRSV infection and infection pathology were analyzed in this study using high-throughput deep sequencing and histopathology. Results H-PRRSV infection resulted in severe lung pathology. The results indicate that aberrant host innate immune responses to H-PRRSV and induction of an anti-apoptotic state could be responsible for the aggressive replication and dissemination of H-PRRSV. Prolific rapid replication of H-PRRSV could have triggered aberrant sustained expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines leading to a markedly robust inflammatory response compounded by significant cell death and increased oxidative damage. The end result was severe tissue damage and high pathogenicity. Conclusions The systems analysis utilized in this study provides a comprehensive basis for better understanding the pathogenesis of H-PRRSV. Furthermore, it allows the genetic components involved in H-PRRSV resistance/susceptibility in swine populations to be identified.

  3. Chemokine Signaling Specificity: Essential Role for the N-Terminal Domain of Chemokine Receptors†

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. Prado, Gregory; Suetomi, Katsutoshi; Shumate, David; Maxwell, Carrie; Ravindran, Aishwarya; Rajarathnam, Krishna; Navarro, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Chemokine IL-8 (CXCL8) binds to its cognate receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 to induce inflammatory responses, wound healing, tumorogenesis, and neuronal survival. Here we identify the N-loop residues in IL-8 (H18 and F21) and the receptor N-termini as the major structural determinants regulating the rate of receptor internalization, which in turn controlled the activation profile of ERK1/2, a central component of the receptor/ERK signaling pathway that dictates signal specificity. Our data further support the idea that the chemokine receptor core acts as a plastic scaffold. Thus, the diversity and intensity of inflammatory and noninflammatory responses mediated by chemokine receptors appear to be primarily determined by the initial interaction between the receptor N-terminus and the N-loop of chemokines. PMID:17630697

  4. Transcriptome profiling of primary murine monocytes, lung macrophages and lung dendritic cells reveals a distinct expression of genes involved in cell trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohmeyer Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral blood monocytes (PBMo originate from the bone marrow, circulate in the blood and emigrate into various organs where they differentiate into tissue resident cellular phenotypes of the mononuclear phagocyte system, including macrophages (Mϕ and dendritic cells (DC. Like in other organs, this emigration and differentiation process is essential to replenish the mononuclear phagocyte pool in the lung under both inflammatory and non-inflammatory steady-state conditions. While many studies have addressed inflammation-driven monocyte trafficking to the lung, the emigration and pulmonary differentiation of PBMo under non-inflammatory conditions is much less understood. Methods In order to assess the transcriptional profile of circulating and lung resident mononuclear phagocyte phenotypes, PBMo, lung Mϕ and lung DC from naïve mice were flow-sorted to high purity, and their gene expression was compared by DNA microarrays on a genome-wide scale. Differential regulation of selected genes was validated by quantitative PCR and on protein level by flow cytometry. Results Differentially-expressed genes related to cell traffic were selected and grouped into the clusters (i matrix metallopeptidases, (ii chemokines/chemokine receptors, and (iii integrins. Expression profiles of clustered genes were further assessed at the mRNA and protein levels in subsets of circulating PBMo (GR1- vs GR1+ and lung resident macrophages (alveolar vs interstitial Mϕ. Our data identify differentially activated genetic programs in circulating monocytes and their lung descendents. Lung DC activate an extremely diverse set of gene families but largely preserve a mobile cell profile with high expression levels of integrin and chemokine/chemokine receptors. In contrast, interstitial and even more pronounced alveolar Mϕ, stepwise downregulate gene expression of these traffic relevant communication molecules, but strongly upregulate a distinct set of

  5. Flies selected for longevity retain a young gene expression profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarup, Pernille Merete; Sørensen, Peter; Loeschcke, Volker

    2011-01-01

      We investigated correlated responses in the transcriptomes of longevity-selected lines of Drosophila melanogaster to identify pathways that affect life span in metazoan systems. We evaluated the gene expression profile in young, middle-aged, and old male flies, finding that 530 genes were...... differentially expressed between selected and control flies when measured at the same chronological age. The longevity-selected flies consistently showed expression profiles more similar to control flies one age class younger than control flies of the same age. This finding is in accordance with a younger gene...... expression profile in longevity-selected lines. Among the genes down-regulated in longevity-selected lines, we found a clear over-representation of genes involved in immune functions, supporting the hypothesis of a life-shortening effect of an overactive immune system, known as inflammaging. We judged the...

  6. Diagnostic Utility of Gene Expression Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Chengjie; Yan, Yan; Gao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Two crucial problems arise from a microarray experiment in which the primary objective is to locate differentially expressed genes for the diagnosis of diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer’s. The first problem is the detection of a subset of genes which provides an optimum discriminatory power between diseased and normal subjects, and the second problem is the statistical estimation of discriminatory power from the optimum subset of genes between two groups of subjects. We develop a new meth...

  7. Gene Expression Profiling in the Brains of Human Cocaine Abusers

    OpenAIRE

    Bannon, Michael J.; Kapatos, Gregory; ALBERTSON, DAWN N.

    2005-01-01

    Chronic cocaine abuse induces long-term neurochemical, structural and behavioural changes thought to result from altered gene expression within the nucleus accumbens and other brain regions playing a critical role in addiction. Recent methodological advances now allow the profiling of gene expression in human postmortem brain. In this article, we review studies in which we have used Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays to identify transcripts that are differentially expressed in the nucleus...

  8. Candidate Soluble Immune Mediators in Young Women with High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Infection: High Expression of Chemokines Promoting Angiogenesis and Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotta, Nunzia; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Annunziata, Clorinda; Stellato, Giovanni; Buonaguro, Franco Maria; Comar, Manola

    2016-01-01

    Background The causal interpretation of cervical immune response to Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is complex and poorly characterized mainly due to the delicate balance that exists between viral infection, increase of inflammatory cytokines and host risk factors. This study aims to explore the significance of cervical immune mediators associated to cell survival, angiogenesis and interaction with immune response, in predicting the risk to develop HPV-related intraepithelial lesions. Methods A panel of 48 cytokines and growth factors were explored in a selected cohort of 168 immunocompetent women including 88 diagnosed with low (LSIL) or high (HSIL) squamous intraepithelial lesions of the cervix and 80 with normal cervical cytology (NIL). HPV genotyping was performed by Linear Array HPV test and the soluble concentration of 48 immune molecules was analyzed using the Bio-Plex platform. Results The prevalence of single HR-HPV infection was 30% in NIL and 100% in LSIL and HSIL women. The expression of 13 cytokines, including interleukins IL-6, IL-3, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-16, IL-18, LIF, of chemokines CCL7 (MCP-3), CXCL9 (MIG), CXCL12 (SDF-1α) and of the tropic factors VEGF, G-CSF, M-CSF were significantly associated with the presence of infection, with levels being higher in women with precancerous lesions compared to NIL HPV negative women. Only the growth factor GM-CSF was positively associated with the cytological abnormalities. Conclusions The ability of HR-HPV to escape from innate immune recognition and to orchestrate the production of specific inflammatory and growth factors, involved in early inflammatory response and in the cell-proliferating phase of intraepithelial damage, was documented in women before the development of cervical lesions. PMID:26990868

  9. Chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7)-expression and IFNγ production define vaccine-specific canine T-cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Ashley N; Tarleton, Rick L

    2015-04-15

    Canines suffer from and serve as strong translational animals models for many immunological disorders and infectious diseases. Routine vaccination has been a mainstay of protecting dogs through the stimulation of robust antibody responses and expansion of memory T-cell populations. Commercially available reagents and described techniques are limited for identifying and characterizing canine T-cell subsets and evaluating T-cell-specific effector function. To define reagents for delineating naïve versus activated T-cells and identify antigen-specific T-cells, we tested anti-human and anti-bovine T-cell specific cell surface marker reagents for cross-reactivity with canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells from healthy canine donors showed reactivity to CCL19-Ig, a CCR7 ligand, and coexpression with CD62L. An in vitro stimulation with concanavalin A validated downregulation of CCR7 and CD62L expression on stimulated healthy control PBMCs, consistent with an activated T-cell phenotype. Anti-IFNγ antibodies identified antigen-specific IFNγ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells upon in vitro vaccine antigen PBMC stimulation. PBMC isolation within 24h of sample collection allowed for efficienT-cell recovery and accurate T-cell effector function characterization. These data provide a reagent and techniques platform via flow cytometry for identifying canine T-cell subsets and characterizing circulating antigen-specific canine T-cells for potential use in diagnostic and field settings. PMID:25758065

  10. Gene expression profiling analysis of ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    YIN, JI-GANG; LIU, XIAN-YING; WANG, BIN; WANG, DAN-YANG; WEI, MAN; FANG, HUA; XIANG, MEI

    2016-01-01

    As a gynecological oncology, ovarian cancer has high incidence and mortality. To study the mechanisms of ovarian cancer, the present study analyzed the GSE37582 microarray. GSE37582 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus and included data from 74 ovarian cancer cases and 47 healthy controls. The differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) were screened using linear models for microarray data package in R and were further screened for functional annotation. Next, Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs was conducted. The interaction associations of the proteins encoded by the DEGs were searched using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes, and the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was visualized by Cytoscape. Moreover, module analysis of the PPI network was performed using the BioNet analysis tool in R. A total of 284 DEGs were screened, consisting of 145 upregulated genes and 139 downregulated genes. In particular, downregulated FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS) was an oncogene, while downregulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A) was a tumor suppressor gene and upregulated cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) was classed as an ‘other’ gene. The enriched functions included collagen catabolic process, stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinases cascade and insulin receptor signaling pathway. Meanwhile, FOS (degree, 15), CD44 (degree, 9), B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2; degree, 7), CDKN1A (degree, 7) and matrix metallopeptidase 3 (MMP3; degree, 6) had higher connectivity degrees in the PPI network for the DEGs. These genes may be involved in ovarian cancer by interacting with other genes in the module of the PPI network (e.g., BCL2-FOS, BCL2-CDKN1A, FOS-CDKN1A, FOS-CD44, MMP3-MMP7 and MMP7-CD44). Overall, BCL2, FOS, CDKN1A, CD44, MMP3 and MMP7 may be correlated with ovarian cancer. PMID:27347159

  11. The role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in eosinophil activation during inflammatory allergic reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira S.H.P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are important chemotactic cytokines that play a fundamental role in the trafficking of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. They are also potent cell-activating factors, inducing cytokine and histamine release and free radical production, a fact that makes them particularly important in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation. The action of chemokines is regulated at the level of agonist production and processing as well as at the level of receptor expression and coupling. Therefore, an analysis of the ligands must necessarily consider receptors. Eosinophils are target cells involved in the allergic inflammatory response since they are able to release a wide variety of mediators including CC and CXC chemokines and express their receptors. These mediators could damage the airway epithelial cells and might be important to stimulate other cells inducing an amplification of the allergic response. This review focuses on recently emerging data pertaining to the importance of chemokines and chemokine receptors in promoting eosinophil activation and migration during the allergic inflammatory process. The analysis of the function of eosinophils and their chemokine receptors during allergic inflammation might be a good approach to understanding the determinants of asthma severity and to developing novel therapies.

  12. MicroRNA expression profiling of the porcine developing brain.

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    Agnieszka Podolska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs are small, non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and play an important role in the control of developmental and physiological processes. In particular, the developing brain contains an impressive diversity of microRNAs. Most microRNA expression profiling studies have been performed in human or rodents and relatively limited knowledge exists in other mammalian species. The domestic pig is considered to be an excellent, alternate, large mammal model for human-related neurological studies, due to its similarity in both brain development and the growth curve when compared to humans. Considering these similarities, studies examining microRNA expression during porcine brain development could potentially be used to predict the expression profile and role of microRNAs in the human brain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MicroRNA expression profiling by use of microRNA microarrays and qPCR was performed on the porcine developing brain. Our results show that microRNA expression is regulated in a developmentally stage-specific, as well as a tissue-specific manner. Numerous developmental stage or tissue-specific microRNAs including, miR-17, miR-18a, miR-29c, miR-106a, miR-135a and b, miR-221 and miR-222 were found by microarray analysis. Expression profiles of selected candidates were confirmed by qPCR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The differential expression of specific microRNAs in fetal versus postnatal samples suggests that they likely play an important role in the regulation of developmental and physiological processes during brain development. The data presented here supports the notion that microRNAs act as post-transcriptional switches which may regulate gene expression when required.

  13. T-cells in the cerebrospinal fluid express a similar repertoire of inflammatory chemokine receptors in the absence or presence of CNS inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivisäkk, P; Trebst, C; Liu, Z;

    2002-01-01

    is not sufficient for the trafficking of CD3+T-cells to the CSF. We hypothesize that CXCR3 is the principal inflammatory chemokine receptor involved in intrathecal accumulation of T-cells in MS. Through interactions with its ligands, CXCR3 is proposed to mediate retention of T-cells in the inflamed CNS....

  14. Chemokine Receptors and Transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinquan Tan; Gang Zhou

    2005-01-01

    A complex process including both the innate and acquired immune responses results in allograft rejection. Some chemokine receptors and their ligands play essential roles not only for leukocyte migration into the graft but also in facilitating dendritic and T cell trafficking between lymph nodes and the transplant in the early and late stage of the allogeneic response. This review focuses on the impact of these chemoattractant proteins on transplant outcome and novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for antirejection therapy based on targeting of chemokine receptors and/or their ligands. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  15. Expression profiling identifies genes involved in emphysema severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowman Rayleen V

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major public health problem. The aim of this study was to identify genes involved in emphysema severity in COPD patients. Gene expression profiling was performed on total RNA extracted from non-tumor lung tissue from 30 smokers with emphysema. Class comparison analysis based on gas transfer measurement was performed to identify differentially expressed genes. Genes were then selected for technical validation by quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT-PCR if also represented on microarray platforms used in previously published emphysema studies. Genes technically validated advanced to tests of biological replication by qRT-PCR using an independent test set of 62 lung samples. Class comparison identified 98 differentially expressed genes (p p Gene expression profiling of lung from emphysema patients identified seven candidate genes associated with emphysema severity including COL6A3, SERPINF1, ZNHIT6, NEDD4, CDKN2A, NRN1 and GSTM3.

  16. Immunological assays for chemokine detection in in-vitro culture of CNS cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan Supriya D.; Schwartz Stanley A; Nair Madhavan P.N.

    2003-01-01

    Herein we review the various methods currently in use for determining the expression of chemokines by CNS cells in vitro. Chemokine detection assays are used in conjuction with one another to provide a comprehensive, biologically relevant assessment of the chemokines which is necessary for correct data interpretation of a specific observed biological effect. The methods described include bioassays for soluble chemokine receptors, RNA extraction, RT-PCR, Real - time quantitative PCR, gene arra...

  17. Emotional face expression profiles supported by virtual human ontology

    OpenAIRE

    García-Rojas, Alejandra; Vexo, Frédéric; Thalmann, Daniel; Raouzaiou, Amaryllis; Karpouzis, Kostas; Kollias, Stefanos D.; Moccozet, Laurent; Magnenat Thalmann, Nadia

    2006-01-01

    Expressive facial animation synthesis of human like characters has had many approaches with good results. MPEG-4 standard has functioned as the basis of many of those approaches. In this paper we would like to lay out the knowledge of some of those approaches inside an ontology in order to support the modeling of emotional facial animation in virtual humans (VH). Inside this ontology we will present MPEG-4 facial animation concepts and its relationship with emotion through expression profiles...

  18. Integrated analysis of DNA methylation profiles and gene expression profiles to identify genes associated with pilocytic astrocytomas

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ruigang; MAN, YIGANG

    2016-01-01

    The present study performed an integral analysis of the gene expression and DNA methylation profile of pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs). Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was also performed to examine and identify the genes correlated to PAs, to identify candidate therapeutic targets for the treatment of PAs. The DNA methylation profile and gene expression profile were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Following screening of the differentially expressed gene...

  19. DRD1-DRD5 EXPRESSION PROFILES IN ARTHRITIS RHEUMATOID

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    M.T. SADEGHI KOUPAEI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesThe cause of rheumatoid arthritis (RA as a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease is still unknown. It appears that both genetic and environmental factors play a role in its pathogenesis. Recent studies reveal that in addition to the CNS, immune cells synthesis neurotransmitters so that these catecholamines can regulate immune functions. The aim of this study is to evaluate the dopamine receptor gene expression profiles on peripheral blood mononuclear cells of rheumatoid arthritis patients in comparison with normal individuals.Material & MethodsIn the present study, we investigated dopamine receptor gene expression in PBMCs of 40 RA patients and 40 healthy individuals using Real Time-PCR.The specificities of the obtained Real time PCR products for the respective dopamine receptors fragments were confirmed by sequenced analysis capillary systemResultsWe found that DRD1-DRD5 types of dopamine receptors genes expression profiles of rheumatoid arthritis patients differ compared to healthy individuals. Moreover, a significant difference of DR2 and DR4 gene expression was seen in rheumatoid arthritis patients.ConclusionThis study showed that some types of dopamine receptors genes expression profiles alter in rheumatoid arthritis patients with comparison to healthy individuals Moreover, this alteration possibly could result in dysfunction of dopaminergic system in immune cells and finally lead to rheumatoid arthritis.Keywords: Rheumatoid arthritis, Dopamine receptor, Gene expression, Human peripheral blood lymphocytes, Real Time- Polymerase Chain Reaction

  20. Congruence of tissue expression profiles from Gene Expression Atlas, SAGEmap and TissueInfo databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfe Kenneth H

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracting biological knowledge from large amounts of gene expression information deposited in public databases is a major challenge of the postgenomic era. Additional insights may be derived by data integration and cross-platform comparisons of expression profiles. However, database meta-analysis is complicated by differences in experimental technologies, data post-processing, database formats, and inconsistent gene and sample annotation. Results We have analysed expression profiles from three public databases: Gene Expression Atlas, SAGEmap and TissueInfo. These are repositories of oligonucleotide microarray, Serial Analysis of Gene Expression and Expressed Sequence Tag human gene expression data respectively. We devised a method, Preferential Expression Measure, to identify genes that are significantly over- or under-expressed in any given tissue. We examined intra- and inter-database consistency of Preferential Expression Measures. There was good correlation between replicate experiments of oligonucleotide microarray data, but there was less coherence in expression profiles as measured by Serial Analysis of Gene Expression and Expressed Sequence Tag counts. We investigated inter-database correlations for six tissue categories, for which data were present in the three databases. Significant positive correlations were found for brain, prostate and vascular endothelium but not for ovary, kidney, and pancreas. Conclusion We show that data from Gene Expression Atlas, SAGEmap and TissueInfo can be integrated using the UniGene gene index, and that expression profiles correlate relatively well when large numbers of tags are available or when tissue cellular composition is simple. Finally, in the case of brain, we demonstrate that when PEM values show good correlation, predictions of tissue-specific expression based on integrated data are very accurate.

  1. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Liao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potential and hurdles of developing novel, chemokine-based drugs to treat LN.

  2. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in the Development of Lupus Nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaofeng; Pirapakaran, Tharshikha; Luo, Xin M

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with damage to multiple organs. Leukocyte recruitment into the inflamed kidney is a critical step to promote LN progression, and the chemokine/chemokine receptor system is necessary for leukocyte recruitment. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of LN and discuss the potential and hurdles of developing novel, chemokine-based drugs to treat LN. PMID:27403037

  3. Proteomics of protein expression profiling in tissues with different radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation activates multiple signaling pathways, resulting in diverse stress responses including apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and gene induction. Liver tissue is known to be rather resistant to radiation while a spleen tissue is highly radiosentitive. Our purpose was to compare radioresponse in liver and spleen following exposure to radiation to further investigate the differentially protein expression profile in radiosensitive and radioresistant tissues

  4. MicroRNA Expression Profiling of the Porcine Developing Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podolska, Agnieszka; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Busk, Peter Kamp; Søkilde, Rolf; Litman, Thomas; Fredholm, Merete; Cirera, Susanna

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small, non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and play an important role in the control of developmental and physiological processes. In particular, the developing brain contains an impressive diversity of microRNAs. Most microRNA...... the growth curve when compared to humans. Considering these similarities, studies examining microRNA expression during porcine brain development could potentially be used to predict the expression profile and role of microRNAs in the human brain....

  5. Human decidual macrophages and NK cells differentially express Toll-like receptors and display distinct cytokine profiles upon TLR stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ElisabethMenu

    2014-07-01

    We report for the first time that both human dMs and dNK cells express mRNAs encoding TLRs 1-9, albeit with a higher expression level in dMs. TLR2, TLR3 and TLR4 protein expression checked by flow cytometry was positive for both dMs and dNK cells. In vitro treatment of primary dMs and dNK cells with specific TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7/8 and TLR9 agonists enhanced their secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, as well as cytokines and chemokines involved in immune cell crosstalk. Only dNK cells released IFN-γ, whereas only dMs released IL-1β, IL-10 and IL-12. TLR9 activation of dMs resulted in a distinct pattern of cytokine expression compared to the other TLRs. The cytokine profiles expressed by dMs and dNK cells upon TLR activation are compatible with maintenance of the fetotolerant immune environment during initiation of immune responses to pathogens at the maternofetal interface.

  6. Gene expression profiling of intestinal regeneration in the sea cucumber

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    Méndez-Merced Ana T

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among deuterostomes, the regenerative potential is maximally expressed in echinoderms, animals that can quickly replace most injured organs. In particular, sea cucumbers are excellent models for studying organ regeneration since they regenerate their digestive tract after evisceration. However, echinoderms have been sidelined in modern regeneration studies partially because of the lack of genome-wide profiling approaches afforded by modern genomic tools. For the last decade, our laboratory has been using the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima to dissect the cellular and molecular events that allow for such amazing regenerative processes. We have already established an EST database obtained from cDNA libraries of normal and regenerating intestine at two different regeneration stages. This database now has over 7000 sequences. Results In the present work we used a custom-made microchip from Agilent with 60-mer probes for these ESTs, to determine the gene expression profile during intestinal regeneration. Here we compared the expression profile of animals at three different intestinal regeneration stages (3-, 7- and 14-days post evisceration against the profile from normal (uneviscerated intestines. The number of differentially expressed probes ranged from 70% at p actins, and developmental genes, such as Wnt and Hox genes, show interesting expression profiles during regeneration. Conclusion Our findings set the base for future studies into the molecular basis of intestinal regeneration. Moreover, it advances the use of echinoderms in regenerative biology, animals that because of their amazing properties and their key evolutionary position, might provide important clues to the genetic basis of regenerative processes.

  7. Gene expression profiling in peanut using high density oligonucleotide microarrays

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    Burow Mark

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptome expression analysis in peanut to date has been limited to a relatively small set of genes and only recently has a significant number of ESTs been released into the public domain. Utilization of these ESTs for oligonucleotide microarrays provides a means to investigate large-scale transcript responses to a variety of developmental and environmental signals, ultimately improving our understanding of plant biology. Results We have developed a high-density oligonucleotide microarray for peanut using 49,205 publicly available ESTs and tested the utility of this array for expression profiling in a variety of peanut tissues. To identify putatively tissue-specific genes and demonstrate the utility of this array for expression profiling in a variety of peanut tissues, we compared transcript levels in pod, peg, leaf, stem, and root tissues. Results from this experiment showed 108 putatively pod-specific/abundant genes, as well as transcripts whose expression was low or undetected in pod compared to peg, leaf, stem, or root. The transcripts significantly over-represented in pod include genes responsible for seed storage proteins and desiccation (e.g., late-embryogenesis abundant proteins, aquaporins, legumin B, oil production, and cellular defense. Additionally, almost half of the pod-abundant genes represent unknown genes allowing for the possibility of associating putative function to these previously uncharacterized genes. Conclusion The peanut oligonucleotide array represents the majority of publicly available peanut ESTs and can be used as a tool for expression profiling studies in diverse tissues.

  8. The Expression Profile of Complement Components in Podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuejuan; Ding, Fangrui; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Baihong; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Podocytes are critical for maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier and are injured in many renal diseases, especially proteinuric kidney diseases. Recently, reports suggested that podocytes are among the renal cells that synthesize complement components that mediate glomerular diseases. Nevertheless, the profile and extent of complement component expression in podocytes remain unclear. This study examined the expression profile of complement in podocytes under physiological conditions and in abnormal podocytes induced by multiple stimuli. In total, 23/32 complement component components were detected in podocyte by conventional RT-PCR. Both primary cultured podocytes and immortalized podocytes expressed the complement factors C1q, C1r, C2, C3, C7, MASP, CFI, DAF, CD59, C4bp, CD46, Protein S, CR2, C1qR, C3aR, C5aR, and Crry (17/32), whereas C4, CFB, CFD, C5, C6, C8, C9, MBL1, and MBL2 (9/32) complement factors were not expressed. C3, Crry, and C1q-binding protein were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. Podocyte complement gene expression was affected by several factors (puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN), angiotensin II (Ang II), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)). Representative complement components were detected using fluorescence confocal microscopy. In conclusion, primary podocytes express various complement components at the mRNA and protein levels. The complement gene expressions were affected by several podocyte injury factors. PMID:27043537

  9. The Expression Profile of Complement Components in Podocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejuan Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Podocytes are critical for maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier and are injured in many renal diseases, especially proteinuric kidney diseases. Recently, reports suggested that podocytes are among the renal cells that synthesize complement components that mediate glomerular diseases. Nevertheless, the profile and extent of complement component expression in podocytes remain unclear. This study examined the expression profile of complement in podocytes under physiological conditions and in abnormal podocytes induced by multiple stimuli. In total, 23/32 complement component components were detected in podocyte by conventional RT-PCR. Both primary cultured podocytes and immortalized podocytes expressed the complement factors C1q, C1r, C2, C3, C7, MASP, CFI, DAF, CD59, C4bp, CD46, Protein S, CR2, C1qR, C3aR, C5aR, and Crry (17/32, whereas C4, CFB, CFD, C5, C6, C8, C9, MBL1, and MBL2 (9/32 complement factors were not expressed. C3, Crry, and C1q-binding protein were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. Podocyte complement gene expression was affected by several factors (puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN, angiotensin II (Ang II, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β. Representative complement components were detected using fluorescence confocal microscopy. In conclusion, primary podocytes express various complement components at the mRNA and protein levels. The complement gene expressions were affected by several podocyte injury factors.

  10. Expression profiling and comparative sequence derived insights into lipid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callow, Matthew J.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2001-12-19

    Expression profiling and genomic DNA sequence comparisons are increasingly being applied to the identification and analysis of the genes involved in lipid metabolism. Not only has genome-wide expression profiling aided in the identification of novel genes involved in important processes in lipid metabolism such as sterol efflux, but the utilization of information from these studies has added to our understanding of the regulation of pathways participating in the process. Coupled with these gene expression studies, cross species comparison, searching for sequences conserved through evolution, has proven to be a powerful tool to identify important non-coding regulatory sequences as well as the discovery of novel genes relevant to lipid biology. An example of the value of this approach was the recent chance discovery of a new apolipoprotein gene (apo AV) that has dramatic effects upon triglyceride metabolism in mice and humans.

  11. Profiling of chicken adipose tissue gene expression by genome array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shou-Zhi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive accumulation of lipids in the adipose tissue is a major problem in the present-day broiler industry. However, few studies have analyzed the expression of adipose tissue genes that are involved in pathways and mechanisms leading to adiposity in chickens. Gene expression profiling of chicken adipose tissue could provide key information about the ontogenesis of fatness and clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying obesity. In this study, Chicken Genome Arrays were used to construct an adipose tissue gene expression profile of 7-week-old broilers, and to screen adipose tissue genes that are differentially expressed in lean and fat lines divergently selected over eight generations for high and low abdominal fat weight. Results The gene expression profiles detected 13,234–16,858 probe sets in chicken adipose tissue at 7 weeks, and genes involved in lipid metabolism and immunity such as fatty acid binding protein (FABP, thyroid hormone-responsive protein (Spot14, lipoprotein lipase(LPL, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7(IGFBP7 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC, were highly expressed. In contrast, some genes related to lipogenesis, such as leptin receptor, sterol regulatory element binding proteins1 (SREBP1, apolipoprotein B(ApoB and insulin-like growth factor 2(IGF2, were not detected. Moreover, 230 genes that were differentially expressed between the two lines were screened out; these were mainly involved in lipid metabolism, signal transduction, energy metabolism, tumorigenesis and immunity. Subsequently, real-time RT-PCR was performed to validate fifteen differentially expressed genes screened out by the microarray approach and high consistency was observed between the two methods. Conclusion Our results establish the groundwork for further studies of the basic genetic control of growth and development of chicken adipose tissue, and will be beneficial in clarifying the molecular mechanism of

  12. Recurrent and multiple bladder tumors show conserved expression profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urothelial carcinomas originate from the epithelial cells of the inner lining of the bladder and may appear as single or as multiple synchronous tumors. Patients with urothelial carcinomas frequently show recurrences after treatment making follow-up necessary. The leading hypothesis explaining the origin of meta- and synchronous tumors assumes a monoclonal origin. However, the genetic relationship among consecutive tumors has been shown to be complex in as much as the genetic evolution does not adhere to the chronological appearance of the metachronous tumors. Consequently, genetically less evolved tumors may appear chronologically later than genetically related but more evolved tumors. Forty-nine meta- or synchronous urothelial tumors from 22 patients were analyzed using expression profiling, conventional CGH, LOH, and mutation analyses. We show by CGH that partial chromosomal losses in the initial tumors may not be present in the recurring tumors, by LOH that different haplotypes may be lost and that detected regions of LOH may be smaller in recurring tumors, and that mutations present in the initial tumor may not be present in the recurring ones. In contrast we show that despite apparent genomic differences, the recurrent and multiple bladder tumors from the same patients display remarkably similar expression profiles. Our findings show that even though the vast majority of the analyzed meta- and synchronous tumors from the same patients are not likely to have originated directly from the preceding tumor they still show remarkably similar expressions profiles. The presented data suggests that an expression profile is established early in tumor development and that this profile is stable and maintained in recurring tumors

  13. Recurrent and multiple bladder tumors show conserved expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knuutila Sakari

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urothelial carcinomas originate from the epithelial cells of the inner lining of the bladder and may appear as single or as multiple synchronous tumors. Patients with urothelial carcinomas frequently show recurrences after treatment making follow-up necessary. The leading hypothesis explaining the origin of meta- and synchronous tumors assumes a monoclonal origin. However, the genetic relationship among consecutive tumors has been shown to be complex in as much as the genetic evolution does not adhere to the chronological appearance of the metachronous tumors. Consequently, genetically less evolved tumors may appear chronologically later than genetically related but more evolved tumors. Methods Forty-nine meta- or synchronous urothelial tumors from 22 patients were analyzed using expression profiling, conventional CGH, LOH, and mutation analyses. Results We show by CGH that partial chromosomal losses in the initial tumors may not be present in the recurring tumors, by LOH that different haplotypes may be lost and that detected regions of LOH may be smaller in recurring tumors, and that mutations present in the initial tumor may not be present in the recurring ones. In contrast we show that despite apparent genomic differences, the recurrent and multiple bladder tumors from the same patients display remarkably similar expression profiles. Conclusion Our findings show that even though the vast majority of the analyzed meta- and synchronous tumors from the same patients are not likely to have originated directly from the preceding tumor they still show remarkably similar expressions profiles. The presented data suggests that an expression profile is established early in tumor development and that this profile is stable and maintained in recurring tumors.

  14. Bifidobacterium bifidum Actively Changes the Gene Expression Profile Induced by Lactobacillus acidophilus in Murine Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Gudrun Margarethe; Rasmussen, Simon; Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard; Nielsen, Birgit Margrethe Nøhr; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    cytokine IL-12 in DC, whereas bifidobacteria do not induce IL-12 but inhibit the IL-12 production induced by lactobacilli. In the present study, genome-wide microarrays were used to investigate the gene expression pattern of murine DC stimulated with Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium......Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal regulatory role in activation of both the innate as well as the adaptive immune system by responding to environmental microorganisms. We have previously shown that Lactobacillus acidophilus induces a strong production of the pro-inflammatory and Th1 polarizing...... bifidum Z9. L. acidophilus NCFM strongly induced expression of interferon (IFN)-beta, other virus defence genes, and cytokine and chemokine genes related to the innate and the adaptive immune response. By contrast, B. bifidum Z9 up-regulated genes encoding cytokines and chemokines related to the innate...

  15. Expression profiling of human renal carcinomas with functional taxonomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madore Steven J

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular characterization has contributed to the understanding of the inception, progression, treatment and prognosis of cancer. Nucleic acid array-based technologies extend molecular characterization of tumors to thousands of gene products. To effectively discriminate between tumor sub-types, reliable laboratory techniques and analytic methods are required. Results We derived mRNA expression profiles from 21 human tissue samples (eight normal kidneys and 13 kidney tumors and two pooled samples using the Affymetrix GeneChip platform. A panel of ten clustering algorithms combined with four data pre-processing methods identified a consensus cluster dendrogram in 18 of 40 analyses and of these 16 used a logarithmic transformation. Within the consensus dendrogram the expression profiles of the samples grouped according to tissue type; clear cell and chromophobe carcinomas displayed distinctly different gene expression patterns. By using a rigorous statistical selection based method we identified 355 genes that showed significant (p Conclusions Affymetrix GeneChip profiling differentiated clear cell and chromophobe carcinomas from one another and from normal kidney cortex. Clustering methods that used logarithmic transformation of data sets produced dendrograms consistent with the sample biology. Functional taxonomy provided a practical approach to the interpretation of gene expression data.

  16. Gene Expression Profiling Predicts Survival in Conventional Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Conventional renal cell carcinoma (cRCC accounts for most of the deaths due to kidney cancer. Tumor stage, grade, and patient performance status are used currently to predict survival after surgery. Our goal was to identify gene expression features, using comprehensive gene expression profiling, that correlate with survival. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Gene expression profiles were determined in 177 primary cRCCs using DNA microarrays. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis segregated cRCC into five gene expression subgroups. Expression subgroup was correlated with survival in long-term follow-up and was independent of grade, stage, and performance status. The tumors were then divided evenly into training and test sets that were balanced for grade, stage, performance status, and length of follow-up. A semisupervised learning algorithm (supervised principal components analysis was applied to identify transcripts whose expression was associated with survival in the training set, and the performance of this gene expression-based survival predictor was assessed using the test set. With this method, we identified 259 genes that accurately predicted disease-specific survival among patients in the independent validation group (p < 0.001. In multivariate analysis, the gene expression predictor was a strong predictor of survival independent of tumor stage, grade, and performance status (p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: cRCC displays molecular heterogeneity and can be separated into gene expression subgroups that correlate with survival after surgery. We have identified a set of 259 genes that predict survival after surgery independent of clinical prognostic factors.

  17. Gene expression profiling of canine osteosarcoma reveals genes associated with short and long survival times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Nagesha AS

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression profiling of spontaneous tumors in the dog offers a unique translational opportunity to identify prognostic biomarkers and signaling pathways that are common to both canine and human. Osteosarcoma (OS accounts for approximately 80% of all malignant bone tumors in the dog. Canine OS are highly comparable with their human counterpart with respect to histology, high metastatic rate and poor long-term survival. This study investigates the prognostic gene profile among thirty-two primary canine OS using canine specific cDNA microarrays representing 20,313 genes to identify genes and cellular signaling pathways associated with survival. This, the first report of its kind in dogs with OS, also demonstrates the advantages of cross-species comparison with human OS. Results The 32 tumors were classified into two prognostic groups based on survival time (ST. They were defined as short survivors (dogs with poor prognosis: surviving fewer than 6 months and long survivors (dogs with better prognosis: surviving 6 months or longer. Fifty-one transcripts were found to be differentially expressed, with common upregulation of these genes in the short survivors. The overexpressed genes in short survivors are associated with possible roles in proliferation, drug resistance or metastasis. Several deregulated pathways identified in the present study, including Wnt signaling, Integrin signaling and Chemokine/cytokine signaling are comparable to the pathway analysis conducted on human OS gene profiles, emphasizing the value of the dog as an excellent model for humans. Conclusion A molecular-based method for discrimination of outcome for short and long survivors is useful for future prognostic stratification at initial diagnosis, where genes and pathways associated with cell cycle/proliferation, drug resistance and metastasis could be potential targets for diagnosis and therapy. The similarities between human and canine OS makes the

  18. Gene expression profiling reveals multiple toxicity endpoints induced by hepatotoxicants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Qihong; Jin Xidong; Gaillard, Elias T.; Knight, Brian L.; Pack, Franklin D.; Stoltz, James H.; Jayadev, Supriya; Blanchard, Kerry T

    2004-05-18

    Microarray technology continues to gain increased acceptance in the drug development process, particularly at the stage of toxicology and safety assessment. In the current study, microarrays were used to investigate gene expression changes associated with hepatotoxicity, the most commonly reported clinical liability with pharmaceutical agents. Acetaminophen, methotrexate, methapyrilene, furan and phenytoin were used as benchmark compounds capable of inducing specific but different types of hepatotoxicity. The goal of the work was to define gene expression profiles capable of distinguishing the different subtypes of hepatotoxicity. Sprague-Dawley rats were orally dosed with acetaminophen (single dose, 4500 mg/kg for 6, 24 and 72 h), methotrexate (1 mg/kg per day for 1, 7 and 14 days), methapyrilene (100 mg/kg per day for 3 and 7 days), furan (40 mg/kg per day for 1, 3, 7 and 14 days) or phenytoin (300 mg/kg per day for 14 days). Hepatic gene expression was assessed using toxicology-specific gene arrays containing 684 target genes or expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Principal component analysis (PCA) of gene expression data was able to provide a clear distinction of each compound, suggesting that gene expression data can be used to discern different hepatotoxic agents and toxicity endpoints. Gene expression data were applied to the multiplicity-adjusted permutation test and significantly changed genes were categorized and correlated to hepatotoxic endpoints. Repression of enzymes involved in lipid oxidation (acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, medium chain, enoyl CoA hydratase, very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase) were associated with microvesicular lipidosis. Likewise, subsets of genes associated with hepatotocellular necrosis, inflammation, hepatitis, bile duct hyperplasia and fibrosis have been identified. The current study illustrates that expression profiling can be used to: (1) distinguish different hepatotoxic endpoints; (2) predict the development of toxic endpoints; and

  19. Gene expression profiling reveals multiple toxicity endpoints induced by hepatotoxicants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microarray technology continues to gain increased acceptance in the drug development process, particularly at the stage of toxicology and safety assessment. In the current study, microarrays were used to investigate gene expression changes associated with hepatotoxicity, the most commonly reported clinical liability with pharmaceutical agents. Acetaminophen, methotrexate, methapyrilene, furan and phenytoin were used as benchmark compounds capable of inducing specific but different types of hepatotoxicity. The goal of the work was to define gene expression profiles capable of distinguishing the different subtypes of hepatotoxicity. Sprague-Dawley rats were orally dosed with acetaminophen (single dose, 4500 mg/kg for 6, 24 and 72 h), methotrexate (1 mg/kg per day for 1, 7 and 14 days), methapyrilene (100 mg/kg per day for 3 and 7 days), furan (40 mg/kg per day for 1, 3, 7 and 14 days) or phenytoin (300 mg/kg per day for 14 days). Hepatic gene expression was assessed using toxicology-specific gene arrays containing 684 target genes or expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Principal component analysis (PCA) of gene expression data was able to provide a clear distinction of each compound, suggesting that gene expression data can be used to discern different hepatotoxic agents and toxicity endpoints. Gene expression data were applied to the multiplicity-adjusted permutation test and significantly changed genes were categorized and correlated to hepatotoxic endpoints. Repression of enzymes involved in lipid oxidation (acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, medium chain, enoyl CoA hydratase, very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase) were associated with microvesicular lipidosis. Likewise, subsets of genes associated with hepatotocellular necrosis, inflammation, hepatitis, bile duct hyperplasia and fibrosis have been identified. The current study illustrates that expression profiling can be used to: (1) distinguish different hepatotoxic endpoints; (2) predict the development of toxic endpoints; and

  20. Cytokine expression profile over time in burned mice

    OpenAIRE

    Finnerty, Celeste C.; Przkora, Rene; Herndon, David N; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2008-01-01

    The persistent inflammatory response induced by a severe burn increases patient susceptibility to infections and sepsis, potentially leading to multi-organ failure and death. In order to use murine models to develop interventions that modulate the post-burn inflammatory response, the response in mice and the similarities to the human response must first be determined. Here we present the temporal serum cytokine expression profiles in burned in comparison to sham mice and human burn patients. ...

  1. Microarray gene expression profiling and analysis in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhukhan Provash

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common cancer in adult kidney. The accuracy of current diagnosis and prognosis of the disease and the effectiveness of the treatment for the disease are limited by the poor understanding of the disease at the molecular level. To better understand the genetics and biology of RCC, we profiled the expression of 7,129 genes in both clear cell RCC tissue and cell lines using oligonucleotide arrays. Methods Total RNAs isolated from renal cell tumors, adjacent normal tissue and metastatic RCC cell lines were hybridized to affymatrix HuFL oligonucleotide arrays. Genes were categorized into different functional groups based on the description of the Gene Ontology Consortium and analyzed based on the gene expression levels. Gene expression profiles of the tissue and cell line samples were visualized and classified by singular value decomposition. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to confirm the expression alterations of selected genes in RCC. Results Selected genes were annotated based on biological processes and clustered into functional groups. The expression levels of genes in each group were also analyzed. Seventy-four commonly differentially expressed genes with more than five-fold changes in RCC tissues were identified. The expression alterations of selected genes from these seventy-four genes were further verified using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Detailed comparison of gene expression patterns in RCC tissue and RCC cell lines shows significant differences between the two types of samples, but many important expression patterns were preserved. Conclusions This is one of the initial studies that examine the functional ontology of a large number of genes in RCC. Extensive annotation, clustering and analysis of a large number of genes based on the gene functional ontology revealed many interesting gene expression patterns in RCC. Most

  2. Width of gene expression profile drives alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wegmann

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing generates an enormous amount of functional and proteomic diversity in metazoan organisms. This process is probably central to the macromolecular and cellular complexity of higher eukaryotes. While most studies have focused on the molecular mechanism triggering and controlling alternative splicing, as well as on its incidence in different species, its maintenance and evolution within populations has been little investigated. Here, we propose to address these questions by comparing the structural characteristics as well as the functional and transcriptional profiles of genes with monomorphic or polymorphic splicing, referred to as MS and PS genes, respectively. We find that MS and PS genes differ particularly in the number of tissues and cell types where they are expressed.We find a striking deficit of PS genes on the sex chromosomes, particularly on the Y chromosome where it is shown not to be due to the observed lower breadth of expression of genes on that chromosome. The development of a simple model of evolution of cis-regulated alternative splicing leads to predictions in agreement with these observations. It further predicts the conditions for the emergence and the maintenance of cis-regulated alternative splicing, which are both favored by the tissue specific expression of splicing variants. We finally propose that the width of the gene expression profile is an essential factor for the acquisition of new transcript isoforms that could later be maintained by a new form of balancing selection.

  3. Super-paramagnetic clustering of yeast gene expression profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Getz, G; Domany, E; Zhang, M Q

    2000-01-01

    High-density DNA arrays, used to monitor gene expression at a genomic scale, have produced vast amounts of information which require the development of efficient computational methods to analyze them. The important first step is to extract the fundamental patterns of gene expression inherent in the data. This paper describes the application of a novel clustering algorithm, Super-Paramagnetic Clustering (SPC) to analysis of gene expression profiles that were generated recently during a study of the yeast cell cycle. SPC was used to organize genes into biologically relevant clusters that are suggestive for their co-regulation. Some of the advantages of SPC are its robustness against noise and initialization, a clear signature of cluster formation and splitting, and an unsupervised self-organized determination of the number of clusters at each resolution. Our analysis revealed interesting correlated behavior of several groups of genes which has not been previously identified.

  4. Gene expression profiles identify inflammatory signatures in dendritic cells.

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    Anna Torri

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs constitute a heterogeneous group of antigen-presenting leukocytes important in activation of both innate and adaptive immunity. We studied the gene expression patterns of DCs incubated with reagents inducing their activation or inhibition. Total RNA was isolated from DCs and gene expression profiling was performed with oligonucleotide microarrays. Using a supervised learning algorithm based on Random Forest, we generated a molecular signature of inflammation from a training set of 77 samples. We then validated this molecular signature in a testing set of 38 samples. Supervised analysis identified a set of 44 genes that distinguished very accurately between inflammatory and non inflammatory samples. The diagnostic performance of the signature genes was assessed against an independent set of samples, by qRT-PCR. Our findings suggest that the gene expression signature of DCs can provide a molecular classification for use in the selection of anti-inflammatory or adjuvant molecules with specific effects on DC activity.

  5. MicroRNA expression profiles and functions in the brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanting Qi; Yu Zhao; Zhuyin Chen; Xiaona Chen; Marie C. Lin; Xiangfu Kong; Lihui Lai

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs are abundant in the brains of vertebrates and some show a brain-specific or brain-enriched expression pattern. Because microRNAs regulate the expression of hundreds of target genes, it is not surprising that they have profoundly important functions in brain development and pathological processes. For example, miR-124 plays an important role in inducing and maintaining neuronal identity through targeting at least two anti-neural factors. MicroRNAs have also been implicated in brain disorders, including brain tumors and neurodegenerative diseases. This review aims to present an overview of the expression profiles and functions of microRNAs in the developing brains of vertebrates.

  6. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Zibert, John R; Gissel, Hanne;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer) to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have...... therefore investigated transcriptional changes through gene expression profile analyses, morphological changes by histological analysis, and physiological changes by force generation measurements. DNA electrotransfer was obtained using a combination of a short high voltage pulse (HV, 1000 V/cm, 100 mus......) followed by a long low voltage pulse (LV, 100 V/cm, 400 ms); a pulse combination optimised for efficient and safe gene transfer. Muscles were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and excised at 4 hours, 48 hours or 3 weeks after treatment. RESULTS: Differentially expressed genes were...

  7. Protein Expression Profiling in the Spectrum of Renal Cell Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A Valera, Elsa Li-Ning-T, Beatriz A Walter, David D. Roberts, W M Linehan, Maria J Merino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to evaluate the protein expression profile of a spectrum of renal cell carcinomas (RCC to find potential biomarkers for disease onset and progression and therefore, prospective therapeutic targets. A 2D-gel based proteomic analysis was used to outline differences in protein levels among different subtypes of renal cell carcinomas, including clear cell carcinomas, papillary lesions, chromophobe tumors and renal oncocytomas. Spot pattern was compared to the corresponding normal kidney from the same patients and distinctive, differentially expressed proteins were characterized by mass spectrometry. Twenty-one protein spots were found differentially expressed between clear cell RCC and normal tissue and 38 spots were found expressed in chromophobe tumors. Eleven proteins were identified, with most differentially expressed -by fold change- between clear cell tumors and the corresponding normal tissue. Two of the identified proteins, Triosephosphate isomerase 1 (TPI-1 and Heat Shock protein 27 (Hsp27, were further validated in a separate set of tumors by immunohistochemistry and expression levels were correlated with clinicopathologic features of the patients. Hsp27 was highly expressed in 82% of the tumors used for validation, and all cases showed strong immunoreactivity for TPI-1. In both Hsp27 and TPI-1, protein expression positively correlated with histologic features of the disease. Our results suggest that the subjacent cytogenetic abnormalities seen in different histological types of RCC are followed by specific changes in protein expression. From these changes, Hsp27 and TPI-1 emerged as potential candidates for the differentiation and prognosis in RCC.

  8. [Gene expression profile of spinal ventral horn in ALS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masahiko; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Sobue, Gen

    2007-10-01

    The causative pathomechanism of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is not clearly understood. Using microarray technology combined with laser-captured microdissection, gene expression profiles of degenerating spinal motor neurons as well as spinal ventral horn from autopsied patients with sporadic ALS were examined. Spinal motor neurons showed a distinct gene expression profile from the whole spinal ventral horn. Three percent of genes examined were significantly downregulated, and 1% were upregulated in motor neurons. In contrast with motor neurons, the total spinal ventral horn homogenates demonstrated 0.7% and 0.2% significant upregulation and downregulation of gene expression, respectively. Downregulated genes in motor neurons included those associated with cytoskeleton/axonal transport, transcription and cell surface antigens/receptors, such as dynactin 1 (DCTN1) and early growth response 3 (EGR3). In particular, DCTN1 was markedly downregulated in most residual motor neurons prior to the accumulation of pNF-H and ubiquitylated protein. Promoters for cell death pathway, death receptor 5 (DR5), cyclins C (CCNC) and A1 (CCNA), and caspases were upregulated, whereas cell death inhibitors, acetyl-CoA transporter (ACATN) and NF-kappaB (NFKB) were also upregulated. In terms of spinal ventral horn, the expression of genes related to cell surface antigens/receptors, transcription and cell adhesion/ECM were increased. The gene expression resulting in neurodegenerative and neuroprotective changes were both present in spinal motor neurons and ventral horn. Moreover, Inflammation-related genes, such as belonging to the cytokine family were not, however, significantly upregulated in either motor neurons or ventral horn. The sequence of motor neuron-specific gene expression changes from early DCTN1 downregulation to late CCNC upregulation in sporadic ALS can provide direct information on the genes leading to neurodegeneration and neuronal death, and are helpful

  9. Subgingival bacterial colonization profiles correlate with gingival tissue gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handfield Martin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by the microbiota of the periodontal pocket. We investigated the association between subgingival bacterial profiles and gene expression patterns in gingival tissues of patients with periodontitis. A total of 120 patients undergoing periodontal surgery contributed with a minimum of two interproximal gingival papillae (range 2-4 from a maxillary posterior region. Prior to tissue harvesting, subgingival plaque samples were collected from the mesial and distal aspects of each tissue sample. Gingival tissue RNA was extracted, reverse-transcribed, labeled, and hybridized with whole-genome microarrays (310 in total. Plaque samples were analyzed using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridizations with respect to 11 bacterial species. Random effects linear regression models considered bacterial levels as exposure and expression profiles as outcome variables. Gene Ontology analyses summarized the expression patterns into biologically relevant categories. Results Wide inter-species variation was noted in the number of differentially expressed gingival tissue genes according to subgingival bacterial levels: Using a Bonferroni correction (p -7, 9,392 probe sets were differentially associated with levels of Tannerella forsythia, 8,537 with Porphyromonas gingivalis, 6,460 with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, 506 with Eikenella corrodens and only 8 with Actinomyces naeslundii. Cluster analysis identified commonalities and differences among tissue gene expression patterns differentially regulated according to bacterial levels. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the microbial content of the periodontal pocket is a determinant of gene expression in the gingival tissues and provide new insights into the differential ability of periodontal species to elicit a local host response.

  10. The expression of cytokines and chemokines in the blood of patients with severe weight loss from anorexia nervosa: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisetsky, D S; Trace, S E; Brownley, K A; Hamer, R M; Zucker, N L; Roux-Lombard, P; Dayer, J-M; Bulik, C M

    2014-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious, potentially life-threatening disorder characterized by severe weight loss, dysregulated eating, and often excessive exercise. While psychiatric illnesses such as depression are associated with increased levels of pro-inflammatory mediators, evidence for such disturbances in patients with AN has been less clear. In an exploratory study of possible disturbances in immune responses in AN, we assayed a panel of cytokines and chemokines in the blood of patients undergoing inpatient treatment, testing the hypothesis that metabolic disturbances in this disease would lead to a pattern of immune disturbances distinct from that of other psychiatric diseases. For this purpose, we evaluated patients by the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and the Eating Disorders Examination-Questionnaire and assessed cytokines and chemokines by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Patients reported a moderate level of depression (mean BDI-II = 22.6) but exhibited few immunologic abnormalities of the kind associated with major depressive disorder [e.g., increased interleukin (IL)-6]; RANTES showed the most frequent elevations and was increased in 4 of the patients studied. Together, these findings suggest that features of AN such as loss of adipose tissue and excessive exercise may attenuate cytokine production and thus modulate the experience of illness that impacts on core features of disease. PMID:25022969

  11. Gene Expression Profiling in the Hibernating Primate, Cheirogaleus Medius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faherty, Sheena L; Villanueva-Cañas, José Luis; Klopfer, Peter H; Albà, M Mar; Yoder, Anne D

    2016-01-01

    Hibernation is a complex physiological response that some mammalian species employ to evade energetic demands. Previous work in mammalian hibernators suggests that hibernation is activated not by a set of genes unique to hibernators, but by differential expression of genes that are present in all mammals. This question of universal genetic mechanisms requires further investigation and can only be tested through additional investigations of phylogenetically dispersed species. To explore this question, we use RNA-Seq to investigate gene expression dynamics as they relate to the varying physiological states experienced throughout the year in a group of primate hibernators-Madagascar's dwarf lemurs (genus Cheirogaleus). In a novel experimental approach, we use longitudinal sampling of biological tissues as a method for capturing gene expression profiles from the same individuals throughout their annual hibernation cycle. We identify 90 candidate genes that have variable expression patterns when comparing two active states (Active 1 and Active 2) with a torpor state. These include genes that are involved in metabolic pathways, feeding behavior, and circadian rhythms, as might be expected to correlate with seasonal physiological state changes. The identified genes appear to be critical for maintaining the health of an animal that undergoes prolonged periods of metabolic depression concurrent with the hibernation phenotype. By focusing on these differentially expressed genes in dwarf lemurs, we compare gene expression patterns in previously studied mammalian hibernators. Additionally, by employing evolutionary rate analysis, we find that hibernation-related genes do not evolve under positive selection in hibernating species relative to nonhibernators. PMID:27412611

  12. Human decidual macrophages and NK cells differentially express Toll-like receptors and display distinct cytokine profiles upon TLR stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duriez, Marion; Quillay, Héloïse; Madec, Yoann; El Costa, Hicham; Cannou, Claude; Marlin, Romain; de Truchis, Claire; Rahmati, Mona; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Nugeyre, Marie-Thérèse; Menu, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Maternofetal pathogen transmission is partially controlled at the level of the maternal uterine mucosa at the fetal implantation site (the decidua basalis), where maternal and fetal cells are in close contact. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) may play an important role in initiating rapid immune responses against pathogens in the decidua basalis, however the tolerant microenvironment should be preserved in order to allow fetal development. Here we investigated the expression and functionality of TLRs expressed by decidual macrophages (dMs) and NK cells (dNKs), the major decidual immune cell populations. We report for the first time that both human dMs and dNK cells express mRNAs encoding TLRs 1-9, albeit with a higher expression level in dMs. TLR2, TLR3, and TLR4 protein expression checked by flow cytometry was positive for both dMs and dNK cells. In vitro treatment of primary dMs and dNK cells with specific TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7/8, and TLR9 agonists enhanced their secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, as well as cytokines and chemokines involved in immune cell crosstalk. Only dNK cells released IFN-γ, whereas only dMs released IL-1β, IL-10, and IL-12. TLR9 activation of dMs resulted in a distinct pattern of cytokine expression compared to the other TLRs. The cytokine profiles expressed by dMs and dNK cells upon TLR activation are compatible with maintenance of the fetotolerant immune environment during initiation of immune responses to pathogens at the maternofetal interface. PMID:25071732

  13. Domain-oriented functional analysis based on expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greene Jonathan

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-regulation of genes may imply involvement in similar biological processes or related function. Many clusters of co-regulated genes have been identified using microarray experiments. In this study, we examined co-regulated gene families using large-scale cDNA microarray experiments on the human transcriptome. Results We present a simple model, which, for each probe pair, distills expression changes into binary digits and summarizes the expression of multiple members of a gene family as the Family Regulation Ratio. The set of Family Regulation Ratios for each protein family across multiple experiments is called a Family Regulation Profile. We analyzed these Family Regulation Profiles using Pearson Correlation Coefficients and derived a network diagram portraying relationships between the Family Regulation Profiles of gene families that are well represented on the microarrays. Our strategy was cross-validated with two randomly chosen data subsets and was proven to be a reliable approach. Conclusion This work will help us to understand and identify the functional relationships between gene families and the regulatory pathways in which each family is involved. Concepts presented here may be useful for objective clustering of protein functions and deriving a comprehensive protein interaction map. Functional genomic approaches such as this may also be applicable to the elucidation of complex genetic regulatory networks.

  14. Regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration by CCR2-activating chemokines is directly related to macrophage recruitment

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Carlo O.; McHale, Matthew J.; Wells, Jason T.; OCHOA, OSCAR; Joel E. Michalek; McManus, Linda M.; Shireman, Paula K.

    2010-01-01

    Muscle regeneration requires CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression on bone marrow-derived cells; macrophages are a prominent CCR2-expressing cell in this process. CCR2−/− mice have severe impairments in angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment, and skeletal muscle regeneration following cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced injury. However, multiple chemokines activate CCR2, including monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCP)-1, -3, and -5. We hypothesized that MCP-1 is the chemokine ligand that mediates the i...

  15. Bcl-2 expression and triple negative profile in breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallel-Bayoudh, Imen; Hassen, Hanen Ben; Khabir, Abdelmajid; Boujelbene, Noureddine; Daoud, Jamel; Frikha, Mounir; Sallemi-Boudawara, Tahia; Aifa, Sami; Rebaï, Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    Many biomarkers for breast cancer prognosis have been proposed during the last two decades, among which HER2 and oestrogen receptors are of common use in routine clinical practice. However, in recent years, BCL2 has been recognized as an important prognostic parameter in human breast cancer, although its clinical utility is well established. The aim of this study was to examine the protein expression patterns of BCL2, HER2, oestrogen (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR) and to evaluate their correlation with survival and other prognostic parameters such as tumour size, histological grade and metastasis. We used a retrospective study including 84 Tunisian women with breast cancer. Immunohistochemistry was used to measure protein expression levels of several biomarkers. Association with conventional biopathological factors was analysed by SPSS (version13). The expression rates of BCL2, HER2, ER and PR were, respectively, 69, 62, 58.3 and 51.2%. In univariate analyses, BCL2 was highly correlated with both PR (P < 0.001) and ER (P = 0.006) and also with HER2 expression (P = 0.001). The triple negative profile showed a significant association with SBR (P = 0.016) and BCL2 expression (P = 0.02). In multivariate analyses, a significant association was maintained between BCL2 and both PR and ER (P = 0.02 and P = 0.004, respectively). Survival analysis showed that BCL2 expression was positively correlated with patients survival (P = 0.032). A Bayesian network analysis of all the variables confirmed the high value of BCL2 expression as a predictor of survival. As conclusion, BCL2 expression seems to be a very useful factor that should be in combination with HER2 and ER in breast cancer prognosis. PMID:20890735

  16. Chemokines and inflammation in heart disease: adaptive or maladaptive?

    OpenAIRE

    Tarzami, Sima T.

    2011-01-01

    Heart disease is not only the leading cause of death, disability, and healthcare expense in the US, but also the leading cause of death worldwide. Therefore, treatments to lessen ischemia-related cardiac damage could affect a broad swath of the population and have significant health and fiscal impacts. Cardiac dysfunction has been associated with elevated circulating chemokine levels, both in animals and humans. Most studies in this area have focused on chemokine expression as a prominent fea...

  17. Blood Gene Expression Profiling of Breast Cancer Survivors Experiencing Fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To extend knowledge on the mechanisms and pathways involved in maintenance of radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) by performing gene expression profiling of whole blood from breast cancer (BC) survivors with and without fibrosis 3-7 years after end of radiotherapy treatment. Methods and Materials: Gene expression profiles from blood were obtained for 254 BC survivors derived from a cohort of survivors, treated with adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer 3-7 years earlier. Analyses of transcriptional differences in blood gene expression between BC survivors with fibrosis (n = 31) and BC survivors without fibrosis (n = 223) were performed using R version 2.8.0 and tools from the Bioconductor project. Gene sets extracted through a literature search on fibrosis and breast cancer were subsequently used in gene set enrichment analysis. Results: Substantial differences in blood gene expression between BC survivors with and without fibrosis were observed, and 87 differentially expressed genes were identified through linear analysis. Transforming growth factor-β1 signaling was identified as the most significant gene set, showing a down-regulation of most of the core genes, together with up-regulation of a transcriptional activator of the inhibitor of fibrinolysis, Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 in the BC survivors with fibrosis. Conclusion: Transforming growth factor-β1 signaling was found down-regulated during the maintenance phase of fibrosis as opposed to the up-regulation reported during the early, initiating phase of fibrosis. Hence, once the fibrotic tissue has developed, the maintenance phase might rather involve a deregulation of fibrinolysis and altered degradation of extracellular matrix components.

  18. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksen Jens

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have therefore investigated transcriptional changes through gene expression profile analyses, morphological changes by histological analysis, and physiological changes by force generation measurements. DNA electrotransfer was obtained using a combination of a short high voltage pulse (HV, 1000 V/cm, 100 μs followed by a long low voltage pulse (LV, 100 V/cm, 400 ms; a pulse combination optimised for efficient and safe gene transfer. Muscles were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP and excised at 4 hours, 48 hours or 3 weeks after treatment. Results Differentially expressed genes were investigated by microarray analysis, and descriptive statistics were performed to evaluate the effects of 1 electroporation, 2 DNA injection, and 3 time after treatment. The biological significance of the results was assessed by gene annotation and supervised cluster analysis. Generally, electroporation caused down-regulation of structural proteins e.g. sarcospan and catalytic enzymes. Injection of DNA induced down-regulation of intracellular transport proteins e.g. sentrin. The effects on muscle fibres were transient as the expression profiles 3 weeks after treatment were closely related with the control muscles. Most interestingly, no changes in the expression of proteins involved in inflammatory responses or muscle regeneration was detected, indicating limited muscle damage and regeneration. Histological analysis revealed structural changes with loss of cell integrity and striation pattern in some fibres after DNA+HV+LV treatment, while HV+LV pulses alone showed preservation of cell integrity. No difference in the force generation capacity was observed in

  19. Rationally designed chemokine-based toxin targeting the viral G protein-coupled receptor US28 potently inhibits cytomegalovirus infection in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiess, Katja; Jeppesen, Mads G.; Malmgaard-Clausen, Mikkel; Krzywkowski, Karen; Dulal, Kalpana; Cheng, Tong; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Larsen, Olav; Burg, John S.; Jarvis, Michael A.; Christopher Garcia, K.; Zhu, Hua; Kledal, Thomas N; Rosenkilde, Mette M.

    2015-01-01

    target the human viral pathogen, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), on the basis of its expression of the 7TM G protein-coupled chemokine receptor US28. The virus origin of US28 provides an exceptional chemokine-binding profile with high selectivity and improved binding for the CX3C chemokine, CX3CL1......The use of receptor-ligand interactions to direct toxins to kill diseased cells selectively has shown considerable promise for treatment of a number of cancers and, more recently, autoimmune disease. Here we move the fusion toxin protein (FTP) technology beyond cancer/autoimmune therapeutics to....... Moreover, US28 is constitutively internalizing by nature, providing highly effective FTP delivery. We designed a synthetic CX3CL1 variant engineered to have ultra-high affinity for US28 and greater specificity for US28 than the natural sole receptor for CX3CL1, CX3CR1, and we fused the synthetic variant...

  20. Expansion of CD4(+ CD25(+ and CD25(- T-Bet, GATA-3, Foxp3 and RORγt cells in allergic inflammation, local lung distribution and chemokine gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Lu

    Full Text Available Allergic asthma is associated with airway eosinophilia, which is regulated by different T-effector cells. T cells express transcription factors T-bet, GATA-3, RORγt and Foxp3, representing Th1, Th2, Th17 and Treg cells respectively. No study has directly determined the relative presence of each of these T cell subsets concomitantly in a model of allergic airway inflammation. In this study we determined the degree of expansion of these T cell subsets, in the lungs of allergen challenged mice. Cell proliferation was determined by incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU together with 7-aminoactnomycin (7-AAD. The immunohistochemical localisation of T cells in the lung microenvironments was also quantified. Local expression of cytokines, chemokines and receptor genes was measured using real-time RT-PCR array analysis in tissue sections isolated by laser microdissection and pressure catapulting technology. Allergen exposure increased the numbers of T-bet(+, GATA-3(+, RORγt(+ and Foxp3(+ cells in CD4(+CD25(+ and CD4(+CD25(- T cells, with the greatest expansion of GATA-3(+ cells. The majority of CD4(+CD25(+ T-bet(+, GATA-3(+, RORγt(+ and Foxp3(+ cells had incorporated BrdU and underwent proliferation during allergen exposure. Allergen exposure led to the accumulation of T-bet(+, GATA-3(+ and Foxp3(+ cells in peribronchial and alveolar tissue, GATA-3(+ and Foxp3(+ cells in perivascular tissue, and RORγt(+ cells in alveolar tissue. A total of 28 cytokines, chemokines and receptor genes were altered more than 3 fold upon allergen exposure, with expression of half of the genes claimed in all three microenvironments. Our study shows that allergen exposure affects all T effector cells in lung, with a dominant of Th2 cells, but with different local cell distribution, probably due to a distinguished local inflammatory milieu.

  1. Differential chemokine responses in the murine brain following lyssavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, D J; Núñez, A; Banyard, A C; Williams, A; Ortiz-Pelaez, A; Fooks, A R; Johnson, N

    2013-11-01

    The hallmark of lyssavirus infection is lethal encephalomyelitis. Previous studies have reported distinct lyssavirus isolate-related differences in severity of cellular recruitment into the encephalon in a murine model of infection following peripheral inoculation with rabies virus (RABV) and European bat lyssavirus (EBLV)-1 and -2. In order to understand the role of chemokines in this process, comparative studies of the chemokine pattern, distribution and production in response to infection with these lyssaviruses were undertaken. Expression of CCL2, CCL5 and CXCL10 was observed throughout the murine brain with a distinct caudal bias in distribution, similar to both inflammatory changes and virus antigen distribution. CCL2 immunolabelling was localized to neuronal and astroglial populations. CCL5 immunolabelling was only detected in the astroglia, while CXCL10 labelling, although present in the astroglia, was more prominent in neurons. Isolate-dependent differences in the amount of chemokine immunolabelling in specific brain regions and chemokine production by neurons in vitro were observed, with a greater expression of CCL5 in vivo and CXCL10 production in vitro after EBLV infection. Additionally, strong positive associations between chemokine immunolabelling and perivascular cuffing and, to a lesser extent, virus antigen score were also observed. These differences in chemokine expression may explain the variation in severity of encephalitic changes observed in animals infected with different lyssavirus isolates. PMID:23746482

  2. A beginner's guide to chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar

    2012-05-01

    This review provides an overview of chemokines and their receptors, with an emphasis on general features and nomenclature along with a short summary of their properties and functions. It is intended as an introduction to the subject and a reference point for those wishing to learn key facts about chemokines and their role in biology. PMID:22571610

  3. Microarray analysis of gene expression profiles in ripening pineapple fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koia Jonni H

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pineapple (Ananas comosus is a tropical fruit crop of significant commercial importance. Although the physiological changes that occur during pineapple fruit development have been well characterized, little is known about the molecular events that occur during the fruit ripening process. Understanding the molecular basis of pineapple fruit ripening will aid the development of new varieties via molecular breeding or genetic modification. In this study we developed a 9277 element pineapple microarray and used it to profile gene expression changes that occur during pineapple fruit ripening. Results Microarray analyses identified 271 unique cDNAs differentially expressed at least 1.5-fold between the mature green and mature yellow stages of pineapple fruit ripening. Among these 271 sequences, 184 share significant homology with genes encoding proteins of known function, 53 share homology with genes encoding proteins of unknown function and 34 share no significant homology with any database accession. Of the 237 pineapple sequences with homologs, 160 were up-regulated and 77 were down-regulated during pineapple fruit ripening. DAVID Functional Annotation Cluster (FAC analysis of all 237 sequences with homologs revealed confident enrichment scores for redox activity, organic acid metabolism, metalloenzyme activity, glycolysis, vitamin C biosynthesis, antioxidant activity and cysteine peptidase activity, indicating the functional significance and importance of these processes and pathways during pineapple fruit development. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis validated the microarray expression results for nine out of ten genes tested. Conclusions This is the first report of a microarray based gene expression study undertaken in pineapple. Our bioinformatic analyses of the transcript profiles have identified a number of genes, processes and pathways with putative involvement in the pineapple fruit ripening process. This study

  4. Gene expression profiles of Nitrosomonas europaea, an obligate chemolitotroph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel J. Arp

    2005-05-25

    Nitrosomonas europaea is an aerobic lithoautotrophic bacterium that uses ammonia (NH3) as its energy source. As a nitrifier, it is an important participant in the nitrogen cycle, which can also influence the carbon cycle. The focus of this work was to explore the genetic structure and mechanisms underlying the lithoautotrophic growth style of N. europaea. Whole genome gene expression: The gene expression profile of cells in exponential growth and during starvation was analyzed using microarrays. During growth, 98% of the genes increased in expression at least two fold compared to starvation conditions. In growing cells, approximately 30% of the genes were expressed eight fold higher, Approximately 10% were expressed more than 15 fold higher. Approximately 3% (91 genes) were expressed to more than 20 fold of their levels in starved cells. Carbon fixation gene expression: N. europaea fixes carbon via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle via a type I ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). This study showed that transcription of cbb genes was up-regulated when the carbon source was limited, while amo, hao and other energy harvesting related genes were down-regulated. Iron related gene expression: Because N. europaea has a relatively high content of hemes, sufficient Fe must be available in the medium for it to grow. The genome revealed that approximately 5% of the coding genes in N. europaea are dedicated to Fe transport and assimilation. Nonetheless, with the exception of citrate biosynthesis genes, N. europaea lacks genes for siderophore production. The Fe requirements for growth and the expression of the putative membrane siderophore receptors were determined. The N. europaea genome has over 100 putative genes ({approx}5% of the coding genes) related to Fe uptake and its siderophore receptors could be grouped phylogenetically in four clusters. Fe related genes, such as a number of TonB-dependent Fe-siderophore receptors for ferrichrome and

  5. Gene expression profiles of Nitrosomonas europaea, an obligate chemolitotroph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel J Arp

    2005-06-15

    Nitrosomonas europaea is an aerobic lithoautotrophic bacterium that uses ammonia (NH3) as its energy source. As a nitrifier, it is an important participant in the nitrogen cycle, which can also influence the carbon cycle. The focus of this work was to explore the genetic structure and mechanisms underlying the lithoautotrophic growth style of N. europaea. Whole genome gene expression. The gene expression profile of cells in exponential growth and during starvation was analyzed using microarrays. During growth, 98% of the genes increased in expression at least two fold compared to starvation conditions. In growing cells, approximately 30% of the genes were expressed eight fold higher, Approximately 10% were expressed more than 15 fold higher. Approximately 3% (91 genes) were expressed to more than 20 fold of their levels in starved cells. Carbon fixation gene expression. N. europaea fixes carbon via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle via a type I ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). This study showed that transcription of cbb genes was up-regulated when the carbon source was limited, while amo, hao and other energy harvesting related genes were down-regulated. Iron related gene expression. Because N. europaea has a relatively high content of hemes, sufficient Fe must be available in the medium for it to grow. The genome revealed that approximately 5% of the coding genes in N. europaea are dedicated to Fe transport and assimilation. Nonetheless, with the exception of citrate biosynthesis genes, N. europaea lacks genes for siderophore production. The Fe requirements for growth and the expression of the putative membrane siderophore receptors were determined. The N. europaea genome has over 100 putative genes ({approx}5% of the coding genes) related to Fe uptake and its siderophore receptors could be grouped phylogenetically in four clusters. Fe related genes, such as a number of TonB-dependent Fe-siderophore receptors for ferrichrome and

  6. PARC/CCL18 Is a Plasma CC Chemokine with Increased Levels in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Struyf, Sofie; Schutyser, Evemie; Gouwy, Mieke; Gijsbers, Klara; Proost, Paul; Benoit, Yves; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van Damme, Jo; Laureys, Geneviève

    2003-01-01

    Chemokines play an important role in leukocyte mobilization, hematopoiesis, and angiogenesis. Tissue-specific expression of particular chemokines also influences tumor growth and metastasis. Here, the CC chemokine pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine (PARC)/CCL18 was measured in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Surprisingly, PARC immunoreactivity was consistently detected in plasma from healthy donors. After purification to ho...

  7. Cytokine expression profile over time in burned mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Przkora, Rene; Herndon, David N; Jeschke, Marc G

    2009-01-01

    The persistent inflammatory response induced by a severe burn increases patient susceptibility to infections and sepsis, potentially leading to multi-organ failure and death. In order to use murine models to develop interventions that modulate the post-burn inflammatory response, the response in mice and the similarities to the human response must first be determined. Here we present the temporal serum cytokine expression profiles in burned in comparison to sham mice and human burn patients. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomized to control (n=47) or subjected to a 35% TBSA scald burn (n=89). Mice were sacrificed 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 48 hours and 7, 10, and 14 days post-burn; cytokines were measured by multi-plex array. Following the burn injury, IL-6, IL-1β, KC, G-CSF, TNF, IL-17, MIP-1α, RANTES, and GM-CSF were increased, p<0.05. IL-2, IL-3, and IL-5 were decreased, p<0.05. IL-10, IFN-γ, and IL-12p70 were expressed in a biphasic manner, p<0.05. This temporal cytokine expression pattern elucidates the pathogenesis of the inflammatory response in burned mice. Expression of 11 cytokines were similar in mice and children, returning to lowest levels by post-burn day 14, confirming the utility of the burned mouse model for development of therapeutic interventions to attenuate the post-burn inflammatory response. PMID:19019696

  8. Gene Expression Profiling in the Hibernating Primate, Cheirogaleus Medius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faherty, Sheena L.; Villanueva-Cañas, José Luis; Klopfer, Peter H.; Albà, M. Mar; Yoder, Anne D.

    2016-01-01

    Hibernation is a complex physiological response that some mammalian species employ to evade energetic demands. Previous work in mammalian hibernators suggests that hibernation is activated not by a set of genes unique to hibernators, but by differential expression of genes that are present in all mammals. This question of universal genetic mechanisms requires further investigation and can only be tested through additional investigations of phylogenetically dispersed species. To explore this question, we use RNA-Seq to investigate gene expression dynamics as they relate to the varying physiological states experienced throughout the year in a group of primate hibernators—Madagascar’s dwarf lemurs (genus Cheirogaleus). In a novel experimental approach, we use longitudinal sampling of biological tissues as a method for capturing gene expression profiles from the same individuals throughout their annual hibernation cycle. We identify 90 candidate genes that have variable expression patterns when comparing two active states (Active 1 and Active 2) with a torpor state. These include genes that are involved in metabolic pathways, feeding behavior, and circadian rhythms, as might be expected to correlate with seasonal physiological state changes. The identified genes appear to be critical for maintaining the health of an animal that undergoes prolonged periods of metabolic depression concurrent with the hibernation phenotype. By focusing on these differentially expressed genes in dwarf lemurs, we compare gene expression patterns in previously studied mammalian hibernators. Additionally, by employing evolutionary rate analysis, we find that hibernation-related genes do not evolve under positive selection in hibernating species relative to nonhibernators. PMID:27412611

  9. Gene expression profiles in liver cancer and normal liver tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian Xin Liu; Hong Chi Jiang; An Long Zhu; Jin Zhou; Xiu Qin Wang; Min Wu

    2000-01-01

    AIM To describe a liver cancer = specific gene expression profile and to identify genes that showed alteredexpression between liver cancer tissues and their adjacent nearly normal tissues.METHODS The cDNA probes which were labeled with a-32P dATP were synthesized from total RNA ofliver cancer and adjacent normal tissues and hybridized separately to two identical Atlas human cancer eDNAexpression array membranes containing 588 known genes.RESULTS Autoradiographic results were analyzed by specific Atlas ImageTM (version 1. 0) software.Among the 588 genes analyzed, 18 genes were found up-regulated in cancer, including TFDP2, Aktl, E2F-3etc, and 25 genes were down-regulated in cancer, including TDGF1, BAK, LAR, etc. Expression levels ofgenes that associated with the regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, cell-cellinteraction, invasion regulators and eytokines altered mostly.CONCLUSION The result obtained from Atlas microarray provides a comprehensive liver cancer-specificexpression profile. The results can lead to the identification of liver cancer-specific biomarkers and may behelpful in early diagnosis and dentifiction of target genes for designing rational therapeutic strategies.

  10. Maternal immune activation by poly(I:C induces expression of cytokines IL-1β and IL-13, chemokine MCP-1 and colony stimulating factor VEGF in fetal mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arrode-Brusés Géraldine

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal viral infection during pregnancy is associated with an increase in the incidence of psychiatric disorders with presumed neurodevelopmental origin, including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. The enhanced risk for developing mental illness appears to be caused by deleterious effects of innate immune response-associated factors on the development of the central nervous system, which predispose the offspring to pathological behaviors in adolescence and adulthood. To identify the immune response-associated soluble factors that may affect central nervous system development, we examined the effect of innate immune response activation by polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (poly(I:C, a synthetic analogue of viral double-stranded RNA, on the expression levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and colony stimulating factors in fetal and postnatal mouse brain 6 h and 24 h after treatment. Methods C57BL/6J pregnant mice (gestational day 16 or newborn mice (postnatal day 4 received a single intraperitoneal injection of the synthetic analogue of viral double-stranded RNA poly(I:C (20 mg/kg. Thirty-two immune response-associated soluble factors, including pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and colony stimulating factors, were assayed 6 h and 24 h after poly(I:C injection using multiplexed bead-based immunoassay (Milliplex Map and processed in a Luminex 100 IS instrument. Results Maternal exposure to poly(I:C at gestational day 16 induced a significant increase in cytokines interleukin (IL-1β, IL-7 and IL-13; chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1α, interferon gamma-induced protein (IP-10 and monokine induced by IFN-gamma (MIG; and in the colony stimulating factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in the fetal brain. IL-1β showed the highest concentration levels in fetal brains and was the only cytokine

  11. Chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1alpha activates basophils by means of CXCR4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Jacobi, H H; Jing, C; Reimert, C M; Quan, S; Dissing, S; Poulsen, Lars K.; Skov, P S

    2000-01-01

    The CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is predominantly expressed on inactivated naive T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and endothelial cells. CXC chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1alpha (SDF-1alpha) is the only known ligand for CXCR4. To date, the CXCR4 expression and function o...

  12. Functional features of gene expression profiles differentiating gastrointestinal stromal tumours according to KIT mutations and expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) represent a heterogeneous group of tumours of mesenchymal origin characterized by gain-of-function mutations in KIT or PDGFRA of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase family. Although mutations in either receptor are thought to drive an early oncogenic event through similar pathways, two previous studies reported the mutation-specific gene expression profiles. However, their further conclusions were rather discordant. To clarify the molecular characteristics of differentially expressed genes according to GIST receptor mutations, we combined microarray-based analysis with detailed functional annotations. Total RNA was isolated from 29 frozen gastric GISTs and processed for hybridization on GENECHIP® HG-U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays (Affymetrix). KIT and PDGFRA were analyzed by sequencing, while related mRNA levels were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Fifteen and eleven tumours possessed mutations in KIT and PDGFRA, respectively; no mutation was found in three tumours. Gene expression analysis identified no discriminative profiles associated with clinical or pathological parameters, even though expression of hundreds of genes differentiated tumour receptor mutation and expression status. Functional features of genes differentially expressed between the two groups of GISTs suggested alterations in angiogenesis and G-protein-related and calcium signalling. Our study has identified novel molecular elements likely to be involved in receptor-dependent GIST development and allowed confirmation of previously published results. These elements may be potential therapeutic targets and novel markers of KIT mutation status

  13. Transcriptional Regulation of Chemokine Genes: A Link to Pancreatic Islet Inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J. Burke

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced expression of chemotactic cytokines (aka chemokines within pancreatic islets likely contributes to islet inflammation by regulating the recruitment and activation of various leukocyte populations, including macrophages, neutrophils, and T-lymphocytes. Because of the powerful actions of these chemokines, precise transcriptional control is required. In this review, we highlight what is known about the signals and mechanisms that govern the transcription of genes encoding specific chemokine proteins in pancreatic islet β-cells, which include contributions from the NF-κB and STAT1 pathways. We further discuss increased chemokine expression in pancreatic islets during autoimmune-mediated and obesity-related development of diabetes.

  14. Alternative Splicing and Expression Profile Analysis of Expressed Sequence Tags in Domestic Pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Zhang; Lin Tao; Lin Ye; Ling He; Yuan-Zhong Zhu; Yue-Dong Zhu; Yan Zhou

    2007-01-01

    Domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica) is one of the most important mammals to humans. Alternative splicing is a cellular mechanism in eukaryotes that greatly increases the diversity of gene products. Expression sequence tags (ESTs) have been widely used for gene discovery, expression profile analysis, and alternative splicing detection. In this study, a total of 712,905 ESTs extracted from 101 different nonnormalized EST libraries of the domestic pig were analyzed. These EST libraries cover the nervous system, digestive system, immune system, and meat production related tissues from embryo, newborn, and adult pigs, making contributions to the analysis of alternative splicing variants as well as expression profiles in various stages of tissues. A modified approach was designed to cluster and assemble large EST datasets, aiming to detect alternative splicing together with EST abundance of each splicing variant. Much efforts were made to classify alternative splicing into different types and apply different filters to each type to get more reliable results. Finally, a total of 1,223 genes with average 2.8 splicing variants were detected among 16,540 unique genes. The overview of expression profiles would change when we take alternative splicing into account.

  15. Influence of mRNA decay rates on the computational prediction of transcription rate profiles from gene expression profiles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chi-Fang Chin; Arthur Chun-Chieh Shih; Kuo-Chin Fan

    2007-12-01

    The abundance of an mRNA species depends not only on the transcription rate at which it is produced, but also on its decay rate, which determines how quickly it is degraded. Both transcription rate and decay rate are important factors in regulating gene expression. With the advance of the age of genomics, there are a considerable number of gene expression datasets, in which the expression profiles of tens of thousands of genes are often non-uniformly sampled. Recently, numerous studies have proposed to infer the regulatory networks from expression profiles. Nevertheless, how mRNA decay rates affect the computational prediction of transcription rate profiles from expression profiles has not been well studied. To understand the influences, we present a systematic method based on a gene dynamic regulation model by taking mRNA decay rates, expression profiles and transcription profiles into account. Generally speaking, an expression profile can be regarded as a representation of a biological condition. The rationale behind the concept is that the biological condition is reflected in the changing of gene expression profile. Basically, the biological condition is either associated to the cell cycle or associated to the environmental stresses. The expression profiles of genes that belong to the former, so-called cell cycle data, are characterized by periodicity, whereas the expression profiles of genes that belong to the latter, so-called condition-specific data, are characterized by a steep change after a specific time without periodicity. In this paper, we examine the systematic method on the simulated expression data as well as the real expression data including yeast cell cycle data and condition-specific data (glucose-limitation data). The results indicate that mRNA decay rates do not significantly influence the computational prediction of transcription-rate profiles for cell cycle data. On the contrary, the magnitudes and shapes of transcription-rate profiles for

  16. The Maternal Cytokine and Chemokine Profile of Naturally Conceived Gestations Is Mainly Preserved during In Vitro Fertilization and Egg Donation Pregnancies

    OpenAIRE

    Alicia Martínez-Varea; Begoña Pellicer; Vicente Serra; David Hervás-Marín; Alicia Martínez-Romero; José Bellver; Alfredo Perales-Marín; Antonio Pellicer

    2015-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal study aimed at comparing maternal immune response among naturally conceived (NC; n = 25), in vitro fertilization (IVF; n = 25), and egg donation (ED; n = 25) pregnancies. The main outcome measures were, firstly, to follow up plasma levels of interleukin (IL) 1beta, IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL8, IL10, IL17, interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ), regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES...

  17. Bitumen fume-induced gene expression profile in rat lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to bitumen fumes during paving and roofing activities may represent an occupational health risk. To date, most of the studies performed on the biological effect of asphalt fumes have been done with regard to their content in carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In order to gain an additional insight into the mechanisms of action of bitumen fumes, we studied their pulmonary effects in rodents following inhalation using the microarray technology. Fisher 344 rats were exposed for 5 days, 6 h/day to bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature (170 oC) using a nose-only exposition device. With the intention of studying the early transcriptional events induced by asphalt fumes, lung tissues were collected immediately following exposure and gene expression profiles in control and exposed rats were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays. Data analysis revealed that genes involved in lung inflammatory response as well as genes associated with PAH metabolization and detoxification were highly expressed in bitumen-exposed animals. In addition, the expression of genes related to elastase activity and its inhibition which are associated with emphysema was also modulated. More interestingly genes coding for monoamine oxidases A and B involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotics were downregulated in exposed rats. Altogether, these data give additional information concerning the bitumen fumes biological effects and would allow to better review the health effects of occupational asphalt fumes exposure

  18. Long non‑coding RNA‑GAS5 acts as a tumor suppressor in bladder transitional cell carcinoma via regulation of chemokine (C‑C motif) ligand 1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qifeng; Wang, Ning; Qi, Juan; Gu, Zhengqin; Shen, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Long non‑coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important roles in diverse biological processes, including transcriptional regulation, cell growth and tumorigenesis. The present study aimed to investigate whether lncRNA‑growth arrest‑specific (GAS)5 regulated bladder cancer progression via regulation of chemokine (C‑C) ligand (CCL)1 expression. The viability of BLX bladder cancer cells was detected using a Cell Counting kit‑8 assay, and cell apoptosis was assessed by annexin V‑propidium iodide double‑staining. The expression levels of specific genes and proteins were analyzed by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. In addition, cells were transfected with small interfering (si)RNAs or recombinant GAS5 in order to silence or overexpress GAS5, respectively. The results of the present study demonstrated that knockdown of GAS5 expression promoted bladder cancer cell proliferation, whereas overexpression of GAS5 suppressed cell proliferation. Furthermore, knockdown of GAS5 resulted in an increased percentage of cells in S and G2 phase, and a decreased percentage of cells in G1 phase. In addition, the present study performed a hierarchical cluster analysis of differentially expressed lncRNAs in bladder cancer cells and detected that CCL1 overexpression resulted in an upregulation of GAS5, which may improve the ability of cells to regulate a stress response in vitro. Furthermore, knockdown of GAS5 expression increased the mRNA and protein expression of CCL1 in bladder cancer cells. Gain‑of‑function and loss‑of‑function studies demonstrated that GAS5 was able to inhibit bladder cancer cell proliferation, at least in part, by suppressing the expression of CCL1. The results of the present study demonstrated that GAS5 was able to suppress bladder cancer cell proliferation, at least partially, by suppressing the expression of CCL1. The results of the present study may provide a basis for developing novel

  19. Gene Expression Commons: an open platform for absolute gene expression profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Seita

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling using microarrays has been limited to comparisons of gene expression between small numbers of samples within individual experiments. However, the unknown and variable sensitivities of each probeset have rendered the absolute expression of any given gene nearly impossible to estimate. We have overcome this limitation by using a very large number (>10,000 of varied microarray data as a common reference, so that statistical attributes of each probeset, such as the dynamic range and threshold between low and high expression, can be reliably discovered through meta-analysis. This strategy is implemented in a web-based platform named "Gene Expression Commons" (https://gexc.stanford.edu/ which contains data of 39 distinct highly purified mouse hematopoietic stem/progenitor/differentiated cell populations covering almost the entire hematopoietic system. Since the Gene Expression Commons is designed as an open platform, investigators can explore the expression level of any gene, search by expression patterns of interest, submit their own microarray data, and design their own working models representing biological relationship among samples.

  20. Chemokine Signaling Directs Trunk Lymphatic Network Formation along the Preexisting Blood Vasculature

    OpenAIRE

    Cha, Young Ryun; Fujita, Misato; Butler, Matthew; Isogai, Sumio; Kochhan, Eva; Siekmann, Arndt F; Weinstein, Brant M

    2012-01-01

    The lymphatic system is crucial for fluid homeostasis, immune responses, and numerous pathological processes. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for establishing the anatomical form of the lymphatic vascular network remain largely unknown. Here, we show that chemokine signaling provides critical guidance cues directing early trunk lymphatic network assembly and patterning. The chemokine receptors Cxcr4a and Cxcr4b are expressed in lymphatic endothelium, while chemokine ligands Cxcl...

  1. Gene expression profiling of alveolar soft-part sarcoma (ASPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alveolar soft-part sarcoma (ASPS) is an extremely rare, highly vascular soft tissue sarcoma affecting predominantly adolescents and young adults. In an attempt to gain insight into the pathobiology of this enigmatic tumor, we performed the first genome-wide gene expression profiling study. For seven patients with confirmed primary or metastatic ASPS, RNA samples were isolated immediately following surgery, reverse transcribed to cDNA and each sample hybridized to duplicate high-density human U133 plus 2.0 microarrays. Array data was then analyzed relative to arrays hybridized to universal RNA to generate an unbiased transcriptome. Subsequent gene ontology analysis was used to identify transcripts with therapeutic or diagnostic potential. A subset of the most interesting genes was then validated using quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Analysis of patient array data versus universal RNA identified elevated expression of transcripts related to angiogenesis (ANGPTL2, HIF-1 alpha, MDK, c-MET, VEGF, TIMP-2), cell proliferation (PRL, IGFBP1, NTSR2, PCSK1), metastasis (ADAM9, ECM1, POSTN) and steroid biosynthesis (CYP17A1 and STS). A number of muscle-restricted transcripts (ITGB1BP3/MIBP, MYF5, MYF6 and TRIM63) were also identified, strengthening the case for a muscle cell progenitor as the origin of disease. Transcript differentials were validated using real-time PCR and subsequent immunohistochemical analysis confirmed protein expression for several of the most interesting changes (MDK, c-MET, VEGF, POSTN, CYP17A1, ITGB1BP3/MIBP and TRIM63). Results from this first comprehensive study of ASPS gene expression identifies several targets involved in angiogenesis, metastasis and myogenic differentiation. These efforts represent the first step towards defining the cellular origin, pathogenesis and effective treatment strategies for this atypical malignancy

  2. Gene expression profiles in Finnish twins with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaprio Jaakko

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since genetic alterations influencing susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS, the most common autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS, are as yet poorly understood, the purpose of this study was to identify genes responsible for MS by studying monozygotic (MZ twin pairs discordant for MS. Methods In order to identify genes involved in MS development, the gene expression profiles in blood mononuclear cells obtained from eight MZ twin pairs discordant for MS were analyzed by cDNA microarray technology detecting the expression of 8 300 genes. The twins were collected from the Finnish Twin Cohort Study and both affected subjects and their healthy siblings underwent neurological evaluation and cerebral and spinal magnetic resonance imaging. Gene expressions were confirmed by relative quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Results It appeared that 25 genes were at least two-fold up-regulated and 15 genes down-regulated in 25% (2/8 of twins with MS when compared to their healthy siblings. Moreover, 6/25 genes were up-regulated in 40% of MS twins and one gene, interferon alpha-inducible protein (clone IFI-6-16 (G1P3, in 50% of them. The six most constantly expressed genes are (1 G1P3, (2 POU domain, class 3, transcription factor 1, (3 myxovirus resistance 2, (4 lysosomal-associated multispanning membrane protein-5, (5 hemoglobin alpha 2 and (6 hemoglobin beta. Conclusion Over two-fold up-regulation of these six genes in almost half of MZ twins with MS suggests their role in MS pathogenesis. Studies using MZ MS twins obtained from genetically homogeneous population offer a unique opportunity to explore the genetic nature of MS.

  3. Gene expression profiling of alveolar soft-part sarcoma (ASPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffeld Mark

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar soft-part sarcoma (ASPS is an extremely rare, highly vascular soft tissue sarcoma affecting predominantly adolescents and young adults. In an attempt to gain insight into the pathobiology of this enigmatic tumor, we performed the first genome-wide gene expression profiling study. Methods For seven patients with confirmed primary or metastatic ASPS, RNA samples were isolated immediately following surgery, reverse transcribed to cDNA and each sample hybridized to duplicate high-density human U133 plus 2.0 microarrays. Array data was then analyzed relative to arrays hybridized to universal RNA to generate an unbiased transcriptome. Subsequent gene ontology analysis was used to identify transcripts with therapeutic or diagnostic potential. A subset of the most interesting genes was then validated using quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results Analysis of patient array data versus universal RNA identified elevated expression of transcripts related to angiogenesis (ANGPTL2, HIF-1 alpha, MDK, c-MET, VEGF, TIMP-2, cell proliferation (PRL, IGFBP1, NTSR2, PCSK1, metastasis (ADAM9, ECM1, POSTN and steroid biosynthesis (CYP17A1 and STS. A number of muscle-restricted transcripts (ITGB1BP3/MIBP, MYF5, MYF6 and TRIM63 were also identified, strengthening the case for a muscle cell progenitor as the origin of disease. Transcript differentials were validated using real-time PCR and subsequent immunohistochemical analysis confirmed protein expression for several of the most interesting changes (MDK, c-MET, VEGF, POSTN, CYP17A1, ITGB1BP3/MIBP and TRIM63. Conclusion Results from this first comprehensive study of ASPS gene expression identifies several targets involved in angiogenesis, metastasis and myogenic differentiation. These efforts represent the first step towards defining the cellular origin, pathogenesis and effective treatment strategies for this atypical malignancy.

  4. Gene expression profiling and endothelin in acute experimental pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helieh S Oz; Ying Lu; Louis P Vera-Portocarrero; Pei Ge; Ada Silos-Santiago; Karin N Westlund

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To analyze gene expression profiles in an experimental pancreatitis and provide functional reversal of hypersensitivity with candidate gene endothelin-1 antagonists.METHODS:Dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) is a chemical used as a polyvinyl carbonate stabilizer/catalyzer,biocide in agriculture,antifouling agent in paint and fabric.DBTC induces an acute pancreatitis flare through generation of reactive oxygen species.Lewis-inbred rats received a single i.v.injection with either DBTC or vehicle.Spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were taken at the peak of inflammation and processed for transcriptional profiling with a cDNA microarray biased for rat brain-specific genes.In a second study,groups of animals with DBTC-induced pancreatitis were treated with endothelin (ET) receptor antagonists [ET-A (BQ123) and ET-B BQ788)].Spontaneous pain related mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity were measured.Immunohistochemical analysis was performed using anti-ET-A and ET-B antibodies on sections from pancreatic tissues and DRG of the T10-12 spinal segments.RESULTS:Animals developed acute pancreatic inflammation persisting 7-10 d as confirmed by pathological studies (edema in parenchyma,loss of pancreatic architecture and islets,infiltration of inflammatory cells,neutrophil and mononuclear cells,degeneration,vacuolization and necrosis of acinar cells) and the painrelated behaviors (cutaneous secondary mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity).Gene expression profile was different in the spinal cord from animals with pancreatitis compared to the vehicle control group.Over 260 up-regulated and 60 down-regulated unique genes could be classified into 8 functional gene families:circulatory/acute phase/immunomodulatory; extracellular matrix; structural; channel/receptor/transporter; signaling transduction; transcription/translation-related; antioxidants/chaperones/heat shock; pancreatic and other enzymes.ET-1 was among the 52 candidate genes upregulated greater than 2-fold in

  5. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk; Wittenhagen, P;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta). METHODS: The CCR5 Delta32 allele and a CCR5 promoter polymorphism associated with cell surface expression of CCR5 were...

  6. Intragraft gene expression profile associated with the induction of tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Jacqueline M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenotransplantation holds the promise of providing an unlimited supply of donor organs for terminal patients with organ failure. Pre-existing natural antibodies to the Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNac-R (αGal carbohydrate xenoantigen, however, bind rapidly to the graft endothelium and initiate hyperacute rejection of wild type pig grafts in humans. Experimental procedures designed to prevent xenoantibody-mediated rejection have been tested in gal knockout mice. These mice produce anti-gal xenoantibodies and are widely used as small animal models for xenotransplantation research. In this model, chimerism for cells expressing the gal carbohydrate can be achieved by transplantation of mixed cells or by transduction of bone marrow cells with viral vectors expressing a functional α1,3 galactosyltransferase gene. Chimerism induces tolerance to heart grafts expressing αGal. The mechanisms by which tolerance is achieved include systemic changes such as clonal deletion and/or anergy. Intragraft changes that occur during the early stages of tolerance induction have not been characterized. Results Cytoprotective genes heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, Bcl2, and A20 that have been reported to contribute to long-term graft survival in various models of accommodation were not expressed at high levels in tolerant heart grafts. Intragraft gene expression at both early (Day 10 and late (>2 month time points after heart transplant were examined by real-time PCR and microarray analysis was used to identify changes associated with the induction of tolerance. Intragraft gene expression profiling using microarray analysis demonstrated that genes identified in the functional categories of stress and immunity and signal transduction were significantly up-regulated in early tolerant grafts compared with syngeneic control grafts. Biological process classification showed lower binomial p-values in the categories of "response to biotic stimulus, defense response, and

  7. Gene expression profile analysis of human intervertebral disc degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Wu, Dajiang; Zhu, Xiaodong; Ni, Haijian; Wei, Xianzhao; Mao, Ningfang; Xie, Yang; Niu, Yunfei; Li, Ming

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we used microarray analysis to investigate the biogenesis and progression of intervertebral disc degeneration. The gene expression profiles of 37 disc tissue samples obtained from patients with herniated discs and degenerative disc disease collected by the National Cancer Institute Cooperative Tissue Network were analyzed. Differentially expressed genes between more and less degenerated discs were identified by significant analysis of microarray. A total of 555 genes were significantly overexpressed in more degenerated discs with a false discovery rate of < 3%. Functional annotation showed that these genes were significantly associated with membrane-bound vesicles, calcium ion binding and extracellular matrix. Protein-protein interaction analysis showed that these genes, including previously reported genes such as fibronectin, COL2A1 and β-catenin, may play key roles in disc degeneration. Unsupervised clustering indicated that the widely used morphology-based Thompson grading system was only marginally associated with the molecular classification of intervertebral disc degeneration. These findings indicate that detailed, systematic gene analysis may be a useful way of studying the biology of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:24130454

  8. Gene expression profile analysis of human intervertebral disc degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used microarray analysis to investigate the biogenesis and progression of intervertebral disc degeneration. The gene expression profiles of 37 disc tissue samples obtained from patients with herniated discs and degenerative disc disease collected by the National Cancer Institute Cooperative Tissue Network were analyzed. Differentially expressed genes between more and less degenerated discs were identified by significant analysis of microarray. A total of 555 genes were significantly overexpressed in more degenerated discs with a false discovery rate of < 3%. Functional annotation showed that these genes were significantly associated with membrane-bound vesicles, calcium ion binding and extracellular matrix. Protein-protein interaction analysis showed that these genes, including previously reported genes such as fibronectin, COL2A1 and f-catenin, may play key roles in disc degeneration. Unsupervised clustering indicated that the widely used morphology-based Thompson grading system was only marginally associated with the molecular classification of intervertebral disc degeneration. These findings indicate that detailed, systematic gene analysis may be a useful way of studying the biology of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  9. Intergrin gene expression profiles of human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Xin Liu; Hong-Chi Jiang; Zhi-Hua Liu; Jing Zhou; Wei-Hui Zhang; An-Long Zhu; Xiu-Qin Wang; Min Wu

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gene expression profiles of intergringenes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) through theusage of Atlas Human Cancer Array membranes, semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chainreaction (RT-PCR) and Northern blot.METHODS: Hybridization of cDNA array membrane wasperformed with α 32P-labeled cDNA probes synthesizedfrom RNA isolated from hepatocellular carcinoma andadjacent non-cirrhotic liver. AtlasImage, which is asoftware specific to array, was used to analyze theresult. RT-PCR of 24 pairs specimen and Northern blotof 4 pairs specimen were used to confirm the expressionpattern of some intergrin genes identified by Atlasarrays hybridization.RESULTS: Among 588 genes spotted in membrane, 17genes were related to intergrin. Four genes were up-regulated, such as intergrin alpha8, beta1, beta7 andbeta8 in HCC. Whereas there were no genes down-regulated in HCC. RT-PCR and Northern blot analysisof intergrin beta1 gene gave results consistent withcDNA array findings.CONCLUSION: Investigation of these intergrin genesshould help to disclose the molecular mechanism of thecell adhesion, invasive and metastasis of HCC. A fewgenes are reported to have changed in HCC for the firsttime. The quick and high-throughout method of profilinggene expression by cDNA array provides us overviewof key factors that may involved in HCC, and may findthe clue of the study of HCC metastasis and moleculartargets of anti-metastasis therapy. The preciserelationship between the altered genes and HCC is amatter of further investigation.

  10. Bifidobacterium bifidum actively changes the gene expression profile induced by Lactobacillus acidophilus in murine dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Gudrun; Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen Fink, Lisbeth; Jarmer, Hanne; Nøhr Nielsen, Birgit; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal regulatory role in activation of both the innate as well as the adaptive immune system by responding to environmental microorganisms. We have previously shown that Lactobacillus acidophilus induces a strong production of the pro-inflammatory and Th1 polarizing cytokine IL-12 in DC, whereas bifidobacteria do not induce IL-12 but inhibit the IL-12 production induced by lactobacilli. In the present study, genome-wide microarrays were used to investigate the gene expression pattern of murine DC stimulated with Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium bifidum Z9. L. acidophilus NCFM strongly induced expression of interferon (IFN)-beta, other virus defence genes, and cytokine and chemokine genes related to the innate and the adaptive immune response. By contrast, B. bifidum Z9 up-regulated genes encoding cytokines and chemokines related to the innate immune response. Moreover, B. bifidum Z9 inhibited the expression of the Th1-promoting genes induced by L. acidophilus NCFM and had an additive effect on genes of the innate immune response and Th2 skewing genes. The gene encoding Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a transcription factor regulating the activation of JNK, was one of the few genes only induced by B. bifidum Z9. Neutralization of IFN-beta abrogated L. acidophilus NCFM-induced expression of Th1-skewing genes, and blocking of the JNK pathway completely inhibited the expression of IFN-beta. Our results indicate that B. bifidum Z9 actively inhibits the expression of genes related to the adaptive immune system in murine dendritic cells and that JPD2 via blocking of IFN-beta plays a central role in this regulatory mechanism. PMID:20548777

  11. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  12. Mycobacterium bovis-infected macrophages from resistant and susceptible cattle exhibited a differential pro-inflammatory gene expression profile depending on strain virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonseca-Silva, Edgar; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Gutiérrez-Pabello, José A

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, is an intracellular bacterium that normally persists inside host macrophages. However, the influence of bacterial virulence and host resistance on the final outcome in this interaction is not well known. In this study, we infected macrophages isolated from natural disease resistant (R) and susceptible (S) cattle donors with M. bovis strains characterized as attenuated and virulent to assess pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNFα, IL-12, IL-18, IL-1β, IL-6), chemokine (MCP-1, MCP-2, MIP-1), macrophage receptor (MSR1, TLR2, TLR4, MMR) and iNOS mRNA expression levels. Our findings identified a pro-inflammatory gene expression profile as a common feature after M. bovis infection regardless of bacterial virulence, however in S macrophages a superior expression was induced by the attenuated strain, whereas in R macrophages it was accomplished by the virulent M. bovis. A macrophage pro-inflammatory profile is intended to control M. bovis intracellular growth; however the host resistant phenotype plays a determinant role in it, since R macrophages had better intracellular bacterial control than S cells. PMID:26970816

  13. PROFILES OF GENE EXPRESSION ASSOCIATED WITH TETRACYCLINE OVER EXPRESSION OF HSP70 IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profiles of gene expression associated with tetracycline over expression of HSP70 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) protect cells from damage through their function as molecular chaperones. Some cancers reveal high levels of HSP70 expression in asso...

  14. CXC chemokine receptor 3 expression on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H; Jing, C; Millner, A; Jensen, B; Madsen, H O; Ryder, L P; Svejgaard, A; Malling, H J; Skov, P S; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2000-01-01

    expressed on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood stimulated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) but not on freshly isolated CD34(+) progenitors. Freshly isolated CD34(+) progenitors expressed low levels of CXCR3 messenger RNA, but this expression was highly up...... Mig-induced CD34(+) progenitor chemotaxis. These chemotactic attracted CD34(+) progenitors are colony-forming units-granulocyte-macrophage. gamma IP-10 and Mig also induced GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitor adhesion and aggregation by means of CXCR3, a finding confirmed by the observation that anti....... (Blood. 2000;96:1230-1238)...

  15. The chemokine receptor CXCR6 contributes to recruitment of bone marrow-derived fibroblast precursors in renal fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Yunfeng; Yan, Jingyin; Jin, Xiaogao; Entman, Mark L.; Wang, Yanlin

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived fibroblasts in circulation are of hematopoietic origin, proliferate, differentiate into myofibroblasts, and express the chemokine receptor CXCR6. Since chemokines mediate the trafficking of circulating cells to sites of injury, we studied the role of CXCR6 in mouse models of renal injury. Significantly fewer bone marrow-derived fibroblasts accumulated in the kidney of CXCR6 knockout mice in response to injury, expressed less profibrotic chemokines and cytokines, displayed ...

  16. Gene expression profiles of gliomas in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Gravendeel (Lonneke); J.J. de Rooi (Johan); P.H.C. Eilers (Paul); M.J. van den Bent (Martin); P.A.E. Sillevis Smitt (Peter); P.J. French (Pim)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: We have recently demonstrated that expression profiling is a more accurate and objective method to classify gliomas than histology. Similar to most expression profiling studies, our experiments were performed using fresh frozen (FF) glioma samples whereas most archival sample

  17. The Modulatory Effect of Ellagic Acid and Rosmarinic Acid on Ultraviolet-B-Induced Cytokine/Chemokine Gene Expression in Skin Keratinocyte (HaCaT Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Lembo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet radiation (UV induces an increase in multiple cutaneous inflammatory mediators. Ellagic acid (EA and rosmarinic acid (RA are natural anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory compounds found in many plants, fruits, and nuts. We assessed the ability of EA and RA to modulate IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, MCP-1, and TNF-α gene expression in HaCaT cells after UVB irradiation. Cells were treated with UVB (100 mJ/cm2 and simultaneously with EA (5 μM in 0.1% DMSO or RA (2.7 μM in 0.5% DMSO. Moreover, these substances were added to the UVB-irradiated cells 1 h or 6 h before harvesting, depending on the established UVB-induced cytokine expression peak. Cytokine gene expression was examined using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. RA produced a significant reduction in UVB-induced expression of IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, and TNF-α when applied at the same time as irradiation. EA showed milder effects compared with RA, except for TNF-α. Both substances decreased IL-6 expression, also when applied 5 h after irradiation, and always produced a significant increase in UVB-induced IL-10 expression. Our findings suggest that EA and RA are able to prevent and/or limit the UVB-induced inflammatory cascade, through a reduction in proinflammatory mediators and the enhancement of IL-10, with its protective function.

  18. Integrated analysis of DNA methylation profiles and gene expression profiles to identify genes associated with pilocytic astrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ruigang; Man, Yigang

    2016-04-01

    The present study performed an integral analysis of the gene expression and DNA methylation profile of pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs). Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was also performed to examine and identify the genes correlated to PAs, to identify candidate therapeutic targets for the treatment of PAs. The DNA methylation profile and gene expression profile were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Following screening of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and differentially methylated regions (DMRs), respectively, integrated analysis of the DEGs and DMRs was performed to detect their correlation. Subsequently, the WGCNA algorithm was applied to identify the significant modules and construct the co‑expression network associated with PAs. Furthermore, Gene Ontology enrichment analysis of the associated genes was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. A total number of 2,259 DEGs and 235 DMRs were screened out. Integrated analysis revealed that 30 DEGs were DMRs with prominent negative correlation (cor=‑0.82; P=0.02). Based on the DEGs, the gene co‑expression network was constructed, and nine network modules associated with PAs were identified. The functional analysis results showed that genes relevant to PAs were closely associated with cell differentiation modulation. The screened PA-associated genes were significantly different at the expression and methylation levels. These genes may be used as reliable candidate target genes for the treatment of PAs. PMID:26934913

  19. Integrated analysis of DNA methylation profiles and gene expression profiles to identify genes associated with pilocytic astrocytomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHOU, RUIGANG; MAN, YIGANG

    2016-01-01

    The present study performed an integral analysis of the gene expression and DNA methylation profile of pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs). Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was also performed to examine and identify the genes correlated to PAs, to identify candidate therapeutic targets for the treatment of PAs. The DNA methylation profile and gene expression profile were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Following screening of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and differentially methylated regions (DMRs), respectively, integrated analysis of the DEGs and DMRs was performed to detect their correlation. Subsequently, the WGCNA algorithm was applied to identify the significant modules and construct the co-expression network associated with PAs. Furthermore, Gene Ontology enrichment analysis of the associated genes was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. A total number of 2,259 DEGs and 235 DMRs were screened out. Integrated analysis revealed that 30 DEGs were DMRs with prominent negative correlation (cor=−0.82; P=0.02). Based on the DEGs, the gene co-expression network was constructed, and nine network modules associated with PAs were identified. The functional analysis results showed that genes relevant to PAs were closely associated with cell differentiation modulation. The screened PA-associated genes were significantly different at the expression and methylation levels. These genes may be used as reliable candidate target genes for the treatment of PAs. PMID:26934913

  20. Comprehensive profiling of EBV gene expression in nasopharyngeal carcinoma through paired-end transcriptome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lijuan; Lin, Zhirui; Wu, Yanheng; Dong, Juqin; Zhao, Bo; Cheng, Yanbing; Huang, Peiyu; Xu, Lihua; Xia, Tianliang; Xiong, Dan; Wang, Hongbo; Li, Manzhi; Guo, Ling; Kieff, Elliott; Zeng, Yixin; Zhong, Qian; Zeng, Musheng

    2016-03-01

    The latent expression pattern of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) genes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has been extensively investigated, and the expression of several lytic genes in NPC has been reported. However, comprehensive information through EBV transcriptome analysis in NPC is limited. We performed paired-end RNA-seq to systematically and comprehensively characterize the expression of EBV genes in NPC tissue and C666-1 NPC cell line, which consistently carries EBV. In addition to the transcripts restricted to type II latency infection, the type III latency EBNA3s genes and a substantial number of lytic genes, such as BZLF1, BRLF1, and BMRF1, were detected through RNA-seq and were further verified in C666-1 cells and NPC tissue through realtime PCR.We also performed clustering analysis to classify NPC patient groups in terms of EBV gene expression, which presented two subtypes of NPC samples. Results revealed interesting patterns of EBV gene expression in NPC patients. This clustering was correlated with many signaling pathways, such as those related to heterotrimeric G-protein signaling, inflammation mediated by chemokine and cytokine signaling, ribosomes, protein metabolism, influenza infection, and ECM-receptor interaction. Our combined findings suggested that the expression of EBV genes in NPC is restricted not only to type II latency genes but also to type III latency and lytic genes. This study provided further insights into the potential role of EBV in the development of NPC. PMID:26969667

  1. A computational profiling of changes in gene expression and transcription factors induced by vFLIP K13 in primary effusion lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasu Punj

    Full Text Available Infection with Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV has been linked to the development of primary effusion lymphoma (PEL, a rare lymphoproliferative disorder that is characterized by loss of expression of most B cell markers and effusions in the body cavities. This unique clinical presentation of PEL has been attributed to their distinctive plasmablastic gene expression profile that shows overexpression of genes involved in inflammation, adhesion and invasion. KSHV-encoded latent protein vFLIP K13 has been previously shown to promote the survival and proliferation of PEL cells. In this study, we employed gene array analysis to characterize the effect of K13 on global gene expression in PEL-derived BCBL1 cells, which express negligible K13 endogenously. We demonstrate that K13 upregulates the expression of a number of NF-κB responsive genes involved in cytokine signaling, cell death, adhesion, inflammation and immune response, including two NF-κB subunits involved in the alternate NF-κB pathway, RELB and NFKB2. In contrast, CD19, a B cell marker, was one of the genes downregulated by K13. A comparison with K13-induced genes in human vascular endothelial cells revealed that although there was a considerable overlap among the genes induced by K13 in the two cell types, chemokines genes were preferentially induced in HUVEC with few exceptions, such as RANTES/CCL5, which was induced in both cell types. Functional studies confirmed that K13 activated the RANTES/CCL5 promoter through the NF-κB pathway. Taken collectively, our results suggest that K13 may contribute to the unique gene expression profile, immunophenotype and clinical presentation that are characteristics of KSHV-associated PEL.

  2. Chemokines in the balance: maintenance of homeostasis and protection at CNS barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Williams

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the adult central nervous system (CNS, chemokines and their receptors are involved in developmental, physiological and pathological processes. Although most lines of investigation focus on their ability to induce the migration of cells, recent studies indicate that chemokines also promote cellular interactions and activate signaling pathways that maintain CNS homeostatic functions. Many homeostatic chemokines are expressed on the vasculature of the blood brain barrier including CXCL12, CCL19, CCL20, and CCL21. While endothelial cell expression of these chemokines is known to regulate the entry of leukocytes into the CNS during immunosurveillance, new data indicate that CXCL12 is also involved in diverse cellular activities including adult neurogenesis and neuronal survival, having an opposing role to the homeostatic chemokine, CXCL14, which appears to regulate synaptic inputs to neural precursors. Neuronal expression of CX3CL1, yet another homeostatic chemokine that promotes neuronal survival and communication with microglia, is partly regulated by CXCL12. Regulation of CXCL12 is unique in that it may regulate its own expression levels via binding to its scavenger receptor CXCR7/ACKR3. In this review, we explore the diverse roles of these and other homeostatic chemokines expressed within the CNS, including the possible implications of their dysfunction as a cause of neurologic disease.

  3. Chemokines in the corpus luteum: Implications of leukocyte chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liptak Amy R

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chemokines are small molecular weight peptides responsible for adhesion, activation, and recruitment of leukocytes into tissues. Leukocytes are thought to influence follicular atresia, ovulation, and luteal function. Many studies in recent years have focused attention on the characterization of leukocyte populations within the ovary, the importance of leukocyte-ovarian cell interactions, and more recently, the mechanisms of ovarian leukocyte recruitment. Information about the role of chemokines and leukocyte trafficking (chemotaxis during ovarian function is important to understanding paracrine-autocrine relationships shared between reproductive and immune systems. Recent advances regarding chemokine expression and leukocyte accumulation within the ovulatory follicle and the corpus luteum are the subject of this mini-review.

  4. Overexpression of the duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) by NSCLC tumor cells results in increased tumor necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) is known to be a promiscuous chemokine receptor that binds a variety of CXC and CC chemokines in the absence of any detectable signal transduction events. Within the CXC group of chemokines, DARC binds the angiogenic CXC chemokines including IL-8 (CXCL8), GROα (CXCL1) and ENA-78 (CXCL5), all of which have previously been shown to be important in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumor growth. We hypothesized that overexpression of DARC by a NSCLC tumor cell line would result in the binding of the angiogenic ELR+ CXC chemokines by the tumor cells themselves, and thus interfere with the stimulation of endothelial cells and induction of angiogenesis by the tumor cell-derived angiogenic chemokines. NSCLC tumor cells that constitutively expressed DARC were generated and their growth characteristics were compared to control transfected cells in vitro and in vivo in SCID animals. We found that tumors derived from DARC-expressing cells were significantly larger in size than tumors derived from control-transfected cells. However, upon histological examination we found that DARC-expressing tumors had significantly more necrosis and decreased tumor cellularity, as compared to control tumors. Expression of DARC by NSCLC cells was also associated with a decrease in tumor-associated vasculature and a reduction in metastatic potential. The expression of DARC in the context of NSCLC tumors may act as a chemokine decoy receptor and interferes with normal tumor growth and chemokine-induced tumor neovascularization

  5. Gene expression profiling reveals distinct features of various porcine adipose tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Chaowei; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Jideng; Jiang, Anan; Tang, Guoqing; Mai, Miaomiao; Zhu, Li; Bai, Lin; Li, Mingzhou; Li, Xuewei

    2013-01-01

    Background The excessive accumulation of body fat is a major risk factor to develop a variety of metabolic diseases. To investigate the systematic association between the differences in gene expression profiling and adipose deposition, we used pig as a model, and measured the gene expression profiling of six variant adipose tissues in male and females from three pig breeds which display distinct fat level. Results We identified various differential expressed genes among breeds, tissues and be...

  6. Rapid Identification of Potential Drugs for Diabetic Nephropathy Using Whole-Genome Expression Profiles of Glomeruli

    OpenAIRE

    Jingsong Shi; Song Jiang; Dandan Qiu; Weibo Le; Xiao Wang; Yinhui Lu; Zhihong Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate potential drugs for diabetic nephropathy (DN) using whole-genome expression profiles and the Connectivity Map (CMAP). Methodology. Eighteen Chinese Han DN patients and six normal controls were included in this study. Whole-genome expression profiles of microdissected glomeruli were measured using the Affymetrix human U133 plus 2.0 chip. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between late stage and early stage DN samples and the CMAP database were used to identify pote...

  7. Interaction of chemokines with their receptors--from initial chemokine binding to receptor activating steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2014-01-01

    The human chemokine system comprises 19 seven-transmembrane helix (7TM) receptors and 45 endogenous chemokines that often interact with each other in a promiscuous manner. Due to the chemokine system's primary function in leukocyte migration, it has a central role in immune homeostasis and...... interactions possibly occur, resulting in a multi-step process, as recently proposed for other 7TM receptors. Overall, the N-terminus of chemokine receptors is pivotal for binding of all chemokines. During receptor activation, differences between the two major chemokine subgroups occur, as CC-chemokines mainly...

  8. Automated Lineage and Expression Profiling in Live Caenorhabditis elegans Embryos

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: John Isaac Murray and Zhirong Bao Adapted from [*Imaging in Developmental Biology*](http://www.cshlpress.com/link/imagingdevbiop.htm)(ed. Sharpe and Wong). CSHL Press, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA, 2011. ### Abstract Describing gene expression during animal development requires a way to quantitatively measure expression levels with cellular resolution and to describe how expression changes with time. Fluorescent protein reporters make it possible to measure expression dyna...

  9. Transcriptional profiling of host gene expression in chicken embryo lung cells infected with laryngotracheitis virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xianyao

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection by infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV; gallid herpesvirus 1 causes acute respiratory diseases in chickens often with high mortality. To better understand host-ILTV interactions at the host transcriptional level, a microarray analysis was performed using 4 × 44 K Agilent chicken custom oligo microarrays. Results Microarrays were hybridized using the two color hybridization method with total RNA extracted from ILTV infected chicken embryo lung cells at 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 days post infection (dpi. Results showed that 789 genes were differentially expressed in response to ILTV infection that include genes involved in the immune system (cytokines, chemokines, MHC, and NF-κB, cell cycle regulation (cyclin B2, CDK1, and CKI3, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and cellular metabolism. Differential expression for 20 out of 789 genes were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR. A bioinformatics tool (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis used to analyze biological functions and pathways on the group of 789 differentially expressed genes revealed that 21 possible gene networks with intermolecular connections among 275 functionally identified genes. These 275 genes were classified into a number of functional groups that included cancer, genetic disorder, cellular growth and proliferation, and cell death. Conclusion The results of this study provide comprehensive knowledge on global gene expression, and biological functionalities of differentially expressed genes in chicken embryo lung cells in response to ILTV infections.

  10. Essential roles of the interaction between cancer cell-derived chemokine, CCL4, and intra-bone CCR5-expressing fibroblasts in breast cancer bone metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Soichiro; Baba, Tomohisa; Nishimura, Tatsunori; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Hashimoto, Shin-ichi; GOTO, Noriko(Graduate school of Education,Tokyo Gakugei University); Mukaida, Naofumi

    2016-01-01

    From a murine breast cancer cell line, 4T1, we established a subclone, 4T1.3, which consistently metastasizes to bone upon its injection into the mammary fat pad. 4T1.3 clone exhibited similar proliferation rate and migration capacity as the parental clone. However, the intra-bone injection of 4T1.3 clone caused larger tumors than that of the parental cells, accompanied with increases in fibroblast, but not osteoclast or osteoblast numbers. 4T1.3 clone displayed an enhanced expression of a ch...

  11. Face in profile view reduces perceived facial expression intensity: an eye-tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Shaw, Heather

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies measuring the facial expressions of emotion have focused primarily on the perception of frontal face images. As we frequently encounter expressive faces from different viewing angles, having a mechanism which allows invariant expression perception would be advantageous to our social interactions. Although a couple of studies have indicated comparable expression categorization accuracy across viewpoints, it is unknown how perceived expression intensity and associated gaze behaviour change across viewing angles. Differences could arise because diagnostic cues from local facial features for decoding expressions could vary with viewpoints. Here we manipulated orientation of faces (frontal, mid-profile, and profile view) displaying six common facial expressions of emotion, and measured participants' expression categorization accuracy, perceived expression intensity and associated gaze patterns. In comparison with frontal faces, profile faces slightly reduced identification rates for disgust and sad expressions, but significantly decreased perceived intensity for all tested expressions. Although quantitatively viewpoint had expression-specific influence on the proportion of fixations directed at local facial features, the qualitative gaze distribution within facial features (e.g., the eyes tended to attract the highest proportion of fixations, followed by the nose and then the mouth region) was independent of viewpoint and expression type. Our results suggest that the viewpoint-invariant facial expression processing is categorical perception, which could be linked to a viewpoint-invariant holistic gaze strategy for extracting expressive facial cues. PMID:25531122

  12. Expression profiles for six zebrafish genes during gonadal sex differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Morthorst, Jane E.; Andersen, Ole;

    2008-01-01

    the precise timing of expression of six genes previously suggested to be associated with sex differentiation in zebrafish. The current study investigates the expression of all six genes in the same individual fish with extensive sampling dates during sex determination and -differentiation. RESULTS: In...... investigated on cDNA from the same fish allowing comparison of the high and low expressers of genes that are expected to be highest expressed in either males or females. There were 78% high or low expressers of all three "male" genes (ar, sox9a and dmrt1) in the investigated period and 81% were high or low...

  13. Chemokines in tumor development and progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukaida, Naofumi, E-mail: naofumim@kenroku.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Baba, Tomohisa [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    Chemokines were originally identified as mediators of the inflammatory process and regulators of leukocyte trafficking. Subsequent studies revealed their essential roles in leukocyte physiology and pathology. Moreover, chemokines have profound effects on other types of cells associated with the inflammatory response, such as endothelial cells and fibroblasts. Thus, chemokines are crucial for cancer-related inflammation, which can promote tumor development and progression. Increasing evidence points to the vital effects of several chemokines on the proliferative and invasive properties of tumor cells. The wide range of activities of chemokines in tumorigenesis highlights their roles in tumor development and progression.

  14. Expression profiling to predict outcome in breast cancer: the influence of sample selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene expression profiling of tumors using DNA microarrays is a promising method for predicting prognosis and treatment response in cancer patients. It was recently reported that expression profiles of sporadic breast cancers could be used to predict disease recurrence better than currently available clinical and histopathological prognostic factors. Having observed an overlap in those data between the genes that predict outcome and those that predict estrogen receptor-α status, we examined their predictive power in an independent data set. We conclude that it may be important to define prognostic expression profiles separately for estrogen receptor-α-positive and estrogen receptor-α-negative tumors

  15. Chemokine binding protein M3 of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 modulates the host response to infection in a natural host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Hughes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68 infection of Mus musculus-derived strains of mice is an attractive model of γ-herpesvirus infection. Surprisingly, however, ablation of expression of MHV-68 M3, a secreted protein with broad chemokine-binding properties in vitro, has no discernable effect during experimental infection via the respiratory tract. Here we demonstrate that M3 indeed contributes significantly to MHV-68 infection, but only in the context of a natural host, the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus. Specifically, M3 was essential for two features unique to the wood mouse: virus-dependent inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT in the lung and highly organized secondary follicles in the spleen, both predominant sites of latency in these organs. Consequently, lack of M3 resulted in substantially reduced latency in the spleen and lung. In the absence of M3, splenic germinal centers appeared as previously described for MHV-68-infected laboratory strains of mice, further evidence that M3 is not fully functional in the established model host. Finally, analyses of M3's influence on chemokine and cytokine levels within the lungs of infected wood mice were consistent with the known chemokine-binding profile of M3, and revealed additional influences that provide further insight into its role in MHV-68 biology.

  16. Chemokine binding protein M3 of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 modulates the host response to infection in a natural host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David J; Kipar, Anja; Leeming, Gail H; Bennett, Elaine; Howarth, Deborah; Cummerson, Joanne A; Papoula-Pereira, Rita; Flanagan, Brian F; Sample, Jeffery T; Stewart, James P

    2011-03-01

    Murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) infection of Mus musculus-derived strains of mice is an attractive model of γ-herpesvirus infection. Surprisingly, however, ablation of expression of MHV-68 M3, a secreted protein with broad chemokine-binding properties in vitro, has no discernable effect during experimental infection via the respiratory tract. Here we demonstrate that M3 indeed contributes significantly to MHV-68 infection, but only in the context of a natural host, the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus). Specifically, M3 was essential for two features unique to the wood mouse: virus-dependent inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT) in the lung and highly organized secondary follicles in the spleen, both predominant sites of latency in these organs. Consequently, lack of M3 resulted in substantially reduced latency in the spleen and lung. In the absence of M3, splenic germinal centers appeared as previously described for MHV-68-infected laboratory strains of mice, further evidence that M3 is not fully functional in the established model host. Finally, analyses of M3's influence on chemokine and cytokine levels within the lungs of infected wood mice were consistent with the known chemokine-binding profile of M3, and revealed additional influences that provide further insight into its role in MHV-68 biology. PMID:21445235

  17. Immunological assays for chemokine detection in in-vitro culture of CNS cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahajan Supriya D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein we review the various methods currently in use for determining the expression of chemokines by CNS cells in vitro. Chemokine detection assays are used in conjuction with one another to provide a comprehensive, biologically relevant assessment of the chemokines which is necessary for correct data interpretation of a specific observed biological effect. The methods described include bioassays for soluble chemokine receptors, RNA extraction, RT-PCR, Real - time quantitative PCR, gene array analysis, northern blot analysis, Ribonuclease Protection assay, Flow cytometry, ELISPOT, western blot analysis, and ELISA. No single method of analysis meets the criteria for a comprehensive, biologically relevant assessment of the chemokines, therefore more than one assay might be necessary for correct data interpretation, a choice that is based on development of a scientific rationale for the method with emphasis on the reliability and relevance of the method.

  18. Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas can be identified by a gene expression profile that partly overlaps with human breast cancer profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Similar to human breast cancer mammary tumors of the female dog are commonly associated with a fatal outcome due to the development of distant metastases. However, the molecular defects leading to metastasis are largely unknown and the value of canine mammary carcinoma as a model for human breast cancer is unclear. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression signatures associated with mammary tumor metastasis and asked for parallels with the human equivalent. Messenger RNA expression profiles of twenty-seven lymph node metastasis positive or negative canine mammary carcinomas were established by microarray analysis. Differentially expressed genes were functionally characterized and associated with molecular pathways. The findings were also correlated with published data on human breast cancer. Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas had 1,011 significantly differentially expressed genes when compared to non-metastatic carcinomas. Metastatic carcinomas had a significant up-regulation of genes associated with cell cycle regulation, matrix modulation, protein folding and proteasomal degradation whereas cell differentiation genes, growth factor pathway genes and regulators of actin organization were significantly down-regulated. Interestingly, 265 of the 1,011 differentially expressed canine genes are also related to human breast cancer and, vice versa, parts of a human prognostic gene signature were identified in the expression profiles of the metastatic canine tumors. Metastatic canine mammary carcinomas can be discriminated from non-metastatic carcinomas by their gene expression profiles. More than one third of the differentially expressed genes are also described of relevance for human breast cancer. Many of the differentially expressed genes are linked to functions and pathways which appear to be relevant for the induction and maintenance of metastatic progression and may represent new therapeutic targets. Furthermore, dogs are in some aspects suitable as a

  19. Immune response CC Chemokines, CCL2 and CCL5 are associated with Pulmonary Sarcoidosis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav

    2011-04-04

    Abstract Background Pulmonary sarcoidosis involves an intense leukocyte infiltration of the lung with the formation of non-necrotizing granulomas. CC chemokines (chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)-CCL5) are chemoattractants of mononuclear cells and act through seven transmembrane G-coupled receptors. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results with regard to the associations of these chemokines with sarcoidosis. In an effort to clarify previous discrepancies, we performed the largest observational study to date of CC chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Results BALF chemokine levels from 72 patients affected by pulmonary sarcoidosis were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared to 8 healthy volunteers. BALF CCL3 and CCL4 levels from pulmonary sarcoidosis patients were not increased compared to controls. However, CCL2 and CCL5 levels were elevated, and subgroup analysis showed higher levels of both chemokines in all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis. CCL2, CCL5, CC chemokine receptor type 1 (CCR1), CCR2 and CCR3 were expressed from mononuclear cells forming the lung granulomas, while CCR5 was only found on mast cells. Conclusions These data suggest that CCL2 and CCL5 are important mediators in recruiting CCR1, CCR2, and CCR3 expressing mononuclear cells as well as CCR5-expressing mast cells during all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  20. Analyzing the gene expression profile of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with real-time PCR arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Yan-Fang Tao; Dong Wu; Li Pang; Wen-Li Zhao; Jun Lu; Na Wang; Jian Wang; Xing Feng; Yan-Hong Li; Jian Ni; Jian Pan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The Real-time PCR Array System is the ideal tool for analyzing the expression of a focused panel of genes. In this study, we will analyze the gene expression profile of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with real-time PCR arrays. Methods Real-time PCR array was designed and tested firstly. Then gene expression profile of 11 pediatric AML and 10 normal controls was analyzed with real-time PCR arrays. We analyzed the expression data with MEV (Multi Experiment View) cluster so...

  1. Gene expression profiling of circulating tumor cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from breast cancer patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hensler, M.; Vancurova, I.; Becht, E.; Palata, O.; Strnad, P.; Tesarova, P.; Cabinakova, M.; Švec, David; Kubista, Mikael; Bartunkova, J.; Spisek, R.; Sojka, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2016), e1102827. ISSN 2162-402X Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Breast cancer * gene expression profiling * circulating tumor cells Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology

  2. Statistical framework for phylogenomic analysis of gene family expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xun

    2004-05-01

    Microarray technology has produced massive expression data that are invaluable for investigating the genome-wide evolutionary pattern of gene expression. To this end, phylogenetic expression analysis is highly desirable. On the basis of the Brownian process, we developed a statistical framework (called the E(0) model), assuming the independent expression of evolution between lineages. Several evolutionary mechanisms are integrated to characterize the pattern of expression diversity after gene duplications, including gradual drift and dramatic shift (punctuated equilibrium). When the phylogeny of a gene family is given, we show that the likelihood function follows a multivariate normal distribution; the variance-covariance matrix is determined by the phylogenetic topology and evolutionary parameters. Maximum-likelihood methods for multiple microarray experiments are developed, and likelihood-ratio tests are designed for testing the evolutionary pattern of gene expression. To reconstruct the evolutionary trace of expression diversity after gene (or genome) duplications, we developed a Bayesian-based method and use the posterior mean as predictors. Potential applications in evolutionary genomics are discussed. PMID:15166175

  3. Expression profile of genes associated with mastitis in dairy cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Isabela Fonseca; Priscila Vendramini Silva; Carla Christine Lange; Guimarães, Marta F. M.; Mayara Morena Del Cambre Amaral Weller; Katiene Régia Silva Sousa; Paulo de Sávio Lopes; José Domingos Guimarães; Simone E.F. Guimarães

    2009-01-01

    In order to characterize the expression of genes associated with immune response mechanisms to mastitis, we quantified the relative expression of the IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFN-γ and TNF-α genes in milk cells of healthy cows and cows with clinical mastitis. Total RNA was extracted from milk cells of six Black and White Holstein (BW) cows and six Gyr cows, including three animals with and three without mastitis per breed. Gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR. IL-10 g...

  4. Expression profile of genes associated with mastitis in dairy cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Isabela; Silva, Priscila Vendramini; Lange, Carla Christine; Guimarães, Marta F. M.; Weller, Mayara Morena Del Cambre Amaral; Sousa, Katiene Régia Silva; Lopes, Paulo Sávio; Guimarães, José Domingos; Simone E.F. Guimarães

    2009-01-01

    In order to characterize the expression of genes associated with immune response mechanisms to mastitis, we quantified the relative expression of the IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFN-γ and TNF- α genes in milk cells of healthy cows and cows with clinical mastitis. Total RNA was extracted from milk cells of six Black and White Holstein (BW) cows and six Gyr cows, including three animals with and three without mastitis per breed. Gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR. IL-10 gene expre...

  5. Peripheral Blood Monocyte Gene Expression Profile Clinically Stratifies Patients With Recent-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Irvine, Katharine M.; Gallego, Patricia; An, Xiaoyu; Best, Shannon E.; Thomas, Gethin; Wells, Christine; Harris, Mark; Cotterill, Andrew; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2012-01-01

    Novel biomarkers of disease progression after type 1 diabetes onset are needed. We profiled peripheral blood (PB) monocyte gene expression in six healthy subjects and 16 children with type 1 diabetes diagnosed ∼3 months previously and analyzed clinical features from diagnosis to 1 year. Monocyte expression profiles clustered into two distinct subgroups, representing mild and severe deviation from healthy control subjects, along the same continuum. Patients with strongly divergent monocyte gen...

  6. Carotid artery disease: Novel pathophysiological mechanisms identified by gene-expression profiling of peripheral blood

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi L, Lapini I, Magi A, Pratesi G, Lavitrano M, Biasi GM, Pulli R, Pratesi C, Abbate R, Giusti B

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of carotid artery stenosis (CAS) as well as the mechanisms underlying the different localisation of the atherosclerotic lesions remains poorly understood. We used microarray technology to identify novel systemic mediators that could contribute to CAS pathogenesis. Moreover, we compared gene-expression profile of CAS with that of patients affected by abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), previously published by our group. METHODS AND RESULTS: By global gene-expression profil...

  7. 21 CFR 866.6040 - Gene expression profiling test system for breast cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cancer prognosis. (a) Identification. A gene expression profiling test system for breast cancer prognosis... previously diagnosed breast cancer. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control is... Profiling Test System for Breast Cancer Prognosis.” See § 866.1(e) for the availability of this...

  8. Hormone receptor and ERBB2 status in gene expression profiles of human breast tumor samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dvorkin-Gheva

    Full Text Available The occurrence of large publically available repositories of human breast tumor gene expression profiles provides an important resource to discover new breast cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. For example, knowledge of the expression of the estrogen and progesterone hormone receptors (ER and PR, and that of the ERBB2 in breast tumor samples enables choice of therapies for the breast cancer patients that express these proteins. Identifying new biomarkers and therapeutic agents affecting the activity of signaling pathways regulated by the hormone receptors or ERBB2 might be accelerated by knowledge of their expression levels in large gene expression profiling data sets. Unfortunately, the status of these receptors is not invariably reported in public databases of breast tumor gene expression profiles. Attempts have been made to employ a single probe set to identify ER, PR and ERBB2 status, but the specificity or sensitivity of their prediction is low. We enquired whether estimation of ER, PR and ERBB2 status of profiled tumor samples could be improved by using multiple probe sets representing these three genes and others with related expression.We used 8 independent datasets of human breast tumor samples to define gene expression signatures comprising 24, 51 and 14 genes predictive of ER, PR and ERBB2 status respectively. These signatures, as demonstrated by sensitivity and specificity measures, reliably identified hormone receptor and ERBB2 expression in breast tumors that had been previously determined using protein and DNA based assays. Our findings demonstrate that gene signatures can be identified which reliably predict the expression status of the estrogen and progesterone hormone receptors and that of ERBB2 in publically available gene expression profiles of breast tumor samples. Using these signatures to query transcript profiles of breast tumor specimens may enable discovery of new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for

  9. Gene expression profiling of placentas affected by pre-eclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh, Anne Mette; Borup, Rehannah; Nielsen, Finn Cilius;

    2010-01-01

    expression from pooled samples was analysed by microarrays. Verification of the expression of selected genes was performed using real-time PCR. A surprisingly low number of genes (21 out of 15,000) were identified as differentially expressed. Among these were genes not previously associated with pre......-eclampsia as bradykinin B1 receptor and a 14-3-3 protein, but also genes that have already been connected with pre-eclampsia, for example, inhibin beta A subunit and leptin. A low number of genes were repeatedly identified as differentially expressed, because they may represent the endpoint of a cascade of......Several studies point to the placenta as the primary cause of pre-eclampsia. Our objective was to identify placental genes that may contribute to the development of pre-eclampsia. RNA was purified from tissue biopsies from eleven pre-eclamptic placentas and eighteen normal controls. Messenger RNA...

  10. Expression Profiling of LPS Responsive miRNA in Primary Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Afsar Raza; Zhong, Sheng; Dang, Hong; Fordham, Jezrom B; Nares, Salvador; Khan, Asma

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important regulators of the innate and adaptive immune response. The purpose of the present study was to interrogate miRNA profiles of primary human macrophages challenged with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with focus on expression kinetics. We employed Nanostring platform to precisely characterize the changes in miRNA expression following different doses and durations of LPS exposure. Differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in response to LPS challenge with convergent and divergent expression profiles. Pathway analysis of LPS-responsive miRNAs revealed regulation of biological processes linked to key cell signaling (including PIK3-Akt, MAP kinase, ErbB) and pathogen response pathways. Our data provide a comprehensive miRNA profiling of human primary macrophages treated with LPS. These results show that bacterial Toll like receptor (TLR) ligands can temporally modulate macrophage miRNA expression. PMID:27307950

  11. Prominent hippocampal CA3 gene expression profile in neurocognitive aging

    OpenAIRE

    Haberman, Rebecca P.; Colantuoni, Carlo; Stocker, Amy M.; Schmidt, Alexandra C.; Pedersen, Jan T.; Gallagher, Michela

    2009-01-01

    Research in aging laboratory animals has characterized physiological and cellular alterations in medial temporal lobe structures, particularly the hippocampus, that are central to age-related memory deficits. The current study compares molecular alterations across hippocampal subregions in a rat model that closely mirrors individual differences in neurocognitive features of aging humans, including both impaired memory and preserved function. Using mRNA profiling of the CA1, CA3 and dentate gy...

  12. C-terminal engineering of CXCL12 and CCL5 chemokines: functional characterization by electrophysiological recordings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Picciocchi

    Full Text Available Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines comprised of 70-100 amino acids. The chemokines CXCL12 and CCL5 are the endogenous ligands of the CXCR4 and CCR5 G protein-coupled receptors that are also HIV co-receptors. Biochemical, structural and functional studies of receptors are ligand-consuming and the cost of commercial chemokines hinders their use in such studies. Here, we describe methods for the expression, refolding, purification, and functional characterization of CXCL12 and CCL5 constructs incorporating C-terminal epitope tags. The model tags used were hexahistidines and Strep-Tag for affinity purification, and the double lanthanoid binding tag for fluorescence imaging and crystal structure resolution. The ability of modified and purified chemokines to bind and activate CXCR4 and CCR5 receptors was tested in Xenopus oocytes expressing the receptors, together with a Kir3 G-protein activated K(+ channel that served as a reporter of receptor activation. Results demonstrate that tags greatly influence the biochemical properties of the recombinant chemokines. Besides, despite the absence of any evidence for CXCL12 or CCL5 C-terminus involvement in receptor binding and activation, we demonstrated unpredictable effects of tag insertion on the ligand apparent affinity and efficacy or on the ligand dissociation. These tagged chemokines should constitute useful tools for the selective purification of properly-folded chemokines receptors and the study of their native quaternary structures.

  13. Comparative study of CXC chemokines modulation in brown trout (Salmo trutta) following infection with a bacterial or viral pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgoglione, Bartolomeo; Zahran, Eman; Taylor, Nick G H; Feist, Stephen W; Zou, Jun; Secombes, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    Chemokine modulation in response to pathogens still needs to be fully characterised in fish, in view of the recently described novel chemokines present. This paper reports the first comparative study of CXC chemokine genes transcription in salmonids (brown trout), with a particular focus on the fish specific CXC chemokines (CXCL_F). Adopting new primer sets, optimised to specifically target mRNA, a RT-qPCR gene screening was carried out. Constitutive gene expression was assessed first in six tissues from SPF brown trout. Transcription modulation was next investigated in kidney and spleen during septicaemic infection induced by a RNA virus (Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia virus, genotype Ia) or by a Gram negative bacterium (Yersinia ruckeri, ser. O1/biot. 2). From each target organ specific pathogen burden, measured detecting VHSV-glycoprotein or Y. ruckeri 16S rRNA, and IFN-γ gene expression were analysed for their correlation to chemokine transcription. Both pathogens modulated CXC chemokine gene transcript levels, with marked up-regulation seen in some cases, and with both temporal and tissue specific effects apparent. For example, Y. ruckeri strongly induced chemokine transcription in spleen within 24h, whilst VHS generally induced the largest increases at 3d.p.i. in both tissues. This study gives clues to the role of the novel CXC chemokines, in comparison to the other known CXC chemokines in salmonids. PMID:26866873

  14. Genomic and expression array profiling of chromosome 20q amplicon in human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gain of the q arm of chromosome 20 in human colorectal cancer has been associated with poorer survival time and has been reported to increase in frequency from adenomas to metastasis. The increasing frequency of chromosome 20q amplification during colorectal cancer progression and the presence of this amplification in carcinomas of other tissue origin has lead us to hypothesize that 20q11-13 harbors one or more genes which, when over expressed promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Aims: Generate genomic and expression profiles of the 20q amplicon in human cancer cell lines in order to identify genes with increased copy number and expression. Materials and Methods: Utilizing genomic sequencing clones and amplification mapping data from our lab and other previous studies, BAC/ PAC tiling paths spanning the 20q amplicon and genomic microarrays were generated. Array-CGH on the custom array with human cancer cell line DNAs was performed to generate genomic profiles of the amplicon. Expression array analysis with RNA from these cell lines using commercial oligo microarrays generated expression profiles of the amplicon. The data were then combined in order to identify genes with increased copy number and expression. Results: Over expressed genes in regions of increased copy number were identified and a list of potential novel genetic tumor markers was assembled based on biological functions of these genes Conclusions: Performing high-resolution genomic microarray profiling in conjunction with expression analysis is an effective approach to identify potential tumor markers.

  15. Co-Expression of Cancer Stem Cell Markers Corresponds to a Pro-Tumorigenic Expression Profile in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoda, Jan; Hermanova, Marketa; Loja, Tomas; Nemec, Pavel; Neradil, Jakub; Karasek, Petr; Veselska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies. Its dismal prognosis is often attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that have been identified in PDAC using various markers. However, the co-expression of all of these markers has not yet been evaluated. Furthermore, studies that compare the expression levels of CSC markers in PDAC tumor samples and in cell lines derived directly from those tumors are lacking. Here, we analyzed the expression of putative CSC markers—CD24, CD44, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD133, and nestin—by immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and quantitative PCR in 3 PDAC-derived cell lines and by immunohistochemistry in 3 corresponding tumor samples. We showed high expression of the examined CSC markers among all of the cell lines and tumor samples, with the exception of CD24 and CD44, which were enriched under in vitro conditions compared with tumor tissues. The proportions of cells positive for the remaining markers were comparable to those detected in the corresponding tumors. Co-expression analysis using flow cytometry revealed that CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells represented a significant population of the cells (range, 43 to 72%) among the cell lines. The highest proportion of CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells was detected in the cell line derived from the tumor of a patient with the shortest survival. Using gene expression profiling, we further identified the specific pro-tumorigenic expression profile of this cell line compared with the profiles of the other two cell lines. Together, CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells are present in PDAC cell lines derived from primary tumors, and their increased proportion corresponds with a pro-tumorigenic gene expression profile. PMID:27414409

  16. Co-Expression of Cancer Stem Cell Markers Corresponds to a Pro-Tumorigenic Expression Profile in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoda, Jan; Hermanova, Marketa; Loja, Tomas; Nemec, Pavel; Neradil, Jakub; Karasek, Petr; Veselska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies. Its dismal prognosis is often attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that have been identified in PDAC using various markers. However, the co-expression of all of these markers has not yet been evaluated. Furthermore, studies that compare the expression levels of CSC markers in PDAC tumor samples and in cell lines derived directly from those tumors are lacking. Here, we analyzed the expression of putative CSC markers-CD24, CD44, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD133, and nestin-by immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and quantitative PCR in 3 PDAC-derived cell lines and by immunohistochemistry in 3 corresponding tumor samples. We showed high expression of the examined CSC markers among all of the cell lines and tumor samples, with the exception of CD24 and CD44, which were enriched under in vitro conditions compared with tumor tissues. The proportions of cells positive for the remaining markers were comparable to those detected in the corresponding tumors. Co-expression analysis using flow cytometry revealed that CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells represented a significant population of the cells (range, 43 to 72%) among the cell lines. The highest proportion of CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells was detected in the cell line derived from the tumor of a patient with the shortest survival. Using gene expression profiling, we further identified the specific pro-tumorigenic expression profile of this cell line compared with the profiles of the other two cell lines. Together, CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells are present in PDAC cell lines derived from primary tumors, and their increased proportion corresponds with a pro-tumorigenic gene expression profile. PMID:27414409

  17. Dimensionality of Data Matrices with Applications to Gene Expression Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xingdong

    2009-01-01

    Probe-level microarray data are usually stored in matrices. Take a given probe set (gene), for example, each row of the matrix corresponds to an array, and each column corresponds to a probe. Often, people summarize each array by the gene expression level. Is one number sufficient to summarize a whole probe set for a specific gene in an array?…

  18. Expression profiles of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and their regulation by Relish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dongdong; LI Fuhua; LI Shihao; WEN Rong; XIANG Jianhai

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs),as key immune effectors,play important roles in the innate immune system of invertebrates.Different types of AMPs,including Penaeidin,Crustin,ALF (antilipopolysaccharide factor) have been identified in different penaeid shrimp; however,systematic analyses on the function of different AMPs in shrimp responsive to different types of bacteria are very limited.In this study,we analyzed the expression profiles of AMPs in the Chinese shrimps,Fenneropenaeus chinensis,simultaneously by real-time RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) when shrimp were challenged with Micrococcus lysodeikticus (Gram-positive,G+) or Vibrio anguillarium (Gram-negative,G).Different AMPs showed different expression profiles when shrimp were injected with one type of bacterium,and one AMP also showed different expression profiles when shrimp were challenged with different bacteria.Furthermore,the expression of these AMPs showed temporal expression profiles,suggesting that different AMPs function coordinately in bacteria-infected shrimp.An RNA interference approach was used to study the function of the Relish transcription factor in regulating the transcription of different AM Ps.The current study showed that Relish could regulate the transcription of different AMPs in shrimp.Differential expression profiles of AMPs in shrimp injected with different types of bacteria indicated that a complicated antimicrobial response network existed in shrimp.These data contribute to our understanding of immunity in shrimp and may provide a strategy for the control of disease in shrimp.

  19. Expression profiles of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and their regulation by Relish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongdong; Li, Fuhua; Li, Shihao; Wen, Rong; Xiang, Jianhai

    2012-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), as key immune effectors, play important roles in the innate immune system of invertebrates. Different types of AMPs, including Penaeidin, Crustin, ALF (antilipopolysaccharide factor) have been identified in different penaeid shrimp; however, systematic analyses on the function of different AMPs in shrimp responsive to different types of bacteria are very limited. In this study, we analyzed the expression profiles of AMPs in the Chinese shrimps, Fenneropenaeus chinensis, simultaneously by real-time RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) when shrimp were challenged with Micrococcus lysodeikticus (Gram-positive, G+) or Vibrio anguillarium (Gram-negative, G-). Different AMPs showed different expression profiles when shrimp were injected with one type of bacterium, and one AMP also showed different expression profiles when shrimp were challenged with different bacteria. Furthermore, the expression of these AMPs showed temporal expression profiles, suggesting that different AMPs function coordinately in bacteria-infected shrimp. An RNA interference approach was used to study the function of the Relish transcription factor in regulating the transcription of different AMPs. The current study showed that Relish could regulate the transcription of different AMPs in shrimp. Differential expression profiles of AMPs in shrimp injected with different types of bacteria indicated that a complicated antimicrobial response network existed in shrimp. These data contribute to our understanding of immunity in shrimp and may provide a strategy for the control of disease in shrimp.

  20. Metabolic profiles of dystrophin and utrophin expression in mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, J L; Sang, E; Evens, T; Davies, K; Clarke, K

    2002-10-23

    Metabolic profiles from (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been used to describe both one and two protein systems in four mouse models related to Duchenne muscular dystrophy using the pattern recognition technique partial least squares. Robust statistical models were built for extracts and intact cardiac tissue, distinguishing mice according to expression of dystrophin. Using metabolic profiles of diaphragm, models were built describing dystrophin and utrophin, a dystrophin related protein, expression. Increased utrophin expression counteracted some of the deficits associated with dystrophic tissue. This suggests the method may be ideal for following treatment regimes such as gene therapy. PMID:12387876

  1. Identification of pediatric septic shock subclasses based on genome-wide expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaco Marie

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Septic shock is a heterogeneous syndrome within which probably exist several biological subclasses. Discovery and identification of septic shock subclasses could provide the foundation for the design of more specifically targeted therapies. Herein we tested the hypothesis that pediatric septic shock subclasses can be discovered through genome-wide expression profiling. Methods Genome-wide expression profiling was conducted using whole blood-derived RNA from 98 children with septic shock, followed by a series of bioinformatic approaches targeted at subclass discovery and characterization. Results Three putative subclasses (subclasses A, B, and C were initially identified based on an empiric, discovery-oriented expression filter and unsupervised hierarchical clustering. Statistical comparison of the three putative subclasses (analysis of variance, Bonferonni correction, P Conclusion Genome-wide expression profiling can identify pediatric septic shock subclasses having clinically relevant phenotypes.

  2. MicroRNA expression profiling of carcinoma in situ cells of the testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novotny, Guy Wayne; Belling, Kirstine Christensen; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram;

    2012-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours, seminoma (SE) and non-seminoma (NS), of young adult men develop from a precursor cell, carcinoma in situ (CIS), which resembles foetal gonocytes and retains embryonic pluripotency. We used microarrays to analyse microRNA (miRNA) expression in 12 human testis samples...... with CIS cells and compared it with miRNA expression profiles of normal adult testis, testis with Sertoli-cell-only that lacks germ cells, testis tumours (SE and embryonal carcinoma (EC), an undifferentiated component of NS) and foetal male and female gonads. Principal components analysis revealed...... that the miRNA expression profile changes during testis development and that the miRNA profile of adult testis with CIS cells shares characteristic similarities with the expression in foetal gonocytes....

  3. Global gene expression profiling of asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli during biofilm growth in human urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Klemm, Per

    2007-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is an important health problem worldwide, with many millions of cases each year, and Escherichia coli is the most common organism causing UTI in humans. Also, E. coli is responsible for most infections in patients with chronic indwelling bladder catheter. The two...... strains 83972 and VR50. Significant differences in expression levels were seen between the biofilm expression profiles of the two strains with the corresponding planktonic expression profiles in morpholinepropanesulfonic acid minimal laboratory medium and human urine; 417 and 355 genes were up- and down...... asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) E. coli strains 83972 and VR50 are significantly better biofilm formers in their natural growth medium, human urine, than the two uropathogenic E. coli isolates CFT073 and 536. We used DNA microarrays to monitor the expression profile during biofilm growth in urine of the two ABU...

  4. Single-cell PCR profiling of gene expression in hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, José; Enver, Tariq; Pina, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell analysis of gene expression offers the possibility of exploring cellular and molecular heterogeneity in stem and developmental cell systems, including cancer, to infer routes of cellular specification and their respective gene regulatory modules. PCR-based technologies, although limited to the analysis of a predefined set of genes, afford a cost-effective balance of throughput and biological information and have become a method of choice in stem cell laboratories. Here we describe an experimental and analytical protocol based on the Fluidigm microfluidics platform for the simultaneous expression analysis of 48 or 96 genes in multiples of 48 or 96 cells. We detail wet laboratory procedures and describe clustering, principal component analysis, correlation, and classification tools for the inference of cellular pathways and gene networks. PMID:25062620

  5. Gene Expression Profiling of Biological Pathway Alterations by Radiation Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kuei-Fang; Weng, Julia Tzu-Ya; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Chi, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Ching-Kai; Liu, Ingrid Y.; CHEN, YI-CHENG; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Though damage caused by radiation has been the focus of rigorous research, the mechanisms through which radiation exerts harmful effects on cells are complex and not well-understood. In particular, the influence of low dose radiation exposure on the regulation of genes and pathways remains unclear. In an attempt to investigate the molecular alterations induced by varying doses of radiation, a genome-wide expression analysis was conducted. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from...

  6. Gene expression profile of renal cell carcinoma clear cell type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos F. Dall’Oglio

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The determination of prognosis in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC is based, classically, on stage and histopathological aspects. The metastatic disease develops in one third of patients after surgery, even in localized tumors. There are few options for treating those patients, and even the new target designed drugs have shown low rates of success in controlling disease progression. Few studies used high throughput genomic analysis in renal cell carcinoma for determination of prognosis. This study is focused on the identification of gene expression signatures in tissues of low-risk, high-risk and metastatic RCC clear cell type (RCC-CCT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed the expression of approximately 55,000 distinct transcripts using the Whole Genome microarray platform hybridized with RNA extracted from 19 patients submitted to surgery to treat RCC-CCT with different clinical outcomes. They were divided into three groups (1 low risk, characterized by pT1, Fuhrman grade 1 or 2, no microvascular invasion RCC; (2 high risk, pT2-3, Fuhrman grade 3 or 4 with, necrosis and microvascular invasion present and (3 metastatic RCC-CCT. Normal renal tissue was used as control. RESULTS: After comparison of differentially expressed genes among low-risk, high-risk and metastatic groups, we identified a group of common genes characterizing metastatic disease. Among them Interleukin-8 and Heat shock protein 70 were over-expressed in metastasis and validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. CONCLUSION: These findings can be used as a starting point to generate molecular markers of RCC-CCT as well as a target for the development of innovative therapies.

  7. Gene Expression Profile of the Hippocampus of Rats Subjected to Chronic Immobilization Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Chen, Jia-Xu; Yue, Guang-Xin; Liu, Yue-Yun; Zhao, Xin; Guo, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Qun; Jiang, You-Ming; Bai, Ming-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study systematically investigated the effect of chronic stress on the hippocampus and its damage mechanism at the whole genome level. Methods The rat whole genome expression chips (Illumina) were used to detect gene expression differences in the hippocampus of rats subjected to chronic immobilization stress (daily immobilization stress for 3 h, for 7 or 21 days). The hippocampus gene expression profile was studied through gene ontology and signal pathway analyses using bioinfor...

  8. Cloning and Expression Profiles of Myf5 Gene of Yak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqiu Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To reveal the sequence characteristic and expression pattern of Myf5 gene in Jiulong yaks (Bos grunniens, a full-length cDNA of Myf5 was cloned from yak muscle tisssue by RT-PCR. The cDNA obtained was 821bp nucleotide (nt long with an ORF of 768 bp which encoding 255 amino acids. Compared with cattle, sheep, pig, horse, human, pygmy chimpanzee, mouse, rat and dog, the homology of amino acid sequences were higher (89-9%, but lower in Zebrafish (60%. SQ RT-PCR analysis showed that Myf5 gene expression was observed only in longissimus muscle, but not be detected in heart, liver, kidney, spleen and adipose tissues. The expression level of Myf5 gene in longissium muscle of 0.5 and over 9 years old yaks was significantly higher than those of 3.5-5.5 years old yaks (p<0.05. These results suggest that Myf5 may play an important role in the regulation of muscle growth and development of yak.

  9. Optimization of translation profiles enhances protein expression and solubility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Katrin Hess

    Full Text Available mRNA is translated with a non-uniform speed that actively coordinates co-translational folding of protein domains. Using structure-based homology we identified the structural domains in epoxide hydrolases (EHs and introduced slow-translating codons to delineate the translation of single domains. These changes in translation speed dramatically improved the solubility of two EHs of metagenomic origin in Escherichia coli. Conversely, the importance of transient attenuation for the folding, and consequently solubility, of EH was evidenced with a member of the EH family from Agrobacterium radiobacter, which partitions in the soluble fraction when expressed in E. coli. Synonymous substitutions of codons shaping the slow-transiting regions to fast-translating codons render this protein insoluble. Furthermore, we show that low protein yield can be enhanced by decreasing the free folding energy of the initial 5'-coding region, which can disrupt mRNA secondary structure and enhance ribosomal loading. This study provides direct experimental evidence that mRNA is not a mere messenger for translation of codons into amino acids but bears an additional layer of information for folding, solubility and expression level of the encoded protein. Furthermore, it provides a general frame on how to modulate and fine-tune gene expression of a target protein.

  10. Microarray expression profiles of 20.000 genes across 23 healthy porcine tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Hornshøj

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene expression microarrays have been intensively applied to screen for genes involved in specific biological processes of interest such as diseases or responses to environmental stimuli. For mammalian species, cataloging of the global gene expression profiles in large tissue collections under normal conditions have been focusing on human and mouse genomes but is lacking for the pig genome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present the results from a large-scale porcine study establishing microarray cDNA expression profiles of approximately 20.000 genes across 23 healthy tissues. As expected, a large portion of the genes show tissue specific expression in agreement with mappings to gene descriptions, Gene Ontology terms and KEGG pathways. Two-way hierarchical clustering identified expected tissue clusters in accordance with tissue type and a number of cDNA clusters having similar gene expression patterns across tissues. For one of these cDNA clusters, we demonstrate that possible tissue associated gene function can be inferred for previously uncharacterized genes based on their shared expression patterns with functionally annotated genes. We show that gene expression in common porcine tissues is similar to the expression in homologous tissues of human. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study constitute a valuable and publicly available resource of basic gene expression profiles in normal porcine tissues and will contribute to the identification and functional annotation of porcine genes.

  11. RNA degradation compromises the reliability of microRNA expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muckenthaler Martina U

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and their expression is frequently altered in human diseases, including cancer. To correlate clinically relevant parameters with microRNA expression, total RNA is frequently prepared from samples that were archived for various time periods in frozen tissue banks but, unfortunately, RNA integrity is not always preserved in these frozen tissues. Here, we investigate whether experimentally induced RNA degradation affects microRNA expression profiles. Results Tissue samples were maintained on ice for defined time periods prior to total RNA extraction, which resulted in different degrees of RNA degradation. MicroRNA expression was then analyzed by microarray analysis (miCHIP or microRNA-specific real-time quantitative PCR (miQPCR. Our results demonstrate that the loss of RNA integrity leads to in unpredictability of microRNA expression profiles for both, array-based and miQPCR assays. Conclusion MicroRNA expression cannot be reliably profiled in degraded total RNA. For the profiling of microRNAs we recommend use of RNA samples with a RNA integrity number equal to or above seven.

  12. Emotion Expression, Emotionality, Depressive Symptoms, and Stress: Maternal Profiles Related to Child Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Emma; Feng, Xin; Christian, Lisa; Slesnick, Natasha

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the relationships between various maternal characteristics and child outcomes in preschool age children. Participants included 128 mother-child pairs. Mothers and children participated in two observational tasks, clean-up and Tickle-Me-Elmo, which were coded for expressions of emotion, and mothers completed self-report surveys. A person-centered latent profile analysis was applied, identifying distinct maternal profiles defined by observed positive emotion expression and reported positive and negative emotionality, depressive symptoms, and parenting stress. Four profiles were identified, labeled Happy, Melancholic, Stressed, and Struggling. These profiles were found to be associated with child outcomes, including observed positive and negative emotion expression and problem behaviors. Specifically, the Melancholic and Struggling profiles tended to be negatively related to child emotion expression, while the Stressed and Struggling profiles tended to be related to greater child problem behaviors. The results highlight meaningful distinctions between concurrent, interacting maternal characteristics that contribute to child emotion socialization, and they suggest significant differentiations in the factors that contribute to child risk. PMID:25894387

  13. Brain Gene Expression Signatures From Cerebrospinal Fluid Exosome RNA Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, S. B.; Stevens, B.; Calvillo, E.; Tang, R.; Gutierrez Flores, B.; Hu, L.; Skog, J.; Bershad, E.

    2016-01-01

    While the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome observations have focused on ocular symptoms, spaceflight has been also associated with a number of other performance and neurologic signs, such as headaches, cognitive changes, vertigo, nausea, sleep/circadian disruption and mood alterations, which, albeit likely multifactorial, can also result from elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP). We therefore hypothesize that these various symptoms are caused by disturbances in the neurophysiology of the brain structures and are correlated with molecular markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as indicators of neurophysiological changes. Exosomes are 30-200 nm microvesicles shed into all biofluids, including blood, urine, and CSF, carrying a highly rich source of intact protein and RNA cargo. Exosomes have been identified in human CSF, and their proteome and RNA pool is a potential new reservoir for biomarker discovery in neurological disorders. The purpose of this study is to investigate changes in brain gene expression via exosome analysis in patients suffering from ICP elevation of varied severity (idiopathic intracranial hypertension -IIH), a condition which shares some of the neuroophthalmological features of VIIP, as a first step toward obtaining evidence suggesting that cognitive function and ICP levels can be correlated with biomarkers in the CSF. Our preliminary work, reported last year, validated the exosomal technology applicable to CSF analysis and demonstrated that it was possible to obtain gene expression evidence of inflammation processes in traumatic brain injury patients. We are now recruiting patients with suspected IIH requiring lumbar puncture at Baylor College of Medicine. Both CSF (5 ml) and human plasma (10 ml) are being collected in order to compare the pattern of differentially expressed genes observed in CSF and in blood. Since blood is much more accessible than CSF, we would like to determine whether plasma biomarkers for

  14. Proteomics of protein expression profiling in tissues with different radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to identify Radiosensitivity of proteins in tissues with different radiosensitivity. C3H/HeJ mice were exposed to 10 Gy. The mice were sacrifiud 8 hrs after radiation. Their spleen and liver tissues were collected and analyzed histologically for apoptosis. The expressions of radiosusceptibility protein were analyzed by 2-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The peak of apoptosis levels were 35.3 ± 1.7% in spleen and 0.6 ± 0.2% in liver at 8 hrs after radiation. Liver, radioresistant tissues, showed that the levels of ROS metabolism related to proteins such as cytochromm c, glutathione S transferase, NADH dehydrogenase, riken cDNA and peroxiredoxin VI increased after radiation. The expression of cytochrome c increased significantly in spleen and liver tissues after radiation. In spleen, radiosensitivity tissue, the identified proteins showed a significantly quantitative alteration following radiation. It was categorized as signal transduction, apoptosis, cytokine, Ca signal related protein, stress-related protein, cytoskeletal regulation, ROS metabolism, and others. Differences of radiation-induced apoptosis by tissues specifted were coupled with the induction of related radiosensitivity and radioresistant proteins. The result suggests that apoptosis relate protein and redox proteins play important roles in this radiosusceptibility

  15. Gene expression profiling gut microbiota in different races of humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-03-01

    The gut microbiome is shaped and modified by the polymorphisms of microorganisms in the intestinal tract. Its composition shows strong individual specificity and may play a crucial role in the human digestive system and metabolism. Several factors can affect the composition of the gut microbiome, such as eating habits, living environment, and antibiotic usage. Thus, various races are characterized by different gut microbiome characteristics. In this present study, we studied the gut microbiomes of three different races, including individuals of Asian, European and American races. The gut microbiome and the expression levels of gut microbiome genes were analyzed in these individuals. Advanced feature selection methods (minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection) and four machine-learning algorithms (random forest, nearest neighbor algorithm, sequential minimal optimization, Dagging) were employed to capture key differentially expressed genes. As a result, sequential minimal optimization was found to yield the best performance using the 454 genes, which could effectively distinguish the gut microbiomes of different races. Our analyses of extracted genes support the widely accepted hypotheses that eating habits, living environments and metabolic levels in different races can influence the characteristics of the gut microbiome.

  16. Gene expression profiles in stages II and III colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Kirkeby, Lene T; Hansen, Raino;

    2012-01-01

    were retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (n¿=¿111) in addition to a Danish data set (n¿=¿37). All patients had stages II and III colon cancers. A Prediction Analysis of Microarray classifier, based on the 128-gene signature and the original training set of stage I (n¿=¿65) and stage IV (n......PURPOSE: A 128-gene signature has been proposed to predict outcome in patients with stages II and III colorectal cancers. In the present study, we aimed to reproduce and validate the 128-gene signature in external and independent material. METHODS: Gene expression data from the original material......¿=¿76) colon cancers, was reproduced. The stages II and III colon cancers were subsequently classified as either stage I-like (good prognosis) or stage IV-like (poor prognosis) and assessed by the 36 months cumulative incidence of relapse. RESULTS: In the GEO data set, results were reproducible in stage...

  17. Glycosyltransferase Gene Expression Profiles Classify Cancer Types and Propose Prognostic Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkani, Jahanshah; Naidoo, Kevin J.

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant glycosylation in tumours stem from altered glycosyltransferase (GT) gene expression but can the expression profiles of these signature genes be used to classify cancer types and lead to cancer subtype discovery? The differential structural changes to cellular glycan structures are predominantly regulated by the expression patterns of GT genes and are a hallmark of neoplastic cell metamorphoses. We found that the expression of 210 GT genes taken from 1893 cancer patient samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) microarray data are able to classify six cancers; breast, ovarian, glioblastoma, kidney, colon and lung. The GT gene expression profiles are used to develop cancer classifiers and propose subtypes. The subclassification of breast cancer solid tumour samples illustrates the discovery of subgroups from GT genes that match well against basal-like and HER2-enriched subtypes and correlates to clinical, mutation and survival data. This cancer type glycosyltransferase gene signature finding provides foundational evidence for the centrality of glycosylation in cancer.

  18. Suppression of T-Cell Chemokines by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui, Catherine E.; Wang, Qian; Wright, Christopher J.; Takeuchi, Hiroki; Uriarte, Silvia M.

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen in periodontal disease and is associated with immune dysbiosis. In this study, we found that P. gingivalis did not induce the expression of the T-cell chemokine IP-10 (CXCL10) from neutrophils, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), or gingival epithelial cells. Furthermore, P. gingivalis suppressed gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-stimulated release of IP-10, ITAC (CXCL11), and Mig (CXCL9) from epithelial cells and inhibited IP-10 secretion in a mixed infection with the otherwise stimulatory Fusobacterium nucleatum. Inhibition of chemokine expression occurred at the level of gene transcription and was associated with downregulation of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) and decreased levels of Stat1. Ectopic expression of IRF-1 in epithelial cells relieved P. gingivalis-induced inhibition of IP-10 release. Direct contact between P. gingivalis and epithelial cells was not required for IP-10 inhibition. These results highlight the immune-disruptive potential of P. gingivalis. Suppression of IP-10 and other Th1-biasing chemokines by P. gingivalis may perturb the balance of protective and destructive immunity in the periodontal tissues and facilitate the pathogenicity of oral microbial communities. PMID:23589576

  19. Involvement of chemokine receptors in breast cancer metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Anja; Homey, Bernhard; Soto, Hortensia; Ge, Nianfeng; Catron, Daniel; Buchanan, Matthew E.; McClanahan, Terri; Murphy, Erin; Yuan, Wei; Wagner, Stephan N.; Barrera, Jose Luis; Mohar, Alejandro; Verástegui, Emma; Zlotnik, Albert

    2001-03-01

    Breast cancer is characterized by a distinct metastatic pattern involving the regional lymph nodes, bone marrow, lung and liver. Tumour cell migration and metastasis share many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is critically regulated by chemokines and their receptors. Here we report that the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 are highly expressed in human breast cancer cells, malignant breast tumours and metastases. Their respective ligands CXCL12/SDF-1α and CCL21/6Ckine exhibit peak levels of expression in organs representing the first destinations of breast cancer metastasis. In breast cancer cells, signalling through CXCR4 or CCR7 mediates actin polymerization and pseudopodia formation, and subsequently induces chemotactic and invasive responses. In vivo, neutralizing the interactions of CXCL12/CXCR4 significantly impairs metastasis of breast cancer cells to regional lymph nodes and lung. Malignant melanoma, which has a similar metastatic pattern as breast cancer but also a high incidence of skin metastases, shows high expression levels of CCR10 in addition to CXCR4 and CCR7. Our findings indicate that chemokines and their receptors have a critical role in determining the metastatic destination of tumour cells.

  20. Analysis of expression profiles of MAGE-A antigens in oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reichert Torsten E

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immunological response to solid tumours is insufficient. Therefore, tumour specific antigens have been explored to facilitate the activation of the immune system. The cancer/testis antigen class of MAGE-A antigens is a possible target for vaccination. Their differential expression profiles also modulate the course of the cancer disease and its response to antineoplastic drugs. Methods The expression profiles of MAGE-A2, -A3, -A4, -A6 and -A10 in five own oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were characterised by rt-PCR, qrt-PCR and immunocytochemistry with a global MAGE-A antibody (57B and compared with those of an adult keratinocyte cell line (NHEK. Results All tumour cell lines expressed MAGE-A antigens. The antigens were expressed in groups with different preferences. The predominant antigens expressed were MAGE-A2, -A3 and -A6. MAGE-A10 was not expressed in the cell lines tested. The MAGE-A gene products detected in the adult keratinocyte cell line NHEK were used as a reference. Conclusion MAGE-A antigens are expressed in oral squamous cell carcinomas. The expression profiles measured facilitate distinct examinations in forthcoming studies on responses to antineoplastic drugs or radiation therapy. MAGE-A antigens are still an interesting aim for immunotherapy.

  1. An expression profile analysis of ES cell-derived definitive endodermal cells and Pdx1-expressing cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kume Kazuhiko

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We developed an efficient in vitro method to differentiate mouse ES cells into the definitive endoderm (DE and then Pdx1-expressing pancreatic lineages using mesodermal-derived supporting cells, M15. Using this method, resulting ES cell-derived DE and Pdx1-expressing cells were isolated by cell sorting, and their gene expression profiles were investigated with DNA microarray. Genes that were specifically expressed in DE and/or in Pdx1-expressing cells were extracted and their expression patterns in normal embryonic development were studied. Results Genes whose expression increased in DE and Pdx1 positive cells compared to the undifferentiated ES cells were chosen and in situ hybridizations were performed. Out of 54 genes examined, 27 were expressed in the DE of E8.5 mouse embryos and 15 genes were expressed in distinct domains in the pancreatic buds of E14.5 embryos. Among those genes expressed were Foxq1, CpM, Foxp4, Pcdh1, and Zmiz1, which were previously reported in other endodermal tissues. Genes, such as Parm1, Tmem184a, Hipk2 and Sox4 were reported to be expressed during early pancreatic development. Nptx2, C2cd4b, Tcf7l2 and Kiss1r were reported to be associated with beta cell or pancreatic functions in the adult. Akr1c19, Aebp2, Pbxip1 and Creb3l1, were novel and have not been described as being expressed either in DE or the pancreas. Conclusions We identified 27 genes, including 4 novel genes expressed in DE and pancreatic progenitor cells during normal development using an ES cell in vitro differentiation system. These results showed that DE cells and Pdx1/GFP-expressing cells obtained from our M15 based differentiation method mimic cells during the normal developmental processes. Additionally, ES cells are an excellent model for studies of early developmental processes.

  2. MicroRNAs Expression Profiles in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Bronze-da-Rocha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current search for new markers of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs is explained by the high morbidity and mortality still observed in developed and developing countries due to cardiovascular events. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs have emerged as potential new biomarkers and are small sequences of RNAs that regulate gene expression at posttranscriptional level by inhibiting translation or inducing degradation of the target mRNAs. Circulating miRNAs are involved in the regulation of signaling pathways associated to aging and can be used as novel diagnostic markers for acute and chronic diseases such as cardiovascular pathologies. This review summarizes the biogenesis, maturation, and stability of miRNAs and their use as potential biomarkers for coronary artery disease (CAD, myocardial infarction (MI, and heart failure (HF.

  3. Stability and Heterogeneity of Expression Profiles in Lung Cancer Specimens Harvested Following Surgical Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona H. Blackhall

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the major concerns in microarray profiling studies of clinical samples is the effect of tissue sampling and RNA extraction on data. We analyzed gene expression in lung cancer specimens that were serially harvested from tumor mass and snap-frozen at several intervals up to 120 minutes after surgical resection. Global gene expression was profiled on cDNA microarrays, and selected stress and hypoxia-activated genes were evaluated using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Remarkably, similar gene expression profiles were obtained for the majority of samples regardless of the time that had elapsed between resection and freezing. Real-time RT-PCR studies showed significant heterogeneity in the expression levels of stress and hypoxia-activated genes in samples obtained from different areas of a tumor specimen at one time point after resection. The variations between multiple samplings were significantly greater than those of elapsed time between sampling/freezing. Overall samples snap-frozen within 30 to 60 minutes of surgical resection are acceptable for gene expression studies, thus making sampling and snap-freezing of tumor samples in a routine surgical pathology laboratory setting feasible. However, sampling and pooling from multiple sites of each tumor may be necessary for expression profiling studies to overcome the molecular heterogeneity present in tumor specimens.

  4. CX3CL1/CX3CR1 and CCL2/CCR2 Chemokine/Chemokine Receptor Complex in Patients with AMD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Mads Krüger; Singh, Amardeep; Faber, Carsten; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Hviid, Thomas; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The chemokine receptors CX3CR1 and CCR2 have been implicated in the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The evidence is mainly derived from experimental cell studies and murine models of AMD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between expression...... of CX3CR1 and CCR2 on different leukocyte subsets and AMD. Furthermore we measured the plasma levels of ligands CX3CL1 and CCL2. METHODS: Patients attending our department were asked to participate in the study. The diagnosis of AMD was based on clinical examination and multimodal imaging techniques....... Chemokine plasma level and chemokine receptor expression were measured by flow-cytometry. RESULTS: A total of 150 participants were included. We found a significantly lower expression of CX3CR1 on CD8+ T cells in the neovascular AMD group compared to the control group (p = 0.04). We found a significant...

  5. Quality Control Usage in High-Density Microarrays Reveals Differential Gene Expression Profiles in Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas-Ruiz, Vanessa; Moreno, Jose; Jacome-Lopez, Karina; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Juarez-Mendez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    There are several existing reports of microarray chip use for assessment of altered gene expression in different diseases. In fact, there have been over 1.5 million assays of this kind performed over the last twenty years, which have influenced clinical and translational research studies. The most commonly used DNA microarray platforms are Affymetrix GeneChip and Quality Control Software along with their GeneChip Probe Arrays. These chips are created using several quality controls to confirm the success of each assay, but their actual impact on gene expression profiles had not been previously analyzed until the appearance of several bioinformatics tools for this purpose. We here performed a data mining analysis, in this case specifically focused on ovarian cancer, as well as healthy ovarian tissue and ovarian cell lines, in order to confirm quality control results and associated variation in gene expression profiles. The microarray data used in our research were downloaded from ArrayExpress and Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and analyzed with Expression Console Software using RMA, MAS5 and Plier algorithms. The gene expression profiles were obtained using Partek Genomics Suite v6.6 and data were visualized using principal component analysis, heat map, and Venn diagrams. Microarray quality control analysis showed that roughly 40% of the microarray files were false negative, demonstrating over- and under-estimation of expressed genes. Additionally, we confirmed the results performing second analysis using independent samples. About 70% of the significant expressed genes were correlated in both analyses. These results demonstrate the importance of appropriate microarray processing to obtain a reliable gene expression profile. PMID:27268623

  6. Gene Expression Profiles as Prognostic Marker in Women with Ovarian Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochumsen, Kirsten Marie; Tan, Qihua; Høgdall, EV;

    2009-01-01

    toward investigations for more individualized therapies and the use of gene expression profiles in the clinical practice. RNA from tumor tissue from 43 Danish patients with serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma (11 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics [FIGO] stage I/II, 32 FIGO stage III...... disease. Furthermore, its ability to classify in an external validation set was demonstrated. The identified 14-gene prognostic profile was able to predict survival (short- vs long-term survival) with a strength that is better than any other prognostic factor in epithelial ovarian cancer including FIGO......The purpose was to find a gene expression profile that could distinguish short-term from long-term survivors in our collection of serous epithelial ovarian carcinomas. Furthermore, it should be able to stratify in an external validation set. Such a classifier profile will take us a step forward...

  7. Gene expression profiles as prognostic markers in women with ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochumsen, Kirsten M; Tan, Qihua; Høgdall, Estrid V;

    2009-01-01

    toward investigations for more individualized therapies and the use of gene expression profiles in the clinical practice. RNA from tumor tissue from 43 Danish patients with serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma (11 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics [FIGO] stage I/II, 32 FIGO stage III...... disease. Furthermore, its ability to classify in an external validation set was demonstrated. The identified 14-gene prognostic profile was able to predict survival (short- vs long-term survival) with a strength that is better than any other prognostic factor in epithelial ovarian cancer including FIGO......The purpose was to find a gene expression profile that could distinguish short-term from long-term survivors in our collection of serous epithelial ovarian carcinomas. Furthermore, it should be able to stratify in an external validation set. Such a classifier profile will take us a step forward...

  8. MHD stability properties expressed in terms of plasma profile characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental identification and theoretical simulation of the MHD activity in tokamaks is a major area of research. At the present time, this requires detailed and tedious computations, starting from a careful simulation of the discharge followed by extensive theoretical analysis. As a consequence this is not done very frequently and systematic analysis is generally not possible. An alternate method could involve detailed analyses of theoretical models over a wide range of parameter space, with the results catalogued in some suitable manner. This has the advantage of giving experimentalists a quick reference guide. A principal difficulty is the choice of representation of the parameter space, since the stability properties are related to both the local as well as the global characteristics of the plasma. Recently there has been a proposal to use the s-α diagrams to characterize the equilibrium properties of experimental discharges. The authors examine the possibility of extending that concept to stability analysis as well. The use of s-α diagrams for analysis of ballooning modes is well established, here they examine their application to kink modes as well. Another method for depicting the equilibrium properties in a stability diagram is to use the inductance, li, and the pressure peaking factor, PPF. They present the stability properties for a variety of plasma profiles and geometries in terms of various equilibrium quantities, including s-α diagrams as well as li, and PPF. They also apply these concepts to experimental data from TFTR and PBXM and compare the observed MHD behavior with the predictions of the theoretical models

  9. Differential Expression of Gene Profiles in MRGX-treated Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon Yong-Kyun; Lee Seung-Yeul; Kang Hwan-Soo; Sung Jung-Suk; Cho Chong-Kwan; Yoo Hwa-Seung; Shin Seungjin; Choi Jong-Soon; Lee Yeon-Weol; Jang Ik-Soon

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Modified regular ginseng extract (MRGX) has stronger anti-cancer activity-possessing gensenoside profiles. Methods: To investigate changes in gene expression in the MRGX-treated lung cancer cells (A549), we examined genomic data with cDNA microarray results. After completing the gene-ontology-based analysis, we grouped the genes into up-and down-regulated profiles and into ontology-related regulated genes and proteins through their interaction network. Results: One hundred n...

  10. Comprehensive qPCR profiling of gene expression in single neuronal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Citri, Ami; Pang, Zhiping P.; Sudhof, Thomas C.; Wernig, Marius; Malenka, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in neuronal stem cell biology lies in characterization of lineage-specific reprogrammed human neuronal cells, a process that necessitates the use of an assay sensitive to the single-cell level. Single-cell gene profiling can provide definitive evidence regarding the conversion of one cell type into another at a high level of resolution. The protocol we describe employs Fluidigm Biomark dynamic arrays for high-throughput expression profiling from single neuronal cells, assayi...

  11. Microbiological exploitation of the chemokine system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter J; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2003-01-01

    Several viruses encode chemokine elements in their genome. This review focuses on the roles of such elements in the ongoing battle between the virus and the host. The biological and pharmacological characterizations of several of these chemokine elements have highlighted their importance in the m...

  12. Microbiological exploitation of the chemokine system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    Several viruses encode chemokine elements in their genome. This review focuses on the roles of such elements in the ongoing battle between the virus and the host. The biological and pharmacological characterizations of several of these chemokine elements have highlighted their importance in the m...

  13. Discrimination of meniscal cell phenotypes using gene expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Son

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of quantitative and objective metrics to assess cartilage and meniscus cell phenotypes contributes to the challenges in fibrocartilage tissue engineering. Although functional assessment of the final resulting tissue is essential, initial characterization of cell sources and quantitative description of their progression towards the natural, desired cell phenotype would provide an effective tool in optimizing cell-based tissue engineering strategies. The purpose of this study was to identify quantifiable characteristics of meniscal cells and thereby find phenotypical markers that could effectively categorize cells based on their tissue of origin (cartilage, inner, middle, and outer meniscus. The combination of gene expression ratios collagen VI/collagen II, ADAMTS-5/collagen II, and collagen I/collagen II was the most effective indicator of variation among different tissue regions. We additionally demonstrate a possible application of these quantifiable metrics in evaluating the use of serially passaged chondrocytes as a possible cell source in fibrocartilage engineering. Comparing the ratios of the passaged chondrocytes and the native meniscal cells may provide direction to optimize towards the desired cell phenotype. We have thus shown that measurable markers defining the characteristics of the native meniscus can establish a standard by which different tissue engineering strategies can be objectively assessed. Such metrics could additionally be useful in exploring the different stages of meniscal degradation in osteoarthritis and provide some insight in the disease progression.

  14. Direct cell lysis for single-cell gene expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DavidSvec

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The interest to analyze single and few cell samples is rapidly increasing. Numerous extraction protocols to purify nucleic acids are available, but most of them compromise severely on yield to remove contaminants and are therefore not suitable for the analysis of samples containing small numbers of transcripts only. Here, we evaluate 17 direct cell lysis protocols for transcript yield and compatibility with downstream reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR. Four endogenously expressed genes are assayed together with RNA and DNA spikes in the samples. We found bovine serum albumin (BSA to be the best lysis agent, resulting in efficient cell lysis, high RNA stability and enhanced reverse transcription efficiency. Furthermore, we found direct cell lysis with BSA superior to standard column based extraction methods, when analyzing from 1 up to 512 mammalian cells. In conclusion, direct cell lysis protocols based on BSA can be applied with most cell collection methods and are compatible with most analytical workflows to analyze single cells as well as samples composed of small numbers of cells.

  15. Gene Expression Profile in Peripheral Blood Cells of Friedreich Ataxia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahao, Agessandro; Pedroso, Jose Luiz; de Carvalho Aguiar, Patricia Maria; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas

    2016-06-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common autosomal recessive ataxia characterized by a combination of neurological involvement, cardiomyopathy, and skeletal and glucose metabolism disturbances. FRDA is caused by mutations in FXN gene that results in reduction of mRNA and protein levels of frataxin. Previous microarray and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) studies showed that the downregulation of FXN is associated with a complex gene expression profile. However, these studies showed a wide variability in the subset of genes with altered expression among tissues and models. Genes differentially expressed in peripheral blood cells (PBC) could potentially help in the understanding of FRDA pathophysiology and also function as reliable disease biomarkers obtained from an easily accessible tissue, which could have implications in clinical practice. This study aimed to validate by qPCR the expression of 26 genes, revealed as differentially expressed by other studies, using peripheral blood cells (PBC) of 11 FRDA patients compared to 11 healthy controls. We found a robust downregulation of FXN, but no statistically significant differences were found between FRDA and controls for the remaining genes. Except for FXN, our study did not find a differential gene expression profile in PBC of FRDA patients and a reliable gene expression profile biomarker in a clinical relevant and noninvasive tissue remains unclear. PMID:26170003

  16. Prediction of metastasis from low-malignant breast cancer by gene expression profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Tan, Qihua; Eiriksdottir, Freyja;

    2007-01-01

    Promising results for prediction of outcome in breast cancer have been obtained by genome wide gene expression profiling. Some studies have suggested that an extensive overtreatment of breast cancer patients might be reduced by risk assessment with gene expression profiling. A patient group hardly...... examined in these studies is the low-risk patients for whom outcome is very difficult to predict with currently used methods. These patients do not receive adjuvant treatment according to the guidelines of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG). In this study, 26 tumors from low-risk patients...

  17. CD26/dipeptidylpeptidase IV-chemokine interactions: double-edged regulation of inflammation and tumor biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, Anneleen; Gouwy, Mieke; Van Damme, Jo; Proost, Paul; Struyf, Sofie

    2016-06-01

    Post-translational modification of chemokines is an essential regulatory mechanism to enhance or dampen the inflammatory response. CD26/dipeptidylpeptidase IV, ubiquitously expressed in tissues and blood, removes NH2-terminal dipeptides from proteins with a penultimate Pro or Ala. A large number of human chemokines, including CXCL2, CXCL6, CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, CXCL12, CCL3L1, CCL4, CCL5, CCL11, CCL14, and CCL22, are cleaved by CD26; however, the efficiency is clearly influenced by the amino acids surrounding the cleavage site and although not yet proven, potentially affected by the chemokine concentration and interactions with third molecules. NH2-terminal cleavage of chemokines by CD26 has prominent effects on their receptor binding, signaling, and hence, in vitro and in vivo biologic activities. However, rather than having a similar result, the outcome of NH2-terminal truncation is highly diverse. Either no difference in activity or drastic alterations in receptor recognition/specificity and hence, chemotactic activity are observed. Analogously, chemokine-dependent inhibition of HIV infection is enhanced (for CCL3L1 and CCL5) or decreased (for CXCL12) by CD26 cleavage. The occurrence of CD26-processed chemokine isoforms in plasma underscores the importance of the in vitro-observed CD26 cleavages. Through modulation of chemokine activity, CD26 regulates leukocyte/tumor cell migration and progenitor cell release from the bone marrow, as shown by use of mice treated with CD26 inhibitors or CD26 knockout mice. As chemokine processing by CD26 has a significant impact on physiologic and pathologic processes, application of CD26 inhibitors to affect chemokine function is currently explored, e.g., as add-on therapy in viral infection and cancer. PMID:26744452

  18. Alteration of gene expression profiles during mycoplasma-induced malignant cell transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mycoplasmas are the smallest microorganisms capable of self-replication. Our previous studies show that some mycoplasmas are able to induce malignant transformation of host mammalian cells. This malignant transformation is a multistage process with the early infection, reversible and irreversible stages, and similar to human tumor development in nature. The purpose of this study is to explore mechanisms for this malignant transformation. To better understand mechanisms for this unique process, we examined gene expression profiles of C3H cells at different stages of the mycoplasma-induced transformation using cDNA microarray technology. A total of 1185 genes involved in oncogenesis, apoptosis, cell growth, cell-cycle regulation, DNA repair, etc. were examined. Differences in the expression of these genes were compared and analyzed using the computer software AtlasImage. Among 1185 genes screened, 135 had aberrant expression at the early infection stage, 252 at the reversible stage and 184 at the irreversible stage. At the early infection stage, genes with increased expression (92 genes) were twice more than those with decreased expression (42 genes). The global gene expression at the reversible stage appeared to be more volatile than that at any other stages but still resembled the profile at the early infection stage. The expression profile at the irreversible stage shows a unique pattern of a wide range of expression levels and an increased number of expressing genes, especially the cancer-related genes. Oncogenes and tumor suppressors are a group of molecules that showed significant changes in expression during the transformation. The majority of these changes occurred in the reversible and irreversible stages. A prolonged infection by mycoplasmas lead to the expression of more cancer related genes at the irreversible stage. The results indicate that the expression profiles correspond with the phenotypic features of the cells in the mycoplasma induced

  19. Associations between Serum Sex Hormone Concentrations and Whole Blood Gene Expression Profiles in the General Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Haring

    Full Text Available Despite observational evidence from epidemiological and clinical studies associating sex hormones with various cardiometabolic risk factors or diseases, pathophysiological explanations are sparse to date. To reveal putative functional insights, we analyzed associations between sex hormone levels and whole blood gene expression profiles.We used data of 991 individuals from the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-TREND with whole blood gene expression levels determined by array-based transcriptional profiling and serum concentrations of total testosterone (TT, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG, free testosterone (free T, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS, androstenedione (AD, estradiol (E2, and estrone (E1 measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and immunoassay. Associations between sex hormone concentrations and gene expression profiles were analyzed using sex-specific regression models adjusted for age, body mass index, and technical covariables.In men, positive correlations were detected between AD and DDIT4 mRNA levels, as well as between SHBG and the mRNA levels of RPIA, RIOK3, GYPB, BPGM, and RAB2B. No additional significant associations were observed.Besides the associations between AD and DDIT4 expression and SHBG and the transcript levels of RPIA, RIOK3, GYPB, BPGM, and RAB2B, the present study did not indicate any association between sex hormone concentrations and whole blood gene expression profiles in men and women from the general population.

  20. CCR5 signalling, but not DARC or D6 regulatory, chemokine receptors are targeted by herpesvirus U83A chemokine which delays receptor internalisation via diversion to a caveolin-linked pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gompels Ursula A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpesviruses have evolved chemokines and chemokine receptors, which modulate the recruitment of human leukocytes during the inflammatory response to infection. Early post-infection, human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A infected cells express the chemokine receptor U51A and chemokine U83A which have complementary effects in subverting the CC-chemokine family thereby controlling anti-viral leukocyte recruitment. Here we show that, to potentiate this activity, the viral chemokine can also avoid clearance by scavenger chemokine receptors, DARC and D6, which normally regulate an inflammatory response. Conversely, U83A delays internalisation of its signalling target receptor CCR5 with diversion to caveolin rich membrane domains. This mechanism can redirect displaced human chemokines to DARC and D6 for clearance of the anti-viral inflammatory response, leaving the viral chemokine unchecked. Methods Cell models for competitive binding assays were established using radiolabeled human chemokines and cold U83A on CCR5, DARC or D6 expressing cells. Flow cytometry was used to assess specific chemotaxis of CCR5 bearing cells to U83A, and internalisation of CCR5 specific chemokine CCL4 after stimulation with U83A. Internalisation analyses were supported by confocal microscopy of internalisation and co-localisation of CCR5 with caveosome marker caveolin-1, after virus or human chemokine stimulation. Results U83A displaced efficiently human chemokines from CCR5, with a high affinity of 0.01nM, but not from DARC or D6. Signalling via CCR5 resulted in specific chemoattraction of primary human leukocytes bearing CCR5. However, U83A effective binding and signalling to CCR5 resulted in delayed internalisation and recycling up to 2 hours in the absence of continual re-stimulation. This resulted in diversion to a delayed caveolin-linked pathway rather than the rapid clathrin mediated endocytosis previously shown with human chemokines CCL3 or CCL4

  1. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN ARSENIC-TREATED MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS EXPRESSING DIFFERENT LEVELS OF HSP70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene expression profiles in arsenic-treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells expressing different levels of HSP70Gail Nelson, Susan Hester, Ernest Winkfield, Jill Barnes, James AllenEnvironmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Rese...

  2. Microarray Expression Profiling Identifies Genes with Altered Expression in HDL-Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Callow, Matthew J.; Dudoit, Sandrine; Gong, Elaine L.; Speed, Terence P.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-01-01

    Based on the assumption that severe alterations in the expression of genes known to be involved in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism may affect the expression of other genes, we screened an array of >5000 mouse expressed sequence tags for altered gene expression in the livers of two lines of mice with dramatic decreases in HDL plasma concentrations. Labeled cDNA from livers of apolipoprotein AI (apoAI)-knockout mice, scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) transgenic mice, and control mice were...

  3. Expression profiling of human melanocytes in response to UV-B irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saioa López

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive gene expression analysis of human melanocytes was performed assessing the transcriptional profile of dark melanocytes (DM and light melanocytes (LM at basal conditions and after UV-B irradiation at different time points (6, 12 and 24 h, and in culture with different keratinocyte-conditioned media (KCM+ and KCM−. The data, previously published in [1], have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO accession number: GSE70280.

  4. Slow freezing and vitrification differentially modify the gene expression profile of human metaphase II oocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Monzo, Cécile; Haouzi, Delphine; Roman, K.; Assou, Said; Dechaud, Hervé; Hamamah, Samir

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cryopreservation is now considered as an efficient way to store human oocytes to preserve fertility. However, little is known about the effects of this technology on oocyte gene expression. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the two cryopreservation procedures, slow freezing and vitrification, on the gene expression profile of human metaphase II (MII) oocytes. METHODS: Unfertilized MII oocytes following ICSI failure were cryopreserved either by slow freezing or by ...

  5. Improved quantitative real-time RT–PCR for expression profiling of individual cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liss, Birgit

    2002-01-01

    The real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (rtqPCR) has overcome the limitations of conventional, time-consuming quantitative PCR strategies and is maturing into a routine tool to quantify gene expression levels, following reverse transcription (RT) of mRNA into complementary DNA (cDNA). Expression profiling with single-cell resolution is highly desirable, in particular for complex tissues like the brain that contain a large variety of different cell types in close proximity. The pa...

  6. AI-05IMPACT OF GBM MICROENVIRONMENT ON EXPRESSION PROFILE OF BONE MARROW DERIVED PROGENITOR CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Burrell, Kelly; Singh, Sanjay; Agnihotri, Sameer; Hill, Richard; Aldape, Kenneth; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2014-01-01

    We have recently shown that bone marrow derived cells (BMDC) provide a distinct tumor region dependent contribution to glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) neovascularization. The influence of GBM microenvironment on differentiation and modulation of expression factors by BMDC however remains unknown. In this study we establish the differential expression profile of BMDC as a consequence of recruitment and interaction with the GBM microenvironment and in response to radiation (RTx) and anti-angiogen...

  7. Diagnosis of Partial Body Radiation Exposure in Mice Using Peripheral Blood Gene Expression Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Meadows, Sarah K.; Dressman, Holly K.; Daher, Pamela; Himburg, Heather; Russell, J. Lauren; Doan, Phuong; Chao, Nelson J.; Lucas, Joseph; Nevins, Joseph R.; Chute, John P

    2010-01-01

    In the event of a terrorist-mediated attack in the United States using radiological or improvised nuclear weapons, it is expected that hundreds of thousands of people could be exposed to life-threatening levels of ionizing radiation. We have recently shown that genome-wide expression analysis of the peripheral blood (PB) can generate gene expression profiles that can predict radiation exposure and distinguish the dose level of exposure following total body irradiation (TBI). However, in the e...

  8. Analysis of genomewide expression profiles of thyroid tumors and of their in vitro models

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, David

    2009-01-01

    New technologies to probe the global output of the normal and cancer genomes have recently reached widespread use. The resulting genomewide gene expression profiles, e.g, a gene expression measurement per gene and per tissue sample, remain challenging to analyze and interpret, but have already provided new insights into the pathophysiology of cancer and towards personalized care.In vitro cell culture-based experimental models are used to elucidate cancer onset and progression because experime...

  9. Effect of Normalization on Statistical and Biological Interpretation of Gene Expression Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Shaopu; Kim, Jinhee; Arafat, Dalia; Gibson, Greg

    2013-01-01

    An under-appreciated aspect of the genetic analysis of gene expression is the impact of post-probe level normalization on biological inference. Here we contrast nine different methods for normalization of an Illumina bead-array gene expression profiling dataset consisting of peripheral blood samples from 189 individual participants in the Center for Health Discovery and Well Being study in Atlanta, quantifying differences in the inference of global variance components and covariance of gene e...

  10. Differential gene expression profiling of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells during adipogenic development.

    OpenAIRE

    Menssen Adriane; Häupl Thomas; Sittinger Michael; Delorme Bruno; Charbord Pierre; Ringe Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Adipogenesis is the developmental process by which mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) differentiate into pre-adipocytes and adipocytes. The aim of the study was to analyze the developmental strategies of human bone marrow MSC developing into adipocytes over a defined time scale. Here we were particularly interested in differentially expressed transcription factors and biochemical pathways. We studied genome-wide gene expression profiling of human MSC based on an adipogenic diffe...

  11. Isolation of Specific Neurons from C. elegans Larvae for Gene Expression Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    W Clay Spencer; Rebecca McWhirter; Tyne Miller; Pnina Strasbourger; Owen Thompson; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Waterston, Robert H.; Miller, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The simple and well-described structure of the C. elegans nervous system offers an unprecedented opportunity to identify the genetic programs that define the connectivity and function of individual neurons and their circuits. A correspondingly precise gene expression map of C. elegans neurons would facilitate the application of genetic methods toward this goal. Here we describe a powerful new approach, SeqCeL (RNA-Seq of C. elegans cells) for producing gene expression profiles of s...

  12. A cross-laboratory comparison of expression profiling data from normal human postmortem brain

    OpenAIRE

    Mistry, Meeta; Pavlidis, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Expression profiling of post-mortem human brain tissue has been widely used to study molecular changes associated with neuropsychiatric diseases as well as normal processes such as aging. Changes in expression associated with factors such as age, gender or postmortem interval are often more pronounced than changes associated with disease. Therefore in addition to being of interest in their own right, careful consideration of these effects are important in the interpretation of disease studies...

  13. Gene expression profiling of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia reveals ADAMTS2 overexpression as a potential marker

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Shang-Hui; Yang, Wen-Jun; Liu, Sheng-Wen; Li, Jiang; Zhang, Chun-Ye; Zhu, Yun; ZHANG, CHEN-PING

    2014-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) as an abnormal bone growth is one of the common fibro-osseous leasions (FOL) in oral and maxillofacial region, however, its etiology still remains unclear. Here, we performed gene expression profiling of FD using microarray analysis to explore the key molecule events in FD development, and develop potential diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets for FD. We found that 1,881 genes exhibited differential expression with more than two-fold changes in FD compared to norma...

  14. Induction of the Chemokines CCL3α, CCL3α and CCL5 in Atherosclerotic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyaa Mousa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines recruit immune cells to inflammatory sites and promote the process of inflammation. The role of these mediators in the disease process in atherosclerosis is not fully studied. The spontaneous mRNA expression and intracellular protein production of the potential inflammatory chemokines CCL3 and CCL3 (macrophage- inflammatory protein-1and ; CCR3 ligand and CCL5 (regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES; CCR5 ligand in atherosclerotic patients was examined together with the effects of the chlamydial antigen HSP60 and LPS on the gene expression and protein induction of these mediators. Detection of chemokine mRNA and protein levels was assessed by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry respectively. The examined chemokines were detected at significantly high levels on atherosclerotic patients compared to healthy controls at both mRNA and protein levels. Stimulation with HSP60 and LPS from Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae and E. coli showed increased numbers of CCL3, CCL3 and CCL5 mRNA expressing cells in patients compared to health controls. Protein translation of these chemokines was depicted in correspondence to the mRNA gene expression for all examined chemokines spontaneously and after stimulation with chlamydial HSP60 and LPS and E. coli LPS. Thus, the herein data demonstrate the induction of potential inflammatory chemokines in atherosclerotic patients and that bacterial antigens play a role in the immunopathologic events in this disease by generating more inflammatory mediators.

  15. Computational gene expression profiling under salt stress reveals patterns of co-expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchita; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-03-01

    Plants respond differently to environmental conditions. Among various abiotic stresses, salt stress is a condition where excess salt in soil causes inhibition of plant growth. To understand the response of plants to the stress conditions, identification of the responsible genes is required. Clustering is a data mining technique used to group the genes with similar expression. The genes of a cluster show similar expression and function. We applied clustering algorithms on gene expression data of Solanum tuberosum showing differential expression in Capsicum annuum under salt stress. The clusters, which were common in multiple algorithms were taken further for analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) further validated the findings of other cluster algorithms by visualizing their clusters in three-dimensional space. Functional annotation results revealed that most of the genes were involved in stress related responses. Our findings suggest that these algorithms may be helpful in the prediction of the function of co-expressed genes. PMID:26981411

  16. Computational dissection of tissue contamination for identification of colon cancer-specific expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türeci, Ozlem; Ding, Jiayi; Hilton, Holly; Bian, Hongjin; Ohkawa, Hitomi; Braxenthaler, Michael; Seitz, Gerhard; Raddrizzani, Laura; Friess, Helmut; Buchler, Markus; Sahin, Ugur; Hammer, Juergen

    2003-03-01

    Microarray profiles of bulk tumor tissues reflect gene expression corresponding to malignant cells as well as to many different types of contaminating normal cells. In this report, we assess the feasibility of querying baseline multitissue transcriptome databases to dissect disease-specific genes. Using colon cancer as a model tumor, we show that the application of Boolean operators (AND, OR, BUTNOT) for database searches leads to genes with expression patterns of interest. The BUTNOT operator for example allows the assignment of "expression signatures" to normal tissue specimens. These expression signatures were then used to computationally identify contaminating cells within conventionally dissected tissue specimens. The combination of several logic operators together with an expression database based on multiple human tissue specimens can resolve the problem of tissue contamination, revealing novel cancer-specific gene expression. Several markers, previously not known to be colon cancer associated, are provided. PMID:12631577

  17. Chemokines and their receptors in Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vorst, Emiel P C; Döring, Yvonne; Weber, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the medium- and large-sized arteries, is the main underlying cause of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) most often leading to a myocardial infarction or stroke. However, atherosclerosis can also develop without this clinical manifestation. The pathophysiology of atherosclerosis is very complex and consists of many cells and molecules interacting with each other. Over the last years, chemokines (small 8-12 kDa cytokines with chemotactic properties) have been identified as key players in atherogenesis. However, this remains a very active and dynamic field of research. Here, we will give an overview of the current knowledge about the involvement of chemokines in all phases of atherosclerotic lesion development. Furthermore, we will focus on two chemokines that recently have been associated with atherogenesis, CXCL12, and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Both chemokines play a crucial role in leukocyte recruitment and arrest, a critical step in atherosclerosis development. MIF has shown to be a more pro-inflammatory and thus pro-atherogenic chemokine, instead CXCL12 seems to have a more protective function. However, results about this protective role are still quite debatable. Future research will further elucidate the precise role of these chemokines in atherosclerosis and determine the potential of chemokine-based therapies. PMID:26175090

  18. Systematic Characterisation of Cellular Localisation and Expression Profiles of Proteins Containing MHC Ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncker, Agnieszka; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Weinhold, Nils; Nielsen, Morten; Brunak, Søren; Lund, Ole

    2009-01-01

    -scale study, we used a large data set of proteins containing experimentally identified MHC class I or II ligands and examined the proteins according to their expression profiles at the mRNA level and their Gene Ontology (GO) classification within the cellular component ontology. Proteins encoded by highly...

  19. Gene expression profiling in circulating cells (ctcs) of breast carcinoma patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kološtová, K.; Pinterová, D.; Tesařová, P.; Mikulová, V.; Kubecová, M.; Brychta, M.; Rusňáková, Vendula; Kasimir-Bauer, S.; Kubista, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, suppl. 4 (2010), s. 49-59. ISSN 0923-7534 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Circulating tumor cells * Breast cancer * Gene expression profiling Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.452, year: 2010

  20. Gene expression profiles give insight into the molecular pathology of bone in primary hyperparathyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reppe, Sjur; Stilgren, Lis; Olstad, Ole K; Brixen, Kim; Nissen-Meyer, Lise Sofie; Gautvik, Kaare M; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Global gene expression profiling has been used to study the molecular mechanisms of increased bone remodeling caused by PHPT. This disease is a model for chronic over-stimulation of target organs by PTH due to an inappropriate overproduction of the hormone. Hyperactivity of osteoblasts and...... potential bearing on future treatment....

  1. Age and vitamin E-induced changes in Gene Expression Profiles of T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    T cell is vulnerable to age associated changes and vitamin E has been shown to improve T cell functions in the old. We studied the gene expression profile of T cells to better understand the underlying mechanisms of age and vitamin E-induced changes in T cell function. Young and old C57BL mice were ...

  2. MicroRNA Expression Profiling Identifies Molecular Diagnostic Signatures for Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Cuiling; Iqbal, Javeed; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie;

    2013-01-01

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs) encompass at least 2 systemic diseases distinguished by the presence or absence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) expression. We performed genome-wide microRNA (miRNA) profiling on 33 ALK-positive (ALK[+]) ALCLs, 25 ALK-negative (ALK[-]) ALCLs, 9 angioimm...

  3. Distinct expression and ligand-binding profiles of two constitutively active GPR17 splice variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Rosenkilde, M M

    2010-01-01

    In humans and non-human primates, the 7TM receptor GPR17 exists in two isoforms differing only by the length of the N-terminus. Of these, only the short isoform has previously been characterized. Hence, we investigated gene expression and ligand-binding profiles of both splice variants and furthe...

  4. Whole genome expression profiling using DNA microarray for determining biocompatibility of polymeric surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Wang, Zhenyu; Kutter, Jörg Peter;

    2006-01-01

    There is an ever increasing need to find surfaces that are biocompatible for applications like medical implants and microfluidics-based cell culture systems. The biocompatibility of five different surfaces with different hydrophobicity was determined using gene expression profiling as well as more...

  5. Consistent metagenes from cancer expression profiles yield agent specific predictors of chemotherapy response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qiyuan; Eklund, Aron Charles; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome scale expression profiling of human tumor samples is likely to yield improved cancer treatment decisions. However, identification of clinically predictive or prognostic classifiers can be challenging when a large number of genes are measured in a small number of tumors. RESULTS...

  6. Profiles of Receptive and Expressive Language Abilities in Boys with Comorbid Fragile X Syndrome and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDuffie, Andrea; Kover, Sara; Abbeduto, Leonard; Lewis, Pamela; Brown, Ted

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined receptive and expressive language profiles for a group of verbal male children and adolescents who had fragile X syndrome along with varying degrees of autism symptoms. A categorical approach for assigning autism diagnostic classification, based on the combined use of the Autism Diagnostic Interview--Revised and the Autism…

  7. Expression profiling in head and neck cancer: Predicting response to chemoradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Pramana, J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to find biomarkers through gene expression profiling, using microarray techniques, which can predict outcome after concurrent chemoradiation in head and neck cancer. The main endpoints for outcome were local control, locoregional control and disease free survival.

  8. Gene expression profiling in liver and testis of rats to characterize the toxicity of triazole fungicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four triazole fungicides were studied using toxicogenomic techniques to identify potential mechanisms of action. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed for 14 days by gavage with fluconazole, myclobutanil, propiconazole, or triadimefon. Following exposure, serum was collected for hormone measurements, and liver and testes were collected for histology, enzyme biochemistry, or gene expression profiling. Body and testis weights were unaffected, but liver weights were significantly increased by all four triazoles, and hepatocytes exhibited centrilobular hypertrophy. Myclobutanil exposure increased serum testosterone and decreased sperm motility, but no treatment-related testis histopathology was observed. We hypothesized that gene expression profiles would identify potential mechanisms of toxicity and used DNA microarrays and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) to generate profiles. Triazole fungicides are designed to inhibit fungal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 51 enzyme but can also modulate the expression and function of mammalian CYP genes and enzymes. Triazoles affected the expression of numerous CYP genes in rat liver and testis, including multiple Cyp2c and Cyp3a isoforms as well as other xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME) and transporter genes. For some genes, such as Ces2 and Udpgtr2, all four triazoles had similar effects on expression, suggesting possible common mechanisms of action. Many of these CYP, XME and transporter genes are regulated by xeno-sensing nuclear receptors, and hierarchical clustering of CAR/PXR-regulated genes demonstrated the similarities of toxicogenomic responses in liver between all four triazoles and in testis between myclobutanil and triadimefon. Triazoles also affected expression of multiple genes involved in steroid hormone metabolism in the two tissues. Thus, gene expression profiles helped identify possible toxicological mechanisms of the triazole fungicides

  9. Diverging mechanisms of activation of chemokine receptors revealed by novel chemokine agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Sarmiento

    Full Text Available CXCL8/interleukin-8 is a pro-inflammatory chemokine that triggers pleiotropic responses, including inflammation, angiogenesis, wound healing and tumorigenesis. We engineered the first selective CXCR1 agonists on the basis of residue substitutions in the conserved ELR triad and CXC motif of CXCL8. Our data reveal that the molecular mechanisms of activation of CXCR1 and CXCR2 are distinct: the N-loop of CXCL8 is the major determinant for CXCR1 activation, whereas the N-terminus of CXCL8 (ELR and CXC is essential for CXCR2 activation. We also found that activation of CXCR1 cross-desensitized CXCR2 responses in human neutrophils co-expressing both receptors, indicating that these novel CXCR1 agonists represent a new class of anti-inflammatory agents. Further, these selective CXCR1 agonists will aid at elucidating the functional significance of CXCR1 in vivo under pathophysiological conditions.

  10. Dual targeting of the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and ACKR3 with novel engineered chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Melinda S; Salanga, Catherina L; Chowdry, Arnab B; Comerford, Iain; McColl, Shaun R; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M

    2015-09-11

    The chemokine CXCL12 and its G protein-coupled receptors CXCR4 and ACKR3 are implicated in cancer and inflammatory and autoimmune disorders and are targets of numerous antagonist discovery efforts. Here, we describe a series of novel, high affinity CXCL12-based modulators of CXCR4 and ACKR3 generated by selection of N-terminal CXCL12 phage libraries on live cells expressing the receptors. Twelve of 13 characterized CXCL12 variants are full CXCR4 antagonists, and four have Kd values multiple sclerosis, demonstrating translational potential. Molecular modeling was used to elucidate the structural basis of binding and antagonism of selected variants and to guide future designs. Together, this work represents an important step toward the development of therapeutics targeting CXCR4 and ACKR3. PMID:26216880

  11. Microarray-based gene expression profiles in rabbit retina due to negative pressure suction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H X; Niu, C M; Guan, W Y

    2012-01-01

    We investigated a possible molecular pathogenesis involving retinal ganglion cell apoptosis following transient high intraocular pressure. Changes in the gene expression profiles of the retina were detected via gene chip methodology. Twelve New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned to control and 3-min negative pressure suction groups. The control group was treated only with a laser, and the experimental group was also treated with suction for 3 min, using a negative pressure generator. Total RNA was then extracted from the retinal tissue at different recovery stages to analyze gene expression profiles using the Agilent rabbit one-way gene chip. The groups were then compared. Immediately after negative pressure suction induction, 704 genes were differentially expressed. Among these, 485 genes were upregulated, and 219 were downregulated. Expression of the genes encoding CRYAA, CRYAB, and TLR3 genes, which are involved in apoptosis, was elevated. The KRT18 gene, which is involved in apoptosis, had reduced expression. Seven days after negative pressure suction, 482 genes were differentially expressed. Among these, 178 genes were upregulated, and 304 were downregulated. Expression of the genes encoding CRYAB, IL1-BETA and IL1R1, which are involved in apoptosis, was upregulated. Ten days after negative pressure suction, 402 genes were differentially expressed. Of these, 213 genes were upregulated, and 189 were downregulated. Apoptosis genes CRYAB, CRYBA3, CRYBB2, IL1- BETA, and IL1R1 showed higher expression levels. We concluded that negative pressure suction for long periods of time (for example, 3 min) results in changes in gene expression. Genes with higher fold changes help protect retinal ganglion cells from apoptosis. We suggest that promoting the expression of these genes should be considered as a new means for treating ischemic-hypoxic retinopathy. PMID:22653643

  12. PR gene families of citrus: their organ specific-biotic and abiotic inducible expression profiles based on ESTs approach

    OpenAIRE

    Magnólia A. Campos; Daniel D. Rosa; Juliana Érika C. Teixeira; Maria Luisa P.N. Targon; De Souza, Alessandra A.; Paiva, Luciano V.; Dagmar R. Stach-Machado; Machado, Marcos A

    2007-01-01

    In silico expression profiles, of the discovered 3,103 citrus ESTs putatively encoding for PR protein families (PR-1 to PR-17), were evaluated using the Brazil citrus genome EST CitEST/database. Hierarchical clustering was displayed to identify similarities in expression patterns among citrus PR-like gene families (PRlgf) in 33 selected cDNA libraries. In this way, PRlgf preferentially expressed by organ and citrus species, and library conditions were highlighted. Changes in expression profil...

  13. A Breast Tissue Protein Expression Profile Contributing to Early Parity-Induced Protection Against Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Marie Gutierrez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Early parity reduces breast cancer risk, whereas, late parity and nulliparity increase breast cancer risk. Despite substantial efforts to understand the protective effects of early parity, the precise molecular circuitry responsible for these changes is not yet fully defined. Methods: Here, we have conducted the first study assessing protein expression profiles in normal breast tissue of healthy early parous, late parous, and nulliparous women. Breast tissue biopsies were obtained from 132 healthy parous and nulliparous volunteers. These samples were subjected to global protein expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. GeneSpring and MetaCore bioinformatics analysis software were used to identify protein expression profiles associated with early parity (low risk versus late/nulliparity (high risk. Results: Early parity reduces expression of key proteins involved in mitogenic signaling pathways in breast tissue through down regulation of EGFR1/3, ESR1, AKT1, ATF, Fos, and SRC. Early parity is also characterized by greater genomic stability and reduced tissue inflammation based on differential expression of aurora kinases, p53, RAD52, BRCA1, MAPKAPK-2, ATF-1, ICAM1, and NF-kappaB compared to late and nulli parity. Conclusions: Early parity reduces basal cell proliferation in breast tissue, which translates to enhanced genomic stability, reduced cellular stress/inflammation, and thus reduced breast cancer risk.

  14. Difference of Gene Expression Profiles between Barrett's Esophagus and Cardia Intestinal Metaplasia by Gene Chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Ying; LIU Bin

    2006-01-01

    The difference of gene expression profile changes in Barrettes esophagus (BE) and cardia intestinal metaplasia (CIM) epithelium was studied and the novel associated genes were screened in the early stage by cDNA microarray. The cDNA retro-transcribed from equal quantity mRNA from BE and CIM epithelial tissues were labeled with Cy3 and Cy5 fluorescence as probes. The mixed probe was hybridized with three pieces BiostarH-40s double dot human whole gene chip. The chips were scanned with a ScanArray 4000. The acquired images were analyzed using GenePix Pro 3.0 software. It was found a total of 141 genes were screened out that exhibited differentially expression more than 2 times in all three chips. It was identified that in gene expression profiles of BE, 74 genes were up-regulated and 67 down-regulated as compared with CIM. The comparison between the difference of gene expression profile changes in BE and CIM epithelia revealed that there existed the difference between BE and CIM at gene level. 141 genes with the expression more than two time were probably related to the occurrence and development of BE and the promotion or progress in adenocarcinoma.

  15. Gene expression profiles at different stages of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Zhou; Li-Qun Zhao; Mo-Miao Xiong; Xiu-Qin Wang; Guan-Rui Yang; Zong-Liang Qiu; Min Wu; Zhi-Hua Liu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the gene expression profiles in differentstages of carcinogenesis of esophageal epithelium.METHODS: A microarray containing 588 cancer relatedgenes was employed to study the gene expression profileat different stages of esophageal squamous cell carcinomaincluding basal cell hyperplasia, high-grade dysplasia,carcinoma in situ, early and late cancer. Principle componentanalysis was performed to search the genes which wereimportant in carcinogenesis.RESULTS: More than 100 genes were up or down regulatedin esophageal epithelial cells during the stages of basal cellhyperplasia, high-grade dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, earlyand late cancer. Principle component analysis identified aset of genes which may play important roles in the tumordevelopment. Comparison of expression profiles betweenthese stages showed that some genes, such as P160ROCK,JNK2, were activated and may play an important role inearly stages of carcinogenesis. CONCLUSION: These findings provided an esophagealcancer-specific and stage-specific expression profiles,showing that complex alterations of gene expression underliethe development of malignant phenotype of esophagealcancer cells.

  16. Signaling pathway-focused gene expression profiling in pressure overloaded hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Musumeci

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The β-blocker propranolol displays antihypertrophic and antifibrotic properties in the heart subjected to pressure overload. Yet the underlying mechanisms responsible for these important effects remain to be completely understood. The purpose of this study was to determine signaling pathway-focused gene expression profile associated with the antihypertrophic action of propranolol in pressure overloaded hearts. To address this question, a focused real-time PCR array was used to screen left ventricular RNA expression of 84 gene transcripts representative of 18 different signaling pathways in C57BL/6 mice subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC or sham surgery. On the surgery day, mice received either propranolol (80 mg/kg/day or vehicle for 14 days. TAC caused a 49% increase in the left ventricular weight-to-body weight (LVW/BW ratio without changing gene expression. Propranolol blunted LVW/BW ratio increase by approximately 50% while causing about a 3-fold increase in the expression of two genes, namely Brca1 and Cdkn2a, belonging to the TGF-beta and estrogen pathways, respectively. In conclusion, after 2 weeks of pressure overload, TAC hearts show a gene expression profile superimposable to that of sham hearts. Conversely, propranolol treatment is associated with an increased expression of genes which negatively regulate cell cycle progression. It remains to be established whether a mechanistic link between gene expression changes and the antihypertrophic action of propranolol occurs.

  17. Fibroblast and lymphoblast gene expression profiles in schizophrenia: are non-neural cells informative?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Matigian

    Full Text Available Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs and fibroblasts provide conveniently derived non-neuronal samples in which to investigate the aetiology of schizophrenia (SZ using gene expression profiling. This assumes that heritable mechanisms associated with risk of SZ have systemic effects and result in changes to gene expression in all tissues. The broad aim of this and other similar studies is that comparison of the transcriptomes of non-neuronal tissues from SZ patients and healthy controls may identify gene/pathway dysregulation underpinning the neurobiological defects associated with SZ. Using microarrays consisting of 18,664 probes we compared gene expression profiles of LCLs from SZ cases and healthy controls. To identify robust associations with SZ that were not patient or tissue specific, we also examined fibroblasts from an independent series of SZ cases and controls using the same microarrays. In both tissue types ANOVA analysis returned approximately the number of differentially expressed genes expected by chance. No genes were significantly differentially expressed in either tissue when corrected for multiple testing. Even using relaxed parameters (p or = 2-fold change between the groups of SZ cases and controls common to both LCLs and fibroblasts. We conclude that despite encouraging data from previous microarray studies assessing non-neural tissues, the lack of a convergent set of differentially expressed genes associated with SZ using fibroblasts and LCLs indicates the utility of non-neuronal tissues for detection of gene expression differences and/or pathways associated with SZ remains to be demonstrated.

  18. Candidate EDA targets revealed by expression profiling of primary keratinocytes from Tabby mutant mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esibizione, Diana; Cui, Chang-Yi; Schlessinger, David

    2009-01-01

    EDA, the gene mutated in anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, encodes ectodysplasin, a TNF superfamily member that activates NF-kB mediated transcription. To identify EDA target genes, we have earlier used expression profiling to infer genes differentially expressed at various developmental time points in Tabby (Eda-deficient) compared to wild-type mouse skin. To increase the resolution to find genes whose expression may be restricted to epidermal cells, we have now extended studies to primary keratinocyte cultures established from E19 wild-type and Tabby skin. Using microarrays bearing 44,000 gene probes, we found 385 preliminary candidate genes whose expression was significantly affected by Eda loss. By comparing expression profiles to those from Eda-A1 transgenic skin, we restricted the list to 38 “candidate EDA targets”, 14 of which were already known to be expressed in hair follicles or epidermis. We confirmed expression changes for 3 selected genes, Tbx1, Bmp7, and Jag1, both in keratinocytes and in whole skin, by Q-PCR and Western blotting analyses. Thus, by the analysis of keratinocytes, novel candidate pathways downstream of EDA were detected. PMID:18848976

  19. Monitoring the Expression Profiles of Cereal Crops Seedlings by Using Rice cDNA Microarray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Liang-xian; DONG Hai-tao; LI De-bao

    2004-01-01

    Through exploiting the high homology of cereal crop genes, membranous cDNA microarrays containing 3 311 unique rice transcripts (including 1 639 endosperm-derived transcripts and 1 672 mature stem-derived transcripts) were used for monitoring the expression profiles of 1-leaf stage seedlings of 4 cereal crop species: rice, maize, sorghum and barley. After hybridizing with [α-33p] labeled probes, 73.6 % of the arrayed genes generated reliable signals in all of the four cereal crops. Further analysis revealed that among the arrayed genes, a higher percentage of the endosperm-derived transcripts (86.6 %) expressed than that of the mature stem-derived genes (60.9 %), indicating that most of the endosperm expressed genes functioned in young seedlings while considerable amount of mature stem tissue expressed genes did not express. These results also inferred that some genes might function only at certain developmental stages. By comparing the obtained profiles, 84 genes were identified constantly expressed in all the four cereal crops. Many housekeeping genes, such as polyubiquitin, ubiquitin conjugating enzyme and ribosomal proteins were included in this catalogue. The experiment also identified 14 rice seedling specifically expressed genes, including 3 biotic and abiotic stress induced genes and 1 apoptosis suppressor encoding gene Bax inhibitor-1. This investigation provided invaluable information for comparative genomics of gramineae members.

  20. Microenvironment alters epigenetic and gene expression profiles in Swarm rat chondrosarcoma tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant cartilage tumors that do not respond to traditional chemotherapy or radiation. The 5-year survival rate of histologic grade III chondrosarcoma is less than 30%. An animal model of chondrosarcoma has been established - namely, the Swarm Rat Chondrosarcoma (SRC) - and shown to resemble the human disease. Previous studies with this model revealed that tumor microenvironment could significantly influence chondrosarcoma malignancy. To examine the effect of the microenvironment, SRC tumors were initiated at different transplantation sites. Pyrosequencing assays were utilized to assess the DNA methylation of the tumors, and SAGE libraries were constructed and sequenced to determine the gene expression profiles of the tumors. Based on the gene expression analysis, subsequent functional assays were designed to determine the relevancy of the specific genes in the development and progression of the SRC. The site of transplantation had a significant impact on the epigenetic and gene expression profiles of SRC tumors. Our analyses revealed that SRC tumors were hypomethylated compared to control tissue, and that tumors at each transplantation site had a unique expression profile. Subsequent functional analysis of differentially expressed genes, albeit preliminary, provided some insight into the role that thymosin-β4, c-fos, and CTGF may play in chondrosarcoma development and progression. This report describes the first global molecular characterization of the SRC model, and it demonstrates that the tumor microenvironment can induce epigenetic alterations and changes in gene expression in the SRC tumors. We documented changes in gene expression that accompany changes in tumor phenotype, and these gene expression changes provide insight into the pathways that may play a role in the development and progression of chondrosarcoma. Furthermore, specific functional analysis indicates that thymosin-β4 may have a role in chondrosarcoma metastasis

  1. The expression of chemokine MCP-1 in colorectal carcinoma and its relationship to the infiltration of macrophage%结直肠癌趋化因子MCP-1的表达及其与巨噬细胞浸润的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨春康; 陈道达; 黄凯

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the expression of MCP-1 in colorectal carcinoma and its relationship to the infiltration of the macrophage and to the biological behaviour of infiltration and metastasis of colorectal carcinoma.Methods: The expression of the MCP-1 mRNAwas assessed in colorectal carcinoma collected freshly from surgical specimen by RT-PCR and the expression of the MCP-1 protein was assessed in colorectal carcinoma collected from surgical specimen by immunohistochemistry.The tumor infiltrating cell and macrophage were also investigated by immunohistochemistry.Results: All the 12 specimens of colorectal carcinoma detected by RT-PCR expressed the MCP-1 mRNA; MCP-1 protein was detected in 90% (36/40) cases of the tumor; The expression of the MCP-1 protein in colorectal carcinoma correlated negatively with its state of metastasis and the Dukes' stage.But a postive correlation was found between the expression of MCP-1 and the infiltrated macrophage.The stronger expression of MCP-1,the more number of the infiltrated macrophage.Conclusion: The expression of chemokine MCP-1 in colorectal carcinoma may influence its biological behaviour of infiltration and metastasis,and can attract the immuno-cell to the local of the tumor,such as Macrophage.

  2. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) mutation analysis, gene expression profiling and EGFR protein expression in primary prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activating mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) confer sensitivity to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKi), gefitinib and erlotinib. We analysed EGFR expression, EGFR mutation status and gene expression profiles of prostate cancer (PC) to supply a rationale for EGFR targeted therapies in this disease. Mutational analysis of EGFR TK domain (exons from 18 to 21) and immunohistochemistry for EGFR were performed on tumour tissues derived from radical prostatectomy from 100 PC patients. Gene expression profiling using oligo-microarrays was also carried out in 51 of the PC samples. EGFR protein overexpression (EGFRhigh) was found in 36% of the tumour samples, and mutations were found in 13% of samples. Patients with EGFRhigh tumours experienced a significantly increased risk of biochemical relapse (hazard ratio-HR 2.52, p=0.02) compared with patients with tumours expressing low levels of EGFR (EGFRlow). Microarray analysis did not reveal any differences in gene expression between EGFRhigh and EGFRlow tumours. Conversely, in EGFRhigh tumours, we were able to identify a 79 gene signature distinguishing mutated from non-mutated tumours. Additionally, 29 genes were found to be differentially expressed between mutated/EGFRhigh (n=3) and mutated/EGFRlow tumours (n=5). Four of the down-regulated genes, U19/EAF2, ABCC4, KLK3 and ANXA3 and one of the up-regulated genes, FOXC1, are involved in PC progression. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that accurate definition of the EGFR status could improve prognostic stratification and we suggest a possible role for EGFR-directed therapies in PC patients. Having been generated in a relatively small sample of patients, our results warrant confirmation in larger series

  3. Gene expression profile of glioblastoma peritumoral tissue: an ex vivo study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annunziato Mangiola

    Full Text Available The gene expression pattern of glioblastoma (GBM is well documented but the expression profile of brain adjacent to tumor is not yet analysed. This may help to understand the oncogenic pathway of GBM development. We have established the genome-wide expression profiles of samples isolated from GBM tumor mass, white matter adjacent to tumor (apparently free of tumor cells, and white matter controls by using the Affymetrix HG-U133 arrays. Array-CGH (aCGH was also performed to detect genomic alterations. Among genes dysregulated in peritumoral white matter, 15 were over-expressed, while 42 were down-regulated when compared to white matter controls. A similar expression profile was detected in GBM cells. Growth, proliferation and cell motility/adhesion-associated genes were up-regulated while genes involved in neurogenesis were down-regulated. Furthermore, several tumor suppressor genes along with the KLRC1 (a member of natural killer receptor were also down-regulated in the peritumoral brain tissue. Several mosaic genomic lesions were detected by aCGH, mostly in tumor samples and several GBM-associated mosaic genomic lesions were also present in the peritumoral brain tissue, with a similar mosaicism pattern. Our data could be explained by a dilution of genes expressed from tumor cells infiltrating the peritumour tissue. Alternatively, these findings could be substained by a relevant amount of "apparently normal" cells presenting a gene profile compatible with a precancerous state or even "quiescent" cancer cells. Otherwise, the recurrent tumor may arise from both infiltrating tumor cells and from an interaction and recruitment of apparently normal cells in the peritumor tissue by infiltrating tumor cells.

  4. Integrated pathway-based transcription regulation network mining and visualization based on gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibinge, Nelson; Ono, Naoaki; Horie, Masafumi; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Saito, Akira; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2016-06-01

    Conventionally, workflows examining transcription regulation networks from gene expression data involve distinct analytical steps. There is a need for pipelines that unify data mining and inference deduction into a singular framework to enhance interpretation and hypotheses generation. We propose a workflow that merges network construction with gene expression data mining focusing on regulation processes in the context of transcription factor driven gene regulation. The pipeline implements pathway-based modularization of expression profiles into functional units to improve biological interpretation. The integrated workflow was implemented as a web application software (TransReguloNet) with functions that enable pathway visualization and comparison of transcription factor activity between sample conditions defined in the experimental design. The pipeline merges differential expression, network construction, pathway-based abstraction, clustering and visualization. The framework was applied in analysis of actual expression datasets related to lung, breast and prostrate cancer. PMID:27064123

  5. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on genomic expression profiling of porcine parthenogenetic activated and cloned embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Lin; Luo, Yonglun; Sørensen, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    mechanism underlying the effects of HHP treatment on embryonic development is poorly understood and so was investigated in the present study. Thus, in the present study, we undertook genome-wide gene expression analysis in HHP-treated and untreated oocytes, as well as in 4-cell and blastocyst stage embryos...... derived by PA or HMC. Hierarchical clustering depicted stage-specific genomic expression profiling. At the 4-cell and blastocyst stages, 103 and 163 transcripts were differentially expressed between the HMC and PA embryos, respectively (P < 0.05). These transcripts are predominantly involved in regulating...... cellular differentiation, gene expression and cell-to-cell signalling. We found that 44 transcripts were altered by HHP treatment, with most exhibiting lower expression in HHP-treated oocytes. Genes involved in embryonic development were prominent among the transcripts affected by HHP. Two of these genes...

  6. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in mucosal homeostasis at the intestinal epithelial barrier in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Noah P Zimmerman; Vongsa, Rebecca A.; Wendt, Michael K; Michael B Dwinell

    2008-01-01

    Chemokines, a large family of small chemoattractive cytokines, and their receptors play an integral role in the regulation of the immune response and homeostasis. The ability of chemokines to attract specific populations of immune cells sets them apart from other chemoattractants. Chemokines produced within the gastrointestinal mucosa, are critical players in directing the balance between physiological and pathophysiological inflammation in health, inflammatory bowel disease and the progressi...

  7. Global gene expression profiles of canine macrophages and canine mammary cancer cells grown as a co-culture in vitro

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    Król Magdalena

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solid tumours comprise various cells, including cancer cells, resident stromal cells, migratory haemopoietic cells and other. These cells regulate tumour growth and metastasis. Macrophages constitute probably the most important element of all interactions within the tumour microenvironment. However, the molecular mechanism, that guides tumour environment, still remains unknown. Exploring the underlying molecular mechanisms that orchestrate these phenomena has been the aim of our study. A co-culture of canine mammary cancer cells and macrophages was established and maintained for 72 hrs. Having sorted the cells, gene expression in cancer cells and macrophages, using DNA microarrays, was examined. The results were confirmed using real-time qPCR and confocal microscopy. Moreover, their ability for migration and invasion has been assessed. Results Microarray analysis showed that the up-regulated genes in the cancer cell lines are involved in 15 highly over-manifested pathways. The pathways that drew our diligent attention included: the inflammation pathway mediated by chemokine and cytokine, the Toll receptor signalling pathway and the B cell activation. The up-regulated genes in the macrophages were involved in only 18 significantly over-manifested pathways: the angiogenesis, the p53 pathway feedback loops2 and the Wnt signalling pathway. The microarray analysis revealed that co-culturing of cancer cells with macrophages initiated the myeloid-specific antigen expression in cancer cells, as well as cytokine/chemokine genes expression. This finding was confirmed at mRNA and protein level. Moreover, we showed that macrophages increase cancer migration and invasion. Conclusions The presence of macrophages in the cancer environment induces acquisition of the macrophage phenotype (specific antigens and chemokines/cytokines expression in cancer cells. We presumed that cancer cells also acquire other myeloid features, such as

  8. MicroRNA expression profiling of the porcine developing hypothalamus and pituitary tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lifan; Cai, Zhaowei; Wei, Shengjuan; Zhou, Huiyun; Zhou, Hongmei; Jiang, Xiaoling; Xu, Ningying

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNA molecules, play important roles in gene expressions at transcriptional and post-transcriptional stages in mammalian brain. So far, a growing number of porcine miRNAs and their function have been identified, but little is known regarding the porcine developing hypothalamus and pituitary. In the present study, Solexa sequencing analysis showed 14,129,397 yielded reads, 6,680,678 of which were related to 674 unique miRNAs. After a microarray assay, we detected 175 unique miRNAs in the hypothalamus, including 136 previously known miRNAs and 39 novel candidates, while a total of 140 miRNAs, including 104 known and 36 new candidate miRNAs, were discovered in pituitary. More importantly, 37 and 30 differentially expressed miRNAs from several developmental stages of hypothalamus and pituitary were revealed, respectively. The 37 differentially expressed miRNAs in hypothalamus represented 6 different expression patterns, while the 30 differentially expressed miRNAs in pituitary represented 7 different expression patterns. To clarify potential target genes and specific functions of these differentially expressed miRNAs in hypothalamus and pituitary, TargetScan and Gorilla prediction tools were then applied. The current functional analysis showed that the differentially expressed miRNAs in hypothalamus and pituitary shared many biological processes, with the main differences being found in tissue-specific processes including: CDP-diacylglycerol biosynthetic/metabolic process; phosphatidic acid biosynthetic/metabolic process; energy reserve metabolic process for hypothalamus; adult behavior; sterol transport/homeostasis; and cholesterol/reverse cholesterol transport for pituitary. Overall, this study identified miRNA profiles and differentially expressed miRNAs among various developmental stages in hypothalamus and pituitary and indicated miRNA profiles change with age and brain location, enhancing our knowledge about spatial

  9. MicroRNA Expression Profiling of the Porcine Developing Hypothalamus and Pituitary Tissue

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    Xiaoling Jiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs, a class of small non-coding RNA molecules, play important roles in gene expressions at transcriptional and post-transcriptional stages in mammalian brain. So far, a growing number of porcine miRNAs and their function have been identified, but little is known regarding the porcine developing hypothalamus and pituitary. In the present study, Solexa sequencing analysis showed 14,129,397 yielded reads, 6,680,678 of which were related to 674 unique miRNAs. After a microarray assay, we detected 175 unique miRNAs in the hypothalamus, including 136 previously known miRNAs and 39 novel candidates, while a total of 140 miRNAs, including 104 known and 36 new candidate miRNAs, were discovered in pituitary. More importantly, 37 and 30 differentially expressed miRNAs from several developmental stages of hypothalamus and pituitary were revealed, respectively. The 37 differentially expressed miRNAs in hypothalamus represented 6 different expression patterns, while the 30 differentially expressed miRNAs in pituitary represented 7 different expression patterns. To clarify potential target genes and specific functions of these differentially expressed miRNAs in hypothalamus and pituitary, TargetScan and Gorilla prediction tools were then applied. The current functional analysis showed that the differentially expressed miRNAs in hypothalamus and pituitary shared many biological processes, with the main differences being found in tissue-specific processes including: CDP-diacylglycerol biosynthetic/metabolic process; phosphatidic acid biosynthetic/metabolic process; energy reserve metabolic process for hypothalamus; adult behavior; sterol transport/homeostasis; and cholesterol/reverse cholesterol transport for pituitary. Overall, this study identified miRNA profiles and differentially expressed miRNAs among various developmental stages in hypothalamus and pituitary and indicated miRNA profiles change with age and brain location, enhancing our

  10. Transcriptomic profiles of peripheral white blood cells in type II diabetes and racial differences in expression profiles

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    Mao Jinghe

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Along with obesity, physical inactivity, and family history of metabolic disorders, African American ethnicity is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D in the United States. However, little is known about the differences in gene expression and transcriptomic profiles of blood in T2D between African Americans (AA and Caucasians (CAU, and microarray analysis of peripheral white blood cells (WBCs from these two ethnic groups will facilitate our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanism in T2D and identify genetic biomarkers responsible for the disparities. Results A whole human genome oligomicroarray of peripheral WBCs was performed on 144 samples obtained from 84 patients with T2D (44 AA and 40 CAU and 60 healthy controls (28 AA and 32 CAU. The results showed that 30 genes had significant difference in expression between patients and controls (a fold change of 1.4 with a P value Conclusions These newly identified genetic markers in WBCs provide valuable information about the pathophysiology of T2D and can be used for diagnosis and pharmaceutical drug design. Our results also found that AA and CAU patients with T2D express genes and pathways differently.

  11. Mining Gene Expression Profiles: An Integrated Implementation of Kernel Principal Component Analysis and Singular Value Decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ferran Reverter; Esteban Vegas; Pedro Sánchez

    2010-01-01

    The detection of genes that show similar profiles under different experimental conditions is often an initial step in inferring the biological significance of such genes.Visualization tools are used to identify genes with similar profiles in microarray studies.Given the large number of genes recorded in microarray experiments,gene expression data are generally displayed on a low dimensional plot,based on linear methods.However,microarray data show nonlinearity,due to high-order terms of interaction between genes,so alternative approaches,such as kernel methods,may be more appropriate.We introduce a technique that combines kernel principal component analysis(KPCA)and Biplot to visualize gene expression profiles.Our approach relies on the singular value decomposition of the input matrix and incorporates an additional step that involves KPCA.The main properties of our method are the extraction of nonlinear features and the preservation of the input variables(genes)in the output display.We apply this algorithm to colon tumor,leukemia and lymphoma datasets.Our approach reveals the underlying structure of the gene expression profiles and provides a more intuitive understanding of the gene and sample association.

  12. Genetic profiles of gastroesophageal cancer: combined analysis using expression array and tiling array--comparative genomic hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Mats; Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Ohlsson, Mattias; Francis, Princy; Staaf, Johan; Jönsson, Mats; Borg, Ake; Nilbert, Mef

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the genomic profiles of adenocarcinomas in the gastroesophageal junction in relation to cancers in the esophagus and the stomach. Profiles of gains/losses as well as gene expression profiles were obtained from 27 gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas by means of 32k high-resol...

  13. Global gene expression profiling of the asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strain 83972 in the human urinary tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Klemm, Per

    2006-01-01

    seen between the in vivo expression profiles of strain 83972 in three patients and the corresponding in vitro expression profiles in lab medium and human urine. The data revealed an in vivo lifestyle of microaerobic growth with respiration of nitrate coupled to degradation of sugar acids and amino...

  14. Genome-wide identification and developmental expression profiling of long noncoding RNAs during Drosophila metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Xia; Jia, Shili; Chen, Shuang; Kang, Le

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered with the recent advances in RNA-sequencing technologies. lncRNAs play key roles across diverse biological processes, and are involved in developmental regulation. However, knowledge about how the genome-wide expression of lncRNAs is developmentally regulated is still limited. We here performed a whole-genome identification of lncRNAs followed by a global expression profiling of these lncRNAs during development in Drosophila melanogaster. We combined bioinformatic prediction of lncRNAs with stringent filtering of protein-coding transcripts and experimental validation to define a high-confidence set of Drosophila lncRNAs. We identified 1,077 lncRNAs in the given transcriptomes that contain 43,967 transcripts; among these, 646 lncRNAs are novel. In vivo expression profiling of these lncRNAs in 27 developmental processes revealed that the expression of lncRNAs is highly temporally restricted relative to that of protein-coding genes. Remarkably, 21% and 42% lncRNAs were significantly upregulated at late embryonic and larval stage, the critical time for developmental transition. The results highlight the developmental specificity of lncRNA expression, and reflect the regulatory significance of a large subclass of lncRNAs for the onset of metamorphosis. The systematic annotation and expression analysis of lncRNAs during Drosophila development form the foundation for future functional exploration. PMID:26996731

  15. Differential gene expression profile in pig adipose tissue treated with/without clenbuterol

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    Deng Xue M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clenbuterol, a beta-agonist, can dramatically reduce pig adipose accumulation at high dosages. However, it has been banned in pig production because people who eat pig products treated with clenbuterol can be poisoned by the clenbuterol residues. To understand the molecular mechanism for this fat reduction, cDNA microarray, real-time PCR, two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectra were used to study the differential gene expression profiles of pig adipose tissues treated with/without clenbuterol. The objective of this research is to identify novel genes and physiological pathways that potentially facilitate clenbuterol induced reduction of adipose accumulation. Results Clenbuterol was found to improve the lean meat percentage about 10 percent (P Conclusion Pig fat accumulation was reduced dramatically with clenbuterol treatment. Histological sections and global evaluation of gene expression after administration of clenbuterol in pigs identified profound changes in adipose cells. With clenbuterol stimulation, adipose cell volumes decreased and their gene expression profile changed, which indicate some metabolism processes have been also altered. Although the biological functions of the differentially expressed genes are not completely known, higher expressions of these molecules in adipose tissue might contribute to the reduction of fat accumulation. Among these genes, five lipid metabolism related genes were of special interest for further study, including apoD and apoR. The apoR expression was increased at both the RNA and protein levels. The apoR may be one of the critical molecules through which clenbuterol reduces fat accumulation.

  16. Expression profiles of sugarcane under drought conditions: Variation in gene regulation

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    Júlio César Farias de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDrought is a major factor in decreased sugarcane productivity because of the resulting morphophysiological effects that it causes. Gene expression studies that have examined the influence of water stress in sugarcane have yielded divergent results, indicating the absence of a fixed pattern of changes in gene expression. In this work, we investigated the expression profiles of 12 genes in the leaves of a drought-tolerant genotype (RB72910 of sugarcane and compared the results with those of other studies. The genotype was subjected to 80–100% water availability (control condition and 0–20% water availability (simulated drought. To analyze the physiological status, the SPAD index, Fv/Fm ratio, net photosynthesis (A, stomatal conductance (gs and stomatal transpiration (E were measured. Total RNA was extracted from leaves and the expression of SAMDC, ZmPIP2-1 protein, ZmTIP4-2 protein, WIP protein, LTP protein, histone H3, DNAj, ferredoxin I, β-tubulin, photosystem I, gene 1 and gene 2 was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR. Important differences in the expression profiles of these genes were observed when compared with other genotypes, suggesting that complex defense mechanisms are activated in response to water stress. However, there was no recognizable pattern for the changes in expression of the different proteins associated with tolerance to drought stress.

  17. Gene expression and epigenetic profiles of mammary gland tissue: insight into the differential predisposition of four rat strains to mammary gland cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzhna, Lidia; Kutanzi, Kristy; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2015-02-01

    Rats are excellent experimental models for studying breast cancer, but rat strains differ in susceptibility. Among the four strains used in this study, Fischer rats are less susceptible to spontaneous breast cancer, yet they are highly prone to extremely severe metastatic and drug-resistant tumors, in those case where they actually develop the disease. In contrast, Sprague Dawley rats are the most susceptible to spontaneous breast cancer among the strains. ACI rats are highly prone to estrogen-induced cancer. Long-Evans rats are commonly used in mammary gland carcinogenesis studies. The molecular mechanisms of differential breast cancer susceptibility among rat strains are not well understood. Here, gene expression analysis was conducted in the mammary gland tissue of four rat strains--August × Copenhagen Irish (ACI), Long Evans, Fischer-344 and Sprague Dawley--to evaluate possible explanations for the differing breast cancer predispositions. According to the DAVID functional annotation analysis, there were at least eleven, five, and one significantly different pathways, respectively, in Fischer-344, Long-Evans and Sprague Dawley rats, in comparison to ACI rats. Two strains, Fischer-344 and Long-Evans, displayed differential expression in the complement and coagulation cascades, chemokine signaling, PPAR signaling, renin-angiotensin system, ECM-receptor interaction, focal adhesion and glutathione metabolism pathways. The only pathway that was significantly different between the Sprague Dawley and the ACI rats was the ribosome pathway. Our data indicate that general cancer susceptibility and predisposition to the development of aggressive and metastatic cancer are independent genetic conditions. Moreover, we have identified several important differences in the basal epigenetic profile of four rat strains with varying degrees of susceptibility to spontaneous and induced mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:25813725

  18. Gene expression profiling in a mouse model of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis reveals upregulation of immediate early genes and mediators of the inflammatory response

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    Hofmann Sandra L

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The infantile form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (also known as infantile Batten disease is caused by hereditary deficiency of a lysosomal enzyme, palmitoyl-protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1, and is characterized by severe cortical degeneration with blindness and cognitive and motor dysfunction. The PPT1-deficient knockout mouse recapitulates the key features of the disorder, including seizures and death by 7–9 months of age. In the current study, we compared gene expression profiles of whole brain from PPT1 knockout and normal mice at 3, 5 and 8 months of age to identify temporal changes in molecular pathways implicated in disease pathogenesis. Results A total of 267 genes were significantly (approximately 2-fold up- or downregulated over the course of the disease. Immediate early genes (Arc, Cyr61, c-fos, jun-b, btg2, NR4A1 were among the first genes upregulated during the presymptomatic period whereas immune response genes dominated at later time points. Chemokine ligands and protease inhibitors were among the most transcriptionally responsive genes. Neuronal survival factors (IGF-1 and CNTF and a negative regulator of neuronal apoptosis (DAP kinase-1 were upregulated late in the course of the disease. Few genes were downregulated; these included the α2 subunit of the GABA-A receptor, a component of cortical and hippocampal neurons, and Hes5, a transcription factor important in neuronal differentiation. Conclusion A molecular description of gene expression changes occurring in the brain throughout the course of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis suggests distinct phases of disease progression, provides clues to potential markers of disease activity, and points to new targets for therapy.

  19. Dynamic expression profiles from static cytometry data: component fitting and conversion to relative, "same scale" values.

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    Jayant Avva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cytometry of asynchronous proliferating cell populations produces data with an extractable time-based feature embedded in the frequency of clustered, correlated events. Here, we present a specific case of general methodology for calculating dynamic expression profiles of epitopes that oscillate during the cell cycle and conversion of these values to the same scale. METHODS: Samples of K562 cells from one population were labeled by direct and indirect antibody methods for cyclins A2 and B1 and phospho-S10-histone H3. The same indirect antibody was used for both cyclins. Directly stained samples were counter-stained with 4'6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and indirectly stained samples with propidium to label DNA. The S phase cyclin expressions from indirect assays were used to scale the expression of the cyclins of the multi-variate direct assay. Boolean gating and two dimensional, sequential regions set on bivariate displays of the directly conjugated sample data were used to untangle and isolate unique, unambiguous expression values of the cyclins along the four-dimensional data path through the cell cycle. The median values of cyclins A2 and B1 from each region were correlated with the frequency of events within each region. RESULTS: The sequential runs of data were plotted as continuous multi-line linear equations of the form y = [(y(i+1-y(i/(x(i+1-x(i]x + y(i-[(y(i+1-y(i/(x(i+1-x(i]x(i (line between points (x(i,y(i and (x(i+1, y(i+1 to capture the dynamic expression profile of the two cyclins. CONCLUSIONS: This specific approach demonstrates the general methodology and provides a rule set from which the cell cycle expression of any other epitopes could be measured and calculated. These expression profiles are the "state variable" outputs, useful for calibrating mathematical cell cycle models.

  20. Clustering of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transcriptomes from planktonic cultures, developing and mature biofilms reveals distinct expression profiles

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    Saqi Mansoor

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a genetically complex bacterium which can adopt and switch between a free-living or biofilm lifestyle, a versatility that enables it to thrive in many different environments and contributes to its success as a human pathogen. Results Transcriptomes derived from growth states relevant to the lifestyle of P. aeruginosa were clustered using three different methods (K-means, K-means spectral and hierarchical clustering. The culture conditions used for this study were; biofilms incubated for 8, 14, 24 and 48 hrs, and planktonic culture (logarithmic and stationary phase. This cluster analysis revealed the existence and provided a clear illustration of distinct expression profiles present in the dataset. Moreover, it gave an insight into which genes are up-regulated in planktonic, developing biofilm and confluent biofilm states. In addition, this analysis confirmed the contribution of quorum sensing (QS and RpoS regulated genes to the biofilm mode of growth, and enabled the identification of a 60.69 Kbp region of the genome associated with stationary phase growth (stationary phase planktonic culture and confluent biofilms. Conclusion This is the first study to use clustering to separate a large P. aeruginosa microarray dataset consisting of transcriptomes obtained from diverse conditions relevant to its growth, into different expression profiles. These distinct expression profiles not only reveal novel aspects of P. aeruginosa gene expression but also provide a growth specific transcriptomic reference dataset for the research community.

  1. Global gene expression profiling of individual human oocytes and embryos demonstrates heterogeneity in early development.

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    Lisa Shaw

    Full Text Available Early development in humans is characterised by low and variable embryonic viability, reflected in low fecundity and high rates of miscarriage, relative to other mammals. Data from assisted reproduction programmes provides additional evidence that this is largely mediated at the level of embryonic competence and is highly heterogeneous among embryos. Understanding the basis of this heterogeneity has important implications in a number of areas including: the regulation of early human development, disorders of pregnancy, assisted reproduction programmes, the long term health of children which may be programmed in early development, and the molecular basis of pluripotency in human stem cell populations. We have therefore investigated global gene expression profiles using polyAPCR amplification and microarray technology applied to individual human oocytes and 4-cell and blastocyst stage embryos. In order to explore the basis of any variability in detail, each developmental stage is replicated in triplicate. Our data show that although transcript profiles are highly stage-specific, within each stage they are relatively variable. We describe expression of a number of gene families and pathways including apoptosis, cell cycle and amino acid metabolism, which are variably expressed and may be reflective of embryonic developmental competence. Overall, our data suggest that heterogeneity in human embryo developmental competence is reflected in global transcript profiles, and that the vast majority of existing human embryo gene expression data based on pooled oocytes and embryos need to be reinterpreted.

  2. Rapid Identification of Potential Drugs for Diabetic Nephropathy Using Whole-Genome Expression Profiles of Glomeruli

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    Jingsong Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate potential drugs for diabetic nephropathy (DN using whole-genome expression profiles and the Connectivity Map (CMAP. Methodology. Eighteen Chinese Han DN patients and six normal controls were included in this study. Whole-genome expression profiles of microdissected glomeruli were measured using the Affymetrix human U133 plus 2.0 chip. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs between late stage and early stage DN samples and the CMAP database were used to identify potential drugs for DN using bioinformatics methods. Results. (1 A total of 1065 DEGs (FDR 1.5 were found in late stage DN patients compared with early stage DN patients. (2 Piperlongumine, 15d-PGJ2 (15-delta prostaglandin J2, vorinostat, and trichostatin A were predicted to be the most promising potential drugs for DN, acting as NF-κB inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs, PI3K pathway inhibitors, or PPARγ agonists, respectively. Conclusion. Using whole-genome expression profiles and the CMAP database, we rapidly predicted potential DN drugs, and therapeutic potential was confirmed by previously published studies. Animal experiments and clinical trials are needed to confirm both the safety and efficacy of these drugs in the treatment of DN.

  3. Stemness gene expression profile analysis in human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ming-Yao; Pang, Wei; Jiang, Li-Hong; Liu, Yun-Hong; Wei, Chuan-Yu; Xie, Yan-Hua; Yu, Hai-Dong; Hou, Zong-Liu

    2012-06-01

    Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) have several advantages for clinical therapy: the material is easily obtainable, the donation procedure is painless and there is low risk of viral contamination. UC-MSCs play important roles in tissue regeneration, tissue damage repair, autoimmune disease and graft-versus-host disease. In this study, we investigated the normal mRNA expression profile of UC-MSCs, and analyzed the candidate proteins responsible for the signaling pathway that may affect the differentiation characteristics of UC-MSCs. UC-MSCs were isolated by mincing UC samples into fragments and placing them in growth medium in a six-well plate. The immunophenotype characteristics and multilineage differentiation potential of the UC-MSCs were measured by flow cytometry and immunohistochemical assays. In addition, the pathway-focused gene expression profile of UC-MSCs was compared with those of normal or tumorous cells by realtime quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We successfully isolated and cultured UC-MSCs and analyzed the appropriate surface markers and their capacity for osteogenic, adipogenic and neural differentiation. In total, 168 genes focusing on signal pathways were examined. We found that the expression levels of some genes were much higher or lower than those of control cells, either normal or tumorous. UC-MSCs exhibit a unique mRNA expression profile of pathway-focused genes, especially some stemness genes, which warrants further investigation. PMID:22728706

  4. Isolation of specific neurons from C. elegans larvae for gene expression profiling.

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    W Clay Spencer

    Full Text Available The simple and well-described structure of the C. elegans nervous system offers an unprecedented opportunity to identify the genetic programs that define the connectivity and function of individual neurons and their circuits. A correspondingly precise gene expression map of C. elegans neurons would facilitate the application of genetic methods toward this goal. Here we describe a powerful new approach, SeqCeL (RNA-Seq of C. elegans cells for producing gene expression profiles of specific larval C. elegans neurons.We have exploited available GFP reporter lines for FACS isolation of specific larval C. elegans neurons for RNA-Seq analysis. Our analysis showed that diverse classes of neurons are accessible to this approach. To demonstrate the applicability of this strategy to rare neuron types, we generated RNA-Seq profiles of the NSM serotonergic neurons that occur as a single bilateral pair of cells in the C. elegans pharynx. These data detected >1,000 NSM enriched transcripts, including the majority of previously known NSM-expressed genes.This work offers a simple and robust protocol for expression profiling studies of post-embryonic C. elegans neurons and thus provides an important new method for identifying candidate genes for key roles in neuron-specific development and function.

  5. Variability of gene expression profiles in human blood and lymphoblastoid cell lines

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    Taylor Jennifer M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Readily accessible samples such as peripheral blood or cell lines are increasingly being used in large cohorts to characterise gene expression differences between a patient group and healthy controls. However, cell and RNA isolation procedures and the variety of cell types that make up whole blood can affect gene expression measurements. We therefore systematically investigated global gene expression profiles in peripheral blood from six individuals collected during two visits by comparing five of the following cell and RNA isolation methods: whole blood (PAXgene, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, CD19 and CD20 specific B-cell subsets. Results Gene expression measurements were clearly discriminated by isolation method although the reproducibility was high for all methods (range ρ = 0.90-1.00. The PAXgene samples showed a decrease in the number of expressed genes (P -16 with higher variability (P -16 compared to the other methods. Differentially expressed probes between PAXgene and PBMCs were correlated with the number of monocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils or erythrocytes. The correlations (ρ = 0.83; ρ = 0.79 of the expression levels of detected probes between LCLs and B-cell subsets were much lower compared to the two B-cell isolation methods (ρ = 0.98. Gene ontology analysis of detected genes showed that genes involved in inflammatory responses are enriched in B-cells CD19 and CD20 whereas genes involved in alcohol metabolic process and the cell cycle were enriched in LCLs. Conclusion Gene expression profiles in blood-based samples are strongly dependent on the predominant constituent cell type(s and RNA isolation method. It is crucial to understand the differences and variability of gene expression measurements between cell and RNA isolation procedures, and their relevance to disease processes, before application in large clinical studies.

  6. The integrative roles of chemokines at the maternal-fetal interface in early pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mei-Rong; Wang, Song-Cun; Li, Da-Jin

    2014-09-01

    Embryos express paternal antigens that are foreign to the mother, but the mother provides a special immune milieu at the fetal-maternal interface to permit rather than reject the embryo growth in the uterus until parturition by establishing precise crosstalk between the mother and the fetus. There are unanswered questions in the maintenance of pregnancy, including the poorly understood phenomenon of maternal tolerance to the allogeneic conceptus, and the remarkable biological roles of placental trophoblasts that invade the uterine wall. Chemokines are multifunctional molecules initially described as having a role in leukocyte trafficking and later found to participate in developmental processes such as differentiation and directed migration. It is increasingly evident that the gestational uterine microenvironment is characterized, at least in part, by the differential expression and secretion of chemokines that induce selective trafficking of leukocyte subsets to the maternal-fetal interface and regulate multiple events that are closely associated with normal pregnancy. Here, we review the expression and function of chemokines and their receptors at the maternal-fetal interface, with a special focus on chemokine as a key component in trophoblast invasiveness and placental angiogenesis, recruitment and instruction of immune cells so as to form a fetus-supporting milieu during pregnancy. The chemokine network is also involved in pregnancy complications. PMID:25109684

  7. Effects of Simulated Microgravity on the Expression Profile of Microrna in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wu, Honglu; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Rohde, Larry; Story, Michael; Mangala, Lingegowda

    2012-07-01

    EFFECTS OF SIMULATED MICROGRAVITY ON THE EXPRESSION PROFILE OF MICRORNA IN HUMAN LYMPHOBLASTOID CELLS Lingegowda S. Mangala1,2, Ye Zhang1,3, Zhenhua He2, Kamal Emami1, Govindarajan T. Ramesh4, Michael Story 5, Larry H. Rohde2, and Honglu Wu1 1 NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, USA 2 University of Houston Clear Lake, Houston, Texas, USA 3 Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group, Houston, Texas, USA 4 Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA, USA 5 University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA This study explores the changes in expression of microRNA (miRNA) and related genes under simulated microgravity conditions. In comparison to static 1g, microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells or animals. miRNA has recently emerged as an important regulator of gene expression, possibly regulating as many as one-third of all human genes. However, very little is known about the effect of altered gravity on miRNA expression. To test the hypothesis that the miRNA expression profile would be altered in zero gravity resulting in altered regulation of gene expression leading to metabolic or functional changes in cells, we cultured TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells in a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV; bioreactor) for 72 h either in the rotating condition to model microgravity in space or in the static condition as a control. Expression of several miRNA was changed significantly in the simulated microgravity condition including miR-150, miR-34a, miR-423-5p, miR-22 and miR-141, miR-618 and miR-222. To confirm whether this altered miRNA expression correlates with gene expression and functional changes of the cells, we performed DNA microarray and validated the related genes using q-RT PCR. Network and pathway analysis of gene and miRNA expression profiles indicates that the regulation of cell communication and catalytic activities, as well as pathways involved in immune response_IL-15

  8. Expression Profile of Tumor Endothelial Marker 7 and a Putative Ligand in the Rat Spinal Cord and Dorsal Root Ganglion

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lih; Lee, Kyu-Yeol; Park, Hwan-Tae; Kang, Dong-Sik

    2007-01-01

    Study Design To analyze the expression profile of tumor endothelial marker 7 (TEM7) in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Purpose To investigate the expression profile of TEM7 in the spinal cord and DRG of adult and developing rats. Overview of Literature Tumor endothelial marker 7 (TEM7) is a putative transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in the tumor endothelium and in cerebellar neurons. Methods In the present study, the expression profile of TEM7 in the spinal cord a...

  9. Gene expression profiling in the human middle cerebral artery after cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikman, P; Edvinsson, L

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the gene expression in human middle cerebral artery (MCA) after ischemia. Ischemic stroke affects the perfusion in the affected area and experimental cerebral ischemia results in upregulation of vasopressor receptors in the MCA leading to the ischemic area. We obtained human...... MCA samples distributing to the ischemic area, 7-10 days post-stroke. The gene expression was examined with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and microarray, proteins were studied with immunohistochemistry. We investigated genes previously shown to be upregulated in animal models of cerebral...... ischemia (e.g. ET(A), ET(B), AT1, AT2, and 5-HT(2A/1B/1D)). Their mRNA expression was increased compared with controls, consistent with findings in experimental stroke. Immunohistochemistry showed upregulation of the receptors localized on the smooth muscle cells. The gene expression was profiled with...

  10. Proteomic Profiling Of Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Protein Expression Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Norhaiza; Zhang, J.; Brown, P. J.; James, D. C.; Birch, J. R.; Racher, A. J.; Smales, C. M.

    2008-01-01

    We have undertaken two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) proteomic profiling on a series of cell lines with different recombinant antibody production rates. Due to the nature of 2-DE proteomic investigations there will always be `process variability' factors in any data set collected in this way. Some of this variation will arise during sample preparation, gel running and staining, while further variation will arise from the gel analysis procedure. Therefore, in order to identify all significant changes in protein expression between biological samples when analysed by 2-DE, the system precision or `error', and how this correlates to protein abundance, must be known. Only then can the system be considered robust and investigators accurately and confidently report all observable statistically significant changes in protein expression. We introduce an expression variability test to identify protein spots whose expression correlates with increased antibody production. The results have highlighted a small number of candidate proteins for further investigation.

  11. Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues from Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Zalesak, Selina M.; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Scully, Robert R.; Williams, Kyle; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% of very fine dust (gene expression changes in lung tissues from rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m(exp 3) of lunar dust. Five rats per group were euthanized 1 day, and 3 months after the last inhalation exposure. The total RNAs were isolated from lung tissues after being lavaged. The Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray was used to profile global gene expression (44K). The genes with significant expression changes are identified and the gene expression data were further analyzed using various statistical tools.

  12. Expression profiling of cadmium response genes in ramie (Boehmeria nivea L.) root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Wei; Zhu, Shoujing; Jie, Yucheng; Xing, Hucheng; Cui, Guoxian

    2015-04-01

    Ramie (Boehmeria nivea), a perennial herb belongs to Urticaceae family, is a rapid growth and high biomass crop with highly tolerant and accumulative to heavy metals. However, the gene expression and regulation caused by cadmium (Cd) in ramie has not been well studied. In the present study, a gene expression database of ramie root in the absence (control) or presence of 100 μM Cd was established. Solexa high-throughput sequencing technology showed that 3,654,395 and 3,572,333 tags have been obtained from control and Cd treatment respectively. In total, 3887 genes were detected with significant differential expression levels, in which 2883 genes were up-regulated and 1004 genes were down-regulated. Gene ontology and pathway-based analyses were performed to determine and further to understand the biological functions of those differentially expressed genes. Fifteen genes were selected and their expression levels were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR, and twelve of them showed consistent expression patterns with the digital gene expression data. Results on these expression profiling of genes lay the basis for biotechnological modification of new transgenic plants with improved phytoremediation capacity. PMID:25724673

  13. Transient Gene and MicroRNA Expression Profile Changes of Confluent Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Lu, Tao; Wong, Michael; Wang, Xiaoyu; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Story, Michael; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Microgravity, or an altered gravity environment from the Earth1g, has been shown to influence global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells. However, most of the reported studies conducted in space or using simulated microgravity on the ground have focused on the growth or differentiation of these cells. Whether non-proliferating cultured cells will sense the presence of microgravity in space has not been specifically addressed. In an experiment conducted onboard the International Space Station (ISS), confluent human fibroblast cells were fixed after being cultured in space for 3 and 14 days, respectively, for investigations of gene and miRNA expression profile changes in these cells. Results of the experiment showed that on Day 3, both the flown and ground cells were still proliferating slowly, as measured by the percentage of Ki-67 positive cells. Gene and miRNA expression data indicated activation of NF(kappa)B and other growth related pathways involving HGF and Vegf along with down regulation of the Let-7 miRNA family. On Day 14 when the cells were mostly non-proliferating, the gene and miRNA expression profiles between the flight and ground samples were indistinguishable. Comparison of gene and miRNA expressions in the Day 3 samples with respect to Day 14 revealed that most of the changes observed on Day 3 were related to cell growth for both the flown and ground cells. Analysis of cytoskeletal changes via immunohistochemistry staining of the cells with antibodies for alpha-tubulin and fibronectin showed no difference between flown and ground samples. Taken together, our study suggests that in true non-dividing human fibroblast cells in culture, microgravity experienced in space has little effect on the gene and miRNA expression profiles.

  14. Transcriptome analysis and gene expression profiling of abortive and developing ovules during fruit development in hazelnut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunqing Cheng

    Full Text Available A high ratio of blank fruit in hazelnut (Corylus heterophylla Fisch is a very common phenomenon that causes serious yield losses in northeast China. The development of blank fruit in the Corylus genus is known to be associated with embryo abortion. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms responsible for embryo abortion during the nut development stage. Genomic information for C. heterophylla Fisch is not available; therefore, data related to transcriptome and gene expression profiling of developing and abortive ovules are needed.In this study, de novo transcriptome sequencing and RNA-seq analysis were conducted using short-read sequencing technology (Illumina HiSeq 2000. The results of the transcriptome assembly analysis revealed genetic information that was associated with the fruit development stage. Two digital gene expression libraries were constructed, one for a full (normally developing ovule and one for an empty (abortive ovule. Transcriptome sequencing and assembly results revealed 55,353 unigenes, including 18,751 clusters and 36,602 singletons. These results were annotated using the public databases NR, NT, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG, and GO. Using digital gene expression profiling, gene expression differences in developing and abortive ovules were identified. A total of 1,637 and 715 unigenes were significantly upregulated and downregulated, respectively, in abortive ovules, compared with developing ovules. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was used in order to verify the differential expression of some genes.The transcriptome and digital gene expression profiling data of normally developing and abortive ovules in hazelnut provide exhaustive information that will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of abortive ovule formation in hazelnut.

  15. Gene expression profiles in BCL11B-siRNA treated malignant T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grabarczyk Piotr

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Downregulation of the B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL/lymphoma11B (BCL11B gene by small interfering RNA (siRNA leads to growth inhibition and apoptosis of the human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL cell line Molt-4. To further characterize the molecular mechanism, a global gene expression profile of BCL11B-siRNA -treated Molt-4 cells was established. The expression profiles of several genes were further validated in the BCL11B-siRNA -treated Molt-4 cells and primary T-ALL cells. Results 142 genes were found to be upregulated and 109 genes downregulated in the BCL11B-siRNA -treated Molt-4 cells by microarray analysis. Among apoptosis-related genes, three pro-apoptotic genes, TNFSF10, BIK, BNIP3, were upregulated and one anti-apoptotic gene, BCL2L1 was downregulated. Moreover, the expression of SPP1 and CREBBP genes involved in the transforming growth factor (TGF-β pathway was down 16-fold. Expression levels of TNFSF10, BCL2L1, SPP1, and CREBBP were also examined by real-time PCR. A similar expression pattern of TNFSF10, BCL2L1, and SPP1 was identified. However, CREBBP was not downregulated in the BLC11B-siRNA -treated Molt-4 cells. Conclusion BCL11B-siRNA treatment altered expression profiles of TNFSF10, BCL2L1, and SPP1 in both Molt-4 T cell line and primary T-ALL cells.

  16. Transient gene and microRNA expression profile changes of confluent human fibroblast cells in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Honglu; Story, Michael; Karouia, Fathi; Stodieck, Louis; Zhang, Ye; Lu, Tao

    2016-07-01

    Microgravity, or an altered gravity environment from the Earth1g, has been shown to influence global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells. However, most of the reported studies conducted in space or using simulated microgravity on the ground have focused on the growth or differentiation of these cells. Whether non-proliferating cultured cells will sense the presence of microgravity in space has not been specifically addressed. In an experiment conducted onboard the International Space Station (ISS), confluent human fibroblast cells were fixed after being cultured in space for 3 and 14 days, respectively, for investigations of gene and miRNA expression profile changes in these cells. Results of the experiment showed that on Day 3, both the flown and ground cells were still proliferating slowly, as measured by the percentage of Ki-67 positive cells. Gene and miRNA expression data indicated activation of NFkB and other growth related pathways involving HGF and Vegf along with down regulation of the Let-7 miRNA family. On Day 14 when the cells were mostly non-proliferating, the gene and miRNA expression profiles between the flight and ground samples were indistinguishable. Comparison of gene and miRNA expressions in the Day 3 samples with respect to Day 14 revealed that most of the changes observed on Day 3 were related to cell growth for both the flown and ground cells. Analysis of cytoskeletal changes via immunohistochemistry staining of the cells with antibodies for αa-tubulin and fibronectin showed no difference between flown and ground samples. Taken together, our study suggests that in true non-dividing human fibroblast cells in culture, microgravity experienced in space has little effect on the gene and miRNA expression profiles.

  17. Comparison of gene expression profiles in chromate transformed BEAS-2B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI] is a potent human carcinogen. Occupational exposure has been associated with increased risk of respiratory cancer. Multiple mechanisms have been shown to contribute to Cr(VI induced carcinogenesis, including DNA damage, genomic instability, and epigenetic modulation, however, the molecular mechanism and downstream genes mediating chromium's carcinogenicity remain to be elucidated. METHODS/RESULTS: We established chromate transformed cell lines by chronic exposure of normal human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low doses of Cr(VI followed by anchorage-independent growth. These transformed cell lines not only exhibited consistent morphological changes but also acquired altered and distinct gene expression patterns compared with normal BEAS-2B cells and control cell lines (untreated that arose spontaneously in soft agar. Interestingly, the gene expression profiles of six Cr(VI transformed cell lines were remarkably similar to each other yet differed significantly from that of either control cell lines or normal BEAS-2B cells. A total of 409 differentially expressed genes were identified in Cr(VI transformed cells compared to control cells. Genes related to cell-to-cell junction were upregulated in all Cr(VI transformed cells, while genes associated with the interaction between cells and their extracellular matrices were down-regulated. Additionally, expression of genes involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis were also changed. CONCLUSION: This study is the first to report gene expression profiling of Cr(VI transformed cells. The gene expression changes across individual chromate exposed clones were remarkably similar to each other but differed significantly from the gene expression found in anchorage-independent clones that arose spontaneously. Our analysis identified many novel gene expression changes that may contribute to chromate induced cell transformation, and collectively this type of

  18. Expression profile and prognostic role of sex hormone receptors in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing interest has been devoted to the expression and possible role of sex hormone receptors in gastric cancer, but most of these findings are controversial. In the present study, the expression profile of sex hormone receptors in gastric cancer and their clinicopathological and prognostic value were determined in a large Chinese cohort. The mRNA and protein expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), estrogen receptor beta (ERβ), progesterone receptor (PR), and androgen receptor (AR) in primary gastric tumors and corresponding adjacent normal tissues from 60 and 866 Chinese gastric cancer patients was detected by real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry method, respectively. The expression profile of the four receptors was compared and their associations with clinicopathological characteristics were assessed by using Chi-square test. The prognostic value of the four receptors in gastric cancer was evaluated by using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis. The presence of ERα, ERβ, PR, and AR in both gastric tumors and normal tissues was confirmed but their expression levels were extremely low except for the predominance of ERβ. The four receptors were expressed independently and showed a decreased expression pattern in gastric tumors compared to adjacent normal tissues. The positive expression of the four receptors all correlated with high tumor grade and intestinal type, and ERα and AR were also associated with early TNM stage and thereby a favorable outcome. However, ERα and AR were not independent prognostic factors for gastric cancer when multivariate survival analysis was performed. Our findings indicate that the sex hormone receptors may be partly involved in gastric carcinogenesis but their clinicopathological and prognostic significance in gastric cancer appears to be limited

  19. Gene expression profiling of duodenal biopsies discriminates celiac disease mucosa from normal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragde, Hanna; Jansson, Ulf; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Söderman, Jan

    2011-06-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is identified by histopathologic changes in the small intestine which normalize during a gluten-free diet. The histopathologic assessment of duodenal biopsies is usually routine but can be difficult. This study investigated gene expression profiling as a diagnostic tool. A total of 109 genes were selected to reflect alterations in crypt-villi architecture, inflammatory response, and intestinal permeability and were examined for differential expression in normal mucosa compared with CD mucosa in pediatric patients. Biopsies were classified using discriminant analysis of gene expression. Fifty genes were differentially expressed, of which eight (APOC3, CYP3A4, OCLN, MAD2L1, MKI67, CXCL11, IL17A, and CTLA4) discriminated normal mucosa from CD mucosa without classification errors using leave-one-out cross-validation (n = 39) and identified the degree of mucosal damage. Validation using an independent set of biopsies (n = 27) resulted in four discrepant cases. Biopsies from two of these cases showed a patchy distribution of lesions, indicating that discriminant analysis based on single biopsies failed to identify CD mucosa. In the other two cases, serology support class according to discriminant analysis and histologic specimens were judged suboptimal but assessable. Gene expression profiling shows promise as a diagnostic tool and for follow-up of CD, but further evaluation is needed. PMID:21378598

  20. microRNA Expression Profiling of Side Population Cells in Human Lung Cancer and Preliminary Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotao XU

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Recent studies indicate that the side population (SP which is an enriched source of cancer stem cells (CSCs is the root cause of tumor growth and development. SP appears to be highly resistant to chemo- and radio-therapy which becomes an important factor in tumor recurrence and metastasis. The aim of this study is to determine the difference of microRNA expression profiles between SP cells and non-SP cells so as to lay necessary basis for research on the function of miRNA in lung cancer stem cells. Methods SP and non-SP cells were isolated using flow cytometry and Hoechst 33342 dye efflux assay from human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell. The total RNA was extracted. The microarray detection system was employed to analyze whether there was difference in miRNA expression profile between SP and non-SP cells. Results A total of 85 differentially expressed miRNA were found, including 32 over-expression and 53 low-expression miRNA in SP. Conclusion miRNA may play important roles in tumorigenesis of lung cancer stem cell. The study of miRNA contributes to elucidate the molecular mechanism of lung cancer stem cell.

  1. Gene expression profiling of 1p35-36 genes in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Novikov, Eugene; Monteiro, Marta; Gruel, Nadège; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Loriod, Béatrice; Nguyen, Catherine; Delattre, Olivier

    2004-08-01

    Deletion of the chromosome 1p36 region is a frequent abnormality in neuroblastoma. To gain further insights into the role of this alteration in oncogenesis, we have constructed a specific cDNA microarray representing most known genes and ESTs from the 1p35-36 region and analysed the expression profiles of 15 neuroblastoma cell lines and 28 neuroblastoma tumours. Hierarchical clustering using expression levels of 320 cDNAs from 1p35-36 separated localized or 4S cases without 1p deletion from advanced stages and cell lines. Supervised learning classification enabled to predict reliably the status of chromosome 1p according to its expression profile. Around 15% of the genes or ESTs presented a significantly decreased expression in samples with 1p deletion as compared to 1p-normal samples suggesting that 1p deletion results in a gene dosage effect on a subset of genes critical for the development of 1p-deleted neuroblastoma. Several genes presumed to have functions in neural differentiation (CDC42, VAMP3, CLSTN1), signal transduction in neural cells (GNB1) and cell cycle regulation (STMN1, RPA2, RBAF600, FBXO6, MAD2L2) exhibited a decreased expression in samples presenting 1p deletion. The identification of such genes provides baseline information for further studies to elucidate how these genes could individually or collectively play a critical role in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. PMID:15195138

  2. Identification of novel miRNAs and miRNA expression profiling in wheat hybrid necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Zhou

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs play essential roles in a vast array of biological processes, including growth and development, defense against viral infection, and responses to environmental changes in plant. Wheat hybrid necrosis is an interesting genetic phenomenon observed frequency and it is lethal or semi lethal, resulting in gradual death or loss of productivity. However, the molecular basis and mechanisms associated with hybrid necrosis in wheat are still not well understood. Here, we report the population and expression profiles of miRNAs in wheat hybrid necrosis. We identified a total of 57 conserved miRNA families as well as 182 putative novel miRNAs. Expression profiling revealed that expression of 49 known miRNAs and 165 novel miRNAs was changed in hybrid necrosis. And the expression levels of some miRNAs and their predicated targets have been confirmed by qRT-PCR. These results indicate that these miRNAs, especially miR159, miR166, miR167 and miR5072 could be involved in the extensive regulation of gene expression in response to hybrid necrosis.

  3. Gene expression profiling reveals sequential changes in gastric tubular adenoma and carcinoma in situ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Hee Lee; Seung-Hyun Bang; Seung-Koo Lee; Kyu-Young Song; In-Chul Lee

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the expression profiles of premalignant and/or preclinical lesions of gastric cancers.METHODS: We analyzed the expression profiles of normal gastric pit, tubular adenoma and carcinoma in situ using microdissected cells from routine gastric biopsies. For the DNA microarray analysis of formalin-fixed samples,we developed a simple and reproducible RNA extraction and linear amplification procedure applying two polymerasebinding sites. The amplification procedure took only 8 h and yielded comparable DNA microarray data between formalin-fixed tissues and unfixed controls.RESULTS: In comparison with normal pit, adenoma/carcinoma showed 504 up-regulated and 29 down-regulated genes at the expected false significance rate 0.15%. The differential expression between adenoma and carcinoma in situ was subtle: 50 and 22 genes were up-, and down-regulated in carcinomas at the expected false significance rate of 0.61%, respectively. Differentially expressed genes were grouped according to patterns of the sequential changes for the 'tendency analysis' in the gastric mucosaadenoma-carcinoma sequence.CONCLUSION: Groups of genes are shown to reflect the sequential expression changes in the early carcinogenic steps of stomach cancer. It is suggested that molecular carcinogenic pathways could be analyzed using routinely processed biopsies.

  4. Gene expression profiles of primary colorectal carcinomas, liver metastases, and carcinomatoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myklebost Ola

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the fact that metastases are the leading cause of colorectal cancer deaths, little is known about the underlying molecular changes in these advanced disease stages. Few have studied the overall gene expression levels in metastases from colorectal carcinomas, and so far, none has investigated the peritoneal carcinomatoses by use of DNA microarrays. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate and compare the gene expression patterns of primary carcinomas (n = 18, liver metastases (n = 4, and carcinomatoses (n = 4, relative to normal samples from the large bowel. Results Transcriptome profiles of colorectal cancer metastases independent of tumor site, as well as separate profiles associated with primary carcinomas, liver metastases, or peritoneal carcinomatoses, were assessed by use of Bayesian statistics. Gains of chromosome arm 5p are common in peritoneal carcinomatoses and several candidate genes (including PTGER4, SKP2, and ZNF622 mapping to this region were overexpressed in the tumors. Expression signatures stratified on TP53 mutation status were identified across all tumors regardless of stage. Furthermore, the gene expression levels for the in vivo tumors were compared with an in vitro model consisting of cell lines representing all three tumor stages established from one patient. Conclusion By statistical analysis of gene expression data from primary colorectal carcinomas, liver metastases, and carcinomatoses, we are able to identify genetic patterns associated with the different stages of tumorigenesis.

  5. Expression profile of microRNAs in c-Myc induced mouse mammary tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yuan; Wu, Jack; Wu, Si-hung; Thakur, Archana; Bollig, Aliccia; Huang, Yong; Liao, D. Joshua

    2008-01-01

    c-Myc is a transcription factor overexpression of which induces mammary cancer in transgenic mice. To explore whether certain microRNAs (mirRNA) mediate c-Myc induced mammary carcinogenesis, we studied mir-RNA expression profile in mammary tumors developed from MMTV-c-myc transgenic mice, and found 50 and 59 mirRNAs showing increased and decreased expression, respectively, compared with lactating mammary glands of wild type mice. Twenty-four of these mirRNAs could be grouped into eight cluste...

  6. Clinical Findings and Genetic Expression Profiling of Three Pigmented Lesions of the Optic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A. de Alba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Optic disk melanocytoma is a primary tumor of the optic disk that represents a clinical diagnostic challenge due to its similarities with melanoma. Purpose. The authors present three cases in which genetic expression profiling was used to identify tumor prognosis of optic disk melanocytoma. Case Series. In two cases fine-needle aspiration biopsy was performed to obtain tissue through a transvitreal route into the apex of the tumor while the patient underwent pars plana vitrectomy, laser ablation, phacoemulsification with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation, and intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide. In the other case the tissue was obtained after definite enucleation. Conclusion. Genetic expression profiling is a useful diagnostic tool for classification and can provide vital information to the ocular oncologist regarding prognosis.

  7. Evaluation of gene expression profiling in a mouse model of L-gulonolactone oxidase gene deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Yan

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Humans and guinea pigs are species which are unable to synthesize ascorbic acid (vitamin C because, unlike rodents, they lack the enzyme L-gulonolactone oxidase (Gulo. Although the phenotype of lacking vitamin C in humans, named scurvy, has long been well known, information on the impact of lacking Gulo on the gene expression profiles of different tissues is still missing. This knowledge could improve our understanding of molecular pathways in which Gulo may be involved. Recently, we discovered a deletion that includes all 12 exons in the gene for Gulo in the sfx mouse, characterized by spontaneous bone fractures. We report here the initial analysis of the impact of the Gulo gene deletion on the murine gene expression profiles in the liver, femur and kidney.

  8. Whole genome expression profiling using DNA microarray for determining biocompatibility of polymeric surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Wang, Zhenyu; Kutter, Jörg Peter; Dufva, Hans Martin; Wolff, Anders

    2006-01-01

    There is an ever increasing need to find surfaces that are biocompatible for applications like medical implants and microfluidics-based cell culture systems. The biocompatibility of five different surfaces with different hydrophobicity was determined using gene expression profiling as well as more...... conventional methods to determine biocompatibility such as cellular growth rate, morphology and the hydrophobicity of the surfaces. HeLa cells grown on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or a SU-8 surface treated with HNO3-ceric ammonium nitrate (HNO3-CAN) and ethanolamine showed no differences in growth rate......, morphology or gene expression profiles as compared to HeLa cells grown in cell culture flasks. Cells grown on SU-8 treated with only HNO3-CAN showed almost the same growth rate (36 ¡ 1 h) and similar morphology as cells grown in cell culture flasks (32 ¡ 1 h), indicating good biocompatibility. However, more...

  9. Structure-function analysis of the extracellular domains of the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines: characterization of antibody and chemokine binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournamille, Christophe; Filipe, Anne; Wasniowska, Kazimiera; Gane, Pierre; Lisowska, Elwira; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2003-09-01

    The Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC), a seven-transmembrane glycoprotein carrying the Duffy (Fy) blood group, acts as a widely expressed promiscuous chemokine receptor. In a structure-function study, we analysed the binding of chemokines and anti-Fy monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to K562 cells expressing 39 mutant forms of DARC with alanine substitutions spread out on the four extracellular domains (ECDs). Using synthetic peptides, we defined previously the Fy6 epitope (22-FEDVW-26), and we characterized the Fya epitope as the linear sequence 41-YGANLE-46. In agreement with these results, mutations of F22-E23, V25 and Y41, G42, N44, L45 on ECD1 abolished the binding of anti-Fy6 and anti-Fya mAbs to K562 cells respectively, Anti-Fy3 binding was abolished by D58-D59 (ECD1), R124 (ECD2), D263 and D283 (ECD4) substitutions. Mutations of C51 (ECD1), C129 (ECD2), C195 (ECD3) and C276 (ECD4 severely reduced anti-Fy3 and CXC-chemokine ligand 8 (CXCL-8) binding. CXCL-8 binding was also abrogated by mutations of F22-E23, P50 (ECD1) and D263, R267, D283 (ECD4). These results defined the Fya epitope and suggested that (1) two disulphide bridges are involved in the creation of an active chemokine binding pocket; (2) a limited number of amino acids in ECDs 1-4 participate in CXCL-8 binding; and (3) Fy3 is a conformation-dependent epitope involving all ECDs. We also showed that N-glycosylation of DARC occurred on N16SS and did not influence antibody and chemokine binding. PMID:12956774

  10. Reproducibility of quantitative RT-PCR array in miRNA expression profiling and comparison with microarray analysis

    OpenAIRE

    McManus Linda M; Gelfond Jonathan AL; Chen Yongxin; Shireman Paula K

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have critical functions in various biological processes. MiRNA profiling is an important tool for the identification of differentially expressed miRNAs in normal cellular and disease processes. A technical challenge remains for high-throughput miRNA expression analysis as the number of miRNAs continues to increase with in silico prediction and experimental verification. Our study critically evaluated the performance of a novel miRNA expression profiling ...

  11. Expression Profiling in Bemisia tabaci under Insecticide Treatment: Indicating the Necessity for Custom Reference Gene Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Pei; Guo, Yajie; Zhou, Xuguo; Gao, Xiwu

    2014-01-01

    Finding a suitable reference gene is the key for qRT-PCR analysis. However, none of the reference gene discovered thus far can be utilized universally under various biotic and abiotic experimental conditions. In this study, we further examine the stability of candidate reference genes under a single abiotic factor, insecticide treatment. After being exposed to eight commercially available insecticides, which belong to five different classes, the expression profiles of eight housekeeping genes...

  12. Differential gene expression profile in pig adipose tissue treated with/without clenbuterol

    OpenAIRE

    Deng Xue M; Guo Wei; Liu Qiu Y; He Qiang; Zhang Jin; Zhang Wei W; Hu Xiao X; Li Ning

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Clenbuterol, a beta-agonist, can dramatically reduce pig adipose accumulation at high dosages. However, it has been banned in pig production because people who eat pig products treated with clenbuterol can be poisoned by the clenbuterol residues. To understand the molecular mechanism for this fat reduction, cDNA microarray, real-time PCR, two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectra were used to study the differential gene expression profiles of pig adipose tissues tre...

  13. Gene expression profiling of sex differences in HIF1-dependent adaptive cardiac responses to chronic hypoxia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bohuslavová, Romana; Kolář, František; Kuthanová, Lada; Neckář, Jan; Tichopád, Aleš; Pavlínková, Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 4 (2010), s. 1195-1202. ISSN 8750-7587 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/09/0117 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha * hypoxia * gene expression profiling Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.232, year: 2010

  14. Fish-oil supplementation induces antiinflammatory gene expression profiles in human blood mononuclear cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bouwens, M.; Rest, van de, O.; Dellschaft, N.; Grootte Bromhaar, M.M.; Groot, de, W.T.; Geleijnse, J M; Müller, M.R.; Afman, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Polyunsaturated fatty acids can have beneficial effects on human immune cells, such as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). However, the mechanisms of action of polyunsaturated fatty acids on immune cells are still largely unknown. Objective: The objective was to examine the effects of supplementation with the polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on whole-genome PBMC gene expression profiles, in healthy Dutch elderly subject...

  15. Molecular Classifiers for Acute Kidney Transplant Rejection in Peripheral Blood by Whole Genome Gene Expression Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Kurian, S M; Williams, A N; Gelbart, T.; Campbell, D.; Mondala, T. S.; Head, S. R.; Horvath, S; Gaber, L; R. Thompson; Whisenant, T; Lin, W; Langfelder, P; Robison, E. H.; Schaffer, R. L.; Fisher, J S

    2014-01-01

    There are no minimally invasive diagnostic metrics for acute kidney transplant rejection (AR), especially in the setting of the common confounding diagnosis, acute dysfunction with no rejection (ADNR). Thus, though kidney transplant biopsies remain the gold standard, they are invasive, have substantial risks, sampling error issues and significant costs and are not suitable for serial monitoring. Global gene expression profiles of 148 peripheral blood samples from transplant patients with exce...

  16. An efficient computational approach to evaluate the expression profile of individual acute leukemia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marcus Celik; Nyvold, Charlotte Guldborg; Haferlach, Torsten;

    Microarray and sequencing studies have been instrumental in the mapping of genome wide associations in hematological diseases. Thus, the MILE Study has taught us that it is possible to robustly classify and predict leukemia subgroups. Several factors have impeded the general use of such data and...... that combining data from MILE Study and data mining at the single patient level by novel scripts could help delineate the leukemia subtype and profile the unique expression signature....

  17. The Pectin Lyases in Arabidopsis thaliana: Evolution, Selection and Expression Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Pectin lyases are a group of enzymes that are thought to contribute to many biological processes, such as the degradation of pectin. However, until this study, no comprehensive study incorporating phylogeny, chromosomal location, gene duplication, gene organization, functional divergence, adaptive evolution, expression profiling and functional networks has been reported for Arabidopsis. Sixty-seven pectin lyase genes have been identified, and most of them possess signal sequences targeting th...

  18. Systematic enrichment analysis of gene expression profiling studies identifies consensus pathways implicated in colorectal cancer development

    OpenAIRE

    Jesús Lascorz; Kari Hemminki; Asta Försti

    2011-01-01

    Background: A large number of gene expression profiling (GEP) studies on colorectal carcinogenesis have been performed but no reliable gene signature has been identified so far due to the lack of reproducibility in the reported genes. There is growing evidence that functionally related genes, rather than individual genes, contribute to the etiology of complex traits. We used, as a novel approach, pathway enrichment tools to define functionally related genes that are consistently up- or down-r...

  19. Profiling of Differentially Expressed Genes Using Suppression Subtractive Hybridization in an Equine Model of Chronic Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Lefebvre-Lavoie, Josiane; Leclere, Mathilde; Lavoie-Lamoureux, Anouk; Chamberland, Annie; Laprise, Catherine; Lussier, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene expression analyses are used to investigate signaling pathways involved in diseases. In asthma, they have been primarily derived from the analysis of bronchial biopsies harvested from mild to moderate asthmatic subjects and controls. Due to ethical considerations, there is currently limited information on the transcriptome profile of the peripheral lung tissues in asthma. Objective To identify genes contributing to chronic inflammation and remodeling in the peripheral lung tis...

  20. Oxidative Stress Alters miRNA and Gene Expression Profiles in Villous First Trimester Trophoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney E. Cross

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between oxidative stress and miRNA changes in placenta as a potential mechanism involved in preeclampsia (PE is not fully elucidated. We investigated the impact of oxidative stress on miRNAs and mRNA expression profiles of genes associated with PE in villous 3A first trimester trophoblast cells exposed to H2O2 at 12 different concentrations (0-1 mM for 0.5, 4, 24, and 48 h. Cytotoxicity, determined using the SRB assay, was used to calculate the IC50 of H2O2. RNA was extracted after 4 h exposure to H2O2 for miRNA and gene expression profiling. H2O2 exerted a concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity on 3A trophoblast cells. Short-term exposure of 3A cells to low concentration of H2O2 (5% of IC50 significantly altered miRNA profile as evidenced by significant changes in 195 out of 595 evaluable miRNAs. Tool for annotations of microRNAs (TAM analysis indicated that these altered miRNAs fall into 43 clusters and 34 families, with 41 functions identified. Exposure to H2O2 altered mRNA expression of 22 out of 84 key genes involved in dysregulation of placental development. In conclusion, short-term exposure of villous first trimester trophoblasts to low concentrations of H2O2 significantly alters miRNA profile and expression of genes implicated in placental development.

  1. Global Gene Expression during the Human Organogenesis: From Transcription Profiles to Function Predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Lu; Yi, Hong; Huang, Zan; Shi, Yun-Bo; LI, WEN-XIN

    2011-01-01

    Human embryogenesis includes an integrated set of complex yet coordinated development of different organs and tissues, which is regulated by the spatiotemporal expression of many genes. Deciphering the gene regulation profile is essential for understanding the molecular basis of human embryo development. While molecular and genetic studies in mouse have served as a valuable tool to understand mammalian development, significant differences exists in human and mouse development at morphological...

  2. Altered brain protein expression profiles are associated with molecular neurological dysfunction in the PKU mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Imperlini, Esther; Orrù, Stefania; Corbo, Claudia; Daniele, Aurora; Salvatore, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU), if not detected and treated in newborns, causes severe neurological dysfunction and cognitive and behavioral deficiencies. Despite the biochemical characterization of PKU, the molecular mechanisms underlying PKU-associated brain dysfunction remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to gain insights into the pathogenesis of this neurological damage by analyzing protein expression profiles in brain tissue of Black and Tan BRachyury-PahEnu2 mice (a mouse model of...

  3. Quality assessment metrics for whole genome gene expression profiling of paraffin embedded samples

    OpenAIRE

    Mahoney, Douglas W.; Terry M. Therneau; Anderson, S. Keith; Jen, Jin; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A.; Reinholz, Monica M; Perez, Edith A.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E

    2013-01-01

    Background Formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissues are most commonly used for routine pathology analysis and for long term tissue preservation in the clinical setting. Many institutions have large archives of Formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissues that provide a unique opportunity for understanding genomic signatures of disease. However, genome-wide expression profiling of Formalin fixed, paraffin embedded samples have been challenging due to RNA degradation. Because of the significant h...

  4. ProbeSelect: selecting differentially expressed probes in transcriptional profile data

    OpenAIRE

    Hosur, Raghavendra; Szak, Suzanne; Thai, Alice; Allaire, Norm; Bienkowska, Jadwiga

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Transcriptional profiling still remains one of the most popular techniques for identifying relevant biomarkers in patient samples. However, heterogeneity in the population leads to poor statistical evidence for selection of most relevant biomarkers to pursue. In particular, human transcriptional differences can be subtle, making it difficult to tease out real differentially expressed biomarkers from the variability inherent in the population. To address this issue, we propose a simpl...

  5. Time-Course Global Expression Profiles of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during Photo-Biological H2 Production

    OpenAIRE

    Anh Vu Nguyen; Joerg Toepel; Steven Burgess; Andreas Uhmeyer; Olga Blifernez; Anja Doebbe; Ben Hankamer; Peter Nixon; Lutz Wobbe; Olaf Kruse

    2011-01-01

    We used a microarray study in order to compare the time course expression profiles of two Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strains, namely the high H₂ producing mutant stm6glc4 and its parental WT strain during H₂ production induced by sulfur starvation. Major cellular reorganizations in photosynthetic apparatus, sulfur and carbon metabolism upon H₂ production were confirmed as common to both strains. More importantly, our results pointed out factors which lead to the higher H₂ production in the mut...

  6. The workflow of single-cell expression profiling using quantitative real-time PCR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stahlberg, A.; Kubista, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 3 (2014), s. 323-331. ISSN 1473-7159 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-02154S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : single-cell workflow * gene expression profiling * RT-qPCR Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.516, year: 2014

  7. Mammary Fat of Breast Cancer: Gene Expression Profiling and Functional Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Fengliang Wang; Sheng Gao; Fei Chen; Ziyi Fu; Hong Yin; Xun Lu; Jing Yu; Cheng Lu

    2014-01-01

    Mammary fat is the main composition of breast, and is the most probable candidate to affect tumor behavior because the fat produces hormones, growth factors and adipokines, a heterogeneous group of signaling molecules. Gene expression profiling and functional characterization of mammary fat in Chinese women has not been reported. Thus, we collected the mammary fat tissues adjacent to breast tumors from 60 subjects, among which 30 subjects had breast cancer and 30 had benign lesions. We isolat...

  8. Molecular Expression Profile Reveals Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets in Canine Endometrial Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiana Azevedo Voorwald; Fabio Albuquerque Marchi; Rolando Andre Rios Villacis; Carlos Eduardo Fonseca Alves; Gilson Hélio Toniollo; Renee Laufer Amorim; Sandra Aparecida Drigo; Silvia Regina Rogatto

    2015-01-01

    Cystic endometrial hyperplasia (CEH), mucometra, and pyometra are common uterine diseases in intact dogs, with pyometra being a life threatening disease. This study aimed to determine the gene expression profile of these lesions and potential biomarkers for closed-cervix pyometra, the most severe condition. Total RNA was extracted from 69 fresh endometrium samples collected from 21 healthy female dogs during diestrus, 16 CEH, 15 mucometra and 17 pyometra (eight open and nine closed-cervixes)....

  9. Genome-wide Expression Profiling in Ponkan Infected by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Bo; Zhong, Yun; Cheng, Chunzhen; Zeng, Jiwu; ZHONG, Guangyan; Yi, Ganjun

    2014-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is an economical and destructive disease of citrus in South China, such as in Guangdong, Guangxi that is caused by the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. The interaction at mRNA level between pathogen and citrus (Ponkan, Citrus reticulata Blanco ) was primarily researched by Digital Gene Expression Tag Profiling. Ponkan leaves at 13 weeks and 26 weeks after HLB inoculation were used for analysis. The numbers of up-regulated genes were increased from 37% in 13 wpi...

  10. Matrix metalloproteinase protein expression profiles cannot distinguish between normal and early osteoarthritic synovial fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heard Bryan J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA are diseases which result in the degeneration of the joint surface articular cartilage. Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs are enzymes that aid in the natural remodelling of tissues throughout the body including cartilage. However, some MMPs have been implicated in the progression of OA and RA as their expression levels and activation states can change dramatically with the onset of disease. Yet, it remains unknown if normal and arthritic joints demonstrate unique MMPs expression profiles, and if so, can the MMP expression profile be used to identify patients with early OA. In this study, the synovial fluid protein expression levels for MMPs 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, 12 & 13, as well as those for the Tissue Inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs 1, 2, 3, & 4 were examined in highly characterized normal knee joints, and knee joints with clinically diagnosed OA (early and advanced or RA. The purpose of this study was to determine if normal, OA, and RA patients exhibit unique expression profiles for a sub-set of MMPs, and if early OA patients have a unique MMP expression profile that could be used as an early diagnostic marker. Methods Synovial fluid was aspirated from stringently characterized normal knee joints, and in joints diagnosed with either OA (early and advanced or RA. Multiplexing technology was employed to quantify protein expression levels for 8 MMPs and 4 TIMPs in the synovial fluid of 12 patients with early OA, 17 patients diagnosed with advanced OA, 15 with RA and 25 normal knee joints. Principle component analysis (PCA was used to reveal which MMPs were most influential in the distinction between treatment groups. K – means clustering was used to verify the visual grouping of subjects via PCA. Results Significant differences in the expression levels of MMPs and TIMPs were observed between normal and arthritic synovial fluids (with the exception of MMP 12. PCA demonstrated that MMPs 2, 8

  11. The atypical chemokine receptor D6 contributes to the development of experimental colitis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordon, Yvonne; Hansell, Chris A. H.; Sester, David P; Clarke, Mairi; Mowat, Allan McI.; Nibbs, Robert J. B.

    2009-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory CC chemokines control leukocyte recruitment and function during inflammation by engaging chemokine receptors expressed on circulating leukocytes. The D6 chemokine receptor can bind several of these chemokines but appears unable to couple to signal transduction pathways or direct cell migration. Instead, D6 has been proposed to act as a chemokine scavenger, removing pro-inflammatory chemokines to dampen leukocyte responses. In this report, we have examined the role of D6 in the colon using the dextran sodium sulphate-induced model of colitis. We show that D6 is expressed in the resting colon, predominantly by stromal cells and B cells, and is up-regulated during colitis. Unexpectedly, D6-deficient mice showed reduced susceptibility to colitis and had less pronounced clinical symptoms associated with this model. D6 deletion had no impact on the level of pro-inflammatory CC chemokines released from cultured colon explants, or on the balance of leukocyte subsets recruited to the inflamed colon. However, late in colitis, inflamed D6-deficient colons showed enhanced production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IFNγ and IL-17A, and there was a marked increase in IL-17A-secreting γδ T cells in the lamina propria. Moreover, antibody-mediated neutralisation of IL-17A worsened the clinical symptoms of colitis at these later stages of the response in D6-deficient, but not wild-type, mice. Thus, D6 can contribute to the development of colitis by regulating IL-17A secretion by γδ T cells in the inflamed colon. PMID:19342683

  12. Regulation of MCP-1 chemokine transcription by p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasylyk Bohdan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous studies showed that the expression of the monocyte-chemoattractant protein (MCP-1, a chemokine, which triggers the infiltration and activation of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, is abrogated in human papillomavirus (HPV-positive premalignant and malignant cells. In silico analysis of the MCP-1 upstream region proposed a putative p53 binding side about 2.5 kb upstream of the transcriptional start. The aim of this study is to monitor a physiological role of p53 in this process. Results The proposed p53 binding side could be confirmed in vitro by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assays and in vivo by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Moreover, the availability of p53 is apparently important for chemokine regulation, since TNF-α can induce MCP-1 only in human keratinocytes expressing the viral oncoprotein E7, but not in HPV16 E6 positive cells, where p53 becomes degraded. A general physiological role of p53 in MCP-1 regulation was further substantiated in HPV-negative cells harboring a temperature-sensitive mutant of p53 and in Li-Fraumeni cells, carrying a germ-line mutation of p53. In both cases, non-functional p53 leads to diminished MCP-1 transcription upon TNF-α treatment. In addition, siRNA directed against p53 decreased MCP-1 transcription after TNF-α addition, directly confirming a crosstalk between p53 and MCP-1. Conclusion These data support the concept that p53 inactivation during carcinogenesis also affects immune surveillance by interfering with chemokine expression and in turn communication with